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Sample records for antipsychotic-naive first-episode schizophrenia

  1. Hippocampal and caudate volume reductions in antipsychotic-naive first-episode schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebdrup, Bjørn Hylsebeck; Glenthøj, Birte; Rasmussen, Hans

    2010-01-01

    enlargement and hippocampal and caudate volume reductions are morphological traits of antipsychotic-naive first-episode schizophrenia. METHODS: We obtained high-resolution 3-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans for 38 antipsychotic-naive first-episode schizophrenia patients and 43 matched...

  2. Hippocampal and caudate volume reductions in antipsychotic-naive first-episode schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebdrup, Bjørn Hylsebeck; Glenthøj, Birte; Rasmussen, Hans

    2010-01-01

    enlargement and hippocampal and caudate volume reductions are morphological traits of antipsychotic-naive first-episode schizophrenia. METHODS: We obtained high-resolution 3-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans for 38 antipsychotic-naive first-episode schizophrenia patients and 43 matched...... healthy controls by use of a 3-T scanner. We warped the brain images to each other by use of a high-dimensional intersubject registration algorithm. We performed voxel-wise group comparisons with permutation tests. We performed small volume correction for the hippocampus, caudate and ventricles by use...... that hippocampal and caudate volumes were decreased in patients with first-episode schizophrenia. We found no ventricular enlargement, differences in global volume or significant associations between tissue volume and duration of untreated illness or psychopathology. The hippocampal volume reductions appeared...

  3. Structural brain correlates of sensorimotor gating in antipsychotic-naive men with first-episode schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Trine B; Oranje, Bob; Skimminge, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    Background: Prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle reflex is modulated by a complex neural network. Prepulse inhibition impairments are found at all stages of schizophrenia. Previous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies suggest that brain correlates of PPI differ between patients...... with schizophrenia and healthy controls; however, these studies included only patients with chronic illness and medicated patients. Our aim was to examine the structural brain correlates of PPI in antipsychotic-naive patients with first-episode schizophrenia. Methods: We performed acoustic PPI assessment...... areas in which PPI and grey matter volume correlated did not differ between the groups. Independent of group, PPI was significantly and positively associated with regional grey matter volume in the right superior parietal cortex. Prepulse inhibition and grey matter volume associations were also observed...

  4. Neocortical serotonin2A receptor binding predicts quetiapine associated weight gain in antipsychotic-naive first-episode schizophrenia patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Hans; Ebdrup, Bjørn H; Oranje, B

    2014-01-01

    related serotonin2A receptor binding to weight gain before and after antipsychotic monotherapy. Fifteen antipsychotic-naive first-episode schizophrenia patients were included and investigated before and after six months of quetiapine treatment. We examined the relationship between serotonin2A receptor......Antipsychotic-induced weight gain is of major clinical importance since it is associated with severe metabolic complications and increased mortality. The serotonin2A receptor system has been suggested to be implicated in weight gain and obesity. However, no previous in vivo imaging data have...... to treatment and subsequent increase in BMI (rho = 0.59, p = 0.022). At follow-up, the serotonin2A receptor occupancy was positively correlated with BMI increase (rho = 0.54, p = 0.038). To our knowledge, these are the first in vivo receptor imaging data in initially antipsychotic-naive first...

  5. Decreased frontal serotonin2A receptor binding in antipsychotic-naive patients with first-episode schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Hans; Erritzoe, David; Andersen, Rune

    2010-01-01

    , in vivo studies of serotonin(2A) binding report conflicting results, presumably because sample sizes have been small or because schizophrenic patients who were not antipsychotic-naive were included. Furthermore, the relationships between serotonin(2A) binding, psychopathology, and central neurocognitive......Postmortem investigations and the receptor affinity profile of atypical antipsychotics have implicated the participation of serotonin(2A) receptors in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Most postmortem studies point toward lower cortical serotonin(2A) binding in schizophrenic patients. However...

  6. Two subgroups of antipsychotic-naive, first-episode schizophrenia patients identified with a Gaussian mixture model on cognition and electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, N; Ebdrup, B H; Oranje, B; Fagerlund, B; Jensen, M H; Düring, S W; Nielsen, M Ø; Glenthøj, B Y; Hansen, L K

    2017-04-11

    Deficits in information processing and cognition are among the most robust findings in schizophrenia patients. Previous efforts to translate group-level deficits into clinically relevant and individualized information have, however, been non-successful, which is possibly explained by biologically different disease subgroups. We applied machine learning algorithms on measures of electrophysiology and cognition to identify potential subgroups of schizophrenia. Next, we explored subgroup differences regarding treatment response. Sixty-six antipsychotic-naive first-episode schizophrenia patients and sixty-five healthy controls underwent extensive electrophysiological and neurocognitive test batteries. Patients were assessed on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) before and after 6 weeks of monotherapy with the relatively selective D 2 receptor antagonist, amisulpride (280.3±159 mg per day). A reduced principal component space based on 19 electrophysiological variables and 26 cognitive variables was used as input for a Gaussian mixture model to identify subgroups of patients. With support vector machines, we explored the relation between PANSS subscores and the identified subgroups. We identified two statistically distinct subgroups of patients. We found no significant baseline psychopathological differences between these subgroups, but the effect of treatment in the groups was predicted with an accuracy of 74.3% (P=0.003). In conclusion, electrophysiology and cognition data may be used to classify subgroups of schizophrenia patients. The two distinct subgroups, which we identified, were psychopathologically inseparable before treatment, yet their response to dopaminergic blockade was predicted with significant accuracy. This proof of principle encourages further endeavors to apply data-driven, multivariate and multimodal models to facilitate progress from symptom-based psychiatry toward individualized treatment regimens.

  7. Sensorimotor gating and habituation in antipsychotic-naive, first-episode schizophrenia patients before and after 6 months' treatment with quetiapine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aggernaes, Bodil; Glenthøj, Birte Yding; Ebdrup, Bjorn H

    2010-01-01

    , since these patients are so difficult to recruit. Furthermore, longitudinal studies are few, and their results are inconsistent: some results indicating a reduction of PPI deficits by treatment with atypical antipsychotics, while others do not. This study reports on PPI, habituation and sensitization......-significant trend for reduced sensitization at baseline, but not at follow-up. Patients and controls showed similar levels of habituation, both at baseline, and at follow-up. These findings indicate that PPI deficits are already present from the earliest stage of clinical onset of schizophrenia, before the patients...... have received any antipsychotic treatment. In addition, following 6 months' treatment with quetiapine these PPI deficits were normalized. Furthermore, the results suggest that schizophrenia patients in the antipsychotic-naive state show reduced levels of sensitization, yet normal levels of habituation....

  8. P50 Suppression and its Neural Generators in Antipsychotic-Naive First-Episode Schizophrenia Before and After 6 Months of Quetiapine Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oranje, Bob; Aggernæs, Bodil; Rasmussen, Hans

    2013-01-01

    generators were investigated in antipsychotic-naïve first-episode patients with schizophrenia before and after 6 months of treatment with quetiapine. Methods: Thirty-four antipsychotic-naïve first-episode schizophrenia patients and age and gender matched healthy controls were tested in an auditory sensory...... more active in patients than in controls at the time of the testing stimulus. Conclusions: The present findings suggest that P50 suppression deficits are already present at an early stage of schizophrenia. Furthermore, particularly those patients with more severe gating deficits appeared to need higher...

  9. Stability of prepulse inhibition and habituation of the startle reflex in schizophrenia: a 6-year follow-up study of initially antipsychotic-naive, first-episode schizophrenia patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Trine Bjørg; Oranje, Bob; Fagerlund, Birgitte

    2011-01-01

    Deficits in information processing appear to be core features in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) and habituation of the startle reflex are operational measures of early information processing. Impaired PPI in schizophrenia has been replicated in many studies and is re......Deficits in information processing appear to be core features in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) and habituation of the startle reflex are operational measures of early information processing. Impaired PPI in schizophrenia has been replicated in many studies...... and is regarded as an endophenotype for schizophrenia. However, reports on the stability of PPI over a longer period of time are lacking, both for patients with schizophrenia and for healthy subjects. The current study examined 25 initially drug-naive, first-episode schizophrenia patients and 23 healthy matched...

  10. Neural markers of negative symptom outcomes in distributed working memory brain activity of antipsychotic-naive schizophrenia patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nejad, Ayna B.; Madsen, Kristoffer H.; Ebdrup, Bjørn H.

    2013-01-01

    but not the default mode network. These preliminary data suggest that functional patterns at baseline can predict negative symptom treatment–response in schizophrenia. This information may be used to stratify patients into subgroups thereby facilitating personalized treatment.......Since working memory deficits in schizophrenia have been linked to negative symptoms, we tested whether features of the one could predict the treatment outcome in the other. Specifically, we hypothesized that working memory-related functional connectivity at pre-treatment can predict improvement...... of negative symptoms in antipsychotic-treated patients. Fourteen antipsychotic-naive patients with first-episode schizophrenia were clinically assessed before and after 7 months of quetiapine monotherapy. At baseline, patients underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing a verbal n...

  11. Frontal fasciculi and psychotic symptoms in antipsychotic-naive patients with schizophrenia before and after 6 weeks of selective dopamine D2/3 receptor blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebdrup, Bjørn H; Raghava, Jayachandra M; Nielsen, Mette Ødegaard

    2016-01-01

    in the right CT (t= 2.52, p= 0.019). LIMITATIONS: Smoking and a previous diagnosis of substance abuse were potential confounders. Long-term effects of amisulpride on white matter were not evaluated. CONCLUSION: Antipsychotic-naive patients with schizophrenia displayed subtle deficits in white matter......BACKGROUND: Psychotic symptoms are core clinical features of schizophrenia. We tested recent hypotheses proposing that psychotic, or positive, symptoms stem from irregularities in long-range white matter tracts projecting into the frontal cortex, and we predicted that selective dopamine D2....../3 receptor blockade would restore white matter. METHODS: Between December 2008 and July 2011, antipsychotic-naive patients with first-episode schizophrenia and matched healthy controls underwent baseline examination with 3 T MRI diffusion tensor imaging and clinical assessments. We assessed group differences...

  12. The influence of impaired processing speed on cognition in first-episode antipsychotic-naive schizophrenic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rune; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Rasmussen, Hans

    2013-01-01

    , processing speed, sustained attention, working memory, reasoning and problem solving, verbal learning and memory, visual learning and memory, and reaction time. All these significant differences, except for verbal intelligence and global cognition, disappeared when processing speed was included......BACKGROUND: Impaired cognition is a prominent feature of schizophrenia. To what extent the heterogeneous cognitive impairments can be accounted for by considering only a single underlying impairment or a small number of core impairments remains elusive. This study examined whether cognitive...

  13. Global Micro- and Macro-structural White Matter Alterations and the reward circuit in First-episode Antipsychotic-naïve Schizophrenia Patients. Preliminary Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raghava, Jayachandra Mitta; Ebdrup, Bjørn Hylsebeck; Nielsen, Mette Ødegaard

    to what extend WM alterations are present before and after the initiation of antipsychotic medication with amisulpride in anti-psychotic naïve schizophrenia patients. Methods Thirty-eight first-episode, antipsychotic-naive schizophrenia patients and 38 matched healthy controls were scanned on Philips 3T...

  14. Mismatch negativity in chronic schizophrenia and first-episode schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Dean F; Shenton, Martha E; Griggs, Carlye B; Bonner-Jackson, Aaron; McCarley, Robert W

    2002-08-01

    Mismatch negativity (MMN) is an event-related brain potential that is sensitive to stimulus deviation from a repetitive pattern. The MMN is thought primarily to reflect the activity of sensory memory, with, at most, moderate influences of higher-level cognitive processes, such as attention. The MMN is reported to be reduced in patients with chronic schizophrenia. However, it is unknown whether MMN is reduced in patients with first-episode schizophrenia (at first hospitalization). Subject groups comprised patients with chronic schizophrenia (n = 16) and older control subjects (n = 13), and patients with first-episode schizophrenia (n = 21) and younger control subjects (n = 27). The MMN was visualized by subtracting the averaged event-related brain potential to standard tones (1 kHz [95% of all tones]) from the event-related brain potential to pitch-deviant tones (1.2 kHz [5% of all tones]). The MMN voltage was the mean voltage from 100 to 200 milliseconds. Pitch-deviant MMN was reduced by approximately 47% in patients with chronic illness along the sagittal midline relative to controls. The MMN was not reduced in patients with first-episode schizophrenia. All 4 groups showed approximately 64% larger MMN to pitch-deviant tones over the right hemisphere compared with the left hemisphere. The pitch-deviant MMN reductions present in patients with chronic schizophrenia are not present at first hospitalization. The sensory, echoic memory functions indexed by MMN seem unaffected early in the schizophrenia disease process. Reductions in MMN amplitude may develop over time and index the progression of the disorder, although that can only be definitively determined by longitudinal assessments.

  15. Social cognition and neurocognitive deficits in first-episode schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliksted, Vibeke; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Weed, Ethan; Frith, Chris; Videbech, Poul

    2014-03-01

    Recent research has shown a significant impact of social cognitive domains on real world functioning and prognosis in schizophrenia. However, the correlations between specific aspects of social cognition, neurocognition, IQ and clinical symptoms remain unclear in first-episode schizophrenia. Researchers have speculated about social cognitive subgroups since patients with schizophrenia appear to be a very heterogeneous group. Patients with a recent diagnosis of first-episode schizophrenia were tested regarding theory of mind, social perception, neurocognition, IQ, and clinical symptoms. Data from 36 first-episode schizophrenia patients and 36 one to one matched healthy controls were analysed. Principal component analysis in the patient group was used to examine the variance contributed by different aspects of social cognition, neurocognition, and clinical symptoms. Complex aspects of social cognition explained 24% of the variance in the patient group. The other principal components consisted mainly of aspects of simple perception of theory of mind. Neurocognition and clinical symptoms only explained a minor proportion of the variance in the patient group. The results imply that social cognitive deficits in first-episode schizophrenia come in two distinct versions where one is a complex, cognitive demanding form linked with IQ. The other version is related to simpler forms of social cognition and independent of IQ. These two forms are comparable to the implicit and explicit mentalising discussed in the developmental literature. The two forms of social cognitive deficits are likely to require quite different social cognitive interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Social cognition and neurocognitive deficits in first-episode schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliksted, Vibeke Fuglsang; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Weed, Ethan

    2014-01-01

    -episode schizophrenia. Researchers have speculated about social cognitive subgroups since patients with schizophrenia appear to be a very heterogeneous group. METHODS: Patients with a recent diagnosis of first-episode schizophrenia were tested regarding theory of mind, social perception, neurocognition, IQ...... symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Complex aspects of social cognition explained 24% of the variance in the patient group. The other principal components consisted mainly of aspects of simple perception of theory of mind. Neurocognition and clinical symptoms only explained a minor proportion of the variance......BACKGROUND: Recent research has shown a significant impact of social cognitive domains on real world functioning and prognosis in schizophrenia. However, the correlations between specific aspects of social cognition, neurocognition, IQ and clinical symptoms remain unclear in first...

  17. Reduced auditory segmentation potentials in first-episode schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, Brian A; Haigh, Sarah M; Murphy, Timothy K; Leiter-Mcbeth, Justin; Salisbury, Dean F

    2017-10-22

    Auditory scene analysis (ASA) dysfunction is likely an important component of the symptomatology of schizophrenia. Auditory object segmentation, the grouping of sequential acoustic elements into temporally-distinct auditory objects, can be assessed with electroencephalography through measurement of the auditory segmentation potential (ASP). Further, N2 responses to the initial and final elements of auditory objects are enhanced relative to medial elements, which may indicate auditory object edge detection (initiation and termination). Both ASP and N2 modulation are impaired in long-term schizophrenia. To determine whether these deficits are present early in disease course, we compared ASP and N2 modulation between individuals at their first episode of psychosis within the schizophrenia spectrum (FE, N=20) and matched healthy controls (N=24). The ASP was reduced by >40% in FE; however, N2 modulation was not statistically different from HC. This suggests that auditory segmentation (ASP) deficits exist at this early stage of schizophrenia, but auditory edge detection (N2 modulation) is relatively intact. In a subset of subjects for whom structural MRIs were available (N=14 per group), ASP sources were localized to midcingulate cortex (MCC) and temporal auditory cortex. Neurophysiological activity in FE was reduced in MCC, an area linked to aberrant perceptual organization, negative symptoms, and cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia, but not temporal auditory cortex. This study supports the validity of the ASP for measurement of auditory object segmentation and suggests that the ASP may be useful as an early index of schizophrenia-related MCC dysfunction. Further, ASP deficits may serve as a viable biomarker of disease presence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The neurobiology and treatment of first-episode schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, R S; Sommer, I E

    2015-02-01

    It is evident that once psychosis is present in patients with schizophrenia, the underlying biological process of the illness has already been ongoing for many years. At the time of diagnosis, patients with schizophrenia show decreased mean intracranial volume (ICV) as compared with healthy subjects. Since ICV is driven by brain growth, which reaches its maximum size at approximately 13 years of age, this finding suggests that brain development in patients with schizophrenia is stunted before that age. The smaller brain volume is expressed as decrements in both grey and white matter. After diagnosis, it is mainly the grey matter loss that progresses over time whereas white matter deficits are stable or may even improve over the course of the illness. To understand the possible causes of the brain changes in the first phase of schizophrenia, evidence from treatment studies, postmortem and neuroimaging investigations together with animal experiments needs to be incorporated. These data suggest that the pathophysiology of schizophrenia is multifactorial. Increased striatal dopamine synthesis is already evident before the time of diagnosis, starting during the at-risk mental state, and increases during the onset of frank psychosis. Cognitive impairment and negative symptoms may, in turn, result from other abnormalities, such as NMDA receptor hypofunction and low-grade inflammation of the brain. The latter two dysfunctions probably antedate increased dopamine synthesis by many years, reflecting the much earlier presence of cognitive and social dysfunction. Although correction of the hyperdopaminergic state with antipsychotic agents is generally effective in patients with a first-episode psychosis, the effects of treatments to correct NMDA receptor hypofunction or low-grade inflammation are (so far) rather modest at best. Improved efficacy of these interventions can be expected when they are applied at the onset of cognitive and social dysfunction, rather than at the

  19. Akathisia and suicidal ideation in first-episode schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemüller, Florian; Schennach, Rebecca; Mayr, Andreas; Musil, Richard; Jäger, Markus; Maier, Wolfgang; Klingenberg, Stefan; Heuser, Isabella; Klosterkötter, Joachim; Gastpar, Markus; Schmitt, Andrea; Schlösser, Ralf; Schneider, Frank; Ohmann, Christian; Lewitzka, Ute; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Riedel, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Patients with first-episode schizophrenia (FES) are known to be notably sensitive for developing extrapyramidal adverse effects, but the relation of akathisia and suicidal ideation has rarely been studied. The current report is an ongoing analysis of an 8-week double-blind randomized controlled multicenter trial in 289 FES, comparing risperidone and haloperidol. Assessments were conducted weekly and included the Hillside Akathisia Scale and 21-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale ratings. Suicidal ideation was significantly associated with clinician observed akathisia, depressed mood, younger age, and use of propranolol. The allocated treatment, anxiety, and nervousness had no influence. The present findings suggest a promoting effect of akathisia on suicidal ideation can not be ruled out in patients with FES.

  20. Predictors of poor adherence to medication among patients with first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quach, Phuong Le; Mors, Ole; Christensen, Torben Østergaard

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to identify predictors for poor adherence to medication among patients with first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorder.......This study sought to identify predictors for poor adherence to medication among patients with first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorder....

  1. Executive attention impairment in first-episode schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orellana Gricel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We compared the attention abilities of a group of first-episode schizophrenia (FES patients and a group of healthy participants using the Attention Network Test (ANT, a standard procedure that estimates the functional state of three neural networks controlling the efficiency of three different attentional behaviors, i.e., alerting (achieving and maintaining a state of high sensitivity to incoming stimuli, orienting (ability to select information from sensory input, and executive attention (mechanisms for resolving conflict among thoughts, feelings, and actions. Methods We evaluated 22 FES patients from 17 to 29 years of age with a recent history of a single psychotic episode treated only with atypical neuroleptics, and 20 healthy persons matched with FES patients by sex, age, and educational level as the control group. Attention was estimated using the ANT in which participants indicate whether a central horizontal arrow is pointing to the left or the right. The central arrow may be preceded by spatial or temporal cues denoting where and when the arrow will appear, and may be flanked by other arrows (hereafter, flankers pointing in the same or the opposite direction. Results The efficiency of the alerting, orienting, and executive networks was estimated by measuring how reaction time was influenced by congruency between temporal, spatial, and flanker cues. We found that the control group only demonstrated significantly greater attention efficiency than FES patients in the executive attention network. Conclusions FES patients are impaired in executive attention but not in alerting or orienting attention, suggesting that executive attention deficit may be a primary impairment during the progression of the disease.

  2. Effects of Dopamine D2/D3 Blockade on Human Sensory and Sensorimotor Gating in Initially Antipsychotic-Naive, First-Episode Schizophrenia Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Düring, Signe; Glenthøj, Birte Y; Andersen, Gitte Saltoft

    2014-01-01

    , and habituation/sensitization abilities at baseline and after 2 and 6 weeks of treatment with flexible doses of amisulpride. In addition, 47 matched healthy controls were assessed at baseline and after 6 weeks. At baseline, the patients showed significantly reduced PPI, yet normal levels of P50 gating......, habituation, and sensitization. Treatment with amisulpride showed no effects on these measures, either at 2 or 6 weeks of follow-up. This is the first study investigating the effects of monotherapy with a relatively selective dopamine D2/D3 receptor antagonist (amisulpride) on sensory and sensorimotor gating...

  3. Two subgroups of antipsychotic-naive, first-episode schizophrenia patients identified with a Gaussian mixture model on cognition and electrophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, N.; Ebdrup, B.H.; Oranje, B

    2017-01-01

    and sixty-five healthy controls underwent extensive electrophysiological and neurocognitive test batteries. Patients were assessed on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) before and after 6 weeks of monotherapy with the relatively selective D2 receptor antagonist, amisulpride (280.3±159 mg per...

  4. Progressive striatal and hippocampal volume loss in initially antipsychotic-naive, first-episode schizophrenia patients treated with quetiapine: relationship to dose and symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebdrup, Bjørn H; Skimminge, Arnold; Rasmussen, Hans

    2011-01-01

    -weighted images (3 T) from 22 patients and 28 matched healthy controls were analysed using tensor-based morphometry. Non-parametric voxel-wise group comparisons were performed. Small volume correction was employed for striatum, hippocampus and ventricles. Dose-dependent medication effects and associations...

  5. Schizophrenia/first episode psychosis in children and adolescents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Childhood onset schizophrenia (COS) is diagnosed before the age of 13 years, and early onset schizophrenia (EOS) is diagnosed before the age of 18 years. EOS is considered extremely rare and its prevalence in comparison to the worldwide prevalence of schizophrenia (1%) has not adequately been studied. Patients ...

  6. General and social cognition in remitted first-episode schizophrenia patients: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldiroli, Alice; Buoli, Massimiliano; Serati, Marta; Cahn, Wiepke; Altamura, A Carlo

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate whether both neurocognitive and social cognitive performances were different between remitted first-episode schizophrenia patients, non-remitters and healthy controls (HC). We assessed social cognition (Degraded Facial Affect Recognition Task-DFAR and Emotional Mentalizing Task-EMT) and neurocognition (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale and Word Learning Test-WLT) in 174 remitted first-episode schizophrenia patients, 110 non-remitted first-episode schizophrenia patients and 320 HC. Multivariate analyses of variance with age, gender and IQ as covariates (MANCOVA) were performed to compare mean cognitive test scores between the three groups. Remitted first-episode schizophrenia patients performed significantly worse than HC only in one verbal memory task (WLT immediate recall; p = 0.004); in the same test, they were significantly better than non-remitters (p = 0.027). Non-remitted first-episode schizophrenia patients, differently from remitters, performed significantly worse than HC in terms of social cognition (EMT-p schizophrenia patients presented worse cognitive performance than HC in verbal memory tasks, but not in facial affect recognition and in ToM, while non-remitters did; these results suggest that neurocognitive deficits are the core hallmark of schizophrenia and that social cognition is relatively unaffected in remitted patients after their first episode.

  7. First episode schizophrenia | Khamker | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Schizophrenia is a chronic psychiatric condition. Patients with schizophrenia present clinically with psychotic, negative and cognitive symptoms, which can become evident late in adolescence or in early adulthood. The peak age for presentation is 20 years in males and 25 years in females. This chronic condition follows a ...

  8. Differential brain glucose metabolic patterns in antipsychotic-naïve first-episode schizophrenia with and without auditory verbal hallucinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horga, Guillermo; Parellada, Eduard; Lomeña, Francisco; Fernández-Egea, Emilio; Mané, Anna; Font, Mireia; Falcón, Carles; Konova, Anna B; Pavia, Javier; Ros, Domènec; Bernardo, Miguel

    2011-09-01

    Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) are a core symptom of schizophrenia. Previous reports on neural activity patterns associated with AVHs are inconsistent, arguably owing to the lack of an adequate control group (i.e., patients with similar characteristics but without AVHs) and neglect of the potential confounding effects of medication. The current study was conducted in a homogeneous group of patients with schizophrenia to assess whether the presence or absence of AVHs was associated with differential regional cerebral glucose metabolic patterns. We investigated differences between patients with commenting AVHs and patients without AVHs among a group of dextral antipsychotic-naive inpatients with acute first-episode schizophrenia examined with [(18)F]fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) at rest. Univariate and multivariate approaches were used to establish between-group differences. We included 9 patients with AVHs and 7 patients without AVHs in this study. Patients experiencing AVHs during FDG uptake had significantly higher metabolic rates in the left superior and middle temporal cortices, bilateral superior medial frontal cortex and left caudate nucleus (cluster level p 3.3, respectively). Additionally, the multivariate method identified hippocampal-parahippocampal, cerebellar and parietal relative hypoactivity during AVHs in both hemispheres (bootstrap ratio PET imaging technique does not provide information regarding the temporal course of neural activity. The limited sample size may have increased the risk of false-negative findings. Our results indicate that AVHs in patients with schizophrenia may be mediated by an alteration of neural pathways responsible for normal language function. Our findings also point to the potential role of the dominant caudate nucleus and the parahippocampal gyri in the pathophysiology of AVHs. We discuss the relevance of phenomenology-based grouping in the study of AVHs.

  9. Hepatic insulin resistance in antipsychotic naive schizophrenic patients: stable isotope studies of glucose metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nimwegen, Lonneke J. M.; Storosum, Jitschak G.; Blumer, Regje M. E.; Allick, Gideon; Venema, Henk W.; de Haan, Lieuwe; Becker, Hiske; van Amelsvoort, Therese; Ackermans, Mariette T.; Fliers, Eric; Serlie, Mireille J. M.; Sauerwein, Hans P.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to measure insulin sensitivity and body composition in antipsychotic-naive patients with DSM IV schizophrenia and/or schizoaffective disorder compared with matched controls. DESIGN: Seven antipsychotic medication-naive patients fulfilling the DSM IV A criteria for

  10. Outcome of first-episode schizophrenia and the new antipsychotics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    symptoms, have impairment of functioning due to persistent negative symptoms and side-effects, are alienated from society, have impairment of cognitive functions (particularly attention. memory and executive functions),"7 and display frequent ard protracted periods of depression.' About 10% of patients with schizophrenia ...

  11. Differential effects of antipsychotic drugs on insight in first episode schizophrenia: Data from the European First-Episode Schizophrenia Trial (EUFEST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijnenborg, G H M; Timmerman, M E; Derks, E M; Fleischhacker, W W; Kahn, R S; Aleman, A

    2015-06-01

    Although antipsychotics are widely prescribed, their effect of on improving poor illness insight in schizophrenia has seldom been investigated and therefore remains uncertain. This paper examines the effects of low dose haloperidol, amisulpride, olanzapine, quetiapine, and ziprasidone on insight in first-episode schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or schizophreniform disorder. The effects of five antipsychotic drugs in first episode psychosis on insight were compared in a large scale open randomized controlled trial conducted in 14 European countries: the European First-Episode Schizophrenia Trial (EUFEST). Patients with at least minimal impairments in insight were included in the present study (n=455). Insight was assessed with item G12 of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), administered at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after randomization. The use of antipsychotics was associated with clear improvements in insight over and above improvements in other symptoms. This effect was most pronounced in the first three months of treatment, with quetiapine being significantly less effective than other drugs. Effects of spontaneous improvement cannot be ruled out due to the lack of a placebo control group, although such a large spontaneous improvement of insight would seem unlikely. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  12. Deficient inhibition of return in chronic but not first-episode patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dengtang; Fan, Xiaoduo; Wang, Yan; Yang, Zhiliang; Zhuo, Kaiming; Song, Zhenhua; Wu, Yan; Li, Chunbo; Wang, Jijun; Xu, Yifeng

    2010-08-16

    Inhibition of return (IOR) has been tested in patients with schizophrenia with contradictory results. Some studies indicated that patients with schizophrenia have normal levels of IOR; however, other studies reported delayed or blunted IOR. Inconsistency in findings might be due to differences across studies in relevant aspects associated with disease, such as heterogeneity of the disorder, different medications, onset and severity of the illness. The present study was to explore different patterns of IOR in antipsychotic medication free first-episode schizophrenia and chronic schizophrenia. Forty two patients with first-episode schizophrenia, 44 patients with chronic schizophrenia, and 38 healthy controls were included in the study. All subjects went through a covert orienting of attention task with seven stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) intervals (400 ms, 500 ms, 600 ms, 700 ms, 800 ms, 1200 ms and 1500 ms). Compared with healthy controls, the magnitude and onset of IOR in first-episode patients with schizophrenia were intact. However, in patients with chronic schizophrenia, there was an attenuated cuing effect especially at SOA 700 ms; in addition, there was a robust IOR until at SOAs 800 ms or above. Moreover, the illness duration and the number of psychotic episodes were significantly correlated with the validity effect at SOAs 400 ms and 600 ms. Our study suggests that deficient IOR presents in chronic but not in first-episode patients with schizophrenia. IOR deficit in schizophrenia may begin during the course of illness and deteriorate over the course of illness. Our findings are consistent with the neurodegenerative model of schizophrenia. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Neurocognitive performance in subjects at ultrahigh risk for schizophrenia: a comparison with first-episode schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Ran; Park, Jin Young; Song, Dong-Ho; Koo, Hae Kyung; An, Suk Kyoon

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the neurocognitive performance of patients at ultrahigh risk (UHR) compared with patients with first-episode (FE) schizophrenia and healthy control (HC) subjects. Twenty-seven subjects at UHR for schizophrenia, 25 patients in their FE of schizophrenia, and 33 HCs were included. All participants completed a neurocognitive battery, including tests of general intelligence, attention and working memory, executive function, and verbal and visual memory. Of the 3 groups, the FE subjects performed poorest at all neurocognitive tests, encompassing the broad range of impairments. The UHR subjects had a similar pattern of neuropsychological dysfunction but less severe than that of FE patients. The UHR subjects were particularly impaired on measures of attention and working memory, executive function, and verbal memory compared with the HCs. These findings are consistent with the view that the neurocognitive impairments of schizophrenia are neurodevelopmental in nature and, although less severe, those impairments are mostly in place before the onset of the first frank psychotic episode. Neurocognitive impairments may play an important role in the pathogenesis of early psychosis and could help to clarify individuals at UHR for schizophrenia. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Long-Acting Injectable Antipsychotics for First-Episode Schizophrenia: The Pros and Cons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borah Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and psychosocial deterioration associated with schizophrenia occurs within the first few years following the onset of the illness. Therefore, to improve the long-term prognosis, it is important to provide schizophrenia patients with intensive treatment following their first episode. Relapse is highly associated with partial medication adherence or nonadherence in patients with first-episode schizophrenia. Recent studies suggest that long-acting injectable (LAI antipsychotics compared with oral antipsychotics are more effective for medication adherence and relapse prevention. Moreover, some clinical guidelines for the treatment of schizophrenia suggested that LAI antipsychotics should be considered when patients are nonadherent “at any stage.” Decreased compliance is a common cause of relapse during the initial stages of the disease. Therefore, LAI antipsychotics should be highly considered when treating patients with first-episode schizophrenia. In the present paper, clinical trial data and current guidelines on the use of LAI antipsychotics for first-episode schizophrenia are discussed as well as the pros and cons of this treatment option.

  15. Comparison of first-episode and chronic patients diagnosed with schizophrenia: symptoms and childhood trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Xue, Zhimin; Pu, Weidan; Yang, Bo; Li, Li; Yi, Wenyin; Wang, Peng; Liu, Chang; Wu, Guowei; Liu, Zhening; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2013-02-01

    There has been considerable interest in identifying and addressing the specific needs of early-episode patients diagnosed with schizophrenia in the hope that by addressing such needs early, chronic disabilities can be avoided. One hundred twenty-eight early-episode and 571 chronic patients were compared on socio-demographic characteristics, clinical symptoms and history of childhood trauma. Symptoms were measured with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), and trauma with the short version of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. First-episode patients scored 9.3% higher than chronic patients on the PANSS positive symptom scale and 16.3% lower on the negative symptom scale. More first episode patients reported childhood sexual abuse (P = 0.033); however, fewer reported childhood emotional neglect (P = 0.01). Childhood trauma was associated with positive symptoms, specifically with hallucinations in first-episode patients (r = 0.174; P = 0.049). Moreover, fewer parents of first episode patients were living alone (P = 0.008). On multiple logistic regression, the first-episode patients were younger (odds ratio = 0.92), had higher PANSS positive symptom scores (odds ratio 1.04) and lower negative symptom scores (odds ratio 0.948 recalculate). More positive symptoms, fewer negative symptoms, less isolated parents and greater risk of childhood sexual abuse might warrant attention in first episode schizophrenia and perhaps should be a focus for the development of targeted interventions. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. General and social cognition in remitted first-episode schizophrenia patients : a comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caldiroli, Alice; Buoli, Massimiliano; Serati, Marta; Cahn, Wiepke; Altamura, A Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate whether both neurocognitive and social cognitive performances were different between remitted first-episode schizophrenia patients, non-remitters and healthy controls (HC). We assessed social cognition (Degraded Facial Affect Recognition Task-DFAR and

  17. Diffusion tensor imaging study of the fornix in first episode schizophrenia and in healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, J; Hamoda, H M; Swisher, T; Terry, D; Rosenberger, G; Seidman, L J; Goldstein, J; Mesholam-Gately, R; Petryshen, T; Wojcik, J; Kikinis, R; Kubicki, M

    2014-07-01

    The fornix is a compact bundle of white matter fibers that project from the hippocampus to the mamillary bodies and septal nuclei. Its association with memory, as well as with symptoms in schizophrenia, has been reported in chronic schizophrenia. The purpose of this study is to determine whether or not fornix abnormalities are evident at the onset of schizophrenia. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and DT tractography were used to evaluate the fornix in 21 patients with first episode schizophrenia (16 males/5 females) and 22 healthy controls (13 males/9 females). Groups were matched on age, gender, parental socioeconomic status, education and handedness. Fractional anisotropy (FA), a measure of white matter integrity, radial diffusivity (RD), thought to reflect myelin integrity, trace, a possible marker of atrophy or cell loss, and axial diffusivity (AD), thought to reflect axonal integrity, were averaged over the entire tract extracted by means of DT tractography, and used to investigate fornix abnormalities in first episode schizophrenia compared with healthy controls. Significant group differences were found between first episode patients and controls for FA (p=0.0001), RD (p=0.001) and trace (p=0.006). These findings suggest abnormalities in the fornix in the early stages of schizophrenia, and further suggest that white matter abnormalities, which are apparent in the early course of the disease, may reflect myelin disturbances. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of blonanserin on cognitive function in antipsychotic-naïve first-episode schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenjin, Tomomi; Miyamoto, Seiya; Miyake, Nobumi; Ogino, Shin; Kitajima, Rei; Ojima, Kazuaki; Arai, Jun; Teramoto, Haruki; Tsukahara, Sachiko; Ito, Yukie; Tadokoro, Masanori; Anai, Kiriko; Funamoto, Yasuyuki; Kaneda, Yasuhiro; Sumiyoshi, Tomiki; Yamaguchi, Noboru

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of blonanserin, a novel antipsychotic, on cognitive function in first-episode schizophrenia. Twenty-four antipsychotic-naïve patients with first-episode schizophrenia participated in the study. Blonanserin was given in an open-label design for 8 weeks. The Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia-Japanese language version (BACS-J) was administered as the primary outcome measure at baseline and 8 weeks. Clinical evaluation included the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), the Schizophrenia Quality of Life Scale-Japanese language version (SQLS-J), and the Clinical Global Impression-Severity of Illness Scale (CGI-S). To exclude the possibility of retest effects on the BACS-J, 10 age-matched patients with chronic schizophrenia treated with blonanserin were tested at baseline and after an 8-week interval. Twenty first-episode patients completed the study. Repeated measures analysis of covariance revealed a significant group-by-time interaction effect on the letter fluency task due to better performance in the first-episode group, but not in the control group. Main effect of time or group-by-time interaction effect on the Tower of London task was not significant; however, the first-episode group, but not the control group, showed substantial improvement with a moderate effect size. All items on the PANSS, SQLS-J, and CGI-S significantly improved after 8 weeks of treatment. These results suggest that blonanserin improves some types of cognitive function associated with prefrontal cortical function. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Differential brain activation during facial emotion discrimination in first-episode schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reske, Martina; Habel, Ute; Kellermann, Thilo; Backes, Volker; Jon Shah, N; von Wilmsdorff, Martina; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Zilles, Karl; Schneider, Frank

    2009-03-01

    Aberrant brain activation during facial emotion discrimination has been described in chronic schizophrenia, while little is known about early stages of the illness. The aim of the current study was to investigate valence-specific brain activation of emotion discrimination in first-episode schizophrenia. These patients provide the advantage of lacking the effects of long-term medication and chronic illness course and can hence further enhance the understanding of underlying psychopathological mechanisms. Using event-related fMRI, we investigated 18 first-episode schizophrenia patients and 18 matched healthy subjects during an explicit emotion discrimination task presenting happy, sad and neutral monochromatic facial expressions. A repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) with the factors Group (patients, healthy subjects), Gender and Emotion (happy, sad, neutral) was performed on behavioural and functional data. Behavioural performance did not differ between groups. Valence-independent hypoactivations in patients were observed for the anterior cingulate and orbitofrontal cortex while hyperactivations emerged in the posterior cingulate and the precuneus. Emotion-specific group differences were revealed in inferior parietal and orbitofrontal brain areas and the hippocampus. First-episode schizophrenia already affects areas involved in processing of both, emotions and primary facial information. Our study underlines the role of dysfunctional neural networks as the basis of disturbed social interactions in early schizophrenia.

  20. IQ subgroups in relation to neurocognitive profiles, psychopathology and brain volume in first-episode schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maria Høj; Glenthøj, Birte Yding; Rostrup, Egill

    Background and Aim: Approximately half of patients with schizophrenia experience a deterioration in IQ before or around illness onset and recent studies have found apositive association between IQ and brain volume in first episode schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to examine the combined...... impact of estimated IQ trajectory and IQ level at illness onset on psychopathology, neurocognitive profiles and brain volume. Materials and methods: The design is a cross-sectional, case-control study of 60 first-episode antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia patients and 60 matched healthy controls...... MRI generated measure of grey and white matter volume corrected for skull size. Results: Eleven patients (21.5%) were defined as deteriorated low, 10 patients (20%) as deteriorated high, 11 patients (21.5%) as stable low and 19 patients (37%) as stable high. There was a fairly consistent incremental...

  1. The effect of antipsychotic drugs on nonspecific inflammation markers in the first episode of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Vesna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Immune system disorder, including inflammation, takes a significant place when considering still unclear etiology of schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to determine the blood levels of nonspecific inflammation markers in the first episode of schizophrenia and their relation to the therapy response. Methods. In this study we determined the blood levels of nonspecific inflammation markers: white blood cells count (WBC, C-reactive protein (CRP, erythrocytes sedimentation rate (ESR and the elements of differential white blood cell counts (or the leukocyte formula: granulocytes (Gra, lymphocytes (Lym and monocytes (Mon, in the first episode of schizofrenia, in 78 patients hospitalized at the Clinic for Psychiatric Disorders “Dr Laza Lazarević” in Belgrade. The levels were measured at admission to the clinic, as well as after 4 weeks of antipsychotic treatment. The Positive and negative syndrome scale for schizophrenia (PANSS was applied to measure the severity of psychopathology and response to the treatment. Results. During the first episode of schizophrenia, before initiation of antipsychotic treatment, the frequency of abnormal values was high (≥ 25% of the patients for the following non-specific inflammation markers: WBC, CRP, ESR and Gra, in the leukocyte formula, but dropped after 4 weeks of antipsychotic treatment at the level of high statistical significance for WBC and Gra (p < 0.001. The ESR remained unchanged in as many as 50% of the patients even after 4-week antipsychotic treatment, at the level of statistical significance in the non-responders compared to the responders (p = 0.045. Conclusion. The obtained results indicate that in the first episode of schizophrenia the blood levels of non-specific inflammation markers (WBS, CRP, ESR and Gra from the leukocyte formula were high in the subpopulation of patients with the tendency towards normalization of inflammation parameters after a 4-week antipsychotic

  2. First episode schizophrenia-related psychosis and substance use disorders: acute response to olanzapine and haloperidol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Alan I; Tohen, Mauricio F; Hamer, Robert M; Strakowski, Stephen M; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Glick, Ira; Clark, W Scott

    2004-02-01

    Co-occurring substance use disorders, mostly involving alcohol, cannabis or cocaine, occur commonly in patients with schizophrenia and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Available but limited data suggest that substance use disorders (especially cannabis use disorders) may also be common in first-episode patients and appear linked to a poor outcome in these patients. Strategies to curtail substance use form an important dimension of the treatment program for both first-episode and chronic patients. We report on rates of co-occurring substance use disorders in patients within their first episode of schizophrenia-related psychosis from a multicenter, international treatment trial of olanzapine vs. haloperidol. The study involved 262 patients (of 263 who were randomized and who returned for a post-randomization evaluation) within their first episode of psychosis (schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder or schizophreniform disorder) recruited from 14 academic medical centers in North America and Western Europe. Patients with a history of substance dependence within 1 month prior to entry were excluded. Of this sample, 97 (37%) had a lifetime diagnosis of substance use disorder (SUD); of these 74 (28% of the total) had a lifetime cannabis use disorder (CUD) and 54 (21%) had a lifetime diagnosis of alcohol use disorder (AUD). Patients with SUD were more likely to be men. Those with CUD had a lower age of onset than those without. Patients with SUD had more positive symptoms and fewer negative symptoms than those without SUD, and they had a longer duration of untreated psychosis. The 12-week response data indicated that 27% of patients with SUD were responders compared to 35% of those without SUD. Patients with AUD were less likely to respond to olanzapine than those without AUD. These data suggest that first-episode patients are quite likely to have comorbid substance use disorders, and that the presence of these disorders may negatively influence

  3. A magnetic resonance imaging study in first-episode disorganized-type patients with schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, Tohru; Kimura, Michihiro; Takahashi, Tadashi; Iwamoto, Norihiko; Arai, Heii

    1997-01-01

    Although a number of radiological studies have suggested that brains of patients suffering from schizophrenia have morphological abnormalities, the results are inconsistent. In the present study, in order to examine the brain, morphological features of homogeneous schizophrenics' brain magnetic resonance imagings (MRI) were taken, before neuroleptic treatment, from subjects suffering from disorganized-type schizophrenia, (DOS) during their first episodes. Results showed that DOS had significantly smaller indices for bilateral frontal gray matter (GM), left hippocampal formation (HF), left parahippocampal gray matter (PHGM) and left cingulate gyrus gray matter (CGM) than normal controls. These findings support the previous computed tomography (CT) and MRI studies on schizophrenic brains, although the subjects were not defined as disorganized-type, and may suggest the involvement of a neurocircuit between the bilateral frontal lobe and the left side of limbic system in the first-episode DOS group. (author). 54 refs

  4. Determinants of subjective quality of life in first-episode schizophrenia: perspective from Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, K Y

    2010-05-01

    This study sought to examine the determinants of subjective quality of life among patients with first-episode schizophrenia in a developing country. One-hundred and twenty patients registered with National Mental Health Registry for Schizophrenia from 1 January 2003 to 31 August 2005 were included. They were diagnosed with first-episode schizophrenia, schizoaffective and schizophreniform disorders and had been compliant to treatment. Sociodemographic data were obtained and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale-Anchored Version, Health of The Nation Outcome Scales, Simpson-Angus Extrapyramidal Side Effects Scale, Barnes Akathisia Scale and the World Health Organization Quality of Life were used to assess psychopathology, side effects from antipsychotics and subjective quality of life. Gender, positive and disorganized symptoms of schizophrenia, and cognitive and physical impairments appeared to be the most important predictors of subjective quality of life among the patients from this centre in Malaysia. Different domains of self-rated quality of life correlated with different sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Some of the characteristics were malleable and a better understanding of these could lead to improvements in the management of patients with schizophrenia.

  5. Decreased Left Putamen and Thalamus Volume Correlates with Delusions in First-Episode Schizophrenia Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Huang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDelusional thinking is one of the hallmark symptoms of schizophrenia. However, the underlying neural substrate for delusions in schizophrenia remains unknown. In an attempt to further our understanding of the neural basis of delusions, we explored gray matter deficits and their clinical associations in first-episode schizophrenia patients with and without delusions.MethodsTwenty-four first-episode schizophrenia patients with delusions and 18 without delusions as well as 26 healthy controls (HC underwent clinical assessment and whole-brain structural imaging which were acquired a 3.0 T scanner. Voxel-based morphometry was used to explore inter-group differences in gray matter volume using analysis of covariance, and Spearman correlation coefficients (rho between the Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS-delusion scores and mean regional brain volumes was obtained.ResultsPatients with delusions showed decreased brain gray matter volumes in the left putamen, thalamus, and caudate regions compared with HC. Patients with delusions also showed decreased regional volume in the left putamen and thalamus compared with patients without delusions. SAPS-delusion scores were negatively correlated with the gray matter volumes of the left putamen and thalamus.DiscussionLeft putamen and thalamus volume loss may be biological correlates of delusions in schizophrenia.

  6. Middle and Inferior Temporal Gyrus Gray Matter Volume Abnormalities in First-Episode Schizophrenia: An MRI Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kuroki, Noriomi; Shenton, Martha Elizabeth; Salisbury, Dean; Hirayasu, Yoshio; Onitsuka, Toshiaki; Ersner-Hershfield, Hal; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah; Kikinis, Ron; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; McCarley, Robert William

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of schizophrenia reveal temporal lobe structural brain abnormalities in the superior temporal gyrus and the amygdala-hippocampal complex. However, the middle and inferior temporal gyri have received little investigation, especially in first-episode schizophrenia. Method: High-spatial-resolution MRI was used to measure gray matter volume in the inferior, middle, and superior temporal gyri in 20 patients with first-episode schizophrenia, 20 pa...

  7. The association between psychopathology of first-episode psychosis patients within the schizophrenia spectrum and previous offending

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkner, Runa; Haastrup, Soeren; Joergensen, Torben

    2008-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia have been shown to have an increased risk of criminality. The aim was to describe possible psychopathological differences between schizophrenia spectrum patients with and without a criminal career before first-episode psychosis. In a multi-centre study, 16 psychiatric ...... schizophrenia spectrum patients with and without a criminal career before first-episode psychosis, and a better screening procedure in the judicial system could detect these individuals earlier and make adequate treatment possible....

  8. EEG correlates of a mental arithmetic task in patients with first episode schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garakh, Zhanna; Zaytseva, Yuliya; Kapranova, Alexandra; Fiala, Ondrej; Horacek, Jiri; Shmukler, Alexander; Gurovich, Isaac Ya; Strelets, Valeria B

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the spectral power of the cortical bands in patients with first episode schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder at rest and during the performance of a mental arithmetic task. We analyzed EEG spectral power (SP) in the resting state and subsequently while counting down from 200 in steps of 7, in 32 first episode schizophrenia patients (SZ), 32 patients with first episode schizoaffective disorder (SA) and healthy controls (HC, n=40). Behavioral parameters such as accuracy and counting speed were also evaluated. Both SZ and SA patients were slower in counting than HC, no difference was obtained in the accuracy and counting speed in the patient groups. In the resting state patients showed elevated midline theta power, off-midline anterior beta 2 power and decreased central/posterior alpha power. The SA group occupied an intermediate position between the schizophrenia patients and controls. In task performance patients lacked a typical increase of midline theta, left anterior beta 2, and anterior gamma power; however, schizoaffective patients demonstrated a growing trend of power in the gamma band in left anterior off-midline sites similar to HC. Moreover, alpha power was less inhibited in schizoaffective patients and more pronounced in schizophrenia patients indicating distinct inhibitory mechanisms in these psychotic disorders. Patients with SA demonstrate less alteration in the spectral power of bands at rest than SZ, and present spectral power changes during cognitive task performance close to the controls. Our study contributes to the present evidence on the neurophysiological distinction between schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Association between unmet needs and clinical status in patients with first episode of schizophrenia in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia eJorquera

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder involving needs in several matters that are often not covered. A need is defined as a gap between the ideal state and the current state of a patient about a specific topic. Aim: To describe needs in patients with first episode of schizophrenia at the start of treatment, and to describe associated clinical factors. Methods: Observational descriptive cross-sectional design. Patients were over fifteen years old, with first episode schizophrenia, and admitted to treatment in the public health system from six district in two cities of Chile, between 2005 and 2006. Sociodemographic data, clinical evaluations of current psychosis based on the PANSS, and the time of untreated psychosis were obtained. A clinical interview, was carried out followed by the Camberwell Assessment of Need. Results: 29 patients were evaluated, 79.3% male, mean age 21.9 years old. The areas with more needs reported were; psychotic symptoms with 65.5% of sample, 21.1% of which reported it unmet; and daytime activities, where 44.8% of patients reported a need, 61.54% of them as unmet. The percentage of unmet needs correlated with PANSS score (r= 0.55; p=0.003, and with time of positive symptoms prior to diagnosis (r= 0.416; p=0.03. Discussion: Needs assessment in schizophrenia is necessary. It may affect its clinical course, be relevant in its management and help monitor recovery. Defining the main needs in people with first episode schizophrenia and associated factors allows for a better design of treatment strategies in order to obtain better therapeutic results and recovery.

  10. IQ subgroups in relation to neurocognitive profiles, psychopathology and brain volume in first-episode schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maria Høj; Glenthøj, Birte Yding; Rostrup, Egill

    . Promorbid IQ was estimated using the Danish Adult Reading Test and current IQ using 4 subtests from Wechsler's Adult Intelligence Scale III. Patients were divided into 4 subgroups based on a combination of both IQ trajectory from premorbid levels (stable vs. deteriorating) and IQ at illness onset (high vs....... low) using the healthy controls as reference. The IQ subgroups were compared using psychopathology ratings (Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale), neuropsychological assessments (Brief Assessment of Cognition in schizophrenia and Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery) and a combined 3T......Background and Aim: Approximately half of patients with schizophrenia experience a deterioration in IQ before or around illness onset and recent studies have found apositive association between IQ and brain volume in first episode schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to examine the combined...

  11. Detecting incipient schizophrenia: a validation of the Azima battery in first episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafran, Hiba; Mazer, Barbara; Tallant, Beverlea; Chilingaryan, Gevorg; Gelinas, Isabelle

    2017-09-01

    Early psychosis intervention aims to accurately detect adolescents and young adults at risk for major mental disorders, particularly schizophrenia, yet early biomedical diagnostic accuracy remains poor. However, phenomenological approaches focusing on eliciting and understanding the subjective experience of help-seeking youth better detect incipient schizophrenia. The Azima Battery is an occupational therapy projective assessment that uses expressive media in a standard setup, in order to phenomenologically elicit and describe the activity performance and narratives of individuals at risk of, or on, the psychotic-spectrum.The purpose of this study was to estimate the predictive validity of the Azima Battery with youth seeking help for a first episode of psychosis, and identify patterns of performance distinctive of a diagnosis of schizophrenia 1-year later. A mixed methods phenomenological approach was used to calculate the predictive validity of the Azima Battery in detecting incipient schizophrenia, and to qualitatively identify patterns of performance. Study results demonstrate that the diagnostic accuracy of the Azima Battery is greater than psychiatric interviewing for a future diagnosis of schizophrenia (N = 62: 88.7 % vs 42 %). Performance elements and patterns statistically distinctive of schizophrenia are described, and relate to the structure of the created objects. Therefore, the Azima Battery is a valid measure for clinical use by occupational therapists working in early intervention for psychosis as a complement to traditional psychiatric interviewing.

  12. Increased Frontal Gyrification Negatively Correlates with Executive Function in Patients with First-Episode Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasabayashi, Daiki; Takayanagi, Yoichiro; Nishiyama, Shimako; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Furuichi, Atsushi; Kido, Mikio; Nishikawa, Yumiko; Nakamura, Mihoko; Noguchi, Kyo; Suzuki, Michio

    2017-04-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies of gyrification, a possible marker of early neurodevelopment, in schizophrenia patients have reported inconsistent results. In addition, it remains unclear whether aberrant gyrification in schizophrenia patients, if present, is associated with cognitive impairment, which is one of the core features of schizophrenia. Magnetic resonance images were obtained from 62 patients with first-episode schizophrenia and 57 healthy control subjects. Using FreeSurfer software, local gyrification index (LGI) of the entire cortex was compared between the groups. The relationship between LGI and performance in the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) was also examined in a subgroup of patients (n= 28). Compared with the controls, the patients showed a significantly higher LGI in a wide range of bilateral frontal regions as well as in the right inferior parietal and bilateral occipital regions. The number of WCST categories archived in patients was negatively correlated with the LGI mainly in the rostral middle frontal and anterior cingulate regions in the right hemisphere. Our findings suggested a widespread hypergyrification pattern in schizophrenia patients, which supported early neurodevelopmental abnormalities. Our results also suggested that executive dysfunction in schizophrenia patients may be at least partly related to aberrant neurodevelopment, especially in the right frontal regions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. [Pathway to care of people with first episode of schizophrenia, in Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Ruben; Valencia, Eliecer; Madariaga, Carlos; Alieste, Francisco; Minoletti, Alberto; Sepúlveda, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    It has been considered that the duration of first episode of psychosis is a critical period influencing the clini-cal and psychosocial evolution in people with diagnosis of schizophrenia. However, there is little knowledge about this issue in Low and Middle Income Countries. To describe the clinical characteristics and contacts with health services of people with first episode of schizophrenia, prior to their diagnoses and initiation of treatment. Sources and methods. The sample included all persons with diagnosis of first episode of schizo-phrenia, in five psychiatric care centers, located in the North, Center and South of Chile. Diagnosis was confirmed with ICD-10 criteria and psychopathology symptoms were explored using PANSS. The sample was constituted by 48 patients (79.2% men, average age in 23.4 years). The symptom of depression was the first to appear (me-dian of 15 months, before diagnosis). Positive symptoms started in the previous year before diagnosis (delusions, median of 6 months). Positive symptoms triggered the first contact in 77.1% of the patients. Of these cases, 91.7% had medical care in this period (in Primary Health Care Centers and Mental Health Centers). The me-dian for previous contacts was 3.5, but the correct diagnosis was not done at that time. Most of the patients had medical contacts for their psychotic symptoms, but their diagnosis were not made within that period, delaying the start of treatment. There is a need to develop strategies to improve diagnosis capabilities in these centers.

  14. The association between anomalous self-experiences, self-esteem and depression in first episode schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Haug

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anomalous self-experiences (ASEs aggregate in schizophrenia spectrum disorders, but the relationship between ASEs, and depression has been studied to a limited extent. Lower self-esteem has been shown to be associated with depression in early psychosis. Our hypothesis is that ASEs in early phases of schizophrenia are linked to lower levels of self-esteem, which in turn is associated with depression. Aim: The aim is to examine the relationship between ASEs, self-esteem and depression in first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders.Method: ASEs were assessed in 55 patients with first-episode schizophrenia by means of the Examination of anomalous Self-Experience (EASE instrument. Assessment of depression was based on the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS. Self-esteem was measured using the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES. Symptom severity was assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview for the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (SCI-PANSS. Substance misuse was measured with the Drug Use Disorder Identification Test (DUDIT, and alcohol use was measured with the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT. Data on childhood adjustment were collected using the Premorbid Adjustment Scale (PAS. Data on childhood trauma were collected using the Norwegian version of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, short form (CTQ-SF. Results: Analyses detected a significant association between current depression and ASEs as measured by the EASE in women, but not in men. The effect of ASEs on depression appeared to be mediated by self-esteem. No other characteristics associated with depression influenced the relationship between depression, self-esteem and ASEs. Conclusion: Evaluating ASEs can assist clinicians in understanding patients’ experience of self-esteem and depressive symptoms. The complex interaction between ASEs, self-esteem, depression and suicidality could be a clinical target for the prevention of suicidality

  15. Higher total cholesterol level is associated with suicidal ideation in first-episode schizophrenia females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiak, Błażej; Kiejna, Andrzej; Frydecka, Dorota

    2015-03-30

    There are inconsistent reports showing that the relationship between total cholesterol (TC) level and suicidality might be gender-specific. We compared 30 first-episode schizophrenia (FES) patients reporting suicidal ideation based on the Operational Criteria for Psychotic Illness (OPCRIT) checklist with 70 FES patients, who have never experienced suicidal ideation. After controlling for potential confounders, higher TC was associated with suicidal ideation only in FES females. Future studies should disentangle biological underpinnings of this gender-specific association. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Early detection of the first episode of schizophrenia and suicidal behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melle, Ingrid; Johannesen, Jan Olav; Friis, Svein

    2006-01-01

    The suicide rate in schizophrenia is high, with the risk being highest early in the course. The rate of suicide attempts before treatment onset is also high and is often the event leading up to first treatment contact. A previous report showed that the duration of untreated psychosis can be reduced...... through an early detection program, and that the reduction was associated with lower symptom levels at treatment initiation. Treatment programs that bring first-episode patients into treatment at lower symptom levels can have the potential to reduce risk for suicide attempts....

  17. Predictors of schizophrenia in patients with a first episode of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Nicolas; Arranz, Belen; Salavert, Jose; Alvarez, Enrique; Corripio, Iluminada; Dueñas, Rosa Maria; Perez, Victor; San, Luis

    2010-01-30

    Early identification of schizophrenia in patients with a first episode of psychosis (FEP) may help to avoid inappropriate treatment and may enhance long-term outcome by addressing issues such as family network, treatment adherence and functional and symptomatic outcome. It was the aim of the study to determine baseline variables that significantly predicted a diagnosis of schizophrenia in patients with FEP. The sample consisted of 133 FEP patients hospitalized for at least 6 weeks, in whom a DSM-IV diagnosis was confirmed after 1 year follow-up. Patients were divided into two groups, those with a diagnosis of schizophrenia (Schizophrenia group, n=63; 47.8%), and those with other psychosis, who were grouped under Non-Schizophrenic Psychosis (NSP, n=70; 52.2%). Sociodemographic (marital status, educational level) and clinical variables were recorded for each patient. Substance use (alcohol, cannabis and cocaine) did not statistically differ between the two groups. Absence of characteristics defined as criteria for good prognosis, lack of > or = 20% improvement in the total Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale score at 6 weeks, and a poor premorbid adjustment as determined by the Premorbid Adjustment Scale score significantly predicted the presence of schizophrenia. The regression model including these three variables achieved a predictive value of 76.3%, with a sensitivity of 74.6% and a specificity of 77.9%.

  18. Insight and white matter fractional anisotropy in first-episode schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmal, Laila; du Plessis, Stefan; Vink, Matthijs; Fouche, Jean-Paul; Chiliza, Bonginkosi; Emsley, Robin

    2017-05-01

    Impaired insight is a hallmark feature of schizophrenia. Structural studies implicate predominantly prefrontal, cingulate, cuneus/precuneus, and inferior temporal brain regions. The cortical midline structures (CMS) are also implicated in functional studies primarily through self-reflective processing tasks. However, few studies have explored the relationship between white matter tracts and insight in schizophrenia, and none in first-episode schizophrenia (FES). Here, we examined for fractional anisotropy (FA) differences in 89 minimally treated FES patients and 98 matched controls, and identified those FA differences associated with impaired clinical insight in patients. We found widespread FA reduction in FES patients compared to controls. Poorer insight in patients was predicted by lower FA values in a number of white matter tracts with a predilection for tracts associated with cortical midline structures (fronto-occipital, cingulate, cingulate hippocampus, uncinate, anterior corona radiata), and more severe depressive symptoms. The association between FA abnormalities and insight was most robust for the awareness of symptoms and illness awareness domains. Our study implicates a network of tracts involved in impaired insight in schizophrenia with a predilection for the CMS. This study is a first step in delineating the white matter tracts involved in insight impairment in schizophrenia prior to chronicity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Detection of Borna Disease Virus (BDV in Patients with First Episode of Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Soltani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Schizophrenia is a complex widespread neuropsychiatric disorder. This illness encompasses a complex debilitating mental disorder causing illusion, delusion, disturbed relationship, low motivation and decline of emotion. Viral infection of the brain including Borna Disease Virus (BDV may play a role in transient or permanent neurological and behavioral abnormalities. This role of Borna virus has not been resolved outright yet, and based on published papers investigation examining the role of this virus in schizophrenia is in progress worldwide.Method: In this study, Nested Reverse Transcription–Polymerase Chain Reaction (Nested RT-PCR was used for detection of BDV Ribonucleic Acid (RNA in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs of a group of patients experiencing the first episode of schizophrenia. The results were compared with a normal group.Results: In our study, no BDV-positive was found in PBMCs of the case group. Out of 40 participants of control group one was positive for P24 gene of BDV. This result are similar to several published papers about this topic.Conclusion: An etiological relationship between Bornavirus and schizophrenia was not found in this study. More investigations are warranted to illustrate the probable relationship between bornavirus infection and schizophrenia.

  20. Factors Moderating the Relationship Between Childhood Trauma and Premorbid Adjustment in First-Episode Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilian, S; Burns, J K; Seedat, S; Asmal, L; Chiliza, B; Du Plessis, S; Olivier, M R; Kidd, M; Emsley, R

    2017-01-01

    Childhood trauma is a recognised risk factor for schizophrenia. It has been proposed that childhood trauma interferes with normal neurodevelopment, thereby establishing a biological vulnerability to schizophrenia. Poor premorbid adjustment is frequently a precursor to schizophrenia, and may be a manifestation of neurodevelopmental compromise. We investigated the relationship between childhood trauma and premorbid adjustment in 77 patients with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders. We also investigated possible mediating roles for other selected risk factors in the relationship. We found several significant correlations between different trauma types and both social and academic premorbid adjustment from childhood to late adolescence. There were no significant moderating effects for family history of schizophrenia or family history of psychiatric disorder. History of obstetric complications, substance abuse and poor motor coordination weakened some of the associations between childhood trauma and premorbid adjustment, while poor sequencing of motor acts strengthened the association. Our results confirm previous studies indicating an association between childhood trauma and premorbid adjustment. Results indicate a general rather than specific association, apparent with different types of trauma, and affecting both social and academic components of premorbid adjustment across childhood, early and late adolescence. Further, our results suggest a complex interplay of various risk factors, supporting the notion of different pathways to psychosis.

  1. Plasma metabonomics study of first-Episode schizophrenia treated with olanzapine in female patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Ying; Zhang, Lei; He, Shen; Wen, Hui; Yu, Yi-Min; Cao, Chun-Hua; Li, Hua-Fang

    2016-03-23

    Schizophrenia is a persistent chronic mental illness with an unknown pathogenic mechanism; no empirical laboratory-based tests are available to support the diagnosis of schizophrenia or to identify biomarkers correlated with the therapeutic effect of olanzapine. For this study, 15 female first-episode, drug-naïve patients with schizophrenia and 15 healthy female volunteers were recruited. Tests for blood glucose and lipids were conducted at baseline and after 4 weeks of treatment with olanzapine. UPLC-MS based metabonomic analysis was performed on both case and control groups to identify biomarkers of schizophrenia at baseline and to explore which biomarkers correlated with the therapeutic effect of olanzapine after a 4-week treatment. Compared with the control group, the case group showed significant changes in plasma metabolites. Thirteen distinct metabolites were identified. Among all the therapeutically effective cases, levels of these metabolites appeared to shift towards the normal trend; 8 of the identified 13 metabolites changed dramatically. The metabolites that we found are potential biomarkers for the diagnosis and treatment of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Cognitive-perceptual deficits and symptom correlates in first-episode schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riaan M. Olivier

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thought disorder and visual-perceptual deficits have been well documented, but their relationships with clinical symptoms and cognitive function remain unclear. Cognitive-perceptual deficits may underscore clinical symptoms in schizophrenia patients. Aim: This study aimed to explore how thought disorder and form perception are related with clinical symptoms and cognitive dysfunction in first-episode schizophrenia. Setting: Forty-two patients with a first-episode of schizophrenia, schizophreniform or schizoaffective disorder were recruited from community clinics and state hospitals in the Cape Town area. Methods: Patients were assessed at baseline with the Rorschach Perceptual Thinking Index (PTI, the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS and the MATRICS Cognitive Consensus Battery (MCCB. Spearman correlational analyses were conducted to investigate relationships between PTI scores, PANSS factor analysis-derived domain scores and MCCB composite and subscale scores. Multiple regression models explored these relationships further. Results: Unexpectedly, poor form perception (X- % was inversely correlated with the severity of PANSS positive symptoms (r = -0.42, p = 0.02. Good form perception (XA% correlated significantly with speed of processing (r = 0.59, p < 0.01, working memory (r = 0.48, p < 0.01 and visual learning (r = 0.55, p < 0.01. PTI measures of thought disorder did not correlate significantly with PANSS symptom scores or cognitive performance. Conclusions: Form perception is associated with positive symptoms and impairment in executive function during acute psychosis. These findings suggest that there may be clinical value in including sensory-perceptual processing tasks in cognitive remediation and social cognitive training programmes for schizophrenia patients.

  3. Clinical variables associated with suicide attempts in schizophrenia before and after the first episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togay, Bilge; Noyan, Handan; Tasdelen, Rumeysa; Ucok, Alp

    2015-09-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate variables associated with suicide attempts in schizophrenia before and after the first episode. We evaluated history of past sucide attempts, clinical symptoms, level of functioning and cognitive performances of 172 patients with first-episode schizophrenia at first admission. Information was collected regarding clinical symptom severity, treatment compliance, and suicide attempts during the follow-up. We found that 16.5% of the patients attempted suicide before admission, and 6.2% of them attempted suicide during the follow-up. The patients who had attempted suicide before admission were mostly women, and more likely to be hospitalized in first year of follow up. BPRS-depression subscale score at admission and alcohol/substance use appeared as independent variables that found associated with suicide attempts prior to admission in logistic regression analysis. The patients who attempted suicide during the follow-up had significantly higher BPRS-depression subcale scores at sixth months of follow-up. Treatment compliance during the first 6 months and duration of remission was lower in this group. Our findings suggest that longer duration of first hospital treatment, the presence of depressive symptoms, and nonadherence to treatment in early phases of follow up after FES are predictors of suicide attempts. On the other hand, keeping remission during the follow-up protects against suicide attempts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Neurocognitive Graphs of First-Episode Schizophrenia and Major Depression Based on Cognitive Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Sugai; Vega, Roberto; Kong, Xiangzhen; Deng, Wei; Wang, Qiang; Ma, Xiaohong; Li, Mingli; Hu, Xun; Greenshaw, Andrew J; Greiner, Russell; Li, Tao

    2018-04-01

    Neurocognitive deficits are frequently observed in patients with schizophrenia and major depressive disorder (MDD). The relations between cognitive features may be represented by neurocognitive graphs based on cognitive features, modeled as Gaussian Markov random fields. However, it is unclear whether it is possible to differentiate between phenotypic patterns associated with the differential diagnosis of schizophrenia and depression using this neurocognitive graph approach. In this study, we enrolled 215 first-episode patients with schizophrenia (FES), 125 with MDD, and 237 demographically-matched healthy controls (HCs). The cognitive performance of all participants was evaluated using a battery of neurocognitive tests. The graphical LASSO model was trained with a one-vs-one scenario to learn the conditional independent structure of neurocognitive features of each group. Participants in the holdout dataset were classified into different groups with the highest likelihood. A partial correlation matrix was transformed from the graphical model to further explore the neurocognitive graph for each group. The classification approach identified the diagnostic class for individuals with an average accuracy of 73.41% for FES vs HC, 67.07% for MDD vs HC, and 59.48% for FES vs MDD. Both of the neurocognitive graphs for FES and MDD had more connections and higher node centrality than those for HC. The neurocognitive graph for FES was less sparse and had more connections than that for MDD. Thus, neurocognitive graphs based on cognitive features are promising for describing endophenotypes that may discriminate schizophrenia from depression.

  5. First Episode Schizophrenia Regional Cerebral Blood Flow Assessment after Atypical Antipsychotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimbu, A.; Mititelu, R.; Marinescu, G.; Ghita, S.; Mazilu, C.; Codorean, I.; Gheorghe, M.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Aim: Since regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) findings in schizophrenic patients are inconsistent, the aim of our study was to evaluate and compare rCBF in the first episode of schizophrenia, before and after atypical antipsychotic treatment. Method: 21 patients who met criteria for schizophrenia were assessed PANSS score and tomographic brain perfusion (SPECT). The treatment was administered for 10-12 weeks and the dose was 4.8mg/day Risperidone, 11.6mg/day Olanzepine, 440mg/day Quetiapine. After finishing treatment all patients underwent a control SPECT study. Results: PANSS scores revealed two groups: group A-14 patients with predominant positive symptoms; 9 received Olanzapine and 5 Quetiapine. In group B -7 patients with predominant negative symptoms received Risperidone. Positive symptoms were associated with hypoperfusion in posterior parietal regions and superior temporal gyrus, bilaterally; for negative symptoms we found hypoperfusion in prefrontal cortex, predominantly in left side and a hyper perfusion in left basal ganglia. All patients that received atypical antipsychotic drugs had clinical improvement and decreases in PANSS scores; the control SPECT analysis revealed the same cortical changes as first studies in 15 patients and an increase of the rCBF in frontal lobes for 4 patients. 14 patients we noticed an increased rCBF at subcortical level, especially in left caudate nuclei. Conclusions: We found nonspecific features of rCBF in patients with first episode of schizophrenia, suggesting a perfusion dynamic balance rather than a fixed model. Those aspects are much more related to clinical symptoms, than to the therapeutical response. The rCBF changes in subcortical level after treatment (64.4% increase of rCBF; 35.6% not modified), can have a good prognostic value for therapeutic response. (author)

  6. 7T Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex in First-Episode Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Meredith A; Salibi, Nouha; White, David M; Gawne, Timothy J; Denney, Thomas S; Lahti, Adrienne C

    2018-01-29

    Recent magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies suggest that abnormalities of the glutamatergic system in schizophrenia may be dependent on illness stage, medication status, and symptomatology. Glutamatergic metabolites appear to be elevated in the prodromal and early stages of schizophrenia but unchanged or reduced below normal in chronic, medicated patients. However, few of these studies have measured metabolites with high-field 7T MR scanners, which offer higher signal-to-noise ratio and better spectral resolution than 3T scanners and facilitate separation of glutamate and glutamine into distinct signals. In this study, we examined glutamate and other metabolites in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) of first-episode schizophrenia patients. Glutamate and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) were significantly lower in schizophrenia patients vs controls. No differences were observed in levels of glutamine, GABA, or other metabolites. In schizophrenia patients but not controls, GABA was negatively correlated with the total score on the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) as well as the immediate memory and language subscales. Our findings suggest that glutamate and NAA reductions in the ACC may be present early in the illness, but additional large-scale studies are needed to confirm these results as well as longitudinal studies to determine the effect of illness progression and treatment. The correlation between GABA and cognitive function suggests that MRS may be an important technique for investigating the neurobiology underlying cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Duration of Untreated Psychosis Is Associated with More Negative Schizophrenia Symptoms after Acute Treatment for First-Episode Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grano, Niklas; Lindsberg, Jenni; Karjalainen, Marjaana; Gronroos, Peter; Blomberg, Ari-Pekka

    2010-01-01

    Evidence of association between duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) and negative symptoms of schizophrenia in first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients is inconsistent in the recent literature. In the present study, DUP, schizophrenia symptoms, duration of medication, and diagnosis were obtained from hospital archives in a sample of FEP patients.…

  8. Out of touch with reality? Social perception in first-episode schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebisch, Sjoerd J H; Salone, Anatolia; Ferri, Francesca; De Berardis, Domenico; Romani, Gian Luca; Ferro, Filippo M; Gallese, Vittorio

    2013-04-01

    Social dysfunction has been recognized as an elementary feature of schizophrenia, but it remains a crucial issue whether social deficits in schizophrenia concern the inter-subjective domain or primarily have their roots in disturbances of self-experience. Social perception comprises vicarious processes grounding an experiential inter-relationship with others as well as self-regulation processes allowing to maintain a coherent sense of self. The present study investigated whether the functional neural basis underlying these processes is altered in first-episode schizophrenia (FES). Twenty-four FES patients and 22 healthy control participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging during a social perception task requiring them to watch videos depicting other individuals' inanimate and animate/social tactile stimulations, and a tactile localizer condition. Activation in ventral premotor cortex for observed bodily tactile stimulations was reduced in the FES group and negatively correlated with self-experience disturbances. Moreover, FES patients showed aberrant differential activation in posterior insula for first-person tactile experiences and observed affective tactile stimulations. These findings suggest that social perception in FES at a pre-reflective level is characterized by disturbances of self-experience, including impaired multisensory representations and self-other distinction. However, the results also show that social perception in FES involves more complex alterations of neural activation at multiple processing levels.

  9. Out of touch with reality? Social perception in first-episode schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salone, Anatolia; Ferri, Francesca; De Berardis, Domenico; Romani, Gian Luca; Ferro, Filippo M.; Gallese, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    Social dysfunction has been recognized as an elementary feature of schizophrenia, but it remains a crucial issue whether social deficits in schizophrenia concern the inter-subjective domain or primarily have their roots in disturbances of self-experience. Social perception comprises vicarious processes grounding an experiential inter-relationship with others as well as self-regulation processes allowing to maintain a coherent sense of self. The present study investigated whether the functional neural basis underlying these processes is altered in first-episode schizophrenia (FES). Twenty-four FES patients and 22 healthy control participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging during a social perception task requiring them to watch videos depicting other individuals' inanimate and animate/social tactile stimulations, and a tactile localizer condition. Activation in ventral premotor cortex for observed bodily tactile stimulations was reduced in the FES group and negatively correlated with self-experience disturbances. Moreover, FES patients showed aberrant differential activation in posterior insula for first-person tactile experiences and observed affective tactile stimulations. These findings suggest that social perception in FES at a pre-reflective level is characterized by disturbances of self-experience, including impaired multisensory representations and self-other distinction. However, the results also show that social perception in FES involves more complex alterations of neural activation at multiple processing levels. PMID:22275166

  10. Co-morbid depressive disorder is associated with better neurocognitive performance in first episode schizophrenia spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herniman, Sarah E; Cotton, Sue M; Killackey, Eóin; Hester, Robert; Allott, Kelly A

    2018-03-15

    Both major depressive disorder (MDD) and first episode schizophrenia spectrum (FES) are associated with significant neurocognitive deficits. However, it remains unclear whether the neurocognitive deficits in individuals with FES are more severe if there is comorbid depressive disorder. The aim of this study was to compare the neurocognitive profiles between those with and without full-threshold depressive disorder in FES. This study involved secondary analysis of baseline data from a randomized controlled trial of vocational intervention for young people with first-episode psychosis (N = 82; age range: 15-25 years). Those with full-threshold depressive disorder (n = 24) had significantly better information processing speed than those without full-threshold depressive disorder. Severity of depressive symptoms was also associated with better information processing speed. In additional to the cross-sectional design, limitations of this study include the absence of assessing insight as a potential mediator. After the first psychotic episode, it could be speculated that those with better information processing speed may be more likely to develop full-threshold depressive disorder, as their ability to efficiently process information may allow them to be more aware of their situations and environments, and consequently to have greater insight into the devastating consequences of FES. Such novel findings support the examination of full-threshold depressive disorder in relation to neurocognitive performance across illness phases in future work. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Lower LINE-1 methylation in first-episode schizophrenia patients with the history of childhood trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiak, Błażej; Szmida, Elżbieta; Karpiński, Paweł; Loska, Olga; Sąsiadek, Maria M; Frydecka, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    We investigated methylation of DNA repetitive sequences (LINE-1 and BAGE) in peripheral blood leukocytes from first-episode schizophrenia (FES) patients and healthy controls (HCs) with respect to childhood adversities. Patients were divided into two subgroups based on the history of childhood trauma - FES(+) and FES(-) subjects. The majority of HCs had a negative history of childhood trauma - HCs(-) subjects. FES(+) patients had significantly lower LINE-1 methylation in comparison with FES(-) patients or HC(-) subjects. Emotional abuse and total trauma score predicted lower LINE-1 methylation in FES patients, while general trauma score was associated with lower BAGE methylation in HCs. Childhood adversities might be associated with global DNA hypomethylation in adult FES patients.

  12. Characteristics and clinical correlates of prospective memory performance in first-episode schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fu-Chun; Xiang, Yu-Tao; Wang, Chuan-Yue; Dickerson, Faith; Au, Raymond W C; Zhou, Jing-Jing; Zhou, Yan; Shum, David H K; Chiu, Helen F K; Man, David; Lee, Edwin H M; Yu, Xin; Chan, Raymond C K; Ungvari, Gabor S

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine prospective memory (PM) and its socio-demographic, clinical, and neurocognitive correlates in first episode schizophrenia (FES). Fifty-one FES patients and 42 healthy controls formed the study sample. Time- and event-based PM (TBPM and EBPM) performance were measured with the Chinese version of the Cambridge Prospective Memory Test (C-CAMPROMPT). A battery of neuropsychological tests was also administered. Patients' clinical symptoms were evaluated with the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS). Patients performed significantly worse in both TBPM (8.7 ± 5.3 vs. 14.8 ± 3.5) and EBPM (11.3 ± 4.7 vs. 15.7 ± 2.7) than the controls. After controlling for age, gender, education level and neurocognitive test score, the difference in performance on the two types of PM tasks between patients and controls was no longer present. In multiple linear regression analyses, longer duration of untreated psychosis (DUP), lower scores of the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R) and the categories completed of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST-CC) and higher score of the Color Trails Test-2 (CTT-2) contributed to poorer TBPM performance, while lower score of HVLT-R, higher score of the perseverative errors of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST-PE) and longer DUP contributed to worse performance on EBPM. Both subtypes of PM are impaired in first-episode schizophrenia suggesting that PM deficits are an integral part of the cognitive dysfunction in the disease process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Metabolic syndrome and aerobic fitness in patients with first-episode schizophrenia, including a 1-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyboe, L.; Vestergaard, C. H.; Moeller, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and metabolic abnormalities in patients with first-episode schizophrenia (FES) with sex- and age-matched healthy controls; to investigate changes in MetS during 1year of treatment; and to investigate predictors of MetS. METHODS...

  14. Failure to find P50 suppression deficits in young first-episode patients with schizophrenia and clinically unaffected siblings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wilde, O. M.; Bour, L. J.; Dingemans, P. M.; Koelman, J. H. T. M.; Linszen, D. H.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether the P50 gating deficit is present in young first-episode patients with schizophrenia and their healthy young siblings. METHODS: An auditory paired-click paradigm was used to assess P50 gating in 53 patients, 27 unaffected siblings, and 28 healthy controls. P50

  15. Course and predictors of suicidality over the first two years of treatment in first-episode schizophrenia spectrum psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melle, Ingrid; Johannessen, Jan Olav; Friis, Svein

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the course of suicidal behavior over the first 2 years of comprehensive, integrated treatment in two groups of patients with DSM-IV first episode schizophrenia spectrum psychosis, where one group was recruited through an early detection program. We h...

  16. Treatment of patients with first-episode psychosis: two-year outcome data from the Danish National Schizophrenia Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Bent; Valbak, Kristian; Harder, Susanne

    2006-01-01

    First episode psychosis interventions have been in focus in the last two decades in an attempt to improve the course and outcome of schizophrenic disorders. The Danish National Schizophrenia Project began in 1997 its intake of patients, aged 16-35, with a first psychotic episode of a schizophrenic...

  17. The 5-year course of obsessive-compulsive symptoms and obsessive-compulsive disorder in first-episode schizophrenia and related disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, Lieuwe; Sterk, Bouke; Wouters, Luuk; Linszen, Don H.

    2013-01-01

    To determine the course of obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in first-episode schizophrenia and related disorders and their relationship with clinical characteristics. Consecutively, admitted patients with a first-episode of schizophrenia, schizophreniform

  18. Childhood traumatic events and types of auditory verbal hallucinations in first-episode schizophrenia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiak, Błażej; Moustafa, Ahmed A; Kiejna, Andrzej; Frydecka, Dorota

    2016-04-01

    Evidence is accumulating that childhood trauma might be associated with higher severity of positive symptoms in patients with psychosis and higher incidence of psychotic experiences in non-clinical populations. However, it remains unknown whether the history of childhood trauma might be associated with particular types of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH). We assessed childhood trauma using the Early Trauma Inventory Self-Report - Short Form (ETISR-SF) in 94 first-episode schizophrenia (FES) patients. Lifetime psychopathology was evaluated using the Operational Criteria for Psychotic Illness (OPCRIT) checklist, while symptoms on the day of assessment were examined using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Based on ETISR-SF, patients were divided into those with and without the history of childhood trauma: FES(+) and FES(-) patients. FES(+) patients had significantly higher total number of AVH types and Schneiderian first-rank AVH as well as significantly higher PANSS P3 item score (hallucinatory behavior) in comparison with FES(-) patients. They experienced significantly more frequently third person AVH and abusive/accusatory/persecutory voices. These differences remained significant after controlling for education, PANSS depression factor score and chlorpromazine equivalent. Linear regression analysis revealed that the total number of AVH types was predicted by sexual abuse score after controlling for above mentioned confounders. This effect was significant only in females. Our results indicate that the history of childhood trauma, especially sexual abuse, is associated with higher number AVH in females but not in males. Third person AVH and abusive/accusatory/persecutory voices, representing Schneiderian first-rank symptoms, might be particularly related to childhood traumatic events. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The association between anomalous self-experience and suicidality in first-episode schizophrenia seems mediated by depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Elisabeth; Melle, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Raballo, Andrea; Bratlien, Unni; Øie, Merete; Lien, Lars; Møller, Paul

    2012-07-01

    A recent hypothesis is that suicidality in schizophrenia may be linked to the patients' altered basic self-awareness or sense of self, termed self-disorders (SDs). The aim of the study was to investigate whether SDs in first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders are related to suicidality and whether this relationship is independent of or mediated by depression or other standard clinical measures. Self-disorders were assessed in 49 patients with first-episode schizophrenia by means of the Examination of Anomalous Self-Experience (EASE) instrument. Symptoms severity and functioning were assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview for the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia, and Global Assessment of Functioning-Split Version. Suicidality was measured by the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia item 8. Analyses detected a significant association between current suicidality, current depression, and SDs as measured by the EASE. The effect of SDs on suicidal ideation appeared to be mediated by depression. The interaction between anomalous self-experiences and depression could be a rational clinical target for the prevention of suicidality in the early phases of schizophrenia and supports the rationale for including assessment of SDs in early intervention efforts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Rorschach Inkblot Method data at baseline and after 2 years treatment of consecutively admitted patients with first-episode schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Bent; Andersen, Palle Bent; Knudsen, Per Bjerregaard

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Rorschach Inkblot Method is regarded as an important clinical instrument for detailed diagnostic description of the integrative capacities of individuals in psychotic states and as an instrument for measuring progression in the course of treatment. Aims: To describe relevant...... Rorschach variables at baseline in a group of consecutively admitted patients with first-episode schizophrenia. Furthermore, to describe the changes in these variables from baseline to year 2 for the group of patients given psychiatric standard treatment, and to compare these changes with changes in other...... outcome measures [Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF), Strauss-Carpenter and socio-demographic variables]. Methods: In a prospective study, 34 patients consecutively admitted to treatment for a first episode of schizophrenia were tested using Exner...

  1. Genetic Variation in One-Carbon Metabolism and Changes in Metabolic Parameters in First-Episode Schizophrenia Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Misiak, B?a?ej; ?aczma?ski, ?ukasz; S?oka, Natalia Kinga; Szmida, El?bieta; ?l?zak, Ryszard; Piotrowski, Patryk; Kiejna, Andrzej; Frydecka, Dorota

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of polymorphisms in genes encoding 1-carbon metabolism enzymes on differential development of metabolic parameters during 12 weeks of treatment with second-generation antipsychotics in first-episode schizophrenia patients. Methods: The following polymorphisms in 1-carbon metabolism genes were genotyped: MTHFR (C677T and A1298C), MTHFD1 (G1958A), MTRR (A66G), and BHMT (G742A). A broad panel of metabolic parameters includin...

  2. Prevalence and profile of cognitive deficits in a cohort of first-episode antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maria Høj; Glenthøj, Birte Yding; Nielsen, Mette Ødegaard

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Cognitive deficits are considered a core feature of schizophrenia with prevalence estimates ranging from ca. 75-85 %. These deficits are present in the early phase of the illness; however in most first-episode schizophrenia studies the patients are receiving antipsychotic...... intelligence is estimated using DART (Danish Adult Reading Test) and current intelligence is estimated from 4 subtests from WAIS-III (Wechsler´s Adult Intelligence Scale, 3rd ed.). Psychopathology ratings are obtained using PANSS (Positive and Negative Symptom Scale). Results: Preliminary analyses show...

  3. An optimized voxel-based morphometry MRI study of the brain in patients with first episode schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv Su; Huang Xiaoqi; Tang Hehan; Gong Qiyong; Ouyang Luo; Deng Wei; Jiang Lijun; Li Tao

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the structural differences between patients with first episode schizophrenia and normal controls using optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM) study. Methods: High resolution T 1 weighted images were obtained using 3.0 T MR from 13 first-episode, untreated schizophrenia and 13 age, sex, handedness matched normal controls. Images were preprocessed by employing the optimized VBM and two sample t-test was used to detect differences between patients and normal controls with respect to both density and volume of gray matter in the brain. Results Patients with schizophrenia had significant lower gray matter density and gray matter volume generally distributed among bilateral hemispheres, especially in bilateral frontal and temporal lobes. However, no significant increase of gray matter density and gray matter volume was observed in these patients. Conclusions: Optimized voxel-based morphometry study is an automatic and effective method to study psychological diseases such as schizophrenia. Compared with normal controls, patients with schizophrenia had significantly lower gray matter density and gray matter volume across the bilateral hemispheres. (authors)

  4. Dynamic changes in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) findings in first-episode schizophrenia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Tsuyoshi; Kunii, Yasuto; Miura, Itaru; Itagaki, Shuntaro; Kono, Soichi; Shiga, Tetsuya; Oshima, Sachie; Nozaki, Keiko; Suzuki, Rieko; Yabe, Hirooki

    2017-04-28

    The clinical course of schizophrenia is characterized by recurrence and chronicity and has a large burden on society. Nevertheless, diagnosis of schizophrenia is based only on distinctive symptoms and the disease course. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a useful method for measuring changes in the hemoglobin concentration in the cortical surface area and reflects brain function. We measured NIRS four times during the clinical course in a patient with first-episode schizophrenia.A 17-year-old woman admitted to our hospital because of hallucinations, delusions and appetite loss. After treatment with low-dose antipsychotics, NIRS findings showed a prompt increase in the cerebral blood volume in the frontal region. On the basis of the clinical course of this patient, we introduce a new point of view, namely, that NIRS findings may be useful as a state marker that indicates the severity of schizophrenia in some cases.

  5. Complex mismatch negativity to tone pair deviants in long-term schizophrenia and in the first-episode schizophrenia spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Dean F; McCathern, Alexis G; Coffman, Brian A; Murphy, Timothy K; Haigh, Sarah M

    2018-01-01

    Mismatch negativity (MMN) is an event-related potential to stimulus change. MMN to infrequent deviant tones that differs in a simple physical parameter from repetitive standard tones is reduced in patients with long-term schizophrenia (Sz; d=~1). However, this simple MMN is not uniformly reduced at the first-episode of schizophrenia-spectrum psychosis (FESz; d<0.1 for pitch; <0.4 for duration). Deviant stimuli that violate pattern rules also evoke MMN. This complex MMN is evoked by deviations in the relation of sounds to each other. The simplest pattern involves tone pairs. Although the pitch of first tone in the pair varies, the second tone's pitch always follows a rule (e.g., always 3 semitones higher). We measured complex MMN to deviant tone pairs that descended in pitch among standard tone pairs that ascended in pitch, never before examined in Sz or in FESz. Experiment 1 showed significant reductions in complex MMN in 20 Sz compared to 22 matched controls. Experiment 2 replicated smaller complex MMN in a shorter protocol in 24 Sz compared to 21 matched controls, but showed no significant complex MMN reduction in 21 FESz compared to 21 matched controls. Although reduced in Sz, indicating deficits in generation of a simple acoustic pattern rule, the tone pair complex MMN was within normal limits in FESz. This suggests that more complex perceptual pattern analysis processes are, at least partially, still intact at the first break. Future work will determine at what point of pattern complexity subtle auditory perception pathophysiology will be revealed in FESz. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Increased circulatory dehydroepiandrosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulphate in first-episode schizophrenia: relationship to gender, aggression and symptomatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strous, Rael D; Maayan, Rachel; Lapidus, Raya; Goredetsky, Leonid; Zeldich, Ella; Kotler, Moshe; Weizman, Abraham

    2004-12-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is a major circulating neurosteroid in humans and its administration has demonstrated efficacy in the improvement of mood, with increased energy, interest, confidence and activity levels. Since recent findings have suggested the role of neurosteroids in general, and DHEA in particular, in the symptomatology and pharmacotherapy of schizophrenia patients with chronic illness, we investigated DHEA and DHEA-S blood levels in individuals in their first-episode of psychosis in order to exclude effects of age, chronic illness, long-term treatment and institutionalization. Blood levels for DHEA, DHEA-S and cortisol were obtained for 37 first-episode schizophrenia subjects and 27 normal age- and sex-matched controls and correlated with a range of clinical and side-effect rating scales. Baseline DHEA and DHEA-S levels were significantly higher in schizophrenia patients (paggressive behavior (pschizophrenia psychosis may develop a neurosteroid response to the first onset of psychosis, which may be associated with a reduction in various adverse clinical features including aggression. Such a putative mechanism may become desensitized with the onset of chronic illness. While preliminary, these results further imply the role of these neurosteroids in the pathophysiology and management of schizophrenia.

  7. Validation of the virtual-reality prospective memory test (Hong Kong Chinese version) for individuals with first-episode schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, David W K; Ganesan, Balasankar; Yip, Calvin C K; Lee, Christina O P; Tsang, Sarah Y L; Yu, Pan W P; Young, Janice G E; Shum, David H K

    2016-11-13

    This study was performed to examine the psychometric properties of a Virtual-Reality Prospective Memory Test (Hong Kong Chinese version; VRPMT-CV). The VRPMT was administered to 44 individuals with first-episode schizophrenia. The test was administered again 2 weeks later to establish test-retest reliability. The concurrent validity of the VRPMT was evaluated by examining the correlations between the VRPMT score and the score on the Chinese version of the Cambridge Prospective Memory Test (CAMPROMPT-CV). The performance of individuals with schizophrenia on the VRPMT was also compared with that of 42 healthy control subjects to examine the test's sensitivity and specificity. The intraclass correlation for test-retest reliability of the total VRPMT-CV score was 0.78 (p = .005). A significant correlation was found between the total VRPMT-CV score and the total CAMPROMPT-CV score (r = 0.90; p schizophrenia. The VRPMT-CV is an assessment of prospective memory that has good construct validity, test-retest reliability, sensitivity and specificity in the context of first-episode schizophrenia.

  8. Developing a Cognitive Training Strategy for First-Episode Schizophrenia: Integrating Bottom-Up and Top-Down Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuechterlein, Keith H; Ventura, Joseph; Subotnik, Kenneth L; Hayata, Jacqueline N; Medalia, Alice; Bell, Morris D

    2014-07-01

    It is clear that people with schizophrenia typically have cognitive problems in multiple domains as part of their illness. The cognitive deficits are among the main contributors to limitations in their everyday functioning, including their work recovery. Cognitive remediation has been applied successfully to help people with long-term, persistent schizophrenia to improve their cognitive functioning, but it is only beginning to be applied with individuals who have recently had a first episode of psychosis. Several different approaches to cognitive training have been developed. Some approaches emphasize extensive systematic practice with lower-level cognitive processes and building toward higher-level processes ("bottom-up"), while others emphasize greater focus on high-level cognitive processes that normally integrate and organize lower-level processes ("top-down"). Each approach has advantages and disadvantages for a disorder like schizophrenia, with its multiple levels of cognitive dysfunction. In addition, approaches to cognitive remediation differ in the extent to which they systematically facilitate transfer of learning to everyday functioning. We describe in this article the cognitive training approach that was developed for a UCLA study of people with a recent first episode of schizophrenia, a group that may benefit greatly from early intervention that focuses on cognition and recovery of work functioning. This approach integrated bottom-up and top-down computerized cognitive training and incorporated an additional weekly group session to bridge between computerized training and application to everyday work and school functioning.

  9. Decrease in temporal gyrus gray matter volume in first-episode, early onset schizophrenia: an MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinsong Tang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Loss of gray matter has been previously found in early-onset schizophrenic patients. However, there are no consistent findings between studies due to different methods used to measure grey matter volume/density and influences of confounding factors. METHODS: The volume of gray matter (GM was measured in 29 first episode early-onset schizophrenia (EOS and 34 well-matched healthy controls by using voxel-based morphometry (VBM. Psychotic symptoms were assessed using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS. The correlations between the GM volume and PANSS scores, age of psychosis onset, duration of psychosis, and chlorpromazine (CPZ equivalent value were investigated. RESULTS: Relative to healthy subjects, the patients with first episode EOS showed significantly lower GM volume in the left middle and superior temporal gyrus. The loss of GM volume negatively correlated with PANSS-positive symptoms (p = 0.002, but not with PANSS-negative symptoms, PANSS-general psychopathology, and PANSS-total score. No significant correlation was found between GM volume and age of psychosis onset, duration of psychosis, and CPZ equivalent value. CONCLUSION: Patients with first episode EOS have evidence of reduced GM in the left middle and superior temporal gyrus. Structural abnormalities in the left middle and superior temporal gyrus may contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  10. Cognitive behavioral therapy across the stages of psychosis : Prodromal, first episode, and chronic schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valmaggia, Lucia R.; Tabraham, Paul; Morris, Eric; Bourrian, Theo K.

    Since the early 1990s, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been increasingly used as an adjunctive treatment for psychotic disorders. This paper describes the CBT of three cases, each at a different stage of psycholic disorder: at-risk mental state, first-episode psychosis, and chronic psychotic

  11. Analysis of clinical characteristics and antipsychotic medication prescribing practices of first-episode schizophrenia in Israel: a naturalistic prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strous, Rael D; Bar, Faina; Keret, Noa; Lapidus, Raya; Kosov, Nikolai; Chelben, Joseph; Kotler, Moshe

    2006-01-01

    Investigation of the clinical presentation and treatment of first-episode psychosis is important in order to exclude effects of age, chronic illness, long-term treatment and institutionalization. The aim of this descriptive study was to investigate the management practices of first-episode schizophrenia in a cohort of patients in Israel and to document use of the various "typical" or "atypical" antipsychotic agents. Fifty-one consecutive patients (26 M, 25 F) with first-episode psychosis were recruited for study participation and were administered either typical or atypical antipsychotic medications in a naturalistic manner. While an approximately equal number of subjects received typical and atypical medications at illness onset, a prominent shift to atypical antipsychotic treatment occurred over the study course; 18 subjects had medication class shifts: 17 from typical to atypical, and one from atypical to typical. Negative symptoms did not affect length of hospitalization, but were associated with aggression. Higher depression rates were noted in patients with long hospitalizations who received typical antipsychotic medications. Immigrants were admitted at an age approximately four years older than native-born Israelis. The prominent shift from "typical" to "atypical" antipsychotic medications may indicate sensitivity of first-episode psychotic patients to side-effects of "typical" medications and prominence of use of atypical medications in this patient subpopulation be it due to improved efficacy over time or successful marketing. Unique cultural and population characteristics may contribute to the manifestation of first-episode psychosis and suggest the importance of more effective outreach to the immigrant population in order to manage an apparent treatment delay.

  12. Cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular flexibility and strength in first-episode schizophrenia patients: use of a standardized fitness assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gretchen-Doorly, Denise; Kite, Robin E; Subotnik, Kenneth L; Detore, Nicole R; Ventura, Joseph; Kurtz, Andrew S; Nuechterlein, Keith H

    2012-05-01

    This study determined the fitness status and examined potential correlates of fitness in first-episode schizophrenia patients using a standardized fitness test protocol. A certified fitness instructor administered the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) fitness test to 70 recent-onset schizophrenia participants within 3 months of entry into the study. Percentile ranks of scores on muscular strength and endurance, muscular flexibility and cardiorespiratory fitness in our sample were all below the 50th percentile when compared with national norms in the United States. As expected, patients with a higher body mass index and those who smoked had poorer cardiorespiratory fitness. A non-significant trend indicated that patients with a longer duration of illness had worse cardiorespiratory fitness. Exposure to antipsychotic medication was unrelated to cardiorespiratory fitness. Results suggest that physical fitness is impaired and might decline over time in first-episode schizophrenia patients, but this needs to be confirmed in a longitudinal study. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Childhood trauma and dissociation in first-episode psychosis, chronic schizophrenia and community controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braehler, Christine; Valiquette, Luc; Holowka, Darren; Malla, Ashok K; Joober, Ridha; Ciampi, Antonio; Pawliuk, Nicole; King, Suzanne

    2013-11-30

    Increasing evidence supports the role of childhood trauma in the etiology of psychosis but underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Early maltreatment has been linked to dissociative symptoms in psychosis patients. We explored associations between childhood trauma (Childhood Trauma Questionnaire) and dissociation (Dissociative Experiences Scale) in first-episode psychotic patients (n=62), chronic psychotic patients (n=43), and non-psychotic community controls (n=66). Multivariate analyses of covariance were used to test associations between childhood trauma and dissociation by group while controlling for sex. Chronic patients reported the highest level of dissociation. More severe childhood trauma was associated with greater dissociative symptoms in all groups although most strongly in chronic patients. Emotional abuse showed the strongest associations with dissociation, with these being strongest for chronic patients, followed by first-episode patients--and least for controls. Men showed a stronger association between physical neglect and dissociation than women, irrespective of group. There were no significant group by sex interactions. Our findings replicate the strong association between childhood trauma and dissociative symptoms in chronic and first-episode psychotic patients relative to non-psychotic control subjects. We also demonstrate the salience of emotional abuse in explaining variance in dissociation, especially in chronic patients. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Association between Anomalous Self-experiences, Self-esteem and Depressive Symptoms in First Episode Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Elisabeth; Øie, Merete G.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Bratlien, Unni; Romm, Kristin L.; Møller, Paul; Melle, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anomalous self-experiences (ASEs) aggregate in schizophrenia spectrum disorders, but the relationship between ASEs, and depression has been studied to a limited extent. Lower self-esteem has been shown to be associated with depression in early psychosis. Our hypothesis is that ASEs in early phases of schizophrenia are linked to lower levels of self-esteem, which in turn is associated with depression. Aim: The aim is to examine the relationship between ASEs, self-esteem and depression in first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Method: ASEs were assessed in 55 patients with first-episode schizophrenia by means of the Examination of anomalous Self-Experience (EASE) instrument. Assessment of depression was based on the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS). Self-esteem was measured using the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES). Symptom severity was assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview for the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (SCI-PANSS). Substance misuse was measured with the Drug Use Disorder Identification Test (DUDIT), and alcohol use was measured with the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT). Data on childhood adjustment were collected using the Premorbid Adjustment Scale (PAS). Data on childhood trauma were collected using the Norwegian version of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, short form (CTQ-SF). Results: Analyses detected a significant association between current depression and ASEs as measured by the EASE in women, but not in men. The effect of ASEs on depression appeared to be mediated by self-esteem. No other characteristics associated with depression influenced the relationship between depression, self-esteem and ASEs. Conclusion: Evaluating ASEs can assist clinicians in understanding patients' experience of self-esteem and depressive symptoms. The complex interaction between ASEs, self-esteem, depression and suicidality could be a clinical target for the prevention of suicidality in this

  15. The relationship between facial emotion recognition and executive functions in first-episode patients with schizophrenia and their siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chengqing; Zhang, Tianhong; Li, Zezhi; Heeramun-Aubeeluck, Anisha; Liu, Na; Huang, Nan; Zhang, Jie; He, Leiying; Li, Hui; Tang, Yingying; Chen, Fazhan; Liu, Fei; Wang, Jijun; Lu, Zheng

    2015-10-08

    Although many studies have examined executive functions and facial emotion recognition in people with schizophrenia, few of them focused on the correlation between them. Furthermore, their relationship in the siblings of patients also remains unclear. The aim of the present study is to examine the correlation between executive functions and facial emotion recognition in patients with first-episode schizophrenia and their siblings. Thirty patients with first-episode schizophrenia, their twenty-six siblings, and thirty healthy controls were enrolled. They completed facial emotion recognition tasks using the Ekman Standard Faces Database, and executive functioning was measured by Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). Hierarchical regression analysis was applied to assess the correlation between executive functions and facial emotion recognition. Our study found that in siblings, the accuracy in recognizing low degree 'disgust' emotion was negatively correlated with the total correct rate in WCST (r = -0.614, p = 0.023), but was positively correlated with the total error in WCST (r = 0.623, p = 0.020); the accuracy in recognizing 'neutral' emotion was positively correlated with the total error rate in WCST (r = 0.683, p = 0.014) while negatively correlated with the total correct rate in WCST (r = -0.677, p = 0.017). People with schizophrenia showed an impairment in facial emotion recognition when identifying moderate 'happy' facial emotion, the accuracy of which was significantly correlated with the number of completed categories of WCST (R(2) = 0.432, P executive functions and facial emotion recognition in the healthy control group. Our study demonstrated that facial emotion recognition impairment correlated with executive function impairment in people with schizophrenia and their unaffected siblings but not in healthy controls.

  16. The Association between Anomalous Self-experiences, Self-esteem and Depressive Symptoms in First Episode Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Elisabeth; Øie, Merete G; Andreassen, Ole A; Bratlien, Unni; Romm, Kristin L; Møller, Paul; Melle, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anomalous self-experiences (ASEs) aggregate in schizophrenia spectrum disorders, but the relationship between ASEs, and depression has been studied to a limited extent. Lower self-esteem has been shown to be associated with depression in early psychosis. Our hypothesis is that ASEs in early phases of schizophrenia are linked to lower levels of self-esteem, which in turn is associated with depression. Aim: The aim is to examine the relationship between ASEs, self-esteem and depression in first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Method: ASEs were assessed in 55 patients with first-episode schizophrenia by means of the Examination of anomalous Self-Experience (EASE) instrument. Assessment of depression was based on the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS). Self-esteem was measured using the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES). Symptom severity was assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview for the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (SCI-PANSS). Substance misuse was measured with the Drug Use Disorder Identification Test (DUDIT), and alcohol use was measured with the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT). Data on childhood adjustment were collected using the Premorbid Adjustment Scale (PAS). Data on childhood trauma were collected using the Norwegian version of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, short form (CTQ-SF). Results: Analyses detected a significant association between current depression and ASEs as measured by the EASE in women, but not in men. The effect of ASEs on depression appeared to be mediated by self-esteem. No other characteristics associated with depression influenced the relationship between depression, self-esteem and ASEs. Conclusion: Evaluating ASEs can assist clinicians in understanding patients' experience of self-esteem and depressive symptoms. The complex interaction between ASEs, self-esteem, depression and suicidality could be a clinical target for the prevention of suicidality in this

  17. The association between psychopathology of first-episode psychosis patients within the schizophrenia spectrum and previous offending

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkner, Runa; Haastrup, Soeren; Joergensen, Torben

    2009-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia have been shown to have an increased risk of criminality. The aim was to describe possible psychopathological differences between schizophrenia spectrum patients with and without a criminal career before first-episode psychosis. In a multi-centre study, 16 psychiatric...... were linked with data concerning criminal and psychiatric history. No key characteristics were found to assist the early detection of criminal persons before first psychiatric hospital contact for a psychotic incident. However, when adjusted for sex, age, abuse, living conditions, marital status......, employment status and education, a primarily positive symptomatology was associated with a prior criminal career. The premorbid level of functioning and several function parameters were also significantly associated with criminal history. There are significant differences in psychopathology between...

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging and the prediction of outcome in first-episode schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dazzan, Paola; Arango, Celso; Fleischacker, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) measures are promising outcome markers for schizophrenia, since regional frontal and temporal grey matter volumes reductions, and enlargement of the ventricles, have been associated with outcome in this disorder. However, a number of methodological iss...

  19. Out of touch with reality? Social perception in first-episode schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Ebisch, Sjoerd J. H.; Salone, Anatolia; Ferri, Francesca; De Berardis, Domenico; Romani, Gian Luca; Ferro, Filippo M.; Gallese, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    Social dysfunction has been recognized as an elementary feature of schizophrenia, but it remains a crucial issue whether social deficits in schizophrenia concern the inter-subjective domain or primarily have their roots in disturbances of self-experience. Social perception comprises vicarious processes grounding an experiential inter-relationship with others as well as self-regulation processes allowing to maintain a coherent sense of self. The present study investigated whether the functiona...

  20. Increased short-range and long-range functional connectivity in first-episode, medication-naive schizophrenia at rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenbin; Liu, Feng; Xiao, Changqing; Liu, Jianrong; Yu, Miaoyu; Zhang, Zhikun; Zhang, Jian; Zhao, Jingping

    2015-08-01

    Schizophrenia is conceived as a disconnection syndrome and anatomical distance may affect functional connectivity (FC) in schizophrenia patients. However, whether and how anatomical distance affects FC remains unclear in first-episode, medication-naive schizophrenia at rest. Forty-nine schizophrenia patients and 50 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning. Regional FC strength was computed for each voxel in the brain, which was further divided into short-range and long-range FC strength. The patients exhibited increased short-range positive FC strength in the left superior medial frontal gyrus, and increased long-range positive FC strength in the right angular gyrus and bilateral posterior cingulate cortex (PCC)/precuneus compared with the controls. Further seed-based FC analysis showed that the left superior medial frontal gyrus had increased short-range FC with the right inferior frontal gyrus, while the right angular gyrus and bilateral PCC/precuneus had increased long-range FC with the prefrontal gyrus. No significant correlation was observed between abnormal FC strength and clinical variables in the patient group. The findings reveal a pattern of increased anatomical distance affecting FC in the patients, with the results of increased short-range positive FC strength in the anterior default-mode network (DMN) and increased long-range positive FC strength in the posterior DMN in schizophrenia, and highlight the importance of the DMN in the neurobiology of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Course of intelligence deficits in early onset, first episode schizophrenia: a controlled, 5-year longitudinal study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Jens Richardt Møllegaard; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Pagsberg, Anne Katrine

    2010-01-01

    Only few prospective longitudinal studies have assessed the course of intelligence deficits in early onset schizophrenia (EOS), and these have used different age appropriate versions of Wechsler Intelligence Scales and age appropriate norms. The post-psychotic development of intelligence in EOS has...

  2. Early detection of the first episode of schizophrenia and suicidal behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melle, Ingrid; Johannesen, Jan Olav; Friis, Svein

    2006-01-01

    The suicide rate in schizophrenia is high, with the risk being highest early in the course. The rate of suicide attempts before treatment onset is also high and is often the event leading up to first treatment contact. A previous report showed that the duration of untreated psychosis can be reduced...

  3. Early effects of treatment in first episode schizophrenia on brain perfusion evaluated with 99mTc-ECD-SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milcinski, M.; Grmek, M.; Novak, B.; Kocmur, M.

    2002-01-01

    Aim of our study was to evaluate regional cerebral blood flow (r-CBF) in acute first-episode schizophrenia and the early effects of antipsychotic drugs on r-CBF. Methods: Clinical criteria for schizophrenia were met according to International Classification of Diseases - 10th Edition (ICD-10). Psychic status and severity of disease of each patient were evaluated with a semi-structured psychiatric interview, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and Clinical Global Impression (CGI) on the same day as the scintigraphic study. R-CBF was evaluated using 99m-Tc-ECD. Until now 9 first-episode schizophrenic patients 2-7 (average 5.2) days after the beginning of antipsychotic treatment and 7 pts 8-15 (average 10.4) weeks later were investigated. R-CBF was evaluated in every patient in comparison to cerebellar blood flow in frontal and temporal regions in 4 slices. Both studies were compared. Homogeneity of brain perfusion was assessed visually as homogenous, moderately and severely non-homogenous. Results: In acute patients, perfusion was non-homogenous and decreased in left frontal lobe (90.1±4.4) in comparison to the right side (93.3±±4.6, p<0.05). Increase in perfusion was significant (p<0.05) between first and second scan in left (90.1±4.4 to 94.1±5.2, p<0.05) and right (93.4±4.6 to 96.9±5.8, p<0.05) frontal lobes. Significant difference in perfusion between right and left posterior region of temporal lobe found on the first scan was no longer present on the second scan. Perfusion was significantly more homogenous on the second scan. Significant decrease in PANSS (p<0.05) and CGI (p<0.001) scores was noted. Conclusions: Despite the low number of patients included so far, our findings implicate that patients with first-episode schizophrenia have significant bilateral frontal hypoperfusion, more pronounced on the left side. After average 10 weeks of medication, bilateral increase in blood flow was observed in frontal lobes and left-right difference was no

  4. Working Memory Modulation of Frontoparietal Network Connectivity in First-Episode Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Duemose; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Wang, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Working memory (WM) impairment is regarded as a core aspect of schizophrenia. However, the neural mechanisms behind this cognitive deficit remain unclear. The connectivity of a frontoparietal network is known to be important for subserving WM. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, the curr......Working memory (WM) impairment is regarded as a core aspect of schizophrenia. However, the neural mechanisms behind this cognitive deficit remain unclear. The connectivity of a frontoparietal network is known to be important for subserving WM. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging...... between regions (left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), left inferior parietal lobe (IPL), and primary visual area) identified in a psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis was performed to characterize effective connectivity during the n-back task. The PPI analysis revealed that the connectivity...

  5. Long-Acting Injectable Risperidone for Relapse Prevention and Control of Breakthrough Symptoms After a Recent First Episode of Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subotnik, Kenneth L.; Casaus, Laurie R.; Ventura, Joseph; Luo, John S.; Hellemann, Gerhard S.; Gretchen-Doorly, Denise; Marder, Stephen; Nuechterlein, Keith H.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Long-acting, injectable, second-generation antipsychotic medication has tremendous potential to bring clinical stability to persons with schizophrenia. However, long-acting medications are rarely used following a first episode of schizophrenia. OBJECTIVE To compare the clinical efficacy of the long-acting injectable formulation of risperidone with the oral formulation in the early course of schizophrenia. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A randomized clinical trial performed at a university-based research clinic, between 2005 and 2012. Eighty-six patients with recent onset of schizophrenia were randomized to receive long-acting injectable risperidone or oral risperidone. Half of each group was simultaneously randomized to receive cognitive remediation to improve cognitive functioning or healthy-behaviors training to improve lifestyle habits and well-being. An intent-to-treat analysis was performed between October 4, 2012, and November 12, 2014. INTERVENTIONS A 12-month trial comparing the long-acting injectable vs oral risperidone and cognitive remediation vs healthy-behaviors training. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Psychotic relapse and control of breakthrough psychotic symptoms. RESULTS Of the 86 patients randomized, 3 refused treatment in the long-acting injectable risperidone group. The psychotic exacerbation and/or relapse rate was lower for the long-acting risperidone group compared with the oral group (5% vs 33%; χ21 = 11.1; P risperidone better controlled mean levels of hallucinations and delusions throughout follow-up (β = −0.30; t68 = −2.6, P = .01). The cognitive remediation and healthy-behaviors training groups did not differ significantly regarding psychotic relapse, psychotic symptom control, or hospitalization rates, and there were no significant interactions between the 2 medications and the 2 psychosocial treatments. Discontinuations owing to inadequate clinical response were more common in the oral group than in the long

  6. Effect of risperidone on serum homocysteine levels in first-episode, drug-naïve patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ning; Tan, Yunlong; Yang, Fude; Tian, Li; Chen, Song; Li, Jia; Wang, Zhiren; Zhang, Xiangyang

    2017-05-22

    Some studies have shown that homocysteine (Hcy) levels are increased in patients with schizophrenia, and may be involved in its pathophysiology. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the atypical antipsychotic drug risperidone on serum Hcy levels and to explore the relationship between the changes in Hcy levels and the therapeutic outcome, which, to our best knowledge have not been investigated. Fifty-six first-episode and drug-naïve inpatients with schizophrenia were assigned to a 12-week treatment regime with risperidone. Clinical efficacy was determined with the Positive And Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Serum Hcy levels were measured by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in schizophrenia patients before and after the 12-week treatment, and the values were compared with those of fifty-six age- and gender- matched healthy controls. Serum Hcy levels were significantly higher in first-episode and drug-naïve patients than in control subjects (11.18±4.53 vs. 5.99±3.61μmol/L, F=37.195, df=1, p=1.73×10 -8 ). Moreover, a significant positive correlation between Hcy levels and PANSS negative sub-score was observed (r=0.515; p=4.81×10 -5 ). Serum Hcy levels were significantly decreased in patients after risperidone treatment (baseline: 11.18±4.53μmol/L vs. post-treatment: 8.98±4.07μmol/L, t=3.857, p=3.034×10 -4 ). At post-treatment, there was a significant negative relationship between serum Hcy levels and PANSS negative sub-scores (r=-0.288, p=0.032). High Hcy levels at the onset of psychosis suggests that it may contribute to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and is related to clinical psychopathology. Serum Hcy levels were significantly decreased in schizophrenia patients after risperidone treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Retraction: 'Effect of blonanserin on cognitive function in antipsychotic-naïve first-episode schizophrenia'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenjin, Tomomi; Miyamoto, Seiya; Miyake, Nobumi; Ogino, Shin; Kitajima, Rei; Ojima, Kazuaki; Arai, Jun; Teramoto, Haruki; Tsukahara, Sachiko; Ito, Yukie; Tadokoro, Masanori; Anai, Kiriko; Funamoto, Yasuyuki; Kaneda, Yasuhiro; Sumiyoshi, Tomiki; Yamaguchi, Noboru

    2017-05-01

    The above article from Human Psychopharmacology, first published on 25 January 2012 in Wiley OnlineLibrary (onlinelibrary.wiley.com), and in Volume 90, pp. 90-100, has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor in Chief, David Baldwin, and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation by the St Marianna University Ethics Committee which determined that the paper was not as originally designed and approved. Tenjin, T., Miyamoto, S., Miyake, N., Ogino, S., Kitajima, R., Ojima, K., … Yamaguchi, N. (2012). Effect of blonanserin on cognitive function in antipsychotic-naïve first-episode schizophrenia. Hum. Psychopharmacol Clin Exp, 27, 90-100. https://doi.org/10.1002/hup.1276. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Cognitive insight in first-episode schizophrenia: further evidence for a role of the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchy, Lisa; Hawco, Colin; Joober, Ridha; Malla, Ashok; Lepage, Martin

    2015-08-01

    In people with psychoses, Self-Reflectiveness may rely on the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC). We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a novel virtual reality paradigm to evaluate the role of the VLPFC for Self-Reflectiveness in 25 first-episode of schizophrenia (FES) participants and 24 controls. Participants first viewed 20 characters each paired with a unique object/location, and later completed source memory judgements during fMRI scanning. Self-Reflectiveness, measured with the Beck Cognitive Insight Scale, was significantly and positively correlated to activation in bilateral VLPFC in FES, but not in controls, providing further evidence that the VLPFC supports Self-Reflectiveness in FES. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Gender differences in young adults with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders at baseline in the Danish OPUS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Anne; Petersen, Lone; Jeppesen, Pia

    2007-01-01

    Gender differences in age at first onset, duration of untreated psychosis, psychopathology, social functioning, and self-esteem were investigated in a group of 578 young adults with a first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorder. The mean age at first-onset of symptoms, age at first contact......, and duration of untreated psychosis were similar for men and women. Men had more severe negative symptoms, poorer premorbid functioning, and poorer social networks, whereas women had more severe hallucinations. More men than women were substance abusers, were unemployed, and lived alone. Women had poorer self-esteem...... functioning, which cannot be explained by older age of onset for women. Women make more suicide attempts and experience lower self-esteem in spite of better social functioning. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-May...

  10. Gender differences in young adults with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders at baseline in the Danish OPUS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Anne; Petersen, Lone; Jeppesen, Pia

    2007-01-01

    Gender differences in age at first onset, duration of untreated psychosis, psychopathology, social functioning, and self-esteem were investigated in a group of 578 young adults with a first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorder. The mean age at first-onset of symptoms, age at first contact......, and duration of untreated psychosis were similar for men and women. Men had more severe negative symptoms, poorer premorbid functioning, and poorer social networks, whereas women had more severe hallucinations. More men than women were substance abusers, were unemployed, and lived alone. Women had poorer self-esteem...... functioning, which cannot be explained by older age of onset for women. Women make more suicide attempts and experience lower self-esteem in spite of better social functioning....

  11. Suicidal ideation and quality of life in patients with a first episode of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Górna

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Risk of suicide in patients with schizophrenia is 20- to 50-fold higher than in the general population. The impact of suicidal behaviour on quality of life rarely was a subject of in-depth analysis. The issue is particularly important in patients after first psychiatric hospitalisation, since the risk of suicide is very high during the first postdischarge months. The aim of this study was to analyse correlations between presence of suicidal ideations prior to first hospitalisation and quality of life of patients with schizophrenia during the first post-hospitalisation year. Material and method: Overall, 86 patients were enrolled in the study. Suicidal ideations and behaviours were assessed based on interviews with patients and their relatives, as well as on medical records. The patients’ quality of life was evaluated one month (1st exam and after one year (2nd exam after discharge. Quality of life was assessed using the WHOQOL questionnaire and the SFS scale. Psychopathological symptoms were evaluated using the PANSS inventory. Results: Prior to first hospitalisation, suicidal ideations were present in 39.5% of our patients. Persons with suicidal thoughts presented more severe psychopathological symptoms (1st exam; p=0.05. Both examinations revealed differences in the patients’ quality of life. Lack of suicidal ideations was associated with a better quality of life as assessed by the WHOQOL questionnaire in the following domains: general well-being (1st and 2nd exam, state of health (1st exam, Mental (1st and 2nd exam, Physical (1st exam, Environmental domains (1st exam and Work/Employment (SFS scale, 1st and 2nd exam. A correlation was noticed between suicidal ideation and change in quality of life (WHOQOL in domains Social relationships and Environmental. An improvement of quality of life in this domain was noticed in persons with suicidal ideations. Conclusions: Suicidal ideations prior to first psychiatric hospitalisation

  12. Frequency and pattern of childhood symptom onset reported by first episode schizophrenia and clinical high risk youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodberry, Kristen A; Serur, Rachael A; Hallinan, Sean B; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I; Giuliano, Anthony J; Wojcik, Joanne D; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Frazier, Jean A; Goldstein, Jill M; Shenton, Martha E; McCarley, Robert W; Seidman, Larry J

    2014-09-01

    Psychosis prevention and early intervention efforts in schizophrenia have focused increasingly on sub-threshold psychotic symptoms in adolescents and young adults. Although many youth report symptom onset prior to adolescence, the childhood incidence of prodromal-level symptoms in those with schizophrenia or related psychoses is largely unknown. This study reports on the retrospective recall of prodromal-level symptoms from 40 participants in a first-episode of schizophrenia (FES) and 40 participants at "clinical high risk" (CHR) for psychosis. Onset of positive and non-specific symptoms was captured using the Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes. Frequencies are reported according to onset during childhood (prior to age 13), adolescence (13-17), or adulthood (18+). Childhood-onset of attenuated psychotic symptoms was not rare. At least 11% of FES and 23% of CHR reported specific recall of childhood-onset of unusual or delusional ideas, suspiciousness, or perceptual abnormalities. Most recalled experiencing non-specific symptoms prior to positive symptoms. CHR and FES did not differ significantly in the timing of positive and non-specific symptom onset. Other than being younger at assessment, those with childhood onset did not differ demographically from those with later onset. Childhood-onset of initial psychotic-like symptoms may be more common than previous research has suggested. Improved characterization of these symptoms and a focus on their predictive value for subsequent schizophrenia and other major psychoses are needed to facilitate screening of children presenting with attenuated psychotic symptoms. Accurate detection of prodromal symptoms in children might facilitate even earlier intervention and the potential to alter pre-illness trajectories. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Beyond the first episode: candidate factors for a risk prediction model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Brendan P

    2010-01-01

    Many early psychosis services are financially compromised and cannot offer a full tenure of care to all patients. To maintain viability of services it is important that those with schizophrenia are identified early to maximize long-term outcomes, as are those with better prognoses who can be discharged early. The duration of untreated psychosis remains the mainstay in determining those who will benefit from extended care, yet its ability to inform on prognosis is modest in both the short and medium term. There are a number of known or putative genetic and environmental risk factors that have the potential to improve prognostication, though a multivariate risk prediction model combining them with clinical characteristics has yet to be developed. Candidate risk factors for such a model are presented, with an emphasis on environmental risk factors. More work is needed to corroborate many putative factors and to determine which of the established factors are salient and which are merely proxy measures. Future research should help clarify how gene-environment and environment-environment interactions occur and whether risk factors are dose-dependent, or if they act additively or synergistically, or are redundant in the presence (or absence) of other factors.

  14. Metabolic dysregulation in first-episode schizophrenia patients with respect to genetic variation in one-carbon metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiak, Błażej; Łaczmański, Łukasz; Słoka, Natalia Kinga; Szmida, Elżbieta; Piotrowski, Patryk; Loska, Olga; Ślęzak, Ryszard; Kiejna, Andrzej; Frydecka, Dorota

    2016-04-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of metabolic disturbances in patients with first-episode schizophrenia (FES) and test the hypothesis that genetic variation in one-carbon metabolism may account for metabolic dysregulation in early psychosis. We measured fasting glucose, lipid profile parameters, homocysteine, folate and vitamin B12 in 135 patients with FES and 146 healthy controls (HCs). Polymorphisms in the following genes were determined: MTHFR (C677T and A1298C), MTHFD1 (G1958A), MTRR (A66G) and BHMT (G742A). Serum levels of folate and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) were significantly lower in patients with FES compared to HCs. In turn, serum levels of homocysteine and triglycerides were significantly higher in patients with FES than in HCs. Prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia, low folate and HDL levels together with dyslipidemia was significantly higher in patients with FES compared to HCs. Higher homocysteine levels, lower vitamin B12 levels and the presence of metabolic syndrome were associated with higher severity of negative symptoms. None of studied polymorphisms was associated with schizophrenia risk. Several associations between studied polymorphisms and cardio-metabolic parameters were found. None of them remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Our results indicate that metabolic dysregulation in patients with FES is not associated with genetic variation in one-carbon metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. EEG microstate duration and syntax in acute, medication-naive, first-episode schizophrenia: a multi-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Dietrich; Faber, Pascal L; Galderisi, Silvana; Herrmann, Werner M; Kinoshita, Toshihiko; Koukkou, Martha; Mucci, Armida; Pascual-Marqui, Roberto D; Saito, Naomi; Wackermann, Jiri; Winterer, Georg; Koenig, Thomas

    2005-02-28

    In young, first-episode, productive, medication-naive patients with schizophrenia, EEG microstates (building blocks of mentation) tend to be shortened. Koenig et al. [Koenig, T., Lehmann, D., Merlo, M., Kochi, K., Hell, D., Koukkou, M., 1999. A deviant EEG brain microstate in acute, neuroleptic-naive schizophrenics at rest. European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience 249, 205-211] suggested that shortening concerned specific microstate classes. Sequence rules (microstate concatenations, syntax) conceivably might also be affected. In 27 patients of the above type and 27 controls, from three centers, multichannel resting EEG was analyzed into microstates using k-means clustering of momentary potential topographies into four microstate classes (A-D). In patients, microstates were shortened in classes B and D (from 80 to 70 ms and from 94 to 82 ms, respectively), occurred more frequently in classes A and C, and covered more time in A and less in B. Topography differed only in class B where LORETA tomography predominantly showed stronger left and anterior activity in patients. Microstate concatenation (syntax) generally were disturbed in patients; specifically, the class sequence A-->C-->D-->A predominated in controls, but was reversed in patients (A-->D-->C-->A). In schizophrenia, information processing in certain classes of mental operations might deviate because of precocious termination. The intermittent occurrence might account for Bleuler's "double bookkeeping." The disturbed microstate syntax opens a novel physiological comparison of mental operations between patients and controls.

  16. Focal changes in brain energy and phospholipid metabolism in first-episode schizophrenia: 31P-MRS chemical shift imaging study at 4 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, J Eric; Miller, Jodi; Williamson, Peter C; Neufeld, Richard W J; Menon, Ravi S; Malla, Ashok; Manchanda, Rahul; Schaefer, Betsy; Densmore, Maria; Drost, Dick J

    2004-05-01

    Membrane phospholipid and high-energy abnormalities measured with phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P-MRS) have been reported in patients with schizophrenia in several brain regions. Using improved imaging techniques, previously inaccessible brain regions were examined in patients with first-episode schizophrenia and healthy volunteers with 4.0 T (31)P-MRS. Brain spectra were collected in vivo from 15 patients with first-episode schizophrenia and 15 healthy volunteers from 15 cm(3) effective voxels in the thalamus, cerebellum, hippocampus, anterior/posterior cingulate, prefrontal cortex and parieto-occipital cortex. People with first-episode schizophrenia showed increased levels of glycerophosphocholine in the anterior cingulate. Inorganic phosphate, phosphocreatine and adenosine triphosphate concentrations were also increased in the anterior cingulate in this group. The increased phosphodiester and high-energy phosphate levels in the anterior cingulate of brains of people with first-episode schizophrenia may indicate neural overactivity in this region during the early stages of the illness, resulting in increased excitotoxic neural membrane breakdown.

  17. Frequency and predictive values of first rank symptoms at baseline among 362 young adult patients with first-episode schizophrenia Results from the Danish OPUS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Anne; Petersen, Lone; Jeppesen, Pia

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the frequency of the Schneiderian First Rank Symptoms (FRSs) in a representative group of patients with first-episode schizophrenia and to analyse the predictive value of these symptoms in relation to psychopathology, work situation, depression, dependency and admission after 2 years...

  18. Effects of Blocking D2/D3 Receptors on Mismatch Negativity and P3a Amplitude of Initially Antipsychotic Naïve, First Episode Schizophrenia Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Düring, Signe; Glenthøj, Birte Yding; Oranje, Bob

    2016-01-01

    : Fifty-one antipsychotic-naïve, first-episode schizophrenia patients were tested in a mismatch negativity paradigm at baseline and after 6 weeks of treatment with amisulpride. We further examined 48 age- and gender-matched controls in this paradigm. RESULTS: At baseline, the patients showed significantly...

  19. Machine learning classification of first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders and controls using whole brain white matter fractional anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolas, Pavol; Hlinka, Jaroslav; Skoch, Antonin; Pitra, Zbynek; Frodl, Thomas; Spaniel, Filip; Hajek, Tomas

    2018-04-10

    Early diagnosis of schizophrenia could improve the outcome of the illness. Unlike classical between-group comparisons, machine learning can identify subtle disease patterns on a single subject level, which could help realize the potential of MRI in establishing a psychiatric diagnosis. Machine learning has previously been predominantly tested on gray-matter structural or functional MRI data. In this paper we used a machine learning classifier to differentiate patients with a first episode of schizophrenia-spectrum disorder (FES) from healthy controls using diffusion tensor imaging. We applied linear support-vector machine (SVM) and traditional tract based spatial statistics between group analyses to brain fractional anisotropy (FA) data from 77 FES and 77 age and sex matched healthy controls. We also evaluated the effects of medication and symptoms on the SVM classification. The SVM distinguished between patients and controls with significant accuracy of 62.34% (p = 0.005). Participants with FES showed widespread FA reductions relative to controls in a large cluster (N  = 56,647 voxels, corrected p = 0.002). The white matter regions, which contributed to the correct identification of participants with FES, overlapped with the regions, which showed lower FA in patients relative to controls. There was no association between the classification performance and medication or symptoms. Our results provide a proof of concept that SVM might help differentiate FES patients early in the course of illness from healthy controls using white-matter fractional anisotropy. As there was no effect of medications or symptoms, the SVM classification seemed to be based on trait rather than state markers and appeared to capture the lower FA in FES participants relative to controls.

  20. Cognitive reserve as a predictor of two year neuropsychological performance in early onset first-episode schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Serna, Elena; Andrés-Perpiñá, Susana; Puig, Olga; Baeza, Inmaculada; Bombin, Igor; Bartrés-Faz, David; Arango, Celso; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Parellada, Mara; Mayoral, María; Graell, Montserrat; Otero, Soraya; Guardia, Joan; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina

    2013-01-01

    The concept of cognitive reserve (CR) has been defined as individual differences in the efficient utilization of brain networks which allow some people to cope better than others with brain pathology. CR has been developed mainly in the field of aging and dementia after it was observed that there appears to be no direct relationship between the degree of brain pathology and the severity of clinical manifestations of this damage. The present study applies the concept of CR to a sample of children and adolescents with a first episode of schizophrenia, aiming to assess the possible influence of CR on neuropsychological performance after two year follow-up, controlling for the influence of clinical psychopathology. 35 patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (SSD) and 98 healthy controls (HC) matched for age and gender were included. CR was assessed at baseline, taking into account premorbid IQ, educational-occupational level and leisure activities. Clinical and neuropsychological assessments were completed by all patients at two year follow-up. The CR proxy was able to predict working memory and attention at two year follow-up. Verbal memory and cognitive flexibility were not predicted by any of the variables included in the regression model. The SSD group obtained lower scores than HC on CR. CR measures correctly classified 79.8% of the sample as being SSD or HC. Lower scores on CR were observed in SSD than in HC and the CR measure correctly classified a high percentage of the sample into the two groups. CR may predict SSD performance on working memory and attention tasks. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Genetic Variation in One-Carbon Metabolism and Changes in Metabolic Parameters in First-Episode Schizophrenia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiak, Blazej; Laczmanski, Lukasz; Sloka, Natalia Kinga; Szmida, Elzbieta; Slezak, Ryszard; Piotrowski, Patryk; Kiejna, Andrzej; Frydecka, Dorota

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of polymorphisms in genes encoding 1-carbon metabolism enzymes on differential development of metabolic parameters during 12 weeks of treatment with second-generation antipsychotics in first-episode schizophrenia patients. The following polymorphisms in 1-carbon metabolism genes were genotyped: MTHFR (C677T and A1298C), MTHFD1 (G1958A), MTRR (A66G), and BHMT (G742A). A broad panel of metabolic parameters including body mass index, waist circumference, total cholesterol low and high density lipoproteins, triglycerides, homocysteine, folate, and vitamin B12 was determined. There was a significant effect of the interaction between the MTHFR C677T polymorphism and time on body mass index and waist circumference in the allelic and genotype analyses. Indeed, patients with the MTHFR 677CC genotype had higher increase in body mass index and waist circumference compared with other corresponding genotypes or the MTHFR 677T allele carriers (CT and TT genotypes). In addition, patients with the MTHFR 677TT genotype had higher waist circumference in all time points. Similarly, patients with the MTHFR 677TT genotype had higher body mass index in all time points, but this effect was not significant after correction for multiple testing. Our results indicate that the MTHFR C677T polymorphism may predict antipsychotic-induced weight gain. Effects of the MTHFR C677T polymorphism might be different in initial exposure to antipsychotics compared with long-term perspective.

  2. The history of childhood trauma is associated with lipid disturbances and blood pressure in adult first-episode schizophrenia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiak, Błażej; Kiejna, Andrzej; Frydecka, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    It has repeatedly been found that early-life traumatic events may contribute to metabolic dysregulation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between the history of childhood trauma and cardiovascular risk factors in first-episode schizophrenia (FES) patients. The history of childhood trauma was assessed using the Early Trauma Inventory Self Report - Short Form (ETISR-SF) in 83 FES patients. Based on the ETISR-SF, patients were divided into those with positive and negative history of childhood trauma: FES(+) and FES(-) patients. Serum levels of fasting glucose lipids, homocysteine, vitamin B12 and folate, as well as anthropometric parameters and resting systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP) were measured. The history of childhood trauma was associated with higher low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels, SBP and DBP after covarying for age, gender, body mass index, education and chlorpromazine equivalent. There were significant correlations between scores of distinct ETISR-SF subscales and LDL, high-density lipoprotein, SBP, DBP and the number of metabolic syndrome criteria. Results of this study indicate that traumatic events during childhood might be related to higher resting blood pressure and higher LDL levels in adult FES patients. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Altered effective brain connectivity at early response of antipsychotics in first-episode schizophrenia with auditory hallucinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Leilei; Liu, Weibo; He, Wei; Yu, Shaohua; Zhong, Guodong

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to examine the alterations of cortical connectivity in first-episode schizophrenia (FES) with auditory hallucinations at early response of antipsychotics. This was a nonexperimental control of medication study. We measured the cortical activity of 20 medicated patients with FES (medicated group), 19 nonmedicated patients with FES (nonmedicated group), and 22 healthy controls using electroencephalogram during eye-open resting state. Source reconstruction analysis was performed to determine the brain regions that showed significant group difference. A dynamic causal modelling (DCM) analysis was used to estimate the effective connectivity between sources. Both FES groups expressed increased activity in the right middle frontal gyrus (RMFG) and left/right superior temporal gyrus (L/RSTG) relative to that in the controls (phallucination diminished at early response of routine medication. This study provided the first evidence of early drug response-related alterations in effective brain connectivity. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. First episode schizophrenia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of a psychotic illness, during which patients first experience changes in their ... attention, a depressed mood, sleep disturbances, anxiety, social withdrawal .... Psychosis is also linked to substance use disorders. Between 20% and 60% of patients have a substance use disorder at some stage during the course of the illness.

  5. The effect of positive symptoms on social cognition in first-episode schizophrenia is modified by the presence of negative symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliksted, Vibeke Fuglsang; Videbech, Poul B; Fagerlund, Birgitte

    2017-01-01

    tested using the Danish version of NART (premorbid IQ), subtests from WAIS-III (current IQ), and global cognition using Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrena (BACS), a neurocognitive test battery. Social perception was tested using film clips of everyday interactions (TASIT). Theory of mind (To......OBJECTIVE: There is considerable evidence that patients with schizophrenia have neurocognitive and social-cognitive deficits. It is unclear how such deficits in first-episode schizophrenia relate to current clinical symptoms. METHOD: Fifty-nine patients with first-episode schizophrenia (FES) were...... symptoms (using SANS and SAPS). Healthy controls were matched to the patients. RESULTS: High levels of negative symptoms were associated with low estimated functional IQ and poor neurocognition and social cognition. All SANS subscales, but Avolition-Apathy, had significant negative impact on social...

  6. Prefrontal cortex connectivity dysfunction in performing the Fist–Edge–Palm task in patients with first-episode schizophrenia and non-psychotic first-degree relatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond C.K. Chan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological soft signs have been considered one of the promising neurological endophenotypes for schizophrenia. However, most previous studies have employed clinical rating data only. The present study aimed to examine the neurobiological basis of one of the typical motor coordination signs, the Fist–Edge–Palm (FEP task, in patients with first-episode schizophrenia and their non-psychotic first degree relatives. Thirteen patients with first-episode schizophrenia, 14 non-psychotic first-degree relatives and 14 healthy controls were recruited. All of them were instructed to perform the FEP task in a 3 T GE Machine. Psychophysiological interaction (PPI analysis was used to evaluate the functional connectivity between the sensorimotor cortex and frontal regions when participants performed the FEP task compared to simple motor tasks. In the contrast of palm-tapping (PT vs. rest, activation of the left frontal–parietal region was lowest in the schizophrenia group, intermediate in the relative group and highest in the healthy control group. In the contrast of FEP vs. PT, patients with schizophrenia did not show areas of significant activation, while relatives and healthy controls showed significant activation of the left middle frontal gyrus. Moreover, with the increase in task complexity, significant functional connectivity was observed between the sensorimotor cortex and the right frontal gyrus in healthy controls but not in patients with first episode schizophrenia. These findings suggest that activity of the left frontal–parietal and frontal regions may be neurofunctional correlates of neurological soft signs, which in turn may be a potential endophenotype of schizophrenia. Moreover, the right frontal gyrus may play a specific role in the execution of the FEP task in schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

  7. A longitudinal study of alterations of hippocampal volumes and serum BDNF levels in association to atypical antipsychotics in a sample of first-episode patients with schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil Rizos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schizophrenia is associated with structural and functional abnormalities of the hippocampus, which have been suggested to play an important role in the formation and emergence of schizophrenia syndrome. Patients with schizophrenia exhibit significant bilateral hippocampal volume reduction and progressive hippocampal volume decrease in first-episode patients with schizophrenia has been shown in many neuroimaging studies. Dysfunction of the neurotrophic system has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The initiation of antipsychotic medication alters the levels of serum Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF levels. However it is unclear whether treatment with antipsychotics is associated with alterations of hippocampal volume and BDNF levels. METHODS: In the present longitudinal study we investigated the association between serum BDNF levels and hippocampal volumes in a sample of fourteen first-episode drug-naïve patients with schizophrenia (FEP. MRI scans, BDNF and clinical measurements were performed twice: at baseline before the initiation of antipsychotic treatment and 8 months later, while the patients were receiving monotherapy with second generation antipsychotics (SGAs. RESULTS: We found that left hippocampal volume was decreased (corrected left HV [t = 2.977, df = 13, p = .011] at follow-up; We also found that the higher the BDNF levels change the higher were the differences of corrected left hippocampus after 8 months of treatment with atypical antipsychotics (Pearson r = 0.597, p = 0.024. CONCLUSIONS: The association of BDNF with hippocampal volume alterations in schizophrenia merits further investigation and replication in larger longitudinal studies.

  8. Longitudinal changes in prospective memory and their clinical correlates at 1-year follow-up in first-episode schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungvari, Gabor S.; Ng, Chee H.; Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Liang; Zhou, Jingjing; Shum, David H. K.; Man, David; Liu, Deng-Tang; Li, Jun; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate prospective memory (PM) and the association with clinical factors at 1-year follow-up in first-episode schizophrenia (FES). Thirty-two FES patients recruited from a university-affiliated psychiatric hospital in Beijing and 17 healthy community controls (HCs) were included. Time- and event-based PM (TBPM and EBPM) performances were measured with the Chinese version of the Cambridge Prospective Memory Test (C-CAMPROMPT) at baseline and at one-year follow-up. A number of other neurocognitive tests were also administered. Remission was determined at the endpoint according to the PANSS score ≤ 3 for selected items. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed a significant interaction between time (baseline vs. endpoint) and group (FES vs. HCs) for EBPM (F(1, 44) = 8.8, p = 0.005) and for all neurocognitive components. Paired samples t-tests showed significant improvement in EBPM in FES (13.1±3.7 vs. 10.3±4.8; t = 3.065, p = 0.004), compared to HCs (15.7±3.6 vs. 16.5±2.3; t = -1.248, p = 0.230). A remission rate of 59.4% was found in the FES group. Analysis of covariance revealed that remitters performed significantly better on EBPM (14.9±2.6 vs. 10.4±3.6; F(1, 25) = 12.2, p = 0.002) than non-remitters at study endpoint. The association between EBPM and 12-month clinical improvement in FES suggests that EBPM may be a potential neurocognitive marker for the effectiveness of standard pharmacotherapy. Furthermore, the findings also imply that PM may not be strictly a trait-related endophenotype as indicated in previous studies. PMID:28245266

  9. Long-term efficacy and safety of blonanserin in patients with first-episode schizophrenia: a 1-year open-label trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya, Yuriko; Miyamoto, Seiya; Tenjin, Tomomi; Ogino, Shin; Miyake, Nobumi; Kaneda, Yasuhiro; Sumiyoshi, Tomiki; Yamaguchi, Noboru

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term effectiveness and safety of blonanserin, a second-generation antipsychotic drug developed in Japan, in patients with first-episode schizophrenia. Twenty-three antipsychotic-naïve patients with first-episode schizophrenia were treated within an open-label, 1-year, prospective trial of blonanserin (2-24 mg/day). Clinical evaluations were conducted at baseline and 2, 6, and 12 months after the start of treatment. The main outcome measures were changes in subjective well-being and subjective quality of life, as assessed by the Subjective Well-being under Neuroleptic treatment scale Short form-Japanese version and the Schizophrenia Quality of Life Scale-Japanese version, respectively. Secondary outcome measures included the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia-Japanese version, laboratory tests, bodyweight, and extrapyramidal symptoms. Fourteen patients (60.9%) remained on the study at 1 year. In the intention-to-treat analysis, significant improvements were observed in several subscales on the Subjective Well-being under Neuroleptic treatment scale Short form-Japanese version, the Schizophrenia Quality of Life Scale-Japanese version, and the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia-Japanese version, and in all factor scores on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Improvement in depressive symptoms with blonanserin treatment was positively correlated with improvements in subjective well-being and subjective quality of life, as well as verbal memory. No significant changes were noted for any safety measure during the 1-year study period. Blonanserin was well tolerated and effective for the treatment of first-episode schizophrenia in terms of subjective wellness, cognition, and a wide range of pathological symptoms. Further large-scale studies are warranted to confirm our findings. © 2014 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2014

  10. Social network among young adults with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders: results from the Danish OPUS trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Anne; Petersen, Lone; Jeppesen, Pia

    2006-01-01

    Social network has considerable impact on physical and mental health. Patients experiencing first-episode psychosis early in adult life may experience severe problems concerning development and maintenance of their social network....

  11. Social network among young adults with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders: results from the Danish OPUS trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Anne; Petersen, Lone; Jeppesen, Pia

    2006-01-01

    Social network has considerable impact on physical and mental health. Patients experiencing first-episode psychosis early in adult life may experience severe problems concerning development and maintenance of their social network.......Social network has considerable impact on physical and mental health. Patients experiencing first-episode psychosis early in adult life may experience severe problems concerning development and maintenance of their social network....

  12. Effects of Blocking D2/D3 Receptors on Mismatch Negativity and P3a Amplitude of Initially Antipsychotic Naïve, First Episode Schizophrenia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düring, Signe; Glenthøj, Birte Yding; Oranje, Bob

    2015-10-09

    Reduced mismatch negativity and P3a amplitude have been suggested to be among the core deficits in schizophrenia since the late 1970s. Blockade of dopamine D2 receptors play an important role in the treatment of schizophrenia. In addition, there is some evidence indicating that deficits in mismatch negativity and P3a amplitude are related to increased dopaminergic activity. This is the first study investigating the effect of amisulpride, a potent D2-antagonist, on mismatch negativity and P3a amplitude in a large group of antipsychotic-naïve, first-episode schizophrenia patients. Fifty-one antipsychotic-naïve, first-episode schizophrenia patients were tested in a mismatch negativity paradigm at baseline and after 6 weeks of treatment with amisulpride. We further examined 48 age- and gender-matched controls in this paradigm. At baseline, the patients showed significantly reduced P3a amplitude compared with healthy controls, but no differences in mismatch negativity. Although the treatment with amisulpride significantly improved the patients' psychopathological (PANSS) and functional (GAF) scores, it did not influence their mismatch negativity amplitude, while also their reduced P3a amplitude persisted. Our findings show that antipsychotic naïve, first-episode patients with schizophrenia have normal mismatch negativity yet reduced P3a amplitude compared with healthy controls. In spite of the fact that the 6-week amisulpride treatment improved the patients both clinically and functionally, it had no effect on either mismatch negativity or P3a amplitude. This suggests that even though there is a dopaminergic involvement in global functioning and symptomatology in schizophrenia, there is no such involvement in these particular measures of early information processing. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Effects of Short-Term Inpatient Treatment on Sensitivity to a Size Contrast Illusion in First-Episode Psychosis and Multiple-Episode Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Silverstein

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the Ebbinghaus illusion, a shape appears larger than its actual size when surrounded by small shapes and smaller than its actual size when surrounded by large shapes. Resistance to this illusion has been previously reported in schizophrenia, and linked to disorganized symptoms and poorer prognosis in cross-sectional studies. It is unclear, however, when in the course of illness this resistance first emerges or how it varies longitudinally with illness phase. Method: First-episode psychosis patients, multiple-episode schizophrenia patients and healthy controls completed a psychophysical task at two different time points, corresponding to hospital admission and discharge for patients. The task required judging the relative size of two circles centered on either side of the screen. Targets were presented without context (baseline, or were surrounded by shapes that made the size judgment harder or easier (misleading and helpful contexts, respectively. Context sensitivity was operationalized as improvement relative to baseline in the helpful condition minus the amount of decrement (relative to baseline in the misleading condition. Results: At admission, context sensitivity was lower in the multiple-episode group than in the other groups, and was marginally less in the first episode than in the control group. In addition, schizophrenia patients were significantly more and less accurate than the other groups in the misleading and helpful conditions, respectively. At discharge, all groups exhibited similar context sensitivity. Poorer context sensitivity was related to higher levels of disorganized symptoms, and lower level of depression, excitement, and positive symptoms. Discussion: Resistance to the Ebbinghaus illusion, as a characteristic of the acute phase of schizophrenia, emerges after the first episode of psychosis. This suggests that visual context processing is a state-marker in schizophrenia and a biomarker of relapse and

  14. Gender differences in young adults with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders at baseline in the Danish OPUS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Anne; Petersen, Lone; Jeppesen, Pia

    2007-01-01

    -esteem than men, in spite of better scores in functioning. Premorbid social adjustment was significantly related to the level of negative symptoms and number of friends. Conclusion is that men and women with first-episode psychosis showed different psychopathological characteristics and different social...

  15. Altered Patterns of Reward Activation in a Large Cohort of Antipsychotic Naïve First Episode Schizophrenia Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Ødegaard; Rostrup, Egill; Wulff, Sanne

    2014-01-01

    not have been caught by the focused analyses. By using a multivariate approach we want to confirm previous findings in a smaller group of patients, and further we expect this method to reveal other important alterations in reward processing. METHODS 53 antipsychotic-naïve first-episode patients...

  16. The 5-year course of obsessive-compulsive symptoms and obsessive-compulsive disorder in first-episode schizophrenia and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Lieuwe; Sterk, Bouke; Wouters, Luuk; Linszen, Don H

    2013-01-01

    To determine the course of obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in first-episode schizophrenia and related disorders and their relationship with clinical characteristics. Consecutively, admitted patients with a first-episode of schizophrenia, schizophreniform disorder, or schizoaffective disorder were screened for OCS, and these were measured with the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale. Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale were used to assess severity of other symptoms. The course of 3- and 5-year symptoms, psychotic relapse, substance use, remission, full recovery, suicide, and social functioning were assessed. One hundred and eighty-six consecutively admitted and consenting patients were included. Five years after admission, OCS could be assessed in 172 patients. Ninety-one patients (48.9%) reported no OCS symptoms on any of the assessments. OCS restricted to the first assessments occured in 15.1%, 13.4% had persistent OCS, 7.0% had no OCS at first assessment but developed OCS subsequently, and 15.6% had intermittent OCS. The proportion of patients with comorbid OCD varied between 7.3% and 11.8% during follow-up. OCD was associated with more severe depressive symptoms and poorer premorbid functioning and social functioning at follow-up. The 5-year course of OCS/OCD in patients with first-episode schizophrenia or related disorders is variable. OCS/OCD comorbidity was not associated with a more severe course of psychotic symptoms and relapse. Comorbid OCD was associated with more severe depressive symptoms, social dysfunction and worse premorbid functioning. Specific treatment options for schizophrenia patients with comorbid OCD are needed.

  17. Role of Long-Acting Injectable Second-Generation Antipsychotics in the Treatment of First-Episode Schizophrenia: A Clinical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovan Přikryl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 80% of patients with the first-episode schizophrenia reach symptomatic remission after antipsychotic therapy. However, within two years most of them relapse, mainly due to low levels of insight into the illness and nonadherence to their oral medication. Therefore, although the formal data available is limited, many experts recommend prescribing long-acting injectable second-generation antipsychotics (mostly risperidone or alternatively paliperidone in the early stages of schizophrenia, particularly in patients who have benefited from the original oral molecule in the past and agree to receive long-term injectable treatment. Early application of long-acting injectable second-generation antipsychotics can significantly reduce the risk of relapse in the future and thus improve not only the social and working potential of patients with schizophrenia but also their quality of life.

  18. Telomerase level increase is related to n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid efficacy in first episode schizophrenia: Secondary outcome analysis of the OFFER randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawełczyk, Tomasz; Grancow-Grabka, Marta; Trafalska, Elżbieta; Szemraj, Janusz; Żurner, Natalia; Pawełczyk, Agnieszka

    2018-04-20

    Schizophrenia is associated with shortening of the lifespan mainly due to cardiovascular events, cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Both telomere attrition and decrease of telomerase levels were observed in schizophrenia. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) influence multiple biochemical mechanisms which are postulated to accelerate telomere shortening and limit the longevity of patients with schizophrenia. Intervention studies based on add-on therapy with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) in patients with schizophrenia did not assess the changes in telomerase levels. A randomized placebo-controlled trial named OFFER was designed to compare the efficacy of a 26-week intervention composed of either 2.2g/day of n-3 PUFA or olive oil placebo with regard to symptom severity in first-episode schizophrenia patients. The secondary outcome measure of the study was to describe the association between the clinical effect of n-3 PUFA and changes in telomerase levels. Seventy-one patients aged 16-35 were enrolled in the study and randomly assigned to the study arms. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was used to assess the change in symptom severity. Telomerase levels of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were assessed at three points: at baseline and at weeks 8 and 26 of the intervention. A significantly greater increase in PBMC telomerase levels in the intervention group compared to placebo was observed (p<0.001). Changes in telomerase levels significantly and inversely correlated with improvement in depressive symptoms and severity of the illness. The efficacy of a six-month intervention with n-3 PUFA observed in first-episode schizophrenia may be related to an increase in telomerase levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Grey and white matter differences in brain energy metabolism in first episode schizophrenia: 31P-MRS chemical shift imaging at 4 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, J Eric; Miller, Jodi; Williamson, Peter C; Neufeld, Richard W J; Menon, Ravi S; Malla, Ashok; Manchanda, Rahul; Schaefer, Betsy; Densmore, Maria; Drost, Dick J

    2006-03-31

    Altered high energy and membrane metabolism, measured with phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS), has been inconsistently reported in schizophrenic patients in several anatomical brain regions implicated in the pathophysiology of this illness, with little attention to the effects of brain tissue type on the results. Tissue regression analysis correlates brain tissue type to measured metabolite levels, allowing for the extraction of "pure" estimated grey and white matter compartment metabolite levels. We use this tissue analysis technique on a clinical dataset of first episode schizophrenic patients and matched controls to investigate the effect of brain tissue specificity on altered energy and membrane metabolism. In vivo brain spectra from two regions, (a) the fronto-temporal-striatal region and (b) the frontal-lobes, were analyzed from 12 first episode schizophrenic patients and 11 matched controls from a (31)P chemical shift imaging (CSI) study at 4 Tesla (T) field strength. Tissue regression analyses using voxels from each region were performed relating metabolite levels to tissue content, examining phosphorus metabolite levels in grey and white matter compartments. Compared with controls, the first episode schizophrenic patient group showed significantly increased adenosine triphosphate levels (B-ATP) in white matter and decreased B-ATP levels in grey matter in the fronto-temporal-striatal region. No significant metabolite level differences were found in grey or white matter compartments in the frontal cortex. Tissue regression analysis reveals grey and white matter specific aberrations in high-energy phosphates in first episode schizophrenia. Although past studies report inconsistent regional differences in high-energy phosphate levels in schizophrenia, the present analysis suggests more widespread differences that seem to be strongly related to tissue type. Our data suggest that differences in grey and white matter tissue content between past

  20. Decreased left middle temporal gyrus volume in antipsychotic drug-naive, first-episode schizophrenia patients and their healthy unaffected siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Maorong; Li, Jun; Eyler, Lisa; Guo, Xiaofeng; Wei, Qingling; Tang, Jingsong; Liu, Feng; He, Zhong; Li, Lihua; Jin, Hua; Liu, Zhening; Wang, Juan; Liu, Fang; Chen, Huafu; Zhao, Jingping

    2013-03-01

    The shared neuropathological characteristics of patients with schizophrenia and their siblings might represent intermediate phenotypes that could be used to investigate genetic susceptibility to the illness. We sought to discover gray matter volume differences in patients with schizophrenia and their unaffected siblings with voxel-based morphometry (VBM). We recruited antipsychotic drug-naive, first-episode schizophrenia (FES) patients, their unaffected siblings and age-, sex- and handedness-matched healthy controls. We used VBM to investigate differences in gray matter volume among the 3 groups. There were significant gray matter volumetric differences among the 3 groups in bilateral hippocampal and parahippocampal gyri, bilateral middle temporal gyri, and superior temporal gyri (FDR ptemporal gyrus, and volume of this region was not different between siblings and patients. Our findings confirm and extend previous VBM analyses in schizophrenia and it indicate that schizophrenia may be characterized by an abnormal development of cerebral lateralization. Furthermore, these data argue that patients and their unaffected siblings might share decreases in the gray matter volume of the left middle temporal gyrus, and this regional reduction might be a potential endophenotype for schizophrenia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. An algorithm-based approach to first-episode schizophrenia: response rates over 3 prospective antipsychotic trials with a retrospective data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agid, Ofer; Arenovich, Tamara; Sajeev, Gautam; Zipursky, Robert B; Kapur, Shitij; Foussias, George; Remington, Gary

    2011-11-01

    Early, effective treatment in first-episode schizophrenia is advocated, although evidence based on a systematic approach over multiple antipsychotic trials is lacking. Employing a naturalistic design, we examined response rates over 3 circumscribed antipsychotic trials. Between June 2003 and December 2008, 244 individuals with first-episode schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder according to DSM-IV criteria were treated at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, following an algorithm that moved them through 2 antipsychotic trials, followed by a trial with clozapine. For the first 2 trials, treatment consisted of risperidone followed by olanzapine, or vice versa; each trial consisted of 3 stages (low-, full-, or high-dose) lasting up to 4 weeks at each level and adjusted according to response/tolerability. Clinical response was defined as a Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement score of 2 (much improved) or 1 (very much improved) and/or a Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale Thought Disorder subscale score ≤ 6. Data were analyzed retrospectively, and publication of anonymized clinical data was approved by the Research Ethics Board of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in May 2003. In trial 1, 74.5% of individuals responded, with rates significantly higher for olanzapine (82.1%, 115/140) versus risperidone (66.3%, 69/104; P = .005). With trial 2, response rate dropped dramatically to 16.6% but again was significantly higher for olanzapine (25.7%, 9/35) compared to risperidone (4.0%, 1/25; P = .04). Response rate climbed above 70% once more, specifically 75.0% (21/28), in those individuals who agreed to a third trial with clozapine. Results confirm a high response rate (75%) to initial antipsychotic treatment in first-episode schizophrenia. A considerably lower response rate (algorithm. © Copyright 2011 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  2. Effect of integrated treatment on the use of coercive measures in first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorder. A randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlenschlaeger, Johan; Nordentoft, Merete; Thorup, Anne

    2008-01-01

    The effect of integrated treatment on the use of coercive measures in first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorder in Denmark is not known. A total of 328 patients were randomly assigned to integrated treatment (167 patients) or standard treatment (161 patients). Integrated treatment consisted...... of assertive community treatment, psycho-educational multi-family groups, and social skills training. Data on coercion were extracted from the register from the National Board of Health, and data on continuity from medical records. Even though the level of continuity seemed higher in integrated treatment...

  3. Differential Cortical Gray Matter Deficits in Adolescent- and Adult-Onset First-Episode Treatment-Na?ve Patients with Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chengcheng; Wang, Qiang; Ni, Peiyan; Deng, Wei; Li, Yinfei; Zhao, Liansheng; Ma, Xiaohong; Wang, Yingcheng; Yu, Hua; Li, Xiaojing; Zhang, Pingping; Meng, Yajing; Liang, Sugai; Li, Mingli; Li, Tao

    2017-01-01

    The current study aimed to explore age-variant trait differences of cortical gray matter volume (GMV) in a unique sample of first-episode and treatment-na?ve patients with schizophrenia. A total of 158 subjects, including 26 adolescent-onset patients and 49 adult-onset patients as well as 83 age- and gender-matched controls were scanned using a 3T MRI scanner. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) following Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) was used to e...

  4. Impaired temporoparietal deactivation with working memory load in antipsychotic-naïve patients with first-episode schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nejad, Ayna B; Ebdrup, Bjørn H; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objectives. Neuroimaging studies have shown abnormal task-related deactivations during working memory (WM) in schizophrenia patients with recent emphasis on brain regions within the default mode network. Using fMRI, we tested whether antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia patients were impaired...

  5. Imaging Microglial Activation in Untreated First-Episode Psychosis: A PET Study With [18F]FEPPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafizi, Sina; Tseng, Huai-Hsuan; Rao, Naren; Selvanathan, Thiviya; Kenk, Miran; Bazinet, Richard P; Suridjan, Ivonne; Wilson, Alan A; Meyer, Jeffrey H; Remington, Gary; Houle, Sylvain; Rusjan, Pablo M; Mizrahi, Romina

    2017-02-01

    Neuroinflammation and abnormal immune responses are increasingly implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Previous positron emission tomography (PET) studies targeting the translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) have been limited by high nonspecific binding of the first-generation radioligand, low-resolution scanners, small sample sizes, and psychotic patients being on antipsychotics or not being in the first episode of their illness. The present study uses the novel second-generation TSPO PET radioligand [ 18 F]FEPPA to evaluate whether microglial activation is elevated in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of untreated patients with first-episode psychosis. Nineteen untreated patients with first-episode psychosis (14 of them antipsychotic naive) and 20 healthy volunteers underwent a high-resolution [ 18 F]FEPPA PET scan and MRI. Dynamic PET data were analyzed using the validated two-tissue compartment model with arterial plasma input function with total volume of distribution (V T ) as outcome measure. All analyses were corrected for TSPO rs6971 polymorphism (which is implicated in differential binding affinity). No significant differences were observed between patients and healthy volunteers in microglial activation, as indexed by [ 18 F]FEPPA V T , in either the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex or the hippocampus. There were no significant correlations between [ 18 F]FEPPA V T and duration of illness, clinical presentation, or neuropsychological measures after adjusting for multiple testing. The lack of significant differences in [ 18 F]FEPPA V T between groups suggests that microglial activation is not present in first-episode psychosis.

  6. Morphology according to cranial computed tomography of first-episode cycloid psychosis and its long-term-course: differences compared to schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höffler, J; Bräunig, P; Krüger, S; Ludvik, M

    1997-09-01

    Cranial computed tomography (CCT) findings for 37 patients with cycloid psychosis and 19 patients with DSM-III-R schizophrenia were compared with findings for age- and sex-matched controls. Schizophrenic patients showed enlarged ventricles compared both to controls and to patients suffering from cycloid psychosis. In patients with cycloid psychosis, neither at the first episode nor after many years (mean 16.6 years) of disease were significant differences found compared to control subjects. Over the course of the illness, patients with cycloid psychosis showed ventricular enlargement which was correlated with age but not with the duration of illness. The morphological differences provide further evidence for the proposed nosological distinction between cycloid psychosis and schizophrenia.

  7. Impaired white matter connectivity between regions containing mirror neurons, and relationship to negative symptoms and social cognition, in patients with first-episode schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yukiko; Kubicki, Marek; Koerte, Inga; Otsuka, Tatsui; Rathi, Yogesh; Pasternak, Ofer; Bouix, Sylvain; Eckbo, Ryan; Kikinis, Zora; von Hohenberg, Christian Clemm; Roppongi, Tomohide; Del Re, Elisabetta; Asami, Takeshi; Lee, Sang-Hyuk; Karmacharya, Sarina; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I; Seidman, Larry J; Levitt, James; McCarley, Robert W; Shenton, Martha E; Niznikiewicz, Margaret A

    2018-02-01

    In schizophrenia, abnormalities in structural connectivity between brain regions known to contain mirror neurons and their relationship to negative symptoms related to a domain of social cognition are not well understood. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) scans were acquired in 16 patients with first episode schizophrenia and 16 matched healthy controls. FA and Trace of the tracts interconnecting regions known to be rich in mirror neurons, i.e., anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), inferior parietal lobe (IPL) and premotor cortex (PMC) were evaluated. A significant group effect for Trace was observed in IPL-PMC white matter fiber tract (F (1, 28) = 7.13, p = .012), as well as in the PMC-ACC white matter fiber tract (F (1, 28) = 4.64, p = .040). There were no group differences in FA. In addition, patients with schizophrenia showed a significant positive correlation between the Trace of the left IPL-PMC white matter fiber tract, and the Ability to Feel Intimacy and Closeness score (rho = .57, p = 0.034), and a negative correlation between the Trace of the left PMC-ACC and the Relationships with Friends and Peers score (rho = remove -.54, p = 0.049). We have demonstrated disrupted white mater microstructure within the white matter tracts subserving brain regions containing mirror neurons. We further showed that such structural disruptions might impact negative symptoms and, more specifically, contribute to the inability to feel intimacy (a measure conceptually related to theory of mind) in first episode schizophrenia. Further studies are needed to understand the potential of our results for diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic interventions.

  8. A virtual reality task based on animal research - spatial learning and memory in patients after the first episode of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajnerová, Iveta; Rodriguez, Mabel; Levčík, David; Konrádová, Lucie; Mikoláš, Pavol; Brom, Cyril; Stuchlík, Aleš; Vlček, Kamil; Horáček, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive deficit is considered to be a characteristic feature of schizophrenia disorder. A similar cognitive dysfunction was demonstrated in animal models of schizophrenia. However, the poor comparability of methods used to assess cognition in animals and humans could be responsible for low predictive validity of current animal models. In order to assess spatial abilities in schizophrenia and compare our results with the data obtained in animal models, we designed a virtual analog of the Morris water maze (MWM), the virtual Four Goals Navigation (vFGN) task. Twenty-nine patients after the first psychotic episode with schizophrenia symptoms and a matched group of healthy volunteers performed the vFGN task. They were required to find and remember four hidden goal positions in an enclosed virtual arena. The task consisted of two parts. The Reference memory (RM) session with a stable goal position was designed to test spatial learning. The Delayed-matching-to-place (DMP) session presented a modified working memory protocol designed to test the ability to remember a sequence of three hidden goal positions. Data obtained in the RM session show impaired spatial learning in schizophrenia patients compared to the healthy controls in pointing and navigation accuracy. The DMP session showed impaired spatial memory in schizophrenia during the recall of spatial sequence and a similar deficit in spatial bias in the probe trials. The pointing accuracy and the quadrant preference showed higher sensitivity toward the cognitive deficit than the navigation accuracy. Direct navigation to the goal was affected by sex and age of the tested subjects. The age affected spatial performance only in healthy controls. Despite some limitations of the study, our results correspond well with the previous studies in animal models of schizophrenia and support the decline of spatial cognition in schizophrenia, indicating the usefulness of the vFGN task in comparative research.

  9. A Virtual Reality Task Based on Animal Research - Spatial Learning and Memory in Patients after the First Episode of Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iveta eFajnerova

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cognitive deficit is considered to be a characteristic feature of schizophrenia disorder. A similar cognitive dysfunction was demonstrated in animal models of schizophrenia. However, the poor comparability of methods used to assess cognition in animals and humans could be responsible for low predictive validity of current animal models. In order to assess spatial abilities in schizophrenia and compare our results with the data obtained in animal models we designed a virtual analogue of the Morris water maze (MWM, the virtual Four Goals Navigation (vFGN task.Method: Twenty-nine patients after the first psychotic episode with schizophrenia symptoms and a matched group of healthy volunteers performed the vFGN task. They were required to find and remember four hidden goal positions in an enclosed virtual arena. The task consisted of two parts. The Reference memory (RM session with a stable goal position was designed to test spatial learning. The Delayed-matching-to-place (DMP session presented a modified working memory protocol designed to test the ability to remember a sequence of three hidden goal positions.Results: Data obtained in the RM session show impaired spatial learning in schizophrenia patients compared to healthy controls in pointing and navigation accuracy. The DMP session showed impaired spatial memory in schizophrenia during the recall of spatial sequence and similar deficit in spatial bias in probe trials. The pointing accuracy and the quadrant preference showed higher sensitivity toward the cognitive deficit than the navigation accuracy. Direct navigation to the goal was affected by sex and age of the tested subjects. Age affected spatial performance only in healthy controls. Conclusions: Despite some limitations of the study, our results correspond well to previous studies in animal models of schizophrenia and support the decline of spatial cognition in schizophrenia, indicating the usefulness of the vFGN task in

  10. Neurological signs and involuntary movements in schizophrenia: intrinsic to and informative on systems pathobiology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whitty, Peter F

    2012-02-01

    While it has long been considered whether the pathobiology of schizophrenia extends beyond its defining symptoms to involve diverse domains of abnormality, in the manner of a systemic disease, studies of neuromotor dysfunction have been confounded by treatment with antipsychotic drugs. This challenge has been illuminated by a new generation of studies on first-episode schizophrenia before initiation of antipsychotic treatment and by opportunities in developing countries to study chronically ill patients who have remained antipsychotic naive due to limitations in provision of psychiatric care. Building from studies in antipsychotic-naive patients, this article reviews 2 domains of neuromotor dysfunction in schizophrenia: neurological signs and involuntary movements. The presence and characteristics of neurological signs in untreated vis-a-vis treated psychosis indicate a vulnerability marker for schizophrenia and implicate disruption to neuronal circuits linking the basal ganglia, cerebral cortex, and cerebellum. The presence and characteristics of involuntary movements in untreated vis-a-vis treated psychosis indicate an intrinsic feature of the disease process and implicate dysfunction in cortical-basal ganglia-cortical circuitry. These neuromotor disorders of schizophrenia join other markers of subtle but pervasive cerebral and extracerebral, systemic dysfunction, and complement current concepts of schizophrenia as a disorder of developmentally determined cortical-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical\\/cerebellar network disconnectivity.

  11. The association between psychopathology of first-episode psychosis patients within the schizophrenia spectrum and previous offending

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkner, Runa; Haastrup, Soeren; Joergensen, Torben

    2008-01-01

    treatment centres included and rated 477 patients with first-episode psychosis over a 2-year period on socio-demography, the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, OPerational CRITeria checklist, Global Assessment of Functioning, Premorbid Adjustment Scale and Self-report Insight Scale for psychosis. Data...... were linked with data concerning criminal and psychiatric history. No key characteristics were found to assist the early detection of criminal persons before first psychiatric hospital contact for a psychotic incident. However, when adjusted for sex, age, abuse, living conditions, marital status......, employment status and education, a primarily positive symptomatology was associated with a prior criminal career. The premorbid level of functioning and several function parameters were also significantly associated with criminal history. There are significant differences in psychopathology between...

  12. Relationship between neurocognition and functional recovery in first-episode schizophrenia: Results from the second year of the Oslo multi-follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgalsbøen, Anne-Kari; Mohn, Christine; Czajkowski, Nikolai; Rund, Bjørn Rishovd

    2015-06-30

    Lack of control of confounding variables, high attrition rate, and too few neurocognitive domains completed at each assessment point are some of the limitations identified in studies of the relationship between cognition and functional outcome in schizophrenia. In the ongoing Oslo multi-follow-up study 28 first episode schizophrenia patients and a pairwise matched control group (N=28) are assessed with the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB), a clinical interview, an inventory on social and role functioning and criteria of remission and recovery at several follow-up points. The current paper describes the rate of remission and full recovery, and investigates the relationship between neurocognition and functional outcome. At 2-year follow-up, 80.0% of the patients were in remission and 16.0% of them fulfilled the criteria for full recovery. The attrition rate was very low. In the follow-up period, there was a statistically significant decline in Verbal Learning and a significant improvement on Reasoning/Problem Solving and Social Cognition in the schizophrenia group, but not in the control group. This indicates a differentiated neurocognitive course. In the schizophrenia group, Attention/Vigilance and years of education at baseline were significant predictors of social and role functioning 2 years later. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Differential Cortical Gray Matter Deficits in Adolescent- and Adult-Onset First-Episode Treatment-Naïve Patients with Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengcheng; Wang, Qiang; Ni, Peiyan; Deng, Wei; Li, Yinfei; Zhao, Liansheng; Ma, Xiaohong; Wang, Yingcheng; Yu, Hua; Li, Xiaojing; Zhang, Pingping; Meng, Yajing; Liang, Sugai; Li, Mingli; Li, Tao

    2017-08-31

    The current study aimed to explore age-variant trait differences of cortical gray matter volume (GMV) in a unique sample of first-episode and treatment-naïve patients with schizophrenia. A total of 158 subjects, including 26 adolescent-onset patients and 49 adult-onset patients as well as 83 age- and gender-matched controls were scanned using a 3T MRI scanner. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) following Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) was used to explore group differences between patients and controls in regional GMV. We found that patients with schizophrenia had decreased GMV in the left parietal postcentral region that extended to the left frontal regions, the right middle temporal gyrus, the occipital lobe and the right cerebellum posterior pyramis. Further analysis showed a distinct pattern of gray matter alterations in adolescent-onset patients compared with both healthy controls and adult-onset patients. Relative to healthy controls, adolescent-onset patients showed GMV alterations in the left parietal postcentral gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus and right cerebellum posterior pyramis, while GMV deficits in adult-onset patients were focused on the cingulo-fronto-temporal module and right occipital regions. Our study identified differential cortical gray matter deficits between adolescent- and adulthood-onset patients with schizophrenia, which suggests that the cortical abnormalities in schizophrenia are likely adjusted by the developmental community structure of the human brain.

  14. Motor abnormalities in first-episode psychosis patients and long-term psychosocial functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Manuel J; García de Jalón, Elena; Campos, M Sol; Moreno-Izco, Lucía; Lorente-Omeñaca, Ruth; Sánchez-Torres, Ana M; Peralta, Víctor

    2017-09-07

    Motor abnormalities (MAs) are highly prevalent in patients with first-episode psychosis both before any exposure and after treatment with antipsychotic drugs. However, the extent to which these abnormalities have predictive value for long-term psychosocial functioning is unknown. One hundred antipsychotic-naive first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients underwent extensive motor evaluation including catatonic, parkinsonism, dyskinesia, akathisia and neurological soft signs. Patients were assessed at naïve state and 6months later. Patients were followed-up in their naturalistic treatment and settings and their psychosocial functioning was assessed at 6-month, 1year, 5year and 10years from the FEP by collecting all available information. A set of linear mixed models were built to account for the repeated longitudinal assessment of psychosocial functioning during the follow-up regarding to the five domains of MAs (catatonic, parkinsonism, akathisia, dyskinesia and neurologic soft-signs) at index episode at antipsychotic naïve state and after 6months of FEP. Basic epidemiological variables, schizophrenia diagnosis and average of chlorpromazine equivalent doses of antipsychotic drugs were included as covariates. Catatonic signs and dyskinesia at drug-naïve state were significantly associated with poor long-term psychosocial functioning. Moreover, higher scores on parkinsonism, akathisia, neurological soft signs and catatonic signs at 6-month of FEP but not dyskinesia showed significant associations with poor long-term psychosocial functioning. Our results added empirical evidence to motor abnormalities as core manifestations of psychotic illness before and after antipsychotic treatment with high predictive value for poor long-term psychosocial functioning in FEP patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of positive symptoms on social cognition in first-episode schizophrenia is modified by the presence of negative symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliksted, Vibeke; Videbech, Poul; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Frith, Chris

    2017-02-01

    There is considerable evidence that patients with schizophrenia have neurocognitive and social-cognitive deficits. It is unclear how such deficits in first-episode schizophrenia relate to current clinical symptoms. Fifty-nine patients with first-episode schizophrenia (FES) were tested using the Danish version of NART (premorbid IQ), subtests from WAIS-III (current IQ), and global cognition using Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrena (BACS), a neurocognitive test battery. Social perception was tested using film clips of everyday interactions (TASIT). Theory of mind (ToM) was tested using silent animations (Animated Triangles Task). The FES subjects had been experiencing psychotic symptoms for several years (mean duration 9.5 years 95% confidence interval (CI [7.6;11.3]). The FES patients were divided into clinical subgroups based on their level of positive and negative symptoms (using SANS and SAPS). Healthy controls were matched to the patients. High levels of negative symptoms were associated with low estimated functional IQ and poor neurocognition and social cognition. All SANS subscales, but Avolition-Apathy, had significant negative impact on social cognition. The effects of positive symptoms were complex. High levels of delusions were associated with higher premorbid IQ. In the presence of high levels of negative symptoms, high levels of positive symptoms were associated with the most comprehensive deficits in social perception, while, in the absence of negative symptoms, high levels of positive symptoms were not associated with such deficits. The results suggest that social-cognitive training will need to take account of the above mentioned effects of symptoms. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Reduced white matter integrity and facial emotion perception in never-medicated patients with first-episode schizophrenia: A diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoxin; Sui, Yuxiu; Yao, Jingjing; Lv, Yiding; Zhang, Xinyue; Jin, Zhuma; Chen, Lijun; Zhang, Xiangrong

    2017-07-03

    Facial emotion perception is impaired in schizophrenia. Although the pathology of schizophrenia is thought to involve abnormality in white matter (WM), few studies have examined the correlation between facial emotion perception and WM abnormalities in never-medicated patients with first-episode schizophrenia. The present study tested associations between facial emotion perception and WM integrity in order to investigate the neural basis of impaired facial emotion perception in schizophrenia. Sixty-three schizophrenic patients and thirty control subjects underwent facial emotion categorization (FEC). The FEC data was inserted into a logistic function model with subsequent analysis by independent-samples T test and the shift point and slope as outcome measurements. Severity of symptoms was measured using a five-factor model of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Voxelwise group comparison of WM fractional anisotropy (FA) was operated using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). The correlation between impaired facial emotion perception and FA reduction was examined in patients using simple regression analysis within brain areas that showed a significant FA reduction in patients compared with controls. The same correlation analysis was also performed for control subjects in the whole brain. The patients with schizophrenia reported a higher shift point and a steeper slope than control subjects in FEC. The patients showed a significant FA reduction in left deep WM in the parietal, temporal and occipital lobes, a small portion of the corpus callosum (CC), and the corona radiata. In voxelwise correlation analysis, we found that facial emotion perception significantly correlated with reduced FA in various WM regions, including left forceps major (FM), inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF), Left splenium of CC, and left ILF. The correlation analyses in healthy controls revealed no significant correlation of FA with

  17. Predictive validity of a culturally informed diagnosis of schizophrenia: a 30 month follow-up study with first episode psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandi, Tekleh; Havenaar, Johan M.; Laan, Wijnand; Kahn, Rene S.; van den Brink, Wim

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has shown discrepancies between a standard diagnostic interview for schizophrenia (CASH) and a culture sensitive version of this instrument (CASH-CS) in Moroccan patients. More specifically we showed that among Moroccan immigrants the CASH-CS resulted in fewer patients with a

  18. Plasma levels of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol are associated with microstructural changes within the cerebellum in the early stage of first-episode schizophrenia: a longitudinal VBM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishimura J

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Joji Nishimura,1 Shingo Kakeda,1 Osamu Abe,2 Reiji Yoshimura,3 Keita Watanabe,1 Naoki Goto,3 Hikaru Hori,3 Toru Sato,1 Hidemasa Takao,4 Hiroyuki Kabasawa,5 Jun Nakamura,3 Yukunori Korogi1 1Department of Radiology, University of Occupational and Environmental Health School of Medicine, Fukuoka, Japan; 2Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Nihon University, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Psychiatry, University of Occupational and Environmental Health School of Medicine, Fukuoka, Japan; 4Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; 5MR Applied Science Laboratory Japan, GE Yokogawa Medical Systems, Hino-shi, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: The aims of this study are to determine how the interval changes of the brain structures in the early stage of first-episode schizophrenia relate to the interval changes in the clinical data, including the clinical symptoms of schizophrenia and catecholaminergic measures (plasma homovanillic acid [HVA] and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol [MHPG]. Regional brain volumes and fractional anisotropy (FA/mean diffusivity (MD with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI were measured at baseline and 6-month follow-up in a 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI system in a cohort of 16 schizophrenic patients, who were in their first episode at the time of baseline MRI. At the time of baseline and follow-up MRI, all 16 patients underwent evaluations that included a psychopathological assessment (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale [PANSS] and peripheral catecholaminergic measures (plasma MHPG or HVA. For interval changes between baseline and follow-up MRI data (morphological change, MD, and FA, the correlation/regression analysis was performed as a series of single regression correlations in Statistical Parametric Mapping 5, with the interval changes in PANSS or plasma HVA and MHPG as the covariates of interest. Positive and inverse correlations contrasts were created, and in this

  19. 48 echo T2 myelin imaging of white matter in first-episode schizophrenia: Evidence for aberrant myelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna J.M. Lang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myelin water imaging provides a novel strategy to assess myelin integrity and corresponding clinical relationships in psychosis, of particular relevance in frontal white matter regions. In the current study, T2 myelin water imaging was used to assess the myelin water fraction (MWF signal from frontal areas in a sample of 58 individuals experiencing first-episode psychosis (FEP and 44 healthy volunteers. No differences in frontal MWF were observed between FEP subjects and healthy volunteers; however, differences in normal patterns of associations between frontal MWF and age, education and IQ were seen. Significant positive relationships between frontal MWF and age, North American Adult Reading Test (NAART IQ, and years of completed education were observed in healthy volunteers. In contrast, only the relationship between frontal MWF and NAART IQ was significant after Bonferroni correction in the FEP group. Additionally, significant positive relationships between age and MWF in the anterior and posterior internal capsules, the genu, and the splenium were observed in healthy volunteers. In FEP subjects, only the relationship between age and MWF in the splenium was statistically significant. Frontal MWF was not associated with local white matter volume. Altered patterns of association between age, years of education, and MWF in FEP suggest that subtle disturbances in myelination may be present early in the course of psychosis.

  20. A Randomized Comparison of Aripiprazole and Risperidone for the Acute Treatment of First-Episode Schizophrenia and Related Disorders: 3-Month Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Delbert G; Gallego, Juan A; John, Majnu; Petrides, Georgios; Hassoun, Youssef; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Lopez, Leonardo; Braga, Raphael J; Sevy, Serge M; Addington, Jean; Kellner, Charles H; Tohen, Mauricio; Naraine, Melissa; Bennett, Natasha; Greenberg, Jessica; Lencz, Todd; Correll, Christoph U; Kane, John M; Malhotra, Anil K

    2015-11-01

    Research findings are particularly important for medication choice for first-episode patients as individual prior medication response to guide treatment decisions is unavailable. We describe the first large-scale double-masked randomized comparison with first-episode patients of aripiprazole and risperidone, 2 commonly used first-episode treatment agents. One hundred ninety-eight participants aged 15-40 years with schizophrenia, schizophreniform disorder, schizoaffective disorder or psychotic disorder Not Otherwise Specified, and who had been treated in their lifetime with antipsychotics for 2 weeks or less were randomly assigned to double-masked aripiprazole (5-30 mg/d) or risperidone (1-6 mg/d) and followed for 12 weeks. Positive symptom response rates did not differ (62.8% vs 56.8%) nor did time to response. Aripiprazole-treated participants had better negative symptom outcomes but experienced more akathisia. Body mass index change did not differ between treatments but advantages were found for aripiprazole treatment for total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting glucose, and prolactin levels. Post hoc analyses suggested advantages for aripiprazole on depressed mood. Overall, if the potential for akathisia is a concern, low-dose risperidone as used in this trial maybe a preferred choice over aripiprazole. Otherwise, aripiprazole would be the preferred choice over risperidone in most situations based upon metabolic outcome advantages and some symptom advantages within the context of similar positive symptom response between medications. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Anterior cingulate cortex-related connectivity in first-episode schizophrenia: a spectral dynamic causal modeling study with functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long-Biao eCui

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the neural basis of schizophrenia (SZ is important for shedding light on the neurobiological mechanisms underlying this mental disorder. Structural and functional alterations in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, hippocampus, and medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC have been implicated in the neurobiology of SZ. However, the effective connectivity among them in SZ remains unclear. The current study investigated how neuronal pathways involving these regions were affected in first-episode SZ using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Forty-nine patients with a first-episode of psychosis and diagnosis of SZ—according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision—were studied. Fifty healthy controls (HCs were included for comparison. All subjects underwent resting state fMRI. We used spectral dynamic causal modeling (DCM to estimate directed connections among the bilateral ACC, DLPFC, hippocampus, and MPFC. We characterized the differences using Bayesian parameter averaging (BPA in addition to classical inference (t-test. In addition to common effective connectivity in these two groups, HCs displayed widespread significant connections predominantly involved in ACC not detected in SZ patients, but SZ showed few connections. Based on BPA results, SZ patients exhibited anterior cingulate cortico-prefrontal-hippocampal hyperconnectivity, as well as ACC-related and hippocampal-dorsolateral prefrontal-medial prefrontal hypoconnectivity. In summary, sDCM revealed the pattern of effective connectivity involving ACC in patients with first-episode SZ. This study provides a potential link between SZ and dysfunction of ACC, creating an ideal situation to associate mechanisms behind SZ with aberrant connectivity among these cognition and emotion-related regions.

  2. Overlapping and disease specific trait, response, and reflection impulsivity in adolescents with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepsen, J R M; Rydkjaer, J; Fagerlund, B; Pagsberg, A K; Jespersen, R Av F; Glenthøj, B Y; Oranje, B

    2018-03-01

    Schizophrenia and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are developmental disorders with shared clinical characteristics such as cognitive impairments and impulsivity. Impulsivity is a core feature of ADHD and an important factor in aggression, violence, and substance use in schizophrenia. Based on the hypothesis that schizophrenia and ADHD represent a continuum of neurodevelopmental impairments, the aim was to identify overlapping and disease specific forms of impulsivity. Adolescents between 12 and 17 years of age were assessed with the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-aged Children - Present and Lifetime Version. Subjects with early-onset, first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders (EOS) (N = 29) or ADHD (N = 29) and healthy controls (N = 45) were compared on two performance measures (Information Sampling Task, Stop Signal Task) and a subjective personality trait measure of impulsivity (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, Version 11 (BIS-11)). Significantly increased reflection impulsivity was observed in ADHD but not in the EOS group. No significant response inhibition deficits (stop signal reaction time) were found in the two clinical groups. The ADHD and the EOS group showed significantly increased motor, attentional, and non-planning subtraits of impulsivity. Impaired pre-decisional information gathering appeared to be specific for ADHD while the information gathering was not significantly reduced in subjects with EOS. Neither the ADHD nor EOS group showed impaired response inhibition but shared increased personality subtraits of attentional, non-planning, and motor impulsivity although the latter was significantly more pronounced in ADHD. These increased subtraits of impulsivity may reflect diagnostic non-specific neurodevelopmental impairments in ADHD and EOS in adolescence.

  3. A critical review of major mortality risk factors for all-cause mortality in first-episode schizophrenia: clinical and research implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beary, Michael; Hodgson, Richard; Wildgust, Hiram J

    2012-05-01

    A bibliographical search was performed to identify and evaluate the impact in first-episode schizophrenia of the major mortality risk factors as described by the World Health Organisation (2009). We found that at first diagnosis rates of diabetes were only slightly increased, although lipid abnormalities, mild hypertension and being overweight were commonly reported. Levels of drug and alcohol abuse were high, as were pre-diagnosis rates of smoking, physical inactivity and poor cardiorespiratory fitness. During the first year of antipsychotic treatment, there were significant increases in the rates of hyperglycaemia/diabetes, obesity, lipid abnormalities and hypertension, but no changes in fitness levels, smoking or drug and alcohol abuse. In chronic schizophrenia, excess cancer and cardiac deaths seem linked in part to availability and quality of care. Innate risk factors such as abnormal reelin and raised prolactin may also be important. New evidence, such as an inverse relationship between body mass index and suicide in the general population, suggests accepted wisdom may not apply to patients at high risk of ending their own lives. With current knowledge emphasis needs to be placed by early intervention services on physical fitness, smoking and other substance misuse, diabetes and hypertension, as well as focusing on weight reduction only in the obese.

  4. Modification of the association between antipsychotic treatment response and childhood adversity by MMP9 gene variants in a first-episode schizophrenia cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Nathaniel; Thompson, Nicole; O'Connell, Kevin Sean; Emsley, Robin; van der Merwe, Lize; Warnich, Louise

    2018-04-01

    Antipsychotics remain the most effective, and wide used option for ameliorating the symptoms of schizophrenia. However, inter-individual differences in treatment outcome are vast and suggest a role for genetic and environmental factors in affording favourable outcomes. A notable epigenetic relationship which has gained considerable traction in recent literature is the way in which the severity of childhood trauma can modify associations seen between genetic variation and antipsychotic treatment response. A potential mechanism of action which may facilitate this relationship is synaptic plasticity. This study investigated the role of variants in matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9), a gene involved in synaptic plasticity, with treatment outcome considering the severity of childhood trauma as an interacting variable. The cohort comprised South African first episode schizophrenia patients treated with a single injectable antipsychotic, flupenthixol decanoate, monitored over 12 months. Relationships between novel and previously described variants, and haplotypes, with antipsychotic treatment response were found to be modified when considering childhood trauma as an interacting variable. This study provides the first evidence for the involvement of polymorphisms within MMP9 and the severity of childhood trauma in antipsychotic treatment response, and warrants further investigation into the role gene-environment interactions may play in the betterment of antipsychotic treatment strategies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Four-way multimodal fusion of 7 T imaging data using an mCCA+jICA model in first-episode schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lottman, Kristin K; White, David M; Kraguljac, Nina V; Reid, Meredith A; Calhoun, Vince D; Catao, Fabio; Lahti, Adrienne C

    2018-04-01

    Acquisition of multimodal brain imaging data for the same subject has become more common leading to a growing interest in determining the intermodal relationships between imaging modalities to further elucidate the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Multimodal data have previously been individually analyzed and subsequently integrated; however, these analysis techniques lack the ability to examine true modality inter-relationships. The utilization of a multiset canonical correlation and joint independent component analysis (mCCA + jICA) model for data fusion allows shared or distinct abnormalities between modalities to be examined. In this study, first-episode schizophrenia patients (n SZ =19) and matched controls (n HC =21) completed a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan at 7 T. Grey matter (GM), white matter (WM), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF) maps were used as features in a mCCA + jICA model. Results of the mCCA + jICA model indicated three joint group-discriminating components (GM-CSF, WM-ALFF, GM-ALFF) and two modality-unique group-discriminating components (GM, WM). The joint component findings are highlighted by GM basal ganglia, somatosensory, parietal lobe, and thalamus abnormalities associated with ventricular CSF volume; WM occipital and frontal lobe abnormalities associated with temporal lobe function; and GM frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital lobe abnormalities associated with caudate function. These results support and extend major findings throughout the literature using independent single modality analyses. The multimodal fusion of 7 T data in this study provides a more comprehensive illustration of the relationships between underlying neuronal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia than examination of imaging data independently. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Deinstitutionalization revisited: a 5-year follow-up of a randomized clinical trial of hospital-based rehabilitation versus specialized assertive intervention (OPUS) versus standard treatment for patients with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete; Øhlenschlæger, Johan; Thorup, Anne Amalie Elgaard

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effects of hospital-based rehabilitation including weekly supportive psychodynamic therapy compared with specialized assertive intervention and standard treatment has not previously been investigated in first-episode psychosis. The aim of the study was to examine long-term effect...... on use of institutional care of different intensive interventions for patients with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorder on use of psychiatric bed days and days in supported housing.MethodA total of 94 severely ill patients with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders were included...... and in supported housing throughout the 5-year follow-up period compared with the two other groups. Patients in OPUS treatment spent significantly fewer days in psychiatric wards and supported housing in the first 3 years compared with patients in hospital-based rehabilitation. Due to attrition and small sample...

  7. First Episode Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Psychosis Treatment Share Fact Sheet: First Episode Psychosis Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy En Español Facts About Psychosis The word psychosis is used to describe conditions ...

  8. Effect of time and duration of untreated psychosis on cognitive and social functioning in Chinese patients with first-episode schizophrenia: A 1-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeramun-Aubeeluck, Anisha; Liu, Na; Fischer, Felix; Huang, Nan; Chen, Fazhan; He, Leiying; Yang, Chengqing; Luo, Yanli; Lu, Zheng

    2015-05-01

    Duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) is believed to exert a deleterious effect on cognitive and social function. However, to date, results remain inconclusive. To investigate the effect of time and DUP on cognitive and social functioning in first-episode schizophrenia (FES) subjects in Shanghai, China. FES patients were subjected to a comprehensive neuropsychological battery, the Personal and Social Performance scale (PSP) and the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS) at baseline, 6 month and 1 year. DUP was defined as the time from onset of first psychotic symptoms to first contact made with psychiatric services. Though the rate of non-completers in our observational study was relatively high (40%), we did not find any significant differences between the completers and non-completers (P-values > 0.05). Significant impairments in verbal learning and memory and executive function were noted over the course of 1 year. Meanwhile, social function improved significantly over the course of 1 year. Although, DUP did not share any significant relationship with cognitive or social function the effect estimate (range: - 0.03 to 0.02) of an increase of 1 month in DUP was clinically non-negligible in this study. In Chinese FES patients, the longitudinal course of cognitive function tends to worsen in verbal learning and memory, executive function and motor speed, while that of social function tends to improve. DUP was not found to be associated with cognitive or social deterioration in Chinese FES.

  9. Metabolic syndrome in antipsychotic naive African patients with severe mental illness in usual care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saloojee, Shamima; Burns, Jonathan K; Motala, Ayesha A

    2017-04-12

    To determine the prevalence and incidence of metabolic syndrome in individuals with a first episode of severe mental illness from South Africa. Antipsychotic naïve study subjects with a first episode of severe mental illness and control subjects were recruited at baseline for a prospective study. Individuals without metabolic syndrome at baseline were followed up for 12 months after antipsychotic medication was initiated. Metabolic syndrome was determined at baseline and at the 12-month follow-up using the Joint Interim Statement criteria. At baseline, the 67 study (M:F; 48:19) and 67 control subjects (M:F; 48:19) had a mean age of 22.8 (±3.7) and 23.3 (±2.6) years (P = .4), respectively. The majority were of black African ethnicity (97%) and 82% were diagnosed with schizophrenia. There was no difference in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (4.5%) or any of the individual components between the study and control group prior to the initiation of antipsychotics. Of the 64 study subjects without metabolic syndrome at baseline, only 36 (M:F; 25:11) completed the 12-month follow-up (response rate 56.3%) and 2 subjects developed metabolic syndrome .The incidence of metabolic syndrome was 5.5% with a significant increase in the elevated waist circumference criterion after 1 year of antipsychotic treatment (P = .02). There was a low prevalence and incidence of metabolic syndrome in this group of patients with a first episode of severe mental illness. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. first-episode psychosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    banzi

    m o re likely to choose cannabis as their substance of abuse than. c o n t rols. They also started abusing substances at a younger age than controls. Subjects with first-episode psychosis who abused substances presented at an earlier age than non-abusers. Substances affected symptoms at baseline pre s e n t a t i o n .

  11. First-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The thesis is part of a Scandinavian follow-up study, Early Intervention in Psychosis (the “TIPS” Project). The sample comprises first-episode non-affective patients (n=301), of which the Roskilde sub-sample (n=55) had separate investigations of personality trait/disorders. The study showed...... prodromal symptoms and the psychosis itself. Dimensional personality scores caught more variance than a categorical approach. Schizoid, avoidant and schizotypal traits were associated with poor premorbid social functioning and the schizoid traits were correlated with later development of negative symptoms....... Patients with first-episode psychosis had significantly high NEO-PI-R scores for neuroticism and agreeableness, and lower scores for conscientiousness and extroversion. The median time for remission in the total sample was three months. Female gender and better premorbid functioning were predictive of less...

  12. Reduced γ-Aminobutyric Acid and Glutamate+Glutamine Levels in Drug-Naïve Patients with First-Episode Schizophrenia but Not in Those at Ultrahigh Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Altered γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, glutamate (Glu levels, and an imbalance between GABAergic and glutamatergic neurotransmissions have been involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. However, it remains unclear how these abnormalities impact the onset and course of psychosis. In the present study, 21 drug-naïve subjects at ultrahigh risk for psychosis (UHR, 16 drug-naïve patients with first-episode schizophrenia (FES, and 23 healthy controls (HC were enrolled. In vivo GABA and glutamate+glutamine (Glx levels in the medial prefrontal cortex were measured using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Medial prefrontal GABA and Glx levels in FES patients were significantly lower than those in HC and UHR, respectively. GABA and Glx levels in UHR were comparable with those in HC. In each group, there was a positive correlation between GABA and Glx levels. Reduced medial prefrontal GABA and Glx levels thus may play an important role in the early stages of schizophrenia.

  13. A virtual reality task based on animal research – spatial learning and memory in patients after the first episode of schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Fajnerová, Iveta; Rodriguez, Mabel; Levčík, David; Konrádová, Lucie; Mikoláš, Pavol; Brom, Cyril; Stuchlík, Aleš; Vlček, Kamil; Horáček, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Cognitive deficit is considered to be a characteristic feature of schizophrenia disorder. A similar cognitive dysfunction was demonstrated in animal models of schizophrenia. However, the poor comparability of methods used to assess cognition in animals and humans could be responsible for low predictive validity of current animal models. In order to assess spatial abilities in schizophrenia and compare our results with the data obtained in animal models, we designed a virtual analo...

  14. Epidemiological and clinical characterization following a first psychotic episode in major depressive disorder: Comparisons with Schizophrenia and Bipolar I Disorder in the Cavan-Monaghan First Episode Psychosis Study (CAMFEPS).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Owoeye, Olabisi

    2013-05-28

    While recent research on psychotic illness has focussed on the nosological, clinical, and biological relationships between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, little attention has been directed to the most common other psychotic diagnosis, major depressive disorder with psychotic features (MDDP). As this diagnostic category captures the confluence between dimensions of psychotic and affective psychopathology, it is of unappreciated heuristic potential to inform on the nature of psychotic illness. Therefore, the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of MDDP were compared with those of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder within the Cavan-Monaghan First Episode Psychosis Study (n = 370). Epidemiologically, the first psychotic episode of MDDP (n = 77) was uniformly distributed across the adult life span, while schizophrenia (n = 73) and bipolar disorder (n = 73) were primarily disorders of young adulthood; the incidence of MDDP, like bipolar disorder, did not differ between the sexes, while the incidence of schizophrenia was more common in males than in females. Clinically, MDDP was characterized by negative symptoms, executive dysfunction, neurological soft signs (NSS), premorbid intellectual function, premorbid adjustment, and quality of life similar to those for schizophrenia, while bipolar disorder was characterized by less prominent negative symptoms, executive dysfunction and NSS, and better quality of life. These findings suggest that what we currently categorize as MDDP may be more closely aligned with other psychotic diagnoses than has been considered previously. They indicate that differences in how psychosis is manifested vis-à-vis depression and mania may be quantitative rather than qualitative and occur within a dimensional space, rather than validating categorical distinctions.

  15. Primeiro episódio da esquizofrenia e assistência de enfermagem Primer episodio de la esquizofrenia y asistencia de enfermería First episode of schizophrenia and nursing care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Cristina Ciccone Giacon

    2006-06-01

    disponibles y pocos recursos sociales. Tal condición muestra la necesidad de estudios relacionados al primer episodio.Schizophrenia is one of the main health problems in current days, requiring considerable investment from the health system. Intervening in the first episode offers a unique opportunity in the treatment of schizophrenia and influences the course of the illness. This article consists of a critical literature review aimed at examining knowledge on first episode schizophrenia and discussing the contribution of nursing care. A research was carried out in bibliographical databases. The data collected made possible the organization of information on the general concept of schizophrenia, its first episode, types of intervention and nursing performance. We found out that in Brazil there are few studies related to first episode schizophrenia in Nursing, few available specialized services, and few social resources. This situation reveals the need for more studies on first episode schizophrenia.

  16. Overlapping and disease specific trait, response, and reflection impulsivity in adolescents with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, J. R.M.; Rydkjaer, J.; Fagerlund, B.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Schizophrenia and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are developmental disorders with shared clinical characteristics such as cognitive impairments and impulsivity. Impulsivity is a core feature of ADHD and an important factor in aggression, violence, and substance use...

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging and the prediction of outcome in first-episode schizophrenia : A review of current evidence and directions for future research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dazzan, Paola; Arango, Celso; Fleischacker, Wolfgang; Galderisi, Silvana; Glenthøj, Birte; Leucht, Stephan; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Kahn, Rene; Rujescu, Dan; Sommer, Iris; Winter, Inge; McGuire, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) measures are promising outcome markers for schizophrenia, since regional frontal and temporal grey matter volumes reductions, and enlargement of the ventricles, have been associated with outcome in this disorder. However, a number of methodological issues have

  18. A virtual reality task based on animal research – spatial learning and memory in patients after the first episode of schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajnerová, Iveta; Rodriguez, Mabel; Levčík, David; Konrádová, Lucie; Mikoláš, Pavol; Brom, Cyril; Stuchlík, Aleš; Vlček, Kamil; Horáček, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Cognitive deficit is considered to be a characteristic feature of schizophrenia disorder. A similar cognitive dysfunction was demonstrated in animal models of schizophrenia. However, the poor comparability of methods used to assess cognition in animals and humans could be responsible for low predictive validity of current animal models. In order to assess spatial abilities in schizophrenia and compare our results with the data obtained in animal models, we designed a virtual analog of the Morris water maze (MWM), the virtual Four Goals Navigation (vFGN) task. Methods: Twenty-nine patients after the first psychotic episode with schizophrenia symptoms and a matched group of healthy volunteers performed the vFGN task. They were required to find and remember four hidden goal positions in an enclosed virtual arena. The task consisted of two parts. The Reference memory (RM) session with a stable goal position was designed to test spatial learning. The Delayed-matching-to-place (DMP) session presented a modified working memory protocol designed to test the ability to remember a sequence of three hidden goal positions. Results: Data obtained in the RM session show impaired spatial learning in schizophrenia patients compared to the healthy controls in pointing and navigation accuracy. The DMP session showed impaired spatial memory in schizophrenia during the recall of spatial sequence and a similar deficit in spatial bias in the probe trials. The pointing accuracy and the quadrant preference showed higher sensitivity toward the cognitive deficit than the navigation accuracy. Direct navigation to the goal was affected by sex and age of the tested subjects. The age affected spatial performance only in healthy controls. Conclusions: Despite some limitations of the study, our results correspond well with the previous studies in animal models of schizophrenia and support the decline of spatial cognition in schizophrenia, indicating the usefulness of the vFGN task in

  19. Selective attention and mismatch negativity in antipsychotic-naïve, first-episode schizophrenia patients before and after 6 months of antipsychotic monotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oranje, B.; Aggernaes, B.; Rasmussen, H.

    2017-01-01

    -naïve patients with schizophrenia and an equal number of healthy controls were tested in a selective attention and a typical mismatch negativity (MMN) paradigm at baseline and after 6 months. The patients were treated with quetiapine according to their clinical needs during the period between baseline and follow......-up, whereas controls received no treatment. Results Patients showed lower MMN and P200 amplitude than healthy controls in the selective attention paradigm at baseline, while this was not the case for MMN of the typical MMN paradigm. Interestingly, after 6 months treatment, this MMN deficit was only......Background Attention deficits have been frequently reported in schizophrenia. It has been suggested that treatment with second-generation antipsychotics can ameliorate these deficits. In this study, the influence of 6 months treatment with quetiapine, a compound with less affinity for dopamine D2...

  20. Global Micro- and Macro-structural White Matter Alterations and the reward circuit in First-episode Antipsychotic-naïve Schizophrenia Patients. Preliminary Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raghava, Jayachandra Mitta; Ebdrup, Bjørn Hylsebeck; Nielsen, Mette Ødegaard

    hypothalamus separately. All tracking was performed using PROBTRACKX. Results Baseline: Voxel-wise statistics performed on the probabilistic WM fiber maps for whole brain identified deficiencies in patients, showing reduced macro-structural connectivity in: thalamus, putamen, pallidum, hippocampus, forceps...... that widespread structural WM deficiencies are present in never-medicated schizophrenia patients. After 6 weeks of anti-psychotic monotherapy using amisulpride, there seems to be an improved connectivity within certain WM regions....

  1. A virtual reality task based on animal research – spatial learning and memory in patients after the first episode of schizophrenia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fajnerová, Iveta; Rodriguez, M.; Levčík, David; Konrádová, L.; Mikoláš, P.; Brom, C.; Stuchlík, Aleš; Vlček, Kamil; Horáček, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 8, May 27 (2014), s. 157 ISSN 1662-5153 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT13386 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) NT14291; GA MZd(CZ) NT13843 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : schizophrenia * spatial navigation * learning and memory * virtual reality environment * cognitive deficit * Morris Water Maze (MWM) * psychotic disorders * spatial behavior Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.270, year: 2014

  2. Twenty-year progression of body mass index in a county-wide cohort of people with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder identified at their first episode of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassnig, Martin; Kotov, Roman; Cornaccio, Danielle; Fochtmann, Laura; Harvey, Philip D; Bromet, Evelyn J

    2017-08-01

    There is an increased prevalence of obesity in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, leading to a disproportionate risk of adverse health conditions. Prospective, long-term weight gain data, however, are scarce. We analyzed data from the Suffolk County Mental Health Project cohort of consecutive first admissions with psychosis recruited from September 1989 to December 1995 and subsequently followed for 20 years, focusing on people with schizophrenia (n=146) and bipolar disorder (n=87). The time course of weight gain was examined using a 2 (group)×5 (time) mixed-model repeated measures ANOVA, and body mass index (BMI) scores at the first (6 months) and second (2 years) assessments were compared to examine whether early overweight predicted later obesity. There was a statistically significant effect of time (F(1,210)=68.06, Pdiagnosis (F(1,210)=29.18, Pdiagnosis (F(1,210)=0.88, P=.48). Most participants had normal BMIs at the first two assessments. Early overweight was a predictor of eventual obesity for both groups. At the 20-year follow-ups, approximately 50% of the bipolar and 62% of the schizophrenia sample were obese, with a greater prevalence of obesity in schizophrenia at each assessment (all Pschizophrenia and over half of those with bipolar disorder were obese 20 years after first hospitalization for psychosis, considerably higher than the rate for adults in New York State (27%). Early intervention may be required to prevent long-term consequences of obesity-related morbidity and mortality. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Differences in omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid consumption in people at ultra-high risk of psychosis, first-episode schizophrenia, and in healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawełczyk, Tomasz; Trafalska, Elżbieta; Pawełczyk, Agnieszka; Kotlicka-Antczak, Magdalena

    2017-12-01

    Supplementation with omega-3 PUFA showed efficacy in reducing the risk of transition into psychosis in UHR individuals. It is uncertain whether dietary patterns can be partly responsible for n-3 deficiencies observed in susceptible participants before the diagnosis of schizophrenia. The study was designed to assess differences in omega-3 and omega-6 PUFA consumption in healthy controls (HC), UHR participants and FES patients as well as to verify the hypothesis that dietary changes in PUFA consumption are present before active psychosis develops, that is, in UHR individuals. Dietary habits during the previous year were assessed in 34 patients at UHR of psychosis, 33 patients diagnosed with FES and 33 HC participants using a validated Food-Frequency Questionnaire and the Polish Food Composition Tables. Significant differences in omega-3 and omega-6 PUFA intake were observed between study groups. UHR and FES groups reported significantly higher consumption of omega-6 PUFA in comparison with HC. FES patients also reported a higher consumption of alpha-linolenic acid (omega-3) in comparison with HC. No significant differences were seen in consumption of long-chain marine PUFA. Differences in omega-6 and omega-3 PUFA consumption exist before development of psychotic symptoms, fulfilling the criteria of schizophrenia. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Methylation at a transcription factor-binding site on the 5-HT1A receptor gene correlates with negative symptom treatment response in first episode schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hao; Dalton, Caroline F; Srisawat, Umarat; Zhang, Zhi Jun; Reynolds, Gavin P

    2014-04-01

    Individual variability and inadequate response of negative symptoms are major limitations of antipsychotic treatment in schizophrenia. A functional polymorphism, rs6295, in the 5-HT1A-receptor gene (HTR1A) contributes to this variability in negative symptom response. The DNA sequence containing rs6295 is rich in cytosine methylation (CpG) sites; CpG methylation is an epigenetic factor that, like rs6295, can modify transcriptional control. To investigate whether DNA methylation influences response to antipsychotic treatment, we determined methylation at CpG sites close to rs6295 in DNA from 82 Chinese subjects with a first psychotic episode. Methylation of one CpG site within a recognition sequence for HES transcriptional repressors was found to correlate with changes in total PANSS score (p = 0.006) and negative factor sub-score (p factor score (p = 0.019); the effect on symptom change remained after correction for this baseline score. An effect of rs6295 on negative symptom response was not seen in this sample, which may not have provided sufficient power for the pharmacogenetic association. These preliminary results indicate that epigenetic modification of transcriptional regulation by specific cytosine methylation may modulate HTR1A expression, resulting in effects on emotional dysfunction and negative symptom response to antipsychotic treatment.

  5. Auditory change detection in schizophrenia: sources of activity, related neuropsychological function and symptoms in patients with a first episode in adolescence, and patients 14 years after an adolescent illness-onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachsse Jan

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The event-related brain response mismatch negativity (MMN registers changes in auditory stimulation with temporal lobe sources reflecting short-term echoic memory and frontal sources a deviance-induced switch in processing. Impairment, controversially present at the onset of schizophrenia, develops rapidly and can remain independent of clinical improvement. We examined the characteristics of the scalp-recorded MMN and related these to tests of short-term memory and set-shifting. We assessed whether the equivalent dipole sources are affected already at illness-onset in adolescence and how these features differ after a 14-year course following an adolescent onset. The strength, latency, orientation and location of frontal and temporal lobe sources of MMN activity early and late in the course of adolescent-onset schizophrenia are analysed and illustrated. Methods MMN, a measure of auditory change-detection, was elicited by short deviant tones in a 3-tone oddball-presentation and recorded from 32 scalp electrodes. Four dipole sources were placed following hypothesis-led calculations using brain electrical source analysis on brain atlas and MR-images. A short neuropsychological test battery was administered. We compared 28 adolescent patients with a first episode of schizophrenia and 18 patients 14 years after diagnosis in adolescence with two age-matched control groups from the community (n = 22 and 18, respectively. Results MMN peaked earlier in the younger than the older subjects. The amplitude was reduced in patients, especially the younger group, and was here associated with negative symptoms and slow set-shifting. In first-episode patients the temporal lobe sources were more ventral than in controls, while the left cingular and right inferior-mid frontal sources were more caudal. In the older patients the left temporal locus remained ventral (developmental stasis, the right temporal locus extended more antero

  6. Auditory change detection in schizophrenia: sources of activity, related neuropsychological function and symptoms in patients with a first episode in adolescence, and patients 14 years after an adolescent illness-onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oades, Robert D; Wild-Wall, Nele; Juran, Stephanie A; Sachsse, Jan; Oknina, Ljubov B; Röpcke, Bernd

    2006-02-08

    The event-related brain response mismatch negativity (MMN) registers changes in auditory stimulation with temporal lobe sources reflecting short-term echoic memory and frontal sources a deviance-induced switch in processing. Impairment, controversially present at the onset of schizophrenia, develops rapidly and can remain independent of clinical improvement. We examined the characteristics of the scalp-recorded MMN and related these to tests of short-term memory and set-shifting. We assessed whether the equivalent dipole sources are affected already at illness-onset in adolescence and how these features differ after a 14-year course following an adolescent onset. The strength, latency, orientation and location of frontal and temporal lobe sources of MMN activity early and late in the course of adolescent-onset schizophrenia are analysed and illustrated. MMN, a measure of auditory change-detection, was elicited by short deviant tones in a 3-tone oddball-presentation and recorded from 32 scalp electrodes. Four dipole sources were placed following hypothesis-led calculations using brain electrical source analysis on brain atlas and MR-images. A short neuropsychological test battery was administered. We compared 28 adolescent patients with a first episode of schizophrenia and 18 patients 14 years after diagnosis in adolescence with two age-matched control groups from the community (n = 22 and 18, respectively). MMN peaked earlier in the younger than the older subjects. The amplitude was reduced in patients, especially the younger group, and was here associated with negative symptoms and slow set-shifting. In first-episode patients the temporal lobe sources were more ventral than in controls, while the left cingular and right inferior-mid frontal sources were more caudal. In the older patients the left temporal locus remained ventral (developmental stasis), the right temporal locus extended more antero-laterally (illness progression), and the right frontal source moved

  7. Study of Lurasidone in Treating Antipsychotic Naive or Quasi-Naive Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-18

    Schizophrenia; Schizoaffective Disorder; Schizophreniform Disorder; Psychosis NOS; Autistic Disorder; Asperger Syndrome; Child Development Disorders, Pervasive; Bipolar I Disorder; Bipolar II Disorder; Mood Disorder NOS; Severe Major Depression With Psychotic Features; Single Episode Major Depression Without Psychotic Symptoms; Severe Mood Disorder With Psychotic Features

  8. Structural brain abnormalities in early onset first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, A K; Baaré, William Frans Christian; Raabjerg Christensen, A M

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain morphometry in children and adolescents with first-episode psychosis offer a unique opportunity for pathogenetic investigations. METHODS: We compared high-resolution 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance images of the brain in 29 patients (schizophrenia, schizotypal disorder...

  9. Obesity, dyslipidemia and brain age in first-episode psychosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolenic, M.; Franke, K.; Hlinka, Jaroslav; Matějka, M.; Čapková, J.; Pausova, Z.; Uher, R.; Alda, M.; Španiel, F.; Hájek, T.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 99, April (2018), s. 151-158 ISSN 0022-3956 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) NV16-32791A; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1611 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : BrainAGE score * Dyslipidemia * First-episode psychosis * Obesity * Overweight * Schizophrenia Impact factor: 4.183, year: 2016

  10. Early detection of first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tor K; Melle, Ingrid; Auestad, Bjørn

    2006-01-01

    Early intervention is assumed to improve outcome in first-episode psychosis, but this has not been proven.......Early intervention is assumed to improve outcome in first-episode psychosis, but this has not been proven....

  11. Early detection strategies for untreated first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Jan Olav; McGlashan, T H; Larsen, Tor Ketil

    2001-01-01

    Some studies in first-episode schizophrenia correlate shorter duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) with better prognosis, suggesting that timing of treatment may be important. A three-site prospective clinical trial in Norway and Denmark is underway to investigate the effect of the timing...... of treatment in first-episode psychosis. One health care sector (Rogaland, Norway) is experimental and has developed an early detection (ED) system to reduce DUP. Two other sectors (Ullevål, Norway, and Roskilde, Denmark) are comparison sectors and rely on existing detection and referral systems for first......-episode cases. The study ultimately will compare early detected with usual detected patients. This paper describes the study's major independent intervention variable, i.e. a comprehensive education and detection system to change DUP in first onset psychosis. System variables and first results from the four...

  12. Structural brain abnormalities in early onset first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, A K; Baaré, W F C; Raabjerg Christensen, A M

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain morphometry in children and adolescents with first-episode psychosis offer a unique opportunity for pathogenetic investigations. METHODS: We compared high-resolution 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance images of the brain in 29 patients (schizophrenia, schizotypal disorder......, delusional disorder or other non-organic psychosis), aged 10-18 to those of 29 matched controls, using optimized voxel-based morphometry. RESULTS: Psychotic patients had frontal white matter abnormalities, but expected (regional) gray matter reductions were not observed. Post hoc analyses revealed...... already at illness onset in young schizophrenia spectrum patients, suggests aberrant neurodevelopmental processes in the pathogenesis of these disorders. Gray matter volume changes, however, appear not to be a key feature in early onset first-episode psychosis....

  13. Structural brain abnormalities in early onset first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, A K; Baaré, W F C; Raabjerg Christensen, A M

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain morphometry in children and adolescents with first-episode psychosis offer a unique opportunity for pathogenetic investigations. METHODS: We compared high-resolution 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance images of the brain in 29 patients (schizophrenia, schizotypal disorder, delusi...... already at illness onset in young schizophrenia spectrum patients, suggests aberrant neurodevelopmental processes in the pathogenesis of these disorders. Gray matter volume changes, however, appear not to be a key feature in early onset first-episode psychosis.......BACKGROUND: Brain morphometry in children and adolescents with first-episode psychosis offer a unique opportunity for pathogenetic investigations. METHODS: We compared high-resolution 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance images of the brain in 29 patients (schizophrenia, schizotypal disorder......, delusional disorder or other non-organic psychosis), aged 10-18 to those of 29 matched controls, using optimized voxel-based morphometry. RESULTS: Psychotic patients had frontal white matter abnormalities, but expected (regional) gray matter reductions were not observed. Post hoc analyses revealed...

  14. Neurocognitive performance in first-episode and chronic schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, Steffen; Andresen, Burghard; Perro, Christian; Schickel, Marc; Krausz, Micheal; Naber, Dieter

    2002-02-01

    Previous research on neuropsychological disturbances in first-episode and chronic schizophrenic patients has provided mixed results which can be partially attributed to methodological inconsistencies. For the present study, 70 schizophrenic patients (40 with chronic and 30 with first-episode schizophrenia) were compared to 30 healthy controls on a large battery of neuropsychological tests. Special attention was paid to potential confounds such as differences in psychopathology, age and educational level between the schizophrenic sub-samples. Healthy controls performed better than both first-episode and chronic patients in almost all cognitive domains (P < 0.01), while the patient samples did not differ in any of the tasks. Results were confirmed in a second series of analyses in which patient subgroups were equated for sociodemographic background variables. The present results confirm recent data collected in longitudinal studies, thus, lending further support for a neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia. It is suggested that neuropsychological disturbances occur early in schizophrenia and do not worsen in the course beyond age-related decrement. Possible reasons why previous research has produced contradictory findings are discussed.

  15. Caregiver psychoeducation for first-episode psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McWilliams, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    International best-practice guidelines for the management of first-episode psychosis have recommended the provision of psychoeducation for multifamily groups. While there is ample evidence of their efficacy in multiepisode psychosis, there is a paucity of evidence supporting this approach specifically for first-episode psychosis. We sought to determine whether a six-week caregiver psychoeducation programme geared specifically at first-episode psychosis improves caregiver knowledge and attitudes.

  16. Apathy in first episode psychosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evensen, Julie; Røssberg, Jan Ivar; Barder, Helene

    2012-01-01

    Apathy is a common symptom in first episode psychosis (FEP), and is associated with poor functioning. Prevalence and correlates of apathy 10 years after the first psychotic episode remain unexplored.......Apathy is a common symptom in first episode psychosis (FEP), and is associated with poor functioning. Prevalence and correlates of apathy 10 years after the first psychotic episode remain unexplored....

  17. Deinstitutionalization revisited: a 5-year follow-up of a randomized clinical trial of hospital-based rehabilitation versus specialized assertive intervention (OPUS) versus standard treatment for patients with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete; Øhlenschlæger, Johan; Thorup, Anne Amalie Elgaard

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effects of hospital-based rehabilitation including weekly supportive psychodynamic therapy compared with specialized assertive intervention and standard treatment has not previously been investigated in first-episode psychosis. The aim of the study was to examine long-term effect...... in a special part of the Copenhagen OPUS trial and randomized to either the specialized assertive intervention program (OPUS), standard treatment or hospital-based rehabilitation. RESULTS: It was a stable pattern that patients randomized to hospital-based rehabilitation spent more days in psychiatric wards...

  18. Predictors of recovery in first episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austin, Stephen F; Mors, Ole; Secher, Rikke Gry

    2013-01-01

    Recovery, the optimal goal in treatment, is the attainment of both symptomatic and functional remission over a sustained period of time. Identification of factors that promote recovery can help develop interventions that facilitate good outcomes for people with first episode psychosis.......Recovery, the optimal goal in treatment, is the attainment of both symptomatic and functional remission over a sustained period of time. Identification of factors that promote recovery can help develop interventions that facilitate good outcomes for people with first episode psychosis....

  19. Deinstitutionalization revisited: a 5-year follow-up of a randomized clinical trial of hospital-based rehabilitation versus specialized assertive intervention (OPUS) versus standard treatment for patients with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete; Øhlenschlæger, Johan; Thorup, Anne Amalie Elgaard

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effects of hospital-based rehabilitation including weekly supportive psychodynamic therapy compared with specialized assertive intervention and standard treatment has not previously been investigated in first-episode psychosis. The aim of the study was to examine long-term effect...... in a special part of the Copenhagen OPUS trial and randomized to either the specialized assertive intervention program (OPUS), standard treatment or hospital-based rehabilitation. RESULTS: It was a stable pattern that patients randomized to hospital-based rehabilitation spent more days in psychiatric wards...... and in supported housing throughout the 5-year follow-up period compared with the two other groups. Patients in OPUS treatment spent significantly fewer days in psychiatric wards and supported housing in the first 3 years compared with patients in hospital-based rehabilitation. Due to attrition and small sample...

  20. Neurocognition and occupational functioning in patients with first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tandberg, Marte; Ueland, Torill; Sundet, Kjetil

    2011-01-01

    Neurocognitive deficits are a core feature of schizophrenia that is associated with poor occupational functioning. Few studies have investigated this relationship in patients with first-episode psychosis. The current study examined the characteristics of employed and unemployed patients with first......-episode psychosis at baseline and 2-year follow-up, and the predictive value of neurocognition on employment status. One-hundred and twenty-two first-episode psychosis patients were assessed with clinical and neurocognitive measures at baseline. Occupational status was assessed at baseline and 2-year follow...

  1. Shortened duration of untreated first episode of psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tor Ketil; McGlashan, T H; Johannessen, Jan Olav

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study examined whether duration of untreated psychosis can be shortened in patients with first episodes of DSM-IV schizophrenia spectrum disorders and whether shorted duration alters patient appearance at treatment. METHOD: Two study groups were ascertained in the same Norwegian...... health care sector: one from 1993-1994 with usual detection methods and one from 1997-1998 with early detection strategies that included education about psychosis. RESULTS: Patients with early detection had a shorter median duration of untreated psychosis by 21.5 weeks than patients with usual detection....... The number with psychosis was greater in the early detection group; the number with schizophrenia was less. Early detection patients had more substance abuse and were younger, better adjusted premorbidly, and less ill. CONCLUSIONS: Early detection can shorten duration of untreated psychosis and help more...

  2. How successful are first episode programs?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete; Rasmussen, Jesper Østrup; Melau, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: It has been hypothesized that the first 5 years after first episode of psychosis are a critical period with opportunities for ameliorating the course of illness. On the basis of this rationale, specialized assertive early intervention services were developed. We wanted to inves...

  3. Mental health nursing and first episode psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dusseldorp, L. van; Goossens, P.J.J.; Achterberg, T. van

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to identify mental health nursing's contribution to the care and treatment of patients with a first episode of psychosis; A systematic literature review was undertaken, with 27 articles selected for study. Five domains were identified: development of

  4. Family Intervention in First-Episode Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anvar Sadath

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Family interventions have produced benefits on clinical and family outcomes in long standing psychosis. However, little is known about the efficacy of such interventions in the early stages of psychosis. This article reviews published research over the last two decades on family intervention in first-episode psychosis. Electronic databases, such as PubMed, PsycINFO, and ScienceDirect, have been systematically searched. In addition, an exhaustive Internet search was also carried out using Google and Google Scholar to identify the potential studies that evaluated family interventions in first-episode psychosis. We have identified seven reports of five randomized controlled trials (RCTs and five non-randomized and uncontrolled studies of family intervention. Our review on 12 reports of family intervention studies has shown mixed effects on outcomes in first-episode psychosis. Most of the reports showed no added benefits or very short-term benefits on primary clinical or family outcome variables. There is a dearth of family intervention studies in first-episode psychosis. More RCTs are needed to reach reliable conclusions.

  5. Depressive symptoms in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sönmez, Nasrettin; Røssberg, Jan Ivar; Evensen, Julie

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: The present study examined if any patient characteristics at baseline predicted depressive symptoms at 10 years and whether patients prone to depressive symptoms in the first year of treatment had a different prognosis in the following years. METHOD: A total of 299 first-episode psychosis...

  6. First-episode psychosis: An update

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    working memory and executive functioning.32 A standardised cognitive battery for schizophrenia is being developed, as it has been difficult to compare ..... schizophrenia: studies in acute psychosis, post psychotic depression and auditory hallucinations. Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci 2005; 255(3): 202-212. 26. Sim K ...

  7. 10 year course of IQ in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barder, Helene Eidsmo; Sundet, Kjetil; Rund, Bjørn Rishovd

    2015-01-01

    A substantial proportion of patients suffering from schizophrenia-spectrum disorders (SSDs) exhibit a general intellectual impairment at illness onset, but the subsequent intellectual course remains unclear. Relationships between accumulated time in psychosis and long-term intellectual functioning...... are largely uninvestigated, but may identify subgroups with different intellectual trajectories. Eighty-nine first-episode psychosis patients were investigated on IQ at baseline and at 10-years follow-up. Total time in psychosis was defined as two separate variables; Duration of psychosis before start...... of treatment (i.e. duration of untreated psychosis: DUP), and duration of psychosis after start of treatment (DAT). The sample was divided in three equal groups based on DUP and DAT, respectively. To investigate if diagnosis could separate IQ-trajectories beyond that of psychotic duration, two diagnostic...

  8. Capgras' syndrome in first-episode psychotic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatore, Paola; Bhuvaneswar, Chaya; Tohen, Mauricio; Khalsa, Hari-Mandir K; Maggini, Carlo; Baldessarini, Ross J

    2014-01-01

    Misidentification phenomena, including the delusion of 'imposters' named after Joseph Capgras, occur in various major psychiatric and neurological disorders but have rarely been studied systematically in broad samples of modern patients. This study investigated the prevalence and correlated clinical factors of Capgras' phenomenon in a broad sample of patient-subjects with first-lifetime episodes of psychotic affective and nonaffective disorders. We evaluated 517 initially hospitalized, first-episode psychotic-disorder patients for the prevalence of Capgras' phenomenon and its association with DSM-IV-TR diagnoses including schizophreniform, brief psychotic, unspecified psychotic, delusional, and schizoaffective disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar-I disorder and major depression with psychotic features, and with characteristics of interest including antecedent psychiatric and neurological morbidity, onset type and presenting psychopathological phenomena, using standard bivariate and multivariate statistical methods. Capgras' syndrome was identified in 73/517 (14.1%) patients (8.2-50% across diagnoses). Risk was greatest with acute or brief psychotic disorders (schizophreniform psychoses 50%, brief psychoses 34.8%, or unspecified psychoses 23.9%), intermediate in major depression (15%), schizophrenia (11.4%) and delusional disorder (11.1%), and lowest in bipolar-I (10.3%) and schizoaffective disorders (8.2%). Associated were somatosensory, olfactory and tactile hallucinations, Schneiderian (especially delusional perception), and cycloid features including polymorphous psychotic phenomena, rapidly shifting psychomotor and affective symptoms, pananxiety, ecstasy, overconcern with death, and perplexity or confusion, as well as rapid onset, but not sex, age, abuse history, dissociative features, or indications of neurological disorders. Capgras' syndrome was prevalent across a broad spectrum of first-episode psychotic disorders, most often in acute psychoses of rapid onset.

  9. Capgras Syndrome in First-Episode Psychotic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatore, Paola; Bhuvaneswar, Chaya; Tohen, Mauricio; Khalsa, Hari-Mandir K.; Maggini, Carlo; Baldessarini, Ross J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Misidentification phenomena, including the delusion of “imposters” named after Joseph Capgras, occur in various major psychiatric and neurological disorders but have rarely been studied systematically in broad samples of modern patients. This study investigated the prevalence and correlated clinical factors of Capgras phenomenon in a broad sample of patient-subjects with first-lifetime episodes of psychotic affective and non affective disorders. Methods We evaluated 517 initially hospitalized, first-episode psychotic-disorder patients for prevalence of Capgras phenomenon and its association with DSM-IV-TR diagnoses including schizophreniform, brief psychotic, unspecified psychotic, delusional, and schizoaffective disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar-I disorder and major depression with psychotic features, and with characteristics of interest including antecedent psychiatric and neurological morbidity, onset-type and presenting psychopathological phenomena, using standard bivariate and multivariate statistical methods. Results Capgras syndrome was identified in 73/517 (14.1%) patients (8.2%–50% across diagnoses). Risk was greatest with acute or brief psychotic disorders (schizophreniform [50%], brief [34.8%], or unspecified [23.9%] psychoses), intermediate in major depression (15%), schizophrenia (11.4%) and delusional disorder (11.1%), and lowest in bipolar-I (10.3%) and schizoaffective disorders (8.2%). Associated were somatosensory, olfactory and tactile hallucinations, Schneiderian (especially delusional perception), and cycloid features as described by Perris and Brockington including polymorphous psychotic phenomena, rapidly shifting psychomotor and affective symptoms, pan-anxiety, ecstasy, over-concern with death, and perplexity or confusion, as well as rapid-onset, but not sex, age, abuse-history, dissociative features, or indications of neurological disorders. Conclusions Capgras syndrome was prevalent across a broad spectrum of first-episode

  10. Apathy is associated with executive functioning in first episode psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agartz Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The underlying nature of negative symptoms in psychosis is poorly understood. Investigation of the relationship between the different negative subsymptoms and neurocognition is one approach to understand more of the underlying nature. Apathy, one of the subsymptoms, is also a common symptom in other brain disorders. Its association with neurocognition, in particular executive functioning, is well documented in other brain disorders, but only studied in one former study of chronic patients with schizophrenia. This study investigates the association between apathy and neurocognitive functioning in patients with first episode psychosis (FEP, with the hypothesis that apathy is more associated with tests representing executive function than tests representing other neurocognitive domains. Methods Seventy-one FEP patients were assessed with an extensive neuropsychological test battery. Level of apathy was assessed with the abridged Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES-C-Apathy. Results AES-C-Apathy was only significantly associated with tests from the executive domain [Semantic fluency (r = .37, p Conclusion We replicated in FEP patients the relationship between apathy and executive functioning reported in another study for chronic patients with schizophrenia. We also found apathy in FEP to have the same relationship to executive functioning, as assessed with the Verbal fluency tests, as that reported in patients with other brain disorders, pointing to a common underlying nature of this symptom across disorders.

  11. Apathy is associated with executive functioning in first episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faerden, Ann; Vaskinn, Anja; Finset, Arnstein; Agartz, Ingrid; Ann Barrett, Elizabeth; Friis, Svein; Simonsen, Carmen; Andreassen, Ole A; Melle, Ingrid

    2009-01-08

    The underlying nature of negative symptoms in psychosis is poorly understood. Investigation of the relationship between the different negative subsymptoms and neurocognition is one approach to understand more of the underlying nature. Apathy, one of the subsymptoms, is also a common symptom in other brain disorders. Its association with neurocognition, in particular executive functioning, is well documented in other brain disorders, but only studied in one former study of chronic patients with schizophrenia. This study investigates the association between apathy and neurocognitive functioning in patients with first episode psychosis (FEP), with the hypothesis that apathy is more associated with tests representing executive function than tests representing other neurocognitive domains. Seventy-one FEP patients were assessed with an extensive neuropsychological test battery. Level of apathy was assessed with the abridged Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES-C-Apathy). AES-C-Apathy was only significantly associated with tests from the executive domain [Semantic fluency (r = .37, p co-occuring depression, positive symptoms or use of antipsychotic medication did not significantly influence the results. We replicated in FEP patients the relationship between apathy and executive functioning reported in another study for chronic patients with schizophrenia. We also found apathy in FEP to have the same relationship to executive functioning, as assessed with the Verbal fluency tests, as that reported in patients with other brain disorders, pointing to a common underlying nature of this symptom across disorders.

  12. Personality disorders in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik; Haahr, Ulrik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of personality disorders in the early course of first-episode psychosis and their likely presence in the premorbid period. Fifty-five patients were enrolled at baseline and premorbid function was evaluated by the Premorbid Adjustment Scale....... Thirty-three of these of the patients were assessed at two-year follow-up for comorbid personality disorders by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders and by the self-report instrument Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II. Half of the patients met the criteria of two...... or more personality disorders, while one-third of the patients did not fulfil the criteria for any personality disorder. The schizoid and the avoidant were the most frequent personality disorders and both were associated with social withdrawal during childhood and adolescence. The limitation of the study...

  13. Suicidal behaviour and mortality in first-episode psychosis: the OPUS trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mette; Jeppesen, Pia; Petersen, Lone

    2007-01-01

    : A longitudinal, prospective, 5-year follow-up study of 547 individuals with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum psychosis. Individuals presenting for their first treatment in mental health services in two circumscribed urban areas in Denmark were included in a randomised controlled trial of integrated v......-up. We found a strong association between suicidal thoughts, plans and previous attempts, depressive and psychotic symptoms and young age, and with suicidal plans and attempts at 1- and 2-year follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: In this first-episode cohort depressive and psychotic symptoms, especially...

  14. Gender differences in first episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koster, A.; Lajer, M.; Lindhardt, A.

    2008-01-01

    In the description of 1 episode schizophrenia patients, female gender is associated with better social function and a higher degree of compliance, while males exhibit more negative symptoms and a higher degree of abuse. The question is raised whether gender specific differences exist which should...

  15. A Test of the Transdiagnostic Dopamine Hypothesis of Psychosis Using Positron Emission Tomographic Imaging in Bipolar Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhar, Sameer; Nour, Matthew M; Veronese, Mattia; Rogdaki, Maria; Bonoldi, Ilaria; Azis, Matilda; Turkheimer, Federico; McGuire, Philip; Young, Allan H; Howes, Oliver D

    2017-12-01

    The dopamine hypothesis suggests that dopamine abnormalities underlie psychosis, irrespective of diagnosis, implicating dopamine dysregulation in bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia, in line with the research domain criteria approach. However, this hypothesis has not been directly examined in individuals diagnosed with bipolar disorder with psychosis. To test whether dopamine synthesis capacity is elevated in bipolar disorder with psychosis and how this compares with schizophrenia and matched controls and to examine whether dopamine synthesis capacity is associated with psychotic symptom severity, irrespective of diagnostic class. This cross-sectional case-control positron emission tomographic study was performed in the setting of first-episode psychosis services in an inner-city area (London, England). Sixty individuals participated in the study (22 with bipolar psychosis [18 antipsychotic naive or free], 16 with schizophrenia [14 antipsychotic naive or free], and 22 matched controls) and underwent fluorodihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine ([18F]-DOPA) positron emission tomography to examine dopamine synthesis capacity. Standardized clinical measures, including the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Young Mania Rating Scale, and Global Assessment of Functioning, were administered. The study dates were March 2013 to November 2016. Dopamine synthesis capacity (Kicer) and clinical measures (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Young Mania Rating Scale, and Global Assessment of Functioning). The mean (SD) ages of participants were 23.6 (3.6) years in 22 individuals with bipolar psychosis (13 male), 26.3 (4.4) years in 16 individuals with schizophrenia (14 male), and 24.5 (4.5) years in controls (14 male). There was a significant group difference in striatal dopamine synthesis capacity (Kicer) (F2,57 = 6.80, P = .002). Kicer was significantly elevated in both the bipolar group (mean [SD], 13.18 [1.08] × 10-3 min-1; P = .002) and the schizophrenia

  16. Prevention of negative symptom psychopathologies in first-episode schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melle, Ingrid; Larsen, Tor K; Haahr, Ulrik

    2008-01-01

    The duration of untreated psychosis (DUP)-the time from onset of psychotic symptoms to the start of adequate treatment--is consistently correlated with better course and outcome, but the mechanisms are poorly understood....

  17. Early detection and intervention in first-episode schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tor Ketil; Friis, Svein; Haahr, U

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the literature on early intervention in psychosis and to evaluate relevant studies. METHOD: Early intervention was defined as intervention in the prodromal phase (primary prevention) and intervention after the onset of psychosis, i.e. shortening of duration of untreated psych...

  18. Extrastriatal dopamine D-2/3 receptors and cortical grey matter volumes in antipsychotic-naive schizophrenia patients before and after initial antipsychotic treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørbak-Emig, Henrik; Pinborg, Lars H.; Raghava, Jayachandra M.

    2017-01-01

    ), and psychopathology assessments before and after 3 months of treatment with either risperidone (N = 13) or zuclopenthixol (N = 9). Twenty healthy controls matched on age, gender and parental socioeconomic status underwent baseline MRI and SPECT. RESULTS: Neither extrastriatal D2/3 receptor BPND at baseline, nor...

  19. Childhood trauma and cognitive function in first-episode affective and non-affective psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Aas, Monica

    2011-06-01

    A history of childhood trauma is reportedly more prevalent in people suffering from psychosis than in the general population. Childhood trauma has also been linked to cognitive abnormalities in adulthood, and cognitive abnormalities, in turn, are one of the key clinical features of psychosis. Therefore, this study investigated whether there was a relationship between childhood trauma and cognitive function in patients with first-episode psychosis. The potential impact of diagnosis (schizophrenia or affective psychosis) and gender on this association was also examined.

  20. Reduced mirror neuron activity in schizophrenia and its association with theory of mind deficits: evidence from a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Urvakhsh Meherwan; Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Basavaraju, Rakshathi; Gangadhar, Bangalore N; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2014-09-01

    The "mirror-neuron system" has been proposed to be a neurophysiological substrate for social cognition (SC) ability. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) paradigms to compare putative mirror neuron activity (MNA) in 3 groups: antipsychotic-naive, medicated schizophrenia patients, and healthy comparison subjects. We also explored the association between MNA and SC ability in patients. Fifty-four consenting right-handed schizophrenia patients (33 antipsychotic naive) and 45 matched healthy comparison subjects completed a TMS experiment to assess putative premotor MNA. We used 4 TMS paradigms of eliciting motor-evoked potentials (MEP) in the right first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle. These were applied while the subjects observed a goal-directed action involving the FDI (actual action and its video) and a static image. The difference in the amplitude of the MEP while they observed the static image and the action provided a measure of MNA. Subjects also underwent SC assessments (theory of mind [ToM], emotion processing, and social perception). Two-way repeated measures ANOVA revealed significant group × occasion interaction effect in 3 TMS paradigms, indicating deficient motor facilitation during action observation relative to rest state in antipsychotic-naive schizophrenia patients as compared with the other two groups. Among patients, there were significant direct correlations between measures of MNA and ToM performance. Antipsychotic-naive schizophrenia patients have poorer MNA than medicated patients and healthy controls. Measures of putative MNA had significant and consistent associations with ToM abilities. These findings suggest a possibility of deficient mirror neuron system underlying SC deficits in schizophrenia. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Suicide in first episode psychosis: a nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkenstam, C; Björkenstam, E; Hjern, A; Bodén, R; Reutfors, J

    2014-08-01

    Relatively little is known about suicide in diagnostic subtypes of first episode psychosis (FEP). Our aim was to assess suicide rates and potential risk factors for suicide in FEP. This is a national register-based cohort study of patients born in 1973-1978 in Sweden and who were hospitalized with a FEP between ages 15 and 30years (n=2819). The patients were followed from date of discharge until death, emigration, or 31st of December 2008. The suicide rates for six diagnostic subtypes of FEP were calculated. Suicide incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were calculated to evaluate the association between suicide and psychiatric, familial, social, and demographic factors. In total 121 patients died by suicide. The overall suicide rate was 4.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.5-5.0) per 1000person-years. The highest suicide rates were found in depressive disorder with psychotic symptoms and in delusional disorder. In an adjusted model, the strongest risk factors for suicide were self-harm (IRR 2.7, CI 1.7-4.4) or a conviction for violent crime (IRR 2.0, CI 1.3-3.2). Also having a first-degree relative with a schizophrenia/bipolar diagnosis (IRR 2.1, CI 1.2-3.6) or substance use disorder (IRR 2.0, CI 1.2-3.2) were significant risk factors for suicide. Impulsive behavior such as self-harm as well as having a family history of severe mental disorder or substance use are important risk factors for suicide in FEP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Cannabis use in first episode psychosis: Meta-analysis of prevalence, and the time course of initiation and continued use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myles, Hannah; Myles, Nicholas; Large, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Cannabis use is prevalent among people with first episode psychosis and the epidemiology of its use in early psychosis is unclear. We performed a meta-analysis of observational studies to determine; (1) the interval between age at initiation of cannabis use and age at onset of first episode psychosis, (2) the prevalence of cannabis use at time of first episode psychosis, and (3) the odds of continuing cannabis following treatment for first episode psychosis. Search of electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Web of Science and CINAHL for English-language papers using search terms (psychosis OR schizophrenia) AND (cannabis OR marijuana) IN (title OR keyword OR abstract), current to October 2014. Studies were included if they reported on prevalence of current cannabis use in first episode psychosis cohorts. A total of 37 samples were included for meta-analysis. Rates of cannabis use in each sample were extracted to determine prevalence estimates. The age at initiation of regular cannabis and age at onset of psychosis were used to determine the length of cannabis use preceding psychosis. Prevalence estimates at first episode psychosis and various time points of follow-up following first episode psychosis were analysed to determine odds ratio of continuing cannabis use. Data synthesis was performed using random-effects meta-analyses. The pooled estimate for the interval between initiation of regular cannabis use and age at onset of psychosis was 6.3 years (10 samples, standardised mean difference = 1.56, 95% confidence interval = [1.40, 1.72]). The estimated prevalence of cannabis use at first episode psychosis was 33.7% (35 samples, 95% confidence interval = [31%, 39%]). Odds of continued cannabis use between 6 months and 10 years following first episode psychosis was 0.56 (19 samples, 95% confidence interval = [0.40, 0.79]). © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  3. Psychometric evaluation of the Danish and Swedish Satisfaction with Life Scale in first episode psychosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hochwälder, Jacek; Mattsson, Maria; Holmqvist, Ragnhild

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To psychometrically evaluate the Satisfaction with Life Scale in two cohorts of first-episode psychosis patients in the Danish National Schizophrenia Project and in the Swedish Parachute Project. METHOD: Four properties of the Satisfaction with Life Scale were examined in the Danish cohort....... The dimensions were confirmed in the Swedish sample. CONCLUSION: The Satisfaction with Life Scale shows satisfactory psychometric properties and seems valid and useful among first-episode psychosis patients....... with Life Scale and various life conditions were investigated in the Swedish cohort. RESULTS: For both samples, the analysis indicated that the obtained four-dimensional 11-item scale had satisfactory properties. Moderately high scores were obtained in the four subscales: "living," "social relationships...

  4. Depression and quality of life in first-episode psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Renwick, Laoise

    2012-07-01

    Quality of life (QOL) has gained recognition as a valid measure of outcome in first-episode psychosis (FEP). This study aimed to determine the influence of specific groups of depressive symptoms on separate domains of subjectively appraised QOL.

  5. Rates of Homicide During the First Episode of Psychosis and After Treatment: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielssen, Olav; Large, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    The observation that almost half of the homicides committed by people with a psychotic illness occur before initial treatment suggests an increased risk of homicide during the first episode of psychosis. The aim of this study was to estimate the rates of homicide during the first episode of psychosis and after treatment. A systematic search located 10 studies that reported details of all the homicide offenders with a psychotic illness within a known population during a specified period and reported the number of people who had received treatment prior to the offense. Meta-analysis of these studies showed that 38.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 31.1%–46.5%) of homicides occurred during the first episode of psychosis, prior to initial treatment. Homicides during first-episode psychosis occurred at a rate of 1.59 homicides per 1000 (95% CI = 1.06–2.40), equivalent to 1 in 629 presentations. The annual rate of homicide after treatment for psychosis was 0.11 homicides per 1000 patients (95% CI = 0.07–0.16), equivalent to 1 homicide in 9090 patients with schizophrenia per year. The rate ratio of homicide in the first episode of psychosis in these studies was 15.5 (95% CI = 11.0–21.7) times the annual rate of homicide after treatment for psychosis. Hence, the rate of homicide in the first episode of psychosis appears to be higher than previously recognized, whereas the annual rate of homicide by patients with schizophrenia after treatment is lower than previous estimates. Earlier treatment of first-episode psychosis might prevent some homicides. PMID:18990713

  6. Suicidal behavior and mortality in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete; Madsen, Trine; Fedyszyn, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    risk in psychosis in Denmark decreased over time, most likely because of improved quality of inpatient and outpatient services. There is a high proportion of young people with first-episode psychosis who attempted suicide before their first contact with mental health services. This finding suggests...... in first-episode psychosis, and staff members should, in collaboration with the patients, monitor the risk of suicide and develop and revise crisis plans....

  7. Reducing the duration of untreated first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melle, Ingrid; Larsen, Tor K; Haahr, Ulrik

    2004-01-01

    Most studies on first-episode psychosis show an association between a long duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) and poorer short-term outcome, but the mechanisms of this relationship are poorly understood.......Most studies on first-episode psychosis show an association between a long duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) and poorer short-term outcome, but the mechanisms of this relationship are poorly understood....

  8. Polarity of the first episode and time to diagnosis of bipolar I disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Boseok; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Ha, Tae Hyon; Chang, Jae Seung; Ha, Kyooseob

    2009-06-01

    The current study explored the relationship between the polarity of the first episode and the timing of eventual diagnosis of bipolar I disorder, and associated clinical implications. Twelve years of clinical data from the medical records of 258 inpatients meeting DSM-III-R or DSM-IV criteria for bipolar I disorder were analyzed. Subjects were divided into two groups according to the polarity of the first episode: those with depressive polarity (FE-D), and those with manic polarity (FE-M). Comparisons were made between the two groups on variables associated with the timing of diagnosis and related outcomes. In population with bipolar I disorder, a significant longer time lapse from the first major mood episode to the confirmed diagnosis was associated with the FE-D group compared to the FE-M group [5.6 (+/-6.1) vs. 2.5 (+/-5.5) years, pschizophrenia and major depressive disorder while FE-M subjects tended to have prior diagnoses of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. A significantly higher rate of suicide attempts was associated with the FE-D group compared to the FE-M group (12.7 vs. 1.7%, pdepressive polarity is likely to be followed by a considerable delay until an eventual confirmed diagnosis of bipolar I disorder. Given that first-episode depressive patients are particularly vulnerable to unfavorable clinical outcomes such as suicide attempts, a more systematic approach is needed to differentiate bipolar disorder among depressed patients in their early stages.

  9. The economic cost of pathways to care in first episode psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Heslin, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have examined the economic cost of psychoses other than schizophrenia and there have been no studies of the economic cost of pathways to care in patients with their first episode of psychosis. The aims of this study were to explore the economic cost of pathways to care in patients with a first episode of psychosis and to examine variation in costs. Data on pathways to care for first episode psychosis patients referred to specialist mental health services in south-east London and Nottingham between 1997-2000. Costs of pathway events were estimated and compared between diagnostic groups. The average costs for patients in south-east London were £54 (CI £33-£75) higher, compared to patients in Nottingham. Across both centres unemployed patients had £25 (CI £7-£43) higher average costs compared to employed patients. Higher costs were associated with being unemployed and living in south-east London and these differences could not be accounted for by any single factor. This should be considered when the National Health Service (NHS) is making decisions about funding.

  10. Retrospective study on structural neuroimaging in first-episode psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Coentre

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. No consensus between guidelines exists regarding neuroimaging in first-episode psychosis. The purpose of this study is to assess anomalies found in structural neuroimaging exams (brain computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in the initial medical work-up of patients presenting first-episode psychosis. Methods. The study subjects were 32 patients aged 18–48 years (mean age: 29.6 years, consecutively admitted with first-episode psychosis diagnosis. Socio-demographic and clinical data and neuroimaging exams (CT and MRI were retrospectively studied. Diagnostic assessments were made using the Operational Criteria Checklist +. Neuroimaging images (CT and MRI and respective reports were analysed by an experienced consultant psychiatrist. Results. None of the patients had abnormalities in neuroimaging exams responsible for psychotic symptoms. Thirty-seven percent of patients had incidental brain findings not causally related to the psychosis (brain atrophy, arachnoid cyst, asymmetric lateral ventricles, dilated lateral ventricles, plagiocephaly and falx cerebri calcification. No further medical referral was needed for any of these patients. No significant differences regarding gender, age, diagnosis, duration of untreated psychosis, in-stay and cannabis use were found between patients who had neuroimaging abnormalities versus those without. Discussion. This study suggests that structural neuroimaging exams reveal scarce abnormalities in young patients with first-episode psychosis. Structural neuroimaging is especially useful in first-episode psychosis patients with neurological symptoms, atypical clinical picture and old age.

  11. Prevalence of item level negative symptoms in first episode psychosis diagnoses.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lyne, John

    2012-03-01

    The relevance of negative symptoms across the diagnostic spectrum of the psychoses remains uncertain. The purpose of this study was to report on prevalence of item and subscale level negative symptoms across the first episode psychosis (FEP) diagnostic spectrum in an epidemiological sample, and to ascertain whether items and subscales were more prevalent in a schizophrenia spectrum diagnoses group compared to an \\'all other psychotic diagnoses\\' group. We measured negative symptoms in 330 patients presenting with FEP using the Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), and ascertained diagnosis using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM IV. Prevalence of SANS items and subscales were tabulated across all psychotic diagnoses, and logistic regression analysis determined which items and subscales were predictive of schizophrenia spectrum diagnoses. SANS items were most prevalent in schizophrenia spectrum conditions but frequently presented in other FEP diagnoses, particularly substance induced psychotic disorder and Major Depressive Disorder. Brief psychotic disorder and bipolar disorders had low levels of negative symptoms. SANS items and subscales which significantly predicted schizophrenia spectrum diagnoses, were also frequently present in some of the other psychotic diagnoses. Conclusions: SANS items have high prevalence in FEP, and while commonest in schizophrenia spectrum conditions are not restricted to this diagnostic subgroup.

  12. Substance abuse in first-episode non-affective psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tor K; Melle, Ingrid; Auestad, Bjørn

    2006-01-01

    Abuse of alcohol and drugs is an important and clinically challenging aspect of first-episode psychosis. Only a few studies have been carried out on large-sized and reliably characterized samples. These are reviewed, and the results are compared with a sample of 300 first-episode psychosis patients...... recruited for the TIPS (Early Treatment and Identification of Psychosis) study from Norway and Denmark. Prevalence rates from the literature vary from 6% to 44% for drugs and 3% to 35% for alcohol. In our sample, 23% abused drugs and 15% abused alcohol during the last 6 months. When compared to non...... of patients abusing both drugs and alcohol had poor premorbid academic functioning from early childhood. Overall, drug and alcohol abuse are highly prevalent in contemporary first-episode psychosis samples. In our study, substance abuse comorbidity did not generate differences on diagnosis, duration...

  13. Patient satisfaction with treatment in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Ulrik; Simonsen, Erik; Røssberg, Jan Ivar

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine first-episode psychotic patients' satisfaction with elements of a comprehensive 2-year treatment program. Subjects and method: The TIPS (Early Treatment and Intervention in Psychosis) project provided a 2-year treatment program consisting of milieu therapy (inpatient), individ......Purpose: To examine first-episode psychotic patients' satisfaction with elements of a comprehensive 2-year treatment program. Subjects and method: The TIPS (Early Treatment and Intervention in Psychosis) project provided a 2-year treatment program consisting of milieu therapy (inpatient...... in satisfaction for specific interventions. In this sample of first-episode psychosis patients, there was general satisfaction with treatments based on one-to-one relationships while multi-family group intervention was consistently valued less enthusiastically....

  14. Measuring quality of life in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melle, I; Friis, Svein; Haahr, U

    2005-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) measures are increasingly recognized as necessary parts of outcome assessments in psychosis. The present paper is a comprehensive study of patients with first-episode psychosis where QoL is measured by the commonly used Lehman Quality of Life Interview (L-QoLI). The aim...... is to examine if the L-QoLI maintain its original structure when used in a group of patients with first-episode psychosis, and to investigate what determines global subjective QoL with a specific emphasis on premorbid adjustment, duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) and clinical symptoms. The study indicates......, abusing drugs, being depressed, having a diagnosis of psychotic affective disorder, having poor premorbid social adjustment and DUP over 10 weeks. The study supports the notion that patients with first-episode psychosis construct QoL in the same way as other groups, and that longer durations...

  15. Cognitive dysfunction at baseline predicts symptomatic 1-year outcome in first-episode schizophrenics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, S; Krausz, M; Gottwalz, E; Lambert, M; Perro, C; Ganzer, S; Naber, D

    2000-01-01

    The present study addresses the consequences of cognitive disturbances on symptomatic outcome. Fifty-three first-episode schizophrenics were reassessed (n = 32) 1 year after admission. Simple regression analyses revealed that several self-perceived cognitive deficits at baseline as measured with the Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire significantly predicted increased Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale global scores at follow-up (p = 0.05 to p = 0.005). A stepwise regression analysis proved memory dysfunction to be the strongest predictor of symptomatic worsening (p = 0.005). It is suggested that the exploration and treatment of neuropsychological deficits in schizophrenia is of great clinical importance with regard to its impact on both functional and symptomatic outcome in schizophrenia. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  16. Comparative Analysis of Theory of Mind Tests in First Episode Psychosis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Alexandra; Garakh, Zhanna; Bendova, Marie; Zaytseva, Yuliya

    2017-09-01

    The research is based on comparative analysis of 'Hinting Task', 'Faux Pas', and 'Reading the Mind in the Eyes' tests sensitivity in detection of Theory of Mind deficits. The study included 20 subjects with schizophrenia and schizophrenia spectrum disorders with the first episode of psychosis. Every subject performed the three proposed tests. It was shown that success rate of the three tests differed significantly. The non-verbal test 'Reading the Mind in the Eyes' caused the most difficulties. The success rate percentage of this test performance correlated negatively with the severity of psychopathological symptoms evaluated according to the PANSS scale. Thus, 'Reading the Mind in the Eyes' test is the most sensitive out of the three to Theory of Mind deficits detection, which may be used for diagnostic purposes.

  17. Diagnostic Stability of ICD/DSM First Episode Psychosis Diagnoses: Meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Cappucciati, Marco; Rutigliano, Grazia; Heslin, Margaret; Stahl, Daniel; Brittenden, Zera; Caverzasi, Edgardo; McGuire, Philip; Carpenter, William T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Validity of current International Classification of Disease/Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (ICD/DSM) first episode psychosis diagnoses is essential in clinical practice, research, training and public health. Method: We provide a meta-analytical estimate of prospective diagnostic stability and instability in ICD-10 or DSM-IV first episode diagnoses of functional psychoses. Independent extraction by multiple observers. Random effect meta-analysis conducted with the “metaprop,” “metaninf,” “metafunnel,” “metabias,” and “metareg” packages of STATA13.1. Moderators were tested with meta-regression analyses. Heterogeneity was assessed with the I 2 index. Sensitivity analyses tested robustness of results. Publication biases were assessed with funnel plots and Egger’s test. Findings: 42 studies and 45 samples were included, for a total of 14 484 first episode patients and an average follow-up of 4.5 years. Prospective diagnostic stability ranked: schizophrenia 0.90 (95% CI 0.85–0.95), affective spectrum psychoses 0.84 (95% CI 0.79–0.89), schizoaffective disorder 0.72 (95% CI 0.61–0.73), substance-induced psychotic disorder 0.66 (95% CI 0.51–0.81), delusional disorder 0.59 (95% CI 0.47–0.71), acute and transient psychotic disorder/brief psychotic disorder 0.56 (95% CI 0.62–0.60), psychosis not otherwise specified 0.36 (95% CI 0.27–0.45, schizophreniform disorder 0.29 (95% CI 0.22–0.38). Diagnostic stability within schizophrenia spectrum psychoses was 0.93 (95% CI 0.89–0.97); changes to affective spectrum psychoses were 0.05 (95% CI 0.01–0.08). About 0.10 (95% CI 0.05–0.15) of affective spectrum psychoses changed to schizophrenia spectrum psychosis. Across the other psychotic diagnoses there was high diagnostic instability, mostly to schizophrenia. Interpretation: There is meta-analytical evidence for high prospective diagnostic stability in schizophrenia spectrum and affective spectrum psychoses

  18. Is deterioration of IQ a feature of first episode psychosis and how can we measure it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Jennifer A; Wiffen, Benjamin D R; Reichenberg, Abraham; Aas, Monica; Falcone, M Aurora; Russo, Manuela; Sood, Poonam Gardner; Taylor, Heather; David, Anthony S

    2012-05-01

    Estimates of pre-morbid IQ are widely used to measure the trajectory of cognitive function and decline in people with schizophrenia. This study examined the usefulness of two indices of decline to identify cognitive subtypes in first episode psychosis, and to determine the specificity of non-IQ neuropsychological impairments in this population. Neuropsychological data were collected from 118 first episode psychosis patients and compared to 118 epidemiologically matched controls. The National Adult Reading Test (NART) and the Information subtest of the WAIS-III were compared as indicators of crystallised intelligence or 'pre-morbid IQ'. Measurement of NART minus current full scale IQ (FSIQ) (where 10 points discrepancy is the decline criterion) did not reveal a large group of individuals with 'deteriorating' IQ patterns. Using the Information subtest and the same decline criteria, a 'deteriorating' patient group emerged (36%) but was matched by a larger 'deteriorating' control group (45%). The 'deteriorating' patient group performed at a low IQ level for tasks that loaded highly on performance ability but a relatively high level for tasks measuring verbal skills. Verbal memory discriminated patients from controls better than IQ. Compared to controls, patients showed large selective impairments of verbal episodic memory (effect size, d=1.4) These data suggest that in first episode populations, caution should be exercised in inferring deterioration of IQ from discrepancies between reading-based and other IQ tests. Rather, sub-groups of patients and controls do show greater verbal aptitude in comparison to performance skills. Memory is generally impaired in first episode patients regardless of IQ. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Phenomenology of Emotion Experience in First-Episode Psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vodušek, V V; Parnas, J; Tomori, M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although it has been suggested that disturbances in emotion experience and regulation play a central role in the aetiology and psychopathology of schizophrenia spectrum disorders, the phenomenology of emotion experience in schizophrenia remains under-researched. SAMPLING AND METHODS: ...

  20. Relationship between substance abuse and first-episode psychosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Co-morbidity between substance abuse and psychotic disorders is high. Few studies have examined the relationship between first-episode psychosis and substance abuse. Several questions emerge from this common relationship and many of them remain unanswered . Objectives. To determine the effect of ...

  1. Cannabis use and family history in adolescent first episode ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To investigate the clinical correlates of cannabis use in adolescents with first episode psychosis (FEP). Methods: Inpatient psychiatric records provided demographic, lifetime cannabis use, family history of mental illness, and clinical data on 45 FEP adolescents, aged 12–18 years, admitted to a psychiatric unit in ...

  2. First-episode psychosis: An update | Chiliza | South African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interest in the subject of first-episode psychosis has increased considerably in the last two decades. At present, a number of centres around the world focus on early identification and intervention in people with psychotic disorders. Researchers have focused particularly on people who are possibly experiencing the ...

  3. White Matter Changes in First Episode Psychosis and their Relation to the Size of Sample Studied: A DTI Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Melicher, T.; Horáček, J.; Hlinka, Jaroslav; Španiel, F.; Tintěra, J.; Ibrahim, I.; Mikoláš, P.; Novák, T.; Mohr, P.; Höschl, C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 162, 1-3 (2015), s. 22-28 ISSN 0920-9964 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-23940S Grant - others:GA UK(CZ) 1392213 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : first episode psychosis * schizophrenia * diffusion tensor imaging * Tract-Based Spatial Statistics * fractional anisotropy Subject RIV: FL - Psychiatry, Sexuology Impact factor: 4.453, year: 2015

  4. Positive and negative caregiver experiences in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Jens Einar; Lysaker, Paul H.; Harder, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Objectives While caregivers of persons with first-episode psychosis often report a range of negative experiences, little is known about what psychological factors are involved. The aim of this study was to examine how caregivers' general wellbeing, emotional overinvolvement and metacognition...... influenced their reports of both positive and negative caregiving experiences. Design A prospective consecutive cross-sectional study. Methods Forty caregivers of patients with first-episode psychosis were interviewed using semi-structured interview and questionnaires. Results Greater levels of distress...... and overinvolvement were associated with more negative experiences of caregiving while greater metacognitive capacity was associated with more positive experiences of caregiving. Conclusions The experience of positive and negative aspects of caregiving seems to be associated with different variables. Greater...

  5. Future-directed thinking in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodby, Emmeline; MacLeod, Andrew K

    2016-06-01

    This study employed the Future Thinking Task (MacLeod et al., 2005, Br. J. Clin. Psychol., 44, 495) to investigate whether future-directed thinking in first-episode psychosis is significantly different from that of matched controls, and to identify its correlates in this patient group. Cross-sectional, mixed-model, case-control design. Participants were 30 patients with first-episode psychosis and 27 matched controls. The Future Thinking Task was used to assess future-directed thinking in both groups. Anxiety and depression were also measured as well as self-report measures of hopelessness, suicide ideation and a measure of negative symptoms. Individuals with psychosis were impaired in future-directed thinking in both positive and negative domains, particularly with respect to the coming year. Increased self-reported hopelessness was associated with reduced positive future thinking and increased negative future thinking. Increased positive future thinking was also associated with reduced severity of negative symptoms, whilst negative future thinking was associated with suicide ideation. Individuals with first-episode psychosis show a reduction in positive future thinking in line with that seen in other clinical groups, but this is accompanied by an unexpected reduction in negative future thinking. The findings suggest a general disengagement with the future in this group that may affect recovery and functioning. Individuals with first-episode psychosis may benefit from interventions to help them engage with their future, in particular in the mid-range, up to 1 year. The Future Thinking Task may be a helpful addition to the assessment of suicide risk in those with first-episode psychosis. Decreased positive future thinking was associated with increased severity of negative symptoms, indicating a potential new treatment angle for this resistant aspect of psychosis. The cross-sectional design of this study does not allow for conclusions about the causal relationship

  6. Psychosis: clinical insight and beliefs in immigrants in their first episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Akiah Ottesen; Barrett, Elizabeth Ann; Nerhus, Mari; Büchman, Camilla; Simonsen, Carmen; Faerden, Ann; Andreassen, Ole A; Melle, Ingrid

    2018-04-01

    Lack of insight into illness is frequent in psychotic disorders and seen as part of their primary pathology. The recognition of symptoms as psychotic, and beliefs about treatment alternatives, is also influenced by socio-cultural factors. Here we examined clinical insight into illness and beliefs about psychosis in immigrants in their first episode of psychosis compared with a reference group. A total of 277 first-episode psychosis participants were recruited to this cross-sectional study; 40 first- and 40 second-generation immigrants from Europe, Americas and Oceania (n = 37), Asia including Turkey (n = 28) or Africa (n = 15). The Birchwood Insight Scale was used to measure clinical insight and 'The Attitudes and Beliefs about Mental Health Problems' schizophrenia version to assess socio-cultural beliefs. Immigrants did not differ from the reference sample in clinical insight. After controlling for education level, first-generation immigrants were less likely to recognize psychotic symptoms (odds ratio (OR) 2.9; Wald = 8.977, degrees of freedom (d.f.) 1, P = 0.003) and viewed hospitalization (OR 5.2; Wald = 20.388, d.f. 1, P = 0.001) and treatment by a psychiatrist (OR 4.9; Wald = 6.609, d.f. 1, P = 0.01)) as less beneficial than the reference group. Immigrants from Asia held more alternative explanations (OR 0.3; Wald = 6.567, d.f. 1, P = 0.010). There were significantly stronger associations between clinical insight and socio-cultural beliefs in the reference group. Socio-cultural beliefs about psychosis in immigrants in first-episode psychosis call for more tailored information to this group, and emphasize the importance of treatment interventions involving both a cultural and personal perspective of insight. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Psychometric evaluation of the Danish and Swedish Satisfaction with Life Scale in first episode psychosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochwälder, Jacek; Mattsson, Maria; Holmqvist, Ragnhild; Cullberg, Johan; Rosenbaum, Bent

    2013-04-01

    To psychometrically evaluate the Satisfaction with Life Scale in two cohorts of first-episode psychosis patients in the Danish National Schizophrenia Project and in the Swedish Parachute Project. Four properties of the Satisfaction with Life Scale were examined in the Danish cohort (explorative investigation) and then confirmed in the Swedish cohort: (1) the factor structure; (2) correlations between subscales; (3) internal consistencies of subscales; and (4) main tendencies (arithmetic means) and variations (standard deviations) of subscales. The relations between the Satisfaction with Life Scale and various life conditions were investigated in the Swedish cohort. For both samples, the analysis indicated that the obtained four-dimensional 11-item scale had satisfactory properties. Moderately high scores were obtained in the four subscales: "living," "social relationships," "self and present life" and "work." They correlated positively with each other, the internal consistencies of the subscales were acceptable and the means for the subscales indicated no apparent floor or ceiling effects. The four dimensions obtained seem relevant and presented good face validity. The dimensions were confirmed in the Swedish sample. The Satisfaction with Life Scale shows satisfactory psychometric properties and seems valid and useful among first-episode psychosis patients.

  8. Fewer neurological soft signs among first episode psychosis patients with heavy cannabis use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Veguilla, Miguel; Gurpegui, Manuel; Barrigón, María Luisa; Ferrín, Maite; Marín, Esther; Rubio, José Luis; Gutiérrez, Blanca; Pintor, Antonio; Cervilla, Jorge

    2009-02-01

    Although neurological soft signs (NSS) have been consistently associated with schizophrenia and a variety of risk factors, few studies have focused on the association between NSS and environmental factors such as cannabis use, particularly in patients with first episode psychosis. We administered the Neurological Evaluation Scale (NES) to 92 patients during their first episode of functional psychosis. Psychopathology was assessed with the Positive And Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the family history of psychotic disorder was established on the basis of the Family Interview for Genetic Studies (FIGS). We also assessed lifetime cannabis and cocaine use utilizing that specific section of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. The outcome variable was the presence of high NSS, defined by a score above the median split of the NES score (>21). Most patients (80/92, 87%) presented a non-affective psychosis. The presence of high NSS showed a significant independent association with not having been a heavy cannabis user (OR=8.3; 95% CI, 2.4-33.3), family history of psychosis (OR=4.3; 95% CI, 1.2-14.9), male sex (OR=4.0; 95% CI, 1.2-14.0), lower score in verbal fluency and higher score in negative symptoms (both ppsychosis may exist, including neurological premorbid alteration and environmental cannabis abuse.

  9. Abnormal movements in first-episode, nonaffective psychosis: dyskinesias, stereotypies, and catatonic-like signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Michael T; Fantes, Francisco; Wan, Claire Ramsay; Johnson, Stephanie; Walker, Elaine F

    2015-03-30

    Motor abnormalities represent a neurobehavioral domain of signs intrinsic to schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, though they are commonly attributed to medication side effects and remain understudied. Individuals with first-episode psychosis represent an ideal group to study innate movement disorders due to minimal prior antipsychotic exposure. We measured dyskinesias, stereotypies, and catatonic-like signs and examined their associations with: (1) age at onset of psychotic symptoms and duration of untreated psychosis; (2) positive, negative, and disorganized symptoms; (3) neurocognition; and (4) neurological soft signs. Among 47 predominantly African American first-episode psychosis patients in a public-sector hospital, the presence and severity of dyskinesias, stereotypies, and catatonic-like features were assessed using approximately 30-min video recordings. Movement abnormalities were rated utilizing three scales (Dyskinesia Identification System Condensed User Scale, Stereotypy Checklist, and Catatonia Rating Scale). Correlational analyses were conducted. Scores for each of three movement abnormality types were modestly inter-correlated (r=0.29-0.40). Stereotypy score was significantly associated with age at onset of psychotic symptoms (r=0.32) and positive symptom severity scores (r=0.29-0.41). There were no meaningful or consistent associations with negative symptom severity, neurocognition, or neurological soft signs. Abnormal movements appear to represent a relatively distinct phenotypic domain deserving of further research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Emotional Intelligence in a Group of Patients with First-Episode Psychosis in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Pooretemad

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to evaluate the Emotional Intelligence (EI of a group of patients with first episode psychosis in Iran as compared with a healthy control group. A case-control design was used. EI was assessed using Persian version of Bar-On Emotional Quotient inventory (EQ-i administered on 25 patients with history of a single psychotic episode in the last two years, as well as 64 healthy participants. The mean (±SD of EI scores of patients and healthy controls group was 319.8 (±40.9 and 328.8 (±33.3, respectively. Two-independent sample t-test revealed no significant difference in the EI scores of two groups (P=0.29. In contrast with chronic schizophrenia, the patients with first-episode psychosis were not different from the healthy subjects in terms of emotional intelligence score. It might be implied that the low emotional intelligence of the patients with chronic psychotic disorders is an accumulative result of the underlying disease over time.

  11. Childhood trauma and cognitive function in first-episode affective and non-affective psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aas, Monica; Dazzan, Paola; Fisher, Helen L; Morgan, Craig; Morgan, Kevin; Reichenberg, Abraham; Zanelli, Jolanta; Fearon, Paul; Jones, Peter B; Murray, Robin M; Pariante, Carmine M

    2011-06-01

    A history of childhood trauma is reportedly more prevalent in people suffering from psychosis than in the general population. Childhood trauma has also been linked to cognitive abnormalities in adulthood, and cognitive abnormalities, in turn, are one of the key clinical features of psychosis. Therefore, this study investigated whether there was a relationship between childhood trauma and cognitive function in patients with first-episode psychosis. The potential impact of diagnosis (schizophrenia or affective psychosis) and gender on this association was also examined. Data were available for 138 first-episode psychosis patients and 138 geographically-matched controls recruited from a catchment area based organisation. History of childhood trauma was obtained using the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire. Cognitive function was assessed through a comprehensive and standardised neuropsychological test battery. A history of childhood trauma was associated with worse cognitive performances, predominantly in affective psychoses, and in male patients. No association between a history of childhood trauma and cognition was found amongst female patients, or female controls. The results need replication, but underline the necessity of investigating biological and psychosocial mechanisms underlying these subjects' sensitivity to the negative effect of childhood stress. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Suicide risk in first episode psychosis: A selective review of the current literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pompili, Maurizio; Serafini, Gianluca; Innamorati, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have confirmed that the risk of suicide in patients with first-episode psychosis (FEP) is high, and high rates of premature mortality, particularly from suicide, may occur in the early phases of schizophrenia. However, suicide rates are difficult to measure in FEP patients, even...... in carefully defined samples, and there is relatively little specific information about the risk of suicide at illness onset or retrospectively concerning the untreated psychotic period. This selected review of the literature investigates suicidal behaviour with particular regard to severe suicidality (plans...... and attempts) and risk factors associated with suicide in FEP patients. A search was performed to identify all papers and book chapters during the period 1965-2010, and approximately 100 studies met the inclusion criteria. Most of evidence suggests that risk of suicidal behaviour is relatively high in FEP...

  13. Neuropsychological functioning in early-onset first-episode psychosis: comparison of diagnostic subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabala, Arantzazu; Rapado, Marta; Arango, Celso; Robles, Olalla; de la Serna, Elena; González, Cristina; Rodríguez-Sánchez, José Manuel; Andrés, Patricia; Mayoral, María; Bombín, Igor

    2010-04-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the nature and extent of cognitive impairment in first-episode early-onset psychosis (FE-EOP) soon after their stabilisation and to search for potential differences according to specific diagnostic sub-groups of patients. As part of a Spanish multicentre longitudinal study, 107 FE-EOP patients and 98 healthy controls were assessed on the following cognitive domains: attention, working memory, executive functioning, and verbal learning and memory. Three diagnostic categories were established in the patient sample: schizophrenia (n = 36), bipolar disorder (n = 19), and other psychosis (n = 52). Patients performed significantly worse than controls in all cognitive domains. The three diagnostic sub-groups did not differ in terms of impaired/preserved cognitive functions or degree of impairment. FE-EOP patients show significant cognitive impairment that, during this early phase, seems to be non-specific to differential diagnosis.

  14. Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... local NAMI About NAMI + x IN THIS SECTION Esquizofrenia Share NAMI Share Home Learn More Mental Health Conditions Schizophrenia IN THIS SECTION Esquizofrenia Schizophrenia Overview Treatment Support Discuss Schizophrenia is a ...

  15. Subjective quality of life in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardsjord, Erlend Strand; Romm, Kristin Lie; Friis, Svein

    2016-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Subjective quality of life (S-QoL) is an important outcome measure in first episode psychosis (FEP). The aims of this study were to describe S-QoL-development the first 10-years in FEP patients and to identify predictors of this development. METHODS: A representative sample of 272...... analysis, increased daily activities and a decrease in depressive symptoms were associated with a positive S-QoL-development. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment of depressive symptoms and measures aimed at increasing daily activities seem important to improve S-QoL in patients with psychosis. More contact with family...

  16. Intrinsic motivation and amotivation in first episode and prolonged psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Lauren; Lysaker, Paul H; Firmin, Ruth L; Breier, Alan; Vohs, Jenifer L

    2015-12-01

    The deleterious functional implications of motivation deficits in psychosis have generated interest in examining dimensions of the construct. However, there remains a paucity of data regarding whether dimensions of motivation differ over the course of psychosis. Therefore, this study examined two motivation dimensions, trait-like intrinsic motivation, and the negative symptom of amotivation, and tested the impact of illness phase on the 1) levels of these dimensions and 2) relationship between these dimensions. Participants with first episode psychosis (FEP; n=40) and prolonged psychosis (n=66) completed clinician-rated measures of intrinsic motivation and amotivation. Analyses revealed that when controlling for group differences in gender and education, the FEP group had significantly more intrinsic motivation and lower amotivation than the prolonged psychosis group. Moreover, intrinsic motivation was negatively correlated with amotivation in both FEP and prolonged psychosis, but the magnitude of the relationship did not statistically differ between groups. These findings suggest that motivation deficits are more severe later in the course of psychosis and that low intrinsic motivation may be partially independent of amotivation in both first episode and prolonged psychosis. Clinically, these results highlight the importance of targeting motivation in early intervention services. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Ten year neurocognitive trajectories in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barder, Helene E; Sundet, Kjetil; Rund, Bjørn R

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Neurocognitive impairment is commonly reported at onset of psychotic disorders. However, the long-term neurocognitive course remains largely uninvestigated in first episode psychosis (FEP) and the relationship to clinically significant subgroups even more so. We report 10 year longitud......Objective: Neurocognitive impairment is commonly reported at onset of psychotic disorders. However, the long-term neurocognitive course remains largely uninvestigated in first episode psychosis (FEP) and the relationship to clinically significant subgroups even more so. We report 10 year...... longitudinal neurocognitive development in a sample of FEP patients, and explore whether the trajectories of cognitive course are related to presence of relapse to psychosis, especially within the first year, with a focus on the course of verbal memory. Method: Forty-three FEP subjects (51% male, 28 ± 9 years...... of illness. We conclude that worsening of specific parts of cognitive function may be expected for patients with on-going psychosis, but that the majority of patients do not show significant change in cognitive performance during the first 10 years after being diagnosed....

  18. Very Low-Dose Risperidone in First-Episode Psychosis: A Safe and Effective Way to Initiate Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick D. McGorry

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients experiencing a first psychotic episode have high rates of extrapyramidal symptoms (EPSs when treated with the doses of neuroleptics used in multiepisode or chronic schizophrenia. There is some evidence that lower doses may be equally, if not more, effective but less toxic in this population. Here, we report the results of a biphasic open label trial designed to assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of low-dose (2–4 mg/day risperidone treatment in a group of 96 first-episode nonaffective psychosis patients. At the end of the trial, 62% of patients met the response criteria although approximately 80% had achieved a response at some time during the study. Reports of EPS remained low, and there were no dystonic reactions. We conclude that even at a dose of 2 mg/day, risperidone was highly effective in reducing acute symptomatology in a real world sample of young first-episode psychosis patients.

  19. Verbal memory improvement in first-episode psychosis APOE-ε4 carriers: a pleiotropic effect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vila-Rodriguez F

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Fidel Vila-Rodriguez,1 Donna J Lang,2 Heather Baitz,3 Kristina Gicas,3 Allen E Thorton,3 Thomas S Ehmann,1 Geoff N Smith,1 Alasdair M Barr,4 Ivan J Torres,1 Lili C Kopala,1 G William MacEwan,1 Daniel J Müller,5 James L Kennedy,5 William G Honer11Department of Psychiatry, 2Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, 3Department of Psychology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, 4Department of Anesthesiology, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, 5Department of Psychiatry, Centre for Mental Health and Addictions, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CanadaBackground: Verbal memory impairment is a core feature in schizophrenia even at early stages of the disease, but its etiopathogenesis is not fully understood. The APOE-ε4 is the main genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease. Our primary goal was to ascertain whether APOE-ε4 status had a pleiotropic effect in early stages of the illness.Participants and methods: A total of 86 first-episode psychosis (FEP outpatients and 39 healthy volunteers were recruited. Demographic and clinical data, APOE genotyping, and a neuropsychological test battery including the California Verbal Learning Test – second edition (CVLT-II were administered and assessed at study entry and at 1-year follow-up. Data were analyzed using mixed-model repeated measures, where the dependent variable was verbal memory indexed by California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT Trials 1–5 total recall score.Results: FEP-APOE-ε4 carriers and FEP-APOE-ε4 noncarriers had similar symptom severity, clinical outcomes, premorbid and current intelligence quotient, and exposure to antipsychotics. There was a main effect of group on CVLT 1–5 (FEP =43.30 vs control =58.25; F[1, 119.7]=42.97; P<0.001 as well as an APOE-ε4 by group by time (F[4, 116.2]=2.73, P=0.033 interaction with only FEP-APOE-ε4 carriers showing improved verbal

  20. Integrated treatment ameliorates negative symptoms in first episode psychosis--results from the Danish OPUS trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Anne Amalie Elgaard; Petersen, L; Jeppesen, P

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the effect of integrated treatment on negative, psychotic and disorganised symptoms in patients with first episode psychosis.......To investigate the effect of integrated treatment on negative, psychotic and disorganised symptoms in patients with first episode psychosis....

  1. Spontaneous dyskinesia in first-episode psychosis in a Southeast Asian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jimmy; Poon, Lye-Yin; Chong, Siow-Ann

    2008-10-01

    Spontaneous dyskinesia in first-episode psychosis was described previously with varying incidence rates ranging from zero to 53%. Dyskinesia was also found to be more common in siblings of patients with both schizophrenia and dyskinesia. This condition was linked with structural brain abnormalities and posited to be another subtype of schizophrenia with striatal pathology. Whether there are ethnic variations in the rates of spontaneous dyskinesia is unknown because of the paucity of studies in this area. This study aims to establish the rates of spontaneous dyskinesia in a Southeast Asian population of drug-naive patients experiencing their first psychotic episode and to examine the clinical correlates. A total of 908 patients were examined, of which, 76.1% were Chinese; 15.4%, Malays; 6.2%, Indians; and 2.3%, from other minor ethnic groups. Schizophrenia was diagnosed in 48.9% of the population. There were 3 patients of Chinese descent who had "minimal" or "mild" dyskinetic movements when rated with the Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale, but none fulfilled the Schooler and Kane criteria for spontaneous dyskinesia. Their dyskinetic movements resolved when reassessed 3 and 6 months after treatment with antipsychotic medications. Of the 3 patients, 2 were treatment resistant and subsequently treated with clozapine. This is the largest study to date examining the prevalence of spontaneous dyskinesia. We hypothesize that there is an ethnically based difference in the rates of spontaneous dyskinesia that could reflect underlying genetic variations. Patients with dyskinetic movements at baseline could have a more treatment refractory course of illness.

  2. Metacognition, social cognition, and symptoms in patients with first episode and prolonged psychoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohs, J L; Lysaker, P H; Francis, M M; Hamm, J; Buck, K D; Olesek, K; Outcalt, J; Dimaggio, G; Leonhardt, B; Liffick, E; Mehdiyoun, N; Breier, A

    2014-03-01

    While it has been documented that persons with prolonged schizophrenia have deficits in metacognition and social cognition, it is less clear whether these difficulties are already present during a first episode. To explore this issue we assessed and compared metacognition using the Metacognition Assessment Scale-Abbreviated (MAS-A) and social cognition using the Eyes, Hinting and Bell-Lysaker Emotional Recognition Tests (BLERT) in participants with first episode psychosis (FEP; n=26), participants with a prolonged psychosis (n=72), and a psychiatric control group consisting of persons with a substance use disorder and no history of psychosis (n=14). Analyses revealed that both psychosis cohorts scored lower than controls on the MAS-A total and all subscales except metacognitive mastery. Compared to the FEP group, the persons with prolonged psychosis demonstrated greater metacognitive capacities only in those MAS-A domains reflective of the ability to understand the mental state of others and to see that others may have motivations and desires separate from their own. Other domains of metacognition did not differ between psychosis groups. The Eyes, Hinting and BLERT scores of the two psychosis groups did not differ but were poorer than those produced by the control group. Exploratory correlations in the FEP group showed a pattern similar to that previously observed in prolonged psychosis. Taken together, these findings suggest that while certain domains of metacognition could improve with prolonged psychosis, difficulties with global metacognition and social cognition may be stable features of the disorder and perhaps unique to psychosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schizophrenia is a serious brain illness. People who have it may hear voices that aren't there. ... job or take care of themselves. Symptoms of schizophrenia usually start between ages 16 and 30. Men ...

  4. “Everyone Needs a Friend Sometimes” – Social Predictors of Long-term Remission In first Episode psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jone Bjornestad

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPredictors of long-term symptomatic remission are crucial to the successful tailoring of treatment in first episode psychosis. There is lack of studies distinguishing the predictive effects of different social factors. This prevents a valid evaluating of their independent effects.ObjectivesTo test specific social baseline predictors of long-term remission. We hypothesized that first, satisfaction with social relations predicts remission; second, that frequency of social interaction predicts remission; and third, that the effect of friend relationship satisfaction and frequency will be greater than that of family relations satisfaction and frequency.Material and MethodsA sample of first episode psychosis (n=186 completed baseline measures of social functioning, as well as clinical assessments. We compared groups of remitted and non-remitted individuals using generalized estimating equations analyses.ResultsFrequency of social interaction with friends was a significant positive predictor of remission over a two-year period. Neither global perceived social satisfaction nor frequency of family interaction showed significant effects. ConclusionsThe study findings are of particular clinical importance since frequency of friendship interaction is a possibly malleable factor. Frequency of interaction could be affected through behavioral modification and therapy already from an early stage in the course, and thus increase remission rates.KeywordsFirst-Episode Psychosis, Schizophrenia, Social factors, Baseline predictors, Long-term remission.

  5. Prolactin concentrations in antipsychotic-naïve patients with schizophrenia and related disorders: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Blanco, Leticia; Greenhalgh, Anne Marie D; Garcia-Rizo, Clemente; Fernandez-Egea, Emilio; Miller, Brian J; Kirkpatrick, Brian

    2016-07-01

    The use of dopaminergic antagonist antipsychotics is associated with hyperprolactinemia, but some studies have found increased prolactin concentrations in antipsychotic-naive patients with schizophrenia and related disorders. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies of prolactin in antipsychotic-naïve patient with these disorders (PRISMA No. CRD42015016337). PubMed (Medline), PsycInfo, and Web of Science were searched for articles from 1950 to the present in English. Seven studies of males (N=141 for patients, N=191 for control subjects) and five studies of females (N=67 and N=116) met criteria for inclusion: data on blood prolactin concentrations for both control subjects and antipsychotic-naive patients with schizophrenia or a related disorder, with data available separately for males and females. Data was extracted from the papers by one author and independently verified by a second. The mean effect size for males was 1.02 (95% CI, 0.77, 1.26; pprolactin levels in both male and female antipsychotic-naïve patients with schizophrenia and related disorders. The small number of studies and limited matching for potentially confounding variables in some of the studies were limitations of this analysis. Prolonged hyperprolactinemia may lead to sexual dysfunction and osteoporosis, and some antipsychotics cause additional elevation of prolactin concentrations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Peripheral endocannabinoid system dysregulation in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioque, Miquel; García-Bueno, Borja; Macdowell, Karina S; Meseguer, Ana; Saiz, Pilar A; Parellada, Mara; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Roberto; Lobo, Antonio; Leza, Juan C; Bernardo, Miguel

    2013-12-01

    Several hypotheses involving alterations of the immune system have been proposed among etiological explanations for psychotic disorders. The endocannabinoid system (ECS) has a homeostatic role as an endogenous neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory system. Alterations of this system have been associated with psychosis. Cannabis use is a robust risk factor for these disorders that could alter the ECS signalling. In this study, 95 patients with a first episode of psychosis (FEP) and 90 healthy controls were recruited. Protein expression of cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), the protein levels of the main endocannabinoid synthesizing enzymes N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase (NAPE) and diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL), and of degradation enzymes fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) were determined by western blot analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Patients with a FEP showed a decreased expression of CB2 and of both endocannabinoids synthesizing enzymes (NAPE and DAGL) in comparison to healthy controls. After controlling for age, gender, body mass index, and cannabis use, NAPE and DAGL expression remained significantly decreased, whereas FAAH and MAGL expression were increased. On the other hand, FEP subjects with history of severe cannabis use showed a larger ECS dysregulation compared with healthy controls. These results indicate an ECS dysregulation in PBMC of FEP patients. The alteration of the ECS presented at the initial phases of psychosis could be contributing to the pathophysiology of the disease and constitutes a possible biomarker of psychotic disorders and an interesting pharmacological target to take into account for therapeutic purposes.

  7. Childhood adversities and clinical symptomatology in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Maija; Mäntylä, Teemu; Rikandi, Eva; Torniainen-Holm, Minna; Morales-Muñoz, Isabel; Kieseppä, Tuula; Mantere, Outi; Suvisaari, Jaana

    2017-12-01

    In addition to severe traumatic experiences, milder, more common childhood adversities reflecting psychosocial burden may also be common in people with psychotic disorders and have an effect on symptomatology and functioning. We explored eleven negative childhood experiences and their influence on clinical symptoms among young adults with first-episode psychosis (FEP, n = 75) and matched population controls (n = 51). Individuals with FEP reported more adversities than controls. Specifically serious conflicts within the family, bullying at school, maternal mental health problems, and one's own and parents' serious illness during childhood were experienced by the patients more often than by controls. In the FEP group, the severity of adversity was associated with increased anxiety, manic, and obsessive-compulsive symptoms, but not with the severity of positive psychotic symptoms. Adversity produced a more pronounced effect on symptoms in male patients than in female patients. To conclude, in line with earlier studies of more chronic psychosis, a majority of the participants with FEP reported exposure to childhood adversities, with the FEP group reporting more adversities than controls. High levels of mood and anxiety symptoms in patients with FEP may be related to cumulative exposure to childhood adversities. This should be taken into account in the treatment for FEP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevalence of psychotic and non-psychotic disorders in relatives of patients with a first episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faridi, Kia; Pawliuk, Nicole; King, Suzanne; Joober, Ridha; Malla, Ashok K

    2009-10-01

    Family members of individuals with schizophrenia suffer from elevated rates of schizophrenia-spectrum disorders (SSD) and other forms of psychopathology. However, few studies have examined familial psychopathology in probands with a first episode of psychosis (FEP). We systematically evaluated family history in patients experiencing an affective or non-affective FEP. The Family Interview for Genetic Studies was used to obtain diagnostic information on all first- and second-degree relatives of probands admitted to a specialized FEP program. Probands were 94 previously untreated patients suffering from a first-episode of affective or schizophrenia spectrum psychosis, aged 14 to 30. The interview ascertained diagnoses of psychotic disorders, affective disorders, substance-use disorders (SUD), and schizophrenia-related personality disorders. One in five probands (19.1%) had a history of psychosis among their first-degree relatives, while 34.0% had any relative with psychosis. Fewer probands had a family history of SSD (7.4% with a first-degree history and 18.1% with a history among any relatives). Over half (53.2%) of probands had a first-degree relative with Major Depressive Disorder, and 38.3% had a first-degree relative with a SUD. Overall, 69.9% of probands had a first-degree relative with a mental disorder. The proportion of probands with a family history of any of these diagnoses did not vary by proband diagnosis (affective or SS Psychosis), though probands with co-morbid SUD were more likely to have a family history of substance abuse. Diverse psychopathology is commonly present in families of FEP patients and may imply a generalized vulnerability to psychiatric disorders to be greater in such families compared to specific vulnerability to SS or affective psychosis. These findings may also have implications for provision of care for the probands.

  9. Mnemonic Discrimination Deficits in First-Episode Psychosis and a Ketamine Model Suggests Dentate Gyrus Pathology Linked to N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Hypofunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraguljac, Nina Vanessa; Carle, Matthew; Frölich, Michael A; Tran, Steve; Yassa, Michael A; White, David Matthew; Reddy, Abhishek; Lahti, Adrienne Carol

    2018-03-01

    Converging evidence from neuroimaging and postmortem studies suggests that hippocampal subfields are differentially affected in schizophrenia. Recent studies report dentate gyrus dysfunction in chronic schizophrenia, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here we sought to examine if this deficit is already present in first-episode psychosis, and if N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor hypofunction, a putative central pathophysiological mechanism in schizophrenia, experimentally induced by ketamine, would result in a similar abnormality. We applied a mnemonic discrimination task selectively taxing pattern separation in two experiments: 1) a group of 23 first-episode psychosis patients and 23 matched healthy volunteers and 2) a group of 19 healthy volunteers before and during a ketamine challenge (0.27 mg/kg over 10 minutes, then 0.25 mg/kg/hour for 50 minutes, 0.01 mL/s). We calculated response bias-corrected pattern separation and recognition scores. We also examined the relationships between task performance and symptom severity as well as ketamine levels. We report a deficit in pattern separation but not recognition performance in first-episode psychosis patients compared with healthy volunteers (p = .04) and in volunteers during the ketamine challenge compared with baseline (p = .003). Exploratory analyses revealed no correlation between task performance and Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status total scores or positive symptoms in first-episode psychosis patients, or with ketamine serum levels. We observed a mnemonic discrimination deficit but intact recognition in both datasets. Our findings suggest a tentative mechanistic link between dentate gyrus dysfunction in first-episode psychosis and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor hypofunction. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Neuropsychological Impairment in Prodromal, First-Episode, and Chronic Psychosis: Assessing RBANS Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, William S.; Woodberry, Kristen A.; Seidman, Larry J.; Tang, YingYing; Guo, Qian; Zhuo, KaiMing; Qian, ZhenYing; Cui, HuiRu; Zhu, YiKang; Jiang, LiJuan; Chow, Annabelle; Tang, YunXiang; Li, ChunBo; Jiang, KaiDa; Yi, ZhengHui; Xiao, ZePing; Wang, JiJun

    2015-01-01

    Background Cognitive deficits are observed throughout all developmental phases of psychosis. However, prior studies have usually focused on a limited illness period and used a wide variety of cognitive instruments. Therefore, it has been difficult to characterize or highlight cognitive functioning in different stages of psychosis. Method We administered the RBANS (Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status) tests to 4 participant subgroups, including healthy volunteers (controls, HC, n = 28), subjects at high risk for clinical psychosis (prodrome, CHR, n = 27), first-episode schizophrenia patients (FE-Sz, n = 26), and mid-term and long-term chronic schizophrenia patients (Ch-Sz, n =147). Comparison, correlation, and regression analyses of RBANS index scores were assessed among groups. We examined clinical outcomes over 2 years between the CHR and HC subjects, and RBANS domains were used as possible predictors for conversion to psychosis. Results Performance on all RBANS domains was significantly impaired during a post-onset stage of psychosis (FE-Sz and Ch-Sz), and RBANS scores declined along with disease progression. Regression analyses showed that for CHR and HC subjects, baseline impairment in delayed memory (DM) significantly predicted conversion to psychosis. Additionally, partial correlations showed that for FE-Sz and Ch-Sz subjects, DM was the only correlate with a later stage of psychosis. Conclusions Cognitive deficits broadly emerged, and diminished functioning followed along with disease progression. Impairment in DM is perhaps one domain that helps us understand the development of psychosis. A critical need is to monitor and treat memory functioning for psychotic patients throughout all phases of the disease. PMID:25973925

  11. Verbal working memory deficits predict levels of auditory hallucination in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisselgård, Jens; Anda, Liss Gøril; Brønnick, Kolbjørn; Langeveld, Johannes; Ten Velden Hegelstad, Wenche; Joa, Inge; Johannessen, Jan Olav; Larsen, Tor Ketil

    2014-03-01

    Auditory verbal hallucinations are a characteristic symptom in schizophrenia. Recent causal models of auditory verbal hallucinations propose that cognitive mechanisms involving verbal working memory are involved in the genesis of auditory verbal hallucinations. Thus, in the present study, we investigate the hypothesis that verbal working memory is a specific factor behind auditory verbal hallucinations. In the present study, we investigated the association between verbal working memory manipulation (Backward Digit Span and Letter-Number Sequencing) and auditory verbal hallucinations in a population study (N=52) of first episode psychosis. The degree of auditory verbal hallucination as reported in the P3-subscale of the PANSS interview was included as dependent variable using sequential multiple regression, while controlling for age, psychosis symptom severity, executive cognitive functions and simple auditory working memory span. Multiple sequential regression analyses revealed verbal working memory manipulation to be the only significant predictor of verbal hallucination severity. Consistent with cognitive data from auditory verbal hallucinations in healthy individuals, the present results suggest a specific association between auditory verbal hallucinations, and cognitive processes involving the manipulation of phonological representations during a verbal working memory task. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Suicidality in first episode psychosis is associated with insight and negative beliefs about psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Elizabeth A; Sundet, Kjetil; Faerden, Ann; Agartz, Ingrid; Bratlien, Unni; Romm, Kristin Lie; Mork, Erlend; Rossberg, Jan Ivar; Steen, Nils Eiel; Andreassen, Ole A; Melle, Ingrid

    2010-11-01

    Suicidal behaviour is prevalent in psychotic disorders. Insight has been found to be associated with increased risk for suicidal behaviour, but not consistently. A possible explanation for this is that insight has different consequences for patients depending on their beliefs about psychosis. The present study investigated whether a relationship between insight, negative beliefs about psychosis and suicidality was mediated by depressive symptoms, and if negative beliefs about psychosis moderated the relationship between insight and suicidality in patients with a first episode of psychosis (FEP). One hundred ninety-four FEP-patients were assessed with a clinical interview for diagnosis, symptoms, functioning, substance use, suicidality, insight, and beliefs about psychosis. Nearly 46% of the patients were currently suicidal. Depressive symptoms, having a schizophrenia spectrum disorder, insight, and beliefs about negative outcomes for psychosis were independently associated with current suicidality; contradicting a mediating effect of depressive symptoms. Negative beliefs about psychosis did not moderate the effect of insight on current suicidality. The results indicate that more depressive symptoms, higher insight, and negative beliefs about psychosis increase the risk for suicidality in FEP-patients. The findings imply that monitoring insight should be part of assessing the suicide risk in patients with FEP, and that treating depression and counteracting negative beliefs about psychosis may possibly reduce the risk for suicidality. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical and functional implications of a history of childhood ADHD in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rho, Aldanie; Traicu, Alexandru; Lepage, Martin; Iyer, Srividya N; Malla, Ashok; Joober, Ridha

    2015-07-01

    There is mounting evidence indicating that a childhood history of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with an increased risk for psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia. However, the implications of such a history on the symptomatic and functional outcomes of patients with psychotic disorders are still not well documented. This study examined the prevalence of childhood ADHD in patients with first episode psychosis (FEP) consecutively admitted to a specialized early intervention clinic covering a well-defined catchment area, and compared patients with and without a history of childhood ADHD on socio-demographic, clinical, and functional outcomes over a six to twelve months period. Out of 179 patients with FEP, 27 (15%) were treated for ADHD during childhood, consistent with previous literature indicating an association between childhood ADHD and psychosis. FEP patients with childhood history of ADHD had lower academic achievement, earlier onset of psychosis, and higher rates of childhood conduct and learning disorder. While the two groups had similar scores on psychopathology and functioning at baseline, patients with childhood ADHD showed significantly less improvement in positive and negative symptoms, as well as social and occupational functioning. These results strongly indicate that a history of childhood ADHD in FEP is more frequent than that reported in the general population and predictive of poorer clinical response to treatment. This emphasizes the need for actively screening for a history of ADHD in FEP patients and for treatments that are tailored for these patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The prevalence, diagnostic significance and demographic characteristics of Schneiderian first-rank symptoms in an epidemiological sample of first-episode psychoses.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ihara, Kazushige

    2009-01-01

    The diagnostic significance of first-rank symptoms (FRSs) remains uncertain. Ethnic differences in FRSs may account for high rates of schizophrenia in minority groups. This study aims to examine the prevalence of FRSs in an epidemiological sample of first-episode psychoses stratified by relevant demographic variables. SAMPLING AND METHOD: We identified everyone aged 16-64 presenting with their first psychosis over 2 years in 3 UK centres.

  15. Predictors of suicide attempt in early-onset, first-episode psychoses: a longitudinal 24-month follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Gistau, Vanessa; Baeza, Inmaculada; Arango, Celso; González-Pinto, Ana; de la Serna, Elena; Parellada, Mara; Graell, Motserrat; Paya, Beatriz; Llorente, Cloe; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina

    2013-01-01

    To study the prevalence of suicide attempts and factors associated with risk for suicide during the first episode of psychosis, and to identify early predictors of suicide attempts over a 24-month follow-up period in an early-onset, first-episode psychosis cohort. 110 subjects in their first episode of psychosis aged between 9 and 17 years were assessed by using the DSM-IV diagnostic interview Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime Version and a battery of clinical instruments at baseline and at 12 and 24 months. Patients were enrolled in the study from March 2003 through November 2005. Suicide attempts and level of suicidality at each assessment were evaluated by using the Clinical Global Impression for Severity of Suicidality and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Subjects were classified as being at high, low, or no risk of suicide, depending on their scores on certain items of these scales. Clinical associations between the outcome measures high risk for suicide during acute episode and suicide attempts during follow-up were investigated by 2 sets of logistic regression analyses. The 24-month prevalence of suicide attempters was 12.4%. History of suicide attempts prior to psychotic episode (OR = 20.13; 95% CI, 1.83-220.55; P = .01), severe depressive symptoms (OR = 8.78; 95% CI, 1.15-67.11; P = .003), and antidepressant treatment (OR = 15.56; 95% CI, 2.66-90.86; P = .002) were associated with being classified as high suicide risk at baseline. The categorization of high suicide risk at baseline predicted suicide attempts during follow-up (OR = 81.66; 95% CI, 11.61-574.35; P = .000). Suicide is a major concern in early-onset first-episode psychosis. Suicidal behavior and depressive symptoms at psychosis onset are important signs to be aware of to prevent suicide attempts during the early period after first-episode psychosis. © Copyright 2013 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  16. Endogenous and Antipsychotic-Related Risks for Diabetes Mellitus in Young People With Schizophrenia: A Danish Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, Anto P; Horsdal, Henriette Thisted; Wimberley, Theresa; Cohen, Dan; Mors, Ole; Børglum, Anders D; Gasse, Christiane

    2017-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus contributes to excessive cardiovascular deaths and reduced life expectancy in schizophrenia. This population-based cohort study investigated the endogenous risk for diabetes in antipsychotic-naive schizophrenia and evaluated the risks added by starting antipsychotic treatment in people with schizophrenia. The study followed all people born in Denmark on or after Jan. 1, 1977, until Jan. 1, 2013 (N=2,736,510). The Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register ascertained schizophrenia diagnoses. The Danish National Prescription Registry provided data on prescriptions of antipsychotics. Diabetes was ascertained from the Danish National Patient Register and Danish National Prescription Registry. The authors estimated the endogenous and antipsychotic-related risks for diabetes by using Cox proportional hazards regression models, while accounting for potential confounders. Of the cohort members, 14,118 (0.52%) developed diabetes, and 8,945 (0.33%) developed schizophrenia during follow-up (49,582,279 person-years). The adjusted hazard ratio for diabetes was 3.07 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.71-5.41) in antipsychotic-naive schizophrenia compared with the general population. The risk for diabetes after starting antipsychotic treatment was significantly higher (adjusted hazard ratio, 3.64; 95% CI, 1.95-6.82) than the risk in antipsychotic-naive schizophrenia, after adjustment for family history of diabetes and other potential confounders. First-line treatment with either first-generation antipsychotics (adjusted hazard ratio, 3.06; 95% CI, 1.32-7.05) or second-generation antipsychotics (adjusted hazard ratio, 3.44; 95% CI, 1.73-6.83) increased the risk for diabetes without a statistically significant difference. Appropriate sensitivity analyses limited to type 2 diabetes corroborated these results. Schizophrenia confers a high endogenous risk for diabetes, and the risk is further increased by both first-generation and second-generation antipsychotics

  17. Modelling gene-environment interaction in first episodes of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Miguel; Bioque, Miquel; Cabrera, Bibiana; Lobo, Antonio; González-Pinto, Ana; Pina, Laura; Corripio, Iluminada; Sanjuán, Julio; Mané, Anna; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Vieta, Eduard; Arango, Celso; Mezquida, Gisela; Gassó, Patricia; Parellada, Mara; Saiz-Ruiz, Jerónimo; Cuesta, Manuel J; Mas, Sergi

    2017-11-01

    Recent research demonstrates the heterogeneous etiology of psychotic disorders, where gen-environment (GxE) interaction plays a key role. Large genetic studies have linked many genetic variants with schizophrenia, but each variant is only associated with a small effect and the GxE interaction contribution has not been evaluated. The PEPs Project was designed to carefully collect a large amount of genetic and environmental exposure data of 335 FEP patients and 253 matched healthy controls.780single-nucleotide polymorphisms (from 159 candidate genes)and 16 environmental variables previously reported as the main psychosis non-genetic risk factors were analyzed together using entropy-based measures of information gain. Our analyses identified an interaction between nine SNPs and the exposition to the environmental risk factors of psychosis, showing a clear enrichment of genes linked to serotonin neurotransmission and neurodevelopmental processes. This study has allowed the identification of several GxE-environment interactions involved in the risk of presenting a FEP. Our results highlight the importance of serotonin neurotransmission interacting with certain environmental stimuli. The serotoninergic system may be playing a key role in the regulatory network of stress and other systems implicated in the emergence and development of psychotic disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Integrated treatment of first-episode psychosis: effect of treatment on family burden: OPUS trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Pia; Petersen, Lone; Thorup, Anne

    2005-01-01

    The families of patients with first-episode psychosis often play a major role in care and often experience lack of support.......The families of patients with first-episode psychosis often play a major role in care and often experience lack of support....

  19. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C.; Bakker, Olaf J.; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J.; Brink, Menno A.; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; Spanier, B. W. Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H.; Besselink, Marc G.; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis admitted to 15 Dutch

  20. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C.; Bakker, Olaf J.; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J.; Brink, Menno A.; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; Spanier, B. W Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H.; Besselink, Marc G.; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims: Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute

  1. The promise of biological markers for treatment response in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fond, Guillaume; d'Albis, Marc-Antoine; Jamain, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Successful treatment of first-episode psychosis is one of the major factors that impacts long-term prognosis. Currently, there are no satisfactory biological markers (biomarkers) to predict which patients with a first-episode psychosis will respond to which treatment. In addition, a non-negligibl...

  2. Two-Year Diagnostic Stability in Early-Onset First-Episode Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Baeza, Immaculada; de la Serna, Elena; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Parellada, Mara; Graell, Montserrat; Moreno, Dolores; Otero, Soraya; Arango, Celso

    2011-01-01

    Background: Only one study has used a prospective method to analyze the diagnostic stability of first psychotic episodes in children and adolescents. The Child and Adolescent First-Episode Psychosis Study (CAFEPS) is a 2-year, prospective longitudinal study of early-onset first episodes of psychosis (EO-FEP). Aim: To describe diagnostic stability…

  3. First-episode psychosis patients recruited into treatment via early detection teams versus ordinary pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Jan Olav; Joa, Inge; Auestad, Bjørn

    2011-01-01

    To compare the 5-year course and outcome of first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients recruited via active outreach detection teams (DTs) versus ordinary referral channels (not-DT).......To compare the 5-year course and outcome of first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients recruited via active outreach detection teams (DTs) versus ordinary referral channels (not-DT)....

  4. Negative Symptoms and Reward Disturbances in Schizophrenia Before and After Antipsychotic Monotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Ødegaard; Rostrup, Egill; Broberg, Brian Villumsen

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Negative symptoms (NS) are a central part of the symptomatology of schizophrenia, which is highly correlated to the functional outcome. Disturbances of the brain reward system are suggested to be central in the pathogenesis of NS by decreasing motivation and hedonic experiences. In th...... in working memory and reward learning or with pronounced symptoms within specific domains of NS may be addressed in future studies.......BACKGROUND: Negative symptoms (NS) are a central part of the symptomatology of schizophrenia, which is highly correlated to the functional outcome. Disturbances of the brain reward system are suggested to be central in the pathogenesis of NS by decreasing motivation and hedonic experiences....... In this study, we compared reward-related brain activity in patients improving and not improving in NS after treatment with amisulpride. METHODS: Thirty-nine antipsychotic-naive patients and 49 healthy controls completed functional magnetic resonance imaging with a modified monetary incentive delay task...

  5. Effects of Risperidone on Cytokine Profile in Drug-Naïve First-Episode Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noto, Cristiano; Ota, Vanessa Kiyomi; Gouvea, Eduardo S.; Rizzo, Lucas B.; Spindola, Leticia M. N.; Honda, Pedro H. S.; Cordeiro, Quirino; Belangero, Sintia Iole; Bressan, Rodrigo Affonseca; Gadelha, Ary; Maes, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is robust evidence that schizophrenia is characterized by immune-inflammatory abnormalities, including variations on cytokine levels. The results of previous studies, however, are heterogeneous due to several confounding factors, such as the effects of antipsychotic drugs. Therefore, research on drug-naïve first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients is essential to elucidate the role of immune processes in that disorder. Methods: The aim of this study is to compare cytokine levels (IL-2, IL-10, IL-4, IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-17) in drug-naïve FEP patients both before and after treatment with risperidone for 10 weeks, and to investigate possible associations between cytokine levels and clinical responses to treatment and presence of depressive symptoms. It this study, we included 55 drug-naïve FEP patients who had repeated measurements of cytokine levels and 57 healthy controls. Results: We found that FEP patients had significantly higher IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α levels than healthy controls. After risperidone treatment, these three cytokines and additionally IL-4 decreased significantly. No significant difference was found between the post-treatment cytokine levels in FEP patients and in healthy controls, suggesting that these alterations in cytokine profiles are a state marker of FEP. No significant association was found between risperidone-induced changes in cytokines and the clinical response to treatment or the presence of depression. There was a significant inverse association between the risperidone-induced changes in IL-10 and the negative symptoms. Conclusions: In conclusion, our results show a specific cytokine profile in FEP patients (monocytic and regulatory T-cell activation) and suggest immunoregulatory effects of risperidone treatment, characterized by suppressant effects on monocytic, Th2, and T-regulatory functions. PMID:25522386

  6. Altered Default Network Resting State Functional Connectivity in Patients with a First Episode of Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Solís, Anna; Corripio, Iluminada; de Castro-Manglano, Pilar; Duran-Sindreu, Santiago; Garcia-Garcia, Manuel; Proal, Erika; Nuñez-Marín, Fidel; Soutullo, Cesar; Alvarez, Enric; Gómez-Ansón, Beatriz; Kelly, Clare; Castellanos, F. Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Background Default network (DN) abnormalities have been identified in patients with chronic schizophrenia using “resting state” functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI). Here, we examined the integrity of the DN in patients experiencing their first episode of psychosis (FEP) compared with sex- and age-matched healthy controls. Methods We collected R-fMRI data from 19 FEP patients (mean age 24.9±4.8 yrs, 14 males) and 19 healthy controls (26.1±4.8 yrs, 14 males) at 3 Tesla. Following standard preprocessing, we examined the functional connectivity (FC) of two DN subsystems and the two DN hubs (P<0.0045, corrected). Results Patients with FEP exhibited abnormal FC that appeared largely restricted to the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dMPFC) DN subsystem. Relative to controls, FEP patients exhibited weaker positive FC between dMPFC and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and precuneus, extending laterally through the parietal lobe to the posterior angular gyrus. Patients with FEP exhibited weaker negative FC between the lateral temporal cortex and the intracalcarine cortex, bilaterally. The PCC and temporo-parietal junction also exhibited weaker negative FC with the right fusiform gyrus extending to the lingual gyrus and lateral occipital cortex, in FEP patients, compared to controls. By contrast, patients with FEP showed stronger negative FC between the temporal pole and medial motor cortex, anterior precuneus and posterior mid-cingulate cortex. Conclusions Abnormalities in the dMPFC DN subsystem in patients with a FEP suggest that FC patterns are altered even in the early stages of psychosis. PMID:22633527

  7. Antipsychotic treatment in child and adolescent first-episode psychosis: a longitudinal naturalistic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Parellada, Mara; Soutullo, César A; Baeza, Immaculada; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Graell, Montserrat; Paya, Beatriz; Moreno, Dolores; de la Serna, Elena; Arango, Celso

    2008-08-01

    The Child and Adolescent First-Episode Psychosis Study (CAFEPS) is a naturalistic longitudinal study of early-onset first psychotic episodes. This report describes the antipsychotic treatment during the first year and compares the most frequently used agents after 6 months. Participants were 110 patients, aged 9-17 years, with a first psychotic episode attended consecutively at six different centers. The Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS), Clinical Global Impressions (CGI), Disability Assessment Schedule (DAS), and Global Assessment of Function (GAF) scales were administered at baseline and at 6 months and the Udvalg for Kliniske Undersøgelser (UKU) Side Effects Rating Scale only at 6 months. Diagnoses at baseline were 38.2% psychotic disorder not otherwise specified, 39.1% schizophrenia-type disorder, 11.8% depressive disorder with psychotic symptoms, and 10.9% bipolar disorder, manic episode with psychotic symptoms. The most frequently used antipsychotic agents were risperidone (n = 50), quetiapine (n = 18), and olanzapine (n = 16). Patients who were prescribed olanzapine or quetiapine had more negative and general symptoms. Using the baseline score as covariate, no significant differences were found in the reductions on any scale in patients treated with risperidone, quetiapine, or olanzapine for 6 months. Weight increase was greater with olanzapine than with risperidone (p = 0.020) or quetiapine (p = 0.040). More neurological side effects appeared with risperidone than with olanzapine (p = 0.022). All side effects were mild or moderate. Second-generation antipsychotics, especially risperidone, quetiapine, and olanzapine, are the most used in our context in first psychotic episodes in children and adolescents. These three obtain similar clinical improvement, but differ in their side effects.

  8. Metacognition as a Mediating Variable Between Neurocognition and Functional Outcome in First Episode Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Geoff; Fowler, David; Greenwood, Kathryn

    2017-07-01

    Neurocognitive and functional outcome deficits have long been acknowledged in schizophrenia and neurocognition has been found to account for functional disability to a greater extent than psychopathology. Much of the variance in functional outcome however still remains unexplained and metacognition may mediate the relationship between neurocognition, functional capacity, and self-reported social and occupational function. Eighty first episode psychosis participants were recruited and completed measures of neurocognition (memory, executive function, and intelligence quotient), metacognition (Beck Cognitive Insight Scale, Metacognitive Awareness Interview), psychopathology (PANSS), and both functional capacity (UPSA) and real-life social and occupational function (The Time Use Survey). Path analyses investigated the relationships between variables through structural equation modeling. A series of path models demonstrated that metacognition partially mediates the relationship between neurocognition and functional capacity, and fully mediates the relationship between functional capacity and social and occupational function. The present study findings identify that metacognition may be critical to translating cognitive and functional skills into real-world contexts, and this relationship is found at early stages of illness. Understanding how individuals translate cognitive and functional skills into the real-world (the competence-performance gap) may offer valuable guidance to intervention programs. This finding is important to models of recovery as it suggests that intervention programs that focus on enhancing metacognition abilities may have a greater impact than traditional rehabilitation programs focusing on cognitive abilities, on social and occupational outcomes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  9. Hippocampal subregion volume changes associated with antipsychotic treatment in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhindress, K; Robinson, D G; Gallego, J A; Wellington, R; Malhotra, A K; Szeszko, P R

    2017-07-01

    Hippocampal dysfunction is considered central to many neurobiological models of schizophrenia, yet there are few longitudinal in vivo neuroimaging studies that have investigated the relationship between antipsychotic treatment and morphologic changes within specific hippocampal subregions among patients with psychosis. A total of 29 patients experiencing a first episode of psychosis with little or no prior antipsychotic exposure received structural neuroimaging examinations at illness onset and then following 12 weeks of treatment with either risperidone or aripiprazole in a double-blind randomized clinical trial. In addition, 29 healthy volunteers received structural neuroimaging examinations at baseline and 12-week time points. We manually delineated six hippocampal subregions [i.e. anterior cornu ammonis (CA) 1-3, posterior CA1-3, subiculum, dentate gyrus/CA4, entorhinal cortex, and fimbria] from 3T magnetic resonance images using an established method with high inter- and intra-rater reliability. Following antipsychotic treatment patients demonstrated significant reductions in dentate gyrus/CA4 volume and increases in subiculum volume. Healthy volunteers demonstrated non-significant volumetric changes in these subregions across the two time points. We observed a significant quadratic (i.e. inverted U) association between changes in dentate gyrus/CA4 volume and cumulative antipsychotic dosage between the scans. This study provides the first evidence to our knowledge regarding longitudinal in vivo volumetric changes within specific hippocampal subregions in patients with psychosis following antipsychotic treatment. The finding of a non-linear relationship between changes in dentate gyrus/CA4 subregion volume and antipsychotic exposure may provide new avenues into understanding dosing strategies for therapeutic interventions relevant to neurobiological models of hippocampal dysfunction in psychosis.

  10. The relationship of verbal learning and verbal fluency with written story production: implications for social functioning in first episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stain, Helen J; Hodne, Sigrun; Joa, Inge; Hegelstad, Wenche Ten Velden; Douglas, Katie M; Langveld, Johannes; Gisselgard, Jens P; Johannesen, Jan Olav; Larsen, Tor K

    2012-07-01

    Impairments in speech, communication and Theory of Mind are common in schizophrenia, and compromise social functioning. Some of these impairments may already be present pre-morbidly. This study aimed to investigate verbal functions in relation to written story production and social functioning in people experiencing a first episode of psychosis (FEP). Two groups of participants: FEP (N=31) and healthy controls (HC, N=31), completed measures of clinical status, social functioning, a series of neuropsychological tests targeting verbal functioning, and the "Frog Where Are You?" story production task. Story results showed reduced efficiency (words per minute) and self-monitoring (corrections per minute) for FEP compared with HC groups (pproduction was positively associated with verbal learning and verbal fluency for the FEP group only (pproduction, verbal learning and verbal fluency. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Gender differences in first-episode psychosis at 5-year follow-up - two different courses of disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, A; Albert, Nancy; Bertelsen, M

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Gender differences in psychosis have been investigated, and the results have contributed to a better understanding of the disease, but many questions are unanswered. In clinical terms, women and men with psychosis differ in terms of access to social support, tendency of substance abuse......, level of functioning and symptom patterns. We aimed to investigate how gender differences at onset of psychosis develop during the first 5years of treatment. METHOD: A total of 578 patients with a first-episode psychosis in the schizophrenia spectrum were included in the Danish OPUS trial - a randomized...... clinical trial comparing 2years of intensive early-intervention programme with standard treatment. All patients were assessed with validated instruments at inclusion, and after 2 and 5years. Data were analysed for significant gender differences. RESULTS: Males have significantly higher levels of negative...

  12. The experience of childhood trauma and its influence on the course of illness in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Jens Einar; Pedersen, Marlene Buch; Trauelsen, Anne Marie

    2016-01-01

    . To examine this, we conducted in-depth interviews with 15 service users with a diagnosis of a first-episode nonaffective psychosis who had reported 1 or more childhood traumas in self-report measures. Therewas an unexpected discrepancy between the number of traumas reported in self-report measures......Persons with schizophrenia spectrum disorders often report high levels of childhood trauma, which often exacerbates symptoms and impede the process of recovery. However, little is known about how these traumas are experienced by service users and how they are integrated in their life stories...... and in semistructured interviews, and many of the traumas did not seem integrated in their personal narratives. The analyses further revealed that although participants often described complicated and traumatic childhood environments, they still felt supported by their families; they reported a range of ways in which...

  13. Substance abuse and first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. The Danish OPUS trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lone; Jeppesen, Pia; Thorup, Anne

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate whether integrated treatment (given by OPUS), in comparison with standard treatment, significantly reduced the number of patients with substance abuse and improved clinical and social outcome in the group of substance abusers after 2 years.......To evaluate whether integrated treatment (given by OPUS), in comparison with standard treatment, significantly reduced the number of patients with substance abuse and improved clinical and social outcome in the group of substance abusers after 2 years....

  14. Alterations of Intrinsic Connectivity Networks in Antipsychotic-Naïve First-Episode Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anhøj, Simon; Ødegaard Nielsen, Mette; Jensen, Maria Høj

    2018-01-01

    controls were scanned with functional magnetic resonance imaging under resting conditions. Main outcome measures were differences in functional connectivity between groups and the relationship between network alterations, psychopathology and cognition. Results: Altered connectivity was found between right...

  15. Substance abuse and first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. The Danish OPUS trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lone; Jeppesen, Pia; Thorup, Anne

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate whether integrated treatment (given by OPUS), in comparison with standard treatment, significantly reduced the number of patients with substance abuse and improved clinical and social outcome in the group of substance abusers after 2 years....

  16. Adjunctive Taurine in First-Episode Psychosis: A Phase 2, Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Colin P; Allott, Kelly A; Murphy, Brendan P; Yuen, Hok Pan; Proffitt, Tina-Marie; Papas, Alicia; Moral, Jennifer; Pham, Tee; O'Regan, Michaela K; Phassouliotis, Christina; Simpson, Raelene; McGorry, Patrick D

    2016-12-01

    Taurine is an inhibitory neuromodulatory amino acid in the central nervous system that activates the GABA- and glycine-insensitive chloride channel and inhibits the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor. It also functions as a neuroprotective agent and has a role in neural development and neurogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of adjunctive taurine in improving symptomatology and cognition among patients with a DSM-IV first-episode psychotic disorder. 121 patients with first-episode psychosis, aged 18-25 years, attending early intervention services consented to participate in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted from January 2007 to May 2009. Patients taking low-dose antipsychotic medication were randomly assigned to receive once-daily taurine 4 g or placebo for 12 weeks. The coprimary outcomes were change in symptomatology (measured by the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale [BPRS] total score) and change in cognition (measured by the Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia [MATRICS] Consensus Cognitive Battery composite score) at 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes included tolerability and safety and additional clinical and functioning measures. 86 participants (n = 47 taurine; n = 39 placebo) were included in the final analysis. Taurine significantly improved symptomatology measured by the BPRS total score (95% CI, 1.8-8.5; P = .004) and psychotic subscale (95% CI, 0.1-1.5; P = .026) compared to placebo. Additionally, improvements were observed in the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (95% CI, 0.1-3.0; P = .047) and Global Assessment of Functioning (95% CI, 0.3-8.8; P = .04) scores. There was no group difference in composite cognitive score (95% CI, -1.7 to 1.0; P = .582). A significant group difference was found on one safety and tolerability item (psychic item 2, asthenia/lassitude/increased fatigability) of the Udvalg for Kliniske Undersogelser, with the taurine group showing a

  17. The association between working alliance and clinical and functional outcome in a cohort of 400 patients with first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melau, Marianne; Harder, Susanne; Jeppesen, Pia

    2015-01-01

    working alliance was associated with fewer clinical symptoms and better social functioning. METHOD: In a cross-sectional design, patients with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders (ICD-10, F20-29) were included after 18 months of treatment (N = 400). Baseline data were collected between June.......01), and between working alliance and better social functioning (β = 1.45; 95% CI, 0.55 to 2.36). General self-efficacy mediated the effect of working alliance, explaining 14%-18% of the variance in associated outcomes. Global level of cognitive functioning, compliance, and self-efficacy influenced clinical......OBJECTIVE: Working alliance between patients with a first-episode psychosis and their case manager is regarded as a key element in specialized early intervention services. The impact of this patient-case manager dyad on functional and clinical outcome is unknown. We aimed to investigate if a strong...

  18. Using internet enabled mobile devices and social networking technologies to promote exercise as an intervention for young first episode psychosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Pamela

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Young people with first episode psychosis are at an increased risk for a range of poor health outcomes. In contrast to the growing body of evidence that suggests that exercise therapy may benefit the physical and mental health of people diagnosed with schizophrenia, there are no studies to date that have sought to extend the use of exercise therapy among patients with first episode psychosis. The aim of the study is to test the feasibility and acceptability of an exercise program that will be delivered via internet enabled mobile devices and social networking technologies among young people with first episode psychosis. Methods/Design This study is a qualitative pilot study being conducted at Orygen Youth Health Research Centre in Melbourne, Australia. Participants are young people aged 15-24 who are receiving clinical care at a specialist first episode psychosis treatment centre. Participants will also comprise young people from the general population. The exercise intervention is a 9-week running program, designed to gradually build a person's level of fitness to be able to run 5 kilometres (3 miles towards the end of the program. The program will be delivered via an internet enabled mobile device. Participants will be asked to post messages about their running experiences on the social networking website, and will also be asked to attend three face-to-face interviews. Discussion This paper describes the development of a qualitative study to pilot a running program coupled with the use of internet enabled mobile devices among young people with first episode psychosis. If the program is found to be feasible and acceptable to patients, it is hoped that further rigorous evaluations will ultimately lead to the introduction of exercise therapy as part of an evidence-based, multidisciplinary approach in routine clinical care.

  19. Cost-effectiveness of early intervention in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hastrup, Lene Halling; Kronborg, Christian; Bertelsen, Mette

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Information about the cost-effectiveness of early intervention programmes for first-episode psychosis is limited. AIMS: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of an intensive early-intervention programme (called OPUS) (trial registration NCT00157313) consisting of enriched assertive...... community treatment, psychoeducational family treatment and social skills training for individuals with first-episode psychosis compared with standard treatment. METHOD: An incremental cost-effectiveness analysis of a randomised controlled trial, adopting a public sector perspective was undertaken. RESULTS...

  20. Tardive dyskinesia in a South Asian population with first episode psychosis treated with antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam UU

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Usman Adam, Nusrat Husain, Peter M Haddad, Tariq Munshi, Fauzia Tariq, Farooq Naeem, Imran B ChaudhryBackground: Tardive dyskinesia (TD is a side effect of antipsychotic treatment that often only appears after months or years of treatment. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials lasting more than 1 year showed that second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs were associated with an approximately fivefold lower risk of TD compared to haloperidol in patients with chronic schizophrenia. In contrast, there is little research on the risk of TD with other first-generation antipsychotics (FGAs, and this applies especially to their use in the treatment of patients with first episode psychosis (FEP.Objectives: To determine the severity and point prevalence of TD in a naturalistic sample of patients with FEP in Pakistan treated with FGAs or SGAs.Methods: This was an observational study. TD was assessed by trained clinicians using the Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale.Results: In the total sample (number =86 the mean age of patients was 26 years and the prevalence of TD (Schooler Kane criteria was 29% with no significant difference between those treated with FGAs and SGAs (31% FGAs versus 26% SGAs; P=0.805. The Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale total score (items 1–7, a measure of the severity of TD, was significantly higher for patients treated with FGAs versus those treated with SGAs (P=0.033. Scores on specific items showed that this reflected higher scores for dyskinesia affecting the muscles of facial expression, as well as of the upper and lower limb, whereas scores did not differ significantly in other body areas. Conclusion: FGAs were associated with greater severity, though not prevalence, of TD than SGAs. The study highlights the relatively high rate of TD in Asian FEP patients and the need for clinicians to monitor for this and other potential antipsychotic side effects during treatment. Keywords: first-generation antipsychotic

  1. A randomised multicentre trial of integrated versus standard treatment for patients with a first episode of psychotic illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lone Bente; Jeppesen, Pia; Thorup, Anne

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of integrated treatment for patients with a first episode of psychotic illness.......To evaluate the effects of integrated treatment for patients with a first episode of psychotic illness....

  2. Sex differences in cognitive functioning in at-risk mental state for psychosis, first episode psychosis and healthy control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ittig, S; Studerus, E; Papmeyer, M; Uttinger, M; Koranyi, S; Ramyead, A; Riecher-Rössler, A

    2015-02-01

    Several sex differences in schizophrenia have been reported including differences in cognitive functioning. Studies with schizophrenia patients and healthy controls (HC) indicate that the sex advantage for women in verbal domains is also present in schizophrenia patients. However, findings have been inconsistent. No study focused on sex-related cognitive performance differences in at-risk mental state for psychosis (ARMS) individuals yet. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate sex differences in cognitive functioning in ARMS, first episode psychosis (FEP) and HC subjects. We expected a better verbal learning and memory performance of women in all groups. The neuropsychological data analysed in this study were collected within the prospective Früherkennung von Psychosen (FePsy) study. In total, 118 ARMS, 88 FEP individuals and 86 HC completed a cognitive test battery covering the domains of executive functions, attention, working memory, verbal learning and memory, IQ and speed of processing. Women performed better in verbal learning and memory regardless of diagnostic group. By contrast, men as compared to women showed a shorter reaction time during the working memory task across all groups. The results provide evidence that women generally perform better in verbal learning and memory, independent of diagnostic group (ARMS, FEP, HC). The finding of a shorter reaction time for men in the working memory task could indicate that men have a superior working memory performance since they responded faster during the target trials, while maintaining a comparable overall working memory performance level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Brain pathology in first-episode psychosis: magnetization transfer imaging provides additional information to MRI measurements of volume loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Gary; Cercignani, Mara; Chu, Elvina M; Barnes, Thomas R E; Barker, Gareth J; Joyce, Eileen M; Ron, Maria A

    2010-01-01

    Loss of brain volume in first-episode psychosis can be detected using conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but subtle changes--not leading to reduction in volume--that may contribute to clinical and cognitive abnormalities, may go undetected. Magnetization transfer imaging (MTI), a technique more sensitive to subtle neuropathological changes than conventional MRI, could yield important information on the extent and nature of structural abnormalities. Forty-eight patients (33 males) from a population-based sample with first-episode psychosis (41 with schizophrenia and 7 with schizoaffective psychosis) and 47 healthy volunteers (27 males) were studied. Differences in magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and white and grey matter volumes between groups were investigated. In patients, MTR was reduced in right entorhinal cortex, fusiform, dentate and superior frontal gyri and in left superior frontal and inferior/rostral cingulate gyri. Grey matter volume was reduced in right insula, frontal operculum and middle and superior temporal gyri and in left middle temporal gyrus. Grey matter volume increases were seen in patients in the superior frontal gyrus. White matter volume loss was found adjacent to grey matter loss. In patients MTR was lower in all areas of volumetric differences between groups suggesting that both changes may be related. Similar findings were observed when patients with schizoaffective psychosis were removed from the analysis. The correlations between clinical and MRI parameters did not survive correction for multiple comparisons. MTI frontal and temporal abnormalities suggesting neuroaxonal and myelin changes were more extensive in our patients than those detected with conventional MRI. Our findings also suggest that there is regional variation in the severity of structural brain abnormalities.

  4. Brain pathology in first-episode psychosis: Magnetization transfer imaging provides additional information to MRI measurements of volume loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Gary; Cercignani, Mara; Chu, Elvina M.; Barnes, Thomas R.E.; Barker, Gareth J.; Joyce, Eileen M.; Ron, Maria A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Loss of brain volume in first-episode psychosis can be detected using conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but subtle changes – not leading to reduction in volume – that may contribute to clinical and cognitive abnormalities, may go undetected. Magnetization transfer imaging (MTI), a technique more sensitive to subtle neuropathological changes than conventional MRI, could yield important information on the extent and nature of structural abnormalities. Methods Forty-eight patients (33 males) from a population-based sample with first-episode psychosis (41 with schizophrenia and 7 with schizoaffective psychosis) and 47 healthy volunteers (27 males) were studied. Differences in magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and white and grey matter volumes between groups were investigated. Results In patients, MTR was reduced in right entorhinal cortex, fusiform, dentate and superior frontal gyri and in left superior frontal and inferior/rostral cingulate gyri. Grey matter volume was reduced in right insula, frontal operculum and middle and superior temporal gyri and in left middle temporal gyrus. Grey matter volume increases were seen in patients in the superior frontal gyrus. White matter volume loss was found adjacent to grey matter loss. In patients MTR was lower in all areas of volumetric differences between groups suggesting that both changes may be related. Similar findings were observed when patients with schizoaffective psychosis were removed from the analysis. The correlations between clinical and MRI parameters did not survive correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusions MTI frontal and temporal abnormalities suggesting neuroaxonal and myelin changes were more extensive in our patients than those detected with conventional MRI. Our findings also suggest that there is regional variation in the severity of structural brain abnormalities. PMID:19632338

  5. Insight as a predictor of the outcome of first-episode nonaffective psychosis in a prospective cohort study in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Richard J; Dunn, Graham; Tarrier, Nick; Bentall, Richard P; Haddock, Gillian; Lewis, Shôn W

    2007-01-01

    To estimate the effect of insight on time to relapse and readmission and on social function and symptoms after following up a cohort of first-episodes of nonaffective psychosis for 18 months. Patients with first episodes of DSM-IV schizophreniform disorder, schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, delusional disorder, and psychosis not otherwise specified (excluding primary substance-induced or organic psychoses), aged 16 to 65 years, were recruited over the 26 months from July 1996 to September 1998 from consecutive admissions to day-patient and inpatient units in England with a catchment area population of 2.3 million. They were interviewed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Birchwood Insight Scale, and Social Functioning Scale at baseline and 18 months. The hazard ratio for relapse, per unit increase in the insight score, was estimated in a Cox proportional hazards model to be 0.943 (95% CI = 0.892 to 0.996; p = .035). Those with the best insight scores had an estimated rate of relapse that was 39% of that of those with the worst scores (95% CI = 16% to 93%). Readmission was highly correlated with relapse, so poor insight also predicted readmission (hazard ratio 0.934; 95% CI = 0.876 to 0.996; p = .036). However, insight did not independently predict symptoms or social function after adjustment for other predictors of outcome. Insight predicted both relapse and readmission. The details of the beliefs and assumptions determining outcome remain unclear, but intervening to alter them appears to be justified.

  6. Brain derived Neurotropic Factor (BDNF) is associated with childhood abuse but not cognitive domains in first episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theleritis, Christos; Fisher, Helen L; Shäfer, Ingo; Winters, Laura; Stahl, Daniel; Morgan, Craig; Dazzan, Paola; Breedvelt, Josefien; Sambath, Irene; Vitoratou, Silia; Russo, Manuela; Reichenberg, Abraham; Falcone, M Aurora; Mondelli, Valeria; O'Connor, Jennifer; David, Anthony; McGuire, Philip; Pariante, Carmine; Di Forti, Marta; Murray, Robin M; Bonaccorso, Stefania

    2014-10-01

    The Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) modulates cognitive processes and is associated with increased risk of schizophrenia. Childhood trauma (CT) is frequent in patients with psychosis and severely affects course and outcome. We investigated the hypothesis that BDNF is associated with both CT and cognitive deficits in a sample of first-episode psychosis (FEP) cases and unaffected controls. Participants with FEP and healthy controls were recruited between August 2008 and July 2011 from South London, UK. Childhood traumatic events were detected using the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire (CECA-Q). Neuropsychological data were also collected. BDNF plasma levels were measured from fasting blood samples. Data were available on 87 FEP patients and 152 controls. Our results showed a significant effect of separation (F=5.5; df=1,115; p=.02), physical (F=4.7; df=1, 118; p=.03) and sexual abuse (F=5.4; df=1,117; p=.02) on BDNF levels with lower levels among those who experienced the traumatic event compared to those who did not. Physical abuse predicted lower plasma levels of BDNF (β=-.30; p=.03) whereas sexual and/or physical abuse showed a trend (β=-.26; p=.06) in FEP patients but not in unaffected controls. No association between BDNF plasma levels and cognitive functions was found among patients with FEP and controls. Our findings suggest the possible involvement of BDNF in the onset of first-episode psychosis in individuals exposed to early trauma and propose BDNF as a potential clinical biomarker to detect the detrimental effects of CT on human brain plasticity. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Visual Hallucinations in First-Episode Psychosis: Association with Childhood Trauma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Solesvik

    Full Text Available Hallucinations are a core diagnostic criterion for psychotic disorders and have been investigated with regard to its association with childhood trauma in first-episode psychosis samples. Research has largely focused on auditory hallucinations, while specific investigations of visual hallucinations in first-episode psychosis remain scarce.The aims of this study were to describe the prevalence of visual hallucinations, and to explore the association between visual hallucination and childhood trauma in a first-episode psychosis sample.Subjects were included from TIPS-2, a first episode psychosis study in south Rogaland, Norway. Based on the medical journal descriptions of the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS, a separate score for visual and auditory hallucinations was created (N = 204. Patients were grouped according to hallucination severity (none, mild, and psychotic hallucinations and multinomial logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with visual hallucination group.Visual hallucinations of a psychotic nature were reported by 26.5% of patients. The experience of childhood interpersonal trauma increased the likelihood of having psychotic visual hallucinations.Visual hallucinations are common in first-episode psychosis, and are related to childhood interpersonal trauma.

  8. Visual Hallucinations in First-Episode Psychosis: Association with Childhood Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solesvik, Martine; Joa, Inge; Larsen, Tor Ketil; Langeveld, Johannes; Johannessen, Jan Olav; Bjørnestad, Jone; Anda, Liss Gøril; Gisselgård, Jens; Hegelstad, Wenche Ten Velden; Brønnick, Kolbjørn

    2016-01-01

    Hallucinations are a core diagnostic criterion for psychotic disorders and have been investigated with regard to its association with childhood trauma in first-episode psychosis samples. Research has largely focused on auditory hallucinations, while specific investigations of visual hallucinations in first-episode psychosis remain scarce. The aims of this study were to describe the prevalence of visual hallucinations, and to explore the association between visual hallucination and childhood trauma in a first-episode psychosis sample. Subjects were included from TIPS-2, a first episode psychosis study in south Rogaland, Norway. Based on the medical journal descriptions of the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS), a separate score for visual and auditory hallucinations was created (N = 204). Patients were grouped according to hallucination severity (none, mild, and psychotic hallucinations) and multinomial logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with visual hallucination group. Visual hallucinations of a psychotic nature were reported by 26.5% of patients. The experience of childhood interpersonal trauma increased the likelihood of having psychotic visual hallucinations. Visual hallucinations are common in first-episode psychosis, and are related to childhood interpersonal trauma.

  9. Striatal Reward Activity and Antipsychotic-Associated Weight Change in Patients With Schizophrenia Undergoing Initial Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Ødegaard; Rostrup, Egill; Wulff, Sanne

    2016-01-01

    anticipation is associated with amisulpride-induced weight change in antipsychotic-naive patients with schizophrenia undergoing initial treatment and to examine the association between weight change and changes in reward anticipation activity after treatment. Design, Setting, and Participants: Sixty...... with amisulpride, a relatively selective dopamine D2 antagonist, 39 patients underwent a second fMRI scan and measurement of change in body weight. Final follow-up was completed on January 14, 2014, and data were analyzed from October 25, 2014, to June 15, 2015 and August 31 to September 19, 2015. Exposures: Six...... weeks of individually dosed amisulpride treatment. Main Outcomes and Measures: Reward-anticipation activity in the striatum before and after treatment and weight change. Results: Of the 69 patients who consented to the study, 39 underwent the follow-up fMRI and weight measurement (age range, 18-45 years...

  10. Five years of specialised early intervention versus two years of specialised early intervention followed by three years of standard treatment for patients with a first episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Nikolai; Melau, Marianne; Jensen, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    of three core elements-modified assertive community treatment, family involvement, and social skill training-with a patient-case manager ratio of no more than 12:1. For participants randomised to five years of OPUS treatment, the treatment was largely unchanged. Participants randomised to the control group......OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of five years of specialised early intervention (SEI) treatment for first episode schizophrenia spectrum disorder with the standard two years of SEI plus three years of treatment as usual. DESIGN: Randomised, superiority, parallel group trial with blinded outcome...... assessment. Randomisation was centralised and computerised with concealed randomisation sequence carried out at an external site. SETTING: Participants were recruited from six OPUS teams in Denmark between 2009 and 2012. OPUS teams provide SEI treatment to all patients diagnosed with a schizophrenia spectrum...

  11. Five years of specialised early intervention versus two years of specialised early intervention followed by three years of standard treatment for patients with a first episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Nikolai; Melau, Marianne; Jensen, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    of three core elements-modified assertive community treatment, family involvement, and social skill training-with a patientcase manager ratio of no more than 12:1. For participants randomised to five years of OPUS treatment, the treatment was largely unchanged. Participants randomised to the control group......Objective To compare the effects of five years of specialised early intervention (SEI) treatment for first episode schizophrenia spectrum disorder with the standard two years of SEI plus three years of treatment as usual. Design Randomised, superiority, parallel group trial with blinded outcome...... assessment. Randomisation was centralised and computerised with concealed randomisation sequence carried out at an external site. Setting Participants were recruited from six OPUS teams in Denmark between 2009 and 2012. OPUS teams provide SEI treatment to all patients diagnosed with a schizophrenia spectrum...

  12. The quality of life among first-episode psychotic patients in the OPUS trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Anne; Petersen, Lone; Jeppesen, Pia

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: From an 'objective' perspective, treatment of first-episode psychosis has improved in many ways with the development of specialised early and intensive team-based treatment like e.g. the 'OPUS' treatment. However, the patients' perspective is also important and was investigated in the...... extent and more strongly with the affective balance and level of self-esteem.......BACKGROUND: From an 'objective' perspective, treatment of first-episode psychosis has improved in many ways with the development of specialised early and intensive team-based treatment like e.g. the 'OPUS' treatment. However, the patients' perspective is also important and was investigated...

  13. Rates of First Episode of Psychosis in a Defined Catchment Area in Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Peritogiannis, Vaios; Mantas, Christos; Tatsioni, Athina; Mavreas, Venetsanos

    2013-01-01

    This is the first Greek study presenting epidemiologic data on first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients in a defined catchment area. Data for first episode psychotic patients during a two-year period (2008 and 2009) were obtained by all the mental health providers in the area, public or private. A total of 132 FEP patients were examined in the 2-year period in the catchment area. Most of the patients (61.4%) were diagnosed and treated by private practicing psychiatrists. Statistical analysis sh...

  14. Neurocognitive development in first episode psychosis 5 years follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barder, Helene Eidsmo; Sundet, Kjetil; Rund, Bjørn Rishovd

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive deficits are documented in first-episode psychosis (FEP), but the continuing course is not fully understood. The present study examines the longitudinal development of neurocognitive function in a five year follow-up of FEP-patients, focusing on the relation to illness severity, as meas......Cognitive deficits are documented in first-episode psychosis (FEP), but the continuing course is not fully understood. The present study examines the longitudinal development of neurocognitive function in a five year follow-up of FEP-patients, focusing on the relation to illness severity...

  15. Trajectories of suicidal ideation in patients with first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Trine; Karstoft, Karen-Inge; Secher, Rikke Gry

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heterogeneity in suicidal ideation over time in patients with first-episode psychosis is expected, but prototypical trajectories of this have not yet been established. We aimed to identify trajectories of suicidal ideation over a 3-year period and to examine how these trajectories...... relate to subsequent suicidality. METHODS: We used longitudinal data from the prospective 10-year follow-up OPUS trial of young Danish patients with first-episode psychosis. Participants were recruited between January, 1998, and December, 2000, from all inpatient and outpatient mental health services...

  16. Predictors of functional and clinical outcome in early-onset first-episode psychosis: the child and adolescent first episode of psychosis (CAFEPS) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parellada, Mara; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Pina-Camacho, Laura; Moreno, Dolores; Rapado-Castro, Marta; Otero, Soraya; de la Serna, Elena; Moreno, Carmen; Baeza, Inmaculada; Graell, Montserrat; Arango, Celso

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to study baseline clinical and biological predictors of 2-year outcome in a cohort of children and adolescents with a first episode of psychosis. Standard instruments were used to evaluate symptoms and functioning in 110 children and adolescents (mean age = 15.47 years) with first episode of psychosis at admission (between 2003 and 2005) and after 2-year follow-up. Clinical assessments included diagnostic assessment to yield DSM-IV diagnosis, developmental, premorbid, and past-year data, together with structural neuroimaging and other biological parameters (genetics and oxidative stress). Eighty-three subjects had assessments at baseline (including the Strauss-Carpenter Outcome Scale [SCOS]) and at 2-year follow-up. Association and multistep regression analyses were conducted to show correlates and predictors of primary outcome measures: functional outcome (Children's Global Assessment Scale [CGAS]), improvement (CGAS change), and primary negative symptoms (Proxy for the Deficit Syndrome Scale). The SCOS predicted 27.46% (P < .001) of the variance in CGAS score at 2 years. Baseline severity (measured by CGAS) predicted 30.9% (P < .001) of CGAS improvement after 2 years, and SCOS total score predicted an added 24.1% (P < .001). A diagnosis of nonaffective psychosis, primary negative symptoms, and less white matter at baseline predicted more primary negative symptoms at follow-up. The prediction of functional outcome was not increased by genetic, oxidative stress, or neurostructural markers. Baseline clinical assessments have a better predictive value than biological assessments for 2-year follow-up functioning of children and adolescents with a first episode of psychosis. Patients with primary negative symptoms at baseline continue to have negative symptoms 2 years later, and neurostructural markers predict these. Clinicians must still rely on clinical variables to judge the functional prognosis of early-onset first psychotic episodes

  17. Factor structure of the Cannabis Experiences Questionnaire in a first-episode psychosis sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Michael L; Cleary, Sean D; Ramsay Wan, Claire; Pauselli, Luca; Compton, Michael T

    2017-10-20

    The Cannabis Experiences Questionnaire (CEQ) was developed to measure the subjective experiences of cannabis use both during and after intoxication. Despite the need to better understand the nature of the complex and significant relationship between cannabis use and early psychosis, this questionnaire has rarely been used in individuals with first-episode psychosis. We conducted a set of factor analyses using CEQ data from 194 first-episode psychosis patients who used cannabis in order to uncover the underlying factor structure of the questionnaire and thus the overarching types of psychological experiences during/after using cannabis in young people with psychotic disorders. Our exploratory factor analysis identified 4 subscales, including: Distortions of Reality and Self-Perception (Factor 1), Euphoria Effects (Factor 2), Slowing and Amotivational Effects (Factor 3), and Anxiety and Paranoia Effects (Factor 4). Elucidating the underlying factor structure of the CEQ in first-episode psychosis samples could help researchers move towards a deeper understanding of the types of experiences associated with cannabis intoxication among young adults with first-episode psychosis and could inform the development of programs designed to reduce use, improve the course of illness, and possibly delay or prevent the onset of psychotic symptoms in those at risk. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. First episode of consciousness loss: setting new standards in acute care management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuciureanu Dan Iulian

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a high prevalence of patients addressed to the emergency department presenting a first episode of consciousness loss. The high prevalence of patients admitted to the emergency departments (ED with a first episode of consciousness loss (ECL is well established. Although there are studies assessing acute management in these patients, there is still need for more data on clinical and paraclinical characteristics which may prompt early etiological diagnosis, especially in countries where integrated medical procedures are lacking and access to specialized medical care is still limited. Sudden death syndrome, early cerebral morphological changes emerging in chronic epilepsy is the main motivation for an early diagnosis of epilepsy. The aim of our study was to evaluate demographic, clinical and paraclinical data in adult patients referred to our emergency hospital presenting a first episode of consciousness loss, in order to avoid misdiagnosis (with personal and social high impact and unnecessary anti-epileptic treatment versus underestimation of epilepsy diagnosis. Conclusion: There is a clear need to improve multidisciplinary circuits in patients with a first episode of consciousness loss at a local level, in order to promote accurate and prompt diagnosis. We consider necessary to build a unitary online platform in order to establish an early and complete diagnosis.

  19. The quality of life among first-episode psychotic patients in the OPUS trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Anne; Petersen, Lone; Jeppesen, Pia

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: From an 'objective' perspective, treatment of first-episode psychosis has improved in many ways with the development of specialised early and intensive team-based treatment like e.g. the 'OPUS' treatment. However, the patients' perspective is also important and was investigated in the...... extent and more strongly with the affective balance and level of self-esteem....

  20. Effects on referral patterns of reducing intensive informational campaigns about first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joa, Inge; Johannessen, Jan Olav; Auestad, Bjørn

    2007-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to assess referral patterns and duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) following the partial dismantling of intensive, information campaigns (IC) to help detect first-episode, non-affective psychosis via early detection teams in the TIPS study....

  1. Relationship between substance abuse and first-episode psychosis - a South African perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Brink

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Co-morbidity between substance abuse and psy- chotic disorders is high. Few studies have examined therelationship between first-episode psychosis and substance abuse. Several questions emerge from this common relationship and many of them remain unanswered. Objectives. To determine the effect of substance abuse on psychosis in terms of onset, duration, severity of symptoms, use of medication and outcome. Method. Thirty - three subjects with first-episode psychosis, as well as primary caregivers, were interviewed re g a rding substance abuse and its relation to illness. Thirty-six control subjects were also interv i e w e d . Results. Twenty-seven per cent of subjects abused substances in the 3 months before onset of illness, and 77.8% of the abusers w e re male. Subjects in the first-episode psychosis group were m o re likely to choose cannabis as their substance of abuse than c o n t rols. They also started abusing substances at a younger age than controls. Subjects with first-episode psychosis who abused substances presented at an earlier age than non-abusers. Substances affected symptoms at baseline presentation . Conclusions. Substance abuse has a significant impact on first- onset psychosis as far as age of onset and symptom severity are c o n c e rned. Subjects with an underlying vulnerability to psychosis seem to start abusing substances at an earlier age than the general population. Males are more likely to abuse substances than females.

  2. Interference control in children with first episode major depression : A brief report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meere, Jaap; Börger, Norbert A.; Pirila, Silja; Sallee, Floyed

    2011-01-01

    The ability to deal with sources of conflict, that is, interference control, was evaluated in a group of 11 children with first episode Major Depression and a peer control group. To this end, the Eriksen and Schultz (1979) task was used. Here, the participant is presented with a stimulus that

  3. Does duration of untreated psychosis bias study samples of first-episode psychosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, S; Melle, I; Larsen, T K

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: While findings are contradictory, many studies report that long Duration of Untreated Psychosis (DUP) correlates with poorer outcome in first episode psychosis. In an outcome study of first-episode psychosis, we compared the patients who refused to participate in a follow-along with th......OBJECTIVE: While findings are contradictory, many studies report that long Duration of Untreated Psychosis (DUP) correlates with poorer outcome in first episode psychosis. In an outcome study of first-episode psychosis, we compared the patients who refused to participate in a follow......-along with those who consented to estimate the importance of this factor in sample recruitment bias. Our questions were: (i) What is the percentage of refusers? (ii) Are there systematic differences between refusers and consenters on DUP and/or other admission variables? (iii) What is the risk of refusal...... for different values of DUP? METHOD: In an unselected group of consecutively admitted patients we compared follow-along refusers and consenters on the following admission variables: sex, age, diagnostic group, substance abuse, being in-patient, coming from an early detection site and DUP. We conducted...

  4. [Etiology and risk factors for a first episode of cerebral isquemia in young adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarazona, B; Ramos, W; Arce, J; Yarinsueca, J; Morales, S; Ronceros, G; Galarza, C; Pérez, J

    2010-10-01

    To determinate the etiology and risk factors for a first episode of cerebral ischemia in young adults at three hospitals of Lima and Callao-Peru. Multicentric study carried out at three national hospitals in Lima. The sample included 30 patients with a first episode of stroke and 60 controls matched by age and sex 2:1 with the patients. Serum biochemistry studies, EKGs and echocardiograms were done. Etiologies were classified based on the classification of Baltimore-Washington Cooperative Young Stroke Study. The most frequent etiologies were cardiac embolism and atherosclerotic valvular heart disease, which were 30% of the cases (9 patients) each one. Hypertriglyceridemia (p=0.014), valvular heart disease (p=0.001) and hormonal contraception/replacement therapy (p=0.002) were independent risk factors for a first episode of cerebral ischemia in peruvian young adults. Motor deficiency was the most frequent presentation (50.0%). Intracraneal hypertension and urinary tract infection were the most frequent complications during acute ischemia and mortality was raised up to 10%. The hypertriglyceridemia, valvular heart disease and the use of oral contraceptives are independent risk factors for a first episode of ischemia in young adults from three hospitals of Lima and Callao. The most frequent etiologies were cardiac embolism and atheroesclerotic valvular heart disease.

  5. Change in cannabis use, clinical symptoms and social functioning among patients with first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, L; Hjorthøj, C R; Thorup, Anne A.E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies indicate that cannabis use among patients with psychotic disorders is associated with worse outcome, but only a few studies have controlled for baseline condition and medication. METHOD: At 5-year follow-up, interviews were carried out with 314 first-episode psychosis ...

  6. Are multi family groups appropriate for patients with first episode psychosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossberg, Jan Ivar; Johannessen, J O; Klungsoyr, O

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare outcome over 5 years for patients who participated in multi family groups (MFGs) to those who refused or were not offered participation. METHOD: Of 301 first episode psychotic patients aged 15-65 years, 147 participated in MFGs. Outcome was measured by drop-out rates, positive...

  7. Clinical correlates of first episode early onset psychosis in KwaZulu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The study of first episode early onset psychosis can yield many clues to understanding the early development of psychosis and guide interventions to decrease psychosis risk and improve outcome. The aim of the study was to investigate the socio-demographic profile and clinical correlates in early onset ...

  8. Criminal offending and distinguishing features of offenders among persons experiencing a first episode of psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hodgins, Sheilagh

    2011-02-01

    Persons with severe mental illness (SMI) are at increased risk of criminal offending, particularly violent offending, as compared with the general population. Most offenders with SMI acquire convictions prior to contact with mental health services. This study examined offending among 301 individuals experiencing their first episode of psychosis.

  9. Regional Gray Matter Volume Deficits in Adolescents with First-Episode Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Joost; Parellada, Mara; Moreno, Dolores; Graell, Montserrat; Fraguas, David; Zabala, Arantzazu; Vazquez, Veronica Garcia; Desco, Manuel; Arango, Celso

    2008-01-01

    The regional gray matter volumes of adolescents with first-episode psychosis are compared with those of a control group. Magnetic resonance imaging was conducted on 70 patients with early onset FEP and on 51 individuals without FEP. Findings revealed that volume deficits in the left medial frontal gray matter were common in individuals with…

  10. Influence of childhood trauma on diagnosis and substance use in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassi, S; Tosato, S; Mondelli, V; Faravelli, C; Lasalvia, A; Fioravanti, G; Bonetto, C; Fioritti, A; Cremonese, C; Lo Parrino, R; De Santi, K; Meneghelli, A; Torresani, S; De Girolamo, G; Semrov, E; Pratelli, M; Cristofalo, D; Ruggeri, M

    2017-09-01

    Background Childhood trauma has been significantly associated with first-episode psychosis, affective dysfunction and substance use. Aims To test whether people with first-episode psychosis who had experienced childhood trauma, when compared with those who had not, showed a higher rate of affective psychosis and an increased lifetime rate of substance use. Method The sample comprised 345 participants with first-episode psychosis (58% male, mean age 29.8 years, s.d. = 9.7). Results Severe sexual abuse was significantly associated with a diagnosis of affective psychosis (χ 2 = 4.9, P = 0.04) and with higher rates of lifetime use of cannabis (68% v 41%; P = 0.02) and heroin (20% v 5%; P = 0.02). Severe physical abuse was associated with increased lifetime use of heroin (15% v 5%; P = 0.03) and cocaine (32% v 17%; P = 0.05). Conclusions Patients with first-episode psychosis exposed to childhood trauma appear to constitute a distinctive subgroup in terms of diagnosis and lifetime substance use. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.

  11. First-episode psychosis patients recruited into treatment via early detection teams versus ordinary pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Jan O; Friis, Svein; Joa, Inge

    2007-01-01

    Within an early detection sector, to compare the 1- and 2-year course and outcome of first-episode psychosis patients coming into the treatment system via active outreach detection teams (DTs) versus those achieving help via ordinary referral channels (not-DT)....

  12. Current Data on and Clinical Insights into the Treatment of First Episode Nonaffective Psychosis: A Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Pelayo-Teran, Jose Maria; Mayoral-van Son, Jacqueline

    2016-12-01

    Implementing the most suitable treatment strategies and making appropriate clinical decisions about individuals with a first episode of psychosis (FEP) is a complex and crucial task, with relevant impact in illness outcome. Treatment approaches in the early stages should go beyond choosing the right antipsychotic drug and should also address tractable factors influencing the risk of relapse. Effectiveness and likely metabolic and endocrine disturbances differ among second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) and should guide the choice of the first-line treatment. Clinicians should be aware of the high risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in schizophrenia patients, and therefore monitoring weight and metabolic changes across time is mandatory. Behavioral and counseling interventions might be partly effective in reducing weight gain and metabolic disturbances. Ziprasidone and aripiprazole have been described to be least commonly associated with weight gain or metabolic changes. In addition, some of the SGAs (risperidone, amisulpride, and paliperidone) have been associated with a significant increase of plasma prolactin levels. Overall, in cases of FEP, there should be a clear recommendation of using lower doses of the antipsychotic medication. If no or minimal clinical improvement is found after 2 weeks of treatment, such patients may benefit from a change or augmentation of treatment. Clinicians should provide accurate information to patients and relatives about the high risk of relapse if antipsychotics are discontinued, even if patients have been symptom free and functionally recovered on antipsychotic treatment for a lengthy period of time.

  13. Functional deterioration from the premorbid period to 2 years after the first episode of psychosis in early-onset psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rey-Mejías, Ángel; Fraguas, David; Díaz-Caneja, Covadonga M; Pina-Camacho, Laura; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Baeza, Inmaculada; Espliego, Ana; Merchán-Naranjo, Jessica; González-Pinto, Ana; de la Serna, Elena; Payá, Beatriz; Graell, Montserrat; Arango, Celso; Parellada, Mara

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze changes in functional adjustment from childhood to 2 years after the first episode of psychosis (FEP) in patients with early-onset schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD) and affective psychoses (AFP) and a good or intermediate level of premorbid adjustment. We followed 106 adolescents (aged 12-17 years) with FEP for 2 years after recruitment. Premorbid adjustment in childhood was assessed in 98 patients with the childhood subscale of the Cannon-Spoor Premorbid Adjustment Scale (c-PAS). Global functioning was assessed 2 years after the FEP with the Children's Global Assessment Scale (c-GAS) or the Global Assessment of Functioning scale (GAF), as appropriate. Functional deterioration was defined as a downward shift in the level of functional adjustment from childhood to 2 years after the FEP. In patients with good or intermediate premorbid adjustment, functional deterioration was observed in 28.2 % (26.5 % of the AFP group, 29.4 % of the SSD group). Longer duration of untreated psychosis (Beta = 0.01; P = 0.01) and higher symptom severity at the FEP, as measured with the Clinical Global Impression Scale (Beta = 1.12; P = 0.02), significantly predicted the presence of functional deterioration, accounting for 21.4 % of the variance. Irrespective of diagnosis (SSD or AFP), almost one-third of adolescents with FEP and good or intermediate premorbid adjustment showed functional deterioration from the premorbid period to 2 years after the FEP.

  14. Auditory and non-auditory hallucinations in first-episode psychosis: Differential associations with diverse clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galletti, Chiara; Paolini, Enrico; Tortorella, Alfonso; Compton, Michael T

    2017-08-01

    Data from 247 first-episode psychosis patients were used to explore associations between types of hallucinations and nine diverse clinical characteristics. Psychopathology was rated using the Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms and Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS). Childhood adversity was assessed with seven instruments; family history with an adapted version of the Family Interview for Genetic Studies; age at onset of psychosis and duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) with the Symptom Onset in Schizophrenia inventory; and insight with the Birchwood Insight Scale. Both principal component analysis-derived Auditory and Non-Auditory Hallucinations were similarly associated with delusions of influence, negative affect delusions (jealousy and sin/guilt), interpersonal childhood abuse, DUP, and insight. However, the two hallucination domains had different associations with grandiose/religious, paranoid, and somatic delusions; SANS score; childhood violence exposure; cannabis use disorders; and cocaine/other drug use disorders. Neither Auditory nor Non-Auditory Hallucinations were associated with childhood neglect, age at onset, alcohol use disorders, family history, or mode of onset of psychosis. Findings support considering hallucinations not as a unitary psychopathological construct. They represent at least two domains and are correlated in different ways with diverse clinical variables. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Incidence of stressful life events and influence of sociodemographic and clinical variables on the onset of first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butjosa, Anna; Gómez-Benito, Juana; Huerta-Ramos, Elena; Del Cacho, Núria; Barajas, Ana; Baños, Iris; Usall, Judith; Dolz, Montserrat; Sánchez, Bernardo; Carlson, Janina; Maria Haro, Josep; Ochoa, Susana

    2016-11-30

    This study presents a quantitative analysis of the incidence of stressful life events (SLEs) and the variables gender, age at onset, family history and psychotic symptoms in patients with first-episode psychosis (FEP). A descriptive, cross-sectional methodology was used to interview 68 patients with FEP between 13 and 47 years of age. The Psychiatric Epidemiology Research Interview Life Events Scale collected one-year period prior to onset of FEP - used to analyse the subcategories academic, work, love and marriage, children, residence, legal affairs, finances and social activities-, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, and Clinical Global Impression-Schizophrenia scale were used to assess the relevance of certain SLEs during adolescence. Age at onset showed a significant negative correlation with the categories academic and social activities. By contrast, it showed a positive correlation with work and children. A significant relationship was found between paternal family history and social activities and between maternal family history and academic and love and marriage. Finally, an inverse relationship was observed between negative symptoms and the categories children and finance. Depressive symptoms were significantly correlated with the category academic. Our results show the importance of SLEs during adolescence and suggest that there is a clear need to develop preventive actions that promote effective strategies for dealing with the accumulation of psychosocial stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Diffusion tensor imaging tractography of the fornix and belief confidence in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchy, Lisa; Luck, David; Czechowska, Yvonne; Malla, Ashok; Joober, Ridha; Lepage, Martin

    2012-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that patients with psychosis are more confident in beliefs and judgments compared to healthy participants and psychiatric controls with major depression. A recent study conducted by our research group has provided evidence for hippocampal pathology in association with overconfidence in a first-episode psychosis sample. The fornix is the primary efferent neural pathway of the hippocampus and may also play a role in self-certainty pathophysiology. The current investigation applied diffusion tensor imaging tractography to a first-episode psychosis sample to explore whether integrity of the fornix is associated with self-certainty. High resolution structural magnetic resonance and diffusion tensor images were obtained in 44 people with a first-episode psychosis. Diffusion tensor imaging tractography was used to estimate fractional anisotrophy (FA), a measure of white matter integrity, in the fornix. Confidence in beliefs and judgments was measured with the self-certainty subscale of the Beck Cognitive Insight Scale (BCIS). The analysis showed that self-certainty significantly correlated to FA values in the right fornix but was nonsignificant for the left fornix. The findings indicate anatomical dysconnectivity of the right fornix in correlation with BCIS-rated self-certainty in our first-episode psychosis sample. When considered with our previously published self-certainty-hippocampus result in a first-episode psychosis sample, overlapping with that of this study, the results indicate a concurrence of volumetric reductions in hippocampus and fornix pathology in correlation with self-certainty. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Family Burden, Emotional Distress and Service Satisfaction in First Episode Psychosis. Data from the GET UP Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirella Ruggeri

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Literature has documented the role of family in the outcome of chronic schizophrenia. In the light of this, family interventions (FIs are becoming an integral component of treatment for psychosis. The First Episode of Psychosis (FEP is the period when most of the changes in family atmosphere are observed; unfortunately, few studies on the relatives are available.Objective: To explore burden of care and emotional distress at baseline and at 9-month follow-up and the levels of service satisfaction at follow-up in the two groups of relatives (experimental treatment EXP vs. treatment as usual TAU recruited in the cluster-randomized controlled GET UP PIANO trial.Methods: The experimental treatment was provided by routine public Community Mental Health Centers (Italian National Health Service and consisted of Treatment as Usual plus evidence-based additional treatment (Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for psychosis for patients, Family Intervention for psychosis, and Case Management. TAU consisted of personalized outpatient psychopharmacological treatment, combined with non-specific supportive clinical management and informal support/educational sessions for families. The outcomes on relatives were assessed by the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire (IEQ-EU, the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12, and the Verona Service Satisfaction Scale (VSSS-EU. Differences within and between groups were evaluated.Results: At baseline, 75 TAU and 185 EXP caregivers were assessed. In the experimental group 92% of relatives participated in at least 1 family session. At follow-up both groups experienced improvement in all IEQ and GHQ items, but caregivers belonging to the EXP arm experienced a significantly greater change in 10 IEQ items (mainly pertaining to the “Tension” dimension and in GHQ items. Due to the low sample size, a significant effectiveness was only observed for 2 IEQ items and 1 GHQ-12 item. With respect to VSSS data at follow

  18. Rates of first episode of psychosis in a defined catchment area in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peritogiannis, Vaios; Mantas, Christos; Tatsioni, Athina; Mavreas, Venetsanos

    2013-01-01

    This is the first Greek study presenting epidemiologic data on first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients in a defined catchment area. Data for first episode psychotic patients during a two-year period (2008 and 2009) were obtained by all the mental health providers in the area, public or private. A total of 132 FEP patients were examined in the 2-year period in the catchment area. Most of the patients (61.4%) were diagnosed and treated by private practicing psychiatrists. Statistical analysis showed no differences between the two sectors in terms of patients' age, gender, family and social status, profession and duration of untreated psychosis (median duration 6 months). Patients who were abusing substances and had no family psychiatric history were less likely been treated in the public sector. Immigrants comprised only a small proportion of the patients, probably because they have difficulties in accessing the mental health system.

  19. Frequency of acute bacterial meningitis in children with first episode of febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Hina Batool; Haider, Nighat; Khan, Zarmast

    2017-07-01

    To determine the frequency of acute bacterial meningitis in children with first episode of febrile seizures. This cross-sectional study was conducted at the Polyclinic, Postgraduate Medical Institute, Islamabad, Pakistan, from December 2012 to August 2013, and comprised patients with first episode of fever and seizure. SPSS 10 was used for data analysis. Of the157 patients, 12(7.6%) were diagnosed to have acute bacterial meningitis with 5(41.6%) in the age group of 6-12 months, 4(33.3%) in 13-18 months and 3(25%) in the age group of 19-60 months. Clinicians evaluating children after a febrile seizure should direct their attention toward identifying the cause of the child's fever.

  20. Substance Use in Patients With First-Episode Psychosis: Is Gender Relevant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arranz, Belen; Safont, Gemma; Corripio, Iluminada; Ramirez, Nicolas; Dueñas, Rosa Maria; Perez, Victor; Alvarez, Enric; San, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Only a few studies in patients with first-episode psychosis have included gender in the study hypothesis or considered this a primary study variable. The aim of this study was to explore the influence of gender in the pattern of substance use in patients with first-episode psychosis. This is a sub-analysis of a randomized open clinical trial that compared 1-year treatment retention rates of patients with first-episode psychosis randomized to haloperidol, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, or ziprasidone. Our sub-analysis included 85 men and 29 women. Substance use was relatively high among these patients and differed significantly by gender. Men were more likely to use substances overall than women (89.4% for men vs. 55.2% for women), χ(2) = 16.2, df = 1, p cocaine (χ(2) = 10.3; df = 1, p cocaine, men were significantly younger at first consumption of cannabis (M = 16.08 years, SD = 2.1) than women (M = 18.0 years, SD = 3.8), F(1, 59) = 5, p psychosis, F(3, 29) = 1.2, p =.30. However, there was a significant difference among men, with earlier onset of psychosis noted in men consuming multiple substances; F(4, 85) = 5.8, p psychosis, both male gender and the use of a higher number of substances significantly predicted an earlier age at onset of psychosis. Our study provides some evidence of gender differences in the pattern of substance use in patients with first-episode psychosis, suggesting the possible need for gender-specific approaches in the interventions performed in these patients. This study is registered as #12610000954022 with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (www.anzctr.org.au).

  1. Screening for substance use disorders in first-episode psychosis: implications for readmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalla, Albert; Garcia-Rizo, Clemente; Castellví, Pere; Fernandez-Egea, Emili; Yücel, Murat; Parellada, Eduard; Kirkpatrick, Brian; Martin-Santos, Rocío; Bernardo, Miguel

    2013-05-01

    Screening of substance use may prove useful to prevent readmission after the first episode of psychosis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of drug use on readmission risk in a first-episode psychosis sample, and to determine whether the cannabis/cocaine subscale of the Dartmouth Assessment of Lifestyle Inventory (DALI) is a better predictive instrument than urinary analysis. After admission, first-episode psychotic patients were interviewed for substance use and assessed with the DALI scale. They also underwent blood and urine sampling. Time to readmission was studied as a dependent outcome. The Kaplan-Meier estimator was applied to estimate the survival curves for bivariate analysis. The Cox proportional hazards model for multivariate analysis was assessed in order to control for potential confounders. ROC curve and validity parameters were used to assess validity to detect readmission. Fifty-eight patients were included. The DALI cannabis/cocaine subscale and urinalysis were associated with increased readmission risk in survival curves, mainly the first five years of follow-up. After controlling for potential confounding variables for readmission, only the DALI cannabis/cocaine subscale remained as a significant risk factor. In terms of validity, the DALI cannabis/cocaine subscale was more sensitive than urinalysis. Alcohol assessments were not related to readmission. The findings demonstrated that a quick screening self-report scale for cannabis/cocaine use disorders is superior to urinary analysis for predicting readmission. Future research should consider longitudinal assessments of brief validated screening tests in order to evaluate their benefits in preventing early readmission in first-episode psychosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The relationship between insight and neurological dysfunction in first-episode psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hill, M

    2012-04-01

    Impaired insight is commonly seen in psychosis and some studies have proposed that is a biologically based deficit. Support for this view comes from the excess of neurological soft signs (NSS) observed in patients with psychoses and their neural correlates which demonstrate a degree of overlap with the regions of interest implicated in neuroimaging studies of insight. The aim was to examine the relationship between NSS and insight in a sample of 241 first-episode psychosis patients.

  3. The Effect of Substance Use on 10-Year Outcome in First-Episode Psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weibell, Melissa A; Hegelstad, Wenche Ten Velden; Auestad, Bjørn

    2017-01-01

    Substance use is common in first-episode psychosis (FEP) and has been linked to poorer outcomes with more severe psychopathology and higher relapse rates. Early substance discontinuation appears to improve symptoms and function. However, studies vary widely in their methodology, and few have exam...... be significantly reversed if one stops the abuse in time. This can help patients who struggle with addiction with their motivation to embrace abstinence....

  4. Self-Determination Theory and First-Episode Psychosis: A Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. K. Breitborde

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-determination theory (SDT posits that human well-being depends on the satisfaction of three basic psychological needs: autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Although many scholars have suggested that SDT may be relevant to psychotic disorders, only one empirical study of SDT in individuals with psychosis has been completed to date by Breitborde and colleagues (2012. This study revealed that individuals with first-episode psychosis reported lower satisfaction of the three basic psychological needs as compared to individuals without psychosis. Moreover, greater satisfaction of basic psychological needs was modestly associated with lower general symptoms (e.g., anxiety and depression, greater social functioning, and better quality of life. Thus, the goal of this project was to replicate Breitborde et al.’s (2012 investigation of basic psychological need satisfaction among individuals with first-episode psychosis. Our results supported the conclusion that individuals with first-episode psychosis report lower autonomy, competence, and relatedness than individuals without psychosis. Moreover, our results comport with the finding that greater need satisfaction was associated with less severe symptomatology and better social functioning and quality of life. In total, the findings lend further credence to the hypothesis that SDT may help to inform the development of improved clinical services for individuals with psychotic disorders.

  5. Endurance Tests Ability to predict Chronicity in First Episode Acute Low Back Pain Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asghar Norasteh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Despite evaluation of spinal muscle endurance was done in chronic low back pain, this has not been studied in first episode acute low back pain. The purpose of present study was comparatively evaluating patients with first-episode low back pain and healthy subjects to predict disability and chronicity after six weeks with spinal muscle endurance tests. Materials & Methods: Through an analytical, cross sectional and case – control study in the first stage of research Eliot’s spinal endurance tests were used to evaluate endurance. Disability and pain were used to assess recovery. The study was conducted in two groups of patients (n=32 and normal subjects (n=51 using non-randomized simple sampling. In the second stage, a longitudinal prospective study was done. Studied variables were compared in recovered and non recovered patients after six weeks. Data were analyzed by using Kolmogorof – Smirnoff test, independent T test and Chi-Square. Results: The results of independent t tests showed lower muscular endurance in patients compared to normal individuals (P<0.0001. Also the results of independent t-tests showed lower flexor endurance in unrecovered patients (P<0.04. Conclusion: It seems low back pain patients can contract decreased endurance in the first episode and no need to repeat episodes. Results show may be endurance tests could differentiate acute low back pain patients with high risk to chronicity and disability.

  6. Treatment and violent behavior in persons with first episode psychosis during a 10-year prospective follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langeveld, Johannes; Bjørkly, Stål; Auestad, Bjørn

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: First episode psychosis (FEP) patients have an increased risk for violence and criminal activity prior to initial treatment. However, little is known about the prevalence of criminality and acts of violence many years after implementation of treatment for a first episode psychosis. AI...

  7. Early detection, early symptom progression and symptomatic remission after ten years in a first episode of psychosis study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ten Velden Hegelstad, Wenche; Haahr, Ulrik; Larsen, Tor K

    2013-01-01

    Poor symptom outcome remains a challenge in psychosis: At least 50% of first-episode patients continue to have positive and/or negative symptoms after ten years.......Poor symptom outcome remains a challenge in psychosis: At least 50% of first-episode patients continue to have positive and/or negative symptoms after ten years....

  8. Opposite effective connectivity in the posterior cingulate and medial prefrontal cortex between first-episode schizophrenic patients with suicide risk and healthy controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiran Zhang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The schizophrenic patients with high suicide risk are characterized by depression, better cognitive function, and prominent positive symptoms. However, the neurobiological basis of suicide attempts in schizophrenia is not clear. The suicide in schizophrenia is implicated in the defects in emotional process and decision-making, which are associated with prefrontal-cingulate circuit. In order to explore the possible neurobiological basis of suicide in schizophrenia, we investigated the correlation of prefrontal-cingulate circuit with suicide risk in schizophrenia via dynamic casual modelling. METHOD: Participants were 33 first-episode schizophrenic patients comprising of a high suicide risk group (N = 14 and a low suicide risk group (N = 19. A comparison group of healthy controls (N = 15 were matched for age, gender and education. N-back tasking functional magnetic resonance imaging data was collected. RESULTS: Compared with healthy controls group, the two patients groups showed decreased task-related suppression during 2-back task state versus baseline state in the left posterior cingulate and medial prefrontal cortex; the hyper-connectivity from the left posterior cingulate cortex to the left medial prefrontal cortex existed in both schizophrenic patients groups, but hypo-connectivity in the opposite direction only existed in the schizophrenic patients group with high suicide risk. CONCLUSIONS: The hyper-connectivity from the left posterior cingulate cortex to the left medial prefrontal cortex may suggest that the abnormal effective connectivity was associated with risk for schizophrenia. The hypo-connectivity in the opposite direction may represent a possible correlate of increased vulnerability to suicide attempt.

  9. Aberrant within- and between-network connectivity of the mirror neuron system network and the mentalizing network in first episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Eugenie; Lee, Tae Young; Kim, Minah; Hur, Ji-Won; Yoon, Youngwoo Bryan; Cho, Kang-Ik K; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2018-03-26

    It has been suggested that the mentalizing network and the mirror neuron system network support important social cognitive processes that are impaired in schizophrenia. However, the integrity and interaction of these two networks have not been sufficiently studied, and their effects on social cognition in schizophrenia remain unclear. Our study included 26 first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients and 26 healthy controls. We utilized resting-state functional connectivity to examine the a priori-defined mirror neuron system network and the mentalizing network and to assess the within- and between-network connectivities of the networks in FEP patients. We also assessed the correlation between resting-state functional connectivity measures and theory of mind performance. FEP patients showed altered within-network connectivity of the mirror neuron system network, and aberrant between-network connectivity between the mirror neuron system network and the mentalizing network. The within-network connectivity of the mirror neuron system network was noticeably correlated with theory of mind task performance in FEP patients. The integrity and interaction of the mirror neuron system network and the mentalizing network may be altered during the early stages of psychosis. Additionally, this study suggests that alterations in the integrity of the mirror neuron system network are highly related to deficient theory of mind in schizophrenia, and this problem would be present from the early stage of psychosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Late Onset First Episode Psychosis Emerging as Delusional Misidentification of Familiar Sacred Places During a Holy Pilgrimage: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awara, Mahmoud A; Moselhy, Hamdy F; Elnenaei, Manal O

    2017-11-07

    The delusional misidentification syndromes (DMS) include a myriad of discrete but related syndromes, which have wide spectrum anomalies of familiarity. Several misidentification syndromes have been described in the psychiatric literature, the most common of these delusions are: the Capgras syndrome; the Fregoli syndrome; the syndrome of inter-metamorphosis; reduplicative paramnesia; and environmental reduplication. The reported case highlights the emergence of late onset first episode psychosis in a Middle Eastern 65-year-old female who has no previous psychiatric history. The nature of psychosis was mainly delusions of misidentification and persecution. DMS are relatively rare and occur predominantly in association with schizophrenia and affective psychosis. Between 25 and 40% are associated with organic conditions such as dementia, head injuries, brain tumors, and epilepsy. Only three cases of misidentification of sacred places have been reported previously in the literature. This case report is the first to present a DMS, emerging as a late onset first episode psychosis during the sacred journey of Hajj. The reported case highlights the importance of early recognition and treatment of mental health conditions that may appear de novo during the Hajj sacred journey. Readily available psychiatric resources, psychotropic medications, and psycho-education may be pivotal in ensuring mental well-being of pilgrims, which is fundamental to maintain the mental capacity required for completing these journeys.

  11. Family Functioning in First-Episode and Chronic Psychosis: The Role of Patient's Symptom Severity and Psychosocial Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutra, Katerina; Triliva, Sofia; Roumeliotaki, Theano; Basta, Maria; Lionis, Christos; Vgontzas, Alexandros N

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the relationship between illness-related characteristics, such as symptom severity and psychosocial functioning, and specific aspects of family functioning both in patients experiencing their first episode of psychosis (FEP) and chronically ill patients. A total of 50 FEP and 50 chronic patients diagnosed with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder (most recent episode manic severe with psychotic features) and their family caregivers participated in the study. Family functioning was evaluated in terms of cohesion and flexibility (FACES IV Package), expressed emotion (FQ), family burden (FBS) and caregivers' psychological distress (GHQ-28). Patients' symptom severity (BPRS) and psychosocial functioning (GAS) were assessed by their treating psychiatrist within 2 weeks from the caregivers' assessment. Increased symptom severity was associated with greater dysfunction in terms of family cohesion and flexibility (β coefficient -0.13; 95 % CI -0.23, -0.03), increased caregivers' EE levels on the form of emotional overinvolvement (β coefficient 1.03; 95 % CI 0.02, 2.03), and psychological distress (β coefficient 3.37; 95 % CI 1.29, 5.45). Family burden was found to be significantly related to both symptom severity (β coefficient 3.01; 95 % CI 1.50, 4.51) and patient's functioning (β coefficient -2.04; 95 % CI -3.55, -0.53). No significant interaction effect of chronicity was observed in the afore-mentioned associations. These findings indicate that severe psychopathology and patient's low psychosocial functioning are associated with poor family functioning. It appears that the effect for family function is significant from the early stages of the illness. Thus, early psychoeducational interventions should focus on patients with severe symptomatology and impaired functioning and their families.

  12. Evolution of metabolic risk factors over a two-year period in a cohort of first episodes of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioque, Miquel; García-Portilla, M A Paz; García-Rizo, Clemente; Cabrera, Bibiana; Lobo, Antonio; González-Pinto, Ana; Díaz-Caneja, Covadonga M; Corripio, Iluminada; Vieta, Eduard; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Bobes, Julio; Gutiérrez-Fraile, Miguel; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Roberto; Mezquida, Gisela; Llerena, Adrián; Saiz-Ruiz, Jeronimo; Bernardo, Miguel

    2018-03-01

    Patients with a first episode of psychosis (FEP) display a broad range of metabolic risk factors related to the development of diverse medical comorbidities. Initial stages of these disorders are essential in understanding the increased vulnerability of developing cardiometabolic disturbances, associated with a reduced life expectancy. This study aimed to evaluate the metabolic profile of a cohort of patients with a FEP and its evolution during a two year follow-up, as well as the factors that influence the changes in their metabolic status. 16 participating centers from the PEPs Project recruited 335 subjects with a FEP and 253 matched healthy controls, aged 9-35years. We investigated a set of anthropometric measures, vital signs and laboratory data obtained from each participant over two years in a prospective, naturalistic study. From the beginning of the study the FEP group showed differences in the metabolic profile compared to the control group, together with a progressive worsening in the major part of the analyzed variables during the follow-up period, with higher rates of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Certain risk factors were related to determinate clinical variables such as male gender, the presence of affective symptoms or an early onset or to treatment variables such as the use of antipsychotic polypharmacy, antidepressants or mood stabilizers. Our results highlight the extremely high risk of patients at early phases of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders of developing cardiovascular comorbidity and the fast worsening of the metabolic profile during the first two years. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Profiling of Amino Acids and Their Derivatives Biogenic Amines Before and After Antipsychotic Treatment in First-Episode Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liisa Leppik

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia (SCH is a heterogeneous disorder, deriving from a potential multitude of etiopathogenetic factors. During the past few years there has been an increasing interest in the role of circulating amino acids (AAs and biogenic amines (BAs in the pathophysiology of SCH. In the present study, we aimed to provide an insight into the potential role of alterations in levels of AAs and BAs as well as examine their more specific metabolic shifts in relation to early stage of SCH. We measured 21 AAs and 17 BAs in serum samples of patients with first-episode psychosis (FEP before and after 7-month antipsychotic treatment in comparison to control subjects (CSs. According to multivariate analysis, antipsychotic-naïve FEP patients had significantly higher levels of taurine and spermine, whereas values of proline (Pro, alpha-aminoadipic acid (alpha-AAA, kynurenine (Kyn, valine (Val, tyrosine (Tyr, citrulline (Citr, tryptophan (Trp, and histidine (His were diminished compared to CSs. Increased levels of taurine and spermine, as well as reduced levels of alpha-AAA and Kyn probably reflect the compromised function of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors in patients. The decreased levels of Pro (AA modulating the function of glutamate decarboxylase likely reflect the imbalanced function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA system in the brain of FEP patients. The alterations in ratio between Tyr and phenylalanine (Phe can be taken as a sign of compromised function of dopaminergic system. These metabolic shifts were reinstated by 7-month antipsychotic treatment. Serum metabolic profiles can be regarded as important indicators to investigate clinical course of SCH and treatment response.

  14. Premorbid IQ subgroups in first episode non affective psychosis patients: Long-term sex differences in function and neurocognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayesa-Arriola, Rosa; Setién-Suero, Esther; Neergaard, Karl David; Belzunces, Àuria Albacete; Contreras, Fernando; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto

    2017-12-21

    Low IQ has been associated with schizophrenia, even to the point of being posited as a possible causal factor for psychosis. However, individuals with normal and high IQ also develop psychotic illnesses. The aim of this study was to characterize premorbid IQ subgroups at first episode of psychosis (FEP). The study sample comes from a large epidemiological, 3-year longitudinal, intervention program on psychosis containing individuals living in a catchment area in Spain. Estimated premorbid IQ (epIQ) scores were used to build low (110) epIQ subgroups in samples of FEP patients (N=292) and healthy controls (N=199). The epIQ subgroups were compared in sociodemographic, neuropsychological, clinical and premorbid characteristics. Long-term functional and cognitive outcome, with a focus on sex differences, were also explored. Low-epIQ was more frequently found in FEP patients (28.8%) than in healthy controls (14.6%). Low-epIQ patients were more likely to have worse premorbid adjustment, belong to low socioeconomic status families, have less years of education, and to be single, unemployed, and younger. They presented more severe impairments in processing speed, executive and global cognitive function. Female patients with low-epIQ showed better baseline function and more stable outcome than males. Our results indicate that low premorbid IQ is a morbid manifestation, easily detected in a subgroup of FEP patients that predicts poorer outcome particularly in males. This perspective provides important information for the tailoring of subgroup-specific early intervention programs for psychosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Functional brain-imaging correlates of negative affectivity and the onset of first-episode depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, C G; Whittle, S; Harrison, B J; Simmons, J G; Byrne, M L; Schwartz, O S; Allen, N B

    2015-04-01

    The amygdala and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sACC) are key brain regions for the generation of negative affect. In this longitudinal fMRI study of adolescents we investigated how amygdala-sACC connectivity was correlated with negative affectivity (NA) both cross-sectionally and longitudinally, and examined its relationship to the onset of first-episode depression. Fifty-six adolescents who were part of a larger longitudinal study of adolescent development were included. They had no history of mental illness at the time of their baseline scan (mean age 16.5 years) and had a follow-up scan 2 years later (mean age 18.8 years). We used resting-state functional-connectivity MRI to investigate whether cross-sectional and change measures of amygdala-sACC connectivity were (i) correlated with NA and its change over time, and (ii) related to the onset of first-episode depression. The magnitude of amygdala connectivity with sACC showed significant positive correlation with NA at both time-points. Further analysis confirmed that change in amygdala-sACC connectivity between assessments was correlated with change in NA. Eight participants developed a first episode of depression between the baseline and follow-up assessments: they showed increased amygdala-sACC connectivity at follow-up. Amygdala-sACC connectivity is associated with NA in adolescence, with change in connectivity between these regions showing positive correlation with change in NA. Our observation that the onset of depression was associated with an increase in connectivity between the regions provides support for the neurobiological 'scar' hypothesis of depression.

  16. Differential effects of sex on substance use between first episode psychosis patients and healthy people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Christian; Ochoa, Susana; Huerta-Ramos, Elena; Baños, Iris; Barajas, Ana; Dolz, Montserrat; Sánchez, Bernardo; Del Cacho, Núria; Usall, Judith

    2016-08-01

    Substance use in psychosis is an important field of study given that it can be a risk factor for the development of psychosis and can give rise to psychotic symptoms. Studies of substance use in first episode psychosis patients do not frequently assess non-pathological substance consumption among patients, but rather the prevalence of substance abuse or dependence disorders. Moreover, most of these studies do not address the effects of sex in sufficient depth, and the consumption of caffeine or tobacco, which are two of the most frequently used substances, is often not assessed. The aim of this study was to compare patterns and quantities of substance use between first episode psychosis patients and healthy controls and between men and women, and explore the potential interactive effects between group (patients or controls) and sex. A total of 158 participants (82 first episode psychosis patients and 76 healthy controls) were included in the study. Both adults and adolescents were included in the study. Frequency and amount of use of caffeine, tobacco, alcohol, cannabis, cocaine, hallucinogens, stimulants, and opiates were gathered. A significant main effect of sex was found for the frequency of use of tobacco (p=.050). Main effects of group were found for the quantity of tobacco (pcannabis (pcannabis (p=.017) consumed. There were also interaction effects between group and sex for the frequency of use of tobacco (p=.005) and cannabis (p=.009), and for the amount of cannabis consumed (p=.049). Qualitative differences between males and females regarding combined substance use are also reported. Among patients, men used tobacco more frequently than women, but this sex difference was not the same for the control group, in which women smoked more often than men. Regarding cannabis, men smoked cannabis more frequently and in larger amounts than women, but only in the patients group, whereas no sex differences for cannabis were found for the controls. Main effects of

  17. Metacognitive mastery in persons with first-episode psychosis and their caregivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Jens Einar; Lysaker, Paul H.; Trauelsen, Anne Marie

    2017-01-01

    While metacognitive mastery seems to be closely linked to general functioning in persons with psychosis, little is known of metacognitive capacity of family members, who often play an important role in recovery and often report high levels of distress. We gathered assessments of metacognitive...... mastery from persons with first-episode psychosis and their mothers. We found that relatively higher overall mean mastery levels among the dyads, was related to less negative caregiver experiences, and less caregiver criticism. Greater levels of mastery were related to decreased duration of untreated...... psychosis. Clinical implications in terms of family intervention programmes repertoire are discussed....

  18. Interaction between genetic polymorphisms and stressful life events in first episode depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Jens Drachmann; Bock, Camilla; Vinberg, Maj

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A polymorphism in the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene seems to moderate the influence of stressful life events on depression. However, the results from previous studies of gene-environment interactions in depression are inconsistent and might be confounded by the history...... derived neurotrophic factor interact with recent stressful life events on depression among patients with no history of previous depressive episodes....... of depression among participants. METHOD: We applied a case-only design, including 290 ethnically homogeneous patients suffering exclusively from first episode depression. Psychiatric mo-morbidity, personality traits and disorders and stressful life events in a six months period preceding onset of depression...

  19. Multifamily group treatment in a program for patients with first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjell, Anne; Bloch Thorsen, Gerd Ragna; Friis, Svein

    2007-01-01

    to participate and 147 agreed. Patients' reluctance to participate increased with age. Most had to wait between six and 12 months until a sufficient number was gathered to start a group. Treatment was well received by patients and families. Care should be taken to prevent a long delay before group commencement......Psychoeducational multifamily group treatment based on the McFarlane model was implemented for adult patients experiencing a first episode of psychosis and for the families of 301 patients. Patients were participants in a research project in Norway and Denmark. Of 301 patients 246 were invited...

  20. Higher-order social cognition in first-episode major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladegaard, Nicolai; Larsen, Erik Roj; Videbech, Poul; Lysaker, Paul H

    2014-04-30

    Patients suffering from major depression experience difficulties in multiple cognitive faculties. A growing body of research has linked affective disorders to abnormalities in social cognition and specifically the processing of discrete emotional stimuli. However, little inquiry has gone into possible impairment in higher-order social cognition including theory of mind, social perception and metacognition. Forty-four medication-naïve patients with first-episode unipolar major depressive disorder and an equal number of matched controls were assessed by the Metacognitive Assessment Scale-Abbreviated (MAS-A), The Frith-Happé animations (FHA) and The Awareness of Social Inference Test (TASIT). Additionally, neurocognition was assessed utilyzing the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB). Depressed patients showed impairment in all domains of higher-order social cognitive ability. Importantly, social cognitive variables retained their inter-group significance after controlling for possible covariates including neurocognition. Results indicate that first-episode depressed patients experience difficulties in all domains of higher-order social cognition including theory of mind, social perception and metacognition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The role of self-esteem for outcome in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vracotas, Nadia; Iyer, Srividya N; Joober, Ridha; Malla, Ashok

    2012-01-01

    Self-esteem may be associated with a wide range of psychiatric disorders, including psychotic disorders. However, the relationship between self-esteem and outcome in psychosis has not been adequately examined, especially early in the course of the illness. The aim of the study was to examine the impact of self-esteem in individuals who presented for treatment of a first episode of psychosis on outcome early in the course of the illness. The Self-Esteem Rating Scale (SERS) was administered to 121 individuals with first-episode psychosis following entry into a specialized programme. Symptoms and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) were assessed at six months after beginning treatment. A correlational analysis was followed by a linear regression controlling for potential confounds. Self-esteem assessed early in the course of treatment was positively correlated with GAF at six months (r = 0.281, p self-esteem as predictors and GAF at six months as the outcome variable revealed only self-esteem to be a significant predictor of GAF at six months (β = 0.290, p self-esteem and remission at six months (β = 0.003, p > 0.05). Self-esteem is associated with global functional outcome at six months but not with remission of symptoms. Efforts should be made to provide interventions that may improve low self-esteem in the attempt to influence functional outcome.

  2. Interventions for men and women with their first episode of genital herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, Rachel; Roberts, Helen; Flower, Deralie; Jordan, Vanessa

    2016-08-30

    Genital herpes is incurable, and is caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV). First-episode genital herpes is the first clinical presentation of herpes that a person experiences. Current treatment is based around viral suppression in order to decrease the length and severity of the episode. To determine the effectiveness and safety of the different existing treatments for first-episode genital herpes on the duration of symptoms and time to recurrence. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (from inception to April 2016), MEDLINE (from inception to April 2016), the Specialised Register of the Cochrane Sexually Transmitted Infections Review Group (from inception to April 2016), EMBASE (from inception to April 2016), PsycINFO (from inception to April 2016), CINAHL (from inception to April 2016), LILACS (from inception to April 2016), AMED (from inception to April 2016), and the Alternative Medicines Specialised Register (from inception to April 2016). We handsearched a number of relevant journals, searched reference lists of all included studies, databases of ongoing trials, and other Internet databases. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on participants with first-episode genital herpes. We excluded vaccination trials, and trials in which the primary objective assessed a complication of HSV infection. All studies written in English were independently assessed by at least two review authors for inclusion, risk of bias for each trial, and to extract data. Studies requiring translation were assessed for inclusion, trial quality, and data extraction by external translators. We included 26 trials with 2084 participants analysed. Most of the studies were conducted in the United Kingdom (UK) and United States (US), and involved men and women experiencing their first episode of genital herpes, with the exception of three studies which included only women. We rated the majority of these studies as having an unclear risk of bias

  3. The longitudinal association between social functioning and theory of mind in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Sarah; Lewis, Glyn; Mohr, Christine; Herzig, Daniela; Corcoran, Rhiannon; Drake, Richard; Evans, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    There is some cross-sectional evidence that theory of mind ability is associated with social functioning in those with psychosis but the direction of this relationship is unknown. This study investigates the longitudinal association between both theory of mind and psychotic symptoms and social functioning outcome in first-episode psychosis. Fifty-four people with first-episode psychosis were followed up at 6 and 12 months. Random effects regression models were used to estimate the stability of theory of mind over time and the association between baseline theory of mind and psychotic symptoms and social functioning outcome. Neither baseline theory of mind ability (regression coefficients: Hinting test 1.07 95% CI -0.74, 2.88; Visual Cartoon test -2.91 95% CI -7.32, 1.51) nor baseline symptoms (regression coefficients: positive symptoms -0.04 95% CI -1.24, 1.16; selected negative symptoms -0.15 95% CI -2.63, 2.32) were associated with social functioning outcome. There was evidence that theory of mind ability was stable over time, (regression coefficients: Hinting test 5.92 95% CI -6.66, 8.92; Visual Cartoon test score 0.13 95% CI -0.17, 0.44). Neither baseline theory of mind ability nor psychotic symptoms are associated with social functioning outcome. Further longitudinal work is needed to understand the origin of social functioning deficits in psychosis.

  4. Determinants of adherence to treatment in first-episode psychosis: a comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Leclerc

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To conduct a comprehensive review of current evidence on factors for nonadherence to treatment in individuals with first-episode psychosis (FEP.Methods:MEDLINE, LILACS, PsycINFO, and SciELO databases were searched with the keywords first episode psychosis, factor, adherence, nonadherence, engagement, disengagement, compliance, and intervention. References of selected studies were consulted for relevant articles.Results:A total of 157 articles were screened, of which 33 articles were retained for full review. The factors related to nonadherence were: a patient-related (e.g., lower education level, persistent substance use, forensic history, unemployment, history of physical abuse; b environment-related (e.g., no family involved in treatment, social adjustment difficulties; c medication-related (e.g., rapid remission of negative symptoms when starting treatment, therapeutic alliance; and d illness-related (e.g., more positive symptoms, more relapses. Treatment factors that improve adherence include a good therapeutic alliance and a voluntary first admission when hospitalization occurs.Conclusion:The results of this review suggest that nonadherence to treatment in FEP is multifactorial. Many of these factors are modifiable and can be specifically targeted in early intervention programs. Very few studies have assessed strategies to raise adherence in FEP.

  5. Substance use in a population-based clinic sample of people with first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Jennifer H; Werners, Ursula; Secher, Sandra M; Hill, Katherine E; Brazil, Rossa; Masson, Kim; Pernet, David E; Kirkbride, James B; Murray, Graham K; Bullmore, Ed T; Jones, Peter B

    2007-06-01

    Substance use is implicated in the cause and course of psychosis. To characterise substance and alcohol use in an epidemiologically representative treatment sample of people experiencing a first psychotic episode in south Cambridgeshire. Current and lifetime substance use was recorded for 123 consecutive referrals to a specialist early intervention service. Substance use was compared with general population prevalence estimates from the British Crime Survey. Substance use among people with first-episode psychosis was twice that of the general population and was more common in men than women. Cannabis abuse was reported in 51% of patients (n=62) and alcohol abuse in 43% (n=53). More than half (n=68, 55%) had used Class A drugs, and 38% (n=43) reported polysubstance abuse. Age at first use of cannabis, cocaine, ecstasy and amphetamine was significantly associated with age at first psychotic symptom. Substance misuse is present in the majority of people with first-episode psychosis and has major implications for management. The association between age at first substance use and first psychotic symptoms has public health implications.

  6. First-episode psychosis as the initial presentation of multiple sclerosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enderami, Athena; Fouladi, Rose; Hosseini, Seyed Hamzeh

    2018-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease that affects the central nervous system (CNS). MS with episode of psychosis is a rare entity, and to the best of our knowledge, no case has been reported from Iran till date. We report a case of MS with first-episode psychosis in a 27-year-old single man with no history of psychiatric disorder or drug abuse. The patient developed neurological symptoms after 3 months and was finally diagnosed as a case of MS. His symptoms started with behavioral dysfunctions and progressively resulted in depression. Subsequently, treatment was performed with citalopram 20 mg daily, risperidone 2 mg three times a day, and biperiden 2 mg three times a day; however, no improvements in the symptoms were observed. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging has demonstrated periventricular and white matter multiple sclerotic plugs with lesions. Eventually, MS was diagnosed after the appearance of paresthesia, upper and lower limb muscle weakness, ataxia, and urinary incontinency as typical signs. Then, the medications were changed to methylprednisolone and interferon therapy, which resulted in improvements in the clinical conditions of the patient. Based on the fact that organic disorders such as MS may sometimes appear with initial pure psychiatric symptoms without any neurological signs and symptoms, examinations for symptoms linked to CNS dysfunction, cognitive changes, atypical symptoms, detailed neurological examination, and limited response to conventional antipsychotic drugs are highly recommended to be carried out for patients with first-episode psychosis and even in the followup period.

  7. Cannabis use, COMT, BDNF and age at first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mané, Anna; Bergé, Daniel; Penzol, Maria Jose; Parellada, Mara; Bioque, Miquel; Lobo, Antonio; González-Pinto, Ana; Corripio, Iluminada; Cabrera, Bibiana; Sánchez-Torres, Ana Maria; Saiz-Ruiz, Jerónimo; Bernardo, Miguel

    2017-04-01

    Although an interaction between COMT Val158Met and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms with cannabis use has been proposed with respect to the risk of psychosis emergence, findings remain inconclusive. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the different possible associations between these polymorphisms and early cannabis use and the age at the first episode of psychosis. The relationship between age at psychosis onset and COMT Val158Met and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms with early cannabis use as well as those factors associated with early cannabis use were investigated. Among 260 Caucasian first-episode psychosis patients, early cannabis use and the presence of the met-allele from the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism were significantly associated with age at psychosis onset. Furthermore, early cannabis use was significantly associated with male gender in the logistic regression analysis. These findings provide evidence of the important role of early cannabis use and the Val66Met BDNF polymorphism on age at psychosis onset and they point out to sex-specific differences in cannabis use patterns. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cannabis use, cognition and brain structure in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Paulo Jannuzzi; Rosa, Pedro Gomes P; Ayres, Adriana de Mello; Duran, Fábio L S; Santos, Luciana C; Scazufca, Marcia; Menezes, Paulo R; dos Santos, Bernardo; Murray, Robin M; Crippa, José Alexandre S; Busatto, Geraldo F; Schaufelberger, Maristela S

    2013-07-01

    Cannabis use is highly prevalent worldwide and it is associated with psychosis, but its effects on brain structure and cognition are still controversial. The aim of this paper is to investigate cognitive functioning and brain structure in patients with their first episode of psychosis who used Cannabis. We examined gray matter and lateral ventricle volumes in 28 patients with first-episode psychosis and a history of Cannabis use, 78 patients without a history of Cannabis use and 80 healthy controls who had not used Cannabis. Cognition was assessed using forward and backwards digit span tests, from the Wechsler Memory Scale-Third Edition (WMS-III) and the Controlled Oral Word Association Test (COWAT). Patients with a history of Cannabis use had less brain abnormalities, characterized by gray matter and lateral ventricle volume preservation, as well as less attentional and executive impairments compared to patients without a history of Cannabis use. Cannabis-using patients who develop psychosis have less neurodevelopmental impairment and better cognitive reserve than other psychotic patients; perhaps reflecting different etiological processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Social networks and support in first episode psychosis: exploring the role of loneliness and anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sündermann, Oliver; Onwumere, Juliana; Kane, Fergus; Morgan, Craig; Kuipers, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To investigate social support and network features in people with first episode psychosis, and to examine anxiety as a possible mediator between loneliness and a rating of paranoia. METHOD Thirty eight people with first-episode psychosis were recruited for a cross-sectional study. Self report questionnaires and structured interviews assessed symptoms, functioning, and qualitative social network and support features. A mood-induction task involved watching anxiety-inducing pictures on a computer screen. Visual analogue scales assessed changes in paranoia, anxiety and loneliness and a mediation analysis was conducted. RESULTS One third of the sample (34%) had no confidant (95% CI 18.4%, 50.0%). The average number of weekly contacts was 3.9, with 2.6 lonely days. Poor perceived social support, loneliness and the absence of a confidant were strongly associated with psychosis and depressive symptoms (.35loneliness and paranoia was mediated through anxiety (ab=.43, z=3.5; pAnxiety may be one pathway through which loneliness affects psychosis. Interventions which focus on this are indicated. PMID:23955376

  10. Social networks and support in first-episode psychosis: exploring the role of loneliness and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sündermann, Oliver; Onwumere, Juliana; Kane, Fergus; Morgan, Craig; Kuipers, Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    To investigate social support and network features in people with first-episode psychosis, and to examine anxiety as a possible mediator between loneliness and a rating of paranoia. Thirty-eight people with first-episode psychosis were recruited for a cross-sectional study. Self-report questionnaires and structured interviews assessed symptoms, functioning, and qualitative social network and support features. A mood-induction task involved watching anxiety-inducing pictures on a computer screen. Visual analogue scales assessed changes in paranoia, anxiety and loneliness and a mediation analysis was conducted. One-third of the sample (34%) had no confidant [95% CI (18.4, 50.0%)]. The average number of weekly contacts was 3.9, with 2.6 lonely days. Poor perceived social support, loneliness and the absence of a confidant were strongly associated with psychosis and depressive symptoms (0.35 loneliness and paranoia was mediated through anxiety (ab = 0.43, z = 3.5; p Anxiety may be one pathway through which loneliness affects psychosis. Interventions which focus on this are indicated.

  11. Pyogenic liver abscess: current status and predictive factors for recurrence and mortality of first episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwonko, Matías E; Huespe, Pablo; Bertone, Santiago; Pellegrini, Pablo; Mazza, Oscar; Pekolj, Juan; de Santibañes, Eduardo; Hyon, Sung Ho; de Santibañes, Martín

    2016-12-01

    In times of modern surgery, transplantation and percutaneous techniques, pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) has essentially become a problem of biliary or iatrogenic origin. In the current scenario, diagnostic approach, clinical behavior and therapeutic outcomes have not been profoundly studied. This study analyzes the clinical and microbiological features, diagnostic methods, therapeutic management and predictive factors for recurrence and mortality of first episodes of PLA. A retrospective single-center study was conducted including 142 patients admitted to the Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, between 2005 and 2015 with first episodes of PLA. Prevailing identifiable causes were biliary diseases (47.9%) followed by non-biliary percutaneous procedures (NBIPLA, 15.5%). Seventeen patients (12%) were liver recipients. Eleven patients (7.8%) died and 18 patients (13.7%) had recurrence in the first year of follow up. The isolation of multiresistant organisms (p = 0.041) and a history of cholangitis (p 5 mg/dL (p = 0.022) and bilateral involvement (p = 0.014) in the multivariate analysis. NBPLA and PLA after transplantation may be increasing among the population of PLA in referral centers. History of cholangitis is a strong predictor for recurrence. Mortality is associated to hiperbilirrubinemia and anatomical distribution of the lesions. Copyright © 2016 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The diagnostic yield of the first episode of a periodic health evaluation: a descriptive epidemiology study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kermott Cindy A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The benefits of a periodic health evaluation remain debatable. The incremental value added by such evaluations beyond the delivery of age appropriate screening and preventive medicine recommendations is unclear. Methods We retrospectively collected data on a cohort of consecutive patients presenting for their first episode of a comprehensive periodic health evaluation. We abstracted data on new diagnoses that were identified during this single episode of care and that were not trivial (i.e., required additional testing or intervention. Results The cohort consisted of 491 patients. The rate of new diagnoses per this single episode of care was 0.9 diagnoses per patient. The majority of these diagnoses was not prompted by patients’ complaints (71% and would not have been identified by screening guidelines (51%. Men (odds ratio 2.67; 95% CI, 1.76, 4.03 and those with multiple complaints at presentation (odds ratio 1.12; 95% CI, 1.05, 1.19 were more likely to receive a clinically relevant diagnosis at the conclusion of the visit. Age was not a predictor of receiving a diagnosis in this cohort. Conclusion The first episode of a comprehensive periodic health evaluation may reveal numerous important diagnoses or risk factors that are not always identified through routine screening.

  13. Subclinical depressive symptoms and continued cannabis use: predictors of negative outcomes in first episode psychosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itxaso González-Ortega

    Full Text Available Although depressive symptoms in first episode psychosis have been associated with cannabis abuse, their influence on the long-term functional course of FEP patients who abuse cannabis is unknown. The aims of the study were to examine the influence of subclinical depressive symptoms on the long-term outcome in first episode-psychosis patients who were cannabis users and to assess the influence of these subclinical depressive symptoms on the ability to quit cannabis use.64 FEP patients who were cannabis users at baseline were followed-up for 5 years. Two groups were defined: (a patients with subclinical depressive symptoms at least once during follow-up (DPG, and (b patients without subclinical depressive symptoms during follow-up (NDPG. Psychotic symptoms were measured using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS, depressive symptoms using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17, and psychosocial functioning was assessed using the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF. A linear mixed-effects model was used to analyze the combined influence of cannabis use and subclinical depressive symptomatology on the clinical outcome.Subclinical depressive symptoms were associated with continued abuse of cannabis during follow-up (β= 4.45; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.78 to 11.17; P = .001 and with worse functioning (β = -5.50; 95% CI: -9.02 to -0.33; P = .009.Subclinical depressive symptoms and continued cannabis abuse during follow-up could be predictors of negative outcomes in FEP patients.

  14. Childhood trauma and hippocampal and amygdalar volumes in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Katrina; Barrett, Suzanne; Shannon, Ciaran; Campbell, Clodagh; Watson, David; Rushe, Teresa; Shevlin, Mark; Bai, Feng; Cooper, Stephen; Mulholland, Ciaran

    2012-11-01

    A history of childhood trauma is common in individuals who later develop psychosis. Similar neuroanatomical abnormalities are observed in people who have been exposed to childhood trauma and people with psychosis. However, the relationship between childhood trauma and such abnormalities in psychosis has not been investigated. This study aimed to explore the association between the experience of childhood trauma and hippocampal and amygdalar volumes in a first-episode psychosis (FEP) population. The study employed an observational retrospective design. Twenty-one individuals, who had previously undergone magnetic resonance imaging procedures as part of the longitudinal Northern Ireland First-Episode Psychosis Study, completed measures assessing traumatic experiences and were included in the analysis. Data were subject to correlation analyses (r and r (pb)). Potential confounding variables (age at FEP and delay to scan from recruitment) were selected a priori for inclusion in multiple regression analyses. There was a high prevalence of lifetime (95%) and childhood (76%) trauma in the sample. The experience of childhood trauma was a significant predictor of left hippocampal volume, although age at FEP also significantly contributed to this model. There was no significant association between predictor variables and right hippocampal volume. The experience of childhood trauma was a significant predictor of right and total amygdalar volumes and the hippocampal/amygdalar complex volume as a whole. The findings indicate that childhood trauma is associated with neuroanatomical measures in FEP. Future research controlling for childhood traumatic experiences may contribute to explaining brain morphology in people with psychosis.

  15. Trajectories of suicidal ideation in patients with first-episode psychosis: secondary analysis of data from the OPUS trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Trine; Karstoft, Karen-Inge; Secher, Rikke Gry; Austin, Stephen F; Nordentoft, Merete

    2016-05-01

    Heterogeneity in suicidal ideation over time in patients with first-episode psychosis is expected, but prototypical trajectories of this have not yet been established. We aimed to identify trajectories of suicidal ideation over a 3-year period and to examine how these trajectories relate to subsequent suicidality. We used longitudinal data from the prospective 10-year follow-up OPUS trial of young Danish patients with first-episode psychosis. Participants were recruited between January, 1998, and December, 2000, from all inpatient and outpatient mental health services in Copenhagen and Aarhus County, were aged between 18 and 45 years, and had a diagnosis in the schizophrenia spectrum. Randomisation was done by a computer-generated randomisation list, stratified in alternating blocks for five centres. In Aarhus, a secretary drew lots when the researcher phoned her. Patients were randomly assigned to a treatment group (modified assertive community treatment) or a control group (standard treatment at community mental health centres) and assessed at treatment initiation, and after 1, 2, 5, and 10 years. We included all patients' data on suicidal ideation from the first three assessments in a latent growth mixture modelling analysis to empirically identify trajectories of suicidal ideation. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were applied to estimate associations between trajectories and subsequent suicidality. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00157313. Three trajectories for suicidal ideation were identified in 521 patients. 317 of 521 members (61%) of the largest trajectory, low-decreasing, consisted of patients who initially reported suicidal ideation once-to-a-few-times in the past year followed by a decrease in suicidal ideation. 172 of 521 (33%) members of the frequent-stable trajectory reported suicidal ideation sometimes-to-frequently at the first assessment and remained stable over time. Finally, 32 of 521 (6%) members of the

  16. The role of DMSA renal scintigraphy in the first episode of urinary tract infection in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supavekin, S.; Pravisithikul, N.; Kutanavanishapong, S.; Chiewvit, S.; Surapaitoolkorn, W.

    2013-01-01

    The role of dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) renal scintigraphy in the first episode of urinary tract infection (UTI) has been the subject of debate for many years. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship of voiding cystourethrography (VCUG), renal ultrasonography and DMSA renal scintigraphy and to detect renal parenchymal changes by performing DMSA renal scintigraphy at 6 months after the first episode of UTI. A prospective study was conducted in 67 hospitalized children (46 boys, 21 girls). Mean age of the patients was 0.97±1.57 years (0.02-7.26 years). All children received VCUG, renal ultrasonography and DMSA renal scintigraphy. DMSA renal scintigraphy was performed at 1 and 6 months after UTI. Of 67 children, 17 (25.4%), 23 (34.3%) and 20 (29.9%) had vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), abnormal renal ultrasonography and abnormal DMSA renal scintigraphy, respectively. Unilateral hydronephrosis had a significant correlation with VUR at p value 0.024. In renal units, abnormal renal ultrasonography and hydronephrosis had significant correlations with VUR at p values 0.039 and 0.021, respectively. In patients and renal units, hydronephrosis had no significant correlation with abnormal DMSA renal scintigraphy at 1 month after UTI. However, abnormal renal ultrasonography and VUR had significant correlations with abnormal DMSA renal scintigraphy at p values 0.022 and <0.001 in patients and at p values 0.024 and <0.001 in renal units, respectively. Both in patients and renal units, VUR (Grade I-III) had no significant correlation with abnormal DMSA renal scintigraphy. However, severe VUR (Grade IV-V) had significant correlations with abnormal DMSA renal scintigraphy at p values <0.001 and <0.001, respectively. Seventeen patients underwent DMSA renal scintigraphy at 6 months after UTI. In addition, 15 (88.2%) developed persistent renal scarring. Abnormal renal ultrasonography and severe VUR identify renal parenchymal changes. DMSA renal scintigraphy in the first

  17. Metacognitive capacity as a predictor of insight in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohs, Jenifer L; Lysaker, Paul H; Liffick, Emily; Francis, Michael M; Leonhardt, Bethany L; James, Alison; Buck, Kelly D; Hamm, Jay A; Minor, Kyle S; Mehdiyoun, Nikki; Breier, Alan

    2015-05-01

    Impaired insight is common in the first episode of psychosis (FEP). Although considerable research has examined the factors that are associated with impaired insight in chronic psychosis, less is known about the factors that underlie and sustain poor insight in FEP. Impaired metacognition, or the ability to form integrated representations of self and others, is a promising potential contributor to poor insight in FEP. To explore this possibility, the authors assessed insight and metacognition in 40 individuals with FEP and then examined the relationship between these areas and social cognition domains, neurocognitive domains, and psychotic symptoms. Correlation analyses revealed that improved insight was associated with higher metacognition, better vocabulary and Theory of Mind scores, and fewer symptoms. The domain of metacognitive mastery also predicted clinical insight. Results support the need to develop an integrative therapeutic approach focused on improving metacognition, hence addressing poor insight in FEP.

  18. A comparison of capacities for social cognition and metacognition in first episode and prolonged depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladegaard, Nicolai; Lysaker, Paul H; Larsen, Erik R; Videbech, Poul

    2014-12-30

    There is a growing awareness that social cognition is a valuable construct for understanding the psycho-social disabilities in depressive illness. Numerous studies have linked affective disorders to impairments in social cognition and specifically the processing of discrete emotional stimuli. Only few studies have investigated the relation between the burden of depressive illness and social cognitive ability. To study these issues, we compared a group of first-episode depressed patients with a group of chronically depressed patients (duration >2 years) on a broad array of higher-order social cognitive measures including the metacognition assessment scale abbreviated. Contrary to prediction, deficits in social cognition were roughly equivalent between the two groups and there was no significant link between symptom severity and social cognitive ability. Having moderate to severe major depressive disorder (MDD) could be sufficient to predict the presence of deficits in social cognitive ability.

  19. The influence of comorbid personality disorder and neuroticism on treatment outcome in first episode depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bock, Camilla; Bukh, Jens Drachmann; Vinberg, Maj

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has never been investigated whether comorbid personality disorder or neuroticism predicts a poor treatment outcome in first episode depression. METHODS: Medically treated patients discharged with a diagnosis of a single depressive episode from a psychiatric in- or outpatient hospital...... setting were consecutively sampled from the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register. The patients participated in an extensive interview including the Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry, the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Personality Disorders and a detailed...... of antidepressant treatment, and (2) 2 trials of antidepressant treatment. Further personality traits were assessed by means of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. RESULTS: Among a total of 301 patients with a single depressive episode, 31.9% fulfilled diagnostic criteria for at least 1 personality disorder...

  20. Early Predictors of Ten-Year Course in First-Episode Psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Svein; Melle, Ingrid; Johannessen, Jan Olav

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Identifying patients at risk of poor outcome at an early stage of illness can aid in treatment planning. This study sought to create a best-fit statistical model of known baseline and early-course risk factors to predict time in psychosis during a ten-year follow-up period after a first...... psychotic episode. METHODS: Between 1997 and 2000, 301 patients with DSM-IV nonorganic, nonaffective first-episode psychosis were recruited consecutively from catchment area-based sectors in Norway and Denmark. Specialized mental health personnel evaluated patients at baseline, three months, and one, two......, five, and ten years (N=186 at ten years). Time in psychosis was defined as time with scores ≥4 on any of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale items P1, P3, P5, P6, and G9. Evaluations were retrospective, based on clinical interviews and all available clinical information. During the first two years...

  1. Dopamine transporter gene polymorphism and psychiatric symptoms seen in schizophrenic patients at their first episode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inada, Toshiya; Sugita, Tetsuyoshi; Dobashi, Izumi [National Institute of Mental Health, Chiba (Japan)] [and others

    1996-07-26

    To investigate the possible role of the dopamine transporter (DAT) gene in determining the phenotype in human subjects, allele frequencies for the 40-bp variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphism at this site were compared between 117 Japanese normal controls and 118 schizophrenic patients, including six subgroups: early-onset, those with a family history, and those suffering from one of the following psychiatric symptoms at their first episode: delusion and hallucination; disorganization; bizarre behavior; and negative symptoms. No significant differences were observed between the group as a whole or any subgroup of schizophrenic patients and controls. The results indicate that VNTR polymorphism in the DAT gene is unlikely to be a major contributor to any of the psychiatric parameters examined in the present population of schizophrenic subjects. 12 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Mismatch negativity and P3a amplitude in young adolescents with first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydkjær, J.; Møllegaard Jepsen, J. R.; Pagsberg, A. K.

    2017-01-01

    responses, measured as MMN and P3a amplitude, are present in young adolescents with first-episode psychosis (FEP) and whether findings are specific to psychosis compared to young adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method MMN and P3a amplitude were assessed in young adolescents...... (age 12-17 years) with either FEP (N = 27) or ADHD (N = 28) and age- and gender-matched healthy controls (N = 43). The MMN paradigm consisted of a four-tone auditory oddball task with deviant stimuli based on frequency, duration and their combination. Results Significantly less MMN was found...... in patients with psychosis compared to healthy controls in response to frequency and duration deviants. MMN amplitudes in the group of patients with ADHD were not significantly different from patients with psychosis or healthy controls. No significant group differences were found on P3a amplitude. Conclusion...

  3. Religious construction of a first episode of psychosis in urban Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redko, Cristina

    2003-12-01

    Religion plays an important role in the lives of people with psychosis. Based on fieldwork with 21 families living in poor neighborhoods of São Paulo, Brazil, this article examines how youth suffering a first episode of psychosis resort to religion for help (including, Catholicism, Pentecostalism, Candomblé, and Umbanda) and how this frames their experience of psychosis and that of their family members. For young people, the personal articulation of religious idioms and signifiers served to communicate, elaborate and transform their experience of psychosis. Family members resorted to religion as a source of healing, complementary to psychiatric treatment, as well as for personal relief and comfort. For youth, involvement with religion worked in both 'progressive' and 'regressive' ways, to improve and, at times, to diminish functioning and well-being.

  4. Childhood adversity specificity and dose-response effect in non-affective first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trauelsen, Anne Marie; Bendall, Sarah; Jansen, Jens Einar

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reviews conclude that childhood and adolescence sexual, physical, emotional abuse and emotional and physical neglect are all risk factors for psychosis. However, studies suggest only some adversities are associated with psychosis. Dose-response effects of several adversities on risk...... of psychosis have not been consistently found. The current study aimed to explore adversity specificity and dose-response effects of adversities on risk of psychosis. METHOD: Participants were 101 persons with first-episode psychosis (FEP) diagnosed with ICD-10 F20 - F29 (except F21) and 101 non......% of the control group. Childhood and adolescent sexual, physical, emotional abuse, and physical and emotional neglect, separation and institutionalization were about four to 17 times higher for the FEP group (all ppsychosis increased two and a half times for each additional adversity. All...

  5. Do stressful life events predict medical treatment outcome in first episode of depression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bock, Camilla; Bukh, Jens Drachmann; Vinberg, Maj

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether medical treatment outcome in first episode depression differ for patients with and without stressful life events prior to onset of depression. METHODS: Patients discharged with a diagnosis of a single depressive episode from a psychiatric in- or outpatient hospital......-II) and the interview of recent life events (IRLE). Medical treatment history was assessed in detail using standardised procedures (TRAQ). Remission was defined as a score or= 4 on TRAQ following (1) first trial of antidepressant treatment (2) two...... adequate trials of antidepressant treatment. RESULTS: A total of 399 patients participated in the interview and among these 301 patients obtained a SCAN diagnosis of a single depressive episode. A total of 62.8% of the 301 patients experienced at least one moderate to severe stressful life event in a 6...

  6. Assessment of posttraumatic symptoms in patients with first-episode psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-11-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder is common among patients with psychotic disorders. The present study examined the internal reliability and comparability of the Impact of Event Scale (IES) in a sample of 38 patients with first-episode psychosis and 47 controls exposed to severe physical and\\/or sexual abuse. The IES total score and both subscales showed high internal consistency in both groups (Cronbach\\'s alpha coefficients of approximately 0.9 or higher). Given their equivalent trauma reporting, the lack of differences in IES scores between patients and controls seems to indicate that patients are likely to report accurately and neither exaggerate nor minimize their posttraumatic symptoms. Overall, the findings suggest that the IES can be used to assess symptoms of posttraumatic stress in patients with psychotic disorders as in other populations.

  7. Clinical utility of Standardised Assessment of Personality - Abbreviated Scale (SAPAS) among patients with first episode depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Jens Drachmann; Bock, Camilla; Vinberg, Maj

    2010-01-01

    for comorbid personality disorder among patients suffering from depression would be of clinical use. METHOD: The present study aimed to assess the utility of the Standardised Assessment of Personality - Abbreviated Scale (SAPAS) as a screen for personality disorder in a population of patients recently......BACKGROUND: Personality disorder frequently co-occurs with depression and seems to be associated with a poorer outcome of treatment and increased risk for recurrences. However, the diagnosing of personality disorder can be lengthy and requires some training. Therefore, a brief screening interview...... diagnosed with first episode depression. A total number of 394 patients with an ICD-10 diagnosis of a single depressive episode were sampled consecutively via the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register during a 2years inclusion period and assessed by the screening interview and, subsequently...

  8. Deficits in Neurite Density Underlie White Matter Structure Abnormalities in First-Episode Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Charlotte L; Davies, Geoff; Garfinkel, Sarah N; Gabel, Matt C; Dowell, Nicholas G; Cercignani, Mara; Seth, Anil K; Greenwood, Kathryn E; Medford, Nick; Critchley, Hugo D

    2017-11-15

    Structural abnormalities across multiple white matter tracts are recognized in people with early psychosis, consistent with dysconnectivity as a neuropathological account of symptom expression. We applied advanced neuroimaging techniques to characterize microstructural white matter abnormalities for a deeper understanding of the developmental etiology of psychosis. Thirty-five first-episode psychosis patients, and 19 healthy controls, participated in a quantitative neuroimaging study using neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging, a multishell diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging technique that distinguishes white matter fiber arrangement and geometry from changes in neurite density. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity images were also derived. Tract-based spatial statistics compared white matter structure between patients and control subjects and tested associations with age, symptom severity, and medication. Patients with first-episode psychosis had lower regional FA in multiple commissural, corticospinal, and association tracts. These abnormalities predominantly colocalized with regions of reduced neurite density, rather than aberrant fiber bundle arrangement (orientation dispersion index). There was no direct relationship with active symptoms. FA decreased and orientation dispersion index increased with age in patients, but not control subjects, suggesting accelerated effects of white matter geometry change. Deficits in neurite density appear fundamental to abnormalities in white matter integrity in early psychosis. In the first application of neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging in psychosis, we found that processes compromising axonal fiber number, density, and myelination, rather than processes leading to spatial disruption of fiber organization, are implicated in the etiology of psychosis. This accords with a neurodevelopmental origin of aberrant brain-wide structural connectivity predisposing individuals to

  9. First-episode psychosis as the initial presentation of multiple sclerosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enderami A

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Athena Enderami,1 Rose Fouladi,2 Seyed Hamzeh Hosseini3 1Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Mazandaran, Sari, Iran; 2Sport Injuries and Corrective Exercise, University of Mazandaran, Mazandaran, Babolsar, Iran; 3Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Research Center, Addiction Institute, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS is an inflammatory disease that affects the central nervous system (CNS. MS with episode of psychosis is a rare entity, and to the best of our knowledge, no case has been reported from Iran till date. Case presentation: We report a case of MS with first-episode psychosis in a 27-year-old single man with no history of psychiatric disorder or drug abuse. The patient developed neurological symptoms after 3 months and was finally diagnosed as a case of MS. His symptoms started with behavioral dysfunctions and progressively resulted in depression. Subsequently, treatment was performed with citalopram 20 mg daily, risperidone 2 mg three times a day, and biperiden 2 mg three times a day; however, no improvements in the symptoms were observed. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging has demonstrated periventricular and white matter multiple sclerotic plugs with lesions. Eventually, MS was diagnosed after the appearance of paresthesia, upper and lower limb muscle weakness, ataxia, and urinary incontinency as typical signs. Then, the medications were changed to methylprednisolone and interferon therapy, which resulted in improvements in the clinical conditions of the patient. Conclusion: Based on the fact that organic disorders such as MS may sometimes appear with initial pure psychiatric symptoms without any neurological signs and symptoms, examinations for symptoms linked to CNS dysfunction, cognitive changes, atypical symptoms, detailed neurological examination, and limited response to conventional antipsychotic drugs are highly

  10. Predictors of neurocognitive impairment at 2years after a first-episode major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Chuan-Zheng; He, Hui-Li; Duan, Hui-Feng; Su, Zhong-Hua; Chen, Hong; Gan, Jing-Li

    2016-07-01

    Neurocognitive impairment is a contributor to major depressive disorder (MDD). However, MDD patients show great variability in the level and course of deficits. The present longitudinal study was to identify predictors of neurocognitive impairment in first-episode MDD patients. Neurocognitive performance was analyzed in a cohort of 100 patients at 2years after a first-episode MDD. Subgroups, deficit type vs. non-deficit type, were compared on baseline clinical, neuropsychological, premorbid and sociodemographic characteristics. The analysis was performed using the multivariate logistic regression to obtain a model for neurocognitive impairment determination. The predicted probabilities of multivariate logistic regression were analyzed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Fifty-two percent of MDD participants presented general neurocognitive impairment. The regression analyses demonstrated that clinical and sociodemographic characteristics were not predictive variables. A model composed of processing speed, executive function, and attention, dexterity correctly classified 85.8% of the MDD patients with deficit type. ROC curve indicated that the changes of these three cognitions could identify MDD with deficit type from MDD with non-deficit type. In addition, ROC curve also indicated that processing speed and executive function could identify MDD from CN subjects. Finally, processing speed performance was negatively correlated with Hamilton Depression Scale scores in both MDD with deficit and non-deficit type. The present study provides novel insights on frequency and neurocognitive profile of subtypes of patients showing impairment. Our results suggest that processing speed impairment is a trait dimension of the disorder related to specific cognitive dysfunctions and the severity of depression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fusion analysis of first episode depression: Where brain shape deformations meet local composition of tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Ramezani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational neuroanatomical techniques that are used to evaluate the structural correlates of disorders in the brain typically measure regional differences in gray matter or white matter, or measure regional differences in the deformation fields required to warp individual datasets to a standard space. Our aim in this study was to combine measurements of regional tissue composition and of deformations in order to characterize a particular brain disorder (here, major depressive disorder. We use structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI data from young adults in a first episode of depression, and from an age- and sex-matched group of non-depressed individuals, and create population gray matter (GM and white matter (WM tissue average templates using DARTEL groupwise registration. We obtained GM and WM tissue maps in the template space, along with the deformation fields required to co-register the DARTEL template and the GM and WM maps in the population. These three features, reflecting tissue composition and shape of the brain, were used within a joint independent-components analysis (jICA to extract spatially independent joint sources and their corresponding modulation profiles. Coefficients of the modulation profiles were used to capture differences between depressed and non-depressed groups. The combination of hippocampal shape deformations and local composition of tissue (but neither shape nor local composition of tissue alone was shown to discriminate reliably between individuals in a first episode of depression and healthy controls, suggesting that brain structural differences between depressed and non-depressed individuals do not simply reflect chronicity of the disorder but are there from the very outset.

  12. Metacognition in First Episode Psychosis: Item Level Analysis of Associations with Symptoms and Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacBeth, Angus; Gumley, Andrew; Schwannauer, Matthias; Carcione, Antonino; McLeod, Hamish J; Dimaggio, Giancarlo

    2016-07-01

    Significant metacognitive impairments are observed in first episode psychosis (FEP) and chronic psychosis samples. There is evidence of associations between metacognition and presentation in FEP, but the relative contribution of metacognitive understanding of the self and the other is as yet unclear. The current study is a secondary analysis of date on metacognition, symptoms and engagement with treatment (help-seeking) in an FEP sample. In a cross-sectional cohort study, individuals in the first 12 months of treatment metacognition were assessed with the Metacognition Assessment Scale-Revised version (MAS-R). Psychotic symptomatology and help-seeking within treatment (clinician-rated service engagement) were also measured. An item level analysis of the MAS-R was conducted exploring associations between symptoms and cognitive, emotional, differentiation, integration and decentration aspects of metacognition. We report that associations between negative symptoms and deficits in the understanding of other's mental states extend across cognitive, emotional, integrative and decentration aspects of metacognition. We also report associations between negative symptoms and understanding one's own mind. We also note that cognitive and decentration aspects of metacognition were significantly associated with help-seeking once in treatment. Our findings suggest that an appreciation of metacognitive processes may inform treatment frameworks for FEP. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Individual components of metacognition including the capacity to relate cognitive and emotional variables are important in first episode phychosis. Impaired metacognitive understanding of both one's own and others' mental states is associated with increased negative symptoms. Metacognitive variables may be important in understanding how different individuals seek help or engage with services after the initiation of treatment. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Subclinical Depressive Symptoms and Continued Cannabis Use: Predictors of Negative Outcomes in First Episode Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ortega, Itxaso; Alberich, Susana; Echeburúa, Enrique; Aizpuru, Felipe; Millán, Eduardo; Vieta, Eduard; Matute, Carlos; González-Pinto, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Background Although depressive symptoms in first episode psychosis have been associated with cannabis abuse, their influence on the long-term functional course of FEP patients who abuse cannabis is unknown. The aims of the study were to examine the influence of subclinical depressive symptoms on the long-term outcome in first episode-psychosis patients who were cannabis users and to assess the influence of these subclinical depressive symptoms on the ability to quit cannabis use. Methods 64 FEP patients who were cannabis users at baseline were followed-up for 5 years. Two groups were defined: (a) patients with subclinical depressive symptoms at least once during follow-up (DPG), and (b) patients without subclinical depressive symptoms during follow-up (NDPG). Psychotic symptoms were measured using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), depressive symptoms using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS)-17, and psychosocial functioning was assessed using the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). A linear mixed-effects model was used to analyze the combined influence of cannabis use and subclinical depressive symptomatology on the clinical outcome. Results Subclinical depressive symptoms were associated with continued abuse of cannabis during follow-up (β= 4.45; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.78 to 11.17; P = .001) and with worse functioning (β = -5.50; 95% CI: -9.02 to -0.33; P = .009). Conclusions Subclinical depressive symptoms and continued cannabis abuse during follow-up could be predictors of negative outcomes in FEP patients. PMID:25875862

  14. Diagnostic yield of computed tomography of the brain in first episode psychosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strahl, Britta; Cheung, York K.; Stuckey, Stephen L.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Brain computed tomography (CT) is inconsistently recommended worldwide in the investigative algorithm of patients presenting with first episode psychosis (FEP). The objective of this study is to investigate the clinical efficacy of brain CT in patients presenting with FEP without neurological signs in a major metropolitan teaching hospital. Methods: The CT brain scan reports of 237 consecutive patients, for which the imaging requests or reports provided a history of FEP but no focal neurological signs, were retrospectively identified within a 6-year period in a 7So-bed tertiary referral teaching hospital using the radiology information system text-search function (170 male, 67 female; mean age, 28.3 years). All reports were authored or approved by consultant radiologist. They were reviewed for the presence of any lesion that could cause psychosis and hence alter clinical management. Minor neuroradiological abnormalities were also noted. Hospital Ethics Committee registration and approval were obtained and patient informed consent was not required. Results: No focal brain lesion potentially responsible for the psychosis or focal lesion requiring surgical intervention was identified in any patient. Findings unable to be directly linked to the psychosis such as evidence of small vessel ischaemic disease, arachnoid cysts, cerebral atrophy, and normal variants were present in 17.6% of patients (4S of 237 studies), none of which led to an alteration of clinical management. Conclusion: The results of this study postulate that brain CT should not be universally performed in the initial assessment of patients with first episode psychosis without neurological signs.

  15. Cognitive effects of six months of treatment with quetiapine in antipsychotic-naïve first-episode schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rune; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Rasmussen, Hans

    2011-01-01

    , a matched healthy control group (N=24) was also tested at baseline and after 6months. Only few differential changes were observed between patients and healthy controls. Of 8 cognitive domains examined, only significant changes in executive function suggested possible ameliorating effects of quetiapine...... on sustained attention and working memory that were found in healthy controls. The main result of the study is that there was very little evidence of efficacy of quetiapine on cognition. The study also indicated a lack of normal retest effects in patients compared to controls....

  16. Cognitive-perceptual deficits and symptom correlates in first-episode ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: Form perception is associated with positive symptoms and impairment in executive function during acute psychosis. These findings suggest that there may be clinical value in including sensory-perceptual processing tasks in cognitive remediation and social cognitive training programmes for schizophrenia ...

  17. Specific and generalized neuropsychological deficits: a comparison of patients with various first-episode psychosis presentations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zanelli, Jolanta

    2010-01-01

    Overwhelming evidence suggests that compromised neuropsychological function is frequently observed in schizophrenia. Neurocognitive dysfunction has often been reported in other psychotic disorders, although there are inconsistencies in the literature. In the context of four distinct diagnostic groups, the authors compared neuropsychological performance among patients experiencing their first psychotic episode.

  18. Five-Year Follow-Up of Supportive Psychodynamic Psychotherapy in First-Episode Psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Susanne; Køster, Anne; Valbak, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The long-term outcomes of several approaches to intervention targeting social functioning in schizophrenia are not well documented. Contemporary supportive psychodynamic psychotherapy (SPP) aims to improve social functioning. The aim of the present study was to investigate the long-te...

  19. A qualitative study of the prodrome to first-episode major depressive disorder in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed Sheriff, Rebecca J; McGorry, Patrick D; Cotton, Sue; Yung, Alison R

    2015-01-01

    Currently, we lack a clear picture of the evolution of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adolescents. The period of disturbance preceding MDD can be conceptualised as the prodrome. The aim of the study was to explore the prodrome of first-episode MDD retrospectively in a group of help-seeking adolescents using qualitative methodologies. Consecutively referred adolescents (15-18 years of age) with first-episode MDD were recruited for this study from Orygen Youth Health, Melbourne, Vic., Australia. After using quantitative methodologies to confirm the index episode of MDD and measure the extent of recovery, the prodrome was investigated in depth using qualitative techniques. Twenty-nine adolescents (20 females and 9 males) and 7 informants (6 mothers and 1 grandmother) participated. All 29 participants had a prodrome of varying lengths (between 6 days and 4 years). The most noticeable symptoms initially were perplexity and confusion and, thereafter, sadness and irritability. A common pattern was a reduction in their ability to fulfil their role accompanied by guilt, self-blame and reduced self-esteem. Around half of the participants had increased thoughts of suicide and increased anxiety. There were gender differences in the patterns of symptoms noticed, with males more commonly noticing a change in how they related to the world and females more commonly noticing a change in the way that they related to others. All informants noticed a prodrome of varying lengths; in 2 cases longer, in 2 cases shorter and in 3 cases around the same time period as that noticed by the participant. The changes most commonly noticed by informants were sadness, upset, irritability and reduced self-esteem. The symptoms were fewer in number and sometimes varied from those noticed by the adolescents themselves. Whilst we recognise that this study is vulnerable to autobiographical bias, we took all reasonable measures to minimise this. Symptoms not included in the diagnostic criteria for

  20. Neurological soft signs in Tunisian patients with first-episode psychosis and relation with cannabis use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhalla, Ahmed; Ben Mohamed, Bochra; Correll, Christoph U; Amamou, Badii; Mechri, Anouar; Gaha, Lotfi

    2017-01-01

    Neurological soft signs (NSS) are minor non-localizing neurological abnormalities that are conceptualized as neurodevelopmental markers that mediate the biological risk for psychosis. We aimed to explore the relationship between NSS and cannabis use, an environmental risk factor of psychosis. This was a cross-sectional study in consecutively admitted patients hospitalized for first-episode psychosis. NSS were assessed by the NSS scale (23 items exploring motor coordination, motor integrative function, sensory integration, involuntary movements or posture, quality of lateralization). Presence of NSS was defined as a NSS scale total score ≥9.5. Cannabis use was ascertained with the cannabis subsection in the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Among 61 first-episode psychosis patients (mean age = 28.9 ± 9.4 years; male = 86.9%, antipsychotic-naïve = 75.4%), the prevalence of current cannabis use was 14.8% (heavy use = 8.2%, occasional use = 6.6%). NSS were present in 83.6% of the sample (cannabis users = 66.7% versus cannabis non-users = 85.5%, p  = 0.16). The mean total NSS score was 15.3 ± 6.7, with a significant lower total NSS score in cannabis users (11.2 ± 5.6 versus 16.0 ± 6.7, p  = 0.048). Differences were strongest for the "motor coordination" ( p  = 0.06) and "involuntary movements" ( p  = 0.07) sub-scores. This study demonstrated a negative association between cannabis use and NSS, especially regarding motor discoordination. This finding supports the hypothesis that a strong environmental risk factor, such as cannabis, may contribute to the onset of psychosis even in the presence of lower biological and genetic vulnerability, as reflected indirectly by lower NSS scores. Nevertheless, additional studies are needed that explore this interaction further in larger samples and considering additional neurobiological and environmental risk factors.

  1. Cognitive deficits characterization using the CogState Research Battery in first-episode psychosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Audrey; Malla, Ashok K; Iyer, Srividya N; Joober, Ridha; Bherer, Louis; Lepage, Martin

    2015-09-01

    The computer-based CogState Research Battery (CSRB) proposes a test structure which follows MATRICS recommended cognitive domains but lacks direct comparison to pen and paper batteries in first-episode psychosis (FEP). The aim of this study was to compare performances obtained with the CSRB and a pen and paper battery in a historical cohort of FEP patients. Among patients entering an early intervention program between 2003 and 2014, separate cohorts completed the traditional pen and paper cognitive battery (n = 182) and the CSRB (n = 97). Composite z-scores were derived using normative data of matched controls (n = 64 pen and paper, n = 69 CSRB) and were compared between the two batteries for the 7 cognitive domains. The cohort tested using the CSRB performed better on the domains of processing speed, attention, visual memory, and verbal memory than the cohort tested using the pen and paper battery (all p  batteries for the working memory, executive functions, and social cognition domains. Cognitive profiles identified in the two patient cohorts were similar, with verbal memory being the most impaired domain. Better performances on the CSRB may be primarily due to the minimal demand of the computerized tests on graphomotor abilities and reading speed compared to the pen and paper tests. Our investigation offers a better understanding on how the results obtained with computerized batteries may compare to earlier work done with traditional tests.

  2. Breathlessness at High Altitude: First Episode of Bronchoconstriction in an Otherwise Healthy Sojourner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Sanjeeb Sudarshan; Koirala, Pranawa; Lohani, Sadichhya; Phuyal, Pratibha; Basnyat, Buddha

    2017-06-01

    Bhandari, Sanjeeb Sudarshan, Pranawa Koirala, Sadichhya Lohani, Pratibha Phuyal, and Buddha Basnyat. Breathlessness at high altitude: first episode of bronchoconstriction in an otherwise healthy sojourner. High Alt Med Biol.. 18:179-181, 2017-High-altitude illness is a collective term for less severe acute mountain sickness and more severe high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and high-altitude cerebral edema, which we can experience while traveling to high altitude. These get better when we get down to the lower altitudes. People with many comorbidities also have been traveling to high altitudes from the dawn of civilization. Obstructive airway diseases can be confused with HAPE at high altitude. Asthma is one of those obstructive pulmonary diseases, but it is shown to get better with travel to the altitudes higher than the residing altitude. We present a case of 55-year-old nonsmoker, athletic, female, a lowland resident who developed difficulty breathing for the first time at high altitude. She did not get better with the descent to lower altitude and timely intake of acetazolamide. Her pulmonary function test showed obstructive airway pattern, which got better with salbutamol/ipratropium nebulization and oxygen.

  3. Aberrant default mode network homogeneity in patients with first-episode treatment-naive melancholic depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xilong; Guo, Wenbin; Wang, Yi; Yang, Tian-Xiao; Yang, Xin-Hua; Wang, Yefei; Gong, Jingbo; Tan, Changlian; Xie, Guangrong

    2017-02-01

    Melancholic depression is a relatively homogenous subtype of major depressive disorders (MDD). The condition has several endogenous symptoms and represents strong biological components. However, its specific neurobiological mechanisms remain unknown. Previous neuroimaging findings indicated that default mode network (DMN) is closely related to MDD. The present study examined the network homogeneity (NH) of the DMN in patients with melancholic MDD. A total of 33 first-episode, treatment-naive melancholic MDD patients and 32 healthy controls underwent a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. The data were analyzed using the NH method. Compared with healthy controls, patients with melancholic MDD showed low NH values in the right middle temporal gyrus and temporal pole (MTG/TP). The abnormal NH of this region and clinical characteristics were not correlated. Abnormal NH pattern of DMN exists in patients with melancholic MDD. This feature may be part of the pathophysiological basis of this disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Postsecondary academic achievement and first-episode psychosis: A mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Laurence; Rousseau, Jacqueline; Fortier, Pierre; Mottard, Jean-Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Postsecondary academic achievement as an area of functional recovery for young adults living with mental illness has received little research attention. This study had three purposes: to compare rates of participation, performance, and satisfaction in postsecondary education between young adults with first-episode psychosis and closely matched young adults; to identify characteristics associated with academic participation; and to explore the processes associated with educational experiences. One hundred young adults ages 18 to 30 participated in the study. Quantitative data on academic engagement, performance, and satisfaction, and qualitative data (n = 52) on academic experiences were integrated through pattern analyzes. Young adults with psychosis were significantly less likely to be engaged in postsecondary education. No difference appeared for the extent of engagement, but performance and satisfaction were lower among participants with psychosis. Participants engaged in reflexive decision making to access postsecondary education and to maintain adequate academic performance. Strategies used by successful students with mental illness were identified. Assessment and intervention focused on educational needs and skills should become landmark practices for psychiatric rehabilitation practitioners, including occupational therapists. © CAOT 2015.

  5. Birth weight and obstetric complications determine age at onset in first episode of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Abadal, E; Ochoa, S; Barajas, A; Baños, I; Dolz, M; Sanchez, B; Del Cacho, N; Carlson, J; Huerta-Ramos, E; Usall, J

    2015-06-01

    Earlier age at onset of psychosis (AOP) has been associated with poor social adjustment and clinical outcome. Genetic and environmental factors such as obstetric complications, parental history of psychosis, advanced paternal age at time of birth, low birth weight and gestational age, and use of drugs have been described as bringing AOP forward. This study aims to evaluate the relationship between AOP and these factors in a sample of first episode of psychosis (FEP) patients. Clinical and sociodemographic data, age at FEP, age of parents at birth, parental history of psychosis, drug-use habits of the mother during pregnancy and of the patient before psychotic onset, and Lewis and Murray obstetric complication scale were obtained from 90 patients with FEP. Statistical analysis was performed by means of Pearson correlations, Chi-square tests, Student T-test analyses and a linear regression model using SPSS version 22. Pre-eclampsia, need for incubator at birth, use of forceps, parental history of psychosis, and low birth weight were associated with an earlier AOP. Use of forceps and birth weight are the variables which best predict AOP in FEP. Stimulant drugs, which were mostly used together with cannabis and cocaine, were the only substances associated with an earlier AOP. Our findings are consistent with previous study results and underline the role of the prenatal period in the development of psychosis and the importance of careful monitoring of pregnancy and delivery, especially in cases with familial history. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Identifying risk factors for first-episode neck pain: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Rebecca; Wiest, Colin; Clark, Kelly; Cook, Chad; Horn, Maggie

    2018-02-01

    Neck pain affects 15.1% of the United States' general population every 3 months, and ranks fourth in global disability. Because of the tendency for neck pain to become a chronic issue, it is important to identify risk factors that could encourage prevention and early diagnosis. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify risk factors for a first episode of neck pain. Three databases were searched with key words such as "neck pain" and "first incidence." Risk factors from the resulting articles were reported as either a physical or psychosocial risk factor and ranked by the strength of their odds/risk/hazard ratio: empowering leadership, high perceived social climate, leisure physical activity, and cervical extensor endurance. Most risk factors found for neck pain were related to psychosocial characteristics, rather than physical characteristics. A number of these risk factors were mediating factors, suggesting that a prevention-based program may be useful in modifying the existence of the risk factors before the occurrence of neck pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging findings at the first episode of acute optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soelberg, K; Skejoe, H P B; Grauslund, J

    2018-01-01

    lesions were observed in 84% (21/25) at onset of ON; 62%(13/25) progressed to MS with more frequent location in brainstem (p = 0.030) and lesions in periventricular areas (p = 0.015). Spinal cord lesions were detected only in patients who progressed to MS (p = 0.002). MOG-IgG was detected in one patient...... with an optic nerve lesion located at IO and CAN. Serum AQP4-IgG was detected in none. Follow-up MRI showed progression in optic nerve lesions in 55% (11/20) patients. CONCLUSIONS: Specific location of optic nerve and brain lesions and the presence of spinal cord lesions in the acute phase of the first......BACKGROUND: Optic neuritis (ON) is a focal demyelinating event, which may evolve into multiple sclerosis (MS). OBJECTIVE: To study MRI characteristics in the acute phase of the first ON episode. METHODS: A prospective population-based study was performed on 31 patients with a first episode of acute...

  8. Neurocognitive and social cognitive predictors of cannabis use in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Chelsea; Allott, Kelly; Farhall, John; Killackey, Eoin; Cotton, Sue

    2015-10-01

    Findings are unclear as to whether cannabis use is associated with better cognitive functioning in individuals with psychosis. To elucidate the association between cannabis use, neurocognition and social cognition in first-episode psychosis (FEP). Secondary data analysis was conducted on data from 133 FEP participants who had enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of a vocational intervention. Participants completed a neurocognitive and social cognitive battery and characteristics of cannabis use were documented (disorder, recency, frequency and dose). Principal axis factor analysis was used to determine the underlying structure of the cognitive batteries. Regression techniques were used to examine cognitive predictors of current cannabis use disorder (CUD), and recency and frequency of cannabis use. Bivariate correlations were used to examine associations between cognition and dose of cannabis consumption. Male gender (p=.037) was the only significant predictor of having a current CUD. Better processing speed (p=.022) and social cognition (p=.039), male gender (pcannabis use. Faster processing speed (p=.007) and male gender (p=.006) also predicted frequency of cannabis use. No variables were significantly associated with dose of cannabis consumption. Better social cognition and processing speed abilities predicting recency and frequency of cannabis use are consistent with cannabis users having higher cognitive abilities. A positive relationship between cannabis use and cognition may be the result of more drug taking opportunities in less cognitively impaired individuals with psychosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Reflection impulsivity and response inhibition in first-episode psychosis: relationship to cannabis use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddy, V C; Clark, L; Harrison, I; Ron, M A; Moutoussis, M; Barnes, T R E; Joyce, E M

    2013-10-01

    People with psychosis demonstrate impaired response inhibition on the Stop Signal Task (SST). It is less clear if this impairment extends to reflection impulsivity, a form of impulsivity that has been linked to substance use in non-psychotic samples. We compared 49 patients with first-episode psychosis (FEP) and 30 healthy control participants on two forms of impulsivity measured using the Information Sampling Test (IST) and the SST, along with clinical and IQ assessments. We also compared those patients who used cannabis with those who had either given up or never used. Patients with FEP had significantly greater impairment in response inhibition but not in reflection impulsivity compared with healthy controls. By contrast, patients who reported current cannabis use demonstrated greater reflection impulsivity than those that had either given up or never used, whereas there were no differences in response inhibition. These data suggest that abnormal reflection impulsivity is associated with substance use in psychosis but not psychosis itself ; the opposite relationship may hold for response inhibition.

  10. Brain structure abnormalities in first-episode psychosis patients with persistent apathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mørch-Johnsen, Lynn; Nesvåg, Ragnar; Faerden, Ann; Haukvik, Unn K; Jørgensen, Kjetil N; Lange, Elisabeth H; Andreassen, Ole A; Melle, Ingrid; Agartz, Ingrid

    2015-05-01

    Apathy is an enduring and debilitating feature related to poor outcome in patients with first-episode psychosis (FEP). The biological underpinnings of apathy are unknown. We tested if FEP patients with persistent apathy (PA) differed from FEP patients without persistent apathy (NPA) in specific brain structure measures in the early phase of illness. A total of 70 Norwegian FEP patients were recruited within 1 year of first adequate treatment. They were defined as having PA (N=18) or NPA (N=52) based on Apathy Evaluation Scale score at baseline and 1 year later. MRI measures of cortical thickness and subcortical structure volumes were compared between the PA and NPA groups. The PA group had significantly thinner left orbitofrontal cortex and left anterior cingulate cortex. The results remained significant after controlling for depressive symptoms and antipsychotic medication. FEP patients with persistent apathy in the early phase of their illness show brain structural changes compared to FEP patients without persistent apathy. The changes are confined to regions associated with motivation, occur early in the disease course and appear selectively in PA patients when both groups are compared to healthy controls. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Metacognition in first-episode psychosis and its association with positive and negative symptom profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauelsen, Anne Marie; Gumley, Andrew; Jansen, Jens Einar; Pedersen, Marlene Buch; Nielsen, Hanne-Grethe Lyse; Trier, Christopher Høier; Haahr, Ulrik H; Simonsen, Erik

    2016-04-30

    There is growing evidence that metacognitive abilities which include the ability to synthesize knowledge regarding mental states in self and others and use this ability to solve problems are impaired in non-affective psychosis and associated with positive and negative symptom severity. We sought to (a) investigate the severity of metacognitive impairments in first-episode psychosis (FEP) compared to non-clinical controls and (b) explore associations with positive and negative symptom profiles. Ninety-seven people with FEP were compared to 101 control persons. Metacognition was assessed with interviews and the Metacognitive assessment scale-abbreviated. Four groups based on positive and negative symptoms were identified by cluster analysis and compared on metacognition, childhood adversities, duration of untreated psychosis and premorbid social and academic adjustment. Those with high levels of negative symptoms had poorer metacognitive abilities. Those with high positive and low negative symptoms did not have poorer metacognitive abilities than those with low positive and negative symptoms. None of the other predictors differed between the groups. The FEP group had poorer metacognitive abilities than the control group. Inclusion of metacognition in psychosis models may improve our understanding of negative symptoms, while previous findings of a relation with positive symptoms may have been confounded. Implications for current interventions are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Depression in first episode psychosis: the role of subordination and shame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upthegrove, Rachel; Ross, Kerry; Brunet, Katerine; McCollum, Richard; Jones, Lisa

    2014-07-30

    Depression in early psychosis is linked to poor outcome, relapse and risk of suicide, yet remains poorly understood. This article aims to examine the development of depression in acute and post psychotic phases of first episode psychosis (FEP), and its relationship to persecutors, voices, insight, and recovery. Data were gathered on 92 patients with acute FEP on depression course, severity and experience of positive symptoms, insight and appraisals of illness using validated semi-structured interviews and questionnaires. Measures were repeated at 12 months. Malevolent voices, use of safety behaviours and subordination to persecutors were associated with depression and suicidal behaviour in acute FEP. Loss, Shame, low level continuing positive symptoms and longer duration of untreated psychosis were associated with post psychotic depression. Negative appraisals remained stable despite recovery in other symptom domains. Thus, depression and risk in early psychosis may be propagated by the personal significance and content of positive symptoms experienced. When in recovery, low level symptoms, longer period of illness and negative appraisals are significant factors. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Associations between nonauditory hallucinations, dissociation, and childhood adversity in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longden, Eleanor; House, Allan O; Waterman, Mitch G

    2016-01-01

    Although repeated associations have been found between adversity exposure (particularly exposure to childhood sexual abuse), dissociation, and auditory hallucinations in the context of psychosis, there is little comparable research examining hallucinations in other modalities. This study aimed to determine whether cumulative adversity exposure influences the likelihood of experiencing visual, tactile, olfactory, and gustatory hallucinations among psychosis patients and whether measures of dissociation are significantly associated with nonauditory hallucinations when exposure to childhood adversity and psychological distress are adjusted for. Self-report measures and a retrospective case-control design were applied to assess nonauditory hallucinations, dissociation, psychological distress, and childhood adversity exposure in a sample of first-episode psychosis patients reporting nonauditory hallucinations (n = 36) and controls from the same clinical population without nonauditory hallucinations (n = 31). Case participants reported higher levels of dissociation, psychological distress, and exposure to childhood rape than the control group. Dissociation remained significantly associated with nonauditory hallucinations when we adjusted for childhood sexual abuse, other types of childhood adversity, and a combined measure of emotional distress. Indication of a dose-response relationship was detected, in that total number of adversities was significantly associated with reporting more than one modality of nonauditory hallucination. Observed associations between auditory hallucinations and dissociation in psychosis may extend to other hallucination modalities. It is suggested that more research attention be paid to the etiology and impact of nonauditory hallucinations in psychosis samples.

  14. Epigenetics and gene expression profile in first-episode psychosis: The role of childhood trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassi, Simona; Tosato, Sarah

    2017-12-01

    Childhood Trauma (CT) mediation of the epigenome and its impact on gene expression profile could provide a mechanism for the gene-environment interaction underling psychosis. We reviewed the evidence concerning epigenetic and gene expression modifications associated with CT in both First-Episode Psychosis (FEP) and healthy subjects. In order to explore the relative role of psychosis itself in determining these modifications, evidence about FEP and epigenetics/gene expression was also summarized. We performed a systematic search on PubMed, last updated in December 2016. Out of 2966 potentially relevant records, only 41 studies were included. CT resulted associated: in FEP subjects, with global DNA hypo-methylation and reduced BDNF gene-expression; in healthy subjects, with hyper-methylation of SLC6A4, NR3C1, KITLG, and OXTR; hypo-methylation of FKBP5, IL-6, and BDNF; increased IL1B, IL8, and PTGS gene expression; and decreased SLC6A4 gene expression. FEP showed global DNA hypo-methylation; increased methylation and reduced gene expression of GCH1; hyper-expression of MPB, NDEL1, AKT1, and DICER1; and hypo-expression of DROSHA, COMT, and DISC1 in comparison with healthy controls. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The PSS-SR as a screening tool for PTSD in first-episode psychosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Gwen-Li; Abdin, Edimansyah; Lee, Jimmy

    2012-05-01

    We examined the validity of the PTSD Symptom Scale - Self-Report (PSS-SR) as a screening instrument for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in patients recovering from first-episode psychosis. Sixty-one patients from the Early Psychosis Intervention Programme in Singapore completed the PSS-SR questionnaire. The Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale was administered by a blinded interviewer as the 'gold standard' to identify patients with PTSD. The sensitivity, specificity and receiver operating characteristic curve were used to determine the screening performance of the PSS-SR. The score representing the optimal cut-off point for the PSS-SR was 14, with a sensitivity and specificity of 0.83 and 0.71, respectively. The area under the curve was determined to be 0.82 (95% CI: 0.70-0.95). These data suggest that the PSS-SR can be a useful screening instrument for PTSD in patients recovering from their first psychotic episode. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Is motor imagery different in catatonic schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaytseva, Yuliya; Morozova, Alexandra; Bendova, Marie; Garakh, Zhanna

    2017-06-01

    Catatonic schizophrenia, a rare subtype in this disease group, is characterized by motor disturbances. The current study investigated the reactivity of electroencephalographic mu rhythm in a motion imagery task in two single cases of first-episode catatonic schizophrenia, assuming they would show less mu rhythm reduction compared to paranoid schizophrenic patients and healthy controls. © 2017 The Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Suicide in the Early Stage of Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Ventriglio, Antonio; Gentile, Alessandro; Bonfitto, Iris; Stella, Eleonora; Mari, Massimo; Steardo, Luca; Bellomo, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    Suicide is a relevant leading cause of death among patients affected by schizophrenia. Even if suicidal ideation may be present in different stages of disease, some differences have been described between the risk of suicide in patients experiencing first episode of psychosis and those with long-term schizophrenia. It is particularly higher during the first year of illness and reaches a steady decline over the following years. Suicidal ideation and attempts may also be common among subjects w...

  18. A comparison of correlates of suicidal ideation prior to initial hospitalization for first-episode psychosis with prior research on correlates of suicide attempts prior to initial treatment seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Peggy; Compton, Michael T

    2012-05-01

    Individuals with first-episode psychosis, like those with chronic psychotic disorders, are at elevated risk for suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. However, relatively little is known about suicidality among first-episode patients prior to their initial presentation for treatment. This analysis was designed as a US-based examination of recent findings on prior suicide attempts from Dublin, Ireland, here focusing on prevalence and correlates of suicidal ideation during the weeks prior to initial treatment-seeking. Participants included 109 first-episode inpatients with primary psychotic disorders in public-sector settings that serve an urban, low-income, socially disadvantaged, predominantly African American population. Eligible patients had received 3 months prior to the index admission, though most were completely treatment naïve. Assessments included the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia, Birchwood Insight Scale, and a rigorous method for determining age at onset of first psychotic symptoms and duration of untreated psychosis. Disconcertingly, nearly one quarter of patients (23%) endorsed a history of suicidal ideation in the 2 weeks prior to first admission. In the model designed to replicate the prior study in Ireland, Calgary Depression score (calculated omitting hopelessness and suicidal ideation as these were separate variables in the analysis) was a predictor of suicidal ideation (P suicidal ideation. Findings suggest that depression, insight, and suicidality should be carefully monitored among first-episode patients initiating treatment and during the early course of illness. As insight improves, coping strategies should be enhanced with a goal of minimizing depression and preventing suicidality. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Hair cortisol in drug-naïve first-episode individuals with psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvis H. Andrade

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare hair cortisol concentrations (HCC in drug-naïve first-episode psychosis (FEP patients and healthy controls and to investigate the correlations between HCC and psychopathology. Methods: Twenty-four drug-naïve FEP patients and 27 gender- and age-matched healthy control subjects were recruited. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-1 was used to confirm/rule out diagnoses, and the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS was used to assess symptom severity. Hair samples (2-3 cm long obtained from the posterior vertex region of the scalp were processed in 1-cm segments considering a hair growth rate of 1 cm per month. The 1-cm segments were classified according to their proximity to the scalp: segment A was the closest to the scalp and referred to the month prior to inclusion in the study. Segments B and C referred to the 2nd and 3rd months prior to the time of evaluation respectively. Hair steroid extraction was performed using a known protocol. Results: Two-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA with gender and age as covariates revealed a group effect (F1.106 = 4.899, p = 0.029 on HCC. Between-segment differences correlated with total PANSS score and with PANSS General Psychopathology subscale and total score. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, as assessed by long-term (3-month cortisol concentration, is abnormal in the early stages of psychosis. The magnitude of changes in HCC over time prior to the FEP correlates to psychopathology. HPA axis abnormalities might begin prior to full-blown clinical presentation requiring hospital admission.

  20. Differential effect of quetiapine and lithium on functional connectivity of the striatum in first episode mania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandash, Orwa; Yücel, Murat; Daglas, Rothanthi; Pantelis, Christos; McGorry, Patrick; Berk, Michael; Fornito, Alex

    2018-03-06

    Mood disturbances seen in first-episode mania (FEM) are linked to disturbed functional connectivity of the striatum. Lithium and quetiapine are effective treatments for mania but their neurobiological effects remain largely unknown. We conducted a single-blinded randomized controlled maintenance trial in 61 FEM patients and 30 healthy controls. Patients were stabilized for a minimum of 2 weeks on lithium plus quetiapine then randomly assigned to either lithium (serum level 0.6 mmol/L) or quetiapine (dosed up to 800 mg/day) treatment for 12 months. Resting-state fMRI was acquired at baseline, 3 months (patient only) and 12 months. The effects of treatment group, time and their interaction, on striatal functional connectivity were assessed using voxel-wise general linear modelling. At baseline, FEM patients showed reduced connectivity in the dorsal (p = 0.05) and caudal (p = 0.008) cortico-striatal systems when compared to healthy controls at baseline. FEM patients also showed increased connectivity in a circuit linking the ventral striatum with the medial orbitofrontal cortex, cerebellum and thalamus (p = 0.02). Longitudinally, we found a significant interaction between time and treatment group, such that lithium was more rapid, compared to quetiapine, in normalizing abnormally increased functional connectivity, as assessed at 3-month and 12-month follow-ups. The results suggest that FEM is associated with reduced connectivity in dorsal and caudal corticostriatal systems, as well as increased functional connectivity of ventral striatal systems. Lithium appears to act more rapidly than quetiapine in normalizing hyperconnectivity of the ventral striatum with the cerebellum. The study was registered on the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12607000639426). http://www.anzctr.org.au.

  1. Precuneus functioning differentiates first-episode psychosis patients during the fantasy movie Alice in Wonderland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikandi, E; Pamilo, S; Mäntylä, T; Suvisaari, J; Kieseppä, T; Hari, R; Seppä, M; Raij, T T

    2017-02-01

    While group-level functional alterations have been identified in many brain regions of psychotic patients, multivariate machine-learning methods provide a tool to test whether some of such alterations could be used to differentiate an individual patient. Earlier machine-learning studies have focused on data collected from chronic patients during rest or simple tasks. We set out to unravel brain activation patterns during naturalistic stimulation in first-episode psychosis (FEP). We recorded brain activity from 46 FEP patients and 32 control subjects viewing scenes from the fantasy film Alice in Wonderland. Scenes with varying degrees of fantasy were selected based on the distortion of the 'sense of reality' in psychosis. After cleaning the data with a novel maxCorr method, we used machine learning to classify patients and healthy control subjects on the basis of voxel- and time-point patterns. Most (136/194) of the voxels that best classified the groups were clustered in a bilateral region of the precuneus. Classification accuracies were up to 79.5% (p = 5.69 × 10-8), and correct classification was more likely the higher the patient's positive-symptom score. Precuneus functioning was related to the fantasy content of the movie, and the relationship was stronger in control subjects than patients. These findings are the first to show abnormalities in precuneus functioning during naturalistic information processing in FEP patients. Correlational findings suggest that these alterations are associated with positive psychotic symptoms and processing of fantasy. The results may provide new insights into the neuronal basis of reality distortion in psychosis.

  2. Substance abuse and gender differences in first episode psychosis: Impact on hospital readmissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosas, Josep M; Cobo, Jesus; Ahuir, Maribel; Hernández, Carla; García, Rebeca; Pousa, Esther; Oliva, Joan-Carles; Monreal, José-Antonio; Palao, Diego J

    There have been controversial results in the study of gender differences in first episode psychosis (FEP). Substance abuse is the main existing comorbidity in FEP, and has been associated with worse prognosis and greater symptom severity. To explore gender differences in FEP in relation to drug abuse, and their relationship with hospital readmissions. Descriptive and prospective study (18 months). We included 141 patients (31.2% women), aged 26.1 years on average, mostly diagnosed with schizophreniform disorder (32.6%). A percentage of 58.9 had problematic use of drugs. Gender significant differences were found in age of onset, age at entry to the programme, marital status and cohabitation, and percentage differences were revealed in current drug abuse and frequency of consumption. Gender, duration of untreated psychosis, psychiatric history, age of onset and previous drug use were not predictors of re-entry. Hospital readmission rate was 24.8%, with no gender differences. The most common reasons for admission were abandonment of treatment (66.7%) and drug abuse (44.4%). Drug abuse was higher in the men than in the women as a reason for re-admission. There are gender differences in FEP. Men have an earlier onset of symptoms and have worse functional outcomes. Drug abuse in men is higher and represents a major cause of hospital readmission. Therapeutic interventions to prevent the effects of drug abuse are necessary from the early stages of the illness. Copyright © 2017 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Cognitive deficits characterization using the CogState Research Battery in first-episode psychosis patients

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    Audrey Benoit

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The computer-based CogState Research Battery (CSRB proposes a test structure which follows MATRICS recommended cognitive domains but lacks direct comparison to pen and paper batteries in first-episode psychosis (FEP. The aim of this study was to compare performances obtained with the CSRB and a pen and paper battery in a historical cohort of FEP patients. Among patients entering an early intervention program between 2003 and 2014, separate cohorts completed the traditional pen and paper cognitive battery (n = 182 and the CSRB (n = 97. Composite z-scores were derived using normative data of matched controls (n = 64 pen and paper, n = 69 CSRB and were compared between the two batteries for the 7 cognitive domains. The cohort tested using the CSRB performed better on the domains of processing speed, attention, visual memory, and verbal memory than the cohort tested using the pen and paper battery (all p < 0.001. Performance did not differ between the two types of batteries for the working memory, executive functions, and social cognition domains. Cognitive profiles identified in the two patient cohorts were similar, with verbal memory being the most impaired domain. Better performances on the CSRB may be primarily due to the minimal demand of the computerized tests on graphomotor abilities and reading speed compared to the pen and paper tests. Our investigation offers a better understanding on how the results obtained with computerized batteries may compare to earlier work done with traditional tests.

  4. Episode cycles with increasing recurrences in first-episode bipolar-I disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldessarini, R J; Salvatore, P; Khalsa, H-M K; Imaz-Etxeberria, H; Gonzalez-Pinto, A; Tohen, M

    2012-01-01

    Preliminary review of a century of studies of the course of manic-depressive syndromes produced 40 reports, of which approximately one-third report evidence of shortening wellness intervals or cycle-lengths with more recurrences, and two-thirds did not. We evaluated inter-episode intervals (cycle-length) in 128 clinically-treated, DSM-IV bipolar-I disorder patients followed prospectively and systematically over 5.7 years, with 6.5 episodes/person. As expected, cycle-length varied inversely with total cycle-count/person; however, multivariate linear regression found only longer initial hospitalization and fewer total cycles to be associated with cycle-length, whereas cycle-number (1, 2, 3, etc.), sex, intake-age, and first-episode polarity were not. Regression of within-subject cycle-length versus cycle-number yielded individual slope-functions with pseudo-random distribution (28% fell within ±1 month/cycle of the null [zero-slope]). Mean duration of early and late euthymic intervals (cycles 2 vs. 5) in patients with matched recurrence-counts was nearly identical. The course of bipolar-I disorder from onset was largely random or chaotic over nearly 6 years from onset. Only a minority of patients showed either cycle-acceleration or slowing, without changes in wellness intervals. The findings may be influenced by treatment-effects, but seem to indicate that most current bipolar-I disorder patients are unlikely to show progressive shortening of recurrence-cycles. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The role of MRI and CT of the brain in first episodes of psychosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khandanpour, N.; Hoggard, N.; Connolly, D.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether imaging is associated with early detection of the organic causes of the first episode of psychosis (FEP). Materials and methods: Individuals with FEP but no neurological signs referred to a tertiary centre for cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) were reviewed retrospectively. Two groups were evaluated with either CT or MRI; the two groups were independent and no individual underwent both CT and MRI. Results: One hundred and twelve consecutive cerebral MRI and 204 consecutive CT examinations were identified. Three (2.7%) individuals had brain lesions [brain tumour and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) encephalopathy] potentially accountable for the psychosis at MRI. Seventy patients (62.5%) had incidental brain lesions, such as cerebral atrophy, small vessel ischaemic changes, unruptured Circle of Willis aneurysm, cavernoma, and arachnoid cysts at MRI. Three patients (1.5%) had focal brain lesions (primary or secondary tumours) potentially accountable for the psychosis at CT. One hundred and thirty-three patients (65.2%) had incidental brain lesions unrelated to the psychosis on CT scan. There was no significant difference between MRI and CT imaging in detecting organic disease potentially responsible for FEP (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Routine MRI or CT imaging of the brain is unlikely to reveal disease leading to a significant change in management. MRI was comparable with CT in terms of diagnosis of both pathological and incidental cerebral lesions. Therefore, routine brain structural imaging of FEP in patients without focal neurology may not be routinely required and if imaging is requested then CT may function equally as well as MRI as the first-line investigation

  6. Childhood adversity specificity and dose-response effect in non-affective first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauelsen, Anne Marie; Bendall, Sarah; Jansen, Jens Einar; Nielsen, Hanne-Grethe Lyse; Pedersen, Marlene Buch; Trier, Christopher Høier; Haahr, Ulrik H; Simonsen, Erik

    2015-06-01

    Reviews conclude that childhood and adolescence sexual, physical, emotional abuse and emotional and physical neglect are all risk factors for psychosis. However, studies suggest only some adversities are associated with psychosis. Dose-response effects of several adversities on risk of psychosis have not been consistently found. The current study aimed to explore adversity specificity and dose-response effects of adversities on risk of psychosis. Participants were 101 persons with first-episode psychosis (FEP) diagnosed with ICD-10 F20 - F29 (except F21) and 101 non-clinical control persons matched by gender, age and parents' socio-economic status. Assessment included the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and parts of the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire. Eighty-nine percent of the FEP group reported one or more adversities compared to 37% of the control group. Childhood and adolescent sexual, physical, emotional abuse, and physical and emotional neglect, separation and institutionalization were about four to 17 times higher for the FEP group (all p<0.01). The risk of psychosis increased two and a half times for each additional adversity. All associations between specific adversities and psychosis decreased when they were adjusted for other adversities. Our findings suggest that there is a large shared effect of adversities on the risk of psychosis. Contrary to the call for further research into specific adversities, we suggest a search for mechanisms in the shared effects of traumatization. Clinical implications are thorough assessment of adversities and their possible effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Social anxiety in first-episode psychosis: the role of childhood trauma and adult attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michail, Maria; Birchwood, Max

    2014-07-01

    Social anxiety is among the most prevalent affective disturbances among people with psychosis. The developmental pathways associated with its emergence in psychosis, however, remain unclear. The aim of this study is to identify the developmental risk factors associated with social anxiety disorder in first-episode psychosis and to investigate whether social anxiety in psychosis and non-psychosis is associated with similar or different adult attachment styles. This is a cross-sectional study. A sample of individuals with social anxiety disorder (with or without psychosis) was compared with a sample with psychosis only and healthy controls on childhood trauma, dysfunctional parenting and adult attachment. Childhood trauma and dysfunctional parenting (pchildhood trauma and dysfunctional parenting between socially anxious people with and without psychosis. Higher levels of insecure adult attachment (x(2)1=38.5, pChildhood adversities were not associated with insecure adult attachment in people with social anxiety (with or without psychosis). Due to the cross-sectional nature of the study we cannot infer causal relationships between early risk factors, including childhood trauma and dysfunctional parenting, and social anxiety. Also, the use of self-report measures of attachment could be subject to biases. Shared developmental risk factors are implicated in the emergence of affective disorders in psychosis and non-psychosis. Social anxiety in psychosis is associated with insecurity in adult attachments which does not arise a result of adverse developmental pathways. Understanding the bio-psycho-social risk factors for affective dysregulation in psychosis could inform psychological interventions about the role of developmental anomaly and trauma in the emergence of affective dysregulation in psychosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Adverse Childhood Experiences and Risk for First-Episode Major Depression During the Menopause Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epperson, C Neill; Sammel, Mary D; Bale, Tracy L; Kim, Deborah R; Conlin, Sarah; Scalice, Stephanie; Freeman, Katharine; Freeman, Ellen W

    2017-03-01

    Stress exposures may have a differential impact on risk and resilience for depression depending on their timing across development. We sought to determine whether adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and their onset with respect to puberty contribute to the increased risk observed in first-episode major depressive disorder (MDD) during the menopause transition. Participants were from the Penn Ovarian Aging Study cohort, which is composed of women from Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, who underwent behavioral, cognitive, and endocrine evaluations approximately yearly from 1996 to 2012 and completed the Adverse Childhood Experiences Questionnaire at study end point (n = 243). ACEs that first occurred 2 or more years before menarche were considered prepubertal. Incident menopause MDD was defined as first observed onset of the disorder in the perimenopause to postmenopause transition using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R and the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders. Incident menopause MDD occurred in 48% of the 100 women who reported lifetime MDD. Women reporting ≥ 2 total ACEs were at significantly greater risk for lifetime MDD (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.05, P = .034) and incident menopause MDD (aOR = 2.58, P = .03) compared to those reporting 0 ACEs; women with ≥ 2 postpubertal ACEs were 2.3 times more likely to experience incidence menopause MDD (P = .024) after controlling for race, smoking, body mass index, and employment. Experiencing only 1 ACE in the prepubertal window, regardless of additional ACEs in postpuberty, was associated with reduced risk for lifetime and incident menopause MDD. Timing and number of adverse experiences with respect to puberty differentially impacted risk and resilience for MDD across the female life span and during the menopause transition in this community cohort. © Copyright 2017 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  9. Impact of childhood adversities on specific symptom dimensions in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajnakina, O; Trotta, A; Oakley-Hannibal, E; Di Forti, M; Stilo, S A; Kolliakou, A; Gardner-Sood, P; Gaughran, F; David, A S; Dazzan, P; Pariante, C; Mondelli, V; Morgan, C; Vassos, E; Murray, R M; Fisher, H L

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between childhood adversity (CA) and psychotic disorder is well documented. As the adequacy of the current categorical diagnosis of psychosis is being increasingly questioned, we explored independent associations between different types of CA and specific psychotic symptom dimensions in a well-characterized sample of first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients. This study involved 236 FEP cases aged 18-65 years who presented for the first time to psychiatric services in South London, UK. Psychopathology was assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and confirmatory factor analysis was used to evaluate the statistical fit of the Wallwork/Fortgang five-factor model of psychosis. CA prior to 17 years of age (physical abuse, sexual abuse, parental separation, parental death, and being taken into care) was retrospectively assessed using the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire. Childhood sexual abuse [β = 0.96, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.40-1.52], childhood physical abuse (β = 0.48, 95% CI 0.03-0.93) and parental separation (β = 0.60, 95% CI 0.10-1.11) showed significant associations with the positive dimension; while being taken into care was associated with the excited dimension (β = 0.36, 95% CI 0.08-0.65), independent of the other types of CA. No significant associations were found between parental death and any of the symptom dimensions. A degree of specificity was found in the relationships between different types of CA and psychosis symptom dimensions in adulthood, suggesting that distinct pathways may be involved in the CA-psychosis association. These potentially different routes to developing psychosis merit further empirical and theoretical exploration.

  10. Differences in Facial Emotion Recognition between First Episode Psychosis, Borderline Personality Disorder and Healthy Controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Catalan

    Full Text Available Facial emotion recognition (FER is essential to guide social functioning and behaviour for interpersonal communication. FER may be altered in severe mental illness such as in psychosis and in borderline personality disorder patients. However, it is unclear if these FER alterations are specifically related to psychosis. Awareness of FER alterations may be useful in clinical settings to improve treatment strategies. The aim of our study was to examine FER in patients with severe mental disorder and their relation with psychotic symptomatology.Socio-demographic and clinical variables were collected. Alterations on emotion recognition were assessed in 3 groups: patients with first episode psychosis (FEP (n = 64, borderline personality patients (BPD (n = 37 and healthy controls (n = 137, using the Degraded Facial Affect Recognition Task. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Structured Interview for Schizotypy Revised and Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences scales were used to assess positive psychotic symptoms. WAIS III subtests were used to assess IQ.Kruskal-Wallis analysis showed a significant difference between groups on the FER of neutral faces score between FEP, BPD patients and controls and between FEP patients and controls in angry face recognition. No significant differences were found between groups in the fear or happy conditions. There was a significant difference between groups in the attribution of negative emotion to happy faces. BPD and FEP groups had a much higher tendency to recognize happy faces as negatives. There was no association with the different symptom domains in either group.FEP and BPD patients have problems in recognizing neutral faces more frequently than controls. Moreover, patients tend to over-report negative emotions in recognition of happy faces. Although no relation between psychotic symptoms and FER alterations was found, these deficits could contribute to a patient's misinterpretations in daily life.

  11. Social inclusion and its interrelationships with social cognition and social functioning in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Andrew; Cotton, Sue M; Allott, Kelly; Filia, Kate M; Hester, Robert; Killackey, Eóin

    2017-10-27

    People with psychosis are at risk of social exclusion. Research is needed in this area due to the lack of direct measurement of social inclusion, which becomes salient in adolescence and is relevant to first-episode psychosis (FEP; the onset of which typically occurs during or shortly after adolescence). Social inclusion may be impacted by impaired social cognition and social functioning, which are related features observed in psychosis. The aim of this study was to explore interrelationship(s) between social cognition, social functioning and social inclusion in FEP while controlling for symptomatology (positive, negative and depressive symptoms) and demographic characteristics. A series of cross-sectional hierarchical multiple regressions were conducted to examine whether: social cognition (theory of mind, emotion recognition) predicted social functioning; social functioning predicted social inclusion, and whether social functioning mediated the relationship between social cognition and social inclusion in people aged 15 to 25 (M = 20.49, SD = 2.41) with FEP (N = 146). Age, sex, premorbid IQ, positive and negative psychotic symptoms and depression were control variables. Poor facial emotion recognition (β = -.22, P social functioning. Role-specific social functioning (ie, current employment) predicted greater social inclusion (β = .17, P social inclusion (β = -.43, P Social functioning did not mediate the relationship between social cognition and inclusion. Psychotic symptoms were unrelated to social inclusion. Employment and depression may influence social inclusion somewhat independently of psychotic symptomatology in FEP. Inferences should be viewed with caution given this study did not involve longitudinal data. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Differences in cannabis-related experiences between patients with a first episode of psychosis and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianconi, F; Bonomo, M; Marconi, A; Kolliakou, A; Stilo, S A; Iyegbe, C; Gurillo Muñoz, P; Homayoun, S; Mondelli, V; Luzi, S; Dazzan, P; Prata, D; La Cascia, C; O'Connor, J; David, A; Morgan, C; Murray, R M; Lynskey, M; Di Forti, M

    2016-04-01

    Many studies have reported that cannabis use increases the risk of a first episode of psychosis (FEP). However, only a few studies have investigated the nature of cannabis-related experiences in FEP patients, and none has examined whether these experiences are similar in FEP and general populations. The aim of this study was to explore differences in self-reported cannabis experiences between FEP and non-psychotic populations. A total of 252 subjects, who met International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10 criteria for FEP, and 217 controls who reported cannabis use were selected from the Genetics and Psychosis (GAP) study. The Medical Research Council Social Schedule and the Cannabis Experience Questionnaire were used to collect sociodemographic data and cannabis use information, respectively. Both 'bad' and 'enjoyable' experiences were more commonly reported by FEP subjects than controls. Principal components factor analysis identified four components which explained 62.3% of the variance. Linear regression analysis on the whole sample showed that the type of cannabis used and beliefs about the effect of cannabis on health all contributed to determining the intensity and frequency of experiences. Linear regression analysis on FEP subjects showed that the duration of cannabis use and amount of money spent on cannabis were strongly related to the intensity and frequency of enjoyable experiences in this population. These results suggest a higher sensitivity to cannabis effects among people who have suffered their first psychotic episode; this hypersensitivity results in them reporting both more 'bad' and 'enjoyable' experiences. The greater enjoyment experienced may provide an explanation of why FEP patients are more likely to use cannabis and to continue to use it despite experiencing an exacerbation of their psychotic symptoms.

  13. Role of environmental confounding in the association between FKBP5 and first-episode psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olesya eAjnakina

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Failure to account for the etiological diversity that typically occurs in psychiatric cohorts may increase the potential for confounding, as a proportion of genetic variance will be specific to exposures that have variable distribution in cases. This study investigated whether minimizing the potential for such confounding strengthened the evidence for a genetic candidate currently unsupported at the genome-wide level.Methods: 291 first-episode psychosis cases from South London UK, and 218 unaffected controls were evaluated for a functional polymorphism at the rs1360780 locus in FKBP5. The relationship between FKBP5 and psychosis was modelled using logistic regression. Cannabis use (Cannabis Experiences Questionnaire and parental separation (Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire were modelled as confounders in the analysis.Results: Association at rs1360780 was not detected until the effects of the two environmental factors had been adjusted for in the model (OR=2.81, 95% CI 1.23-6.43, p=0.02. A statistical interaction between rs1360780 and parental separation was confirmed by stratified tests (OR=2.8, p=0.02 vs. OR=0.89, p=0.80. The genetic main effect was directionally-consistent with findings in other (stress-related clinical phenotypes. Moreover, the variation in effect magnitude was explained by the level of power associated with different cannabis constructs used in the model (r=0.95.Conclusions: Our results suggest that the extent to which genetic variants in FKBP5 can influence susceptibility to psychosis may depend on the other etiological factors involved. This finding requires further validation in other large independent cohorts. Potentially this work could have translational implications, as the ability to discriminate between genetic etiologies, based on a case-by-case understanding of exposure history would confer an important clinical advantage that would benefit the delivery of personalizable treatment

  14. Serum cholesterol and Suicide in first episode psychosis: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Amresh; Johnston, Megan; Campbell, Robbie; De Sousa, Avinash; Shah, Nilesh

    2017-01-01

    Low levels of cholesterol have been described in suicide behavior including among those individuals who have an increased tendency for impulsivity. Violent suicide attempters show significantly lower cholesterol levels than nonviolent suicide attempters. The suicide rate is particularly high in the prodromal and early phase of schizophrenia. It is unclear if there is a psychopathological relationship between early psychosis, suicide, and cholesterol levels. The present study examines levels of cholesterol and suicide behavior in a cohort of early psychosis. Sixty admitted patients with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, diagnosis of nonaffective schizophrenia spectrum disorder (early psychosis) were assessed in a naturalistic cross-sectional, cohort study. Psychopathology was assessed with the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale for Schizophrenia (PANSS), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and Scale for Impact of Suicidality-Management, Assessment and Planning of Care (SIS-MAP). Serum levels of cholesterol were estimated in the cohort as well. The findings were analyzed for a clinical correlation of cholesterol levels, suicidal attempters, and psychopathology. Out of 60 patients, 13 patients had a suicide attempt in the recent past. No serum cholesterol abnormality (3.7 ± 1.2 mmol/L) was observed in patients as a group and those with low suicidality (SIS-MAP suicidality (SIS-MAP >33; serum cholesterol: 3.5 ± 1.4 mmol/L). Females with moderate suicidality showed statistically significant lower cholesterol levels than males ( P = 0.047). The study suggests lower levels of cholesterol in patients of psychosis with severe suicidal thoughts and depression in early psychosis. More research is required in this field to determine the neurochemistry of suicide behavior in psychosis and its significance in the prediction of suicidal behavior.

  15. The development of subjective quality of life over the first 2 years in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melle, Ingrid; Røssberg, Jan Ivar; Joa, Inge

    2010-01-01

    of variance were done to evaluate the development over time, and multiple linear regression analyses to evaluate predictors of change. These patients with a first-episode psychosis showed a significant improvement in general s-QoL during the first 2 years of treatment. Improvements in general s-QoL were...

  16. Randomized clinical trial of observational versus antibiotic treatment for a first episode of CT-proven uncomplicated acute diverticulitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daniels, L.; de Korte, N.; van Dieren, S.; Stockmann, H. B.; Vrouenraets, B. C.; Consten, E. C.; van der Hoeven, J. A.; Eijsbouts, Q. A.; Faneyte, I. F.; Bemelman, W. A.; Dijkgraaf, M. G.; Boermeester, M. A.; Glaap, C. E M; Croonen, A.; Cuesta, M. A.; Kuijvenhoven, J.; Buijsman, R.; Den Uil, S.; De Reuver, P. R.; Tuynman, J. B.; Van de Wall, B. J M; Stam, M. A W; Roumen, R. M H; Truin, W.; Wijn, R.; Gerhards, M. F.; Kuhlmann, K. F D; Van der Zaag, E. S.; Biemond, J. E.; Klicks, R. J.; Dhar, N.; Cense, H. A.; De Groot, G. H.; Pikoulin, Y.; Van Ramshorst, G. H.; Hoornweg, L. L.; Koet, L.; Van Geloven, A. A W; Emous, M.; Claassen, A. T P M; Mollink, S.; Sonneveld, D. J A; Bouvé, L.; Diepenhorst, G. M P; Vles, W. J.; Toorenvliet, B. R.; Lange, J. F.; Mannaerts, G. H H; Grotenhuis, B. A.; tot Nederveen Cappel, R. J De Vos; Deerenberg, E. B.; Depla, A. C T M; Bruin, S.; Vos, X.; Scheepers, J. J G; Boom, M. J.; Boerma, D.; Van Esser, S.; Pruim, J.; Reitsma, J. B.

    Background: Antibiotics are advised in most guidelines on acute diverticulitis, despite a lack of evidence to support their routine use. This trial compared the effectiveness of a strategy with or without antibiotics for a first episode of uncomplicated acute diverticulitis. Methods: Patients with

  17. Randomized clinical trial of observational versus antibiotic treatment for a first episode of CT-proven uncomplicated acute diverticulitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daniels, L.; Unlu, C.; Korte, N. de; Dieren, S. van; Stockmann, H.B.; Vrouenraets, B.C.; Consten, E.C.; Hoeven, J.A. van der; Eijsbouts, Q.A.; Faneyte, I.F.; Bemelman, W.A.; Dijkgraaf, M.G.; Boermeester, M.A.; Reuver, P.R.; et al.,

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antibiotics are advised in most guidelines on acute diverticulitis, despite a lack of evidence to support their routine use. This trial compared the effectiveness of a strategy with or without antibiotics for a first episode of uncomplicated acute diverticulitis. METHODS: Patients with

  18. Use of brain imaging (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) in first-episode psychosis: review and retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulet, Karine; Deschamps, Benoit; Evoy, François; Trudel, Jean-François

    2009-07-01

    To identify and review available evidence on the diagnostic yield of brain computed tomographies (CTs) and magnetic resonance images (MRIs) in first-episode psychosis, and examine yield in our own institution (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec). Using MEDLINE (1966 to October 2007) and EMBASE (1980 to October 2007), we identified and analyzed studies that examined imaging yields in first-episode psychosis; yield being defined as the percentage of scans showing abnormalities that may result in psychosis. We also retrospectively analyzed diagnostic yields in 46 patients hospitalized in our institution between 2001 and 2006 for first-episode psychosis. Five studies were deemed relevant. Including our own series, the sample comprised 384 CT and 184 MRI scans. Point estimate for diagnostic yield was 1.3% for CT and 1.1% for MRI scans. These yields likely overestimate clinical usefulness of findings. MRI scans also resulted in a sizeable number of fortuitous, clinically irrelevant findings. In first-episode psychosis, routine CT or MRI scans are of little benefit and should be reserved for situations where history or examination suggests neurological causation, or possibly for people aged 50 years and older.

  19. A 2-year follow-up of involuntary admission's influence upon adherence and outcome in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opjordsmoen, S; Friis, S; Melle, I

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To see, if voluntary admission for treatment in first-episode psychosis results in better adherence to treatment and more favourable outcome than involuntary admission. METHOD: We compared consecutively first-admitted, hospitalised patients from a voluntary (n = 91) with an involuntary...

  20. Timing, quantity and quality of stressful life events in childhood and preceding the first episode of bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horesh, Netta; Apter, Alan; Zalsman, Gil

    2011-11-01

    A large body of evidence supports the importance of genetic risk factors in bipolar disorder (BPD), but less is known about the role of stressful life events (SLE). This study assessed the role of SLE in childhood, adulthood and one year prior to first episodes of both depression and mania in BPD. Three groups of 50 matched subjects each were assessed: patients with BPD, with borderline personality disorder (BLPD) and healthy controls. Structured clinical interviews were used for diagnoses. The Coddington Life Events Schedule and the Israel Psychiatric Epidemiology Research Interview Life Event Scale measured life events and were confirmed with a semi-structured interview for subjective experience for each SLE. In BPD, the total number of SLE was lower during childhood and higher in the year preceding the first depression compared to controls and the proportion of loss-related events in childhood was higher. In the year preceding the first depressive episode, BPD subjects had more total, negative uncontrolled and independent but not positive SLE. In the year preceding the first episode of mania, the total number of uncontrolled, negative SLE were higher in BPD, whereas positive and separation-related SLE were not. After the first episode, BPD subjects had less SLE than controls. Negative and loss-related SLE are common in BPD subjects, occur in the year preceding the first episodes of depression and mania and are less common in childhood or after the onset of the disorder. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Deficits of cognitive theory of mind and its relationship with functioning in individuals with an at-risk mental state and first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmuro, Noriyuki; Katsura, Masahiro; Obara, Chika; Kikuchi, Tatsuo; Sakuma, Atsushi; Iizuka, Kunio; Hamaie, Yumiko; Ito, Fumiaki; Matsuoka, Hiroo; Matsumoto, Kazunori

    2016-09-30

    Disturbance of theory of mind (ToM) and its relationship with functioning in schizophrenia is well documented; however, this is unclear in spectrum disorders like at-risk mental state (ARMS) and first-episode psychosis (FEP). To assess mental state reasoning ability, the total score of the Theory of Mind Picture Stories Task questionnaire was compared among 36 Japanese individuals with ARMS, 40 with FEP, and 25 healthy controls (HC). Pearson's correlations between ToM performance and global and social functioning indices were examined. ToM performance for FEP and ARMS subjects was significantly lower than that for HC, though the significance of the difference between the ARMS and HC disappeared when controlling for premorbid IQ. ToM deficits in ARMS subjects were confirmed only in the comprehension of higher-order false belief. Only among FEP subjects were ToM performance and global functioning significantly correlated, though the significance disappeared when controlling for neurocognitive performance or dose of antipsychotics. No significant correlation between ToM performance and social functioning was observed in the FEP and ARMS groups. The current findings suggest that ToM deficits emerge in ARMS subjects confined within a higher-order domain, and that the relationship between ToM impairment and functional deterioration might be established after psychosis onset. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Measuring trauma and stressful events in childhood and adolescence among patients with first-episode psychosis: initial factor structure, reliability, and validity of the Trauma Experiences Checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofaro, Sarah L; Cleary, Sean D; Ramsay Wan, Claire; Broussard, Beth; Chapman, Colby; Haggard, Patrick J; Jananeh, Sara; Myers, Neely L; Compton, Michael T

    2013-12-15

    Past trauma and stressful events, especially in childhood and adolescence, are common among individuals with serious mental illnesses like schizophrenia. Traumatic experiences are thought to be a socio-environmental risk factor not only for poorer outcomes, but also potentially for the onset of these disorders. Because improved measurement tools are needed, we developed and studied, among 205 first-episode psychosis patients, the factor structure, internal consistency reliability, and initial validity of the Trauma Experiences Checklist (TEC), our measure of trauma and stressful events during childhood/adolescence. We assessed validity of subscales using correlations with Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-Short Form, Parental Harsh Discipline, Violence Exposure, and TEC-Informant Version scores. Exploratory factor analysis resulted in two internally consistent subscales (Cronbach's α=0.79 and 0.80, respectively), interpersonal abuse and family stress, and violence, death, and legal involvement. Scores from the former subscale were substantially associated with CTQ-SF physical, emotional, and sexual abuse (r=0.42-0.57, all pchildhood and adolescence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Experience of Childhood Trauma and Its Influence on the Course of Illness in First-Episode Psychosis: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Jens Einar; Pedersen, Marlene Buch; Trauelsen, Anne Marie; Nielsen, Hanne-Grethe Lyse; Haahr, Ulrik Helt; Simonsen, Erik

    2016-03-01

    Persons with schizophrenia spectrum disorders often report high levels of childhood trauma, which often exacerbates symptoms and impede the process of recovery. However, little is known about how these traumas are experienced by service users and how they are integrated in their life stories. To examine this, we conducted in-depth interviews with 15 service users with a diagnosis of a first-episode nonaffective psychosis who had reported 1 or more childhood traumas in self-report measures. There was an unexpected discrepancy between the number of traumas reported in self-report measures and in semistructured interviews, and many of the traumas did not seem integrated in their personal narratives. The analyses further revealed that although participants often described complicated and traumatic childhood environments, they still felt supported by their families; they reported a range of ways in which they tried to cope with and gain control of their psychotic disorder, and they described a general optimistic view of the future.

  4. Microbiology and resistance in first episodes of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis: implications for management and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Kilian; Nüssle, Simone; Rehlen, Tobias; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Mischnik, Alexander; Eisenbach, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    International guidelines for antibiotic treatment of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) are based on studies conducted decades ago and do not reflect regional differences of bacterial epidemiology. We retrospectively analyzed epidemiology of agents, antibiotic resistance patterns, and survival in liver cirrhosis patients with their first episode of SBP during the years 2007-2013. Of the 311 patients included, 114 patients had a positive ascites culture, and 197 had an ascitic neutrophil count >250 μL. Gram-positive bacteria (47.8%) were more frequently found than Gram-negatives (44.9%), fungi in 7.2%. Enterobacter spp. (40.6%), Enterococcus spp. (26.1%), and Staphylcoccus spp. (13.8%) were the most frequently isolated agents. Third-generation cephalosporins covered 70.2% of non-nosocomial and 56.3% of nosocomial-acquired SBP cases.When SBP was diagnosed by a positive ascitic culture, survival was highly significantly reduced (mean: 13.9 ± 2.9 months; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.1-19.8) compared with culture-negative SBP patients (mean: 44.1 ± 5.4 months; 95% CI: 33.4-54.9; P = 0.000). Along with model of end-stage liver disease score and intensive care unit contact, a positive ascites culture remained an independent risk factor associated with poor survival (odds ratio: 1.49; 95% CI: 1.09-2.03) in multivariate analysis; piperacillin/tazobactam proved to be an adequate antibiotic for nosocomial and non-nosocomial SBP in 85.1% and 92.5%, respectively. SBP infection with Enterococcus spp. was associated with poor patient survival (P = 0.048). Third-generation cephalosporins have poor microbial coverage for treatment of SBP. Current guidelines need to adapt for the emerging number of Gram-positive infectious agents in SBP patients. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Diagnostic role of initial renal cortical scintigraphy in children with the first episode of acute pyelonephritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaksic, E.; Bogdanovic, R.; Artiko, V.

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of the first febrile urinary tract infection (UTI) in children has been the subject of debate for many years. Diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis (APN) is usually based on clinical and biological data. The clinical usefulness of early Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy remains controversial, although it may influence the type and duration of treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the role of initial cortical scintigraphy in the detection of early renal parenchymal damage in children highly suspected of having APN and to compare the scintigraphic findings with selected clinical/laboratory parameters and ultrasonography. A prospective study was conducted in 34 infants and young children (18 boys, 16 girls), aged 1.5-36 months (mean 9.8±8.7 months), hospitalized with a first episode of clinically suspected APN. Within the first 5 days after admission, Tc-99m DMSA renal scintigraphy, ultrasonography (US), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), white blood cell count (WBC) and urine analyses were performed. DMSA scintigraphy showed changes consistent with APN in 27/34 (79%) patients, with a mean age of 10.9 months, including 12 males (44%) and 15 (56%) females. Out of 9 febrile children with negative urine culture and supportive evidence of UTI, scintigraphy showed parenchymal involvement in 8 children (24% in the whole group, 30% in scintigraphically documented APN). There were no statistically significant correlations between the frequency or size of the initial scintigraphic abnormalities and age, sex, body temperature, CRP levels or ESR. A CRP level of >54 mg/L and a WBC of >13,300/mm 3 had sensitivities of 56 and 59% and specificities of 86 and 71%, respectively. US showed changes consistent with APN in 7/34 (21%) in the whole group and in 7/27 (26%) patients with positive cortical scan (p<0.05). Initial DMSA renal scintigraphy is a sensitive method for the early diagnosis of APN in young children and is

  6. Does dissociation mediate the relationship between childhood trauma and hallucinations, delusions in first episode psychosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Pamela; Alvarez-Jimenez, Mario; Simpson, Katrina; Lawrence, Katherine; Peach, Natalie; Bendall, Sarah

    2018-04-11

    Childhood trauma has been linked to the presence of delusions and hallucinations in psychosis, although the mechanisms underlying this relationship require elucidation. Dissociation, characterized by disruptions to the integrative functioning of several core mental domains, has emerged as a potential mechanism. There is a paucity of research using a clinician-rated measure of dissociation to test the indirect effect of dissociation on the relationship between childhood trauma and psychotic symptoms. This study aimed to investigate whether dissociation mediated both the relationships between childhood trauma and hallucinations, and childhood trauma and delusions utilizing a clinician-administered measure of dissociation, namely the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders - Revised (SCID-D-R). Sixty-six first-episode psychosis (FEP) participants completed a research interview and questionnaires. Information about experiences of childhood trauma, psychosis, dissociation, general psychopathology and demographics were collected. When using the SCID-D-R, childhood trauma positively correlated with dissociation. Further, dissociation mediated the relationship between childhood trauma and delusions. Contrary to previous findings, we found no relationship between dissociation and hallucinations and no mediating effect of dissociation on the association between childhood trauma and hallucinations. The results of the SCID-D-R differed significantly from those of the Dissociative Experiences Scale-II (DES-II) which were consistent with previous research. Our findings are the first to use a clinician-rated measure to test the mediating effect of dissociation on the relationship between childhood trauma and positive symptoms (i.e., hallucinations and delusions). Given the discrepancies in results between the SCID-D-R and DES-II, how dissociation is measured in future research is an important consideration. The results add to a body of work that

  7. [Blonanserin in the treatment of schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenjin, Tomomi; Miyamoto, Seiya

    2013-04-01

    Blonanserin was developed in Japan in 2008 as an antipsychotic drug. It has high affinity for dopamine D2/3 and serotonin 5-HT2A receptors, but shows low affinity for adrenergic alpha1, histamine H1, and muscarinic M1 receptors. Several short-term double-blind trials demonstrated that blonanserin was well tolerated and had equal efficacy to haloperidol and risperidone in terms of positive symptoms and depressive symptoms in patients with chronic schizophrenia. It was also superior to haloperidol in improving negative symptoms. We have recently reported that blonanserin may improve some types of cognitive function associated with the frontal lobe activity in patients with first-episode schizophrenia. Taken together, blonanserin may be a promising candidate for a first-line antipsychotic for patients with first-episode and chronic schizophrenia.

  8. Assessing clinical and functional outcomes in a gene-environment interaction study in first episode of psychosis (PEPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Miquel; Bioque, Miquel; Parellada, Mara; Saiz Ruiz, Jerónimo; Cuesta, Manuel J; Llerena, Adrián; Sanjuán, Julio; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Arango, Celso; Cabrera, Bibiana

    2013-01-01

    The PEPs study is a multicenter, naturalistic, prospective, longitudinal study designed to evaluate clinical, neuropsychological, neuroimaging, biochemical, environmental and pharmacogenetic variables in a sample of nearly 350 first episode of psychosis patients and 250 healthy controls. The PEPs project was conducted in Spain from January 2009 to December 2011. This article describes the rationale for the measurement approach adopted, providing an overview of the selected clinical and functional measures. The main objectives are: a) the thorough clinical and neurocognitive characterization of a sample of first episodes of psychosis, and b) the study of the interactions between the genetic and environmental variables selected to predict clinical and brain structural outcomes, and to determine the relationship of genetic polymorphisms involved in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, and the responses and adverse effects of treatment. Copyright © 2012 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Antipsychotic medication and remission of psychotic symptoms 10years after a first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wils, Regitze Sølling; Gotfredsen, Ditte Resendal; Hjorthøj, Carsten; Austin, Stephen F; Albert, Nikolai; Secher, Rikke Gry; Thorup, Anne Amalie Elgaard; Mors, Ole; Nordentoft, Merete

    2017-04-01

    Several national guidelines recommend continuous use of antipsychotic medication after a psychotic episode in order to minimize the risk of relapse. However some studies have identified a subgroup of patients who obtain remission of psychotic symptoms while not being on antipsychotic medication for a period of time. This study investigated the long-term outcome and characteristics of patients in remission of psychotic symptoms with no use of antipsychotic medication at the 10-year follow-up. The study was a cohort study including 496 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (ICD 10: F20 and F22-29). Patients were included in the Danish OPUS Trial and followed up 10years after inclusion, where patient data was collected on socio-demographic factors, psychopathology, level of functioning and medication. 61% of the patients from the original cohort attended the 10-year follow up and 30% of these had remission of psychotic symptoms at the time of the 10-year follow up with no current use of antipsychotic medication. This outcome was associated with female gender, high GAF-F score, participation in the labour market and absence of substance abuse. Our results describe a subgroup of patients who obtained remission while not being on antipsychotic medication at the 10-year follow-up. The finding calls for further investigation on a more individualized approach to long-term treatment with antipsychotic medication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A Pharmacovigilance Study in First Episode of Psychosis: Psychopharmacological Interventions and Safety Profiles in the PEPs Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioque, Miquel; Llerena, Adrián; Cabrera, Bibiana; Mezquida, Gisela; Lobo, Antonio; González-Pinto, Ana; Díaz-Caneja, Covadonga M; Corripio, Iluminada; Aguilar, Eduardo J; Bulbena, Antoni; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Vieta, Eduard; Lafuente, Amàlia; Mas, Sergi; Parellada, Mara; Saiz-Ruiz, Jerónimo; Cuesta, Manuel J; Bernardo, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    The characterization of the first episode of psychosis and how it should be treated are principal issues in actual research. Realistic, naturalistic studies are necessary to represent the entire population of first episode of psychosis attended in daily practice. Sixteen participating centers from the PEPs project recruited 335 first episode of psychosis patients, aged 7 to 35 years. This article describes and discusses the psychopharmacological interventions and safety profiles at baseline and during a 60-day pharmacovigilance period. The majority of first episode of psychosis patients received a second-generation antipsychotic (96.3%), orally (95%), and in adjusted doses according to the product specifications (87.2%). A total of 24% were receiving an antipsychotic polytherapy pattern at baseline, frequently associated with lower or higher doses of antipsychotics than the recommended ones. Eight patients were taking clozapine, all in monotherapy. Males received higher doses of antipsychotic (P=.043). A total of 5.2% of the patients were being treated with long-acting injectable antipsychotics; 12.2% of the patients received anticholinergic drugs, 12.2% antidepressants, and 13.7% mood stabilizers, while almost 40% received benzodiazepines; and 35.52% reported at least one adverse drug reaction during the pharmacovigilance period, more frequently associated with higher antipsychotic doses and antipsychotic polytherapy (85.2% vs 45.5%, Psecurity issues, support future research of determinate pharmacological strategies for the treatment of early phases of psychosis, such as the role of clozapine, long-acting injectable antipsychotics, antipsychotic combination, and the use of benzodiazepines. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  11. Reducing the duration of untreated first-episode psychosis -- effects on baseline social functioning and quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melle, I; Haahr, U; Friis, Svein

    2005-01-01

    first-episode patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of non-organic, non-affective psychosis were included, 281 patients gave informed consent and 263 completed a full evaluation of QoL. RESULTS: There were no differences in subjective QoL between ED and No-ED groups attributable to reduction in DUP...... on functional loss in ED educational campaigns may identify risk subjects earlier in the course of the disorder....

  12. Cannabis use and first-episode psychosis: relationship with manic and psychotic symptoms, and with age at presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J M; Fisher, H L; Major, B; Chisholm, B; Woolley, J; Lawrence, J; Rahaman, N; Joyce, J; Hinton, M; Johnson, S; Young, A H

    2014-02-01

    Cannabis use has been reported to be associated with an earlier onset of symptoms in patients with first-episode psychosis, and a worse outcome in those who continue to take cannabis. In general, studies have concentrated on symptoms of psychosis rather than mania. In this study, using a longitudinal design in a large naturalistic cohort of patients with first-episode psychosis, we investigated the relationship between cannabis use, age of presentation to services, daily functioning, and positive, negative and manic symptoms. Clinical data on 502 patients with first-episode psychosis were collected using the MiData audit database from seven London-based Early Intervention in psychosis teams. Individuals were assessed at two time points--at entry to the service and after 1 year. On each occasion, the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Young Mania Rating Scale and Global Assessment of Functioning Scale disability subscale were rated. At both time points, the use of cannabis and other drugs of abuse in the 6 months preceding each assessment was recorded. Level of cannabis use was associated with a younger age at presentation, and manic symptoms and conceptual disorganization, but not with delusions, hallucinations, negative symptoms or daily functioning. Cannabis users who reduced or stopped their use following contact with services had the greatest improvement in symptoms at 1 year compared with continued users and non-users. Continued users remained more symptomatic than non-users at follow-up. Effective interventions for reducing cannabis use may yield significant health benefits for patients with first-episode psychosis.

  13. Perceptions of clinicians treating young people with first-episode psychosis for post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gairns, Sarah; Alvarez-Jimenez, Mario; Hulbert, Carol; McGorry, Patrick; Bendall, Sarah

    2015-02-01

    Evidence shows that approximately half of young people with first-episode psychosis have post-traumatic stress disorder. Yet, post-traumatic stress disorder is often left untreated in the presence of psychosis. To support the development of a post-traumatic stress disorder intervention for young people with first-episode psychosis, clinicians' perceptions of trauma-focused interventions were sought. Two research questions were explored: What treatment barriers were associated with treating young people with first-episode psychosis? What supports would be useful to implement post-traumatic stress disorder intervention? A mixed-methods design incorporated quantitative and qualitative data from a questionnaire with qualitative data from two focus groups. Sixteen (of 20) case managers from an early psychosis intervention centre participated in the study (16 completed a questionnaire, eight participated in focus groups). Descriptive statistics were generated for quantitative data and qualitative material was examined using a grounded theory approach. The results showed that perceived barriers to delivering trauma-focused intervention were increased mental health risks for clients with psychosis, workload pressures and poor client engagement. Targeted training and formal professional guidance were thought to best scaffold an intervention. Post-traumatic stress disorder intervention for first-episode psychosis clients should address engagement, make safeguarded provisions for family involvement and be sufficiently paced and flexible. Trauma-focused intervention is perceived with a degree of caution, is often not prioritized, lacks institutional support and requires more targeted training. It is important to conduct further research regarding the safety of trauma interventions alongside psychosis in order to address widespread concerns. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. First-episode psychosis and migration in Italy (PEP-Ita migration): a study in the Italian mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarricone, Ilaria; Braca, Mauro; Allegri, Fabio; Barrasso, Giuseppe; Bellomo, Antonello; Berlincioni, Vanna; Carpiniello, Bernardo; Ceregato, Alessio; Conforti Donati, Marco; Defilippi, Samuele; Del Vecchio, Valeria; De Rosa, Corrado; Ferrannini, Luigi; Ferrari, Silvia; Furio, Maria Antonietta; Gramaglia, Carla; La Cascia, Caterina; Luciano, Mario; Mulè, Alice; Nardini, Marcello; Podavini, Francesca; Primavera, Diego; Reggianini, Corinna; Rigatelli, Marco; Todarello, Orlando; Turella, Elena; Ventriglio, Antonio; Zeppegno, Patrizia; Fiorillo, Andrea; Berardi, Domenico

    2014-06-23

    It has been frequently reported a higher incidence of psychotic disorders in immigrants than in native populations. There is, however, a lack of knowledge about risk factors which may explain this phenomenon. A better understanding of the causes of psychosis among first-generation migrants is highly needed, particularly in Italy, a country with a recent massive migration. The "Italian study on first-episode psychosis and migration (PEP-Ita)" is a prospective observational study over a two-year period (1 January 2012-31 December 2013) which will be carried out in 11 Italian mental health centres. All participating centres will collect data about all new cases of migrants with first-episode psychosis. The general purpose ("core") of the PEP-Ita study is to explore the socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, and the pathways to care of a population of first-episode psychosis migrants in Italy. Secondary aims of the study will be: 1) to understand risk and protective factors for the development of psychotic disorders in migrants; 2) to evaluate the correlations between psychopathology of psychotic disorders in migrants and socio-demographic characteristics, migration history, life experiences; 3) to evaluate the clinical and social outcomes of first-episode psychoses in migrants. The results of the PEP-Ita study will allow a better understanding of risk factors for psychosis in first-generation migrants in Italy. Moreover, our results will contribute to the development of prevention programmes for psychosis and to the improvement of early intervention treatments for the migrant population in Italy.

  15. Practicing exorcism in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima-Pozo, Kazuhiro; Zambrano-Enriquez, Diana; de Anta, Laura; Moron, María Dolores; Carrasco, Jose Luis; Lopez-Ibor, Juan José; Diaz-Marsá, Marina

    2011-02-15

    Historically, many cases of demonic possession have masked major psychiatric disorder. Our aim is to increase awareness that symptoms of schizophrenia are still being classified as demonic possession by priests today. We report the case of a 28-year-old patient who had been diagnosed 5 years previously with paranoid schizophrenia (treated with clozapine, risperidone, ziprasidone and onlanzapine without a complete response) and was also receiving treatment in a first episode psychosis unit in Spain. The patient was led to believe by priests that her psychotic symptoms were due to the presence of a demon. This was surprising because some of the priests were from the Madrid archdiocese and knew the clinical situation of the patient; however, they believed that she was suffering from demonic possession, and she underwent multiple exorcisms, disrupting response to clinical treatment. Patient insight is an important factor in response to treatment, so religious professionals should encourage appropriate psychiatric treatment and learn about mental illnesses.

  16. Impaired action self-monitoring and cognitive confidence among ultra-high risk for psychosis and first-episode psychosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawęda, Ł; Li, E; Lavoie, S; Whitford, T J; Moritz, S; Nelson, B

    2018-01-01

    Self-monitoring biases and overconfidence in incorrect judgments have been suggested as playing a role in schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Little is known about whether self-monitoring biases may contribute to early risk factors for psychosis. In this study, action self-monitoring (i.e., discrimination between imagined and performed actions) was investigated, along with confidence in judgments among ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis individuals and first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients. Thirty-six UHR for psychosis individuals, 25 FEP patients and 33 healthy controls (CON) participated in the study. Participants were assessed with the Action memory task. Simple actions were presented to participants verbally or non-verbally. Some actions were required to be physically performed and others were imagined. Participants were asked whether the action was presented verbally or non-verbally (action presentation type discrimination), and whether the action was performed or imagined (self-monitoring). Confidence self-ratings related to self-monitoring responses were obtained. The analysis of self-monitoring revealed that both UHR and FEP groups misattributed imagined actions as being performed (i.e., self-monitoring errors) significantly more often than the CON group. There were no differences regarding performed actions as being imagined. UHR and FEP groups made their false responses with higher confidence in their judgments than the CON group. There were no group differences regarding discrimination between the types of actions presented (verbal vs non-verbal). A specific type of self-monitoring bias (i.e., misattributing imagined actions with performed actions), accompanied by high confidence in this judgment, may be a risk factor for the subsequent development of a psychotic disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Gray matter changes and cognitive predictors of 2-year follow-up abnormalities in early-onset first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Bargalló, Nuria; Calvo, Anna; Arango, Celso; Baeza, Immaculada; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Parellada, Mara; Graell, Montserrat; Moreno, Carmen; Otero, Soraya; Janssen, Joost; Rapado-Castro, Marta; de la Serna, Elena

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to examine regional gray matter (GM) changes over a period of 2 years in patients diagnosed with early-onset first-episode psychosis (EO-FEP), and to identify baseline predictors of abnormalities at the follow-up. Fifty-nine patients with EO-FEP aged 11-17 years were assessed. Magnetic resonance imaging was carried out at admission and 2 years later. Changes over time were assessed with voxel-based morphometry. Fifty-nine patients (34 schizophrenia-SCZ, 15 bipolar disorder-BP, and 10 other psychotic disorders) and 70 healthy controls were assessed. At baseline no differences were found between the EO-FEP groups and control subjects. Over time, SCZ patients presented a larger GM decrease in the orbitofrontal cortex, anterior midline frontal cortex, cingulate, left caudate, and thalamus. BP patients also had a larger GM decrease in the right putamen, right orbitofrontal cortex, and anterior and midline region of the right superior frontal gyrus and left caudate, but with fewer areas showing significant differences than in the comparison between SCZ and controls. In the cross-sectional analysis, only SCZ patients showed differences with respect to controls in some GM areas. Significant baseline predictors of a 2-year reduction in GM were IQ and working memory. EO-FEP patients did not show differences in GM compared to controls at baseline. Both SCZ and BP patients showed a greater decrease in specific areas during the first 2 years. At follow-up, only SCZ patients differed significantly from controls in specific brain areas. The GM reduction was predicted by baseline cognitive variables.

  18. Trajectories of positive, negative and general psychopathology symptoms in first episode psychosis and their relationship with functioning over a 2-year follow-up period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdin, Edimansyah; Chong, Siow Ann; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Peh, Chao Xu; Poon, Lye Yin; Rao, Sujatha; Verma, Swapna; Subramaniam, Mythily

    2017-01-01

    Few studies have examined the trajectories of symptom severity in first episode psychosis (FEP) and their impact on functioning. This study aimed to identify discrete trajectories of positive, negative and general psychopathological symptoms and functioning, determine predictors of the identified symptom trajectories and subsequently investigate the relationship between symptom and functioning trajectories over the 2-year follow-up period. Data were extracted from the Singapore Early Psychosis Intervention Programme clinical database. Trajectories of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scale over the two-year follow up were modelled using latent class growth curve modelling. Two distinct trajectories (early response and stable trajectory and delayed response trajectory) for positive symptoms, four distinct trajectories (early response and stable trajectory, early response and relapse trajectory, slower response and no response trajectory and delayed response trajectory) for negative and general psychopathology symptoms and three distinct trajectories for functioning (high functioning trajectory, moderately stable functioning trajectory and deterioration in functioning trajectory) were identified in our sample. Compared to individuals in the early response and stable trajectory, those in the delayed response trajectory for positive and negative symptoms, early response and relapse for negative and general psychopathology symptoms and slower response and no response trajectories for general psychopathology symptoms were significantly associated with higher odds of having deterioration in functioning over time. Poor symptom trajectories were also significantly predicted by younger age, male gender, unemployed and economically inactive status, lower education, longer duration of untreated psychosis and diagnosis of schizophrenia spectrum and delusional disorders. The results confirm that the symptoms trajectories among

  19. Trajectories of positive, negative and general psychopathology symptoms in first episode psychosis and their relationship with functioning over a 2-year follow-up period.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edimansyah Abdin

    Full Text Available Few studies have examined the trajectories of symptom severity in first episode psychosis (FEP and their impact on functioning. This study aimed to identify discrete trajectories of positive, negative and general psychopathological symptoms and functioning, determine predictors of the identified symptom trajectories and subsequently investigate the relationship between symptom and functioning trajectories over the 2-year follow-up period.Data were extracted from the Singapore Early Psychosis Intervention Programme clinical database. Trajectories of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF scale over the two-year follow up were modelled using latent class growth curve modelling.Two distinct trajectories (early response and stable trajectory and delayed response trajectory for positive symptoms, four distinct trajectories (early response and stable trajectory, early response and relapse trajectory, slower response and no response trajectory and delayed response trajectory for negative and general psychopathology symptoms and three distinct trajectories for functioning (high functioning trajectory, moderately stable functioning trajectory and deterioration in functioning trajectory were identified in our sample. Compared to individuals in the early response and stable trajectory, those in the delayed response trajectory for positive and negative symptoms, early response and relapse for negative and general psychopathology symptoms and slower response and no response trajectories for general psychopathology symptoms were significantly associated with higher odds of having deterioration in functioning over time. Poor symptom trajectories were also significantly predicted by younger age, male gender, unemployed and economically inactive status, lower education, longer duration of untreated psychosis and diagnosis of schizophrenia spectrum and delusional disorders.The results confirm that the symptoms

  20. Cannabis and first-episode psychosis: different long-term outcomes depending on continued or discontinued use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pinto, Ana; Alberich, Susana; Barbeito, Sara; Gutierrez, Miguel; Vega, Patricia; Ibáñez, Berta; Haidar, Mahmoud Karim; Vieta, Eduard; Arango, Celso

    2011-05-01

    To examine the influence of cannabis use on long-term outcome in patients with a first psychotic episode, comparing patients who have never used cannabis with (a) those who used cannabis before the first episode but stopped using it during follow-up and (b) those who used cannabis both before the first episode and during follow-up. Patients were studied following their first admission for psychosis. They were interviewed at years 1, 3, and 5. At follow-up after 8 years, functional outcome and alcohol and drug abuse were recorded. Patients were classified according to cannabis use: 25 had cannabis use before their first psychotic episode and continuous use during follow-up (CU), 27 had cannabis use before their first episode but stopped its use during follow-up (CUS), and 40 never used cannabis (NU). The 3 groups did not differ significantly in symptoms or functional outcome at baseline or during short-term follow-up. The CUS group exhibited better long-term functional outcome compared with the other 2 groups and had fewer negative symptoms than the CU group, after adjusting for potential confounders. For the CUS group, the effect size was 1.26 (95% confidence interval [CI]=0.65 to 1.86) for functional outcome and -0.72 (95% CI=-1.27 to -0.14) for negative symptoms. All patients experienced improvements in positive symptoms during long-term follow-up. Cannabis has a deleterious effect, but stopping use after the first psychotic episode contributes to a clear improvement in outcome. The positive effects of stopping cannabis use can be seen more clearly in the long term. © The Author 2009. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.

  1. Is there a link between childhood trauma, cognition, and amygdala and hippocampus volume in first-episode psychosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aas, Monica; Navari, Serena; Gibbs, Ayana; Mondelli, Valeria; Fisher, Helen L; Morgan, Craig; Morgan, Kevin; MacCabe, James; Reichenberg, Abraham; Zanelli, Jolanta; Fearon, Paul; Jones, Peter B; Murray, Robin M; Pariante, Carmine M; Dazzan, Paola

    2012-05-01

    Patients with psychosis have higher rates of childhood trauma, which is also associated with adverse effects on cognitive functions such as attention, concentration and mental speed, language, and verbal intelligence. Although the pathophysiological substrate for this association remains unclear, these cognitive deficits may represent the functional correlate of changes observed in relation to trauma exposure in structures such as the amygdala and the hippocampus. Interestingly, these structures are often reported as altered in psychosis. This study investigated the association between childhood trauma, cognitive function and amygdala and hippocampus volume, in first-episode psychosis. We investigated 83 patients with first-episode psychosis and 63 healthy controls. All participants underwent an MRI scan acquired with a GE Sigma 1.5-T system, and a standardized neuropsychological assessment of general cognition, memory, processing speed, executive function, visuo-spatial abilities, verbal intelligence, and language. In a subsample of the patients (N=45) information on childhood trauma was collected with the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire (CECA.Q). We found that amygdala, but not hippocampus, volume was significantly smaller (p=0.001) in patients compared to healthy controls. There was a trend level interaction for hippocampus volume between group and sex (p=0.056). A history of childhood trauma was associated with both worse cognitive performance and smaller amygdala volume. This smaller amygdala appeared to mediate the relationship between childhood trauma and performance on executive function, language and verbal intelligence in patients with psychosis. This points to a complex relationship between childhood trauma exposure, cognitive function and amygdala volume in first-episode psychosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Determinants of duration of untreated psychosis among first-episode psychosis patients in Denmark: A nationwide register-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hastrup, Lene Halling; Haahr, Ulrik Helt; Jansen, Jens Einar

    2018-01-01

    Background: Information on determinants of duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) is still needed to inform campaigns targeting people with first episode psychosis (FEP). This nation-wide study analysed the association between demographic factors (age, sex, ethnicity, marital status, and geographic......: DUP is related to a number of demographic, premorbid and healthcare factors. These findings suggest that future information campaigns should focus on increasing the awareness of early signs of psychosis not only among mental health professionals but also other professionals in contact with adolescents...

  3. Differing patterns of brain structural abnormalities between black and white patients with their first episode of psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morgan, K D

    2010-07-01

    African-Caribbean and black African people living in the UK are reported to have a higher incidence of diagnosed psychosis compared with white British people. It has been argued that this may be a consequence of misdiagnosis. If this is true they might be less likely to show the patterns of structural brain abnormalities reported in white British patients. The aim of this study therefore was to investigate whether there are differences in the prevalence of structural brain abnormalities in white and black first-episode psychosis patients.

  4. Service User Perspectives on the Experience of Illness and Pathway to Care in First-Episode Psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Jens Einar; Wøldike, Peter Michael; Haahr, Ulrik Helt

    2015-01-01

    to include psychological factors such as normalisation of symptoms and fear of stigma when attempting to reduce DUP in early psychosis, in addition to initiatives to reduce service delays. Also, a greater use of the potentials inherent in Internet and social media platforms seems important in this regard....... service users (median age 20, range 15-24, 6 males, 5 females) diagnosed with a first-episode psychosis and currently enrolled in treatment for this disorder. Fear of stigma, lack of knowledge about mental illness and normalisation of symptoms were barriers to accessing appropriate treatment, while...

  5. Prevalence and clinical correlates of police contact prior to a first diagnosis of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Cornelia; Asmal, Laila; Chiliza, Bonginkosi; Emsley, Robin

    2017-02-01

    Little is known about the reasons why people with schizophrenia have contact with police, especially prior to the first episode of illness. To investigate the prevalence and correlates of police contact in first-episode schizophrenia. The prevalence and type of police contact was established among all 110 patients presenting to psychiatric services in one catchment area during a first episode of schizophrenia and among 65 non-mentally ill controls, by participant and collateral interview and from records. Socio-demographic and clinical characteristics were also recorded and the two groups compared. The first episode of schizophrenia patients had more contact with police than controls, despite the higher prevalence of conduct disorder symptoms among the controls. The patients were not, however, more likely to be incarcerated or arrested. Among the patients, over half of the police call-outs occurred during the period of untreated psychosis. Positive psychotic symptoms were independently associated with police contact, after allowing for socio-demographics. As over a third of people in a first episode of schizophrenia had been in contact with the police - more than twice the proportion among non-psychotic controls - and contact was associated with untreated positive psychotic symptoms, better early detection and treatment of psychosis seems indicated. In the meantime, police services may be playing an important role in reducing the duration of untreated psychosis. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. [Management of pregnant women with first episode of genital herpes. Guidelines for clinical practice from the French college of gynecologists and obstetricians (CNGOF)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sananès, N

    2017-12-01

    To provide guidelines for the management of first episode genital herpes during pregnancy and in the immediate postpartum period. MedLine and Cochrane Library databases search and review of the main foreign guidelines. In case of first episode genital herpes during pregnancy, antiviral treatment with acyclovir (200mg 5 times daily) or valacyclovir (1000mg twice daily) for 5 to 10 days is recommended (grade C). The patient should be tested for HIV if not previously done (grade B). Daily suppressive antiviral treatment with acyclovir (400mg 3 times daily) or valacyclovir (500mg twice daily) is recommended from 36 weeks for women who have had a first episode genital herpes during pregnancy (grade B). A cesarean section should be performed in case of suspicion of first episode genital herpes at the onset of labor (grade B) or premature rupture of the membranes at term (professional consensus), or in case of first episode genital herpes less than 6 weeks before delivery (professional consensus). In the event of first episode genital herpes highlighted in the postpartum period, the neonatologist should be informed (professional consensus). The patient may be treated according the scheme described above. A cesarean section should be performed in case of first episode genital herpes less than 6 weeks before delivery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Altered functional connectivity of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in first-episode patients with major depressive disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Ting, E-mail: yeting@ihep.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 918, Yu-Quan St, Shijingshan District, Beijing 100049 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 918, Yu-Quan St, Shijingshan District, Beijing 100049 (China); Peng, Jing, E-mail: ppengjjing@sina.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, No. 45, Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China); Nie, Binbin, E-mail: niebb@ihep.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 918, Yu-Quan St, Shijingshan District, Beijing 100049 (China); Gao, Juan, E-mail: gaojuan@ihep.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 918, Yu-Quan St, Shijingshan District, Beijing 100049 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 918, Yu-Quan St, Shijingshan District, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Jiangtao, E-mail: Liujiangtao813@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, No. 45, Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China); Li, Yang, E-mail: Liyang2007428@hotmail.com [Department of Psychiatry, Anding Hospital of Capital Medical University, No. 5, An Kang Hutong, Deshengmen wai, Xicheng District, Beijing 100088 (China); Wang, Gang, E-mail: gangwang@gmail.com [Department of Psychiatry, Anding Hospital of Capital Medical University, No. 5, An Kang Hutong, Deshengmen wai, Xicheng District, Beijing 100088 (China); Ma, Xin, E-mail: lijianshe@medmail.com.cn [Department of Psychiatry, Anding Hospital of Capital Medical University, No. 5, An Kang Hutong, Deshengmen wai, Xicheng District, Beijing 100088 (China); Li, Kuncheng [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, No. 45, Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China); and others

    2012-12-15

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate resting-state functional connectivity alteration of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in patients with first-episode major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods: Twenty-two first-episode MDD patients and thirty age-, gender- and education-matched healthy control subjects were enrolled. Rest state functional magnetic resonance images and structure magnetic resonance images were scanned. The functional connectivity analysis was done based on the result of voxel-based morphometry (VBM). And the right DLPFC was chosen as the seed region of interests (ROI), as its gray matter density (GMD) decreased in the MDD patients compared with controls and its GMD values were negative correlation with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) scores. Results: Compared to healthy controls, the MDD patients showed increased functional connectivity with right the DLPFC in the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), left parahippocampal gyrus (PHG), thalamus and precentral gyrus. In contrast, there were decreased functional connectivity between the right DLPFC and right parietal lobe. Conclusions: By applying the VBM results to the functional connectivity analysis, the study suggested that abnormality of GMD in right DLPFC might be related to the functional connectivity alteration in the pathophysiology of MDD, which might be useful in further characterizing structure–function relations in this disorder.

  8. Increased anterior default-mode network homogeneity in first-episode, drug-naive major depressive disorder: A replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenbin; Cui, Xilong; Liu, Feng; Chen, Jindong; Xie, Guangrong; Wu, Renrong; Zhang, Zhikun; Chen, Huafu; Zhao, Jingping

    2018-01-01

    Abnormal default-mode network (DMN) homogeneity has been involved in the neurophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD) with inconsistent findings. The inconsistency may be due to clinical and methodological variability, and the reproducibility of the findings is limited. The present study aimed to examine alterations of the DMN homogeneity in two independent samples of patients with first-episode, drug-naive MDD. The samples included 59 patients with MDD and 31 comparison subjects from Sample 1 and 29 patients with MDD and 24 comparison subjects from Sample 2. Network homogeneity (NH) was computed with an overlapping technique, which was employed to define brain regions with abnormal NH common to the MDD samples. Compared with comparison subjects, patients with MDD exhibited increased NH in an overlapped brain region of the left superior medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC). No correlations were found between abnormal NH and HAMD total/subscale scores in the patients of each sample and in the combined patients from both samples. This study is the first to examine alterations of DMN homogeneity in first-episode, drug-naive patients with MDD in two independent samples by using an overlapping technique. Patients with MDD exhibit increased NH in an overlapped region in the anterior DMN. The present study thus highlights the importance of the DMN in the neurophysiology of MDD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Cognitive functioning in children and adolescents in their first episode of psychosis: differences between previous cannabis users and nonusers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Serna, Elena; Mayoral, María; Baeza, Inmaculada; Arango, Celso; Andrés, Patricia; Bombin, Igor; González, Cristina; Rapado, Marta; Robles, Olalla; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Jose Manuel; Zabala, Arantzazu; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina

    2010-02-01

    To investigate the relationship between cognition and prior cannabis use in children and adolescents presenting a first episode of psychosis. A total of 107 patients with first episode of psychosis and 96 healthy controls, aged 9 to 17 years, were interviewed about their previous substance use and to assess their cognitive functions. Patients were assessed while not using cannabis by means of a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. They were divided into 2 groups depending on the history of prior cannabis use: cannabis users (CU) and cannabis nonusers (CNU). Significant differences were found in all areas evaluated between the 3 groups. Both CU and CNU patients obtained lower scores than controls on verbal learning and memory and working memory. Patients with prior cannabis use performed better on some tests of attention (Continuous performance test (CPT) number of correct responses, p = 0.002; CPT average reaction time, p < 0.001) and executive functions (Trail Making Test, part B (TMT-B) number of mistakes, p < 0.001; Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) number of categories completed, p < 0.001) than CNU patients. CU patients performed better than CNU subjects on some cognitive measures. This may indicate lower individual vulnerability for psychosis in CU patients in whom cannabis use can be a precipitating factor of psychotic episodes.

  10. Increased functional connectivity strength of right inferior temporal gyrus in first-episode, drug-naive somatization disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qinji; Yao, Dapeng; Jiang, Muliang; Liu, Feng; Jiang, Jiajing; Xu, Chunxing; Dai, Yi; Yu, Miaoyu; Long, Liling; Li, Hongzheng; Liu, Jianrong; Zhang, Zhikun; Zhang, Jian; Xiao, Changqing; Guo, Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of brain structural and functional alterations have been implicated in patients with somatization disorder (SD). However, little is known about brain functional connectivity in SD. In the present study, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and graph theory were used to obtain a comprehensive view of whole-brain functional connectivity and to investigate the changes of voxel-wise functional networks in patients with SD. Twenty-five first-episode, medication-naive patients with SD and 28 age-, sex- and education-matched healthy controls (HCs) underwent resting-state fMRI. The graph theory approach was employed to analyze the data. Compared to the HCs, patients with SD showed significantly increased functional connectivity strength in the right inferior temporal gyrus (ITG). There is a significant positive correlation between the z-values of the cluster in the right ITG and Hamilton Anxiety Scale scores. Our findings indicate that there is a disruption of the functional connectivity pattern in the right ITG in first-episode, treatment-naive patients with SD, which bears clinical significance. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  11. Childhood trauma increases the risk of post-traumatic stress disorder in response to first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendall, Sarah; Alvarez-Jimenez, Mario; Hulbert, Carol A; McGorry, Patrick D; Jackson, Henry J

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between childhood trauma, post-traumatic stress symptoms due to the experience of childhood trauma, and post-traumatic stress symptoms due to the experience of psychosis. The current study assessed childhood trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms as a result of both childhood trauma and psychosis using the Impact of Events Scale - Revised, in a group of 36 people with first-episode psychosis. Reported rates of clinical level post-psychotic PTSD symptoms, childhood trauma and childhood trauma-related clinical level PTSD symptoms were 47% (95% CI 31-64%), 64% (95% CI 48-80%) and 39% (95% CI 23-55%), respectively. Reporting childhood trauma increased the risk of developing post-psychosis PTSD 27-fold (95% CI 2.96-253.80, p = 0.01). Having childhood trauma-related PTSD increased the risk of developing post-psychosis PTSD 20-fold (95% CI 3.38-123.25, p = 0.01). These risks were not explained by illness factors such as duration of untreated psychosis, age of onset or severity of psychotic symptoms. Those without post-psychotic PTSD symptoms at clinical levels were unlikely to report childhood trauma (6%; 95% CI 3-8%). These results suggest the cognitive, social and biological consequences of childhood trauma can prevent effective recovery from the trauma of acute first-episode psychosis resulting in post-psychotic PTSD. Treatment strategies for post-psychotic PTSD must address childhood trauma and related PTSD.

  12. What is the recurrence rate of postmenopausal bleeding in women who have a thin endometrium during a first episode of postmenopausal bleeding?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, H. C.; Timmermans, A.; Opmeer, B. C.; Kruitwagen, R. F. M. P.; Dijkhuizen, F. P. H. L. J.; Kooi, G. S.; van de Weijer, P. H. M.; Mol, B. W. J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To determine the incidence and significance of recurrent postmenopausal bleeding among women diagnosed with an endometrial thickness <= 4 mm after a first episode of postmenopausal bleeding. Methods. Consecutive patients not using hormone replacement therapy (HRT) presenting with a first

  13. What is the recurrence rate of postmenopausal bleeding in women who have a thin endometrium during a first episode of postmenopausal bleeding?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, H.C. van; Timmermans, A.; Opmeer, B.C.; Kruitwagen, R.F.P.M.; Dijkhuizen, F.P.; Kooi, G.S.; Weijer, P.H.M. van de; Mol, B.W.; Dupomeb, F.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence and significance of recurrent postmenopausal bleeding among women diagnosed with an endometrial thickness < or =4 mm after a first episode of postmenopausal bleeding. METHODS: Consecutive patients not using hormone replacement therapy (HRT) presenting with a

  14. Investigating trajectories of social recovery in individuals with first-episode psychosis: a latent class growth analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgekins, Jo; Birchwood, Max; Christopher, Rose; Marshall, Max; Coker, Sian; Everard, Linda; Lester, Helen; Jones, Peter; Amos, Tim; Singh, Swaran; Sharma, Vimal; Freemantle, Nick; Fowler, David

    2015-12-01

    Social disability is a hallmark of severe mental illness yet individual differences and factors predicting outcome are largely unknown. To explore trajectories and predictors of social recovery following a first episode of psychosis (FEP). A sample of 764 individuals with FEP were assessed on entry into early intervention in psychosis (EIP) services and followed up over 12 months. Social recovery profiles were examined using latent class growth analysis. Three types of social recovery profile were identified: Low Stable (66%), Moderate-Increasing (27%), and High-Decreasing (7%). Poor social recovery was predicted by male gender, ethnic minority status, younger age at onset of psychosis, increased negative symptoms, and poor premorbid adjustment. Social disability is prevalent in FEP, although distinct recovery profiles are evident. Where social disability is present on entry into EIP services it can remain stable, highlighting a need for targeted intervention. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  15. Suicidal changes in patients with first episode psychosis: clinical predictors of increasing suicidal tendency in the early treatment phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Trine; Nordentoft, Merete

    2012-01-01

    significantly predicted developing a higher suicidal tendency, whereas a one-point increase score on delusions was preventive of this. Feeling hopeless was highly associated with suicide attempt in those with earlier suicide attempt. Conclusion: The risk of suicide attempt did not differ between patient groups......Aim: To identify predictors for developing a higher suicidal tendency during treatment of first-episode psychosis. Methods: In a prospective follow-up study, we examined clinical factors collected at treatment initiation as predictors for developing a higher suicidal tendency among patients...... in the first year of treatment of psychosis. Patients were grouped and ranked according to their highest suicidal tendency in the year before treatment: not suicidal, suicidal thoughts, suicidal plans or suicide attempt(s). Predictors for becoming more suicidal in the first year of treatment were examined...

  16. Relation between premorbid adjustment, duration of untreated psychosis and close interpersonal trauma in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Ulrik Helt; Larsen, Tor Ketil; Simonsen, Erik

    2018-01-01

    different types of trauma, in particular close interpersonal traumas experienced before the age of 18, premorbid factors and baseline clinical characteristics in a sample of first-episode psychosis patients. METHODS: A total of 191 patients from the 'TIPS' cohort completed assessment with the Brief Betrayal...... and physical maltreatment than men. There were significant associations between early interpersonal trauma and premorbid adjustment and duration of untreated psychosis, but no significant associations with length of education, comorbid substance use or baseline clinical symptomatology. CONCLUSIONS: Close...... interpersonal trauma before the age of 18 is associated with poorer premorbid adjustment and a longer duration of untreated psychosis. This may indicate that traumatic experiences delay help-seeking behaviour....

  17. Association Between Genetic Polymorphisms in the Serotonergic System and Comorbid Personality Disorders Among Patients with First-Episode Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Jens D; Bock, Camilla; Kessing, Lars V

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the association between genetic polymorphisms and personality disorders have provided inconsistent results. Using the "enriched sample method," the authors of the present study aimed to assess the association between polymorphisms in the serotonergic transmitter system and comorbid...... personality disorders in patients recently diagnosed with first-episode depression. A total of 290 participants were systematically recruited via the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register. Diagnoses of personality disorders were assessed by a SCID-II interview, and polymorphisms in the genes encoding...... the serotonin transporter, serotonin receptors 1A, 2A, 2C, and tryptophan hydroxylase 1 were genotyped. The authors found a significant effect of the length polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) on cluster B personality disorder (mainly borderline disorder), but no influence on cluster C...

  18. Diagnostic stability of comorbid personality disorders among patients fully or partially remitted from first-episode depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Jens Drachmann; Bech, Per; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2017-01-01

    The diagnostic stability of comorbid personality disorders among patients with depression remains unclear. A total of 262 patients suffering from first-episode depression were assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Personality Disorders (SCID-II) and reassessed after 5...... years. A total of 87 patients (33%) were diagnosed with a personality disorder at baseline, and 63 of them (72%) maintained a personality disorder diagnosis at follow-up (kappa coefficient 0.71). At cluster level, 63% maintained a diagnosis within cluster B and 48% maintained a cluster C disorder across...... the follow-up period (kappa coefficients of 0.54 and 0.64, respectively). Hence, comorbid personality disorders cannot be taken just as artifacts of the depressive mood that will remit spontaneously or with further treatment of the primary depression. Furthermore, the stability of personality disorders...

  19. Five years of specialised early intervention versus two years of specialised early intervention followed by three years of standard treatment for patients with a first episode psychosis: randomised, superiority, parallel group trial in Denmark (OPUS II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Nikolai; Melau, Marianne; Jensen, Heidi; Emborg, Charlotte; Jepsen, Jens Richardt Mollegaard; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Gluud, Christian; Mors, Ole; Hjorthøj, Carsten; Nordentoft, Merete

    2017-01-12

    To compare the effects of five years of specialised early intervention (SEI) treatment for first episode schizophrenia spectrum disorder with the standard two years of SEI plus three years of treatment as usual. Randomised, superiority, parallel group trial with blinded outcome assessment. Randomisation was centralised and computerised with concealed randomisation sequence carried out at an external site. Participants were recruited from six OPUS teams in Denmark between 2009 and 2012. OPUS teams provide SEI treatment to all patients diagnosed with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder in Denmark. 400 participants (51% women) with a mean age of 25.6 (standard deviation 4.3) were randomised to five years of SEI (experimental intervention; n=197) or to two years of SEI plus three years of treatment as usual (control; n=203). OPUS treatment consists of three core elements-modified assertive community treatment, family involvement, and social skill training-with a patient-case manager ratio of no more than 12:1. For participants randomised to five years of OPUS treatment, the treatment was largely unchanged. Participants randomised to the control group were mostly referred to community health centres after two years of SEI treatment. Follow-up assessments were conducted five years after start of OPUS treatment. Primary outcome was negative symptoms measured on the scale for assessment of negative symptoms (avolition-apathy, anhedonia, alogia, and affective blunting). Secondary outcomes were remission of both negative and psychotic symptoms, psychotic symptoms, suicidal ideation, substance abuse, compliance with medical treatment, adherence with treatment, client satisfaction, days in hospital care, and labour market affiliation. Levels of negative symptoms did not differ between the intervention group and control group (1.72 v 1.81 points; estimated mean difference -0.10 (95% confidence interval -0.33 to 0.13), P=0.39). Participants receiving five years of OPUS treatment

  20. Prolactin response to buspirone is not impaired in drug-naïve first episode patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubała, Wiesław Jerzy; Landowski, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    An altered postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptor function along with hypercortisolemia has been associated with major depressive disorder (MDD). However, several methodological considerations related to data interpretation arise when subjects previously exposed to psychotropic medication are included in the study population. To address those issues we designed a study in a well defined cohort of first-episode, treatment-naïve MDD patients. This cross-sectional case-control pharmacologic challenge study was designed to investigate the prolactin (PRL) response to buspirone in 21 non-late-life adult, treatment-naïve MDD patients with the first affective episode and in 20 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Depressed patients showed a basal score in the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD-17) higher than 20. No significant difference in PRL response to buspirone between first-episode, treatment-naïve patients with MDD and controls, was observed. The correlation between basal cortisol levels and PRL response was not observed in MDD group while significant negative correlation was found in healthy controls. The significantly higher PRL response to buspirone was observed in melancholic patients as compared to non-melancholic subjects. The current study is limited by its cross-sectional design, small sample size, factors related to neuroendocrine challenge methodology, and no placebo control. These results indicate no consistent changes in the hormonal response to the 5-HT1A agonist buspirone in major depression. Taken into account the interpretation of the buspirone test the present study does not support the hypothesis of an altered functional activity with down-regulation of the postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptor and/or in the postsynaptic receptor signal transduction in the hypothalamus in the pathogenesis of MDD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Temporal relationship of first-episode non-affective psychosis with cannabis use: a clinical verification of an epidemiological hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrigón, María L; Gurpegui, Manuel; Ruiz-Veguilla, Miguel; Diaz, Francisco J; Anguita, Manuel; Sarramea, Fernando; Cervilla, Jorge

    2010-05-01

    We analyzed the association of age at onset of psychosis treatment (AOPT) with having a history of cannabis use in patients with a first episode of non-affective psychosis. We also investigated the impact on the AOPT of exposure to cannabis in adolescence, compared with young adulthood, and of the additional exposure to cocaine. We recruited 112 consecutive patients (66 men and 46 women; age range, 18-57years) with a first psychotic episode. The composite international diagnostic interview (CIDI) was used to assess drug use and to define the age at onset of heaviest use (AOHU) of a drug, defined as the age when drug was used the most for each patient. The effect of cannabis and cocaine AOHU on AOPT was explored through Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests, and logistic regression. Sex-adjusted cumulative hazard curves and Cox regression models were used to compare the AOPT of patients with and without a history of cannabis use, or associated cocaine use. We found that the AOPT was significantly associated with the use of cannabis, independently of sex, use of cocaine, tobacco smoking or excessive alcohol consumption. There was a dose-response relationship between cannabis AOHU and AOPT: the earlier the AOHU the earlier the AOPT. Hazard curves showed that patients with a history of cannabis use had a higher hazard of having a first-episode psychosis than the rest of the patients (sex-adjusted log-rank chi(2)=23.43, df=1, ppsychosis onset comparing both groups was 2.66 (95% CI, 1.74-4.05). Our results are in favor of a catalytic role for cannabis use in the onset of psychosis. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Diagnosis at the first episode to differentiate antidepressant treatment responses in patients with mood and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kemp, E C M; Moleman, P; Hoogduin, C A L; Broekman, T G; Goedhart, A; Schaap, C P D R; van den Berg, P C

    2002-02-01

    Co-morbidity of mood and anxiety disorders is often ignored in pharmacotreatment outcome studies and this complicates the interpretation of treatment response. The clinical trials are usually based on single categories from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). The present study is a first attempt to differentiate the responses to antidepressants using a design that differs from that used in previous clinical trials. To avoid bias due to co-morbidity, we included patients with any DSM-III-R diagnosis of mood or anxiety disorder for which antidepressant treatment was indicated. We also explored the role of the diagnosis at the first episode in the efficacy of the different antidepressants. A total of 92 outpatients with a mood and/or anxiety disorder were randomly assigned to treatment with imipramine or fluvoxamine in a 6-week study. The diagnosis at the first episode--or primary diagnosis--was available for 78 patients, 40 with a primary depression and 38 with a primary anxiety disorder. Analyses using the MIXED procedure for repeated measures showed no general differences between treatment with imipramine and treatment with fluvoxamine. When the primary diagnoses were taken into consideration, differentiation occurred. Patients with primary depression showed better responses to imipramine than to fluvoxamine. The assumption that patients with primary anxiety disorder would respond better to fluvoxamine than imipramine was observed for only the Clinical Global Impression. The results suggest that the nature of the first illness episode may be more valuable than the DSM categories of mood or anxiety disorders, which may lend support to the concept of primary versus secondary depression for purposes of differentiating treatment responses. Given the exploratory nature of the study, however, replication of our finding is needed.

  3. Motor abnormalities and cognitive impairment in first-episode psychosis patients, their unaffected siblings and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Manuel J; Moreno-Izco, Lucia; Ribeiro, María; López-Ilundain, Jose M; Lecumberri, Pablo; Cabada, Teresa; Lorente-Omeñaca, Ruth; Sánchez-Torres, Ana M; Gómez, M Sol; Peralta, Victor

    2017-10-31

    Motor abnormalities (MAs) may be already evidenced long before the beginning of illness and are highly prevalent in psychosis. However, the extent to which the whole range of MAs are related to cognitive impairment in psychosis remains understudied. This study aimed to examine comparatively the relationships between the whole range of motor abnormalities and cognitive impairments in the first-episode of psychosis (FEP), their unaffected siblings and healthy control subjects. Fifty FEP patients, 21 of their healthy siblings and 24 age- and sex matched healthy controls were included. Motor assessment included catatonic, extrapyramidal and neurological soft signs (NSS) by means of standardized instruments. An exhaustive neuropsychological battery was also performed to extract the 7 cognitive dimensions of MATRICS initiative. Higher scores on NSS but not on extrapyramidal and catatonic signs showed significant associations with worse cognitive performance in the three study groups. However, the pattern of associations regarding specific cognitive functions was different among the three groups. Moreover, extrapyramidal signs showed significant associations with cognitive impairment only in FEP patients but not in their unaffected siblings and healthy controls. Catatonic signs did not show any significant association with cognitive functioning in the three study groups. These findings add evidence to the associations between motor abnormalities, particularly NSS and extrapyramidal signs, and cognitive impairment in first-episode psychosis patients. In addition, our results suggest that the specific pattern of associations between MAs and cognitive functioning is different in FEP patients from those of the unaffected siblings and healthy subjects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Is there an optimal factor structure of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale in patients with first-episode psychosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langeveld, J.; Andreassen, O.A.; Auestad, B.

    2013-01-01

    The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) is the most widely used scale to assess a variety of symptoms in patients with schizophrenia and other psychoses. The factor structure of the PANSS has been examined with confirmatory factor analyses in several studies, but not in a well-defined fi......The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) is the most widely used scale to assess a variety of symptoms in patients with schizophrenia and other psychoses. The factor structure of the PANSS has been examined with confirmatory factor analyses in several studies, but not in a well...

  5. First-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Ulrik; Friis, Svein; Larsen, Tor K

    2008-01-01

    Diagnostic stability is important for daily clinical work and planning of treatment. The aims of this study were to measure diagnostic stability in a clinical epidemiologic sample and to identify markers of change in diagnosis....

  6. first-episode psychosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    banzi

    between drug consumption by psychiatric patients and illness outcome.1-3 Previous attempts to determine'cause and .... the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-IV (DSM-IV) and PANSS. (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale). Inclusion criteria for .... cinogens and stimulants. Our results suggest that, in our study population, ...

  7. Suicide in the Early Stage of Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventriglio, Antonio; Gentile, Alessandro; Bonfitto, Iris; Stella, Eleonora; Mari, Massimo; Steardo, Luca; Bellomo, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    Suicide is a relevant leading cause of death among patients affected by schizophrenia. Even if suicidal ideation may be present in different stages of disease, some differences have been described between the risk of suicide in patients experiencing first episode of psychosis and those with long-term schizophrenia. It is particularly higher during the first year of illness and reaches a steady decline over the following years. Suicidal ideation and attempts may also be common among subjects with subthreshold psychotic experiences. Factors associated with the risk of suicide in the early phase of schizophrenia are previous suicidal attempts and social aspects: the lack of social support and stable relationships, social drift after the first episode, and social impairment. Also, several psychotic symptoms (suspiciousness, paranoid delusions, mental disintegration and agitation, negative symptoms, depression and hopelessness, and command hallucinations) and substance abuse are associated with higher risk of suicide. It has been described that perfectionism and good levels of insight among individuals who have recently developed psychotic symptoms are significantly associated with higher numbers of suicidal attempts. Moreover, recent evidences show that prefrontal cortex-based circuit dysfunction may be related to suicide in the early stage of schizophrenia. This narrative review summarizes available evidences on suicide in the early stage of schizophrenia and deals with issues to be further studied and discussed. PMID:27445872

  8. Suicide in the Early Stage of Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventriglio, Antonio; Gentile, Alessandro; Bonfitto, Iris; Stella, Eleonora; Mari, Massimo; Steardo, Luca; Bellomo, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    Suicide is a relevant leading cause of death among patients affected by schizophrenia. Even if suicidal ideation may be present in different stages of disease, some differences have been described between the risk of suicide in patients experiencing first episode of psychosis and those with long-term schizophrenia. It is particularly higher during the first year of illness and reaches a steady decline over the following years. Suicidal ideation and attempts may also be common among subjects with subthreshold psychotic experiences. Factors associated with the risk of suicide in the early phase of schizophrenia are previous suicidal attempts and social aspects: the lack of social support and stable relationships, social drift after the first episode, and social impairment. Also, several psychotic symptoms (suspiciousness, paranoid delusions, mental disintegration and agitation, negative symptoms, depression and hopelessness, and command hallucinations) and substance abuse are associated with higher risk of suicide. It has been described that perfectionism and good levels of insight among individuals who have recently developed psychotic symptoms are significantly associated with higher numbers of suicidal attempts. Moreover, recent evidences show that prefrontal cortex-based circuit dysfunction may be related to suicide in the early stage of schizophrenia. This narrative review summarizes available evidences on suicide in the early stage of schizophrenia and deals with issues to be further studied and discussed.

  9. Baseline profiles of adolescent vs. adult-onset first-episode psychosis in an early detection program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joa, I; Johannessen, Jan Olav; Langeveld, J

    2009-01-01

    ) and after (n = 189) 18 years on duration of untreated psychosis (DUP), level of symptoms, suicidal behaviour, and other baseline clinical and demographic characteristics. RESULTS: Adolescent onset patients had poorer premorbid functioning, a longer DUP, higher suicidality, and more depressive symptoms...... the description of what used to be labeled process (versus reactive) schizophrenia....

  10. The association between pre-morbid adjustment, duration of untreated psychosis and outcome in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, P; Petersen, L; Thorup, A

    2008-01-01

    The association between the duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) and outcome of schizophrenia may be confounded by other factors such as poor pre-morbid adjustment. The aim of the present study was to examine the independent contributions of DUP and of pre-morbid adjustment to the clinical...

  11. Schizophrenia and Metacognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austin, Stephen F.; Mors, Ole; Nordentoft, Merete

    2014-01-01

    tested for relationships between course of illness and levels of specific metacognitions in schizophrenia spectrum disorders. A large cohort of people with first episode psychosis (n = 578) recruited as part the OPUS trial (1998–2000) were tested. Information about course of illness (remitted, episodic...... beliefs were associated with the severity and duration of psychotic symptoms, consistent with the S-REF model. Moreover, metacognition was a better predictor of course of illness than anxiety and depression. If these associations are shown to be causal, clinical interventions that modify metacognitive...... or continually psychotic) and metacognitive belief ratings were collected. Data obtained from 367 participants revealed that levels of maladaptive metacognitive beliefs varied as a function of course of illness and distinguished between remitted patients and non-patients. Metacognitive beliefs explained 17...

  12. Cortical and subcortical 5-HT2A receptor binding in neuroleptic-naive first-episode schizophrenic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erritzoe, David; Rasmussen, Hans; Kristiansen, Klaus Nyegaard

    2008-01-01

    The serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor is suspected to be involved in a number of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. In particular, atypical antipsychotics have antagonistic effects on the 5-HT(2A) receptors, supporting a specific role of the 5-HT(2A) receptor in the pathophysiology...... of this disease. The aim of this study is to investigate cortical and subcortical 5-HT(2A) binding in neuroleptic-naive schizophrenic patients. Fifteen neuroleptic-naive patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (age 27.5+/-4.5 years), 11 men and 4 women, and 15 healthy control subjects matched for age (28.......5+/-5.7 years) and gender underwent a 40 min positron emission tomography (PET) study using the 5-HT(2A) antagonist, [(18)F]altanserin, as a radioligand. PET images were co-registered to 3 T magnetic resonance images (MRIs) for each individual subject, and ROIs were applied automatically onto the individual...

  13. First-episode acute and transient psychotic disorder in Latvia: a 6-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusaka, Marija; Rancāns, Elmārs

    2014-01-01

    Acute and transient psychotic disorder (ATPD; F23, ICD-10) is an acute, short-lived psychosis, which has variable prevalence worldwide and has not been extensively studied. To explore the first episode of ATPD in patients in Latvia by describing the clinical features, analyzing the longitudinal changes of diagnosis and associated socio-demographic characteristics. Retrospective chart review of all first-time hospitalized patients fulfilling the ICD-10 criteria for ATPD treated at the Riga Centre of Psychiatry and Addiction Disorders, Latvia, during a 3-year period. Patients were followed-up and assessed using standardized instruments. During a 3-year period, 294 patients were first-time hospitalized with a ATPD diagnosis; 54% were women. The average age at first psychotic episode was 35.7 ± 12.3 years for women, and 30.0 ± 10.8 years for men (P Latvia, with data from other countries may help to predict the development of disease and provide the possible basis for potential changes to ICD-11.

  14. The subjective experience and phenomenology of depression following first episode psychosis: a qualitative study using photo-elicitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Amrita; Ives, Jonathan; Birchwood, Max; Upthegrove, Rachel

    2013-07-01

    Depression following first episode psychosis (FEP) is a frequent occurrence, with profound impact on recovery and outcome. Whilst many theories exist about the causes of depression here, research to date has been based on nosology imported wholesale from affective disorder, with little primary research on the subjective experience. This study aimed to explore the subjective experience and phenomenological features of post-psychotic depression in FEP. A qualitative methodology, photo-elicitation, together with unstructured interviews, was used to characterise aspects of depression following FEP and analysed using contemporary framework analysis. Depression was reported by participants as linked to the experience of and recovery from psychosis. The psychotic episode was a traumatic event followed by subjective doubt, shame and embarrassment. Loss and social isolation were central. Core biological symptoms did not feature. Despite the relatively small sample size, this study was able to generate in-depth data that provides useful and novel insight. Whilst generalisability is incompatible with qualitative methodology, further research using the same methodology would generate a wider range of experiences and perspectives. Understanding this dimension of psychosis in and of itself has the potential to improve and aid development of more effective and appropriately targeted interventions and associated outcomes. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A pilot evaluation of a novel First Episode and Rapid Early Intervention service for Eating Disorders (FREED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Jessica; Hodsoll, John; Brown, Amy; Lang, Katie; Boysen, Elena; Flynn, Michaela; Mountford, Victoria A; Glennon, Danielle; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2018-03-01

    This pilot study assesses the impact of FREED (First Episode Rapid Early Intervention for Eating Disorders [ED]), a novel transdiagnostic service for emerging adults with recent ED onset, on clinical outcomes. Data were collected from 56 patients and 19 carers for 12 months following enrolment. FREED patients showed significant improvements in ED and other symptoms across time. Carers also showed psychological improvements. For FREED anorexia nervosa (AN) patients, body mass index (BMI) at initial clinical assessment was similar to that of comparable patients (audit cohort) seen in our service before (16.4 vs 16.1 kg/m 2 ). By start of treatment, because of their shorter wait, FREED-AN had gained weight whereas audit patients had lost (16.7 vs 15.8 kg/m 2 ). This difference continued throughout treatment, and at 12 months, nearly 60% FREED-AN patients returned to a BMI of 18.5 or greater. FREED shows promise as a service model for emerging adults with EDs. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.