WorldWideScience

Sample records for antiviral drug design

  1. Antiviral Drug Research Proposal Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Injaian

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of antiviral drugs provides an excellent example of how basic and clinical research must be used together in order to achieve the final goal of treating disease. A Research Oriented Learning Activity was designed to help students to better understand how basic and clinical research can be combined toward a common goal. Through this project students gained a better understanding of the process of scientific research and increased their information literacy in the field of virology. The students worked as teams to research the many aspects involved in the antiviral drug design process, with each student becoming an "expert" in one aspect of the project. The Antiviral Drug Research Proposal (ADRP culminated with students presenting their proposals to their peers and local virologists in a poster session. Assessment data showed increased student awareness and knowledge of the research process and the steps involved in the development of antiviral drugs as a result of this activity.

  2. Antiviral Drugs: Seasonal Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-29

    In this podcast, Dr. Joe Bresee explains the nature of antiviral drugs and how they are used for seasonal flu.  Created: 9/29/2010 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 9/29/2010.

  3. Design and evaluation of novel interferon lambda analogs with enhanced antiviral activity and improved drug attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Debin; Zhao, Mingzhi; Dong, Liwei; Zhao, Lu; Zou, Mingwei; Sun, Hetong; Zhang, Mengying; Liu, Hongyu; Zou, Zhihua

    2016-01-01

    Type III interferons (IFNs) (also called IFN-λ: IFN-λ1, IFN-λ2, IFN-λ3, and IFN-λ4) are critical players in the defense against viral infection of mucosal epithelial cells, where the activity of type I IFNs is weak, and unlike type I IFNs that are associated with severe and diverse side effects, type III IFNs cause minimal side effects due to the highly restricted expression of their receptors, and thus appear to be promising agents for the treatment and prevention of respiratory and gastrointestinal viral infection. However, the antiviral potency of natural type III IFNs is weak compared to type I and, although IFN-λ3 possesses the highest bioactivity among the type III IFNs, IFN-λ1, instead of IFN-λ3, is being developed as a therapeutic drug due to the difficulty to express IFN-λ3 in the prokaryotic expression system. Here, to develop optimal IFN-λ molecules with improved drug attributes, we designed a series of IFN-λ analogs by replacing critical amino acids of IFN-λ1 with the IFN-λ3 counterparts, and vice versa. Four of the designed analogs were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli with high yield and were easily purified from inclusion bodies. Interestingly, all four analogs showed potent activity in inducing the expression of the antiviral genes MxA and OAS and two of them, analog-6 and -7, displayed an unexpected high potency that is higher than that of type I IFN (IFN-α2a) in activating the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE)-luciferase reporter. Importantly, both analog-6 and -7 effectively inhibited replication of hepatitis C virus in Huh-7.5.1 cells, with an IC50 that is comparable to that of IFN-α2a; and consistent with the roles of IFN-λ in mucosal epithelia, both analogs potently inhibited replication of H3N2 influenza A virus in A549 cells. Together, these studies identified two IFN-λ analogs as candidates to be developed as novel antiviral biologics. PMID:26792983

  4. Clinical relevance of HCV antiviral drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, C; Zeuzem, S

    2012-10-01

    The approval of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) against the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 protease revolutionized antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis C. They mark the beginning of an era with drugs designed to inhibit specific viral proteins involved in the virus life cycle rather than the nonspecific antiviral activity of interferon. Upcoming generations of antivirals are expected that lead to viral eradication in most patients who undergo treatment with hope held for years that HCV can be cured without interferon. Antiviral drug resistance plays a key role in DAA-treatment failure. Knowledge on molecular escape mechanisms of resistant variants, their time to wild-type reversal and potential persistence is of upmost importance to design treatment strategies for patients with previous DAA-treatment failure. PMID:23006585

  5. Design and evaluation of novel interferon lambda analogs with enhanced antiviral activity and improved drug attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu D

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Debin Yu,1 Mingzhi Zhao,2 Liwei Dong,1 Lu Zhao,1 Mingwei Zou,3 Hetong Sun,4 Mengying Zhang,4 Hongyu Liu,4 Zhihua Zou1 1National Engineering Laboratory for AIDS Vaccine, Key Laboratory for Molecular Enzymology and Engineering of the Ministry of Education, School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, 2State Key Laboratory of Proteomics, National Engineering Research Center for Protein Drugs, Beijing Proteome Research Center, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences, University of Houston, Houston, TX, USA; 4Prosit Sole Biotechnology, Co., Ltd., Beijing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Type III interferons (IFNs (also called IFN-λ: IFN-λ1, IFN-λ2, IFN-λ3, and IFN-λ4 are critical players in the defense against viral infection of mucosal epithelial cells, where the activity of type I IFNs is weak, and unlike type I IFNs that are associated with severe and diverse side effects, type III IFNs cause minimal side effects due to the highly restricted expression of their receptors, and thus appear to be promising agents for the treatment and prevention of respiratory and gastrointestinal viral infection. However, the antiviral potency of natural type III IFNs is weak compared to type I and, although IFN-λ3 possesses the highest bioactivity among the type III IFNs, IFN-λ1, instead of IFN-λ3, is being developed as a therapeutic drug due to the difficulty to express IFN-λ3 in the prokaryotic expression system. Here, to develop optimal IFN-λ molecules with improved drug attributes, we designed a series of IFN-λ analogs by replacing critical amino acids of IFN-λ1 with the IFN-λ3 counterparts, and vice versa. Four of the designed analogs were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli with high yield and were easily purified from inclusion bodies. Interestingly, all four analogs showed potent activity in inducing the

  6. Emerging antiviral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Erik

    2008-09-01

    Foremost among the newly described antiviral agents that may be developed into drugs are, for the treatment of human papilloma virus (HPV) infections, cPrPMEDAP; for the treatment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections, BAY 57-1293; for the treatment of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infections, FV-100 (prodrug of Cf 1743); for the treatment of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections, maribavir; for the treatment of poxvirus infections, ST-246; for the treatment of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) (which in the meantime has already been approved in the EU); for the treatment of various DNA virus infections, the hexadecyloxypropyl (HDP) and octadecyloxyethyl (ODE) prodrugs of cidofovir; for the treatment of orthomyxovirus infections (i.e., influenza), peramivir; for the treatment of hepacivirus infections (i.e., hepatitis C), the protease inhibitors telaprevir and boceprevir, the nucleoside RNA replicase inhibitors (NRRIs) PSI-6130 and R1479, and various non-nucleoside RNA replicase inhibitors (NNRRIs); for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections, integrase inhibitors (INIs) such as elvitegravir, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) such as apricitabine, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) such as rilpivirine and dapivirine; and for the treatment of both HCV and HIV infections, cyclosporin A derivatives such as the non-immunosuppressive Debio-025. PMID:18764719

  7. Structures of Two Coronavirus Main Proteases: Implications for Substrate Binding and Antiviral Drug Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Xiaoyu; Yu, Hongwei; Yang, Haitao; Xue, Fei; Wu, Zhixin; Shen, Wei; Li, Jun; Zhou, Zhe; Ding, Yi; Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Xuejun C.; Liao, Ming; Bartlam, Mark; Rao, Zihe (SCAU); (Tsinghua); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2008-07-21

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) can infect humans and multiple species of animals, causing a wide spectrum of diseases. The coronavirus main protease (M{sup pro}), which plays a pivotal role in viral gene expression and replication through the proteolytic processing of replicase polyproteins, is an attractive target for anti-CoV drug design. In this study, the crystal structures of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) MP{sup pro} and a severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV) M{sup pro} mutant (H41A), in complex with an N-terminal autocleavage substrate, were individually determined to elucidate the structural flexibility and substrate binding of M{sup pro}. A monomeric form of IBV M{sup pro} was identified for the first time in CoV M{sup pro} structures. A comparison of these two structures to other available M{sup pro} structures provides new insights for the design of substrate-based inhibitors targeting CoV M{sup pro}s. Furthermore, a Michael acceptor inhibitor (named N3) was cocrystallized with IBV M{sup pro} and was found to demonstrate in vitro inactivation of IBV M{sup pro} and potent antiviral activity against IBV in chicken embryos. This provides a feasible animal model for designing wide-spectrum inhibitors against CoV-associated diseases. The structure-based optimization of N3 has yielded two more efficacious lead compounds, N27 and H16, with potent inhibition against SARS-CoV M{sup pro}.

  8. Influenza Round Table: Antiviral Drugs

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-11-04

    In this podcast, Dr. Joe Bresee explains the nature of antiviral drugs and how they are used.  Created: 11/4/2009 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 11/4/2009.

  9. Can antiviral drugs contain pandemic influenza transmission?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels G Becker

    Full Text Available Antiviral drugs dispensed during the 2009 influenza pandemic generally failed to contain transmission. This poses the question of whether preparedness for a future pandemic should include plans to use antiviral drugs to mitigate transmission.Simulations using a standard transmission model that allows for infected arrivals and delayed vaccination show that attempts to contain transmission require relatively few antiviral doses. In contrast, persistent use of antiviral drugs when the reproduction number remains above 1 use very many doses and are unlikely to reduce the eventual attack rate appreciably unless the stockpile is very large. A second model, in which the community has a household structure, shows that the effectiveness of a strategy of dispensing antiviral drugs to infected households decreases rapidly with time delays in dispensing the antivirals. Using characteristics of past pandemics it is estimated that at least 80% of primary household cases must present upon show of symptoms to have a chance of containing transmission by dispensing antiviral drugs to households. To determine data needs, household outbreaks were simulated with 50% receiving antiviral drugs early and 50% receiving antiviral drugs late. A test to compare the size of household outbreaks indicates that at least 100-200 household outbreaks need to be monitored to find evidence that antiviral drugs can mitigate transmission of the newly emerged virus.Use of antiviral drugs in an early attempt to contain transmission should be part of preparedness plans for a future influenza pandemic. Data on the incidence of the first 350 cases and the eventual attack rates of the first 200 hundred household outbreaks should be used to estimate the initial reproduction number R and the effectiveness of antiviral drugs to mitigate transmission. Use of antiviral drugs to mitigate general transmission should cease if these estimates indicate that containment of transmission is unlikely.

  10. What You Should Know about Flu Antiviral Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters What You Should Know About Flu Antiviral Drugs Language: ... that can be used to treat flu illness. What are antiviral drugs? Antiviral drugs are prescription medicines ( ...

  11. Antiviral Drug Resistance of Human Cytomegalovirus

    OpenAIRE

    Lurain, Nell S.; Chou, Sunwen

    2010-01-01

    Summary: The study of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) antiviral drug resistance has enhanced knowledge of the virological targets and the mechanisms of antiviral activity. The currently approved drugs, ganciclovir (GCV), foscarnet (FOS), and cidofovir (CDV), target the viral DNA polymerase. GCV anabolism also requires phosphorylation by the virus-encoded UL97 kinase. GCV resistance mutations have been identified in both genes, while FOS and CDV mutations occur only in the DNA polymerase gene. Co...

  12. Vaccines and Antiviral Drugs in Pandemic Preparedness

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold S. Monto

    2006-01-01

    While measures such as closing schools and social distancing may slow the effects of pandemic influenza, only vaccines and antiviral drugs are clearly efficacious in preventing infection or treating illness. Unless the pandemic strain closely resembles one already recognized, vaccine will not be available early. However, studies can be conducted beforehand to address questions concerning vaccine dose, frequency of inoculation, and need for adjuvants. In contrast, antiviral drugs, particularly...

  13. Antiviral Drug Resistance: Mechanisms and Clinical Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Strasfeld, Lynne; Chou, Sunwen

    2010-01-01

    Antiviral drug resistance is an increasing concern in immunocompromised patient populations, where ongoing viral replication and prolonged drug exposure lead to the selection of resistant strains. Rapid diagnosis of resistance can be made by associating characteristic viral mutations with resistance to various drugs as determined by phenotypic assays. Management of drug resistance includes optimization of host factors and drug delivery, selection of alternative therapies based on knowledge of...

  14. Bell's Palsy: Treatment with Steroids and Antiviral Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PATIENTS and their FAMILIES BELL’S PALSY: TREATMENT WITH STEROIDS AND ANTIVIRAL DRUGS This information sheet is provided to help you understand the role of steroids and antiviral drugs for treating Bell’s palsy. Neurologists ...

  15. Antiviral drug discovery: broad-spectrum drugs from nature.

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, J P; Sasse, F; Brönstrup, M; Diez, J; Meyerhans, A

    2015-01-01

    Covering: up to April 2014. The development of drugs with broad-spectrum antiviral activities is a long pursued goal in drug discovery. It has been shown that blocking co-opted host-factors abrogates the replication of many viruses, yet the development of such host-targeting drugs has been met with scepticism mainly due to toxicity issues and poor translation to in vivo models. With the advent of new and more powerful screening assays and prediction tools, the idea of a drug that can efficien...

  16. The treatment of influenza with antiviral drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Stiver, Grant

    2003-01-01

    Influenza vaccination with current inactivated vaccines homologous to the prevalent wild-type virus can reduce influenza illness in 75%–80% of healthy adults. Vaccine is recommended for all individuals with chronic underlying diseases and for those aged 65 years or older. Although influenza vaccination is still advocated for patients with blunted immunity, protection rates are not as high, running at 40% for frail institutionalized elderly people. The influenza antiviral agents amantadine or ...

  17. Aminoadamantanes versus other antiviral drugs for chronic hepatitis C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamers, Mieke H; Broekman, Mark; Drenth, Joost Ph;

    2014-01-01

    aminoadamantanes for patients with chronic hepatitis C would show strong benefits, it is probably better to focus on the assessments of other direct acting antiviral drugs. We found no evidence assessing other aminoadamantanes in randomised clinical trials in order to recommend or refute their use....... months after the end of treatment) in approximately 40% to 80% of treated patients, depending on viral genotype. Recently, a new class of drugs have emerged for hepatitis C infection, the direct acting antivirals, which in combination with standard therapy or alone can lead to sustained virological...... response in 80% or more of treated patients. Aminoadamantanes, mostly amantadine, are antiviral drugs used for the treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis C. We have previously systematically reviewed amantadine versus placebo or no intervention and found no significant effects of the amantadine on...

  18. Flu Resistance to Antiviral Drug in North Carolina

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-12-19

    Dr. Katrina Sleeman, Associate Service Fellow at CDC, discusses resistance to an antiviral flu drug in North Carolina.  Created: 12/19/2011 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 12/19/2011.

  19. INVESTMENT IN ANTIVIRAL DRUGS : A REAL OPTIONS APPROACH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attema, Arthur E.; Lugner, Anna K.; Feenstra, Talitha L.

    2010-01-01

    Real options analysis is a promising approach to model investment under uncertainty. We employ this approach to value stockpiling of antiviral drugs as a precautionary measure against a possible influenza pandemic. Modifications of the real options approach to include risk attitude and deviations fr

  20. H1N1 Flu and Antiviral Drugs

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-02

    This podcast discusses the use of antiviral drugs for treating and preventing the H1N1 flu virus.  Created: 5/2/2009 by Coordinating Center for Infectious Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Influenza Division (CCID/NCIRD/ID).   Date Released: 5/2/2009.

  1. Approved Antiviral Drugs over the Past 50 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Erik; Li, Guangdi

    2016-07-01

    Since the first antiviral drug, idoxuridine, was approved in 1963, 90 antiviral drugs categorized into 13 functional groups have been formally approved for the treatment of the following 9 human infectious diseases: (i) HIV infections (protease inhibitors, integrase inhibitors, entry inhibitors, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and acyclic nucleoside phosphonate analogues), (ii) hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections (lamivudine, interferons, nucleoside analogues, and acyclic nucleoside phosphonate analogues), (iii) hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections (ribavirin, interferons, NS3/4A protease inhibitors, NS5A inhibitors, and NS5B polymerase inhibitors), (iv) herpesvirus infections (5-substituted 2'-deoxyuridine analogues, entry inhibitors, nucleoside analogues, pyrophosphate analogues, and acyclic guanosine analogues), (v) influenza virus infections (ribavirin, matrix 2 protein inhibitors, RNA polymerase inhibitors, and neuraminidase inhibitors), (vi) human cytomegalovirus infections (acyclic guanosine analogues, acyclic nucleoside phosphonate analogues, pyrophosphate analogues, and oligonucleotides), (vii) varicella-zoster virus infections (acyclic guanosine analogues, nucleoside analogues, 5-substituted 2'-deoxyuridine analogues, and antibodies), (viii) respiratory syncytial virus infections (ribavirin and antibodies), and (ix) external anogenital warts caused by human papillomavirus infections (imiquimod, sinecatechins, and podofilox). Here, we present for the first time a comprehensive overview of antiviral drugs approved over the past 50 years, shedding light on the development of effective antiviral treatments against current and emerging infectious diseases worldwide. PMID:27281742

  2. Curious discoveries in antiviral drug development: the role of serendipity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Erik

    2015-07-01

    Antiviral drug development has often followed a curious meandrous route, guided by serendipity rather than rationality. This will be illustrated by ten examples. The polyanionic compounds (i) polyethylene alanine (PEA) and (ii) suramin were designed as an antiviral agent (PEA) or known as an antitrypanosomal agent (suramin), before they emerged as, respectively, a depilatory agent, or reverse transcriptase inhibitor. The 2',3'-dideoxynucleosides (ddNs analogues) (iii) have been (and are still) used in the "Sanger" DNA sequencing technique, although they are now commercialized as nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) in the treatment of HIV infections. (E)-5-(2-Bromovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (iv) was discovered as a selective anti-herpes simplex virus compound and is now primarily used for the treatment of varicella-zoster virus infections. The prototype of the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPs), (S)-9-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine [(S)-HPMPA], (v) was never commercialized, although it gave rise to several marketed products (cidofovir, adefovir, and tenofovir). 1-[2-(Hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine (vi) and TIBO (tetrahydroimidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4-benzodiazepin-2(1H)]-one and -thione) (vii) paved the way to a number of compounds (i.e., nevirapine, delavirdine, etravirine, and rilpivirine), which are now collectively called non-NRTIs. The bicyclam AMD3100 (viii) was originally described as an anti-HIV agent before it became later marketed as a stem cell mobilizer. The S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitors (ix), while active against a broad range of (-)RNA viruses and poxviruses may be particularly effective against Ebola virus, and for (x) the O-ANP derivatives, the potential application range encompasses virtually all DNA viruses. PMID:25726922

  3. Searching for antiviral drugs for human papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, M R; Shewchuk, L M; Hassell, A M; Phelps, W C

    2000-12-01

    The human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are ubiquitous human pathogens that cause a wide variety of benign and pre-malignant epithelial tumours. Of the almost 100 different types of HPV that have been characterized to date, approximately two dozen specifically infect genital and oral mucosa. Mucosal HPVs are most frequently sexually transmitted and, with an incidence roughly twice that of herpes simplex virus infection, are considered one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases throughout the world. A subset of genital HPVs, termed 'high-risk' HPVs, is highly associated with the development of genital cancers including cervical carcinoma. The absence of a simple monolayer cell culture system for analysis and propagation of the virus has substantially retarded progress in the development of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for HPV infection. In spite of these difficulties, great progress has been made in the elucidation of the molecular controls of virus gene expression, replication and pathogenesis. With this knowledge and some important new tools, there is great potential for the development of improved diagnostic and prognostic tests, prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines, and traditional antiviral medicines. PMID:11142617

  4. Anti-Viral Drugs for Human Adenoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chor Wing Sing

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available There are many stages in the development of a new drug for viral infection and such processes are even further complicated for adenovirus by the fact that there are at least 51 serotypes, forming six distinct groups (A–F, with different degree of infectivity. This review attempts to address the importance of developing pharmaceuticals for adenovirus and also review recent development in drug discovery for adenovirus, including newer strategies such as microRNA approaches. Different drug screening strategies will also be discussed.

  5. A case for developing antiviral drugs against polio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Marc S; Neyts, Johan; Modlin, John F

    2008-09-01

    Polio eradication is within sight. In bringing the world close to this ultimate goal, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) has relied exclusively on the live, attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). However, as eradication nears, continued OPV use becomes less tenable due to the incidence of vaccine associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP) in vaccine recipients and disease caused by circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) in contacts. Once wild poliovirus transmission has been interrupted globally, OPV use will stop. This will leave the inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) as the only weapon to defend a polio-free world. Outbreaks caused by cVDPVs are expected post-OPV cessation, and accidental or deliberate releases of virus could also occur. There are serious doubts regarding the ability of IPV alone to control outbreaks. Here, we argue that antiviral drugs against poliovirus be added to the arsenal. Anti-poliovirus drugs could be used to treat the infected and protect the exposed, acting rapidly on their own to contain an outbreak and used as a complement to IPV. While there are no polio antiviral drugs today, the technological feasibility of developing such drugs and their probability of clinical success have been established by over three decades of drug development targeting the related rhinoviruses and non-polio enteroviruses (NPEVs). Because of this history, there are known compounds with anti-poliovirus activity in vitro that represent excellent starting points for polio drug development. Stakeholders must come to understand the potential public health benefits of polio drugs, the feasibility of their development, and the relatively modest costs involved. Given the timelines for eradication and those for drug development, the time for action is now. PMID:18513807

  6. A review of antiviral drugs and other compounds with activity against feline herpesvirus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomasy, Sara M; Maggs, David J

    2016-07-01

    Feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1) is a common and important cause of ocular surface disease, dermatitis, respiratory disease, and potentially intraocular disease in cats. Many antiviral drugs developed for the treatment of humans infected with herpesviruses have been used to treat cats infected with FHV-1. Translational use of drugs in this manner ideally requires methodical investigation of their in vitro efficacy against FHV-1 followed by pharmacokinetic and safety trials in normal cats. Subsequently, placebo-controlled efficacy studies in experimentally inoculated animals should be performed followed, finally, by carefully designed and monitored clinical trials in client-owned animals. This review is intended to provide a concise overview of the available literature regarding the efficacy of antiviral drugs and other compounds with proven or putative activity against FHV-1, as well as a discussion of their safety in cats. PMID:27091747

  7. Epidemiological Characteristics of Novel Influenza A (H1N1) in Antiviral Drug Users in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Kyunghi Choi; Sung-il Cho; Masahiro Hashizume; Ho Kim

    2012-01-01

    Soon after the first novel influenza A (H1N1) death was documented in Korea on August 15, 2009, prompt treatment with antiviral drugs was recommended when an infection was suspected. Free antiviral drugs were distributed to patients who met the case definition in the treatment guidelines, and patients prescribed the antiviral drugs were included in the Antiviral Drug Surveillance System (ADSS). A total of 2,825,821 patients were reported to the ADSS from September 1 to December 31, 2009. Odds...

  8. The use of antiviral drugs for influenza: Guidance for practitioners, 2012/2013; Paediatric summary

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Upton D.

    2013-01-01

    This practice point summarizes the use of antiviral drugs to manage influenza illness in children and youth for the 2012/2013 season. It excerpts a recently published, full-length update of Canadian recommendations for clinicians on the use of antiviral drugs for the prevention and treatment of influenza, with a focus on paediatric antiviral therapy. Detailed information on the selective use of chemoprophylaxis can be found in the source document, which also highlights the importance of secon...

  9. Clinical pharmacokinetic drug interactions associated with artemisinin derivatives and HIV-antivirals

    OpenAIRE

    Kiang, Tony K.L.; Kyle J Wilby; Ensom, Mary H H

    2014-01-01

    Management of HIV and malaria co-infection is challenging due to potential drug-drug interactions between antimalarial and HIV-antiviral drugs. Little is known of the clinical significance of these drug interactions, and this review provides a comprehensive summary and critical evaluation of the literature. Specifically, drug interactions between WHO-recommended artemisinin combination therapies (ACT) and HIV-antivirals are discussed. An extensive literature search produced eight articles det...

  10. Design, synthesis, and antiviral properties of 2-aryl-lH-benzimidazole-4-carboxamide derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianjin LUO; Zhonglü ZHANG; Yutian YANG; Fei XUE; Naiyun XIU; Yuanbin SHE

    2009-01-01

    A series of new benzimidazole derivatives were designed and synthesized. Their chemical structures were testified by 1H NMR, infrared spectroscopy (IR), mass spectrography (MS), and elemental analysis. Their potent antiviral properties indicated the prospect of new drugs. Compound 13, 16, 18, 19, 21, 22, and 23 were identified as novel antivirus with much better selective activity and inhibitory activity than the comparable ribavirin against Coxsackie virus B3 in VERO cells.

  11. SOME ASPECTS OF THE MARKETING STUDIES FOR THE PHARMACEUTICAL MARKET OF ANTIVIRAL DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Salnikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiviral drugs are widely used in medicinal practice. They suppress the originator and stimulate the protection of an organism. The drugs are used for the treatment of flu and ARVI, herpetic infections, virus hepatitis, HIV-infection. Contemporary pharmaceutical market is represented by a wide range of antiviral drugs. Marketing studies are conducted to develop strategies, used for the enhancement of pharmacy organization activity efficiency. Conduction of the marketing researches of pharmaceutical market is the purpose of this study. We have used State Registry of Drugs, State Record of Drugs, List of vital drugs, questionnaires of pharmaceutical workers during our work. Historical, sociological, mathematical methods, and a method of expert evaluation were used in the paper. As the result of the study we have made the following conclusions. We have studied and generalized the literature data about classification and application of antiviral drugs, marketing, competition. The assortment of antiviral drugs on the pharmaceutical market of the Russian Federation was also studied. We have conducted an analysis for the obtainment of the information about antiviral drugs by pharmaceutical workers. We have determined the competitiveness of antiviral drugs, and on the basis of the research conducted we have submitted an offer for pharmaceutical organizations to form the range of antiviral drugs.

  12. Development of Potent Antiviral Drugs Inspired by Viral Hexameric DNA-Packaging Motors with Revolving Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Fengmei; Zhao, Zhengyi; Chelikani, Venkata; Yoder, Kristine; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Guo, Peixuan

    2016-09-15

    The intracellular parasitic nature of viruses and the emergence of antiviral drug resistance necessitate the development of new potent antiviral drugs. Recently, a method for developing potent inhibitory drugs by targeting biological machines with high stoichiometry and a sequential-action mechanism was described. Inspired by this finding, we reviewed the development of antiviral drugs targeting viral DNA-packaging motors. Inhibiting multisubunit targets with sequential actions resembles breaking one bulb in a series of Christmas lights, which turns off the entire string. Indeed, studies on viral DNA packaging might lead to the development of new antiviral drugs. Recent elucidation of the mechanism of the viral double-stranded DNA (dsDNA)-packaging motor with sequential one-way revolving motion will promote the development of potent antiviral drugs with high specificity and efficiency. Traditionally, biomotors have been classified into two categories: linear and rotation motors. Recently discovered was a third type of biomotor, including the viral DNA-packaging motor, beside the bacterial DNA translocases, that uses a revolving mechanism without rotation. By analogy, rotation resembles the Earth's rotation on its own axis, while revolving resembles the Earth's revolving around the Sun (see animations at http://rnanano.osu.edu/movie.html). Herein, we review the structures of viral dsDNA-packaging motors, the stoichiometries of motor components, and the motion mechanisms of the motors. All viral dsDNA-packaging motors, including those of dsDNA/dsRNA bacteriophages, adenoviruses, poxviruses, herpesviruses, mimiviruses, megaviruses, pandoraviruses, and pithoviruses, contain a high-stoichiometry machine composed of multiple components that work cooperatively and sequentially. Thus, it is an ideal target for potent drug development based on the power function of the stoichiometries of target complexes that work sequentially. PMID:27356896

  13. Antiviral resistance during pandemic influenza: implications for stockpiling and drug use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowman Christopher S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anticipated extent of antiviral use during an influenza pandemic can have adverse consequences for the development of drug resistance and rationing of limited stockpiles. The strategic use of drugs is therefore a major public health concern in planning for effective pandemic responses. Methods We employed a mathematical model that includes both sensitive and resistant strains of a virus with pandemic potential, and applies antiviral drugs for treatment of clinical infections. Using estimated parameters in the published literature, the model was simulated for various sizes of stockpiles to evaluate the outcome of different antiviral strategies. Results We demonstrated that the emergence of highly transmissible resistant strains has no significant impact on the use of available stockpiles if treatment is maintained at low levels or the reproduction number of the sensitive strain is sufficiently high. However, moderate to high treatment levels can result in a more rapid depletion of stockpiles, leading to run-out, by promoting wide-spread drug resistance. We applied an antiviral strategy that delays the onset of aggressive treatment for a certain amount of time after the onset of the outbreak. Our results show that if high treatment levels are enforced too early during the outbreak, a second wave of infections can potentially occur with a substantially larger magnitude. However, a timely implementation of wide-scale treatment can prevent resistance spread in the population, and minimize the final size of the pandemic. Conclusion Our results reveal that conservative treatment levels during the early stages of the outbreak, followed by a timely increase in the scale of drug-use, will offer an effective strategy to manage drug resistance in the population and avoid run-out. For a 1918-like strain, the findings suggest that pandemic plans should consider stockpiling antiviral drugs to cover at least 20% of the population.

  14. Human cytomegalovirus antiviral drug resistance in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: current state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Ana Bela; Ribeiro, Joana; Boutolleau, David; Sousa, Hugo

    2016-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. The significant clinical impact of HCMV infection and progression to HCMV disease among allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients has been reduced by prophylactic, preemptive, and curative treatments using ganciclovir, valganciclovir, foscarnet, and cidofovir. Resistance to (val)ganciclovir results from mutations localized in HCMV UL97 gene (encoding the pUL97 phosphotransferase), UL54 gene (encoding the pUL54 DNA polymerase), or both genes, whereas foscarnet and cidofovir resistance results from mutations localized within UL54 gene only. This review is focused on HCMV antiviral drug resistance, including the functions of target genes of antivirals, the mechanisms of antiviral resistance, the different mutations in pUL97 and pUL54 that have been identified in either clinical isolates or laboratory strains, and their impact on HCMV susceptibility to antiviral drugs. It emphasizes the importance of proving that observed genetic changes confer resistance so they can be distinguished from polymorphisms. Because of the emergence of HCMV resistance to currently available drugs, novel drugs are urgently needed for the therapeutic management of HCMV-resistant infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26990717

  15. A simple, rapid, and sensitive system for the evaluation of anti-viral drugs in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We established a novel, simple and rapid in vivo system for evaluation of anti-HIV-1 drugs with rats. ► The system may be applicable for other antiviral drugs, and/or useful for initial screening in vivo. ► In this system, TRI-1144 displayed the most potent anti-HIV-1 activity in vivo. -- Abstract: The lack of small animal models for the evaluation of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) agents hampers drug development. Here, we describe the establishment of a simple and rapid evaluation system in a rat model without animal infection facilities. After intraperitoneal administration of test drugs to rats, antiviral activity in the sera was examined by the MAGI assay. Recently developed inhibitors for HIV-1 entry, two CXCR4 antagonists, TF14016 and FC131, and four fusion inhibitors, T-20, T-20EK, SC29EK, and TRI-1144, were evaluated using HIV-1IIIB and HIV-1BaL as representative CXCR4- and CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains, respectively. CXCR4 antagonists were shown to only possess anti-HIV-1IIIB activity, whereas fusion inhibitors showed both anti-HIV-1IIIB and anti-HIV-1BaL activities in rat sera. These results indicate that test drugs were successfully processed into the rat sera and could be detected by the MAGI assay. In this system, TRI-1144 showed the most potent and sustained antiviral activity. Sera from animals not administered drugs showed substantial anti-HIV-1 activity, indicating that relatively high dose or activity of the test drugs might be needed. In conclusion, the novel rat system established here, “phenotypic drug evaluation”, may be applicable for the evaluation of various antiviral drugs in vivo.

  16. Caulerpin as a potential antiviral drug against herpes simplex virus type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathália Regina Porto Vieira Macedo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available About 80% of the human adult population is infected with HSV-1. Although there are many anti-HSV-1 drugs available (acyclovir, ganciclovir, valaciclovir, foscarnet, their continuous use promotes the selection of resistant strains, mainly in ACV patients. In addition to resistance, the drugs also have toxicity, particularly when administration is prolonged. The study of new molecules isolated from green algae with potential antiviral activity represents a good opportunity for the development of antiviral drugs. Caulerpin, the major product from the marine algae Caulerpa Lamouroux (Caulerpales, is known for its biological activities such as antioxidant, antifungal, acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChE and antibacterial activity. In this work, we show that caulerpin could be an alternative to acyclovir as an anti-HSV-1 drug that inhibits the alpha and beta phases of the replication cycle.

  17. Molecular characterization and antiviral activity test of common drugs against echovirus 18 isolated in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Park KwiSung; Yeo SangGu; Baek KyoungAh; Cheon DooSung; Choi YoungJin; Park JoonSoo; Lee SooJin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Genetic diversity and antiviral activity for five common antiviral drugs of echovirus (ECV) 5 isolated in Korea have been described. The present study extended these tests to a Korean ECV 18 isolate. An outbreak of aseptic meningitis caused by the ECV 18 isolate was reported in Korea in 2005, marking the first time this virus had been identified in the country since enterovirus surveillance began in 1993. Using a sample isolated from stool specimen of a 5-year-old male patient with a...

  18. Current Landscape of Antiviral Drug Discovery [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wade Blair

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Continued discovery and development of new antiviral medications are paramount for global human health, particularly as new pathogens emerge and old ones evolve to evade current therapeutic agents. Great success has been achieved in developing effective therapies to suppress human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and hepatitis B virus (HBV; however, the therapies are not curative and therefore current efforts in HIV and HBV drug discovery are directed toward longer-acting therapies and/or developing new mechanisms of action that could potentially lead to cure, or eradication, of the virus. Recently, exciting early clinical data have been reported for novel antivirals targeting respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and influenza (flu. Preclinical data suggest that these new approaches may be effective in treating high-risk patients afflicted with serious RSV or flu infections. In this review, we highlight new directions in antiviral approaches for HIV, HBV, and acute respiratory virus infections.

  19. Pharmacological Characterization of the Spectrum of Antiviral Activity and Genetic Barrier to Drug Resistance of M2-S31N Channel Blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chunlong; Zhang, Jiantao; Wang, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Adamantanes (amantadine and rimantadine) are one of the two classes of Food and Drug Administration-approved antiviral drugs used for the prevention and treatment of influenza A virus infections. They inhibit viral replication by blocking the wild-type (WT) M2 proton channel, thus preventing viral uncoating. However, their use was discontinued due to widespread drug resistance. Among a handful of drug-resistant mutants, M2-S31N is the predominant mutation and persists in more than 95% of currently circulating influenza A strains. We recently designed two classes of M2-S31N inhibitors, S31N-specific inhibitors and S31N/WT dual inhibitors, which are represented by N-[(5-cyclopropyl-1,2-oxazol-3-yl)methyl]adamantan-1-amine (WJ379) and N-[(5-bromothiophen-2-yl)methyl]adamantan-1-amine (BC035), respectively. However, their antiviral activities against currently circulating influenza A viruses and their genetic barrier to drug resistance are unknown. In this report, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of these two classes of M2-S31N inhibitors (WJ379 and BC035) by profiling their antiviral efficacy against multidrug-resistant influenza A viruses, in vitro drug resistance barrier, and synergistic effect with oseltamivir. We found that M2-S31N inhibitors were active against several influenza A viruses that are resistant to one or both classes of Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-influenza drugs. In addition, M2-S31N inhibitors display a higher in vitro genetic barrier to drug resistance than amantadine. The antiviral effect of WJ379 was also synergistic with oseltamivir carboxylate. Overall, these results reaffirm that M2-S31N inhibitors are promising antiviral drug candidates that warrant further development. PMID:27385729

  20. Molecular characterization and antiviral activity test of common drugs against echovirus 18 isolated in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park KwiSung

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genetic diversity and antiviral activity for five common antiviral drugs of echovirus (ECV 5 isolated in Korea have been described. The present study extended these tests to a Korean ECV 18 isolate. An outbreak of aseptic meningitis caused by the ECV 18 isolate was reported in Korea in 2005, marking the first time this virus had been identified in the country since enterovirus surveillance began in 1993. Using a sample isolated from stool specimen of a 5-year-old male patient with aseptic meningitis, the complete genome sequence was obtained and was compared it with the Metcalf prototype strain. Unlike the ECV5 isolate, the 3' untranslated region had the highest identity value (94.2% at the nucleotide level, while, at the amino acid level, the P2 region displayed the highest identity value (96.9%. These two strains shared all cleavage sites, with the exception of the 2B/2C site, which was RQ/NN in the Metcalf strain but RQ/NS in the Korean ECV 18 isolate. In Vero cells infected with the Korean ECV 18 isolate, no cytotoxicity was observed in the presence of azidothymidine, acyclovir, amantadine, lamivudine, or ribavirin, when the drugs were administered at a CC50 value >100 μg/mL. Of the five drugs, only amantadine (IC50: 4.97 ± 0.77 μg/mL, TI: 20.12 and ribavirin (IC50: 7.63 ± 0.87 μg/mL, TI: 13.11 had any antiviral activity against the Korean ECV 18 isolate in the five antiviral drugs. These antiviral activity effects were similar with results of the Korean ECV5 isolate.

  1. Design, synthesis, optimization and antiviral activity of a class of hybrid dengue virus E protein inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadav, Surender Singh; Kaptein, Suzanne; Timiri, Ajaykumar; De Burghgraeve, Tine; Badavath, Vishnu Nayak; Ganesan, Ramesh; Sinha, Barij Nayan; Neyts, Johan; Leyssen, Pieter; Jayaprakash, Venkatesan

    2015-04-15

    The β-OG pocket is a cavity in the flavivirus envelope (E) protein that was identified by Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.2003, 100, 6986 as a promising site for the design of antiviral agents that interfere with virus entry into the host cell. The availability of the X-ray crystal structure of the dengue virus (DENV) E protein provided an opportunity for in silico drug design efforts to identify candidate inhibitors. The present study was set up to explore whether it is possible to generate a novel class of molecules that are hybrids between two hit compounds that have been reported previously by ACS. Chem. Biol.2008, 3, 765 following an in silico screening effort against the DENV E protein. First, a library of twenty hybrid molecules were designed and synthesized to explore the feasibility of this strategy. Antiviral evaluation in a virus-cell-based assay for DENV proved this approach to be successful, after which another twenty-four molecules were produced to further explore and optimize the potency of this novel class of hybrid inhibitors. In the end, a molecule was obtained with an EC50 against dengue virus serotype 2 in the low micromolar range (23, 1.32±0.41μM). PMID:25791449

  2. Parallel shRNA and CRISPR-Cas9 screens enable antiviral drug target identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, Richard M; Morgens, David W; Ökesli, Ayşe; Pillay, Sirika; Horlbeck, Max A; Kampmann, Martin; Gilbert, Luke A; Li, Amy; Mateo, Roberto; Smith, Mark; Glenn, Jeffrey S; Carette, Jan E; Khosla, Chaitan; Bassik, Michael C

    2016-05-01

    Broad-spectrum antiviral drugs targeting host processes could potentially treat a wide range of viruses while reducing the likelihood of emergent resistance. Despite great promise as therapeutics, such drugs remain largely elusive. Here we used parallel genome-wide high-coverage short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 screens to identify the cellular target and mechanism of action of GSK983, a potent broad-spectrum antiviral with unexplained cytotoxicity. We found that GSK983 blocked cell proliferation and dengue virus replication by inhibiting the pyrimidine biosynthesis enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH). Guided by mechanistic insights from both genomic screens, we found that exogenous deoxycytidine markedly reduced GSK983 cytotoxicity but not antiviral activity, providing an attractive new approach to improve the therapeutic window of DHODH inhibitors against RNA viruses. Our results highlight the distinct advantages and limitations of each screening method for identifying drug targets, and demonstrate the utility of parallel knockdown and knockout screens for comprehensive probing of drug activity. PMID:27018887

  3. Dynamics of an HBV Model with Drug Resistance Under Intermittent Antiviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ben-Gong; Tanaka, Gouhei; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Honda, Masao; Kaneko, Shuichi; Chen, Luonan

    2015-06-01

    This paper studies the dynamics of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) model and the therapy regimens of HBV disease. First, we propose a new mathematical model of HBV with drug resistance, and then analyze its qualitative and dynamical properties. Combining the clinical data and theoretical analysis, we demonstrate that our model is biologically plausible and also computationally viable. Second, we demonstrate that the intermittent antiviral therapy regimen is one of the possible strategies to treat this kind of complex disease. There are two main advantages of this regimen, i.e. it not only may delay the development of drug resistance, but also may reduce the duration of on-treatment time compared with the long-term continuous medication. Moreover, such an intermittent antiviral therapy can reduce the adverse side effects. Our theoretical model and computational results provide qualitative insight into the progression of HBV, and also a possible new therapy for HBV disease.

  4. The chemical bases of the various AIDS epidemics: recreational drugs, anti-viral chemotherapy and malnutrition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Peter Duesberg; Claus Koehnlein; David Rasnick

    2003-06-01

    In 1981 a new epidemic of about two-dozen heterogeneous diseases began to strike non-randomly growing numbers of male homosexuals and mostly male intravenous drug users in the US and Europe. Assuming immunodeficiency as the common denominator the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) termed the epidemic, AIDS, for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. From 1981–1984 leading researchers including those from the CDC proposed that recreational drug use was the cause of AIDS, because of exact correlations and of drug-specific diseases. However, in 1984 US government researchers proposed that a virus, now termed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), is the cause of the non-random epidemics of the US and Europe but also of a new, sexually random epidemic in Africa. The virus-AIDS hypothesis was instantly accepted, but it is burdened with numerous paradoxes, none of which could be resolved by 2003: Why is there no HIV in most AIDS patients, only antibodies against it? Why would HIV take 10 years from infection to AIDS? Why is AIDS not self-limiting via antiviral immunity? Why is there no vaccine against AIDS? Why is AIDS in the US and Europe not random like other viral epidemics? Why did AIDS not rise and then decline exponentially owing to antiviral immunity like all other viral epidemics? Why is AIDS not contagious? Why would only HIV carriers get AIDS who use either recreational or anti-HIV drugs or are subject to malnutrition? Why is the mortality of HIV-antibody-positives treated with anti-HIV drugs 7–9%, but that of all (mostly untreated) HIV-positives globally is only 1.4%? Here we propose that AIDS is a collection of chemical epidemics, caused by recreational drugs, anti-HIV drugs, and malnutrition. According to this hypothesis AIDS is not contagious, not immunogenic, not treatable by vaccines or antiviral drugs, and HIV is just a passenger virus. The hypothesis explains why AIDS epidemics strike non-randomly if caused by drugs and randomly if caused by

  5. The Use of Antiviral Drugs for Influenza: Recommended Guidelines for Practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Upton D.; Fred Y Aoki; H Grant Stiver; for the Canadian Paediatric Society and the Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada

    2006-01-01

    The present document outlines current guidelines and supporting literature relating to the use of antiviral drugs for chemoprophylaxis and influenza illness therapy in paediatric and adult settings. The focus is on the management of influenza in interpandemic periods. Where appropriate, the areas in need of additional research are identified. It will be necessary to update aspects of these guidelines as new information emerges. The recommendations that follow represent the results of a joint ...

  6. The anti-obesity drug orlistat reveals anti-viral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammer, Elisabeth; Nietzsche, Sandor; Rien, Christian; Kühnl, Alexander; Mader, Theresa; Heller, Regine; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Henke, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The administration of drugs to inhibit metabolic pathways not only reduces the risk of obesity-induced diseases in humans but may also hamper the replication of different viral pathogens. In order to investigate the value of the US Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-obesity drug orlistat in view of its anti-viral activity against different human-pathogenic viruses, several anti-viral studies, electron microscopy analyses as well as fatty acid uptake experiments were performed. The results indicate that administrations of non-cytotoxic concentrations of orlistat reduced the replication of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) in different cell types significantly. Moreover, orlistat revealed cell protective effects and modified the formation of multi-layered structures in CVB3-infected cells, which are necessary for viral replication. Lowering fatty acid uptake from the extracellular environment by phloretin administrations had only marginal impact on CVB3 replication. Finally, orlistat reduced also the replication of varicella-zoster virus moderately but had no significant influence on the replication of influenza A viruses. The data support further experiments into the value of orlistat as an inhibitor of the fatty acid synthase to develop new anti-viral compounds, which are based on the modulation of cellular metabolic pathways. PMID:25680890

  7. Influenza vaccines and influenza antiviral drugs in Africa: are they available and do guidelines for their use exist?

    OpenAIRE

    Duque, Jazmin; McMorrow, Meredith L.; Adam L Cohen

    2014-01-01

    Background Influenza viruses cause significant morbidity and mortality in Africa, particularly among high-risk groups, but influenza vaccines and antiviral drugs may not be commonly available and used. The main aim of this study was to determine the availability and use of influenza vaccines and antiviral drugs as well as to describe existing related guidelines and policies in Africa. Methods A self-administered survey was distributed among key influenza experts in 40 African countries. Resul...

  8. Guidance on The Use of Antiviral Drugs for Influenza in Acute Care Facilities in Canada, 2014-2015

    OpenAIRE

    H Grant Stiver; Evans, Gerald A; Fred Y Aoki; Allen, Upton D.; Michel Laverdière

    2015-01-01

    This article represents the second update to the AMMI Canada Guidelines document on the use of antiviral drugs for influenza. The article aims to inform health care professionals of the increased risk for influenza in long-term care facilities due to a documented mismatch between the components chosen for this season’s vaccine and currently circulating influenza strains. Adjusted recommendations for the use of antiviral drugs for influenza in the acute care setting for this season are provide...

  9. Studies of Retroviral Reverse Transcriptase and Flaviviral Protease Enzymes as Antiviral Drug Targets : Applications in Antiviral Drug Discovery & Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Junaid, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    Viruses are a major threat to humans due to their unique adaptability, evolvability and  capability to control their hosts as parasites and genetic elements. HIV/AIDS is the third largest cause of death by infectious diseases in the world, and drug resistance due to the viral mutations is still the leading cause of treatment failure. The flaviviruses, such as Dengue virus (DEN) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), represent other major cause of morbidity and mortality, and the areas where t...

  10. Letermovir and inhibitors of the terminase complex: a promising new class of investigational antiviral drugs against human cytomegalovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melendez DP

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Dante P Melendez,1,2 Raymund R Razonable1,2 1Division of Infectious Diseases, 2William J von Liebig Center for Transplantation and Clinical Regeneration, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: Infection with cytomegalovirus is prevalent in immunosuppressed patients. In solid organ transplant and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, cytomegalovirus infection is associated with high morbidity and preventable mortality. Prevention and treatment of cytomegalovirus with currently approved antiviral drugs is often associated with side effects that sometimes preclude their use. Moreover, cytomegalovirus has developed mutations that confer resistance to standard antiviral drugs. During the last decade, there have been calls to develop novel antiviral drugs that could provide better options for prevention and treatment of cytomegalovirus. Letermovir (AIC246 is a highly specific antiviral drug that is currently undergoing clinical development for the management of cytomegalovirus infection. It acts by inhibiting the viral terminase complex. Letermovir is highly potent in vitro and in vivo against cytomegalovirus. Because of a distinct mechanism of action, it does not exhibit cross-resistance with other antiviral drugs. It is predicted to be active against strains that are resistant to ganciclovir, foscarnet, and cidofovir. To date, early-phase clinical trials suggest a very low incidence of adverse effects. Herein, we present a comprehensive review on letermovir, from its postulated novel mechanism of action to the results of most recent clinical studies. Keywords: cytomegalovirus, letermovir, AIC246, terminase, antivirals, transplantation 

  11. Antiviral activity of α-helical stapled peptides designed from the HIV-1 capsid dimerization domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cowburn David

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The C-terminal domain (CTD of HIV-1 capsid (CA, like full-length CA, forms dimers in solution and CTD dimerization is a major driving force in Gag assembly and maturation. Mutations of the residues at the CTD dimer interface impair virus assembly and render the virus non-infectious. Therefore, the CTD represents a potential target for designing anti-HIV-1 drugs. Results Due to the pivotal role of the dimer interface, we reasoned that peptides from the α-helical region of the dimer interface might be effective as decoys to prevent CTD dimer formation. However, these small peptides do not have any structure in solution and they do not penetrate cells. Therefore, we used the hydrocarbon stapling technique to stabilize the α-helical structure and confirmed by confocal microscopy that this modification also made these peptides cell-penetrating. We also confirmed by using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC, sedimentation equilibrium and NMR that these peptides indeed disrupt dimer formation. In in vitro assembly assays, the peptides inhibited mature-like virus particle formation and specifically inhibited HIV-1 production in cell-based assays. These peptides also showed potent antiviral activity against a large panel of laboratory-adapted and primary isolates, including viral strains resistant to inhibitors of reverse transcriptase and protease. Conclusions These preliminary data serve as the foundation for designing small, stable, α-helical peptides and small-molecule inhibitors targeted against the CTD dimer interface. The observation that relatively weak CA binders, such as NYAD-201 and NYAD-202, showed specificity and are able to disrupt the CTD dimer is encouraging for further exploration of a much broader class of antiviral compounds targeting CA. We cannot exclude the possibility that the CA-based peptides described here could elicit additional effects on virus replication not directly linked to their ability to bind

  12. The Use of Antiviral Drugs for Influenza: Guidance for Practitioners 2012/2013

    OpenAIRE

    Fred Y Aoki; Allen, Upton D.; H Grant Stiver; Evans, Gerald A

    2012-01-01

    The present article addresses the use of antiviral drugs in the management of seasonal influenza illness for the 2012/2013 season. It updates the previous document published in 2011 (1). Noteworthy guidance updates since 2011 include the following: Seasonal influenza in 2012/2013 is predicted to be caused by two human influenza A and one influenza B strain, all of which are anticipated to remain generally susceptible to oseltamivir.The predicted strains are A/California/7/2009 (H1N1) pdm09...

  13. The Use of Antiviral Drugs for Influenza: Recommended Guidelines for Practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upton D Allen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present document outlines current guidelines and supporting literature relating to the use of antiviral drugs for chemoprophylaxis and influenza illness therapy in paediatric and adult settings. The focus is on the management of influenza in interpandemic periods. Where appropriate, the areas in need of additional research are identified. It will be necessary to update aspects of these guidelines as new information emerges. The recommendations that follow represent the results of a joint effort supported by the Canadian Paediatric Society and the Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada.

  14. Reaction of cis- and trans-Dichlorotetra(Dimethylsulfoxide)Ruthenium(II) With the Antiviral Drug Acyclovir

    OpenAIRE

    Koutsodimou, Aglaia; Natile, Giovanni

    2000-01-01

    NMR was used to investigate the reaction of cis- and trans-[RuCl2(DMSO)4] with the antiviral drug acyclovir, a guanine derivative containing the acyclic (2-hydroxo) ethoxymethyl pendant linked to N(9). Studies were performed in aqueous solutions at ambient temperature and at 37 °C, and at various molar ratios. Both isomers yielded two compounds, a monoadduct and a bisadduct, the relative yields being dependent upon the metal to ligand concentration ratios. The products derived from the two Ru...

  15. Using ICR and SCID mice as animal models for smallpox to assess antiviral drug efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titova, Ksenya A; Sergeev, Alexander A; Zamedyanskaya, Alena S; Galahova, Darya O; Kabanov, Alexey S; Morozova, Anastasia A; Bulychev, Leonid E; Sergeev, Artemiy A; Glotova, Tanyana I; Shishkina, Larisa N; Taranov, Oleg S; Omigov, Vladimir V; Zavjalov, Evgenii L; Agafonov, Alexander P; Sergeev, Alexander N

    2015-09-01

    The possibility of using immunocompetent ICR mice and immunodeficient SCID mice as model animals for smallpox to assess antiviral drug efficacy was investigated. Clinical signs of the disease did not appear following intranasal (i.n.) challenge of mice with strain Ind-3a of variola virus (VARV), even when using the highest possible dose of the virus (5.2 log10 p.f.u.). The 50 % infective doses (ID50) of VARV, estimated by the virus presence or absence in the lungs 3 and 4 days post-infection, were 2.7 ± 0.4 log10 p.f.u. for ICR mice and 3.5 ± 0.7 log10 p.f.u. for SCID mice. After i.n. challenge of ICR and SCID mice with VARV 30 and 50 ID50, respectively, steady reproduction of the virus occurred only in the respiratory tract (lungs and nose). Pathological inflammatory destructive changes were revealed in the respiratory tract and the primary target cells for VARV (macrophages and epithelial cells) in mice, similar to those in humans and cynomolgus macaques. The use of mice to assess antiviral efficacies of NIOCH-14 and ST-246 demonstrated the compliance of results with those described in scientific literature, which opens up the prospect of their use as an animal model for smallpox to develop anti-smallpox drugs intended for humans. PMID:26067292

  16. A method for evaluating antiviral drug susceptibility of Epstein-Barr virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte A Romain

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Charlotte A Romain1, Henry H Balfour Jr1,2, Heather E Vezina1,3, Carol J Holman11Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, 2Department of Pediatrics, 3Department of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USAAbstract: We developed an in vitro Epstein-Barr virus (EBV drug susceptibility assay using P3HR1 cells or lymphoblastoid cells from subjects with infectious mononucleosis, which were grown in the presence of various concentrations of acyclovir (ACV, ganciclovir (GCV or R-9-[4-hydroxy-2-(hydroxymethylbutyl]guanine (H2G and 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA. On day 7, total cellular DNA was extracted and EBV DNA was detected using an in-house quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR method. All three drugs had in vitro activity against EBV in both the laboratory standard producer cell line P3HR1 and in subject-derived lymphoblastoid cell lines. The median 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s in P3HR1 cells were: ACV, 3.4 μM; GCV, 2.6 μM; and H2G, 2.7 μM and in 3 subject-derived cells were: ACV, 2.5 μM; GCV, 1.7 μM; and H2G, 1.9 μM. Our assay can be used to screen candidate anti-EBV drugs. Because we can measure the IC50 of patients’ strains of EBV, this assay may also be useful for monitoring viral resistance especially in immunocompomised hosts receiving antiviral drugs for prevention or treatment of EBV diseases.Keywords: Epstein-Barr virus, ganciclovir, acyclovir, valomaciclovir, H2G, antivirals

  17. A novel corneal explant model system to evaluate antiviral drugs against feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Matthew R; Fort, Michael W; Ledbetter, Eric C; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R

    2016-06-01

    Feline herpesvirus type-1 (FHV-1) is the most common viral cause of ocular surface disease in cats. Many antiviral drugs are used to treat FHV-1, but require frequent topical application and most lack well-controlled in vivo studies to justify their clinical use. Therefore, better validation of current and novel treatment options are urgently needed. Here, we report on the development of a feline whole corneal explant model that supports FHV-1 replication and thus can be used as a novel model system to evaluate the efficacy of antiviral drugs. The anti-herpes nucleoside analogues cidofovir and acyclovir, which are used clinically to treat ocular herpesvirus infection in cats and have previously been evaluated in traditional two-dimensional feline cell cultures in vitro, were evaluated in this explant model. Both drugs suppressed FHV-1 replication when given every 12 h, with cidofovir showing greater efficacy. In addition, the potential efficacy of the retroviral integrase inhibitor raltegravir against FHV-1 was evaluated in cell culture as well as in the explant model. Raltegravir was not toxic to feline cells or corneas, and most significantly, inhibited FHV-1 replication at 500 µM in both systems. Importantly, this drug was effective when given only once every 24 h. Taken together, our data indicate that the feline whole corneal explant model is a useful tool for the evaluation of antiviral drugs and, furthermore, that raltegravir appears a promising novel antiviral drug to treat ocular herpesvirus infection in cats. PMID:26959283

  18. Prescription of antiviral drugs during the 2009 influenza pandemic: an observational study using electronic medical files of general practitioners in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Hooiveld, M; Groep, T. van de; Verheij, Th.J.M.; Sande, M A; Verheij, R.A.; Tacken, M.A.; van Essen, G. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: After the clinical impact of the A(H1N1) pdm09 virus was considered to be mild, treatment with antiviral drugs was recommended only to patients who were at risk for severe disease or who had a complicated course of influenza. We investigated to what extent antiviral prescriptions in primary care practices were in accordance with the recommendations, what proportion of patients diagnosed with influenza had been prescribed antiviral drugs, and to what extent prescriptions related to...

  19. The Use of Antiviral Drugs for Influenza: Guidance for Practitioners 2012/2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Y Aoki

    2012-01-01

    Seasonal influenza in 2012/2013 is predicted to be caused by two human influenza A and one influenza B strain, all of which are anticipated to remain generally susceptible to oseltamivir.The predicted strains are A/California/7/2009 (H1N1 pdm09-like, A/Victoria/361/2011 (H3N2-like and B/Wisconsin/1/2010-like (Yamagata lineage. All are included in the seasonal influenza vaccine and are susceptible to oseltamivir.Swine-variant H3N2v, which has rarely caused infection in humans exposed to infected swine within the past year in the United States, is susceptible to oseltamivir. It is not included in the current seasonal influenza vaccine.It is still considered that initiation of antiviral therapy more than 36 h to 48 h after onset of symptoms is beneficial in patients hospitalized with complicated influenza and severe illness.Oseltamivir continues to be recommended for the treatment of influenza in pregnant women.The use of antiviral drugs among measures to control outbreaks of influenza in closed facilities such as correctional institutions is now included in the present document.

  20. Diagnostic imaging of herpes simplex virus encephalitis using a radiolabeled antiviral drug: autoradiographic assessment in an animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To develop a new approach to the diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis, we used a radiolabeled antiviral drug, 2'-fluoro-5-methyl-1-beta-D-arabinosyluracil labeled with carbon 14 ([14C]FMAU), as a probe for selectively imaging brain infection in a rat model by quantitative autoradiography. A high correlation was found between focal infection, as defined by immunoperoxidase viral antigen staining, and increased regional [14C]FMAU uptake in brain sections. Two potential sources of false-positive imaging were defined: high concentrations of drug in the choroid plexus because of its higher permeability compared with brain, and drug sequestration by proliferating uninfected cell populations. Our results support the soundness of the proposed strategy of using a labeled antiviral drug that is selectively phosphorylated by herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase in conjunction with scanning methods for human diagnosis, and also define some of the factors that must be taken into account when planning clinical application

  1. Synthesis of an antiviral drug precursor from chitin using a saprophyte as a whole-cell catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steiger Matthias G

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent incidents, such as the SARS and influenza epidemics, have highlighted the need for readily available antiviral drugs. One important precursor currently used for the production of Relenza, an antiviral product from GlaxoSmithKline, is N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuNAc. This substance has a considerably high market price despite efforts to develop cost-reducing (biotechnological production processes. Hypocrea jecorina (Trichoderma reesei is a saprophyte noted for its abundant secretion of hydrolytic enzymes and its potential to degrade chitin to its monomer N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc. Chitin is considered the second most abundant biomass available on earth and therefore an attractive raw material. Results In this study, we introduced two enzymes from bacterial origin into Hypocrea, which convert GlcNAc into NeuNAc via N-acetylmannosamine. This enabled the fungus to produce NeuNAc from the cheap starting material chitin in liquid culture. Furthermore, we expressed the two recombinant enzymes as GST-fusion proteins and developed an enzyme assay for monitoring their enzymatic functionality. Finally, we demonstrated that Hypocrea does not metabolize NeuNAc and that no NeuNAc-uptake by the fungus occurs, which are important prerequisites for a potential production strategy. Conclusions This study is a proof of concept for the possibility to engineer in a filamentous fungus a bacterial enzyme cascade, which is fully functional. Furthermore, it provides the basis for the development of a process for NeuNAc production as well as a general prospective design for production processes that use saprophytes as whole-cell catalysts.

  2. Drug Design and Emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkers, Gerd; Wittwer, Amrei

    2007-11-01

    "Geteiltes Leid ist halbes Leid." The old German proverb reflects the fact that sharing a bad emotion or feeling with someone else may lower the psychological strain of the person experiencing sorrow, mourning or anger. On the other hand the person showing empathy will take literally a load from its counterpart, up to physiological reaction of the peripheral and central nervous pain system. Though subjective, mental and physical states can be shared. Visual perception of suffering may be important but also narrative description plays a role, all our senses are mixing in. It is hypothetized that literature, art and humanities allow this overlap. A change of mental states can lead to empirically observable effects as it is the case for the effect of role identity or placebo on pain perception. Antidepressants and other therapeutics are another choice to change the mental and bodily states. Their development follows today's notion of "rationality" in the design of therapeutics and is characterized solely by an atomic resolution approach to understand drug activity. Since emotional states and physiological states are entangled, given the difficulty of a physical description of emotion, the future rational drug design should encompass mental states as well.

  3. High throughput screening for small molecule enhancers of the interferon signaling pathway to drive next-generation antiviral drug discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhara A Patel

    Full Text Available Most of current strategies for antiviral therapeutics target the virus specifically and directly, but an alternative approach to drug discovery might be to enhance the immune response to a broad range of viruses. Based on clinical observation in humans and successful genetic strategies in experimental models, we reasoned that an improved interferon (IFN signaling system might better protect against viral infection. Here we aimed to identify small molecular weight compounds that might mimic this beneficial effect and improve antiviral defense. Accordingly, we developed a cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS assay to identify small molecules that enhance the IFN signaling pathway components. The assay is based on a phenotypic screen for increased IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE activity in a fully automated and robust format (Z'>0.7. Application of this assay system to a library of 2240 compounds (including 2160 already approved or approvable drugs led to the identification of 64 compounds with significant ISRE activity. From these, we chose the anthracycline antibiotic, idarubicin, for further validation and mechanism based on activity in the sub-µM range. We found that idarubicin action to increase ISRE activity was manifest by other members of this drug class and was independent of cytotoxic or topoisomerase inhibitory effects as well as endogenous IFN signaling or production. We also observed that this compound conferred a consequent increase in IFN-stimulated gene (ISG expression and a significant antiviral effect using a similar dose-range in a cell-culture system inoculated with encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV. The antiviral effect was also found at compound concentrations below the ones observed for cytotoxicity. Taken together, our results provide proof of concept for using activators of components of the IFN signaling pathway to improve IFN efficacy and antiviral immune defense as well as a validated HTS approach to identify

  4. High frequency of antiviral drug resistance and non-b subtypes in HIV-1 patients failing antiviral therapy in Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouri, Vivian; Alemán, Yoan; Pérez, Lissette; Pérez, Jorge; Fonseca, Carlos; Correa, Consuelo; Aragonés, Carlos; Campos, Jorge; Álvarez, Delmis; Schrooten, Yoeri; Vinken, Lore; Limia, Celia; Soto, Yudira; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Emergence of HIV-1 drug resistance may limit the sustained benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in settings with limited laboratory monitoring and drug options. The objective is to implement the surveillance of drug resistance and subtypes in HIV-1 patients failing ART in Cuba. Methods This study compiled clinical and genotypic drug resistance data 588 ART-experienced HIV-1 patients attending a clinical center in Havana in 2009–2013. Drug resistance testing was performed as part of routine clinical care. Drug resistance mutations and levels were determined using Rega version 8.0.2. Results Eighty-three percent received solely ART containing at least three drugs. Patients from 2009 to 2010 were longer treated (median: 4.9 vs 2.7 years) and exposed to more ART regimens (median: 4 vs 2 regimens) compared to patients from 2011–2013. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI), non-nucleoside RTI (NNRTI) and PI mutations were present in 83.5, 77.4 and 52.0%. Full-class resistance (FCR) to NRTI, NNRTI, PI and multidrug resistance (MDR) were detected in 25.0, 33.7, 11.4 and 6.3%. FCR to NRTI, NNRTI, PI and MDR were present in 12.8, 28.7, 0 and 0% after first-line failure (164 patients) and in 23.1, 34.6, 3.8 and 3.1% after second-line failure (130 patients). Subtype B (32.5%), BG recombinants (19.6%) and CRF19_cpx (16.2%) were the most prevalent genetic forms. Subtype distribution did not change significantly between 2009–2010 and 2011–2013, except for BG recombinants that increased from 12.2 to 21.3% (p=0.002). Conclusions Our study found a high prevalence of drug resistance and supports the need for appropriate laboratory monitoring in clinical practice and access to drug options in case of virological failure. PMID:25397499

  5. High frequency of antiviral drug resistance and non-b subtypes in HIV-1 patients failing antiviral therapy in Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Kouri

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergence of HIV-1 drug resistance may limit the sustained benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART in settings with limited laboratory monitoring and drug options. The objective is to implement the surveillance of drug resistance and subtypes in HIV-1 patients failing ART in Cuba. Methods: This study compiled clinical and genotypic drug resistance data 588 ART-experienced HIV-1 patients attending a clinical center in Havana in 2009–2013. Drug resistance testing was performed as part of routine clinical care. Drug resistance mutations and levels were determined using Rega version 8.0.2. Results: Eighty-three percent received solely ART containing at least three drugs. Patients from 2009 to 2010 were longer treated (median: 4.9 vs 2.7 years and exposed to more ART regimens (median: 4 vs 2 regimens compared to patients from 2011–2013. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI, non-nucleoside RTI (NNRTI and PI mutations were present in 83.5, 77.4 and 52.0%. Full-class resistance (FCR to NRTI, NNRTI, PI and multidrug resistance (MDR were detected in 25.0, 33.7, 11.4 and 6.3%. FCR to NRTI, NNRTI, PI and MDR were present in 12.8, 28.7, 0 and 0% after first-line failure (164 patients and in 23.1, 34.6, 3.8 and 3.1% after second-line failure (130 patients. Subtype B (32.5%, BG recombinants (19.6% and CRF19_cpx (16.2% were the most prevalent genetic forms. Subtype distribution did not change significantly between 2009–2010 and 2011–2013, except for BG recombinants that increased from 12.2 to 21.3% (p=0.002. Conclusions: Our study found a high prevalence of drug resistance and supports the need for appropriate laboratory monitoring in clinical practice and access to drug options in case of virological failure.

  6. The SARS-coronavirus papain-like protease: structure, function and inhibition by designed antiviral compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Báez-Santos, Yahira M; St John, Sarah E; Mesecar, Andrew D

    2015-03-01

    Over 10 years have passed since the deadly human coronavirus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV) emerged from the Guangdong Province of China. Despite the fact that the SARS-CoV pandemic infected over 8500 individuals, claimed over 800 lives and cost billions of dollars in economic loss worldwide, there still are no clinically approved antiviral drugs, vaccines or monoclonal antibody therapies to treat SARS-CoV infections. The recent emergence of the deadly human coronavirus that causes Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS-CoV) is a sobering reminder that new and deadly coronaviruses can emerge at any time with the potential to become pandemics. Therefore, the continued development of therapeutic and prophylactic countermeasures to potentially deadly coronaviruses is warranted. The coronaviral proteases, papain-like protease (PLpro) and 3C-like protease (3CLpro), are attractive antiviral drug targets because they are essential for coronaviral replication. Although the primary function of PLpro and 3CLpro are to process the viral polyprotein in a coordinated manner, PLpro has the additional function of stripping ubiquitin and ISG15 from host-cell proteins to aid coronaviruses in their evasion of the host innate immune responses. Therefore, targeting PLpro with antiviral drugs may have an advantage in not only inhibiting viral replication but also inhibiting the dysregulation of signaling cascades in infected cells that may lead to cell death in surrounding, uninfected cells. This review provides an up-to-date discussion on the SARS-CoV papain-like protease including a brief overview of the SARS-CoV genome and replication followed by a more in-depth discussion on the structure and catalytic mechanism of SARS-CoV PLpro, the multiple cellular functions of SARS-CoV PLpro, the inhibition of SARS-CoV PLpro by small molecule inhibitors, and the prospect of inhibiting papain-like protease from other coronaviruses. This paper forms part of a series of

  7. Potential for Drug-Drug Interactions between Antiretrovirals and HCV Direct Acting Antivirals in a Large Cohort of HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Poizot-Martin, Isabelle; Naqvi, Alissa; Obry-Roguet, Véronique; Valantin, Marc-Antoine; Cuzin, Lise; Billaud, Eric; Cheret, Antoine; Rey, David; Jacomet, Christine; Duvivier, Claudine; Pugliese, Pascal; Pradat, Pierre; Cotte, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Development of direct acting antivirals (DAA) offers new benefits for patients with chronic hepatitis C. The combination of these drugs with antiretroviral treatment (cART) is a real challenge in HIV/HCV coinfected patients. The aim of this study was to describe potential drug-drug interactions between DAAs and antiretroviral drugs in a cohort of HIV/HCV coinfected patients. Methods Cross-sectional study of all HIV/HCV coinfected patients attending at least one visit in 2012 in the...

  8. Guidance for Practitioners on the Use of Antiviral Drugs to Control Influenza Outbreaks in Long-Term Care Facilities in Canada, 2014-2015 Season

    OpenAIRE

    Fred Y Aoki; Allen, Upton D.; H Grant Stiver; Michel Laverdière; Danuta Skowronski; Evans, Gerald A

    2015-01-01

    The AMMI Canada Guidelines document ‘The use of antiviral drugs for influenza: A foundation document for practitioners’, published in the Autumn 2013 issue of the Journal, outlines the recommendations for the use of antiviral drugs to treat influenza. This article, which represents the first of two updates to these guidelines published in the current issue of the Journal, aims to inform health care professionals of the increased risk for influenza in long-term care facilities due to a documen...

  9. A human genome-wide loss-of-function screen identifies effective chikungunya antiviral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlas, Alexander; Berre, Stefano; Couderc, Thérèse; Varjak, Margus; Braun, Peter; Meyer, Michael; Gangneux, Nicolas; Karo-Astover, Liis; Weege, Friderike; Raftery, Martin; Schönrich, Günther; Klemm, Uwe; Wurzlbauer, Anne; Bracher, Franz; Merits, Andres; Meyer, Thomas F; Lecuit, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a globally spreading alphavirus against which there is no commercially available vaccine or therapy. Here we use a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify 156 proviral and 41 antiviral host factors affecting CHIKV replication. We analyse the cellular pathways in which human proviral genes are involved and identify druggable targets. Twenty-one small-molecule inhibitors, some of which are FDA approved, targeting six proviral factors or pathways, have high antiviral activity in vitro, with low toxicity. Three identified inhibitors have prophylactic antiviral effects in mouse models of chikungunya infection. Two of them, the calmodulin inhibitor pimozide and the fatty acid synthesis inhibitor TOFA, have a therapeutic effect in vivo when combined. These results demonstrate the value of loss-of-function screening and pathway analysis for the rational identification of small molecules with therapeutic potential and pave the way for the development of new, host-directed, antiviral agents. PMID:27177310

  10. Substituted 3-Benzylcoumarins as Allosteric MEK1 Inhibitors: Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation as Antiviral Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Xu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to find novel antiviral agents, a series of allosteric MEK1 inhibitors were designed and synthesized. Based on docking results, multiple optimizations were made on the coumarin scaffold. Some of the derivatives showed excellent MEK1 binding affinity in the appropriate enzymatic assays and displayed obvious inhibitory effects on the ERK pathway in a cellular assay. These compounds also significantly inhibited virus (EV71 replication in HEK293 and RD cells. Several compounds showed potential as agents for the treatment of viral infective diseases, with the most potent compound 18 showing an IC50 value of 54.57 nM in the MEK1 binding assay.

  11. Ophthalmic antiviral chemotherapy : An overview

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    Athmanathan Sreedharan

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiviral drug development has been slow due to many factors. One such factor is the difficulty to block the viral replication in the cell without adversely affecting the host cell metabolic activity. Most of the antiviral compounds are analogs of purines and pyramidines. Currently available antiviral drugs mainly inhibit viral nucleic acid synthesis, hence act only on actively replicating viruses. This article presents an overview of some of the commonly used antiviral agents in clinical ophthalmology.

  12. NS3 protease from flavivirus as a target for designing antiviral inhibitors against dengue virus

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    Satheesh Natarajan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of novel therapeutic agents is essential for combating the increasing number of cases of dengue fever in endemic countries and among a large number of travelers from non-endemic countries. The dengue virus has three structural proteins and seven non-structural (NS proteins. NS3 is a multifunctional protein with an N-terminal protease domain (NS3pro that is responsible for proteolytic processing of the viral polyprotein, and a C-terminal region that contains an RNA triphosphatase, RNA helicase and RNA-stimulated NTPase domain that are essential for RNA replication. The serine protease domain of NS3 plays a central role in the replicative cycle of dengue virus. This review discusses the recent structural and biological studies on the NS2B-NS3 protease-helicase and considers the prospects for the development of small molecules as antiviral drugs to target this fascinating, multifunctional protein.

  13. Mixture toxicity of the antiviral drug Tamiflu (oseltamivir ethylester) and its active metabolite oseltamivir acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escher, Beate I., E-mail: b.escher@uq.edu.au [University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), 39 Kessels Rd, Brisbane, Qld 4108 (Australia); Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Bramaz, Nadine; Lienert, Judit; Neuwoehner, Judith [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Straub, Juerg Oliver [F.Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Corporate Safety, Health and Environmental Protection, 4070 Basel (Switzerland)

    2010-02-18

    Tamiflu (oseltamivir ethylester) is an antiviral agent for the treatment of influenza A and B. The pro-drug Tamiflu is converted in the human body to the pharmacologically active metabolite, oseltamivir acid, with a yield of 75%. Oseltamivir acid is indirectly photodegradable and slowly biodegradable in sewage works and sediment/water systems. A previous environmental risk assessment has concluded that there is no bioaccumulation potential of either of the compounds. However, little was known about the ecotoxicity of the metabolite. Ester hydrolysis typically reduces the hydrophobicity and thus the toxicity of a compound. In this case, a zwitterionic, but overall neutral species is formed from the charged parent compound. If the speciation and predicted partitioning into biological membranes is considered, the metabolite may have a relevant contribution to the overall toxicity. These theoretical considerations triggered a study to investigate the toxicity of oseltamivir acid (OA), alone and in binary mixtures with its parent compound oseltamivir ethylester (OE). OE and OA were found to be baseline toxicants in the bioluminescence inhibition test with Vibrio fischeri. Their mixture effect lay between predictions for concentration addition and independent action for the mixture ratio excreted in urine and nine additional mixture ratios of OE and OA. In contrast, OE was an order of magnitude more toxic than OA towards algae, with a more pronounced effect when the direct inhibition of photosystem II was used as toxicity endpoint opposed to the 24 h growth rate endpoint. The binary mixtures in this assay yielded experimental mixture effects that agreed with predictions for independent action. This is consistent with the finding that OE exhibits slightly enhanced toxicity, while OA acts as baseline toxicant. Therefore, with respect to mixture classification, the two compounds can be considered as acting according to different modes of toxic action, although there are

  14. Mixture toxicity of the antiviral drug Tamiflu (oseltamivir ethylester) and its active metabolite oseltamivir acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamiflu (oseltamivir ethylester) is an antiviral agent for the treatment of influenza A and B. The pro-drug Tamiflu is converted in the human body to the pharmacologically active metabolite, oseltamivir acid, with a yield of 75%. Oseltamivir acid is indirectly photodegradable and slowly biodegradable in sewage works and sediment/water systems. A previous environmental risk assessment has concluded that there is no bioaccumulation potential of either of the compounds. However, little was known about the ecotoxicity of the metabolite. Ester hydrolysis typically reduces the hydrophobicity and thus the toxicity of a compound. In this case, a zwitterionic, but overall neutral species is formed from the charged parent compound. If the speciation and predicted partitioning into biological membranes is considered, the metabolite may have a relevant contribution to the overall toxicity. These theoretical considerations triggered a study to investigate the toxicity of oseltamivir acid (OA), alone and in binary mixtures with its parent compound oseltamivir ethylester (OE). OE and OA were found to be baseline toxicants in the bioluminescence inhibition test with Vibrio fischeri. Their mixture effect lay between predictions for concentration addition and independent action for the mixture ratio excreted in urine and nine additional mixture ratios of OE and OA. In contrast, OE was an order of magnitude more toxic than OA towards algae, with a more pronounced effect when the direct inhibition of photosystem II was used as toxicity endpoint opposed to the 24 h growth rate endpoint. The binary mixtures in this assay yielded experimental mixture effects that agreed with predictions for independent action. This is consistent with the finding that OE exhibits slightly enhanced toxicity, while OA acts as baseline toxicant. Therefore, with respect to mixture classification, the two compounds can be considered as acting according to different modes of toxic action, although there are

  15. Identification of transformation products of antiviral drugs formed during biological wastewater treatment and their occurrence in the urban water cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, Jan; Prasse, Carsten; Ternes, Thomas A

    2016-07-01

    The fate of five antiviral drugs (abacavir, emtricitabine, ganciclovir, lamivudine and zidovudine) was investigated in biological wastewater treatment. Investigations of degradation kinetics were accompanied by the elucidation of formed transformation products (TPs) using activated sludge lab experiments and subsequent LC-HRMS analysis. Degradation rate constants ranged between 0.46 L d(-1) gSS(-1) (zidovudine) and 55.8 L d(-1) gSS(-1) (abacavir). Despite these differences of the degradation kinetics, the same main biotransformation reaction was observed for all five compounds: oxidation of the terminal hydroxyl-moiety to the corresponding carboxylic acid (formation of carboxy-TPs). In addition, the oxidation of thioether moieties to sulfoxides was observed for emtricitabine and lamivudine. Antiviral drugs were detected in influents of municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with concentrations up to 980 ng L(-1) (emtricitabine), while in WWTP effluents mainly the TPs were found with concentration levels up to 1320 ng L(-1) (carboxy-abacavir). Except of zidovudine none of the original antiviral drugs were detected in German rivers and streams, whereas the concentrations of the TPs ranged from 16 ng L(-1) for carboxy-lamivudine up to 750 ng L(-1) for carboxy-acyclovir. These concentrations indicate an appreciable portion from WWTP effluents present in rivers and streams, as well as the high environmental persistence of the carboxy-TPs. As a result three of the carboxylic TPs were detected in finished drinking water. PMID:27082694

  16. Marine natural seaweed products as potential antiviral drugs against Bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Viana Pinto

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV is an etiologic agent that causes important economic losses in the world. It is endemic in cattle herds in most parts of the world. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxic effect and antiviral properties of several marine natural products obtained from seaweeds: the indole alkaloid caulerpin (CAV, 1 and three diterpenes: 6-hydroxydichotoma-3,14-diene-1,17-dial (DA, 2, 10,18-diacetoxy-8-hydroxy-2,6-dolabelladiene (DB1, 3 and 8,10,18-trihydroxy-2,6-dolabelladiene (DB3, 4. The screening to evaluate the cytotoxicity of compounds did not show toxic effects to MDBK cells. The antiviral activity of the compounds was measured by the inhibition of the cytopathic effect on infected cells by plaque assay (PA and EC50 values were calculated for CAV (EC=2,0± 5.8, DA (EC 2,8± 7.7, DB1 (EC 2,0±9.7, and DB3 (EC 2,3±7.4. Acyclovir (EC50 322± 5.9 was used in all experiments as the control standard. Although the results of the antiviral activity suggest that all compounds are promising as antiviral agents against BVDV, the Selectivity Index suggests that DB1 is the safest of the compounds tested.

  17. Molecular recognition in the human immunodeficiency virus capsid and antiviral design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocanegra, Rebeca; Rodríguez-Huete, Alicia; Fuertes, Miguel Ángel; Del Álamo, Marta; Mateu, Mauricio G

    2012-11-01

    Many compounds able to interfere with HIV-1 infection have been identified; some 25 of them have been approved for clinical use. Current anti-HIV-1 therapy involves the use of drug cocktails, which reduces the probability of virus escape. However, many issues remain, including drug toxicity and the emergence of drug-resistant mutant viruses, even in treated patients. Therefore, there is a constant need for the development of new anti-HIV-1 agents targeting other molecules in the viral cycle. The capsid protein CA plays a key role in many molecular recognition events during HIV-1 morphogenesis and uncoating, and is eliciting increased interest as a promising target for antiviral intervention. This article provides a structure-based, integrated review on the CA-binding small molecules and peptides identified to date, and their effects on virus capsid assembly and stability, with emphasis on recent results not previously reviewed. As a complement, we present novel experimental results on the development and proof-of-concept application of a combinatorial approach to study molecular recognition in CA and its inhibition by peptide compounds. PMID:22728445

  18. Tattoo designs among drug abusers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borokhov, Alexander; Bastiaans, Roland; Lerner, Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    Forty-one males with drug abuse who had tattoos with designs related to drug use were selected from a larger sample of tattooed males in forensic psychiatric wards, prisons and military recruitment centers during the period 1986-2000 in the former Soviet Union. Two-thirds of the tattoo images were related to a specific drug, some served to hide signs of repeated drug use, others to identify ideal sites for injection. Knowledge of these details may be helpful to clinicians, although images may be influenced by current trends. PMID:16910382

  19. Structure-based design and synthesis of triazole-based macrocyclic inhibitors of norovirus protease: Structural, biochemical, spectroscopic, and antiviral studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerawarna, Pathum M; Kim, Yunjeong; Galasiti Kankanamalage, Anushka C; Damalanka, Vishnu C; Lushington, Gerald H; Alliston, Kevin R; Mehzabeen, Nurjahan; Battaile, Kevin P; Lovell, Scott; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Groutas, William C

    2016-08-25

    Outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis caused by noroviruses constitute a public health concern worldwide. To date, there are no approved drugs or vaccines for the management and prophylaxis of norovirus infections. A potentially effective strategy for the development of norovirus therapeutics entails the discovery of inhibitors of norovirus 3CL protease, an enzyme essential for noroviral replication. We describe herein the structure-based design of the first class of permeable, triazole-based macrocyclic inhibitors of norovirus 3C-like protease, as well as pertinent X-ray crystallographic, biochemical, spectroscopic, and antiviral studies. PMID:27235842

  20. The Need for Development of New HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Integrase Inhibitors in the Aftermath of Antiviral Drug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Wainberg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART involves combinations of drugs to achieve maximal virological response and reduce the potential for the emergence of antiviral resistance. There are two broad classes of reverse transcriptase inhibitors, the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs. Since the first classes of such compounds were developed, viral resistance against them has necessitated the continuous development of novel compounds within each class. This paper considers the NRTIs and NNRTIs currently in both preclinical and clinical development or approved for second line therapy and describes the patterns of resistance associated with their use, as well as the underlying mechanisms that have been described. Due to reasons of both affordability and availability, some reverse transcriptase inhibitors with low genetic barrier are more commonly used in resource-limited settings. Their use results to the emergence of specific patterns of antiviral resistance and so may require specific actions to preserve therapeutic options for patients in such settings. More recently, the advent of integrase strand transfer inhibitors represents another major step forward toward control of HIV infection, but these compounds are also susceptible to problems of HIV drug resistance.

  1. Influenza Resistance to Antiviral Drugs: Virus characterization, mechanism and clinical impact

    OpenAIRE

    Vries, Erhard

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Each year, approximately 5-10% of the world population is infected with the influenza viruses resulting in significant morbidity and an estimated 250.000 to 500.000 deaths every year. Among individuals at increased risk of developing severe influenza disease are those with a compromised immune system. For them being able to effectively suppress viral replication antiviral therapy can be crucial. However, in immunocompromised patients the currently available antivi...

  2. Structural Dynamics of Picornaviral RdRP Complexes. Implications for the Design of Antivirals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdaguer, Núria; Ferrer-Orta, Cristina; Domingo, Esteban

    Genome replication in picornavirus is catalyzed by a virally encoded RNA dependent RNA polymerase, termed 3D. These viruses also use a small protein primer, named VPg to initiate RNA replication. Polymerase 3D also catalyzes the covalent linkage of UMP to a N-terminal tyrosine on VPg. Seven different crystal structures of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 3D catalytic complexes have enhanced our understanding of template and primer recognition, VPg uridylylation and rNTP binding and catalysis. In addition, the biochemical and structural analyses of six different FMDV 3D ribavirin resistant mutants provided evidences of three different mechanisms of resistance to this mutagenic nucleoside analogue. Such structural information is providing new insights into the fidelity of RNA replication, and for the design of antiviral compounds.

  3. Antiviral drug profile of human influenza A & B viruses circulating in India: 2004-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V A Potdar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Recent influenza antiviral resistance studies in South East Asia, Europe and the United States reveal adamantane and neuraminidase inhibitor (NAIs resistance. This study was undertaken to evaluate antiviral resistance in influenza viruses isolated from various parts of India, during 2004 to 2011. Methods: Influenza viruses were analyzed genetically for known resistance markers by M2 and NA gene sequencing. Influenza A/H1N1 (n=206, A/H3N2 (n=371 viruses for amantadine resistance and A/H1N1 (n=206, A/H3N2 (n=272 and type B (n=326 for oseltamivir resistance were sequenced. Pandemic (H1N1 (n= 493 isolates were tested for H274Y mutation by real time reverse transcription (rRT-PCR. Randomly selected resistant and sensitive influenza A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 viruses were confirmed by phenotypic assay. Results: Serine to asparagine (S3IN mutation was detected in six isolates of 2007-2008.One dual-resistant A/H1N1 was detected for the first time in India with leucine to phenylalanine (L26F mutation in M2 gene and H274Y mutation in NA gene. A/H3N2 viruses showed an increase in resistance to amantadine from 22.5 per cent in 2005 to 100 per cent in 2008 onwards with S3IN mutation. Fifty of the 61 (82% A/H1N1 viruses tested in 2008-2009 were oseltamivir resistant with H274Y mutation, while all A/H3N2, pandemic A/H1N1 and type B isolates remained sensitive. Genetic results were also confirmed by phenotypic analysis of randomly selected 50 resistant A/H1N1 and 40 sensitive A/H3N2 isolates. Interpretation & conclusions: Emergence of influenza viruses resistant to amantadine and oseltamivir in spite of negligible usage of antivirals emphasizes the need for continuous monitoring of antiviral resistance.

  4. Biochemical Effects Of Ribavirin (Antiviral And Ddb (Hepato Protective Drugs In Albino Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soliman S. Ibrahim, Amr Shalaby and Mahmoud Rabeh

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation has been designed to through spot light on the efficiency of these two drugs in treatment of hepatitis patients. Cortisol, antigliadin (1gG , total protein (TP albumin (ALB , Iron (Fe , alanine aminotransferase (ALT , aspartic aminotransferase (AST and alkaline phosphatase (ALP were determined in serum of normal mature male and female albino rats that injected intraperitoneally day after day with 1mg/kg body weight of each drug separately for 3 months. The cortisol level and ALP showed significant increase in each of ribavirin or DDB treated animals, while the IgG concentration in ribavirin treated animals increased significantly, but it is did not vary greatly from that of the control in DDB treated animals. On the other hand both ribavirin and DDB treated male and female rats showed significant decrease in the ALT in serum while serum AST elicited non significant decrease in each of ribavirin and DDB treated male and female. With respect to serum TP and ALB levels the result showed significant decrease in ribavirin and non significant decrease in DDB treated male and female rats. Furthermore, the serum Fe level in ribavirin treated male and female rats increased significantly but it is did not vary greatly from that of the control in DDB treated animal.

  5. Dengue Virus Reporter Replicon is a Valuable Tool for Antiviral Drug Discovery and Analysis of Virus Replication Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Fumihiro; Hishiki, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Dengue, the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral disease, is caused by the dengue virus (DENV), a member of the Flaviviridae family, and is a considerable public health threat in over 100 countries, with 2.5 billion people living in high-risk areas. However, no specific antiviral drug or licensed vaccine currently targets DENV infection. The replicon system has all the factors needed for viral replication in cells. Since the development of replicon systems, transient and stable reporter replicons, as well as reporter viruses, have been used in the study of various virological aspects of DENV and in the identification of DENV inhibitors. In this review, we summarize the DENV reporter replicon system and its applications in high-throughput screening (HTS) for identification of anti-DENV inhibitors. We also describe the use of this system in elucidation of the mechanisms of virus replication and viral dynamics in vivo and in vitro. PMID:27164125

  6. Dengue Virus Reporter Replicon is a Valuable Tool for Antiviral Drug Discovery and Analysis of Virus Replication Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Fumihiro; Hishiki, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Dengue, the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral disease, is caused by the dengue virus (DENV), a member of the Flaviviridae family, and is a considerable public health threat in over 100 countries, with 2.5 billion people living in high-risk areas. However, no specific antiviral drug or licensed vaccine currently targets DENV infection. The replicon system has all the factors needed for viral replication in cells. Since the development of replicon systems, transient and stable reporter replicons, as well as reporter viruses, have been used in the study of various virological aspects of DENV and in the identification of DENV inhibitors. In this review, we summarize the DENV reporter replicon system and its applications in high-throughput screening (HTS) for identification of anti-DENV inhibitors. We also describe the use of this system in elucidation of the mechanisms of virus replication and viral dynamics in vivo and in vitro. PMID:27164125

  7. Public health management of antiviral drugs during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic: a survey of local health departments in California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter Jennifer C

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The large-scale deployment of antiviral drugs from the Strategic National Stockpile during the 2009 H1N1 influenza response provides a unique opportunity to study local public health implementation of the medical countermeasure dispensing capability in a prolonged event of national significance. This study aims to describe the range of methods used by local health departments (LHDs in California to manage antiviral activities and to gain a better understanding of the related challenges experienced by health departments and their community partners. Methods This research employed a mixed-methods approach. First, a multi-disciplinary focus group of pandemic influenza planners from key stakeholder groups in California was convened in order to generate ideas and identify critical themes related to the local implementation of antiviral activities during the H1N1 influenza response. These qualitative data informed the development of a web-based survey, which was distributed to all 61 LHDs in California for the purpose of assessing the experiences of a representative sample of local health agencies in a large region. Results Forty-four LHDs participated in this study, representing 72% of the local public health agencies in California. While most communities dispensed a modest number of publicly purchased antivirals, LHDs nevertheless drew on their previous work and engaged in a number of antiviral activities, including: acquiring, allocating, distributing, dispensing, tracking, developing guidance, and communicating to the public and clinical community. LHDs also identified specific antiviral challenges presented by the H1N1 pandemic, including: reconciling multiple sources and versions of antiviral guidance, determining appropriate uses and recipients of publicly purchased antivirals, and staffing shortages. Conclusions The 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic presented an unusual opportunity to learn about the role of local public health

  8. Antiviral Polymer Therapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anton Allen Abbotsford

    2014-01-01

    The field of drug delivery is in essence an exercise in engineered pharmacokinetics. Methods of doing so have been developed through the introduction of a vehicle carrying the drug, either by encapsulation or covalent attachment. The emergence of polymer therapeutics in anticancer therapy has...... the examples of polymer therapeutics being applied as an antiviral treatment are few and far in-between. This work aims to explore antiviral therapeutics, specifically in context of hepatitis virus C (HCV) and HIV. The current treatment of hepatitis C consists of a combination of drugs, of which ribavirin...

  9. Crystal Structures, Thermal Analysis, and Dissolution Behavior of New Solid Forms of the Antiviral Drug Arbidol with Dicarboxylic Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex N. Manin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Salts of the antiviral drug arbidol (umifenovir (Arb with maleate (Mlc and fumarate (Fum anions have been obtained, and their crystal structures have been described. The crystal structure of arbidol maleate has been redetermined by single crystal X-ray diffraction at 180K. A new arbidol cocrystal in zwitterion form with succinic acid (Suc has also been found and characterized. The arbidol zwitterion was not previously seen in any of the drug crystal forms, and the [Arb + Suc] cocrystal seems to be the first found instance. Analysis of the conformational preferences of the arbidol molecule in the crystal structures has shown that it adopts two types of conformations, namely “open” and “closed” ones. Thermal stability of the arbidol salts and cocrystal have been analyzed by means of differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric, and mass-spectrometry analysis. The dissolution study of the arbidol salts and cocrystal performed in aqueous buffer solutions with pH 1.2 and 6.8 has shown that both the salts and the cocrystal dissolve incongruently to form an arbidol hydrochloride monohydrate at pH 1.2 and an arbidol base at pH 6.8, respectively. The cocrystal reaches the highest solubility level in both pH 1.2 and pH 6.8 solutions.

  10. HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Antiviral Drug Resistance (Part 1 of 2)

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Eddy

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) contributes to the development of resistance to all anti-AIDS drugs by introducing mutations into the viral genome. At the molecular level, mutations in RT result in resistance to RT inhibitors. Eight nucleoside/nucleotide analogs (NRTIs) and five non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs) are approved HIV-1 drugs. Structures of RT have been determined in complexes with substrates and/or inhibitors, and the structures have revealed different conforma...

  11. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Robert; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) has pharmacologic applications in the field of antiglaucoma, anticonvulsant, antiobesity, and anticancer agents but is also emerging for designing anti-infectives (antifungal and antibacterial agents) with a novel mechanism of action. As a consequence, the drug design of CA inhibitors (CAIs) is a very dynamic field. Sulfonamides and their isosteres (sulfamates/sulfamides) constitute the main class of CAIs which bind to the metal ion in the enzyme active site. Recently the dithiocarbamates, possessing a similar mechanism of action, were reported as a new class of inhibitors. Other families of CAIs possess a distinct mechanism of action: phenols, polyamines, some carboxylates, and sulfocoumarins anchor to the zinc-coordinated water molecule. Coumarins and five/six-membered lactones are prodrug inhibitors, binding in hydrolyzed form at the entrance of the active site cavity. Novel drug design strategies have been reported principally based on the tail approach for obtaining all these types of CAIs, which exploit more external binding regions within the enzyme active site (in addition to coordination to the metal ion), leading thus to isoform-selective compounds. Sugar-based tails as well as click chemistry were the most fruitful developments of the tail approach. Promising compounds that inhibit CAs from bacterial and fungal pathogens, of the dithiocarbamate, phenol and carboxylate types have also been reported. PMID:24146385

  12. Designer drugs: the evolving science of drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanke, L A; DuBose, R F

    1998-07-01

    Drug discovery and design are fundamental to drug development. Until recently, most drugs were discovered through random screening or developed through molecular modification. New technologies are revolutionizing this phase of drug development. Rational drug design, using powerful computers and computational chemistry and employing X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship analysis, is creating highly specific, biologically active molecules by virtual reality modeling. Sophisticated screening technologies are eliminating all but the most active lead compounds. These new technologies promise more efficacious, safe, and cost-effective medications, while minimizing drug development time and maximizing profits. PMID:10185235

  13. Virus-encoded chemokine receptors--putative novel antiviral drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2005-01-01

    Large DNA viruses, in particular herpes- and poxviruses, have evolved proteins that serve as mimics or decoys for endogenous proteins in the host. The chemokines and their receptors serve key functions in both innate and adaptive immunity through control of leukocyte trafficking, and have as such a...... receptors. The chemokine receptors belong to the superfamily of G-protein coupled 7TM receptors that per se are excellent drug targets. At present, non-peptide antagonists have been developed against many chemokine receptors. The potentials of the virus-encoded chemokine receptors as drug targets--ie. as...

  14. Quantifying antiviral activity optimizes drug combinations against hepatitis C virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koizumi, Yoshiki [School of Medicine, College of Medical, Pharmaceutical and Health Sciences, Kanazawa University, Ishikawa, Japan; Nakajim, Syo [Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan; Department of Applied Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Sciences, Chiba, J; Ohash, Hirofumi [Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan: Department of Applied Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Sciences, Chiba, J; Tanaka, Yasuhito [Department of Virology and Liver Unit, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medicinal Sciences, Nagoya, Japan; Wakita, Takaji [Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan; Perelson, Alan S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Iwami, Shingo [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan: PRESTO, JST, Saitama, Japan: CREST, JST, Saitama, Japan; Watashi, Koichi [Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan: Department of Applied Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Sciences, Chiba, J

    2016-03-21

    Cell culture study combing a mathematical model and computer simulation quantifies the anti-hepatitis C virus drug efficacy at any concentrations and any combinations in preclinical settings, and can obtain rich basic evidences for selecting optimal treatments prior to costly clinical trials.

  15. Biophysical studies on the interaction of platinum(II) complex containing antiviral drug ribavirin with human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Hadidi, Saba; Kalar, Zeinab Mirzaei

    2016-07-01

    This study describes HSA binding properties of a platinum(II) complex with an antiviral drug ligand; ribavirin. Spectroscopic analysis of the emission quenching at different temperatures and UV-vis spectra revealed that the quenching mechanism of HSA by Pt(II) complex is static quenching mechanism. The binding constants and the number of binding sites were determined by fluorescence quenching method. Pt(II) complex binding is characterized by one high affinity binding site. Through the site marker competitive experiment, site I was assigned to possess high affinity binding site for Pt(II) complex. The calculated thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH and ΔS) confirmed that the binding reaction is spontaneous, and hydrophobic forces played a major role in the reaction. Fluorescence quenching studies showed that the binding affinity of Pt(II) complex with HSA in the buffer solution at different pH values is: Kb (pH3.0)>Kb (pH9.0)>Kb (pH7.4). The CD spectrum shows the binding of Pt(II) complex leads to a change in the α-helical structure of HSA. CD spectroscopy studies further indicated the influence of pH on the complexation process and the alteration in the protein conformation upon binding. PMID:27183492

  16. Structures of HIV Protease Guide Inhibitor Design to Overcome Drug Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Irene T.; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Harrison, Robert W. (GSU)

    2008-06-03

    The HIV/AIDS infection continues to be a major epidemic worldwide despite the initial promise of antiviral drugs. Current therapy includes a combination of drugs that inhibit two of the virally-encoded enzymes, the reverse transcriptase and the protease. The first generation of HIV protease inhibitors that have been in clinical use for treatment of AIDS since 1995 was developed with the aid of structural analysis of protease-inhibitor complexes. These drugs were successful in improving the life span of HIV-infected people. Subsequently, the rapid emergence of drug resistance has necessitated the design of new inhibitors that target mutant proteases. This second generation of antiviral protease inhibitors has been developed with the aid of data from medicinal chemistry, kinetics, and X-ray crystallographic analysis. Traditional computational methods such as molecular mechanics and dynamics can be supplemented with intelligent data mining approaches. One approach, based on similarities to the protease interactions with substrates, is to incorporate additional interactions with main chain atoms that cannot easily be eliminated by mutations. Our structural and inhibition data for darunavir have helped to understand its antiviral activity and effectiveness on drug resistant HIV and demonstrate the success of this approach.

  17. The antiviral drug valacyclovir successfully suppresses salivary gland hypertrophy virus (SGHV in laboratory colonies of Glossina pallidipes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adly M M Abd-Alla

    Full Text Available Many species of tsetse flies are infected with a virus that causes salivary gland hypertrophy (SGH symptoms associated with a reduced fecundity and fertility. A high prevalence of SGH has been correlated with the collapse of two laboratory colonies of Glossina pallidipes and colony maintenance problems in a mass rearing facility in Ethiopia. Mass-production of G. pallidipes is crucial for programs of tsetse control including the sterile insect technique (SIT, and therefore requires a management strategy for this virus. Based on the homology of DNA polymerase between salivary gland hypertrophy virus and herpes viruses at the amino acid level, two antiviral drugs, valacyclovir and acyclovir, classically used against herpes viruses were selected and tested for their toxicity on tsetse flies and their impact on virus replication. While long term per os administration of acyclovir resulted in a significant reduction of productivity of the colonies, no negative effect was observed in colonies fed with valacyclovir-treated blood. Furthermore, treatment of a tsetse colony with valacyclovir for 83 weeks resulted in a significant reduction of viral loads and consequently suppression of SGH symptoms. The combination of initial selection of SGHV-negative flies by non-destructive PCR, a clean feeding system, and valacyclovir treatment resulted in a colony that was free of SGH syndromes in 33 weeks. This is the first report of the use of a drug to control a viral infection in an insect and of the demonstration that valacyclovir can be used to suppress SGH in colonies of G. pallidipes.

  18. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of phosphorodiamidate prodrugs of antiviral and anticancer nucleosides

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuigan, Christopher; Bourdin, Claire; Derudas, Marco; Hamon, Nadège; Hinsinger, Karen; Kandil, Sahar; Madela, Karolina; Meneghesso, Silvia; Pertusati, Fabrizio; Serpi, Michaela; Slusarczyk, Magdalena; Chamberlain, Stanley; Kolykhalov, Alexander; Vernachio, John; Vanpouille, Christophe; Introini, Andrea; Margolis, Leonid; Balzarini, Jan

    2014-01-01

    We herein report the application of the phosphorodiamidate phosphate prodrug approach to a series of thirteen nucleoside analogs with antiviral or anticancer activity. Twenty-five symmetrical phosphorodiamidates were synthesized, bearing esterified l-Alanine (and in one case d-alanine) in the prodrug moiety, each as single stereoisomer. The presence of an achiral phosphorus represents a potential advantage over the phosphoramidate ProTide approach, where diastereoisomeric mixtures are routinely obtained, and different biological profiles may be expected from the diastereoisomers. Optimization of the synthetic pathway allowed us to identify two general methods depending on the particular nucleoside analogs. All the compounds were biologically evaluated in antiviral and anticancer assays and several showed improvement of activity compared to their parent nucleosides, as in the case of ddA, d4T, abacavir and acyclovir against HIV-1 and/or HIV-2. The biological results were supported by metabolism studies with carboxypeptidase Y monitored by 31P NMR to investigate their bioactivation. This work further validates the phosphorodiamidate approach as a monophosphate prodrug motif with broad application in the antiviral and anticancer fields. PMID:24177359

  19. P1-Substituted Symmetry-Based Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease Inhibitors with Potent Antiviral Activity against Drug-Resistant Viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGoey, David A.; Grampovnik, David J.; Chen, Hui-Ju; Flosi, William J.; Klein, Larry L.; Dekhtyar, Tatyana; Stoll, Vincent; Mamo, Mulugeta; Molla, Akhteruzzaman; Kempf, Dale J. (Abbott)

    2013-03-07

    Because there is currently no cure for HIV infection, patients must remain on long-term drug therapy, leading to concerns over potential drug side effects and the emergence of drug resistance. For this reason, new and safe antiretroviral agents with improved potency against drug-resistant strains of HIV are needed. A series of HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) with potent activity against both wild-type (WT) virus and drug-resistant strains of HIV was designed and synthesized. The incorporation of substituents with hydrogen bond donor and acceptor groups at the P1 position of our symmetry-based inhibitor series resulted in significant potency improvements against the resistant mutants. By this approach, several compounds, such as 13, 24, and 29, were identified that demonstrated similar or improved potencies compared to 1 against highly mutated strains of HIV derived from patients who previously failed HIV PI therapy. Overall, compound 13 demonstrated the best balance of potency against drug resistant strains of HIV and oral bioavailability in pharmacokinetic studies. X-ray analysis of an HIV PI with an improved resistance profile bound to WT HIV protease is also reported.

  20. Simultaneous determination of 14 antiviral drugs and relevant metabolites in chicken muscle by UPLC-MS/MS after QuEChERS preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Pengqian; Xu, Nana; Chai, Tingting; Jia, Qi; Yin, Zhiqiang; Yang, Shuming; Qian, Yongzhong; Qiu, Jing

    2016-06-15

    A fast method for the simultaneous determination of 14 antiviral drugs and relevant metabolites in chicken muscle by ultra-high liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) was developed. The analytes included anti-influenza drugs (amantadine, rimantadine, oseltamivir, oseltamivir carboxylate, memantine, arbidol, and moroxydine), anti-herpes drugs (acyclovir, ganciclovir, famciclovir, penciclovir, ribavirin and its main metabolite TCONH2), and an immunomodulator (imiquimod). The samples were pretreated using a modified QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) method. The determination of the target compounds was conducted in less than 11.0min, and specificity was ensured by the use of multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) acquisition mode. Good linearities (R(2)>0.9928) were obtained in the range of 0.1-100μg/L, and the recovery rates were 56.2-113.4% with RSDs of 1.7-10.3% for intra-day precision and 2.4-8.8% for inter-day precision. The LODs and LOQs of all analytes were in the ranges of 0.02-1.0 and 0.05-2.5μg/kg, respectively. An analysis of real samples suggested that this method is simple, sensitive, reliable and practical for the detection of antiviral drugs in animal tissue. PMID:27174693

  1. 21 CFR 316.24 - Granting orphan-drug designation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Granting orphan-drug designation. 316.24 Section...) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ORPHAN DRUGS Designation of an Orphan Drug § 316.24 Granting orphan-drug designation. (a) FDA will grant the request for orphan-drug designation if none of the reasons described in §...

  2. Antiviral resistance and the control of pandemic influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Lipsitch

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The response to the next influenza pandemic will likely include extensive use of antiviral drugs (mainly oseltamivir, combined with other transmission-reducing measures. Animal and in vitro studies suggest that some strains of influenza may become resistant to oseltamivir while maintaining infectiousness (fitness. Use of antiviral agents on the scale anticipated for the control of pandemic influenza will create an unprecedented selective pressure for the emergence and spread of these strains. Nonetheless, antiviral resistance has received little attention when evaluating these plans. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We designed and analyzed a deterministic compartmental model of the transmission of oseltamivir-sensitive and -resistant influenza infections during a pandemic. The model predicts that even if antiviral treatment or prophylaxis leads to the emergence of a transmissible resistant strain in as few as 1 in 50,000 treated persons and 1 in 500,000 prophylaxed persons, widespread use of antivirals may strongly promote the spread of resistant strains at the population level, leading to a prevalence of tens of percent by the end of a pandemic. On the other hand, even in circumstances in which a resistant strain spreads widely, the use of antivirals may significantly delay and/or reduce the total size of the pandemic. If resistant strains carry some fitness cost, then, despite widespread emergence of resistance, antivirals could slow pandemic spread by months or more, and buy time for vaccine development; this delay would be prolonged by nondrug control measures (e.g., social distancing that reduce transmission, or use of a stockpiled suboptimal vaccine. Surprisingly, the model suggests that such nondrug control measures would increase the proportion of the epidemic caused by resistant strains. CONCLUSIONS: The benefits of antiviral drug use to control an influenza pandemic may be reduced, although not completely offset, by drug resistance

  3. 21 CFR 316.23 - Timing of requests for orphan-drug designation; designation of already approved drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Timing of requests for orphan-drug designation..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ORPHAN DRUGS Designation of an Orphan Drug § 316.23 Timing of requests for orphan-drug designation; designation of already approved drugs....

  4. Preparation of molecularly imprinted solid-phase microextraction fiber for the selective removal and extraction of the antiviral drug abacavir in environmental and biological matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzopoulou, Zoi; Papageorgiou, Myrsini; Kyzas, George Z; Bikiaris, Dimitrios N; Lambropoulou, Dimitra A

    2016-03-24

    In the present study, a molecularly imprinted solid-phase microextraction fiber (MIP-SPMEf) was synthesized and applied for the selective removal and extraction of the antiviral drug, abacavir (ABA). Morphology and structure characterization of fibers were performed by scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectra, respectively. The effects on the adsorption behavior of the process parameters were studied and the equilibrium data were fitted by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Langmuir-Freundlich models. The maximum adsorption capability (Qmax) was determined by Langmuir- Freundlich model and was 149 mg/g for MIP-SPMEf. In the next step, SPME methodology followed by liquid desorption and liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry (LC/MS) has been developed and evaluated for the determination of the target compound in environmental and biological matrices (surface waters, wastewaters and urine). Parameters that could influence SPME efficiency were investigated. Then, optimization of stirring speed, extraction time and salt content was carried out by using a central composite design (CCD) and response surface methodology (RSM). A quadratic model between dependent and independent variables was built. Under the optimum conditions (extraction time 40 min, stirring rate 650 rpm and salt content 0.3% NaCl w/v) the validated method presented a high sensitivity and selectivity with LODs and LOQs in the range of 10.1-13.6 and 33.3-43.9 ng/L, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to the analysis of ABA in real samples. The percentage extraction efficiency ranged from 88 to 99% revealing good accuracy and absence of matrix effects. PMID:26944990

  5. Synthesis and Antiviral Evaluation of 6-(Trifluoromethylbenzyl) and 6-(Fluorobenzyl) Analogues of HIV Drugs Emivirine and GCA-186

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Brollosy, Nasser R.; Sørensen, Esben R.; Pedersen, Erik Bjerreg.;

    2008-01-01

    antiviral activity against HIV-1 wild type and mutants resistant to non-nucleoside RT inhibitors. The biological test results showed that the most of theses compounds showed good activity against wild type HIV-1. Among them, compound 1-(ethoxymethyl)-6-(3-fluorobenzyl)-5-isopropyluracil (9i) showed the...

  6. Designer Drug Confusion: A Focus on MDMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Jerome; Morgan, Patricia A.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the competing definitions and issues surrounding various designer drugs, primarily 3, 4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA). Offers a rationale for why interest in MDMA, which possesses both stimulant and psychedelic properties, will continue to grow despite the drug's recent illegality and increasing evidence of neurotoxicity.…

  7. Antiviral Prophylaxis and Isolation for the Control of Pandemic Influenza

    OpenAIRE

    Qingxia Zhang; Dingcheng Wang

    2014-01-01

    Before effective vaccines become available, antiviral drugs are considered as the major control strategies for a pandemic influenza. However, perhaps such control strategies can be severely hindered by the low-efficacy of antiviral drugs. For this reason, using antiviral drugs and an isolation strategy is included in our study. A compartmental model that allows for imported exposed individuals and asymptomatic cases is used to evaluate the effectiveness of control strategies via antiviral pro...

  8. Diversity of Pharmacological Properties in Chinese and European Medicinal Plants: Cytotoxicity, Antiviral and Antitrypanosomal Screening of 82 Herbal Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Efferth; Marin, Jose J. G.; Stefan Kahl; Dorothea Kaufmann; Ashour, Mohamed L; Blazquez, Alba G; Romero, Marta R.; Michael Wink; Florian Herrmann

    2011-01-01

    In an extensive screening, the antiviral, antitrypanosomal and anticancer properties of extracts from 82 plants used in traditional Chinese medicine and European phytomedicine were determined. Several promising plants that were highly effective against hepatitis B virus (HBV), bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)—a flavivirus used here as a surrogate in vitro model of hepatitis C virus, trypanosomes (Trypanosoma brucei brucei) and several cancer cell lines were identified. Six aqueous extracts...

  9. Use of Antiviral Drugs to Reduce Household Transmission of Pandemic (H1N1) 2009, United Kingdom1

    OpenAIRE

    Pebody, Richard G.; Harris, Ross; Kafatos, George; Chamberland, Mary; Campbell, Colin; Jonathan S Nguyen-Van-Tam; McLean, Estelle; Andrews, Nick; Peter J White; Wynne-Evans, Edward; Green, Jon; Ellis, Joanna; Wreghitt, Tim; Bracebridge, Sam; Ihekweazu, Chikwe

    2011-01-01

    The United Kingdom implemented a containment strategy for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 through administering antiviral agents (AVs) to patients and their close contacts. This observational household cohort study describes the effect of AVs on household transmission. We followed 285 confirmed primary cases in 259 households with 761 contacts. At 2 weeks, the confirmed secondary attack rate (SAR) was 8.1% (62/761) and significantly higher in persons 50 years of age (18.9% vs. 1.2%, p

  10. Smarter Drugs: How Protein Crystallography Revolutionizes Drug Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to Smith, protein crystallography allows scientists to design drugs in a much more efficient way than the standard methods traditionally used by large drug companies, which can cost close to a billion dollars and take 10 to 15 years. 'A lot of the work can be compressed down,' Smith said. Protein crystallography enables researchers to learn the structure of molecules involved in disease and health. Seeing the loops, folds and placement of atoms in anything from a virus to a healthy cell membrane gives important information about how these things work - and how to encourage, sidestep or stop their functions. Drug design can be much faster when the relationship between structure and function tells you what area of a molecule to target. Smith will use a timeline to illustrate the traditional methods of drug development and the new ways it can be done now. 'It is very exciting work. There have been some failures, but many successes too.' A new drug to combat the flu was developed in a year or so. Smith will tell us how. He will also highlight drugs developed to combat HIV, Tuberculosis, hypertension and Anthrax.

  11. Radiation chemistry applied to drug design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation chemistry can contribute to drug design by quantifying redox properties of drugs and where free radicals are suspected intermediates in drug action, radiation can be used to generate these putative species and help characterise relevant reactions. Steady radiolysis produces radicals at a readily-varied but quantified rate; pulse radiolysis with fast spectrophotometric and/or conductimetric detection enables the kinetic properties of radicals to be monitored directly. Using these methods, radical intermediates from drugs with specific cytotoxicity towards hypoxic cells have been shown to react rapidly with oxygen. Radical oxidants from activated neutrophils include superoxide and hydroxyl radicals, and radiation-chemical methods have an important role to play in rational drug design to exploit such oxidative chemistry. Antioxidants can also be evaluated quantitatively by radiolysis methods; the conjugation reactions of thiyl radicals with thiolate and oxygen are now recognised to be major contributions of pulse radiolysis to thiol biochemistry. (author)

  12. Radiation chemistry applied to drug design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wardman, P.; Candeias, L.P.; Everett, S.A. (Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood (United Kingdom). Cancer Research Campaign Gray Lab.); Tracy, M. (SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States))

    1994-01-01

    Radiation chemistry can contribute to drug design by quantifying redox properties of drugs and where free radicals are suspected intermediates in drug action, radiation can be used to generate these putative species and help characterise relevant reactions. Steady radiolysis produces radicals at a readily-varied but quantified rate; pulse radiolysis with fast spectrophotometric and/or conductimetric detection enables the kinetic properties of radicals to be monitored directly. Using these methods, radical intermediates from drugs with specific cytotoxicity towards hypoxic cells have been shown to react rapidly with oxygen. Radical oxidants from activated neutrophils include superoxide and hydroxyl radicals, and radiation-chemical methods have an important role to play in rational drug design to exploit such oxidative chemistry. Antioxidants can also be evaluated quantitatively by radiolysis methods; the conjugation reactions of thiyl radicals with thiolate and oxygen are now recognised to be major contributions of pulse radiolysis to thiol biochemistry. (author).

  13. Bispidine-Amino Acid Conjugates Act as a Novel Scaffold for the Design of Antivirals That Block Japanese Encephalitis Virus Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Haridas, V.; Rajgokul, Kullampalayam Shanmugam; Sadanandan, Sandhya; Agrawal, Tanvi; Sharvani, Vats; M V S Gopalakrishna; M B Bijesh; Kumawat, Kanhaiya Lal; Basu, Anirban; Medigeshi, Guruprasad R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a major cause of viral encephalitis in South and South-East Asia. Lack of antivirals and non-availability of affordable vaccines in these endemic areas are a major setback in combating JEV and other closely related viruses such as West Nile virus and dengue virus. Protein secondary structure mimetics are excellent candidates for inhibiting the protein-protein interactions and therefore serve as an attractive tool in drug development. We synthesi...

  14. Designer Drugs: A Synthetic Catastrophe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Fratantonio

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic stimulants can cause hallucinations, aggressive behaviors, death and are sometimes legal. These substances are sold as plant food and bath salts that are "Not for Human Consumption", therefore skirting the 1986 Federal Analogue Act and giving a false pretense of safety. Studies have proved that these substances are toxic, have a high abuse potential, and are becoming extremely prevalent in the United States. This creates a dilemma for law enforcement agents, hospitals, and substance use disorder treatment centers. Urine Drug Testing is utilized as a clinical diagnostic tool in substance use disorder treatment centers, and the furious pace at which new synthetic stimulants are introduced to the black market are making the detection via urine increasingly difficult. This article will discuss the prevalence, pharmacology and difficulty developing laboratory assays to detect synthetic stimulants.

  15. Efficacy of combined antiviral therapy with pegylated interferon α-2a and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C infection in intravenous drug users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ružić Maja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hepatitis C Virus infection represents not just a medical, but also a socio-economic problem. It is estimated that among 170 million infected, 60% belongs to the category of intravenous drug users (IDUs. Objective. The aim of this paper was to compare the response to the combined therapy of pegylated interferon alfa 2a and ribavirin, in the group of patients with HCV infection who were intravenous drug users (IDUs and in patients who were identified in the other way of transmission of HCV. Also to identify the influence of the therapy on diseases of addiction, during the course of HCV infection and on the effects of the combined therapy of pegylated interferon alfa 2a and ribavirin. Methods. We conducted a retrospective-prospective study, on 60 patients, treated with combined antiviral therapy-pegylated interferon alfa 2a and ribavirin. 30 patients were from the group of IDUs, and 30 patients from other epidemiological groups. Results. There were significant differences between the age of the patients (30.2±7.1 vs. 39.3±11.2 years; p=0.002, but no significant difference in the duration of the HCV infection between the two groups of patients (8.9±7.4 vs. 13.1±7.0 years; p>0.05. A large number of the patients in the group of IDUs had a problem with the abstinence of the drug abuse. In this group, there was the influence of alcohol (30% and other substances with potential hepatotoxicity: marihuana (23.3% and psycho-active drugs (73.6%. Staging of the liver fibrosis was not influenced by those two parameters and was similar in both groups (p>0.05. The genotype 3a was dominant in intravenous drug users (50.0% and genotype 1b in the control group of the patients (76.6%. In both groups, SVR was achieved at a higher percentage (86% vs. 70.00%; p>0.05, but among the intravenous drug users the relapses of HCV infection were at a lower percentage (3.3% vs. 20.0%; p=0.044. Side effects were noticed in solitary cases in both of the examined

  16. Evolution and intelligent design in drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothee eKern

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sophisticated protein kinase networks, empowering complexity in higher organisms, are also drivers of devastating diseases such as cancer. Accordingly, these enzymes have become major drug targets of the 21st century. However, the holy grail of designing specific kinase inhibitors aimed at specific cancers has not been found. Can new approaches in cancer drug design help win the battle with this multi-faced and quickly evolving enemy? In this perspective we discuss new strategies and ideas that were born out of a recent breakthrough in understanding the molecular basis underlying the clinical success of the cancer drug Gleevec. An old method, stopped-flow kinetics, combined with old enzymes, the ancestors dating back up to about billion years, provides an unexpected outlook for future intelligent design of drugs.

  17. Antiviral targets of human noroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Bv Venkataram; Shanker, Sreejesh; Muhaxhiri, Zana; Deng, Lisheng; Choi, Jae-Mun; Estes, Mary K; Song, Yongcheng; Palzkill, Timothy; Atmar, Robert L

    2016-06-01

    Human noroviruses are major causative agents of sporadic and epidemic gastroenteritis both in children and adults. Currently there are no licensed therapeutic intervention measures either in terms of vaccines or drugs available for these highly contagious human pathogens. Genetic and antigenic diversity of these viruses, rapid emergence of new strains, and their ability to infect a broad population by using polymorphic histo-blood group antigens for cell attachment, pose significant challenges for the development of effective antiviral agents. Despite these impediments, there is progress in the design and development of therapeutic agents. These include capsid-based candidate vaccines, and potential antivirals either in the form of glycomimetics or designer antibodies that block HBGA binding, as well as those that target essential non-structural proteins such as the viral protease and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. In addition to these classical approaches, recent studies suggest the possibility of interferons and targeting host cell factors as viable approaches to counter norovirus infection. This review provides a brief overview of this progress. PMID:27318434

  18. Targeted proteins for diabetes drug design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common metabolism disorder characterized by high glucose in the bloodstream, especially in the case of insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency. Nowadays, it is very common in middle-aged people and involves such dangerous symptoms as increasing risk of stroke, obesity and heart failure. In Vietnam, besides the common treatment of insulin injection, some herbal medication is used but no unified optimum remedy for the disease yet exists and there is no production of antidiabetic drugs in the domestic market yet. In the development of nanomedicine at the present time, drug design is considered as an innovative tool for researchers to study the mechanisms of diseases at the molecular level. The aim of this article is to review some common protein targets involved in type 2 diabetes, offering a new idea for designing new drug candidates to produce antidiabetic drugs against type 2 diabetes for Vietnamese people. (review)

  19. Bispidine-amino acid conjugates act as a novel scaffold for the design of antivirals that block Japanese encephalitis virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Haridas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV is a major cause of viral encephalitis in South and South-East Asia. Lack of antivirals and non-availability of affordable vaccines in these endemic areas are a major setback in combating JEV and other closely related viruses such as West Nile virus and dengue virus. Protein secondary structure mimetics are excellent candidates for inhibiting the protein-protein interactions and therefore serve as an attractive tool in drug development. We synthesized derivatives containing the backbone of naturally occurring lupin alkaloid, sparteine, which act as protein secondary structure mimetics and show that these compounds exhibit antiviral properties. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we have identified 3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane, commonly called bispidine, as a privileged scaffold to synthesize effective antiviral agents. We have synthesized derivatives of bispidine conjugated with amino acids and found that hydrophobic amino acid residues showed antiviral properties against JEV. We identified a tryptophan derivative, Bisp-W, which at 5 µM concentration inhibited JEV infection in neuroblastoma cells by more than 100-fold. Viral inhibition was at a stage post-entry and prior to viral protein translation possibly at viral RNA replication. We show that similar concentration of Bisp-W was capable of inhibiting viral infection of two other encephalitic viruses namely, West Nile virus and Chandipura virus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have demonstrated that the amino-acid conjugates of 3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane can serve as a molecular scaffold for development of potent antivirals against encephalitic viruses. Our findings will provide a novel platform to develop effective inhibitors of JEV and perhaps other RNA viruses causing encephalitis.

  20. Diversity of Pharmacological Properties in Chinese and European Medicinal Plants: Cytotoxicity, Antiviral and Antitrypanosomal Screening of 82 Herbal Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Efferth

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In an extensive screening, the antiviral, antitrypanosomal and anticancer properties of extracts from 82 plants used in traditional Chinese medicine and European phytomedicine were determined. Several promising plants that were highly effective against hepatitis B virus (HBV, bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV—a flavivirus used here as a surrogate in vitro model of hepatitis C virus, trypanosomes (Trypanosoma brucei brucei and several cancer cell lines were identified. Six aqueous extracts from Celosia cristata, Ophioglossum vulgatum, Houttuynia cordata, Selaginella tamariscina, Alpinia galanga and Alpinia oxyphylla showed significant antiviral effects against BVDV without toxic effects on host embryonic bovine trachea (EBTr cells, while Evodia lepta, Hedyotis diffusa and Glycyrrhiza spp. demonstrated promising activities against the HBV without toxic effects on host human hepatoblastoma cells transfected with HBV-DNA (HepG2 2.2.15 cells. Seven organic extracts from Alpinia oxyphylla, Coptis chinensis, Kadsura longipedunculata, Arctium lappa, Panax ginseng, Panax notoginseng and Saposhnikovia divaricata inhibited T. b. brucei. Moreover, among fifteen water extracts that combined high antiproliferative activity (IC50 0.5–20 µg/mL and low acute in vitro toxicity (0–10% reduction in cell viability at IC50, Coptis chinensis presented the best beneficial characteristics. In conclusion, traditional herbal medicine from Europe and China still has a potential for new therapeutic targets and therapeutic applications.

  1. Defining Patient Centric Pharmaceutical Drug Product Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemann, Sven; Ternik, Robert L; Onder, Graziano; Khan, Mansoor A; van Riet-Nales, Diana A

    2016-09-01

    The term "patient centered," "patient centric," or "patient centricity" is increasingly used in the scientific literature in a wide variety of contexts. Generally, patient centric medicines are recognized as an essential contributor to healthy aging and the overall patient's quality of life and life expectancy. Besides the selection of the appropriate type of drug substance and strength for a particular indication in a particular patient, due attention must be paid that the pharmaceutical drug product design is also adequately addressing the particular patient's needs, i.e., assuring adequate patient adherence and the anticipate drug safety and effectiveness. Relevant pharmaceutical design aspects may e.g., involve the selection of the route of administration, the tablet size and shape, the ease of opening the package, the ability to read the user instruction, or the ability to follow the recommended (in-use) storage conditions. Currently, a harmonized definition on patient centric drug development/design has not yet been established. To stimulate scientific research and discussions and the consistent interpretation of test results, it is essential that such a definition is established. We have developed a first draft definition through various rounds of discussions within an interdisciplinary AAPS focus group of experts. This publication summarizes the outcomes and is intended to stimulate further discussions with all stakeholders towards a common definition of patient centric pharmaceutical drug product design that is useable across all disciplines involved. PMID:27317470

  2. Design, Characterization, and Optimization of Controlled Drug Delivery System Containing Antibiotic Drug/s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Apurv; Dodiya, Hitesh; Shelate, Pragna; Shastri, Divyesh; Dave, Divyang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was design, characterization, and optimization of controlled drug delivery system containing antibiotic drug/s. Osmotic drug delivery system was chosen as controlled drug delivery system. The porous osmotic pump tablets were designed using Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken factorial design to find out the best formulation. For screening of three categories of polymers, six independent variables were chosen for Plackett-Burman design. Osmotic agent sodium chloride and microcrystalline cellulose, pore forming agent sodium lauryl sulphate and sucrose, and coating agent ethyl cellulose and cellulose acetate were chosen as independent variables. Optimization of osmotic tablets was done by Box-Behnken design by selecting three independent variables. Osmotic agent sodium chloride, pore forming agent sodium lauryl sulphate, and coating agent cellulose acetate were chosen as independent variables. The result of Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken design and ANOVA studies revealed that osmotic agent and pore former had significant effect on the drug release up to 12 hr. The observed independent variables were found to be very close to predicted values of most satisfactory formulation which demonstrates the feasibility of the optimization procedure in successful development of porous osmotic pump tablets containing antibiotic drug/s by using sodium chloride, sodium lauryl sulphate, and cellulose acetate as key excipients. PMID:27610247

  3. Rational design of highly potent HIV-1 fusion inhibitory proteins: Implication for developing antiviral therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recombinant protein containing one heptad-repeat 1 (HR1) segment and one HR2 segment of the HIV-1 gp41 (HR1-HR2) has been shown to fold into thermally stable six-helix bundle, representing the fusogenic core of gp41. In this study, we have used the fusogenic core as a scaffold to design HIV-1 fusion inhibitory proteins by linking another HR1 to the C terminus of HR1-HR2 (HR121) or additional HR2 to the N terminus of HR1-HR2 (HR212). Both recombinant proteins could be abundantly and solubly expressed and easily purified, exhibiting high stability and potent inhibitory activity on HIV-1 fusion with IC50 values of 16.2 ± 2.8 and 2.8 ± 0.63 nM, respectively. These suggest that these rationally designed proteins can be further developed as novel anti-HIV-1 therapeutics

  4. The design and synthesis of novel N-heterocyclic compounds, and their evaluation of anti-cancer and anti-viral activity

    OpenAIRE

    More, Vijaykumar

    2014-01-01

    2010 - 2011 The thesis entitled “The design and synthesis of novel N-heterocyclic compounds, and their evaluation of anti-cancer and anti-viral activity" is divided into three chapters. The title of the thesis clearly reflects the importance of nitrogen heterocycles compounds: in fact they are extremely pivotal structural motifs responsible for eliciting various biological activities in natural products and synthetic medicines. This has attracted the medicinal chemists towards the synth...

  5. A Quantitative Measurement of Antiviral Activity of Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Drugs against Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: Dose-Response Curve Slope Strongly Influences Class-Specific Inhibitory Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Kai; Zink, M. Christine; Clements, Janice E; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in macaques is so far the best animal model for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) studies, but suppressing viral replication in infected animals remains challenging. Using a novel single-round infectivity assay, we quantitated the antiviral activities of antiretroviral drugs against SIV. Our results emphasize the importance of the dose-response curve slope in determining the inhibitory potential of antiretroviral drugs and provide useful...

  6. Viability of a Drug-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease Variant: Structural Insights for Better Antiviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Prabu-Jeyabalan, Moses; Ellen A. Nalivaika; King, Nancy M.; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2003-01-01

    Under the selective pressure of protease inhibitor therapy, patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) often develop drug-resistant HIV strains. One of the first drug-resistant mutations to arise in the protease, particularly in patients receiving indinavir or ritonavir treatment, is V82A, which compromises the binding of these and other inhibitors but allows the virus to remain viable. To probe this drug resistance, we solved the crystal structures of three natural substrates ...

  7. Towards antivirals against chikungunya virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelnabi, Rana; Neyts, Johan; Delang, Leen

    2015-09-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has re-emerged in recent decades, causing major outbreaks of chikungunya fever in many parts of Africa and Asia, and since the end of 2013 also in Central and South America. Infections are usually associated with a low mortality rate, but can proceed into a painful chronic stage, during which patients may suffer from polyarthralgia and joint stiffness for weeks and even several years. There are no vaccines or antiviral drugs available for the prevention or treatment of CHIKV infections. Current therapy therefore consists solely of the administration of analgesics, antipyretics and anti-inflammatory agents to relieve symptoms. We here review molecules that have been reported to inhibit CHIKV replication, either as direct-acting antivirals, host-targeting drugs or those that act via a yet unknown mechanism. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on "Chikungunya discovers the New World." PMID:26119058

  8. Counting on natural products for drug design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Tiago; Reker, Daniel; Schneider, Petra; Schneider, Gisbert

    2016-06-01

    Natural products and their molecular frameworks have a long tradition as valuable starting points for medicinal chemistry and drug discovery. Recently, there has been a revitalization of interest in the inclusion of these chemotypes in compound collections for screening and achieving selective target modulation. Here we discuss natural-product-inspired drug discovery with a focus on recent advances in the design of synthetically tractable small molecules that mimic nature's chemistry. We highlight the potential of innovative computational tools in processing structurally complex natural products to predict their macromolecular targets and attempt to forecast the role that natural-product-derived fragments and fragment-like natural products will play in next-generation drug discovery.

  9. Development of robust in vitro RNA-dependent RNA polymerase assay as a possible platform for antiviral drug testing against dengue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amraiz, Deeba; Zaidi, Najam-Us-Sahar Sadaf; Fatima, Munazza

    2016-10-01

    NS5 is the largest and most conserved protein among the four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes. It has been the target of interest for antiviral drug development due to its major role in replication. NS5 consists of two domains, the N-terminal methyltransferase domain and C-terminal catalytic RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain. It is an unstable protein and is prone to inactivation upon prolonged incubation at room temperature, thus affecting the inhibitor screening assays. In the current study, we expressed and purified DENV RdRp alone in Esherichia coli (E. coli) cells. The N-terminally His-tagged construct of DENV RdRp was transformed into E. coli expression strain BL-21 (DE3) pLysS cells. Protein expression was induced with isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) at a final concentration of 0.4mM. The induced cultures were then grown for 20h at 18°C and cells were harvested by centrifugation at 6000xg for 15min at 4°C. The recombinant protein was purified using HisTrap affinity column (Ni-NTA) and then the sample was subjected to size exclusion chromatography, which successfully removed the degradation product obtained during the previous purification step. The in vitro polymerase activity of RdRp was successfully demonstrated using homopolymeric polycytidylic acid (poly(rC)) RNA template. This study describes the high level production of enzymatically active DENV RdRp protein which can be used to develop assays for testing large number of compounds in a high-throughput manner. RdRp has the de novo initiation activity and the in vitro polymerase assays for the protein provide a platform for highly robust and efficient antiviral compound screening systems. PMID:27542741

  10. Use of antiviral drugs to reduce household transmission of pandemic (H1N1) 2009, United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pebody, Richard G; Harris, Ross; Kafatos, George; Chamberland, Mary; Campbell, Colin; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan S; McLean, Estelle; Andrews, Nick; White, Peter J; Wynne-Evans, Edward; Green, Jon; Ellis, Joanna; Wreghitt, Tim; Bracebridge, Sam; Ihekweazu, Chikwe; Oliver, Isabel; Smith, Gillian; Hawkins, Colin; Salmon, Roland; Smyth, Bryan; McMenamin, Jim; Zambon, Maria; Phin, Nick; Watson, John M

    2011-06-01

    The United Kingdom implemented a containment strategy for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 through administering antiviral agents (AVs) to patients and their close contacts. This observational household cohort study describes the effect of AVs on household transmission. We followed 285 confirmed primary cases in 259 households with 761 contacts. At 2 weeks, the confirmed secondary attack rate (SAR) was 8.1% (62/761) and significantly higher in persons 50 years of age (18.9% vs. 1.2%, p<0.001). Early (<48 hours) treatment of primary case-patients reduced SAR (4.5% vs. 10.6%, p = 0.003). The SAR in child contacts was 33.3% (10/30) when the primary contact was a woman and 2.9% (1/34) when the primary contact was a man (p = 0.010). Of 53 confirmed secondary case-patients, 45 had not received AV prophylaxis. The effectiveness of AV prophylaxis in preventing infection was 92%. PMID:21749759

  11. Accessible haptic technology for drug design applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonta, Nicola; Grimstead, Ian J; Avis, Nick J; Brancale, Andrea

    2009-02-01

    Structure-based drug design is a creative process that displays several features that make it closer to human reasoning than to machine automation. However, very often the user intervention is limited to the preparation of the input and analysis of the output of a computer simulation. In some cases, allowing human intervention directly in the process could improve the quality of the results by applying the researcher intuition directly into the simulation. Haptic technology has been previously explored as a useful method to interact with a chemical system. However, the need of expensive hardware and the lack of accessible software have limited the use of this technology to date. Here we are reporting the implementation of a haptic-based molecular mechanics environment aimed for interactive drug design and ligand optimization, using an easily accessible software/hardware combination. PMID:19048316

  12. Using mutagenesis to explore conserved residues in the RNA-binding groove of influenza A virus nucleoprotein for antiviral drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Lin; Hung, Hui-Chen; Lo, Shou-Chen; Chiang, Ching-Hui; Chen, I-Jung; Hsu, John T-A; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoprotein (NP) is the most abundant type of RNA-binding viral protein in influenza A virus-infected cells and is necessary for viral RNA transcription and replication. Recent studies demonstrated that influenza NP is a valid target for antiviral drug development. The surface of the groove, covered with numerous conserved residues between the head and body domains of influenza A NP, plays a crucial role in RNA binding. To explore the mechanism by which NP binds RNA, we performed a series of site-directed mutagenesis in the RNA-binding groove, followed by surface plasmon resonance (SPR), to characterize the interactions between RNA and NP. Furthermore, a role of Y148 in NP stability and NP-RNA binding was evaluated. The aromatic residue of Y148 was found to stack with a nucleotide base. By interrupting the stacking interaction between Y148 and an RNA base, we identified an influenza virus NP inhibitor, (E, E)-1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl) -1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione; this inhibitor reduced the NP's RNA-binding affinity and hindered viral replication. Our findings will be useful for the development of new drugs that disrupt the interaction between RNA and viral NP in the influenza virus. PMID:26916998

  13. Pharmacokinetics and antiviral activity of PHX1766, a novel HCV protease inhibitor, using an accelerated Phase I study design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.M. Hotho (Daphne); J. Bruijne (Joep); N. O'Farrell; T. Boyea (Teresa); J. Li (Jianke); M. Bracken (Michele); X. Li (Xin); D. Campbell (David); H.-P. Guler (Hans-Peter); C.J. Weegink (Christine); J. Schinkel (Janke); R. Molenkamp (Richard); J. Van De Wetering De Rooij (Jeroen); A.A. Vliet (Andre); H.L.A. Janssen (Harry); R.J. de Knegt (Robert); H.W. Reesink (Henk)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: PHX1766 is a novel HCV NS3/4 protease inhibitor with robust potency and high selectivity in replicon studies (50% maximal effective concentration 8 nM). Two clinical trials investigated the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and antiviral activity of PHX1766 in healthy vo

  14. Evaluation of Antiviral Compounds Against Avian Influenza

    OpenAIRE

    Call, Evan W.

    1991-01-01

    Tests in vitro for antiviral activity against avian influenza viruses, A/Turkey/Sanpete/85 (H6N8) and A/Turkey/Sanpete/86 (H10N9), isolated in Sanpete County, Utah, utilized known antiviral agents, amantadine•HCl (adamantanamine hydrochloride) and ribavirin (1-β-D ribofuranosyl-1,2,4-triazole-3-carboxamide). The testing involved evaluation of seven drug concentrations. Maximum tolerated dose, minimum inhibitory concentration and therapeutic indexes were determined for each drug used. Both dru...

  15. TARGETING OF ANTIVIRAL DRUGS TO LYMPHOCYTES-T4 - ANTI-HIV ACTIVITY OF NEOGLYCOPROTEIN AZTMP CONJUGATES INVITRO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOLEMA, G; JANSEN, RW; PAUWELS, R; DECLERCQ, E; MEIJER, DKF

    1990-01-01

    The delivery of the anti-HIV agent 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT), in its 5'-monophosphate form, (in)to human T-lymphocyte MT-4 cells in vitro through covalent coupling to neoglycoproteins was investigated. In vivo application of this drug targeting concept may lead to increased efficacy and/or di

  16. Determination of Appropriate Dosing of Influenza Drugs in Pediatric Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Acosta, EP; Kimberlin, DW

    2010-01-01

    Dose-finding studies of influenza antiviral drugs are challenging because it is difficult to enroll subjects in pediatric interventional studies and also because of the lack of concentration (or toxicity)–response relationships, the short duration of antiviral therapy, and the continually developing metabolic profiles of infants and young children. The evaluation of influenza antiviral agents in premature infants adds even more complexity. Recent advances in exposure-targeted study designs an...

  17. Potent Antiviral HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor GRL-02031 Adapts to the Structures of Drug Resistant Mutants with Its P1;#8242;-Pyrrolidinone Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yu-Chung E.; Yu, XiaXia; Zhang, Ying; Tie, Yunfeng; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Yashchuk, Sofiya; Ghosh, Arun K.; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T. (GSU); (Purdue); (GSI); (CDC)

    2012-11-14

    GRL-02031 (1) is an HIV-1 protease (PR) inhibitor containing a novel P1' (R)-aminomethyl-2-pyrrolidinone group. Crystal structures at resolutions of 1.25-1.55 {angstrom} were analyzed for complexes of 1 with the PR containing major drug resistant mutations, PR{sub I47V}, PR{sub L76V}, PR{sub V82A}, and PR{sub N88D}. Mutations of I47V and V82A alter residues in the inhibitor-binding site, while L76V and N88D are distal mutations having no direct contact with the inhibitor. Substitution of a smaller amino acid in PR{sub I47V} and PR{sub L76V} and the altered charge of PR{sub N88D} are associated with significant local structural changes compared to the wild-type PR{sub WT}, while substitution of alanine in PR{sub V82A} increases the size of the S1' subsite. The P1' pyrrolidinone group of 1 accommodates to these local changes by assuming two different conformations. Overall, the conformation and interactions of 1 with PR mutants resemble those of PR{sub WT} with similar inhibition constants in good agreement with the antiviral potency on multidrug resistant HIV-1.

  18. Evaluation of the role of the antioxidant silymarin in modulating the in vivo genotoxicity of the antiviral drug ribavirin in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noshy, Magda M; Hussien, Nahed A; El-Ghor, Akmal A

    2013-04-15

    Ribavirin (1-β-d-ribofuranosyl-1,2,4-triazole-3-carboxamide) is a widely used broad-spectrum antiviral drug. Recently, several reports revealed genotoxic effects of ribavirin in vivo and in vitro, which were correlated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study aimed to evaluate the genotoxicity of ribavirin and to investigate the role of the natural antioxidant silymarin to modulate this genotoxicity. Male albino mice (age, 8-10 weeks) were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with ribavirin at three dose levels (20, 75 and 130 mg/kg bw) either in a single injection (acute treatment) or in multiple injections on five consecutive days (sub-acute treatment). Other comparable groups were treated with silymarin (70 mg/kg bw) 1h before the injection with ribavirin. Mice were sacrificed at different sampling times (24, 48 and 72 h) after the last ribavirin treatment. Micronucleus (MN) and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) assays were used to assess genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of ribavirin and to evaluate the protective effect of the pre-treatment with silymarin. Our results reveal genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of ribavirin in the MN assay. Pre-treatment with silymarin reduced the toxicity of ribavirin. In the SSCP assay, ribavirin treatment did not induce any mutations in the two selected sites in the D-loop of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). PMID:23402882

  19. Chiral analysis of anti-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome drug, 9-(R)-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl]adenine (tenofovir), and related antiviral acyclic nucleoside phosphonates by CE using beta-CD as chiral selector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šolínová, Veronika; Kašička, Václav; Sázelová, Petra; Holý, Antonín

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 12 (2009), s. 2245-2254. ISSN 0173-0835 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/06/1044; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/08/1428; GA AV ČR 1QS400550501; GA MŠk 1M0508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : antiviral drugs * capillary electrophoresis * enantioseparation Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.077, year: 2009

  20. Phytosterols and anabolic agents versus designer drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brabander, H.F. de [Ghent University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Research group of Veterinary Public Health and Zoonoses, Laboratory of Chemical Analysis, Salisburylaan 133, B-9820 Merelbeke (Belgium)]. E-mail: Hubert.DeBrabander@UGent.be; Verheyden, K. [Ghent University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Research group of Veterinary Public Health and Zoonoses, Laboratory of Chemical Analysis, Salisburylaan 133, B-9820 Merelbeke (Belgium); Mortier, V. [Ghent University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Research group of Veterinary Public Health and Zoonoses, Laboratory of Chemical Analysis, Salisburylaan 133, B-9820 Merelbeke (Belgium); Le Bizec, B. [LABERCA, Ecole Nationale Veterinaire de Nantes, BP 50707, F-44087 Nantes Cedex 03 (France); Verbeke, W. [Ghent University, Department of Agricultural Economics, Coupure links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Courtheyn, D. [Federal Feed and Food Laboratory, Braemkasteelstraat 59, B-9050 Ghentbruges (Belgium); Noppe, H. [Ghent University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Research group of Veterinary Public Health and Zoonoses, Laboratory of Chemical Analysis, Salisburylaan 133, B-9820 Merelbeke (Belgium)

    2007-03-14

    Cholesterol is a well-known component in fats of animal origin and it also is the precursor of natural hormones. Phytosterols appear in plants and only differ slightly in structure from cholesterol. An important difference however is the low absorption in the gut of phytosterols and their saturated derivatives, the phytostanols. As a result, there is time for all kind of reactions in faecal material inside and outside of the gut. Determination of the abuse of natural hormones may be based on gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS). Abuse of natural hormones changes the {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio of some metabolites during a relatively long time. The formation of (natural) hormones in the gut may interfere with this method. Designer drugs are mainly known from sports doping. In animal fattening, designer drugs may be used as well. Small changes in the structure of (natural) hormones may lead to a new group of substances asking for new strategies for their detection and the constatation of their abuse.

  1. Phytosterols and anabolic agents versus designer drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cholesterol is a well-known component in fats of animal origin and it also is the precursor of natural hormones. Phytosterols appear in plants and only differ slightly in structure from cholesterol. An important difference however is the low absorption in the gut of phytosterols and their saturated derivatives, the phytostanols. As a result, there is time for all kind of reactions in faecal material inside and outside of the gut. Determination of the abuse of natural hormones may be based on gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS). Abuse of natural hormones changes the 13C/12C ratio of some metabolites during a relatively long time. The formation of (natural) hormones in the gut may interfere with this method. Designer drugs are mainly known from sports doping. In animal fattening, designer drugs may be used as well. Small changes in the structure of (natural) hormones may lead to a new group of substances asking for new strategies for their detection and the constatation of their abuse

  2. Small molecules with antiviral activity against the Ebola virus

    OpenAIRE

    Nadia Litterman; Christopher Lipinski; Sean Ekins

    2015-01-01

    The recent outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa has highlighted the clear shortage of broad-spectrum antiviral drugs for emerging viruses. There are numerous FDA approved drugs and other small molecules described in the literature that could be further evaluated for their potential as antiviral compounds. These molecules are in addition to the few new antivirals that have been tested in Ebola patients but were not originally developed against the Ebola virus, and may play an important r...

  3. Conformational Analysis, Molecular Structure and Solid State Simulation of the Antiviral Drug Acyclovir (Zovirax) Using Density Functional Theory Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Ros, Margarita Clara; Palafox, Mauricio Alcolea

    2014-01-01

    The five tautomers of the drug acyclovir (ACV) were determined and optimised at the MP2 and B3LYP quantum chemical levels of theory. The stability of the tautomers was correlated with different parameters. On the most stable tautomer N1 was carried out a comprehensive conformational analysis, and the whole conformational parameters (R, β, Φ, φ1, φ2, φ3, φ4, φ5) were studied as well as the NBO Natural atomic charges. The calculations were carried out with full relaxation of all geometrical parameters. The search located at least 78 stable structures within 8.5 kcal/mol electronic energy range of the global minimum, and classified in two groups according to the positive or negative value of the torsional angle φ1. In the nitrogen atoms and in the O2' and O5' oxygen atoms of the most stable conformer appear a higher reactivity than in the natural nucleoside deoxyguanosine. The solid state was simulated through a dimer and tetramer forms and the structural parameters were compared with the X-ray crystal data available. Several general conclusions were emphasized. PMID:24915059

  4. Conformational Analysis, Molecular Structure and Solid State Simulation of the Antiviral Drug Acyclovir (Zovirax Using Density Functional Theory Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Clara Alvarez-Ros

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The five tautomers of the drug acyclovir (ACV were determined and optimised at the MP2 and B3LYP quantum chemical levels of theory. The stability of the tautomers was correlated with different parameters. On the most stable tautomer N1 was carried out a comprehensive conformational analysis, and the whole conformational parameters (R, β, Φ, φ1, φ2, φ3, φ4, φ5 were studied as well as the NBO Natural atomic charges. The calculations were carried out with full relaxation of all geometrical parameters. The search located at least 78 stable structures within 8.5 kcal/mol electronic energy range of the global minimum, and classified in two groups according to the positive or negative value of the torsional angle j1. In the nitrogen atoms and in the O2' and O5' oxygen atoms of the most stable conformer appear a higher reactivity than in the natural nucleoside deoxyguanosine. The solid state was simulated through a dimer and tetramer forms and the structural parameters were compared with the X-ray crystal data available. Several general conclusions were emphasized.

  5. Mathematical Modeling of Hepatitis C Prevalence Reduction with Antiviral Treatment Scale-Up in Persons Who Inject Drugs in Metropolitan Chicago.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desarae Echevarria

    Full Text Available New direct-acting antivirals (DAAs provide an opportunity to combat hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in persons who inject drugs (PWID. Here we use a mathematical model to predict the impact of a DAA-treatment scale-up on HCV prevalence among PWID and the estimated cost in metropolitan Chicago.To estimate the HCV antibody and HCV-RNA (chronic infection prevalence among the metropolitan Chicago PWID population, we used empirical data from three large epidemiological studies. Cost of DAAs is assumed $50,000 per person.Approximately 32,000 PWID reside in metropolitan Chicago with an estimated HCV-RNA prevalence of 47% or 15,040 cases. Approximately 22,000 PWID (69% of the total PWID population attend harm reduction (HR programs, such as syringe exchange programs, and have an estimated HCV-RNA prevalence of 30%. There are about 11,000 young PWID (<30 years old with an estimated HCV-RNA prevalence of 10% (PWID in these two subpopulations overlap. The model suggests that the following treatment scale-up is needed to reduce the baseline HCV-RNA prevalence by one-half over 10 years of treatment [cost per year, min-max in millions]: 35 per 1,000 [$50-$77] in the overall PWID population, 19 per 1,000 [$20-$26] for persons in HR programs, and 5 per 1,000 [$3-$4] for young PWID.Treatment scale-up could dramatically reduce the prevalence of chronic HCV infection among PWID in Chicago, who are the main reservoir for on-going HCV transmission. Focusing treatment on PWID attending HR programs and/or young PWID could have a significant impact on HCV prevalence in these subpopulations at an attainable cost.

  6. Antiviral activity of silymarin against chikungunya virus

    OpenAIRE

    Rafidah Lani; Pouya Hassandarvish; Chun Wei Chiam; Ehsan Moghaddam; Justin Jang Hann Chu; Kai Rausalu; Andres Merits; Stephen Higgs; Dana Vanlandingham; Sazaly Abu Bakar; Keivan Zandi

    2015-01-01

    The mosquito-borne chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes chikungunya fever, with clinical presentations such as severe back and small joint pain, and debilitating arthritis associated with crippling pains that persist for weeks and even years. Although there are several studies to evaluate the efficacy of drugs against CHIKV, the treatment for chikungunya fever is mainly symptom-based and no effective licensed vaccine or antiviral are available. Here, we investigated the antiviral activity of thre...

  7. 21 CFR 316.29 - Revocation of orphan-drug designation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Revocation of orphan-drug designation. 316.29... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ORPHAN DRUGS Designation of an Orphan Drug § 316.29 Revocation of orphan-drug designation. (a) FDA may revoke orphan-drug designation for any drug if the agency finds that: (1) The...

  8. HIV-1 NNRTIs: structural diversity, pharmacophore similarity, and implications for drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Peng; Chen, Xuwang; Li, Dongyue; Fang, Zengjun; De Clercq, Erik; Liu, Xinyong

    2013-06-01

    Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) nowadays represent very potent and most promising anti-AIDS agents that specifically target the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). However, the effectiveness of NNRTI drugs can be hampered by rapid emergence of drug-resistant viruses and severe side effects upon long-term use. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop novel, highly potent NNRTIs with broad spectrum antiviral activity and improved pharmacokinetic properties, and more efficient strategies that facilitate and shorten the drug discovery process would be extremely beneficial. Fortunately, the structural diversity of NNRTIs provided a wide space for novel lead discovery, and the pharmacophore similarity of NNRTIs gave valuable hints for lead discovery and optimization. More importantly, with the continued efforts in the development of computational tools and increased crystallographic information on RT/NNRTI complexes, structure-based approaches using a combination of traditional medicinal chemistry, structural biology, and computational chemistry are being used increasingly in the design of NNRTIs. First, this review covers two decades of research and development for various NNRTI families based on their chemical scaffolds, and then describes the structural similarity of NNRTIs. We have attempted to assemble a comprehensive overview of the general approaches in NNRTI lead discovery and optimization reported in the literature during the last decade. The successful applications of medicinal chemistry strategies, crystallography, and computational tools for designing novel NNRTIs are highlighted. Future directions for research are also outlined. PMID:21523792

  9. Molecular Rift: Virtual Reality for Drug Designers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrby, Magnus; Grebner, Christoph; Eriksson, Joakim; Boström, Jonas

    2015-11-23

    Recent advances in interaction design have created new ways to use computers. One example is the ability to create enhanced 3D environments that simulate physical presence in the real world--a virtual reality. This is relevant to drug discovery since molecular models are frequently used to obtain deeper understandings of, say, ligand-protein complexes. We have developed a tool (Molecular Rift), which creates a virtual reality environment steered with hand movements. Oculus Rift, a head-mounted display, is used to create the virtual settings. The program is controlled by gesture-recognition, using the gaming sensor MS Kinect v2, eliminating the need for standard input devices. The Open Babel toolkit was integrated to provide access to powerful cheminformatics functions. Molecular Rift was developed with a focus on usability, including iterative test-group evaluations. We conclude with reflections on virtual reality's future capabilities in chemistry and education. Molecular Rift is open source and can be downloaded from GitHub. PMID:26558887

  10. Bioinformatics in cancer therapy and drug design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the mechanisms of external signal transduction (ionizing radiation, toxicants, stress) to the target cell is the existence of membrane and intracellular proteins with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. No wonder that etiology of malignant growth links to abnormalities in signal transduction through tyrosine kinases. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinases play fundamental roles in development, proliferation and differentiation of tissues of epithelial, mesenchymal and neuronal origin. There are four types of EGFR: EGF receptor (ErbB1/HER1), ErbB2/Neu/HER2, ErbB3/HER3 and ErbB4/HER4. Abnormal expression of EGFR, appearance of receptor mutants with changed ability to protein-protein interactions or increased tyrosine kinase activity have been implicated in the malignancy of different types of human tumors. Bioinformatics is currently using in investigation on design and selection of drugs that can make alterations in structure or competitively bind with receptors and so display antagonistic characteristics. (authors)

  11. STABLE DRUG DESIGNING BY MINIMIZING DRUG PROTEIN INTERACTION ENERGY USING PSO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Ghosh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Each and every biological function in living organism happens as a result of protein-protein interactions. The diseases are no exception to this. Identifying one or more proteins for a particular disease and then designing a suitable chemical compound (known as drug to destroy these proteins has been an interesting topic of research in bio-informatics. In previous methods, drugs were designed using only seven chemical components and were represented as a fixedlength tree. But in reality, a drug contains many chemical groups collectively known as pharmacophore. Moreover, the chemical length of the drug cannot be determined before designing the drug.

  12. Nanogel Carrier Design for Targeted Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Eckmann, D.M.; Composto, R. J.; Tsourkas, A; Muzykantov, V. R.

    2014-01-01

    Polymer-based nanogel formulations offer features attractive for drug delivery, including ease of synthesis, controllable swelling and viscoelasticity as well as drug loading and release characteristics, passive and active targeting, and the ability to formulate nanogel carriers that can respond to biological stimuli. These unique features and low toxicity make the nanogels a favorable option for vascular drug targeting. In this review, we address key chemical and biological aspects of nanoge...

  13. Antiviral Strategies for Pandemic and Seasonal Influenza

    OpenAIRE

    Fang Fang; Maria Hedlund; Larson, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    While vaccines are the primary public health response to seasonal and pandemic flu, short of a universal vaccine there are inherent limitations to this approach. Antiviral drugs provide valuable alternative options for treatment and prophylaxis of influenza. Here, we will review drugs and drug candidates against influenza with an emphasis on the recent progress of a host-targeting entry-blocker drug candidate, DAS181, a sialidase fusion protein.

  14. Genetic Consequences of Antiviral Therapy on HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Arenas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of enzyme inhibitors have been developed in combating HIV-1, however the fast evolutionary rate of this virus commonly leads to the emergence of resistance mutations that finally allows the mutant virus to survive. This review explores the main genetic consequences of HIV-1 molecular evolution during antiviral therapies, including the viral genetic diversity and molecular adaptation. The role of recombination in the generation of drug resistance is also analyzed. Besides the investigation and discussion of published works, an evolutionary analysis of protease-coding genes collected from patients before and after treatment with different protease inhibitors was included to validate previous studies. Finally, the review discusses the importance of considering genetic consequences of antiviral therapies in models of HIV-1 evolution that could improve current genotypic resistance testing and treatments design.

  15. 21 CFR 316.28 - Publication of orphan-drug designations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Publication of orphan-drug designations. 316.28... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ORPHAN DRUGS Designation of an Orphan Drug § 316.28 Publication of orphan-drug designations. Each month FDA will update a publically available list of drugs designated as...

  16. 21 CFR 316.26 - Amendment to orphan-drug designation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amendment to orphan-drug designation. 316.26... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ORPHAN DRUGS Designation of an Orphan Drug § 316.26 Amendment to orphan-drug designation. (a) At any time prior to approval of a marketing application for a designated orphan drug,...

  17. 21 CFR 316.25 - Refusal to grant orphan-drug designation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Refusal to grant orphan-drug designation. 316.25... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ORPHAN DRUGS Designation of an Orphan Drug § 316.25 Refusal to grant orphan-drug designation. (a) FDA will refuse to grant a request for orphan-drug designation if any of...

  18. Design of Nanoparticle-Based Carriers for Targeted Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaojiao Yu; Ian Trase; Muqing Ren; Kayla Duval; Xing Guo; Zi Chen

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles have shown promise as both drug delivery vehicles and direct antitumor systems, but they must be properly designed in order to maximize efficacy. Computational modeling is often used both to design new nanoparticles and to better understand existing ones. Modeled processes include the release of drugs at the tumor site and the physical interaction between the nanoparticle and cancer cells. In this paper, we provide an overview of three different targeted drug delivery methods (p...

  19. Determining Mechanism of Action of Antivirals for Respiratory Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Irma; Dobrovolny, Hana

    2015-03-01

    Viral infections in the respiratory tract are common in humans and can cause serious illness and death. Drug treatment is the principal line of protection against many of these illnesses and many compounds are tested as antivirals. Often the efficacy of these antivirals are determined before a mechanism of action is understood. We use mathematical models to represent the evolution of these diseases and establish which experiments can help determine the mechanism of action of antivirals.

  20. Screening for Antiviral Activities of Isolated Compounds from Essential Oils

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Schnitzler; Jürgen Reichling; Akram Astani

    2011-01-01

    Essential oil of star anise as well as phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes, for example, trans-anethole, eugenol, β-eudesmol, farnesol, β-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene oxide, which are present in many essential oils, were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in vitro. Antiviral activity was analyzed by plaque reduction assays and mode of antiviral action was determined by addition of the drugs to uninfected cells, to the virus prior to infectio...

  1. Meeting report: 26th International Conference on Antiviral Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vere Hodge, R Anthony

    2013-10-01

    The 26th International Conference on Antiviral Research (ICAR) was held in San Francisco, California from May 11 to 15, 2013. This article summarizes the principal invited lectures at the meeting. The opening symposium on the legacy of the late Antonín Holý included presentations on his pioneering work with nucleotide analogs, which led to the development of several antiviral drugs including tenofovir. This drug has transformed the treatment of HIV infection and has recently become the first-line therapy for chronic hepatitis B. The Gertrude Elion Award lecturer described the anti-HIV activities of the CCR5 inhibitor cenicriviroc and the reverse transcriptase inhibitor festinavir®, and also reviewed the evaluation of biodegradable nanoparticles with adjuvant activity. The William Prusoff Award winner reported on the creation of NAOMI, a computer model with 21 enzymes to predict the activity of nucleoside analogs against hepatitis C virus (HCV). Other invited lecturers discussed the development of countermeasures against severe dengue and the potential of RNA virus capping and repair enzymes as drug targets. Topics in the clinical symposium included the current status of the anti-HCV compounds sovaprevir, ACH-3102, miravirsen and ALS-2200; the evaluation of single-tablet regimens for HIV infection; and the investigation of cytomegalovirus resistance to CMX001. Two chemistry minisymposia examined strategies and tactics in drug design and the use of in drug discovery. PMID:23973733

  2. Multiscale Modeling in the Clinic: Drug Design and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Colleen E; An, Gary; Cannon, William R; Liu, Yaling; May, Elebeoba E; Ortoleva, Peter; Popel, Aleksander S; Sluka, James P; Su, Jing; Vicini, Paolo; Zhou, Xiaobo; Eckmann, David M

    2016-09-01

    A wide range of length and time scales are relevant to pharmacology, especially in drug development, drug design and drug delivery. Therefore, multiscale computational modeling and simulation methods and paradigms that advance the linkage of phenomena occurring at these multiple scales have become increasingly important. Multiscale approaches present in silico opportunities to advance laboratory research to bedside clinical applications in pharmaceuticals research. This is achievable through the capability of modeling to reveal phenomena occurring across multiple spatial and temporal scales, which are not otherwise readily accessible to experimentation. The resultant models, when validated, are capable of making testable predictions to guide drug design and delivery. In this review we describe the goals, methods, and opportunities of multiscale modeling in drug design and development. We demonstrate the impact of multiple scales of modeling in this field. We indicate the common mathematical and computational techniques employed for multiscale modeling approaches used in pharmacometric and systems pharmacology models in drug development and present several examples illustrating the current state-of-the-art models for (1) excitable systems and applications in cardiac disease; (2) stem cell driven complex biosystems; (3) nanoparticle delivery, with applications to angiogenesis and cancer therapy; (4) host-pathogen interactions and their use in metabolic disorders, inflammation and sepsis; and (5) computer-aided design of nanomedical systems. We conclude with a focus on barriers to successful clinical translation of drug development, drug design and drug delivery multiscale models. PMID:26885640

  3. Anti-malarial Drug Design by Targeting Apicoplasts: New Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinaba Mukherjee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Malaria has been a major global health problem in recent times with increasing mortality. Current treatment methods include parasiticidal drugs and vaccinations. However, resistance among malarial parasites to the existing drugs has emerged as a significant area of concern in anti-malarial drug design. Researchers are now desperately looking for new targets to develop anti-malarials drug which is more target specific. Malarial parasites harbor a plastid-like organelle known as the ‘apicoplast’, which is thought to provide an exciting new outlook for the development of drugs to be used against the parasite. This review elaborates on the current state of development of novel compounds targeted againstemerging malaria parasites. Methods: The apicoplast, originates by an endosymbiotic process, contains a range of metabolic pathways and housekeeping processes that differ from the host body and thereby presents ideal strategies for anti-malarial drug therapy. Drugs are designed by targeting the unique mechanism of the apicoplasts genetic machinery. Several anabolic and catabolic processes, like fatty acid, isopenetyl diphosphate and heme synthess in this organelle, have also been targeted by drugs. Results: Apicoplasts offer exciting opportunities for the development of malarial treatment specific drugs have been found to act by disrupting this organelle’s function, which wouldimpede the survival of the parasite. Conclusion: Recent advanced drugs, their modes of action, and their advantages in the treatment of malaria by using apicoplasts as a target are discussed in this review which thought to be very useful in desigining anti-malarial drugs. Targetting the genetic machinery of apicoplast shows a great advantange regarding anti-malarial drug design. Critical knowledge of these new drugs would give a healthier understanding for deciphering the mechanism of action of anti-malarial drugs when targeting apicoplasts to overcome drug

  4. The Antiviral Activity of Approved and Novel Drugs against HIV-1 Mutations Evaluated under the Consideration of Dose-Response Curve Slope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Chang

    Full Text Available This study was designed to identify common HIV-1 mutation complexes affecting the slope of inhibition curve, and to propose a new parameter incorporating both the IC50 and the slope to evaluate phenotypic resistance.Utilizing site-directed mutagenesis, we constructed 22 HIV-1 common mutation complexes. IC50 and slope of 10 representative approved drugs and a novel agent against these mutations were measured to determine the resistance phenotypes. The values of new parameter incorporating both the IC50 and the slope of the inhibition curve were calculated, and the correlations between parameters were assessed.Depending on the class of drug, there were intrinsic differences in how the resistance mutations affected the drug parameters. All of the mutations resulted in large increases in the IC50s of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. The effects of the mutations on the slope were the most apparent when examining their effects on the inhibition of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors. For example, some mutations, such as V82A, had no effect on IC50, but reduced the slope. We proposed a new concept, termed IIPatoxic, on the basis of IC50, slope and the maximum limiting concentrations of the drug. The IIPatoxic values of 10 approved drugs and 1 novel agent were calculated, and were closely related to the IIPmax values (r > 0.95, p < 0.001.This study confirms that resistance mutations cannot be accurately assessed by IC50 alone, because it tends to underestimate the degree of resistance. The slope parameter is of very importance in the measurement of drug resistance and the effect can be applied to more complex patterns of resistance. This is the most apparent when testing the effects of the mutations on protease inhibitors activity. We also propose a new index, IIPatoxic, which incorporates both the IC50 and the slope. This new index could complement current IIP indices, thereby enabling predict the

  5. In Vitro Antiviral Activity of Favipiravir (T-705) against Drug-Resistant Influenza and 2009 A(H1N1) Viruses▿

    OpenAIRE

    Sleeman, Katrina; Mishin, Vasiliy P.; Deyde, Varough M.; Furuta, Yousuke; Klimov, Alexander I; Larisa V Gubareva

    2010-01-01

    Favipiravir (T-705) has previously been shown to have a potent antiviral effect against influenza virus and some other RNA viruses in both cell culture and in animal models. Currently, favipiravir is undergoing clinical evaluation for the treatment of influenza A and B virus infections. In this study, favipiravir was evaluated in vitro for its ability to inhibit the replication of a representative panel of seasonal influenza viruses, the 2009 A(H1N1) strains, and animal viruses with pandemic ...

  6. Antiviral activity of silymarin against chikungunya virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lani, Rafidah; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Chiam, Chun Wei; Moghaddam, Ehsan; Chu, Justin Jang Hann; Rausalu, Kai; Merits, Andres; Higgs, Stephen; Vanlandingham, Dana; Abu Bakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-01-01

    The mosquito-borne chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes chikungunya fever, with clinical presentations such as severe back and small joint pain, and debilitating arthritis associated with crippling pains that persist for weeks and even years. Although there are several studies to evaluate the efficacy of drugs against CHIKV, the treatment for chikungunya fever is mainly symptom-based and no effective licensed vaccine or antiviral are available. Here, we investigated the antiviral activity of three types of flavonoids against CHIKV in vitro replication. Three compounds: silymarin, quercetin and kaempferol were evaluated for their in vitro antiviral activities against CHIKV using a CHIKV replicon cell line and clinical isolate of CHIKV of Central/East African genotype. A cytopathic effect inhibition assay was used to determine their activities on CHIKV viral replication and quantitative reverse transcription PCR was used to calculate virus yield. Antiviral activity of effective compound was further investigated by evaluation of CHIKV protein expression using western blotting for CHIKV nsP1, nsP3, and E2E1 proteins. Briefly, silymarin exhibited significant antiviral activity against CHIKV, reducing both CHIKV replication efficiency and down-regulating production of viral proteins involved in replication. This study may have important consequence for broaden the chance of getting the effective antiviral for CHIKV infection. PMID:26078201

  7. DESIGN OF GASTRO RETENTIVE DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM OF DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE

    OpenAIRE

    L. K. Omray

    2014-01-01

    Gastro retentive drug delivery system of diltiazem hydrochloride was designed and evaluated for its effectiveness for the management of mild to moderate hypertension. Gastro retentive drug delivery system were prepared using polyvinyl alcohol and sodium carboxy methyl cellulose as the polymers and sodium bicarbonate as a gas generating agent for the reduction of floating lag time. Gastro retentive drug delivery system tablets were prepared by wet granulation method by compression in tablet co...

  8. Antiviral therapy of decompensated hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Guang-cheng; YU Tao; HUANG Kai-hong; CHEN Qi-kui

    2012-01-01

    Objective To review the development,mechanism,necessity and limitation of antiviral therapy in decompensated hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis.Data sources Most information was pulled from a literature search (Pubmed 2000 to 2011) using the keywords of antiviral and decompensated hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis.Relevant book chapters were also reviewed.Study selection Well-controlled,prospective landmark studies and review articles on antiviral therapy in decompesated hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis were selected.Results Specific antiviral agents not only control viral replication,which permits liver transplantation,but also improve liver function so significantly that patients could be removed from the transplant waiting list.However,the emergence of drug-resistant mutants can result in treatment failure.Combination therapy is a save-strategy in drug-resistant.Conclusions Although the treatment of end-stage liver disease is still a challenge worldwide,antiviral therapy has altered the natural history of hepatitis B patients with decompensated cirrhosis.The approval of the new generation of antivirals is opening new perspectives for finding the optimal antiviral treatment for patients with decompensated cirrhosis and preventing antiviral resistance.A combination of antivirals may be one of the future strategies for fulfilling these goals.

  9. Design and synthesis of HIV-1 protease inhibitors for a long-acting injectable drug application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesteleyn, Bart; Amssoms, Katie; Schepens, Wim; Hache, Geerwin; Verschueren, Wim; Van De Vreken, Wim; Rombauts, Klara; Meurs, Greet; Sterkens, Patrick; Stoops, Bart; Baert, Lieven; Austin, Nigel; Wegner, Jörg; Masungi, Chantal; Dierynck, Inge; Lundgren, Stina; Jönsson, Daniel; Parkes, Kevin; Kalayanov, Genadiy; Wallberg, Hans; Rosenquist, Asa; Samuelsson, Bertil; Van Emelen, Kristof; Thuring, Jan Willem

    2013-01-01

    The design and synthesis of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) (1-22), which display high potency against HIV-1 wild-type and multi-PI-resistant HIV-mutant clinical isolates, is described. Lead optimization was initiated from compound 1, a Phe-Phe hydroxyethylene peptidomimetic PI, and was directed towards the discovery of new PIs suitable for a long-acting (LA) injectable drug application. Introducing a heterocyclic 6-methoxy-3-pyridinyl or a 6-(dimethylamino)-3-pyridinyl moiety (R(3)) at the para-position of the P1' benzyl fragment generated compounds with antiviral potency in the low single digit nanomolar range. Halogenation or alkylation of the metabolic hot spots on the various aromatic rings resulted in PIs with high stability against degradation in human liver microsomes and low plasma clearance in rats. Replacing the chromanolamine moiety (R(1)) in the P2 protease binding site by a cyclopentanolamine or a cyclohexanolamine derivative provided a series of high clearance PIs (16-22) with EC(50)s on wild-type HIV-1 in the range of 0.8-1.8 nM. PIs 18 and 22, formulated as nanosuspensions, showed gradual but sustained and complete release from the injection site over two months in rats, and were therefore identified as interesting candidates for a LA injectable drug application for treating HIV/AIDS. PMID:23177258

  10. PARP1 Inhibitors: antitumor drug design

    OpenAIRE

    MALYUCHENKO N.V.; Kotova, E. Yu.; Kulaeva, O. I.; Kirpichnikov, M P; STUDITSKIY V.M.

    2015-01-01

    The poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) enzyme is one of the promising molecular targets for the discovery of antitumor drugs. PARP1 is a common nuclear protein (1–2 million molecules per cell) serving as a “sensor” for DNA strand breaks. Increased PARP1 expression is sometimes observed in melanomas, breast cancer, lung cancer, and other neoplastic diseases. The PARP1 expression level is a prognostic indicator and is associated with a poor survival prognosis. There is evidence that high PA...

  11. PARP1 INHIBITORS: ANTITUMOR DRUG DESIGN

    OpenAIRE

    MALYUCHENKO N.V.; KOTOVA E. YU.; Kulaeva, O. I.; Kirpichnikov, M P; STUDITSKIY V.M.

    2015-01-01

    The poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) enzyme is one of the promising molecular targets for the discovery of antitumor drugs. PARP1 is a common nuclear protein (1-2 million molecules per cell) serving as a “sensor” for DNA strand breaks. Increased PARP1 expression is sometimes observed in melanomas, breast cancer, lung cancer, and other neoplastic diseases. The PARP1 expression level is a prognostic indicator and is associated with a poor survival prognosis. There is evidence that high PA...

  12. Design and Optimization of Floating Drug Delivery System of Acyclovir

    OpenAIRE

    Kharia A; Hiremath S; Singhai A; Omray L; Jain S

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was to design and optimize floating drug delivery systems of acyclovir using psyllium husk and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose K4M as the polymers and sodium bicarbonate as a gas generating agent. The tablets were prepared by wet granulation method. A 32 full factorial design was used for optimization of drug release profile. The amount of psyllium husk (X1) and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose K4M (X2) were selected as independent variables. The times required for 50...

  13. Quantitative Analysis of a Parasitic Antiviral Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hwijin; Yin, John

    2004-01-01

    We extended a computer simulation of viral intracellular growth to study a parasitic antiviral strategy that diverts the viral replicase toward parasite growth. This strategy inhibited virus growth over a wide range of conditions, while minimizing host cell perturbations. Such parasitic strategies may inhibit the development of drug-resistant virus strains.

  14. Antiviral activity of luteolin against Japanese encephalitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenchun; Qian, Suhong; Qian, Ping; Li, Xiangmin

    2016-07-15

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a member of family Flaviviridae, is a neurotropic flavivirus that causes Japanese encephalitis (JE). JEV is one of the most important causative agents of viral encephalitis in humans, and this disease leads to high fatality rates. Although effective vaccines are available, no effective antiviral therapy for JE has been developed. Hence, identifying effective antiviral agents against JEV infection is important. In this study, we found that luteolin was an antiviral bioflavonoid with potent antiviral activity against JEV replication in A549 cells with IC50=4.56μg/mL. Luteolin also showed extracellular virucidal activity on JEV. With a time-of-drug addition assay revealing that JEV replication was inhibited by luteolin after the entry stage. Overall, our results suggested that luteolin can be used to develop an antiviral drug against JEV. PMID:27126774

  15. Design and optimization of floating drug delivery system of acyclovir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharia A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present work was to design and optimize floating drug delivery systems of acyclovir using psyllium husk and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose K4M as the polymers and sodium bicarbonate as a gas generating agent. The tablets were prepared by wet granulation method. A 32 full factorial design was used for optimization of drug release profile. The amount of psyllium husk (X1 and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose K4M (X2 were selected as independent variables. The times required for 50% (t 50% and 70% (t 70% drug dissolution were selected as dependent variables. All the designed nine batches of formulations were evaluated for hardness, friability, weight variation, drug content uniformity, swelling index, in vitro buoyancy, and in vitro drug release profile. All formulations had floating lag time below 3 min and constantly floated on dissolution medium for more than 24 h. Validity of the developed polynomial equation was verified by designing two check point formulations (C1 and C2. The closeness of predicted and observed values for t 50% and t 70% indicates validity of derived equations for the dependent variables. These studies indicated that the proper balance between psyllium husk and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose K4M can produce a drug dissolution profile similar to the predicted dissolution profile. The optimized formulations followed Higuchi′s kinetics while the drug release mechanism was found to be anomalous type, controlled by diffusion through the swollen matrix.

  16. Design and optimization of floating drug delivery system of acyclovir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharia, A A; Hiremath, S N; Singhai, A K; Omray, L K; Jain, S K

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of the present work was to design and optimize floating drug delivery systems of acyclovir using psyllium husk and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose K4M as the polymers and sodium bicarbonate as a gas generating agent. The tablets were prepared by wet granulation method. A 3(2) full factorial design was used for optimization of drug release profile. The amount of psyllium husk (X1) and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose K4M (X2) were selected as independent variables. The times required for 50% (t(50%)) and 70% (t(70%)) drug dissolution were selected as dependent variables. All the designed nine batches of formulations were evaluated for hardness, friability, weight variation, drug content uniformity, swelling index, in vitro buoyancy, and in vitro drug release profile. All formulations had floating lag time below 3 min and constantly floated on dissolution medium for more than 24 h. Validity of the developed polynomial equation was verified by designing two check point formulations (C1 and C2). The closeness of predicted and observed values for t(50%) and t(70%) indicates validity of derived equations for the dependent variables. These studies indicated that the proper balance between psyllium husk and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose K4M can produce a drug dissolution profile similar to the predicted dissolution profile. The optimized formulations followed Higuchi's kinetics while the drug release mechanism was found to be anomalous type, controlled by diffusion through the swollen matrix. PMID:21694992

  17. 21 CFR 316.30 - Annual reports of holder of orphan-drug designation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Annual reports of holder of orphan-drug... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ORPHAN DRUGS Designation of an Orphan Drug § 316.30 Annual reports of holder of orphan-drug designation. Within 14 months after the date on which a drug was...

  18. 21 CFR 316.27 - Change in ownership of orphan-drug designation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Change in ownership of orphan-drug designation... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ORPHAN DRUGS Designation of an Orphan Drug § 316.27 Change in ownership of orphan-drug designation. (a) A sponsor may transfer ownership of or any beneficial interest...

  19. Update on emerging antivirals for the management of herpes simplex virus infections: a patenting perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadlapudi, Aswani D; Vadlapatla, Ramya K; Mitra, Ashim K

    2013-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections can be treated efficiently by the application of antiviral drugs. The herpes family of viruses is responsible for causing a wide variety of diseases in humans. The standard therapy for the management of such infections includes acyclovir (ACV) and penciclovir (PCV) with their respective prodrugs valaciclovir and famciclovir. Though effective, long term prophylaxis with the current drugs leads to development of drug-resistant viral isolates, particularly in immunocompromised patients. Moreover, some drugs are associated with dose-limiting toxicities which limit their further utility. Therefore, there is a need to develop new antiherpetic compounds with different mechanisms of action which will be safe and effective against emerging drug resistant viral isolates. Significant advances have been made towards the design and development of novel antiviral therapeutics during the last decade. As evident by their excellent antiviral activities, pharmaceutical companies are moving forward with several new compounds into various phases of clinical trials. This review provides an overview of structure and life cycle of HSV, progress in the development of new therapies, update on the advances in emerging therapeutics under clinical development and related recent patents for the treatment of Herpes simplex virus infections. PMID:23331181

  20. Design, RNA cleavage and antiviral activity of new artificial ribonucleases derived from mono-, di- and tripeptides connected by linkers of different hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamkovich, Nikolay; Koroleva, Lyudmila; Kovpak, Mikhail; Goncharova, Elena; Silnikov, Vladimir; Vlassov, Valentin; Zenkova, Marina

    2016-03-15

    A novel series of metal-free artificial ribonucleases (aRNases) was designed, synthesized and assessed in terms of ribonuclease activity and ability to inactivate influenza virus WSN/A33/H1N1 in vitro. The compounds were built of two short peptide fragments, which include Lys, Ser, Arg, Glu and imidazole residues in various combinations, connected by linkers of different hydrophobicity (1,12-diaminododecane or 4,9-dioxa-1,12-diaminododecane). These compounds efficiently cleaved different RNA substrates under physiological conditions at rates three to five times higher than that of artificial ribonucleases described earlier and displayed RNase A-like cleavage specificity. aRNases with the hydrophobic 1,12-diaminododecane linker displayed ribonuclease activity 3-40 times higher than aRNases with the 4,9-dioxa-1,12-diaminododecane linker. The assumed mechanism of RNA cleavage was typical for natural ribonucleases, that is, general acid-base catalysis via the formation of acid/base pairs by functional groups of amino acids present in the aRNases; the pH profile of cleavage confirmed this mechanism. The most active aRNases under study exhibited high antiviral activity and entirely inactivated influenza virus A/WSN/33/(H1N1) after a short incubation period of viral suspension under physiological conditions. PMID:26899594

  1. A drug-specific nanocarrier design for efficient anticancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Changying; Guo, Dandan; Xiao, Kai; Wang, Xu; Wang, Lili; Luo, Juntao

    2015-07-01

    The drug-loading properties of nanocarriers depend on the chemical structures and properties of their building blocks. Here we customize telodendrimers (linear dendritic copolymer) to design a nanocarrier with improved in vivo drug delivery characteristics. We do a virtual screen of a library of small molecules to identify the optimal building blocks for precise telodendrimer synthesis using peptide chemistry. With rationally designed telodendrimer architectures, we then optimize the drug-binding affinity of a nanocarrier by introducing an optimal drug-binding molecule (DBM) without sacrificing the stability of the nanocarrier. To validate the computational predictions, we synthesize a series of nanocarriers and evaluate systematically for doxorubicin delivery. Rhein-containing nanocarriers have sustained drug release, prolonged circulation, increased tolerated dose, reduced toxicity, effective tumour targeting and superior anticancer effects owing to favourable doxorubicin-binding affinity and improved nanoparticle stability. This study demonstrates the feasibility and versatility of the de novo design of telodendrimer nanocarriers for specific drug molecules, which is a promising approach to transform nanocarrier development for drug delivery.

  2. Rational design of purely peptidic amphiphiles for drug delivery applications

    OpenAIRE

    Bruyn Ouboter, Dirk de

    2011-01-01

    A broad range of new properties is emerging from supramolecular aggregates. Self-assembled structures of purely peptidic amphiphiles exploit these properties to produce biocompatible, biodegradable, smart materials for drug administration. This thesis explores the design, synthesis, purification, characterization of purely peptidic amphiphiles, and evaluates potential applications. The first chapter provides a general introduction to the field of self-assembly, and of drug delivery as com...

  3. 21 CFR 316.20 - Content and format of a request for orphan-drug designation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Content and format of a request for orphan-drug... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ORPHAN DRUGS Designation of an Orphan Drug § 316.20 Content and format of a request for orphan-drug designation. (a) A sponsor that submits a request for...

  4. 21 CFR 316.40 - Treatment use of a designated orphan drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Treatment use of a designated orphan drug. 316.40... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ORPHAN DRUGS Open Protocols for Investigations § 316.40 Treatment use of a designated orphan drug. Prospective investigators seeking to obtain treatment use of designated orphan...

  5. [Design of the novel dipeptide neuropsychotropic drug preparations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudasheva, T A; Skoldinov, A P

    2003-01-01

    The paper considers a new strategy in the field of neuropsychotropic dipeptide drug design, the main points being as follows: (i) determination of the structural elements of dipeptides, such as fragments of amino acid side radicals and peptide bonds, in nonpeptide drugs; (ii) design of peptide analogs topologically close to the drug; (iii) synthesis and activity testing of these analogs; (iv) determination of the corresponding endogenous neuropeptide among the known neuropeptides or identification of the new neuropeptides in the brain of experimental animals. Using this approach, new pyroglutamyl- and prolyl-containing dipeptides were obtained based on the structure of the well-known classical nootropic drug piracetam. The new drugs exhibit nootropic activity in doses 100-10,000 times lower than those of piracetam. The structure of most active pyroglutamyl dipeptide pGlu-Asn-NH2 coincides with that of the N-end fragment of the endogenous memory peptide AVP(4-9). Noopept (N-phenylacetylprolylglycine ethyl ester), patented in Russia and USA as a new nootropic drug, is currently under stage 2 of successful clinical trials. The main metabolite of noopept, cyclo-Pro-Gly, is identical to the endogenous dipeptide designed in this work and is most close analog of piracetam with respect to pharmacological activity. The universal character of the proposed strategy is demonstrated by the design of active dipeptide analogs of an atypical neuroleptic drug sulpiride. As a result, a potential dipeptide neuroleptic dilept was obtained, which has been patented in Russia and now passes broad preclinical trials. PMID:12962042

  6. Potential Broad Spectrum Inhibitors of the Coronavirus 3CLpro: A Virtual Screening and Structure-Based Drug Design Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Berry

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human coronaviruses represent a significant disease burden; however, there is currently no antiviral strategy to combat infection. The outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS in 2003 and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS less than 10 years later demonstrates the potential of coronaviruses to cross species boundaries and further highlights the importance of identifying novel lead compounds with broad spectrum activity. The coronavirus 3CLpro provides a highly validated drug target and as there is a high degree of sequence homology and conservation in main chain architecture the design of broad spectrum inhibitors is viable. The ZINC drugs-now library was screened in a consensus high-throughput pharmacophore modeling and molecular docking approach by Vina, Glide, GOLD and MM-GBSA. Molecular dynamics further confirmed results obtained from structure-based techniques. A highly defined hit-list of 19 compounds was identified by the structure-based drug design methodologies. As these compounds were extensively validated by a consensus approach and by molecular dynamics, the likelihood that at least one of these compounds is bioactive is excellent. Additionally, the compounds segregate into 15 significantly dissimilar (p < 0.05 clusters based on shape and features, which represent valuable scaffolds that can be used as a basis for future anti-coronaviral inhibitor discovery experiments. Importantly though, the enriched subset of 19 compounds identified from the larger library has to be validated experimentally.

  7. Potential Broad Spectrum Inhibitors of the Coronavirus 3CLpro: A Virtual Screening and Structure-Based Drug Design Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Michael; Fielding, Burtram C; Gamieldien, Junaid

    2015-12-01

    Human coronaviruses represent a significant disease burden; however, there is currently no antiviral strategy to combat infection. The outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2003 and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) less than 10 years later demonstrates the potential of coronaviruses to cross species boundaries and further highlights the importance of identifying novel lead compounds with broad spectrum activity. The coronavirus 3CL(pro) provides a highly validated drug target and as there is a high degree of sequence homology and conservation in main chain architecture the design of broad spectrum inhibitors is viable. The ZINC drugs-now library was screened in a consensus high-throughput pharmacophore modeling and molecular docking approach by Vina, Glide, GOLD and MM-GBSA. Molecular dynamics further confirmed results obtained from structure-based techniques. A highly defined hit-list of 19 compounds was identified by the structure-based drug design methodologies. As these compounds were extensively validated by a consensus approach and by molecular dynamics, the likelihood that at least one of these compounds is bioactive is excellent. Additionally, the compounds segregate into 15 significantly dissimilar (p < 0.05) clusters based on shape and features, which represent valuable scaffolds that can be used as a basis for future anti-coronaviral inhibitor discovery experiments. Importantly though, the enriched subset of 19 compounds identified from the larger library has to be validated experimentally. PMID:26694449

  8. Input of Isosteric and Bioisosteric Approach in Drug design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioisosterism has unique relevance in the field of pharmaceutical sciences and is conducted to curtail side effects or to alter the biological activity of a lead molecule. In the biomedical field, the aim of exchanging one bioisostere for another is to boost the preferred pharmacological, biological or physical qualities of a substance without making substantial changes in the chemical skeleton. A vital feature of medicinal chemistry has been to ascertain a correlation between chemical skeleton of drugs and their physicochemical properties and in turn such properties modify the pharmacological properties and consequently the therapeutic response of drugs. Drugs with analogous structures often are liable to have comparable pharmacological properties. The present review highlights the vital role of bioisosterism as a special approach of structural modification and optimization process in drug design programme with clear 2D and 3D structural drawings. (author)

  9. Antiviral effects of Glycyrrhiza species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Cristina; Eisenhut, Michael; Krausse, Rea; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Pellati, Donatella; Armanini, Decio; Bielenberg, Jens

    2008-02-01

    Historical sources for the use of Glycyrrhiza species include ancient manuscripts from China, India and Greece. They all mention its use for symptoms of viral respiratory tract infections and hepatitis. Randomized controlled trials confirmed that the Glycyrrhiza glabra derived compound glycyrrhizin and its derivatives reduced hepatocellular damage in chronic hepatitis B and C. In hepatitis C virus-induced cirrhosis the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma was reduced. Animal studies demonstrated a reduction of mortality and viral activity in herpes simplex virus encephalitis and influenza A virus pneumonia. In vitro studies revealed antiviral activity against HIV-1, SARS related coronavirus, respiratory syncytial virus, arboviruses, vaccinia virus and vesicular stomatitis virus. Mechanisms for antiviral activity of Glycyrrhiza spp. include reduced transport to the membrane and sialylation of hepatitis B virus surface antigen, reduction of membrane fluidity leading to inhibition of fusion of the viral membrane of HIV-1 with the cell, induction of interferon gamma in T-cells, inhibition of phosphorylating enzymes in vesicular stomatitis virus infection and reduction of viral latency. Future research needs to explore the potency of compounds derived from licorice in prevention and treatment of influenza A virus pneumonia and as an adjuvant treatment in patients infected with HIV resistant to antiretroviral drugs. PMID:17886224

  10. Drug Design, Development, and Delivery: An Interdisciplinary Course on Pharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prausnitz, Mark R.; Bommarius, Andreas S.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a new interdisciplinary course on pharmaceuticals to address needs of undergraduate and graduate students in chemical engineering and other departments. This course introduces drug design, development, and delivery in an integrated fashion that provides scientific depth in context with broader impacts in business, policy, and ethics.…

  11. Biological characteristics of dengue virus and potential targets for drug design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-feng Qi; Ling Zhang; Cheng-wu Chi

    2008-01-01

    Dengue infection is a major cause of morbidity in tropical and subtropical regions, bringing nearly 40% of the world population at risk and causing more than 20,000 deaths per year. But there is neither a vaccine for dengue disease nor antiviral drugs to treat the infection. In recent years, dengue infection has been particularly prevalent in India, Southeast Asia, Brazil, and Guangdong Province, China. In this article, we present a brief summary of the biological characteristics of dengue virus and associated flaviviruses, and outline the progress on studies of vaccines and drugs based on potential targets of the dengue virus.

  12. [Effects of the new comprehensive system for designating illegal drug components on the abuse of designer drugs and future problems based on an online questionnaire].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morino, Taichi; Okazaki, Mitsuhiro; Toda, Takaki; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    Recently, the abuse of designer drugs has become a social problem. Designer drugs are created by modifying part of the chemical structure of drugs that have already been categorized as illegal, thereby creating a different chemical compound in order to evade Pharmaceutical Affairs Law regulations. The new comprehensive system for designating illegal drug components has been in effect since March 2013, and many designer drugs can now be regulated. We conducted an online questionnaire survey of people with a history of designer drug use to elucidate the effects of the new system on the abuse of designer drugs and to identify potential future problems. Over half the subjects obtained designer drugs only before the new system was implemented. Awareness of the system was significantly lower among subjects who obtained designer drugs for the first time after its introduction than those who obtained the drugs only before its implementation. Due to the new system, all methods of acquiring designer drugs saw decreases in activity. However, the ratio of the acquisition of designer drugs via the Internet increased. Since over 50% of the subjects never obtained designer drugs after the new system was introduced, goals that aimed to make drug procurement more difficult were achieved. However, awareness of the new system among subjects who obtained designer drugs after the new system was introduced was significantly low. Therefore, fostering greater public awareness of the new system is necessary. The results of the questionnaire also suggested that acquiring designer drugs through the Internet has hardly been affected by the new system. We strongly hope that there will be a greater push to restrict the sale of designer drugs on the Internet in the near future. PMID:26975077

  13. Antiviral lead compounds from marine sponges

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil

    2010-10-11

    Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of pharmacologically active compounds found in the marine environment. These bioactive molecules are often secondary metabolites, whose main function is to enable and/or modulate cellular communication and defense. They are usually produced by functional enzyme clusters in sponges and/or their associated symbiotic microorganisms. Natural product lead compounds from sponges have often been found to be promising pharmaceutical agents. Several of them have successfully been approved as antiviral agents for clinical use or have been advanced to the late stages of clinical trials. Most of these drugs are used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV). The most important antiviral lead of marine origin reported thus far is nucleoside Ara-A (vidarabine) isolated from sponge Tethya crypta. It inhibits viral DNA polymerase and DNA synthesis of herpes, vaccinica and varicella zoster viruses. However due to the discovery of new types of viruses and emergence of drug resistant strains, it is necessary to develop new antiviral lead compounds continuously. Several sponge derived antiviral lead compounds which are hopedto be developed as future drugs are discussed in this review. Supply problems are usually the major bottleneck to the development of these compounds as drugs during clinical trials. However advances in the field of metagenomics and high throughput microbial cultivation has raised the possibility that these techniques could lead to the cost-effective large scale production of such compounds. Perspectives on biotechnological methods with respect to marine drug development are also discussed. 2010 by the authors; licensee MDPI.

  14. Antiviral Lead Compounds from Marine Sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth P. Minneman

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of pharmacologically active compounds found in the marine environment. These bioactive molecules are often secondary metabolites, whose main function is to enable and/or modulate cellular communication and defense. They are usually produced by functional enzyme clusters in sponges and/or their associated symbiotic microorganisms. Natural product lead compounds from sponges have often been found to be promising pharmaceutical agents. Several of them have successfully been approved as antiviral agents for clinical use or have been advanced to the late stages of clinical trials. Most of these drugs are used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and herpes simplex virus (HSV. The most important antiviral lead of marine origin reported thus far is nucleoside Ara-A (vidarabine isolated from sponge Tethya crypta. It inhibits viral DNA polymerase and DNA synthesis of herpes, vaccinica and varicella zoster viruses. However due to the discovery of new types of viruses and emergence of drug resistant strains, it is necessary to develop new antiviral lead compounds continuously. Several sponge derived antiviral lead compounds which are hopedto be developed as future drugs are discussed in this review. Supply problems are usually the major bottleneck to the development of these compounds as drugs during clinical trials. However advances in the field of metagenomics and high throughput microbial cultivation has raised the possibility that these techniques could lead to the cost-effective large scale production of such compounds. Perspectives on biotechnological methods with respect to marine drug development are also discussed.

  15. Drug treatments for schizophrenia: pragmatism in trial design shows lack of progress in drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, F; Jones, P B

    2013-09-01

    Aims. The introduction of second generation antipsychotic (SGA) medication over a decade ago led to changes in prescribing practices; these drugs have eclipsed their predecessors as treatments for schizophrenia. However, the metabolic side effects of these newer antipsychotics have been marked and there are increasing concerns as to whether these novel drugs really are superior to their predecessors in terms of the balance between risks and benefits. In this article, we review the literature regarding comparisons between first generation antipsychotic (FGA) and SGA in terms of clinical effectiveness. Methods. Large (n > 150) randomized-controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effectiveness (efficacy and side effects) of FGA and SGA medications other than clozapine were reviewed, as were meta-analyses that included smaller studies. Results. The superiority in efficacy and reduced extrapyramidal side effects (EPSE) of SGAs is modest, especially when compared with low-dose FGAs. However, the high risk of weight gain and other metabolic disturbances associated with certain SGAs such as olanzapine is markedly higher than the risk with FGAs at the doses used in the trials. Conclusions. The efficacy profiles of various FGAs and SGAs are relatively similar, but their side effects vary between and within classes. Overall, large pragmatic trials of clinical effectiveness indicate that the care used in prescribing and managing drug treatments to ensure tolerability may be more important than the class of drug used. PMID:23388168

  16. DESIGN OF GASTRO RETENTIVE DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM OF DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. K. Omray

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Gastro retentive drug delivery system of diltiazem hydrochloride was designed and evaluated for its effectiveness for the management of mild to moderate hypertension. Gastro retentive drug delivery system were prepared using polyvinyl alcohol and sodium carboxy methyl cellulose as the polymers and sodium bicarbonate as a gas generating agent for the reduction of floating lag time. Gastro retentive drug delivery system tablets were prepared by wet granulation method by compression in tablet compression machine. Formulations DL1, DL2, DL3, DL4 and DL5 were developed which differed in the ratio of polyvinyl alcohol and sodium carboxy methyl cellulose polymers. All the formulations were evaluated for hardness, weight variation, friability, drug content, swelling index, buoyancy studies and in vitro drug release study. In vitro drug release study was performed using United State Pharmacopoeia 23 type 2 dissolution test apparatus employing paddle stirrer at 50 r/pm. Dissolution medium was 900 ml of 0.1N hydrochloric acid at 37ºC ± 3ºC. Formulations DL3 was found to be better as compared to other formulation.

  17. Effects of solubilizing surfactants and loading of antiviral, antimicrobial, and antifungal drugs on their release rates from ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallury, Padmavathy; Randall, Marcus K; Thaw, Khin L; Preisser, John S.; Kalachandra, Sid

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study investigates the effects of surfactants and drug loading on the drug release rate from ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) copolymer. The release rate of nystatin from EVA was studied with addition of non-ionic surfactants Tween 60 and Cremophor RH 40. In addition, the effect of increasing drug load on the release rates of nystatin, chlorhexidine diacetate and acyclovir is also presented. Method Polymer casting solutions were prepared by stirring EVA copolymer and nystatin (2.5 wt %) in dichloromethane. Nystatin and surfactants were added in ratios of (1:1), (1:2) and (1:3). Drug loading was studied with 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0% wt. proportions of nystatin, chlorhexidine diacetate and acyclovir incorporated into a separate polymer. Three drug loaded polymer square films (3cm × 3cm × 0.08 cm) were cut from dry films to follow the kinetics of drug release at 37°C. 10 ml of either distilled water or PBS was used as the extracting medium that was replaced daily. PBS was used for nystatin release with addition of surfactants and water was used for the study on drug loading and surfactant release. The rate of drug release was measured by UV-spectrophotometer. The amount of surfactant released was determined by HPLC. Results The release of nystatin was low in PBS and its release rate increased with the addition of surfactants. Also, increasing surfactant concentrations resulted in increased drug release rates. The release rates of chlorhexidine diacetate (p<0.0001), acyclovir (p<0.0003) and nystatin (p<0.0017) linearly increased with increasing drug loads. The amount of surfactants released was above the CMC. Significance This study demonstrates that the three therapeutic agents show a sustained rate of drug release from EVA copolymer over extended periods of time. Nystatin release in PBS is low owing to its poor solubility. Its release rate is enhanced by addition of surfactants and increasing the drug load as well. PMID:17049593

  18. Application of coamplification at lower denaturation temperature-PCR sequencing for early detection of antiviral drug resistance mutations of hepatitis B virus

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Danny Ka-Ho; Tsoi, Ottilia; Huang, Fung-Yu; Seto, Wai-Kay; Fung, James; Lai, Ching-Lung; YUEN, MAN-FUNG

    2014-01-01

    Nucleoside/nucleotide analogue for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is hampered by the emergence of drug resistance mutations. Conventional PCR sequencing cannot detect minor variants of

  19. Virtual Screening and Structure Generation Applied to Drug Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN B.T.; CHEN H. F.; XIE L.; YUAN S. G.; A. PANAYE; J-P. DOUCET

    2004-01-01

    The methods of computer-aided drug design can be divided into two categories according to whether or not the structures of receptors are known1, corresponding to two principal strategies:(1) searching the bio-active ligands against virtual combinatorial libraries and calculating the affinity energy between ligand and receptor by docking ; (2) QSAR and 3D-structure data-mining.3D-QSAR method is now applied widely to drug discovery, but this method is generally limited to refine the structures of known bio-active compounds. During the process of drug design, we have usually the prejudice that certain groups or structural fragments will play or not important roles on the activity. This will sometimes be misleading, and prevent us from obtaining expected results.The method of generating firstly diverse structures, then screening out the promising structures by means of a computational method or QSAR model, is an efficient way for drug discovery. We developed an efficient virtual and rational drag design method. It combines virtual bioactive compound generation using genetic algorithms with 3D-QSAR model and docking. Using this method can generate a lot of highly diverse molecules and find virtual active lead compounds. The method was validated by the study on a set of anti-tumor drugs, colchicine analogs2. With the constraints of pharmacophore obtained determined by DISCO, 97 virtual bioactive compounds were generated,and their anti-tumor activities were predicted by CoMFA. 8 structures with high activity were selected and screened by 3D-QSAR model. The most active generated structure was further investigated by modifying its structure in order to increase the activity (see fig.1). This drug design method could also avoid the conflict between the insufficiency of active structures and the great quantity of compounds needed for high-throughput screening. This method has been also applied to anti-HIV drug design.We have developed equally another approach of virtual

  20. L-Valine Ester of Cyclopropavir - a New Antiviral Prodrug

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Zhimeng; Drach, John C.; Prichard, Mark N.; Yanachkova, Milka; Yanachkov, Ivan; Bowlin, Terry L.; Zemlicka, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    The L-Valine ester of antiviral agent cyclopropavir, valcyclopropavir (6), was synthesized and evaluated for antiviral properties. Prodrug (6) inhibited replication of HCMV virus (Towne and AD169 strain) in HFF cells to approximately the same extent as the parent drug cyclopropavir (5). Stability of 6 toward hydrolysis at pH 7.0 roughly corresponds to that of valganciclovir (2). Pharmacokinetic studies in mice established that the oral bioavailability of valcyclopropavir (6) was 95%.

  1. ANTIVIRAL POTENTIAL OF MEDICINAL PLANTS: AN OVERVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Ruwali Pushpa; Rai Nishant; Kumar Navin; Gautam Pankaj

    2013-01-01

    The term ‘Antiviral agents’ has been defined in very broad terms as substances other than a virus or virus containing vaccine or specific antibody which can produce either a protective or therapeutic effect to the clear detectable advantage of the virus infected host. The herbal medicine has a long traditional use and the major advantage over other medicines is their wide therapeutic window with rare side effects. There are some disadvantages of synthetic drugs like narrow therapeutic window...

  2. Antiviral immunity in marine molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Timothy J; Raftos, David; Speck, Peter; Montagnani, Caroline

    2015-09-01

    Marine molluscs, like all living organisms, are constantly exposed to viruses and have evolved efficient antiviral defences. We review here recent developments in molluscan antiviral immunity against viruses belonging to the order Herpesvirales. Emerging results suggest an interferon-like response and autophagy are involved in the antiviral defence of bivalves to viral infection. Multi-functional plasma proteins from gastropods and bivalves have been identified to have broad-spectrum antiviral activity against mammalian viruses. The antiviral defences present in molluscs can be enhanced by genetic selection, as shown by the presence of oyster strains specifically resistant to ostreid herpesvirus type 1. Whether varying amounts or different isoforms of these antiviral plasma proteins contributes to genetic resistance is worthy of further research. Other evolutionarily conserved antiviral mechanisms, such as RNA interference and apoptosis, still need further characterization. PMID:26297577

  3. Role of combination antiviral therapy in pandemic influenza and stockpiling implications

    OpenAIRE

    Tsiodras, Sotirios; Mooney, John D; Hatzakis, Angelos

    2007-01-01

    It is impossible to predict which drugs will be effective against a new pandemic strain of influenza. Sotirios Tsiodras and colleagues argue that failure to stockpile both major classes of antiviral drugs could prove costly

  4. Drug: D02267 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D02267 Drug Foscarnet sodium hydrate (JAN); Trisodium phosphonoformate hexahydrate;...Chemotherapeutics 625 Antivirals 6250 Antivirals D02267 Foscarnet sodium hydrate (JAN) Anatomical Therapeuti...SE J05A DIRECT ACTING ANTIVIRALS J05AD Phosphonic acid derivatives J05AD01 Foscarnet D02267 Foscar...net sodium hydrate (JAN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-cytomegalovirus (CMV) Agents Foscar...net D02267 Foscarnet sodium hydrate (JAN) Antiherpetic Agents Foscarnet D02267 Foscarn

  5. Cyclotides: macrocyclic peptides with applications in drug design and agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craik, David J; Mylne, Joshua S; Daly, Norelle L

    2010-01-01

    Cyclotides are disulfide-rich peptides from plants that are exceptionally stable as a result of their unique cyclic cystine knot structural motif. Their natural role is thought to be as plant defence agents, most notably against insect pests, but they also have potential applications in drug design and agriculture. This article identifies gaps in current knowledge on cyclotides and suggests future directions for research into this fascinating family of ultra-stable mini-proteins. PMID:19795188

  6. Evaluation of the in vitro skin permeation of antiviral drugs from penciclovir 1% cream and acyclovir 5% cream used to treat herpes simplex virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bader Marlene

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpes simplex virus infection (HSV is a common and ubiquitous infection of the skin which causes mucocutaneous lesions called cold sores (herpes labialis or fever blisters. It is estimated that approximately 80% of the population worldwide are carriers of the Herpes simplex virus, approximately 40% suffer from recurrent recurrent infections. This study evaluates the in vitro skin permeation and penetration of penciclovir and acyclovir from commercialized creams for the treatment of herpes labialis (cold sores, using non viable excised human abdominal skin samples, which were exposed to 5 mg/cm2 of acyclovir 5% cream or penciclovir 1% cream. Methods After 24 h of cream application, excess cream was washed off and layers of stratum corneum were removed by successive tape stripping. Amounts of active ingredients having penetrated through the skin were measured, as well as the amounts in the washed-off cream, in skin strips and creams remaining in the skin. Molecular modelling was used to evaluate physico-chemical differences between the drugs. Western blot analysis enabled to determine whether the marker of basal cells keratin 5 could be detected in the various tape strips. Results Application of penciclovir 1% cream yielded higher concentration of drug in the deeper layers of the epidermis as well as a higher drug flux through the skin. Molecular modelling showed two higher hydrophobic moieties for acyclovir. Presence of the basal cell marker keratin 5 was underscored in the deeper tape strips from the skin, giving evidence that both drugs can reach their target cells. Conclusion Penciclovir 1% cream has the tendency to facilitate the diffusion of the drug through the stratum corneum into the deeper epidermis layers, in which it could reach the target basal cells at effective therapeutical concentration. The small difference in the surface properties between both molecules might also contribute to favour the passage of

  7. Design of drugs involving the concepts and theories of drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D A; Jones, B C; Walker, D K

    1996-05-01

    Drug metabolism input to the discovery process had historically been on an empirical case-by-case basis, since, detailed descriptors of the effect on pharmacokinetics of a change in structure or physicochemical property were not available. Considerable advances have been made in recent years, such that basic rules can be applied to predict the behavior of a compound in man based on physicochemistry and structure. This is particularly true in the areas of absorption, distribution, and clearance. In particular, knowledge of the reactions catalyzed by the enzymes of drug metabolism, including the cytochrome P450 super family, can be used in the design of new chemical entities, together with the usual pharmacological-derived SAR. The combination of both pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics at the discovery stage leads to drugs with optimum performance characteristics. Such drugs are easier to develop, representing a huge saving in resources. Moreover, the marketed compound is much more likely to find high clinical utilization. This review uses dofetilide, fluconazole, and amlodipine to highlight the multifaceted consequences of changing chemical structure, in terms of drug disposition, and reinforces these principles with examples from the literature. PMID:8727426

  8. Liposomal Drug Products: A Quality by Design Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoming

    Quality by Design (QbD) principles has been applied to the development of two liposomal formulations, containing a hydrophilic small molecule therapeutic (Tenofovir) and a protein therapeutic (superoxide dismutase). The goal of the research is to provide critical information on 1) how to reduce the preparation variability in liposome formulations, and 2) how to increase drug encapsulation inside liposomes to reduce manufacturing cost. Most notably, an improved liposome preparation method was developed which increased the encapsulation efficiency of hydrophilic molecules. In particular, this method allows for very high encapsulation efficiency. For example, encapsulation efficiencies of up to 50% have been achieved, whereas previously only 20% or less have been reported. Another significant outcome from this research is a first principle mathematical model to predict the encapsulation efficiency of hydrophilic drugs in unilamellar liposomes. This mathematical model will be useful in: formulation development to rapidly achieve optimized formulations; comparison of drug encapsulation efficiencies of liposomes prepared using different methods; and assisting in the development of suitable process analytical technologies to achieve real-time monitoring and control of drug encapsulation during manufacturing. A novel two-stage reverse dialysis in vitro release testing method has also been developed for passively targeted liposomes, which uses the first stage to mimic the circulation of liposomes in the body and the second stage to imitate the drug release process at the target. The developed in vitro release testing method can be used to distinguish formulations with varied compositions for quality control testing purposes. This developed method may pave the way to the development of more biorelevant quality control testing methods for liposomal drug products in the future. The QbD case studies performed in this research are examples of how this approach can be used to

  9. Drugs, structures, fragments: substructure-based approaches to GPCR drug discovery and design

    OpenAIRE

    Horst, Eelke van der

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is all about cheminformatics, and its impact on drug discovery. A number of strategies are discussed that apply computational methods for the analysis and design of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands. Frequent substructure mining is applied to find the common structural motifs that are discriminative for predefined classes of GPCR ligands. In addtion, this approach is extended to cluster GPCRs to suggest a new classification for this receptor superfamily. Furthermore, subst...

  10. iDrug: a web-accessible and interactive drug discovery and design platform

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xia; Chen, Haipeng (Allan); Yang, Feng; Gong, Jiayu; Li, Shiliang; Pei, Jianfeng; Liu, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Hualiang; Lai, Luhua; Li, Honglin

    2014-01-01

    Background The progress in computer-aided drug design (CADD) approaches over the past decades accelerated the early-stage pharmaceutical research. Many powerful standalone tools for CADD have been developed in academia. As programs are developed by various research groups, a consistent user-friendly online graphical working environment, combining computational techniques such as pharmacophore mapping, similarity calculation, scoring, and target identification is needed. Results We presented a...

  11. Evolution and Spread of Influenza Virus and Progress on Antiviral Drugs and Vaccines%流感病毒的演变传播及抗病毒药物和疫苗的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈执中

    2009-01-01

    The influenza virus is an infectious virus in mankind. After the storm of influenza across the world in 1918, that is nightmare incessantly now. In this article, the evolution and spread of itinerary map of influenza virus are reviewed. Additionally, the progress on unique 'cap-snatching' mechanism, antiviral drugs and vaccines are also introduced. The applications of neuraminidase inhibitors and the developments of new influenza vaccines will open up broad prospects for the prevention and therapy of influenza.%流感病毒是引起人类流感的传染性病毒.1918年流感风暴席卷全球,至今仍为挥之不去的梦魇.本文综述了流感病毒的演变,在世界的传播路线和流感病毒"劫持"人体细胞的新机制,以及抗流感病毒新药和新型流感疫苗的研究进展.神经氨酸苷酶抑制剂的应用和新型流感疫苗的研制成功将为预防和治疗流感开拓广阔的前景.

  12. Nanotechnology-based intelligent drug design for cancer metastasis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu; Xie, Jingjing; Chen, Haijun; Gu, Songen; Zhao, Rongli; Shao, Jingwei; Jia, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Traditional chemotherapy used today at clinics is mainly inherited from the thinking and designs made four decades ago when the Cancer War was declared. The potency of those chemotherapy drugs on in-vitro cancer cells is clearly demonstrated at even nanomolar levels. However, due to their non-specific effects in the body on normal tissues, these drugs cause toxicity, deteriorate patient's life quality, weaken the host immunosurveillance system, and result in an irreversible damage to human's own recovery power. Owing to their unique physical and biological properties, nanotechnology-based chemotherapies seem to have an ability to specifically and safely reach tumor foci with enhanced efficacy and low toxicity. Herein, we comprehensively examine the current nanotechnology-based pharmaceutical platforms and strategies for intelligent design of new nanomedicines based on targeted drug delivery system (TDDS) for cancer metastasis treatment, analyze the pros and cons of nanomedicines versus traditional chemotherapy, and evaluate the importance that nanomaterials can bring in to significantly improve cancer metastasis treatment. PMID:24211475

  13. 75 FR 21368 - Designation of Five Counties as High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-23

    ... PRESIDENT Office of National Drug Control Policy Designation of Five Counties as High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy designated five additional counties as High Drug Trafficking Areas pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 1706. The...

  14. Perspective of Use of Antiviral Peptides against Influenza Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalickova, Sylvie; Heger, Zbynek; Krejcova, Ludmila; Pekarik, Vladimir; Bastl, Karel; Janda, Jozef; Kostolansky, Frantisek; Vareckova, Eva; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-10-01

    The threat of a worldwide influenza pandemic has greatly increased over the past decade with the emergence of highly virulent avian influenza strains. The increased frequency of drug-resistant influenza strains against currently available antiviral drugs requires urgent development of new strategies for antiviral therapy, too. The research in the field of therapeutic peptides began to develop extensively in the second half of the 20(th) century. Since then, the mechanisms of action for several peptides and their antiviral prospect received large attention due to the global threat posed by viruses. Here, we discussed the therapeutic properties of peptides used in influenza treatment. Peptides with antiviral activity against influenza can be divided into three main groups. First, entry blocker peptides such as a Flupep that interact with influenza hemagglutinin, block its binding to host cells and prevent viral fusion. Second, several peptides display virucidal activity, disrupting viral envelopes, e.g., Melittin. Finally, a third set of peptides interacts with the viral polymerase complex and act as viral replication inhibitors such as PB1 derived peptides. Here, we present a review of the current literature describing the antiviral activity, mechanism and future therapeutic potential of these influenza antiviral peptides. PMID:26492266

  15. Perspective of Use of Antiviral Peptides against Influenza Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Skalickova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The threat of a worldwide influenza pandemic has greatly increased over the past decade with the emergence of highly virulent avian influenza strains. The increased frequency of drug-resistant influenza strains against currently available antiviral drugs requires urgent development of new strategies for antiviral therapy, too. The research in the field of therapeutic peptides began to develop extensively in the second half of the 20th century. Since then, the mechanisms of action for several peptides and their antiviral prospect received large attention due to the global threat posed by viruses. Here, we discussed the therapeutic properties of peptides used in influenza treatment. Peptides with antiviral activity against influenza can be divided into three main groups. First, entry blocker peptides such as a Flupep that interact with influenza hemagglutinin, block its binding to host cells and prevent viral fusion. Second, several peptides display virucidal activity, disrupting viral envelopes, e.g., Melittin. Finally, a third set of peptides interacts with the viral polymerase complex and act as viral replication inhibitors such as PB1 derived peptides. Here, we present a review of the current literature describing the antiviral activity, mechanism and future therapeutic potential of these influenza antiviral peptides.

  16. [Antiviral properties of basidiomycetes metabolites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avtonomova, A V; Krasnopolskaya, L M

    2014-01-01

    The data on the antiviral action of the Ganoderma lucidum, Lentinus edodes, Grifola frondosa, Agaricus brasiliensis and other basidiomycetes metabolites are summurized. The metabolites of these species of basidiomycetes exhibit a direct antiviral effect on herpes simplex virus types I and II, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, influenza virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and others. Moreover, metabolites of basidiomycetes increased antiviral immunity. PMID:25975107

  17. Antiviral agents against equid alphaherpesviruses: Current status and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissani, María A; Thiry, Etienne; Dal Pozzo, Fabiana; Barrandeguy, María

    2016-01-01

    Equid herpesvirus infections cause respiratory, neurological and reproductive syndromes. Despite preventive and control measures and the availability of vaccines and immunostimulants, herpesvirus infections still constitute a major threat to equine health and for the equine industry worldwide. Antiviral drugs, particularly nucleoside analogues and foscarnet, are successfully used for the treatment of human alphaherpesvirus infections. In equine medicine, the use of antiviral medications in alphaherpesvirus infections would decrease the excretion of virus and diminish the risk of contagion and the convalescent time in affected horses, and would also improve the clinical outcome of equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy. The combined use of antiviral compounds, along with vaccines, immune modulators, and effective preventive and control measures, might be beneficial in diminishing the negative impact of alphaherpesvirus infections in horses. The purpose of this review is to analyse the available information regarding the use of antiviral agents against alphaherpesviruses, with particular emphasis on equine alphaherpesvirus infections. PMID:26654843

  18. Structure-Based Design and Engineering of a Nontoxic Recombinant Pokeweed Antiviral Protein with Potent Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Uckun, Fatih M.; Rajamohan, Francis; Pendergrass, Sharon; Ozer, Zahide; Waurzyniak, Barbara; Mao, Chen

    2003-01-01

    A molecular model of pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP)-RNA interactions was used to rationally engineer FLP-102(151AA152) and FLP-105(191AA192) as nontoxic PAPs with potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus (anti-HIV) activities. FLP-102 and FLP-105 have been produced in Escherichia coli and tested both in vitro and in vivo. These proteins depurinate HIV type 1 (HIV-1) RNA much better than rRNA and are more potent anti-HIV agents than native PAP or recombinant wild-type PAP. They are substanti...

  19. Targeting Plasmodium Metabolism to Improve Antimalarial Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avitia-Domínguez, Claudia; Sierra-Campos, Erick; Betancourt-Conde, Irene; Aguirre-Raudry, Miriam; Vázquez-Raygoza, Alejandra; Luevano-De la Cruz, Artemisa; Favela-Candia, Alejandro; Sarabia-Sanchez, Marie; Ríos-Soto, Lluvia; Méndez-Hernández, Edna; Cisneros-Martínez, Jorge; Palacio-Gastélum, Marcelo Gómez; Valdez-Solana, Mónica; Hernández-Rivera, Jessica; De Lira-Sánchez, Jaime; Campos-Almazán, Mara; Téllez-Valencia, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the main infectious diseases in tropical developing countries and represents high morbidity and mortality rates nowadays. The principal etiological agent P. falciparum is transmitted through the bite of the female Anopheles mosquito. The issue has escalated due to the emergence of resistant strains to most of the antimalarials used for the treatment including Chloroquine, Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine, and recently Artemisinin derivatives, which has led to diminished effectiveness and by consequence increased the severity of epidemic outbreaks. Due to the lack of effective compounds to treat these drug-resistant strains, the discovery or development of novel anti-malaria drugs is important. In this context, one strategy has been to find inhibitors of enzymes, which play an important role for parasite survival. Today, promising results have been obtained in this regard, involving the entire P. falciparum metabolism. These inhibitors could serve as leads in the search of a new chemotherapy against malaria. This review focuses on the achievements in recent years with regard to inhibition of enzymes used as targets for drug design against malaria. PMID:26983887

  20. Low energy nanoemulsification to design veterinary controlled drug delivery devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry F Vandamme

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Thierry F Vandamme, Nicolas Anton, University of Strasbourg, Faculty of Pharmacy, Illkirch Cedex, France; UMR CNRS 7199, Laboratoire de Conception et Application de Molécules Bioactives, équipe de Pharmacie Biogalénique, Illkirch Cedex, France,  This work is selected as Controlled Release Society Outstanding Veterinary Paper Award 2010Abstract: The unique properties of nanomaterials related to structural stability and quantum-scale reactive properties open up a world of possibilities that could be exploited to design and to target drug delivery or create truly microscale biological sensors for veterinary applications. We developed cost-saving and solvent-free nanoemulsions. Formulated with a low-energy method, these nanoemulsions can find application in the delivery of controlled amounts of drugs into the beverage of breeding animals (such as poultry, cattle, pigs or be used for the controlled release of injectable poorly water-soluble drugs.Keywords: nanoemulsion, nanomedicine, low-energy emulsification, veterinary, ketoprofen, sulfamethazine

  1. Is Minocycline an Antiviral Agent? A Review of Current Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarakanti, Sandhya; Bishburg, Eliahu

    2016-01-01

    Minocycline is a second-generation semi-synthetic derivative of tetracycline and has well-known anti-bacterial effects. The drug possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-apoptotic and immunomodulatory effects. The drug is widely used in bacterial infections and non-infectious conditions such as acne, dermatitis, periodontitis and neurodegenerative conditions. Minocycline was shown to have antiviral activity in vitro and also against different viruses in some animal models. Some studies have been done on human patients infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus. We have review the available data regarding minocycline activity as an antiviral agent. PMID:26177421

  2. Multistep Reaction Based De Novo Drug Design: Generating Synthetically Feasible Design Ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masek, Brian B; Baker, David S; Dorfman, Roman J; DuBrucq, Karen; Francis, Victoria C; Nagy, Stephan; Richey, Bree L; Soltanshahi, Farhad

    2016-04-25

    We describe a "multistep reaction driven" evolutionary algorithm approach to de novo molecular design. Structures generated by the approach include a proposed synthesis path intended to aid the chemist in assessing the synthetic feasibility of the ideas that are generated. The methodology is independent of how the design ideas are scored, allowing multicriteria drug design to address multiple issues including activity at one or more pharmacological targets, selectivity, physical and ADME properties, and off target liabilities; the methods are compatible with common computer-aided drug discovery "scoring" methodologies such as 2D- and 3D-ligand similarity, docking, desirability functions based on physiochemical properties, and/or predictions from 2D/3D QSAR or machine learning models and combinations thereof to be used to guide design. We have performed experiments to assess the extent to which known drug space can be covered by our approach. Using a library of 88 generic reactions and a database of ∼20 000 reactants, we find that our methods can identify "close" analogs for ∼50% of the known small molecule drugs with molecular weight less than 300. To assess the quality of the in silico generated synthetic pathways, synthesis chemists were asked to rate the viability of synthesis pathways: both "real" and in silico generated. In silico reaction schemes generated by our methods were rated as very plausible with scores similar to known literature synthesis schemes. PMID:27031173

  3. Neuropsychiatric Effects of HIV Antiviral Medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treisman, Glenn J; Soudry, Olivia

    2016-10-01

    The development of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has dramatically increased the lifespan of HIV patients but treatment is complicated by numerous adverse effects and toxicities. ART complications include neuropsychiatric, metabolic, gastrointestinal, cardiac, and numerous other toxicities, and clinicians often have to choose one toxicity over another to offer the best medication regimen for a patient. Some antiviral drugs cause significant neuropsychiatric complications, including depression, cognitive impairment, and sleep disturbance. Even in careful studies, it may be difficult to determine which effects are related to the virus, the immune system, or the treatment. Of the six currently marketed classes of antiviral drugs, the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors have been most commonly associated with neuropsychiatric complications. Within these classes, certain drugs are more likely to cause difficulty than others. We review the contention regarding the central nervous system (CNS) complications of efavirenz, as well as debate about the role of CNS penetration in drug effectiveness and toxicity. A thorough working knowledge of the neuropsychiatric consequences of ART allows clinicians to tailor treatment more successfully to individual patients as well as to identify ART more quickly as the source of a problem or symptom. PMID:27534750

  4. Dendrimers in drug research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Ulrik; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2004-01-01

    and in vivo cytotoxicity, as well as biopermeability, biostability and immunogenicity. The review deals with numerous applications of dendrimers as tools for efficient multivalent presentation of biological ligands in biospecific recognition, inhibition and targeting. Dendrimers may be used as drugs...... for antibacterial and antiviral treatment and have found use as antitumor agents. The review highlights the use of dendrimers as drug or gene delivery devices in e.g. anticancer therapy, and the design of different host-guest binding motifs directed towards medical applications is described. Other specific examples...

  5. Drug: D10469 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 9 D10469.gif Treatment of hepatitis C [DS:H00413] Therapeutic category: 6250 Macrocyclic antivirus Direct-ac...tics 625 Antivirals 6250 Antivirals D10469 Simeprevir sodium (JAN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-hepatitis

  6. Age-prioritized use of antivirals during an influenza pandemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajelli Marco

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The WHO suggested that governments stockpile, as part of preparations for the next influenza pandemic, sufficient influenza antiviral drugs to treat approximately 25% of their populations. Our aim is two-fold: first, since in many countries the antiviral stockpile is well below this level, we search for suboptimal strategies based on treatment provided only to an age-dependent fraction of cases. Second, since in some countries the stockpile exceeds the suggested minimum level, we search for optimal strategies for post-exposure prophylactic treatment of close contacts of cases. Methods We used a stochastic, spatially structured individual-based model, considering explicit transmission in households, schools and workplaces, to simulate the spatiotemporal spread of an influenza pandemic in Italy and to evaluate the efficacy of interventions based on age-prioritized use of antivirals. Results Our results show that the antiviral stockpile required for treatment of cases ranges from 10% to 35% of the population for R0 in 1.4 – 3. No suboptimal strategies, based on treatment provided to an age-dependent fraction of cases, were found able to remarkably reduce both clinical attack rate and antiviral drugs needs, though they can contribute to largely reduce the excess mortality. Treatment of all cases coupled with prophylaxis provided to younger individuals is the only intervention resulting in a significant reduction of the clinical attack rate and requiring a relatively small stockpile of antivirals. Conclusion Our results strongly suggest that governments stockpile sufficient influenza antiviral drugs to treat approximately 25% of their populations, under the assumption that R0 is not much larger than 2. In countries where the number of antiviral stockpiled exceeds the suggested minimum level, providing prophylaxis to younger individuals is an option that could be taken into account in preparedness plans. In countries where the

  7. Biomembrane models and drug-biomembrane interaction studies: Involvement in drug design and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Pignatello

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Contact with many different biological membranes goes along the destiny of a drug after its systemic administration. From the circulating macrophage cells to the vessel endothelium, to more complex absorption barriers, the interaction of a biomolecule with these membranes largely affects its rate and time of biodistribution in the body and at the target sites. Therefore, investigating the phenomena occurring on the cell membranes, as well as their different interaction with drugs in the physiological or pathological conditions, is important to exploit the molecular basis of many diseases and to identify new potential therapeutic strategies. Of course, the complexity of the structure and functions of biological and cell membranes, has pushed researchers toward the proposition and validation of simpler two- and three-dimensional membrane models, whose utility and drawbacks will be discussed. This review also describes the analytical methods used to look at the interactions among bioactive compounds with biological membrane models, with a particular accent on the calorimetric techniques. These studies can be considered as a powerful tool for medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical technology, in the steps of designing new drugs and optimizing the activity and safety profile of compounds already used in the therapy.

  8. Emerging trends, confront and scenario in healthcare and antiviral development for infectious diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra N

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Health defines the state of being free from illness, infection or injury and healthcare performs the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of such anomalies. Infectious diseases are well known since ancient time to human civilization and put heavy toll on social health as well as healthcare system. Among different infections agents viruses are the most notorious ones. Even in 21st century word, virus creates a panic in well educated society and among healthcare professionals. This causes unnecessary havoc, limited help to the patients and malfunctioning of healthcare system. The scuffle between the viruses and the humans is unremitting process and both are continuously changing their combating strategies to succeed. Our increasing knowledge about viruses, mechanism of their infections and the rapid involvement of novel antiviral strategies and techniques has enabled us to develop various antivirals. Development of antiviral is very costly, complex, risky, tedious, time consuming and multistage process. Inspite of recent development in technology, identification of novel antivirals and stern regulation in quality control measures; till date there is no fool proof treatment (vaccines and drugs available against viruses and due to viral resistance and/or drug toxicity, the rate of antiviral drugs coming to the market for human application is very low probably. Therefore, this review is mainly based on global view of antiviral discovery including classification of antiviral, its developmental stages, current advancements in upcoming technologies and limitations of the antiviral drug development in last five decades as well as future challenges and briefly on emerging problems in healthcare.

  9. RAS GTPase AS THE DRUG TARGET FOR ANTI-CANCER DESIGNING OF DRUG FROM TEMPLATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Krishnapriya and P.K. Krishnan Namboori*

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ras proteins in association with GTP and GDP act as a bio-molecular switch for signaling cell growth, cell survival and signal transduction. The presence of mutated Ras proteins is found to vary in different cancer types and the highest occurrence of about 90% is observed in pancreatic cancer. The Ras GTPase binding site is mainly involved in signal cell proliferation. Hence, this binding site has been considered as a major target. At the same time, targeting a specific protein and designing the drug molecule with respect to that is practically of no use as the target proteins are fast mutating. In this scenario, designing the template from the hot spot of proteins and fitting the template for all the target protein molecules seem to be a promising technique. The templates are initially screened on the basis of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic requirements. Six templates are found to be satisfying conditions like IC50, lipophilic efficiency, ligand efficiency etc. and their efficiencies are compared with standard reference molecules. The computed enrichment factors support these templates to be leads for effective anti-cancer drugs subject to further in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

  10. Click Chemistry in Peptide-Based Drug Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwin Chaiken

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Click chemistry is an efficient and chemoselective synthetic method for coupling molecular fragments under mild reaction conditions. Since the advent in 2001 of methods to improve stereochemical conservation, the click chemistry approach has been broadly used to construct diverse chemotypes in both chemical and biological fields. In this review, we discuss the application of click chemistry in peptide-based drug design. We highlight how triazoles formed by click reactions have been used for mimicking peptide and disulfide bonds, building secondary structural components of peptides, linking functional groups together, and bioconjugation. The progress made in this field opens the way for synthetic approaches to convert peptides with promising functional leads into structure-minimized and more stable forms.

  11. Screening for Antiviral Activities of Isolated Compounds from Essential Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Astani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential oil of star anise as well as phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes, for example, trans-anethole, eugenol, β-eudesmol, farnesol, β-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene oxide, which are present in many essential oils, were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 in vitro. Antiviral activity was analyzed by plaque reduction assays and mode of antiviral action was determined by addition of the drugs to uninfected cells, to the virus prior to infection or to herpesvirus-infected cells. Star anise oil reduced viral infectivity by >99%, phenylpropanoids inhibited HSV infectivity by about 60–80% and sesquiterpenes suppressed herpes virus infection by 40–98%. Both, star anise essential oil and all isolated compounds exhibited anti-HSV-1 activity by direct inactivation of free virus particles in viral suspension assays. All tested drugs interacted in a dose-dependent manner with herpesvirus particles, thereby inactivating viral infectivity. Star anise oil, rich in trans-anethole, revealed a high selectivity index of 160 against HSV, whereas among the isolated compounds only β-caryophyllene displayed a high selectivity index of 140. The presence of β-caryophyllene in many essential oils might contribute strongly to their antiviral ability. These results indicate that phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes present in essential oils contribute to their antiviral activity against HSV.

  12. Glucosidase inhibitors as antiviral agents for hepatitis B and C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durantel, David; Alotte, Christine; Zoulim, Fabien

    2007-02-01

    HBV and HCV infections are a major public health concern. New antiviral drugs are urgently needed with improved efficacy. Compounds that specifically target viral enzymes are the most attractive in terms of drug development and are therefore the most studied. However, antiviral strategies based entirely on this class of compounds encounter problems caused by the emergence of viral escape mutants, as already widely described for HIV. One way to prevent or delay viral resistance is to combine antiviral agents that target different steps of the virus life cycle. Future therapy may also combine such virus-specific antivirals with compounds targeting host proteins or functions. In this respect, viral morphogenesis and infectivity represent interesting, and still unexploited, novel molecular targets. Endoplasmic reticulum glucosidase inhibitors have demonstrated anti-HBV and anti-HCV properties by inhibiting viral morphogenesis and infectivity. One such compound, celgosivir, is currently being evaluated in clinical trials against HCV infection, and encouraging phase IIa data have been disclosed. This review will discuss HBV and HCV morphogenesis, with a particular focus on the role of N-glycosylation for viral protein folding and assembly, and will present the antiviral properties of glucosidase inhibitors. PMID:17328228

  13. Screening for antiviral activities of isolated compounds from essential oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astani, Akram; Reichling, Jürgen; Schnitzler, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Essential oil of star anise as well as phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes, for example, trans-anethole, eugenol, β-eudesmol, farnesol, β-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene oxide, which are present in many essential oils, were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in vitro. Antiviral activity was analyzed by plaque reduction assays and mode of antiviral action was determined by addition of the drugs to uninfected cells, to the virus prior to infection or to herpesvirus-infected cells. Star anise oil reduced viral infectivity by >99%, phenylpropanoids inhibited HSV infectivity by about 60-80% and sesquiterpenes suppressed herpes virus infection by 40-98%. Both, star anise essential oil and all isolated compounds exhibited anti-HSV-1 activity by direct inactivation of free virus particles in viral suspension assays. All tested drugs interacted in a dose-dependent manner with herpesvirus particles, thereby inactivating viral infectivity. Star anise oil, rich in trans-anethole, revealed a high selectivity index of 160 against HSV, whereas among the isolated compounds only β-caryophyllene displayed a high selectivity index of 140. The presence of β-caryophyllene in many essential oils might contribute strongly to their antiviral ability. These results indicate that phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes present in essential oils contribute to their antiviral activity against HSV. PMID:20008902

  14. Antiviral medication in sexually transmitted diseases. Part I: HSV, HPV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynarczyk-Bonikowska, Beata; Majewska, Anna; Malejczyk, Magdalena; Mlynarczyk, Grazyna; Majewski, Slawomir

    2013-11-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) are one of the most prevalent infectious diseases in the world and important cause of morbidity and mortality. Especially STDs of viral etiology are difficult to cure. In many cases the antiviral therapy can relieve the symptoms but not eliminate the virus. During the past decades, considerable progress has been made in the development of antiviral drugs. One of the oldest antiviral medications is acyclovir (ACV). It is approved to treat initial and recurrent genital herpes and as a suppressive therapy in severe recurrent genital infections as well. Drug resistance to ACV and related drugs is seen among immunocompromised hosts, including human immunodeficiency virus HIV-infected patients. Resistant infections can be managed by second-line drugs - foscarnet or cidofovir- but they are more toxic than ACV. In case of HPV there is not known specific target for the medication and that is why the substances used in human papilloma virus HPV infection therapy are either antimitotics or immunomodulators. The Part I review focuses on mechanisms of actions and mechanisms of resistance to antiviral agents used in a treatment of the genital herpes and genital HPV infection. In Part II we will show the therapeutic options in other sexually transmitted infections: hepatitis B, C and HIV. PMID:24032509

  15. 6-azacytidine--compound with wide spectrum of antiviral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeeva, I; Dyachenko, N; Nosach, L; Zhovnovataya, V; Rybalko, S; Lozitskaya, R; Fedchuk, A; Lozitsky, V; Gridina, T; Shalamay, A; Palchikovskaja, L; Povnitsa, O

    2001-01-01

    6-azacytidine demonstrates activity against adenoviruses types 1, 2, 5. It inhibit synthesis of viral DNA and proteins. 6-AC shows antiherpetic and antiinfluenza action during experimental infection in mice. 6-AC is prospective for drug development as an antiviral substance with a wide spectrum of activity. PMID:11562975

  16. Alzheimer's disease drug development based on Computer-Aided Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huahui; Wu, Xiangxiang

    2016-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the excessive deposition of amyloids in the brain. The pathological features mainly include the extracellular amyloid plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, which are the production of amyloid precursor protein (APP) processed by the α-, β- and γ-secretases. Based on the amyloid cascade hypotheses of AD, a large number of amyloid-β agents and secretase inhibitors against AD have been recently developed by using computational methods. This review article describes pathophysiology of AD and the structure of the Aβ plaques, β- and γ-secretases, and discusses the recent advances in the development of the amyloid agents for AD therapy and diagnosis by using Computer-Aided Drug Design approach. PMID:26415837

  17. Design and development of gastro retentive drug delivery System of tramadol hydrochloride

    OpenAIRE

    Rathore, Devashish; Dahima, Rashmi

    2011-01-01

    The present investigation concerns the development of floating tablets of tramadol hydrochloride, which after oral administration are designed to prolong the gastric residence time; improves the drug bioavailability, reduces drug waste and diminish the side effects of drug. The D-optimal experimental design was employed to evaluate contribution of hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) K4M concentration, lactose concentration and kollidone SR concentration on drug release from floating tablets...

  18. Antiviral therapy: a perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahidi Bonjar AH

    2016-02-01

    s recovery to a large extent depends on their general health status. EVAC would be for single use and appropriately disposed of after each detoxification procedure. When sufficient research has yielded positive results in animal models, EVAC could be used as a supportive treatment in humans along with conventional antiviral therapies. EVAC would not be suitable for all viral infections, but could be expected to decrease the casualties resulting from blood-borne viral infections. The EVAC approach would be efficient in terms of time, effort, and expenditure in the research and treatment of blood-borne viral infections. Keywords: blood, virus, infection, antiviral, sepsis, HIV, Ebola

  19. Emerging pathogens: Dynamics, mutation and drug resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perelson, A.S.; Goldstein, B.; Korber, B.T. [and others

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objectives of this project were to develop models of the spread of pathogens, such as HIV-1 and influenza, in humans, and then to use the models to address the possibility of designing appropriate drug therapies that may limit the ability of the pathogen to escape treatment by mutating into a drug resistant form. We have developed a model of drug-resistance to amantidine and rimantadine, the two major antiviral drugs used to treat influenza, and have used the model to suggest treatment strategies during an epidemic.

  20. Development of antiviral agents toward enterovirus 71 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourianfar, Hamid Reza; Grollo, Lara

    2015-02-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection remains a public health problem at a global level, particularly in the Asia-Pacific region. The infection normally manifests as hand-foot-mouth disease; however, it is capable of developing into potentially fatal neurological complications. There is currently no approved vaccine or antiviral substance available for the prevention or treatment of EV71 infection. This paper, thus, reviews efforts to develop or discover synthetic as well as naturally occurring compounds directed against EV71 infection. The recent achievements in cellular receptors of EV71 are also highlighted, and their contribution to the development of antiviral drugs against EV71 is discussed in this article. PMID:24560700

  1. Computational design of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for selective targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Gregg A.; Bevan, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting diseased cells and tissues.Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting

  2. Novel four-drug salvage treatment regimens after failure of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease inhibitor-containing regimen: antiviral activity and correlation of baseline phenotypic drug susceptibility with virologic outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeks, S G; Hellmann, N S; Grant, R M; Parkin, N T; Petropoulos, C J; Becker, M; Symonds, W; Chesney, M; Volberding, P A

    1999-06-01

    Twenty human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients experiencing virologic failure of an indinavir- or ritonavir-containing treatment regimen were evaluated in a prospective, open-label study. Subjects received nelfinavir, saquinavir, abacavir, and either another nucleoside analog (n=10) or nevirapine (n=10). Patients treated with the nevirapine-containing regimen experienced significantly greater virologic suppression at week 24 than those not treated with nevirapine (P=.04). Baseline phenotypic drug susceptibility was strongly correlated with outcome in both treatment arms. Subjects with baseline virus phenotypically sensitive to 2 or 3 drugs in the salvage regimen experienced significantly greater virus load suppression than those with baseline virus sensitive to 0 or 1 drug (median week-24 change=-2.24 log and -0.35 log, respectively; P=.01). In conclusion, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors may represent a potent drug in salvage therapy regimens after failure of an indinavir or ritonavir regimen. Phenotypic resistance testing may provide a useful tool for selecting more effective salvage regimens. PMID:10228057

  3. Exploiting Genetic Interference for Antiviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkegaard, Karla A.; Weinberger, Leor S.

    2016-01-01

    Rapidly evolving viruses are a major threat to human health. Such viruses are often highly pathogenic (e.g., influenza virus, HIV, Ebola virus) and routinely circumvent therapeutic intervention through mutational escape. Error-prone genome replication generates heterogeneous viral populations that rapidly adapt to new selection pressures, leading to resistance that emerges with treatment. However, population heterogeneity bears a cost: when multiple viral variants replicate within a cell, they can potentially interfere with each other, lowering viral fitness. This genetic interference can be exploited for antiviral strategies, either by taking advantage of a virus’s inherent genetic diversity or through generating de novo interference by engineering a competing genome. Here, we discuss two such antiviral strategies, dominant drug targeting and therapeutic interfering particles. Both strategies harness the power of genetic interference to surmount two particularly vexing obstacles—the evolution of drug resistance and targeting therapy to high-risk populations—both of which impede treatment in resource-poor settings. PMID:27149616

  4. Exploiting Genetic Interference for Antiviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Elizabeth J; Kirkegaard, Karla A; Weinberger, Leor S

    2016-05-01

    Rapidly evolving viruses are a major threat to human health. Such viruses are often highly pathogenic (e.g., influenza virus, HIV, Ebola virus) and routinely circumvent therapeutic intervention through mutational escape. Error-prone genome replication generates heterogeneous viral populations that rapidly adapt to new selection pressures, leading to resistance that emerges with treatment. However, population heterogeneity bears a cost: when multiple viral variants replicate within a cell, they can potentially interfere with each other, lowering viral fitness. This genetic interference can be exploited for antiviral strategies, either by taking advantage of a virus's inherent genetic diversity or through generating de novo interference by engineering a competing genome. Here, we discuss two such antiviral strategies, dominant drug targeting and therapeutic interfering particles. Both strategies harness the power of genetic interference to surmount two particularly vexing obstacles-the evolution of drug resistance and targeting therapy to high-risk populations-both of which impede treatment in resource-poor settings. PMID:27149616

  5. Exploiting Genetic Interference for Antiviral Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth J Tanner

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rapidly evolving viruses are a major threat to human health. Such viruses are often highly pathogenic (e.g., influenza virus, HIV, Ebola virus and routinely circumvent therapeutic intervention through mutational escape. Error-prone genome replication generates heterogeneous viral populations that rapidly adapt to new selection pressures, leading to resistance that emerges with treatment. However, population heterogeneity bears a cost: when multiple viral variants replicate within a cell, they can potentially interfere with each other, lowering viral fitness. This genetic interference can be exploited for antiviral strategies, either by taking advantage of a virus's inherent genetic diversity or through generating de novo interference by engineering a competing genome. Here, we discuss two such antiviral strategies, dominant drug targeting and therapeutic interfering particles. Both strategies harness the power of genetic interference to surmount two particularly vexing obstacles-the evolution of drug resistance and targeting therapy to high-risk populations-both of which impede treatment in resource-poor settings.

  6. [Antiviral activity of aqueous extracts of the birch fungus Inonotus obliquus on the human immunodeficiency virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibnev, V A; Garaev, T M; Finogenova, M P; Kalnina, L B; Nosik, D N

    2015-01-01

    Fractions of aqueous and water-alcohol extracts of the birch fungus Inonotus obliquus have antiviral effect against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Antiviral properties of low toxic extracts were manifested in the concentration of 5.0 μg/ml upon simultaneous application with the virus in the lymphoblastoid cells culture MT-4. The extract of the birch fungus can be used for development of new antiviral drugs, inhibitors of HIV-replication when used both in the form of individual drugs and as a part of complex therapy. PMID:26182655

  7. Liposomal Systems as Nanocarriers for the Antiviral Agent Ivermectin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croci, Romina; Bottaro, Elisabetta; Chan, Kitti Wing Ki; Watanabe, Satoru; Pezzullo, Margherita; Mastrangelo, Eloise; Nastruzzi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    RNA virus infections can lead to the onset of severe diseases such as fever with haemorrhage, multiorgan failure, and mortality. The emergence and reemergence of RNA viruses continue to pose a significant public health threat worldwide with particular attention to the increasing incidence of flaviviruses, among others Dengue, West Nile Virus, and Yellow Fever viruses. Development of new and potent antivirals is thus urgently needed. Ivermectin, an already known antihelminthic drug, has shown potent effects in vitro on Flavivirus helicase, with EC50 values in the subnanomolar range for Yellow Fever and submicromolar EC50 for Dengue Fever, Japanese encephalitis, and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. However ivermectin is hampered in its application by pharmacokinetic problems (little solubility and high cytotoxicity). To overcome such problems we engineered different compositions of liposomes as ivermectin carriers characterizing and testing them on several cell lines for cytotoxicity. The engineered liposomes were less cytotoxic than ivermectin alone and they showed a significant increase of the antiviral activity in all the Dengue stains tested (1, 2, and S221). In the current study ivermectin is confirmed to be an effective potential antiviral and liposomes, as drug carriers, are shown to modulate the drug activity. All together the results represent a promising starting point for future improvement of ivermectin as antiviral and its delivery. PMID:27242902

  8. Small molecules with antiviral activity against the Ebola virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litterman, Nadia; Lipinski, Christopher; Ekins, Sean

    2015-01-01

    The recent outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa has highlighted the clear shortage of broad-spectrum antiviral drugs for emerging viruses. There are numerous FDA approved drugs and other small molecules described in the literature that could be further evaluated for their potential as antiviral compounds. These molecules are in addition to the few new antivirals that have been tested in Ebola patients but were not originally developed against the Ebola virus, and may play an important role as we await an effective vaccine. The balance between using FDA approved drugs versus novel antivirals with minimal safety and no efficacy data in humans should be considered. We have evaluated 55 molecules from the perspective of an experienced medicinal chemist as well as using simple molecular properties and have highlighted 16 compounds that have desirable qualities as well as those that may be less desirable. In addition we propose that a collaborative database for sharing such published and novel information on small molecules is needed for the research community studying the Ebola virus. PMID:25713700

  9. Liposomal Systems as Nanocarriers for the Antiviral Agent Ivermectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croci, Romina; Bottaro, Elisabetta; Chan, Kitti Wing Ki; Watanabe, Satoru; Pezzullo, Margherita; Mastrangelo, Eloise; Nastruzzi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    RNA virus infections can lead to the onset of severe diseases such as fever with haemorrhage, multiorgan failure, and mortality. The emergence and reemergence of RNA viruses continue to pose a significant public health threat worldwide with particular attention to the increasing incidence of flaviviruses, among others Dengue, West Nile Virus, and Yellow Fever viruses. Development of new and potent antivirals is thus urgently needed. Ivermectin, an already known antihelminthic drug, has shown potent effects in vitro on Flavivirus helicase, with EC50 values in the subnanomolar range for Yellow Fever and submicromolar EC50 for Dengue Fever, Japanese encephalitis, and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. However ivermectin is hampered in its application by pharmacokinetic problems (little solubility and high cytotoxicity). To overcome such problems we engineered different compositions of liposomes as ivermectin carriers characterizing and testing them on several cell lines for cytotoxicity. The engineered liposomes were less cytotoxic than ivermectin alone and they showed a significant increase of the antiviral activity in all the Dengue stains tested (1, 2, and S221). In the current study ivermectin is confirmed to be an effective potential antiviral and liposomes, as drug carriers, are shown to modulate the drug activity. All together the results represent a promising starting point for future improvement of ivermectin as antiviral and its delivery. PMID:27242902

  10. Liposomal Systems as Nanocarriers for the Antiviral Agent Ivermectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina Croci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA virus infections can lead to the onset of severe diseases such as fever with haemorrhage, multiorgan failure, and mortality. The emergence and reemergence of RNA viruses continue to pose a significant public health threat worldwide with particular attention to the increasing incidence of flaviviruses, among others Dengue, West Nile Virus, and Yellow Fever viruses. Development of new and potent antivirals is thus urgently needed. Ivermectin, an already known antihelminthic drug, has shown potent effects in vitro on Flavivirus helicase, with EC50 values in the subnanomolar range for Yellow Fever and submicromolar EC50 for Dengue Fever, Japanese encephalitis, and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. However ivermectin is hampered in its application by pharmacokinetic problems (little solubility and high cytotoxicity. To overcome such problems we engineered different compositions of liposomes as ivermectin carriers characterizing and testing them on several cell lines for cytotoxicity. The engineered liposomes were less cytotoxic than ivermectin alone and they showed a significant increase of the antiviral activity in all the Dengue stains tested (1, 2, and S221. In the current study ivermectin is confirmed to be an effective potential antiviral and liposomes, as drug carriers, are shown to modulate the drug activity. All together the results represent a promising starting point for future improvement of ivermectin as antiviral and its delivery.

  11. Antiviral activity of monoterpenes beta-pinene and limonene against herpes simplex virus in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Astani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils are complex mixtures containing compounds of several different functional- group classes. Depending on the structure, we can distinguish monoterpenes, phenylpropanes, and other components. Here in this study two monoterpene compounds of essential oils, i.e. β-pinene and limonene were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 in vitro.All antiviral assays were performed using RC-37 cells. Cytotoxicity was determined in a neutral red assay, antiviral assays were performed with HSV-1 strain KOS. The mode of antiviral action was evaluated at different periods during the viral replication cycle. Acyclovir was used as positive antiviral control.Beta-pinenene and limonenen reduced viral infectivity by 100 %. The mode of antiviral action has been determined, only moderate antiviral effects were revealed by monoterpenes when these drugs were added to host cells prior infection or after entry of HSV into cells. However, both monoterpenes exhibited high anti-HSV-1 activity by direct interaction with free virus particles. Both tested drugs interacted with HSV-1 in a dose-dependent manner thereby inactivating viral infection.These results suggest that monoterpenes in essential oils exhibit antiherpetic activity in the early phase of viral multiplication and might be used as potential antiviral agents.

  12. Novel anti-tuberculosis drug designs by data mining for similarity in substituent substitution and structure modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Lee Bartzatt

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB is among the most common of infectious diseases that cause death, and as many as one-third of the world’s population may be infected. This work presents 17 novel hydrazide agents formed by focused in silico data mining utilizing search parameters restricted to substituent replacement only. Substituent substitution has been highly successful in design of novel antibacterial and antiviral drugs. This diverse set of hydrazide constructs possess molecular properties indicating favorable bioavailability with excellent intestinal absorption for oral administration. All agents have zero violations of the Rule of 5, indicating favorable druglikeness. Important pharmaceutical properties including polar surface area, Log P, and formula weight were determined and compared to that of the parent structure of isoniazid by hierarchical cluster analysis and discriminant analysis. The average Log P with range is -0.258 and -2.165 to 1.373, respectively. The average polar surface area (PSA with range is 75.19 A2 and 55.121 A2 to 94.036 A2, respectively. The diverse range of PSA and Log P, with other descriptors, portend a versatile group of hydrazide drugs having substantial potential to expand the application and effectiveness for clinical treatment of multi-organ infected TB patients. Analysis of similarity indicated that all 17 agents are significantly similar to isoniazid, however discriminant analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis are able to differentiate isoniazid based upon molecular properties. Molecular weight and number of atoms were highly correlated by Pearson r (r > 0.9000, with Log P moderately correlated (r > 0.5500 to number of atoms, molecular weight, and volume. Seventeen hydrazide compounds (success rate of approximately 38% having diverse pharmaceutical properties resulted from substituent data mining with potential for clinical application.

  13. Using Free Computational Resources to Illustrate the Drug Design Process in an Undergraduate Medicinal Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Ricardo P.; Andrade, Saulo F.; Mantoani, Susimaire P.; Eifler-Lima, Vera L.; Silva, Vinicius B.; Kawano, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in, and dissemination of, computer technologies in the field of drug research now enable the use of molecular modeling tools to teach important concepts of drug design to chemistry and pharmacy students. A series of computer laboratories is described to introduce undergraduate students to commonly adopted "in silico" drug design…

  14. Pharmacogenomics of the human ABC transporter ABCG2: from functional evaluation to drug molecular design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Toshihisa; Tamura, Ai; Saito, Hikaru; Wakabayashi, Kanako; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2005-10-01

    In the post-genome-sequencing era, emerging genomic technologies are shifting the paradigm for drug discovery and development. Nevertheless, drug discovery and development still remain high-risk and high-stakes ventures with long and costly timelines. Indeed, the attrition of drug candidates in preclinical and development stages is a major problem in drug design. For at least 30% of the candidates, this attrition is due to poor pharmacokinetics and toxicity. Thus, pharmaceutical companies have begun to seriously re-evaluate their current strategies of drug discovery and development. In that light, we propose that a transport mechanism-based design might help to create new, pharmacokinetically advantageous drugs, and as such should be considered an important component of drug design strategy. Performing enzyme- and/or cell-based drug transporter, interaction tests may greatly facilitate drug development and allow the prediction of drug-drug interactions. We recently developed methods for high-speed functional screening and quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis to study the substrate specificity of ABC transporters and to evaluate the effect of genetic polymorphisms on their function. These methods would provide a practical tool to screen synthetic and natural compounds, and these data can be applied to the molecular design of new drugs. In this review article, we present an overview on the genetic polymorphisms of human ABC transporter ABCG2 and new camptothecin analogues that can circumvent AGCG2-associated multidrug resistance of cancer.

  15. Drug: D07441 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D07441 Drug Amantadine (INN) C10H17N 151.1361 151.2487 D07441.gif Antiviral, Antiparkinson...synapse Transporter: SLC22A2 [HSA:6582] map07044 Antiviral agents map07057 Antiparkinson...inson Agents Antiparkinson Agents, Other Amantadine D07441 Amantadine (INN) Antivir...ntane derivatives N04BB01 Amantadine D07441 Amantadine (INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antipark

  16. Protein crystallization for drug design in the last 50 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stura, Enrico A.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We live in an era where we expect to be able to visit our doctor and obtain a pill to cure any ailment from which we suffer. Yet, this is still not the case. Many of the current cures are still derived from natural sources although new drugs are increasingly the result of intelligent design. In this process, X-ray protein crystallography now plays a major and effective role in the discovery of new treatments. The developments that have made this possible have evolved during the past fifty years. The methods for crystallizing macromolecules and determining their structures by X-ray crystallography have been automated and the speed for X-ray data acquisition is several orders of magnitude faster. Fifty years ago it took several years to solve a single structure. Now, several protein–ligand complexes can be determined in single day. High-throughput crystallography is considered to be a great asset to the drug discovery process, providing a fast way to tailor drug candidates to their targets by analysing their binding mode in detail. Crystallization remains the main challenge.Vivimos en una época en la que esperamos ir al médico y obtener una pastilla para curar cualquier dolencia que padezcamos; por desgracia, esta expectativa no es real. Aunque muchos de los remedios en uso provienen de fuentes naturales, la mayoría de los nuevos medicamentos son el resultado de la investigación científica. En el proceso de diseño y descubrimiento de fármacos, la cristalografía de proteínas juega un papel central. Los conocimientos que han hecho esto posible han venido evolucionando desde hace cincuenta años aproximadamente. Los métodos de cristalización de macromoléculas y la determinación de sus estructuras a través de la cristalografía de rayos X han sido automatizados y miniaturizados y la velocidad de la adquisición de datos de difracción ha aumentado en varios órdenes de magnitud. Si hace cincuenta años la resolución de una sola

  17. Antiviral Chemistry & Chemotherapy's current antiviral agents FactFile 2008 (2nd edition): RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Erik; Field, Hugh J

    2008-01-01

    Among the RNA viruses, other than the retroviruses (that is, HIV), which are dealt with separately in the current FactFile, the most important targets for the development of antiviral agents at the moment are the orthomyxoviruses (that is, influenza), the hepaciviruses (that is, hepatitis C virus [HCV]) and, to a lesser extent, the picornaviruses. Although the uncoating inhibitors amantadine and rimantadine were the first known inhibitors of influenza A, the neuraminidase inhibitors oseltamivir, zanamivir and peramivir have now become the prime antiviral drugs for the treatment of influenza A and B virus infections. For HCV infections, standard treatment consists of the combination of pegylated interferon-alpha with ribavirin, but several other antivirals targeted at specific viral functions such as the HCV protease and/ or polymerase may be expected to soon take an important share of this important market. Still untapped is the potential of a variety of uncoating inhibitors, as well as protease and/or polymerase inhibitors against the wide spectrum of picornaviruses. While ribavirin has been available for 35 years as a broad-spectrum anti-RNA virus agent, relatively new and unexplored is favipiravir (T-705) accredited with activity against influenza as well as flaviviruses, bunyaviruses and arenaviruses. PMID:18727441

  18. 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities of some steroidal cyanopyridinone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mohizea, Abdullah M; Al-Omar, Mohamed A; Abdalla, Mohamed M; Amr, Abdel-Galil E

    2012-01-01

    We herein report the 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities of some synthesized heterocyclic cyanopyridone and cyanothiopyridone derivatives fused with steroidal structure. Initially the acute toxicity of the compounds was assayed via the determination of their LD(50). All the compounds, except 3b, were interestingly less toxic than the reference drug (Prednisolone(®)). Seventeen heterocyclic derivatives containing a cyanopyridone or cyanothiopyridone rings fused to a steroidal moiety were synthesized and screened for their 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities comparable to that of Anastrozole, Bicalutamide, Efavirenz, Capravirine, Ribavirin, Oseltamivir and Amantadine as the reference drugs. Some of the compounds exhibited better 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities than the reference drugs. The detailed 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities of the synthesized compounds were reported. PMID:22057085

  19. BIOISOSTERES AND BIOISOSTERIC REPLACEMENT: A USEFUL STRATEGY FOR STRUCTURAL MODIFICATION OF LEAD COMPOUND IN DRUG DESIGN AND IN DRUG DISCOVERY

    OpenAIRE

    Ashutosh kumar Patidar

    2010-01-01

    In drug design, it is a major challenge to convert a compound with high affinity to a biological lead in to a successful drug on the market. Bioisosteres represents one approach used by the medicinal chemist for the rational modification of lead compounds into safer and more clinically effective agents. A bioisosteres can be considered as a compound resulting from the exchange of an atom or groups of atoms with another, broadly similar, atom or groups of atoms. The objective of a bioisosteri...

  20. Cre-dependent DREADD (Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hu; Aryal, Dipendra K; Olsen, Reid H J; Urban, Daniel J; Swearingen, Amanda; Forbes, Stacy; Roth, Bryan L; Hochgeschwender, Ute

    2016-08-01

    DREADDs, designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs, are engineered G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) which can precisely control GPCR signaling pathways (for example, Gq, Gs, and Gi). This chemogenetic technology for control of GPCR signaling has been successfully applied in a variety of in vivo studies, including in mice, to remotely control GPCR signaling, for example, in neurons, glia cells, pancreatic β-cells, or cancer cells. In order to fully explore the in vivo applications of the DREADD technology, we generated hM3Dq and hM4Di strains of mice which allow for Cre recombinase-mediated restricted expression of these pathway-selective DREADDs. With the many Cre driver lines now available, these DREADD lines will be applicable to studying a wide array of research and preclinical questions. genesis 54:439-446, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27194399

  1. Antiviral therapy: a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidi Bonjar, Amir Hashem

    2016-01-01

    research has yielded positive results in animal models, EVAC could be used as a supportive treatment in humans along with conventional antiviral therapies. EVAC would not be suitable for all viral infections, but could be expected to decrease the casualties resulting from blood-borne viral infections. The EVAC approach would be efficient in terms of time, effort, and expenditure in the research and treatment of blood-borne viral infections. PMID:26893542

  2. Viral Ancestors of Antiviral Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis P. Villarreal

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the ‘Big Bang’ theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features.

  3. Viral ancestors of antiviral systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Luis P

    2011-10-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the 'Big Bang' theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features. PMID:22069523

  4. 3D Printing of Medicines: Engineering Novel Oral Devices with Unique Design and Drug Release Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyanes, Alvaro; Wang, Jie; Buanz, Asma; Martínez-Pacheco, Ramón; Telford, Richard; Gaisford, Simon; Basit, Abdul W

    2015-11-01

    Three dimensional printing (3D printing) was used to fabricate novel oral drug delivery devices with specialized design configurations. Each device was loaded with multiple actives, with the intent of applying this process to the production of personalized medicines tailored at the point of dispensing or use. A filament extruder was used to obtain drug-loaded--paracetamol (acetaminophen) or caffeine--filaments of poly(vinyl alcohol) with characteristics suitable for use in fused-deposition modeling 3D printing. A multinozzle 3D printer enabled fabrication of capsule-shaped solid devices containing the drug with different internal structures. The design configurations included a multilayer device, with each layer containing drug, whose identity was different to the drug in the adjacent layers, and a two-compartment device comprising a caplet embedded within a larger caplet (DuoCaplet), with each compartment containing a different drug. Raman spectroscopy was used to collect 2-dimensional hyper spectral arrays across the entire surface of the devices. Processing of the arrays using direct classical least-squares component matching to produce false color representations of distribution of the drugs was used. This clearly showed a definitive separation between the drug layers of paracetamol and caffeine. Drug release tests in biorelevant bicarbonate media showed unique drug release profiles dependent on the macrostructure of the devices. In the case of the multilayer devices, release of both paracetamol and caffeine was simultaneous and independent of drug solubility. With the DuoCaplet design, it was possible to engineer either rapid drug release or delayed release by selecting the site of incorporation of the drug in the device; the lag-time for release from the internal compartment was dependent on the characteristics of the external layer. The study confirms the potential of 3D printing to fabricate multiple-drug containing devices with specialized design

  5. Cyclotides : Tuning Parameters Toward Their Use in Drug Design

    OpenAIRE

    Yeshak, Mariamawit Yonathan

    2012-01-01

    Cyclotides are plant proteins with a unique topology, defined as the cyclic cystine knot motif. The motif endows cyclotides with exceptional chemical and biological stability. They also exhibit a wide range of biological activities including insecticidal, cytotoxic, anti-HIV and antimicrobial effects. Hence, cyclotides have become potential candidates in the development of peptide-based drugs; either as scaffolds to stabilize susceptible peptide sequences or as drugs by their own right. In th...

  6. Design and evaluation of transdermal drug delivery system of gliclazide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinde Anilkumar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal systems are ideally suited for diseases that demand chronic treatment. Hence, an anti-diabetic agent of both therapeutic and prophylactic usage has been subjected to transdermal investigation. Gliclazide, a second-generation hypoglycemic agent, faces problems like its poor solubility, poor oral bioavailability with large individual variation and extensive metabolism. In the present work, transdermal matrix-type patches were prepared by film casting techniques on mercury using polymers like HPMC, Eudragit RL-100, and chitosan. Also an attempt was made to increase the permeation rate of drug by preparing an inclusion complex with hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin (HP β-CD. The possibility of a synergistic effect of chemical penetration enhancers (CPE (propylene glycol and oleic acid on the transdermal transport of the drug was also studied. Folding endurance was found to be high in patches containing higher amount of the Eudragit. There was increase in tensile strength with an increase in Eudragit in the polymer blend. In vitro drug release profile indicates that the drug release is sustained with increasing the amount of Eudragit in patches. The patches containing inclusion complex of drug showed higher permeation flux compared with patches containing plain drug. The result of the synergistic effect indicates that the HP β- CD in conjunction with other CPE showed a higher permeation flux.

  7. Unbalance Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship Problem Reduction in Drug Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pugazhenthi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Activities of drug molecules can be predicted by Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR models, which overcome the disadvantage of high cost and long cycle by employing traditional experimental methods. With the fact that number of drug molecules with positive activity is rather fewer than that with negatives, it is important to predict molecular activities considering such an unbalanced situation. Approach: Asymmetric bagging and feature selection was introduced into the problem and Asymmetric Bagging of Support Vector Machines (AB-SVM was proposed on predicting drug activities to treat unbalanced problem. At the same time, features extracted from structures of drug molecules affected prediction accuracy of QSAR models. Hybrid algorithm named SPRAG was proposed, which applied an embedded feature selection method to remove redundant and irrelevant features for AB-SVM. Results: Numerical experimental results on a data set of molecular activities showed that AB-SVM improved AUC and sensitivity values of molecular activities and SPRAG with feature selection further helps to improve prediction ability. Conclusion: Asymmetric bagging can help to improve prediction accuracy of activities of drug molecules, which could be furthermore improved by performing feature selection to select relevant features from the drug.

  8. In-Silico Drug Design: A revolutionary approach to change the concept of current Drug Discovery Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakhyajit Boruah, Aparoop Das, Lalit Mohan Nainwal, Neha Agarwal*, Brajesh Shankar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Computational methods play a central role in modern drug discovery process. It includes the design andmanagement of small molecule libraries, initial hit identification through virtual screening, optimization ofthe affinity as well as selectivity of hits and improving the physicochemical properties of the leadcompounds. In this review article, computational drug designing approaches have been elucidated anddiscussed. The key considerations and guidelines for virtual chemical library design and whole drugdiscovery process. Traditional approach for discovery of a new drug is a costly and time consuming affairbesides not being so productive. A number of potential reasons witness choosing the In-silico method ofdrug design to be a more wise and productive approach. There is a general perception that applied sciencehas not kept pace with the advances of basic science. Therefore, there is a need for the use of alternativetools to get answers on efficacy and safety faster, with more certainty and at lower cost. In-silico drugdesign can play a significant role in all stages of drug development from the initial lead designing to finalstage clinical development.

  9. Computational drug design strategies applied to the modelling of human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucianna Helene Santos

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Reverse transcriptase (RT is a multifunctional enzyme in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 life cycle and represents a primary target for drug discovery efforts against HIV-1 infection. Two classes of RT inhibitors, the nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs and the nonnucleoside transcriptase inhibitors are prominently used in the highly active antiretroviral therapy in combination with other anti-HIV drugs. However, the rapid emergence of drug-resistant viral strains has limited the successful rate of the anti-HIV agents. Computational methods are a significant part of the drug design process and indispensable to study drug resistance. In this review, recent advances in computer-aided drug design for the rational design of new compounds against HIV-1 RT using methods such as molecular docking, molecular dynamics, free energy calculations, quantitative structure-activity relationships, pharmacophore modelling and absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity prediction are discussed. Successful applications of these methodologies are also highlighted.

  10. Computational drug design strategies applied to the modelling of human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Lucianna Helene; Ferreira, Rafaela Salgado; Caffarena, Ernesto Raúl

    2015-11-01

    Reverse transcriptase (RT) is a multifunctional enzyme in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 life cycle and represents a primary target for drug discovery efforts against HIV-1 infection. Two classes of RT inhibitors, the nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs) and the nonnucleoside transcriptase inhibitors are prominently used in the highly active antiretroviral therapy in combination with other anti-HIV drugs. However, the rapid emergence of drug-resistant viral strains has limited the successful rate of the anti-HIV agents. Computational methods are a significant part of the drug design process and indispensable to study drug resistance. In this review, recent advances in computer-aided drug design for the rational design of new compounds against HIV-1 RT using methods such as molecular docking, molecular dynamics, free energy calculations, quantitative structure-activity relationships, pharmacophore modelling and absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity prediction are discussed. Successful applications of these methodologies are also highlighted. PMID:26560977

  11. Antiviral Effect Assay of Aqueous Extract of Echium Amoenum-L against HSV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malihe Farahani

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medicinal plants have been used for different diseases in past. There is an increasing need for substances with antiviral activity since the treatment of viral infections with the available antiviral drugs often leads to the problem of viral resistance. Therefore in the present study Echium amoenum L plant with ethnomedical background was screened for antiviral activity against HSV-1 in different times. Materials and Methods: Flower part of Echium amoenum L plant collected from Iran was extracted with different methods to obtain crude aqueous extract. This extract was screened for its cytotoxicity against Hep II cell line by CPE assay. Antiviral properties of the plant extract were determined by cytopathic effect inhibition assay.Results: Echium amoenum L extract exhibited significant antiviral activity at non toxic concentrations to the cell line used. Findings indicated that plant extract has the most antiviral activity when it used an hour after virus inoculation.Conclusion: Echium amoenum L plant had not toxic effect at highest concentrations to the cell lines used and showed the most antiviral activity when it used an hour after virus inoculation. Further research is needed to elucidate the active constituents of this plant which may be useful in the development of new and effective antiviral agents.

  12. Design and evaluation of a PEGylated lipopeptide equipped with drug-interactive motifs as an improved drug carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Lu, Jianqin; Huang, Yixian; Zhao, Wenchen; Zhang, Yifei; Zhang, Xiaolan; Li, Jiang; Venkataramanan, Raman; Gao, Xiang; Li, Song

    2014-01-01

    Micelles are attractive delivery systems for hydrophobic drugs due to their small size and the ease of application. However, the limited drug loading capacity and the intrinsic poor stability of drug-loaded formulations represent two major issues for some micellar systems. In this study, we designed and synthesized a micelle-forming PEG-lipopeptide conjugate with two Fmoc groups located at the interfacial region, and two oleoyl chains as the hydrophobic core. The significance of Fmoc groups as a broadly applicable drug-interactive motif that enhances the carrier-drug interaction was examined using eight model drugs of diverse structures. Compared with an analogue without carrying a Fmoc motif, PEG5000-(Fmoc-OA)₂ demonstrated a lower value of critical micelle concentration and three-fold increases of loading capacity for paclitaxel (PTX). These micelles showed tubular structures and small particle sizes (∼70 nm), which can be lyophilized and readily reconstituted with water without significant changes in particle sizes. Fluorescence quenching study illustrated the Fmoc/PTX π-π stacking contributes to the carrier/PTX interaction, and drug-release study demonstrated a much slower kinetics than Taxol, a clinically used PTX formulation. PTX/PEG5000-(Fmoc-OA)₂ mixed micelles exhibited higher levels of cytotoxicity than Taxol in several cancer cell lines and more potent inhibitory effects on tumor growth than Taxol in a syngeneic murine breast cancer model (4T1.2). We have further shown that seven other drugs can be effectively formulated in PEG5000-(Fmoc-OA)₂ micelles. Our study suggests that micelle-forming PEG-lipopeptide surfactants with interfacial Fmoc motifs may represent a promising formulation platform for a broad range of drugs with diverse structures. PMID:24281690

  13. Mechanisms of virus resistance and antiviral activity of snake venoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JVR Rivero

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses depend on cell metabolism for their own propagation. The need to foster an intimate relationship with the host has resulted in the development of various strategies designed to help virus escape from the defense mechanisms present in the host. Over millions of years, the unremitting battle between pathogens and their hosts has led to changes in evolution of the immune system. Snake venoms are biological resources that have antiviral activity, hence substances of significant pharmacological value. The biodiversity in Brazil with respect to snakes is one of the richest on the planet; nevertheless, studies on the antiviral activity of venom from Brazilian snakes are scarce. The antiviral properties of snake venom appear as new promising therapeutic alternative against the defense mechanisms developed by viruses. In the current study, scientific papers published in recent years on the antiviral activity of venom from various species of snakes were reviewed. The objective of this review is to discuss the mechanisms of resistance developed by viruses and the components of snake venoms that present antiviral activity, particularly, enzymes, amino acids, peptides and proteins.

  14. Drug: D03256 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D03256 Drug Valganciclovir hydrochloride (JAN/USAN); Valcyte (TN) C14H22N6O5. HCl 3...90.1418 390.8226 D03256.gif Antiviral [DS:H00368] Therapeutic category: 6250 ATC code: J05AB14 prodrug, active substance: Ganciclov...ms and parasites 62 Chemotherapeutics 625 Antivirals 6250 Antivirals D03256 Valganciclovir hydrochloride (JA...nd nucleotides excl. reverse transcriptase inhibitors J05AB14 Valganciclovir D03256 Valganciclovir hydrochlo...ride (JAN/USAN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-cytomegalovirus (CMV) Agents Valganciclovir D03256 Valganciclov

  15. Drug: D00333 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00333 Drug Ganciclovir (JAN/USP/INN); Cytovene (TN); Vitrasert (TN) C9H13N5O4 255....ic organisms and parasites 62 Chemotherapeutics 625 Antivirals 6250 Antivirals D00333 Ganciclovir (JAN/USP/I...ucleotides excl. reverse transcriptase inhibitors J05AB06 Ganciclovir D00333 Ganciclovir (JAN/USP/INN) S SEN...SORY ORGANS S01 OPHTHALMOLOGICALS S01A ANTIINFECTIVES S01AD Antivirals S01AD09 Ganciclovir D00333 Ganciclovi...r (JAN/USP/INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-cytomegalovirus (CMV) Agents Ganciclo

  16. IN SILICO MODELLING AND DRUG DESIGN – A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Praveen kumar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Bioinformatics and Computational biology is an interdisciplinary field that applies the techniques of computer science, applied mathematics and statistics to address biological problems. Research in computational biology often overlaps with systems biology. Major research efforts in the field include sequence alignment, gene finding, genome assembly, protein structure alignment, protein structure prediction, prediction of gene expression and protein-protein interactions, and the in silico drug modelling. Drug discovery is an intense, lengthy and interdisciplinary endeavour. It is mostly portrayed as a linear, consecutive process that starts with target and lead discovery, followed by lead optimization and pre-clinical in vivo and in vitro studies to determine if such compounds satisfy a numbers of pre-set criteria for initiating clinical developments. In silico methods help in identifying drug targets via bioinformatics tools. They can be used to analyze the target structures for possible binding sites, generate candidate molecules, check for their drug likeness, dock these molecules with the target, rank them according to their binding affinities and further optimize the molecules to improve binding characteristics.

  17. Antiviral effect of lithium chloride on infection of cells by canine parvovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Pei; Fu, Xinliang; Yan, Zhongshan; Fang, Bo; Huang, San; Fu, Cheng; Hong, Malin; Li, Shoujun

    2015-11-01

    Canine parvovirus type 2 causes significant viral disease in dogs, with high morbidity, high infectivity, and high mortality. Lithium chloride is a potential antiviral drug for viruses. We determined the antiviral effect of Lithium Chloride on canine parvovirus type 2 in feline kidney cells. The viral DNA and proteins of canine parvovirus were suppressed in a dose-dependent manner by lithium chloride. Further investigation verified that viral entry into cells was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by lithium chloride. These results indicated that lithium chloride could be a potential antiviral drug for curing dogs with canine parvovirus infection. The specific steps of canine parvovirus entry into cells that are affected by lithium chloride and its antiviral effect in vivo should be explored in future studies. PMID:26315688

  18. Beyond THC: the new generation of cannabinoid designer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana eFattore

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic cannabinoids are functionally similar to delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, the psychoactive principle of cannabis, and bind to the same cannabinoid receptors in the brain and peripheral organs. From 2008, synthetic cannabinoids were detected in herbal smoking mixtures sold on websites and in head shops under the brand name of Spice Gold, Yucatan Fire, Aroma, and others. Although these products (also known as Spice drugs or legal highs do not contain tobacco or cannabis, when smoked they produce effects similar to THC. Intoxication, withdrawal, psychosis and death have been recently reported after consumption, posing difficult social, political and health challenges. More than 140 different Spice products have been identified to date. The ability to induce strong cannabis-like psychoactive effects, along with the fact that they are readily available on the Internet, still legal in many countries, marketed as natural safe substances, and undetectable by conventional drug screening tests, has rendered these drugs very popular and particularly appealing to young and drug-naïve individuals seeking new experiences. An escalating number of compounds with cannabinoid receptor activity are currently being found as ingredients of Spice, of which almost nothing is known in terms of pharmacology, toxicology and safety. Since legislation started to control the synthetic cannabinoids identified in these herbal mixtures, many new analogs have appeared on the market. New cannabimimetic compounds are likely to be synthesized in the near future to replace banned synthetic cannabinoids, leading to a dog chasing its tail situation. Spice smokers are exposed to drugs that are extremely variable in composition and potency, and are at risk of serious, if not lethal, outcomes. Social and health professionals should maintain a high degree of alertness for Spice use and its possible psychiatric effects in vulnerable people.

  19. 76 FR 53912 - FDA's Public Database of Products With Orphan-Drug Designation: Replacing Non-Informative Code...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration FDA's Public Database of Products With Orphan-Drug... Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Office of Orphan Products... its public database of products that have received orphan-drug designation. The Orphan Drug...

  20. Design, development and optimization of selfmicroemulsifying drug delivery system of an anti-obesity drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagruti Desai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to formulate a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS containing orlistat. The oil, surfactant and co-surfactant were decided based on the solubility studies. Pseudoternary phase diagrams were plotted, microemulsification area was determined and different formulations were prepared. Particle size, zeta potential, dispersibility test and thermodynamic stability studies were measured. In-vitro dissolution test of thermodynamically stable formulations OS-B and OS-C were carried and results were compared with those of plain drug and suspension formulation. Stability studies performed indicated that formulation OS-C remained stable over 12 months period. Thus this investigation concluded that hydrophobic drugs like orlistat can be delivered effectively through the formulation of SMEDDS.

  1. [Design and implementation of virtual reality software with psychological treatment for drug-dependent patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Zhao, Xu; Ou, Yalin; Zhang, Jingyu; Li, Qing; Liu, Zhihong

    2012-12-01

    High relapse rate of drug-dependent patients is a serious problem in the current situation. The present article describes how to design and implement virtual reality technology for drug-dependent patients with psychological treatment, with the aim at the addiction withdrawal. The software was developed based on open-source game engine for 2D models. The form of a game simulates the actual style in the day-to-day living environment of drug-dependent patients and the temptation of using drugs. The software helps the patients deal with different scenarios and different event handling, cause their own thinking, and response to the temptation from high-risk environment and from other drug-dependent patients. The function of the software is close to the real life of drug-dependent patients, and has a prospect to become a new treatment to reduce the relapse rate of drug-dependence. PMID:23469551

  2. Antiviral therapies against Ebola and other emerging viral diseases using existing medicines that block virus entry

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Jason; Wright, Edward; Molesti, Eleonora; Temperton, Nigel J.; Barclay, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Emerging viral diseases pose a threat to the global population as intervention strategies are mainly limited to basic containment due to the lack of efficacious and approved vaccines and antiviral drugs. The former was the only available intervention when the current unprecedented Ebolavirus (EBOV) outbreak in West Africa began. Prior to this, the development of EBOV vaccines and anti-viral therapies required time and resources that were not available. Therefore, focus has turned to re-purpos...

  3. Liposomal Systems as Nanocarriers for the Antiviral Agent Ivermectin

    OpenAIRE

    Romina Croci; Elisabetta Bottaro; Kitti Wing Ki Chan; Satoru Watanabe; Margherita Pezzullo; Eloise Mastrangelo; Claudio Nastruzzi

    2016-01-01

    RNA virus infections can lead to the onset of severe diseases such as fever with haemorrhage, multiorgan failure, and mortality. The emergence and reemergence of RNA viruses continue to pose a significant public health threat worldwide with particular attention to the increasing incidence of flaviviruses, among others Dengue, West Nile Virus, and Yellow Fever viruses. Development of new and potent antivirals is thus urgently needed. Ivermectin, an already known antihelminthic drug, has shown ...

  4. Miniaturization In Rational drug design of Pharmaceuticals – A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ghazala Yasmeen; Mohd. Ibrahim; V. Murli Balram; S. Imam Pasha; Sadaf Rahman; Mohsina Abid

    2016-01-01

    Miniaturization in High Throughput Screening (HTS) is perceived as essential by pharmaceutical screening laboratories to accommodate the enormous increase in compounds and targets over the past few years. The two primary goals are to increase throughput while decreasing costs. The ability to perform primary screening assays in high-density micro-well plates at volumes of 1–2µl will accelerate the early stages of drug discovery. Ultra-HTS (uHTS) assays require an accurate and reliable means of...

  5. Structures of mammalian ER α-glucosidase II capture the binding modes of broad-spectrum iminosugar antivirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Alessandro T; Alonzi, Dominic S; Marti, Lucia; Reca, Ida-Barbara; Kiappes, J L; Struwe, Weston B; Cross, Alice; Basu, Souradeep; Lowe, Edward D; Darlot, Benoit; Santino, Angelo; Roversi, Pietro; Zitzmann, Nicole

    2016-08-01

    The biosynthesis of enveloped viruses depends heavily on the host cell endoplasmic reticulum (ER) glycoprotein quality control (QC) machinery. This dependency exceeds the dependency of host glycoproteins, offering a window for the targeting of ERQC for the development of broad-spectrum antivirals. We determined small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and crystal structures of the main ERQC enzyme, ER α-glucosidase II (α-GluII; from mouse), alone and in complex with key ligands of its catalytic cycle and antiviral iminosugars, including two that are in clinical trials for the treatment of dengue fever. The SAXS data capture the enzyme's quaternary structure and suggest a conformational rearrangement is needed for the simultaneous binding of a monoglucosylated glycan to both subunits. The X-ray structures with key catalytic cycle intermediates highlight that an insertion between the +1 and +2 subsites contributes to the enzyme's activity and substrate specificity, and reveal that the presence of d-mannose at the +1 subsite renders the acid catalyst less efficient during the cleavage of the monoglucosylated substrate. The complexes with iminosugar antivirals suggest that inhibitors targeting a conserved ring of aromatic residues between the α-GluII +1 and +2 subsites would have increased potency and selectivity, thus providing a template for further rational drug design. PMID:27462106

  6. Drug: D00317 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00317 Drug Famciclovir (JAN/USAN/INN); Famvir (TN) C14H19N5O4 321.1437 321.3318 D0...0317.gif Antiviral [DS:H00365] Therapeutic category: 6250 ATC code: J05AB09 S01AD07 Prodrug, active substance: Penciclov...otherapeutics 625 Antivirals 6250 Antivirals D00317 Famciclovir (JAN/USAN/INN) Anatomical Therapeutic Chemic...ptase inhibitors J05AB09 Famciclovir D00317 Famciclovir (JAN/USAN/INN) S SENSORY ORGANS S01 OPHTHALMOLOGICAL...S S01A ANTIINFECTIVES S01AD Antivirals S01AD07 Famciclovir D00317 Famciclovir (JAN/USAN/INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Antiherpetic Agents Famciclovir D00317 Famciclovir (JAN/USAN/INN) Antiinfectives [BR:br08307] Antivirals Anti-HSV agent DNA polym

  7. In vitro antiviral effect of germacrone on feline calicivirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongxia; Liu, Yongxiang; Zu, Shaopo; Sun, Xue; Liu, Chunguo; Liu, Dafei; Zhang, Xiaozhan; Tian, Jin; Qu, Liandong

    2016-06-01

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) often causes respiratory tract and oral disease in cats and is a highly contagious virus. Widespread vaccination does not prevent the spread of FCV. Furthermore, the low fidelity of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of FCV leads to the emergence of new variants, some of which show increased virulence. Currently, few effective anti-FCV drugs are available. Here, we found that germacrone, one of the main constituents of volatile oil from rhizoma curcuma, was able to effectively reduce the growth of FCV strain F9 in vitro. This compound exhibited a strong anti-FCV effect mainly in the early phase of the viral life cycle. The antiviral effect depended on the concentration of the drug. In addition, germacrone treatment had a significant inhibitory effect against two other reference strains, 2280 and Bolin, and resulted in a significant reduction in the replication of strains WZ-1 and HRB-SS, which were recently isolated in China. This is the first report of antiviral effects of germacrone against a calicivirus, and extensive in vivo research is needed to evaluate this drug as an antiviral therapeutic agent for FCV. PMID:26997613

  8. TRPV1: A Target for Rational Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Vincenzo; Rohacs, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective, Ca(2+) permeable cation channel activated by noxious heat, and chemical ligands, such as capsaicin and resiniferatoxin (RTX). Many compounds have been developed that either activate or inhibit TRPV1, but none of them are in routine clinical practice. This review will discuss the rationale for antagonists and agonists of TRPV1 for pain relief and other conditions, and strategies to develop new, better drugs to target this ion channel, using the newly available high-resolution structures. PMID:27563913

  9. West Nile Virus Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Pheng Lim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The outbreak of West Nile virus (WNV in 1999 in the USA, and its continued spread throughout the Americas, parts of Europe, the Middle East and Africa, underscored the need for WNV antiviral development. Here, we review the current status of WNV drug discovery. A number of approaches have been used to search for inhibitors of WNV, including viral infection-based screening, enzyme-based screening, structure-based virtual screening, structure-based rationale design, and antibody-based therapy. These efforts have yielded inhibitors of viral or cellular factors that are critical for viral replication. For small molecule inhibitors, no promising preclinical candidate has been developed; most of the inhibitors could not even be advanced to the stage of hit-to-lead optimization due to their poor drug-like properties. However, several inhibitors developed for related members of the family Flaviviridae, such as dengue virus and hepatitis C virus, exhibited cross-inhibition of WNV, suggesting the possibility to re-purpose these antivirals for WNV treatment. Most promisingly, therapeutic antibodies have shown excellent efficacy in mouse model; one of such antibodies has been advanced into clinical trial. The knowledge accumulated during the past fifteen years has provided better rationale for the ongoing WNV and other flavivirus antiviral development.

  10. Application of Design of Experiment for Floating Drug Delivery of Tapentadol Hydrochloride

    OpenAIRE

    Jagdale, Swati C.; Somnath Patil; KUCHEKAR, BHANUDAS S.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to apply design of experiment (DOE) to optimize floating drug delivery of tapentadol hydrochloride. Tapentadol hydrochloride is a synthetic opioid used as a centrally acting analgesic and effective in both experimental and clinical pain. The half-life of the drug is about 4 hours and oral dose is 50 to 250 mg twice a day. For optimization 32 full factorial design was employed for formulation of tapentadol hydrochloride tablets. Sodium bicarbonate was incorpora...

  11. Improving Protocol Design Feasibility to Drive Drug Development Economics and Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Kenneth Getz

    2014-01-01

    Protocol design complexity has increased substantially during the past decade and this in turn has adversely impacted drug development economics and performance. This article reviews the results of two major Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development studies quantifying the direct cost of conducting less essential and unnecessary protocol procedures and of implementing amendments to protocol designs. Indirect costs including personnel time, work load and cycle time delays associated with...

  12. Scientists meet in Lugano, share Computational Methods in Drug Design research

    OpenAIRE

    Micale, Barbara L.

    2005-01-01

    More than 20 stellar scientists from the United States and Europe convened for a three-day symposium recently at Casa Maderni, Virginia Tech's Center for European Studies and Architecture at Riva San Vitale, Switzerland, to discuss the scientific challenges associated with new opportunities to exploit computational approaches to drug design. The group shared research studies and findings during the symposium, Looking to the Future: Computational Methods in Drug Design, sponsored by Virginia T...

  13. Acid-mediated Lipinski’s second rule: application to drug design and targeting in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Omran, Ziad; Rauch, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    With a predicted 382.4 per 100,000 people expected to suffer from some form of malignant neoplasm by 2015, and a current death toll of 1 out of 8 deaths worldwide, improving treatment and/or drug design is an essential focus of cancer research. Multi-drug resistance is the leading cause of chemotherapeutic failure, and delivery of anticancer drugs to the inside of cancerous cells is another major challenge. Fifteen years ago, in a completely different field in which improving drug delivery is...

  14. Drug: D10518 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D10518 Drug Valaciclovir hydrochloride hydrate (JAN); Valaciclovir (TN) C13H20N6O4.... HCl. xH2O D10518.gif Antiviral [DS:H00365] Therapeutic category: 6250 ATC code: J05AB11 prodrug, active substance: Aciclov...ganisms and parasites 62 Chemotherapeutics 625 Antivirals 6250 Antivirals D10518 Valaciclovir hydrochloride ...ides and nucleotides excl. reverse transcriptase inhibitors J05AB11 Valaciclovir D10518 Valaciclovir hydroch

  15. Improving protocol design feasibility to drive drug development economics and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Kenneth

    2014-05-01

    Protocol design complexity has increased substantially during the past decade and this in turn has adversely impacted drug development economics and performance. This article reviews the results of two major Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development studies quantifying the direct cost of conducting less essential and unnecessary protocol procedures and of implementing amendments to protocol designs. Indirect costs including personnel time, work load and cycle time delays associated with complex protocol designs are also discussed. The author concludes with an overview of steps that research sponsors are taking to improve protocol design feasibility. PMID:24823665

  16. Antiviral treatment for the control of pandemic influenza: some logistical constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Arinaminpathy, N.; McLean, A. R.

    2007-01-01

    Disease control programmes for an influenza pandemic will rely initially on the deployment of antiviral drugs such as Tamiflu, until a vaccine becomes available. However, such control programmes may be severely hampered by logistical constraints such as a finite stockpile of drugs and a limit on the distribution rate. We study the effects of such constraints using a compartmental modelling approach.

  17. Price Sensitivity of Demand for Prescription Drugs: Exploiting a Regression Kink Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Marianne; Skipper, Lars; Skipper, Niels

    This paper investigates price sensitivity of demand for prescription drugs using drug purchase records for at 20% random sample of the Danish population. We identify price responsiveness by exploiting exogenous variation in prices caused by kinked reimbursement schemes and implement a regression ...... education and income are, however, more responsive to the price. Also, essential drugs that prevent deterioration in health and prolong life have lower associated average price sensitivity.......This paper investigates price sensitivity of demand for prescription drugs using drug purchase records for at 20% random sample of the Danish population. We identify price responsiveness by exploiting exogenous variation in prices caused by kinked reimbursement schemes and implement a regression...... kink design. Thus, within a unifying framework we uncover price sensitivity for different subpopulations and types of drugs. The results suggest low average price responsiveness with corresponding price elasticities ranging from -0.08 to -0.25, implying that demand is inelastic. Individuals with lower...

  18. Unsteady jet in designing innovative drug delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Mazur, Paul; Cosse, Julia; Rider, Stephanie; Gharib, Morteza

    2014-11-01

    Micro-needle injections, a promising pain-free drug delivery method, is constrained by its limited penetration depth. This deficiency can be overcome by implementing fast unsteady jet that can penetrate sub-dermally. The development of a faster liquid jet would increase the penetration depth and delivery volume of micro-needles. In this preliminary work, the nonlinear transient behavior of an elastic tube balloon in providing fast discharge is analyzed. A physical model that combines the Mooney Rivlin Material model and Young-Lapalce's Law was developed and used to investigate the fast discharging dynamic phenomenon. A proof of concept prototype was constructed to demonstrate the feasibility of a simple thumb-sized delivery system to generate liquid jet with desired speed in the range of 5-10 m/s. This work is supported by ZCUBE Corporation.

  19. Quantitative modeling of selective lysosomal targeting for drug design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Stefan; Rosania, G.; Horobin, R.W.;

    2008-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic organelles and are involved in various diseases, the most prominent is malaria. Accumulation of molecules in the cell by diffusion from the external solution into cytosol, lysosome and mitochondrium was calculated with the Fick–Nernst–Planck equation. The cell model considers...... the diffusion of neutral and ionic molecules across biomembranes, protonation to mono- or bivalent ions, adsorption to lipids, and electrical attraction or repulsion. Based on simulation results, high and selective accumulation in lysosomes was found for weak mono- and bivalent bases with intermediate...... to high log K ow. These findings were validated with experimental results and by a comparison to the properties of antimalarial drugs in clinical use. For ten active compounds, nine were predicted to accumulate to a greater extent in lysosomes than in other organelles, six of these were in the...

  20. Escape Mutations in NS4B Render Dengue Virus Insensitive to the Antiviral Activity of the Paracetamol Metabolite AM404.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Cleef, Koen W R; Overheul, Gijs J; Thomassen, Michael C; Marjakangas, Jenni M; van Rij, Ronald P

    2016-04-01

    Despite the enormous disease burden associated with dengue virus infections, a licensed antiviral drug is lacking. Here, we show that the paracetamol (acetaminophen) metabolite AM404 inhibits dengue virus replication. Moreover, we find that mutations in NS4B that were previously found to confer resistance to the antiviral compounds NITD-618 and SDM25N also render dengue virus insensitive to AM404. Our work provides further support for NS4B as a direct or indirect target for antiviral drug development. PMID:26856827

  1. Antifungal and antiviral products of marine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Pan, Wen Liang; Chan, Yau Sang; Yin, Cui Ming; Dan, Xiu Li; Wang, He Xiang; Fang, Evandro Fei; Lam, Sze Kwan; Ngai, Patrick Hung Kui; Xia, Li Xin; Liu, Fang; Ye, Xiu Yun; Zhang, Guo Qing; Liu, Qing Hong; Sha, Ou; Lin, Peng; Ki, Chan; Bekhit, Adnan A; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din; Wan, David Chi Cheong; Ye, Xiu Juan; Xia, Jiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2014-04-01

    Marine organisms including bacteria, fungi, algae, sponges, echinoderms, mollusks, and cephalochordates produce a variety of products with antifungal activity including bacterial chitinases, lipopeptides, and lactones; fungal (-)-sclerotiorin and peptaibols, purpurides B and C, berkedrimane B and purpuride; algal gambieric acids A and B, phlorotannins; 3,5-dibromo-2-(3,5-dibromo-2-methoxyphenoxy)phenol, spongistatin 1, eurysterols A and B, nortetillapyrone, bromotyrosine alkaloids, bis-indole alkaloid, ageloxime B and (-)-ageloxime D, haliscosamine, hamigeran G, hippolachnin A from sponges; echinoderm triterpene glycosides and alkene sulfates; molluscan kahalalide F and a 1485-Da peptide with a sequence SRSELIVHQR; and cepalochordate chitotriosidase and a 5026.9-Da antifungal peptide. The antiviral compounds from marine organisms include bacterial polysaccharide and furan-2-yl acetate; fungal macrolide, purpurester A, purpurquinone B, isoindolone derivatives, alterporriol Q, tetrahydroaltersolanol C and asperterrestide A, algal diterpenes, xylogalactofucan, alginic acid, glycolipid sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, sulfated polysaccharide p-KG03, meroditerpenoids, methyl ester derivative of vatomaric acid, lectins, polysaccharides, tannins, cnidarian zoanthoxanthin alkaloids, norditerpenoid and capilloquinol; crustacean antilipopolysaccharide factors, molluscan hemocyanin; echinoderm triterpenoid glycosides; tunicate didemnin B, tamandarins A and B and; tilapia hepcidin 1-5 (TH 1-5), seabream SauMx1, SauMx2, and SauMx3, and orange-spotted grouper β-defensin. Although the mechanisms of antifungal and antiviral activities of only some of the aforementioned compounds have been elucidated, the possibility to use those known to have distinctly different mechanisms, good bioavailability, and minimal toxicity in combination therapy remains to be investigated. It is also worthwhile to test the marine antimicrobials for possible synergism with existing drugs. The prospects of

  2. Simultaneous determination of four designer drugs and their major metabolites by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueguo

    2015-06-15

    A sensitive liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-ITMS) method was utilized for the simultaneous analysis of four designer drugs and their in vitro metabolites in rat liver microsome S9 fraction. Four designer drugs, including methcathinone (MC), 3,4-methylenedioxymethcathinone (MDMC), 3,4-methylenedioxy-pyrovalerone (MDPV) and 4'-methyl-α-pyrrolidinopropiophenone (MPPP), were individually incubated with rat liver microsome S9 fraction, and the incubation mixtures were pooled together and analyzed by LC-ESI-ITMS simultaneously. Besides four designer drugs, five of their main metabolites were identified via the analysis of protonated molecules and tandem mass spectrometry data. Meanwhile, the quantification analysis of four designer drugs in rat liver microsome S9 fraction was performed, the calibration curves showed good linearity in the range of 0.01-5.0μg/mL and the detection limits were below 0.03μg/mL with RSDs less than 5.9% and recovery ratios above 77.4%. The experimental results not only showed that these designer drugs could be easily metabolized in rat liver microsome, and also displayed the superiorities of the method including time and cost saving, high efficiency, sensitivity and selectivity. The studies in this study indicated that the approach could be applied in the determination of illicit drugs and their metabolites in medical, pharmaceutical and forensic investigations. PMID:25939091

  3. Design of Drug Delivery Methods for the Brain and Central Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueshen, Eric

    Due to the impermeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to macromolecules delivered systemically, drug delivery to the brain and central nervous system (CNS) is quite difficult and has become an area of intense research. Techniques such as convection-enhanced intraparenchymal delivery and intrathecal magnetic drug targeting offer a means of circumventing the blood-brain barrier for targeted delivery of therapeutics. This dissertation focuses on three aspects of drug delivery: pharmacokinetics, convection-enhanced delivery, and intrathecal magnetic drug targeting. Classical pharmacokinetics mainly uses black-box curve fitting techniques without biochemical or biological basis. This dissertation advances the state-of-the-art of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics by incorporating first principles and biochemical/biotransport mechanisms in the prediction of drug fate in vivo. A whole body physiologically-based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) modeling framework is engineered which creates multiscale mathematical models for entire organisms composed of organs, tissues, and a detailed vasculature network to predict drug bioaccumulation and to rigorously determine kinetic parameters. These models can be specialized to account for species, weight, gender, age, and pathology. Systematic individual therapy design using the proposed mechanistic PBPK modeling framework is also a possibility. Biochemical, anatomical, and physiological scaling laws are also developed to accurately project drug kinetics in humans from small animal experiments. Our promising results demonstrate that the whole-body mechanistic PBPK modeling approach not only elucidates drug mechanisms from a biochemical standpoint, but offers better scaling precision. Better models can substantially accelerate the introduction of drug leads to clinical trials and eventually to the market by offering more understanding of the drug mechanisms, aiding in therapy design, and serving as an accurate dosing tool. Convection

  4. Breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) in clinical pharmacokinetics and drug interactions: practical recommendations for clinical victim and perpetrator drug-drug interaction study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Caroline A; O'Connor, Meeghan A; Ritchie, Tasha K; Galetin, Aleksandra; Cook, Jack A; Ragueneau-Majlessi, Isabelle; Ellens, Harma; Feng, Bo; Taub, Mitchell E; Paine, Mary F; Polli, Joseph W; Ware, Joseph A; Zamek-Gliszczynski, Maciej J

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; ABCG2) limits intestinal absorption of low-permeability substrate drugs and mediates biliary excretion of drugs and metabolites. Based on clinical evidence of BCRP-mediated drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and the c.421C>A functional polymorphism affecting drug efficacy and safety, both the US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency recommend preclinical evaluation and, when appropriate, clinical assessment of BCRP-mediated DDIs. Although many BCRP substrates and inhibitors have been identified in vitro, clinical translation has been confounded by overlap with other transporters and metabolic enzymes. Regulatory recommendations for BCRP-mediated clinical DDI studies are challenging, as consensus is lacking on the choice of the most robust and specific human BCRP substrates and inhibitors and optimal study design. This review proposes a path forward based on a comprehensive analysis of available data. Oral sulfasalazine (1000 mg, immediate-release tablet) is the best available clinical substrate for intestinal BCRP, oral rosuvastatin (20 mg) for both intestinal and hepatic BCRP, and intravenous rosuvastatin (4 mg) for hepatic BCRP. Oral curcumin (2000 mg) and lapatinib (250 mg) are the best available clinical BCRP inhibitors. To interrogate the worst-case clinical BCRP DDI scenario, study subjects harboring the BCRP c.421C/C reference genotype are recommended. In addition, if sulfasalazine is selected as the substrate, subjects having the rapid acetylator phenotype are recommended. In the case of rosuvastatin, subjects with the organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1B1 c.521T/T genotype are recommended, together with monitoring of rosuvastatin's cholesterol-lowering effect at baseline and DDI phase. A proof-of-concept clinical study is being planned by a collaborative consortium to evaluate the proposed BCRP DDI study design. PMID:25587128

  5. Synthetic strategy and antiviral evaluation of diamide containing heterocycles targeting dengue and yellow fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saudi, Milind; Zmurko, Joanna; Kaptein, Suzanne; Rozenski, Jef; Gadakh, Bharat; Chaltin, Patrick; Marchand, Arnaud; Neyts, Johan; Van Aerschot, Arthur

    2016-10-01

    High-throughput screening of a subset of the CD3 chemical library (Centre for Drug Design and Discovery; KU Leuven) provided us with a lead compound 1, displaying low micromolar potency against dengue virus and yellow fever virus. Within a project aimed at discovering new inhibitors of flaviviruses, substitution of its central imidazole ring led to synthesis of variably substituted pyrazine dicarboxylamides and phthalic diamides, which were evaluated in cell-based assays for cytotoxicity and antiviral activity against the dengue virus (DENV) and yellow fever virus (YFV). Fourteen compounds inhibited DENV replication (EC50 ranging between 0.5 and 3.4 μM), with compounds 6b and 6d being the most potent inhibitors (EC50 0.5 μM) with selectivity indices (SI) > 235. Compound 7a likewise exhibited anti-DENV activity with an EC50 of 0.5 μM and an SI of >235. In addition, good antiviral activity of seven compounds in the series was also noted against the YFV with EC50 values ranging between 0.4 and 3.3 μM, with compound 6n being the most potent for this series with an EC50 0.4 μM and a selectivity index of >34. Finally, reversal of one of the central amide bonds as in series 13 proved deleterious to the inhibitory activity. PMID:27240271

  6. New designer drugs (synthetic cannabinoids and synthetic cathinones): review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottencin, Olivier; Rolland, Benjamin; Karila, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    New designer drugs (synthetic cannabinoids and synthetic cathinones) are new "legal highs" that are sold online for recreational public or private use. Synthetic cannabinoids are psychoactive herbal and chemical products that mimic the effects of cannabis when used. These drugs are available on the Internet or in head shops as incense or air fresheners to circumvent the law. Cathinone is a naturally occurring beta-ketone amphetamine analog found in the leaves of the Catha edulis plant. Synthetic cathinones are phenylalkylamine derivatives that may possess amphetamine-like properties. These drugs are sold online as bath salts. Designer drugs are often labeled as "not for human consumption" to circumvent drug abuse legislation. The absence of legal risks, the ease of obtaining these drugs, the moderate cost, and the availability via the Internet are the main features that attract users, but the number of intoxicated people presenting with emergencies is increasing. There is evidence that negative health and social consequences may affect recreational and chronic users. The addictive potential of designer drugs is not negligible. PMID:24001292

  7. Naturally surveilled space: the design of a male drug rehabilitation center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permana, A. R.; Aryanti, T.; Rahmanullah, F.

    2016-04-01

    The increase of drug addicts in Indonesia has not been supported by adequate facilities, both quantitatively and qualitatively. Despite being treated in a rehabilitation center, drug addicts may still use drugs surreptitiously and put themselves in danger. Architectural design may contribute to this either positively or negatively. This article elaborates a therapeutic design of a male rehabilitation center in the borderland of Bandung city, Indonesia. Employing the notion of natural surveillance, the rehabilitation center is designed to allow continual control over attendees without them feeling suppressed. The center design uses the behavioral approach to consider both attendees’ physical and psychological comforts, as well as their security. Building masses are designed in a way that forms an inward orientation and are laid out circularly according to the therapy processes that attendees must undertake. Moreover, rooms are planned differently in response to attendees’ unique conditions and restrictive physical requirements, such as their restriction on lighting and requirement of water for treatment. The landscape uses shady trees and vegetations as natural borders to demarcate the private zone, where attendees live, from the public area, where visitors may enter. The design is intended to provide a model for a responsive drug rehabilitation center that facilitates drug addicts’ recovery.

  8. Rational mutagenesis to support structure-based drug design: MAPKAP kinase 2 as a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Christopher

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structure-based drug design (SBDD can provide valuable guidance to drug discovery programs. Robust construct design and expression, protein purification and characterization, protein crystallization, and high-resolution diffraction are all needed for rapid, iterative inhibitor design. We describe here robust methods to support SBDD on an oral anti-cytokine drug target, human MAPKAP kinase 2 (MK2. Our goal was to obtain useful diffraction data with a large number of chemically diverse lead compounds. Although MK2 structures and structural methods have been reported previously, reproducibility was low and improved methods were needed. Results Our construct design strategy had four tactics: N- and C-terminal variations; entropy-reducing surface mutations; activation loop deletions; and pseudoactivation mutations. Generic, high-throughput methods for cloning and expression were coupled with automated liquid dispensing for the rapid testing of crystallization conditions with minimal sample requirements. Initial results led to development of a novel, customized robotic crystallization screen that yielded MK2/inhibitor complex crystals under many conditions in seven crystal forms. In all, 44 MK2 constructs were generated, ~500 crystals were tested for diffraction, and ~30 structures were determined, delivering high-impact structural data to support our MK2 drug design effort. Conclusion Key lessons included setting reasonable criteria for construct performance and prioritization, a willingness to design and use customized crystallization screens, and, crucially, initiation of high-throughput construct exploration very early in the drug discovery process.

  9. ANTIVIRAL POTENTIAL OF MEDICINAL PLANTS: AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruwali Pushpa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The term ‘Antiviral agents’ has been defined in very broad terms as substances other than a virus or virus containing vaccine or specific antibody which can produce either a protective or therapeutic effect to the clear detectable advantage of the virus infected host. The herbal medicine has a long traditional use and the major advantage over other medicines is their wide therapeutic window with rare side effects. There are some disadvantages of synthetic drugs like narrow therapeutic window and more importantly the various adverse side effects which occur quite frequently. Due to these disadvantages and other limitations, there is an increasing trend in the field of research for discovering new and noble drugs based on various herbal formulations. This review attempts to address the importance of developing therapeutic herbal formulations from various medicinal plants using the knowledge based on traditional system of medicines, the Ayurveda. Although natural products have been used by civilization since ancient times, only in recent decades has there been growing research into alternative therapies and the therapeutics use of natural products, especially those derived from plants. Plants synthesize and preserve a variety of biochemical products, many of which are extractable and used for various scientific investigations. Therefore, medicinal plants proved to be a major resort for the treatment of diseases and sicknesses by traditional healers in many societies.

  10. Cross-reactivity of designer drugs, including cathinone derivatives, in commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swortwood, Madeleine J; Hearn, W Lee; DeCaprio, Anthony P

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of synthetic heroin, designer drugs have been increasing in prevalence in the United States drug market over the past few decades. Recently, 'legal highs' sold as 'bath salts' have become a household term for one such class of designer drugs. While a number of federal and state bans have been enacted, the abuse of these designer drugs still continues. Few assays have been developed for the comprehensive detection of such compounds, so it is important to investigate how they may or may not react in presumptive screens, i.e. pre-existing commercial immunoassays. In this experiment, 16 different ELISA reagents were evaluated to determine the cross-reactivity of 30 designer drugs, including 24 phenylethylamines (including 8 cathinone derivatives), 3 piperazines, and 3 tryptamines. Cross-reactivity towards most drugs was <4% in assays targeting amphetamine or methamphetamine. Compounds such as MDA, MDMA, ethylamphetamine, and α-methyltryptamine demonstrated cross-reactivities in the range of 30-250%, but data were consistent with both manufacturer's inserts and published literature. When tested against the Randox Mephedrone/Methcathinone kit, cathinone derivatives demonstrated cross-reactivity at concentrations as low as 150 ng/ml. Since this same reagent did not cross-react with other amphetamine-like compounds, it opens the possibility to screen post-mortem specimens without the interference of putrefactive amines. All other assays demonstrated essentially no cross-reactivity towards any of the analytes evaluated. Given these results, a great need exists for more broad-range screening techniques to be applied when analyzing biological specimens by immunoassays for drugs of abuse, specifically the more recent designer drugs. PMID:23677923

  11. Multi-Step Usage of in Vivo Models During Rational Drug Design and Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles H. Williams

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article we propose a systematic development method for rational drug design while reviewing paradigms in industry, emerging techniques and technologies in the field. Although the process of drug development today has been accelerated by emergence of computational methodologies, it is a herculean challenge requiring exorbitant resources; and often fails to yield clinically viable results. The current paradigm of target based drug design is often misguided and tends to yield compounds that have poor absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion, toxicology (ADMET properties. Therefore, an in vivo organism based approach allowing for a multidisciplinary inquiry into potent and selective molecules is an excellent place to begin rational drug design. We will review how organisms like the zebrafish and Caenorhabditis elegans can not only be starting points, but can be used at various steps of the drug development process from target identification to pre-clinical trial models. This systems biology based approach paired with the power of computational biology; genetics and developmental biology provide a methodological framework to avoid the pitfalls of traditional target based drug design.

  12. 75 FR 8968 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Adaptive Design Clinical Trials for Drugs and Biologics; Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Adaptive Design Clinical Trials for Drugs and Biologics; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft...

  13. Affinity-Based Screening Technology and HCV Drug Discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bin

    2003-01-01

    @@ NS5A is one of the non-structural gene products encoded by Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and related viruses that are essential for viral replication. The amino acid sequence of NS5A is conserved between different HCV genotypes and the primary amino acid sequence of NS5A is unique to HCV and closely related viruses. Importantly, NS5A is unrelated to any human protein. This indicates that drugs designed to block the actions of NS5A could inhibit the replication of HCV without showing toxic side effects in human host cells, thus making NS5A inhibitors ideal anti-viral drugs. However, there are presently no functional assays for this essential viral protein. Therefore, conventional high throughput screening (HTS) approaches can not be used to discover antiviral drugs against NS5A.

  14. Drug: D03690 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D03690 Drug Desciclovir (USAN/INN) C8H11N5O2 209.0913 209.2052 D03690.gif Antiviral...08307] Antivirals Anti-HSV agent DNA polymerase inhibitor Purine analogue Desciclovir D03690 Desciclovir (US

  15. Drug: D04008 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2O 295.1281 295.2945 D04008.gif Antiviral used in the treatment of hepatitis B infections [DS:H00412] Therap...ntecavir D04008 Entecavir hydrate (JAN); Entecavir (USAN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-hepatitis

  16. Drug: D01937 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D01937 Drug Zanamivir hydrate (JAN); Relenza (TN) C12H20N4O7. xH2O D01937.gif Antiviral; Inhibit ... or [influenza virus neuraminidase] [DS:H00398] Therapeutic catego ... ry: 6250 ATC code: J05AH01 influenza virus A, B neuraminidase inhibitor map07044 Antivir ...

  17. Drug: D08306 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D08306 Drug Oseltamivir (INN); Agucort (TN) C16H28N2O4 312.2049 312.4045 D08306.gif Antiviral; E ... nzyme inhibitor, neuraminidase, influenza ... virus [DS:H00398] Same as: C08092 ATC code: J05AH0 ... 2 influenza virus A, B neuraminidase inhibitor map07044 Antivir ...

  18. Drug: D08775 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D08775 Mixture, Drug Abacavir sulfate - lamivudine mixt; Epzicom (TN) Abacavir sulf...emotherapeutics 625 Antivirals 6250 Antivirals D08775 Abacavir sulfate - lamivudi...ns, combinations J05AR02 Lamivudine and abacavir D08775 Abacavir sulfate - lamivu... Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTI)v Abacavir and Lamivudine D08775 Abacavir sulfate - lamivudine mixt PubChem: 96025458 ...

  19. Drug: D02764 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available OTHERAPEUTICS FOR DERMATOLOGICAL USE D06B CHEMOTHERAPEUTICS FOR TOPICAL USE D06BB Antivirals D06BB03 Aciclov...NTIINFECTIVES S01AD Antivirals S01AD03 Aciclovir D02764 Acyclovir sodium (USAN) USP drug classification [BR:...Antiinfectives [BR:br08307] Antivirals Anti-HSV agent DNA polymerase inhibitor Purine analogue Aciclovir [AT...se inhibitors J05AB01 Aciclovir D02764 Acyclovir sodium (USAN) S SENSORY ORGANS S01 OPHTHALMOLOGICALS S01A A...ECT ACTING ANTIVIRALS J05AB Nucleosides and nucleotides excl. reverse transcripta

  20. Secondary metabolites as DNA topoisomerase inhibitors: A new era towards designing of anticancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Baikar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of secondary metabolites like alkaloids, terpenoids, polyphenols and quinones are produced by the plants. These metabolites can be utilized as natural medicines for the reason that they inhibit the activity of DNA topoisomerase which are the clinical targets for anticancer drugs. DNA topoisomerases are the cellular enzymes that change the topological state of DNA through the breaking and rejoining of DNA strands. Synthetic drugs as inhibitors of topoisomerases have been developed and used in the clinical trials but severe side effects are a serious problem for them therefore, there is a need for the development of novel plant-derived natural drugs and their analogs which may serve as appropriate inhibitors with respect to drug designing. The theme for this review is how secondary metabolites or natural products inactivate the action of DNA topoisomerases and open new avenues towards isolation and characterization of compounds for the development of novel drugs with anticancer potential.

  1. Critical challenges to the design of drug-eluting medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Andrew; Junnarkar, Gunjan

    2013-04-01

    Drug-eluting devices cover a wide variety of possible product concepts. The design constraints for modified or sustained local delivery technologies that are compatible with medical devices are quite different from those constraints with any conventional dosage forms. To develop a successful development strategy from proof-of-concept to commercialization, it is of paramount importance to assess how drug delivery affects the desired mechanism of action of such combination products. Starting at the feasibility stage, the project team must have a clear understanding of the performance targets expected by patients and physicians/surgeons. In addition, R&D staff must anticipate and proactively address the differences in technical, quality and regulatory requirements from drug delivery and medical device perspectives. Through the eyes of drug delivery, this article will describe common challenges encountered in the development of drug-eluting devices and offer relevant mitigation strategies. PMID:23557288

  2. Molecular docking as a popular tool in drug design, an in silico travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruyck, Jerome; Brysbaert, Guillaume; Blossey, Ralf; Lensink, Marc F

    2016-01-01

    New molecular modeling approaches, driven by rapidly improving computational platforms, have allowed many success stories for the use of computer-assisted drug design in the discovery of new mechanism-or structure-based drugs. In this overview, we highlight three aspects of the use of molecular docking. First, we discuss the combination of molecular and quantum mechanics to investigate an unusual enzymatic mechanism of a flavoprotein. Second, we present recent advances in anti-infectious agents’ synthesis driven by structural insights. At the end, we focus on larger biological complexes made by protein–protein interactions and discuss their relevance in drug design. This review provides information on how these large systems, even in the presence of the solvent, can be investigated with the outlook of drug discovery. PMID:27390530

  3. 75 FR 52780 - Designation of Nine Counties as High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-27

    ...The Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy designated nine additional counties as High Drug Trafficking Areas pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 1706. The new counties are (1) Shelby County in Tennessee as part of the Gulf Coast HIDTA, (2) Navajo County in Arizona as part of the Southwest Border HIDTA--Arizona Region, (3) Jefferson County in New York as part of the New York/New Jersey......

  4. 76 FR 44613 - Designation of Eight Counties as High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ...The Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy has designated eight additional counties as High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 1706. The new counties are (1) Orange County in New York as part of the New York/New Jersey HIDTA; (2) Medocino County in California as part of the Northern California HIDTA; (3) Porter County in Indiana as part of the Lake County......

  5. Recent insights in nanotechnology-based drugs and formulations designed for effective anti-cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Piktel, Ewelina; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wątek, Marzena; Wollny, Tomasz; Deptuła, Piotr; Bucki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of nanotechnology provides alternative approaches to overcome several limitations of conventional anti-cancer therapy. Drug targeting using functionalized nanoparticles to advance their transport to the dedicated site, became a new standard in novel anti-cancer methods. In effect, the employment of nanoparticles during design of antineoplastic drugs helps to improve pharmacokinetic properties, with subsequent development of high specific, non-toxic and biocompatible anti...

  6. Lipophilicity in computer-aided drug design: new tools and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Oberhauser, Nils

    2014-01-01

    In the past decades computer-aided drug design (CADD) has become an integral part in the process of drug development. Computational methods require accurate description of chemical forces and interactions, of which the complex contribution of hydrophobicity is often only described by van der Waals energies. One way to achieve a more accurate description of hydrophobicity is the application of the molecular lipophilicity potential (MLP). The MLP is a molecular interaction field (MIF) that is b...

  7. Design and in Vitro Biocompatibility of a Novel Ocular Drug Delivery Device

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce Gale; Dolly J. Holt; Randon Michael Burr; Nathan Gooch; Balamurali Ambati

    2013-01-01

    The capsule drug ring (CDR) is a reservoir and delivery agent, which is designed to be placed within the capsular bag during cataract surgery. Prototypes were manufactured by hot melt extrusion of Bionate II®, a polycarbonate urethane. The devices have been optimized using Avastin® as the drug of interest. In vitro biocompatibility was assessed with human lens epithelial cell (B-3), mouse macrophage (J774A.1) and mouse fibroblast (L-929) cell lines. Cell migration and prolif...

  8. LIPOSOMAL ENCAPSULATION TECHNOLOGY A NOVEL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM DESIGNED FOR AYURVEDIC DRUG PREPARATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hemanth kumar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Liposomal Encapsulation Technology (LET is the newest delivery method used by medical researchers to transfer drugs that act as healing promoters to the definite body organs. This form of delivery system offers targeted delivery of vital compounds to the body. It has been in existence since the early 70’s. Liposomal Encapsulation Technology is a state of the art method of producing sub-microscopic bubbles called liposomes, which encapsulate various substances. These phospholipids or “liposomes” form a barrier around their contents that is resistant to enzymes in the mouth and stomach, digestive juices, alkaline solutions, bile salts, and intestinal flora, found in the human body as well as free radicals. The contents of the liposomes are therefore shielded from degradation and oxidation. This protective phospholipid shield or barrier remains unharmed until the contents of the liposome are delivered right to the target organ, gland, or system where the contents will be utilized. Natural extracts are generally degraded because of oxidation and other chemical reactions before they delivered to the target site. Our research has shown liposomal encapsulated ayurvedic preparations have shown more stability and also more efficiency when compared to traditional preparations. Size of liposomes were measured around 85-200 nm.

  9. Designer drugs: aspectos analíticos e biológicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Bulcão

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, analytical toxicologists have been facing difficulties in detecting designer drugs due to the chemical modifications on the existing structures and the speed in which they are released into the market, requiring the development and improvement of specific and appropriate analytical methods. This work is a review of the literature which summarizes the characteristics of the drugs and the analytical validated methods using conventional and unconventional matrices currently used for correct identification and quantification of the following classes of emerging drugs of abuse: derivatives of opiates, amphetamines, tryptamines, piperazines and cannabinoids.

  10. Сost-effectiveness of the second wave of protease inhibitors in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C (genotype 1 in patients not previously treated with antiviral drugs, and for relapsed disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Rudakova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The protease inhibitors (PI actively using for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C (CHC.The aim of this analysis was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of narlaprevir and simeprevir in the CHC (genotype 1 therapy in treatment-naïve patients and relapses.Material and methods. Analysis of the cost-effectiveness of simeprevir and narlaprevir was conducted from the perspective of the health care system and base on QUEST-1, QUEST-2, ASPIRE and PIONEER clinical trials. The relative risk of achieving SVR 24 compared to the peg-INF + RBV therapy was used in the model. Treatment discontinuation in patients receiving narlaprevir assumed in the absence of a SVR after 12 weeks and in patients receiving simeprevir in the SVR absence after 4 weeks. The cost of narlaprevir was calculate based on estimated registration price in case of EDL (essential pharmaceutical list approved by MOH inclusion, including VAT (10% and 10% as trade margin. Costs of other antiviral products were in line with the results of 2015 average auctions prices.Results. In the base case costs on antiviral products with narlaprevir as first-line therapy are lower compared with simeprevir by 12,2% (950,6 and 1083,0 thousand RUR, respectively, and the cost per patient with SVR 24 by 7,8%. In patients group after relapse costs on antiviral products with narlaprevir as first-line therapy will decrease compared with simeprevir by 4,3% (971,3 and 1014,7 thousand RUR, respectively, and the cost per patient with SVR 24 by 25,0%. The sensitivity analysis demonstrated a high reliability of obtained results. Thus, assuming equal clinical effectiveness of narlaprevir and simeprevir, costs of treatment naive patients will be 10.6% lower for narlaprevir group compared to simeprevir group (953,0 and 1066,0 thousand rur, respectively, and by 12,9% for the treatment of relapses (957,9 and 1100,0 thousand RUR, respectively.Conclusions. With comparable clinical efficacy and

  11. Antiviral properties of two trimeric recombinant gp41 proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisole Sébastien

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As it is the very first step of the HIV replication cycle, HIV entry represents an attractive target for the development of new antiviral drugs. In this context, fusion inhibitors are the third class of anti-HIV drugs to be used for treatment, in combination with nucleoside analogues and antiproteases. But the precise mechanism of HIV fusion mechanism is still unclear. Gp41 ectodomain-derived synthetic peptides represent ideal tools for clarifying this mechanism, in order to design more potent anti-HIV drugs. Results Two soluble trimeric recombinant gp41 proteins, termed Rgp41B and Rgp41A were designed. Both comprise the N- and C-terminal heptad repeat regions of the ectodomain of HIV-1 gp41, connected by a 7-residue hydrophilic linker, in order to mimic the trimeric fusogenic state of the transmembrane glycoprotein. Both recombinant proteins were found to inhibit HIV-1 entry into target cells in a dose-dependent manner. Rgp41A, the most potent inhibitor, was able to inhibit both X4 and R5 isolates into HeLa cells and primary T lymphocytes. X4 viruses were found to be more susceptible than R5 isolates to inhibition by Rgp41A. In order to elucidate how the trimeric recombinant gp41 protein can interfere with HIV-1 entry into target cells, we further investigated its mode of action. Rgp41A was able to bind gp120 but did not induce gp120-gp41 dissociation. Furthermore, this inhibitor could also interfere with a late step of the fusion process, following the mixing of lipids. Conclusion Taken together, our results suggest that Rgp41A can bind to gp120 and also interfere with a late event of the fusion process. Interestingly, Rgp41A can block membrane fusion without preventing lipid mixing. Although further work will be required to fully understand its mode of action, our results already suggest that Rgp41A can interfere with multiple steps of the HIV entry process.

  12. Population-wide emergence of antiviral resistance during pandemic influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed M Moghadas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The emergence of neuraminidase inhibitor resistance has raised concerns about the prudent use of antiviral drugs in response to the next influenza pandemic. While resistant strains may initially emerge with compromised viral fitness, mutations that largely compensate for this impaired fitness can arise. Understanding the extent to which these mutations affect the spread of disease in the population can have important implications for developing pandemic plans. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By employing a deterministic mathematical model, we investigate possible scenarios for the emergence of population-wide resistance in the presence of antiviral drugs. The results show that if the treatment level (the fraction of clinical infections which receives treatment is maintained constant during the course of the outbreak, there is an optimal level that minimizes the final size of the pandemic. However, aggressive treatment above the optimal level can substantially promote the spread of highly transmissible resistant mutants and increase the total number of infections. We demonstrate that resistant outbreaks can occur more readily when the spread of disease is further delayed by applying other curtailing measures, even if treatment levels are kept modest. However, by changing treatment levels over the course of the pandemic, it is possible to reduce the final size of the pandemic below the minimum achieved at the optimal constant level. This reduction can occur with low treatment levels during the early stages of the pandemic, followed by a sharp increase in drug-use before the virus becomes widely spread. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that an adaptive antiviral strategy with conservative initial treatment levels, followed by a timely increase in the scale of drug-use, can minimize the final size of a pandemic while preventing large outbreaks of resistant infections.

  13. A new antiviral screening method that simultaneously detects viral replication, cell viability, and cell toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matza-Porges, Sigal; Eisen, Kobi; Ibrahim, Hadeel; Haberman, Adva; Fridlender, Bertold; Joseph, Gili

    2014-11-01

    Viruses cause a variety of illnesses in humans, yet only a few antiviral drugs have been developed; thus, new antiviral drugs are urgently needed. Plants could be a good source of antiviral drugs, they do not have mobility and can only defend themselves by producing compounds against pathogens such as viruses in their own fix environment. These compounds may have the potential to inhibit animal and human viruses as well. In this study, a fast and reliable method for screening plant extracts for specific antiviral activity against Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) was developed. This method distinguishes between host cell death due to infectivity and multiplicity of the virus versus toxicity of the plant extract. Extracts from 80 plant and plant organs were screened using this approach. Six plant extracts showed potential to exert specific HSV-1 growth inhibition activity. In two cases, different organs from the same plant showed similar active results. With this method it is possible to screen a large number of extracts in a rapid and accurate way to detect antiviral substances against HSV-I and other viruses. PMID:25152527

  14. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Thiophene[3,2-d]pyrimidine Derivatives as HIV-1 Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors with Significantly Improved Drug Resistance Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dongwei; Fang, Zengjun; Li, Zhenyu; Huang, Boshi; Zhang, Heng; Lu, Xueyi; Xu, Haoran; Zhou, Zhongxia; Ding, Xiao; Daelemans, Dirk; De Clercq, Erik; Pannecouque, Christophe; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-09-01

    We designed and synthesized a series of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) with a piperidine-substituted thiophene[3,2-d]pyrimidine scaffold, employing a strategy of structure-based molecular hybridization and substituent decorating. Most of the synthesized compounds exhibited broad-spectrum activity with low (single-digit) nanomolar EC50 values toward a panel of wild-type (WT), single-mutant, and double-mutant HIV-1 strains. Compound 27 was the most potent; compared with ETV, its antiviral efficacy was 3-fold greater against WT, 5-7-fold greater against Y181C, Y188L, E138K, and F227L+V106A, and nearly equipotent against L100I and K103N, though somewhat weaker against K103N+Y181C. Importantly, 27 has lower cytotoxicity (CC50 > 227 μM) and a huge selectivity index (SI) value (ratio of CC50/EC50) of >159101. 27 also showed favorable, drug-like pharmacokinetic and safety properties in rats in vivo. Molecular docking studies and the structure-activity relationships provide important clues for further molecular elaboration. PMID:27541578

  15. Antiviral Activities of Several Oral Traditional Chinese Medicines against Influenza Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Lin-Lin Ma; Miao Ge; Hui-Qiang Wang; Jin-Qiu Yin; Jian-Dong Jiang; Yu-Huan Li

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is still a serious threat to human health with significant morbidity and mortality. The emergence of drug-resistant influenza viruses poses a great challenge to existing antiviral drugs. Traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) may be an alternative to overcome the challenge. Here, 10 oral proprietary Chinese medicines were selected to evaluate their anti-influenza activities. These drugs exhibit potent inhibitory effects against influenza A H1N1, influenza A H3N2, and influenza B virus...

  16. Update On Emerging Antivirals For The Management Of Herpes Simplex Virus Infections: A Patenting Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Vadlapudi, Aswani D.; Vadlapatla, Ramya K.; Ashim K. Mitra

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections can be treated efficiently by the application of antiviral drugs. The herpes family of viruses is responsible for causing a wide variety of diseases in humans. The standard therapy for the management of such infections includes acyclovir (ACV) and penciclovir (PCV) with their respective prodrugs valaciclovir and famciclovir. Though effective, long term prophylaxis with the current drugs leads to development of drug-resistant viral isolates, particularly i...

  17. Structural studies on ligand–DNA systems: A robust approach in drug design

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Surat Kumar; Prateek Pandya; Kumud Pandav; Surendra P Gupta; Arun Chopra

    2012-07-01

    Molecular docking, molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics and relaxation matrix simulation protocols have been extensively used to generate the structural details of ligand–receptor complexes in order to understand the binding interactions between the two entities. Experimental methods like NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography are known to provide structural information about ligand–receptor complexes. In addition, fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and molecular docking have also been utilized to decode the phenomenon of the ligand–DNA interactions, with good correlation between experimental and computational results. The DNA binding affinity was demonstrated by analysing fluorescence spectral data. Structural rigidity of DNA upon ligand binding was identified by CD spectroscopy. Docking is carried out using the DNA-Dock program which results in the binding affinity data along with structural information like interatomic distances and H-bonding, etc. The complete structural analyses of various drug–DNA complexes have afforded results that indicate a specific DNA binding pattern of these ligands. It also exhibited that certain structural features of ligands can make a ligand to be AT- or GC-specific. It was also demonstrated that changing specificity from AT base pairs to GC base pairs further improved the DNA topoisomerase inhibiting activity in certain ligands. Thus, a specific molecular recognition signature encrypted in the structure of ligand can be decoded and can be effectively employed in designing more potent antiviral and antitumour agents.

  18. Design, Synthesis, and Biological and Structural Evaluations of Novel HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors To Combat Drug Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parai, Maloy Kumar; Huggins, David J.; Cao, Hong; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Tidor, Bruce; Rana, Tariq M. (MIT); (UMASS, MED); (Sanford-Burnham)

    2012-09-11

    A series of new HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) were designed using a general strategy that combines computational structure-based design with substrate-envelope constraints. The PIs incorporate various alcohol-derived P2 carbamates with acyclic and cyclic heteroatomic functionalities into the (R)-hydroxyethylamine isostere. Most of the new PIs show potent binding affinities against wild-type HIV-1 protease and three multidrug resistant (MDR) variants. In particular, inhibitors containing the 2,2-dichloroacetamide, pyrrolidinone, imidazolidinone, and oxazolidinone moieties at P2 are the most potent with Ki values in the picomolar range. Several new PIs exhibit nanomolar antiviral potencies against patient-derived wild-type viruses from HIV-1 clades A, B, and C and two MDR variants. Crystal structure analyses of four potent inhibitors revealed that carbonyl groups of the new P2 moieties promote extensive hydrogen bond interactions with the invariant Asp29 residue of the protease. These structure-activity relationship findings can be utilized to design new PIs with enhanced enzyme inhibitory and antiviral potencies.

  19. Identification of Residues of SARS-CoV nsp1 That Differentially Affect Inhibition of Gene Expression and Antiviral Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauregui, Andrew R.; Savalia, Dhruti; Lowry, Virginia K.; Farrell, Cara M.; Wathelet, Marc G.

    2013-01-01

    An epidemic of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) led to the identification of an associated coronavirus, SARS-CoV. This virus evades the host innate immune response in part through the expression of its non-structural protein (nsp) 1, which inhibits both host gene expression and virus- and interferon (IFN)-dependent signaling. Thus, nsp1 is a promising target for drugs, as inhibition of nsp1 would make SARS-CoV more susceptible to the host antiviral defenses. To gain a better understanding of nsp1 mode of action, we generated and analyzed 38 mutants of the SARS-CoV nsp1, targeting 62 solvent exposed residues out of the 180 amino acid protein. From this work, we identified six classes of mutants that abolished, attenuated or increased nsp1 inhibition of host gene expression and/or antiviral signaling. Each class of mutants clustered on SARS-CoV nsp1 surface and suggested nsp1 interacts with distinct host factors to exert its inhibitory activities. Identification of the nsp1 residues critical for its activities and the pathways involved in these activities should help in the design of drugs targeting nsp1. Significantly, several point mutants increased the inhibitory activity of nsp1, suggesting that coronaviruses could evolve a greater ability to evade the host response through mutations of such residues. PMID:23658627

  20. The RNA Template Channel of the RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase as a Target for Development of Antiviral Therapy of Multiple Genera within a Virus Family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Lonneke; Vives-Adrián, Laia; Selisko, Barbara; Ferrer-Orta, Cristina; Liu, Xinran; Lanke, Kjerstin; Ulferts, Rachel; De Palma, Armando M; Tanchis, Federica; Goris, Nesya; Lefebvre, David; De Clercq, Kris; Leyssen, Pieter; Lacroix, Céline; Pürstinger, Gerhard; Coutard, Bruno; Canard, Bruno; Boehr, David D; Arnold, Jamie J; Cameron, Craig E; Verdaguer, Nuria; Neyts, Johan; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2015-01-01

    The genus Enterovirus of the family Picornaviridae contains many important human pathogens (e.g., poliovirus, coxsackievirus, rhinovirus, and enterovirus 71) for which no antiviral drugs are available. The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is an attractive target for antiviral therapy. Nucleoside-b

  1. Hepatotoxicity of piperazine designer drugs: Comparison of different in vitro models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias-da-Silva, D; Arbo, M D; Valente, M J; Bastos, M L; Carmo, H

    2015-08-01

    Piperazine derived drugs emerged on the drug market in the last decade. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the potential hepatotoxicity of the designer drugs N-benzylpiperazine (BZP), 1-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)piperazine (TFMPP), 1-(4-methoxyphenyl)piperazine (MeOPP) and 1-(3,4-methylenedioxybenzyl)piperazine (MDBP) in two human hepatic cell lines (HepaRG and HepG2) and in primary rat hepatocytes. Cell death was evaluated by the MTT assay, after 24 h-incubations. Among the tested drugs, TFMPP was the most cytotoxic. HepaRG cells and primary hepatocytes revealed to be the most and the least resistant cellular models, respectively. To ascertain whether the CYP450 metabolism could explain their higher susceptibility, primary hepatocytes were co-incubated with the piperazines and the CYP450 inhibitors metyrapone and quinidine, showing that CYP450-mediated metabolism contributes to the detoxification of these drugs. Additionally, the intracellular contents of reactive species, ATP, reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and caspase-3 activation were further evaluated in primary cells. Overall, an increase in reactive species formation, followed by intracellular GSH and ATP depletion, loss of Δψm and caspase-3 activation was observed for all piperazines, in a concentration-dependent manner. In conclusion, piperazine designer drugs produce hepatic detrimental effects that can vary in magnitude among the different analogues. PMID:25863214

  2. 77 FR 9946 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Drug Interaction Studies-Study Design, Data Analysis, Implications...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... on Drug Interaction Studies--Study Design, Data Analysis, Implications for Dosing, and Labeling... entitled ``Drug Interaction Studies--Study Design, Data Analysis, Implications for Dosing, and Labeling... vivo studies, in vivo study design, and data analysis in the context of identifying potential...

  3. 76 FR 39883 - Design of Clinical Trials for Systemic Antibacterial Drugs for the Treatment of Acute Otitis...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Design of Clinical Trials for Systemic Antibacterial Drugs... workshop regarding the design of Clinical Trials for Systemic Antibacterial Agents for the Treatment of... various aspects of the design of clinical trials. The input from this public workshop will help...

  4. Drug: D06478 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D06478 Drug Darunavir ethanolate (JAN); Prezista (TN) C27H37N3O7S. C2H6O 593.2771 5...BR:br08301] 6 Agents against pathologic organisms and parasites 62 Chemotherapeutics 625 Antivirals 6250 Antivirals D06478 Daruna...ING ANTIVIRALS J05AE Protease inhibitors J05AE10 Darunavir D06478 Darunavir ethanolate (JAN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-HIV Agents, Protease Inhibitors Darunavir D06478 Darunavir ethanolate ...08307] Antivirals Anti-HIV agent Protease inhibitor (PIs) Nonpeptidic Daruna...vir [ATC:J05AE10] D06478 Darunavir ethanolate (JAN) CAS: 635728-49-3 PubChem: 47208134

  5. Sequential design of a novel PVA-based crosslinked ethylenic homopolymer for extended drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Viness; Sibanda, Wilbert; Danckwerts, Michael P

    2005-09-14

    A Box-Behnken Design was employed to study the influence of boric acid, sodium sulfate, ammonia and n-propanol in the formulation of crosslinked ethylenic homopolymeric (CEH) gelispheres from native polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The dependent variables studied included the size of the spherical gelispheres, drug encapsulation efficiency, in vitro dissolution after 30 min and textural parameters, namely fracture force and matrix rupture energy. Based on these responses, an optimized CEH gelisphere matrix was formulated and thereafter incorporated as a powder into a candidate crosslinked zinc-pectinate multiple-unit device to assess its effect on modifying drug release. In the case of the CEH-loaded zinc-pectinate gelispheres, it was determined via constrained optimization that a maximum drug encapsulation efficiency of 28.63% could be obtained under the conditions of 0% (w/v) CEH, 13 h of crosslinking and drying temperature of 60 degrees C. On the other hand, initial drug release could be significantly retarded when 0.10% (w/v) of CEH was included in the formulation and crosslinked for 24 h at 40 degrees C. In this regard, CEH induced a 4 h lag phase. Furthermore, zero-order drug release was produced and could be maintained over several weeks. Kinetic analysis of drug release further supported that CEH inhibits polymer relaxation (k2pectinate drug delivery system appears to be a suitable carrier that may be employed for long-term administration for, e.g. via subcutaneous implantation. PMID:16023807

  6. Molecular docking as a popular tool in drug design, an in silico travel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Ruyck J

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Jerome de Ruyck, Guillaume Brysbaert, Ralf Blossey, Marc F Lensink University Lille, CNRS UMR8576 UGSF, Lille, FranceAbstract: New molecular modeling approaches, driven by rapidly improving computational platforms, have allowed many success stories for the use of computer-assisted drug design in the discovery of new mechanism- or structure-based drugs. In this overview, we highlight three aspects of the use of molecular docking. First, we discuss the combination of molecular and quantum mechanics to investigate an unusual enzymatic mechanism of a flavoprotein. Second, we present recent advances in anti-infectious agents' synthesis driven by structural insights. At the end, we focus on larger biological complexes made by protein–protein interactions and discuss their relevance in drug design. This review provides information on how these large systems, even in the presence of the solvent, can be investigated with the outlook of drug discovery.Keywords: structure-based drug design, protein–protein docking, quaternary structure prediction, residue interaction networks, RINs, water position

  7. Using the Ferret as an Animal Model for Investigating Influenza Antiviral Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ding Y; Hurt, Aeron C

    2016-01-01

    The concern of the emergence of a pandemic influenza virus has sparked an increased effort toward the development and testing of novel influenza antivirals. Central to this is the animal model of influenza infection, which has played an important role in understanding treatment effectiveness and the effect of antivirals on host immune responses. Among the different animal models of influenza, ferrets can be considered the most suitable for antiviral studies as they display most of the human-like symptoms following influenza infections, they can be infected with human influenza virus without prior viral adaptation and have the ability to transmit influenza virus efficiently between one another. However, an accurate assessment of the effectiveness of an antiviral treatment in ferrets is dependent on three major experimental considerations encompassing firstly, the volume and titer of virus, and the route of viral inoculation. Secondly, the route and dose of drug administration, and lastly, the different methods used to assess clinical symptoms, viral shedding kinetics and host immune responses in the ferrets. A good understanding of these areas is necessary to achieve data that can accurately inform the human use of influenza antivirals. In this review, we discuss the current progress and the challenges faced in these three major areas when using the ferret model to measure influenza antiviral effectiveness. PMID:26870031

  8. Using the ferret as an animal model for investigating influenza antiviral effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Yuan Oh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The concern of the emergence of a pandemic influenza virus has sparked an increased effort towards the development and testing of novel influenza antivirals. Central to this is the animal model of influenza infection, which has played an important role in understanding treatment effectiveness and the effect of antivirals on host immune responses. Among the different animal models of influenza, ferrets can be considered the most suitable for antiviral studies as they display most of the human-like symptoms following influenza infections, they can be infected with human influenza virus without prior viral adaptation and have the ability to transmit influenza virus efficiently between one another. However, an accurate assessment of the effectiveness of an antiviral treatment in ferrets is dependent on three major experimental considerations encompassing firstly, the volume and titre of virus, and the route of viral inoculation. Secondly, the route and dose of drug administration, and lastly, the different methods used to assess clinical symptoms, viral shedding kinetics and host immune responses in the ferrets. A good understanding of these areas is necessary to achieve data that can accurately inform the human use of influenza antivirals. In this review, we discuss the current progress and the challenges faced in these three major areas when using the ferret model to measure influenza antiviral effectiveness.

  9. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Mingyong; Cui, Wenxuan; Zhao, Yuanhui; Liu, Zunying; Dong, Shiyuan; Guo, Yao

    2008-08-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10 5 kDa, 5 1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10 5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  10. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10-5 kDa, 5-1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10?5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  11. Drug: D02748 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available (generical recombination) (JAN); Peginterferon alfa-2b (INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-hepatitis...(JAN); Peginterferon alfa-2b (INN) Anti-hepatitis C (HCV) Agents Peginterferon Al

  12. Design and optimization of selfnanoemulsifying drug delivery systems for enhanced dissolution of gemfibrozil

    OpenAIRE

    Sierra Villar, Ana María; Clares Naveros, Beatriz; Calpena Campmany, Ana Cristina; Aróztegui Trenchs, Montserrat; Barbé Rocabert, Coloma; Halbaut, Lyda

    2012-01-01

    Self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems of gemfibrozil were developed under Quality by Design approach for improvement of dissolution and oral absorption. Preliminary screening was performed to select proper components combination. Box-Behnken experimental design was employed as statistical tool to optimize the formulation variables, X1 (Cremophor® EL), X2 (Capmul® MCM-C8), and X3 (lemon essential oil). Systems were assessed for visual characteristics (emulsification efficacy), turbidity, ...

  13. Designing anti-cancer drugs and directing anti-cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Velasquez, Elinor; Soto-Andrade, Jorge; Bongalon, Ben

    2014-01-01

    A prototype for a web application was designed and implemented as a guide to be used by clinicians when designing the best drug therapy for a specific cancer patient, given biological data derived from the patients tumor tissue biopsy. A representation of the patients metabolic pathways is displayed as a graph in the application, with nodes as substrates and products and edges as enzymes. The top metabolically active sub- paths in the pathway, ranked using an algorithm based on both the patie...

  14. Platinum coordination complexes. From DNA interactions to new anti-tumor drug design

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brabec, Viktor

    Dubai , 2008. s. 1. [1st International Conference on Drug Design & Discovery. 04.02.2008-07.02.2008, Dubai ] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : platinum * DNA interactions * anticancer Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  15. The semiempirical quantum mechanical scoring function for in-silico drug design

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Lepšík, Martin; Řezáč, Jan; Kolář, Michal; Pecina, Adam; Nachtigallová, Dana; Hobza, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2015), s. 34. ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology . Annual Meeting of the Czech Society for Structural Biology /13./. 19.03.2015-21.03.2015, Nové Hrady] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : drug design * SQM methods * binding Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  16. Design and Evaluation of Stomach-Specific Drug Delivery of Domperidone using Floating Pectin Beads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.Varun Kumar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of present study was to develop floating beads of Domperidone (DOM in order to increase its residence time in the stomach without contact with the mucosa, improve patient compliance and obtain improved therapeutic efficacy. They are prepared by extrusion congealing technique with pectin as a polymer. Floating beads were characterized by polymer compatibility by using FT-IR. The prepared beads were evaluated for particle size, surface morphology, buoyancy, actual drug content, entrapment efficiency and in vitro drug release. Nine formulations of DOM floating beads were formulated by using different percentage of both gas forming agent and pectin. Density of the formulated beads was found to be ranging between 0.101 and 0.182 g/cm3. The particle size was distributed between 0.6 to 1.6 mm. Buoyancy percentage was 71-87% and Drug entrapment efficiency was 54.4-64.48%. The micrometric properties were found to be good and scanning electron microscopy (SEM confirmed their hollow structure with smooth surface. The content of drug release was done by UV spectrophotometer at 284 nm. In vitro drug release of DOM, for F2 is 81.10% and for F6 is 82.6%. And the beads formulated using 0.3w/w (F2 and 0.4% w/w (F6 of pectin was more uniform in shape and exhibited maximum buoyancy. The drug content of the formulated beads was found to be satisfactory by this method. It remains in the gastric region for several hours and hence prolongs the gastric residence time of drug. From the study it was concluded that the gastro retentive drug delivery system designed as floating beads could be suitable drug delivery system for DOM.

  17. Design of Drug Delivery Methods for the Brain and Central Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueshen, Eric

    Due to the impermeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to macromolecules delivered systemically, drug delivery to the brain and central nervous system (CNS) is quite difficult and has become an area of intense research. Techniques such as convection-enhanced intraparenchymal delivery and intrathecal magnetic drug targeting offer a means of circumventing the blood-brain barrier for targeted delivery of therapeutics. This dissertation focuses on three aspects of drug delivery: pharmacokinetics, convection-enhanced delivery, and intrathecal magnetic drug targeting. Classical pharmacokinetics mainly uses black-box curve fitting techniques without biochemical or biological basis. This dissertation advances the state-of-the-art of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics by incorporating first principles and biochemical/biotransport mechanisms in the prediction of drug fate in vivo. A whole body physiologically-based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) modeling framework is engineered which creates multiscale mathematical models for entire organisms composed of organs, tissues, and a detailed vasculature network to predict drug bioaccumulation and to rigorously determine kinetic parameters. These models can be specialized to account for species, weight, gender, age, and pathology. Systematic individual therapy design using the proposed mechanistic PBPK modeling framework is also a possibility. Biochemical, anatomical, and physiological scaling laws are also developed to accurately project drug kinetics in humans from small animal experiments. Our promising results demonstrate that the whole-body mechanistic PBPK modeling approach not only elucidates drug mechanisms from a biochemical standpoint, but offers better scaling precision. Better models can substantially accelerate the introduction of drug leads to clinical trials and eventually to the market by offering more understanding of the drug mechanisms, aiding in therapy design, and serving as an accurate dosing tool. Convection

  18. Drug: D02297 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n [BR:br08301] 6 Agents against pathologic organisms and parasites 62 Chemotherapeutics 625 Antivirals 6250 Ant...D02297 Mixture, Drug Emtricitabine - tenofovir disoproxil fumarate mixt; Truvada (T...N) Emtricitabine [DR:D01199], Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate [DR:D01982] Antiviral [DS:H00406] Therapeutic cate...ivirals D02297 Emtricitabine - tenofovir disoproxil fumarate mixt Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classificat...ofovir disoproxil and emtricitabine D02297 Emtricitabine - tenofovir disoproxil fumarate mixt USP drug classificat

  19. Drug: D07896 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nhibitors J05AF10 Entecavir D07896 Entecavir (INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-hepatitis...atitis B infection [DS:H00412] ATC code: J05AF10 Nucleoside reverse transcriptase i...D07896 Drug Entecavir (INN) C12H15N5O3 277.1175 277.2792 D07896.gif Antiviral agent used in treatment of hep

  20. Drug: D10081 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ease inhibitor [CPD:C18290 C18291] ko05160 Hepatitis C USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-hepatitis...D10081 Drug Simeprevir (JAN/USAN); Olysio (TN) C38H47N5O7S2 749.2917 749.9391 D10081.gif Treatment of hepati...tis C [DS:H00413] Macrocyclic antivirus Direct-acting antiviral (DAA) NS3/NS4A prot

  1. Drug: D08483 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D08483 Drug Rimantadine (INN) C12H21N 179.1674 179.3018 D08483.gif Antiviral [DS:H00398] Same as ... : C07236 ATC code: J05AC02 Adamantane derivative influenza ... A M2 proton channel blocker [VG:NC_004907_1 NC_002 ... P drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-influenza ... Agents Rimantadine D08483 Rimantadine (INN) Antiin ...

  2. Drug: D02737 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D02737 Drug Palivizumab (genetical recombination) (JAN); Palivizumab (INN); Synagis... parasites 62 Chemotherapeutics 625 Antivirals 6250 Antivirals D02737 Palivizumab (genetica...pecific immunoglobulins J06BB16 Palivizumab D02737 Palivizumab (genetical recombi...tein monoclonal antibody Palivizumab [ATC:J06BB16] D02737 Palivizumab (genetical recombination) (JAN); Palivizumab (INN) CAS: 188039-54-5 PubChem: 47205815 DrugBank: DB00110 ...

  3. 77 FR 52744 - Food and Drug Administration/European Medicines Agency Orphan Product Designation and Grant Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... Orphan Product Designation and Grant Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of meeting. The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Office of Orphan Products Development is announcing the following meeting: Food and Drug Administration/European Medicines Agency Orphan...

  4. Drug: D05407 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D05407 Drug Penciclovir (USAN/INN); Denavir (TN) C10H15N5O3 253.1175 253.2578 D0540...TICS FOR TOPICAL USE D06BB Antivirals D06BB06 Penciclovir D05407 Penciclovir (USAN/INN) J ANTIINFECTIVES FOR...s excl. reverse transcriptase inhibitors J05AB13 Penciclovir D05407 Penciclovir (...USAN/INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Antiherpetic Agents Penciclovir D05407 Penciclovir... (USAN/INN) Antiinfectives [BR:br08307] Antivirals Anti-HSV agent DNA polymerase inhibitor Purine analogue Penciclov

  5. Drug: D02124 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D02124 Drug Penciclovir sodium (USAN); Denavir (TN) C10H14N5O3. Na 275.0994 275.239...LOGICAL USE D06B CHEMOTHERAPEUTICS FOR TOPICAL USE D06BB Antivirals D06BB06 Penciclovir D02124 Penciclovir s... J05AB Nucleosides and nucleotides excl. reverse transcriptase inhibitors J05AB13 Penciclov...ir D02124 Penciclovir sodium (USAN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Antiherpetic Agents Penciclov...ir D02124 Penciclovir sodium (USAN) Antiinfectives [BR:br08307] Antivirals Anti-HSV agent DNA

  6. Drug: D04301 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D04301 Drug Ganciclovir sodium (USAN); Cytovene IV (TN) C9H12N5O4. Na 277.0787 277....DIRECT ACTING ANTIVIRALS J05AB Nucleosides and nucleotides excl. reverse transcriptase inhibitors J05AB06 Ganciclovir D04301 Ganciclo...lovir D04301 Ganciclovir sodium (USAN) USP drug classifi...cation [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-cytomegalovirus (CMV) Agents Ganciclovir D04301 Ganciclovir sodium (USAN...) Antiinfectives [BR:br08307] Antivirals Anti-CMV agent DNA polymerase inhibitor Purine analogue Ganciclovir

  7. Drug: D02495 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D02495 Drug Valganciclovir (INN) C14H22N6O5 354.1652 354.3617 D02495.gif Antiviral ...[DS:H00368] ATC code: J05AB14 prodrug, active substance: Ganciclovir [DR:D00333] DNA polymerase inhibitor [E...NTIVIRALS J05AB Nucleosides and nucleotides excl. reverse transcriptase inhibitors J05AB14 Valganciclovir D02495 Valganciclov...ir (INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-cytomegalovirus (CMV) Agents Valganciclov...ir D02495 Valganciclovir (INN) Antiinfectives [BR:br08307] Antivirals

  8. Drug: D00579 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00579 Drug Foscarnet sodium (USAN/INN); Foscavir (TN) CO5P. 3Na 191.9176 191.9508 ...d derivatives J05AD01 Foscarnet D00579 Foscarnet sodium (USAN/INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Anti...virals Anti-cytomegalovirus (CMV) Agents Foscarnet D00579 Foscarnet sodium (USAN/INN) Antiherpetic Agents Foscarnet D00579 Foscar... Anti-CMV agent DNA polymerase inhibitor Phosphonic acid derivatives Foscarnet [ATC:J05AD01] D00579 Foscarne...05 ANTIVIRALS FOR SYSTEMIC USE J05A DIRECT ACTING ANTIVIRALS J05AD Phosphonic aci

  9. Cytotoxic, Virucidal, and Antiviral Activity of South American Plant and Algae Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Faral-Tello

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 infection has a prevalence of 70% in the human population. Treatment is based on acyclovir, valacyclovir, and foscarnet, three drugs that share the same mechanism of action and of which resistant strains have been isolated from patients. In this aspect, innovative drug therapies are required. Natural products offer unlimited opportunities for the discovery of antiviral compounds. In this study, 28 extracts corresponding to 24 plant species and 4 alga species were assayed in vitro to detect antiviral activity against HSV-1. Six of the methanolic extracts inactivated viral particles by direct interaction and 14 presented antiviral activity when incubated with cells already infected. Most interesting antiviral activity values obtained are those of Limonium brasiliense, Psidium guajava, and Phyllanthus niruri, which inhibit HSV-1 replication in vitro with 50% effective concentration (EC50 values of 185, 118, and 60 μg/mL, respectively. For these extracts toxicity values were calculated and therefore selectivity indexes (SI obtained. Further characterization of the bioactive components of antiviral plants will pave the way for the discovery of new compounds against HSV-1.

  10. Colon-targeted oral drug delivery systems: design trends and approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amidon, Seth; Brown, Jack E; Dave, Vivek S

    2015-08-01

    Colon-specific drug delivery systems (CDDS) are desirable for the treatment of a range of local diseases such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic pancreatitis, and colonic cancer. In addition, the colon can be a potential site for the systemic absorption of several drugs to treat non-colonic conditions. Drugs such as proteins and peptides that are known to degrade in the extreme gastric pH, if delivered to the colon intact, can be systemically absorbed by colonic mucosa. In order to achieve effective therapeutic outcomes, it is imperative that the designed delivery system specifically targets the drugs into the colon. Several formulation approaches have been explored in the development colon-targeted drug delivery systems. These approaches involve the use of formulation components that interact with one or more aspects of gastrointestinal (GI) physiology, such as the difference in the pH along the GI tract, the presence of colonic microflora, and enzymes, to achieve colon targeting. This article highlights the factors influencing colon-specific drug delivery and colonic bioavailability, and the limitations associated with CDDS. Further, the review provides a systematic discussion of various conventional, as well as relatively newer formulation approaches/technologies currently being utilized for the development of CDDS. PMID:26070545

  11. Recent insights in nanotechnology-based drugs and formulations designed for effective anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piktel, Ewelina; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wątek, Marzena; Wollny, Tomasz; Deptuła, Piotr; Bucki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of nanotechnology provides alternative approaches to overcome several limitations of conventional anti-cancer therapy. Drug targeting using functionalized nanoparticles to advance their transport to the dedicated site, became a new standard in novel anti-cancer methods. In effect, the employment of nanoparticles during design of antineoplastic drugs helps to improve pharmacokinetic properties, with subsequent development of high specific, non-toxic and biocompatible anti-cancer agents. However, the physicochemical and biological diversity of nanomaterials and a broad spectrum of unique features influencing their biological action requires continuous research to assess their activity. Among numerous nanosystems designed to eradicate cancer cells, only a limited number of them entered the clinical trials. It is anticipated that progress in development of nanotechnology-based anti-cancer materials will provide modern, individualized anti-cancer therapies assuring decrease in morbidity and mortality from cancer diseases. In this review we discussed the implication of nanomaterials in design of new drugs for effective antineoplastic therapy and describe a variety of mechanisms and challenges for selective tumor targeting. We emphasized the recent advantages in the field of nanotechnology-based strategies to fight cancer and discussed their part in effective anti-cancer therapy and successful drug delivery. PMID:27229857

  12. Crystals of Human Serum Albumin for Use in Genetic Engineering and Rational Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    This invention pertains to crystals of serum albumin and processes for growing them. The purpose of the invention is to provide crystals of serum albumin which can be studied to determine binding sites for drugs. Form 2 crystals grow in the monoclinic space P2(sub 1), and possesses the following unit cell constraints: a = 58.9 +/- 7, b = 88.3 +/- 7, c = 60.7 +/- 7, Beta = 101.0 +/- 2 degrees. One advantage of the invention is that it will allow rational drug design

  13. Design of HIV Protease Inhibitors Targeting Protein Backbone: An Effective Strategy for Combating Drug Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Chapsal, Bruno D.; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki (GSU); (Kumamoto Univ., Japan); (Purdue)

    2008-06-03

    The discovery of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors (PIs) and their utilization in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have been a major turning point in the management of HIV/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS). However, despite the successes in disease management and the decrease of HIV/AIDS-related mortality, several drawbacks continue to hamper first-generation protease inhibitor therapies. The rapid emergence of drug resistance has become the most urgent concern because it renders current treatments ineffective and therefore compels the scientific community to continue efforts in the design of inhibitors that can efficiently combat drug resistance.

  14. Transdermal Delivery and Cutaneous Targeting of Antivirals using a Penetration Enhancer and Lysolipid Prodrugs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Diblíková, D.; Kopečná, M.; Školová, B.; Krečmerová, Marcela; Roh, J.; Hrabálek, A.; Vávrová, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 4 (2014), s. 1071-1081. ISSN 0724-8741 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/11/0365 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : acyclic nucleoside phosphonate antivirals * lysolipid prodrug * penetration enhancer * skin absorption * transdermal drug delivery Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 3.420, year: 2014

  15. Design and characterisation of matrix tablets of highly water soluble drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayalakshmi Prakya

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Tramadol HCL is a centrally acting opioid analgesic. Although the drug has a higher plasma half life, the steady state plasma concentration is not achieved with frequent dosing of q.i.d at 6 hour intervals. Therefore, the objective of the present work was to formulate a 100mg strength Tramadol matrix tablets to extend the drug release and thus decrease the dosing frequency and achieve steady state plasma concentration. Initially, preformulation studies were carried out to rule out any incompatibility between the drug and the chosen polymer(s after exposing physical mixtures of the drug and the polymer(s to 40 and deg;C/75% RH for three months. A suitable method was developed for drug estimation at 271nm by a UV double beam spectrophotometer. Next, various batches of tablets were designed using different polymers such as Ethylcellulose, Carnauba wax, HPMC-K100M, Carbopol-974P and Kollidon-SR. Direct compression technique was used except for the formulation containing carnauba wax for which melt granulation was done followed by compression. Formulations F-1 to F-15 contained single polymers in increasing concentrations in drug:polymer ratios of 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 where it was observed that the drug release extended with increasing polymer concentrations. Carbopol-974P extended drug release better followed by HPMC-K100M and Carnauba wax compared to other polymers. A combination of these polymers was also used at various ratios to get formulations F-16 to F-20 and observed that the polymer combinations controlled drug release better. The type of fillers like lactose and microcrystalline cellulose had no effect on the physiochemical characters as well as on the drug release profiles. The in vitro release data from the best formulation fitted well in Higuchi as well as Peppas model, the and #8216;n and #8217; value, which confirmed that the release mechanism shifted from initial dissolution to later extended diffusion in which both diffusion and erosion

  16. Functionalized Benzimidazole Scaffolds: Privileged Heterocycle for Drug Design in Therapeutic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajani, Olayinka O; Aderohunmu, Damilola V; Ikpo, Chinwe O; Adedapo, Adebusayo E; Olanrewaju, Ifedolapo O

    2016-07-01

    Benzimidazole derivatives are crucial structural scaffolds found in diverse libraries of biologically active compounds which are therapeutically useful agents in drug discovery and medicinal research. They are structural isosteres of naturally occurring nucleotides, which allows them to interact with the biopolymers of living systems. Hence, there is a need to couple the latest information with the earlier documentations to understand the current status of the benzimidazole nucleus in medicinal chemistry research. This present work unveils the benzimidazole core as a multifunctional nucleus that serves as a resourceful tool of information for synthetic modifications of old existing candidates in order to tackle drug resistance bottlenecks in therapeutic medicine. This manuscript deals with the recent advances in the synthesis of benzimidazole derivatives, the widespread biological activities as well as pharmacokinetic reports. These present them as a toolbox for fighting infectious diseases and also make them excellent candidates for future drug design. PMID:27213292

  17. Application of CellDesigner to the Selection of Anticancer Drug Targets: Test Case using P53

    OpenAIRE

    Isea, Raul; Hoebeke, Johan; Mayo, Rafael; Alvarez, Fernando; Holmes, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a disease involving many genes, consequently it has been difficult to design anticancer drugs that are efficacious over a broad range of cancers. The robustness of cellular responses to gene knockout and the need to reduce undesirable side effects also contribute to the problem of effective anti-cancer drug design. To promote the successful selection of drug targets, each potential target should be subjected to a systems biology scrutiny to locate effective and specific targets whil...

  18. 78 FR 51732 - The Food and Drug Administration/European Medicines Agency Orphan Product Designation and Grant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... Orphan Product Designation and Grant Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Office of Orphan Products Development... Agency Orphan Product Designation and Grant Workshop.'' This 1-day workshop is intended to...

  19. Computation-based virtual screening for designing novel antimalarial drugs by targeting falcipain-III: A structure-based drug designing approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar Kesharwani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Cysteine proteases (falcipains, a papain-family of enzymes of Plasmodium falciparum, are responsible for haemoglobin degradation and thus necessary for its survival during asexual life cycle phase inside the human red blood cells while remaining non-functional for the human body. Therefore, these can act as potential targets for designing antimalarial drugs. The P. falciparum cysteine proteases, falcipain-II and falcipain- III are the enzymes which initiate the haemoglobin degradation, therefore, have been selected as targets. In the present study, we have designed new leupeptin analogues and subjected to virtual screening using Glide at the active site cavity of falcipain-II and falcipain-III to select the best docked analogues on the basis of Glide score and also compare with the result of AutoDock. The proposed analogues can be synthesized and tested in vivo as future potent antimalarial drugs. Methods: Protein falcipain-II and falcipain-III together with bounds inhibitors epoxysuccinate E64 (E64 and leupeptin respectively were retrieved from protein data bank (PDB and latter leupeptin was used as lead molecule to design new analogues by using Ligbuilder software and refined the molecules on the basis of Lipinski rule of five and fitness score parameters. All the designed leupeptin analogues were screened via docking simulation at the active site cavity of falcipain-II and falcipain-III by using Glide software and AutoDock. Results: The 104 new leupeptin-based antimalarial ligands were designed using structure-based drug designing approach with the help of Ligbuilder and subjected for virtual screening via docking simulation method against falcipain-II and falcipain-III receptor proteins. The Glide docking results suggest that the ligands namely result_037 shows good binding and other two, result_044 and result_042 show nearly similar binding than naturally occurring PDB bound ligand E64 against falcipain-II and in

  20. Hydration Free Energy as a Molecular Descriptor in Drug Design: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Ayesha; Reynisson, Jóhannes

    2016-05-01

    In this work the idea was investigated whether calculated hydration energy (ΔGhyd ) can be used as a molecular descriptor in defining promising regions of chemical space for drug design. Calculating ΔGhyd using the Density Solvation Model (SMD) in conjunction with the density functional theory (DFT) gave an excellent correlation with experimental values. Furthermore, calculated ΔGhyd correlates reasonably well with experimental water solubility (r(2) =0.545) and also log P (r(2) =0.530). Three compound collections were used: Known drugs (n=150), drug-like compounds (n=100) and simple organic compounds (n=140). As an approximation only molecules, which do not de/protonate at physiological pH were considered. A relatively broad distribution was seen for the known drugs with an average at -15.3 kcal/mol and a standard deviation of 7.5 kcal/mol. Interestingly, much lower averages were found for the drug-like compounds (-7.5 kcal/mol) and the simple organic compounds (-3.1 kcal/mol) with tighter distributions; 4.3 and 3.2 kcal/mol, respectively. This trend was not observed for these collections when calculated log P and log S values were used. The considerable greater exothermic ΔGhyd average for the known drugs clearly indicates in order to develop a successful drug candidate value of ΔGhyd <-5 kcal/mol or less is preferable. PMID:27492087

  1. Self nano-emulsifying drug delivery system for Embelin: Design, characterization and in-vitro studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komal Parmar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available CThe objective of the present study was to prepare solid self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (S-SNEDDS containing Capryol-90 as oil phase for the delivery of Embelin, a poorly water soluble herbal active ingredient. Box-Behnken experimental design was employed to optimise the formulation variables, X1 (amount of oil; Capryol 90, X2 (amount of surfactant; Acrysol EL 135 and X3 (amount of co-surfactant; PEG 400. Systems were appraised for visual characteristics for self emulsifying time, globule size and drug release. Optimised liquid formulations were formulated into free flowing granules (S-SNEDDS by adsorption on the porous materials like Aerosil 200 and Neusilin and thereby compressed into tablet. In vitro dissolution studies of SNEDDS revealed increased in the dissolution rate of the drug. FT-IR data revealed no physicochemical interaction between drug and excipients. Solid state characterization of S-SNEDDS by DSC and Powder XRD confirmed reduction in drug crystallinity which further supports the results of dissolution studies. TEM analysis exhibited spherical globules. Further, the accelerated stability studies for 6 months revealed that S-SNEDDS of Embelin are found to be stable without any significant change in physicochemical properties. Thus, the present studies demonstrated dissolution enhancement potential of porous carrier based S-SNEDDS for poorly water soluble herbal active ingredient, Embelin.

  2. Design and assembly of pH-sensitive lipidic cubic phase matrices for drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazaruk, Ewa; Szlęzak, Monika; Górecka, Ewa; Bilewicz, Renata; Osornio, Yazmin M; Uebelhart, Peter; Landau, Ehud M

    2014-02-11

    Bicontinuous lipidic cubic phases (LCPs) exhibit a combination of material properties that make them highly interesting for various biomaterial applications: they are nontoxic, biodegradable, optically transparent, thermodynamically stable in excess water, and can incorporate active molecules of virtually any polarity. Here we present a molecular system comprising host lipid, water, and designed lipidic additive, which form a structured, pH-sensitive lipidic matrix for hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic drug incorporation and release. The model drug doxorubicin (Dox) was loaded into the LCP. Tunable interactions with the lipidic matrix led to the observed pH-dependent drug release from the phase. The rate of Dox release from the cubic phase at pH 7.4 was low but increased significantly at more acidic pH. A small amount of a tailored diacidic lipid (lipid 1) added to the monoolein LCP modified the release rate of the drug. Phase identity and structural parameters of pure and doped mesophases were characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and release profiles from the matrix were monitored electrochemically. Analysis of the release kinetics revealed that the total amount of drug released from the LCP matrix is linearly dependent on the square root of time, implying that the release mechanism proceeds according to the Higuchi model. PMID:24443890

  3. Design of a RESTful web information system for drug prescription and administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Lorenzo; Paganelli, Federica; Pettenati, Maria Chiara; Turchi, Stefano; Ciofi, Lucia; Iadanza, Ernesto; Giuli, Dino

    2014-05-01

    Drug prescription and administration processes strongly impact on the occurrence of risks in medical settings for they can be sources of adverse drug events (ADEs). A properly engineered use of information and communication technologies has proven to be a promising approach to reduce these risks. In this study, we propose PHARMA, a web information system which supports healthcare staff in the secure cooperative execution of drug prescription, transcription and registration tasks. PHARMA allows the easy sharing and management of documents containing drug-related information (i.e., drug prescriptions, medical reports, screening), which is often inconsistent and scattered across different information systems and heterogeneous organization domains (e.g., departments, other hospital facilities). PHARMA enables users to access such information in a consistent and secure way, through the adoption of REST and web-oriented design paradigms and protocols. We describe the implementation of the PHARMA prototype, and we discuss the results of the usability evaluation that we carried out with the staff of a hospital in Florence, Italy. PMID:24107986

  4. Antiviral activities of whey proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Wang, Yan; Ip, Denis Tsz Ming; Wan, David Chi Cheong; Xia, Jiang

    2015-09-01

    Milk contains an array of proteins with useful bioactivities. Many milk proteins encompassing native or chemically modified casein, lactoferrin, alpha-lactalbumin, and beta-lactoglobulin demonstrated antiviral activities. Casein and alpha-lactalbumin gained anti-HIV activity after modification with 3-hydroxyphthalic anhydride. Many milk proteins inhibited HIV reverse transcriptase. Bovine glycolactin, angiogenin-1, lactogenin, casein, alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, bovine lactoferrampin, and human lactoferrampin inhibited HIV-1 protease and integrase. Several mammalian lactoferrins prevented hepatitis C infection. Lactoferrin, methylated alpha-lactalbumin and methylated beta-lactoglobulin inhibited human cytomegalovirus. Chemically modified alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin and lysozyme, lactoferrin and lactoferricin, methylated alpha-lactalbumin, methylated and ethylated beta-lactoglobulins inhibited HSV. Chemically modified bovine beta-lactoglobulin had antihuman papillomavirus activity. Beta-lactoglobulin, lactoferrin, esterified beta-lactoglobulin, and esterified lactoferrindisplayed anti-avian influenza A (H5N1) activity. Lactoferrin inhibited respiratory syncytial virus, hepatitis B virus, adenovirus, poliovirus, hantavirus, sindbis virus, semliki forest virus, echovirus, and enterovirus. Milk mucin, apolactoferrin, Fe(3+)-lactoferrin, beta-lactoglobulin, human lactadherin, bovine IgG, and bovine kappa-casein demonstrated antihuman rotavirus activity. PMID:26198883

  5. Factorial design studies of antiretroviral drug-loaded stealth liposomal injectable: PEGylation, lyophilization and pharmacokinetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakar, Beeravelli; Krishna, Mylangam Chaitanya; Murthy, Kolapalli Venkata Ramana

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to formulate and evaluate the ritonavir-loaded stealth liposomes by using 32 factorial design and intended to delivered by parenteral delivery. Liposomes were prepared by ethanol injection method using 32 factorial designs and characterized for various physicochemical parameters such as drug content, size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency and in vitro drug release. The optimization process was carried out using desirability and overlay plots. The selected formulation was subjected to PEGylation using 10 % PEG-10000 solution. Stealth liposomes were characterized for the above-mentioned parameters along with surface morphology, Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer, differential scanning calorimeter, stability and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies in rats. Stealth liposomes showed better result compared to conventional liposomes due to effect of PEG-10000. The in vivo studies revealed that stealth liposomes showed better residence time compared to conventional liposomes and pure drug solution. The conventional liposomes and pure drug showed dose-dependent pharmacokinetics, whereas stealth liposomes showed long circulation half-life compared to conventional liposomes and pure ritonavir solution. The results of statistical analysis showed significance difference as the p value is (<0.05) by one-way ANOVA. The result of the present study revealed that stealth liposomes are promising tool in antiretroviral therapy.

  6. Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Rationally Designed Vehicles for Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based tumor-targeted drug delivery system (DDS) has been developed, which consists of a functionalized SWNT linked to tumor-targeting modules as well as prodrug modules. There are three key features of this nanoscale DDS: (a) use of functionalized SWNTs as a biocompatible platform for the delivery of therapeutic drugs or diagnostics, (b) conjugation of prodrug modules of an anticancer agent (taxoid with a cleavable linker) that is activated to its cytotoxic form inside the tumor cells upon internalization and in situ drug release, and (c) attachment of tumor-recognition modules (biotin and a spacer) to the nanotube surface. To prove the efficacy of this DDS, three fluorescent and fluorogenic molecular probes were designed, synthesized, characterized, and subjected to the analysis of the receptor-mediated endocytosis and drug release inside the cancer cells (L1210FR leukemia cell line) by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy. The specificity and cytotoxicity of the conjugate have also been assessed and compared with L1210 and human noncancerous cell lines. Then, it has unambiguously been proven that this tumor-targeting DDS works exactly as designed and shows high potency toward specific cancer cell lines, thereby forming a solid foundation for further development.

  7. Identification of a series of compounds with potent antiviral activity for the treatment of enterovirus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Angus M; Mitchell, Dale R; Palmer, Nicholas J; Van de Poël, Hervé; Conrath, Katja; Andrews, Martin; Leyssen, Pieter; Neyts, Johan

    2013-07-11

    Rhinovirus (genus enterovirus) infections are responsible for many of the severe exacerbations of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Other members of the genus can cause life-threatening acute neurological infections. There is currently no antiviral drug approved for the treatment of such infections. We have identified a series of potent, broad-spectrum antiviral compounds that inhibit the replication of the human rhinovirus, Coxsackie virus, poliovirus, and enterovirus-71. The mechanism of action of the compounds has been established as inhibition of a lipid kinase, PI4KIIIβ. Inhibition of hepatitis C replication in a replicon assay correlated with enterovirus inhibition. PMID:24900715

  8. Designing of Anti Dengue Drug Molecule against Insilico Modeled Target DC-Sign (CD-209

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashantha C.N

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The C-type lectin DC-SIGN (CD209 plays a major role in receptor on human dendritic cells, it binds to several glycoproteins of viruses that facilitate disease progression. In dengue fever, the disease targets of arbovirus infection, show dendritic and reticuloendothelial cells that may affect immune system. The phytochemical extracts of Bosenbergia rotunda (BR have been effectively used as potential small molecular inhibitors to inhibit DC-SIGN (CD209 function. Using rational drug designing the training sets include Panduratin-A and 4-hydroxypanduratin is designed from BR derivatives could be an effective inhibitor of a DC-SIGN (CD209 binding towards the drug discovery/ therapy against dengue fever.

  9. Application of SMILES Notation Based Optimal Descriptors in Drug Discovery and Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselinović, Aleksandar M; Veselinović, Jovana B; Živković, Jelena V; Nikolić, Goran M

    2015-01-01

    SMILES notation based optimal descriptors as a universal tool for the QSAR analysis with further application in drug discovery and design is presented. The basis of this QSAR modeling is Monte Carlo method which has important advantages over other methods, like the possibility of analysis of a QSAR as a random event, is discussed. The advantages of SMILES notation based optimal descriptors in comparison to commonly used descriptors are defined. The published results of QSAR modeling with SMILES notation based optimal descriptors applied for various pharmacologically important endpoints are listed. The presented QSAR modeling approach obeys OECD principles and has mechanistic interpretation with possibility to identify molecular fragments that contribute in positive and negative way to studied biological activity, what is of big importance in computer aided drug design of new compounds with desired activity. PMID:25961525

  10. Antiviral activity of viro care gz-08 against newcastle disease virus in poultry and its in-vitro cytotoxicity assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newcastle disease (ND), one of the most important disease of poultry throughout the World is caused by Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV). It is causing huge economic losses in poultry industry of Pakistan. Regardless of vaccination, other prevention and control measures are necessary to prevent ND outbreaks. Natural resources have been exploited to obtain antiviral compounds in several latest studies. In this study, the antiviral activity of Viro Care GZ-081 was checked up in-vitro, in-ovo and in-vivo. The cytotoxicity assay of the product was performed using Vero cell line. All the trials revealed that the stock solution and 1:2 dilution of GZ-08 had some antiviral activity as well as were cytotoxic. As the concentration decreased, cytotoxicity as well as antiviral activities were lost. Based on these findings, it was concluded that GZ-08 sanitizer or spray can be used as antiviral agent to clean or disinfect some non-living surfaces against different viruses in general and NDV in particular. However, in-vivo use of GZ-08 in poultry against NDV is recommended only as pre-treatment with ND vaccines as it significantly reduced morbidity and mortality as compared to the use of vaccines alone. However, further work is recommended in future on GZ-08 for its use as post-treatment of ND as well as on other antiviral compounds of natural origin to develop a novel antiviral drug against NDV in poultry. (author)

  11. Design and optimization of self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems for improved bioavailability of cyclovirobuxine D

    OpenAIRE

    Ke, Zhongcheng

    2016-01-01

    Zhongcheng Ke,1–3 Xuefeng Hou,4 Xiao-bin Jia31Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 2Huangshan University, Huangshan, Anhui, 3Third Clinical Medical College, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 4Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei, Anhui, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: The main purpose of this research was to design a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) for improving the bioavailability of cyclovirobux...

  12. Design and optimization of self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems for improved bioavailability of cyclovirobuxine D

    OpenAIRE

    Ke ZC; Hou XF; Jia XB

    2016-01-01

    Zhongcheng Ke,1–3 Xuefeng Hou,4 Xiao-bin Jia31Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 2Huangshan University, Huangshan, Anhui, 3Third Clinical Medical College, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 4Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei, Anhui, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: The main purpose of this research was to design a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) for improving the bioavailability of cyclovirobuxine D as...

  13. Development of gastro retentive drug delivery system of cephalexin by using factorial design

    OpenAIRE

    Prakash Rao, B.; Ashok Kottan, Neelima; Snehith, V.S.; Ramesh, C.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research work was to formulate and optimize the floating drug delivery system containing cephalexin using 23 factorial design. Floating tablets were prepared by direct compression method incorporating HPMC K4M, xanthan gum, guar gum, sodium bicarbonate and tartaric acid as gas generating agent. The influence of independent variables like, polymer: polymer ratio, polymer type and tartaric acid on floating lag time and cephalexin release profile were studied. The diffusion...

  14. The Semiempirical Quantum Mechanical Scoring Function for In Silico Drug Design

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lepšík, Martin; Řezáč, Jan; Kolář, Michal; Pecina, Adam; Hobza, Pavel; Fanfrlík, Jindřich

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 78, č. 9 (2013), s. 921-931. ISSN 2192-6506 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Grant ostatní: Operational Program Research and Development for Innovations(XE) CZ 1.05/2.1.00/03/0058 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : computational chemistry * drug design * noncovalent interactions * quantum chemistry * semiempirical calculations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.242, year: 2013

  15. Drug design based on x-ray diffraction and steered molecular dynamics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hašek, Jindřich; Skálová, Tereza; Dohnálek, Jan; Dušková, Jarmila; Petroková, Hana; Vondráčková, Eva; Zimmermann, K.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 3 (2005), s. 208-210. ISSN 1211-5894. [VUFB Conference on Modern Methods in Synthesis and Analysis of Active Pharmaceutical Substances /5./. Praha, 23.11.2005-24.11.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB4050312 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : drug design * X-ray diffraction * steered molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  16. PERSYVE - Design and validation of a questionnaire about adverse effects of antihypertensive drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Duarte-Silva D,; Figueiras A,; Herdeiro MT,; Teixeira Rodrigues A; Silva Branco F,; Polónia J; Figueiredo IV

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to design and validate a questionnaire to measure perceived symptoms associated with antihypertensive drugs (PERSYVE). Methods: The PERSYVE development and validation included four stages: 1) item development (bibliographic review and questionnaire elaboration); 2) face and content validation; 3) field testing (pre-test); and 4) test-retest validation, assessment of internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha) and reproducibility over time (intraclass correl...

  17. Design and performance of a sericin-alginate interpenetrating network hydrogel for cell and drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Yeshun Zhang; Jia Liu; Lei Huang; Zheng Wang; Lin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Although alginate hydrogels have been extensively studied for tissue engineering applications, their utilization is limited by poor mechanical strength, rapid drug release, and a lack of cell adhesive ability. Aiming to improve these properties, we employ the interpenetrating hydrogel design rationale. Using alginate and sericin (a natural protein with many unique properties and a major component of silkworm silk), we develop an interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) hydrogel comprising inter...

  18. Importance of polar solvation and configurational entropy for design of antiretroviral drugs targeting HIV-1 protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Parimal; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Knecht, Volker

    2013-05-16

    highlights that structural inspection alone is not sufficient for identifying the key contributions to binding affinities and affinity changes for the design of drugs but that solvation effects must be taken into account. A detailed understanding of the molecular forces governing binding and drug resistance might assist in the design of new inhibitors against HIV-1 PR variants that are resistant against current drugs. PMID:23614718

  19. Antiviral effect of ranpirnase against Ebola virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Thomas; Draper, Ken; Brasel, Trevor; Freiberg, Alexander; Squiquera, Luis; Sidransky, David; Sulley, Jamie; Taxman, Debra J

    2016-08-01

    The recent epidemic of Ebola has intensified the need for the development of novel antiviral therapeutics that prolong and improve survival against deadly viral diseases. We sought to determine whether ranpirnase, an endoribonuclease from Rana pipiens with a demonstrated human safety profile in phase III oncology trials, can reduce titers of Ebola virus (EBOV) in infected cells, protect mice against mouse-adapted EBOV challenge, and reduce virus levels in infected mice. Our results demonstrate that 0.50 μg/ml ranpirnase is potently effective at reducing EBOV Zaire Kikwit infection in cultured Vero E6 cells (Selectivity Index 47.8-70.2). In a prophylactic study, a single intravenous dose of 0.1 mg/kg ranpirnase protected 70% of mice from progressive infection. Additionally, in a post-exposure prophylactic study, 100% of female mice survived infection after intraperitoneal administration of 0.1 mg/kg ranpirnase for ten days beginning 1 h post challenge. Most of the male counterparts were sacrificed due to weight loss by Study Day 8 or 9; however, the Clinical Activity/Behavior scores of these mice remained low and no significant microscopic pathologies could be detected in the kidneys, livers or spleens. Furthermore, live virus could not be detected in the sera of ranpirnase-treated mice by Study Day 8 or in the kidneys, livers or spleens by Study Day 12, and viral RNA levels declined exponentially by Study Day 12. Because ranpirnase is exceptionally stable and has a long track record of safe intravenous administration to humans, this drug provides a promising new candidate for clinical consideration in the treatment of Ebola virus disease alone or in combination with other therapeutics. PMID:27350309

  20. Repurposing Kinase Inhibitors as Antiviral Agents to Control Influenza A Virus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perwitasari, Olivia; Yan, Xiuzhen; O'Donnell, Jason; Johnson, Scott; Tripp, Ralph A

    2015-12-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) infection causes seasonal epidemics of contagious respiratory illness that causes substantial morbidity and some mortality. Regular vaccination is the principal strategy for controlling influenza virus, although vaccine efficacy is variable. IAV antiviral drugs are available; however, substantial drug resistance has developed to two of the four currently FDA-approved antiviral drugs. Thus, new therapeutic approaches are being sought to reduce the burden of influenza-related disease. A high-throughput screen using a human kinase inhibitor library was performed targeting an emerging IAV strain (H7N9) in A549 cells. The inhibitor library contained 273 structurally diverse, active cell permeable kinase inhibitors with known bioactivity and safety profiles, many of which are at advanced stages of clinical development. The current study shows that treatment of human A549 cells with kinase inhibitors dinaciclib, flavopiridol, or PIK-75 exhibits potent antiviral activity against H7N9 IAV as well as other IAV strains. Thus, targeting host kinases can provide a broad-spectrum therapeutic approach against IAV. These findings provide a path forward for repurposing existing kinase inhibitors safely as potential antivirals, particularly those that can be tested in vivo and ultimately for clinical use. PMID:26192013

  1. Biochip array technology immunoassay performance and quantitative confirmation of designer piperazines for urine workplace drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaneto, Marisol S; Barnes, Allan J; Concheiro, Marta; Klette, Kevin L; Martin, Thomas A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-06-01

    Designer piperazines are emerging novel psychoactive substances (NPS) with few high-throughput screening methods for their identification. We evaluated a biochip array technology (BAT) immunoassay for phenylpiperazines (PNP) and benzylpiperazines (BZP) and analyzed 20,017 randomly collected urine workplace specimens. Immunoassay performance at recommended cutoffs was evaluated for PNPI (5 μg/L), PNPII (7.5 μg/L), and BZP (5 μg/L) antibodies. Eight hundred forty positive and 206 randomly selected presumptive negative specimens were confirmed by liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). Assay limits of detection for PNPI, PNPII, and BZP were 2.9, 6.3, and 2.1 μg/L, respectively. Calibration curves were linear (R (2) > 0.99) with upper limits of 42 μg/L for PNPI/PNII and 100 μg/L for BZP. Quality control samples demonstrated imprecision performance of the Randox BAT immunoassay to identify urinary piperazines and documented improved performance when antibody cutoffs were raised. In addition, in randomized workplace urine specimens, all but two positive specimens contained mCPP and/or trazodone, most likely from legitimate medical prescriptions. Graphical Abstract Biochip array technology (BAT) immunoassay for designer piperazines detection in urine. In chemiluminescent immunoassay, the labeled-drug (antigen) competes with the drug in the urine. In the absence of drug, the labeled-drug binds to the antibody releasing an enzyme (horseradish peroxidase) to react with the substrate and producing chemiluminescence. The higher the drug concentration in urine, the weaker the chemiluminescent signal is produced. All presumptive positive specimens and randomly selected presumptive negative specimens were analyzed and confirmed by a liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry with limit of quantification of 2.5 or 5 μg/L. PMID:25903022

  2. Multivalent antiviral XTEN-peptide conjugates with long in vivo half-life and enhanced solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Sheng; Song, Michael; Sim, Bee-Cheng; Gu, Chen; Podust, Vladimir N; Wang, Chia-Wei; McLaughlin, Bryant; Shah, Trishul P; Lax, Rodney; Gast, Rainer; Sharan, Rahul; Vasek, Arthur; Hartman, M Amanda; Deniston, Colin; Srinivas, Prathna; Schellenberger, Volker

    2014-07-16

    XTENs are unstructured, nonrepetitive protein polymers designed to prolong the in vivo half-life of pharmaceuticals by introducing a bulking effect similar to that of poly(ethylene glycol). While XTEN can be expressed as a recombinant fusion protein with bioactive proteins and peptides, therapeutic molecules of interest can also be chemically conjugated to XTEN. Such an approach permits precise control over the positioning, spacing, and valency of bioactive moieties along the length of XTEN. We have demonstrated the attachment of T-20, an anti-retroviral peptide indicated for the treatment of HIV-1 patients with multidrug resistance, to XTEN. By reacting maleimide-functionalized T-20 with cysteine-containing XTENs and varying the number and positioning of cysteines in the XTENs, a library of different peptide-polymer combinations were produced. The T-20-XTEN conjugates were tested using an in vitro antiviral assay and were found to be effective in inhibiting HIV-1 entry and preventing cell death, with the copy number and spacing of the T-20 peptides influencing antiviral activity. The peptide-XTEN conjugates were also discovered to have enhanced solubilities in comparison with the native T-20 peptide. The pharmacokinetic profile of the most active T-20-XTEN conjugate was measured in rats, and it was found to exhibit an elimination half-life of 55.7 ± 17.7 h, almost 20 times longer than the reported half-life for T-20 dosed in rats. As the conjugation of T-20 to XTEN greatly improved the in vivo half-life and solubility of the peptide, the XTEN platform has been demonstrated to be a versatile tool for improving the properties of drugs and enabling the development of a class of next-generation therapeutics. PMID:24932887

  3. Antiviral Activity of Hederasaponin B from Hedera helix against Enterovirus 71 Subgenotypes C3 and C4a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jaehyoung; Yeo, Sang-Gu; Hong, Eun-Hye; Lee, Bo-Ra; Kim, Jin-Won; Kim, Jeonghoon; Jeong, Hyeongun; Kwon, Yongsoo; Kim, Hyunpyo; Lee, Sangwon; Park, Jae-Hak; Ko, Hyun-Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the predominant cause of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). The antiviral activity of hederasaponin B from Hedera helix against EV71 subgenotypes C3 and C4a was evaluated in vero cells. In the current study, the antiviral activity of hederasaponin B against EV71 C3 and C4a was determined by cytopathic effect (CPE) reduction method and western blot assay. Our results demonstrated that hederasaponin B and 30% ethanol extract of Hedera helix containing hederasaponin B showed significant antiviral activity against EV71 subgenotypes C3 and C4a by reducing the formation of a visible CPE. Hederasaponin B also inhibited the viral VP2 protein expression, suggesting the inhibition of viral capsid protein synthesis.These results suggest that hederasaponin B and Hedera helix extract containing hederasaponin B can be novel drug candidates with broad-spectrum antiviral activity against various subgenotypes of EV71. PMID:24596620

  4. Integration of active pharmaceutical ingredient solid form selection and particle engineering into drug product design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticehurst, Martyn David; Marziano, Ivan

    2015-06-01

    This review seeks to offer a broad perspective that encompasses an understanding of the drug product attributes affected by active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) physical properties, their link to solid form selection and the role of particle engineering. While the crucial role of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) solid form selection is universally acknowledged in the pharmaceutical industry, the value of increasing effort to understanding the link between solid form, API physical properties and drug product formulation and manufacture is now also being recognised. A truly holistic strategy for drug product development should focus on connecting solid form selection, particle engineering and formulation design to both exploit opportunities to access simpler manufacturing operations and prevent failures. Modelling and predictive tools that assist in establishing these links early in product development are discussed. In addition, the potential for differences between the ingoing API physical properties and those in the final product caused by drug product processing is considered. The focus of this review is on oral solid dosage forms and dry powder inhaler products for lung delivery. PMID:25677227

  5. [Benzimidazole and its derivatives--from fungicides to designer drugs. A new occupational and environmental hazards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Benzimidazole and benzimidazole derivatives play an important role in controlling various fungal pathogens. The benzimidazoles are also used to treat nematode and trematode infections in humans and animals. It acts by binding to the microtubules and stopping hyphal growth. It also binds to the spindle microtubules and blocks nuclear division. The most popular fungicide is carbendazim. The fungicide is used to control plant diseases in cereals and fruits. Laboratory studies have shown that carbendazim cause infertility and destroy the testicles of laboratory animals. Other benzimidazole derivatives are used as a preservative in paint, textile, papermaking, leather industry, and warehousing practices, as well as a preservative of fruits. Occupational exposure to benzimidazole may occur through inhalation and dermal contact with those compounds at workplaces where benzimidazole is used or produced. Some of the benzimidazoles are common environmental pollutants. They are often found in food and fruit products. Some of the benzimidazoles, like a astemizole or esomeprazole have found applications in diverse therapeutical areas. Despite of the clear advantages afforded by the use of benzimidazole derivatives, they share a danger potential. The most hazardous, however, are new illegally synthesed psychoactive drugs known as designer drugs. Some of them, like nitazene, etonitazene or clonitazene belong to benzimidazole derivatives. Laboratory animal studies revealed that etonitazene produced very similar effects in central nervous system as those observed after morphine administration. Considering etonitazene's properties, it seems reasonable to expected that long-term exposure to other benzimidazole derivatives may result in drug abuse and development of drug dependence. PMID:22994080

  6. Design and evaluation of mucoadhesive beads of glipizide as a controlled release drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, K; Khanam, J; Mohanraj, K P; Mazumder, B

    2014-01-01

    The present work aims at the development of a low-cost controlled release system of glipizide beads embedded in pectin to overcome the problem of frequent dosing of drug. The method of preparation has been optimised by experimental design to achieve satisfactory responses with respect to controlling variables. The controlling variables are X1, drug-polymer ratio; X2, surfactant concentration and X3, isooctane-acetone ratio. The most effective combination is X1(1:6), X2(1%), X3(50:50). Various parameters such as mucoadhesivity and swellability of beads, characterisation, dissolution, stability, ex vivo absorption and in vivo (Oral glucose tolerance test in rat) studies were performed with the optimised product. The optimised product was found quiet satisfactory that showed yield of 86.78%, drug entrapment efficiency (DEE) of 87.38% and drug release was extended up to 18 h. The present formulation of glipizide is a promising multiparticulate system of glipizide with significant hypoglycemic effect, and moreover it was prepared rapidly with ease. PMID:24047213

  7. Design and performance of a sericin-alginate interpenetrating network hydrogel for cell and drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yeshun; Liu, Jia; Huang, Lei; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Lin

    2015-07-01

    Although alginate hydrogels have been extensively studied for tissue engineering applications, their utilization is limited by poor mechanical strength, rapid drug release, and a lack of cell adhesive ability. Aiming to improve these properties, we employ the interpenetrating hydrogel design rationale. Using alginate and sericin (a natural protein with many unique properties and a major component of silkworm silk), we develop an interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) hydrogel comprising interwoven sericin and alginate double networks. By adjusting the sericin-to-alginate ratios, IPNs’ mechanical strength can be adjusted to meet stiffness requirements for various tissue repairs. The IPNs with high sericin content show increased stability during degradation, avoiding pure alginate’s early collapse. These IPNs have high swelling ratios, benefiting various applications such as drug delivery. The IPNs sustain controlled drug release with the adjustable rates. Furthermore, these IPNs are adhesive to cells, supporting cell proliferation, long-term survival and migration. Notably, the IPNs inherit sericin’s photoluminescent property, enabling bioimaging in vivo. Together, our study indicates that the sericin-alginate IPN hydrogels may serve as a versatile platform for delivering cells and drugs, and suggests that sericin may be a building block broadly applicable for generating IPN networks with other biomaterials for diverse tissue engineering applications.

  8. Design, Synthesis, and Characterization of Novel Zwitterionic Lipids for Drug and siRNA Delivery Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Colin L.

    of these lipids. Our results indicate that structural variations significantly impact the biophysical and transfection behavior of this class of lipids. In summary, we have synthesized several new classes of lipids with biophysical characteristics that may be useful for drug delivery applications. Our results show that slight modifications to lipid structure impacts their biophysical behavior, which in turn dictates their potential utility in drug delivery systems. Further understanding lipid structure-activity relationships will allow for the rational design and engineering of lipids with appropriate properties for specific delivery applications.

  9. Application of Design of Experiment for Floating Drug Delivery of Tapentadol Hydrochloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati C. Jagdale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to apply design of experiment (DOE to optimize floating drug delivery of tapentadol hydrochloride. Tapentadol hydrochloride is a synthetic opioid used as a centrally acting analgesic and effective in both experimental and clinical pain. The half-life of the drug is about 4 hours and oral dose is 50 to 250 mg twice a day. For optimization 32 full factorial design was employed for formulation of tapentadol hydrochloride tablets. Sodium bicarbonate was incorporated as a gas-generating agent. Combination of polymers Xanthan gum and Locust bean gum was used to achieve controlled release effect. The concentration of polymers was considered as the independent variables and dependent variables were floating lag time and swelling index of the tablets. From the factorial batches, it was observed that formulation containing combination of 20% sodium bicarbonate and 10% citric acid shows optimum floating ability whereas the formulation containing 20% Xanthan gum and 28% Locust bean gum shows optimum sustained drug release pattern with adequate floating.

  10. Crystal Engineering of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase for structure-Based Drug Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman,J.; Das, K.; Ho, W.; Baweja, M.; Himmel, D.; Clark, A.; Oren, D.; Shatkin, A.; Arnold, E.

    2008-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is a primary target for anti-AIDS drugs. Structures of HIV-1 RT, usually determined at {approx}2.5-3.0 Angstroms resolution, are important for understanding enzyme function and mechanisms of drug resistance in addition to being helpful in the design of RT inhibitors. Despite hundreds of attempts, it was not possible to obtain the structure of a complex of HIV-1 RT with TMC278, a nonnucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI) in advanced clinical trials. A systematic and iterative protein crystal engineering approach was developed to optimize RT for obtaining crystals in complexes with TMC278 and other NNRTIs that diffract X-rays to 1.8 Angstroms resolution. Another form of engineered RT was optimized to produce a high-resolution apo-RT crystal form, reported here at 1.85 Angstroms resolution, with a distinct RT conformation. Engineered RTs were mutagenized using a new, flexible and cost effective method called methylated overlap-extension ligation independent cloning. Our analysis suggests that reducing the solvent content, increasing lattice contacts, and stabilizing the internal low-energy conformations of RT are critical for the growth of crystals that diffract to high resolution. The new RTs enable rapid crystallization and yield high-resolution structures that are useful in designing/developing new anti-AIDS drugs.

  11. Ultrasmall dual-modality silica nanoparticle drug conjugates: Design, synthesis, and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Barney; Ma, Kai; Zhang, Li; Burns, Andrew; Sequeira, Sonia; Mellinghoff, Ingo; Brennan, Cameron; Wiesner, Ulrich; Bradbury, Michelle S

    2015-11-15

    The physicochemical design and synthesis of effective cancer-directed and particle-based nanotherapeutic imaging agents remains a challenging task. Of critical importance is the ability to demonstrate maximum delivery, retention, and treatment efficacy for platforms designed to deposit their cargo at sites of disease without attendant dose-limiting toxicity. In this work, we describe dual-modality nanoparticle drug conjugates (NDCs) which utilize protease sensitive linkers to attached drug compounds and imaging labels to a clinically translated class of ultrasmall silica nanoparticle (C' dots). We describe the synthesis and characterization of these linker-drug constructs. Linkers incorporating dipeptide enzyme substrates are attached to analogs of a prototypical epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI), through a cleavable amide bond or para-aminobenzyloxycarbonyl (PABC) group. These constructs are conjugated onto C' dots leading to the desired NDCs. These NDCs exhibit fast and predictable release kinetics in the presence of model proteases, and are stable in various biological media. Finally, in vitro assays show NDCs to be highly active in reducing phosphorylated EGFR levels in H1650 cells, a human tumor-derived cell line. The data suggests that NDCs exhibit desirable properties that warrant further development toward oncological therapy. PMID:26462054

  12. Challenges, Applications, and Recent Advances of Protein-Ligand Docking in Structure-Based Drug Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Z. Grinter

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The docking methods used in structure-based virtual database screening offer the ability to quickly and cheaply estimate the affinity and binding mode of a ligand for the protein receptor of interest, such as a drug target. These methods can be used to enrich a database of compounds, so that more compounds that are subsequently experimentally tested are found to be pharmaceutically interesting. In addition, like all virtual screening methods used for drug design, structure-based virtual screening can focus on curated libraries of synthesizable compounds, helping to reduce the expense of subsequent experimental verification. In this review, we introduce the protein-ligand docking methods used for structure-based drug design and other biological applications. We discuss the fundamental challenges facing these methods and some of the current methodological topics of interest. We also discuss the main approaches for applying protein-ligand docking methods. We end with a discussion of the challenging aspects of evaluating or benchmarking the accuracy of docking methods for their improvement, and discuss future directions.

  13. Drugs and drug intermediates from fungi: Striving for greener processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Monika; Sharma, Rohit

    2016-03-01

    There is an ever-increasing demand of newer and improved drugs from biological sources to cater to the bio-pharmaceutical sector. Among various other resources, fungal species have an immense contribution owing to their potential to carry out the bio-transformations and drug synthesis in diverse conditions and in an eco-friendly manner. Advancement in the biotechnological processes has accelerated the process. Genome sequence information of various fungal species has opened newer avenues for improved and faster drug targeting and designing. The review highlights the production of pharmaceutical drugs and drug intermediates like antibiotics, anti-cancer, anti-cholesterol, anti-diabetic, immunosuppressant, anti-anxiety, anti-virals and many other drugs from fungus. Many of these have been commercialized and there are many more which are either in research or in clinical trial phase. There is a need to exploit and explore the vast biota of fungi in the hope of discovering untapped therapeutic uses of the earth's countless species of fungus. PMID:25159041

  14. Design and characterisation of micro-diaphragm for low power drug delivery applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, Don W.; Al-Sarawi, Said F.; Lu, Tien-Fu; Abbott, Derek

    2008-03-01

    Micro-fabricated diaphragms can be used to provide pumping action in microvalve and microfluidic applications. In this paper, a design for a micro-diaphragm that features low power and small area is presented. The diaphragm is actuated using a Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) device that is interrogated from an RF signal to provide secure actuation operation. The micropump is targeted for in vivo nano-scale drug delivery and similar applications. For low power micropump operation, it is important to design the diaphragm with a higher flexibility while maintaining the stability. Analysis is carried out using ANSYS simulation tools with different design methods and materials. Results achieved from analytical and Finite Element Modeling (FEM) methods are compared and discussed to decide on optimal dimensions for the diaphragm.

  15. NaVirCept - Nucleic Acid-Based Anti-Viral Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaccines are generally considered to be the most effective countermeasures to bacterial and viral diseases, however, licensed vaccines against many disease agents are either not available or their efficacies have not been demonstrated. Vaccines are generally agent specific in terms of treatment spectrum and are subject to defeat through natural mutation or through directed efforts. With respect to viral therapeutics, one of the major limitations associated with antiviral drugs is acquired drug resistance caused by antigenic shift or drift. A number of next-generation prophylactic and/or therapeutic measures are on the horizon. Of these, nucleic acid-based drugs are showing great antiviral potential. These drugs elicit long-lasting, broad spectrum protective immune responses, especially to respiratory viral pathogens. The Nucleic Acid-Based Antiviral (NaVirCept) project provides the opportunity to demonstrate the effectiveness of novel medical countermeasures against military-significant endemic and other viral threat agents. This project expands existing DRDC drug delivery capability development, in the form of proprietary liposome intellectual property, by coupling it with leading-edge nucleic acid-based technology to deliver effective medical countermeasures that will protect deployed personnel and the warfighter against a spectrum of viral disease agents. The technology pathway will offer a means to combat emerging viral diseases or modified threat agents such as the bird flu or reconstructed Spanish flu without going down the laborious, time-consuming and expensive paths to develop countermeasures for each new and/or emerging viral disease organism.(author)

  16. Designed drug-release systems having various breathable polyurethane film-backed hydrocolloid acrylated adhesive layers for moisture healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ching-Hsien; Liu, Hsia-Wei; Huang, Ching-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    A series of designed drug-release systems were prepared and established for clear moisture healing. These systems were designed to have an interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) structure, which contained a breathable polyurethane film, hydrocolloidlayer, and polyacrylate adhesive layer. Breathable polyurethane film (2000 g/m(2)/24 hr) with high moisture permeability was employed as a base for new drug-release systems or wound dressings. All drug-release systems having a polyurethane film-backed hydrocolloid acrylated adhesive layer showed an increase of water uptakes with increasing time. After 114 hours, high water uptakes of drug-release systems with 20% hydrocolloid components were observed in the values of 160, 1100, and 1870% for different additional hydrocolloid components of carboxymethylcellulose, sodium alginate, and carbomer U10, respectively. New drug-release systems of polyurethane film-backed hydrocolloid/adhesive layers could be designed and established for wound care managements. PMID:25226905

  17. Design and optimization of self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems for improved bioavailability of cyclovirobuxine D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke ZC

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Zhongcheng Ke,1–3 Xuefeng Hou,4 Xiao-bin Jia31Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 2Huangshan University, Huangshan, Anhui, 3Third Clinical Medical College, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 4Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei, Anhui, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: The main purpose of this research was to design a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS for improving the bioavailability of cyclovirobuxine D as a poorly water-soluble drug.Materials and methods: Solubility trials, emulsifying studies, and pseudo-ternary phase diagrams were used to screen the SNEDDS formulations. The optimized drug-loaded SNEDDS was prepared at a mass ratio of 3:24:38:38 for cyclovirobuxine D, oleic acid, Solutol SH15, and propylene glycol, respectively. The optimized formulation was characterized in terms of physicochemical and pharmacokinetic parameters compared with marketed cyclovirobuxine D tablets.Results: The optimized cyclovirobuxine-D-loaded SNEDDS was spontaneously dispersed to form a nanoemulsion with a globule size of 64.80±3.58 nm, which exhibited significant improvement of drug solubility, rapid absorption rate, and enhanced area under the curve, together with increased permeation and decreased efflux. Fortunately, there was a nonsignificant cytotoxic effect toward Caco-2 cells. The relative bioavailability of SNEDDS was 200.22% in comparison with market tablets, in rabbits.Conclusion: SNEDDS could be a potential candidate for an oral dosage form of cyclovirobuxine D with improved bioavailability.Keywords: self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery, bioavailability, cyclovirobuxine D

  18. Micellar polymer drug conjugates of betulinic acid designed for pH-triggered drug release and micelle disintegration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chytil, Petr; Lomkova, Ekaterina; Janoušková, Olga; Trhlíková, Olga; Filippov, Sergey K.; Hvězdová, Zuzana; Ulbrich, Karel; Etrych, Tomáš

    Salt Lake City: The University of Utah, 2015. P14. [International Symposium on Recent Advances in Drug Delivery Systems /17./. 14.06.2015-17.06.2015, Salt Lake City] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0029 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : drug delivery systems * pH-controlled release * HPMA copolymers Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  19. Design and Characterization of a Silk-Fibroin-Based Drug Delivery Platform Using Naproxen as a Model Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Dyakonov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this proof-of-concept study was to develop a platform for controlled drug delivery based on silk fibroin (SF and to explore the feasibility of using SF in oral drug delivery. The SF-containing matrixes were prepared via spray-drying and film casting, and the release profile of the model drug naproxen sodium was evaluated. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR has been used to observe conformational changes in SF- and drug-containing compositions. SF-based films, spray-dried microparticles, and matrixes loaded with naproxen were prepared. Both FTIR spectra and in vitro dissolution data demonstrated that SF β-sheet conformation regulates the release profile of naproxen. The controlled release characteristics of the SF-containing compositions were evaluated as a function of SF concentration, temperature, and exposure to dehydrating solvents. The results suggest that SF may be an attractive polymer for use in controlled drug delivery systems.

  20. A fresh look at an antiviral helicase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leonid Gitlin; Marco Colonna

    2007-01-01

    @@ In order to survive,all organlsms must guard against viral infections.Recognition of viruses is accomplished via multiple sensors.Many mammalian proteins can recognize viral products,such as double-stranded RNA(dsRNA),yet feW of them are known to induce interferon,the central antiviral messenger.Since interferon is indispensable for Successful antiviral defense [1],the interferon-inducing sensors have been of particular interest.However,a clear understanding of such sensors has been elusive,and the first well-established sensor family,the toll-like receptors (TLRs),was described relatively recently[2].Antiviral TLRS are positioned in the endosomes,where they report the appearance of viral genetic material(DNA,single-and double-stranded RNA).

  1. Computational Biology Tools for Identifying Specific Ligand Binding Residues for Novel Agrochemical and Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neshich, Izabella Agostinho Pena; Nishimura, Leticia; de Moraes, Fabio Rogerio; Salim, Jose Augusto; Villalta-Romero, Fabian; Borro, Luiz; Yano, Inacio Henrique; Mazoni, Ivan; Tasic, Ljubica; Jardine, Jose Gilberto; Neshich, Goran

    2015-01-01

    The term "agrochemicals" is used in its generic form to represent a spectrum of pesticides, such as insecticides, fungicides or bactericides. They contain active components designed for optimized pest management and control, therefore allowing for economically sound and labor efficient agricultural production. A "drug" on the other side is a term that is used for compounds designed for controlling human diseases. Although drugs are subjected to much more severe testing and regulation procedures before reaching the market, they might contain exactly the same active ingredient as certain agrochemicals, what is the case described in present work, showing how a small chemical compound might be used to control pathogenicity of Gram negative bacteria Xylella fastidiosa which devastates citrus plantations, as well as for control of, for example, meningitis in humans. It is also clear that so far the production of new agrochemicals is not benefiting as much from the in silico new chemical compound identification/discovery as pharmaceutical production. Rational drug design crucially depends on detailed knowledge of structural information about the receptor (target protein) and the ligand (drug/agrochemical). The interaction between the two molecules is the subject of analysis that aims to understand relationship between structure and function, mainly deciphering some fundamental elements of the nanoenvironment where the interaction occurs. In this work we will emphasize the role of understanding nanoenvironmental factors that guide recognition and interaction of target protein and its function modifier, an agrochemical or a drug. The repertoire of nanoenvironment descriptors is used for two selected and specific cases we have approached in order to offer a technological solution for some very important problems that needs special attention in agriculture: elimination of pathogenicity of a bacterium which is attacking citrus plants and formulation of a new fungicide. Finally

  2. Report of the first Asia-Pacific Forum on antiviral treatment of influenza, Asia-Pacific Alliance for the Control of Influenza, Bangkok, 14 June 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Lance C; Smith, David W; Chan, Paul K S

    2013-11-01

    On 14 June 2012, the Asia-Pacific Alliance for the Control of Influenza (APACI) convened the first Antiviral Forum jointly with the Influenza Foundation of Thailand and the Thailand Department of Disease Control. The goals of the meeting were to improve pandemic planning in the region from lessons learned during the 2009 pandemic, particularly with regard to the safety and efficacy of antiviral use; gain a better understanding of the therapeutic use of antivirals in seasonal influenza; review and analyse the official influenza control policies of Asia-Pacific countries and evidence gaps to support policy development; and to establish collaborative relationships to promote best practices in the use of antivirals for the treatment of influenza. The urgent need for education highlighting the importance of influenza and the benefits of antiviral drug use in the Asia-Pacific region was identified. PMID:23756551

  3. Drug: D00222 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00222 Drug Aciclovir (JP16/INN); Acyclovir (USP); Sitavig (TN); Zovirax (TN) C8H11...Ophthalmic agents 1319 Others D00222 Aciclovir (JP16/INN); Acyclovir (USP) 6 Agents against pathologic organ...isms and parasites 62 Chemotherapeutics 625 Antivirals 6250 Antivirals D00222 Aciclov...SE D06BB Antivirals D06BB03 Aciclovir D00222 Aciclovir (JP16/INN); Acyclovir (USP...eosides and nucleotides excl. reverse transcriptase inhibitors J05AB01 Aciclovir D00222 Aciclovir (JP16/INN)

  4. Computer aided drug designing of imidazole free acyl piperazine derivative as a histamine H/sub 3/ receptor antagonist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer aided drug designing of 1- alkyl-4-acyl piperazine derivative was performed by Argus Lab software. The minimum potential energy is calculated by geometry convergence function by Argus lab software. The most feasible position for the drug to interact with the receptor was found to be 51.19358580 kcal/mol. (author)

  5. Optimization of self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems (SMEDDS) using a D-optimal design and the desirability function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, R.; Jensen, I.H.M.; Sonnergaard, Jørn

    2006-01-01

    D-optimal design and the desirability function were applied to optimize a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS). The optimized key parameters were the following: 1) particle size of the dispersed emulsion, 2) solubility of the drug in the vehicle, and 3) the vehicle compatibility wi...

  6. "Friends in Need": Designing and Implementing a Psychoeducational Group for School Children from Drug-Involved Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dore, Martha M.; Nelson-Zlupko, Lani; Kaufman, Eda

    1999-01-01

    Discusses design and use of a model curriculum for latency-aged children in schools located in communities where drug use is pervasive. Results show that children affected by family drug use have workable strategies and skills for coping with aversive environments. Responsiveness of group participants to structure, predictability, and affirmation…

  7. Comparative study on the antiviral activity of selected monoterpenes derived from essential oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astani, Akram; Reichling, Jürgen; Schnitzler, Paul

    2010-05-01

    Essential oils are complex natural mixtures, their main constituents, e.g. terpenes and phenylpropanoids, being responsible for their biological properties. Essential oils from eucalyptus, tea tree and thyme and their major monoterpene compounds alpha-terpinene, gamma-terpinene, alpha-pinene, p-cymene, terpinen-4-ol, alpha-terpineol, thymol, citral and 1,8-cineole were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in vitro. These essential oils were able to reduce viral infectivity by >96%, the monoterpenes inhibited HSV by about >80%. The mode of antiviral action has been determined, only moderate antiviral effects were revealed by essential oils and monoterpenes when these drugs were added to host cells prior to infection or after entry of HSV into cells. However, both essential oils and monoterpenes exhibited high anti-HSV-1 activity by direct inactivation of free virus particles. All tested drugs interacted in a dose-dependent manner with herpesvirus particles thereby inactivating viral infection. Among the analysed compounds, monoterpene hydrocarbons were slightly superior to monoterpene alcohols in their antiviral activity, alpha-pinene and alpha-terpineol revealed the highest selectivity index. However, mixtures of different monoterpenes present in natural tea tree essential oil revealed a ten-fold higher selectivity index and a lower toxicity than its isolated single monoterpenes. PMID:19653195

  8. Antiviral activity of constituents of Tamus communis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, R; Conti, C; De Simone, F; Orsi, N; Pizza, C; Stein, M L

    1991-10-01

    The antiviral activity of the phenanthrene derivatives 1-6, of the spyrostane triglycosides dioscin (7) and gracillin (8), of the furostanol tetraglycosides methylprotodioscin (9), its (25S) epimer methylprotoneodioscin (10), and methylprotogracillin 11, have been tested towards two RNA viruses: vesicular stomatitis virus and human rhinovirus type 1B. All these products were extracted from the rizomes of Tamus communis L; compound 11 was isolated also from Asparagus cochinchinesis, together with pseudoprotodioscin (12), a 20 (22)-unsaturated furostanoside, which was also investigated for antiviral activity. The results were of some interest mainly for the phenanthrene derivatives. PMID:1667189

  9. Self nano-emulsifying drug delivery system for Embelin: Design, characterization and in-vitro studies

    OpenAIRE

    Komal Parmar; Jayvadan Patel; Navin Sheth

    2015-01-01

    CThe objective of the present study was to prepare solid self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (S-SNEDDS) containing Capryol-90 as oil phase for the delivery of Embelin, a poorly water soluble herbal active ingredient. Box-Behnken experimental design was employed to optimise the formulation variables, X1 (amount of oil; Capryol 90), X2 (amount of surfactant; Acrysol EL 135) and X3 (amount of co-surfactant; PEG 400). Systems were appraised for visual characteristics for self emulsifying ti...

  10. Drug: D00398 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00398 Drug Valaciclovir hydrochloride (JAN); Valacyclovir hydrochloride (USAN); Va...tegory: 6250 ATC code: J05AB11 prodrug, active substance: Aciclovir [DR:D00222] DNA polymerase inhibitor Tra...erapeutics 625 Antivirals 6250 Antivirals D00398 Valaciclovir hydrochloride (JAN); Valacyclovir hydrochlorid...and nucleotides excl. reverse transcriptase inhibitors J05AB11 Valaciclovir D00398 Valaciclovir hydrochlorid...ntivirals Antiherpetic Agents Valacyclovir D00398 Valaciclovir hydrochloride (JAN); Valacyclovir hydrochlori

  11. Application of a Novel Ant Algorithm Termed Continuous Gridded in Aidded Drug Design%Application of a Novel Ant Algorithm Termed Continuous Gridded in Aidded Drug Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈国华; 陆瑶

    2011-01-01

    Aimed at solving continuous optimum parameter problems effectively in added drug design, this paper develops a novel ant algorithm termed continuous gridded ant colony (CGAC), where the spy ants are utilized to search the latent optimum grid in the domain completely and effectively. In order to test the effect, the CGAC algorithm was success in finding the best values of C and y, when the support vector machine (SVM) was used to fit the nonlinear relationship between the numerical representation of the chemical structure and IC50. The genetic algorithm (GA) was also used to obtain the appropriate feature subset simultaneously, because feature subset selection influences the appropriate kernel parameters and vice versa. The obtained results illustrate that GA-CGAC-SVM models have satisfactory prediction accuracy. The best quantitative modeling results in thirteen-descriptors model based on GA-CGAC-SVMr with mean-square errors 0.397, a predicted correlation coefficient (R2) 0.842, and a cross-validated correlation coefficient (Q^2) 0.756. The best classification result was found using SVM: the percentage (%) of correct prediction based on 7-fold cross-validation was 90.6%. The results demonstrate that the proposed CGAC algorithm provides a new and effective method to find the optimum parameters when the SVM tool is used.

  12. Electro fluido dynamic techniques to design instructive biomaterials for tissue engineering and drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Vincenzo; Altobelli, Rosaria; Cirillo, Valentina; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    A large variety of processes and tools is continuously investigated to discover new solutions to design instructive materials with controlled chemical, physical and biological properties for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Among them, electro fluido dynamic techniques (EFDTs) are emerging as an interesting strategy, based on highly flexible and low-cost processes, to revisit old biomaterial's manufacturing approach by utilizing electrostatic forces as the driving force for the fabrication of 3D architectures with controlled physical and chemical functionalities to guide in vitro and in vivo cell activities. By a rational selection of polymer solution properties and process conditions, EFDTs allow to produce fibres and/or particles at micro and/or nanometric size scale which may be variously assembled by tailored experimental setups, thus giving the chance to generate a plethora of different 3D devices able to incorporate biopolymers (i.e., proteins, polysaccharides) or active molecules (e.g., drugs) for different applications. Here, we focus on the optimization of basic EFDTs - namely electrospinning, electrospraying and electrodynamic atomization - to develop active platforms (i.e., monocomponent, protein and drug loaded scaffolds and µ-scaffolds) made of synthetic (PCL, PLGA) or natural (chitosan, alginate) polymers. In particular, we investigate how to set materials and process parameters to impart specific morphological, biochemical or physical cues to trigger all the fundamental cell-biomaterial and cell- cell cross-talking elicited during regenerative processes, in order to reproduce the complex microenvironment of native or pathological tissues.

  13. Electro fluido dynamic techniques to design instructive biomaterials for tissue engineering and drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large variety of processes and tools is continuously investigated to discover new solutions to design instructive materials with controlled chemical, physical and biological properties for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Among them, electro fluido dynamic techniques (EFDTs) are emerging as an interesting strategy, based on highly flexible and low-cost processes, to revisit old biomaterial’s manufacturing approach by utilizing electrostatic forces as the driving force for the fabrication of 3D architectures with controlled physical and chemical functionalities to guide in vitro and in vivo cell activities. By a rational selection of polymer solution properties and process conditions, EFDTs allow to produce fibres and/or particles at micro and/or nanometric size scale which may be variously assembled by tailored experimental setups, thus giving the chance to generate a plethora of different 3D devices able to incorporate biopolymers (i.e., proteins, polysaccharides) or active molecules (e.g., drugs) for different applications. Here, we focus on the optimization of basic EFDTs - namely electrospinning, electrospraying and electrodynamic atomization - to develop active platforms (i.e., monocomponent, protein and drug loaded scaffolds and µ-scaffolds) made of synthetic (PCL, PLGA) or natural (chitosan, alginate) polymers. In particular, we investigate how to set materials and process parameters to impart specific morphological, biochemical or physical cues to trigger all the fundamental cell–biomaterial and cell– cell cross-talking elicited during regenerative processes, in order to reproduce the complex microenvironment of native or pathological tissues

  14. Electro fluido dynamic techniques to design instructive biomaterials for tissue engineering and drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guarino, Vincenzo, E-mail: vguarino@unina.it; Altobelli, Rosaria; Cirillo, Valentina; Ambrosio, Luigi [Institute for Polymers, Composites and Biomaterials, Department of Chemical Sciences & Materials Technology, National Research Council of Italy, V.le Kennedy 54, Naples (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    A large variety of processes and tools is continuously investigated to discover new solutions to design instructive materials with controlled chemical, physical and biological properties for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Among them, electro fluido dynamic techniques (EFDTs) are emerging as an interesting strategy, based on highly flexible and low-cost processes, to revisit old biomaterial’s manufacturing approach by utilizing electrostatic forces as the driving force for the fabrication of 3D architectures with controlled physical and chemical functionalities to guide in vitro and in vivo cell activities. By a rational selection of polymer solution properties and process conditions, EFDTs allow to produce fibres and/or particles at micro and/or nanometric size scale which may be variously assembled by tailored experimental setups, thus giving the chance to generate a plethora of different 3D devices able to incorporate biopolymers (i.e., proteins, polysaccharides) or active molecules (e.g., drugs) for different applications. Here, we focus on the optimization of basic EFDTs - namely electrospinning, electrospraying and electrodynamic atomization - to develop active platforms (i.e., monocomponent, protein and drug loaded scaffolds and µ-scaffolds) made of synthetic (PCL, PLGA) or natural (chitosan, alginate) polymers. In particular, we investigate how to set materials and process parameters to impart specific morphological, biochemical or physical cues to trigger all the fundamental cell–biomaterial and cell– cell cross-talking elicited during regenerative processes, in order to reproduce the complex microenvironment of native or pathological tissues.

  15. Improving Drug Design: An Update on Recent Applications of Efficiency Metrics, Strategies for Replacing Problematic Elements, and Compounds in Nontraditional Drug Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meanwell, Nicholas A

    2016-04-18

    Drug discovery and development is a complex and lengthy enterprise that suffers from high rates of candidate attrition at all stages of the process. The physical, biological, and toxicological properties of a drug candidate are inextricably linked to its structure, and once a molecule has been synthesized, all subsequent studies along the development path are focused only on assessing and understanding its properties in greater detail. Unfortunately, a full prediction of the biological properties of a molecule from an analysis of its 2- or 3-dimensional structure is currently beyond our expertise. This backdrop mandates that considerable care be taken at the design stage if a molecule is to be successful in testing a mechanistic concept underlying a disease process and to progress into late stage clinical trials and, ultimately, marketing approval. While there are multiple potential causes of candidate attrition, an introspective analysis of drug design practices over the past decade has focused attention on the perception that contemporary molecules are unnecessarily obese, burdened by high molecular weight and excessive lipophilicity. This practice is believed to have its roots in the singular pursuit of enhancing potency during lead optimization rather than adopting a more holistic approach to drug design that gives broader consideration to how structural features affect developability properties. In an effort to provide the medicinal chemistry community with practical guideposts to enhancing compound quality in the drug design phase and which can readily be applied, a series of efficiency indices have been proposed that attempt to define aspects of compound quality in the context of a series of physicochemical parameters. Of these metrics, lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE or LipE), which provides an index of the dependence of the potency of a molecule on its intrinsic lipophilicity, has been characterized as the most robust metric that has potential for broad

  16. Role of particle size, shape, and stiffness in design of intravascular drug delivery systems: insights from computations, experiments, and nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2016-03-01

    Packaging of drug molecules within microparticles and nanoparticles has become an important strategy in intravascular drug delivery, where the particles are designed to protect the drugs from plasma effects, increase drug residence time in circulation, and often facilitate drug delivery specifically at disease sites. To this end, over the past few decades, interdisciplinary research has focused on developing biocompatible materials for particle fabrication, technologies for particle manufacture, drug formulation within the particles for efficient loading, and controlled release and refinement of particle surface chemistries to render selectivity toward disease site for site-selective action. Majority of the particle systems developed for such purposes are spherical nano and microparticles and they have had low-to-moderate success in clinical translation. To refine the design of delivery systems for enhanced performance, in recent years, researchers have started focusing on the physicomechanical aspects of carrier particles, especially their shape, size, and stiffness, as new design parameters. Recent computational modeling studies, as well as, experimental studies using microfluidic devices are indicating that these design parameters greatly influence the particles' behavior in hemodynamic circulation, as well as cell-particle interactions for targeted payload delivery. Certain cellular components of circulation are also providing interesting natural cues for refining the design of drug carrier systems. Based on such findings, new benefits and challenges are being realized for the next generation of drug carriers. The current article will provide a comprehensive review of these findings and discuss the emerging design paradigm of incorporating physicomechanical components in fabrication of particulate drug delivery systems. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:255-270. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1362 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs

  17. Determination of cathinones and other stimulant, psychedelic, and dissociative designer drugs in real hair samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomone, Alberto; Gazzilli, Giulia; Di Corcia, Daniele; Gerace, Enrico; Vincenti, Marco

    2016-03-01

    The detection of new psychoactive substances (NPS) in hair proved to provide insight into their current diffusion among the population and the social characteristics of these synthetic drugs' users. Therefore, a UHPLC-MS/MS method was developed in order to determine 31 stimulant and psychedelic substituted phenethylamines, and dissociative drugs in hair samples. The method proved to be simple, fast, specific, and sensitive. The absence of matrix interferents, together with excellent repeatability of both retention times and relative abundances of diagnostic transitions, allowed the correct identification of all analytes tested. The method showed optimal linearity in the interval 10-1000 pg/mg, with correlation coefficient values varying between 0.9981 and 0.9997. Quantitation limits ranged from 1.8 pg/mg for 4-methoxyphencyclidine (4-MeO-PCP) up to 35 pg/mg for 6-(2-aminopropyl)benzofuran (6-APB). The method was applied to (i) 23 real samples taken from proven MDMA and ketamine abusers and (ii) 54 real hair samples which had been previously tested negative during regular drug screening in driver's license recovery. Six samples tested positive for at least one target analyte. Methoxetamine (MXE) was found in three cases (range of concentration 7.7-27 pg/mg); mephedrone (4-MMC) was found in two cases (50-59 pg/mg) while one sample tested positive for methylone at 28 pg/mg. Other positive findings included 4-methylethcathinone (4-MEC), alpha-pyrrolidinovalerophenone (α-PVP), 4-fluoroamphetamine (4-FA), 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), and diphenidine. The present study confirms the increasing diffusion of new designer drugs with enhanced stimulant activity among the target population of poly-abuse consumers. PMID:26680593

  18. Trypanothione Reductase: A Viable Chemotherapeutic Target for Antitrypanosomal and Antileishmanial Drug Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Omar F. Khan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis are two debilitating disease groups caused by parasites of Trypanosoma and Leishmania spp. and affecting millions of people worldwide. A brief outline of the potential targets for rational drug design against these diseases are presented, with an emphasis placed on the enzyme trypanothione reductase. Trypanothione reductase was identified as unique to parasites and proposed to be an effective target against trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis. The biochemical basis of selecting this enzyme as a target, with reference to the simile and contrast to human analogous enzyme glutathione reductase, and the structural aspects of its active site are presented. The process of designing selective inhibitors for the enzyme trypanothione reductase has been discussed. An overview of the different chemical classes of inhibitors of trypanothione reductase with their inhibitory activities against the parasites and their prospects as future chemotherapeutic agents are briefl y revealed.

  19. Design of dual action antibiotics as an approach to search for new promising drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The review is devoted to the latest achievements in the design of dual action antibiotics — heterodimeric (chimeric) structures based on antibacterial agents of different classes (fluoroquinolones, anthracyclines, oxazolidines, macrolides and so on). Covalent binding can make the pharmacokinetic characteristics of these molecules more predictable and improve the penetration of each component into the cell. Consequently, not only does the drug efficacy increase owing to inhibition of two targets but also the resistance to one or both antibiotics can be overcome. The theoretical grounds of elaboration, design principles and methods for the synthesis of dual action antibiotics are considered. The structures are classified according to the type of covalent spacer (cleavable or not) connecting the moieties of two agents. Dual action antibiotics with a spacer that can be cleaved in a living cell are considered as dual action prodrugs. Data on the biological action of heterodimeric compounds are presented and structure–activity relationships are analyzed. The bibliography includes 225 references

  20. Meeting report: 4th ISIRV antiviral group conference: Novel antiviral therapies for influenza and other respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKimm-Breschkin, Jennifer L; Fry, Alicia M

    2016-05-01

    The International Society for Influenza and other Respiratory Virus Diseases (isirv) held its 4th Antiviral Group Conference at the University of Texas on 2-4 June, 2015. With emerging resistance to the drugs currently licensed for treatment and prophylaxis of influenza viruses, primarily the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu) and the M2 inhibitors amantadine and rimantadine, and the lack of effective interventions against other respiratory viruses, the 3-day programme focused on the discovery and development of inhibitors of several virus targets and key host cell factors involved in virus replication or mediating the inflammatory response. Virus targets included the influenza haemagglutinin, neuraminidase and M2 proteins, and both the respiratory syncytial virus and influenza polymerases and nucleoproteins. Therapies for rhinoviruses and MERS and SARS coronaviruses were also discussed. With the emerging development of monoclonal antibodies as therapeutics, the potential implications of antibody-dependent enhancement of disease were also addressed. Topics covered all aspects from structural and molecular biology to preclinical and clinical studies. The importance of suitable clinical trial endpoints and regulatory issues were also discussed from the perspectives of both industry and government. This meeting summary provides an overview, not only for the conference participants, but also for those interested in the current status of antivirals for respiratory viruses. PMID:26872862

  1. Broad spectrum antiviral activity of favipiravir (T-705: protection from highly lethal inhalational Rift Valley Fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L Caroline

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Development of antiviral drugs that have broad-spectrum activity against a number of viral infections would be of significant benefit. Due to the evolution of resistance to currently licensed antiviral drugs, development of novel anti-influenza drugs is in progress, including Favipiravir (T-705, which is currently in human clinical trials. T-705 displays broad-spectrum in vitro activity against a number of viruses, including Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV. RVF is an important neglected tropical disease that causes human, agricultural, and economic losses in endemic regions. RVF has the capacity to emerge in new locations and also presents a potential bioterrorism threat. In the current study, the in vivo efficacy of T-705 was evaluated in Wistar-Furth rats infected with the virulent ZH501 strain of RVFV by the aerosol route. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Wistar-Furth rats are highly susceptible to a rapidly lethal disease after parenteral or inhalational exposure to the pathogenic ZH501 strain of RVFV. In the current study, two experiments were performed: a dose-determination study and a delayed-treatment study. In both experiments, all untreated control rats succumbed to disease. Out of 72 total rats infected with RVFV and treated with T-705, only 6 succumbed to disease. The remaining 66 rats (92% survived lethal infection with no significant weight loss or fever. The 6 treated rats that succumbed survived significantly longer before succumbing to encephalitic disease. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Currently, there are no licensed antiviral drugs for treating RVF. Here, T-705 showed remarkable efficacy in a highly lethal rat model of Rift Valley Fever, even when given up to 48 hours post-infection. This is the first study to show protection of rats infected with the pathogenic ZH501 strain of RVFV. Our data suggest that T-705 has potential to be a broad-spectrum antiviral drug.

  2. Computer-Aided Drug Design (CADD): Methodological Aspects and Practical Applications in Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianti, Eleonora

    Computer-Aided Drug Design (CADD) has deservedly gained increasing popularity in modern drug discovery (Schneider, G.; Fechner, U. 2005), whether applied to academic basic research or the pharmaceutical industry pipeline. In this work, after reviewing theoretical advancements in CADD, we integrated novel and stateof- the-art methods to assist in the design of small-molecule inhibitors of current cancer drug targets, specifically: Androgen Receptor (AR), a nuclear hormone receptor required for carcinogenesis of Prostate Cancer (PCa); Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5 (STAT5), implicated in PCa progression; and Epstein-Barr Nuclear Antigen-1 (EBNA1), essential to the Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) during latent infections. Androgen Receptor. With the aim of generating binding mode hypotheses for a class (Handratta, V.D. et al. 2005) of dual AR/CYP17 inhibitors (CYP17 is a key enzyme for androgens biosynthesis and therefore implicated in PCa development), we successfully implemented a receptor-based computational strategy based on flexible receptor docking (Gianti, E.; Zauhar, R.J. 2012). Then, with the ultimate goal of identifying novel AR binders, we performed Virtual Screening (VS) by Fragment-Based Shape Signatures, an improved version of the original method developed in our Laboratory (Zauhar, R.J. et al. 2003), and we used the results to fully assess the high-level performance of this innovative tool in computational chemistry. STAT5. The SRC Homology 2 (SH2) domain of STAT5 is responsible for phospho-peptide recognition and activation. As a keystone of Structure-Based Drug Design (SBDD), we characterized key residues responsible for binding. We also generated a model of STAT5 receptor bound to a phospho-peptide ligand, which was validated by docking publicly known STAT5 inhibitors. Then, we performed Shape Signatures- and docking-based VS of the ZINC database (zinc.docking.org), followed by Molecular Mechanics Generalized Born Surface Area (MMGBSA

  3. Viral genome imaging of hepatitis C virus to probe heterogeneous viral infection and responses to antiviral therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanan, Vyas; Trehan, Kartik; Ong, Mei-Lyn; Luna, Joseph M; Hoffmann, Hans-Heinrich; Espiritu, Christine; Sheahan, Timothy P; Chandrasekar, Hamsika; Schwartz, Robert E; Christine, Kathleen S; Rice, Charles M; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive single-stranded RNA virus of enormous global health importance, with direct-acting antiviral therapies replacing an immunostimulatory interferon-based regimen. The dynamics of HCV positive and negative-strand viral RNAs (vRNAs) under antiviral perturbations have not been studied at the single-cell level, leaving a gap in our understanding of antiviral kinetics and host-virus interactions. Here, we demonstrate quantitative imaging of HCV genomes in multiple infection models, and multiplexing of positive and negative strand vRNAs and host antiviral RNAs. We capture the varying kinetics with which antiviral drugs with different mechanisms of action clear HCV infection, finding the NS5A inhibitor daclatasvir to induce a rapid decline in negative-strand viral RNAs. We also find that the induction of host antiviral genes upon interferon treatment is positively correlated with viral load in single cells. This study adds smFISH to the toolbox available for analyzing the treatment of RNA virus infections. PMID:27128351

  4. Drug: D08664 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D08664 Drug Valaciclovir (INN); Valacyclovir; Valtrex (TN) C13H20N6O4 324.1546 324....3357 D08664.gif Antiviral [DS:H00365] ATC code: J05AB11 prodrug, active substance: Aciclovir [DR:D00222] DNA...xcl. reverse transcriptase inhibitors J05AB11 Valaciclovir D08664 Valaciclovir (INN) USP drug classification... [BR:br08302] Antivirals Antiherpetic Agents Valacyclovir D08664 Valaciclovir (IN...ir [ATC:J05AB11] D08664 Valaciclovir (INN) CAS: 124832-26-4 PubChem: 96025347 DrugBank: DB00577 LigandBox: D

  5. IFN-gamma: Novel antiviral cytokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ank, Nina; West, Hans; Paludan, Søren Riis

    2006-01-01

    adaptive immune responses. Recently, a novel class of cytokines was discovered and named IFN-lambda (alternatively type III IFN or interleukin-28/29 [IL- 28/29]), based on IFN-like antiviral activity and induction of typical IFN-inducible genes. Here, we review the literature on IFN-lambda and discuss the...

  6. The IKK Kinases: Operators of Antiviral Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alissa M. Pham

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability of a cell to combat an intracellular pathogen requires a mechanism to recognize the threat and elicit a transcriptional response against it. In the context of virus infection, the cell must take measures to inhibit viral replication, meanwhile, convey warning signals to neighboring cells of the imminent threat. This immune response is predominantly mediated by the production of cytokines, notably, interferon beta (IFNβ. IFNβ signaling results in the transcriptional induction of over one hundred antiviral gene products whose timely expression renders infected cells more capable of inhibiting virus replication, while providing the uninfected cells with the reinforcements to generate a less permissive cellular environment. Induction of IFNβ and many aspects of the antiviral response pivot on the function of the IKK and IKK-related kinases. Despite sharing high levels of homology and some degree of functional redundancy, the classic IKK kinases: IKKα and IKKβ, and the IKK-related kinases: TBK1 and IKKε, perform distinct roles in regulating the host antiviral defense. These kinases serve as molecular operators in their cooperative ability to integrate incoming cellular cues and act on a range of essential antiviral transcription factors to reshape the cellular transcriptome during infection.

  7. Anti-viral Responses in Insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although the study of anti-viral responses in insects has lagged behind studies of responses to other types of pathogens, progress has begun to rapidly accelerate over the past few years. Insects are subject to infection by many different kinds of DNA and RNA viruses. These include viruses that ar...

  8. Antiviral Prophylaxis and H1N1

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-07-14

    Dr. Richard Pebody, a consultant epidemiologist at the Health Protection Agency in London, UK, discusses the use of antiviral post-exposure prophylaxis and pandemic H1N1.  Created: 7/14/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 7/18/2011.

  9. Can engineered "designer" T cells outsmart chronic hepatitis B?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protzer, U; Abken, H

    2010-01-01

    More than 350 million people worldwide are persistently infected with human heptatitis B virus (HBV) and at risk to develop liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma making long-term treatment necessary. While a vaccine is available and new antiviral drugs are being developed, elimination of persistently infected cells is still a major issue. Recent efforts in adoptive cell therapy are experimentally exploring immunotherapeutic elimination of HBV-infected cells by means of a biological attack with genetically engineered "designer" T cells. PMID:21188203

  10. Virtual Screening Strategies in Drug Design [Estratégias de Triagem Virtual no Planejamento de Fármacos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo P. Rodrigues

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of virtual screening techniques represents a major advance in the current drug design era. Through several strategies, virtual screening is able to facilitate the selection of molecules with the desired chemical features to modulate the biological activity of the most attractive molecular targets currently available. From the simplest techniques, as the similarity search or molecular docking, to more complex strategies, including statistical methods and machine learning, the main goal of virtual screening is to improve the searching for molecules with the desired features required for becoming drug candidates, thus accelerating the continuous process of drug design. The aim of this review is to discuss the main virtual screening strategies and how they relate to the drug design process.

  11. Antiviral treatment in patients with cytomegalovirus positive ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kadir; Ozturk

    2014-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus(CMV) is a common virus in patients with ulcerative colitis receiving immunosuppressive drugs. Many studies suggested that CMV infection is an exacerbating factor in patients with ulcerative colitis. The role of CMV in exacerbations of ulcerative colitis has been discussed. One of studies starting this discussion is an article entitled "CMV positive ulcerative colitis: A single center experience and literature review" by Kopylov et al. However, we think that there are some points that should be emphasized about the study. Especially, the small number of patients in the study has led to meaningless results. Large controlled prospective trials are needed to clarify the benefit of antiviral therapy for active ulcerative colitis patients.

  12. Binding Mode and Induced Fit Predictions for Prospective Computational Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebner, Christoph; Iegre, Jessica; Ulander, Johan; Edman, Karl; Hogner, Anders; Tyrchan, Christian

    2016-04-25

    Computer-aided drug design plays an important role in medicinal chemistry to obtain insights into molecular mechanisms and to prioritize design strategies. Although significant improvement has been made in structure based design, it still remains a key challenge to accurately model and predict induced fit mechanisms. Most of the current available techniques either do not provide sufficient protein conformational sampling or are too computationally demanding to fit an industrial setting. The current study presents a systematic and exhaustive investigation of predicting binding modes for a range of systems using PELE (Protein Energy Landscape Exploration), an efficient and fast protein-ligand sampling algorithm. The systems analyzed (cytochrome P, kinase, protease, and nuclear hormone receptor) exhibit different complexities of ligand induced fit mechanisms and protein dynamics. The results are compared with results from classical molecular dynamics simulations and (induced fit) docking. This study shows that ligand induced side chain rearrangements and smaller to medium backbone movements are captured well in PELE. Large secondary structure rearrangements, however, remain challenging for all employed techniques. Relevant binding modes (ligand heavy atom RMSD design cycles. PMID:26974351

  13. Randomised controlled trials may underestimate drug effects: balanced placebo trial design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Lund

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is an inherent assumption in randomised controlled trials that the drug effect can be estimated by subtracting the response during placebo from the response during active drug treatment. OBJECTIVE: To test the assumption of additivity. The primary hypothesis was that the total treatment effect is smaller than the sum of the drug effect and the placebo effect. The secondary hypothesis was that non-additivity was most pronounced in participants with large placebo effects. METHODS: We used a within-subject randomised blinded balanced placebo design and included 48 healthy volunteers (50% males, mean (SD age 23.4 (6.2 years. Experimental pain was induced by injections of hypertonic saline into the masseter muscle. Participants received four injections with hypertonic saline along with lidocaine or matching placebo in randomised order: A: received hypertonic saline/told hypertonic saline; B: received hypertonic saline+lidocaine/told hypertonic saline; C: received hypertonic saline+placebo/told hypertonic saline+pain killer; D: received hypertonic saline+lidocaine/told hypertonic saline+pain killer. The primary outcome measure was the area under the curve (AUC, mm(2 of pain intensity during injections. RESULTS: There was a significant difference between the sum of the drug effect and the placebo effect (mean AUC 6279 mm(2 (95% CI, 4936-7622 and the total treatment effect (mean AUC 5455 mm(2 (95% CI, 4585-6324 (P = 0.049. This difference was larger for participants with large versus small placebo effects (P = 0.015, and the difference correlated significantly with the size of the placebo effect (r = 0.65, P = 0.006. CONCLUSION: Although this study examined placebo effects and not the whole placebo response as in randomised controlled trials, it does suggest that the additivity assumption may be incorrect, and that the estimated drug effects in randomised controlled trials may be underestimated, particularly in studies

  14. Drug: D00901 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00901 Drug Rimantadine hydrochloride (USAN); Flumadine (TN) C12H21N. HCl 215.1441 215.7628 D009 ... TC code: J05AC02 Adamantane derivative Indication: Influenza ... A influenza ... A M2 proton channel blocker [VG:NC_004 ... P drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-influenza ... Agents Rimantadine D00901 Rimantadine hydrochlorid ...

  15. Drug: D06806 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D06806 Drug Measles virus vaccine live (USP) Immunizing agent [active] Component of... M-M-Vax (TN) map07044 Antiviral agents USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Immunological Agents Vaccines Measles... virus vaccine live D06806 Measles virus vaccine live (USP) PubChem: 47208457 ...

  16. Discovery of antiviral molecules for dengue: In silico search and biological evaluation.

    OpenAIRE

    Cabarcas-Montalvo, Maria; Maldonado-Rojas, Wilson; Montes-Grajales, Diana; Bertel-Sevilla, Angela; Wagner-Döbler, Irene; Sztajer, Helena; Reck, Michael; Flechas-Alarcon, Maria; Ocazionez, Raquel; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus

    2016-01-01

    Dengue disease is a global disease that has no effective treatment. The dengue virus (DENV) NS2B/NS3 protease complex is a target for designing specific antivirals due to its importance in viral replication and its high degree of conservation.

  17. Conjugation of a nonspecific antiviral sapogenin with a specific HIV fusion inhibitor: a promising strategy for discovering new antiviral therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Lu, Lu; Na, Heya; Li, Xiangpeng; Wang, Qian; Jiang, Xifeng; Xu, Xiaoyu; Yu, Fei; Zhang, Tianhong; Li, Jinglai; Zhang, Zhenqing; Zheng, Baohua; Liang, Guodong; Cai, Lifeng; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Keliang

    2014-09-11

    Triterpene saponins are a major group of active components in natural products with nonspecific antiviral activities, while T20 peptide (enfuvirtide), which contains a helix zone-binding domain (HBD), is a gp41-specific HIV-1 fusion inhibitor. In this paper, we report the design, synthesis, and structure-activity relationship (SAR) of a group of hybrid molecules in which bioactive triterpene sapogenins were covalently attached to the HBD-containing peptides via click chemistry. We found that either the triterpenes or peptide part alone showed weak activity against HIV-1 Env-mediated cell-cell fusion, while the hybrids generated a strong cooperative effect. Among them, P26-BApc exhibited anti-HIV-1 activity against both T20-sensitive and -resistant HIV-1 strains and improved pharmacokinetic properties. These results suggest that this scaffold design is a promising strategy for developing new HIV-1 fusion inhibitors and possibly novel antiviral therapeutics against other viruses with class I fusion proteins. PMID:25156906

  18. The promise and progress of RNA-interference-based antiviral therapy for respiratory syncytial virus.

    OpenAIRE

    V. V. Vysochinskayа; E. V. Esaulenko; Bogdanov, A A; D. N. Ghorab; N. A. Кnyazev; Dubina, M. V.

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of morbidity in infants, young children, and the elderly worldwide. Presently, there are no explicit recommendations for RSV treatment apart from supportive care. Recent progress in studies of the mechanism of RNA interference suggests the formation of a new class of antiviral drugs in the treatment of RSV infection and related respiratory diseases.

  19. The promise and progress of RNA-interference-based antiviral therapy for respiratory syncytial virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Vysochinskayа

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a major cause of morbidity in infants, young children, and the elderly worldwide. Presently, there are no explicit recommendations for RSV treatment apart from supportive care. Recent progress in studies of the mechanism of RNA interference suggests the formation of a new class of antiviral drugs in the treatment of RSV infection and related respiratory diseases.

  20. Treatment of norovirus infections: Moving antivirals from the bench to the bedside

    OpenAIRE

    Kaufman, Stuart S.; Green, Kim Y.; Korba, Brent E.

    2014-01-01

    Noroviruses (NV) are the most common cause of acute gastrointestinal illness in the United States and worldwide. The development of specific antiviral countermeasures has lagged behind that of other viral pathogens, primarily because norovirus disease has been perceived as brief and self-limiting and robust assays suitable for drug discovery have been lacking. The increasing recognition that NV illness can be life-threatening, especially in immunocompromised patients who often require prolong...

  1. A phage-targeting strategy for the design of spatiotemporal drug delivery from grafted matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawada Ritsuko

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The natural response to injury is dynamic and normally consists of complex temporal and spatial cellular changes in gene expression, which, when acting in synchrony, result in patent tissue repair and, in some instances, regeneration. However, current therapeutic regiments are static and most rely on matrices, gels and engineered skin tissue. Accordingly, there is a need to design next-generation grafting materials to enable biotherapeutic spatiotemporal targeting from clinically approved matrices. To this end, rather then focus on developing completely new grafting materials, we investigated whether phage display could be deployed onto clinically approved synthetic grafts to identify peptide motifs capable of linking pharmaceutical drugs with differential affinities and eventually, control drug delivery from matrices over both space and time. Methods To test this hypothesis, we biopanned combinatorial peptide libraries onto different formulations of a wound-healing matrix (Integra® and eluted the bound peptides with 1 high salt, 2 collagen and glycosaminoglycan or 3 low pH. After three to six rounds of biopanning, phage recovery and phage amplification of the bound particles, any phage that had acquired a capacity to bind the matrix was sequenced. Results In this first report, we identify distinct classes of matrix-binding peptides which elute differently from the screened matrix and demonstrate that they can be applied in a spatially relevant manner. Conclusions We suggest that further applications of these combinatorial techniques to wound-healing matrices may offer a new way to improve the performance of clinically approved matrices so as to introduce temporal and spatial control over drug delivery.

  2. Virus susceptibility and clinical effectiveness of anti-influenza drugs during the 2010–2011 influenza season in Russia

    OpenAIRE

    I.A. Leneva; E.I. Burtseva; S.B. Yatsyshina; I.T. Fedyakina; E.S. Kirillova; E.P. Selkova; Osipova, E.; V. V. Maleev

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antiviral drugs are critical adjuncts to influenza vaccination. This study determined the in vitro susceptibilities of influenza A and B viruses isolated in the 2010–2011 season in Russia to the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir and the hemagglutinin fusion inhibitor umifenovir and clinical efficacy of this antiviral drugs in this season. Methods: The antiviral potency of these drugs against A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in mice was assessed. Importantly, the clinical effectiveness of o...

  3. Design and utilization of the drug-excipient chemical compatibility automated system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, V Hayden; Naath, Maryanne

    2008-07-01

    To accelerate clinical formulation development, an excipient compatibility screen should be conducted as early as possible and it must be rapid, robust and resource sparing. This however, does not describe the traditional excipient compatibility testing approach, requiring many tedious and labor intensive manual operations. This study focused on transforming traditional practices into a completely automated screening process to increase sample throughput and realign resources to more urgent areas, while maintaining quality. Using the developed system, a complete on-line performance study was conducted whereby drug-excipient mixtures were weighed, blended and subjected to accelerated stress stability for up to 1 month, followed by sample extraction and HPLC analysis. Compared to off-line traditional study protocols, the system provided similar relative rank order results with equivalent precision and accuracy, while increasing sample throughput. The designed system offers a resource sparing primary screen for drug-excipient chemical compatibility for solid dosage form development. This approach allows risk assessment analysis, based upon formulation complexity, to be conducted prior to the commitment of resources and candidate selection for clinical development. PMID:18486368

  4. Free energy calculations to estimate ligand-binding affinities in structure-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M Rami; Reddy, C Ravikumar; Rathore, R S; Erion, Mark D; Aparoy, P; Reddy, R Nageswara; Reddanna, P

    2014-01-01

    Post-genomic era has led to the discovery of several new targets posing challenges for structure-based drug design efforts to identify lead compounds. Multiple computational methodologies exist to predict the high ranking hit/lead compounds. Among them, free energy methods provide the most accurate estimate of predicted binding affinity. Pathway-based Free Energy Perturbation (FEP), Thermodynamic Integration (TI) and Slow Growth (SG) as well as less rigorous end-point methods such as Linear interaction energy (LIE), Molecular Mechanics-Poisson Boltzmann./Generalized Born Surface Area (MM-PBSA/GBSA) and λ-dynamics have been applied to a variety of biologically relevant problems. The recent advances in free energy methods and their applications including the prediction of protein-ligand binding affinity for some of the important drug targets have been elaborated. Results using a recently developed Quantum Mechanics (QM)/Molecular Mechanics (MM) based Free Energy Perturbation (FEP) method, which has the potential to provide a very accurate estimation of binding affinities to date has been discussed. A case study for the optimization of inhibitors for the fructose 1,6- bisphosphatase inhibitors has been described. PMID:23947646

  5. Structure-Based Drug Design of Small Molecule Peptide Deformylase Inhibitors to Treat Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Gao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Human peptide deformylase (HsPDF is an important target for anticancer drug discovery. In view of the limited HsPDF, inhibitors were reported, and high-throughput virtual screening (HTVS studies based on HsPDF for developing new PDF inhibitors remain to be reported. We reported here on diverse small molecule inhibitors with excellent anticancer activities designed based on HTVS and molecular docking studies using the crystal structure of HsPDF. The compound M7594_0037 exhibited potent anticancer activities against HeLa, A549 and MCF-7 cell lines with IC50s of 35.26, 29.63 and 24.63 μM, respectively. Molecular docking studies suggested that M7594_0037 and its three derivatives could interact with HsPDF by several conserved hydrogen bonds. Moreover, the pharmacokinetic and toxicity properties of M7594_0037 and its derivatives were predicted using the OSIRIS property explorer. Thus, M7594_0037 and its derivatives might represent a promising scaffold for the further development of novel anticancer drugs.

  6. Designing a Poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) Nanocapsule for Magnetic Field-assisted Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denmark, Daniel; Mukherjee, Pritish; Witanachchi, Sarath

    2014-03-01

    The method of synthesis and the characteristics of polymer based nanocapsules as biomedical drug delivery systems are presented. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been incorporated into these capsules for effective guidance with external magnetic fields to transport therapeutic compounds to various parts of the human body. Once they have reached their destination they can be stimulated to release the drug to the target tissue through externally applied fields. The polymeric material that constitutes the capsules is specifically designed to melt away with the external stimuli to deliver the therapeutic bio agents near the target tissue. In this work we use nebulization to create aqueous poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) nanoparticles that decompose after being heated beyond their transition temperature. Transmission Electron Microscopic imaging (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments have been conducted to study the decomposition of the capsules under external stimuli. Distribution of the magnetic nanoparticles within the capsules and their role in delivering the bio agents have been investigated by the Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM).

  7. DESIGN, EVALUATION AND RECENT TRENDS IN TRANSDERMAL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    M. Hanumanaik et al

    2012-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS) is topically administered dosage form in the form of patches which deliver drugs for systemic effects at a predetermined and controlled rate. It works very simply in which drug is applied inside the patch and it is worn on skin for long period of time. By this constant concentration of drug remain in blood for long time. Polymer matrix, drug, permeation enhancers are the main components of TDDS; Polymers include gelatine, gum Arabic, methyl cellulose, s...

  8. Genetic diversity of the hepatitis C virus: Impact and issues in the antiviral therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H Le Guillou-Guillemette; S Vallet; C Gaudy-Graffin; C Payan; A Pivert; A Goudeau; F Lunel-Fabiani

    2007-01-01

    The hepatitis C Virus (HCV) presents a high degree of genetic variability which is explained by the combination of a lack of proof reading by the RNA dependant RNA polymerase and a high level of viral replication. The resuiting genetic polymorphism defines a classification in clades, genotypes, subtypes, isolates and quasispecies.This diversity is known to reflect the range of responses to Interferon therapy. The genotype is one of the predictive parameters currently used to define the antiviral treatment strategy and the chance of therapeutic success. Studies have also reported the potential impact of the viral genetic polymorphism in the outcome of antiviral therapy in patients infected by the same HCV genotype. Both structural and non structural genomic regions of HCV have been suggested to be involved in the Interferon pathway and the resistance to antiviral therapy. In this review, we first detail the viral basis of HCV diversity.Then, the HCV genetic regions that may be implicated in resistance to therapy are described, with a focus on the structural region encoded by the E2 gene and the non-structural genes NS3, NS5A and NS5B. Both mechanisms of the Interferon resistance and of the new antiviral drugs are described in this review.

  9. A High Throughput Assay for Screening Host Restriction Factors and Antivirals Targeting Influenza A Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingyan; Li, Wenjun; Li, Shitao

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is a human respiratory pathogen that causes seasonal epidemics and occasional global pandemics with devastating levels of morbidity and mortality. Currently approved treatments against influenza are losing effectiveness, as new viral strains are often refractory to conventional treatments. Thus, there is an urgent need to find new therapeutic targets with which to develop novel antiviral drugs. The common strategy to discover new drug targets and antivirals is high throughput screening. However, most current screenings for IAV rely on the engineered virus carrying a reporter, which prevents the application to newly emerging wild type flu viruses, such as 2009 pandemic H1N1 flu. Here we developed a simple and sensitive screening assay for wild type IAV by quantitatively analyzing viral protein levels using a Dot Blot Assay in combination with the LI-COR Imaging System (DBALIS). We first validated DBALIS in overexpression and RNAi assays, which are suitable methods for screening host factors regulating viral infection. More importantly, we also validated and initiated drug screening using DBALIS. A pilot compound screening identified a small molecule that inhibited IAV infection. Taken together, our method represents a reliable and convenient high throughput assay for screening novel host factors and antiviral compounds. PMID:27375580

  10. A High Throughput Assay for Screening Host Restriction Factors and Antivirals Targeting Influenza A Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingyan; Li, Wenjun; Li, Shitao

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is a human respiratory pathogen that causes seasonal epidemics and occasional global pandemics with devastating levels of morbidity and mortality. Currently approved treatments against influenza are losing effectiveness, as new viral strains are often refractory to conventional treatments. Thus, there is an urgent need to find new therapeutic targets with which to develop novel antiviral drugs. The common strategy to discover new drug targets and antivirals is high throughput screening. However, most current screenings for IAV rely on the engineered virus carrying a reporter, which prevents the application to newly emerging wild type flu viruses, such as 2009 pandemic H1N1 flu. Here we developed a simple and sensitive screening assay for wild type IAV by quantitatively analyzing viral protein levels using a Dot Blot Assay in combination with the LI-COR Imaging System (DBALIS). We first validated DBALIS in overexpression and RNAi assays, which are suitable methods for screening host factors regulating viral infection. More importantly, we also validated and initiated drug screening using DBALIS. A pilot compound screening identified a small molecule that inhibited IAV infection. Taken together, our method represents a reliable and convenient high throughput assay for screening novel host factors and antiviral compounds. PMID:27375580

  11. Pharmacological Targeting of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Opportunities for Computer-Aided Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miglianico, Marie; Nicolaes, Gerry A F; Neumann, Dietbert

    2016-04-14

    As a central regulator of metabolism, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an established therapeutic target for metabolic diseases. Beyond the metabolic area, the number of medical fields that involve AMPK grows continuously, expanding the potential applications for AMPK modulators. Even though indirect AMPK activators are used in the clinics for their beneficial metabolic outcome, the few described direct agonists all failed to reach the market to date, which leaves options open for novel targeting methods. As AMPK is not actually a single molecule and has different roles depending on its isoform composition, the opportunity for isoform-specific targeting has notably come forward, but the currently available modulators fall short of expectations. In this review, we argue that with the amount of available structural and ligand data, computer-based drug design offers a number of opportunities to undertake novel and isoform-specific targeting of AMPK. PMID:26510622

  12. STRUCTURE BASED DRUG DESIGN STUDIES ON HETEROARYL PROPANOIC ACID DERIVATIVES AS PPARΓ AGONISTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARUN KUMAR,MANGA RATNAM,ARCHANA KUMARI, AJAY BABU

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs are a group of nuclear receptorproteins. Docking studies are based on several factors. Among 15 entries of PPARγ, 2Q6S wastaken for docking analysis, as it showed 418 most favored regions, 35 in additionally allowedregion and none of the residue in disallowed regions. To carry out drug designing, moleculeswere considered from the literature in which substitution of R1 position with dihydrofurylreported to have high dock score (-14.98 Kcal/mol than the remaining analogues, with bettergeometry and interactions. Hence docking analysis using heteroaryl propionic acid derivatives asanti-diabetic agents suggest the reproducibility of active molecules being predicted bycomputational docking studies using Auto dock software.

  13. Editorial: Current status and perspective on drug targets in tubercle bacilli and drug design of antituberculous agents based on structure-activity relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, Haruaki

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, tuberculosis (TB) remains the most frequent and important infectious disease causing morbidity and death. However, the development of new drugs for the treatment and prophylaxis of TB, particularly those truly active against dormant and persistent types of tubercle bacilli, has been slow, although some promising drugs, such as diarylquinoline TMC207, nitroimidazopyran PA-824, nitroimidazo-oxazole Delamanid (OPC-67683), oxazolidinone PNU-100480, ethylene diamine SQ-109, and pyrrole derivative LL3858, are currently under phase 1 to 3 clinical trials. Therefore, novel types of antituberculous drug, which act on unique drug targets in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) pathogens, particularly drug targets related to the establishment of mycobacterial dormancy in the host's macrophages, are urgently needed. In this context, it should be noted that current anti-TB drugs mostly target the metabolic reactions and proteins which are essential for the growth of MTB in extracellular milieus. It may also be promising to develop another type of drug that exerts an inhibitory action against bacterial virulence factors which cross-talk and interfere with signaling pathways of MTB-infected immunocompetent host cells, such as lymphocytes, macrophages, and NK cells, thereby changing the intracellular milieus that are favorable to intramacrophage survival and the growth of infected bacilli. This special issue contains ten review articles, dealing with recent approaches to identify and establish novel drug targets in MTB for the development of new and unique antitubercular drugs, including those related to mycobacterial dormancy and crosstalk with cellular signaling pathways. In addition, this special issue contains some review papers with special reference to the drug design based on quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis, especially three-dimensional (3D)-QSAR. New, critical information on the entire genome of MTB and mycobacterial virulence genes is

  14. Design, development and in vitro evaluation of sennosides tablets containing pectin HPMC for colonic drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momin Munira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present investigation was to achieve colon specific delivery of sennosides using the polysaccharide pectin as a compression-coating agent. In this study, pectin along with hydroxypropylmethylcellulose was used for compression coating of the core tablets of calcium sennoside. Drug dissolution and erosion studies were carried out in pH 1.2 and phosphate buffer pH 7.4 using a pectinolytic enzyme. The system was designed based on the gastrointestinal transit time concept, assuming colon arrival time to be 6 h. It was found that pectin alone was not sufficient to protect the core tablets during entire gastrointestinal transit time. Addition of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose was required to control the erosion of tablets. In this investigation a 3 2 factorial design was constructed to investigate the influence of two variables; the amount of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (X1 and coat weight of the tablets (X2 on the time taken for 50% erosion of tablet in presence of pectinase enzyme (TE 50 and average percent weight difference between tablets with and without enzyme at the 10 th hour (% WD. The results revealed that for protecting the calcium sennosides core tablets in upper gastrointestinal tract, the core tablets should be coated with lower amount of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose and higher amount of coat weight. The main effects were found to be statistically significant in nature. The amount of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose exhibited predominant action as compared to coat weight. In vivo performance was assessed by X-ray roentegenography study. The pectin-hydroxypropylmethylcellulose coating was found to be a promising colon delivery system for those drugs like sennosides.

  15. Indian marine bivalves: Potential source of antiviral drugs

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chatterji, A.; Ansari, Z.A.; Ingole, B.S.; Bichurina, M.A.; Sovetova, M.; Boikov, Y.A.

    ( Crassostrea gryphoides ) and clam (Meretrix casta , M. meretrix , Paphia malabarica , Villorita cypr i noides ) . Recent investigations conducted jointly by Russian and Indian scientists showed that Indian green mussels ( P. viridis... prophyla c tic effect has been observed in mice when a dose of mussel extract was given 5 h before inoculation of v i rus 3 and the mice showed 100% survival. Marine bivalves are filter - feeding animals, and while feeding they accumulate...

  16. Pandemic influenza: overview of vaccines and antiviral drugs.

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Manon M. J.

    2005-01-01

    Pandemic influenza has become a high priority item for all public health authorities. An influenza pandemic is believed to be imminent, and scientists agree that it will be a matter of when, where, and what will be the causative agent. Recently, most attention has been directed to human cases of avian influenza caused by a H5N1 avian influenza virus. An effective vaccine will be needed to substantially reduce the impact of an influenza pandemic. Current influenza vaccine manufacturing technol...

  17. Acyclic nucleoside phosphonates: A key class of antiviral drugs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    De Clercq, E.; Holý, Antonín

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 13 (2005), 928-940. ISSN 1474-1776 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : tenofovir * adefovir * cidofovir Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 18.775, year: 2005

  18. 78 FR 57166 - Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-17

    ... the treatment of chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 infection, in combination with peginterferon alfa and... disease (including cirrhosis) who are treatment- na ve or who have failed previous interferon...

  19. Gastroretentive drug delivery of metformin hydrochloride: formulation and in vitro evaluation using 3(2) full factorial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldhane, Sanjay P; Kuchekar, Bhanudas S

    2009-10-01

    Metformin Hydrochloride (MF) is glucose lowering agent that is widely used for management for type II diabetes. MF is reported to be absorbed mainly in upper part of GIT. It is having narrow absorption window and high water solubility, and it would be more beneficial to retain the drug in stomach for prolonged duration so as to achieve maximum absorption and better bioavailability. A conventional oral CR formulation releases most of the drug content at the colon, which requires that the drug will be absorbed from the colon. The present investigation is aimed to develop novel gastroretentive (GR) drug delivery system, which not only release the drug in the absorption window but also provides controlled release drug profile that may result patient compliance and therapeutic success. Floating tablets of MF was prepared using sodium alginate, and sodium carboxymethylcellulose was used as a gelling agent, and release modifiers, respectively. Eudragit NE 30 D was used as sustained release polymer to control the initial burst release. Drug and excipients compatibility studies were monitored by thermal analysis by using differential scanning calorimeter. 32 full factorial design was applied to optimize the formulation. The DSC thermogram of drug, polymer and physical mixtures revealed that there was no known interaction between drug and polymers. The prepared tablets were evaluated for in vitro dissolution, in vitro buoyancy, percentage swelling, percentage erosion and similarity factors with marketed tablets. The optimization study using a 32 full factorial design revealed that the amount of sodium alginate and sodium carboxymethylcellulose had a significant effect on t50, t90, Flag and f2. Thus, by selecting a suitable composition of release rate modifier and gel forming agent, Gastro retentive system can be developed with the desired dissolution profile. This study indicated that the MF GR tablets prepared using sodium alginate and sodium carboxymethylcellulose can

  20. Design and development of a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system for telmisartan for oral drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Jaydeep; Kevin, Garala; Patel, Anjali; Raval, Mihir; Sheth, Navin

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aim: Telmisartan (TEL) is an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) antihypertensive agent. The aim of the present investigation was to develop a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) to enhance the oral bioavailability of poorly water soluble TEL. Materials and Methods: The solubility of TEL in various oils was determined to identify the oil phase of a SNEDDS. Various surfactants and co-surfactants were screened for their ability to emulsify the selected oil. Pseud...

  1. Design, development and optimization of self-microemulsifying drug delivery system of an anti-obesity drug

    OpenAIRE

    Jagruti Desai; Nirav Khatri; Sachin Chauhan; Avinash Seth

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to formulate a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) containing orlistat. The oil, surfactant and co-surfactant were decided based on the solubility studies. Pseudoternary phase diagrams were plotted, microemulsification area was determined and different formulations were prepared. Particle size, zeta potential, dispersibility test and thermodynamic stability studies were measured. In-vitro dissolution test of thermodynamically stable formulations...

  2. Investigation of Different Lipid Based Materials as Matrices Designed to Control the Release of a Hydrophobic Drug

    OpenAIRE

    Inderbir Singh; Pradeep Kumar; Nisha Rani; Vikas Rana

    2009-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of different hydrophobic materials and their loading level on the release profile of etoricoxib, a model lipophilic drug, from matrix systems. Matrix tablets of the drug were prepared using compritol, precirol, glyceryl monostearate, cetostearyl alcohol and eudragit as release retarding agents by direct compression process. The resulting monolithic tablets were found to have optimum hardness, uniform thickness, high content uniformity and ...

  3. Design and development of microemulsion drug delivery system of atorvastatin and study its intestinal permeability in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Surjyanarayan Mandal; Snigdha S. Mandal; Krutika K. Sawant

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design and develop microemulsion drug delivery system of Atorvastatin and to investigate its intestinal transport behavior using the single-pass intestinal perfusion method in rat. Microemulsion drug delivery system of Atorvastatin was prepared by water titration method and optimized formulation was characterized. The permeability behavior of Atorvastatin over three different concentrations (10, 20 and 40 μg/mL) was studied in each isolated region o...

  4. Rational design of urea-based glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) inhibitors as versatile tools for specific drug targeting and delivery

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tykvart, Jan; Schimer, Jiří; Bařinková, Jitka; Pachl, Petr; Poštová Slavětínská, Lenka; Majer, Pavel; Konvalinka, Jan; Šácha, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 15 (2014), s. 4099-4108. ISSN 0968-0896 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Grant ostatní: OPPK(CZ) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : GCPII * PSMA * structure-aided drug design * specific drug targeting Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.793, year: 2014

  5. Introducing rapid diagnostic tests for malaria into drug shops in Uganda: design and implementation of a cluster randomized trial

    OpenAIRE

    Mbonye, AK; Magnussen, P.; Chandler, CI; Hansen, KS; Lal, S; Cundill, B; Lynch, CA; Clarke, SE

    2014-01-01

    Background An intervention was designed to introduce rapid diagnostics tests for malaria (mRDTs) into registered drug shops in Uganda to encourage rational and appropriate treatment of malaria with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). We conducted participatory training of drug shop vendors and implemented supporting interventions to orientate local communities (patients) and the public sector (health facility staff and district officials) to the behavioral changes in diagnosis, treat...

  6. Design and evaluation of a brinzolamide drug-resin in situ thermosensitive gelling system for sustained ophthalmic drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Liu, Hua; Liu, Li-li; Cai, Chao-nan; Xin, Hong-xia; Liu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    In this study a brinzolamide drug-resin ophthalmic thermosensitive in situ gelling system was developed and evaluated. Brinzolamide was combined with ion exchange resins to prolong the retention time of drugs in the eye and to reduce ocular and systemic side effects. Poloxamer F127 was used as gelling vehicle in combination with carbopol 934P, which acted as a viscosity-enhancing agent. They were prepared using the cold method. The optimized formulation exhibited a sol-gel transition at 33.2±1.1°C with pseudoplastic flow behavior. This formulation was stable and nonirritant to rabbit eyes. In vitro release studies demonstrated diffusion-controlled release of brinzolamide from the combined solutions over a period of 8 h. In vivo evaluation (the elimination of brinzolamide through tears and absorption of brinzolamide in aqueous humor) indicated that the solution combination was better able to retain the drug than commercial preparations. Thus this formulation is safe for ophthalmic use and significantly increases brinzolamide bioavailability in aqueous humor. PMID:25099146

  7. Covalent inhibitors in drug discovery: from accidental discoveries to avoided liabilities and designed therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Renato A

    2015-09-01

    Drugs that covalently bond to their biological targets have a long history in drug discovery. A look at drug approvals in recent years suggests that covalent drugs will continue to make impacts on human health for years to come. Although fraught with concerns about toxicity, the high potencies and prolonged effects achievable with covalent drugs may result in less-frequent drug dosing and in wide therapeutic margins for patients. Covalent inhibition can also dissociate drug pharmacodynamics (PD) from pharmacokinetics (PK), which can result in desired drug efficacy for inhibitors that have short systemic exposure. Evidence suggests that there is a reduced risk for the development of resistance against covalent drugs, which is a major challenge in areas such as oncology and infectious disease. PMID:26002380

  8. Clinical Implications of Antiviral Resistance in Influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy C. M. Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is a major cause of severe respiratory infections leading to excessive hospitalizations and deaths globally; annual epidemics, pandemics, and sporadic/endemic avian virus infections occur as a result of rapid, continuous evolution of influenza viruses. Emergence of antiviral resistance is of great clinical and public health concern. Currently available antiviral treatments include four neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir, laninamivir, M2-inibitors (amantadine, rimantadine, and a polymerase inhibitor (favipiravir. In this review, we focus on resistance issues related to the use of neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs. Data on primary resistance, as well as secondary resistance related to NAI exposure will be presented. Their clinical implications, detection, and novel therapeutic options undergoing clinical trials are discussed.

  9. An antiviral furanoquinone from Paulownia tomentosa Steud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, K H; Huh, H; Kim, B K; Lee, C K

    1999-11-01

    A methanol extract of the stem bark of Paulownia tomentosa showed antiviral activity against poliovirus types 1 and 3. Sequential liquid-liquid extraction with n-hexane, chloroform and water, and a silicagel column chromatography resulted in the purification of a compound. The compound was identified as methyl-5-hydroxy-dinaphthol[1,2-2',3']furan-7,12-dione-6-carbox yla te on the basis of spectroscopic data. The component caused a significant reduction of viral cytopathic effect when it was subjected to a standard antiviral assay by using HeLa cells. The EC(50) of the compound against poliovirus type 1 strain Brunhilde, and type 3 strain Leon were 0.3 microg/mL and 0.6 microg/mL, respectively. PMID:10548761

  10. RNAi: antiviral therapy against dengue virus

    OpenAIRE

    Idrees, Sobia; Ashfaq, Usman A

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus infection has become a global threat affecting around 100 countries in the world. Currently, there is no licensed antiviral agent available against dengue. Thus, there is a strong need to develop therapeutic strategies that can tackle this life threatening disease. RNA interference is an important and effective gene silencing process which degrades targeted RNA by a sequence specific process. Several studies have been conducted during the last decade to evaluate the efficiency of...

  11. Strategies to develop antivirals against enterovirus 71

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, Rei-Lin; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2013-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is an important human pathogen which may cause severe neurological complications and death in children. The virus caused several outbreaks in the Asia-Pacific region during the past two decades and has been considered a significant public health problem in the post-poliovirus eradication era. Unlike poliovirus, there is no effective vaccine or approved antivirals against EV71. To explore anti-EV71 agents therefore is of vital importance. Several strategies have been empl...

  12. Antiviral and Immunostimulant Activities of Andrographis paniculata

    OpenAIRE

    Churiyah; Olivia Bunga Pongtuluran; Elrade Rofaani; Tarwadi,

    2015-01-01

    Andrographis paniculata (Burm. f.) Nees is a medicinal plant which was reported to have anti HIV, anti pathogenic bacteria and immunoregulatory activities. The research purpose was to investigate the activity of Andrographis paniculata ethanol extract as antiviral and immunostimulant. A. paniculata leaves oven-dried, then grinded and macerated with ethanol 90%, and the extract then analyzed using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) to determine the content of active compounds androg...

  13. Design and sample size considerations for simultaneous global drug development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qin; Chen, Gang; Yuan, Zhilong; Lan, K K Gordon

    2012-09-01

    Due to the potential impact of ethnic factors on clinical outcomes, the global registration of a new treatment is challenging. China and Japan often require local trials in addition to a multiregional clinical trial (MRCT) to support the efficacy and safety claim of the treatment. The impact of ethnic factors on the treatment effect has been intensively investigated and discussed from different perspectives. However, most current methods are focusing on the assessment of the consistency or similarity of the treatment effect between different ethnic groups in exploratory nature. In this article, we propose a new method for the design and sample size consideration for a simultaneous global drug development program (SGDDP) using weighted z-tests. In the proposed method, to test the efficacy of a new treatment for the targeted ethnic (TE) group, a weighted test that combines the information collected from both the TE group and the nontargeted ethnic (NTE) group is used. The influence of ethnic factors and local medical practice on the treatment effect is accounted for by down-weighting the information collected from NTE group in the combined test statistic. This design controls rigorously the overall false positive rate for the program at a given level. The sample sizes needed for the TE group in an SGDDP for three most commonly used efficacy endpoints, continuous, binary, and time-to-event, are then calculated. PMID:22946950

  14. Creation of a S1P Lyase bacterial surrogate for structure-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argiriadi, Maria A; Banach, David; Radziejewska, Elzbieta; Marchie, Susan; DiMauro, Jennifer; Dinges, Jurgen; Dominguez, Eric; Hutchins, Charles; Judge, Russell A; Queeney, Kara; Wallace, Grier; Harris, Christopher M

    2016-05-01

    S1P Lyase (SPL) has been described as a drug target in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. It plays an important role in maintaining intracellular levels of S1P thereby affecting T cell egress from lymphoid tissues. Several groups have already published approaches to inhibit S1P Lyase with small molecules, which in turn increase endogenous S1P concentrations resulting in immunosuppression. The use of structural biology has previously aided SPL inhibitor design. Novel construct design is at times necessary to provide a reagent for protein crystallography. Here we present a chimeric bacterial protein scaffold used for protein X-ray structures in the presence of early small molecule inhibitors. Mutations were introduced to the bacterial SPL from Symbiobacterium thermophilum which mimic the human enzyme. As a result, two mutant StSPL crystal structures resolved to 2.8Å and 2.2Å resolutions were solved and provide initial structural hypotheses for an isoxazole chemical series, whose optimization is discussed in the accompanying paper. PMID:27013389

  15. Ab initio parameterization of YFF1, a universal force field for drug-design applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovenko, Olexandr Ya; Li, Yvonne Y; Oliferenko, Alexander A; Vashchenko, Ganna M; Bdzhola, Volodymyr G; Jones, Steven J M

    2012-02-01

    The YFF1 is a new universal molecular mechanic force field designed for drug discovery purposes. The electrostatic part of YFF1 has already been parameterized to reproduce ab initio calculated dipole and quadrupole moments. Now we report a parameterization of the van der Waals interactions (vdW) for the same atom types that were previously defined. The 6-12 Lennard-Jones potential terms were parameterized against homodimerization energies calculated at the MP2/6-31 G level of theory. The Boys-Bernardi counterpoise correction was employed to account for the basis-set superposition error. As a source of structural information we used about 2,400 neutral compounds from the ZINC2007 database. About 6,600 homodimeric configurations were generated from this dataset. A special "closure" procedure was designed to accelerate the parameters fitting. As a result, dimerization energies of small organic compounds are reproduced with an average unsigned error of 1.1 kcal mol(-1). Although the primary goal of this work was to parameterize nonbonded interactions, bonded parameters were also derived, by fitting to PM6 semiempirically optimized geometries of approximately 20,000 compounds. PMID:21562826

  16. TDP1 repairs nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage induced by chain-terminating anticancer and antiviral nucleoside analogs

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Shar-yin N.; Murai, Junko; Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Dexheimer, Thomas S.; Naumova, Alena; Gmeiner, William H.; Pommier, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Chain-terminating nucleoside analogs (CTNAs) that cause stalling or premature termination of DNA replication forks are widely used as anticancer and antiviral drugs. However, it is not well understood how cells repair the DNA damage induced by these drugs. Here, we reveal the importance of tyrosyl–DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1) in the repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage induced by CTNAs. On investigating the effects of four CTNAs—acyclovir (ACV), cytarabine (Ara-C), zidovudine (AZT...

  17. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... (HRP), codified at 10 CFR part 712. HRP employees will be subject to the drug testing standards of this... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Random drug testing requirements and identification of... PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.7 Random drug testing requirements and identification of...

  18. In Vitro Antiviral Effect of "Nanosilver" on Influenza Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Mehrbod

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Influenza is a viral infectious disease with frequent seasonal epidemics causing world-wide economical and social effects. Due to antigenic shifts and drifts of influenza virus, long-lasting vaccine has not been developed so far. The current annual vaccines and effective antiviral drugs are not available sufficiently. Therefore in order to prevent spread of infectious agents including viruses, antiseptics are considered by world health authorities. Small particles of silver have a long history as general antiseptic and disinfectant. Silver does not induce resistance in microorganisms and this ability in Nano-size is stronger. Materials and methods: The aim of this study was to determine antiviral effects of Nanosilver against influenza virus. TCID50 (50% Tissue Culture Infectious Dose of the virus as well as CC50 (50% Cytotoxic Concentration of Nanosilver was obtained by MTT (3- [4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide, Sigma method. This compound was non-toxic to MDCK (Madin-Darbey Canin Kidney cells at concentration up to 1 µg/ml.  Effective minimal cytotoxic concentration and 100 TCID50 of the virus were added to the confluent cells.  Inhibitory effects of Nanosilver on the virus and its cytotoxicity were assessed at different temperatures using Hemagglutination (HA assay, RT-PCR (Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction, and DIF (Direct Immunofluorescent. RT-PCR and free band densitometry software were used to compare the volume of the PCR product bands on the gel. Results and Discussion:  In this study it was found that Nanosilver has destructive effect on the virus membrane glycoprotein knobs as well as the cells.

  19. Drug: D02734 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D02734 Drug Abacavir succinate (USAN) C14H18N6O. C4H6O4 404.1808 404.4204 D02734.gi...ry the HLA-B*5701 allele are at high risk for experiencing a hypersensitivity reaction to Abacavir RNA-direc...scriptase inhibitors J05AF06 Abacavir D02734 Abacavir succinate (USAN) USP drug c...lassification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-HIV Agents, Nucleoside and Nucleotide Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTI)v Abacavir... D02734 Abacavir succinate (USAN) Antiinfectives [BR:br08307] Antivirals Anti-HIV agen

  20. Drug: D07057 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D07057 Drug Abacavir (INN) C14H18N6O 286.1542 286.3323 D07057.gif Antiviral [DS:H00...the HLA-B*5701 allele are at high risk for experiencing a hypersensitivity reaction to Abacavir RNA-directed...iptase inhibitors J05AF06 Abacavir D07057 Abacavir (INN) USP drug classification ...[BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-HIV Agents, Nucleoside and Nucleotide Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTI)v Abacavir D07057 Abacavir...nhibitor (RTI) Nucleoside and nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) Abacavir