WorldWideScience

Sample records for antitoxin partner phd

  1. Doc of prophage P1 is inhibited by its antitoxin partner Phd through fold complementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Pino, Abel; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Mikkel; Wyns, Lode;

    2008-01-01

    Prokaryotic toxin-antitoxin modules are involved in major physiological events set in motion under stress conditions. The toxin Doc (death on curing) from the phd/doc module on phage P1 hosts the C-terminal domain of its antitoxin partner Phd (prevents host death) through fold complementation...

  2. Crystal Structures of Phd-Doc, HigA, and YeeU Establish Multiple Evolutionary Links between Microbial Growth-Regulating Toxin-Antitoxin Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbing, Mark A.; Handelman, Samuel K.; Kuzin, Alexandre P.; Verdon, Grégory; Wang, Chi; Su, Min; Rothenbacher, Francesca P.; Abashidze, Mariam; Liu, Mohan; Hurley, Jennifer M.; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas; Inouye, Masayori; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Woychik, Nancy A.; Hunt, John F. (Rutgers); (Columbia); (RWJ-Med)

    2010-09-27

    Bacterial toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems serve a variety of physiological functions including regulation of cell growth and maintenance of foreign genetic elements. Sequence analyses suggest that TA families are linked by complex evolutionary relationships reflecting likely swapping of functional domains between different TA families. Our crystal structures of Phd-Doc from bacteriophage P1, the HigA antitoxin from Escherichia coli CFT073, and YeeU of the YeeUWV systems from E. coli K12 and Shigella flexneri confirm this inference and reveal additional, unanticipated structural relationships. The growth-regulating Doc toxin exhibits structural similarity to secreted virulence factors that are toxic for eukaryotic target cells. The Phd antitoxin possesses the same fold as both the YefM and NE2111 antitoxins that inhibit structurally unrelated toxins. YeeU, which has an antitoxin-like activity that represses toxin expression, is structurally similar to the ribosome-interacting toxins YoeB and RelE. These observations suggest extensive functional exchanges have occurred between TA systems during bacterial evolution.

  3. Toxin-Antitoxin Battle in Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cataudella, Ilaria

    This PhD thesis consists of three research projects revolving around the common thread of investigation of the properties and biological functions of Toxin-Antitoxin loci. Toxin-Antitoxin (TA) loci are transcriptionally regulated via an auto-inhibition mechanism called conditional cooperativity, ...

  4. Keeping the wolves at bay: antitoxins of prokaryotic type II toxin-antitoxin systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai Ting eChan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In their initial stages of discovery, prokaryotic toxin-antitoxin (TA systems were confined to bacterial plasmids where they function to mediate the maintenance and stability of usually low- to medium-copy number plasmids through the post-segregational killing of any plasmid-free daughter cells that developed. Their eventual discovery as nearly ubiquitous and repetitive elements in bacterial chromosomes led to a wealth of knowledge and scientific debate as to their diversity and functionality in the prokaryotic lifestyle. Currently categorized into six different types designated types I – VI, type II TA systems are the best characterized. These generally comprised of two genes encoding a proteic toxin and its corresponding proteic antitoxin, respectively. Under normal growth conditions, the stable toxin is prevented from exerting its lethal effect through tight binding with the less stable antitoxin partner, forming a non-lethal TA protein complex. Besides binding with its cognate toxin, the antitoxin also plays a role in regulating the expression of the type II TA operon by binding to the operator site, thereby repressing transcription from the TA promoter. In most cases, full repression is observed in the presence of the TA complex as binding of the toxin enhances the DNA binding capability of the antitoxin. TA systems have been implicated in a gamut of prokaryotic cellular functions such as being mediators of programmed cell death as well as persistence or dormancy, biofilm formation, as defensive weapons against bacteriophage infections and as virulence factors in pathogenic bacteria. It is thus apparent that these antitoxins, as DNA-binding proteins, play an essential role in modulating the prokaryotic lifestyle whilst at the same time preventing the lethal action of the toxins under normal growth conditions, i.e., keeping the proverbial wolves at bay. In this review, we will cover the diversity and characteristics of various type II TA

  5. 9 CFR 113.451 - Tetanus Antitoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tetanus Antitoxin. 113.451 Section 113... Products § 113.451 Tetanus Antitoxin. Tetanus Antitoxin is a specific antibody product containing... Tetanus Antitoxin shall yield not less than the labeled unitage of antitoxin throughout the dating...

  6. Partnering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    to meet the de- successful despite the site challenges and sign intent, business changes during the project. (Groves was acquired by the Torno ...34 Complete the contract without need for America company during construction- litigation. Torno embraced Partnering and continued the process which was

  7. Repurposing a Prokaryotic Toxin-Antitoxin System for the Selective Killing of Oncogenically Stressed Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Mark A; Pimentel, Belén; Bermejo-Rodríguez, Camino; Dionne, Isabelle; Turnbull, Alice; de la Cueva-Méndez, Guillermo

    2016-07-15

    Prokaryotes express intracellular toxins that pass unnoticed to carrying cells until coexpressed antitoxin partners are degraded in response to stress. Although not evolved to function in eukaryotes, one of these toxins, Kid, induces apoptosis in mammalian cells, an effect that is neutralized by its cognate antitoxin, Kis. Here we engineered this toxin-antitoxin pair to create a synthetic system that becomes active in human cells suffering a specific oncogenic stress. Inspired by the way Kid becomes active in bacterial cells, we produced a Kis variant that is selectively degraded in human cells expressing oncoprotein E6. The resulting toxin-antitoxin system functions autonomously in human cells, distinguishing those that suffer the oncogenic insult, which are killed by Kid, from those that do not, which remain protected by Kis. Our results provide a framework for developing personalized anticancer strategies avoiding off-target effects, a challenge that has been hardly tractable by other means thus far.

  8. Toxin-Antitoxin Systems of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F. Schuster

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Toxin-antitoxin (TA systems are small genetic elements found in the majority of prokaryotes. They encode toxin proteins that interfere with vital cellular functions and are counteracted by antitoxins. Dependent on the chemical nature of the antitoxins (protein or RNA and how they control the activity of the toxin, TA systems are currently divided into six different types. Genes comprising the TA types I, II and III have been identified in Staphylococcus aureus. MazF, the toxin of the mazEF locus is a sequence-specific RNase that cleaves a number of transcripts, including those encoding pathogenicity factors. Two yefM-yoeB paralogs represent two independent, but auto-regulated TA systems that give rise to ribosome-dependent RNases. In addition, omega/epsilon/zeta constitutes a tripartite TA system that supposedly plays a role in the stabilization of resistance factors. The SprA1/SprA1AS and SprF1/SprG1 systems are post-transcriptionally regulated by RNA antitoxins and encode small membrane damaging proteins. TA systems controlled by interaction between toxin protein and antitoxin RNA have been identified in S. aureus in silico, but not yet experimentally proven. A closer inspection of possible links between TA systems and S. aureus pathophysiology will reveal, if these genetic loci may represent druggable targets. The modification of a staphylococcal TA toxin to a cyclopeptide antibiotic highlights the potential of TA systems as rather untapped sources of drug discovery.

  9. Toxin-Antitoxin Systems of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Christopher F; Bertram, Ralph

    2016-05-05

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are small genetic elements found in the majority of prokaryotes. They encode toxin proteins that interfere with vital cellular functions and are counteracted by antitoxins. Dependent on the chemical nature of the antitoxins (protein or RNA) and how they control the activity of the toxin, TA systems are currently divided into six different types. Genes comprising the TA types I, II and III have been identified in Staphylococcus aureus. MazF, the toxin of the mazEF locus is a sequence-specific RNase that cleaves a number of transcripts, including those encoding pathogenicity factors. Two yefM-yoeB paralogs represent two independent, but auto-regulated TA systems that give rise to ribosome-dependent RNases. In addition, omega/epsilon/zeta constitutes a tripartite TA system that supposedly plays a role in the stabilization of resistance factors. The SprA1/SprA1AS and SprF1/SprG1 systems are post-transcriptionally regulated by RNA antitoxins and encode small membrane damaging proteins. TA systems controlled by interaction between toxin protein and antitoxin RNA have been identified in S. aureus in silico, but not yet experimentally proven. A closer inspection of possible links between TA systems and S. aureus pathophysiology will reveal, if these genetic loci may represent druggable targets. The modification of a staphylococcal TA toxin to a cyclopeptide antibiotic highlights the potential of TA systems as rather untapped sources of drug discovery.

  10. Antitoxin Treatment of Inhalation Anthrax: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Eileen; Pillai, Satish K; Bower, William A; Hendricks, Katherine A; Guarnizo, Julie T; Hoyle, Jamechia D; Gorman, Susan E; Boyer, Anne E; Quinn, Conrad P; Meaney-Delman, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Concern about use of anthrax as a bioweapon prompted development of novel anthrax antitoxins for treatment. Clinical guidelines for the treatment of anthrax recommend antitoxin therapy in combination with intravenous antimicrobials; however, a large-scale or mass anthrax incident may exceed antitoxin availability and create a need for judicious antitoxin use. We conducted a systematic review of antitoxin treatment of inhalation anthrax in humans and experimental animals to inform antitoxin recommendations during a large-scale or mass anthrax incident. A comprehensive search of 11 databases and the FDA website was conducted to identify relevant animal studies and human reports: 28 animal studies and 3 human cases were identified. Antitoxin monotherapy at or shortly after symptom onset demonstrates increased survival compared to no treatment in animals. With early treatment, survival did not differ between antimicrobial monotherapy and antimicrobial-antitoxin therapy in nonhuman primates and rabbits. With delayed treatment, antitoxin-antimicrobial treatment increased rabbit survival. Among human cases, addition of antitoxin to combination antimicrobial treatment was associated with survival in 2 of the 3 cases treated. Despite the paucity of human data, limited animal data suggest that adjunctive antitoxin therapy may improve survival. Delayed treatment studies suggest improved survival with combined antitoxin-antimicrobial therapy, although a survival difference compared with antimicrobial therapy alone was not demonstrated statistically. In a mass anthrax incident with limited antitoxin supplies, antitoxin treatment of individuals who have not demonstrated a clinical benefit from antimicrobials, or those who present with more severe illness, may be warranted. Additional pathophysiology studies are needed, and a point-of-care assay correlating toxin levels with clinical status may provide important information to guide antitoxin use during a large-scale anthrax

  11. Toxins-antitoxins: diversity, evolution and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Finbarr; Van Melderen, Laurence

    2011-10-01

    Genes for toxin-antitoxin (TA) complexes are widespread in prokaryote genomes, and species frequently possess tens of plasmid and chromosomal TA loci. The complexes are categorized into three types based on genetic organization and mode of action. The toxins universally are proteins directed against specific intracellular targets, whereas the antitoxins are either proteins or small RNAs that neutralize the toxin or inhibit toxin synthesis. Within the three types of complex, there has been extensive evolutionary shuffling of toxin and antitoxin genes leading to considerable diversity in TA combinations. The intracellular targets of the protein toxins similarly are varied. Numerous toxins, many of which are sequence-specific endoribonucleases, dampen protein synthesis levels in response to a range of stress and nutritional stimuli. Key resources are conserved as a result ensuring the survival of individual cells and therefore the bacterial population. The toxin effects generally are transient and reversible permitting a set of dynamic, tunable responses that reflect environmental conditions. Moreover, by harboring multiple toxins that intercede in protein synthesis in response to different physiological cues, bacteria potentially sense an assortment of metabolic perturbations that are channeled through different TA complexes. Other toxins interfere with the action of topoisomersases, cell wall assembly, or cytoskeletal structures. TAs also play important roles in bacterial persistence, biofilm formation and multidrug tolerance, and have considerable potential both as new components of the genetic toolbox and as targets for novel antibacterial drugs.

  12. Evolution of the SpoIISABC Toxin-Antitoxin-Antitoxin System in Bacilli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Gabriško

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death in bacteria is generally associated with two-component toxin-antitoxin systems. The SpoIISABC system, originally identified in Bacillus subtilis, consists of three components: a SpoIISA toxin and the SpoIISB and SpoIISC antitoxins. SpoIISA is a membrane-bound protein, while SpoIISB and SpoIISC are small cytosolic antitoxins, which are able to bind SpoIISA and neutralize its toxicity. In the presented bioinformatics analysis, a taxonomic distribution of the genes of the SpoIISABC system is investigated; their conserved regions and residues are identified; and their phylogenetic relationships are inferred. The SpoIISABC system is part of the core genome in members of the Bacillus genus of the Firmicutes phylum. Its presence in some non-bacillus species is likely the result of horizontal gene transfer. The SpoIISB and SpoIISC antitoxins originated by gene duplications, which occurred independently in the B. subtilis and B. cereus lineages. In the B. cereus lineage, the SpoIIS module is present in two different architectures.

  13. Evolution of the SpoIISABC Toxin-Antitoxin-Antitoxin System in Bacilli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriško, Marek; Barák, Imrich

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death in bacteria is generally associated with two-component toxin-antitoxin systems. The SpoIISABC system, originally identified in Bacillus subtilis, consists of three components: a SpoIISA toxin and the SpoIISB and SpoIISC antitoxins. SpoIISA is a membrane-bound protein, while SpoIISB and SpoIISC are small cytosolic antitoxins, which are able to bind SpoIISA and neutralize its toxicity. In the presented bioinformatics analysis, a taxonomic distribution of the genes of the SpoIISABC system is investigated; their conserved regions and residues are identified; and their phylogenetic relationships are inferred. The SpoIISABC system is part of the core genome in members of the Bacillus genus of the Firmicutes phylum. Its presence in some non-bacillus species is likely the result of horizontal gene transfer. The SpoIISB and SpoIISC antitoxins originated by gene duplications, which occurred independently in the B. subtilis and B. cereus lineages. In the B. cereus lineage, the SpoIIS module is present in two different architectures. PMID:27294956

  14. Characterisation of the stbD/E toxin-antitoxin system of pEP36, a plasmid of the plant pathogen Erwinia pyrifoliae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterholzner, Simon J; Hailer, Barbara; Poppenberger, Brigitte; Rozhon, Wilfried

    2013-09-01

    pEP36 is a plasmid ubiquitously present in Erwinia pyrifoliae, a pathogen which causes black stem blight of Asian pear. pEP36 is highly stable in its host, even in the absence of selective pressure. The plasmid is closely related to pEA29, which is widespread in E. amylovora, the causative agent of fire blight of apple and pear trees. Here we report that pEP36 possesses a functional hybrid toxin-antitoxin module, stbD/E(pEP36), with the toxin showing homology to the RelE/ParE proteins and the antidote belonging to the Phd/YefM antitoxin family. Bacteria expressing the StbE(pEP36) toxin arrest cell growth and enter a viable but non-culturable stage. However, they maintain their typical cell length and do not show filamentation. Pulse-chase experiments revealed that StbE(pEP36) acts as a global inhibitor of protein synthesis while it does not interfere with DNA and RNA synthesis. The StbD(pEP36) antitoxin is capable of neutralising StbE(pEP36) toxicity. Additional experiments show that the stbD/E(pEP36) module can stabilise plasmids at least 20-fold. Thus the toxin-antitoxin system may contribute to the remarkable stability of pEP36.

  15. Prokaryotic toxin-antitoxin systems: novel regulations of the toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Yuichi

    2016-05-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are widely conserved in prokaryotic plasmids and chromosomes and are linked to many roles in cell physiology, including plasmid maintenance, stress response, persistence and protection from phage infection. A TA system is composed of a stable toxin and a labile antitoxin that inhibits a harmful effect of the cognate toxin. When gene expression from the TA loci is repressed under certain conditions such as nutrient starvation, the toxin is freed from the rapidly degrading antitoxin and obstructs an essential cellular process, such as DNA replication, translation and peptidoglycan synthesis, which subsequently causes growth arrest. TA systems are classified into five types according to the nature and the function of antitoxins, and the activity of toxins is tightly regulated in a variety of ways. This short-review highlights several novel regulatory mechanisms for Escherichia coli toxins that we recently discovered.

  16. Toxin-Antitoxin Systems in Clinical Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Fernández-García

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Toxin-antitoxin (TA systems are prevalent in bacteria and archaea. Although not essential for normal cell growth, TA systems are implicated in multiple cellular functions associated with survival under stress conditions. Clinical strains of bacteria are currently causing major human health problems as a result of their multidrug resistance, persistence and strong pathogenicity. Here, we present a review of the TA systems described to date and their biological role in human pathogens belonging to the ESKAPE group (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter spp. and others of clinical relevance (Escherichia coli, Burkholderia spp., Streptococcus spp. and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Better understanding of the mechanisms of action of TA systems will enable the development of new lines of treatment for infections caused by the above-mentioned pathogens.

  17. Equine Botulinum Antitoxin for the Treatment of Infant Botulism ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Vanella de Cuetos, Elida E.; Fernandez, Rafael A.; Bianco, María I.; Sartori, Omar J.; Piovano, María L.; Lúquez, Carolina; de Jong, Laura I. T.

    2011-01-01

    Infant botulism is the most common form of human botulism in Argentina and the United States. BabyBIG (botulism immune globulin intravenous [human]) is the antitoxin of choice for specific treatment of infant botulism in the United States. However, its high cost limits its use in many countries. We report here the effectiveness and safety of equine botulinum antitoxin (EqBA) as an alternative treatment. We conducted an analytical, observational, retrospective, and longitudinal study on cases ...

  18. TasA-tasB, a new putative toxin-antitoxin (TA system from Bacillus thuringiensis pGI1 plasmid is a widely distributed composite mazE-doc TA system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahillon Jacques

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-segregational killing systems are present in a large variety of microorganisms. When found on plasmids, they are described as addiction systems that act to maintain the plasmid during the partitioning of the cell. The plasmid to be maintained through the generations harbours a group of two genes, one coding for a stable toxin and the other coding for an unstable antitoxin that inhibits the effects of the toxin. If, during cell division, the plasmid is lost, the toxin and antitoxin proteins present in the cytosol cease to be newly expressed. The level of unstable antitoxin protein then rapidly decreases, leaving the toxin free to act on the cellular target, leading to cell death. Consequently, only cells harbouring the plasmid can survive. Results The pGI1 plasmid of Bacillus thuringiensis H1.1 harbours a group of two genes, one showing similarities with the Doc toxin of the phd-doc toxin-antitoxin system, potentially coding for a toxin-antitoxin system. Attempts were made to clone this putative system in the Gram-negative host Escherichia coli. The putative antitoxin tasA was easily cloned in E. coli. However, although several combinations of DNA fragment were used in the cloning strategy, only clones containing a mutation in the toxin gene could be recovered, suggesting a toxic activity of TasB. An exhaustive search was carried out in order to index genes homologous to those of the putative tasA-tasB system among microorganisms. This study revealed the presence of this system in great number and in a large variety of microorganisms, either as tasA-tasB homologues or in association with toxins (or antitoxins from other TA systems. Conclusion In this work, we showed that the pGI1 plasmid of B. thuringiensis H1.1 harbours genes resembling a toxin-antitoxin system, named tasA-tasB for thuringiensis addiction system. This system appeared to be functional but unregulated in E. coli. Bioinformatics studies showed that the tas

  19. A regulatory role for Staphylococcus aureus toxin-antitoxin system PemIKSa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Michal; Lyzen, Robert; Helbin, Weronika M; Bonar, Emilia; Szalewska-Palasz, Agnieszka; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz; Dubin, Grzegorz; Dubin, Adam; Wladyka, Benedykt

    2013-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin systems were shown to be involved in plasmid maintenance when they were initially discovered, but other roles have been demonstrated since. Here we identify and characterize a novel toxin-antitoxin system (pemIKSa) located on Staphylococcus aureus plasmid pCH91. The toxin (PemKSa) is a sequence-specific endoribonuclease recognizing the tetrad sequence U↓AUU, and the antitoxin (PemISa) inhibits toxin activity by physical interaction. Although the toxin-antitoxin system is responsible for stable plasmid maintenance our data suggest the participation of pemIKSa in global regulation of staphylococcal virulence by alteration of the translation of large pools of genes. We propose a common mechanism of reversible activation of toxin-antitoxin systems based on antitoxin transcript resistance to toxin cleavage. Elucidation of this mechanism is particularly interesting because reversible activation is a prerequisite for the proposed general regulatory role of toxin-antitoxin systems.

  20. 9 CFR 113.455 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Toxin. (v) Neutralize all toxin-antitoxin mixtures at room temperature for 1 hour, and hold in ice water... is acceptable to Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. (vi) Diluent. The solution used to make... 0.25 gram of sodium chloride in each 100 ml of distilled water; adjusting the pH to 7.2;...

  1. 9 CFR 113.454 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) Neutralize all toxin-antitoxin mixtures at room temperature for 1 hour and hold in ice water until injections... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. (vi) Diluent. The solution used to make proper dilutions... chloride in each 100 ml of distilled water; adjusting the pH to 7.2; autoclaving at 250 °F. for 25...

  2. THE NATURE OF THE TOXIN-ANTITOXIN FLOCCULATION PHENOMENON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfenbrenner, J J; Reichert, P

    1926-09-30

    1. Animals immunized with the formalinized filtrates of young toxic cultures of B. botulinus produce an antitoxic serum poor in precipitins. 2. Animals immunized with the formalinized filtrates of old and partly autolyzed toxic cultures produce an antitoxic serum containing precipitins. 3. Animals immunized with toxin-free autolyzed bacteria produce a serum free from antitoxin but rich in specific precipitins. 4. Animals immunized with the filtrates of an atoxic variant produce a serum free from antitoxin but rich in precipitins for the homologous toxin. 5. Animals immunized with the washed bacteria of the atoxic variant produce a serum that contains no antitoxin, but is rich in precipitins for the homologous toxin. 6. Removal of the precipitins by flocculation with a non-toxic antigen does not materially reduce the antitoxic value of a serum. 7. Removal of the proteins of the antigen by add coagulation removes the specific precipitable substance. 8. All the sera that contain precipitins produce the specific flocculus when combined with homologous toxins, anatoxins, or with the filtrates of the atoxic variant. The flocculation is restricted within the type. The amount of the precipitate and the width of the zone vary approximately with the estimated amount of bacterial protein in the antigen that is used for the immunization of animals. We conclude, therefore, that the toxin-antitoxin flocculation is a specific bacterial precipitation phenomenon.

  3. Crystallization of the HigBA2 toxin-antitoxin complex from Vibrio cholerae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadǽi, San; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Martinez-Rodriguez, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The genome of Vibrio cholerae encodes two higBA toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules that are activated by amino-acid starvation. Here, the TA complex of the second module, higBA2, as well as the C-terminal domain of the corresponding HigA2 antitoxin, have been purified and crystallized. The HigBA2 complex...

  4. The Antitoxin Protein of a Toxin-Antitoxin System from Xylella fastidiosa Is Secreted via Outer Membrane Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, André da Silva; Mendes, Juliano S.; dos Santos, Clelton A.; de Toledo, Marcelo A. S.; Beloti, Lilian L.; Crucello, Aline; Horta, Maria A. C.; Favaro, Marianna T. de Pinho; Munar, Duber M. M.; de Souza, Alessandra A.; Cotta, Mônica A.; de Souza, Anete P.

    2016-01-01

    The Xylella fastidiosa subsp pauca strain 9a5c is a Gram-negative, xylem-limited bacterium that is able to form a biofilm and affects citrus crops in Brazil. Some genes are considered to be involved in biofilm formation, but the specific mechanisms involved in this process remain unknown. This limited understanding of how some bacteria form biofilms is a major barrier to our comprehension of the progression of diseases caused by biofilm-producing bacteria. Several investigations have shown that the toxin-antitoxin (TA) operon is related to biofilm formation. This operon is composed of a toxin with RNAse activity and its cognate antitoxin. Previous reports have indicated that the antitoxin is able to inhibit toxin activity and modulate the expression of the operon as well as other target genes involved in oxidative stress and mobility. In this study, we characterize a toxin-antitoxin system consisting of XfMqsR and XfYgiT, respectively, from X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca strain 9a5c. These proteins display a high similarity to their homologs in X. fastidiosa strain Temecula and a predicted tridimensional structure that is similar to MqsR-YgiT from Escherichia coli. The characterization was performed using in vitro assays such as analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC), size exclusion chromatography, isothermal titration calorimetry, and Western blotting. Using a fluorometric assay to detect RNAses, we demonstrated that XfMqsR is thermostable and can degrade RNA. XfMqsR is inhibited by XfYgiT, which interacts with its own promoter. XfYgiT is known to be localized in the intracellular compartment; however, we provide strong evidence that X. fastidiosa secretes wild-type XfYgiT into the extracellular environment via outer membrane vesicles, as confirmed by Western blotting and specific immunofluorescence labeling visualized by fluorescence microscopy. Taken together, our results characterize the TA system from X. fastidiosa strain 9a5c, and we also discuss the possible

  5. Emerging Roles of Toxin-Antitoxin Modules in Bacterial Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Kędzierska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Toxin-antitoxin (TA cassettes are encoded widely by bacteria. The modules typically comprise a protein toxin and protein or RNA antitoxin that sequesters the toxin factor. Toxin activation in response to environmental cues or other stresses promotes a dampening of metabolism, most notably protein translation, which permits survival until conditions improve. Emerging evidence also implicates TAs in bacterial pathogenicity. Bacterial persistence involves entry into a transient semi-dormant state in which cells survive unfavorable conditions including killing by antibiotics, which is a significant clinical problem. TA complexes play a fundamental role in inducing persistence by downregulating cellular metabolism. Bacterial biofilms are important in numerous chronic inflammatory and infectious diseases and cause serious therapeutic problems due to their multidrug tolerance and resistance to host immune system actions. Multiple TAs influence biofilm formation through a network of interactions with other factors that mediate biofilm production and maintenance. Moreover, in view of their emerging contributions to bacterial virulence, TAs are potential targets for novel prophylactic and therapeutic approaches that are required urgently in an era of expanding antibiotic resistance. This review summarizes the emerging evidence that implicates TAs in the virulence profiles of a diverse range of key bacterial pathogens that trigger serious human disease.

  6. sRNA Antitoxins: More than One Way to Repress a Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Wen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial toxin-antitoxin loci consist of two genes: one encodes a potentially toxic protein, and the second, an antitoxin to repress its function or expression. The antitoxin can either be an RNA or a protein. For type I and type III loci, the antitoxins are RNAs; however, they have very different modes of action. Type I antitoxins repress toxin protein expression through interacting with the toxin mRNA, thereby targeting the mRNA for degradation or preventing its translation or both; type III antitoxins directly bind to the toxin protein, sequestering it. Along with these two very different modes of action for the antitoxin, there are differences in the functions of the toxin proteins and the mobility of these loci between species. Within this review, we discuss the major differences as to how the RNAs repress toxin activity, the potential consequences for utilizing different regulatory strategies, as well as the confirmed and potential biological roles for these loci across bacterial species.

  7. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD Dissertations. Guido Antonioli Conservator pacis et iustitie. La signoria di Taddeo Pepoli a Bologna (1337-1347, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Filologia romanza e cultura medievale (XIII ciclo, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2001   Elisabetta Filippini «In vassallatico episcopi permanere debent». Rapporti vassallatici e concessioni beneficiali dei vescovi di Cremona fra X e XIII secolo, Tesi di dottorato di Ricerca in Storia Medievale (XV ciclo, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Milano, 2003   Marco Meschini, Innocenzo III e il "negotium pacis et fidei" in Linguadoca tra il 1198 e il 1215, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, 2003   Fabrizio Ricciardelli The Politics of Exclusion in Florence (1215-1434, thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in History, University of Warwick, Department of History, April 2003 Renata Salvarani Baptizare pueros et decimas dare. Cura delle anime, strutturazione ecclesiastica e organizzazione delle campagne in area gardesana fra VIII e XIII secolo (diocesi di Brescia, Verona, Mantova e Trento, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XV ciclo, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Milano, 2002-2003   Vito Sibilio Le parole della prima crociata, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia dei centri delle vie e della cultura dei pellegrinaggi nel medioevo euromediterraneo, Università degli studi di Lecce, 2003

  8. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD Dissertations. Francesco Barone Istituzioni, società ed economia a Catania nel tardo medioevo (XIV-XV secolo, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004   Laura Berti Ceroni Il territorio e le strutture di Cesarea e Classe tra tarda antichità e alto medioevo in rapporto con Ravenna, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia e Informatica, Università degli studi di Bologna, 2002-2003.   Marco Bicchierai Poppi dalla signoria dei conti Guidi al vicariato del Casentino (1360-1480, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XIV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004   Emanuela Garimberti Spatiosa ad habitandum loca. Luoghi e identità nella Historia Langobardorum di Paolo Diacono, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2004   Lorenzo Tanzini Sistemi normativi e pratiche istituzionali a Firenze dalla fine del XIII all’inizio del XV secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004   Stefania Tarquini Pellegrinaggio e asseto urbano di Roma, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia dei centri, delle vie e della cultura dei pellegrinaggi nel Medioevo euro mediterraneo (XV ciclo, Università degli studi di Lecce, 2003

  9. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD dissertations. Andrea Brugnoli Una storia locale: l’organizzazione del territorio veronese nel medioevo: trasformazioni della realtà e schemi notarili (IX-metà XII secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Scienze Storiche e Antropologiche (XXII ciclo, Università degli Studi di Verona, 2010   Luca Filangieri Famiglie e gruppi dirigenti a Genova (secoli XII-metà XIII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (XXII ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2010   Jakub Kujawi ski Wernakularna kolekcja historiograficzna z rękopisu francuskiego nr 688 z Biblioteki Narodowej w Paryżu. Studium źródłoznawcze (La raccolta dei volgarizzamenti delle opere storiografiche nel manoscritto francese 688 della Biblioteca Nazionale di Parigi, Tesi di dottorato, Università “Adam Mickiewicz”, Facoltà di Storia, Pozna, a.a. 2009/2010   Marta Longhi I signori “de Radicata”. Strategie di affermazione familiare e patrimoniale nel Piemonte dei secoli XII-XIV, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Istituzioni, Società, Religioni dal Tardo Antico alla fine del Medioevo (XX ciclo, Università di Torino, 2008

  10. Bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene system as containment control in yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, P.; Jensen, G. B.; Gerdes, K.;

    2000-01-01

    The potential of a bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene system for use in containment control in eukaryotes was explored. The Escherichia coli relE and relB genes were expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Expression of the relE gene was highly toxic to yeast cells. However, expression...... of the relB gene counteracted the effect of relE to some extent, suggesting that toxin-antitoxin interaction also occurs in S. cerevisiae, Thus, bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene systems also have potential applications in the control of cell proliferation in eukaryotic cells, especially in those industrial...

  11. Industrial PhD report: Sustainable Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Gitte Gylling Hammershøj

    2011-01-01

    Erhvervs PhD rapport udarbejdet i tilknytning til Erhvervs PhD kurset der er obligatorisk for Erhvervs PhD studerende. Rapporten omhandler relationer melllem den akademiske verden og industrien i sammenhæng med PhD projektet, betragtet og analyseret gennem teori om bæredygtig innovation....

  12. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD dissertation. Laura Baietto Una politica per le città. Rapporti fra papato, vescovi e comuni nell'Italia centro-settentrionale da Innocenzo III a Gregorio IX, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia Medievale, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2002   Giuseppe Banfo Compresenze e sovrapposizioni di poteri territoriali di qualità diversa tra X e XIII: il caso del basso Monferrato, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2002   Francesca Dell'Acqua La vetrata tra l'età tardo imperiale e l'altomedioevo: le fonti, l'archeologia, Tesi di Perfezionamento in Storia dell'Arte Medievale, Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa, 2001   Primo Giovanni Embriaco I vescovi di Albenga e gli sviluppi signorili nella Liguria occidentale (secoli XI-XIII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2001   Antonella Ghignoli Documenti e proprietà altomedievali. Fondamenti e problemi dell'esegesi storica delle fonti documentarie nello specchio della tradizione delle carte pisane dei secoli VIII-XI, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2002   Vito Loré Espansione monastica e mutamenti politici. La Trinità di Cava nei suoi rapporti con i sovrani longobardi e normanni e con l'aristocrazia territoriale. Secoli XI-XII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2002   Rosaria Stracuzzi Messina nel '400, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Palermo, 2001   Stefania Tamburini Le "portate" ecclesiastiche nel piviere di San Giovanni in Firenze nel 1427. Spunti per una riflessione sul patrimonio ecclesiastico della diocesi fiorentina,Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia e informatica, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2001

  13. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD Dissertations. Federica Cengarle Le investiture feudali di Filippo Maria Visconti (1412-1447, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Milano, 2005 Silvia Coazzin Liberi domini totius castri. L'aristocrazia rurale "minore" nel Senese e nella Toscana meridionale. Forme di egemonia, assetto sociale e patrimoniale di lignaggi, famiglie e gruppi consortili di castello (secc. XI-XIV, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Firenze, 2005 Maria Elena Cortese Signori e castelli. Famiglie aristocratiche, dominati signorili e trasformazioni insediative nel comitatus fiorentino (fine X-metà XII secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Firenze, 2005 Patrizia Meli Gabriele Malaspina marchese di Fosdinovo: il condottiero ed il politico, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Firenze, 2005 Federica Pessotto La Morea franca. Economia e istituzioni tra Oriente e Occidente nei secoli XIII e XIV, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Istituzioni, Società e Religioni dal Tardoantico alla fine del Medioevo, Università degli studi di Torino, 2003 Lorenzo Pubblici Dal Caucaso al Mar d’Azov. L’impatto dell’invasione mongola nella Caucasia fra nomadismo e civiltà sedentaria (1204-1395, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Firenze, 2005 [01/05] Riccardo Rao "Comunia". Risorse collettive e patrimoniali dei maggiori comuni subalpini (secoli XII - inizio XIV, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medioevale, Università degli Studi di Milano, 2005 Alessandro Soddu Feudalesimo e potere signorile in Sardegna nei secoli XI-XIV.  La signoria territoriale dei Malaspina, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia, Università "Pompeu Fabra" di Barcellona, 2004

  14. Discovery of Functional Toxin/Antitoxin Systems in Bacteria by Shotgun Cloning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sberro, Hila; Leavitt, Azita; Kiro, Ruth; Koh, Eugene; Peleg, Yoav; Qimron, Udi; Sorek, Rotem

    2013-04-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules, composed of a toxic protein and a counteracting antitoxin, play important roles in bacterial physiology. We examined the experimental insertion of 1.5 million genes from 388 microbial genomes into an Escherichia coli host using over 8.5 million random clones. This revealed hundreds of genes (toxins) that could only be cloned when the neighboring gene (antitoxin) was present on the same clone. Clustering of these genes revealed TA families widespread in bacterial genomes, some of which deviate from the classical characteristics previously described for such modules. Introduction of these genes into E. coli validated that the toxin toxicity is mitigated by the antitoxin. Infection experiments with T7 phage showed that two of the new modules can provide resistance against phage. Moreover, our experiments revealed an 'anti-defense' protein in phage T7 that neutralizes phage resistance. Our results expose active fronts in the arms race between bacteria and phage.

  15. Discovery of functional toxin/antitoxin systems in bacteria by shotgun cloning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sberro, Hila; Leavitt, Azita; Kiro, Ruth; Koh, Eugene; Peleg, Yoav; Qimron, Udi; Sorek, Rotem

    2013-04-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules, composed of a toxic protein and a counteracting antitoxin, play important roles in bacterial physiology. We examined the experimental insertion of 1.5 million genes from 388 microbial genomes into an Escherichia coli host using over 8.5 million random clones. This revealed hundreds of genes (toxins) that could only be cloned when the neighboring gene (antitoxin) was present on the same clone. Clustering of these genes revealed TA families widespread in bacterial genomes, some of which deviate from the classical characteristics previously described for such modules. Introduction of these genes into E. coli validated that the toxin toxicity is mitigated by the antitoxin. Infection experiments with T7 phage showed that two of the new modules can provide resistance against phage. Moreover, our experiments revealed an 'anti-defense' protein in phage T7 that neutralizes phage resistance. Our results expose active fronts in the arms race between bacteria and phage.

  16. Protection Against Clostridium difficile Infection With Broadly Neutralizing Antitoxin Monoclonal Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The spore-forming bacterium Clostridium difficile represents the principal cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis worldwide. C. difficile infection (CDI) is mediated by 2 bacterial toxins, A and B; neutralizing these toxins with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) provides a potential nonantibiotic strategy for combating the rising prevalence, severity, and recurrence of CDI. Novel antitoxin mAbs were generated in mice and were humanized. The humanized antitoxin A mAb PA-50...

  17. Equine botulinum antitoxin for the treatment of infant botulism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanella de Cuetos, Elida E; Fernandez, Rafael A; Bianco, María I; Sartori, Omar J; Piovano, María L; Lúquez, Carolina; de Jong, Laura I T

    2011-11-01

    Infant botulism is the most common form of human botulism in Argentina and the United States. BabyBIG (botulism immune globulin intravenous [human]) is the antitoxin of choice for specific treatment of infant botulism in the United States. However, its high cost limits its use in many countries. We report here the effectiveness and safety of equine botulinum antitoxin (EqBA) as an alternative treatment. We conducted an analytical, observational, retrospective, and longitudinal study on cases of infant botulism registered in Mendoza, Argentina, from 1993 to 2007. We analyzed 92 medical records of laboratory-confirmed cases and evaluated the safety and efficacy of treatment with EqBA. Forty-nine laboratory-confirmed cases of infant botulism demanding admission in intensive care units and mechanical ventilation included 31 treated with EqBA within the 5 days after the onset of signs and 18 untreated with EqBA. EqBA-treated patients had a reduction in the mean length of hospital stay of 23.9 days (P = 0.0007). For infants treated with EqBA, the intensive care unit stay was shortened by 11.2 days (P = 0.0036), mechanical ventilation was reduced by 11.1 days (P = 0.0155), and tube feeding was reduced by 24.4 days (P = 0.0001). The incidence of sepsis in EqBA-treated patients was 47.3% lower (P = 0.0017) than in the untreated ones. Neither sequelae nor adverse effects attributable to EqBA were noticed, except for one infant who developed a transient erythematous rash. These results suggest that prompt treatment of infant botulism with EqBA is safe and effective and that EqBA could be considered an alternative specific treatment for infant botulism when BabyBIG is not available.

  18. Equine Botulinum Antitoxin for the Treatment of Infant Botulism ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanella de Cuetos, Elida E.; Fernandez, Rafael A.; Bianco, María I.; Sartori, Omar J.; Piovano, María L.; Lúquez, Carolina; de Jong, Laura I. T.

    2011-01-01

    Infant botulism is the most common form of human botulism in Argentina and the United States. BabyBIG (botulism immune globulin intravenous [human]) is the antitoxin of choice for specific treatment of infant botulism in the United States. However, its high cost limits its use in many countries. We report here the effectiveness and safety of equine botulinum antitoxin (EqBA) as an alternative treatment. We conducted an analytical, observational, retrospective, and longitudinal study on cases of infant botulism registered in Mendoza, Argentina, from 1993 to 2007. We analyzed 92 medical records of laboratory-confirmed cases and evaluated the safety and efficacy of treatment with EqBA. Forty-nine laboratory-confirmed cases of infant botulism demanding admission in intensive care units and mechanical ventilation included 31 treated with EqBA within the 5 days after the onset of signs and 18 untreated with EqBA. EqBA-treated patients had a reduction in the mean length of hospital stay of 23.9 days (P = 0.0007). For infants treated with EqBA, the intensive care unit stay was shortened by 11.2 days (P = 0.0036), mechanical ventilation was reduced by 11.1 days (P = 0.0155), and tube feeding was reduced by 24.4 days (P = 0.0001). The incidence of sepsis in EqBA-treated patients was 47.3% lower (P = 0.0017) than in the untreated ones. Neither sequelae nor adverse effects attributable to EqBA were noticed, except for one infant who developed a transient erythematous rash. These results suggest that prompt treatment of infant botulism with EqBA is safe and effective and that EqBA could be considered an alternative specific treatment for infant botulism when BabyBIG is not available. PMID:21918119

  19. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD Dissertations. Massimo Della Misericordia Divenire comunità. Comuni rurali, poteri signorili, identità sociali in Valtellina e nella montagna lombarda nel tardo medioevo, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XIV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2003   Mariano Dell’Omo Il monastero di S. Liberatore alla Maiella centro dell’irradiazione di Montecassino nell’Abruzzo medievale e moderno. Contributo alla storia dell’organizzazione patrimoniale e della civiltà monastica cassinese nell’Italia centrale attraverso i documenti di S. Liberatore conservati nell’Archivio di Montecassino. Introduzione storica, paleografica e archivistica. Edizione dei documenti più antichi (†798-1000 e regesti di quelli posteriori (1005-1735, Tesi di dottorato in Storia Ecclesiastica, Facoltà di Storia Ecclesiastica, Pontificia Università Gregoriana di Roma,  2004   Giulia Lorenzoni Conquistare e governare la città. Forme di potere e istituzioni nel primo anno della signoria viscontea a Bologna (ottobre 1350-novembre 1351, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2004   Federica Monteleone Il viaggio di Carlo Magno in Terra Santa. Un’esperienza di pellegrinaggio nella tradizione europea occidentale, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia dei centri, delle vie e della cultura dei pellegrinaggi nel Medioevo euro mediterraneo (XV ciclo   Francesca Pucci Donati Fra teorie mediche e pratica quotidiana: i calendari dietetici dell’Occidente latino altomedievale (secoli IX-XI, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (XV ciclo, Università degli studi di Bologna, 2004 Alberto Ricciardi L’Epistolario di Lupo di Ferrières come fonte per la storia degli intellettuali nell’età di Carlo il Calvo, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2004   Francesco Paolo Terlizzi I trattati dell'Anonimo Normanno: ricerche di ecclesiologia, Tesi

  20. Algal chloroplast produced camelid VH H antitoxins are capable of neutralizing botulinum neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Daniel J; Rosenberg, Julian N; Chiu, Joanna G; Chang, Yung-Nien; Debatis, Michelle; Ngoi, Soo-Mun; Chang, John T; Shoemaker, Charles B; Oyler, George A; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    We have produced three antitoxins consisting of the variable domains of camelid heavy chain-only antibodies (VH H) by expressing the genes in the chloroplast of green algae. These antitoxins accumulate as soluble proteins capable of binding and neutralizing botulinum neurotoxin. Furthermore, they accumulate at up to 5% total soluble protein, sufficient expression to easily produce these antitoxins at scale from algae. The genes for the three different antitoxins were transformed into Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplasts and their products purified from algae lysates and assayed for in vitro biological activity using toxin protection assays. The produced antibody domains bind to botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) with similar affinities as camelid antibodies produced in Escherichia coli, and they are similarly able to protect primary rat neurons from intoxication by BoNT/A. Furthermore, the camelid antibodies were produced in algae without the use of solubilization tags commonly employed in E. coli. These camelid antibody domains are potent antigen-binding proteins and the heterodimer fusion protein containing two VH H domains was capable of neutralizing BoNT/A at near equimolar concentrations with the toxin. Intact antibody domains were detected in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of mice treated orally with antitoxin-producing microalgae. These findings support the use of orally delivered antitoxins produced in green algae as a novel treatment for botulism.

  1. Social Partners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tikkanen, Tarja; Hansen, Leif Emil; Guðmundsson, Bernharður

    2012-01-01

    based on a survey carried out in the Nordic countries in the regie of Nordic Council of Ministries the article deals with the role of social partners in senior and older workers policies and practises......based on a survey carried out in the Nordic countries in the regie of Nordic Council of Ministries the article deals with the role of social partners in senior and older workers policies and practises...

  2. Effect of biotherapeutics on antitoxin IgG in experimentally induced Clostridium difficile infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kaur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Recurrent diarrhoea after successful treatment of primary Clostridium difficile associated disease (CDAD occurs due to bowel flora alterations and failure to mount an effective antibody response. Apart from antibiotics, risk factors include immunosuppressive and acid-suppressive drug administration. Biotherapeutics such as probiotic and epidermal growth factor (EGF may offer potential effective therapy for CDAD. Materials and Methods: The effect of biotherapeutics in mounting an antibody response against C. difficile toxins was studied in BALB/c mice challenged with C. difficile after pre-treatment with ampicillin, lansoprazole or cyclosporin. Sera from sacrificed animals were estimated for antitoxin IgG by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Antitoxin IgG was significantly higher (P0.05 in animals in which C. difficile was given after pre-treatment with cyclosporin compared to those without any pre-treatment, or pre-treatment with antibiotic or lansoprazole. In inter-subgroup comparisons also significant anomaly in production of antitoxin IgG was found. The antitoxin IgG levels were raised in animals administered C. difficile after pre-treatment with ampicillin, but lower in animals administered cyclosporin. High levels of antitoxin IgG were also found in the serum samples of animals receiving lansoprazole and C. difficile. Conclusions: Probiotics showed their beneficial effect by boosting the immune response as seen by production of antitoxin IgG. Oral administration of EGF did not affect the immune response to C. difficile toxins as significant increase was not observed in the serum antitoxin IgG levels in any of the groups investigated.

  3. PARTNER Project

    CERN Multimedia

    Ballantine, A; Dixon-Altaber, H; Dosanjh, M; Kuchina, L

    2011-01-01

    Hadrontherapy uses particle beams to treat tumours located near critical organs and tumours that respond poorly to conventional radiation therapy. It has become evident that there is an emerging need for reinforcing research in hadrontherapy and it is essential to train professionals in this rapidly developing field. PARTNER is a 4-year Marie Curie Training project funded by the European Commission with 5.6 million Euros aimed at the creation of the next generation of experts. Ten academic institutes and research centres and two leading companies are participating in PARTNER, that is coordinated by CERN, forming a unique multidisciplinary and multinational European network. The project offers research and training opportunities to 25 young biologists, engineers, physicians and physicists and is allowing them to actively develop modern techniques for treating cancer in close collaboration with leading European Institutions. For this purpose PARTNER relies on cutting edge research and technology development, ef...

  4. Regulating Toxin-Antitoxin Expression: Controlled Detonation of Intracellular Molecular Timebombs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finbarr Hayes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Genes for toxin-antitoxin (TA complexes are widely disseminated in bacteria, including in pathogenic and antibiotic resistant species. The toxins are liberated from association with the cognate antitoxins by certain physiological triggers to impair vital cellular functions. TAs also are implicated in antibiotic persistence, biofilm formation, and bacteriophage resistance. Among the ever increasing number of TA modules that have been identified, the most numerous are complexes in which both toxin and antitoxin are proteins. Transcriptional autoregulation of the operons encoding these complexes is key to ensuring balanced TA production and to prevent inadvertent toxin release. Control typically is exerted by binding of the antitoxin to regulatory sequences upstream of the operons. The toxin protein commonly works as a transcriptional corepressor that remodels and stabilizes the antitoxin. However, there are notable exceptions to this paradigm. Moreover, it is becoming clear that TA complexes often form one strand in an interconnected web of stress responses suggesting that their transcriptional regulation may prove to be more intricate than currently understood. Furthermore, interference with TA gene transcriptional autoregulation holds considerable promise as a novel antibacterial strategy: artificial release of the toxin factor using designer drugs is a potential approach to induce bacterial suicide from within.

  5. Development of an Innovative in Vitro Potency Assay for Anti-Botulinum Antitoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Osnat; Ozeri, Eyal; Barnea, Ada; David, Alon Ben; Zichel, Ran

    2016-09-24

    Botulinum neurotoxins are bacterial proteins that cause botulism, a life-threatening disease. Therapy relies mostly on post-intoxication antibody treatment. The only accepted method to measure the potency of, and to approve, antitoxin preparations is the mouse lethality neutralization bioassay. However, this assay is time-consuming, labor-intensive, costly, and raises ethical issues related to the large numbers of laboratory animals needed. Until now, all efforts to develop an alternative in vitro assay have not provided a valid replacement to the mouse potency assay. In the present study, we report the development of an innovative in vitro assay for determining botulinum antitoxin potency, using botulinum type B as a model. The concept of the assay is to mimic two fundamental steps in botulinum intoxication: receptor binding and catalytic activity. By simulating these steps in vitro we were able to accurately determine the potency of antitoxin preparations. The reproducibility of the assay was high with a CV vitro assay highly correlated with that measured by the standard in vivo mouse assay (r = 0.9842, p vitro assay has the potential to be considered, after validation, as a replacement to the mouse assay for quantitating neutralizing antibody concentrations in pharmaceutical botulinum antitoxin preparations. Future adoption of this in vitro assay would minimize the use of laboratory animals, speed up the time, and reduce the cost of botulinum antitoxin approval.

  6. Analysis of the Bacillus cereus SpoIIS antitoxin-toxin system reveals its three-component nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melničáková, Jana; Bečárová, Zuzana; Makroczyová, Jana; Barák, Imrich

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death in bacteria is generally associated with two-component toxin-antitoxin systems. The SpoIIS toxin-antitoxin system, consisting of a membrane-bound SpoIISA toxin and a small, cytosolic antitoxin SpoIISB, was originally identified in Bacillus subtilis. In this work we describe the Bacillus cereus SpoIIS system which is a three-component system, harboring an additional gene spoIISC. Its protein product serves as an antitoxin, and similarly as SpoIISB, is able to bind SpoIISA and abolish its toxic effect. Our results indicate that SpoIISC seems to be present not only in B. cereus but also in other Bacilli containing a SpoIIS toxin-antitoxin system. In addition, we show that B. cereus SpoIISA can form higher oligomers and we discuss the possible role of this multimerization for the protein's toxic function.

  7. An efficient method for the purification of proteins from four distinct toxin-antitoxin modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterckx, Yann G-J; De Gieter, Steven; Zorzini, Valentina; Hadži, San; Haesaerts, Sarah; Loris, Remy; Garcia-Pino, Abel

    2015-04-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules are stress response elements that are ubiquitous in the genomes of bacteria and archaea. Production and subsequent purification of individual TA proteins is anything but straightforward as over-expression of the toxin gene is lethal to bacterial and eukaryotic cells and over-production of the antitoxin leads to its proteolytic degradation because of its inherently unstructured nature. Here we describe an effective production and purification strategy centered on an on-column denaturant-induced dissociation of the toxin-antitoxin complex. The success of the method is demonstrated by its application on four different TA families, encoding proteins with distinct activities and folds. A series of biophysical and in vitro activity tests show that the purified proteins are of high quality and suitable for structural studies.

  8. Social Partners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Leif Emil

    2011-01-01

    the demographic change and promote opportunities for lifelong learning and career development among their senior members (45+). Workforce in the Nordic countries tend to be highly organised – especially the older workers. The social partners’ involvement in the discussion of sustainable society....... The findings showed, on one hand, that while some social partners have started very good work, for many the issues of lifelong learning and opportunities for career development for older workers are not on their agenda. Besides differences between the unions in regards many aspects and within most countries...... lifelong learning and career development to their senior members during their last 15-20 years in working life. In this issue the social partners can and should play an active role – indeed, a leading role if needed – among the other key actors in society....

  9. Rapid Curtailing of the Stringent Response by Toxin-Antitoxin Encoded mRNases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Chengzhe; Roghanian, Mohammad; Jørgensen, Mikkel Girke

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli regulates its metabolism to adapt to changes in the environment, in particular to stressful downshifts in nutrient quality. Such shifts elicit the so-called stringent response coordinated by the alarmone guanosine tetra- and pentaphosphate [(p)ppGpp]. At sudden amino-acid (aa...... %. IMPORTANCE: The early stringent response elicited by amino-acid starvation is controlled by a sharp increase of the cellular (p)ppGpp level. Toxin-antitoxin encoded mRNases are activated by (p)ppGpp through enhanced degradation of antitoxins. The present work shows that this activation happens at a very...

  10. Conditional Cooperativity in Toxin-Antitoxin Regulation Prevents Random Toxin Activation and Promotes Fast Translational Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cataudella, Ilaria; Trusina, Ala; Sneppen, Kim;

    2012-01-01

    Many toxin–antitoxin (TA) loci are known to strongly repress their own transcription. This auto-inhibition is often called ‘conditional cooperativity’ as it relies on cooperative binding of TA complexes to operator DNA that occurs only when toxins are in a proper stoichiometric relationship...... system, relBE of Escherichia coli. We show that the model with the in vivo and in vitro established parameters reproduces experimentally observed response to nutritional stress. We further demonstrate that conditional cooperativity stabilizes the level of antitoxin in rapidly growing cells...

  11. UNDERCOVER PARTNER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru MARIAN

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The undercover partner takes part in the process of providing the investigating bodies with information. This institution carries out activities similar to undercover investigator. These both represent a proactive investigating instrument used by criminal authorities to obtain better results concerning the fight against criminality. Under the cover another identity, they carefully search for crimes or favorable circumstances for commitment of others new.

  12. UNDERCOVER PARTNER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian ALEXANDRU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The undercover partner takes part in the process of providing the investigating bodies with information. This institution carries out activities similar to undercover investigator. These both represent a proactive investigating instrument used by criminal authorities to obtain better results concerning the fight against criminality. Under the cover another identity, they carefully search for crimes or favorable circumstances for commitment of others new.

  13. RnlB Antitoxin of the Escherichia coli RnlA-RnlB Toxin-Antitoxin Module Requires RNase HI for Inhibition of RnlA Toxin Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naka, Kenta; Qi, Dan; Yonesaki, Tetsuro; Otsuka, Yuichi

    2017-01-11

    The Escherichia coli RnlA-RnlB toxin-antitoxin system is related to the anti-phage mechanism. Under normal growth conditions, an RnlA toxin with endoribonuclease activity is inhibited by binding of its cognate RnlB antitoxin. After bacteriophage T4 infection, RnlA is activated by the disappearance of RnlB, resulting in the rapid degradation of T4 mRNAs and consequently no T4 propagation when T4 dmd encoding a phage antitoxin against RnlA is defective. Intriguingly, E. coli RNase HI, which plays a key role in DNA replication, is required for the activation of RnlA and stimulates the RNA cleavage activity of RnlA. Here, we report an additional role of RNase HI in the regulation of RnlA-RnlB system. Both RNase HI and RnlB are associated with NRD (one of three domains of RnlA). The interaction between RnlB and NRD depends on RNase HI. Exogenous expression of RnlA in wild-type cells has no effect on cell growth because of endogenous RnlB and this inhibition of RnlA toxicity requires RNase HI and NRD. These results suggest that RNase HI recruits RnlB to RnlA through NRD for inhibiting RnlA toxicity and thus plays two contrary roles in the regulation of RnlA-RnlB system.

  14. Counterselection method based on conditional silencing of antitoxin genes in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukuda, Miyuki; Nakashima, Nobutaka; Miyazaki, Kentaro

    2015-11-01

    Counterselection is a genetic engineering technique to eliminate specific genetic fragments containing selectable marker genes. Although the technique is widely used in bacterial genome engineering and plasmid curing experiments, the repertoire of the markers usable in Escherichia coli is limited. Here we developed a novel counterselection method in E. coli based on antisense RNA (asRNA) technology directed against toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules. Under normal conditions, excess antitoxin neutralizes its cognate toxin and thus the module is stably maintained in the genome. We hypothesised that repression of an antitoxin gene would perturb cell growth due to the toxin being released. We designed asRNAs corresponding to all 19 type II antitoxins encoded in the E. coli genome. asRNAs were then conditionally expressed; repression of MqsA in the MqsR/MqsA module had the greatest inhibitory effect, followed by RnlB in the RnlA/RnlB module. The utility of asRNA(MqsA) as a counterselection marker was demonstrated by efficient plasmid curing and strain improvement experiments.

  15. Discovery of Peptide-Based Antitoxins against Neurotoxins from Green and Black Mamba (Dendroaspis Family)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jappe, Emma Christine; Munk, Andreas; Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard

    dendrotoxins α-dendrotoxin (α-Dtx, UniProtKBP00980), isolated from Dendroaspisangusticeps (Green mamba), and dendrotoxin I (Dtx I, UniProtKBP00979) from Dendroaspis polylepis (Black mamba) by phage display [5,6].Cross-reactive antitoxins with theability to neutralise several toxins are of interest to antivenom...

  16. Interaction in PhD supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, Sofie; Grout, Brian William Wilson; Rump, Camilla Østerberg

    This paper contains an analysis of a single supervision session, undertaken with the aim of identifying how learning opportunities might be created for a PhD student. The supervision session concerned methodologies to be employed in a PhD study related to storm water management and included the Ph...

  17. Urbanism PhD Research 2008 - 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Hoeven, F.D.; Brand, N.; Van der Burg, L.; Çalışkan, O.; Tan, E.R.; Wang, C.-Y.; Zhou, J.

    2009-01-01

    To ensure the quality of the Ph.D. research the Department introduced a special procedure for periodic evaluation: after a period of nine months the potential Ph.D. candidates are asked to present their research design, theoretical framework and methodological approach to the members of the Departme

  18. A PHD in histone language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrika, Nulu Naga Prafulla; Sundaravelpandian, Kalaipandian; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of core histones are important for various DNA-templated processes such as transcription and repair. We recently reported that the ALFIN LIKE 6 (AL6) gene, identified in a forward genetic screen, is critical for phosphate deficiency-induced root hair formation and several other processes associated with the regulation of cellular phosphate homeostasis. AL6 contains a Plant Homeo Domain (PHD) finger that can bind to trimethylated lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4me3). Homozygous mutants defective in AL6 expression form very short root hairs under phosphate-deficient conditions, presumably caused by altered expression of putative primary and secondary down-stream targets of AL6. In this Addendum, we speculate about possible roles of AL6, H3K4 trimethylation and other chromatin modifications in the adaptation of plants to low phosphate availability. PMID:23531693

  19. Crystallization of two operator complexes from the Vibrio cholerae HigBA2 toxin-antitoxin module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadzi, San; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Gerdes, Kenn

    2015-01-01

    The HigA2 antitoxin and the HigBA2 toxin-antitoxin complex from Vibrio cholerae were crystallized in complex with their operator box. Screening of 22 different DNA duplexes led to two crystal forms of HigA2 complexes and one crystal form of a HigBA2 complex. Crystals of HigA2 in complex with a 17...

  20. A Conserved Mode of Protein Recognition and Binding in a ParD−ParE Toxin−Antitoxin Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, Kevin M.; Crosson, Sean (UC)

    2010-05-06

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems form a ubiquitous class of prokaryotic proteins with functional roles in plasmid inheritance, environmental stress response, and cell development. ParDE family TA systems are broadly conserved on plasmids and bacterial chromosomes and have been well characterized as genetic elements that promote stable plasmid inheritance. We present a crystal structure of a chromosomally encoded ParD-ParE complex from Caulobacter crescentus at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. This TA system forms an {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} heterotetramer in the crystal and in solution. The toxin-antitoxin binding interface reveals extensive polar and hydrophobic contacts of ParD antitoxin helices with a conserved recognition and binding groove on the ParE toxin. A cross-species comparison of this complex structure with related toxin structures identified an antitoxin recognition and binding subdomain that is conserved between distantly related members of the RelE/ParE toxin superfamily despite a low level of overall primary sequence identity. We further demonstrate that ParD antitoxin is dimeric, stably folded, and largely helical when not bound to ParE toxin. Thus, the paradigmatic model in which antitoxin undergoes a disorder-to-order transition upon toxin binding does not apply to this chromosomal ParD-ParE TA system.

  1. ACTIVE IMMUNITY PRODUCED BY SO CALLED BALANCED OR NEUTRAL MIXTURES OF DIPHTHERIA TOXIN AND ANTITOXIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T

    1909-03-01

    The foregoing and earlier data taken together demonstrate that an active immunity lasting several years can be produced in guinea-pigs, by the injection of toxin-antitoxin mixtures which have no recognizable harmful effect either immediate or remote. They also show, what might have been anticipated, that under the same conditions mixtures which produce local lesions and which, therefore, contain an excess of toxin produce a much higher degree of immunity than the neutral mixtures, and that an excess of antitoxin reduces the possibility of producing an active immunity, and may extinguish it altogether. There is, therefore, a certain definite relation between the components of the mixture and the degree of immunity producible. Furthermore, toxin-antitoxin mixtures do not change materially within five days at room temperature. They are apparently more efficacious at the end of forty-eight hours than immediately after preparation. The experiments finally prove that a relatively high degree of active immunity can be induced by a harmless procedure, whereas the use of toxin alone leading to very severe local lesions is incapable of producing more than an insignificant protection. The method, therefore, invites further tests in regard to its ultimate applicability to the human being. Unless the subcutis of the guinea-pig reacts to toxin-antitoxin mixtures in a manner peculiar to itself, a practical, easily controlled method for active immunization can be worked out which should afford a larger protection than the serum alone and avoid the complications associated with horse serum. That proportion of toxin and antitoxin which would produce the highest desirable immunity consistent with the least discomfort would have to be carefully worked out for the human subject. From the nature of the immunity induced it is obvious, however, that such a method of immunization cannot take the place of a large dose of antitoxin in exposed individuals who must be protected at once. It

  2. ATLAS PhD Grant Scheme

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    In this #CERNandSociety video, the 3 PhD students, awarded the ATLAS PhD Grant in 2015, talk about their research work within the ATLAS Collaboration and how this experience has shaped their future. Find out more about the ATLAS PhD Grant Scheme: cern.ch/ATLASPhDGrant This programme is just one of the many #CERNandSociety projects at CERN. Find out more and how you can be involved: http://cern.ch/go/pBt7

  3. Horizontal gene transfer of chromosomal Type II toxin-antitoxin systems of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramisetty, Bhaskar Chandra Mohan; Santhosh, Ramachandran Sarojini

    2016-02-01

    Type II toxin-antitoxin systems (TAs) are small autoregulated bicistronic operons that encode a toxin protein with the potential to inhibit metabolic processes and an antitoxin protein to neutralize the toxin. Most of the bacterial genomes encode multiple TAs. However, the diversity and accumulation of TAs on bacterial genomes and its physiological implications are highly debated. Here we provide evidence that Escherichia coli chromosomal TAs (encoding RNase toxins) are 'acquired' DNA likely originated from heterologous DNA and are the smallest known autoregulated operons with the potential for horizontal propagation. Sequence analyses revealed that integration of TAs into the bacterial genome is unique and contributes to variations in the coding and/or regulatory regions of flanking host genome sequences. Plasmids and genomes encoding identical TAs of natural isolates are mutually exclusive. Chromosomal TAs might play significant roles in the evolution and ecology of bacteria by contributing to host genome variation and by moderation of plasmid maintenance.

  4. Prokaryotic toxin-antitoxin systems--the role in bacterial physiology and application in molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Michal; Rojowska, Anna; Wladyka, Benedykt

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria have developed multiple complex mechanisms ensuring an adequate response to environmental changes. In this context, bacterial cell division and growth are subject to strict control to ensure metabolic balance and cell survival. A plethora of studies cast light on toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems as metabolism regulators acting in response to environmental stress conditions. Many of those studies suggest direct relations between the TA systems and the pathogenic potential or antibiotic resistance of relevant bacteria. Other studies point out that TA systems play a significant role in ensuring stability of mobile genetic material. The evolutionary origin and relations between various TA systems are still a subject of a debate. The impact of toxin-antitoxin systems on bacteria physiology prompted their application in molecular biology as tools allowing cloning of some hard-to-maintain genes, plasmid maintenance and production of recombinant proteins.

  5. Identification of a Human Monoclonal Antibody To Replace Equine Diphtheria Antitoxin for Treatment of Diphtheria Intoxication

    OpenAIRE

    Sevigny, Leila M; Booth, Brian J.; Rowley, Kirk J.; Leav, Brett A.; Cheslock, Peter S.; Kerry A Garrity; Sloan, Susan E.; Thomas, William; Babcock, Gregory J.; Wang, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Diphtheria antitoxin (DAT) has been the cornerstone of the treatment of Corynebacterium diphtheriae infection for more than 100 years. Although the global incidence of diphtheria has declined steadily over the last quarter of the 20th century, the disease remains endemic in many parts of the world, and significant outbreaks still occur. DAT is an equine polyclonal antibody that is not commercially available in the United States and is in short supply globally. A safer, more readily available ...

  6. Heterologous Expression of Toxins from Bacterial Toxin-Antitoxin Systems in Eukaryotic Cells: Strategies and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chew Chieng Yeo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Toxin-antitoxin (TA systems are found in nearly all prokaryotic genomes and usually consist of a pair of co-transcribed genes, one of which encodes a stable toxin and the other, its cognate labile antitoxin. Certain environmental and physiological cues trigger the degradation of the antitoxin, causing activation of the toxin, leading either to the death or stasis of the host cell. TA systems have a variety of functions in the bacterial cell, including acting as mediators of programmed cell death, the induction of a dormant state known as persistence and the stable maintenance of plasmids and other mobile genetic elements. Some bacterial TA systems are functional when expressed in eukaryotic cells and this has led to several innovative applications, which are the subject of this review. Here, we look at how bacterial TA systems have been utilized for the genetic manipulation of yeasts and other eukaryotes, for the containment of genetically modified organisms, and for the engineering of high expression eukaryotic cell lines. We also examine how TA systems have been adopted as an important tool in developmental biology research for the ablation of specific cells and the potential for utility of TA systems in antiviral and anticancer gene therapies.

  7. Characterization of a novel toxin-antitoxin module, VapBC, encoded by Leptospira interrogans chromosome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Xuan ZHANG; Xiao Kui GUO; Chuan WU; Bo BI; Shuang Xi REN; Chun Fu WU; Guo Ping ZHAO

    2004-01-01

    Comparative genomic analysis of the coding sequences (CDSs) of Leptospira interrogans revealed a pair of closely linked genes homologous to the vapBC loci of many other bacteria with respect to both deduced amino acid sequences and operon organizations. Expression of single vapC gene in Escherichia coli resulted in inhibition of bacterial growth,whereas co-expression of vapBC restored the growth effectively. This phenotype is typical for three other characterized toxin-antitoxin systems of bacteria, i.e., mazEF[1], relBE[2] and chpIK[3]. The VapC proteins of bacteria and a thermophilic archeae, Solfolobus tokodaii, form a structurally distinguished group of toxin different from the other known toxins of bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis of both toxins and antitoxins of all categories indicated that although toxins were evolved from divergent sources and may or may not follow their speciation paths (as indicated by their 16s RNA sequences), co-evolution with their antitoxins was obvious.

  8. Protection against Clostridium difficile infection with broadly neutralizing antitoxin monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marozsan, Andre J; Ma, Dangshe; Nagashima, Kirsten A; Kennedy, Brian J; Kang, Yun Kenneth; Arrigale, Robert R; Donovan, Gerald P; Magargal, Wells W; Maddon, Paul J; Olson, William C

    2012-09-01

    The spore-forming bacterium Clostridium difficile represents the principal cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis worldwide. C. difficile infection (CDI) is mediated by 2 bacterial toxins, A and B; neutralizing these toxins with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) provides a potential nonantibiotic strategy for combating the rising prevalence, severity, and recurrence of CDI. Novel antitoxin mAbs were generated in mice and were humanized. The humanized antitoxin A mAb PA-50 and antitoxin B mAb PA-41 have picomolar potencies in vitro and bind to novel regions of the respective toxins. In a hamster model for CDI, 95% of animals treated with a combination of humanized PA-50 and PA-41 showed long-term survival relative to 0% survival of animals treated with standard antibiotics or comparator mAbs. These humanized mAbs provide insight into C. difficile intoxication and hold promise as potential nonantibiotic agents for improving clinical management of CDI.

  9. Regulation of the vapBC-1 toxin-antitoxin locus in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan D Cline

    Full Text Available Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi are human-adapted commensal bacteria that can cause a number of chronic mucosal infections, including otitis media and bronchitis. One way for these organisms to survive antibiotic therapy and cause recurrent disease is to stop replicating, as most antimicrobials target essential biosynthetic pathways. Toxin-antitoxin (TA gene pairs have been shown to facilitate entry into a reversible bacteriostatic state. Characteristically, these operons encode a protein toxin and an antitoxin that associate following translation to form a nontoxic complex, which then binds to and regulates the cognate TA promoter. Under stressful conditions, the labile antitoxin is degraded and the complex disintegrates, freeing the stable toxin to facilitate growth arrest. How these events affected the regulation of the TA locus, as well as how the transcription of the operon was subsequently returned to its normal state upon resumption of growth, was not fully understood. Here we show that expression of the NTHi vapBC-1 TA locus is repressed by a complex of VapB-1 and VapC-1 under conditions favorable for growth, and activated by the global transactivator Factor for Inversion Stimulation (Fis upon nutrient upshift from stationary phase. Further, we demonstrate for the first time that the VapC-1 toxin alone can bind to its cognate TA locus control region and that the presence of VapB-1 directs the binding of the VapBC-1 complex in the transcriptional regulation of vapBC-1.

  10. Calibration and commutability assessment of the 1st International Standard for Diphtheria Antitoxin Human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickings, Paul; Rigsby, Peter; Coombes, Laura; von Hunolstein, Christina; Ralli, Luisa; Pinto, Antonella; Sesardic, Dorothea

    2013-11-01

    The 1st International Standard for Diphtheria Antitoxin Human (coded 10/262) was established by the World Health Organization Expert Committee on Biological Standardization in 2012. This paper describes the production, characterization and calibration of the new standard which is intended for use in the standardization of assays used to measure diphtheria antibody responses in human serum. The new standard was calibrated in terms of the International Standard for Diphtheria Antitoxin Equine in an international collaborative study. A total of 8 participants from 8 different countries performed in vivo and/or in vitro toxin neutralization tests and returned data that was used to assign units to the proposed new standard. The new standard has a diphtheria antitoxin potency of 2 IU/ampoule and is predicted to be stable. A follow up study was performed to assess commutability of the new standard. The follow up study was an existing external quality assessment, modified to include the new standard. Results obtained suggest that the new standard is commutable, showing comparable behaviour to native human serum samples in the majority of the assays compared, and is therefore suitable for use as a reference preparation in assays used to measure the level of anti-diphtheria antibodies in human serum.

  11. A widespread bacteriophage abortive infection system functions through a Type IV toxin-antitoxin mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dy, Ron L; Przybilski, Rita; Semeijn, Koen; Salmond, George P C; Fineran, Peter C

    2014-04-01

    Bacterial abortive infection (Abi) systems are 'altruistic' cell death systems that are activated by phage infection and limit viral replication, thereby providing protection to the bacterial population. Here, we have used a novel approach of screening Abi systems as a tool to identify and characterize toxin-antitoxin (TA)-acting Abi systems. We show that AbiE systems are encoded by bicistronic operons and function via a non-interacting (Type IV) bacteriostatic TA mechanism. The abiE operon was negatively autoregulated by the antitoxin, AbiEi, a member of a widespread family of putative transcriptional regulators. AbiEi has an N-terminal winged-helix-turn-helix domain that is required for repression of abiE transcription, and an uncharacterized bi-functional C-terminal domain, which is necessary for transcriptional repression and sufficient for toxin neutralization. The cognate toxin, AbiEii, is a predicted nucleotidyltransferase (NTase) and member of the DNA polymerase β family. AbiEii specifically bound GTP, and mutations in conserved NTase motifs (I-III) and a newly identified motif (IV), abolished GTP binding and subsequent toxicity. The AbiE systems can provide phage resistance and enable stabilization of mobile genetic elements, such as plasmids. Our study reveals molecular insights into the regulation and function of the widespread bi-functional AbiE Abi-TA systems and the biochemical properties of both toxin and antitoxin proteins.

  12. Heterologous Expression of Toxins from Bacterial Toxin-Antitoxin Systems in Eukaryotic Cells: Strategies and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Chew Chieng; Abu Bakar, Fauziah; Chan, Wai Ting; Espinosa, Manuel; Harikrishna, Jennifer Ann

    2016-02-19

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are found in nearly all prokaryotic genomes and usually consist of a pair of co-transcribed genes, one of which encodes a stable toxin and the other, its cognate labile antitoxin. Certain environmental and physiological cues trigger the degradation of the antitoxin, causing activation of the toxin, leading either to the death or stasis of the host cell. TA systems have a variety of functions in the bacterial cell, including acting as mediators of programmed cell death, the induction of a dormant state known as persistence and the stable maintenance of plasmids and other mobile genetic elements. Some bacterial TA systems are functional when expressed in eukaryotic cells and this has led to several innovative applications, which are the subject of this review. Here, we look at how bacterial TA systems have been utilized for the genetic manipulation of yeasts and other eukaryotes, for the containment of genetically modified organisms, and for the engineering of high expression eukaryotic cell lines. We also examine how TA systems have been adopted as an important tool in developmental biology research for the ablation of specific cells and the potential for utility of TA systems in antiviral and anticancer gene therapies.

  13. Brenda K. Edwards, PhD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenda K. Edwards, PhD, has been with the Surveillance Research Program (SRP) and its predecessor organizations at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) since 1989, serving as SRP’s Associate Director from 1990-2011.

  14. What PhD students really want

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Minnie

    2010-01-01

    The road to becoming an astronomer is exciting, but often fraught with danger and conflicting messages. A PhD student is inundated with catch-phrases such as "publish or perish" and "it's not about the quantity, but the quality of work". How do we know which advice to follow? How can we publish copious amounts of quality work in only three years so as to maximize our success in the future? How do we even know what "good quality" really is? With only a short time to prepare ourselves for the big wide world of Astronomy, what is the best way for a PhD student to maximize their research and ultimately maximize their success as a real astronomer? The PhD students of today are the astronomers of tomorrow, but their journey depends on a positive work environment in which they can thrive and improve. Here I present the results of a survey of current PhD students on how they believe they can maximize their success in science. I find that PhD students in Australia expect to write more papers during their PhD than is e...

  15. ATLAS PhD Grants 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcelloni De Oliveira, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS PHd Grants - We are excited to announce the creation of a dedicated grant scheme (thanks to a donation from Fabiola Gianotti and Peter Jenni following their award from the Fundamental Physics Prize foundation) to encourage young and high-caliber doctoral students in particle physics research (including computing for physics) and permit them to obtain world class exposure, supervision and training within the ATLAS collaboration. This special PhD Grant is aimed at graduate students preparing a doctoral thesis in particle physics (incl. computing for physics) to spend one year at CERN followed by one year support also at the home Institute.

  16. An endogenous antitoxin to the lethal venom of the funnel web spider, Atrax robustus, in rabbit sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheumack, D D; Comis, A; Claassens, R; Mylecharane, E J; Spence, I; Howden, M E

    1991-01-01

    1. An endogenous antitoxin fraction was isolated from non-immune rabbit sera by affinity chromatography with robustoxin bound to the solid support. 2. Robustoxin is the sole lethal toxin in the venom of the male funnel web spider, Atrax robustus. 3. The fraction was found to contain IgG and IgM immunoglobulins. 4. This fraction prevented or reversed the lethal actions of the crude venom in newborn mice, in mouse phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm preparations, and in anaesthetized monkeys. 5. The antitoxin fraction is of potential value in the therapy of human envenomation by A. robustus.

  17. Olympic Partner Programme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The Olympic Partner Programme (TOP) is an international Olympic marketing programme created by the International Olympic Committee (IOC),which includes the Organising Committees of the Games,the National Olympic Committees and the TOP Partners.

  18. The Constitution of Partnering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Stefan Christoffer

    The constitution of partnering. Afhandlingen behandler konstitueringen af ledelseskonceptet partnering og dets anvendelse i dansk byggeri. Partnering er et udbredt koncept i byggeriet som betoner samarbejde, tillid og gensidighed mellem de deltagende parter, og konceptet har de senere år har været...

  19. What My Ph.D. Taught Me

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenstein, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    The author started in the Ph.D. program in comparative literature at Princeton in 1992, a year after she graduated from college. She fell in love with mythology and the classical traditions and find herself teaching literature. In the remainder of her time at Princeton, she precepted for four or five more classes, got the chance to join the…

  20. Retention of prolyl hydroxylase PHD2 in the cytoplasm prevents PHD2-induced anchorage-independent carcinoma cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokilehto, Terhi [Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Abo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Turku Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Turku (Finland); Hoegel, Heidi [Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Abo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Heikkinen, Pekka [Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Abo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Turku Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Turku (Finland); Rantanen, Krista [Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Abo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Elenius, Klaus [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Department of Medical Biochemistry and Genetics, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Sundstroem, Jari [Department of Pathology, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Jaakkola, Panu M. [Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Abo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland)

    2010-04-15

    Cellular oxygen tension is sensed by a family of prolyl hydroxylases (PHD1-3) that regulate the degradation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF-1{alpha} and -2{alpha}). The PHD2 isoform is considered as the main downregulator of HIF in normoxia. Our previous results have shown that nuclear translocation of PHD2 associates with poorly differentiated tumor phenotype implying that nuclear PHD2 expression is advantageous for tumor growth. Here we show that a pool of PHD2 is shuttled between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. In line with this, accumulation of wild type PHD2 in the nucleus was detected in human colon adenocarcinomas and in cultured carcinoma cells. The PHD2 isoforms showing high nuclear expression increased anchorage-independent carcinoma cell growth. However, retention of PHD2 in the cytoplasm inhibited the anchorage-independent cell growth. A region that inhibits the nuclear localization of PHD2 was identified and the deletion of the region promoted anchorage-independent growth of carcinoma cells. Finally, the cytoplasmic PHD2, as compared with the nuclear PHD2, less efficiently downregulated HIF expression. Forced HIF-1{alpha} or -2{alpha} expression decreased and attenuation of HIF expression increased the anchorage-independent cell growth. However, hydroxylase-inactivating mutations in PHD2 had no effect on cell growth. The data imply that nuclear PHD2 localization promotes malignant cancer phenotype.

  1. Structure, Biology, and Therapeutic Application of Toxin–Antitoxin Systems in Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Young Lee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial toxin–antitoxin (TA systems have received increasing attention for their diverse identities, structures, and functional implications in cell cycle arrest and survival against environmental stresses such as nutrient deficiency, antibiotic treatments, and immune system attacks. In this review, we describe the biological functions and the auto-regulatory mechanisms of six different types of TA systems, among which the type II TA system has been most extensively studied. The functions of type II toxins include mRNA/tRNA cleavage, gyrase/ribosome poison, and protein phosphorylation, which can be neutralized by their cognate antitoxins. We mainly explore the similar but divergent structures of type II TA proteins from 12 important pathogenic bacteria, including various aspects of protein–protein interactions. Accumulating knowledge about the structure–function correlation of TA systems from pathogenic bacteria has facilitated a novel strategy to develop antibiotic drugs that target specific pathogens. These molecules could increase the intrinsic activity of the toxin by artificially interfering with the intermolecular network of the TA systems.

  2. A viral nanoparticle with dual function as an anthrax antitoxin and vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darly J Manayani

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The recent use of Bacillus anthracis as a bioweapon has stimulated the search for novel antitoxins and vaccines that act rapidly and with minimal adverse effects. B. anthracis produces an AB-type toxin composed of the receptor-binding moiety protective antigen (PA and the enzymatic moieties edema factor and lethal factor. PA is a key target for both antitoxin and vaccine development. We used the icosahedral insect virus Flock House virus as a platform to display 180 copies of the high affinity, PA-binding von Willebrand A domain of the ANTXR2 cellular receptor. The chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs correctly displayed the receptor von Willebrand A domain on their surface and inhibited lethal toxin action in in vitro and in vivo models of anthrax intoxication. Moreover, VLPs complexed with PA elicited a potent toxin-neutralizing antibody response that protected rats from anthrax lethal toxin challenge after a single immunization without adjuvant. This recombinant VLP platform represents a novel and highly effective, dually-acting reagent for treatment and protection against anthrax.

  3. (p)ppGpp controls bacterial persistence by stochastic induction of toxin-antitoxin activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisonneuve, Etienne; Castro-Camargo, Manuela; Gerdes, Kenn

    2013-08-29

    Persistence refers to the phenomenon in which isogenic populations of antibiotic-sensitive bacteria produce rare cells that transiently become multidrug tolerant. Whether slow growth in a rare subset of cells underlies the persistence phenotype has not be examined in wild-type bacteria. Here, we show that an exponentially growing population of wild-type Escherichia coli cells produces rare cells that stochastically switch into slow growth, that the slow-growing cells are multidrug tolerant, and that they are able to resuscitate. The persistence phenotype depends hierarchically on the signaling nucleotide (p)ppGpp, Lon protease, inorganic polyphosphate, and toxin-antitoxins. We show that the level of (p)ppGpp varies stochastically in a population of exponentially growing cells and that the high (p)ppGpp level in rare cells induces slow growth and persistence. (p)ppGpp triggers slow growth by activating toxin-antitoxin loci through a regulatory cascade depending on inorganic polyphosphate and Lon protease.

  4. Structural studies of the toxin-antitoxin proteins RelE and RelB from E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Røjkjær; Overgaard, Martin; Gerdes, Kenn;

    the special tRNA-mRNA mimic, tmRNA [1]. Questions to be addressed Many questions remain to be answered in the bacterial toxin-antitoxin system. The crystal structure of RelBE from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 was previously solved at 2.3Å [2]. This structure shows the molecule in an inactive state, but OT3......The bacterial toxin-antitoxin system The relBE operon in E. coli encodes two small proteins: A toxin, RelE (12 kDa) and an antitoxin, RelB (9 kDa). RelE is activated under nutritional stress and is able to inhibit protein synthesis by cleaving the mRNA in the ribosomal A-site. This stress response...... serves to down-regulate metabolism in the cell when growth conditions are limited. RelB is expressed in excess over RelE during balanced growth, and inhibits the toxicity of RelE by forming an extremely stable toxin-antitoxin complex. The activation of RelE is induced when the labile RelB protein...

  5. What Is the Link between Stringent Response, Endoribonuclease Encoding Type II Toxin-Antitoxin Systems and Persistence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramisetty, Bhaskar C M; Ghosh, Dimpy; Roy Chowdhury, Maoumita; Santhosh, Ramachandran S

    2016-01-01

    Persistence is a transient and non-inheritable tolerance to antibiotics by a small fraction of a bacterial population. One of the proposed determinants of bacterial persistence is toxin-antitoxin systems (TASs) which are also implicated in a wide range of stress-related phenomena. Maisonneuve E, Castro-Camargo M, Gerdes K. 2013. Cell 154:1140-1150 reported an interesting link between ppGpp mediated stringent response, TAS, and persistence. It is proposed that accumulation of ppGpp enhances the accumulation of inorganic polyphosphate which modulates Lon protease to degrade antitoxins. The decrease in the concentration of antitoxins supposedly activated the toxin to increase in the number of persisters during antibiotic treatment. In this study, we show that inorganic polyphosphate is not required for transcriptional activation of yefM/yoeB TAS, which is an indirect indication of Lon-dependent degradation of YefM antitoxin. The Δ10 strain, an Escherichia coli MG1655 derivative in which the 10 TAS are deleted, is more sensitive to ciprofloxacin compared to wild type MG1655. Furthermore, we show that the Δ10 strain has relatively lower fitness compared to the wild type and hence, we argue that the persistence related implications based on Δ10 strain are void. We conclude that the transcriptional regulation and endoribonuclease activity of YefM/YoeB TAS is independent of ppGpp and inorganic polyphosphate. Therefore, we urge for thorough inspection and debate on the link between chromosomal endoribonuclease TAS and persistence.

  6. Remarkable Functional Convergence: Alarmone ppGpp Mediates Persistence by Activating Type I and II Toxin-Antitoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdes, Kenn; Maisonneuve, Etienne

    2015-07-01

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Verstraeten et al. (2015) demonstrate that the conserved GTPase Obg and the second messenger ppGpp mediate persistence by activation of a type I toxin-antitoxin module (hokB/sokB) in E. coli.

  7. Identification and characterization of chromosomal relBE toxin-antitoxin locus in Streptomyces cattleya DSM46488.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Tai, Cui; Deng, Zixin; Gan, Jianhua; Oggioni, Marco R; Ou, Hong-Yu

    2016-08-18

    The relBE family of Type II toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems have been widely reported in bacteria but none in Streptomyces. With the conserved domain searches for TA pairs in the sequenced Streptomyces genomes, we identified two putative relBE loci, relBE1sca and relBE2sca, on the chromosome of Streptomyces cattleya DSM 46488. Overexpression of the S. cattleya toxin RelE2sca caused severe growth inhibition of E. coli and S. lividans, but RelE1sca had no toxic effect. The toxicity of RelE2sca could be abolished by the co-expression of its cognate RelB2sca antitoxin. Moreover, the RelBE2sca complex, or the antitoxin RelB2sca alone, specifically interacted with the relBE2sca operon and repressed its transcription. The relBE2sca operon transcription was induced under osmotic stress, along with the ClpP proteinase genes. The subsequent in vivo analysis showed that the antitoxin was degraded by ClpP. Interestingly, the E. coli antitoxin RelBeco was able to alleviate the toxicity of S. cattleya RelE2sca while the mutant RelB2sca(N61V&M68L) but not the wild type could alleviate the toxicity of E. coli RelEeco as well. The experimental demonstration of the relBEsca locus might be helpful to investigate the key roles of type II TA systems in Streptomyces physiology and environmental stress responses.

  8. ATLAS PhD Grant Scholarship Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    Abha Eli Phoboo

    2014-01-01

    On 11 February, the first recipients of the ATLAS PhD Grant were presented with a certificate by the programme’s selection committee. The three scholars - Lailin Xu of China, Josefina Alconada of Argentina and Gagik Vardanyan of Armenia - were delighted at being able to continue their PhD programmes at CERN.   With certificates, from left: Lailin Xu, Josefina Alconada, and Gagik Vardanyan. The selection committee members, from left: IFAE Barcelona’s Martine Bosman, Fabiola Gianotti, Peter Jenni and from CERN HR James Purvis. (Image: ATLAS/Claudia Marcelloni). Former ATLAS spokespersons Peter Jenni and Fabiola Gianotti started the fund with the Fundamental Physics Prize award money they received last year. Both have used the entirety of their prizes for educational and humanitarian programmes. "We wanted to do something for students who are working on ATLAS, in particular those who otherwise could not come here and actually see the detector they are working on,&am...

  9. PhD students share their work

    CERN Multimedia

    Joannah Caborn Wengler

    2012-01-01

    Last week, the second Doctoral Student Assembly gave students in the final stages of their PhD at CERN the chance to meet and present their work.   On 9 May, 24 students who are completing their PhD under the CERN Doctoral Student Programme were joined by their CERN supervisors and some of their university supervisors at an event organised by HR and the Technical Students Committee (TSC). After an address by the Director-General Rolf Heuer and short presentations by Ingrid Haug from HR and TSC Chair Stephan Russenschuck, the students presented their work in a poster session. Held in a packed Council Chamber, the event was a great opportunity for the doctoral students to get to know each other and to share their work in fields as diverse as radiation protection, computing, physics and engineering.

  10. Structure and Proposed Activity of a Member of the VapBC Family of Toxin-Antitoxin Systems: VapBC-5 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miallau, L.; Faller, M.; Chiang, J.; Arbing, M.; Guo, F.; Cascio, D.; Eisenberg, D.; (UCLA)

    2009-03-02

    In prokaryotes, cognate toxin-antitoxin pairs have long been known, but no three-dimensional structure has been available for any given complex from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Here we report the crystal structure and activity of a member of the VapBC family of complexes from M. tuberculosis. The toxin VapC-5 is a compact, 150 residues, two domain {alpha}/{beta} protein. Bent around the toxin is the VapB-5 antitoxin, a 33-residue {alpha}-helix. Assays suggest that the toxin is an Mg-enabled endoribonuclease, inhibited by the antitoxin. The lack of DNase activity is consistent with earlier suggestions that the complex represses its own operon. Furthermore, analysis of the interactions in the binding of the antitoxin to the toxin suggest that exquisite control is required to protect the bacteria cell from toxic VapC-5.

  11. Comprehensive comparative-genomic analysis of Type 2 toxin-antitoxin systems and related mobile stress response systems in prokaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makarova Kira S

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prokaryotic toxin-antitoxin systems (TAS, also referred to as TA loci are widespread, mobile two-gene modules that can be viewed as selfish genetic elements because they evolved mechanisms to become addictive for replicons and cells in which they reside, but also possess "normal" cellular functions in various forms of stress response and management of prokaryotic population. Several distinct TAS of type 1, where the toxin is a protein and the antitoxin is an antisense RNA, and numerous, unrelated TAS of type 2, in which both the toxin and the antitoxin are proteins, have been experimentally characterized, and it is suspected that many more remain to be identified. Results We report a comprehensive comparative-genomic analysis of Type 2 toxin-antitoxin systems in prokaryotes. Using sensitive methods for distant sequence similarity search, genome context analysis and a new approach for the identification of mobile two-component systems, we identified numerous, previously unnoticed protein families that are homologous to toxins and antitoxins of known type 2 TAS. In addition, we predict 12 new families of toxins and 13 families of antitoxins, and also, predict a TAS or TAS-like activity for several gene modules that were not previously suspected to function in that capacity. In particular, we present indications that the two-gene module that encodes a minimal nucleotidyl transferase and the accompanying HEPN protein, and is extremely abundant in many archaea and bacteria, especially, thermophiles might comprise a novel TAS. We present a survey of previously known and newly predicted TAS in 750 complete genomes of archaea and bacteria, quantitatively demonstrate the exceptional mobility of the TAS, and explore the network of toxin-antitoxin pairings that combines plasticity with selectivity. Conclusion The defining properties of the TAS, namely, the typically small size of the toxin and antitoxin genes, fast evolution, and

  12. Proteomic profiling of Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies nutrient-starvation-responsive toxin-antitoxin systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Agner, Jeppe; Piersma, Sander R

    2013-01-01

    In order to successfully enter the latent stage, Mycobacterium tuberculosis must adapt to conditions such as nutrient limitation and hypoxia. In vitro models that mimic latent infection are valuable tools for describing the changes in metabolism that occur when the bacterium exists in a non......-growing form. We used two complementary proteomic approaches, label-free LC-MS/MS analysis and two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis, to determine the proteome profile of extracellular proteins from M. tuberculosis cultured under nutrient starvation. Through the label-free LC-MS/MS analysis......, significant differences in the overall metabolism during nutrient starvation were detected. Notably, members of the toxin-antitoxin systems were present in larger quantities in nutrient-starved cultures, supporting a role for these global modules as M. tuberculosis switches its metabolism into dormancy...

  13. Kinetics of epsilon antitoxin antibodies in different strategies for active immunization of lambs against enterotoxaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heni F. Costa

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Enterotoxaemia, a common disease that affects domestic small ruminants, is mainly caused by the epsilon toxin of Clostridium perfringens type D. The present study tested four distinct immunization protocols to evaluate humoral response in lambs, a progeny of non-vaccinated sheep during gestation. Twenty-four lambs were randomly allocated into four groups according to age (7, 15, 30 and 45 days, receiving the first dose of epsilon toxoid commercial vaccine against clostridiosis with booster after 30 days post vaccination. Indirect ELISA was performed after the first vaccine dose and booster to evaluate the immune response of the lambs. Results showed that for the four protocols tested all lambs presented serum title considered protective (≥0.2UI/ml epsilon antitoxin antibodies and also showed that the anticipation of primovaccination of lambs against enterotoxaemia conferred serum title considered protective allowing the optimization of mass vaccination of lambs.

  14. Comparison of four serological methods for the detection of diphtheria anti-toxin antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walory, J; Grzesiowski, P; Hryniewicz, W

    2000-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare four serological methods for the detection of Corynebacterium diphtheriae IgG anti-toxin antibodies (IgG-DTAb) in human serum. One hundred serum samples were evaluated for C. diphtheriae IgG-DTAb by four different methods: passive haemagglutination (PHA), latex agglutination test (LA), toxoid enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Toxoid-ELISA), and toxin-binding inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ToBI-ELISA). As the external standardisation the neutralisation test for C. diphtheriae toxin in Vero cells (TN Vero) was used. For internal standardisation of IgG-DTAb titres, the WHO standard serum of human diphtheria antitoxin was used. The study revealed a poor correlation between the reference test and the PHA (r=0.34 Pearson's correlation coefficient), an acceptable correlation for the LA (r=0.74), a good correlation for the Toxoid-ELISA (r=0.81) and a very good correlation for ToBI-ELISA (r=0.93). The sensitivity measurements of PHA, LA, Toxoid-ELISA and ToBI-ELISA tests, were 14, 100, 94, 96% respectively and the corresponding specificity characteristics were 86, 76, 94, 90 respectively. Of the four evaluated methods, the ToBI-ELISA could be recommended for scientific and precise laboratory assays of diphtheria antibody levels in humans. For screening purposes the Toxoid-ELISA could be used, but the accuracy of antibody titres below 0.1 IU/ml, considered as the limits of protection, is questionable. Both tests offer very useful alternatives to the in vitro diphtheria toxin neutralisation test in Vero cells. Because of their unsatisfactory correlation and sensitivity as compared to the reference method, PHA and LA should be avoided and replaced by one of the two enzyme immunoassays.

  15. PublisherPartners webshop

    OpenAIRE

    Piferrer Torres, Enric

    2013-01-01

    Projecte realitzat en col·laboració amb Fontys University of Applied Sciences i l'empresa PublisherPartners. The main goal in the project was to build a website where the company PublisherPartners could sell and offer its products online to the customer

  16. New Synthesis Route for PHD Polyols

    OpenAIRE

    Peshkov, Vladimir; Evtimova, Rozeta; Herzog, Michael; Behrendt, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    The synthesis of polyurea dispersion polyols (PHD) was developed using a new route via depolymerization of polyurethane polyureas by a mixture of at least two glycols in the presence of a consumable catalyst, i. e. a secondary aliphatic amine. On this way such polyols were produced with a particle size distribution with a maximum in the 120 to 400 nanometer region with hydroxyl numbers of 180 to 300 mg KOH/g being optically clear and highly reactive. The exact adjustment of the ethylene oxide...

  17. Pursuit of the Ph.D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott P. Kerlin

    1995-11-01

    Full Text Available he thesis is put forward that changes in public policy which originally promoted broad access to higher education are leading to the diminished likelihood that minorities, those from low-income backgrounds and females in underrepresented disciplines will pursue, or be able to complete, the doctorate. By reviewing a wide range of research literature and statistical reports on the status of doctoral education in the U.S. & Canada, a detailed sociological portrait of those who pursue the Ph.D. is presented. Recommendations are given for further research on doctoral education, particularly in areas of attrition,retention, student indebtedness, social stratification, and post-doctoral career plans.

  18. Collateral Intimate Partner Homicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Meyer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Collateral intimate partner homicide (CIPH is an underinvestigated genre of intimate partner violence (IPV where an individual(s connected to the IPV victim is murdered. We conducted a content analysis of a statewide database of CIPH newspaper articles (1990-2007. Out of 111 collateral murder victims, there were 84 IPV female focal victims and 84 male perpetrators. The most frequently reported CIPH decedent was the focal victim’s new partner (30%; 45% of focal victims were themselves killed. News reports framed CIPH as the unexpected result of interpersonal conflict, despite evidence of a systematic pattern of coercion and violence that capitulated in murder.

  19. Understanding Non-Traditional PhD Students Habitus--Implications for PhD Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Devika

    2015-01-01

    Against the background of vast changes in doctoral education and the emergence of non-traditional doctoral programmes, this paper investigates the habitus of non-traditional PhD students at a South African university. Bourdieu's conceptual tool of habitus informed the study. In-depth and open-ended interviews were conducted with 10 non-traditional…

  20. What Is the Link between Stringent Response, Endoribonuclease Encoding Type II Toxin–Antitoxin Systems and Persistence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramisetty, Bhaskar C. M.; Ghosh, Dimpy; Roy Chowdhury, Maoumita; Santhosh, Ramachandran S.

    2016-01-01

    Persistence is a transient and non-inheritable tolerance to antibiotics by a small fraction of a bacterial population. One of the proposed determinants of bacterial persistence is toxin–antitoxin systems (TASs) which are also implicated in a wide range of stress-related phenomena. Maisonneuve E, Castro-Camargo M, Gerdes K. 2013. Cell 154:1140–1150 reported an interesting link between ppGpp mediated stringent response, TAS, and persistence. It is proposed that accumulation of ppGpp enhances the accumulation of inorganic polyphosphate which modulates Lon protease to degrade antitoxins. The decrease in the concentration of antitoxins supposedly activated the toxin to increase in the number of persisters during antibiotic treatment. In this study, we show that inorganic polyphosphate is not required for transcriptional activation of yefM/yoeB TAS, which is an indirect indication of Lon-dependent degradation of YefM antitoxin. The Δ10 strain, an Escherichia coli MG1655 derivative in which the 10 TAS are deleted, is more sensitive to ciprofloxacin compared to wild type MG1655. Furthermore, we show that the Δ10 strain has relatively lower fitness compared to the wild type and hence, we argue that the persistence related implications based on Δ10 strain are void. We conclude that the transcriptional regulation and endoribonuclease activity of YefM/YoeB TAS is independent of ppGpp and inorganic polyphosphate. Therefore, we urge for thorough inspection and debate on the link between chromosomal endoribonuclease TAS and persistence. PMID:27933045

  1. Biomedical PhD education - an international perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulvany, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The PhD, otherwise known as the doctor of philosophy or Dr. Phil., is an internationally recognized degree, indicating that the PhD graduate has received training in research under supervision. Traditionally, the PhD was the route to an academic career, with most successful PhD graduates receiving...... increase the competitiveness of their countries in the future economies of the world. Thus, only a small fraction of PhD graduates now end up in academic research. Yet, the PhD remains a research degree, and indeed, institutions have become heavily dependent on PhD students for their research output....... The situation has thus created a paradox. On the one hand, it has become essential for institutions to have many PhD students and for the research performed to be of the highest level. On the other hand, the careers of PhD students are not necessarily going to be directly related to the research performed...

  2. Crystallization of two operator complexes from the Vibrio cholerae HigBA2 toxin–antitoxin module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadži, San; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Gerdes, Kenn; Lah, Jurij; Loris, Remy

    2015-01-01

    The HigA2 antitoxin and the HigBA2 toxin–antitoxin complex from Vibrio cholerae were crystallized in complex with their operator box. Screening of 22 different DNA duplexes led to two crystal forms of HigA2 complexes and one crystal form of a HigBA2 complex. Crystals of HigA2 in complex with a 17 bp DNA duplex belong to space group P3221, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 94.0, c = 123.7 Å, and diffract to 2.3 Å resolution. The second form corresponding to HigA2 in complex with a 19 bp duplex belong to space group P43212 and only diffract to 3.45 Å resolution. Crystals of the HigBA2 toxin–antitoxin were obtained in complex with a 31 bp duplex and belonged to space group P41212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 113.6, c = 121.1 Å. They diffract to 3.3 Å resolution. PMID:25664801

  3. The MazEF Toxin-Antitoxin System Alters the β-Lactam Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Schuster

    Full Text Available Toxin-antitoxin (TA systems are genetic elements of prokaryotes which encode a stable toxin and an unstable antitoxin that can counteract toxicity. TA systems residing on plasmids are often involved in episomal maintenance whereas those on chromosomes can have multiple functions. The opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus aureus possesses at least four different families of TA systems but their physiological roles are elusive. The chromosomal mazEF system encodes the RNase toxin MazF and the antitoxin MazE. In the light of ambiguity regarding the cleavage activity, we here verify that MazF specifically targets UACAU sequences in S. aureus in vivo. In a native strain background and under non-stress conditions, cleavage was observed in the absence or presence of mazE. Transcripts of spa (staphylococcal protein A and rsbW (anti-σB factor were cut, but translational reporter fusions indicated that protein levels of the encoded products were unaffected. Despite a comparable growth rate as the wild-type, an S. aureus mazEF deletion mutant was more susceptible to β-lactam antibiotics, which suggests that further genes, putatively involved in the antibiotic stress response or cell wall synthesis or turnover, are controlled by this TA system.

  4. The MazEF Toxin-Antitoxin System Alters the β-Lactam Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Christopher F; Mechler, Lukas; Nolle, Nicoletta; Krismer, Bernhard; Zelder, Marc-Eric; Götz, Friedrich; Bertram, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are genetic elements of prokaryotes which encode a stable toxin and an unstable antitoxin that can counteract toxicity. TA systems residing on plasmids are often involved in episomal maintenance whereas those on chromosomes can have multiple functions. The opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus aureus possesses at least four different families of TA systems but their physiological roles are elusive. The chromosomal mazEF system encodes the RNase toxin MazF and the antitoxin MazE. In the light of ambiguity regarding the cleavage activity, we here verify that MazF specifically targets UACAU sequences in S. aureus in vivo. In a native strain background and under non-stress conditions, cleavage was observed in the absence or presence of mazE. Transcripts of spa (staphylococcal protein A) and rsbW (anti-σB factor) were cut, but translational reporter fusions indicated that protein levels of the encoded products were unaffected. Despite a comparable growth rate as the wild-type, an S. aureus mazEF deletion mutant was more susceptible to β-lactam antibiotics, which suggests that further genes, putatively involved in the antibiotic stress response or cell wall synthesis or turnover, are controlled by this TA system.

  5. The Constitution of Partnering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Stefan Christoffer

    promoveret af branchen og af staten som et væsentligt led i udviklingen af byggeriets arbejdsformer. Med et udgangspunkt i en Foucauldiansk analyse af dispositiver, rum og orden bidrager afhandlingen med en ny differentieret forståelse af mulighederne for at håndtere branchens modsætningsfyldte fornyelse...... om, hvordan partnering som koncept er fremkommet og har udviklet sig og hvilke konstitutive effekter partnering har på byggeriets praksis. Det teoretiske udgangspunkt i Foucault begrundes i behovet for at fastholde en mangefacetteret og historisk analyse af partnering i modsætning til de...... fremherskende endimensionelle og rationelle forståelser, som ikke svarer til den oplevede og observerede praksis i byggebranchen. I afhandlingens første del diskuteres den analytiske anvendelse af et teoretisk nøglebegreb fra Foucault i analysen af partnering; dispositivet. Hermed forstås de bagvedliggende...

  6. Pacific Partners Wargame Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    such as medical qualifications and malpractice considerations, can be explored as part of interoperability. Partner nations are motivated to...specialized problems. Intellectual exchanges and fora involving experts from government, industry, academic and other institutions could be employed in

  7. Green Power Partner List

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. There are thousands of Green Power Partners, all listed on this page.

  8. Molecular Cloning of phd1 and Comparative Analysis of phd1, 2, and 3 Expression in Xenopus laevis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Han

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intensive gene targeting studies in mice have revealed that prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHDs play important roles in murine embryonic development; however, the expression patterns and function of these genes during embryogenesis of other vertebrates remain largely unknown. Here we report the molecular cloning of phd1 and systematic analysis of phd1, phd2, and phd3 expression in embryos as well as adult tissues of Xenopus laevis. All three phds are maternally provided during Xenopus early development. The spatial expression patterns of phds genes in Xenopus embryos appear to define a distinct synexpression group. Frog phd2 and phd3 showed complementary expression in adult tissues with phd2 transcription levels being high in the eye, brain, and intestine, but low in the liver, pancreas, and kidney. On the contrary, expression levels of phd3 are high in the liver, pancreas, and kidney, but low in the eye, brain, and intestine. All three phds are highly expressed in testes, ovary, gall bladder, and spleen. Among three phds, phd3 showed strongest expression in heart.

  9. Training PhD Physicists for Industrial Careers: The Industrial Leadership in Physics Program at Georgetown University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Keuren, Edward

    2009-03-01

    The Physics department at Georgetown University has a unique PhD level graduate program designed to prepare PhD physicists for positions in high-tech business. Launched in 2001, the Industrial Leadership in Physics (ILP) graduate program combines training in technical subjects and business topics with a focus on group learning, communication skills, and practical work experience. Some highlights of the program include a modular curriculum in fundamental physics, centered on solid-state physics, instrumentation, problem solving and computer modeling; a year-long apprenticeship at the site of an industrial partner chosen to match the interests of the student and coursework in the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown. This presentation will give an overview of the program.

  10. The Importance of Having a Ph.D., Career Advice

    Science.gov (United States)

    A presentation on the importance of having a PhD to motivate Initiative to Maximize Student Diversity Program (IMSD) undergrads towards conducting research, pursuing careers in the biomedical field, applying to grad school, and getting a Ph.D., based upon ARS scientist's experiences as a student, a ...

  11. Tracking the PhD Students' Daily Computer Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Kwong Nui; van der Meer, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated PhD students' computer activities in their daily research practice. Software that tracks computer usage (Manic Time) was installed on the computers of nine PhD students, who were at their early, mid and final stage in doing their doctoral research in four different discipline areas (Commerce, Humanities, Health Sciences and…

  12. ['Sandwich PhD': considerations for a successful experience abroad].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvetti, Marina de Goes; Bueno, Mariana; Gastaldo, Denise; Kimura, Amélia Fumiko; Pimenta, Cibele Andrucioli de Mattos

    2013-03-01

    International PhD internship, named "Sandwich PhD" in Brazil is an opportunity to improve research abilities, to become known in academic area and to establish and/or increase work opportunities in an international context. In this article, we describe key factors regarding the planning and development of the "Sandwich PhD" as experienced by professors and students involved in the collaboration between the School of Nursing, University of São Paulo and Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Canada. We also present the participation of PhD students' network as an alternative to the "Sandwich PhD". An international experience, when well-planned and developed correctly, promotes students' personal and professional development and favors the internationalization of Brazilian graduate programs and research groups.

  13. Neutralization of Bacterial YoeBSpn Toxicity and Enhanced Plant Growth in Arabidopsis thaliana via Co-Expression of the Toxin-Antitoxin Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauziah Abu Bakar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial toxin-antitoxin (TA systems have various cellular functions, including as part of the general stress response. The genome of the Gram-positive human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae harbors several putative TA systems, including yefM-yoeBSpn, which is one of four systems that had been demonstrated to be biologically functional. Overexpression of the yoeBSpn toxin gene resulted in cell stasis and eventually cell death in its native host, as well as in Escherichia coli. Our previous work showed that induced expression of a yoeBSpn toxin-Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP fusion gene apparently triggered apoptosis and was lethal in the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, we investigated the effects of co-expression of the yefMSpn antitoxin and yoeBSpn toxin-GFP fusion in transgenic A. thaliana. When co-expressed in Arabidopsis, the YefMSpn antitoxin was found to neutralize the toxicity of YoeBSpn-GFP. Interestingly, the inducible expression of both yefMSpn antitoxin and yoeBSpn toxin-GFP fusion in transgenic hybrid Arabidopsis resulted in larger rosette leaves and taller plants with a higher number of inflorescence stems and increased silique production. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a prokaryotic antitoxin neutralizing its cognate toxin in plant cells.

  14. The administrative stabilization of vaccines: Regulating the diphtheria antitoxin in France and Germany, 1894-1900.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Volker

    2008-06-01

    It is well known that the development of a diphtheria anti-toxin serum evolved in a competitive race between two groups of researchers, one affiliated with Emil Behring in Berlin and Marburg, and another affiliated with Emile Roux in Paris. Proceeding on the basis of different theoretical assumptions and experimental practices, the two groups developed a therapeutic serum almost simultaneously. But the standardized substance they developed took on very different forms in the two countries. In Germany the new serum was marketed in the private sphere and subjected to state regulations, becoming a kind ofprototype of industrial medications. In France, however, the same substance was marketed as a gift of science to humanity and distributed through the communal health care system. This article demonstrates how a new medication emerged from the efforts to produce, market, regulate, distribute, and apply it in the two respective countries. It attributes the difference to the negotiations between the respective actors (scientists, industrialists, politicians, officers, and the public) and institutions (firms, academies, private and public institutes, legislative bodies, professional corporations). I develop this argument on three different levels: First, I stress the importance of the institutional foundations of serum production; second, I illustrate the decisive role played by existing "ways of regulating" in the rapid development of new legal statutes; and third, I describe the consequences that flowed from the respective administrative organization of marketing and dissemination. In sum, I explore how an experimental object was transformed into an object of the public health system and stabilized by administrative means.

  15. Type II toxin-antitoxin systems are unevenly distributed among Escherichia coli phylogroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedoruk, Krzysztof; Daniluk, Tamara; Swiecicka, Izabela; Sciepuk, Malgorzata; Leszczynska, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Type II toxin-antitoxin systems (TAs) are bicistronic operons ubiquitous in prokaryotic genomes, displaying multilevel association with cell physiology. Various possible functions have been assigned to TAs, ranging from beneficial for their hosts, such as a stress response, dormancy and protection against genomic parasites, to detrimental or useless functions, such as selfish alleles. As there is a link between several Escherichia coli features (e.g. virulence, lifestyle) and the phylogeny of this species, we hypothesized a similar association with TAs. Using PCR we studied the distribution of 15 chromosomal and plasmidic type II TA loci in 84 clinical E. coli isolates in relation to their main phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2 and D). In addition, we performed in silico searching of these TA loci in 60 completely sequenced E. coli genomes deposited in GenBank. The highest number of TA loci per strain was observed in group A (mean 8.2, range 5-12) and the lowest in group B2 (mean 4.2, range 2-8). Moreover, significant differences in the prevalence of nine chromosomal TAs among E. coli phylogroups were noted. In conclusion, the presence of some chromosomal TAs in E. coli is phylogroup-related rather than a universal feature of the species. In addition, their limited collection in group B2 clearly distinguish it from the other E. coli phylogroups.

  16. Standardization and validation of Vero cell assay for potency estimation of diphtheria antitoxin serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Kanwar, Sarika; Bansal, Vivek; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2009-10-01

    Diphtheria toxin has the capacity to block protein synthesis in cultured mammalian cells, and thus causing cell death. This capacity of diphtheria toxin was utilized for in-vitro neutralization test to determine antibody titer, using Vero cells, which have been found to be susceptible to diphtheria toxin. In the present study, a Vero cell assay was standardized and validated for potency estimation of diphtheria antitoxin serum (DATS). The results obtained by Vero cell assay were compared with in-vivo biological assay. High degree of correlation (+0.98) was found between in-vivo biological assay and in-vitro Vero cell assay. The assay has also been found to be effective in determining the rising antibody titer in the equines inducted in DATS production. The present study indicated that although biological assays hold the key for final potency estimations till date but in the future scenario in-vitro Vero cell assay may be a good alternative to in-vivo biological assay.

  17. Launching a Geoscience Career: Insights Gained from MS PHD'S Beyond the PhD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, W. I.; Johnson, A.; Williamson Whitney, V.; Jansma, P. E.; Huggans, M. J.; Ricciardi, L.

    2013-05-01

    The Beyond the PhD (B-PhD) Professional Development Program is the newest addition to the Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success (MS PHD'S®) Professional Development Program in Earth System Science. This exciting new program is designed to facilitate the development of a new community of underrepresented minority (URM) doctoral candidates and recent doctorate degree recipients in Earth system science (ESS)-related fields. Building upon MS PHD'S extensive professional development activities provided to URM undergraduate and graduate students, B-PhD's vision is to encourage and support URM doctoral students and early career PhD's in becoming part of the global workforce. (Since its inception in 2003, MSPHD'S supports 213 participants of which 42 have achieved the doctoral degree and another 71 are enrolled in doctoral programs.) By providing customized support and advocacy for participants, B-PhD facilitates smoother and informed transitions from graduate school to postdoctoral and tenure-track positions, as well as other "first" jobs in academia, government, industry, and non-profit organizations. In 2011, the first conference for 18 doctoral candidate and recent graduates was hosted at the University of Texas at Arlington's (UTA) College of Science. Using a format of guest speakers, brown bag discussions, and interactive breakout sessions, participants engaged in sessions entitled "Toolkits for Success in Academia, Business and Industry, Federal Government and Non-Profits", "Defining Short, Mid and Long Term Career Goals", "Accessing and Refining Skill Sets and Other Door Openers", "International Preparation and Opportunities", "Paying it Forward/Lifting as You Climb", and "Customized Strategies for Next Steps". This presentation will discuss outcomes from this pilot project, the use of social media to track and support ongoing B-PhD activities, and objectives for future B-PhD workshops.

  18. Predictability of conversation partners

    CERN Document Server

    Takaguchi, Taro; Sato, Nobuo; Yano, Kazuo; Masuda, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies have enabled us to examine the nature of human social behavior in greater detail. By applying an information theoretic method to the spatiotemporal data of cell-phone locations, Song et al. (2010) found that human mobility patterns are remarkably predictable. Inspired by their work, we address a similar predictability question in a different kind of human social activity: conversation events. The predictability in the sequence of one's conversation partners is defined as the degree to which one's next conversation partner can be predicted given the current partner. We quantify this predictability by using the mutual information. We examine the predictability of conversation events for each individual using the longitudinal data of face-to-face interactions collected from two company offices in Japan. Each subject wears a name tag equipped with an infrared sensor node, and conversation events are marked when signals are exchanged between close sensor nodes. We find t...

  19. Italia-Netherland PhD Program: the I.O. PhD Research Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellissima, Valentina; Borghesi, Alessandro; Bozzetti, Valentina; Dessì, Angelica; Fabiano, Adele; Risso, Francesco M; Salvo, Vincenzo; Satriano, Angela; Silvagni, Davide; Varrica, Alessandro; van Bel, Frank; Visser, Gerard H A; Vles, Hans Js; Zimmermann, Luc J I; Gavilanes, Antonio D W; Gazzolo, Diego

    2011-10-01

    In the framework of long-term scientific collaboration among the founder members coming from Holland and Italy there was a growing consensus to activate a philosophical doctorate (PhD) program, involving young Italian researchers in the field of perinatal medicine, neonatology and pediatrics. The aims were to promote excellence in research, offering to young Italian physicians the opportunity to maturate an International research experience leading to PhD degree, and to promote human and technological improvement energies in perinatal, neonatal and pediatrics research. Thus, an official collaboration among the Dutch Universities from Maastricht and Utrecht and the Italian Children's Hospital from Alessandria, has been activated on March 1st 2010, finalized to the PhD program. The experimental phase included the selection of projects and relative candidates after an interview-selection focusing on their scientific attitudes and the availability on their research projects. Candidates' selection started on May 2010 and on September 29th ten projects and candidates have been approved by the scientific commission. Research topics included: perinatal asphyxia, aging and the origin of adulthood neurodegenerative disease, neuroprotective strategies, biochemical pulmonology, intrauterine growth retardation and perinatal teratology. To date, all projects have been approved by local Ethics Committee from the University/Hospital of origin of the candidates. Five manuscripts have been published and/or submitted to international Journals regarding pneumology, perinatal asphyxia and teratology, whilst about 60-70% of data regarding clinical studies have already been collected.

  20. Identifying most important skills for PhD students in Food Science and Technology: a comparison between industry and academic stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelo González-Martínez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, there is an increasing need of new skills for PhD students to face the future labour market prospects. PhD graduates must have qualities attractive not only in academia but also outside, in both manufacture and service-oriented enterprises, in small innovative companies, and in the civil services and public administration, among others. To know what the needs of these future employees are, is of great importance to be able to improve their personal and academic formation. The aim of this work was, in the framework of the EC-funded ISEKI_Food 4 network, to evaluate the most desirable specific and soft skills that PhD students should acquire by the end of their doctoral studies. To this aim, several surveys were conducted and sent to the different stakeholders (academia and food industry partners in order to collect the information needed. Results showed that competences related to research skills and techniques, research management, personal effectiveness and communication skills were considered to be the most valuable skills to be acquired by our PhD students to meet the future needs of the labour market.  The importance of these skills was appreciated differently, depending on the stakeholder. To sum up, some recommendations to integrate such valuable skills into the curricula of the PhD student are given.

  1. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of the Escherichia coli RelBE toxin-antitoxin system: indication for a functional role of differential stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherny, Izhack; Overgaard, Martin; Borch, Jonas;

    2007-01-01

    .5 degrees C, and exhibits exceptional sensitivity to heat. Complex formation, accompanied by a structural transition, leads to a 12 degrees C increase in the TM and substantial heat resistance. Moreover, in vivo interaction and protein footprint experiments indicate that the C-terminal part of Rel......The RelE and RelB proteins constitute the RNA interferase (toxin) and its cognate inhibitor (antitoxin) components of the Escherichia coli relBE toxin-antitoxin system. Despite the well-described functionality and physiological activity of this system in E. coli, no structural study was performed...... on the folding and stability of the protein pair in solution. Here we structurally and thermodynamically characterize the RelBE system components from E. coli in solution, both separately and in their complexed state. The RelB antitoxin, an alpha-helical protein according to circular dichroism and infrared...

  2. Partners in Accomplished Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, Arlington, VA.

    This report describes Partners in Accomplished Teaching, a project of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) designed to help increase the number of teachers achieving National Board Certification. It focuses on efforts in St. Paul, Minnesota; Mississippi; North Carolina; and San Antonio, Texas. The St. Paul program is a…

  3. KNOWLEDGE SHARING IN PARTNERING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Thuesen, Christian Langhoff

    This paper adopts practicebased theory for understanding interorganisational knowledge work and extents it with a discussion of the role of redundancy. The paper presents a case study of a project partnership in construction using the partnering concept. The project group responsible...

  4. Partners and Competitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ The United States and China are entering an entirely new and complex era in their economic relationship. In a nutshell, China is both partner and competitor, and simplistic efforts to cast the complexity of U.S.-China economic relations as either one of partnership or competition are unhelpful to the development of effective policy.

  5. Content for Conversation Partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Kathleen

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that a good strategy for helping English language learners to develop communicative competence in English is by pairing them with native English speakers. In such conversation programs, conversation partners should be provided with topics and activities that incorporate the goals, interests, and experiences of the learners. Recommends…

  6. Partnering i praksis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Stefan Christoffer; Bang, Henrik L.; Larsen, Jacob Norvig

    Publikationen sammenfatter resultater og erfaringer vedrørende brug af partnering i realiseringen af LO's hovedsæde i Havnestaden, København. Forløbet i byggesagen adskiller sig fra traditionelle byggesager på en række områder. Vigtigst af disse er anvendelsen af en række partneringstiltag, der u...

  7. Predictability of Conversation Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaguchi, Taro; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Nobuo; Yano, Kazuo; Masuda, Naoki

    2011-08-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies have enabled us to examine the nature of human social behavior in greater detail. By applying an information-theoretic method to the spatiotemporal data of cell-phone locations, [C. Song , ScienceSCIEAS0036-8075 327, 1018 (2010)] found that human mobility patterns are remarkably predictable. Inspired by their work, we address a similar predictability question in a different kind of human social activity: conversation events. The predictability in the sequence of one’s conversation partners is defined as the degree to which one’s next conversation partner can be predicted given the current partner. We quantify this predictability by using the mutual information. We examine the predictability of conversation events for each individual using the longitudinal data of face-to-face interactions collected from two company offices in Japan. Each subject wears a name tag equipped with an infrared sensor node, and conversation events are marked when signals are exchanged between sensor nodes in close proximity. We find that the conversation events are predictable to a certain extent; knowing the current partner decreases the uncertainty about the next partner by 28.4% on average. Much of the predictability is explained by long-tailed distributions of interevent intervals. However, a predictability also exists in the data, apart from the contribution of their long-tailed nature. In addition, an individual’s predictability is correlated with the position of the individual in the static social network derived from the data. Individuals confined in a community—in the sense of an abundance of surrounding triangles—tend to have low predictability, and those bridging different communities tend to have high predictability.

  8. Determination of low tetanus or diphtheria antitoxin titers in sera by a toxin neutralization assay and a modified toxin-binding inhibition test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Sonobe

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for the screening of tetanus and diphtheria antibodies in serum using anatoxin (inactivated toxin instead of toxin was developed as an alternative to the in vivo toxin neutralization assay based on the toxin-binding inhibition test (TOBI test. In this study, the serum titers (values between 1.0 and 19.5 IU measured by a modified TOBI test (Modi-TOBI test and toxin neutralization assays were correlated (P < 0.0001. Titers of tetanus or diphtheria antibodies were evaluated in serum samples from guinea pigs immunized with tetanus toxoid, diphtheria-tetanus or triple vaccine. For the Modi-TOBI test, after blocking the microtiter plates, standard tetanus or diphtheria antitoxin and different concentrations of guinea pig sera were incubated with the respective anatoxin. Twelve hours later, these samples were transferred to a plate previously coated with tetanus or diphtheria antitoxin to bind the remaining anatoxin. The anatoxin was then detected using a peroxidase-labeled tetanus or diphtheria antitoxin. Serum titers were calculated using a linear regression plot of the results for the corresponding standard antitoxin. For the toxin neutralization assay, L+/10/50 doses of either toxin combined with different concentrations of serum samples were inoculated into mice for anti-tetanus detection, or in guinea pigs for anti-diphtheria detection. Both assays were suitable for determining wide ranges of antitoxin levels. The linear regression plots showed high correlation coefficients for tetanus (r² = 0.95, P < 0.0001 and for diphtheria (r² = 0.93, P < 0.0001 between the in vitro and the in vivo assays. The standardized method is appropriate for evaluating titers of neutralizing antibodies, thus permitting the in vitro control of serum antitoxin levels.

  9. Determination of low tetanus or diphtheria antitoxin titers in sera by a toxin neutralization assay and a modified toxin-binding inhibition test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonobe, M H; Trezena, A G; Guilhen, F B; Takano, V L; Fratelli, F; Sakauchi, D; Morais, J F; Prado, S M A; Higashi, H G

    2007-01-01

    A method for the screening of tetanus and diphtheria antibodies in serum using anatoxin (inactivated toxin) instead of toxin was developed as an alternative to the in vivo toxin neutralization assay based on the toxin-binding inhibition test (TOBI test). In this study, the serum titers (values between 1.0 and 19.5 IU) measured by a modified TOBI test (Modi-TOBI test) and toxin neutralization assays were correlated (P diphtheria antibodies were evaluated in serum samples from guinea pigs immunized with tetanus toxoid, diphtheria-tetanus or triple vaccine. For the Modi-TOBI test, after blocking the microtiter plates, standard tetanus or diphtheria antitoxin and different concentrations of guinea pig sera were incubated with the respective anatoxin. Twelve hours later, these samples were transferred to a plate previously coated with tetanus or diphtheria antitoxin to bind the remaining anatoxin. The anatoxin was then detected using a peroxidase-labeled tetanus or diphtheria antitoxin. Serum titers were calculated using a linear regression plot of the results for the corresponding standard antitoxin. For the toxin neutralization assay, L+/10/50 doses of either toxin combined with different concentrations of serum samples were inoculated into mice for anti-tetanus detection, or in guinea pigs for anti-diphtheria detection. Both assays were suitable for determining wide ranges of antitoxin levels. The linear regression plots showed high correlation coefficients for tetanus (r(2) = 0.95, P diphtheria (r(2) = 0.93, P assays. The standardized method is appropriate for evaluating titers of neutralizing antibodies, thus permitting the in vitro control of serum antitoxin levels.

  10. Identification of a human monoclonal antibody to replace equine diphtheria antitoxin for treatment of diphtheria intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevigny, Leila M; Booth, Brian J; Rowley, Kirk J; Leav, Brett A; Cheslock, Peter S; Garrity, Kerry A; Sloan, Susan E; Thomas, William; Babcock, Gregory J; Wang, Yang

    2013-11-01

    Diphtheria antitoxin (DAT) has been the cornerstone of the treatment of Corynebacterium diphtheriae infection for more than 100 years. Although the global incidence of diphtheria has declined steadily over the last quarter of the 20th century, the disease remains endemic in many parts of the world, and significant outbreaks still occur. DAT is an equine polyclonal antibody that is not commercially available in the United States and is in short supply globally. A safer, more readily available alternative to DAT would be desirable. In the current study, we obtained human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) directly from antibody-secreting cells in the circulation of immunized human volunteers. We isolated a panel of diverse hMAbs that recognized diphtheria toxoid, as well as a variety of recombinant protein fragments of diphtheria toxin. Forty-five unique hMAbs were tested for neutralization of diphtheria toxin in in vitro cytotoxicity assays with a 50% effective concentration of 0.65 ng/ml for the lead candidate hMAb, 315C4. In addition, 25 μg of 315C4 completely protected guinea pigs from intoxication in an in vivo lethality model, yielding an estimated relative potency of 64 IU/mg. In comparison, 1.6 IU of DAT was necessary for full protection from morbidity and mortality in this model. We further established that our lead candidate hMAb binds to the receptor-binding domain of diphtheria toxin and physically blocks the toxin from binding to the putative receptor, heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor. The discovery of a specific and potent human neutralizing antibody against diphtheria toxin holds promise as a potential therapeutic.

  11. 2. mednarodna konferenca My PhD = 2nd My phd International Conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armand Faganel

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the organization of the second My phd InternationalConference organized in June in Bratislava. The organizer Friedrich Ebert Foundation is a German non-profit organization. During the conference young researchers from various fields dealt with the issue of ‘New Europe’ and the challenges of sustainable development. The conference was also an opportunity for young researchers to meet new colleagues and exchange their views. The interest was very big since only 40 percent of the applicants were accepted. Another interesting thing was the competitive approach towards the conference, which means that only the best articles will be published in the conference proceedings.

  12. Meet EPA Scientist Michael Nye, Ph.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Nye, Ph.D., is a social scientist who studies natural risk, socio-demographic change and sustainable behavior. Prior to joining EPA, he worked for the UK Environment Agency in flood risk management and emergency preparedness

  13. Meet EPA Engineer Shawn Ryan, Ph.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawn Ryan, Ph.D. is a chemical engineer at EPA's National Homeland Security Research Center. He has worked at EPA for 12 years, nine of which have been devoted to leading research to support decontamination and consequence management.

  14. Meet EPA Scientist Tim Shafer, Ph.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tim Shafer earned his bachelor’s degree in biology and chemistry from Hope College in Holland, MI, in 1986 and his Ph.D. in pharmacology and environmental toxicology from Michigan State University in 1991.

  15. Meet EPA Scientist Susan Yee, Ph.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan Yee, Ph.D., is an ecologist at EPA's Gulf Ecology Division. She is working on the Puerto Rico Sustainable Communities program, developing decision support tools to evaluate how alternative decisions impact coastal ecosystem goods and services

  16. Meet EPA Chemist Quincy Teng, Ph.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA research chemist Quincy Teng, Ph.D., focuses on the application of metabolomics—a relatively new, specialized field of biochemistry focused on studying small molecules known as metabolites—on environmental and life sciences.

  17. Parents as Writing Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenworth, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Parents know that writing is essential to their children's success, and they're eager to help their children become good writers. But often, they're at a loss about how to help. Instead of leaving them in the dark, schools can make parents into valuable writing partners by giving them a toolkit of guidelines for coaching writers.…

  18. Structural insight into histone recognition by the ING PHD fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Karen S; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2009-05-01

    The Inhibitor of Growth (ING) tumor suppressors are implicated in oncogenesis, control of DNA damage repair, cellular senescence and apoptosis. All members of the ING family contain unique amino-terminal regions and a carboxy-terminal plant homeodomain (PHD) finger. While the amino-terminal domains associate with a number of protein effectors including distinct components of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes, the PHD finger binds strongly and specifically to histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me3). In this review we describe the molecular mechanism of H3K4me3 recognition by the ING1-5 PHD fingers, analyze the determinants of the histone specificity and compare the biological activities and structures within subsets of PHD fingers. The atomic-resolution structures of the ING PHD fingers in complex with a H3K4me3 peptide reveal that the histone tail is bound in a large and deep binding site encompassing nearly one-third of the protein surface. An extensive network of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic and cation-pi contacts, and complementary surface interactions coordinate the first six residues of the H3K4me3 peptide. The trimethylated Lys4 occupies an elongated groove, formed by the highly conserved aromatic and hydrophobic residues of the PHD finger, whereas the adjacent groove accommodates Arg2. The two grooves are connected by a narrow channel, the small size of which defines the PHD finger's specificity, excluding interactions with other modified histone peptides. Binding of the ING PHD fingers to H3K4me3 plays a critical role in regulating chromatin acetylation. The ING proteins function as tethering molecules that physically link the HDAC and HAT enzymatic complexes to chromatin. In this review we also highlight progress recently made in understanding the molecular basis underlying biological and tumorigenic activities of the ING tumor suppressors.

  19. A toxin antitoxin system promotes the maintenance of the IncA/C-mobilizable Salmonella Genomic Island 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, Kevin T; Gonnet, Mathieu; Doublet, Benoît; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2016-08-31

    The multidrug resistance Salmonella Genomic Island 1 (SGI1) is an integrative mobilizable element identified in several enterobacterial pathogens. This chromosomal island requires a conjugative IncA/C plasmid to be excised as a circular extrachromosomal form and conjugally mobilized in trans. Preliminary observations suggest stable maintenance of SGI1 in the host chromosome but paradoxically also incompatibility between SGI1 and IncA/C plasmids. Here, using a Salmonella enterica serovar Agona clonal bacterial population as model, we demonstrate that a Toxin-Antitoxin (TA) system encoded by SGI1 plays a critical role in its stable host maintenance when an IncA/C plasmid is concomitantly present. This system, designated sgiAT for Salmonella genomic island 1 Antitoxin and Toxin respectively, thus seems to play a stabilizing role in a situation where SGI1 is susceptible to be lost through plasmid IncA/C-mediated excision. Moreover and for the first time, the incompatibility between SGI1 and IncA/C plasmids was experimentally confirmed.

  20. The ToxAvapA toxin-antitoxin locus contributes to the survival of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Dabin; Kordis, Alexis A; Sonenshine, Daniel E; Daines, Dayle A

    2014-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is an opportunistic pathogen that is a common cause of acute and recurrent mucosal infections. One uncharacterized NTHi toxin-antitoxin (TA) module, NTHI1912-1913, is a host inhibition of growth (higBA) homologue. We hypothesized that this locus, which we designated toxAvapA, contributed to NTHi survival during infection. We deleted toxAvapA and determined that growth of the mutant in defined media was not different from the parent strain. We tested the mutant for persistence during long-term in vitro co-culture with primary human respiratory tissues, which revealed that the ΔtoxAvapA mutant was attenuated for survival. We then performed challenge studies using the chinchilla model of otitis media and determined that mutant survival was also reduced in vivo. Following purification, the toxin exhibited ribonuclease activity on RNA in vitro, while the antitoxin did not. A microarray comparison of the transcriptome revealed that the tryptophan biosynthetic regulon was significantly repressed in the mutant compared to the parent strain. HPLC studies of conditioned medium confirmed that there was no significant difference in the concentration of tryptophan remaining in the supernatant, indicating that the uptake of tryptophan by the mutant was not affected. We conclude that the role of the NTHi toxAvapA TA module in persistence following stress is multifactorial and includes effects on essential metabolic pathways.

  1. A Type III protein-RNA toxin-antitoxin system from Bacillus thuringiensis promotes plasmid retention during spore development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Francesca L; Monson, Rita E; Salmond, George P C

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group of bacteria often contain multiple large plasmids, including those encoding virulence factors in B. anthracis. Bacillus species can develop into spores in response to stress. During sporulation the genomic content of the cell is heavily compressed, which could result in counterselection of extrachromosomal genomic elements, unless they have robust stabilization and segregation systems. Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are near-ubiquitous in prokaryotes and have multiple biological roles, including plasmid stabilization during vegetative growth. Here, we have shown that a Type III TA system, based on an RNA antitoxin and endoribonuclease toxin, from plasmid pAW63 in Bacillus thuringiensis serovar kurstaki HD-73 can dramatically promote plasmid retention in populations undergoing sporulation and germination, and we provide evidence that this occurs through the post-segregational killing of plasmid-free forespores. Our findings show how an extremely common genetic module can be used to ensure plasmid maintenance during stress-induced developmental transitions, with implications for plasmid dynamics in B. cereus s.l. bacteria.

  2. The ToxAvapA toxin-antitoxin locus contributes to the survival of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae during infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dabin Ren

    Full Text Available Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi is an opportunistic pathogen that is a common cause of acute and recurrent mucosal infections. One uncharacterized NTHi toxin-antitoxin (TA module, NTHI1912-1913, is a host inhibition of growth (higBA homologue. We hypothesized that this locus, which we designated toxAvapA, contributed to NTHi survival during infection. We deleted toxAvapA and determined that growth of the mutant in defined media was not different from the parent strain. We tested the mutant for persistence during long-term in vitro co-culture with primary human respiratory tissues, which revealed that the ΔtoxAvapA mutant was attenuated for survival. We then performed challenge studies using the chinchilla model of otitis media and determined that mutant survival was also reduced in vivo. Following purification, the toxin exhibited ribonuclease activity on RNA in vitro, while the antitoxin did not. A microarray comparison of the transcriptome revealed that the tryptophan biosynthetic regulon was significantly repressed in the mutant compared to the parent strain. HPLC studies of conditioned medium confirmed that there was no significant difference in the concentration of tryptophan remaining in the supernatant, indicating that the uptake of tryptophan by the mutant was not affected. We conclude that the role of the NTHi toxAvapA TA module in persistence following stress is multifactorial and includes effects on essential metabolic pathways.

  3. Engaging as Equal Partners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    TRADE volume between China and Africa hit a record last year, sending out positive signals about economic and trade cooperation. China’s robust economic activities,and enhanced cooperation between the two sides,have dragged bilateral trade out of the shadows of the global economic crisis,and helped China emerge as Africa’s largest trading partner in 2009.Professor Mthuli Ncube,Chief Economist and Vice President of the African Development Bank,spoke with ChinAfrica reporter Yu Nan to share his views about the role China has had in Africa’s economic development in recent years. Edited excerpts follow:

  4. New partner - Forestland

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      New partner   Do you need a moment of relaxation and adventure?  Come to Divonne-les-bains and benefit of an immediate discount of 20% on all ropes courses of Forestland http://www.forestland.fr/ upon presentation of your Staff Association membership card. The park is open from 10h00 to 19h00 on Wednesday, Saturday, Sunday during the school period and public holidays (France and Switzerland) or every day during school holidays (France and Switzerland). Different levels of difficulty are available: children, juniors, adults, athletes.

  5. From Neighbors To Partners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    China and Central Asian nations are both benefiting from closer economic,political and social ties This year marks the 15th anniversary of China’s establishment of diplomatic relations with five Central Asian countries—Uzbekistan,Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan and Turkmenistan. After becoming independent upon the breakup of the Soviet Union, they established and developed stable and sustainable ties with China on a brand new basis. Now, with close cooperation in various fields, China and Central Asian countries have become friendly and cooperative partners.

  6. Close partner relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović-Stanojević Tatjana Z.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the theory of emotional attachment, specific emotional relationships are being established at an early age between a child and its parents. On the basis of the quality of these relationships the child creates the so-called internal working model ie the image of itself as well as others. The working model persists throughout one's lifetime, shaping in part the quality of adult relationships. Thus, a dominant adult relationship is a close, partner or love one. Within the indicated theoretical context, we were interested in finding out whether there is a statistically significant link between the emotional ties of parents and their children formed in early childhood. The investigation included 180 grown-ups of the same sex and age. For investigating close partner relationships the test Experience in Close Relationship by the American authors (Brenan K.A., Clark C.L., & Shaver P.R. 1998. was used, while the early emotional relationships were investigated using a test which has been the only one so far to measure this quality in adults - Adult Attachment Interview, (Main M., Casidy J., & Kaplan N., 1985. The results show there is a statistically significant link between the observed variables.

  7. The Production Rate and Employment of Ph.D. Astronomers

    CERN Document Server

    Metcalfe, Travis S

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to promote self-regulation of the astronomy job market, I examine the supply of, and demand for, astronomers over time. On the supply side, I document the production rate of Ph.D. astronomers from 1970 to 2006 using the UMI Dissertation Abstracts database, along with data from other independent sources. I compare the long-term trends in Ph.D. production with federal astronomy research funding over the same time period, and I demonstrate that additional funding is correlated with higher subsequent Ph.D. production. On the demand side, I monitor the changing patterns of employment using statistics about the number and types of jobs advertised in the AAS Job Register from 1984 to 2006. Finally, I assess the sustainability of the job market by normalizing this demand by the annual Ph.D. production. The most recent data suggest that there are now annual advertisements for about one postdoctoral job, half a faculty job, and half a research/support position for every new domestic Ph.D. recipient in astr...

  8. The Production Rate and Employment of Ph.D. Astronomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Travis S.

    2008-02-01

    In an effort to encourage self-regulation of the astronomy job market, I examine the supply of, and demand for, astronomers over time. On the supply side, I document the production rate of Ph.D. astronomers from 1970 to 2006 using the UMI Dissertation Abstracts database, along with data from other independent sources. I compare the long-term trends in Ph.D. production with federal astronomy research funding over the same time period, and I demonstrate that additional funding is correlated with higher subsequent Ph.D. production. On the demand side, I monitor the changing patterns of employment using statistics about the number and types of jobs advertised in the AAS Job Register from 1984 to 2006. Finally, I assess the sustainability of the job market by normalizing this demand by the annual Ph.D. production. The most recent data suggest that there are now annual advertisements for about one postdoctoral job, half a faculty job, and half a research/support position for every new domestic Ph.D. recipient in astronomy and astrophysics. The average new astronomer might expect to hold up to 3 jobs before finding a steady position.

  9. Mid-Career PhD Physicists: Academia & Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan

    2017-01-01

    What jobs do mid-career PhD physicists hold? In a first-ever study, we collected data in 2011 from over 1,500 physics PhD recipients from the classes of 1996, 1997, 2000, and 2001. About 45% of the physics PhD recipients in these classes immediately took jobs that were not temporary, and over 40% accepted postdocs. How does taking a postdoc affect mid-career employment? What is the relationship between first job (after any postdocs) and mid-career employment? How do physicists' actual jobs compare with what they thought they would be doing when they graduated? Using our initial employment and mid-career data, I will answer these questions and more.

  10. Dido3 PHD Modulates Cell Differentiation and Division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovylyn Gatchalian

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Death Inducer Obliterator 3 (Dido3 is implicated in the maintenance of stem cell genomic stability and tumorigenesis. Here, we show that Dido3 regulates the expression of stemness genes in embryonic stem cells through its plant homeodomain (PHD finger. Binding of Dido3 PHD to histone H3K4me3 is disrupted by threonine phosphorylation that triggers Dido3 translocation from chromatin to the mitotic spindle. The crystal structure of Dido3 PHD in complex with H3K4me3 reveals an atypical aromatic-cage-like binding site that contains a histidine residue. Biochemical, structural, and mutational analyses of the binding mechanism identified the determinants of specificity and affinity and explained the inability of homologous PHF3 to bind H3K4me3. Together, our findings reveal a link between the transcriptional control in embryonic development and regulation of cell division.

  11. An analysis of Ph.D. examiners' reports in engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Elena; Holbrook, Allyson; Bourke, Sid

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there have been increasing calls for an overall transformation of the nature of engineering Ph.D. programs and the way theses are assessed. There exists a need to understand the examination process to ensure the best quality outcome for candidates in engineering. The work we present in this paper uses data collected between 2003 and 2010 for a total of 1220 Australian Ph.D. theses by analysing examiner reports. Our analysis indicates that Ph.D. theses in engineering, N = 106, differ considerably from those in other fields in areas such as gender of candidates and examiners and the examiners' geographical location. We also found that assessment areas such as significance and contribution of the thesis, publications arising from the thesis, breadth, depth and recency of the literature review and communication and editorial correctness are areas in which the proportion of text of engineering examiners' comments differs significantly from other fields.

  12. Is the mazEF toxin-antitoxin system responsible for vancomycin resistance in clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available [english] The current study was conducted to investigate the relationship between vancomycin-resistant (VRE and the presence of toxin-antitoxin (TA system, which may be useful as target for novel antimicrobial therapy concepts. The susceptibility of was determined by MIC, and the presence of the TA system was evaluated by PCR. Among 200 isolates 39.5% showed resistance to vancomycin (VRE, while 60.5% were susceptible strains (VSE. The TA system was positive in all VRE isolates (100%, but less prevalent (38/121, 31.4% among the 121 VSE strains. In conclusion, our study demonstrated a positive relationship between the presence of vancomycin resistance and TA system. This observation may introduce therapeutic options against a novel antimicrobial target in enterococci.

  13. Antiradiation Antitoxin IgG : Immunological neutralization of Radiation Toxins at Acute Radiation Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava

    radiation toxins to induce hyperimmune serum: Group A -Toxoid form of CV ARS toxins ( SRD-1); Group B-Toxoid form of CR ARS (SRD-2)toxins ; Group C -Toxoid form of GI ARS (SRD-3); Group D -Toxoid form of HP ARS (SRD-4). After the hyperimmune serum was pooled from several animals, purified, and concentrated, the IgG fraction was separated. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays of the hyper-immune serum had revealed high titers of IgG with specific binding to radi-ation toxins. The antiradiation IgG preparation was injected into laboratory animals one hour before and three hours after irradiation, and was evaluated for its ability to protect inoculated animals against the development of acute radiation syndromes. Results: Animals that were inoculated with specific antiradiation antibodies before and after receiving lethal irradiation at LD 100/30 exhibited 60-75% survival rate within 30 days. Also, these animals inoculated with the Antiradiation Antitoxin had exhibited markedly reduced clinical symptoms of the ARS, even those ones that did not survive irradiation. Discussion: The results of our experiments have demonstrated that the rabbit hyperimmune IgG preparations directed against SRD toxins provide a significant protection against high doses of radiation. In comparison, the mortality rate of irradiated control animals was 100% in the same time period. The mortality rates of animals treated by the hyperimmune IgG antidote have varied in the different groups of ani-mals and different forms of the ARS. However, significant radioprotection was observed in each group treated with the IgGs. The specific antiradiation antidote IGg isolated from hyperim-mune serum of immunized horses is under study. The specific antiradiation antidote contains antibodies to neurotoxins -SAAN IgG includes 50% IgG to Cv ARS, 25% IgG to Cr ARS and 25 % IgG to Gi ARS. The other type of the Specific antiradiation antidote containes antibodies to hematotoxins -SAAH IgG -100%. A combined variant is under

  14. Cell growth inhibition upon deletion of four toxin-antitoxin loci from the megaplasmids of Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milunovic, Branislava; diCenzo, George C; Morton, Richard A; Finan, Turlough M

    2014-02-01

    Toxin and antitoxin (TA) gene pairs are addiction systems that are present in many microbial genomes. Sinorhizobium meliloti is an N2-fixing bacterial symbiont of alfalfa and other leguminous plants, and its genome consists of three large replicons, a circular chromosome (3.7 Mb) and the megaplasmids pSymA (1.4 Mb) and pSymB (1.7 Mb). S. meliloti carries 211 predicted type II TA genes, each encoding a toxin or an antitoxin. We constructed defined deletion strains that collectively removed the entire pSymA and pSymB megaplasmids except for their oriV regions. Of approximately 100 TA genes on pSymA and pSymB, we identified four whose loss was associated with cell death or stasis unless copies of the genes were supplied in trans. Orthologs of three of these loci have been characterized in other organisms (relB/E [sma0471/sma0473], Fic [DOC] [sma2105], and VapC [PIN] [orf2230/sma2231]), and this report contains the first experimental proof that RES/Xre (smb21127/smb21128) loci can function as a TA system. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis did not reveal transcriptional differences between the TA systems to account for why deletion of the four "active" systems resulted in cell toxicity. These data suggest that severe cell growth phenotypes result from the loss of a few TA systems and that loss of most TA systems may result in more subtle phenotypes. These four TA systems do not appear to play a direct role in the S. meliloti-alfalfa symbiosis, as strains lacking these TA systems had a symbiotic N2 fixation phenotype that was indistinguishable from the wild type.

  15. Wound Botulism in Injection Drug Users: Time to Antitoxin Correlates with Intensive Care Unit Length of Stay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Offerman, Steven R

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We sought to identify factors associated with need for mechanical ventilation (MV, length of intensive care unit (ICU stay, length of hospital stay, and poor outcome in injection drug users (IDUs with wound botulism (WB.Methods: This is a retrospective review of WB patients admitted between 1991-2005. IDUs were included if they had symptoms of WB and diagnostic confirmation. Primary outcome variables were the need for MV, length of ICU stay, length of hospital stay, hospital-related complications, and death.Results: Twenty-nine patients met inclusion criteria. Twenty-two (76% admitted to heroin use only and seven (24% admitted to heroin and methamphetamine use. Chief complaints on initial presentation included visual changes, 13 (45%; weakness, nine (31%; and difficulty swallowing, seven (24%. Skin wounds were documented in 22 (76%. Twenty-one (72% patients underwent mechanical ventilation (MV. Antitoxin (AT was administered to 26 (90% patients but only two received antitoxin in the emergency department (ED. The time from ED presentation to AT administration was associated with increased length of ICU stay (Regression coefficient = 2.5; 95% CI 0.45, 4.5. The time from ED presentation to wound drainage was also associated with increased length of ICU stay (Regression coefficient = 13.7; 95% CI = 2.3, 25.2. There was no relationship between time to antibiotic administration and length of ICU stay.Conclusion: MV and prolonged ICU stays are common in patients identified with WB. Early AT administration and wound drainage are recommended as these measures may decrease ICU length of stay.[West J Emerg Med. 2009;10(4:251-256.

  16. Crystal Structure of the Escherichia coli Fic Toxin-Like Protein in Complex with Its Cognate Antitoxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanger, Frédéric V.; Harms, Alexander; Dehio, Christoph; Schirmer, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    FIC domain proteins mediate post-translational modifications of target proteins, which typically results in their inactivation. Depending on the conservation of crucial active site residues, the FIC fold serves as structural scaffold for various enzymatic activities, mostly target adenylylation. The founding member of the vast Fic protein family, EcFicT, was identified in Escherichia coli some time ago. The G55R point mutant of EcFicT displays the “filamentation induced by cAMP” (Fic) phenotype at high 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) concentrations and elevated temperature, but the underlying molecular mechanism and any putative biochemical activity of EcFicT have remained unknown. EcFicT belongs to class I Fic toxin proteins that are encoded together with a small inhibitory protein (antitoxin), named EcFicA in E. coli. Here, we report the crystal structures of two mutant EcFicT/EcFicA complexes (EcFicTG55RA and EcFicTAE28G) both showing close resemblance with the structure of the AMP-transferase VbhT from Bartonella schoenbuchensis in complex with its cognate antitoxin VbhA. However, crucial differences in the active site of EcFicT compared to VbhT and other AMP-transferases rationalize the lack of evidence for adenylylation activity. Comprehensive bioinformatic analysis suggests that EcFicT has evolved from canonical AMP-transferases and has acquired a conserved binding site for a yet to be discovered novel substrate. The G55R mutation has no effect on structure or thermal stability of EcFicT, such that the molecular basis for its associated Fic phenotype remains elusive. We anticipate that this structure will inspire further bioinformatic and experimental analyses in order to characterize the enzymatic activity of EcFicT and help revealing its physiological role. PMID:27657533

  17. Partner selection and Hollywood Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Torben Kragh; Kramer, Mette

    2012-01-01

    Based on cognitive, neurological and evolutionary based film theory the article describes the representation of partner selection in Hollywood films. It analyses paradigm scenarios of partner selection and love, It further describes some of those mechanisms that regulate the relation between auto...

  18. When One Partner Is HIV+

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Translate Text Size Print When One Partner Is HIV+ What is a “mixed-status” Relationship? A " ... but you can minimize it. Tips for the HIV-negative Partner If you are the HIV-negative ...

  19. Intimate Partner Violence. Prevention Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines intimate partner violence (IPV) as violence between two people in a close relationship, including current and former spouses and dating partners. IPV occurs on a continuum from a single episode to ongoing battering and can include physical violence, sexual violence, threats, emotional…

  20. Partnering with the NCPV (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-06-01

    Brochure that explains the basic partnering opportunities that exist within the National Center for Photovoltaics for industry and university groups: non-proprietary partnering opportunities, competitive solicitations, Technology Partnership Agreements, seed fund to develop Technology Partnership Agreements, Hands-On PV Experience Workshop, and NCPV Fellowship Program.

  1. PhD Dissertations Tesi di dottorato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Report of PhD Dissertations.

    Francesco Barone

    Istituzioni, società ed economia a Catania nel tardo medioevo (XIV-XV secolo, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004

     

    Laura Berti Ceroni

    Il territorio e le strutture di Cesarea e Classe tra tarda antichità e alto medioevo in rapporto con Ravenna, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia e Informatica, Università degli studi di Bologna, 2002-2003.

     

    Marco Bicchierai

    Poppi dalla signoria dei conti Guidi al vicariato del Casentino (1360-1480, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XIV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004

     

    Emanuela Garimberti

    Spatiosa ad habitandum loca. Luoghi e identità nella Historia Langobardorum di Paolo Diacono, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2004

     

    Lorenzo Tanzini

    Sistemi normativi e pratiche istituzionali a Firenze dalla fine del XIII all’inizio del XV secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004

     

    Stefania Tarquini

    Pellegrinaggio e asseto urbano di Roma, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia dei centri, delle vie e della cultura dei pellegrinaggi nel Medioevo euro mediterraneo (XV ciclo, Università degli studi di Lecce, 2003

    Segnalazione di tesi di dottorato.

    Francesco Barone

    Istituzioni, società ed economia a Catania nel tardo medioevo (XIV-XV secolo, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004

     

    Laura Berti Ceroni

  2. PhD Dissertations Tesi di dottorato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Report of PhD Dissertations.

    Massimo Della Misericordia

    Divenire comunità. Comuni rurali, poteri signorili, identità sociali in Valtellina e nella montagna lombarda nel tardo medioevo, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XIV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2003

     

    Mariano Dell’Omo

    Il monastero di S. Liberatore alla Maiella centro dell’irradiazione di Montecassino nell’Abruzzo medievale e moderno. Contributo alla storia dell’organizzazione patrimoniale e della civiltà monastica cassinese nell’Italia centrale attraverso i documenti di S. Liberatore conservati nell’Archivio di Montecassino. Introduzione storica, paleografica e archivistica. Edizione dei documenti più antichi (†798-1000 e regesti di quelli posteriori (1005-1735, Tesi di dottorato in Storia Ecclesiastica, Facoltà di Storia Ecclesiastica, Pontificia Università Gregoriana di Roma,  2004

     

    Giulia Lorenzoni

    Conquistare e governare la città. Forme di potere e istituzioni nel primo anno della signoria viscontea a Bologna (ottobre 1350-novembre 1351, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2004

     

    Federica Monteleone

    Il viaggio di Carlo Magno in Terra Santa. Un’esperienza di pellegrinaggio nella tradizione europea occidentale, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia dei centri, delle vie e della cultura dei pellegrinaggi nel Medioevo euro mediterraneo (XV ciclo

     

    Francesca Pucci Donati

    Fra teorie mediche e pratica quotidiana: i calendari dietetici dell’Occidente latino altomedievale (secoli IX-XI, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (XV ciclo, Università degli studi di Bologna, 2004

    Alberto Ricciardi

    L’Epistolario di Lupo

  3. Theo Thole as a PhD ''student''

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanDuijnen, PT

    1997-01-01

    Thee Thole's Ph.D. work was the basis for the Direct Reaction Field method for incorporating a semi-classical ''solvent'' in quantum chemical calculations. The early stages of his work and later progress is reviewed and a typical example of his analytical and programming skills, so far unpublished,

  4. Richard Mazurchuk, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Richard Mazurchuk received a BS in Physics and MS and PhD in Biophysics from SUNY Buffalo. His research focused on developing novel multi-modality imaging techniques, contrast (enhancing) agents and methods to assess the efficacy of experimental therapeutics. |

  5. Ph.D Afhandling: Restaurering verus instaurering og transstaurering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Nielsen, Grith

    2012-01-01

    Ph.d. afhandlingen udforsker holdningen som arkitektfagligt instrument. Fagudøverens "holdning" til værdisætning af arkitektoniske kulturarvsobjekter og til arkitektonisk intervention heri fungerer aktuelt som et anerkendt og konstituerende beslutningsinstrument i praksisnære processer og sammenh...

  6. Proceedings of the ICTSS 2012 PhD Workshop - Preface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Brian; Weise, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    , theoretic, and practical challenges of testing software systems, including communication protocols, services, distributed platforms, middleware, embedded systems, and security infrastructures. The aims of the ICTSS Doctoral Workshop is to provide a forum for PhD students to present preliminary results...

  7. PhD thesis: The relationship between expertise and creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Mikkel Snorre Wilms

    2015-01-01

    I Ph.d. projektet undersøges sammenhænge mellem ekspertise og kreativitet via et eksperiment, hvor eksperter og novicer laver musik ved computer. Musikken vurderes efterfølgende af en række fokusgrupper. Studiet peger overraskende på, at novicer på linje med eksperter er i stand til at skabe musi...

  8. Ph.d. report nº1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernandez, Lorenzo Banos

    The following report serves as an introduction to the Ph.d subject "Control system Modeling of the Wave Star Energy's Power Take-O". The device studied belongs to the Wave Energy field, which forms part of the renewable hydro Power generation sector. In Denmark, following the succesful course...

  9. Peer Mentorship and Transformational Learning: PhD Student Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Jane P.; Ogenchuk, Marcella J.; Nsiah, Joseph K.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to describe our peer mentorship experiences and explain how these experiences fostered transformational learning during our PhD graduate program in educational administration. As a literature backdrop, we discuss characteristics of traditional forms of mentorship and depict how our experiences of peer mentorship was…

  10. PhD by Publication: A Student's Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kanowski

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the first author's experiences as an Australian doctoral student undertaking a PhD by publication in the arena of the social sciences. She published nine articles in refereed journals and a peer-reviewed book chapter during the course of her PhD. We situate this experience in the context of current discussion about doctoral publication practices, in order to inform both postgraduate students and academics in general. The article discusses recent thinking about PhD by publication and identifies the factors that students should consider prior to adopting this approach, in terms of university requirements, supervisors' attitudes, the research subject matter, intellectual property, capacity and working style, and issues of co-authorship. It then outlines our perceptions of the advantages and disadvantages of undertaking a PhD by publication. We suggest that, in general, the advantages outweigh the disadvantages. We conclude by reflecting on how the first author's experiences relate to current discussions about fostering publications by doctoral students.

  11. How Broad Liberal Arts Training Produces Phd Economists: Carleton's Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Jenny; Grawe, Nathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Several recent studies point to strong performance in economics PhD programs of graduates from liberal arts colleges. While every undergraduate program is unique and the likelihood of selection bias combines with small sample sizes to caution against drawing strong conclusions, the authors reflect on their experience at Carleton College to…

  12. First International Student Obtains His PhD at CAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Mr. Ghulam Rasul, the first international student formally enrolled by the Graduate University of CAS (GUCAS) has received his PhD degree this summer after having passed his dissertation defense on May 21 at the CAS Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP).

  13. PhD Dissertations Tesi di dottorato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD Dissertations.Anna Airò La scrittura delle regole. Politica e istituzioni a Taranto nel Quattrocento, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Firenze, 2005 Pasquale Arfé La Clavis Physicae II (316-529 di Honorius Augustodunensis. Studio ed edizione critica, Tesi di dottorato in Storia della filosofia medievale, Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale", 2005 Alessandro Azzimonti Scrittura agiografica e strutture di potere nell'Italia centro-settentrionale (X-XII secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Forme del sapere storico dal medioevo alla contemporaneità, Università degli Studi di Trieste, 2004 Domenico Cerami Il "Confine conteso". Uomini, istituzioni, culture a Monteveglio tra VIII-XII secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia Medievale, Università degli studi di Bologna, 2005 Federica Chilà Ostaggi. Uno strumento di pacificazione e governo tra i secoli VIII e XII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Istituzioni, società, religioni dal Tardo Antico alla fine del Medioevo, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2004 Enrico Faini Firenze nei secoli X-XIII: economia e società, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Firenze, 2005Alessio FioreStrutture e pratiche del potere signorile in area umbro-marchigiana (secoli XI-XIII, Tesi di dottorato ricerca in Storia, Università degli studi di Pisa, 2004Giampaolo FrancesconiTra Riforma, vescovo e clientes. Camaldoli e le società locali (secoli XI-XIII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Firenze, 2005 [09/05] Giuseppe Gardoni "Episcopus et potestas". Vescovi e società a Mantova nella prima metà del Duecento, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia del Cristianesimo e delle Chiese (antichità, medioevo, età moderna, Università degli Studi di Padova, 2005 Nicola Mancassola La gestione delle campagne tra Langobardia e Romània in età carolingia e post

  14. Undertaking Individual Transdisciplinary PhD Research for Sustainable Development: Case Studies from South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Breda, John; Musango, Josephine; Brent, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to improve the understanding of individual transdisciplinary PhD research in a developing country context, focusing on three individual PhD case studies in South Africa. Design/Methodology/Approach: Multiple-case method was used, and three completed transdisciplinary PhD research efforts undertaken at the Stellenbosch…

  15. Partnering in the Construction Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlev Bohnstedt, Kristian; Haugbølle, Kim; Bejder, Erik

    2013-01-01

    gaps in existing body of knowledge. The objective of this literature-based paper is to explore the current literature by systematically reviewing and summarizing research trends in leading top-tier construction management journals between 2002 and 2012, addressing how the themes in partnering related...... publications change across this period. It is concluded that trends such as research on developing trust among construction partners to facilitate project success, feasibility of and the barriers to adopting a partnering approach and strategic propositions for overcoming barriers are highly emerging. Finally...

  16. Partnering models in Nordic construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jacob Norvig

    Traditionally, procurement and contractual policies adopted by building and construction clients produce a system in which clients procure design services separately from construction services, while operation and maintenance have been subject to further, separate procurement actions....... This can involve contractual changes, but is more often primarily founded on agreements and commitments outside the contract framework. The paper presents evidence from an explorative study of partnering and partnerships in five Nordic countries. The study was implemented in a collaborative network......, the concept of partnering was used somewhat ambiguously in the Nordic building industries covering roughly any kind of business relation from alliances, consortia, framework agreements to project partnering....

  17. Co-evolution of quaternary organization and novel RNA tertiary interactions revealed in the crystal structure of a bacterial protein–RNA toxin–antitoxin system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Feng; Short, Francesca L.; Voss, Jarrod E.; Blower, Tim R.; Orme, Anastasia L.; Whittaker, Tom E.; Luisi, Ben F.; Salmond, George P. C.

    2015-01-01

    Genes encoding toxin–antitoxin (TA) systems are near ubiquitous in bacterial genomes and they play key roles in important aspects of bacterial physiology, including genomic stability, formation of persister cells under antibiotic stress, and resistance to phage infection. The CptIN locus from Eubacterium rectale is a member of the recently-discovered Type III class of TA systems, defined by a protein toxin suppressed by direct interaction with a structured RNA antitoxin. Here, we present the crystal structure of the CptIN protein–RNA complex to 2.2 Å resolution. The structure reveals a new heterotetrameric quaternary organization for the Type III TA class, and the RNA antitoxin bears a novel structural feature of an extended A-twist motif within the pseudoknot fold. The retention of a conserved ribonuclease active site as well as traits normally associated with TA systems, such as plasmid maintenance, implicates a wider functional role for Type III TA systems. We present evidence for the co-variation of the Type III component pair, highlighting a distinctive evolutionary process in which an enzyme and its substrate co-evolve. PMID:26350213

  18. Co-evolution of quaternary organization and novel RNA tertiary interactions revealed in the crystal structure of a bacterial protein-RNA toxin-antitoxin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Feng; Short, Francesca L; Voss, Jarrod E; Blower, Tim R; Orme, Anastasia L; Whittaker, Tom E; Luisi, Ben F; Salmond, George P C

    2015-10-30

    Genes encoding toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are near ubiquitous in bacterial genomes and they play key roles in important aspects of bacterial physiology, including genomic stability, formation of persister cells under antibiotic stress, and resistance to phage infection. The CptIN locus from Eubacterium rectale is a member of the recently-discovered Type III class of TA systems, defined by a protein toxin suppressed by direct interaction with a structured RNA antitoxin. Here, we present the crystal structure of the CptIN protein-RNA complex to 2.2 Å resolution. The structure reveals a new heterotetrameric quaternary organization for the Type III TA class, and the RNA antitoxin bears a novel structural feature of an extended A-twist motif within the pseudoknot fold. The retention of a conserved ribonuclease active site as well as traits normally associated with TA systems, such as plasmid maintenance, implicates a wider functional role for Type III TA systems. We present evidence for the co-variation of the Type III component pair, highlighting a distinctive evolutionary process in which an enzyme and its substrate co-evolve.

  19. A vapBC-type toxin-antitoxin module of Sinorhizobium meliloti influences symbiotic efficiency and nodule senescence of Medicago sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipuma, Justine; Cinege, Gyöngyi; Bodogai, Monica; Oláh, Boglárka; Kiers, Aurélie; Endre, Gabriella; Dupont, Laurence; Dusha, Ilona

    2014-12-01

    The symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti carries a large number of toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules both on the chromosome and megaplasmids. One of them, the vapBC-5 module that belongs to the type II systems was characterized here. It encodes an active toxin vapC-5, and was shown to be controlled negatively by the complex of its own proteins. Different mutants of the vapBC-5 genes exhibited diverse effects on symbiotic efficiency during interaction with the host plant Medicago sativa. The absence of the entire vapBC-5 region had no influence on nodule formation and nitrogen fixation properties. The strain carrying an insertion in the antitoxin gene showed a reduced nitrogen fixation capacity resulting in a lower plant yield. In contrast, when the toxin gene was mutated, the strain developed more efficient symbiosis with the host plant. The nitrogen fixing root nodules had a delayed senescent phenotype and contained elevated level of plant-derived molecules characteristic of later steps of nodule development. The longer bacteroid viability and abundance of active nitrogen fixing zone resulted in increased production of plant material. These data indicate that modification of the toxin/antitoxin production may influence bacteroid metabolism and may have an impact on the adaptation to changing environmental conditions.

  20. Coupling between the Basic Replicon and the Kis-Kid Maintenance System of Plasmid R1: Modulation by Kis Antitoxin Levels and Involvement in Control of Plasmid Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan López-Villarejo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available kis-kid, the auxiliary maintenance system of plasmid R1 and copB, the auxiliary copy number control gene of this plasmid, contribute to increase plasmid replication efficiency in cells with lower than average copy number. It is thought that Kis antitoxin levels decrease in these cells and that this acts as the switch that activates the Kid toxin; activated Kid toxin reduces copB-mRNA levels and this increases RepA levels that increases plasmid copy number. In support of this model we now report that: (i the Kis antitoxin levels do decrease in cells containing a mini-R1 plasmid carrying a repA mutation that reduces plasmid copy number; (ii kid-dependent replication rescue is abolished in cells in which the Kis antitoxin levels or the CopB levels are increased. Unexpectedly we found that this coordination significantly increases both the copy number of the repA mutant and of the wt mini-R1 plasmid. This indicates that the coordination between plasmid replication functions and kis-kid system contributes significantly to control plasmid R1 replication.

  1. Same-Sex Partner Bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patlamazoglou, Lefteris; Simmonds, Janette G; Snell, Tristan L

    2017-01-01

    The experience of same-sex-attracted people who have lost a partner is neglected in the existing literature on bereavement. Previous research on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, queer and questioning (LGBTIQ) populations tends to focus on the loss of a partner to HIV-related causes, and there is scant research concerning non-HIV-related bereavement. The purpose of this article is to investigate the non-HIV-related bereavement experiences of same-sex partners and to address the potential complications of disenfranchised grief. Coping with the loss of a same-sex partner and the impact of bereavement on subsequent relationships are also discussed. Implications for counseling of bereaved same-sex-attracted individuals are drawn, and recommendations for future psychological research on the experience of bereavement are made.

  2. 2015 NAIP Partner Availability Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — Shows the available NAIP imagery which NAIP Partners can access. Either Quarter Quads (QQs), Compressed County Mosaics (CCMs) or data that has been physically mailed...

  3. A Partner's Guide to Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... following birth. If your partner has had an episiotomy or a tear during birth, she may be ... support to a woman during labor and childbirth. Episiotomy: A surgical incision made into the perineum (the ...

  4. Managing Your China JV Partner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHRIS; DEVONSHIRE-ELLIS

    2008-01-01

    Having critical management tools gives foreign investors the chance to maximize their investment, minimize their risk and develop a mutually profitable business with a Chinese partner. This concludes our series on this topic.

  5. Managing Your China JV Partner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHRIS; DEVONSHIRE-ELLIS

    2008-01-01

    Joint ventures (JVs) are a marriage between businesses, and as in any marriage,both partners need to put time and effort intoit. Having conducted your due diligence,negotiated your investments, and agreed to

  6. Partner Ballroom Dance Robot -PBDR-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosuge, Kazuhiro; Takeda, Takahiro; Hirata, Yasuhisa; Endo, Mitsuru; Nomura, Minoru; Sakai, Kazuhisa; Koizumi, Mizuo; Oconogi, Tatsuya

    In this research, we have developed a dance partner robot, which has been developed as a platform for realizing the effective human-robot coordination with physical interaction. The robot could estimate the next dance step intended by a human and dance the step with the human. This paper introduce the robot referred to as PBDR (Partner Ballroom Dance Robot), which has performed graceful dancing with the human in EXPO 2005, Aichi, Japan.

  7. Soybean GmPHD-type transcription regulators improve stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Soybean [Glycine max (L. Merr.] is one of the most important crops for oil and protein resource. Improvement of stress tolerance will be beneficial for soybean seed production. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Six GmPHD genes encoding Alfin1-type PHD finger protein were identified and their expressions differentially responded to drought, salt, cold and ABA treatments. The six GmPHDs were nuclear proteins and showed ability to bind the cis-element "GTGGAG". The N-terminal domain of GmPHD played a major role in DNA binding. Using a protoplast assay system, we find that GmPHD1 to GmPHD5 had transcriptional suppression activity whereas GmPHD6 did not have. In yeast assay, the GmPHD6 can form homodimer and heterodimer with the other GmPHDs except GmPHD2. The N-terminal plus the variable regions but not the PHD-finger is required for the dimerization. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the GmPHD2 showed salt tolerance when compared with the wild type plants. This tolerance was likely achieved by diminishing the oxidative stress through regulation of downstream genes. SIGNIFICANCE: These results provide important clues for soybean stress tolerance through manipulation of PHD-type transcription regulator.

  8. Iranian PhD student wins human-rights prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Jon

    2013-11-01

    A physicist imprisoned in Iran while on a break from his PhD studies in the US has been awarded a human-rights prize. Omid Kokabee, who had been based at the University of Texas in Austin, has been given the Andrei Sakharov Prize from the American Physical Society (APS) for "his courage in refusing to use his physics knowledge to work on projects that he deemed harmful to humanity, in the face of extreme physical and psychological pressure".

  9. Role of vapBC toxin-antitoxin loci in the thermal stress response of Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Charlotte R; Daugherty, Amanda J; Tachdjian, Sabrina; Blum, Paul H; Kelly, Robert M

    2009-02-01

    TA (toxin-antitoxin) loci are ubiquitous in prokaryotic micro-organisms, including archaea, yet their physiological function is largely unknown. For example, preliminary reports have suggested that TA loci are microbial stress-response elements, although it was recently shown that knocking out all known chromosomally located TA loci in Escherichia coli did not have an impact on survival under certain types of stress. The hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus encodes at least 26 vapBC (where vap is virulence-associated protein) family TA loci in its genome. VapCs are PIN (PilT N-terminus) domain proteins with putative ribonuclease activity, while VapBs are proteolytically labile proteins, which purportedly function to silence VapCs when associated as a cognate pair. Global transcriptional analysis of S. solfataricus heat-shock-response dynamics (temperature shift from 80 to 90 degrees C) revealed that several vapBC genes were triggered by the thermal shift, suggesting a role in heat-shock-response. Indeed, knocking out a specific vapBC locus in S. solfataricus substantially changed the transcriptome and, in one case, rendered the crenarchaeon heat-shock-labile. These findings indicate that more work needs to be done to determine the role of VapBCs in S. solfataricus and other thermophilic archaea, especially with respect to post-transcriptional regulation.

  10. Role of vapBC toxin–antitoxin loci in the thermal stress response of Sulfolobus solfataricus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Charlotte R.; Daugherty, Amanda J.; Tachdjian, Sabrina; Blum, Paul H.; Kelly, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    TA (toxin–antitoxin) loci are ubiquitous in prokaryotic microorganisms, including archaea, yet their physiological function is largely unknown. For example, preliminary reports have suggested that TA loci are microbial stress-response elements, although it was recently shown that knocking out all known chromosomally located TA loci in Escherichia coli did not have an impact on survival under certain types of stress. The hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus encodes at least 26 vapBC (where vap is virulence-associated protein) family TA loci in its genome. VapCs are PIN (PilT N-terminus) domain proteins with putative ribonuclease activity, while VapBs are proteolytically labile proteins, which purportedly function to silence VapCs when associated as a cognate pair. Global transcriptional analysis of S. solfataricus heat-shock-response dynamics (temperature shift from 80 to 90°C) revealed that several vapBC genes were triggered by the thermal shift, suggesting a role in heat-shock-response. Indeed, knocking out a specific vapBC locus in S. solfataricus substantially changed the transcriptome and, in one case, rendered the crenarchaeon heat-shock-labile. These findings indicate that more work needs to be done to determine the role of VapBCs in S. solfataricus and other thermophilic archaea, especially with respect to post-transcriptional regulation. PMID:19143615

  11. The Cancer Cell Oxygen Sensor PHD2 Promotes Metastasis via Activation of Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kuchnio

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Several questions about the role of the oxygen sensor prolyl-hydroxylase 2 (PHD2 in cancer have not been addressed. First, the role of PHD2 in metastasis has not been studied in a spontaneous tumor model. Here, we show that global PHD2 haplodeficiency reduced metastasis without affecting tumor growth. Second, it is unknown whether PHD2 regulates cancer by affecting cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs. We show that PHD2 haplodeficiency reduced metastasis via two mechanisms: (1 by decreasing CAF activation, matrix production, and contraction by CAFs, an effect that surprisingly relied on PHD2 deletion in cancer cells, but not in CAFs; and (2 by improving tumor vessel normalization. Third, the effect of concomitant PHD2 inhibition in malignant and stromal cells (mimicking PHD2 inhibitor treatment is unknown. We show that global PHD2 haplodeficiency, induced not only before but also after tumor onset, impaired metastasis. These findings warrant investigation of PHD2’s therapeutic potential.

  12. Partnering and integrated supply management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnø, Ole-Christian; Olsen, Anders; Thyssen, Mikael

    2003-01-01

    are common among the actors in the building industry. Partnering is still in its early stages, and a strategic development of the concept to include long-term collaborative relationships appears to be able to offer considerable potential, while there is a pressing need for the development of methods...... for strategic management of collaborative relationships on a line with the purchasing perspectives offered by Supply Chain Management. Based on a study of the literature and an in-depth case study carried out within a large Scandinavian contractor, this article gives a proposal for how Partnering can...... be supported by strategic purchasing, with the aim of achieving strategic Partnering. The contribution of this article is thus the development of a new purchasing perspective within Construction Supply Chain Management....

  13. Applied PhD Research in a Work-Based Environment: An Activity Theory-Based Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, S. N.; Dochy, F.

    2016-01-01

    Activity theory is used to compare PhD undertaken at university, that is, academic PhD, with PhD performed in collaboration with industry, that is, semi-industrial PhD. The research is divided into a literature review and a case study. Semi-industrial and academic PhD are modelled as activity systems, and differences are highlighted in terms of…

  14. The crystal structure of the Rv0301-Rv0300 VapBC-3 toxin-antitoxin complex from M. tuberculosis reveals a Mg2+ ion in the active site and a putative RNA-binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Andrew B; Miallau, Linda; Sawaya, Michael R; Habel, Jeff; Cascio, Duilio; Eisenberg, David [UCLA; (UCB)

    2013-01-10

    VapBC pairs account for 45 out of 88 identified toxin-antitoxin (TA) pairs in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) H37Rv genome. A working model suggests that under times of stress, antitoxin molecules are degraded, releasing the toxins to slow the metabolism of the cell, which in the case of VapC toxins is via their RNase activity. Otherwise the TA pairs remain bound to their promoters, autoinhibiting transcription. The crystal structure of Rv0301-Rv0300, an Mtb VapBC TA complex determined at 1.49 Å resolution, suggests a mechanism for these three functions: RNase activity, its inhibition by antitoxin, and its ability to bind promoter DNA. The Rv0301 toxin consists of a core of five parallel beta strands flanked by alpha helices. Three proximal aspartates coordinate a Mg2+ ion forming the putative RNase active site. The Rv0300 antitoxin monomer is extended in structure, consisting of an N-terminal beta strand followed by four helices. The last two helices wrap around the toxin and terminate near the putative RNase active site, but with different conformations. In one conformation, the C-terminal arginine interferes with Mg2+ ion coordination, suggesting a mechanism by which the antitoxin can inhibit toxin activity. At the N-terminus of the antitoxin, two pairs of Ribbon-Helix-Helix (RHH) motifs are related by crystallographic twofold symmetry. The resulting hetero-octameric complex is similar to the FitAB system, but the two RHH motifs are about 30 Å closer together in the Rv0301-Rv0300 complex, suggesting either a different span of the DNA recognition sequence or a conformational change.

  15. MS PHD'S Professional Development Program: A Scientific Renaissance in Cyberspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. M.; Williamson, V. A.; Griess, C. A.; Pyrtle, A. J.

    2004-12-01

    This study is a component of a four-year investigation of MS PHD'S Professional Development Program's virtual community through the lenses of underrepresented minority students in Earth system science and engineering fields. In this presentation, the development, assessment and projected utilization of the ongoing study will be discussed. The overall goal of this study is to examine the effectiveness of virtual team building methods and understand how the development of a communal cyberinfrastructure acts as an integral part of the emergence of a Scientific Renaissance. The exemplar, Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science (MS PHD'S), provides professional development experiences to facilitate the advancement of students of color achieving outstanding Earth system careers. Undergraduate and graduate students are supported through access to scientific conferences, mentorship and virtual community building. Framed by critical theory, this ethnographic exploration uses a mixed methods research design to record, observe, and analyze both the processes and products of the website, listserv and synchronous web-based dialogue. First, key findings of the formative evaluation and annual reports of the successfully implemented 2003 MS PHD'S Pilot Project are presented. These findings inform future evaluations of the use of technological resources and illustrate how this public space provides peer support and enriched research opportunities. Quantitative methods such as statistical analysis, academic and professional tracking and evaluative tools for scientific content and competency are complimented by qualitative methods that include observations, heuristic case studies and focus group interviews. The findings of this ongoing investigation will provide insight on how national organizations, higher education practitioners, community-based support systems and underrepresented minorities in the sciences promote diversity by developing

  16. Leonard F. Peltier, MD, PhD, 1920-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckling, Frederick W; Lo Vecchio, Janolyn G; Reckling, JoAnn B

    2004-05-01

    Leonard F. Peltier, MD, PhD, was an orthopaedic surgeon, academician, administrator, laboratory investigator, historian, and mentor. His career spanned nearly six decades, beginning with graduate education at the University of Minnesota (UM) under the auspices of Owen H. Wangensteen, MD, PhD. In addition to obtaining a PhD in physiology in the UM Graduate School, he completed general and orthopaedic surgery residencies and attained board certification in each specialty. He served in the US Army Occupation Force Medical Corps in Germany just after World War II. In 1957, at 37 years old, he assumed the chairmanship of the orthopaedic training program at the University of Kansas. In 1971, he couldn't resist the opportunity to become one of the founding members of the "start-up" University of Arizona College of Medicine, accepting an appointment as chair of the new orthopaedic training program, where he remained until his retirement in 1990. He took clinical problems to the laboratory, and made important scientific contributions, particularly in the area of fat embolism and in using calcium sulfate (plaster of Paris) to fill bone defects. He served on governing boards of national professional organizations and presided over the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma from 1980-1981. Throughout his career, he was fascinated by, and published extensively in, the history of medicine arena. Known fondly as "the professor" to many of his residents and colleagues, he had a pragmatic, honest, upbeat, and often humorous approach to life's challenges, valuing personal integrity above other virtues. He explored various eclectic interests far beyond his professional contributions while maintaining his family as a central priority. With his exemplary productivity and interests in the surgical and laboratory sciences, history of medicine, appreciation of fine arts, and perceptive and effective interactions with family, friends, patients, and colleagues, the memory of Leonard

  17. Top couplings and top partners

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We review the model-independent description of the couplings of the top quark to the Higgs and gauge bosons in theories beyond the Standard Model. Then we examine these couplings in the case of arbitrary heavy vector-like quarks mixing with the third family. We also discuss the couplings of these top partners, and comment on implications for LHC searches.

  18. The Symmetry of Partner Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillenbourg, Pierre; Lemaignan, Séverin; Sangin, Mirweis; Nova, Nicolas; Molinari, Gaëlle

    2016-01-01

    Collaborative learning has often been associated with the construction of a shared understanding of the situation at hand. The psycholinguistics mechanisms at work while establishing common grounds are the object of scientific controversy. We postulate that collaborative tasks require some level of mutual modelling, i.e. that each partner needs…

  19. CHINA-JANAICA'S VALUABLE PARTNER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Yan; Yang Wei

    2010-01-01

    @@ Jamaica is China's largest trading partner in the English-speaking Caribbean and bilateral trade has developed rapidly,although last year bilateral trade has been greatly affected because of the economic crisis.However,with continuous development of the two economies,bilateral economic development and trade has great potential.

  20. Beijing 2008 Olympic Games Partners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ At Olympic times, many business giants try to expand their influence by sponsoring the Games. The Games is an opportunity for them to turn from a national to an international brand. Here are brief introductions to some of the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games partners.

  1. Partnering into the New Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sharon; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Suggests the need to develop partnerships in this time of rapidly changing technology. Describes the successful partnership between the John Deere Company and Madison (WI) Area Technical College (MATC) that arose because of needs of both partners: John Deere needed well-trained technicians, and MATC was having difficulty attracting students to its…

  2. Validation of Fear of Partner Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, K Daniel; Foran, Heather; Cohen, Shiri

    2013-10-01

    Therapists have a responsibility to ascertain if psychological aggression, physical aggression, sexual aggression exist, and if there is fear of the partner. A fear of partner measure was evaluated in 100 couples who sought relationship feedback. Fear of partner's psychological, physical, and sexual aggression was related to actual reports of such behavior. For both men and women, fear of speaking in front of partner and fear of being in therapy with partner were related to reports of psychological aggression perpetrated by the partner, dominance, and isolation by the partner, and one's own marital dissatisfaction. Among respondents who were aggressed against, more men than women reported fear of participating in therapy with their partner. The measure herein can be used to determine the extent of fear of aggression by partners and to assist in the decision-making about the appropriateness of marital therapy and divorce mediation.

  3. Transcriptional profiling of type II toxin-antitoxin genes of Helicobacter pylori under different environmental conditions: identification of HP0967-HP0968 system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIGUEL A DE LA CRUZ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the human gastric mucosa and is responsible for causing peptic ulcers and gastric carcinoma. The expression of virulence factors allows the persistence of H. pylori in the stomach, which results in a chronic, sometimes uncontrolled inflammatory response. Type II toxin-antitoxin systems have emerged as important virulence factors in many pathogenic bacteria. Three type II toxin-antitoxin (TA systems have previously been identified in the genome of H. pylori 26695: HP0315-HP0316, HP0892-HP0893, and HP0894-HP0895. Here we characterized a heretofore undescribed type II TA system in H. pylori, HP0967-HP0968, which is encoded by the bicistronic operon hp0968-hp0967 and belongs to the Vap family. The predicted HP0967 protein is a toxin with ribonuclease activity whereas HP0968 is an antitoxin that binds to its own regulatory region. We found that all type II TA systems were expressed in H. pylori during early stationary growth phase, and differentially expressed in the presence of urea, nickel, and iron, although the hp0968-hp0967 pair was the most affected under these environmental conditions. Transcription of hp0968-hp0967 was strongly induced in a mature H. pylori biofilm and when the bacteria interacted with AGS epithelial cells. Kanamycin and chloramphenicol considerably boosted transcription levels of all the four type II TA systems. The hp0968-hp0967 TA system was the most frequent among 317 H. pylori strains isolated from all over the world. This study is the first report on the transcription of type II TA genes in H. pylori under different environmental conditions. Our data show that the HP0967 and HP0968 proteins constitute a bona fide type II TA system in H. pylori, whose expression is regulated by environmental cues, which are relevant in the context of infection of the human gastric mucosa.

  4. Mutagenesis and functional characterization of the RNA and protein components of the toxIN abortive infection and toxin-antitoxin locus of Erwinia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blower, T R; Fineran, P C; Johnson, M J; Toth, I K; Humphreys, D P; Salmond, G P C

    2009-10-01

    Bacteria are constantly challenged by bacteriophage (phage) infection and have developed multiple adaptive resistance mechanisms. These mechanisms include the abortive infection systems, which promote "altruistic suicide" of an infected cell, protecting the clonal population. A cryptic plasmid of Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica, pECA1039, has been shown to encode an abortive infection system. This highly effective system is active across multiple genera of gram-negative bacteria and against a spectrum of phages. Designated ToxIN, this two-component abortive infection system acts as a toxin-antitoxin module. ToxIN is the first member of a new type III class of protein-RNA toxin-antitoxin modules, of which there are multiple homologues cross-genera. We characterized in more detail the abortive infection phenotype of ToxIN using a suite of Erwinia phages and performed mutagenesis of the ToxI and ToxN components. We determined the minimal ToxI RNA sequence in the native operon that is both necessary and sufficient for abortive infection and to counteract the toxicity of ToxN. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis of ToxN revealed key conserved amino acids in this defining member of the new group of toxic proteins. The mechanism of phage activation of the ToxIN system was investigated and was shown to have no effect on the levels of the ToxN protein. Finally, evidence of negative autoregulation of the toxIN operon, a common feature of toxin-antitoxin systems, is presented. This work on the components of the ToxIN system suggests that there is very tight toxin regulation prior to suicide activation by incoming phage.

  5. Hrvoje Tomić, PhD in Technical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Mastelić Ivić

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Hrvoje Tomić defended his PhD thesis Geospatial Data Analysis for the Purpose of Real Estate Valuation in Urban Areas at the Faculty of Geodesy, University of Zagreb, on November 15, 2010. His mentor was Prof. Dr. Siniša Mastelić Ivić, and the other two members of the Grading and Defence Committee were Assist. Prof. Dr. Vlado Cetl and Prof. Dr. Goran Poljanec from the Faculty of Civil Engineering, University of Zagreb.

  6. 77 FR 76380 - Partner's Distributive Share

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... the type of partner (for example, if the partner is a nonresident alien) and the type of income the partnership earns (for example, if the partnership earns effectively connected income). d. Deemed...

  7. I-determinants for a successful PhD or postdoctoral outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2016-01-01

    Many resources are invested in research training, but very little literature exists on predictors for a successful PhD and postdoctoral training outcome. A PhD program has two overall objectives: to extend knowledge about a hopefully important health topic and to provide extensive training to improve the PhD student's skills through learning research methods and collaboration. A substantial number of PhD students may run into some kind of problem in the course of their PhD program. In this article, some determinants all starting with an "I" and indicative of a good PhD outcome are reported. The successful PhD student can be described as having an Interest in the PhD program, an Incentive for the program, and an Idea of what he or she wants to investigate, showing Initiative, and having high personal Integrity and good Interpersonal relationships. When these so-called I-determinants are present, the likelihood of success in a PhD program is high. More evidence is available for selection of candidates for postdoctoral appointments since it is known that the postdoctoral candidate has completed a PhD program, published papers in peer-reviewed journals, and received awarded grants. However, other characteristics determine a successful transition of the postdoctoral candidate into a research leader. These determinants are Identity, Independence and Image, Implementation ability in terms of being able to implement decisions and projects, working with Innovative and Important topics, having In-depth knowledge of the research topic, being Interactive and Integrated with the scientific community, and Internationally oriented. In conclusion, regardless of the framework of research, the personal characteristics of a researcher play a very important role in the quality of research. Application of some of the principles mentioned in this article might allow decision to reach a more evidence-based way to recruit PhD students and postdoctorals.

  8. Light 't Hooft Top Partners

    CERN Document Server

    Cacciapaglia, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Vector-like quarks, usually dubbed top partners, are a common presence in composite Higgs models. Being composite objects, their mass is expected to be of the order of their inverse size, that is the condensation scale of the new strong interactions. Light top partners, while not being a generic prediction, are however often considered in phenomenological models. We suggest that their lightness may be due to the matching of global 't Hooft anomalies of the underlying theory. We check this mechanism in explicit models showing that, in one case, composite fermions with the quantum numbers of the top quark obtain a mass which is controlled by a soft breaking term and can be made parametrically small.

  9. Actors', partners', and observers' perceptions of sarcasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, P

    2000-10-01

    This study compared actors', partners', and observers' perceptions of the amount of sarcasm used by participants (n = 80) in videotaped conversations. Significant differences were found among perceptions of actors, partners, and observers. Of the three perspectives, actors perceived themselves as using the greatest amount of sarcasm, followed by partners' perceptions of actors. Observers perceived actors as using the least amount of sarcasm. Correlations conducted to assess whether partners and observers recognized actors' individual attempts at sarcasm during the conversations were generally low.

  10. The mazEF toxin-antitoxin system as an attractive target in clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soheili, Sara; Ghafourian, Sobhan; Sekawi, Zamberi; Neela, Vasantha Kumari; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda; Taherikalani, Morovat; Khosravi, Afra; Ramli, Ramliza; Hamat, Rukman Awang

    2015-01-01

    The toxin-antitoxin (TA) system is a regulatory system where two sets of genes encode the toxin and its corresponding antitoxin. In this study, the prevalence of TA systems in independently isolated clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis was determined, the dominant TA system was identified, different virulence genes in E. faecium and E. faecalis were surveyed, the level of expression of the virulence and TA genes in normal and stress conditions was determined, and finally their associations with the TA genes were defined. Remarkably, the analysis demonstrated higBA and mazEF in all clinical isolates, and their locations were on chromosomes and plasmids, respectively. On the other hand, a quantitative analysis of TA and virulence genes revealed that the expression level in both genes is different under normal and stress conditions. The results obtained by anti-mazF peptide nucleic acids demonstrated that the expression level of virulence genes had decreased. These findings demonstrate an association between TA systems and virulence factors. The mazEF on the plasmids and the higBA TA genes on the chromosomes of all E. faecium and E. faecalis strains were dominant. Additionally, there was a decrease in the expression of virulence genes in the presence of anti-mazF peptide nucleic acids. Therefore, it is suggested that mazEF TA systems are potent and sensitive targets in all E. faecium and E. faecalis strains.

  11. Construction of a novel, stable, food-grade expression system by engineering the endogenous toxin-antitoxin system in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sen; Kang, Zhen; Cao, Wenlong; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2016-02-10

    Bacillus subtilis as an important workhorse that has been widely used to produce enzymes and metabolites. To broaden its applications, especially in the food and feed industry, we constructed a novel, stable, food-grade expression system by engineering its type II toxin-antitoxin system. The expression of the toxin EndoA, encoded by the chromosomal ydcE gene, was regulated by an endogenous, xylose-inducible promoter, while the ydcD gene, which encodes the unstable antitoxin EndoB, was inserted into a food-grade vector backbone, where its expression was driven by the native, constitutive promoter PylxM. By maintaining the xylose concentration above 2.0 g L(-1), this auto-regulated expression system was absolutely stable after 100 generations. Compared with traditional antibiotic-dependent expression systems, this novel expression system resulted in greater biomass and higher titers of desired products (enzymes or metabolites). Our results demonstrate that this stable, food-grade expression system is suitable for enzyme production and pathway engineering, especially for the production of food-grade enzymes and metabolites.

  12. Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science (MS PHD'S) Beyond the PhD Professional Development Program: A Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A.; Jearld, A.; Williamson Whitney, V.; Huggans, M.; Ricciardi, L.; Thomas, S. H.; Jansma, P. E.

    2012-12-01

    In 2011 the Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science (MS PHD'S)® initiative launched its newest activity entitled the MS PHD'S "Beyond the PhD (B-PhD) Professional Development Program." This exciting new program was designed to facilitate the development of a new community of underrepresented minority (URM) doctoral candidates and recent doctorate degree recipients in Earth system science (ESS)-related fields. The MS PHD'S B-PhD provides customized support and advocacy for MS PHD'S B-PhD participants in order to facilitate smoother and informed transitions from graduate school, to postdoctoral and tenure-track positions, as well as other "first" jobs in government, industry, and non-profit organizations. In November 2011 the first cohort of MS PHD'S B-PhD participants engaged in intensive sessions on the following topics: "Toolkits for Success for Academia, Business/Industry, Federal Government and Non-Profits", "Defining Short, Mid and Long Term Career Goals", "Accessing and Refining Skill Sets and Other Door Openers", "International Preparation and Opportunities", "Paying it Forward/Lifting as You Climb", and "Customized Strategies for Next Steps". This pilot event, which was hosted by the University of Texas at Arlington's (UTA) College of Science, also provided opportunities for participants to serve as guest lecturers in the UTA's Colleges of Science and Engineering and included one-on-one discussions with MS PHD'S B-PhD mentors and guest speakers who are well established within their individual ESS fields. Insights regarding opportunities, challenges and obstacles commonly faced by URMs within the ESS fields, as well as strategies for success were shared by MS PHD'S B-PhD mentors and guest speakers. Survey results indicate that MS PHD'S B-PhD participants appreciated not only the material covered during this pilot activity, but also appreciated the opportunity to become part of a community of young URM ESS

  13. Positive illusions about one's partner's physical attractiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barelds-Dijkstra, Pieternel; Barelds, Dick P. H.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined couples' ratings of self and partner physical attractiveness. On the basis of the theory of positive illusions, it was expected that individuals would rate their partners as more attractive than their partners would rate themselves. Both members of 93 heterosexual couples, with a

  14. Searching for "A Third Space": A Creative Pathway towards International PhD Students' Academic Acculturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Dely Lazarte; Baumfield, Vivienne; Reid, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Undertaking a PhD is a challenging endeavour. Pursuing a doctoral education in a "foreign" context tends to increase the demands of this intellectual venture. The nature of research-based PhD programmes, often characterised by a lack of formal curricula where academic supervision lasts several years, may add another layer of complexity.…

  15. Self-efficacy is related to PhD completion time: possible tool for interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Every two years the University of Groningen evaluates PhD' satisfaction concerning education and working environment. The goal is to create an environment in which PhD's can develop the necessary research skills for their projects as well as finish these projects in time. At Dutch universities most

  16. The Undergraduate Origins of PhD Economists: The Berkeley Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olney, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    The University of California, Berkeley sends more undergraduate students to economics PhD programs than any other public university. While this fact is surely a function of its size, there may be lessons from the Berkeley experience that others could adopt. To investigate why Berkeley generates so many economics PhD students, the author convened…

  17. Research(er) at Home: Auto/Ethnography of (My) PhD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benová, Kamila

    2014-01-01

    This article deals with the PhD phase of tertiary higher education (in Slovakia), which is here considered as the specific phase of the academic career. It tries to answer the question: what is the PhD, in the context of research, theoretically and methodologically approached as a critical ethnography of higher education. It is focused on the…

  18. Creating Entrepreneurial Networks: Academic Entrepreneurship, Mobility and Collaboration during PhD Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienkowska, Dzamila; Klofsten, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Network-building activities of PhD students are an important area of study in furthering our understanding of academic entrepreneurship. This paper focuses on PhD students' participation in network-building activities defined as mobility and collaboration, as well as own interest in and perceived grade of support for commercialisation from various…

  19. Enhancing the Industrial PhD Programme as a Policy Tool for University-Industry Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roolaht, Tõnu

    2015-01-01

    The changing role of universities in society includes the increasing expectation that academic institutions should engage in collaboration with companies. Industrial PhD programmes are educational tools for building bridges between the academic sector and industry. In these programmes, the PhD student studies and carries out research while being…

  20. Adult Attachment as a Risk Factor for Intimate Partner Violence : The "Mispairing" of Partners' Attachment Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumas, Diana M.; Pearson, Christine L.; Elgin, Jenna E.; McKinley, Lisa L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between intimate partner violence and adult attachment in a sample of 70 couples. The attachment style of each partner and the interaction of the partners' attachment styles were examined as predictors of intimate partner violence. Additional analyses were conducted to examine violence reciprocity and to…

  1. Partner Knowledge Awareness in Knowledge Communication: Learning by Adapting to the Partner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehler Zufferey, Jessica; Bodemer, Daniel; Buder, Jurgen; Hesse, Friedrich W.

    2011-01-01

    Awareness of the knowledge of learning partners is not always sufficiently available in collaborative learning scenarios. To compensate, the authors propose to provide collaborators with partner knowledge awareness by means of a visualization tool. Partner knowledge awareness can be used to adapt messages toward the partner. This study…

  2. Three dimensional structure of the MqsR:MqsA complex: a novel TA pair comprised of a toxin homologous to RelE and an antitoxin with unique properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breann L Brown

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available One mechanism by which bacteria survive environmental stress is through the formation of bacterial persisters, a sub-population of genetically identical quiescent cells that exhibit multidrug tolerance and are highly enriched in bacterial toxins. Recently, the Escherichia coli gene mqsR (b3022 was identified as the gene most highly upregulated in persisters. Here, we report multiple individual and complex three-dimensional structures of MqsR and its antitoxin MqsA (B3021, which reveal that MqsR:MqsA form a novel toxin:antitoxin (TA pair. MqsR adopts an alpha/beta fold that is homologous with the RelE/YoeB family of bacterial ribonuclease toxins. MqsA is an elongated dimer that neutralizes MqsR toxicity. As expected for a TA pair, MqsA binds its own promoter. Unexpectedly, it also binds the promoters of genes important for E. coli physiology (e.g., mcbR, spy. Unlike canonical antitoxins, MqsA is also structured throughout its entire sequence, binds zinc and coordinates DNA via its C- and not N-terminal domain. These studies reveal that TA systems, especially the antitoxins, are significantly more diverse than previously recognized and provide new insights into the role of toxins in maintaining the persister state.

  3. Multi-Target Detection from Full-Waveform Airborne Laser Scanner Using Phd Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuse, T.; Hiramatsu, D.; Nakanishi, W.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a new technique to detect multiple targets from full-waveform airborne laser scanner. We introduce probability hypothesis density (PHD) filter, a type of Bayesian filtering, by which we can estimate the number of targets and their positions simultaneously. PHD filter overcomes some limitations of conventional Gaussian decomposition method; PHD filter doesn't require a priori knowledge on the number of targets, assumption of parametric form of the intensity distribution. In addition, it can take a similarity between successive irradiations into account by modelling relative positions of the same targets spatially. Firstly we explain PHD filter and particle filter implementation to it. Secondly we formulate the multi-target detection problem on PHD filter by modelling components and parameters within it. At last we conducted the experiment on real data of forest and vegetation, and confirmed its ability and accuracy.

  4. Attitude of PhD Students Towards Academic Dishonesty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilija Grincevičienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the problem of academic dishonesty. Looking over the results of research done in foreign countries (the USA, Romania, Poland, it is possible to assert that the ethics of a scientist is a topical problem nowadays not only in Lithuania but also all over the world. The results of pilot research show that although in all curricula, textbooks and other sources it is declared that each researcher or a team must keep to certain ethics rules, not everything goes well. Respondents were first year PhD students of Vilnius Gediminas Technical University (N=51. Taking into account the results, more attention should be paid to the analysis and correction of the situation.

  5. Researcher Profile: An Interview with Jodi Letkiewicz, Ph.D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodi Letkiewicz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jodi Letkiewicz, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of finance at York University in Toronto, Ontario. She teaches in the Certified Financial Planner® Core Curriculum program preparing undergraduate students for the Canadian CFP® certification and conducts research in several areas of personal finance and consumer decision-making, including behavioral aspects influencing the decision to seek financial help, how personality traits affect financial decision-making, and the financial state of young adults, including the impact student loans have on overall well-being and financial milestones early in their adult life. Dr. Letkiewicz’s goal is to increase financial well-being in the general public, which she hopes to accomplish through teaching, research, and community outreach.

  6. On M. Mueter's Ph.D. Thesis on Cheeger deformations

    CERN Document Server

    Ziller, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    These are notes of a talk I gave in a seminar at the University of Pennsylvania summarizing results in the Ph.D. thesis of Michael Mueter obtained under the direction of Wolfgang Meyer at the University of Muenster. His thesis on "Kruemmungserhoehende Deformationen mittels Gruppenaktionen" examines in detail curvature properties of so called Cheeger deformations. Such deformations have been a crucial ingredient in non-negative and positive curvature constructions. His thesis contains a wealth of interesting properties of such deformations, but since it was never published, is only known to a few experts. I have no intention to publish these notes, but post them as a service to the public. A scanned version of his thesis (written in German) is available on my homepage.

  7. PHD2: from hypoxia regulation to disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Ana M; Wielockx, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen represents one of the major molecules required for the development and maintenance of life. An adequate response to hypoxia is therefore required for the functioning of the majority of living organisms and relies on the activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway. HIF prolyl hydroxylase domain-2 (PHD2) has long been recognized as the major regulator of this response, controlling a myriad of outcomes that range from cell death to proliferation. However, this enzyme has been associated with more pathways, making the role of this protein remarkably complex under distinct pathologies. While a protective role seems to exist in physiological conditions such as erythropoiesis; the picture is more complex during pathologies such as cancer. Since the regulation of this enzyme and its closest family members is currently considered as a possible therapy for various diseases, understanding the different particular roles of this protein is essential.

  8. Analysis list: ph-d [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ph-d Cell line,Embryo + dm3 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/target/p...h-d.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/target/ph-d.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp.../kyushu-u/dm3/target/ph-d.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/ph-d.Cell_line.tsv,http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/ph-d.Embryo.tsv http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/Cell_line.gml,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/Embryo.gml ...

  9. The Virtual Observatory Powered PhD Thesis

    CERN Document Server

    Zolotukhin, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    The Virtual Observatory has reached sufficient maturity for its routine scientific exploitation by astronomers. To prove this statement, here I present a brief description of the complete VO-powered PhD thesis entitled "Galactic and extragalactic research with modern surveys and the Virtual Observatory" comprising 4 science cases covering various aspects of astrophysical research. These comprize: (1) homogeneous search and measurement of main physical parameters of Galactic open star clusters in huge multi-band photometric surveys; (2) study of optical-to-NIR galaxy colors using a large homogeneous dataset including spectroscopy and photometry from SDSS and UKIDSS; (3) study of faint low-mass X-ray binary population in modern observational archives; (4) search for optical counterparts of unidentified X-ray objects with large positional uncertainties in the Galactic Plane. All these projects make heavy use of the VO technologies and tools and would not be achievable without them. So refereed papers published i...

  10. PhD Thesis: Functional Textiles in Hospital Interiors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Jeppe Emil

    consists of a collection of 5 peer-reviewed papers, and an extended summary. The project is overall related to the construction of new Danish hospitals, where the design concept healing architecture is intro- duced in a national context, representing the vision of a promoted healing process of hospitalised...... of plastic, vinyl and steel. These materials also dominate the new hospitals, designed and constructed these years, and despite the increased focus on the design concept healing architecture, the rational requirements of ef cient cleaning and maintenance still seems to direct the interior design of hospital...... of this PhD project has been to explore the possibilities and design qualities of using these materials in hospital inte- rior design. Relating to both technical and aesthetic aspects of using functional textiles in hospitals, the project seeks to integrate these aspects, departing from the overall research...

  11. The Monoclonal Antitoxin Antibodies (Actoxumab–Bezlotoxumab) Treatment Facilitates Normalization of the Gut Microbiota of Mice with Clostridium difficile Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Džunková, Mária; D'Auria, Giuseppe; Xu, Hua; Huang, Jun; Duan, Yinghua; Moya, Andrés; Kelly, Ciarán P.; Chen, Xinhua

    2016-01-01

    detected by the end of the experiments. In conclusion, MK-3415A (actoxumab–bezlotoxumab) treatment facilitates normalization of the gut microbiota in CDI mice. It remains to be examined whether or not the prevention of recurrent CDI by the antitoxin antibodies observed in clinical trials occurs through modulation of microbiota. PMID:27757389

  12. The monoclonal antitoxin antibodies (actoxumab-bezlotoxumab treatment facilitates normalization of the gut microbiota of mice with Clostridium difficile infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Džunková

    2016-10-01

    detected by the end of the experiments. In conclusion, MK-3415A (actoxumab-bezlotoxumab treatment facilitates normalization of the gut microbiota in CDI mice. It remains to be examined whether or not the prevention of recurrent CDI by the antitoxin antibodies observed in clinical trials occurs through modulation of microbiota.

  13. MATLAB simulation software used for the PhD thesis "Acquisition of Multi-Band Signals via Compressed Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    MATLAB simulation software used for the PhD thesis "Acquisition of Multi-Band Signals via Compressed Sensing......MATLAB simulation software used for the PhD thesis "Acquisition of Multi-Band Signals via Compressed Sensing...

  14. Prolyl-4-hydroxylase 3 (PHD3 expression is downregulated during epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trenton L Place

    Full Text Available Prolyl-4-hydroxylation by the intracellular prolyl-4-hydroxylase enzymes (PHD1-3 serves as a master regulator of environmental oxygen sensing. The activity of these enzymes is tightly tied to tumorigenesis, as they regulate cell metabolism and angiogenesis through their control of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF stability. PHD3 specifically, is gaining attention for its broad function and rapidly accumulating array of non-HIF target proteins. Data from several recent studies suggest a role for PHD3 in the regulation of cell morphology and cell migration. In this study, we aimed to investigate this role by closely examining the relationship between PHD3 expression and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT; a transcriptional program that plays a major role in controlling cell morphology and migratory capacity. Using human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA cell lines and Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK cells, we examined the correlation between several markers of EMT and PHD3 expression. We demonstrated that loss of PHD3 expression in PDA cell lines is highly correlated with a mesenchymal-like morphology and an increase in cell migratory capacity. We also found that induction of EMT in MDCK cells resulted in the specific downregulation of PHD3, whereas the expression of the other HIF-PHD enzymes was not affected. The results of this study clearly support a model by which the basal expression and hypoxic induction of PHD3 is suppressed by the EMT transcriptional program. This may be a novel mechanism by which migratory or metastasizing cells alter signaling through specific pathways that are sensitive to regulation by O2. The identification of downstream pathways that are affected by the suppression of PHD3 expression during EMT may provide important insight into the crosstalk between O2 and the migratory and metastatic potential of tumor cells.

  15. To punish or to leave: distinct cognitive processes underlie partner control and partner choice behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Justin W; Cushman, Fiery

    2015-01-01

    When a cooperative partner defects, at least two types of response are available: Punishment, aimed at modifying behavior, and ostracism, aimed at avoiding further social interaction with the partner. These options, termed partner control and partner choice, have been distinguished at behavioral and evolutionary levels. However, little work has compared their cognitive bases. Do these disparate behaviors depend on common processes of moral evaluation? Specifically, we assess whether they show identical patterns of dependence on two key dimensions of moral evaluation: A person's intentions, and the outcomes that they cause. We address this issue in a "trembling hand" economic game. In this game, an allocator divides a monetary stake between themselves and a responder based on a stochastic mechanism. This allows for dissociations between the allocator's intent and the actual outcome. Responders were either given the opportunity to punish or reward the allocator (partner control) or to switch to a different partner for a subsequent round of play (partner choice). Our results suggest that partner control and partner choice behaviors are supported by distinct underlying cognitive processes: Partner control exhibits greater sensitivity to the outcomes a partner causes, while partner choice is influenced almost exclusively by a partner's intentions. This cognitive dissociation can be understood in light of the unique adaptive functions of partner control and partner choice.

  16. To punish or to leave: distinct cognitive processes underlie partner control and partner choice behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin W Martin

    Full Text Available When a cooperative partner defects, at least two types of response are available: Punishment, aimed at modifying behavior, and ostracism, aimed at avoiding further social interaction with the partner. These options, termed partner control and partner choice, have been distinguished at behavioral and evolutionary levels. However, little work has compared their cognitive bases. Do these disparate behaviors depend on common processes of moral evaluation? Specifically, we assess whether they show identical patterns of dependence on two key dimensions of moral evaluation: A person's intentions, and the outcomes that they cause. We address this issue in a "trembling hand" economic game. In this game, an allocator divides a monetary stake between themselves and a responder based on a stochastic mechanism. This allows for dissociations between the allocator's intent and the actual outcome. Responders were either given the opportunity to punish or reward the allocator (partner control or to switch to a different partner for a subsequent round of play (partner choice. Our results suggest that partner control and partner choice behaviors are supported by distinct underlying cognitive processes: Partner control exhibits greater sensitivity to the outcomes a partner causes, while partner choice is influenced almost exclusively by a partner's intentions. This cognitive dissociation can be understood in light of the unique adaptive functions of partner control and partner choice.

  17. Progress of the Biological Roles of Toxin-Antitoxin System in the Stress Response%毒素-抗毒素系统在应激环境下的生物学作用的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊鸣; 李明; 郑丹阳; 黄伟

    2013-01-01

    毒素-抗毒素系统(toxin-antitoxin system,TAS)广泛存在于细菌染色体及质粒上,是细菌中含量丰富的小型遗传元件.TAS通常由两个紧密相连的基因组成,分别编码毒素(toxin)和抗毒素(antitoxin),稳定的毒素能够损伤宿主细胞,不稳定的抗毒素能够保护宿主细胞免于毒素的损伤作用.依据其性质和作用方式,目前已经发现三种型别的TAS.TAS具有多种生物学作用,如诱导程序性细胞死亡(programmed cell death,PCD),应激条件下介导持留菌形成(persistence),稳定基因大片段等.本文就近几年TAS在应激条件下的生物学作用的研究进展做一综述.%Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are small genetic modules that are widespread and abundant in bacterial chromosomes and plasmids. TA systems are usually composed of two closely linked genes that encode a stable toxin and a labile antitoxin, respectively. The toxin can harm the host cell, while the cognate antitoxin protects the host cell from the toxin's damage. So far, three types of TA system have been described based on their nature and mode of action. Several biological functions of the TA systems have been proposed, such as inducing programmed cell death (PCD), mediating arrest under stress conditions (persistence), promoting stability of large genomic fragments, etc. This review summarizes recent findings on the biological roles of TA systems under stress conditions.

  18. Privacy against the business partner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Meiko; Gruschka, Nils

    2009-01-01

    For service-oriented business processes, an important security requirement is confidentiality of transmitted data. Here, existing Web Services security standards provide suitable solutions for single invocations, but fail to cover service composition scenarios properly, especially for securing bu...... business process data against partners. In this paper, we investigate the issues regarding the realization of process level confidentiality in WS-BPEL-based Web Service compositions. © 2009 IEEE.......For service-oriented business processes, an important security requirement is confidentiality of transmitted data. Here, existing Web Services security standards provide suitable solutions for single invocations, but fail to cover service composition scenarios properly, especially for securing...

  19. Epidermal or dermal specific knockout of PHD-2 enhances wound healing and minimizes ischemic injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S Zimmermann

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α, part of the heterodimeric transcription factor that mediates the cellular response to hypoxia, is critical for the expression of multiple angiogenic growth factors, cell motility, and the recruitment of endothelial progenitor cells. Inhibition of the oxygen-dependent negative regulator of HIF-1α, prolyl hydroxylase domain-2 (PHD-2, leads to increased HIF-1α and mimics various cellular and physiological responses to hypoxia. The roles of PHD-2 in the epidermis and dermis have not been clearly defined in wound healing. METHODS: Epidermal and dermal specific PHD-2 knockout (KO mice were developed in a C57BL/6J (wild type background by crossing homozygous floxed PHD-2 mice with heterozygous K14-Cre mice and heterozygous Col1A2-Cre-ER mice to get homozygous floxed PHD-2/heterozygous K14-Cre and homozygous floxed PHD-2/heterozygous floxed Col1A2-Cre-ER mice, respectively. Ten to twelve-week-old PHD-2 KO and wild type (WT mice were subjected to wounding and ischemic pedicle flap model. The amount of healing was grossly quantified with ImageJ software. Western blot and qRT-PCR was run on protein and RNA from primary cells cultured in vitro. RESULTS: qRT-PCR demonstrated a significant decrease of PHD-2 in keratinocytes and fibroblasts derived from tissue specific KO mice relative to control mice (*p<0.05. Western blot analysis showed a significant increase in HIF-1α and VEGF protein levels in PHD-2 KO mice relative to control mice (*p<0.05. PHD-2 KO mice showed significantly accelerated wound closure relative to WT (*p<0.05. When ischemia was analyzed at day nine post-surgery in a flap model, the PHD-2 tissue specific knockout mice showed significantly more viable flaps than WT (*p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: PHD-2 plays a significant role in the rates of wound healing and response to ischemic insult in mice. Further exploration shows PHD-2 KO increases cellular levels of HIF-1α and this increase leads to the

  20. Collaborative vaccine development: partnering pays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, Rangappa

    2008-01-01

    Vaccine development, supported by infusions of public and private venture capital, is re-entering a golden age as one of the fastest growing sectors in the life-sciences industry. Demand is driven by great unmet need in underdeveloped countries, increased resistance to current treatments, bioterrorism, and for prevention indications in travelers, pediatric, and adult diseases. Production systems are becoming less reliant on processes such as egg-based manufacturing, while new processes can help to optimize vaccines. Expeditious development hinges on efficient study conduct, which is greatly enhanced through research partnerships with specialized contract research organizations (CROs) that are licensed and knowledgeable in the intricacies of immunology and with the technologic and scientific foundation to support changing timelines and strategies inherent to vaccine development. The CRO often brings a more objective assessment for probability of success and may offer alternative development pathways. Vaccine developers are afforded more flexibility and are free to focus on innovation and internal core competencies. Functions readily outsourced to a competent partner include animal model development, safety and efficacy studies, immunotoxicity and immunogenicity, dose response studies, and stability and potency testing. These functions capitalize on the CRO partner's regulatory and scientific talent and expertise, and reduce infrastructure expenses for the vaccine developer. Successful partnerships result in development efficiencies, elimination or reduced redundancies, and improved time to market. Keys to success include honest communications, transparency, and flexibility.

  1. Soybean GmPHD-Type Transcription Regulators Improve Stress Tolerance in Transgenic Arabidopsis Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Wei; Jian Huang; Yu-Jun Hao; Hong-Feng Zou; Hui-Wen Wang; Jing-Yun Zhao; Xue-Yi Liu; Wan-Ke Zhang; Biao Ma; Jin-Song Zhang; Shou-Yi Chen

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is one of the most important crops for oil and protein resource. Improvement of stress tolerance will be beneficial for soybean seed production. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Six GmPHD genes encoding Alfin1-type PHD finger protein were identified and their expressions differentially responded to drought, salt, cold and ABA treatments. The six GmPHDs were nuclear proteins and showed ability to bind the cis-element "GTGGAG". The N-terminal domain of GmPHD play...

  2. I-determinants for a successful PhD or postdoctoral outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sørensen HT

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Henrik Toft Sørensen1–3 1Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus N, Denmark; 2Department of Health Research and Policy, 3Stanford’s Center for Advanced Study in Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: Many resources are invested in research training, but very little literature exists on predictors for a successful PhD and postdoctoral training outcome. A PhD program has two overall objectives: to extend knowledge about a hopefully important health topic and to provide extensive training to improve the PhD student’s skills through learning research methods and collaboration. A substantial number of PhD students may run into some kind of problem in the course of their PhD program. In this article, some determinants all starting with an “I” and indicative of a good PhD outcome are reported. The successful PhD student can be described as having an Interest in the PhD program, an Incentive for the program, and an Idea of what he or she wants to investigate, showing Initiative, and having high personal Integrity and good Interpersonal relationships. When these so-called I-determinants are present, the likelihood of success in a PhD program is high. More evidence is available for selection of candidates for postdoctoral appointments since it is known that the postdoctoral candidate has completed a PhD program, published papers in peer-reviewed journals, and received awarded grants. However, other characteristics determine a successful transition of the postdoctoral candidate into a research leader. These determinants are Identity, Independence and Image, Implementation ability in terms of being able to implement decisions and projects, working with Innovative and Important topics, having In-depth knowledge of the research topic, being Interactive and Integrated with the scientific community, and Internationally oriented. In conclusion, regardless of the framework of research, the

  3. Identification of mazEF Toxin – Antitoxin system and biofilm formation in clinical isolates of MRSA isolated from Eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Interest on Toxin-Antitoxin (TA systems has increased dramatically over recent years. It is ubiquitously present in many bacterial genomes including pathogens like MRSA. Several cellular functions of TA systems are proposed like programmed cell death, persister cell formation, biofilm formation etc. However, their exact role in cell physiology remains unclear. Due to the biofilm development the rate of morbidity and mortality of chronic MRSA infections are increasing day by day. Objectives: The aim of the study is to find any association between biofilm formation and mazEF toxin-antitoxin systems in clinical isolates of MRSA, isolated from tertiary care hospital, Kolkata. Materials and Methods: MRSA isolates were detected for biofilm formation by tube method and simultaneously the presence of mazEF TA gene in these biofilm forming isolates were evaluated. Results: It was found that 52.47 % MRSA isolates were potent biofilm producers by Tube method. The results indicated that 55.26 % of the biofilm forming isolates possessed mazEF gene. And 44% of the biofilm forming isolates did not possessed mazEF gene. Conclusions: The analysis recommended that TA genes are prevalent in clinical isolates of MRSA strains but no significant difference is found in the presence of mazEF TA system in the biofilm producer and non-biofilm producer isolates. Further to come into any conclusion reverse transcription studies are needed to be done in order to find out the exact amount of mazEF expression in all MRSA isolates.

  4. The Virtual Observatory Powered PhD Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotukhin, I. Yu.

    2010-12-01

    The Virtual Observatory has reached sufficient maturity for its routine scientific exploitation by astronomers. To prove this statement, here I present a brief description of the complete VO-powered PhD thesis entitled “Galactic and extragalactic research with modern surveys and the Virtual Observatory” comprising 4 science cases covering various aspects of astrophysical research. These comprize: (1) homogeneous search and measurement of main physical parameters of Galactic open star clusters in huge multi-band photometric surveys; (2) study of optical-to-NIR galaxy colors using a large homogeneous dataset including spectroscopy and photometry from SDSS and UKIDSS; (3) study of faint low-mass X-ray binary population in modern observational archives; (4) search for optical counterparts of unidentified X-ray objects with large positional uncertainties in the Galactic Plane. All these projects make heavy use of the VO technologies and tools and would not be achievable without them. So refereed papers published in the frame of this thesis can undoubtedly be added to the growing list of VO-based research works.

  5. The JIM interview. Art Levinson, PhD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, A

    1997-06-01

    In the early 1980s several prominent scientists left the hallowed halls of respected universities seeking to exploit the revolution occurring in biology in an environment devoid of the bureaucratic and political confines of academia. The emergence of the biotechnology industry has been marked by both spectacular failures and success stories. Genentech was founded in 1976 by biochemist Herbert Boyer and venture capitalist Robert Swanson and went public in 1980. In 1995 Genentech merged with Roche Holdings Ltd., of Basel Switzerland. Distinguished from other biotech companies by the varied array of products it has brought to market, Genentech has also developed a unique corporate culture embodying many traditional academic values. Just as Genentech went public in 1980, Arthur D. Levinson, PhD, finished a post-doctoral appointment in Michael Bishop's lab at the University of California, San Francisco. Despite the disapproval of colleagues, he joined the fledgling company as a senior scientist. Working his way though the ranks, Levinson became Vice President of Research Technology in 1989 and was named President and CEO in 1995. Interviewed at the sprawling corporate headquarters in South San Francisco, Levinson reflected on the process of high risk science, the benefits of the private sector, and the changing relationship between biotech companies and the academic world.

  6. PhD Wang Xingchu,A Successful Leader of A High-tech Company Reform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ PhD Wang Xingchu was born in 1962. He is the Board Chairman of Shanghai Biotechnology Industrial Garden Coalition Development Co., Ltd. and the General Manager of Shanghai Hua Xin High-Biotechnology Co., Ltd.

  7. Improved Bearings-Only Multi-Target Tracking with GM-PHD Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an improved nonlinear Gaussian mixture probability hypothesis density (GM-PHD filter is proposed to address bearings-only measurements in multi-target tracking. The proposed method, called the Gaussian mixture measurements-probability hypothesis density (GMM-PHD filter, not only approximates the posterior intensity using a Gaussian mixture, but also models the likelihood function with a Gaussian mixture instead of a single Gaussian distribution. Besides, the target birth model of the GMM-PHD filter is assumed to be partially uniform instead of a Gaussian mixture. Simulation results show that the proposed filter outperforms the GM-PHD filter embedded with the extended Kalman filter (EKF and the unscented Kalman filter (UKF.

  8. Trends in landscape research and landscape planning : implications for PhD students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tress, G.; Tress, B.; Fry, G.; Antrop, M.

    2005-01-01

    This chapter introduces the contents of the book through an analysis of current trends in landscape research and landscape planning and a discussion of the consequences of these trends for PhD students.

  9. Role of PHD fingers and COOH-terminal 30 amino acids in AIRE transactivation activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Alessandra; Incani, Federica; Corda, Denise; Cao, Antonio; Rosatelli, Maria Cristina

    2008-02-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is a rare autosomic autoimmune disease resulting from the defective function of a gene codifying for a transcription factor named autoimmune regulation (AIRE). The AIRE protein contains several domains among which two PHD fingers involved in the transcriptional activation. We investigated the function of the two PHD finger domains and the COOH terminal portion of AIRE by using several mutated constructs transfected in mammalian cells and a luciferase reporter assay. The results predict that the second PHD as well as the COOH terminal regions have marked transactivational properties. The COOH terminal region contains the fourth LXXLL and the PXXPXP motifs which play a critical role in mediating the transactivation capacity of the AIRE protein. Our study provides a definition of the role of the PHD fingers in transactivation and identifies a new transactivation domain of the AIRE protein localized in the COOH terminal region.

  10. Actualization of the PhD Students' Intercultural Research Competencies in Global Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Dailidiene

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available globalization is changing the qualitative characteristics of society, affecting both the life and mentality of people. In relevance to globalization, higher education is gaining new dimensions as well. Bologna and Lisbon documents guide and obligate each country to create integrated and harmonious international space of higher education in Europe. phd studies are considered as integral in the higher education structure; therefore, internationalization is a significant imperative for phd studies development. In the process of internationalization, the need for students’ intercultural competencies is widely recognized. Firstly, we suppose that the impact of globalization on internationalization still remains underestimated. Globalization makes internationalization not only more intense, but also qualitatively different. Secondly, there is a lack of systemic analysis on the development of intercultural research competencies in phd studies. We relate the need for intercultural research competencies to the following critical and rhetorical question: ‘Are today’s phd students ready to solve tomorrow’s global problems?’

  11. A New Venture in Graduate Education: Co-Op Ph.D. Programme in Chemical Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahidy, Thomas Z.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a cooperative Ph.D. program at the University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, in which industrial and governmental employers participate with the Department of Chemical Engineering in training chemical engineers. (CS)

  12. Improved Bearings-Only Multi-Target Tracking with GM-PHD Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Song, Taek Lyul

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an improved nonlinear Gaussian mixture probability hypothesis density (GM-PHD) filter is proposed to address bearings-only measurements in multi-target tracking. The proposed method, called the Gaussian mixture measurements-probability hypothesis density (GMM-PHD) filter, not only approximates the posterior intensity using a Gaussian mixture, but also models the likelihood function with a Gaussian mixture instead of a single Gaussian distribution. Besides, the target birth model of the GMM-PHD filter is assumed to be partially uniform instead of a Gaussian mixture. Simulation results show that the proposed filter outperforms the GM-PHD filter embedded with the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and the unscented Kalman filter (UKF). PMID:27626423

  13. Articulating Expectations for PhD Candidature upon Commencement: Ensuring Supervisor/Student "Best Fit"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxham, Lorna; Dwyer, Trudy; Reid-Searl, Kerry

    2013-01-01

    The journey towards completion of a PhD is a bumpy one for many. One of the major factors that influence successful and on-time thesis completion is the relationship that the PhD candidate has with her or his supervisor. This paper presents results from research undertaken using a 12-item survey to collect data from a purposive sample: PhD…

  14. Skill development in collaborative research projects: A comparison between PhD students in multi-actor research programs and in traditional trajectories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wardenaar, T.; Belder, R.; de Goede, M.E.E; Horlings, E.; van den Besselaar, P.

    2014-01-01

    The growing number of PhD students has spurred debates about the societal relevance of PhD training trajectories. The academic labour market does not provide enough jobs and many PhD graduates will have a career outside academia. It has been questioned whether current PhD training trajectories are s

  15. Solution NMR structure and histone binding of the PHD domain of human MLL5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Lemak

    Full Text Available Mixed Lineage Leukemia 5 (MLL5 is a histone methyltransferase that plays a key role in hematopoiesis, spermatogenesis and cell cycle progression. In addition to its catalytic domain, MLL5 contains a PHD finger domain, a protein module that is often involved in binding to the N-terminus of histone H3. Here we report the NMR solution structure of the MLL5 PHD domain showing a variant of the canonical PHD fold that combines conserved H3 binding features from several classes of other PHD domains (including an aromatic cage along with a novel C-terminal α-helix, not previously seen. We further demonstrate that the PHD domain binds with similar affinity to histone H3 tail peptides di- and tri-methylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me2 and H3K4me3, the former being the putative product of the MLL5 catalytic reaction. This work establishes the PHD domain of MLL5 as a bone fide 'reader' domain of H3K4 methyl marks suggesting that it may guide the spreading or further methylation of this site on chromatin.

  16. MS PHD'S: Effective Strategies for the Retention and Advancement of URM Students in ESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalera, J.; Burgess, A. K.; Pace, L.; Scott, O.; Strickland, J.; Johnson, A.; Williamson Whitney, V.; Ithier-Guzman, W.

    2012-12-01

    The Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success (MS PHD'S) Professional Development Program in Earth system science (ESS) is a model initiative for improving the retention of underrepresented minority (URM) students in STEM fields. Entering its ninth cohort, MS PHD'S remains committed to helping URM undergraduate and graduate students achieve outstanding careers in ESS. MS PHD'S facilitates URM student achievement through a three-phase program designed to increase student exposure to the ESS community. By engaging in a series of professional development and skill building exercises, peer-to-peer community building activities, participation in scientific society conferences and workshops, mentoring by URM and other scientists, and a virtual community, URM students gain the confidence and support necessary to achieve their academic goals and enter the ESS workforce. Since its inception, MS PHD'S continues to support 189 participants. Of these 189 participants, 35 have advanced from undergraduate and graduate academic pathways to completion of their PhD and another 60 are currently enrolled in doctoral programs. MS PHD'S maintains close ties with program alumni to further support retention, inclusivity, and broadening participation of URM students and graduates in STEM activities. Its model is built on reengaging alumni to become mentors and leaders for each new cohort as well as facilitating valuable opportunities for alumni to advance in their ESS related academic and professional career pathways.

  17. Sexual Experiences of Men with Incontinent Partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, Milou D.; Beck, Jacky J. H.; Putter, Hein; van Driel, Mels F.; Pelger, Rob C. M.; Weijmar Schultz, Willibrordus; Nijeholt, Guus A. B. Lycklama A.; Elzevier, Henk W.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Several studies show that urinary incontinence (UI) impairs women's sexual functioning and sexual satisfaction. However, there is no scientific knowledge about the effects of UI on sexual functioning of the male partners. Aim. To analyze sexual functioning of the male partners of femal

  18. Increasing HIV testing among male partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orne-Gliemann, Joanna; Balestre, Eric; Tchendjou, Patrice; Miric, Marija; Darak, Shrinivas; Butsashvili, Maia; Perez-Then, Eddy; Eboko, Fred; Plazy, Melanie; Kulkarni, Sanjeevani; du Lou, Annabel Desgrees; Dabis, Francois

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Couple-oriented posttest HIV counselling (COC) provides pregnant women with tools and strategies to invite her partner to HIV counselling and testing. We conducted a randomized trial of the efficacy of COC on partner HIV testing in low/medium HIV prevalence settings (Cameroon, Dominican R

  19. Intimate Partner Violence in Older Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomi, Amy E.; Anderson, Melissa L.; Reid, Robert J.; Carrell, David; Fishman, Paul A.; Rivara, Frederick P.; Thompson, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We describe the prevalence, types, duration, frequency, and severity of intimate partner violence ("partner violence") in older women. Design and Methods: We randomly sampled a total of 370 English-speaking women (65 years of age and older) from a health care system to participate in a cross-sectional telephone interview. Using 5…

  20. Telling Your Partner You Have an STD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... offer information about the STD and its symptoms. Give your partner time to take in the information. If you and your partner ... your doctor prescribes. You also might need to take medicine if you have an ... A doctor or a health clinic can give advice on how to lower the chance of ...

  1. Facing the partner influences exchanges in force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Atsushi; Bagnato, Carlo; Burdet, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Many studies in psychology have documented how the behaviour of verbally communicating pairs is affected by social factors such as the partner’s gaze. However, few studies have examined whether physically interacting pairs are influenced by social factors. Here, we asked two partners to exchange forces with one another, where the goal was to accurately replicate the force back onto the other. We first measured an individual’s accuracy in reproducing a force from a robot. We then tested pairs who knowingly exchanged forces whilst separated by a curtain. These separated pairs exchanged forces as two independent individuals would, hence the force reproduction accuracy of partners is not affected by knowingly reproducing a force onto a nonvisible partner. On the other hand, pairs who exchanged forces whilst facing one another consistently under-reproduced the partner’s force in comparison to separated partners. Thus, the force reproduction accuracy of subjects is strongly biased by facing a partner. PMID:27739492

  2. Advice from working women with retired partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Eileen L; Adorno, Gail

    2016-01-01

    in the 21st century, as more women are employed full-time and couples increasingly share egalitarian values, more women continue employment after their partners have voluntarily retired. However, we know very little about the experiences of this growing population of women. We asked working women with retired partners to share their advice for other women who may face this developmental transition. Open-ended responses from 97 women were analyzed to identify pertinent issues and themes. Four primary content areas were identified: time management, division of household labor, financial planning, and communication. Communication between partners was both a topic of concern as well as the solution suggested to resolve conflicts or differences that may arise when women live with a retired partner. It is expected that future changes in the workforce and improvements in the gender balance within relationships will continue to impact experiences for working women with retired partners.

  3. Catastrophizing and perceived partner responses to pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothby, Jennifer L; Thorn, Beverly E; Overduin, Lorraine Y; Ward, L Charles

    2004-06-01

    This study examined the relationship between catastrophizing and patient-perceived partner responses to pain behaviors. The Catastrophizing subscale of the Cognitive Coping Strategy Inventory and the West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory were completed by 62 adult chronic pain patients. Consistent with past research, catastrophizing and patient-perceived solicitous partner behaviors were positively correlated with negative pain outcomes. The communal coping theory of catastrophizing suggests that catastrophizing might be undertaken to solicit support and empathy from others. However, catastrophizing was not related to perceived solicitous partner behavior in this study. Rather, catastrophizing was associated with perceived punishing partner responses. Implications are that catastrophizing and perceived solicitous partner behaviors are independently associated with pain and that catastrophizing may not be reinforced by empathy from significant others.

  4. HMO partnering: the provider dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, J; Benson, L; Bonhag, R

    1996-10-01

    While the growth of HMOs has slowed patient visits to doctors, it also has created a deluge of press clippings. On July 16, 1996, three articles on the subject appeared in the Wall Street Journal, front section. The headlines painted a vivid picture of the forces acting on HMOs and providers alike (Figure 1). The articles portended more change for healthcare. The "shake-out," a term applied to industries in serious transformation, brings shedding of excess capacity and loss of jobs and income. Providers, in particular, find themselves in a difficult dilemma. They must not only cut costs as reimbursement drops, but also retain patients with good outcomes and high quality service. Patient retention means keeping the individual patient from switching to another provider and keeping the insurer's group of patients as an authorized provider for that insurer. The relationship between provider and HMO lies at the heart of the provider dilemma. The HMO structure, which shifts financial risk for care, is quickly setting the standard, for healthcare pricing, medical standards, and management practices. Understanding and responding to HMO needs are vital to competitive advantage and survival. The article discusses the inherent dilemma of HMO and provider partnering and suggests provider responses.

  5. From Doctoral Student To Faculty Member: PhD. Project Alumni’s Evaluation Of Their Preparedness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill N. Schwartz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In response to the important issues regarding diversity in business schools and corporate America, the KPMG Foundation established the PhD Project. The PhD Project helps business professionals and recent college graduates earn doctoral degrees in business disciplines and join business school faculty. While the PhD Project has helped increase the number of minority faculty members in business schools, it may be helpful to gather insights from the recent PhD alumni who have received support from the PhD Project. Our study examines attitudes about preparedness of PhD Project alums for their first faculty position after completing their PhD program. Results show that PhD Project alumni and majority PhD alumni (alumni not associated with the PhD Project felt they were prepared for their first faculty position, but they were not significantly different in their evaluation in most respects. However, to our surprise, majority PhD alumni felt they were better prepared for research than PhD Project alumni. This difference was significant and further analyses showed that younger faculty and those in the ethnic majority were better prepared for research. Both groups considered themselves well prepared for research and teaching. Neither group was as optimistic about being prepared for service responsibilities and the academic climate or politics of an academic career. Our findings show that the PhD Project is necessary to help ensure that minority faculty members are adequately prepared for research and their academic careers.

  6. Preparing for Graduate-Level Training in Professional Psychology: Comparisons across Clinical PhD, Counseling PhD, and Clinical PsyD Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karazsia, Bryan T.; Smith, Lena

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, faculty who teach in clinical and counseling doctor of philosophy (PhD) or doctor of psychology (PsyD) programs completed surveys regarding preferences for prospective student preparations to graduate programs. Faculty expectations of minimum and ideal undergraduate training were highest for scientific methods, though…

  7. Husband/Partner Intoxication and Intimate Partner Violence Against Women in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerridge, Bradley T; Tran, Phu

    2016-09-01

    This study examined husband/partner intoxication and experience with physical, sexual, and emotional intimate partner violence against women (IPVAW) using data derived from a nationally representative survey conducted in the Philippines in 2013. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to examine the association between intoxication and 3 different types of intimate partner violence against women. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine intoxication and severity of violence. In this sample, 28.8% of women reported experiencing any form of intimate partner violence and 92.9% of women reported their partner being intoxicated at least sometimes. Intoxication was significantly associated with all 3 types of intimate partner violence, while the odds of experiencing one form of IPVAW versus no form of IPVAW and 2 forms of IPVAW versus 1 form of IPVAW was greater among women reporting frequency of husband/partner intoxication as often.

  8. Analysis of 1 Case of Recurrent Allergic Reactions Induced by Tetanus Antitoxin Injection%破伤风抗毒素致过敏反应反复发作1例分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李勇; 刘立平

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To alert clinicians pay attention to recurrent allergic reactions caused by Tetanus antitoxin injection.METHODS: 1 patient with left leg injury who suffered from recurrent allergic reactions induced by Tetanus antitoxin injection was reported and analyzed. RESULTS & CONCLUSION: There is no report about recurrent allergic reactions induced by Tetanus antitoxin injection. Clinical medical staff should be aware of the characteristics and pathogenesis of ADR induced by Tetanus antitoxin injection, master application pointer, adopt desensitization therapy for skin test-positive patients on the TAT and make observations and rescue preparation, or use human tetanus immune globulin (TIG) instead of TAT in order to avoid or reduce ADR.%目的:提示临床重视破伤风抗毒素(TAT)引起的过敏反应反复发作.方法:报道并分析1例因左腿外伤注射TAT致过敏反应反复发作.结果与结论:未见TAT注射液引起过敏反应反复发作的报道.临床医务人员应了解TAT注射液致不良反应(ADR)的特点及发病机制,掌握TAT应用指征,对皮肤试验阳性患者采取脱敏注射并做好观察及抢救准备,或使用人破伤风免疫球蛋白(TIG)替代TAT以避免或减少ADR的发生.

  9. Mapping Protein–Protein Interactions of the Resistance-Related Bacterial Zeta Toxin–Epsilon Antitoxin Complex (ε2ζ2 with High Affinity Peptide Ligands Using Fluorescence Polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Isabel Fernández-Bachiller

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Toxin–antitoxin systems constitute a native survival strategy of pathogenic bacteria and thus are potential targets of antibiotic drugs. Here, we target the Zeta–Epsilon toxin–antitoxin system, which is responsible for the stable maintenance of certain multiresistance plasmids in Gram-positive bacteria. Peptide ligands were designed on the basis of the ε2ζ2 complex. Three α helices of Zeta forming the protein–protein interaction (PPI site were selected and peptides were designed conserving the residues interacting with Epsilon antitoxin while substituting residues binding intramolecularly to other parts of Zeta. Designed peptides were synthesized with an N-terminal fluoresceinyl-carboxy-residue for binding assays and provided active ligands, which were used to define the hot spots of the ε2ζ2 complex. Further shortening and modification of the binding peptides provided ligands with affinities <100 nM, allowing us to determine the most relevant PPIs and implement a robust competition binding assay.

  10. A PHD-polycomb repressive complex 2 triggers the epigenetic silencing of FLC during vernalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lucia, Filomena; Crevillen, Pedro; Jones, Alexandra M E; Greb, Thomas; Dean, Caroline

    2008-11-04

    Vernalization, the acceleration of flowering by winter, involves cold-induced epigenetic silencing of Arabidopsis FLC. This process has been shown to require conserved Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) components including the Su(z)12 homologue, VRN2, and two plant homeodomain (PHD) finger proteins, VRN5 and VIN3. However, the sequence of events leading to FLC repression was unclear. Here we show that, contrary to expectations, VRN2 associates throughout the FLC locus independently of cold. The vernalization-induced silencing is triggered by the cold-dependent association of the PHD finger protein VRN5 to a specific domain in FLC intron 1, and this association is dependent on the cold-induced PHD protein VIN3. In plants returned to warm conditions, VRN5 distribution changes, and it associates more broadly over FLC, coincident with significant increases in H3K27me3. Biochemical purification of a VRN5 complex showed that during prolonged cold a PHD-PRC2 complex forms composed of core PRC2 components (VRN2, SWINGER [an E(Z) HMTase homologue], FIE [an ESC homologue], MSI1 [p55 homologue]), and three related PHD finger proteins, VRN5, VIN3, and VEL1. The PHD-PRC2 activity increases H3K27me3 throughout the locus to levels sufficient for stable silencing. Arabidopsis PHD-PRC2 thus seems to act similarly to Pcl-PRC2 of Drosophila and PHF1-PRC2 of mammals. These data show FLC silencing involves changed composition and dynamic redistribution of Polycomb complexes at different stages of the vernalization process, a mechanism with greater parallels to Polycomb silencing of certain mammalian loci than the classic Drosophila Polycomb targets.

  11. Partners in Leadership for Pearl River

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Members of the 2007 class of Partners in Leadership toured NASA Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., on Jan. 11. They visited the center's B Test Stand, part of the center's rocket engine test complex. The Partners in Leadership training program is designed to teach Pearl River County leaders about their county's government, economic development, health and human services, history and arts, environment and education during a 10-month period. The program, sponsored by the Partners for Pearl River County, helps fulfill the mission of the economic and community development agency.

  12. Increased EPO Levels Are Associated With Bone Loss in Mice Lacking PHD2 in EPO-Producing Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauner, Martina; Franke, Kristin; Murray, Marta; Singh, Rashim Pal; Hiram-Bab, Sahar; Platzbecker, Uwe; Gassmann, Max; Socolovsky, Merav; Neumann, Drorit; Gabet, Yankel; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Wielockx, Ben

    2016-10-01

    The main oxygen sensor hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase 2 (PHD2) is a critical regulator of tissue homeostasis during erythropoiesis, hematopoietic stem cell maintenance, and wound healing. Recent studies point toward a role for the PHD2-erythropoietin (EPO) axis in the modulation of bone remodeling, even though the studies produced conflicting results. Here, we used a number of mouse strains deficient of PHD2 in different cell types to address the role of PHD2 and its downstream targets HIF-1α and HIF-2α in bone remodeling. Mice deficient for PHD2 in several cell lineages, including EPO-producing cells, osteoblasts, and hematopoietic cells (CD68:cre-PHD2(f/f) ) displayed a severe reduction of bone density at the distal femur as well as the vertebral body due to impaired bone formation but not bone resorption. Importantly, using osteoblast-specific (Osx:cre-PHD2(f/f) ) and osteoclast-specific PHD2 knock-out mice (Vav:cre- PHD2(f/f) ), we show that this effect is independent of the loss of PHD2 in osteoblast and osteoclasts. Using different in vivo and in vitro approaches, we show here that this bone phenotype, including the suppression of bone formation, is directly linked to the stabilization of the α-subunit of HIF-2, and possibly to the subsequent moderate induction of serum EPO, which directly influenced the differentiation and mineralization of osteoblast progenitors resulting in lower bone density. Taken together, our data identify the PHD2:HIF-2α:EPO axis as a so far unknown regulator of osteohematology by controlling bone homeostasis. Further, these data suggest that patients treated with PHD inhibitors or EPO should be monitored with respect to their bone status. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  13. VapC toxins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis are ribonucleases that differentially inhibit growth and are neutralized by cognate VapB antitoxins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bintou Ahmadou Ahidjo

    Full Text Available The chromosome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb encodes forty seven toxin-antitoxin modules belonging to the VapBC family. The role of these modules in the physiology of Mtb and the function(s served by their expansion are unknown. We investigated ten vapBC modules from Mtb and the single vapBC from M. smegmatis. Of the Mtb vapCs assessed, only Rv0549c, Rv0595c, Rv2549c and Rv2829c were toxic when expressed from a tetracycline-regulated promoter in M. smegmatis. The same genes displayed toxicity when conditionally expressed in Mtb. Toxicity of Rv2549c in M. smegmatis correlated with the level of protein expressed, suggesting that the VapC level must exceed a threshold for toxicity to be observed. In addition, the level of Rv2456 protein induced in M. smegmatis was markedly lower than Rv2549c, which may account for the lack of toxicity of this and other VapCs scored as 'non-toxic'. The growth inhibitory effects of toxic VapCs were neutralized by expression of the cognate VapB as part of a vapBC operon or from a different chromosomal locus, while that of non-cognate antitoxins did not. These results demonstrated a specificity of interaction between VapCs and their cognate VapBs, a finding corroborated by yeast two-hybrid analyses. Deletion of selected vapC or vapBC genes did not affect mycobacterial growth in vitro, but rendered the organisms more susceptible to growth inhibition following toxic VapC expression. However, toxicity of 'non-toxic' VapCs was not unveiled in deletion mutant strains, even when the mutation eliminated the corresponding cognate VapB, presumably due to insufficient levels of VapC protein. Together with the ribonuclease (RNase activity demonstrated for Rv0065 and Rv0617--VapC proteins with similarity to Rv0549c and Rv3320c, respectively--these results suggest that the VapBC family potentially provides an abundant source of RNase activity in Mtb, which may profoundly impact the physiology of the organism.

  14. Transcriptional Profiling of Type II Toxin–Antitoxin Genes of Helicobacter pylori under Different Environmental Conditions: Identification of HP0967–HP0968 System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Mondragón, María G.; Ares, Miguel A.; Panunzi, Leonardo G.; Pacheco, Sabino; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Girón, Jorge A.; Torres, Javier; De la Cruz, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the human gastric mucosa and is responsible for causing peptic ulcers and gastric carcinoma. The expression of virulence factors allows the persistence of H. pylori in the stomach, which results in a chronic, sometimes uncontrolled inflammatory response. Type II toxin–antitoxin (TA) systems have emerged as important virulence factors in many pathogenic bacteria. Three type II TA systems have previously been identified in the genome of H. pylori 26695: HP0315–HP0316, HP0892–HP0893, and HP0894–HP0895. Here we characterized a heretofore undescribed type II TA system in H. pylori, HP0967–HP0968, which is encoded by the bicistronic operon hp0968–hp0967 and belongs to the Vap family. The predicted HP0967 protein is a toxin with ribonuclease activity whereas HP0968 is an antitoxin that binds to its own regulatory region. We found that all type II TA systems were expressed in H. pylori during early stationary growth phase, and differentially expressed in the presence of urea, nickel, and iron, although, the hp0968–hp0967 pair was the most affected under these environmental conditions. Transcription of hp0968–hp0967 was strongly induced in a mature H. pylori biofilm and when the bacteria interacted with AGS epithelial cells. Kanamycin and chloramphenicol considerably boosted transcription levels of all the four type II TA systems. The hp0968–hp0967 TA system was the most frequent among 317 H. pylori strains isolated from all over the world. This study is the first report on the transcription of type II TA genes in H. pylori under different environmental conditions. Our data show that the HP0967 and HP0968 proteins constitute a bona fide type II TA system in H. pylori, whose expression is regulated by environmental cues, which are relevant in the context of infection of the human gastric mucosa. PMID:27920769

  15. Progress in The Study of Bacterial Toxin-antitoxin System%细菌毒素-抗毒素系统的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓蕾; 赵龙旋; 张俊杰

    2008-01-01

    毒素-抗毒素系统(toxin-antitoxin system,TA)由两个共表达的基因组成,其中一个基因编码不稳定的抗毒素蛋白(antitoxin),另一个基因编码稳定的毒素蛋白(toxin).毒素-抗毒素系统最早发现于一些低拷贝的质粒,用来维持低拷贝质粒在菌群中的稳定存在.随后的研究表明,毒素-抗毒素系统广泛存在于细菌,包括一些致病菌的染色体上.在营养缺乏等不良生长条件下,由于基因表达的抑制和蛋白酶的降解作用,不稳定的抗毒素蛋白减少,从而产生游离的毒素蛋白,导致细菌的生长抑制和死亡.毒素-抗毒素系统的生理功能目前还存在争议,有学者认为细茼染色体上的毒素-抗毒素系统可以在不良生长状况下介导细菌的死亡,即细茼程序性细胞死亡(baeterial programmedcell death).但也有证据显示,毒素-抗毒素系统的功能更偏向于应激状态下的生理调节方面,即只起应激状态下的抑菌作用而不是杀菌作用.对细菌生长调控中毒素-抗毒素系统的作用机理进行综述,并探讨毒素-抗毒素系统研究的理论和应用价值.

  16. Progress of Clinical Application and Safety of Tetanus Antitoxin%破伤风抗毒素临床应用及安全性研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余超; 徐玉茗; 徐瑾; 万凯化; 袁兴东; 李穗; 周鹃

    2016-01-01

    目的了解破伤风抗毒素(tetanus antitoxin, TAT)的临床应用现状及其安全性研究进展,为开展上市后安全性评估提供参考。方法检索国内外研究TAT临床应用安全性相关的文献,对其进行归类分析研究。结果目前TAT在临床上主要应用于破伤风被动免疫和破伤风治疗;大量安全性研究显示,其皮试阳性率较高,主要与患者体质、药物因素、操作因素及其他原因造成假阳性过高有关。其不良反应主要有过敏性休克、血清病及其他类型不良反应。结论 TAT仍是国内为外伤患者预防破伤风的首选注射药物,建议在临床应用中应重视过敏,注意观察,并尽快制定适合我国的破伤风预防指南和规范,促进合理用药。%Objective To understand the progress of the clinical utilization status and safety of tetanus antitoxin (TAT), and to provide references for post-marketing safety evaluation.Methods Domestic and foreign literatures on the clinical application and safety of TAT were reviewed for further analysis and comparison.Results Now TAT has been mainly used for passive immunity and tetanus therapeutics in clinic. Intensive safety studies showed that higher false-positive rate of its skin test mainly related to patients’ physique, medicine factor, infusion operation factor, and so on. Its main adverse effects included anaphylactic shock, erum sickness, and other kinds of adverse reactions.Conclusion TAT is still the ifrst choice against tetanus of trauma patients in China, the paper suggests that medical workers must put emphasis on anaphylaxis and close observation, along with our country should expeditiously enact a speciifc against tetanus guidelines and standards of Chinese style, and promoting rational drug use.

  17. MPS/CAS Partner Group on Cosmology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Yipeng; Gerhard B(o)rner

    2004-01-01

    @@ The Partner Group does research in cosmology, focussing on the quantitative modeling of the structure and evolution of galaxies and galaxy clusters, the pattern of galaxies and of larger structures.

  18. Featured Partner: Saddle Creek Logistics Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    This EPA fact sheet spotlights Saddle Creek Logistics as a SmartWay partner committed to sustainability in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution caused by freight transportation, partly by growing its compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles for

  19. Inferring interaction partners from protein sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Colwell, Lucy J; Wingreen, Ned S

    2016-01-01

    Specific protein-protein interactions are crucial in the cell, both to ensure the formation and stability of multi-protein complexes, and to enable signal transduction in various pathways. Functional interactions between proteins result in coevolution between the interaction partners. Hence, the sequences of interacting partners are correlated. Here we exploit these correlations to accurately identify which proteins are specific interaction partners from sequence data alone. Our general approach, which employs a pairwise maximum entropy model to infer direct couplings between residues, has been successfully used to predict the three-dimensional structures of proteins from sequences. Building on this approach, we introduce an iterative algorithm to predict specific interaction partners from among the members of two protein families. We assess the algorithm's performance on histidine kinases and response regulators from bacterial two-component signaling systems. The algorithm proves successful without any a pri...

  20. Predicting the "graduate on time (GOT)" of PhD students using binary logistics regression model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, S. Sarifah Radiah; Rodzi, Nur Atiqah Mohd; Rahman, Kahartini Abdul; Zahari, Siti Meriam; Deni, Sayang Mohd

    2016-10-01

    Malaysian government has recently set a new goal to produce 60,000 Malaysian PhD holders by the year 2023. As a Malaysia's largest institution of higher learning in terms of size and population which offers more than 500 academic programmes in a conducive and vibrant environment, UiTM has taken several initiatives to fill up the gap. Strategies to increase the numbers of graduates with PhD are a process that is challenging. In many occasions, many have already identified that the struggle to get into the target set is even more daunting, and that implementation is far too ideal. This has further being progressing slowly as the attrition rate increases. This study aims to apply the proposed models that incorporates several factors in predicting the number PhD students that will complete their PhD studies on time. Binary Logistic Regression model is proposed and used on the set of data to determine the number. The results show that only 6.8% of the 2014 PhD students are predicted to graduate on time and the results are compared wih the actual number for validation purpose.

  1. PhD students’ expectations from their supervisors: A qualitative content analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH Rimaz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Quality of research in PhD programs increases if supervisors become aware of students' expectations from them. This qualitative study aimed to explore expectations of PhD students from their supervisors was done.   Methods: This qualitative content analysis study was conducted on 22 graduated PhD students of Iran University of Medical Sciences, in 2014. The samples were purposefully selected and interviewed. All interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim.   Results: After analyzing and coding data, it was found that PhD students have four main expectations from their supervisors. These expectations consist of scientific support including help with selection of subject, preparation and registration of proposal, data collection and support for writing and examination of the thesis. Developing scientific skills and help with preparing manuscripts were other expectations. Emotional-social support with five categories including relationship between supervisor-student, general expectations of supervisor, supervisor personality characteristics, needed emotional skills and social activities related to thesis and finally providing adequate resources including financial support and access to facilities inside and outside the university were among the other expectations.   Conclusion: PhD students need to scientific, emotional, social and material supports from their supervisors in the process of performing thesis. These expectations should be told to supervisors.

  2. MS PHD'S: A Synergistic Model for Diversifying the Earth Science Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, L.; Johnson, A.; Williamson Whitney, V.; Ithier-Guzman, W.; Braxton, L.; Johnson, A.

    2013-05-01

    The Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science (MS PHD'S) program focuses on increasing the number of underrepresented minorities (URM) receiving advanced degrees in Earth system sciences (ESS). Subscribing to Aristotle's philosophy that the "whole is greater than the sum of its parts", MS PHD'S uses a synergistic model of tiered mentoring practices, successful minority scientist role models, peer-to-peer community building activities, professional development training techniques, networking opportunities, and state of the art virtual communication tools to facilitate the retention and advancement of underrepresented ESS scientists. Using a three-phase program structure supported by a virtual community, URM students in ESS are afforded opportunities to establish mentoring relationships with successful scientists, build meaningful ties with URM peers and future colleagues, strengthen oral and written communication skills, engage in networking opportunities within premier scientific venues, and maintain continuity of networks formed through program participation. Established in 2003, MS PHD'S is now in its ninth cohort. From the original cohort of 24 participants, the program has grown to support 213 participants. Of these 213 participants, 42 have obtained the doctorate and are employed within the ESS workforce. Another 71 are enrolled in doctoral programs. Looking to the future with the purpose of continually furthering its synergistic philosophy, MS PHD'S has developed a new initiative, Beyond the PhD, designed to support and advance the representation of URM scientists within a global workforce.

  3. Cellular Oxygen Sensing: Crystal Structure of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Prolyl Hydroxylase (PHD2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonough,M.; Li, V.; Flashman, E.; Chowdhury, R.; Mohr, C.; Lienard, B.; Zondlo, J.; Oldham, N.; Clifton, I.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Cellular and physiological responses to changes in dioxygen levels in metazoans are mediated via the posttranslational oxidation of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF). Hydroxylation of conserved prolyl residues in the HIF-{alpha} subunit, catalyzed by HIF prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs), signals for its proteasomal degradation. The requirement of the PHDs for dioxygen links changes in dioxygen levels with the transcriptional regulation of the gene array that enables the cellular response to chronic hypoxia; the PHDs thus act as an oxygen-sensing component of the HIF system, and their inhibition mimics the hypoxic response. We describe crystal structures of the catalytic domain of human PHD2, an important prolyl-4-hydroxylase in the human hypoxic response in normal cells, in complex with Fe(II) and an inhibitor to 1.7 Angstroms resolution. PHD2 crystallizes as a homotrimer and contains a double-stranded {beta}-helix core fold common to the Fe(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependant dioxygenase family, the residues of which are well conserved in the three human PHD enzymes (PHD 1-3). The structure provides insights into the hypoxic response, helps to rationalize a clinically observed mutation leading to familial erythrocytosis, and will aid in the design of PHD selective inhibitors for the treatment of anemia and ischemic disease.

  4. Interoperability in digital electrocardiography: harmonization of ISO/IEEE x73-PHD and SCP-ECG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo, Jesús D; Chiarugi, Franco; Alesanco, Alvaro; Martínez-Espronceda, Miguel; Serrano, Luis; Chronaki, Catherine E; Escayola, Javier; Martínez, Ignacio; García, José

    2010-11-01

    The ISO/IEEE 11073 (x73) family of standards is a reference frame for medical device interoperability. A draft for an ECG device specialization (ISO/IEEE 11073-10406-d02) has already been presented to the Personal Health Device (PHD) Working Group, and the Standard Communications Protocol for Computer-Assisted ElectroCardioGraphy (SCP-ECG) Standard for short-term diagnostic ECGs (EN1064:2005+A1:2007) has recently been approved as part of the x73 family (ISO 11073-91064:2009). These factors suggest the coordinated use of these two standards in foreseeable telecardiology environments, and hence the need to harmonize them. Such harmonization is the subject of this paper. Thus, a mapping of the mandatory attributes defined in the second draft of the ISO/IEEE 11073-10406-d02 and the minimum SCP-ECG fields is presented, and various other capabilities of the SCP-ECG Standard (such as the messaging part) are also analyzed from an x73-PHD point of view. As a result, this paper addresses and analyzes the implications of some inconsistencies in the coordinated use of these two standards. Finally, a proof-of-concept implementation of the draft x73-PHD ECG device specialization is presented, along with the conversion from x73-PHD to SCP-ECG. This paper, therefore, provides recommendations for future implementations of telecardiology systems that are compliant with both x73-PHD and SCP-ECG.

  5. Inter-ethnic Marriage and Partner Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Sinning, Mathias; Worner, Shane

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates immigrant assortative mating and relationship satisfaction. Using a modified random effects ordered probit model, the paper demonstrates that spouses of mixed couples are significantly less satisfied with their partner than nativeonly and foreign-only couples. Dieses Papier untersucht die Wahl des Ehepartners und die Zufriedenheit mit dem Partner. Unter Verwendung eines modifizierten Random Effects Ordered Probit-Modells zeigt das Papier, dass Ehepartner gemischter ...

  6. Perceptions of the physical attractiveness of the self, current romantic partners, and former partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Viren; Allum, Lucy

    2012-02-01

    This study examined ratings of physical attractiveness of the self and former and current partners. A total of 304 participants completed measures of attractiveness, relationship satisfaction, love dimensions, self-esteem and sociosexual orientation. Consistent with previous work, results showed that participants rated their current partners as more attractive than themselves and their former partners. However, results also showed that former partners were rated as more attractive than the self on a number of bodily characteristics. Finally, results showed that ratings of former partner physical attractiveness were associated with passion for the former partner, self-esteem, sociosexual orientation, and attributions of relationship termination. These results are discussed in relation to the available literature on positive illusions in intimate relationships.

  7. Effect of different solvents on skin test results of tetanus antitoxin prepared%不同溶媒配制破伤风抗毒素皮试液对皮试结果的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施雪雁; 范爱飞; 彭丽萍; 龚海琴

    2011-01-01

    Objective To observe skin test results of tetanus antitoxin prepared by different solvents.Methods Patients who needed injecting tetanus antitoxin as required by trauma were randomly divided into two groups, Group A and Group B, respectively. Group A was administered with tetanus antitoxin prepared by water for injection, while Group B with tetanus antitoxin prepared by saline. Skin test results were observed, the incidence of positive skin test results and self-inductance of pain intensity were compared.Results The incidence of positive skin test results in Group A was significantly higher than that in Group B (34.19% vs 17.50%,χ2=8.631,P<0.01), and the self-inductance of pain intensity were also greater than that in Group B. Patients with positive skin test results (40 patients) in Group A, were later injected tetanus antitoxin prepared by saline, 42.50% of them (17 patients) shown negative skin test results.Conclusions There might be a high false positive rate by using tetanus antitoxin prepared by water for injection; therefore tetanus antitoxin prepared by saline is recommended, for it could decrease the false positive rate, reduce unnecessary desensitization injections, alleviate patients' pain and improve nurses' work efficiency.%目的 观察2种不同溶媒配制破伤风抗毒素(TAT)皮试液对皮试结果的影响.方法 将因外伤需要注射TAT的患者237例随机分为甲组117例和乙组120例,分别使用注射用水配制的TAT皮试液和生理盐水配制的TAT皮试液做皮肤过敏试验,观察两组患者的皮试结果,对比两组皮试结果阳性率以及患者自感疼痛度的高低.结果 甲组患者皮试结果阳性率明显高于乙组,差异具有统计学意义(34.19%比17.50%,χ2=8.631,P<0.01),且患者自感疼痛度也高于乙组.甲组皮试结果阳性的患者(40例)在改用生理盐水配制的TAT皮试液做皮试后,17例(42.50%)患者皮试结果转为阴性.结论 用注射用水配制的TAT皮试液做皮肤

  8. GM-PHD Filter Combined with Track-Estimate Association and Numerical Interpolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinguang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For the standard Gaussian mixture probability hypothesis density (GM-PHD filter, the number of targets can be overestimated if the clutter rate is too high or underestimated if the detection rate is too low. These problems seriously affect the accuracy of multitarget tracking for the number and the value of measurements and clutters cannot be distinguished and recognized. Therefore, we proposed an improved GM-PHD filter to tackle these problems. Firstly, a track-estimate association was implemented in the filtering process to detect and remove false-alarm targets. Secondly, a numerical interpolation technique was used to compensate the missing targets caused by low detection rate. At the end of this paper, simulation results were presented to demonstrate the proposed GM-PHD algorithm is more effective in estimating the number and state of targets than the previous ones.

  9. Low immediate scientific yield of the PhD among medical doctors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbol, Emil L.; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Rerup, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    Background: We studied the scientific yield of the medical PhD program at all Danish Universities.Methods: We undertook a retrospective observational study. Three PhD schools in Denmark were included in order to evaluate the postdoctoral research production over more than 18 years through....... Scientific activity over time was assessed independently of author-rank and inactivity was measured relative to the date of graduation. Factors associated with inactivity were identified using multivariable logistic regression. 88.6 % of the PhD theses were conducted in internal medicine vs. 11.......12 (IQR 0.61-1.99) papers per year. About 2/3 of the graduates became inactive after 1 year and approximately 21 % of the graduates remained active during the whole follow-up. Female gender was associated with inactivity: adjusted odds ratio 1.59 (95 % confidence interval 1.24-2.05).Conclusions...

  10. Science PhD career preferences: levels, changes, and advisor encouragement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Sauermann

    Full Text Available Even though academic research is often viewed as the preferred career path for PhD trained scientists, most U.S. graduates enter careers in industry, government, or "alternative careers." There has been a growing concern that these career patterns reflect fundamental imbalances between the supply of scientists seeking academic positions and the availability of such positions. However, while government statistics provide insights into realized career transitions, there is little systematic data on scientists' career preferences and thus on the degree to which there is a mismatch between observed career paths and scientists' preferences. Moreover, we lack systematic evidence whether career preferences adjust over the course of the PhD training and to what extent advisors exacerbate imbalances by encouraging their students to pursue academic positions. Based on a national survey of PhD students at tier-one U.S. institutions, we provide insights into the career preferences of junior scientists across the life sciences, physics, and chemistry. We also show that the attractiveness of academic careers decreases significantly over the course of the PhD program, despite the fact that advisors strongly encourage academic careers over non-academic careers. Our data provide an empirical basis for common concerns regarding labor market imbalances. Our results also suggest the need for mechanisms that provide PhD applicants with information that allows them to carefully weigh the costs and benefits of pursuing a PhD, as well as for mechanisms that complement the job market advice advisors give to their current students.

  11. Systemically administered IgG anti-toxin antibodies protect the colonic mucosa during infection with Clostridium difficile in the piglet model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocean R Cohen

    Full Text Available The use of anti-toxin human monoclonal antibodies (HMab as treatment for C. difficile infection has been investigated in animal models and human clinical trials as an alternative to or in combination with traditional antibiotic therapy. While HMab therapy appears to be a promising option, how systemically administered IgG antibodies protect the colonic mucosa during Clostridium difficile infection is unknown. Using the gnotobiotic piglet model of Clostridium difficile infection, we administered a mixture of anti-TcdA and anti-TcdB HMabs systemically to piglets infected with either pathogenic or non-pathogenic C. difficile strains. The HMabs were present throughout the small and large intestinal tissue of both groups, but significant HMabs were present in the lumen of the large intestines only in the pathogenic strain-infected group. Similarly, HMabs measured in the large intestine over a period of 2-4 days following antibody administration were not significantly different over time in the gut mucosa among the groups, but concentrations in the lumen of the large intestine were again consistently higher in the pathogenic strain-infected group. These results indicate that systemically administered HMab IgG reaches the gut mucosa during the course of CDI, protecting the host against systemic intoxication, and that leakage through the damaged colon likely protects the mucosa from further damage, allowing initiation of repair and recovery.

  12. Dominant negative mutants of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab toxin function as anti-toxins: demonstration of the role of oligomerization in toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Rodríguez-Almazán

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins, that are used worldwide in insect control, kill insects by a mechanism that depends on their ability to form oligomeric pores that insert into the insect-midgut cells. These toxins are being used worldwide in transgenic plants or spray to control insect pests in agriculture. However, a major concern has been the possible effects of these insecticidal proteins on non-target organisms mainly in ecosystems adjacent to agricultural fields. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We isolated and characterized 11 non-toxic mutants of Cry1Ab toxin affected in different steps of the mechanism of action namely binding to receptors, oligomerization and pore-formation. These mutant toxins were analyzed for their capacity to block wild type toxin activity, presenting a dominant negative phenotype. The dominant negative phenotype was analyzed at two levels, in vivo by toxicity bioassays against susceptible Manduca sexta larvae and in vitro by pore formation activity in black lipid bilayers. We demonstrate that some mutations located in helix alpha-4 completely block the wild type toxin activity at sub-stoichiometric level confirming a dominant negative phenotype, thereby functioning as potent antitoxins. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first reported case of a Cry toxin dominant inhibitor. These data demonstrate that oligomerization is a fundamental step in Cry toxin action and represent a potential mechanism to protect special ecosystems from the possible effect of Cry toxins on non-target organisms.

  13. The phage growth limitation system in Streptomyces coelicolor A(3)2 is a toxin/antitoxin system, comprising enzymes with DNA methyltransferase, protein kinase and ATPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskisson, Paul A; Sumby, Paul; Smith, Margaret C M

    2015-03-01

    The phage growth limitation system of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) is an unusual bacteriophage defence mechanism. Progeny ϕC31 phage from an initial infection are thought to be modified such that subsequent infections are attenuated in a Pgl(+) host but normal in a Pgl(-) strain. Earlier work identified four genes required for phage resistance by Pgl. Here we demonstrate that Pgl is an elaborate and novel phage restriction system that, in part, comprises a toxin/antitoxin system where PglX, a DNA methyltransferase is toxic in the absence of a functional PglZ. In addition, the ATPase activity of PglY and a protein kinase activity in PglW are shown to be essential for phage resistance by Pgl. We conclude that on infection of a Pgl(+) cell by bacteriophage ϕC31, PglW transduces a signal, probably via phosphorylation, to other Pgl proteins resulting in the activation of the DNA methyltransferase, PglX and this leads to phage restriction.

  14. Empirical Essays on the Labor Market Outcomes of PhD Graduates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Heidi Skovgaard

    During the past decade, policy makers have accentuated the need for more PhDs to drive innovation and use their research skills to push the technological frontier. The public sector in Denmark has financially supported a doubling of the number of enrolled PhD students based on a strong belief...... that PhDs accelerate growth. A major objective has been to direct more PhDs to the industry to use their skills to monetize knowledge. However, we have limited evidence on how PhDs are absorbed into the labor market, how the market values PhD labor, and how PhDs value the possibility to work...

  15. The oxygen sensor PHD3 limits glycolysis under hypoxia via direct binding to pyruvate kinase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Chen; Oliver Rinner; Dominika Czernik; Katarzyna J Nytko; Dan Zheng; Daniel P Stiehl; Nicola Zamboni; Matthias Gstaiger; Christian Frei

    2011-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, Oxygen levels are critical for cellular physiology.Under low oxygen (hypoxia),cells increase glycolysis while limiting mitochondrial oxidative metabolism.Such adaptation is largely mediated by the transcription factors HIF,which accumulate under hypoxia [1,2].Prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHD) function as cellular oxygen sensors and target HIF for subsequent degradation under normoxia [2].The PHD/HIF pathway is conserved in Drosophila,where a single prolyl hydroxylase,Fatiga,has been characterized.We have previously reported that Fatiga regulates cellular growth rates in a HIF-independent manner,yet mechanisms remained elusive [3].

  16. Education of MSc and PhD Students in Fluid Power and Mechatronics at DTU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conrad, Finn

    1996-01-01

    The paper deals with education of MSc and PhD students in engineering areas fluid power and mechatronics at the Technical Univ of Denmark, DTU, Lyngby. The new education structure and programs for MSc and PhD students adapted to the change and development of technologies. Focus is on two of twenty...... engineering profilies:(1) Engineeing Design and Product Development and (2)Control Engineering which give possibilitie for specialisation in fluid power and mechatronics design and productdevelopment. Synthesis, design and self-learning competency have a high priority taking the importance of training...

  17. The role of PHD2 mutations in the pathogenesis of erythrocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gardie B

    2014-07-01

    of EPO transcription. The α subunits of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor are hydroxylated by three prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD enzymes, which belong to the iron and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent oxygenase superfamily. Sequence analysis of the genes encoding the PHDs in patients with erythrocytosis has revealed heterozygous germline mutations only occurring in Egl nine homolog 1 (EGLN1, also known as PHD2, the gene that encodes PHD2. To date, 24 different EGLN1 mutations comprising missense, frameshift, and nonsense mutations have been described. The phenotypes associated with the patients carrying these mutations are fairly homogeneous and typically limited to erythrocytosis with normal to elevated EPO. However, exceptions exist; for example, there is one case with development of concurrent paraganglioma (PHD2-H374R. Analysis of the erythrocytosis-associated PHD2 missense mutations has shown heterogeneous results. Structural studies reveal that mutations can affect different domains of PHD2. Some are close to the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor α/2-oxoglutarate or the iron binding sites for PHD2. In silico studies demonstrate that the mutations do not always affect fully conserved residues. In vitro and in cellulo studies showed varying effects of the mutations, ranging from mild effects to severe loss of function. The exact mechanism of a potential tumor-suppressor role for PHD2 still needs to be elucidated. A knockin mouse model expressing the first reported PHD2-P317R mutation recapitulates the phenotype observed in humans (erythrocytosis with inappropriately normal serum EPO levels and demonstrates that haploinsufficiency and partial deregulation of PHD2 is sufficient to cause erythrocytosis. Keywords: PHD2, EGLN1, HIF, hypoxia, erythropoietin, erythrocytosis

  18. Partner Market Opportunities and Relationship Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingmar Rapp

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Although partner market opportunities are generally considered to be important for relationship stability, they have never been measured accurately. In order to be able to test the anticipated effects of partner market opportunities, this study conceptualises them as individual opportunities for contact and interaction in concrete social contexts, like the neighbourhood, the workplace, leisure activities, etc. Using data from the German Marriage Market Survey, we first examine the impact of individual partner market opportunities on the risk of separation. Second, we examine to what extend the most frequently studied determinants of divorce and separation depend on partner market opportunities. Our results show that the number of opposite sex contacts increases the probability of separation. Sharing the same contacts with one’s partner decreases the risk of separation. Our results indicate further that reducing opposite sex contacts in the course of the relationship is partly responsible for the higher stability of longer-lasting relationships. Having a migration background is associated with fewer opposite sex contacts. This means that having a migration background would be more destabilising if these individuals did not have less opposite sex contacts than individuals without a migration background. In contrast, joint home ownership, church attendance, higher education and residing in western Germany would generally be more stabilising if these factors were not connected with more opposite sex contacts.

  19. A Community-Academic Partnered Grant Writing Series to Build Infrastructure for Partnered Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Keyonna M; Pardo, Yvette-Janine; Norris, Keith C; Diaz-Romero, Maria; Morris, D'Ann; Vassar, Stefanie D; Brown, Arleen F

    2015-10-01

    Grant writing is an essential skill necessary to secure financial support for community programs and research projects. Increasingly, funding opportunities for translational biomedical research require studies to engage community partners, patients, or other stakeholders in the research process to address their concerns. However, there is little evidence on strategies to prepare teams of academic and community partners to collaborate on grants. This paper presents the description and formative evaluation of a two-part community-academic partnered grant writing series designed to help community organizations and academic institutions build infrastructure for collaborative research projects using a partnered approach. The first phase of the series was a half-day workshop on grant readiness, which was open to all interested community partners. The second phase, open only to community-academic teams that met eligibility criteria, was a 12-week session that covered partnered grant writing for foundation grants and National Institutes of Health grants. Participants in both phases reported an increase in knowledge and self-efficacy for writing partnered proposals. At 1-year follow-up, participants in Phase 2 had secured approximately $1.87 million in funding. This community-academic partnered grant writing series helped participants obtain proposal development skills and helped community-academic teams successfully compete for funding.

  20. Effects of PhD examination stress on allopregnanolone and cortisol plasma levels and peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droogleever Fortuyn, H.A.; Broekhoven, F. van; Span, P.N.; Backstrom, T.; Zitman, F.G.; Verkes, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) density in blood platelets and plasma allopregnanolone concentration in humans were determined following acute stress as represented by PhD examination. Fifteen healthy PhD students participated. Heart rate, blood pressure, plasma allopregnanolone, plasma cor

  1. Publishing and Learning Writing for Publication in English: Perspectives of NNES PhD Students in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ju Chuan

    2010-01-01

    Publication in international journals has become a prerequisite to PhD graduation. This study thus provides a framework for understanding the learning of writing skills and publishing practices of nonnative English-speaking PhD students by investigating their perceptions of publishing and learning to write for publication. Findings show that these…

  2. A Networked Pathway to the PhD: The African-Norwegian Case of Productive Learning Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattingh, Annemarie; Lillejord, Solvi

    2011-01-01

    How do PhD students become socialised into the professional world of academic work? This article pays attention to a "networked" support pathway towards a PhD. The network constitutes an international research collaboration through a programme called Productive Learning Cultures (PLC) (2002-2011) between Norway and seven countries,…

  3. Prolyl Hydroxylase Domain-Containing Protein 2 (Phd2) Regulates Chondrocyte Differentiation and Secondary Ossification in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shaohong; Aghajanian, Patrick; Pourteymoor, Sheila; Alarcon, Catrina; Mohan, Subburaman

    2016-01-01

    Endochondral ossification plays an important role in the formation of the primary ossification centers (POCs) and secondary ossification centers (SOCs) of mammalian long bones. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate POC and SOC formation are different. We recently demonstrated that Prolyl Hydroxylase Domain-containing Protein 2 (Phd2) is a key mediator of vitamin C effects on bone. We investigated the role of Phd2 on endochondral ossification of the epiphyses by conditionally deleting the Phd2 gene in osteoblasts and chondrocytes. We found that the deletion of Phd2 in osteoblasts did not cause changes in bone parameters in the proximal tibial epiphyses in 5 week old mice. In contrast, deletion of Phd2 in chondrocytes resulted in increased bone mass and bone formation rate (normalized to tissue volume) in long bone epiphyses, indicating that Phd2 expressed in chondrocytes, but not osteoblasts, negatively regulates secondary ossification of epiphyses. Phd2 deletion in chondrocytes elevated mRNA expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) signaling molecules including Hif-1α, Hif-2α, Vegfa, Vegfb, and Epo, as well as markers for chondrocyte hypertrophy and mineralization such as Col10, osterix, alkaline phosphatase, and bone sialoprotein. These data suggest that Phd2 expressed in chondrocytes inhibits endochondral ossification at the epiphysis by suppressing HIF signaling pathways. PMID:27775044

  4. The Benefits of Publishing Systematic Quantitative Literature Reviews for PhD Candidates and Other Early-Career Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Catherine; Byrne, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Universities increasingly expect students to publish during a PhD candidature because it benefits the candidate, supervisor, institution, and wider community. Here, we describe a method successfully used by early-career researchers including PhD candidates to undertake and publish literature reviews--a challenge for researchers new to a field. Our…

  5. Welcoming spouses and partners to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    The questions related to Diversity were examined in the framework of the Five-yearly Review, which was approved in December 2015. The first themes implemented this year concern helping spouses or partners integrate into the working world, and improving the balance between professional and private life.   To this end, the Social Affairs Service and the CERN Diversity Office organised together on Tuesday, 15 November, a “Welcome Drink” for the spouses and partners of employed members of the personnel of CERN who have recently arrived in the region. This event was an occasion for the spouses and partners to meet and greet with various internal services at CERN, including the Staff Association, as well as local networks that can provide assistance in integrating into the region, in terms of job search for instance. Therefore, several service providers were present, including: the Geneva Welcome Center (CAGI), a welcoming network for newly arrived employees of international organi...

  6. AIDS, partner notification and gender issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildesheimer, Galya M

    2002-01-01

    The interplay between public health, human rights, legal obligations and physicians' ethical concerns was revealed dramatically in Israel in recent cases involving reporting of the HIV positive status of patients. This paper reviews and critically analyses the decision-making process of Israeli Ethics Committees regarding HIV partner notification. One aim of this analysis is to suggest principles that may guide the decision in such cases. It is argued that the resolution concerning disclosure to partners be based on the Principle of Proportionality, taking into account the type of relationship between partner and patient, their cultural background and gender issues. The paper demonstrates the advantages of addressing such issues by professional multidisciplinary Ethics Committees, whose decisions can bring to bear the scope of relevant considerations.

  7. Partner manipulation stabilises a horizontally transmitted mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heil, Martin; Barajas-Barron, Alejandro; Orona-Tamayo, Domancar; Wielsch, Natalie; Svatos, Ales

    2014-02-01

    Mutualisms require protection from non-reciprocating exploiters. Pseudomyrmex workers that engage in an obligate defensive mutualism with Acacia hosts feed exclusively on the sucrose-free extrafloral nectar (EFN) that is secreted by their hosts, a behaviour linking ant energy supply directly to host performance and thus favouring reciprocating behaviour. We tested the hypothesis that Acacia hosts manipulate this digestive specialisation of their ant mutualists. Invertase (sucrose hydrolytic) activity in the ant midguts was inhibited by chitinase, a dominant EFN protein. The inhibition occurred quickly in cell-free gut liquids and in native gels and thus likely results from an enzyme-enzyme interaction. Once a freshly eclosed worker ingests EFN as the first diet available, her invertase becomes inhibited and she, thus, continues feeding on host-derived EFN. Partner manipulation acts at the phenotypic level and means that one partner actively controls the phenotype of the other partner to enhance its dependency on host-derived rewards.

  8. Whom to Choose as License Partner?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Keld; Reichstein, Toke; Trombini, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the matching of firms on the market for technology. The paper forwards two dimensions along which license formation occurs: technology and product-market. Both sides of the market search for a partner representing potential for high technology synergies to maximize licensing...... benefits and obviate issues related to technology transfer and knowledge recombination. At the same time, firms wish to select a partner operating in a different product market to minimize competitive downside issues and to access other product markets, skills and resources. We contend interdependence...... between technology and market forces: if partners are market distant, the likelihood of technology license contractual partnership decreases with partners’ technological distance. Using data on the formation of license partnerships in the global biopharmaceutical industry over the period 1994...

  9. Partner Selection in Technological Licensing Agreements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Keld; Trombini, Giulia

    as attractors, and market competition and potential involuntary spillovers act as repellants. Firms seek potential licensing partners by trying to maximize technological synergies while attempting to minimize the competitive downsides. We hypothesize that when licensees engage in matches involving a partner...... that is technologically unrelated, ex ante familiarity with the licensors’ technology is required. We contend also that there is interdependence between technological learning and market competition: if partners are in the same product markets, the likelihood of technology license contractual partnerships decreases...... with partners’ technological relatedness. We use data on the formation of license partnerships in the global biopharmaceutical industry over the period 1994-2004 and find that, on the whole, there is empirical support for our theoretical predictions....

  10. Research on Partner-fly Infrared Decoys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HONG Yang; LI Yan-jun; WANG Qi

    2006-01-01

    With the rapid development of new generation of infrared-guided missiles, it is very difficult for the traditional point-source infrared decoys to confront them. Therefore it is important to research the jamming mechanism and tactical application of infrared decoys. Through the research on rocket-propelled infrared decoys, a movement model and a radiation pattern of partner-fly infrared decoy are established based on the jamming mechanism of infrared centroid effect, the aerodynamics principle as well as the aeronautical dynamics principle. A dynamic simulation seeking superiority is conducted for its firing range and direction, a tactical application method of partner-fly infrared decoy against infrared-guided missile is explored, and the technical conditions of partner-fly infrared decoys are determined.

  11. The first recipients of the ATLAS PhD Grant Scholarship Programme 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcelloni, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    First recipients of the ATLAS PhD Grant Scholarship 2014 : With certificates, Lailin Xu, Josefina Alconada, and Gagik Vardanyan. The selection committee members, IFAE Barcelona’s Martine Bosman, Fabiola Gianotti, Peter Jenni and from CERN HR James PurvisProgramme: Lailin Xu, Josefina Alconada, and Gagik Vardanyan

  12. Factors Affecting Timely Completion of a PhD: A Complex Systems Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchforth, Jegar; Beames, Stephanie; Thomas, Aleysha; Falk, Matthew; Farr, Charisse; Gasson, Susan; Thamrin, Sri Astuti; Mengersen, Kerrie

    2012-01-01

    Completing a PhD on time is a complex process, influenced by many interacting factors. In this paper we take a Bayesian Network approach to analyzing the factors perceived to be important in achieving this aim. Focusing on a single research group in Mathematical Sciences, we develop a conceptual model to describe the factors considered to be…

  13. At the MLA, a Ph.D. Candidate Navigates the Jobs Gantlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Stacey

    2012-01-01

    It's the night before one of Javier Jimenez's big job interviews at the Modern Language Association (MLA) meeting. The 35-year-old graduate student, who is scheduled to earn his Ph.D. in comparative literature this spring from the University of California at Berkeley, is trying to ward off anxiety and abdominal pains. The mystique of the MLA, the…

  14. Regulating Emotions and Aiming for a Ph.D.: Excerpts from "Anthropology Matters"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, Ingie

    2012-01-01

    In this article I will present a range of experiences of graduate socialisation that have been discussed in past articles in the journal "Anthropology Matters". These are the experiences of social anthropology Ph.D. students in the United Kingdom. The overarching theme for the article is "regulating emotions", and the excerpts presented illustrate…

  15. COMPARISON OF HEDGES IN M.A. THESES AND PH.D. DISSERTATIONS IN ELT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çağla ATMACA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Writers use some textual devices like hedges and boosters in order to contribute to their textual voice. Differences between M.A. theses and Ph.D. dissertations in English Language Teaching (ELT Department in terms of hedges in Turkish context seem to be an overlooked area. Thus, this paper aims to find the similarities and differences between M.A. theses and Ph.D. dissertations about English Language Teaching in terms of hedges. For this purpose, 10 M.A. theses and 10 Ph.D. dissertations were randomly chosen. Data were analyzed and categorized on the basis of contextual features with the help of content analysis. Various hedging tools emerged as a result of content analysis and it was found that hedges used in the Ph.D. dissertations nearly double those in the M.A. theses. Moreover, modals -followed by passivization- are the leading form of hedging while nouns have the least frequency of hedging type, which could explain some of the differences between novice and experienced writers. In the light of these findings, important implications are drawn for graduate and postgraduate students to enhance their writing skills and be familiar with the principles of academic writing for their future career.

  16. Competitive binding of a benzimidazole to the histone-binding pocket of the Pygo PHD finger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas C R; Rutherford, Trevor J; Birchall, Kristian; Chugh, Jasveen; Fiedler, Marc; Bienz, Mariann

    2014-12-19

    The Pygo-BCL9 complex is a chromatin reader, facilitating β-catenin-mediated oncogenesis, and is thus emerging as a potential therapeutic target for cancer. Its function relies on two ligand-binding surfaces of Pygo's PHD finger that anchor the histone H3 tail methylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me) with assistance from the BCL9 HD1 domain. Here, we report the first use of fragment-based screening by NMR to identify small molecules that block protein-protein interactions by a PHD finger. This led to the discovery of a set of benzothiazoles that bind to a cleft emanating from the PHD-HD1 interface, as defined by X-ray crystallography. Furthermore, we discovered a benzimidazole that docks into the H3K4me specificity pocket and displaces the native H3K4me peptide from the PHD finger. Our study demonstrates the ligandability of the Pygo-BCL9 complex and uncovers a privileged scaffold as a template for future development of lead inhibitors of oncogenesis.

  17. PhD versus DSW: A Critique of Trends in Social Work Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Tyriesa

    2016-01-01

    Social work educators are in a phase of reintroducing the doctor of social work (DSW) degree and refining distinctions between PhD and DSW doctoral programs. This article examines how the two options have been prey to a noticeable "seesaw of precedence", resulting in a debatable history of social work's approach to doctoral education…

  18. The Future of Rhetoric in English Department Ph.D. Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Suzanne

    1995-01-01

    Offers a utopian vision of what the place of rhetoric should be in a department that thinks of itself as literary. Argues that a Ph.D. in English that encompasses both literature and rhetoric works because it is really a degree in rhetoric. (TB)

  19. The New Debate: The PhD versus the MFA Degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranger, Milly S.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Introduces and includes "The Ritz Bar or ABD: In Defense of the MFA," in which Peter Garvie defends the professionalism of the MFA degree in theatre, and "The PhD in Theatre--A Vanishing Degree?" Richard Hornby's discussion of the importance of the doctoral degree as the standard teaching degree. (PD)

  20. Completing a PhD by Publication: A Review of Australian Policy and Implications for Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Denise

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing impetus for higher-degree-by-research students to publish during candidature. Research performance, including higher degree completions and publication output, commonly determines university funding, and doctorates with publishing experience are better positioned for a career in softening academic labour markets. The PhD by…

  1. Ph.D. Thesis: Quantum Field Theory and Gravity in Causal Sets

    CERN Document Server

    Sverdlov, Roman

    2009-01-01

    This is is a copy of dissertation that I have submitted in defense of my ph.d. thesis, with some minor changes that I have made since then. The goal of the project is to generalize matter fields and their Lagrangians from regular space time to causal sets.

  2. Ph.D. Thesis: Quantum Field Theory and Gravity in Causal Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverdlov, Roman

    2009-05-01

    This is is a copy of dissertation that I have submitted in defense of my ph.d. thesis, with some minor changes that I have made since then. The goal of the project is to generalize matter fields and their Lagrangians from regular space time to causal sets.

  3. Winning the PhD Game: Evocative Playing of Snakes and Ladders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickie, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a qualitative approach to developing an understanding of the lived experiences of PhD students. Rather than relying on textbook reports and theories about studying a higher degree by research, by allowing the students' voices to be heard, explicit and conscious research can be used to generate appropriate…

  4. International Students' Motivation to Pursue and Complete a Ph.D. in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji

    2015-01-01

    This study explores what motivates 19 international students to pursue a Ph.D. at a public research university in the U.S. and, more importantly, what motivates them to persist despite unsatisfying socialization. Based on value-expectancy achievement motivation theory, four motivations emerged: intrinsic interest in research, intrinsic interest in…

  5. The Impact of Publishing during PhD Studies on Career Research Publication, Visibility, and Collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, Hugo; Santos, João M.

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes the impact that publishing during the period of PhD study has on researchers' future knowledge production, impact, and co-authorship. The analysis is based on a representative sample of PhDs from all fields of science working in Portugal. For each researcher in the dataset, we compiled a lifetime publication record and…

  6. Three new students selected for the ATLAS PhD Grant Scheme

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2016-01-01

    Initiated in 2013, the ATLAS PhD Grant Scheme aims to enable young, talented and motivated students to work on part of their PhD thesis at CERN. The collaboration has just selected the three students who will start their theses in 2016.   The three students who received the ATLAS grant, which will cover part of their PhD studies. From left to right: Ruth Jacobs (Germany), Artem Basalaev (Russia), Nedaa B I Asbah (Palestine). The ATLAS PhD Grant Scheme was made possible thanks to a large donation by former ATLAS spokespersons Fabiola Gianotti and Peter Jenni, who started the fund with money from the Fundamental Physics Prize they received in 2013. Applications are handled by CERN HR, via this link. The aim of the initiative is to offer a unique educational opportunity to students within the ATLAS collaboration and to give them the possibility to continue their career in particle physics. Selected candidates receive a stipend allowing them to spend one year at CERN, followed by one year at their h...

  7. Regulating Emotions and Aiming for a Ph.D.: Excerpts from "Anthropology Matters"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, Ingie

    2012-01-01

    In this article I will present a range of experiences of graduate socialisation that have been discussed in past articles in the journal "Anthropology Matters". These are the experiences of social anthropology Ph.D. students in the United Kingdom. The overarching theme for the article is "regulating emotions", and the excerpts…

  8. PhD and the Manager's Dream: Professionalising the Students, the Degree and the Supervisors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Frederico

    2013-01-01

    This article has two main aims: to analyse relevant literature on the doctoral degree, and to assess whether recent funding changes in the UK have changed the nature of the PhD in the social sciences in a research-intensive and prestigious UK university. Data were collected at BlueSkies University where interviews with social sciences PhD…

  9. Hypoxia and loss of PHD2 inactivate stromal fibroblasts to decrease tumour stiffness and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Chris D; Pedersen, Jesper T; Venning, Freja A; Singh, Lukram Babloo; Moeendarbary, Emad; Charras, Guillaume; Cox, Thomas R; Sahai, Erik; Erler, Janine T

    2015-10-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) interact with tumour cells and promote growth and metastasis. Here, we show that CAF activation is reversible: chronic hypoxia deactivates CAFs, resulting in the loss of contractile force, reduced remodelling of the surrounding extracellular matrix and, ultimately, impaired CAF-mediated cancer cell invasion. Hypoxia inhibits prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2), leading to hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α stabilisation, reduced expression of αSMA and periostin, and reduced myosin II activity. Loss of PHD2 in CAFs phenocopies the effects of hypoxia, which can be prevented by simultaneous depletion of HIF-1α. Treatment with the PHD inhibitor DMOG in an orthotopic breast cancer model significantly decreases spontaneous metastases to the lungs and liver, associated with decreased tumour stiffness and fibroblast activation. PHD2 depletion in CAFs co-injected with tumour cells similarly prevents CAF-induced metastasis to lungs and liver. Our data argue that reversion of CAFs towards a less active state is possible and could have important clinical implications.

  10. Factors Influencing International PhD Students to Study Physics in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Serene H.-J.; Nieminen, Timo A.; Townson, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Since physics research is an activity of an active international community, international visits are a common way for physicists to share scientific knowledge and skills. International mobility of physicists is also important for PhD physics study and research training. We investigated personal and social factors that influenced the decision for…

  11. Career Aspirations and Career Outcomes for Solar and Space Physics Ph.D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldwin, M.; Morrow, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Results from a recent graduate student survey found unsurprisingly that Solar and Space Physics (S&SP) Ph.D. graduate students almost all aspire to have research careers in Solar and Space Physics. This study reports on the research career outcomes over the last decade for S&SP Ph.Ds. We used publication of peer-reviewed articles as the indicator for persistence in a research career. We found that nearly two-thirds (64%) of Ph.D.s who graduated between 2001 to 2009 published refereed-papers four or more years after their Ph.D., while 17% of Ph.D.s never published another paper beyond the year they received their Ph.D. The remaining 19% of Ph.Ds, stopped publishing within three-years of receiving their Ph.D. We found that though there is statistically no difference on persistence of publishing research between graduates of the largest programs compared to all other programs, there are significant differences between programs. We also found there was no gender differences in any of the persistence data (i.e., men and women stop or continue publishing at the same rates). Graduate programs, faculty advisors and potential graduate students can use these data for career planning. This study suggests that a significant majority of S&SP Ph.D.s (77%) find post-doctoral research positions and a majority (56%) find research careers beyond their post-doc.

  12. Ability, academic climate, and going abroad for work or pursuing a PhD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertrand-Cloodt, D.A.M.; Cörvers, F.; Heijke, J.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate whether a creaming off of highly able students from Dutch universities is taking place. Therefore, we examine the relation between ability and the destination of recent graduates of Dutch universities. Students can choose to continue their academic career by investing in a PhD degree

  13. Ensuring PhD development of responsible conduct of research behaviors: who's responsible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, Sandra L; Ballou, Janice M

    2014-03-01

    The importance of public confidence in scientific findings and trust in scientists cannot be overstated. Thus, it becomes critical for the scientific community to focus on enhancing the strategies used to educate future scientists on ethical research behaviors. What we are lacking is knowledge on how faculty members shape and develop ethical research standards with their students. We are presenting the results of a survey with 3,500 research faculty members. We believe this is the first report on how faculty work with and educate their PhD students on basic research standards. Specifically, we wanted to determine whether individual faculty members, who are advisors or mentors, differ in how they implemented components of responsible conduct of research (RCR) with their PhD students. Mentors were more likely than advisors or supervisors to report working with all of their PhDs, who graduated in the last 5 years, on the 17 recognized critical components of RCR training and research skill development. We also found about half of the faculty members believe RCR is an institutional responsibility versus a faculty responsibility. Less than a quarter have had opportunities to participate in faculty training to be a better mentor, advisor, or research teacher, and about one third of faculty did not or could not remember whether they had guidelines related to their responsibilities to PhD students. We discuss the implications of our findings and focus on ways that PhD research mentoring can be enhanced.

  14. Are human resource professionals strategic business partners?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiu, Randy; Selmer, Jan

    2011-01-01

    place has been less pervasive. Based on a sample of CEOs, line managers and HR executives, this study applies both a quantitative and a qualitative approach to examine the research question whether HR professionals are strategic business partners. Although the overall quantitative results provided...... a weak support for an affirmative answer to the research question, quantitative analyses and the qualitative findings revealed that while HR executives regarded themselves as strategic business partners, CEOs and line managers were not sure that they played this strategic business role. Plausible...

  15. Advances in Biological Function of Toxin-Antitoxin Molecular Systems%毒性分子-抗毒性分子系统的生物学作用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李国利; 胡福泉

    2015-01-01

    毒性分子-抗毒性分子系统( toxin-antitoxin systems,TA systems)被发现广泛存在于细菌染色体、质粒以及古细菌基因组中。TA系统是由2个基因组成的操纵子,这2个基因分别编码稳定的毒性分子和不稳定的抗毒性分子。毒性分子总是蛋白质,抗毒性分子可能是蛋白质或RNA。因此,根据抗毒性分子的性质和作用方式的不同可将TA系统家族分为5种类型。Ⅰ型和Ⅲ型的抗毒性分子是RNA,能抑制毒性分子的合成或者与其隔离;II、IV和V型的抗毒性分子是蛋白质,能隔离、平衡毒性分子作用或抑制其合成。TA系统具有多种生物学功能。目前研究表明,TA系统可能在细菌应激应答、程序化细胞死亡、多重耐药的形成、防止DNA入侵、稳定大基因组片段等方面有重要的作用。%Toxin-antitoxin systems( TA systems)extensively exist in bacterial chromosomes and plasmids as well as in archaic genomes. TA systems is an operon consisting of two genes,they are respectively toxin molecule of stably encoded and anti-toxin molecule of unstably encoded. Toxin molecule is always protein,while antitoxin molecule may be protein or RNA. Therefore,currently TA systems family can be divided into five different types. Antitoxin molecule of type I and type III is RNA,it can inhibit the synthesis of toxin molecule or isolate toxin molecule. Antitoxin mole-cule of type II,IV,and V is protein,it can isolate,balance the role of toxin molecule or inhibit its synthesis. TA systems possess multiple biological functions. Recent studies suggested that TA systems might play important role and have involved in the cell stress response,programmed cell death,the form of multidrug resistance,prevention from DNA invasion,as well as stabilization of large genomic fragments and other aspects.

  16. Skill development in collaborative research projects: A comparison between PhD students in multi-actor research programs and in traditional trajectories

    OpenAIRE

    Wardenaar, T.; Belder, R.; de Goede, M.E.E; Horlings, E.; van den Besselaar, P.

    2014-01-01

    The growing number of PhD students has spurred debates about the societal relevance of PhD training trajectories. The academic labour market does not provide enough jobs and many PhD graduates will have a career outside academia. It has been questioned whether current PhD training trajectories are still adequate and collaborative research projects are introduced as alternative trajectories. Such trajectories can support the development of a broader set of skills, but might have adverse effect...

  17. Exploring challenges of the reproductive health PhD curriculum: A qualitative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Kohan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Enhancing the quality and dynamicity of higher education programs requires continuous evaluation of curriculums. Reproductive health PhD program was established in 2006 in Iran while recommending that its curriculum be evaluated by assessing graduates’ performance in workplace and surveying students, faculty members and managers. This study aimed to explore challenges of the curriculum of reproductive health PhD program. Methods: Employing a qualitative content analysis approach and using purposive and sometimes opportunistic sampling, experiences and viewpoints of 33 graduates and students of reproductive health PhD program, educational managers and reproductive health board members about the curriculum of reproductive health PhD program were collected through individual interviews and notes in 2014-15. Data were transcribed and important expressions were coded. Classification of similar codes led to preliminary categories. Five main categories were extracted by further classifications. Results: The five main categories included inadequacy of course topics and contents, challenges of student education, failure in realizing curriculum goals, long research period, and ambiguity in graduates’ professional status were appeared; each of these included various subcategories. Conclusion: Results showed that the curriculum of reproductive health PhD program required revisions to meet the program’s mission and designing courses such as sexual health and reinforcing the clinical nature of the program were necessary. Moreover, the results emphasized that the establishment of an independent educational department of reproductive health for managing higher education affairs and greater supervision of the reproductive health board on educational affairs was necessary. Furthermore, reproductive health specialists should be employed in different positions to meet society’s reproductive health needs.

  18. [Research misconduct: Knowledge, actions and attitudes of PhD candidates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Bjørn; Holm, Søren

    2016-09-01

    BACKGROUND Increasing attention is being paid to research misconduct in academic journals and in the media, but we know relatively little about its extent or attitudes to research misconduct, or how these are changing. This study therefore aims to investigate PhD candidates' knowledge, own actions and attitudes to specific forms of research misconduct.MATERIAL AND METHOD In autumn 2015, an anonymous questionnaire survey was distributed to all participants in the introductory course for PhD candidates at the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Oslo.RESULTS Altogether 77 PhD candidates (79 %) responded to the questionnaire. A total of 62 % conducted clinical research and 25 % conducted basic research. Around one in four had heard about serious forms of research misconduct in the previous year, and around 4 % were aware of various forms of serious research misconduct in their own department in the previous year. Compared to earlier studies, an increasing number (16 %) responded that they had been subjected to unethical pressure with regard to inclusion or order of authors. Approximately two-thirds were uncertain of whether their department had written policies for academic conduct. One-third of PhD candidates did not disassociate themselves from actions that are generally viewed as scientific misconduct. One-tenth thought it acceptable to falsify or fabricate data in order to expedite publication, one-fifth did not object to taking the credit for others' ideas, and almost half did not believe it was wrong to attempt a number of methods of analysis until one arrived at a significant answer.INTERPRETATION PhD candidates at the Faculty of Medicine were aware of research misconduct, both generally and from their own department. They themselves reported some type of scientific misconduct, and a large majority were uncertain of their department's guidelines. Some of the candidates also accepted several forms of research misconduct.

  19. Structure of the Escherichia coli Antitoxin MqsA (YgiT/b3021) Bound to Its Gene Promoter Reveals Extensive Domain Rearrangements and the Specificity of Transcriptional Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B Brown; T Wood; W Peti; R Page

    2011-12-31

    Bacterial cultures, especially biofilms, produce a small number of persister cells, a genetically identical subpopulation of wild type cells that are metabolically dormant, exhibit multidrug tolerance, and are highly enriched in bacterial toxins. The gene most highly up-regulated in Escherichia coli persisters is mqsR, a ribonuclease toxin that, along with mqsA, forms a novel toxin-antitoxin (TA) system. Like all known TA systems, both the MqsR-MqsA complex and MqsA alone regulate their own transcription. Despite the importance of TA systems in persistence and biofilms, very little is known about how TA modules, and antitoxins in particular, bind and recognize DNA at a molecular level. Here, we report the crystal structure of MqsA bound to a 26-bp fragment from the mqsRA promoter. We show that MqsA binds DNA predominantly via its C-terminal helix-turn-helix domain, with direct binding of recognition helix residues Asn{sup 97} and Arg{sup 010} to the DNA major groove. Unexpectedly, the structure also revealed that the MqsA N-terminal domain interacts with the DNA phosphate backbone. This results in a more than 105{sup o} rotation of the N-terminal domains between the free and complexed states, an unprecedented rearrangement for an antitoxin. The structure also shows that MqsA bends the DNA by more than 55{sup o} in order to achieve symmetrical binding. Finally, using a combination of biochemical and NMR studies, we show that the DNA sequence specificity of MqsA is mediated by direct readout.

  20. Violence and substance use among female partners of men in treatment for intimate-partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wupperman, Peggilee; Amble, Paul; Devine, Susan; Zonana, Howard; Fals-Stewart, William; Easton, Caroline

    2009-01-01

    To improve understanding of the complex dynamics in intimate partner violence (IPV) in heterosexual relationships, we explored violence and substance use among the female partners of men entering treatment for both IPV and substance-related problems. All male participants (n = 75) were alcohol dependent and had at least one domestic-violence arrest. Results showed that female partners were as likely as men to engage in substance use the week before treatment; however, according to reports by the men, the female partners were more likely than men to use substances during the last week of treatment, due to a reported increase in use during the men's treatment. Regarding violence, 59 percent of female IPV victims reported engaging in some form of mild violence against their male partners, and 55 percent reported engaging in some form of severe violence. By contrast, only 23 percent of male batterers reported that their female partners had engaged in mild violence, and only 19 percent reported that their partners had engaged in severe violence. Regardless of whether the violence was defensive in nature, the data suggest that women in relationships involving substance abuse and IPV are in need of treatment. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  1. Children Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence: Conduct Problems, Interventions, and Partner Contact With the Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouriles, Ernest N; Rosenfield, David; McDonald, Renee; Vu, Nicole L; Rancher, Caitlin; Mueller, Victoria

    2016-06-30

    Children's contact with their mother's violent partner is a potentially important variable for understanding conduct problems among children exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV). Within the context of a treatment study evaluating a parenting intervention (Project Support) for families exiting a domestic violence shelter, this study tested four hypotheses regarding children's postshelter contact with their mother's violent partner: (1) participation in Project Support decreases the frequency of children's contact with their mother's violent partner; (2) postshelter contact is positively associated with children's conduct problems and is associated more strongly for girls than boys; (3) frequency of contact mediates Project Support's effects on children's conduct problems; and (4) frequency of contact is positively associated with IPV and partner-child aggression, and these latter associations help explain effects of contact on children's conduct problems. Participants were 66 women (26 White) with a child (32 girls) between 4 and 9 years. Families were assessed every 4 months for 20 months after departure from a domestic violence shelter. Project Support reduced the extent of partner-child contact. In addition, within-subject changes in contact over time were associated with girls', but not boys', conduct problems, and it partially mediated effects of Project Support on girls' conduct problems. Higher average levels of contact over time were also positively associated with further incidents of IPV and partner-child aggression, and partner-child aggression helped explain effects of contact on children's conduct problems. Children's postshelter contact with the mother's violent partner relates positively to several negative family outcomes.

  2. Does working with industry come at a price? A study of doctoral candidates’ performance in collaborative vs. non-collaborative Ph.D. projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salimi, Negin; Bekkers, Rudi; Frenken, Koen

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative Ph.D. projects between university and industry constitute an important aspect of university–industry collaboration, yet has remained under-researched thus far. The specific question this paper asks is how collaborative Ph.D. projects perform compared to non-collaborative Ph.D. projects

  3. Clinical features of 42 patients with drug eruption caused by tetanus antitoxin injection%破伤风抗毒素所致药疹42例临床特点分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵成明; 陈婷婷; 葛永兴; 张敏杰

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To determine the clinical characteristics of drug eruption caused by tetanus antitoxin injection . Methods:The clinical data of 42 cases with drug eruption caused by tetanus antitoxin were analyzed respectively. Results:The skin test was negative in 40 patients and positive in 2 patients. Incubation was 6 to 12 days and the average incubation was 6.5 days. The lesions were presented as erythema in injection area in 2 patients and as generalized rash in 40 patients ( exanthematous type in 6 patients, urticaria type in 32 and erythema multiforme type in 2) . Five of 42 patients accompanied with fever, 5 with voimt and 12 with joint pain. Glucocorticoid was effective in the treatment. Conclusion:The common type of drug eruption caused by tetanus antitoxin injection is urticaria type and some patients have fever, voimt and joint pain. There is no cor-relation between the drug eruption caused by tetanus antitoxin injection and the result of skin test.%目的::明确破伤风抗毒素所致药疹的临床特点。方法:对42例破伤风抗毒素所致药疹的临床资料进行回顾性分析。结果:42例患者中破伤风抗毒素皮试阴性40例,阳性2例。发疹潜伏期6~12天,平均为6.5天,皮疹表现为注射局部红斑2例,全身泛发性皮疹40例(发疹型6例,荨麻疹型32例,多型红斑型2例)。42例患者中伴发热5例,呕吐5例,关节痛12例。糖皮质激素治疗有效。结论:破伤风抗毒素所致药疹最常见类型为荨麻疹型,可伴发热、消化道症状及关节痛。药疹的发生与皮试结果无关。

  4. Strategy Guideline: Partnering for High Performance Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prahl, D.

    2013-01-01

    High performance houses require a high degree of coordination and have significant interdependencies between various systems in order to perform properly, meet customer expectations, and minimize risks for the builder. Responsibility for the key performance attributes is shared across the project team and can be well coordinated through advanced partnering strategies. For high performance homes, traditional partnerships need to be matured to the next level and be expanded to all members of the project team including trades, suppliers, manufacturers, HERS raters, designers, architects, and building officials as appropriate. In an environment where the builder is the only source of communication between trades and consultants and where relationships are, in general, adversarial as opposed to cooperative, the chances of any one building system to fail are greater. Furthermore, it is much harder for the builder to identify and capitalize on synergistic opportunities. Partnering can help bridge the cross-functional aspects of the systems approach and achieve performance-based criteria. Critical success factors for partnering include support from top management, mutual trust, effective and open communication, effective coordination around common goals, team building, appropriate use of an outside facilitator, a partnering charter progress toward common goals, an effective problem-solving process, long-term commitment, continuous improvement, and a positive experience for all involved.

  5. Physical Health Effects of Intimate Partner Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillito, Carrie LeFevre

    2012-01-01

    Although intimate partner violence has been recognized as both a social problem and health issue, the extent to which it is a health issue for both males and females in the general population is largely unknown. This longitudinal research uses data from the National Survey of Family and Households (1987-2003). Random effects logistic regression…

  6. Inferring interaction partners from protein sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Dwyer, Robert S.; Colwell, Lucy J.; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2016-01-01

    Specific protein−protein interactions are crucial in the cell, both to ensure the formation and stability of multiprotein complexes and to enable signal transduction in various pathways. Functional interactions between proteins result in coevolution between the interaction partners, causing their sequences to be correlated. Here we exploit these correlations to accurately identify, from sequence data alone, which proteins are specific interaction partners. Our general approach, which employs a pairwise maximum entropy model to infer couplings between residues, has been successfully used to predict the 3D structures of proteins from sequences. Thus inspired, we introduce an iterative algorithm to predict specific interaction partners from two protein families whose members are known to interact. We first assess the algorithm’s performance on histidine kinases and response regulators from bacterial two-component signaling systems. We obtain a striking 0.93 true positive fraction on our complete dataset without any a priori knowledge of interaction partners, and we uncover the origin of this success. We then apply the algorithm to proteins from ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter complexes, and obtain accurate predictions in these systems as well. Finally, we present two metrics that accurately distinguish interacting protein families from noninteracting ones, using only sequence data. PMID:27663738

  7. Auditory Training with Frequent Communication Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tye-Murray, Nancy; Spehar, Brent; Sommers, Mitchell; Barcroft, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Individuals with hearing loss engage in auditory training to improve their speech recognition. They typically practice listening to utterances spoken by unfamiliar talkers but never to utterances spoken by their most frequent communication partner (FCP)--speech they most likely desire to recognize--under the assumption that familiarity…

  8. Subtyping Male Perpetrators of Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Katherine A.; Westen, Drew

    2011-01-01

    Domestic violence is a serious problem with far-reaching consequences. This study applies a new methodology to derive subtypes of male perpetrators of intimate partner violence. As part of a larger National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)-funded study, a national sample of randomly selected psychologists and psychiatrists describe 188 adult male…

  9. Risk Recognition and Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Tricia H.; Kendra, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether female victims of physical forms of intimate partner violence (IPV) displayed deficits in risk recognition, or the ability to detect danger, in physically violent dating encounters. A total of 182 women watched a video depicting a psychologically and physically aggressive encounter between…

  10. Gender Symmetry, Sexism, and Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Christopher T.; Swan, Suzanne C.; Raghavan, Chitra

    2009-01-01

    This study of a predominantly Hispanic sample of 92 male and 140 female college students examines both gender symmetry in intimate partner violence (IPV) and inconsistent relationships found in previous studies between sexist attitudes and IPV. Results indicate that although comparable numbers of men and women perpetrate and are victimized in…

  11. Yorkie and Scalloped: partners in growth activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Jennifer L; Edgar, Bruce A

    2008-03-01

    The Hippo (Hpo) signaling pathway limits organ growth in organisms from Drosophila to mammals by suppressing the activity of the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie (Yki)/YAP. The TEAD/TEF factor Scalloped (Sd) has been identified as the first known transcription factor to partner with Yki as a downstream target of Hpo signaling.

  12. Self and partner personality in intimate relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barelds, D.P.H.

    2005-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to examine the relations between both partners' personality and marital quality in married or cohabiting heterosexual couples. In Study 1 (N = 1380, or 690 couples), personality was assessed by means of the Dutch Personality Questionnaire, whereas in Study 2 (N = 564, or 2

  13. Making the Most of a Teaching Partner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Boni

    2009-01-01

    Teachers often miss opportunities to use their classroom computers as teaching partners because of a lack of knowledge or confidence about how the computers can support learning. Internet-connected computers can enable teachers to access well-designed websites that support literacy instruction and involve students in interactive responses to…

  14. Bacteriophage ΦM1 of Pectobacterium evolves to escape two bifunctional Type III toxin-antitoxin and abortive infection systems through mutations in a single viral gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blower, Tim R; Chai, Ray; Przybilski, Rita; Chindhy, Shahzad; Fang, Xinzhe; Kidman, Samuel E; Tan, Hui; Luisi, Ben F; Fineran, Peter C; Salmond, George P C

    2017-02-03

    Some bacteria, when infected by their viral parasites (bacteriophages), undergo a suicidal response that also terminates productive viral replication (abortive infection; Abi). This response can be viewed as an altruistic act protecting the uninfected bacterial clonal population. Abortive infection can occur through the action of Type III protein-RNA toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems, such as ToxINPa from the phytopathogen, Pectobacterium atrosepticum Rare spontaneous mutants evolved in the generalized transducing phage, ΦM1, which escaped ToxINPa-mediated abortive infection in P. atrosepticum ΦM1 is a member of the Podoviridae and member of the "KMV-like viruses", a subset of the T7 supergroup. Genomic sequencing of ΦM1 escape mutants revealed single-base changes which clustered in a single open reading frame. The "escape" gene product, M1-23, was highly toxic to the host bacterium when over-expressed, but mutations in M1-23 that enabled an escape phenotype caused M1-23 to be less toxic. M1-23 is encoded within the DNA metabolism modular section of the phage genome, and when it was over-expressed, it co-purified with the host nucleotide excision repair protein, UvrA. While the M1-23 protein interacted with UvrA in co-immunoprecipitation assays, a UvrA mutant strain still aborted ΦM1, suggesting that the interaction is not critical for the Type III TA Abi activity. Additionally, ΦM1 escaped a heterologous Type III TA system (TenpINPl) from Photorhabdus luminescens (reconstituted in P. atrosepticum) through mutations in the same protein, M1-23. The mechanistic action of M1-23 is currently unknown but further analysis of this protein could provide insights into the mode of activation of both systems.

  15. Alcohol Misuse and Multiple Sexual Partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Bazargan-Hejazi, PhD

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We examine the association between self-reported alcohol misuse and alcohol usewithin 2 hours of having sex and the number of sexual partners among a sample of African-Americanand Latino emergency department (ED patients.Methods: Cross-sectional data were collected prospectively from a randomized sample of all EDpatients during a 5-week period. In face-to-face interviews, subjects were asked to report their alcoholuse and number of sexual partners in the past 12 months. Data were analyzed using multiple variablenegative binomial regression models, and effect modification was assessed through inclusion ofinteraction terms.Results: The 395 study participants reported an average of 1.4 (standard error¼0.11 sexual partnersin the past 12 months, 23% reported misusing alcohol, and 28% reported consuming alcohol beforesex. There was no statistically significant association between alcohol misuse and the number ofsexual partners; however, alcohol before sex was associated with a larger number of sexual partners inthe past year. Moreover, among those who misused alcohol, participants who reported alcohol beforesex were 3 times more likely to report a higher number of sexual partners (risk ratio¼3.2; confidenceinterval [CI]¼1.9–5.6. The association between alcohol use before sex and number of sexual partnersis dependent upon whether a person has attributes of harmful drinking over the past 12 months.Overall, alcohol use before sex increases the number of sexual partners, but the magnitude of thiseffect is significantly increased among alcohol misusers.Conclusion: Alcohol misusers and those who reported having more than 1 sexual partner were morelikely to cluster in the same group, ie, those who used alcohol before sex. Efforts to reduce the burdenof sexually transmitted diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus, and other consequences ofrisky sexual behavior in the ED population should be cognizant of the interplay of alcohol and

  16. Substrate preference of the HIF-prolyl hydroxylase-2 (PHD2) and substrate-induced conformational change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pektas, Serap; Knapp, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    HIF prolyl-4-hydroxylase 2 (PHD2) is a non-heme Fe, 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) dependent dioxygenase that regulates the hypoxia inducible transcription factor (HIF) by hydroxylating two conserved prolyl residues in N-terminal oxygen degradation domain (NODD) and C-terminal oxygen degradation domain (CODD) of HIF-1α. Prior studies have suggested that the substrate preference of PHD2 arises from binding contacts with the β2β3 loop of PHD2. In this study we tested the substrate selectivity of PHD2 by kinetic competition assays, varied ionic strength, and global protein flexibility using amide H/D exchange (HDX). Our results revealed that PHD2 preferred CODD by 20-fold over NODD and that electrostatics influenced this effect. Global HDX monitored by mass spectrometry indicated that binding of Fe(II) and 2OG stabilized the overall protein structure but the saturating concentrations of either NODD or CODD caused an identical change in protein flexibility. These observations imply that both substrates stabilize the β2β3 loop to the same extent. Under unsaturated substrate conditions NODD led to a higher HDX rate than CODD due to its lower binding affinity to PHD2. Our results suggest that loop closure is the dominant contributor to substrate selectivity in PHD2.

  17. Partner dependency and intimate partner abuse: A sociocultural grounding of spousal abuse in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adjei, Stephen Baffour

    2015-01-01

    While sociocultural scholarship has attempted an ecological explanation of intimate partner violence, it has largely been criticized for ignoring dispositional factors of both perpetrators and victims. Dependent personality and attachment-related emotional problems have been implicated in the ext......While sociocultural scholarship has attempted an ecological explanation of intimate partner violence, it has largely been criticized for ignoring dispositional factors of both perpetrators and victims. Dependent personality and attachment-related emotional problems have been implicated...... of dependency and attachment-related spousal violence as a form of a psychopathology. This article discusses partner dependency and jealousy-motivated spousal violence as socioculturally situated, dependent on contextual and relational conditions of meaning embedded in the communal society of Ghana....... It highlights Ghanaian communal personality, gendered socialization and meaning systems of marriage as salient sociocultural features for conceptualizing partner dependency and emotional-related spousal violence....

  18. Ants use partner specific odors to learn to recognize a mutualistic partner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru K Hojo

    Full Text Available Regulation via interspecific communication is an important for the maintenance of many mutualisms. However, mechanisms underlying the evolution of partner communication are poorly understood for many mutualisms. Here we show, in an ant-lycaenid butterfly mutualism, that attendant ants selectively learn to recognize and interact cooperatively with a partner. Workers of the ant Pristomyrmex punctatus learn to associate cuticular hydrocarbons of mutualistic Narathura japonica caterpillars with food rewards and, as a result, are more likely to tend the caterpillars. However, the workers do not learn to associate the cuticular hydrocarbons of caterpillars of a non-ant-associated lycaenid, Lycaena phlaeas, with artificial food rewards. Chemical analysis revealed cuticular hydrocarbon profiles of the mutualistic caterpillars were complex compared with those of non-ant-associated caterpillars. Our results suggest that partner-recognition based on partner-specific chemical signals and cognitive abilities of workers are important mechanisms underlying the evolution and maintenance of mutualism with ants.

  19. Rules about casual sex partners, relationship satisfaction, and HIV risk in partnered gay and bisexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grov, Christian; Starks, Tyrel J; Rendina, H Jonathon; Parsons, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The authors used latent class analysis to investigate rules guiding nonmonogamy in partnered gay and bisexual men. Data are from a 2010 survey (N = 463) from which those in relationships (n = 191) were analyzed. More than half (56%) were nonmonogamous, and these men responded to 13 rules about sex outside of their relationship. The safe anonymous sex group (34%) included men who indicated that they must use condoms for anal sex and not have sex with people they know. The communication mandate group (19%) included men who indicated that they must talk about outside partners before sex occurs, disclose their relationship status to outside partners, and use condoms for anal sex. The play together group (9%) included men who indicated that they must play with others as a couple, not have anal sex with outside partners, and not spend the night with outside partners. Those in the no salient rule group (37%) were individuals who did not endorse a clear set of rules. These 4 groups (and compared with monogamous men) differed in age, agreement formality and flexibility, relationship satisfaction, and whether anal sex recently occurred with casual partners. This study provides a novel approach for understanding nonmonogamous same-sex relationships and highlights their complexity.

  20. The proteolytic activation of the relNEs (ssr1114/slr0664) toxin-antitoxin system by both proteases Lons and ClpP2s/Xs of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Degang; Ye, Sen; Liu, Biao; Chang, Jianing

    2011-11-01

    The proteolytic regulation of toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems has been well studied in Escherichia coli but remains unclear in other bacteria. A chromosomal gene pair ssr1114/slr0664, named relNEs, of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 forms a TA system belonging to rel family. Here, we used E. coli strain BL21 (DE3) as a host to characterize the proteolytic regulation of relNEs. The proteases of this strain could not degrade the antitoxin RelN, and the ectopic production of the ATP-dependant protease Lons or ClpP2s/Xs of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 did not affect E. coli growth. Either Lons or ClpP2s/Xs was able to degrade RelN resulting in growth arrest of E. coli due to the activation of RelEs's toxicity, and the presence of RelEs could protect RelN to a certain extent against Lons and ClpP2s/Xs. Our observations suggest that both Lons and ClpP2s/Xs are responsible for RelN proteolysis in the native host under certain conditions. RelN is the first protein substrate identified for cyanobacterial ATP-dependent proteases.

  1. Positive illusions about a partner's personality and relationship quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barelds, Dick P. H.; Dijkstra, Pieternel

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown individuals to hold positive biases about their relationships. The present study examined positive illusions about a partner's specific personality characteristics in relation to relationship quality and personality. Both partners of 120 heterosexual couples participated

  2. National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey: 2010 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey CDC’s National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS) is an ongoing, nationally-representative telephone survey that collects detailed ...

  3. National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS) is an ongoing, nationally representative survey to assess experiences of intimate partner violence,...

  4. Publication ethics from the perspective of PhD students of health sciences: a limited experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arda, Berna

    2012-06-01

    Publication ethics, an important subtopic of science ethics, deals with determination of the misconducts of science in performing research or in the dissemination of ideas, data and products. Science, the main features of which are secure, reliable and ethically obtained data, plays a major role in shaping the society. As long as science maintains its quality by being based on reliable and ethically obtained data, it will be possible to maintain its role in shaping the society. This article is devoted to the presentation of opinions of PhD candidate students in health sciences in Ankara concerning publication ethics. The data obtained from 143 PhD students from the fields of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy and veterinary reveal limited but unique experiences. It also shows that plagiarism is one of the worst issues in the publication ethics from the perspective of these young academics.

  5. Publication rate and PhD enrolment following a medical pre-graduate research programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Marlene; Okkels, Niels; Christensen, Mette Krogh;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In the 1990s, the publication and PhD recruitment rates following the Danish pre-graduate research programme (PGRP) in medicine were 54% and 33%, respectively. Updated estimates are unknown. METHODS: All medical students enrolled in the PGRP at the Faculty of Medicine, Aarhus......, PGRP completion time and years in medical school at the time of PGRP initiation. Supervisors were described by sex, title, position and affiliation. Calculations were tested by the chi-squared test; p ...: Fast completion of the PGRP and early enrolment in the programme were associated with scientific publishing and PhD recruitment. The publication rate has remained stable over time. FUNDING: Authors were funded by their individual affiliations. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant....

  6. Publication rate and PhD enrolment following a medical pre-graduate research programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Marlene; Okkels, Niels; Christensen, Mette Krogh;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In the 1990s, the publication and PhD recruitment rates following the Danish pre-graduate research programme (PGRP) in medicine were 54% and 33%, respectively. Updated estimates are unknown. METHODS: All medical students enrolled in the PGRP at the Faculty of Medicine, Aarhus......% of the overall 224 papers, and 90% were original articles. Publication was positively associated with completion of the PGRP in related to enrolment in the PGRP after fewer years in medical school. CONCLUSIONS......: Fast completion of the PGRP and early enrolment in the programme were associated with scientific publishing and PhD recruitment. The publication rate has remained stable over time. FUNDING: Authors were funded by their individual affiliations. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant....

  7. Protein interactions of the MLL PHD fingers modulate MLL target gene regulation in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, K; Anderson, M; Bulanova, E; Mi, H; Tropschug, M; Diaz, M O

    2001-05-01

    The PHD fingers of the human MLL and Drosophila trx proteins have strong amino acid sequence conservation but their function is unknown. We have determined that these fingers mediate homodimerization and binding of MLL to Cyp33, a nuclear cyclophilin. These two proteins interact in vitro and in vivo in mammalian cells and colocalize at specific nuclear subdomains. Overexpression of the Cyp33 protein in leukemia cells results in altered expression of HOX genes that are targets for regulation by MLL. These alterations are suppressed by cyclosporine and are not observed in cell lines that express a mutant MLL protein without PHD fingers. These results suggest that binding of Cyp33 to MLL modulates its effects on the expression of target genes.

  8. The training, careers, and work of Ph.D. physical scientists: Not simply academic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Steven J.; Pedersen-Gallegos, Liane; Riegle-Crumb, Catherine

    2002-11-01

    We present an in-depth portrait of the training, careers, and work of recent Ph.D. physical scientists. Use of specialized training varies widely, with about half often using knowledge of their Ph.D. specialty area in their jobs. The use of specialized training does not, however, correlate with job satisfaction. In this and other important measures, there are relatively few differences between "academics" and "nonacademics." Important job skills for all employment sectors include writing, oral presentation, management, data analysis, designing projects, critical thinking, and working in an interdisciplinary context. Rankings given by respondents of graduate training in some of these skill areas were significantly lower than the importance of these skills in the workplace. We also found that the rated quality of graduate training varies relatively little by department or advisor. Finally, although nonacademic aspirations among graduate students are fairly common, these do not appear to be well supported while in graduate school.

  9. Interview with Xiaoli Wang PhD winner of CACA 2016 Young Investigator Award

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoli Wang is currently an R&D Senior Scientist in Agilent’s HPLC instrument R&D group at Agilent Technologies, Waldbronn, Germany. Prior to this, he was an R&D manager in Agilent’s CrossLab Group in the US focusing on development of novel chromatographic columns. He has a B.S. degree in Chemistry from Peking University, Beijing China and a PhD. degree in Analytical Chemistry from the University of Minnesota in 2006. He started his industrial career in the pharmaceutical industry at AstraZeneca for four years before joining Agilent Technologies in 2010. Recently, he won the prestigious 2016 Young Investigator Award from Chinese American Chromatography Association (CACA. This interview was conducted by Roland J.W. Meesters PhD, Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Applied Bioanalysis.

  10. Examining the British PhD viva: opening new doors or scarring for life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Bernie; Whittaker, Karen

    2009-01-01

    The PhD viva -- regardless of its format -- has the potential to be a significant rite of passage for the student. It is an experience that can resonate for months or years afterwards. Part of the challenge is that for everyone involved -- student, supervisory team and examiners -- a degree of end-point uncertainty exists. These ambiguities and tensions are perhaps an inherent part of any examination but are particularly characteristic of the examination of the individual and unique body of work that constitutes the doctoral thesis. In recent years, increased attention has been placed on the processes that surround the examination, aiming to increase transparency, consistency and fairness. However, the process of examining a student and their thesis remains challenging and is surrounded by different agendas, ideologies and practices. This paper examines some of the issues surrounding the PhD viva, primarily focusing on the British viva whilst weaving in commentary about the Australian system.

  11. The use of a Virtual Community to Complement the MS PHD'S Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves, I. U.; Brown, D. C.; Bailey, K.; Easley, R.; Johnson, A.; Ithier, W.; Powell, J. M.; Whitney, V. W.; Pyrtle, A. J.

    2005-12-01

    The aim of the Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Sciencer Professional Development Program (MS PHD'S PDP) is to provide professional and mentoring experiences that facilitate the advancement of minorities committed to achieving outstanding Earth system science and engineering careers. The MS PHD'S PDP is structured in three phases that are connected by engagement in virtual community building activities, allowing for continuous peer to peer and mentor to mentee interactions. These activities occur through the use of the MSPHD'S website forum and web cam dialogues. In addition, the virtual community provides the personal and professional support necessary to ensure the success of the students. Examples of interactions within the MSPHD'S PDP virtual community will be presented.

  12. Phd study of reliability and validity: One step closer to a standardized music therapy assessment model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine Lindahl

    The paper will present a phd study concerning reliability and validity of music therapy assessment model “Assessment of Parenting Competences” (APC) in the area of families with emotionally neglected children. This study had a multiple strategy design with a philosophical base of critical realism...... and pragmatism. The fixed design for this study was a between and within groups design in testing the APCs reliability and validity. The two different groups were parents with neglected children and parents with non-neglected children. The flexible design had a multiple case study strategy specifically...... of the theoretical understanding of the clientgroup. Furthermore, a short describtion of the specific assessment protocol and analysis procedures of APC will be a part of the presentation. The phd study sought to explore how to develop measures of parenting competences in looking at autonomy relationship...

  13. HPV genotypes concordance between sex partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevolo, M; Mottolese, M; Marandino, F; Carosi, M; Diodoro, M G; Sentinelli, S; Visca, P; Rollo, F; Mariani, L; Vocaturo, G; Sindico, R; Di Giannuario, D; Perrone Donnorso, R; Pellicciotta, M; Vocaturo, A

    2007-12-01

    The HPV genotype concordance in the sexual couples could support the sexual viral transmission of HPV infection. The present study contains a case-report of a stable Italian sex couple harbouring the same five HPV genotypes in their genital samples. The female partner, affected by vulvar condilomatosis, evidenced positivity in her cervicovaginal scraping with high risk HPV DNA Hybrid Capture 2 test and was negative at liquid-based performed Pap Test and at colposcopic examination. The male partner was clinically healthy regarding his external genitalia. In both male and female genital scrapings, the following HPV genotypes were detected by means of a PCR-based assay: 6, 16, 53, 73 and 84. This considerably high genotype concordance does not appear to be casual and supports, in our opinion, the hypothesis that genital HPV types are sexually transmitted agents

  14. Performance improvement with patient service partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J P

    1998-01-01

    Once the decision is made to use a patient-focused care delivery system, a variety of methods can be used to successfully design the model. The author describes the process used by a multilevel, multidisciplinary team at a community hospital to design and implement a Service Partner role that would meet and exceed customer expectations. Demonstrated performance improvements included increased patient satisfaction, productive labor dollar savings, and improvements in the work environment for staff members.

  15. The Process of Partnering; Gluing Contracts, Organising and Financing together

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Thuesen, Christian; Gottlieb, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses management of partnering projects where construction companies and clients cooperate in developing buildings and services. Taking a practice based theory and political process approach, partnering is seen as an example of a complex project operation, characterised by processual...... interactions between an emergent conceptual frame and the project's operational activities. Drawing on two case studies, it is analyzed how the governance frame of partnering projects is constituted by a combination of partnering elements, traditional contracts and financial arrangements. On the operational...

  16. Including systematic reviews in PhD programmes and candidatures in nursing - 'Hobson's choice'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Cecilia; Ringnér, Anders; Borglin, Gunilla

    2014-03-01

    Nowadays, gathering and synthesising evidence, i.e. conducting systematic reviews, is considered an important part of any health service research endeavour. Reviewing the literature, however suggest that it is not yet common that PhD students/doctoral candidates publish systematic reviews or even include a high quality review of the literature as a part of their PhD programme or candidature. Implying that systematic reviewing skills might not be acquired by going through an education on a postgraduate level. Additionally, scholars debating systematic reviews 'to be or not to be' as a part of research training seem to be sparse, especially within the field of nursing. In this issue for debate, we would like to propose that the absence of systematic reviews' in this context might severely hamper the 'up and coming' researchers as well as the research conducted. We envisage that this lack can have a negative impact on international nursing practice, and therefore propose that systematic reviews should be considered, whenever appropriate, as a mandatory part of any PhD programme or candidature. We believe that abilities in systematic reviewing will be a sought after research skills in the near future. Including systematic reviews would promote i) refined, well-grounded adequate research questions, ii) PhDs with broad and elevated methodological skills, iii) an increased level of evidence based nursing praxis. However, to make this a reality, supervisors, PhD students, and candidates would need to understand the value of this kind of research activity. Finally, lobbying University faculty boards and grant providers that are not inclined to view literature reviews as 'proper' research or as an important part of health service research, needs to be put on the agenda.

  17. Bucharest PhD Training School : Modern Aspects of Quantum Field Theory and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Bucharest 2015 – Modern Aspects of Quantum Field Theory is part of the CERN – SEENET-MTP PhD Training Program, which consists of a number of seminars in theoretical high energy Physics. This is the second seminar organized by this Program. Here are some photos from this event held in Bucharest between 8-14 November 2015. The previous seminar was organized in Belgrade, under the name Belgrade 2015 - Supergravity.

  18. PHD fingers in human diseases: Disorders arising from misinterpreting epigenetic marks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Lindsey A. [Rockefeller University, Laboratory of Chromatin Biology and Epigenetics, 1230 York Avenue, Box 78, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Allis, C. David [Rockefeller University, Laboratory of Chromatin Biology and Epigenetics, 1230 York Avenue, Box 78, New York, NY 10065 (United States)], E-mail: alliscd@rockefeller.edu; Wang, Gang G. [Rockefeller University, Laboratory of Chromatin Biology and Epigenetics, 1230 York Avenue, Box 78, New York, NY 10065 (United States)], E-mail: gwang@rockefeller.edu

    2008-12-01

    Histone covalent modifications regulate many, if not all, DNA-templated processes, including gene expression and DNA damage response. The biological consequences of histone modifications are mediated partially by evolutionarily conserved 'reader/effector' modules that bind to histone marks in a modification- and context-specific fashion and subsequently enact chromatin changes or recruit other proteins to do so. Recently, the Plant Homeodomain (PHD) finger has emerged as a class of specialized 'reader' modules that, in some instances, recognize the methylation status of histone lysine residues, such as histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4). While mutations in catalytic enzymes that mediate the addition or removal of histone modifications (i.e., 'writers' and 'erasers') are already known to be involved in various human diseases, mutations in the modification-specific 'reader' proteins are only beginning to be recognized as contributing to human diseases. For instance, point mutations, deletions or chromosomal translocations that target PHD fingers encoded by many genes (such as recombination activating gene 2 (RAG2), Inhibitor of Growth (ING), nuclear receptor-binding SET domain-containing 1 (NSD1) and Alpha Thalassaemia and Mental Retardation Syndrome, X-linked (ATRX)) have been associated with a wide range of human pathologies including immunological disorders, cancers, and neurological diseases. In this review, we will discuss the structural features of PHD fingers as well as the diseases for which direct mutation or dysregulation of the PHD finger has been reported. We propose that misinterpretation of the epigenetic marks may serve as a general mechanism for human diseases of this category. Determining the regulatory roles of histone covalent modifications in the context of human disease will allow for a more thorough understanding of normal and pathological development, and may provide innovative therapeutic strategies

  19. Patterns in PARTNERing across Public Health Collaboratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine A. Bevc

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Inter-organizational networks represent one of the most promising practice-based approaches in public health as a way to attain resources, share knowledge, and, in turn, improve population health outcomes. However, the interdependencies and effectiveness related to the structure, management, and costs of these networks represents a critical item to be addressed. The objective of this research is to identify and determine the extent to which potential partnering patterns influence the structure of collaborative networks. This study examines data collected by PARTNER, specifically public health networks (n = 162, to better understand the structured relationships and interactions among public health organizations and their partners, in relation to collaborative activities. Combined with descriptive analysis, we focus on the composition of public health collaboratives in a series of Exponential Random Graph (ERG models to examine the partnerships between different organization types to identify the attribute-based effects promoting the formation of network ties within and across collaboratives. We found high variation within and between these collaboratives including composition, diversity, and interactions. The findings of this research suggest common and frequent types of partnerships, as well as opportunities to develop new collaborations. The result of this analysis offer additional evidence to inform and strengthen public health practice partnerships.

  20. Management of Stress and Anxiety Among PhD Students During Thesis Writing: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazrafkan, Leila; Shokrpour, Nasrin; Yousefi, Alireza; Yamani, Nikoo

    2016-01-01

    Today, postgraduate students experience a variety of stresses and anxiety in different situations of academic cycle. Stress and anxiety have been defined as a syndrome shown by emotional exhaustion and reduced personal goal achievement. This article addresses the causes and different strategies of coping with this phenomena by PhD students at Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences. The study was conducted by a qualitative method using conventional content analysis approach. Through purposive sampling, 16 postgraduate medical sciences PhD students were selected on the basis of theoretical sampling. Data were gathered through semistructured interviews and field observations. Six hundred fifty-four initial codes were summarized and classified into 4 main categories and 11 subcategories on the thematic coding stage dependent on conceptual similarities and differences. The obtained codes were categorized under 4 themes including "thesis as a major source of stress," "supervisor relationship," "socioeconomic problem," and "coping with stress and anxiety." It was concluded that PhD students experience stress and anxiety from a variety of sources and apply different methods of coping in effective and ineffective ways. Purposeful supervision and guidance can reduce the cause of stress and anxiety; in addition, coping strategy must be in a thoughtful approach, as recommended in this study.

  1. Substrate-Trapped Interactors of PHD3 and FIH Cluster in Distinct Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Rodriguez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Amino acid hydroxylation is a post-translational modification that regulates intra- and inter-molecular protein-protein interactions. The modifications are regulated by a family of 2-oxoglutarate- (2OG dependent enzymes and, although the biochemistry is well understood, until now only a few substrates have been described for these enzymes. Using quantitative interaction proteomics, we screened for substrates of the proline hydroxylase PHD3 and the asparagine hydroxylase FIH, which regulate the HIF-mediated hypoxic response. We were able to identify hundreds of potential substrates. Enrichment analysis revealed that the potential substrates of both hydroxylases cluster in the same pathways but frequently modify different nodes of signaling networks. We confirm that two proteins identified in our screen, MAPK6 (Erk3 and RIPK4, are indeed hydroxylated in a FIH- or PHD3-dependent mechanism. We further determined that FIH-dependent hydroxylation regulates RIPK4-dependent Wnt signaling, and that PHD3-dependent hydroxylation of MAPK6 protects the protein from proteasomal degradation.

  2. Research Career Persistence for Solar and Space Physics PhD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldwin, Mark B.; Morrow, Cherilynn

    2016-06-01

    Results from a recent graduate student survey found unsurprisingly that Solar and Space Physics (S&SP) PhD graduate students almost all aspire to have research careers in Solar and Space Physics. This study reports on the research career persistence over the first decade of the new millennium for S&SP PhDs. We used publication of science citation indexed articles as the indicator for persistence in a research career. We found that nearly two thirds (64%) of PhDs who graduated between 2001 and 2009 published refereed papers in 2012 or 2013, while 17% of PhDs never published another paper beyond the year they received their PhD. The remaining 19% of PhDs stopped publishing within three years of receiving their PhD. We found no gender difference between research persistence. We also found that though there is statistically no difference on persistence of publishing research between graduates of the largest programs compared to all other programs, there are significant differences between individual programs. This study indicates that a majority of S&SP PhDs find research careers but that a significant fraction pursue careers where publishing in science citation indexed journals is not required. Graduate programs, advisors, and potential graduate students can use these data for career planning and developing mentoring programs that meet the career outcomes of all of their graduates.

  3. "PhD Comics" author Jorge Cham on the power of procrastination

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2015-01-01

    From Tuesday, 22 to Friday, 25 September, Jorge Cham visited CERN. The PHD Movie 2 was screened in the Main Auditorium  and the cartoonist also took part in one of the Researchers' Night events.    Jorge Cham in the CERN Control Centre. On the first day, the author of the comic strip Piled Higher and Deeper (PhD Comics) visited the CERN Control Centre, the Synchrocyclotron, the CMS Service Cavern and the ATLAS control room. On Thursday, he had a busy afternoon, starting with signing copies of his books and then giving a talk entitled “The Power of Procrastination” in a packed Main Auditorium. He made the audience laugh by narrating his experience as a graduate student in robotics at Stanford University, recounting how he started drawing PhD Comics and how it rapidly became popular in universities all over the world. He then analysed the frustrations and anxieties commonly experienced by any graduate student, causing...

  4. A move-step analysis of the concluding chapters in computer science PhD theses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Soler-Monreal

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes how computer science doctoral writers construct the closing chapters of their PhD theses. The data are drawn from the chapters playing a concluding role of 48 PhD theses defended at the University of Glasgow from 2008 to 2014. The analysis applied a qualitative-quantitative approach. The titles of the concluding chapters of the theses were first examined and also their divisions into sections and sub-sections. Then the chapters were subjected to a move-step analysis: Move 1 (M1 “Revisiting the study”; Move 2 (M2 “Consolidating research space”; Move 3 (M3 “Proposing practical applications and implications”, Move 4 (M4 “Recommending future work” and Move 5 (M5 “Recapitulating the study”. The results revealed that most of the computer science PhD theses have one final concluding chapter with three main moves: M1, M2 and M4. The most frequent steps are “reviewing the work carried out” and “summarizing the specific work reported in every thesis chapter” in M1, “presenting results and contributions”, “answering the initial research questions or hypotheses”, and “making claims” in M2, and “acknowledging limitations” and “suggesting further research” in M4. Movestep patterns appear in recurrent cycles throughout the concluding chapters. Several suggestions for pedagogical purposes are provided.

  5. ISO/IEEE 11073 PHD message generation toolkit to standardize healthcare device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Joon-Ho; Park, Chanyong; Park, Soo-Jun; Lee, Kyu-Chul

    2011-01-01

    As senior population increases, various healthcare devices and services are developed such as fall detection device, home hypertension management service, and etc. However, to vitalize healthcare devices and services market, standardization for interoperability between device and service must precede. To achieve the standardization goal, the IEEE 11073 Personal Health Device (PHD) group has been standardized many healthcare devices, but until now there are few devices compatible with the PHD standard. One of main reasons is that it isn't easy for device manufactures to implement standard communication module by analyzing standard documents of over 600 pages. In this paper, we propose a standard message generation toolkit to easily standardize existing non-standard healthcare devices. The proposed toolkit generates standard PHD messages using inputted device information, and the generated messages are adapted to the device with the standard state machine file. For the experiments, we develop a reference H/W, and test the proposed toolkit with three healthcare devices: blood pressure, weighting scale, and glucose meter. The proposed toolkit has an advantage that even if the user doesn't know the standard in detail, the user can easily standardize the non-standard healthcare devices.

  6. Innovation durch Partnering im deutschen Schlüsselfertigbau

    OpenAIRE

    Schmolke, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    In der angloamerikanischen Baubranche werden bereits seit Jahren innovative Managementkonzepte zur Steuerung partnerschaftlicher Kooperationen nach dem Leitgedanken des Partnering zwischen Haupt- und Nachunternehmern im Schlüsselfertigbau erfolgreich umgesetzt. Hierzulande bleibt der Einsatz derartiger Partnering-Modelle bislang jedoch weitgehend unbeachtet. Das Ziel der Arbeit besteht daher darin, wesentliche Elemente und Erfahrungen des angloamerikanischen Partnering-Konzeptes im Hinb...

  7. Partner's Stake in Conformity and Abused Wives' Psychological Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMaris, Alfred; Kaukinen, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the potential buffering effect of help-seeking in the association between intimate partner assault and women's psychological trauma, and how this, in turn, may depend on the partner's stake in conformity. The sample consists of 374 women reporting the experience of domestic violence from a current intimate partner, drawn…

  8. Partner Status, Social Support, and Psychological Adjustment during Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liese, Lawrence H.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Studied partner status, social support, and psychological adjustment of pregnant women. Administered Brief Symptom Inventory to predominantly minority and lower-income pregnant women (N=157) categorized as married, single/partnered, or single/unpartnered. Found single/partnered women were at least risk for emotional disequilibrium and suggested…

  9. Trends in Intimate Partner Violence: 1980-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Rachael A.; Kaukinen, Catherine Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Research on trends in partner violence has primarily relied on official measures of victimization focusing primarily on women's risk for intimate partner homicide. The current study uses 28 years of data from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) to examine the trends of intimate partner violence against female victims and identify…

  10. Positive illusions about a partner's physical attractiveness and relationship quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barelds, Dick P. H.; Dijkstra, Pieternel

    2009-01-01

    The present research examined the existence of positive illusions about a partner's physical attractiveness and its relations to relationship quality. Positive illusions were assumed to exist when individuals rated their partner as more attractive than their partner rated him or herself. In two Dutc

  11. Logistics in Security Force Assistance: Sustainable Partner Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-22

    original hypothesis of this paper was that efforts to build partner capacity historically only included sustainment training in a limited fashion . The...LOGISTICS IN SECURITY FORCE ASSISTANCE: SUSTAINABLE PARTNER DEVELOPMENT A Monograph by MAJ J. Troy Fisher United...Logistics in Security Force Assistance: Sustainable Partner Development 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  12. 45 CFR 162.915 - Trading partner agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Trading partner agreements. 162.915 Section 162... REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS General Provisions for Transactions § 162.915 Trading partner agreements. A covered entity must not enter into a trading partner agreement that would do any of...

  13. National, inter-institutional, graduate modules – blended learning approaches for PhD education in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Cosgrave, Michael; Murphy, Orla

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a case study that describes the design and delivery of national PhD lectures with 40 PhD candidates in Digital Arts and Humanities in Ireland simultaneously to four remote locations, in Trinity College Dublin, in University College Cork, in NUI Maynooth and NUI Galway. Blended learning approaches were utilized to augment traditional teaching practices combining: face-to-face engagement, video-conferencing to multiple sites, social media lecture delivery support – a live blog and...

  14. The influences of partner accuracy and partner memory ability on social false memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numbers, Katya T; Meade, Michelle L; Perga, Vladimir A

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we examined whether increasing the proportion of false information suggested by a confederate would influence the magnitude of socially introduced false memories in the social contagion paradigm Roediger, Meade, & Bergman (Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 8:365-371, 2001). One participant and one confederate collaboratively recalled items from previously studied household scenes. During collaboration, the confederate interjected 0 %, 33 %, 66 %, or 100 % false items. On subsequent individual-recall tests across three experiments, participants were just as likely to incorporate misleading suggestions from a partner who was mostly accurate (33 % incorrect) as they were from a partner who was not at all accurate (100 % incorrect). Even when participants witnessed firsthand that their partner had a very poor memory on a related memory task, they were still as likely to incorporate the confederate's entirely misleading suggestions on subsequent recall and recognition tests (Exp. 2). Only when participants witnessed firsthand that their partner had a very poor memory on a practice test of the experimental task itself were they able to reduce false memory, and this reduction occurred selectively on a subsequent individual recognition test (Exp. 3). These data demonstrate that participants do not always consider their partners' memory ability when working on collaborative memory tasks.

  15. Partner switching can favour cooperation in a biological market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwagmeyer, P L

    2014-09-01

    Intraspecific cooperation and interspecific mutualisms can be promoted by mechanisms that reduce the frequency with which cooperative organisms are exploited by unhelpful partners. One such mechanism consists of changing partners after interacting with an uncooperative individual. I used McNamara et al.'s (Nature, 451, 2008, 189) partner switching model as a framework to examine whether this mechanism can select for increased cooperative investment by house sparrows (Passer domesticus) collaborating to rear offspring; previous research on this species has shown that substantial cooperative investments by both pair members are required to achieve high pay-offs from collaborating. I found that the poorer the outcome of a breeding attempt relative to the number of eggs the female invested, the greater the likelihood of partner switching. The incidence of partner switching changed seasonally, with peak switching coinciding with an increase in the number of alternative partners available to females. After females switched partners, their breeding outcomes rose to match those of females that remained with the same partner; this was not the case for males that switched partners. Consistent with the model's prediction, males in stable partnerships achieved over 25% higher than average reproductive success, which was attributable to both persistently good breeding outcomes and their older partners' high fecundity. These results provide empirical support for the hypothesis that partner switching favours increased cooperative investment levels, and they demonstrate that variation in the relative value of by-product benefits can enhance that process.

  16. TEP Power Partners Project [Tucson Electric Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-02-06

    The Arizona Governor’s Office of Energy Policy, in partnership with Tucson Electric Power (TEP), Tendril, and Next Phase Energy (NPE), formed the TEP Power Partners pilot project to demonstrate how residential customers could access their energy usage data and third party applications using data obtained from an Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) network. The project applied for and was awarded a Smart Grid Data Access grant through the U.S. Department of Energy. The project participants’ goal for Phase I is to actively engage 1,700 residential customers to demonstrate sustained participation, reduction in energy usage (kWh) and cost ($), and measure related aspects of customer satisfaction. This Demonstration report presents a summary of the findings, effectiveness, and customer satisfaction with the 15-month TEP Power Partners pilot project. The objective of the program is to provide residential customers with energy consumption data from AMR metering and empower these participants to better manage their electricity use. The pilot recruitment goals included migrating 700 existing customers from the completed Power Partners Demand Response Load Control Project (DRLC), and enrolling 1,000 new participants. Upon conclusion of the project on November 19, 2013; 1,390 Home Area Networks (HANs) were registered; 797 new participants installed a HAN; Survey respondents’ are satisfied with the program and found value with a variety of specific program components; Survey respondents report feeling greater control over their energy usage and report taking energy savings actions in their homes after participating in the program; On average, 43 % of the participants returned to the web portal monthly and 15% returned weekly; and An impact evaluation was completed by Opinion Dynamics and found average participant savings for the treatment period1 to be 2.3% of their household use during this period.2 In total, the program saved 163 MWh in the treatment period of 2013.

  17. Factors that facilitate or inhibit interest of domestic students in the engineering PhD: A mixed methods study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell Smith, Michelle C.

    Given the increasing complexity of technology in our society, the United States has a growing demand for a more highly educated technical workforce. Unfortunately, the proportion of United States citizens earning a PhD in engineering has been declining and there is concern about meeting the economic, national security and quality of life needs of our country. This mixed methods sequential exploratory instrument design study identified factors that facilitate or inhibit interest in engineering PhD programs among domestic engineering undergraduate students in the United States. This study developed a testable theory for how domestic students become interested in engineering PhD programs and a measure of that process, the Exploring Engineering Interest Inventory (EEII). The study was conducted in four phases. The first phase of the study was a qualitative grounded theory exploration of interest in the engineering PhD. Qualitative data were collected from domestic engineering students, engineering faculty and industry professional who had earned a PhD in engineering. The second phase, instrument development, developed the Exploring Engineering Interest Inventory (EEII), a measurement instrument designed with good psychometric properties to test a series of preliminary hypotheses related to the theory generated in the qualitative phase. In the third phase of the study, the EEII was used to collect data from a larger sample of junior and senior engineering majors. The fourth phase integrated the findings from the qualitative and quantitative phases. Four factors were identified as being significant influences of interest in the engineering PhD: Personal characteristics, educational environment, misperceptions of the economic and personal costs, and misperceptions of engineering work. Recommendations include increasing faculty encouragement of students to pursue an engineering PhD and programming to correct the misperceptions of the costs of the engineering PhD and the

  18. Coordinating the United States Interagency Partnering Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    stage over the last 6 years.7 The DoD is on the cutting edge of partnering and there have been valuable lessons learned at the tactical and...global stage . “3D are the three pillars that provide the foundation for promoting and protecting U.S. national security interests abroad.”33 DoD, DoS...operations now will mean throwing 18 away hard-fought gains, and expose the United States to new risks from across the globalising

  19. Jacobi photonic lattices and their SUSY partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga-Segundo, A; Rodríguez-Lara, B M; Fernández C, David J; Moya-Cessa, H M

    2014-01-13

    We present a classical analog of quantum optical deformed oscillators in arrays of waveguides. The normal modes of these one-dimensional photonic crystals are given in terms of Jacobi polynomials. We show that it is possible to attack the problem via factorization by exploiting the corresponding quantum optical model. This allows us to provide an unbroken supersymmetric partner of the proposed Jacobi lattices. Thanks to the underlying SU(1, 1) group symmetry of the lattices, we present the analytic propagators and impulse functions for these one-dimensional photonic crystals.

  20. Hiring your next partner: AOA critical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasier, R Dale; Gagnon, Michael R; Iannotti, Joseph P; Jarvis-Selinger, Sandra

    2014-09-01

    Hiring a new partner into an orthopaedic department or group can be a daunting task. A recent American Orthopedic Association symposium sought to address three major aspects of hiring that affect orthopaedic leaders: (1) when to hire-the chairperson's role; (2) generational issues that affect hiring; and (3) the development of an initial compensation package.How does the chairperson recruit new physicians? Hiring a new partner into the academic setting requires a good deal of foresight. There must be an established game plan. Advertising and interviews need to be orchestrated. Chairpersons can find information about candidates from many unique sources. Fit within the department and community is important and must be cultivated. Spouses and families need special attention. Research candidates have individual needs. Perhaps the most important aspect of recruitment is the development of a realistic business plan. This paper provides an overview of factors to consider in managing a new hire.Generational issues are intriguing. Should they affect our hiring practices? It seems clear to established physicians that the new generation of graduates is different from their predecessors. Is this really true? Most everyone is familiar with the terms "Silent Generation," "Baby Boomers," "Generation X," and "Generation Y." Is there anything to be gained by categorizing an applicant? Is it important to hire a replica of one's self? This paper provides a thoughtful overview of generational issues as they apply to hiring new partners.Most department chairpersons are not trained as negotiators. Some preparation and experience are helpful in guiding the process of making an initial offer to a candidate. It is not all about pay. The package includes the guarantee period, expectations for the new hire, mentorship, and resources. How much should new orthopaedic academic hires be paid? Recent benchmark data from the Academic Orthopaedic Consortium suggest a mean income of $282,667 for

  1. Touch increases autonomic coupling between romantic partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas eChatel-Goldman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal touch is of paramount importance in human social bonding and close relationships, allowing a unique channel for affect communication. So far the effect of touch on human physiology has been studied at an individual level. The present study aims at extending the study of affective touch from isolated individuals to truly interacting dyads. We have designed an ecological paradigm where romantic partners interact only via touch and we manipulate their empathic states. Simultaneously, we collected their autonomic activity (skin conductance, pulse, respiration. 14 couples participated to the experiment. We found that interpersonal touch increased coupling of electrodermal activity between the interacting partners, regardless the intensity and valence of the emotion felt. In addition, physical touch induced strong and reliable changes in physiological states within individuals. These results support an instrumental role of interpersonal touch for affective support in close relationships. Furthermore, they suggest that touch alone allows the emergence of a somatovisceral resonance between interacting individuals, which in turn is likely to form the prerequisites for emotional contagion and empathy.

  2. An approach to non-traditional partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ornela Fabani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to describe and analyse the evolution of the political-diplomatic and the economic and trade links between Argentina and the Gulf monarchies, as well as the factors that explain this evolution, during the administrations of Cristina Fernandez (2007-2015. Meanwhile, the premise that informs it is that that during Fernandez's governments the political and diplomatic relations between Argentina and the UAE, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and Qatar became more dynamic as a result of the Argentine interest in strengthening economic and trade ties with those States. The deepening of these ties is explained in terms of some of the main areas of Argentina's foreign trade policy, which focus on the following: to diversify trade partners, attract investment and increase the volume of trade. Moreover, the aforementioned actors are perceived as potential partners in that the Gulf monarchies need to ensure food security and advance technological cooperation, in a context marked by the international financial crisis.

  3. Actor and Partner Effects of Adolescents' Romantic Working Models and Styles on Interactions with Romantic Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, Wyndol; Simon, Valerie A.

    2006-01-01

    The present study examined how adolescents' and their romantic partners' romantic working models and relational styles were related to their interactions with each other. Sixty-five couples (M age=18.1 years) were observed interacting. Romantic working models were assessed in interviews about their romantic experiences; romantic styles were…

  4. Designing Comprehensive Partnering Agreements : An Introduction to the Partnering Agreement Scorecard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Pfisterer (Stella); N. Payandeh (Nasim); S. Reid

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAgreements are a key mechanism of partnerships because their role is to govern interactions. They help partnerships become more effective by allowing partners to cope with relational, performance and situational risks that characterise inter-organisational relationships. The Partnerships

  5. Building Better Bridges: An Evaluation of The Bridge to the Ph.D. Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellyn Sanderson, Robyn; Lobel, Caroline; Agueros, Marcel A.; Anderson, Vanessa; Ash, Summer; Purdie-Vaughns, Valerie; Romero-Canyas, Rainer; Walker, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Columbia University's Bridge to the Ph.D. in the Natural Sciences Program is increasing the number of underrepresented scholars entering graduate programs and equipping them to succeed in these programs. In a given year, three to five Bridge participants are hired as full-time Columbia University research assistants for up to two years. Now in its seventh year, the Program supports seven participants, and its alumni (including five astronomers) have gone on to Ph.D. programs across the country. Although to date fewer than 40 people have participated in the Program, a number too small for an exclusively statistical evaluation of its effectiveness, we are collecting invaluable longitudinal data on the career progressions of underrepresented aspiring scientists across the natural sciences. At least a dozen Bridge alumni will earn their Ph.D. in the next two-three years, and we will then learn much more about the impact that the Bridge Program has had on our participants' trajectories. Among other things, we hope to use these data to determine the Program's effectiveness in developing feelings of self-efficacy and participants' confidence in their ability to succeed in doctoral programs, to measure the rate at which Bridge alumni successfully complete doctoral programs relative to their peers, and to identify the aspects of the Program that participants find most helpful to their progress at different stages of their paths to and through doctoral programs. Here we describe the data we have already obtained as part of our on-going study, and preliminary results from our analysis.

  6. Twenty of China's best physics PhD students visited CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Twenty of the top physics PhD students in China were honoured with the 'E=mc2 to modern science' Einstein Award and received a three week tour of major laboratories in Germany and Switzerland, including CERN, DESY and the Max Planck Institute. The Einstein Award is co-sponsored by the German and Swiss Embassies in celebration of the 'Year of Physics' in 2005. For many years, Germany, Switzerland and China have been involved in numerous areas of scientific research and cooperation.

  7. The first Italian doctorate (PhD Course) in Physics Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelini, Marisa; Santi, Lorenzo

    2008-05-01

    The first PhD Italian course in Physics Education Research in Udine aims to qualify young researchers and teachers coming from all the Italian groups of research in the field. It becomes a context for developing research projects carried out following parallel research lines on: Teaching/Learning paths for didactic innovation, cognitive research, ICT for strategies to overcome conceptual knots in physics; E-learning for personalization; d) Computer on-line experiments and modelling; e) Teacher formation and training; f) Informal learning in science.

  8. An interdepartmental Ph.D. program in computational biology and bioinformatics: the Yale perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstein, Mark; Greenbaum, Dov; Cheung, Kei; Miller, Perry L

    2007-02-01

    Computational biology and bioinformatics (CBB), the terms often used interchangeably, represent a rapidly evolving biological discipline. With the clear potential for discovery and innovation, and the need to deal with the deluge of biological data, many academic institutions are committing significant resources to develop CBB research and training programs. Yale formally established an interdepartmental Ph.D. program in CBB in May 2003. This paper describes Yale's program, discussing the scope of the field, the program's goals and curriculum, as well as a number of issues that arose in implementing the program. (Further updated information is available from the program's website, www.cbb.yale.edu.)

  9. Synthesis of the PhD thesis "Anti-money laundering and counter terrorism financing management"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia Popa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available As a whole, this PhD thesis follows three research lines, namely: (1 the conceptual line - concerns the definition of the money laundering and terrorism financing phenomenon, the processes, mechanisms, stages and instruments of the laundering of illegally obtained fund; (2 the estimative line aimed at measuring the size of money laundering phenomenon, the economic, social and security effects and consequences; (3 the line of an awareness of the need to prevent and fight against the effects arising from money laundering processes, the national and international efforts taken until present nation- and worldwide and the future measures required to diminish the consequences of this scourge.

  10. Training of young researchers and PhD supervisors for the future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette

    2004-01-01

    If Europe is to develop an integrated knowledge society and ERA, the research practice has to be developed. Further development of the research practice can among others take place through training of young researchers, which is not only based on the principles of apprenticeship, but a training...... which contributes to break down the usual ways of thinking and to incorporate both intercultural and interdisciplinary principles, and a valued orientation towards trade and industry. The PhD supervisors should also be trained so that light is thrown on the aims, methods and contents of the supervision...

  11. Infrastructure for Personalized Medicine at Partners HealthCare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott T. Weiss

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine (PPM is a center within the Partners HealthCare system (founded by Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital whose mission is to utilize genetics and genomics to improve the care of patients in a cost effective manner. PPM consists of five interconnected components: (1 Laboratory for Molecular Medicine (LMM, a CLIA laboratory performing genetic testing for patients world-wide; (2 Translational Genomics Core (TGC, a core laboratory providing genomic platforms for Partners investigators; (3 Partners Biobank, a biobank of samples (DNA, plasma and serum for 50,000 Consented Partners patients; (4 Biobank Portal, an IT infrastructure and viewer to bring together genotypes, samples, phenotypes (validated diagnoses, radiology, and clinical chemistry from the electronic medical record to Partners investigators. These components are united by (5 a common IT system that brings researchers, clinicians, and patients together for optimal research and patient care.

  12. Preferential partner selection in an evolutionary study of prisoner's dilemma

    CERN Document Server

    Ashlock, D; Stanley, E A; Tesfatsion, L; Ashlock, Dan; Smucker, Mark D; Stanley, E Ann; Tesfatsion, Leigh

    1994-01-01

    Partner selection is an important process in many social interactions, permitting individuals to decrease the risks associated with cooperation. In large populations, defectors may escape punishment by roving from partner to partner, but defectors in smaller populations risk social isolation. We investigate these possibilities for an evolutionary prisoner's dilemma in which agents use expected payoffs to choose and refuse partners. In comparison to random or round-robin partner matching, we find that the average payoffs attained with preferential partner selection tend to be more narrowly confined to a few isolated payoff regions. Most ecologies evolve to essentially full cooperative behavior, but when agents are intolerant of defections, or when the costs of refusal and social isolation are small, we also see the emergence of wallflower ecologies in which all agents are socially isolated. In between these two extremes, we see the emergence of ecologies whose agents tend to engage in a small number of defecti...

  13. Partner Selection Optimization Model of Agricultural Enterprises in Supply Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feipeng Guo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available With more and more importance of correctly selecting partners in supply chain of agricultural enterprises, a large number of partner evaluation techniques are widely used in the field of agricultural science research. This study established a partner selection model to optimize the issue of agricultural supply chain partner selection. Firstly, it constructed a comprehensive evaluation index system after analyzing the real characteristics of agricultural supply chain. Secondly, a heuristic method for attributes reduction based on rough set theory and principal component analysis was proposed which can reduce multiple attributes into some principal components, yet retaining effective evaluation information. Finally, it used improved BP neural network which has self-learning function to select partners. The empirical analysis on an agricultural enterprise shows that this model is effective and feasible for practical partner selection.

  14. The psychopathic intimate partner batterer: a non-psychopathological profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Pozueco-Romero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This theoretical study reviews two of the most cited profiles of intimate partner batterers in the scientific literature, paying special attention to the most notable differences between them, as well as to their common criteria. The study also discusses one of the longest standing controversies in various research studies, including the particular overview with respect to Spain: it being the constant yet erroneous reference to the equivalence of psychopathy and antisocial personality disorder. Similarly, special attention is paid to the implications of considering intimate partner batterers as having either a psychopathological or psychopathic profile, while also stressing the specific role played by psychopathy in the intimate partner batterer and, concerning psychopathic intimate partner batterers, such aspects as their specific motives for perpetrating intimate partner violence and the evaluation instruments of this particular profile. Finally, a series of future directives for research concerning psychopathic intimate partner batterers are also pointed out.

  15. Partner Power: A study of two distance education consortia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Banks Pidduck

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This research reports findings from a study which explored the process and criteria of partner selection – how and why partners are chosen – for two distance education consortia. The researchers reviewed recent literature on partnerships and partner selection. Two Canada-wide distance education consortia were identified as large-scale case studies for investigation of the research theory. A total of 34 informants were contacted. Written business plans, contracts, documents, partner network diagrams, and 231 archival emails from 36 correspondents were collected and analyzed for the two consortia. The research identified four criteria that influence why specific partners are chosen: requirements, resource availability, social network, and reputation. These findings suggest that the formation of partnerships and the process of partner selection are both very complex.

  16. Novel Clostridium difficile Anti-Toxin (TcdA and TcdB Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies Demonstrate In Vitro Neutralization across a Broad Spectrum of Clinical Strains and In Vivo Potency in a Hamster Spore Challenge Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Qiu

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile (C. difficile infection (CDI is the main cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated colitis and increased incidence of community-associated diarrhea in industrialized countries. At present, the primary treatment of CDI is antibiotic administration, which is effective but often associated with recurrence, especially in the elderly. Pathogenic strains produce enterotoxin, toxin A (TcdA, and cytotoxin, toxin B (TcdB, which are necessary for C. difficile induced diarrhea and gut pathological changes. Administration of anti-toxin antibodies provides an alternative approach to treat CDI, and has shown promising results in preclinical and clinical studies. In the current study, several humanized anti-TcdA and anti-TcdB monoclonal antibodies were generated and their protective potency was characterized in a hamster infection model. The humanized anti-TcdA (CANmAbA4 and anti-TcdB (CANmAbB4 and CANmAbB1 antibodies showed broad spectrum in vitro neutralization of toxins from clinical strains and neutralization in a mouse toxin challenge model. Moreover, co-administration of humanized antibodies (CANmAbA4 and CANmAbB4 cocktail provided a high level of protection in a dose dependent manner (85% versus 57% survival at day 22 for 50 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg doses, respectively in a hamster gastrointestinal infection (GI model. This study describes the protective effects conferred by novel neutralizing anti-toxin monoclonal antibodies against C. difficile toxins and their potential as therapeutic agents in treating CDI.

  17. Perpetration and Victimization of Intimate Partner Aggression Among Rural Mothers

    OpenAIRE

    Schwab Reese, Laura M.; Harland, Karisa; Smithart, Kelsey; Ramirez, Marizen

    2015-01-01

    Intimate partner aggression is a leading cause of injury among women of child-bearing age. Research suggests that pregnancy and the postpartum period are times of increased vulnerability to aggression. Since rural women are at an increased risk of intimate partner aggression, research is needed to examine the role of pregnancy and the presence of children on intimate partner aggression among this vulnerable population. The purpose of this study is to examine the association between young chil...

  18. Strategy Guideline. Partnering for High Performance Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prahl, Duncan [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    High performance houses require a high degree of coordination and have significant interdependencies between various systems in order to perform properly, meet customer expectations, and minimize risks for the builder. Responsibility for the key performance attributes is shared across the project team and can be well coordinated through advanced partnering strategies. For high performance homes, traditional partnerships need to be matured to the next level and be expanded to all members of the project team including trades, suppliers, manufacturers, HERS raters, designers, architects, and building officials as appropriate. This guide is intended for use by all parties associated in the design and construction of high performance homes. It serves as a starting point and features initial tools and resources for teams to collaborate to continually improve the energy efficiency and durability of new houses.

  19. New partners of TKS4 scaffold protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kropyvko S. V.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available TKS4 scaffold protein is involved in the formation of invadopodia, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS by tumor cells and other cellular processes. Aim. To identify new TKS4 partners involved in the actin cytoskeleton rearrangements and endo-/exocytosis. Methods. The GST pull-down assay was used to identify the interaction. Results. We revealed that TKS4 SH3 domains interact with the actin cytoskeleton reorganization proteins N-WASP and CR16, as well as with DNM2, SYNJ1 and OPHN1 which are involved in endo-/exocytosis. We also tested the WIP, WIRE, SHIP2, RhoU, RhoV and NUMB proteins, but their interaction with the SH3 domains of TKS4 was not found. Conclusions. The SH3 domains of TKS4 interact with N-WASP, DNM2, SYNJ1, OPHN1 and weakly with CR16 in vitro.

  20. Top Partners Searches and Composite Higgs Models

    CERN Document Server

    Matsedonskyi, Oleksii; Wulzer, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Colored fermionic partners of the top quark are well-known signatures of the Composite Higgs scenario and for this reason they have been and will be subject of an intensive experimental study at the LHC. Performing an assessment of the theoretical implications of this experimental effort is the goal of the present paper. We proceed by analyzing a set of simple benchmark models, characterized by simple two-dimensional parameter spaces where the results of the searches are conveniently visualized and their impact quantified. We only draw exclusion contours, in the hypothesis of no signal, but of course our formalism could equally well be used to report discoveries in a theoretically useful format.

  1. Top partners searches and composite Higgs models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsedonskyi, Oleksii; Panico, Giuliano; Wulzer, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Colored fermionic partners of the top quark are well-known signatures of the Composite Higgs scenario and for this reason they have been and will be subject of an intensive experimental study at the LHC. Performing an assessment of the theoretical implications of this experimental effort is the goal of the present paper. We proceed by analyzing a set of simple benchmark models, characterized by simple two-dimensional parameter spaces where the results of the searches are conveniently visualized and their impact quantified. We only draw exclusion contours, in the hypothesis of no signal, but of course our formalism could equally well be used to report discoveries in a theoretically useful format.

  2. Effects of partner violence in migrant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor Guadalupe Delgadillo Guzmán

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the relationship between partner violence, depression and maternal self-efficacy in migrant women. It is thought that this type of violence brings about sinking morale and a hindrance for their development as mothers. It is a quantitative study of an explanatory correlational type, worked with 40 immigrant women with a residence of two to 25 years, with at least one reported episode of violation and at least one son in preschool. Three instruments were employed: “The Parental Involvement and Efficacy”, “The Survey-Depression Scale” and“The Revised Conflict Tactic Scale”. The results showed important relationships between the variables, namely, the more violence women suffer, the greater the depression is, and the greater the depression is, the lesser the maternal self-efficacy becomes.

  3. Top partner searches and Composite Higgs models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsedonskyi, Oleksii [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Panico, Giuliano [Barcelona Univ. Autonoma (Spain). IFAE; Wulyer, Andrea [Padova Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica e Astronomia; INFN, Padova (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    Colored fermionic partners of the top quark are well-known signatures of the Composite Higgs scenario and for this reason they have been and will be subject of an intensive experimental study at the LHC. Performing an assessment of the theoretical implications of this experimental effort is the goal of the present paper. We proceed by analyzing a set of simple benchmark models, characterized by simple two-dimensional parameter spaces where the results of the searches are conveniently visualized and their impact quantified. We only draw exclusion contours, in the hypothesis of no signal, but of course our formalism could equally well be used to report discoveries in a theoretically useful format.

  4. Partner Selection for Interfirm Collaboration: The Context of Ship Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solesvik, Marina Z.; Encheva, Sylvia

    There is a growing body of research devoted to the issues of cooperative design. However, there are still gaps in the existing knowledge on partner selection for cooperation. This paper intends to explore partner selection issues in the context of collaborative ship design. The study aims to fill a gap in the partner selection literature by proposing a quantitative technique based on formal concept analysis. An illustrative example of the selection of a partner for a project-based alliance in a naval architect firm is presented. The study has implications for practitioners and researchers.

  5. The impact of partner coping in couples experiencing infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, B D; Pirritano, M; Christensen, Ulla

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most studies examining coping with infertility use the individual as the unit of analysis. Although valuable, these studies fail to show the impact that partner coping has on individual distress. Since infertility is a shared stressor, examining the impact of partner coping...... was associated with decreased marital distress in men and increased social distress in women. CONCLUSIONS: Although understudied, partner coping patterns play a key role in a partner's ability to cope with the infertility experience. Physicians and mental health providers can help couples to understand...

  6. Virtual conversation partner for adults with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepagnier, Cheryl Y; Olsen, Dale E; Boteler, Laura; Bell, Corinne A

    2011-01-01

    Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is notable for severely impaired reciprocal social interaction skills relative to language and intellectual abilities, presenting a major barrier to social integration and vocational success. Evidence-based interventions to address these needs are lacking. We report on the development of a small, prototype conversation simulation to teach conversational skills to adolescents and adults with ASD and average to superior intellectual abilities. We also report on a test of the feasibility and acceptability of the simulation approach with a sample of the target population. The simulation engages the user in a virtual conversation with an on-screen partner whose reactions provide naturalistic feedback geared to the appropriateness of the learner's response choices. The prototype simulation, which provides for up to 12 potentially unique multi-turn conversations, was used over a period of 2 weeks by 16 adolescents and adults who then rated statements about the system on a linear scale of 1 (disagreement) to 5 (high agreement). The participants highly endorsed the majority of positive statements about the quality and credibility of the interaction and the virtual conversation partner. In contrast, agreement with positive statements about instructional features external to the conversation was moderate. Unexpectedly, most participants strongly agreed that using the simulation had been helpful to them. Further development and testing in the context of a controlled study with randomized assignment to control and experimental groups are needed to determine whether this approach is effective in improving real-world pragmatic language behavior of high-functioning adults with ASD.

  7. With or without you: does partner satisfaction and partner-directed violence influence the presence of a partner on women's Facebook cover profile photographs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavol Prokop

    Full Text Available Social network sites (SNSs provide new opportunities for online self-presentation of millions of users. The cover profile photograph (CPP along with written information regarding relationship status is a central component of online self-presentation, although their associations with actual romantic relationships are not clear. We investigated relationships between the presence of a current romantic partner on the CPP and the displayed relationship status and partner satisfaction, partner-directed violence and women's intrasexual competition with peers. A total of 28 % of the 158 women with a Facebook profile and being involved in a romantic relationship had their romantic partners on their CPP. As predicted, women with their partners on the CPP were more satisfied with their romantic relationship than others. Furthermore, women who did not have their partner on the CPP tended to conceal or lie in their displayed mating status suggesting that this may be a strategy how to attract another potential mate. The partner-directed violence and intrasexual competition hypotheses were not supported. Overall, the CPP and an honestly displayed relationship status is an expression of relationship satisfaction amongst women.

  8. High Rate of Partner Treatment Among Chlamydia trachomatis-Infected Pregnant Women in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh; Cabeza, Jeanne; Segura, Eddy; García, Patricia J; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2016-05-01

    This was a substudy of 60 Chlamydia trachomatis-infected women from a larger study of pregnant women in Lima, Peru. Participants were encouraged to bring their partners in for concurrent patient-partner treatment. The alternative partner treatment was expedited partner therapy. Partner treatment uptake was 91.7%. Twenty-one partners (38.2%) received treatment through concurrent patient-partner treatment, and 34 (61.8%) through expedited partner therapy. Living with the partner was significantly associated with having the partner treated (P=0.0028).

  9. Next gen PhD a guide to career paths in science

    CERN Document Server

    Sinche, Melanie V

    2016-01-01

    For decades, top scientists in colleges and universities pursued a clear path to success: enroll in a prestigious graduate program, conduct research, publish papers, complete the PhD, pursue postdoctoral work. With perseverance and a bit of luck, a tenure-track professorship awaited at the end. In today s academic job market, this scenario represents the exception. As the number of newly conferred science PhDs keeps rising, the number of tenured professorships remains stubbornly stagnant. Only 14 percent of those with PhDs in science occupy tenure-track positions five years after completing their degree. Next Gen PhD provides a frank and up-to-date assessment of the current career landscape facing science PhDs. Nonfaculty careers once considered Plan B are now preferred by the majority of degree holders, says Melanie Sinche. An upper-level science degree is a prized asset in the eyes of many employers, and a majority of science PhDs build rewarding careers both inside and outside the university. A certified ...

  10. Home healthcare settop-box for senior chronic care using ISO/IEEE 11073 PHD standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Joon-Ho; Park, Chanyong; Park, Soo-Jun

    2010-01-01

    As the number of seniors with chronic disease increases, the need of home healthcare settop-box is increased to manage their chronic disease in their home environment. Using the home healthcare settop-box, the patients can regularly check their health data, and finally, it can lead the decrease of medical expenses. For the home healthcare settop-box, the most important factor is the standard compatibility, which can interoperate with standard devices of any other companies. In this paper, we propose a home healthcare settop-box using ISO/IEEE 11073 PHD standard. It collects health data according to the PHD standard, and provides a chronic-care service based on the collected data. The proposed settop-box is connected with 3 devices of weigh scale, blood pressure monitor, and glucose meter, and tested at 10 homes for a month. Lastly, the proposed settop-box can be used for various healthcare services such as Google Health and Telemedicine Services using a healthcare platform server.

  11. First ‘Gentner Doktor’ finishes PhD at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Jordan Juras

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, the CERN Doctoral Student Programme saw the addition of the Gentner Doctoral Student Programme, named in honour of the celebrated nuclear physicist, Wolfgang Gentner. Four years later, on 22 June 2011, Marcel Schuh finished his PhD with a thesis in the field of accelerator technology and became the very first ‘Gentner Doktor’.   Marcel Schuh, first 'Gentner Doktor', celebrates completing his PhD. (Photo by Carsten P. Welsch) Marcel Schuh became a Gentner student in April 2008, after completing a physics degree in 2007 at the University of Heidelberg. His thesis allowed him to gain exposure to CERN and the LHC, as he worked on monitoring and control systems for trigger and readout electronics on the ALICE detector at the LHC. With the support of university supervisor, Carsten P. Welsch, Schuh applied for a Gentner Doctoral Studentship on the Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) project. “My task was to evaluate whether dedicated higher order mode (HOM) coupler...

  12. Columbia's Bridge to the Ph.D. Program: A research-focused initiative facilitating the transition to graduate school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüeros, Marcel A.

    2015-01-01

    Columbia University's Bridge to the Ph.D. in the Natural Sciences Program aims to enhance the participation of students from underrepresented groups in Ph.D. programs. To achieve this, the Bridge Program provides an intensive research, coursework, and mentoring experience to post-baccalaureates seeking to strengthen their graduate school applications and to prepare for the transition into graduate school. To date, 20 Bridge Program alumni --- including four in astronomy --- have gone on to Ph.D. programs at Columbia, the University of Michigan, Johns Hopkins, the University of Washington, Albert Einstein, Yale, and SUNY-Albany, among others. In this talk, I will touch on some of the connections between Pre-MAP and the Bridge Program, and particularly how my involvement in the former prepared me to lead the latter.

  13. Romantic partners in a market perspective: expectations about what ensures a highly desirable partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Felipe N; Hattori, Wallisen T; Yamamoto, Maria Emília; Lopes, Fívia A

    2013-10-01

    This study used the biological market perspective and influential statistical models from the marketing field to investigate males' and females' expectations regarding which combination of characteristics are most relevant in ensuring desirable partnerships for same-sex individuals. Thus, 358 Brazilian undergraduates assessed eight descriptions of same-gender stimulus targets (formulated with different levels of physical attractiveness, social skills, and current or prospective social status) and evaluated the overall desirability of the targets' expected or probable partners. From the possible combinations, three groups emerged: for one group, mainly composed of men, status characteristics were the most important attributes; for the others, mostly composed of women, social skills or physical characteristics were identified as most important in appealing to a desirable partner. This work expands the understanding of variability in male and female romantic expectations, and its implications are discussed from an evolutionary perspective.

  14. The Road to Become a Legitimate Scholar: A Case Study of International PhD Students in Science and Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Bøgelund

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the doctoral education process is to create and legitimize scholarly researchers. This transformation, from student to scholar, is widely discussed in the literature. However, recent rapid changes in university culture have resulted in less time for supervision, stricter completion deadlines, and a greater focus on efficiency and productivity. This has had an impact on this transition process, and this impact has not been widely studied. The aim of this article is to understand the consequences of the current trends for PhD students and the education of PhD students in general. The article is based on interviews with 14 international students from two different research programs at the Faculty of Engineering and Science at Aalborg University in Denmark. The case of international PhD students in a western setting is singled out as a challenging case for becoming a legitimate scholar, since they face the additional challenge of becoming socialised into their new foreign setting. Overall, the study concludes that the transition process of doctoral students is affected by the way different supervisors deal with current university trends and how PhD students fit or do not fit into their knowledge production practices. The study identifies matches or mismatches in a knowledge production perspective, quality of contact, and degree of independence of the PhD student as factors that influence whether a transition process can be marked as sound, troublesome, or lacking. Finally, the study identifies an overall risk of neglecting the more interdependent types of international PhD students. Suggestions are given as how to address this risk.

  15. The PHD finger of human UHRF1 reveals a new subgroup of unmethylated histone H3 tail readers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Lallous

    Full Text Available The human UHRF1 protein (ubiquitin-like containing PHD and RING finger domains 1 has emerged as a potential cancer target due to its implication in cell cycle regulation, maintenance of DNA methylation after replication and heterochromatin formation. UHRF1 functions as an adaptor protein that binds to histones and recruits histone modifying enzymes, like HDAC1 or G9a, which exert their action on chromatin. In this work, we show the binding specificity of the PHD finger of human UHRF1 (huUHRF1-PHD towards unmodified histone H3 N-terminal tail using native gel electrophoresis and isothermal titration calorimetry. We report the molecular basis of this interaction by determining the crystal structure of huUHRF1-PHD in complex with the histone H3 N-terminal tail. The structure reveals a new mode of histone recognition involving an extra conserved zinc finger preceding the conventional PHD finger region. This additional zinc finger forms part of a large surface cavity that accommodates the side chain of the histone H3 lysine K4 (H3K4 regardless of its methylation state. Mutation of Q330, which specifically interacts with H3K4, to alanine has no effect on the binding, suggesting a loose interaction between huUHRF1-PHD and H3K4. On the other hand, the recognition appears to rely on histone H3R2, which fits snugly into a groove on the protein and makes tight interactions with the conserved aspartates D334 and D337. Indeed, a mutation of the former aspartate disrupts the formation of the complex, while mutating the latter decreases the binding affinity nine-fold.

  16. Short Hairpin RNA Silencing of PHD-2 Improves Neovascularization and Functional Outcomes in Diabetic Wounds and Ischemic Limbs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J Paik

    Full Text Available The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α is responsible for the downstream expression of over 60 genes that regulate cell survival and metabolism in hypoxic conditions as well as those that enhance angiogenesis to alleviate hypoxia. However, under normoxic conditions, HIF-1α is hydroxylated by prolyl hydroxylase 2, and subsequently degraded, with a biological half-life of less than five minutes. Here we investigated the therapeutic potential of inhibiting HIF-1α degradation through short hairpin RNA silencing of PHD-2 in the setting of diabetic wounds and limb ischemia. Treatment of diabetic mouse fibroblasts with shPHD-2 in vitro resulted in decreased levels of PHD-2 transcript demonstrated by qRT-PCR, higher levels of HIF-1α as measured by western blot, and higher expression of the downstream angiogenic genes SDF-1 and VEGFα, as measured by qRT-PCR. In vivo, shPHD-2 accelerated healing of full thickness excisional wounds in diabetic mice compared to shScr control, (14.33 ± 0.45 days vs. 19 ± 0.33 days and was associated with an increased vascular density. Delivery of shPHD-2 also resulted in improved perfusion of ischemic hind limbs compared to shScr, prevention of distal digit tip necrosis, and increased survival of muscle tissue. Knockdown of PHD-2 through shRNA treatment has the potential to stimulate angiogenesis through overexpression of HIF-1α and upregulation of pro-angiogenic genes downstream of HIF-1α, and may represent a viable, non-viral approach to gene therapy for ischemia related applications.

  17. Psychosocial adjustment and marital intimacy among partners of patients with breast cancer: a comparison study with partners of healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Helena; Canavarro, Maria Cristina

    2013-01-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated the psychosocial adjustment of 70 partners of patients with breast cancer by comparing their emotional adjustment and quality of life (QoL) with 70 partners of women without cancer. The role of marital intimacy in their adjustment and the moderating effect of group type were analyzed. The partners of patients with breast cancer presented higher levels of anxious and depressive symptomatology; poor social, psychological, general and physical QoL; and higher levels of intimacy. The moderation analysis showed that higher levels of intimacy predicted lower levels of depression and anxiety and greater QoL only among the partners of cancer patients.

  18. A Study on Changes of Supervision Model in Universities and Fostering Creative PhD Students in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Lingling; Zhou, Chunfang; Zhang, Song

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to explore the changes of supervision model in higher education in relation to fostering creative Ph.D. students in China. The changes are being made from the traditional Apprentice Master Model (AMM) to the modern Collaborative Cohort Model (CCM). According to the results...... of the empirical work done by questionnaire survey, this study shows in the background of the Big Science Era and according to theories on systematic view of creativity, the new CCM improves Ph.D. students’ creativity to some extent; however, problems exist in the creativity development mechanisms. So this paper...

  19. Hypoxia and loss of PHD2 inactivate stromal fibroblasts to decrease tumour stiffness and metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Chris D; Pedersen, Jesper Thorhauge; Venning, Freja A;

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) interact with tumour cells and promote growth and metastasis. Here, we show that CAF activation is reversible: chronic hypoxia deactivates CAFs, resulting in the loss of contractile force, reduced remodelling of the surrounding extracellular matrix and......, which can be prevented by simultaneous depletion of HIF-1α. Treatment with the PHD inhibitor DMOG in an orthotopic breast cancer model significantly decreases spontaneous metastases to the lungs and liver, associated with decreased tumour stiffness and fibroblast activation. PHD2 depletion in CAFs co...

  20. Differences between Partners from Heterosexual, Gay, and Lesbian Cohabiting Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdek, Lawrence A.

    2006-01-01

    Partners from four types of couples without children (gay unmarried, lesbian unmarried, heterosexual unmarried, and heterosexual married, Ns=1,412, 1,310, 1,036, and 1,728, respectively) were compared to partners from heterosexual married couples with children ("N"= 3,116) on mean levels of variables from a model of relationship adjustment as well…

  1. Associating Pregnancy with Partner Violence against Chinese Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ko Ling; Brownridge, Douglas A.; Tiwari, Agnes; Fong, Daniel Y. T.; Leung, Wing Cheong; Ho, Pak Chung

    2011-01-01

    The present study discusses if pregnancy is a risk factor for intimate partner violence using a large, representative sample containing detailed information on partner violence including physical and sexual abuse as well as perpetrator-related risk factors. Data from a representative sample of 2,225 men were analyzed. The self-reported prevalence…

  2. Examining the Interface Between Substance Misuse and Intimate Partner Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M. Monti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable theoretical and empirical support for a link between substance misuse and perpetration and victimization of intimate partner violence. This review briefly summarizes this literature and highlights current research that addresses the interface between treatment for substance abuse and intimate partner violence. Suggestions for future research and clinical implications are provided.

  3. Care Partner Responses to the Onset of Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blieszner, Rosemary; Roberto, Karen A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: We examined characteristics, responses, and psychological well-being of care partners who support and assist older adults recently diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Design and Methods: Based on a sample of 106 care partners of community residents diagnosed with MCI at memory clinics, we conducted face-to-face interviews…

  4. Partner's stake in conformity and abused wives' psychological trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaris, Alfred; Kaukinen, Catherine

    2008-10-01

    This study investigates the potential buffering effect of help-seeking in the association between intimate partner assault and women's psychological trauma, and how this, in turn, may depend on the partner's stake in conformity. The sample consists of 374 women reporting the experience of domestic violence from a current intimate partner, drawn from the larger survey Violence and Threats of Violence Against Women and Men in the United States, 1994-1996. Help-seeking did not appear to buffer the impact of assault severity, contrary to expectation. However, the partner's stake in conformity did condition the effect of his or her having been arrested. Victims had higher levels of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) when police arrested partners of average or below-average stake in conformity. But victims of partners characterized by higher than average stake in conformity did not show elevated PTSD due to their partners having been arrested. On the other hand, PTSD was higher among women experiencing more emotional abuse from the partner.

  5. Betriebliche Bildungsmanager als Business Partner: Professionalisierung und Kompetenzen

    OpenAIRE

    Breßler, Julia; Gehde, Karla

    2015-01-01

    Das Paper ist motiviert durch die Arbeiten von Hasanbegovic, die Bildungsmanagement einbetten in Beratungsforschung und in Managementkonzepte sowie die Arbeit von Diesner, die den Typ 3 Bildungsmanagement als Business Partner einführt. Aufgrund dieser Vorarbeiten analysieren wir betriebliche Bildungsmanager als Business Partner und erarbeiten ein spezifisches Kompetenzprofil. Darauf aufbauend synthetisieren wir die Ergebnisse im Hinblick auf die Professionalisierungstheorie nach Freidson. ...

  6. Parenting and Women Arrested for Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Catherine A.; Lehmann, Peter; Dia, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Exploring the relationship between parenting and women's use of violence the current study surveyed 106 mothers arrested for intimate partner violence (IPV) related crimes on parenting styles and attitudes toward when using violence against their partner is justified. Findings indicate parenting styles indicative of low belief in using physical…

  7. Intimate Partner Violence: Building Resilience with Families and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortham, Thomasine T.

    2014-01-01

    Intimate partner violence includes physical, emotional, or sexual maltreatment from an intimate partner that may include name-calling, hitting, controlling behaviors, use of weapons, rape, intimidation, and a plethora of other physical and emotional tactics (Kress, Protivnak, & Sadlak, 2008; United States Department of Justice, 2013). Such…

  8. Self and partner personality and responses to relationship threats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Pieternel; Barelds, Dick P. H.

    2008-01-01

    Two studies examined the relations between three different types of jealousy and personality characteristics of self and partner in two large heterogeneous community samples of heterosexual couples (459 and 230 couples, respectively). It was expected that partners would resemble each other to some e

  9. Gender Differences in Expectations of Self and Future Partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, Lawrence H.; Coleman, Marilyn

    1992-01-01

    Investigated expectations that 131 single female and 103 male college students had for themselves and their future marital partners. Genders did not differ on expectations for personal success but did differ on expectations for success of future marital partner. Women expected more success for future husbands than men expected for wives.…

  10. Spinal-Cord-Injured Individual's Experiences of Having a Partner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Sanne

    2015-01-01

    Having a partner is a strong factor in adaptation to the new life situation with a spinal cord injury (SCI). Still, more knowledge in detail about the partner's influences according to the experiences of individuals with SCI could contribute to the understanding of the situation after an injury...

  11. PARTNER: A Marie Curie Initial Training Network for hadron therapy

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN BULLETIN; Nathalie Hospital; Manuela Cirilli

    2011-01-01

    PARTNER is a 4-year Marie Curie Training project funded by the European Commission with 5.6 million Euros aimed at the creation of the next generation of experts. Ten academic institutes and research centres and two leading companies are participating in PARTNER, that is coordinated by CERN, forming a unique multidisciplinary and multinational European network.

  12. Female Intimate Partner Violence Survivors' Experiences with Accessing Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Amy L.; Hays, Danica G.; Chang, Catherine Y.

    2010-01-01

    This phenomenological study investigates the types of personal and community resources that female intimate partner violence (IPV) survivors used when leaving an abusive male partner. Three African American and 2 European American IPV survivors, ages 24 to 38 years, described positive and negative experiences with social support, personal…

  13. Intimate Partner Violence and Belief Systems in Liberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Mary; Devitt, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Intimate partner violence is endemic in parts of the African continent. A small scale survey (n = 229) was conducted in 2009 in Northern Liberia, West Africa, to determine the prevalence and nature of intimate partner violence, and the cultural beliefs and gender norms that underpin respondent experiences and views towards intimate partner…

  14. Attitudes toward Intimate Partner Violence in Dating Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincham, Frank D.; Cui, Ming; Braithwaite, Scott; Pasley, Kay

    2008-01-01

    Prevention of intimate partner violence on college campuses includes programs designed to change attitudes, and hence, a scale that assesses such attitudes is needed. Study 1 (N = 859) cross validates the factor structure of the Intimate Partner Violence Attitude Scale-Revised using exploratory factor analysis and presents initial validity data on…

  15. Interaction Design Patterns for ePartners : Method and Example

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulissen, R.T.; Neerincx, M.A.; Cremers, A.H.M.; Kranenborg, K.

    2013-01-01

    An ePartner is a personal computer application that helps its user to achieve personal goals such as managing his or her health related behaviors concerning nutrition, exercise and medication. The aim of the first phase of the ‘ePartners that Care’ project is to achieve a general method and framewor

  16. Institutional Distance and Partner Selection in International Technological Alliances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krammer, Marius

    2013-01-01

    This study posits that institutional distance has a negative influence on partner selection in international technological alliances. Empirical results based on a dataset of firms in the global tire industry confirm that firms prefer technological partners from closer cognitive, normative and regula

  17. Sex Partner with No Zika Symptoms Transmits Virus: CDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_160643.html Sex Partner With No Zika Symptoms Transmits Virus: CDC New report also highlights ties between Zika ... HealthDay News) -- U.S. health officials report that the Zika virus can be spread sexually even when a partner ...

  18. Trauma Symptoms among Infants Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogat, G. Anne; DeJonghe, Erika; Levendosky, Alytia A.; Davidson, William S.; von Eye, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether infants have a traumatic response to intimate partner violence (male violence toward their female partner; IPV) experienced by their mothers, two questions were explored: (1) Is the number of infant trauma symptoms related to the infant's temperament and the mother's mental health? (2) Does severity of violence…

  19. 76 FR 68745 - Seneca Power Partners, L.P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ...] Seneca Power Partners, L.P. v. New York Independent System Operator, Inc.; Notice of Complaint Take... and Procedures, 18 CFR 385.206, Seneca Power Partners, L.P. (Complainant) filed a complaint against... TTY, call (202) 502-8659. Comment Date: 5 p.m. Eastern Time on November 28, 2011. Dated: October...

  20. The crossover of burnout and its relation to partner health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Bakker (Arnold)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractTwo studies among medical residents and teachers in the Netherlands and Greece tested the hypothesis that burnout may transfer from employees to their intimate partners at home and indirectly influence the partner's health. Study 1 included a general index of self-rated health, whereas,

  1. Síntese, caracterização e estudos de interação de um análogo da antitoxina CcdA empregando fluorescência no estado estacionário Synthesis, characterization and interaction studies of an analog of CcdA antitoxin by steady state fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Aparecida Cotrim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxin-antitoxin (TA systems contribute to plasmid stability by a mechanism called post-segregational killing. The ccd was the first TA system to be discovered with CcdB being the toxin and CcdA the antitoxin. CcdA, an 8.3 kDa protein, interacts with CcdB (11.7 kDa, preventing the cytotoxic activity of CcdB on the DNA gyrase. As an approach to understanding this interaction, CcdA41, a polypeptide derived from CcdA, was synthesized by solid-phase methodology and its interaction with CcdB was analyzed by steady state fluorescence. CcdA41 formed a stable complex with CcdBET2, a peptide based on CcdB, the more recently described bacterial topoisomerase inhibitor.

  2. Serving Many Masters: The PhD on the Labour Market, the Everlasting Need of Inequality, and the Premature Death of Humboldt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, Jurgen

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed German doctoral degree holders to examine the processes and outcomes of doctoral training and their impact on subsequent careers and work affiliations. Found a positive outcome of the Ph.D. on the labor market, and that selection for doctoral training is biased by social origin while later career attainment among Ph.D. holders is not. (EV)

  3. Are MS in Economics Programs in Departments That Also Have a PhD Program in Economics Different from Their Counterparts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milkman, Martin I.; Marjadi, Riza; McCoy, James P.

    2016-01-01

    This is the first article that compares terminal master's degree programs in economics from universities that have a PhD program in economics with those that do not offer PhD programs in economics. The authors compare these differences based on surveys in 2002 and 2012. They examine differences in general program characteristics, department…

  4. Practitioner Profile: An Interview with Anne Brennan Malec, Ph.D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Brennan Malec

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dr. Anne Brennan Malec is the founder and managing partner of Symmetry Counseling, a counseling, coaching, and psychotherapy group practice located in downtown Chicago. She has been the driving force behind Symmetry Counseling’s success – what started in 2011 with six offices and five counselors now houses over 25 clinicians.

  5. Telling partners about chlamydia: how acceptable are the new technologies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker Rhian M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Partner notification is accepted as a vital component in the control of chlamydia. However, in reality, many sexual partners of individuals diagnosed with chlamydia are never informed of their risk. The newer technologies of email and SMS have been used as a means of improving partner notification rates. This study explored the use and acceptability of different partner notification methods to help inform the development of strategies and resources to increase the number of partners notified. Methods Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 40 people who were recently diagnosed with chlamydia from three sexual health centres and two general practices across three Australian jurisdictions. Results Most participants chose to contact their partners either in person (56% or by phone (44%. Only 17% chose email or SMS. Participants viewed face-to-face as the "gold standard" in partner notification because it demonstrated caring, respect and courage. Telephone contact, while considered insensitive by some, was often valued because it was quick, convenient and less confronting. Email was often seen as less personal while SMS was generally considered the least acceptable method for telling partners. There was also concern that emails and SMS could be misunderstood, not taken seriously or shown to others. Despite these, email and SMS were seen to be appropriate and useful in some circumstances. Letters, both from the patients or from their doctor, were viewed more favourably but were seldom used. Conclusion These findings suggest that many people diagnosed with chlamydia are reluctant to use the new technologies for partner notification, except in specific circumstances, and our efforts in developing partner notification resources may best be focused on giving patients the skills and confidence for personal interaction.

  6. Marital dysfunction and personality characteristics of partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Draganić-Gajić Saveta

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction A number of studies indicate that an early trauma is of extreme importance (most often experienced in the family of origin in developing personality disorders. Researches on correlations between family dysfunction and individual psychopathology have been rare and controversial. The reason for this stems from an attempt to establish links between traditional medical models and systemic family therapy. The aim of this research was to explore specific personality structures of married couples and the way they relate to the type of dysfunction within the partner relationship. Material and methods The sample consisted of 25 families in the middle of divorce. The examinees were aged 25-45. Specific interactional behavioral patterns were examined by Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS, while personality profile data were obtained using Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI. Results and conclusions In both groups dependency and obsessivness were marked, while males also presented with marked narcissism. Related to structural personality disorders, we have found only a group of men with significantly increased paranoid dimension. Concerning clinical syndromes, the obtained results revealed anxiety and depressive disorder in both genders and a tendency towards alcohol abuse among men. Results indicated to correlation of communication-interactive family patterns on one hand, and certain personality traits on the other. .

  7. Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence Speak Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Tracy A; Finley, Erin; Liebschutz, Jane M

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify characteristics that facilitate trust in the patient-provider relationship among survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV). DESIGN Semistructured, open-ended interviews were conducted to elicit participants' beliefs and attitudes about trust in interactions with health care providers. Using grounded theory methods, the transcripts were analyzed for common themes. A community advisory group, composed of advocates, counselors and IPV survivors, helped interpret themes and interview exerpts. Together, key components of trust were identified. SETTING Eastern Massachusetts. PARTICIPANTS Twenty-seven female survivors of IPV recruited from community-based IPV organizations. MAIN RESULTS Participants' ages ranged from 18 to 56 years, 36% were African American, 32% Hispanic, and 18% white. We identified 5 dimensions of provider behavior that were uniquely important to the development of trust for these IPV survivors: 1) communication about abuse: provider was willing to openly discuss abuse; 2) professional competency: provider asked about abuse when appropriate and was familiar with medical and social histories; 3) practice style: provider was consistently accessible, respected confidentiality, and shared decision making; 4) caring: provider demonstrated personal concern beyond biomedical role through nonjudgmental and compassionate gestures, empowering statements, and persistent, committed behaviors; 5) emotional equality: provider shared personal information and feelings and was perceived by the participant as a friend. CONCLUSIONS These IPV survivors identified dimensions of provider behavior that facilitate trust in their clinical relationship. Strengthening these provider behaviors may increase trust with patients and thus improve disclosure of and referral for IPV. PMID:12911643

  8. Problem gambling and intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Lorne M; Collins, Jane; Dutton, Don; Dhayananthan, Bramilee; Littman-Sharp, Nina; Skinner, Wayne

    2008-03-01

    This study examined the prevalence and severity of intimate partner violence (IPV) among 248 problem gamblers (43 women, 205 men) recruited from newspaper advertisements. The main outcome measures used were the Canadian Problem Gambling Index, the Conflicts Tactics Scale-2, the State Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2, the drug and alcohol section of the Addiction Severity Index and the substance use section of the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV. In this sample, 62.9% of participants reported perpetrating and/or being the victims of IPV in the past year, with 25.4% reporting perpetrating severe IPV. The majority of the sample (64.5%) also had clinically significant anger problems, which was associated with an increased risk of being both the perpetrator and victim of IPV. The presence of a lifetime substance use disorder among participants who had clinically significant anger problems further increased the likelihood of both IPV perpetration and victimization. These findings underscore the importance of routinely screening gambling clients for anger and IPV, and the need to develop public policy, prevention and treatment programs to address IPV among problem gamblers. Future research to examine IPV among problem gamblers is recommended.

  9. Trajectories of Intimate Partner Violence Victimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M. Swartout

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purposes of this study were to assess the extent to which latent trajectories of female intimate partner violence (IPV victimization exist; and, if so, use negative childhood experiences to predict trajectory membership.Methods: We collected data from 1,575 women at 5 time-points regarding experiences during adolescence and their 4 years of college. We used latent class growth analysis to fit a series of personcentered, longitudinal models ranging from 1 to 5 trajectories. Once the best-fitting model was selected, we used negative childhood experience variables—sexual abuse, physical abuse, and witnessing domestic violence—to predict most-likely trajectory membership via multinomial logistic regression.Results: A 5-trajectory model best fit the data both statistically and in terms of interpretability. The trajectories across time were interpreted as low or no IPV, low to moderate IPV, moderate to low IPV, high to moderate IPV, and high and increasing IPV, respectively. Negative childhood experiences differentiated trajectory membership, somewhat, with childhood sexual abuse as a consistent predictor of membership in elevated IPV trajectories.Conclusion: Our analyses show how IPV risk changes over time and in different ways. These differential patterns of IPV suggest the need for prevention strategies tailored for women that consider victimization experiences in childhood and early adulthood. [West J Emerg Med. 2012;13(3:272–277.

  10. Partners in quality: managing your suppliers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, B A

    1991-05-01

    Just expecting more from your supplier is not what partnership is about. We have had the experience where the quality improvement and partnership banner has been waved but the tone and spirit of the meeting did not encourage or support a joint quality improvement effort. Benefits will not be achieved until the wall truly begins to come apart and the relationship is built on mutual respect and trust. Data collection and open answers to questions often reveal embarrassing errors and obvious needs for improvements. As stated before, blame and finger-pointing must be replaced with a mutual commitment to asking and answering the question, "How can we improve?" As Dr. W. Edwards Deming has stated, "End the practice of awarding business on the basis of price tag. Instead, minimize total cost. Move toward a single supplier for any one item on a long-term relationship of loyalty and trust." The structured approach of a quality improvement process and the application of quality methods and techniques has proven useful in removing emotion and helping the team focus on the process rather than the people and the issues involved. Quality improvement methods are focused on achieving both customer and supplier goals--customer satisfaction, employee satisfaction, and operational efficiency and effectiveness. Our experience with Partners in Quality as well as our experience with the quality leadership process supports a recent quote in the Harvard Business Review: "Quality is not just a slogan...(it is) the most profitable way to run a business."

  11. 26 CFR 1.736-1 - Payments to a retiring partner or a deceased partner's successor in interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... time of his death or retirement of the withdrawing partner's interest in all the assets of the... shall not be considered to have terminated upon the death of the partner but shall terminate as to both... interest in partnership property in an arm's length agreement will be regarded as correct. If...

  12. An Initial Test of Inconsistent Nurturing as Control Theory: How Partners of Drug Abusers Assist Their Partners' Sobriety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Poire, Beth A.; Hallett, Jennifer S.; Erlandson, Karen T.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses how inconsistent nurturing as control theory asserts that because of competing goals of nurturing and controlling, partners of drug-dependent individuals will unintentionally encourage the very behavior they are trying to extinguish through inconsistent manifestations of reinforcement and punishment. Finds that partners of substance…

  13. PhD students at Science & Technology exploring student learning in a collaborative video-circle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Hougaard, Rikke F.

    A teaching course for PhD students at Science & Technology, Aarhus University, working as Teaching Assistants (TAs) has been iteratively developed to have two consecutive modules. Role-plays at course days and a "teaching in practice" assignment between modules have indicated that the TAs struggle...... to facilitate students' exploratory talk in small class teaching, lab exercises etc. A potential third module organized as a video-circle with collaborative analysis of the TAs teaching based on observation and video has therefore been tested. The TAs reflections and their enactments in own teaching have been...... of seeing peers teach and getting feedback from professionals. In addition they appreciated the equal atmosphere in the group. there are indications that the TAs focused on student learning by consciously supporting students' exploratory talk in their new enactments. Parts of the TAs reflections...

  14. Preliminary and Partial Inventory of PhD Theses and their Authors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coordinators TRI's National Network

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The mission statement of the Terrorism Research Initiative (TRI is “Enhancing Security through Collaborative Research”. TRI has been encouraging young scholars who are in the process of writing their PhD theses to link up and collaborate with fellow researchers in their own countries. As a result, post-graduate students have begun to interact for their own mutual benefit and for the good of the wider research community. In fact, in a number of cases several senior, post-doctoral scholars have also joined TRI’s national networks of those studying terrorism, political violence and armed conflict, and ways to prevent and counter such threats to human security. 

  15. Researcher Profile: An Interview with John E. Grable, Ph.D., CFP(R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Grable

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available John E. Grable, Ph.D., CFP(R teaches and conducts research in the Certified Financial Planner(TM Board of Standards undergraduate and graduate programs at the University of Georgia. Prior to entering the academic profession, he worked as a pension/benefits administrator and later as a Registered Investment Advisor in an asset management firm. He served as the founding editor for the Journal of Personal Finance and as the co-founding editor of the Journal of Financial Therapy. His research interests include financial risk-tolerance assessment, psychophysiological economics, and financial planning help-seeking behavior. Dr. Grable has published nearly 100 peer-reviewed papers, co-authored two financial planning textbooks, and co-edited a financial planning and counseling scales book. He currently writes a quarterly column for the Journal of Financial Service Professionals, serves as academic consultant to the Journal of Financial Planning, and chair the CFP Board Council on Education.

  16. Introduction to EU Grants and Fellowships for PhD students and early Post-docs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epp Julia

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This talk is based on the presentation “Introduction to EU Grants and Fellowships for PhD students and early Post-docs” and aims at informing young scientists about individual funding schemes in FP7 Specific Programmes “People” and “Ideas”. It also aims at encouraging young scientists employed at Max Planck Institutes in the “Regional Cluster Bavaria”, or scientists who wish to come to Max Planck Institutes which are part of the cluster, to benefit from the support of the Regional EU Office Bavaria, whose consultants can give valuable administrative and tailor-made internal advice to add on the success of a competitive scientific proposal.

  17. Researcher Profile: An Interview with Sonya Britt, Ph.D., CFP, AFC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya Britt

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Sonya Britt, Ph.D., CFP, AFC graduated from Texas Tech University in 2010 with a doctorate in Personal Financial Planning. Her first two degrees are from Kansas State University in Personal Financial Planning (B.S. and Marriage and Family Therapy (M.S.. and she was the founding president of the Financial Therapy Association and recently retired from the board as past-president. She currently serves on the board of the American Council on Consumer Interests association. Sonya is an associate editor for the Journal of Family and Economic Issues and on the editorial board of the Journal of Financial Therapy and on the international scientific board of the Italian Journal of Sociology of Education.

  18. Researcher Profile: An Interview with Virginia Solis Zuiker, Ph.D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Solis Zuiker

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Virginia Solis Zuiker is an Associate Professor in the Department of Family Social Science at the University of Minnesota. She teaches courses on personal and family finance, family financial counseling, family resource management, economic perspectives of families, and family decision-making. Her scholarly research focus is in the area of economic well-being of families with particular interest in self-employment and family-owned businesses. Her research focuses on the Hispanic family life and she is the author of “Hispanic Self-Employment in the Southwest: Rising Above the Threshold of Poverty,” (Garland Publishing, 1997. She received her B.S. from the University of North Texas, an M.S. from Texas Tech University, and a Ph.D. from The Ohio State University. She served three years on the Board of Directors for the Association of Financial Counseling and Planning Education.

  19. Fundraising for Accelerated Study for the PhD in Nursing: A Community Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starck, Patricia L

    2015-01-01

    This article describes fundraising strategies by a School of Nursing to support a post-master's accelerated (3-year) PhD degree program. A sample proposal to solicit funds is included, as well as a contract that students sign before accepting the scholarship and agreeing to teach for 3 years or repay the money. The first campaign raised $2.3 million for ten students, and the second campaign raised $1.3 million for six students. One useful marketing strategy is to show the impact of an investment in educating ten doctoral students who will become faculty and teach 100 additional students per year, who will then become professionals caring for thousands of patients during their careers. Over a 10 year period, the impact of an accelerated program is enormous, with 660 students taught who in their lifetime will care for 2.4 million patients. The article also discusses motivation and mind sets for giving to promote success in fundraising.

  20. Frizzled to finance: one PhD's path from a Drosophila lab to Wall Street.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Job

    2016-06-01

    An equity research analyst's job is to determine whether the price of a stock is likely to go up or down. For science-based businesses, particularly biotechnology companies, a PhD in the life sciences can be very helpful in making this determination. I transitioned from a postdoc position to working in equity research. Here I present information on how I made the transition, an overview of the day-to-day activities of an analyst, and thoughts on how to prepare to look for a job in finance. There are significant positives to working on Wall Street, including exposure to cutting-edge clinical/translational research, access to some of the best scientists in the world, a dynamic work environment, and compensation that generally exceeds academic salaries. This comes at the cost of some independence and the satisfaction of being able to call oneself a scientist.

  1. Better than nothing? Patient-delivered partner therapy and partner notification for chlamydia: the views of Australian general practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowden Francis J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genital chlamydia is the most commonly notified sexually transmissible infection (STI in Australia and worldwide and can have serious reproductive health outcomes. Partner notification, testing and treatment are important facets of chlamydia control. Traditional methods of partner notification are not reaching enough partners to effectively control transmission of chlamydia. Patient-delivered partner therapy (PDPT has been shown to improve the treatment of sexual partners. In Australia, General Practitioners (GPs are responsible for the bulk of chlamydia testing, diagnosis, treatment and follow up. This study aimed to determine the views and practices of Australian general practitioners (GPs in relation to partner notification and PDPT for chlamydia and explored GPs' perceptions of their patients' barriers to notifying partners of a chlamydia diagnosis. Methods In-depth, semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 40 general practitioners (GPs from rural, regional and urban Australia from November 2006 to March 2007. Topics covered: GPs' current practice and views about partner notification, perceived barriers and useful supports, previous use of and views regarding PDPT. Transcripts were imported into NVivo7 and subjected to thematic analysis. Data saturation was reached after 32 interviews had been completed. Results Perceived barriers to patients telling partners (patient referral included: stigma; age and cultural background; casual or long-term relationship, ongoing relationship or not. Barriers to GPs undertaking partner notification (provider referral included: lack of time and staff; lack of contact details; uncertainty about the legality of contacting partners and whether this constitutes breach of patient confidentiality; and feeling both personally uncomfortable and inadequately trained to contact someone who is not their patient. GPs were divided on the use of PDPT - many felt concerned that it is not

  2. 26 CFR 301.6223(h)-1 - Responsibilities of pass-thru partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Responsibilities of pass-thru partner. 301.6223... Responsibilities of pass-thru partner. (a) In general. The pass-thru partner shall, within 30 days of receiving... tax matters partner, or another pass-thru partner, forward a copy of that notice or information to...

  3. Interview with the expert: William E. Collins, Ph.D. Interviewed by Vicki Glaser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, William E

    2009-10-01

    William Collins, Ph.D., received his B.S. and M.Sc. degrees in entomology from Michigan State University. He completed his Ph.D. at Rutgers University in two years, just before being inducted into the Army to serve in the Korean War. He was assigned to Fort Detrick at the Biological Warfare Research Laboratories and after three years returned to Rutgers as an extension entomologist. He accepted a position in 1959 with the U.S. Public Health Service, with which he has worked for the last 50 years. In 1963, the Public Health Service laboratory moved to Atlanta and Dr. Collins' group began working with non-human primates following the discovery that monkey malarias were transmissible to humans. Parasites from monkeys or apes isolated in Asia, South America, and Africa were sent to the laboratory in Chamblee, Georgia, where they were adapted and transmitted to laboratory-maintained primates and their life cycles described and characterized. Transmissions to human volunteers were also attempted. In 1973, the laboratory operation was transferred to the CDC, and the emphasis changed from the study of monkey malaria in monkeys to that of human malaria in monkeys. During the last 25 to 30 years, different isolates of human malaria parasites have been adapted to New World monkeys to characterize the isolates for the development and testing of drugs and vaccines. Dr. Collins' task has been to identify and choose the best combination of vector-parasite-host combinations for testing each vaccine candidate. He has co-authored more than 450 manuscripts and has been awarded the U.S. Public Health Service Superior Service Award, The Joseph A. LaPrince Medal for Malariology from the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, The Distinguished Service Award of the Department of Health and Human Services, the William Watson Medal of Excellence from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Hoogstraal Medal from the American Committee of Medical Entomology.

  4. PhD Students' Experiences of Thesis Supervision in Malaysia: Managing Relationships in the Midst of Institutional Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Steven Eric; Ismail, Ismi Arif

    2010-01-01

    Despite the plethora of studies that have been conducted on PhD supervision, little qualitative investigation has been conducted with a diverse, non-Western sample of doctoral students in an attempt to understand how the supervisory relationship is experienced. In response, eighteen students from diverse, non-Western backgrounds studying at one…

  5. Multimodal Identity Texts as Mediational Spaces in Researching Ph.D. Students' Critical Teacher-Researcher Selves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Marlon; Herath, Sreemali

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses how two Ph.D. students used multimodal identity texts (MMITs) to document their research journeys as they engaged in their doctoral studies. Drawing on qualitative data collected from multiple pre-service teacher preparation programmes in Chile and Sri Lanka, two bi-national researchers (a Colombian-Canadian and a Sri…

  6. Quality Indicators and Expected Outcomes for Social Work PhD Programs: Perceptions of Social Work Students, Faculty, and Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petr, Christopher G.; Harrington, Donna; Kim, Kyeongmo; Black, Beverly; Cunningham-Williams, Renee M.; Bentley, Kia J.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents and discusses the results of a national survey of social work PhD students, faculty, and administrators (n = 416), conducted by the Group for the Advancement of Doctoral Education in Social Work (GADE), in December 2012. The survey was undertaken to inform the updating of GADE's 2003 "Guidelines for Quality in Social…

  7. Trends in Ph.D. Productivity and Diversity in Top-50 U.S. Chemistry Departments: An Institutional Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Sandra L.; Weston, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    The education of doctoral chemists contributes to the chemical research enterprise and thus to innovation as an engine of the economy. This quantitative analysis describes trends in the production and diversity of chemistry Ph.D. degrees in the top-50 U.S. Ph.D.-granting departments in the past two decades. Time series data for individual…

  8. Assessment Procedures of Norwegian PhD Theses as Viewed by Examiners from the USA, the UK and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyvik, Svein

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the assessment procedures of Norwegian PhD theses as viewed by external members of evaluation committees from three countries with different examination systems; the USA, the UK and Sweden. Their viewpoints give useful information not only on the pros and cons with the Norwegian system, but also on the strengths and…

  9. On the Importance of PhD Institute in Establishing a Long-Term Research Career in Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, B K; Vassiliadis, E; Sevenster, M N; Jones, D H; Thornberry, R K; Gibson, Brad K.; Buxton, Michelle; Vassiliadis, Emanuel; Sevenster, Maartje N.; Thornberry, Rebecca K.

    1999-01-01

    We have examined the success rates of 19 American, Canadian, Australian, and Dutch graduate programs in producing astronomers. A 20-year baseline was considered (1975-1994), incorporating 897 PhD recipients. The major conclusion from our study is that the fraction of PhD graduates still involved in astronomical research is surprisingly insensitive to the institutional source of one's PhD. With few exception, 55-75% of graduates, regardless of PhD source, remain active in the astronomical research community. While it remains true that graduates of so-called ``prestigious'' programs preferentially populate the same, it is also clear that an abundance of opportunities exist at smaller ``non-prestigious'' institutions, liberal arts colleges, government, and industry. The latter, of course, generally carry enhanced administrative and/or teaching duties, but, on the other hand, do not entirely preclude a role in the research community. A Kepler-Meier survival analysis of two disparate institutes demonstrates that `...

  10. PhD Topic Arrangement in "D"iscourse Communities of Engineers and Social Sciences/Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasrati, Mostafa; Street, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This article is the result of a grounded theory investigation into the ways PhD topics are assigned by supervisors in engineering and selected by students in the social sciences/humanities in UK universities, broadly referred to as "topic arrangement", which can be regarded as one aspect of academic socialisation into academic Discourse…

  11. Who Am I versus Who Can I Become? Exploring Women's Science Identities in STEM Ph.D. Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szelényi, Katalin; Bresonis, Kate; Mars, Matthew M.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the science identities of 21 women STEM Ph.D. students at three research universities in the United States. Following a narrative approach, the findings depict five salient science identities, including those of a) academic, b) entrepreneurial, c) industrial, and d) policy scientist and e) scientist as community educator. Our…

  12. Learning to Write a Research Article: Ph.D. Students' Transitions toward Disciplinary Writing Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castello, Montserrat; Inesta, Anna; Corcelles, Mariona

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study designed from a socially situated and activity theory perspective aimed at gaining a deeper understanding of how Ph.D. students regulate their academic writing activity. Writing regulation is a complex activity of a highly situated and social nature, involving cyclical thought-action-emotion dynamics and the…

  13. De-Colonising International Collaboration: The University of Kwazulu-Natal-Mauritius Institute of Education Cohort PhD Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Michael Anthony; Mariaye, Hyleen

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the setting up of the partnership across the Mauritian and South African higher education contexts with respect to the development of a postgraduate PhD doctoral studies programme. The Mauritian Institute of Education (MIE) aims to develop staffing capacities through engagement with doctoral studies, especially in the context…

  14. Now or Later?: An Empirical Investigation of When and Why Students Apply to Clinical Psychology PhD Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimak, Eric H.; Edwards, Katie M.; Johnson, Shannon M.; Suhr, Julie

    2011-01-01

    This study used a national sample of PhD students in clinical psychology (N = 1,034) to explore when students decided to pursue their graduate degree, reasons for their decisions, and associated satisfaction. Results indicated that immediately after completing their undergraduate degree, 57% of current graduate students reported postponing…

  15. Standard-compliant real-time transmission of ECGs: harmonization of ISO/IEEE 11073-PHD and SCP-ECG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo, Jesús D; Chiarugi, Franco; Alesanco, Alvaro; Martínez-Espronceda, Miguel; Chronaki, Catherine E; Escayola, Javier; Martínez, Ignacio; García, José

    2009-01-01

    Ambient assisted living and integrated care in an aging society is based on the vision of the lifelong Electronic Health Record calling for HealthCare Information Systems and medical device interoperability. For medical devices this aim can be achieved by the consistent implementation of harmonized international interoperability standards. The ISO/IEEE 11073 (x73) family of standards is a reference standard for medical device interoperability. In its Personal Health Device (PHD) version several devices have been included, but an ECG device specialization is not yet available. On the other hand, the SCP-ECG standard for short-term diagnostic ECGs (EN1064) has been recently approved as an international standard ISO/IEEE 11073-91064:2009. In this paper, the relationships between a proposed x73-PHD model for an ECG device and the fields of the SCP-ECG standard are investigated. A proof-of-concept implementation of the proposed x73-PHD ECG model is also presented, identifying open issues to be addressed by standards development for the wider interoperability adoption of x73-PHD standards.

  16. Device interoperability and authentication for telemedical appliance based on the ISO/IEEE 11073 Personal Health Device (PHD) Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caranguian, Luther Paul R; Pancho-Festin, Susan; Sison, Luis G

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we focused on the interoperability and authentication of medical devices in the context of telemedical systems. A recent standard called the ISO/IEEE 11073 Personal Health Device (X73-PHD) Standards addresses the device interoperability problem by defining common protocols for agent (medical device) and manager (appliance) interface. The X73-PHD standard however has not addressed security and authentication of medical devices which is important in establishing integrity of a telemedical system. We have designed and implemented a security policy within the X73-PHD standards. The policy will enable device authentication using Asymmetric-Key Cryptography and the RSA algorithm as the digital signature scheme. We used two approaches for performing the digital signatures: direct software implementation and use of embedded security modules (ESM). The two approaches were evaluated and compared in terms of execution time and memory requirement. For the standard 2048-bit RSA, ESM calculates digital signatures only 12% of the total time for the direct implementation. Moreover, analysis shows that ESM offers more security advantage such as secure storage of keys compared to using direct implementation. Interoperability with other systems was verified by testing the system with LNI Healthlink, a manager software that implements the X73-PHD standard. Lastly, security analysis was done and the system's response to common attacks on authentication systems was analyzed and several measures were implemented to protect the system against them.

  17. The "Academic" Qualities of Practice: What Are the Criteria for a Practice-based PhD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Richard; Griffiths, Morwenna; Green, Kath

    2000-01-01

    A questionnaire to Ph.D. examiners across disciplines explored criteria appropriate for evaluating practice-based doctoral dissertations, in particular by collecting a core vocabulary of terms. Negative criteria included the lack of: intellectual grasp, coherence, engagement with the literature, originality, and generalizability, along with…

  18. Heteronormativity and sexual partnering among bisexual Latino men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel; Garcia, Jonathan; Wilson, Patrick A; Parker, Richard G; Severson, Nicolette

    2015-05-01

    Our analyses address the question of how bisexual Latino men organize their sexual partnerships. Heteronormativity can be understood as the set of social norms and normative structures that guide sexual partnering among men and women. We provide descriptive statistics to describe bisexual Latino men's sexual partnerships. Logistic and linear regression modeling were used to explore bivariate and multivariate relationships. Of our total sample (N = 142), 41.6 % had unprotected vaginal intercourse 2 months prior to the interview; 21.8 % had unprotected anal intercourse with female partners; 37.5 % had unprotected insertive anal intercourse with male partners; and 22.5 % had unprotected receptive anal intercourse with male partners. In our multivariate model, machismo was directly associated with meeting female partners through formal spaces (workplace, school, and/or church), but inversely associated with meeting male partners in formal spaces. Machismo was positively associated with meeting male sex partners through social networks (i.e., friendship and kinship networks). The more comfortable men were with homosexuality the less likely they were to meet men online and the more likely they were to meet men through social networks of friends and kinship. Interventions to reduce sexually transmitted diseases that target bisexual behavior as an epidemiological "bridge" of transmission from homosexual to heterosexual networks might very well benefit from a more complex understanding of how Latino bisexuality is patterned. Thus, this exploratory analysis might lead to a rethinking of how to address risk and vulnerability among Latino bisexual men and their sexual networks.

  19. Partner Services in STD Prevention Programs: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogben, Matthew; Collins, Dayne; Hoots, Brooke; O’Connor, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Background Partner services have been a mainstay of public health sexually transmitted disease (STD) prevention programs for decades. The principal goals are to interrupt transmission and reduce STD morbidity and sequelae. In this paper, we review current literature with the goal of informing STD prevention programs. Methods We searched the literature for systematic reviews. We found nine reviews published between 2005 and 2014 (covering 108 studies). The reviews varied by study inclusion criteria (e.g., study methods, geographic location, infections). We abstracted major conclusions and recommendations from the reviews. Results Conclusions and recommendations were divided into patient referral interventions and provider referral interventions. For patient referral, there was evidence supporting the use of expedited partner therapy and interactive counseling, but not purely didactic instruction. Provider referral through Disease Intervention Specialists was efficacious and particularly well-supported for HIV. For other studies, modeling data and testing outcomes showed that partner notification in general reached high-prevalence populations. Reviews also suggested more focus on using technology and population-level implementation strategies. However, partner services may not be the most efficient means to reach infected persons. Conclusions Partner services programs constitute a large proportion of program STD prevention activities. Value is maximized by balancing a portfolio of patient and provider referral interventions and by blending partner notification interventions with other STD prevention interventions in overall partner services program structure. STD prevention needs program-level research and development to generate this portfolio. PMID:26779688

  20. Women's experience of intimate partner violence in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Anastasia J

    2005-07-01

    This study examined individual, partner, and community characteristics associated with the occurrence of intimate partner violence among ever-married women of reproductive age, using data from the 2000 Haiti Demographic and Health Survey. Separate logistic regressions were analyzed to assess women's risks of experiencing emotional, physical and sexual violence and multiple forms of intimate partner violence in the past 12 months. Twenty-nine percent of women in the sample experienced some form of intimate partner violence in the past 12 months, with 13 percent having experienced at least two different forms of violence. Significant positive associations with all forms of violence were found for lack of completion of primary school, history of violence exposure in women's families of origin either through witnessing violence between parents while growing up or direct experience of physical violence perpetrated by family members, partner's jealousy, partner's need for control, partner's history of drunkenness, and female-dominated financial decision-making. Significant positive associations were found between men's physical abuse of children at the community level and women's risk of experiencing emotional and physical violence. Neighborhood poverty and male unemployment, number of children living at home, women's attitudinal acceptance of wife beating, and male-dominated financial decision-making were additional risk factors for sexual violence. Women's economic independence was a protective factor for emotional and physical violence, while relationship quality was protective for all forms of violence and multiple victimizations.