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Sample records for antiproton ring lear

  1. LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring), general view.

    CERN Multimedia

    1990-01-01

    When the Antiproton Project was launched in the late 1970s, it was recognized that in addition to the primary purpose of high-energy proton-antiproton collisions in the SPS, there was interesting physics to be done with low-energy antiprotons. In 1982, LEAR was ready to receive antiprotons from the Antiproton Accumulator (AA), via the PS. A year later, delivery of antiprotons to the experiments began, at momenta as low as 100 MeV/c (kinetic energy 5.3 MeV), in an "Ultra-Slow Extraction" mode, dispensing some E9 antiprotons over times counted in hours. For such an achievement, stochastic and electron cooling had to be brought to high levels of perfection.

  2. The CERN Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) project

    CERN Document Server

    Lefèvre, P; Plass, G

    1980-01-01

    The idea to add to the CERN Antiproton Accumulator (AA) a facility for experiments with dense and pure beams of low energy antiprotons has received enthusiastic support from many members of the physics community. After conceptual studies done since 1977 the following scheme was authorized in May 1980: Small batches of cooled antiprotons will be skimmed off from the AA at regular intervals, decelerated in the CERN PS and transferred into a small storage ring (LEAR). In its first stage LEAR will work as a beam stretcher providing a high duty cycle spill of 10/sup 6/ p/s into an experimental area. Future options (not yet authorized) foresee internal jet targets together with cooling, co-rotating beams of p and H, proton antiproton colliding beams, fast extraction with slowing down of p's to rest. A storage ring to fulfil this variety of tasks has to combine some unusual machine features which are summarized in the present report. (6 refs).

  3. LEAR: antiproton extraction lines

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1992-01-01

    Antiprotons, decelerated in LEAR to a momentum of 100 MeV/c (kinetic energy of 5.3 MeV), were delivered to the experiments in an "Ultra-Slow Extraction", dispensing some 1E9 antiprotons over times counted in hours. Beam-splitters and a multitude of beam-lines allowed several users to be supplied simultaneously.

  4. The Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) some months before the start of its particle physics programme

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    LEAR*)and its enclosure in the PS South Hall in Jan, 1983, 4 months before the start of its particle physics programme. Visible (in red) are the 90 degree bending magnets consisting of 6 blocks each. Separated from the magnets by short straight sections are the quadrupole doublets (blue with read end-plates). The 4 long straight sections house large equipment like septa for injection/ejection, RF-cavities and later (since 1986) electron cooling and an internal target and its associated detector (JETSET experiment). Two small copper tubes spanning across the ring are coaxial lines transmitting the stochastic cooling signals from pickup to kicker. (see also photos 8205747X, 8207133, 8207541X, 8309026) *)see e.g.: H.Koziol and D. Möhl, Phys. Rep. 403-404 (2004), p.271 and references therein

  5. The Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) in its first year of operation

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    LEAR*) and its enclosure in the PS South Hall in 1983 shortly after the start of its particle physics programme. Visible (in red) are the 90 degree bending magnets consisting of 6 blocks each. Separated from the magnets by short straight sections are the quadrupole doublets (blue with read end-plates). The 4 long straight sections house large equipment like septa for injection/ejection, RF-cavities and later (since 1986) electron cooling and an internal target and its associated detector (JETSET experiment). Several small copper tubes spanning across the ring are coaxial lines transmitting the stochastic cooling signals from pickup to kicker. *)[see H.Koziol and D. Möhl, Phys. Rep. 403-404 (2004), p.271 and references therein

  6. The Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) some months before the start of its particle physics programme

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    LEAR [see e.g.: H.Koziol and D. Möhl, Phys. Rep. 403-404 (2004), p.271 and references therein] and its enclosure in the PS South Hall in Jan, 1983, 4 months before the start of its particle physics programme. Visible (in red) are the 90 degree bending magnets consisting of 6 blocks each. Separated from the magnets by short straight sections are the quadrupole doublets (blue with read end-plates). The 4 long straight sections house large equipment like septa for injection/ejection, RF-cavities and later (since 1986) electron cooling and an internal target and its associated detector (JETSET experiment). Two small copper tubes spanning across the ring are coaxial lines transmitting the stochastic cooling signals from pick up to kicker. (see also photos 8205747X, 8207133, 8207541X, 8301550X,8309026X)

  7. Low Energy Antiproton Ring experimental area

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    The experimental area at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) is seen. This set up was used to slow down antiprotons which had been produced by colliding a proton beam with a solid target. The experiments in the hall then took antiprotons from LEAR to perform antimatter studies. One such experiment, PS210, produced the world's first antihydrogen atoms.

  8. Professor Walter Oelert, leader of the team which created the first atoms of antihydrogen at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) in January 1996

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1996-01-01

    Antiparticles were predicted in the work of Paul Dirac in the 1920's, since when physicists have identified all the necessary antiparticle constituents of an antiparticle atom - antielectrons (positrons), antiprotons and antineutrons. However, an antihydrogen atom wasn't produced until the PS210 experiment at CERN in 1995. PS210 used the LEAR accelerator, which was then nearing the end of its lifetime, so everything in the experiment had to work first time. After installing the equipment in spring 1995, the experiment took place in the autumn, in two hour periods over 4 weeks. The experiment team collided energetic antiprotons from LEAR with a heavy element, a challenge for them as well as the LEAR operators. Proving that antihydrogen atoms had been formed required several more weeks of data analysis, but the announcement that nine antihydrogen atoms had been produced came on 4 January 1996.

  9. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics: "Light Antiprotonic Atoms" by R. Hayano

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  10. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "Antiproton Mass" by G. Gabrielse

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  11. Golden Jubilee photos: LEAR

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    Extraction lines that carried the antiprotons from LEAR to the experiments. Beam-splitters and a multitude of beam-lines allowed several users to be supplied simultaneously. Particle physicists don't always need ever more powerful accelerators to study interesting physics. LEAR, the Low Energy Antiproton Ring, was designed to help explore the properties of antimatter, with the annihilation of protons and antiprotons becoming the main theme. LEAR was commissioned in 1983 and contributed to more than 30 experiments with great success. LEAR took part in the discovery of a 'glueball', a particle composed entirely of gluons, the carriers of the strong nuclear force. LEAR also observed that neutral kaons and antikaons decay at a slightly different rate, offering physicists another insight into the mystery about why matter prevails over antimatter in the Universe. Uniquely, LEAR combined both the electron and stochastic beam cooling techniques, used to control and refine the beams. It also pioneered a technique usin...

  12. Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) ring and its Transfer Lines: Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Alanzeau, C; Angoletta, M E; Baillie, J; Barna, D; Bartmann, W; Belochitskii, P; Borburgh, J; Breuker, H; Butin, F; Buzio, M; Capatina, O; Carli, C; Carlier, E; Cattin, M; Dobers, T; Chiggiato, P; Ducimetiere, L; Eriksson, T; Fedemann, S; Fowler, T; Froeschl, R; Gebel, R; Gilbert, N; Hancock, S; Harasimowicz, J; Hori, M; Jorgensen, L V; Kersevan, R; Kuchler, D; Lacroix, J M; LeGodec, G; Lelong, P; Lopez-Hernandez, L; Maury, S; Molendijk, J; Morand, B; Newborough, A; Nisbet, D; Nosych, A; Oelert, W; Paoluzzi, M; Pasinelli, S; Pedersen, F; Perini, D; Puccio, B; Sanchez-Quesada, J; Schoerling, D; Sermeus, L; Soby, L; Timmins, M; Tommasini, D; Tranquille, G; Vanbavinckhove, G; Vorozhtsov, A; Welsch, C; Zickler, T

    2014-01-01

    This Report gives a full description of the ELENA Ring to be built within the circumference of the Antiproton Decelarator (AD) Ring, in Building 193 at CERN. The ELENA ring will further decelerate the antiprotons coming from the AD at the momentum of 100 MeV/c down to 13.7 MeV/c, which corresponds to the kinetic energy of 100 keV before extracting to the physics experiments in the same building. The history of such an extra low energy antiproton ring at CERN goes a long way back, and even to the Decelerator’s previous incarnation, the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR), which came into operation in 1983. Already at that time, there were physics’ requests to further decelerate the antiprotons expected from LEAR by proposals for ELENA. Appendix I illustrates the cover pages of two such CERN documents from 1982.

  13. LEAR is dead, long live LEIR!

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring) experiment has now been dismantled. Only the dipoles remain for use in the future LEIR (Low Energy Ion Ring) experiment, the new ring which will supply lead ions to the LHC experiments.

  14. LEAR during its first year of operation

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Construction of the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) had been completed in July 1982, followed by tests with protons and antiprotons on machine properties, acceleration, deceleration and stochastic cooling. At the beginning of 1983, LEAR hardware was brought to operational level, and in July 1983 the first antiprotons were delivered to the experiments. See 8207133 for completion and start-up and 9007366 for a more detailed description. See also 8201061, 8204131.

  15. LEAR bending magnet quadrant

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    During 1981, the PS South-Hall, no longer used for physics experiments, was cleared for the installation of the Low Energy Antiproton Ring, LEAR. In October 1981, 3 of the 4 bending magnet quadrants were in place, this is one of them.

  16. Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1980-01-01

    The AA in its final stage of construction, before it disappeared from view under concrete shielding. Antiprotons were first injected, stochastically cooled and accumulated in July 1980. From 1981 on, the AA provided antiprotons for collisions with protons, first in the ISR, then in the SPS Collider. From 1983 on, it also sent antiprotons, via the PS, to the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR). The AA was dismantled in 1997 and shipped to Japan.

  17. Study of X-Ray and $\\gamma$-Ray Spectra from Antiprotonic Atoms at the Slowly Extracted Antiproton Beam of LEAR

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment will study the X-ray spectra of antiprotonic atoms and the $\\gamma$ spectra of residual nuclei after the antiproton absorption. We intend to begin with measurements on selected isotopically pure targets. Strong interaction effects, the antiproton absorption and the atomic cascade are analysed through the measurement of energies, lineshapes, relative and absolute intensities of all observable lines. The experiments are continued to determine st in resolved fine structure levels and in different isotopes of the same element. Coincidence techniques may be applied. All components of the experimental set-up are already existing from previous experiments and we could begin the measurements with any slowly extracted beam of low energy at LEAR.

  18. In the LEAR control room

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    View into the control room of the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR). Edgar Asseo (sitting) and Dieter Möhl and Georges Carron reflecting upon some beam dynamics (or hardware?) problem. Vassilis Agoritsas, in the background, leaning over a plan or a keyboard. LEAR in its early years (1982 to about 1990) was run from this local control room in building 363 close to the end of the PS South Hall, where the ring was installed. Later-on the operation was surveyed from the PS main control room.

  19. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "LEAR Performance" by M. Chanel

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields: M. Chanel "LEAR Performance"

  20. Antiproton-Decelerator (AD)

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    When the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) was stopped in 1996, because of its costly operation, a cheaper way of continuing low-energy antiproton physics was sought. The Antiproton-Collector (AC), added in 1987 to the Antiproton Accumulator (AA) to provide a tenfold intensity increase, was converted into the Antiproton-Decelerator (AD). Antiprotons from the target at 3.5 GeV/c are decelerated to 100 MeV/c, and fast-ejected to the experiments. Major changes were necessary. Above all, the conversion from a constant-field machine to one with a magnetic cycle, modulating the field by an impressive factor 35. New systems for stochastic and electron cooling had to be added. Beam diagnostics at an intensity of only 2E7 antiprotons was a challenge. In 2000, the AD began delivery of antiprotons to the experiments.

  1. LEAR's physics legacy

    CERN Multimedia

    Philippe Bloch

    2012-01-01

    By providing an intense and clean source of antiprotons for the first time, LEAR has opened many fields of research. Although it is not easy to summarise its versatile physics programme in a few lines, this article is an attempt to do justice to the 27 experiments performed during 14 years of running and to their successful results.   LEAR complex, September 1983. In the early days of LEAR operation, the antiproton intensity was quite limited and the machine was mostly used for studying antiprotonic atoms and interactions of low-energy antiprotons with nuclei. Physicists were also performing measurements of cross-sections (total, elastic, charge exchange) as a function of the antiproton momentum. These first experiments provided valuable insights into the properties of nucleon-antinucleon interactions, including their spin structure, and ruled out the existence of hypothesized multiquark states of matter referred to as “baryonium”. The ASTERIX experiment...

  2. LEAR: a machine ahead of its time

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Described as a “machine physicist's concert platform”, the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) was everything at once: an accelerator, a storage ring, a decelerator, a cooler ring and a beam stretcher. 2012 marks the 30th anniversary of its start-up and an opportunity for the Bulletin to take a look back at the history of this remarkable machine.   This article is a tribute to Dieter Möhl, one of LEAR's founding fathers, who passed away at the end May.   Kilian's graph shows the phase space density of antiprotons produced from 26 GeV protons vs. antiproton momentum. Note that this density is significantly higher at low momentum for a decelerated beam. (Graph published in the 1977 "Low Energy Antiproton Factory" paper.) Like most great CERN projects, LEAR began with a dream and a coffee between colleagues. The year was 1976, the coffee was shared by Kurt Kilian and Diete...

  3. Status of the CP lear experiment and first results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoni, C.; Adler, R.; Angelopoulos, A.; Apostolakis, A.; Aslanides, E.; Backenstoss, G.; Bee, C.B.; Bennet, J.; Beveren, E.V.; Bloch, P.; Bula, C.; Burgun, G.; Carlson, P.; Carvalho, J.; Charalambous, S.; Chardalas, M.; Cobbaert, H.; Dedoussis, S.; Dejardin, M.; Derre, J.; Dodgson, M.; Doussee, J.C.; Duclos, J.; Ealet, A.; Eckart, B.; Faravel, L.; Fassnacht, P.; Faure, J.L.; Felder, C.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fetscher, W.; Fidecaro, M.; Filipcic, A.; Francis, D.; Fry, J.; Fuglesang, C.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Garreta, D.; Geralis, T.; Gerber, H.J.; Go, A.; Gumpliger, P.; Guyot, C.; Harrison, P.F.; Hayman, P.J.; Heyes, W.G.; Hollander, R.W.; Jansson, K.; Johner, H.J.; Jon-And, K.; Kerek, A.; Kern, J.; Kettle, P.R.; Kochowski, C.; Kokkas, P.; Kossionides, E.; Kreuger, R.; Lawry, T.; Gac, R. le; Machado, E.; Maley, P.; Manthos, N.; Marel, G.; Marotte, P.; Mikuz, M.; Miller, J.; Montanet, F.; Nakada, T.; Onofre, A.; Pagels, B.; Paradelis, T.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Pelucchi, F.; Pinto da Cu

    1991-08-01

    The aim of the CP LEAR experiment is to study symmetry-violation effects, making use of tagged K{sup 0}'s and anti K{sup 0}'s. The detector, although missing some electronic components, has been operational for a few weeks at the end of 1989 at the CERN Low-Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR). At the moment, the analysis of the data is in progress. This paper gives a description of the experimental method and of the detector; the sensitivities of some measurements and some preliminary results are also discussed. (orig.).

  4. LEAR construction completed

    CERN Multimedia

    1982-01-01

    In July 1982, LEAR construction was completed, the individual systems had been dry-tested. On 16 July, the first 50 MeV (309 MeV/c) protons from Linac 1 were injected and circulated. On 11 October, the first antiprotons from the AA, decelerated in the PS to 609 MeV/c, were injected. Also in 1982, acceleration, deceleration and stochastic cooling were successfully tested. See 9007366 for a more detailed description. See also 8201061, 8204131, 8309026.

  5. Fermilab Antiproton Source, Recycler Ring, and Main Injector

    CERN Document Server

    Nagaitsev, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    At the end of its operations in 2011, the Fermilab antiproton production complex consisted of a sophisticated target system, three 8-GeV storage rings (namely the Debuncher, the Accumulator and the Recycler), 25 independent multi-GHz stochastic cooling systems, the world's only relativistic electron cooling system and a team of technical experts equal to none. The accelerator complex at Fermilab supported a broad physics program including the Tevatron Collider Run II, neutrino experiments using 8-GeV and 120-GeV proton beams, as well as a test beam facility and other fixed target experiments using 120-GeV primary proton beams. This paper provides a brief description of Fermilab accelerators as they operated at the end of the Collider Run II (2011).

  6. Annihilation of Antiprotons in Light Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. A. Rana; E. U. Khan; M. I. Shahzad; I. E. Qureshi; F. Malik; G. Sher; S. Manzoor; H. A. Khan

    2006-01-01

    @@ CR-39 detectors have been exposed to a 5.9-MeV antiproton beam using the low energy antiproton ring (LEAR) facility at CERN. At this energy, tracks of antiprotons appear in a CR-39 detector after 135 min of etching in 6 M NaOH at 70℃ . Fluence of the antiproton beam has been determined using track density. We have also found tracks in the etched CR-39 detector at different depths (250-500μm). These tracks have resulted from the annihilation of antiprotons with the constituents (H, C and O) of the CR-39 detector. The goal of the experiment is to develop a simple and low-cost method to study properties of antiparticles and those formed after annihilation of these particles with the target matter.

  7. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "Nuclear Physics" by T. von Egidy

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 145 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  8. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "Annihilation in Flight" by D. Hertzog

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  9. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : R. Landua (chairman)

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  10. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "Annihilation at Rest" by U. Gastaldi

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  11. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "AD Project" by S. Maury

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields: S. Maury "AD Project"

  12. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "Meson spectroscopy" by H. Koch

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  13. The CERN Antiproton Collider Programme Accelerators and Accumulation Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Koziol, Heribert

    2004-01-01

    One of CERN's most daring and successful undertakings was the quest for the intermediate bosons, W and Z. In this paper, we describe the accelerator part of the venture which relied on a number of innovations: an extension of the budding method of stochastic cooling by many orders of magnitude; the construction of the Antiproton Accumulator, depending on several novel accelerator methods and technologies; major modifications to the 26 GeV PS Complex; and the radical conversion of the 300 GeV SPS, which just had started up as an accelerator, to a protonâ€"antiproton collider. The SPS Collider had to master the beamâ€"beam effect far beyond limits reached ever before and had to function in a tight symbiosis with the huge detectors UA1 and UA2.

  14. High-precision spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium

    CERN Document Server

    Widmann, E

    2001-01-01

    We present first results of laser and microwave spectroscopy experiments of antiprotonic helium performed at the new Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN. Extending a series of previous measurements done at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) of CERN, several laser- induced transitions of the antiproton in the exotic three-body system He/sup 2+/-e/sup -/-p could be determined with a precision down to 1.3*10/sup -7/. This constitutes an improvement of a factor 3 over previous measurements, and allows to test accurate three-body calculations of this system that include QED corrections. The observed agreement on the same level can be used to infer CPT limits on the antiproton charge and mass. Furthermore, a first indication of a resonance signal of a two-laser microwave triple experiment to measure the hyperfine splitting of antiprotonic helium could been observed. Such a measurement has the potential to determine the antiproton magnetic moment to a higher precision that it is known today. (19 refs).

  15. Non-Gaussian beam dynamics in low energy antiproton storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resta-López, J.; Hunt, J. R.; Welsch, C. P.

    2016-10-01

    In low energy antiproton facilities, where electron cooling is fundamental, the cooling forces together with heating phenomena causing emittance blow-up, such as Intra Beam Scattering (IBS), result in highly non-Gaussian beam distributions. In these cases, a precise simulation of IBS effects is essential to realistically evaluate the long term beam evolution, taking into account the non-Gaussian characteristics of the beam. Here, we analyse the beam dynamics in the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA), which is a new small synchrotron currently being constructed at CERN to decelerate antiprotons to energies as low as 100 keV. Simulations are performed using the code BETACOOL, comparing different models of IBS.

  16. The antiproton interaction with an internal 12C target inside the HESR ring at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introzzi, R.; Balestra, F.; Lavagno, A.; Scozzi, F.; Younis, H.

    2016-04-01

    In order to fulfill the goal of producing higher rates of doubly strange hyperons, the P¯ANDA collaboration will use the antiproton ring HESR at the future facility FAIR. The low energy hyperon production by an antiproton beam requires to insert a solid target inside the ring. Unwanted side effects of such an insertion are the overwhelming amount of annihilations, which would make the detectors blind, and the fast depletion of the bunch, which circulates inside the ring. The choice of the target material impacts the hyperon production yield: Carbon turned out to provide enough initial hyperon deceleration and keep secondary interactions below a tolerable level. The use of a very thin Diamond target, together with beam steering techniques, seems to be a satisfactory solution to the above problems and will be described hereafter.

  17. Inside Hall 193 for the Antiproton Accumulator (AA) ring

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    Installation work is in full swing. A model quadrupole on the left shows where the magnet ring will be. The cables wound on drums are part of the pulse-forming network for the injection kicker. See Annual Report 1979 p. 103, Fig. 9 and photo 7911303. For photos of the AA in different phases of completion (between 1979 and 1982) see: 7911303, 7911597X, 8004261, 8004608X, 8005563X, 8005565X, 8006716X, 8006722X, 8010939X, 8010941X, 8202324, 8202658X, 8203628X .

  18. Nuclear Excitations by Antiprotons and Antiprotonic Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The proposal aims at the investigation of nuclear excitations following the absorption and annihilation of stopped antiprotons in heavier nuclei and at the same time at the study of the properties of antiprotonic atoms. The experimental arrangement will consist of a scintillation counter telescope for the low momentum antiproton beam from LEAR, a beam degrader, a pion multiplicity counter, a monoisotopic target and Ge detectors for radiation and charged particles. The data are stored by an on-line computer.\\\\ \\\\ The Ge detectors register antiprotonic x-rays and nuclear @g-rays which are used to identify the residual nucleus and its excitation and spin state. Coincidences between the two detectors will indicate from which quantum state the antiprotons are absorbed and to which nuclear states the various reactions are leading. The measured pion multiplicity characterizes the annihilation process. Ge&hyphn. and Si-telescopes identify charged particles and determine their energies.\\\\ \\\\ The experiment will gi...

  19. Physics with thermal antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hynes, M.V.; Campbell, L.J.

    1988-01-01

    The same beam cooling techniques that have allowed for high luminosity antiproton experiments at high energy also provide the opportunity for experiments at ultra-low energy. Through a series of deceleration stages, antiprotons collected and cooled at the peak momentum for production can by made available at thermal or sub-thermal energies. In particular, the CERN, PS-200 collaboration is developing an RFO-plused ion trap beam line for the antiproton gravitational mass experiment at LEAR that will provide beams of antiprotons in the energy range 0.001--1000.0 eV. Antiprotons at these energies make these fundamentals particles available for experiments in condensed matter and atomic physics. The recent speculation that antiprotons may form metastable states in some forms of normal matter could open many new avenues of basic and applied research. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "Atomic Physics" by E. Uggerhoj

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  1. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "CP Violation" by P. Pavlopoulos

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  2. Antiproton-proton Annihilation Into Two Mesons: The Role Of Relativistic Distortion

    CERN Document Server

    El-Bennich, B O

    2004-01-01

    The more than a decade old data on differential cross sections and analyzing powers in antiproton-proton annihilation into two pions (or two kaons), measured at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) of CERN, have stimulated several theoretical investigations. A characteristic feature of the data are the large variations of the scattering observables as a function of the scattering angle and of the laboratory energy already below 100 MeV. Amplitude analyzes reproduce the data with few partial waves (J ≤ 4) and one concludes that the annihilation process is very short- ranged and of the order of the nucleon size. Nonetheless, early models, using either baryonic or quark degrees of freedom, give rise to an even shorter antibaryon-baryon interaction failing to produce substantial higher (J ≥ 2) partial wave amplitudes and consequently to adequately describe the LEAR data. In this thesis, we systematically consider improvements within the framework of quark-line diagrams. We first derive various quar...

  3. Measurement of small-angle antiproton-proton and proton-proton elastic scattering at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amos, N.; Block, M.M.; Bobbink, G.J.; Botje, M.A.J.; Favart, D.; Leroy, C.; Linde, F.; Lipnik, P.; Matheys, J-P.; Miller, D.

    1985-01-01

    Antiproton-proton and proton-proton small-angle elastic scattering was measured for centre-of-mass energies at the CERN Intersectung Storage Rings. In addition, proton-proton elastic scattering was measured at . Using the optical theorem, total cross sections are obtained with an accuracy of about

  4. Parallel plate chambers for monitoring the profiles of high-intensity pulsed antiproton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Masaki

    2004-01-01

    Two types of beam profile monitor with thin parallel-plate electrodes have been used in experiments carried out at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) and Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN. The detectors were used to measure non-destructively the spatial profiles, absolute intensities, and time structures of 100-300-ns- long beam pulses containing between 10**7 and 10**9 antiprotons. The first of these monitors was a parallel plate ionization chamber operated at gas pressure P=65 mbar. The other was a secondary electron emission detector, and was operated in the ultra-high vacuum of the AD. Both designs may be useful in medical and commercial applications. The position-sensitive electrodes in these detectors were manufactured by a novel method in which a laser trimmer was used to cut strip patterns on metallized polyester foils.

  5. Cordelia, Lear, and forgiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Roy

    2005-01-01

    Painful human interactions are often followed by urges to forgive, be forgiving, or seek forgiveness. The insight analysands develop into their transferences highlights their finding gratification in constantly reenacting painful interactions. Their new understanding can make forgiveness seem irrelevant; waiving the question of forgiveness might then seem the wiser course to follow. Also thrown into question is whether total forgiveness of self and others can ever be achieved. Shakespeare's The Tragedy of King Lear raises these questions. There we encounter, first, the painful interaction of Cordelia and Lear and, finally, Cordelia's response, "No cause, no cause," to a dying Lear's begging her forgiveness for having initially treated her cruelly. Cordelia's response seems to be waiving the question of guilt and forgiveness, but could it be wholehearted? In a search for answers, a reading of Cordelia's and Lear's lines is interwoven with interpretations of unconscious conflict that might be considered were one to encounter clinically a "Cordelia" abused by an aging and failing father at a turning point in her womanly development. Unconsciously, it is concluded, unforgivingness persists alongside the loving, insightful waiving of forgiveness made possible by higher-level ego functioning. Methodological reflections on reading and interpretation are included.

  6. The Antiproton Decelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    A technician works on the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) ring. This machine slows down antiprotons so that they can combine with anti-electrons (positrons) and produce anti-hydrogen. Experiments are set up on the AD to attempt to store antihydrogen and investigate properties of anti-hydrogen, such as its mass.

  7. Precision measurement of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitlinger, K.; Bacher, R.; Badertscher, A.; Blüm, P.; Eades, J.; Egger, J.; Elsener, K.; Gotta, D.; Morenzoni, E.; Simons, L. M.

    1992-09-01

    X-rays from antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at low pressures. Using the cyclotron trap, a 105 MeV/c antiproton beam from LEAR was stopped with an efficiency of 86% in 30 mbar hydrogen gas in a volume of only 100 cm3. The X-rays were measured with Si(Li) detectors and a Xe-CH4 drift chamber. The strong interaction shift and broadening of the Lyman α transition and the spin-averaged 2p width in antiprotonic hydrogen was measured with unprecedented accuracy. The triplet component of the ground state in antiprotonic hydrogen was determined for the first time.

  8. Antiproton charge radius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivelli, P.; Cooke, D.; Heiss, M. W.

    2016-09-01

    The upcoming operation of the extra low energy antiprotons ring at CERN, the upgrade of the antiproton decelerator (AD), and the installation in the AD hall of an intense slow positron beam with an expected flux of 1 08 e+ /s will open the possibility for new experiments with antihydrogen (H ¯). Here we propose a scheme to measure the Lamb shift of H ¯. For four months of data taking, we anticipate an uncertainty of 100 ppm. This will provide a test of C P T and the first determination of the antiproton charge radius at the level of 10%.

  9. Posing the first LEAR vacuum chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1982-01-01

    The photo shows one of the four bending magnets of LEAR. They were of C-type with the opening ('mouth') to the outside of the ring (yoke to the inside). Last preparations are made before the vacuum chamber is slid through the mouth into the magnet. Stochastic cooling pickups/kickers were installed inside the chamber. One can distinguish a large number of feed-throughs on the chamber (leading to the pickup/kicker gaps). The free space in the middle of the block was left to offer room for an internal target in the magnet. This possibility was never exploited. Instead it is used here, to accommodate a pumping port for the high vacuum system. Michel Chanel (left) and Pierre Lefevre admire the mechanics at work.

  10. Measurement of proton-proton and proton-antiproton elastic scattering at the European center for nuclear research intersecting storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Amos, Norman A

    1985-01-01

    Proton-proton and proton-antiproton elastic scattering was measured at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings. Using the optical theorem, we have extracted the total nuclear cross sections for these collisions. By measuring the interference between the Coulomb amplitude and the nuclear amplitude we have found rho, the ratio of the real part to the imaginary part of the forward nuclear elastic scattering amplitude. Further, we have extracted the nuclear slope parameter in the forward direction. For proton-proton interactions, the total nuclear cross sections measured were 39.95 +- 0.30 mb and 42.19 +- 0.19 mb for center-of-mass energies √s = 30.6 GeV and 52.8 GeV, respectively. The measured values of rho were 0.035 +- 0.009 and 0.071 +- 0.010. For proton-antiproton interactions, the cross sections found were 41.10 +- 0.40 mb and 43.34 +- 0.43 mb, respectively, and the rho values were 0.088 +- 0.025 and 0.066 +- 0.022

  11. Lear and the learned Theban

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ian Clive Lucking

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract - The affinities between Shakespeare’s King Lear and Sophocles’ Oedipus the King, and in particular the pattern of allusion to eyes and to eyesight developed in both plays, is familiar critical terrain. The purpose of this essay is to consider in a somewhat broader perspective King Lear’s relation not only with Oedipus the King, but with the entire group of works generally referred to as the Theban plays. Elements in common between the works by Shakespeare and Sophocles, among which are the eyesight motif and its symbolic connotations, the figures of devoted daughters, a concern with relationships between parents and children, and an interest in what constitutes real knowledge of the self and of the world, are discussed in the first section of the essay. The question of why such parallels should exist, and in particular of whether Shakespeare knew Sophocles’ works either at first hand or as mediated through the derivative plays of Seneca, is investigated in the second part, while in the third the symbolic implications of the sight pattern shared by the works are examined in depth.Keywords: Shakespeare, Sophocles, King Lear, Theban plays, Oedipus.

  12. Antiproton radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; DeMarco, John J.; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Jakel, Oliver; Knudsen, Helge V.; Kovacevic, Sandra; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B.à; Solberg, Timothy D.; Sørensen, Brita S.; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Bradly G.; Holzscheiter, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Antiprotons are interesting as a possible future modality in radiation therapy for the following reasons: When fast antiprotons penetrate matter, protons and antiprotons have near identical stopping powers and exhibit equal radiobiology well before the Bragg-peak. But when the antiprotons come to rest at the Bragg-peak, they annihilate, releasing almost 2 GeV per antiproton–proton annihilation. Most of this energy is carried away by energetic pions, but the Bragg-peak of the antiprotons is still locally augmented with ∼20–30 MeV per antiproton. Apart from the gain in physical dose, an increased relative biological effect also has been observed, which can be explained by the fact that some of the secondary particles from the antiproton annihilation exhibit high-LET properties. Finally, the weakly interacting energetic pions, which are leaving the target volume, may provide a real time feedback on the exact location of the annihilation peak. We have performed dosimetry experiments and investigated the rad...

  13. Extra Low ENergy Antiproton

    CERN Multimedia

    To produce dense antiproton beams at very low energies (110 keV), it has been proposed to install a small decelerator ring between the existing AD ring and the experimental area. Phase-space blowup during deceleration is compensated by electron cooling such that the final emittances are comparable to the 5MeV beam presently delivered by the AD. An immediate consequence is a significant increase in the number of trapped antiprotons at the experiments as outlined in the proposal CERN/SPSC-2009-026; SPCS-P-338. This report describes the machine parameters and layout of the proposal ELENA (Extra Low ENergy Antiproton)ring also gives an approximate estimate of cost and manpower needs. Since the initial estimate, published in 2007 (CERN-AB-2007-079), the ELENA design has evolved considerably. This is due to a new location in the AD hall to acommodate for the possibility of another experimental zone, as suggested by the SPCS, and also due to improvements in the ring optics and layout. The cost estimate that is prese...

  14. Antiprotonic helium

    CERN Multimedia

    Eades, John

    2005-01-01

    An exotic atom in w hich an electron and an antiproton orbit a helium nucleus could reveal if there are any differences between matter and antimatter. The author describes this unusual mirror on the antiworld (5 pages)

  15. An Interview with Dr. Walter Lear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Editors

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this issue of the English version of Social Medicine we are publishing the first of several pamphlets loaned to us by the US Health Activism History Collection. To introduce this collection we travelled to Philadelphia on June 18, 2008 to interview Dr. Walter J. Lear. Dr Lear, born in 1923, is the person responsible for the collection. In a wide-ranging interview in his home Dr. Lear discussed his personal background, the origins and purpose of the collection, the impact of the McCarthy period on the US health left, as well as his vision for the future.

  16. Conceptual Design of an Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peggs, Stephen

    2006-10-24

    The Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility (AGSF) creates copious quantities of antiprotons, for bottling and transportation to remote cancer therapy centers. The first step in the generation and storage process is to accelerate an intense proton beam down the Main Linac for injection into the Main Ring, which is a Rapid Cycling Synchrotron that accelerates the protons to high energy. The beam is then extracted from the ring into a transfer line and into a Proton Target. Immediately downstream of the target is an Antiproton Collector that captures some of the antiprotons and focuses them into a beam that is transported sequentially into two antiproton rings. The Precooler ring rapidly manipulates antiproton bunches from short and broad (in momentum) to long and thin. It then performs some preliminary beam cooling, in the fraction of a second before the next proton bunch is extracted from the Main Ring. Pre-cooled antiprotons are passed on to the Accumulator ring before the next antiprotons arrive from the target. The Accumulator ring cools the antiprotons, compressing them into a dense state that is convenient for mass storage over many hours. Occasionally the Accumulator ring decelerates a large number of antiprotons, injecting them into a Deceleration Linac that passes them into a waiting Penning trap.

  17. Precision measurement of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heitlinger, K.; Bluem, P. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik); Bacher, R.; Badertscher, A.; Egger, J.; Morenzoni, E.; Simons, L.M. (Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)); Eades, J.; Elsener, K. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)); Gotta, D. (Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik)

    1992-05-01

    X-rays from antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at low pressures. Using the cylcotron trap, a 105 MeV/c antiproton beam from LEAR was stopped with an efficiency of 86% in 30 mbar hydrogen gas in a volume of only 100 cm{sup 3}. The X-rays were measured with Si(Li) detectors and a Xe-CH{sub 4} drift chamber. The strong interaction shift and broadening of the Lyman {alpha} transition and the spin-averaged 2p width in antiprotonic hydrogen was measured with unprecedented accuracy. The triplet component of the ground state in antiprotonic hydrogen was determined for the first time. (orig.).

  18. X-rays from anti-protonic hydrogen and deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorringe, T.P.; Davies, J.D.; Lowe, J.; Nelson, J.M.; Playfer, S.M.; Pyle, G.J.; Squier, G.T.A.; Baker, C.A.; Batty, C.J.; Clark, S.A.; Kilvington, A.I.; Moir, J.; Sakamoto, S.; Welsh, R.E.; Winter, R.G.; Lingeman, E.W.A.

    1985-11-07

    Antiprotons from the LEAR facility at CERN were stopped in targets of gaseous H/sub 2/ or D/sub 2/. Yields of L X-rays were measured. K-series from anti p-p atoms were observed. The measured shift and width for the 1s level are ..delta..Esub(1s)=-0.73+-0.15 keV and GAMMAsub(1s)=0.85+-0.39 keV. (orig.).

  19. The Fermilab recycler ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin Hu

    2001-07-24

    The Fermilab Recycler is a permanent magnet storage ring for the accumulation of antiprotons from the Antiproton Source, and the recovery and cooling of the antiprotons remaining at the end of a Tevatron store. It is an integral part of the Fermilab III luminosity upgrade. The following paper describes the design features, operational and commissioning status of the Recycler Ring.

  20. Capture, Electron-Cooling and Compression of Antiprotons in a Large Penning-Trap for Physics Experiments with an Ultra-Low Energy Extracted Antiproton Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS200 \\\\ \\\\The availability of ultra-low energy antiprotons is a crucial ingredient for the execution of the gravity measurements PS200. We have developed a method to provide such low energy antiprotons based on a large Penning trap (the PS200 catching trap). This system can accept a fast-extracted pulse from LEAR, reduce the energy of the antiprotons in the pulse from 5.9~MeV to several tens of kilovolts using a degrading foil, and then capture the antiprotons in a large Penning trap. These antiprotons are cooled by electrons previously admitted to the trap and are collected in a small region at the center of the trap. We have demonstrated our capability to capture up to 1~million antiprotons from LEAR in a single shot, electron cool these antiprotons, and transfer up to 95\\% of them into the inner, harmonic region. A storage time in excess of 1 hour was observed. These results have been obtained with the cryogenic trap vacuum coupled to a room temperature vacuum at about l0$ ^- ^{1} ^0 $ Torr, which is an...

  1. Antiproton Target

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Antiproton target used for the AA (antiproton accumulator). The first type of antiproton production target used from 1980 to 1982 comprised a rod of copper 3mm diameter and 120mm long embedded in a graphite cylinder that was itself pressed into a finned aluminium container. This assembly was air-cooled and it was used in conjunction with the Van der Meer magnetic horn. In 1983 Fermilab provided us with lithium lenses to replace the horn with a view to increasing the antiproton yield by about 30%. These lenses needed a much shorter target made of heavy metal - iridium was chosen for this purpose. The 50 mm iridium rod was housed in an extension to the original finned target container so that it could be brought very close to the entrance to the lithium lens. Picture 1 shows this target assembly and Picture 2 shows it mounted together with the lithium lens. These target containers had a short lifetime due to a combination of beam heating and radiation damage. This led to the design of the water-cooled target in...

  2. The Antiproton Accumulator becomes Antiproton Decelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    The photos show the Antiproton Accumulator (AA) transformed into Antiproton Decelerator. The AA was used at CERN between 1981 and 1999 before being replaced by the Antiproton Decelerator (AD). The AA was used to collect and stochastically cool antiprotons used in proton-antiproton collisions in the SPS collider. This lead to the discovery of the W and Z bosons in 1983 and the Nobel Prize for Carlo Rubbia and Simon van der Meer in 1984.

  3. A detector to search for antiproton decay at the Fermilab antiproton accumulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, T. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Buchanan, C.; Corbin, B.; Lindgren, M.; Muller, T.; Scott, A. [University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90024 (United States); Geer, S.; Marriner, J.; Martens, M.; Ray, R.; Streets, J.; Wester, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Gustafson, R. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Hu, M.; Snow, G.R. [University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE (United States); APEX Collaboration

    1998-07-11

    We describe the experimental apparatus used by the APEX experiment (Experiment 868) at the Fermilab antiproton accumulator. The experiment is designed to search for decays of 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons as they traverse a 3.7 m long evacuated decay tank inserted in a straight section of the antiproton accumulator ring. The detector components in the experimental set-up are discussed individually, and the performance of the experiment during data-taking is described. (orig.)

  4. Testing Quantum Chromodynamics with Antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Brodsky, S J

    2004-01-01

    The antiproton storage ring HESR to be constructed at GSI will open up a new range of perturbative and nonperturbative tests of QCD in exclusive and inclusive reactions. I discuss 21 tests of QCD using antiproton beams which can illuminate novel features of QCD. The proposed experiments include the formation of exotic hadrons, measurements of timelike generalized parton distributions, the production of charm at threshold, transversity measurements in Drell-Yan reactions, and searches for single-spin asymmetries. The interactions of antiprotons in nuclear targets will allow tests of exotic nuclear phenomena such as color transparency, hidden color, reduced nuclear amplitudes, and the non-universality of nuclear antishadowing. The AdS/CFT correspondence of large $N_C$ supergravity theory in higher-dimensional anti-de Sitter space with supersymmetric QCD in 4-dimensional space-time has important implications for hadron phenomenology in the conformal limit, including the nonperturbative derivation of counting rul...

  5. Antiproton--Proton Scattering Experiments with Polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Lenisa, P; Lenisa, Paolo; Rathmann, Frank

    2005-01-01

    The document describes the physics case of the PAX experiment using polarized antiprotons, which has recently been proposed for the new Facility for Antiprotons and Ions Research (FAIR) at GSI--Darmstadt. Polarized antiprotons provide access to a wealth of single-- and double--spin observables, thereby opening a new window to physics uniquely accessible at the HESR. The polarized antiprotons would be most efficiently produced by spin--filtering in a dedicated Antiproton Polarizer Ring (APR) using an internal polarized hydrogen gas target. In the proposed collider scenario of the PAX experiment, polarized protons stored in a COSY--like Cooler Storage Ring (CSR) up to momenta of 3.5 GeV/c are bombarded head--on with 15 GeV/c polarized antiprotons stored in the HESR. This asymmetric double--polarized antiproton--proton collider is ideally suited to map, e.g., the transversity distribution in the proton. The proposed detector consists of a large--angle apparatus optimized for the detection of Drell--Yan electron ...

  6. The anti-proton charge radius

    CERN Document Server

    Crivelli, P; Heiss, M W

    2016-01-01

    The upcoming operation of the Extra Low ENergy Antiprotons (ELENA) ring at CERN, the upgrade of the anti-proton decelerator (AD), and the installation in the AD hall of an intense slow positron beam with an expected flux of $10^{8}$ e$^+$/s will open the possibility for new experiments with anti-hydrogen ($\\bar{\\text{H}}$). Here we propose a scheme to measure the Lamb shift of $\\bar{\\text{H}}$. For a month of data taking, we anticipate an uncertainty of 100 ppm. This will provide a test of CPT and the first determination of the anti-proton charge radius at the level of 10%.

  7. Antiproton therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Knudsen, Helge V; Bassler, Niels; Alsner, Jan; Beyer, Gerd-Jürgen; DeMarco, John J; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Jäkel, Oliver; Kovacevic, Sandra; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B; Ratib, Osman; Solberg, Timothy D; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Bradly G

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the most important means we have for the treatment of localised tumours. It is therefore essential to optimize the technique, and a lot of effort goes into this endeavour. Since the proposal by Wilson in 1946 [R.R. Wilson, Radiology use of fast protons, Radiology 47 (1946) 487.] that proton beams might be better than photon beams at inactivating cancer cells, hadron therapy has been developed in parallel with photon therapy and a substantial knowledge has been gained on the effects of pions, protons and heavy ions (mostly carbon ions). Here we discuss the recent measurements by the CERN ACE collaboration of the biological effects of antiprotons, and argue that these particles very likely are the optimal agents for radiotherapy.

  8. Physics using cold antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayano, Ryugo S.

    2004-10-01

    Recent progress of low-energy antiproton physics by atomic spectroscopy and collisions using slow antiprotons collaboration at CERN AD is presented. High-precision spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium-a neutral three-body system overlinepe-He2+(=overlinepHe+) produced when antiprotons (overlinep) are stopped in various phases of helium-has tested 3-body QED theories as well as proton-vs-antiproton CPT to within ∼10-8. This was achieved by using a newly-developed radiofrequency quadrupole decelerator. Other ongoing and future experiments using low-energy antiprotons are discussed.

  9. Physics using cold antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayano, R.S. E-mail: hayano@phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2004-10-11

    Recent progress of low-energy antiproton physics by atomic spectroscopy and collisions using slow antiprotons collaboration at CERN AD is presented. High-precision spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium--a neutral three-body system pbare{sup -}He{sup 2+}(=pbarHe{sup +}) produced when antiprotons (pbar) are stopped in various phases of helium--has tested 3-body QED theories as well as proton-vs-antiproton CPT to within {approx}10{sup -8}. This was achieved by using a newly-developed radiofrequency quadrupole decelerator. Other ongoing and future experiments using low-energy antiprotons are discussed.

  10. Particle production in antiproton induced nuclear reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2014-01-01

    The quantum molecular dynamics model has been improved to investigate the reaction dynamics induced by antiprotons. The reaction channels of elastic scattering, annihilation, charge exchange and inelastic collisions have been included in the model. Dynamics on particle production, in particular pions, kaons, antikaons and hyperons, is investigated in collisions of $\\overline{p}$ on $^{12}$C, $^{20}$Ne, $^{40}$Ca, $^{112}$Sn, $^{181}$Ta, $^{197}$Au and $^{238}$U from a low to high incident momentum. The rapidity and momentum distributions of $\\pi^{+}$ and protons from the LEAR measurements can be well reproduced. The impacts of system size and incident momentum on particle emissions are investigated from the inclusive spectra, transverse momentum and rapidity distributions. It is found that the annihilations of $\\overline{p}$ on nucleons are of importance on the particle production. Hyperons are mainly produced via meson induced reactions on nucleons and strangeness exchange collisions when the incident moment...

  11. Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons \\\\ ASACUSA Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Matsuda, Y; Lodi-rizzini, E; Kuroda, N; Schettino, G; Hori, M; Pirkl, W; Mascagna, V; Malbrunot, C L S; Yamazaki, Y; Eades, J; Simon, M; Massiczek, O; Sauerzopf, C; Nagata, Y; Uggerhoj, U I; Mc cullough, R W; Toekesi, K M; Venturelli, L; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J; Kanai, Y; Hayano, R; Knudsen, H; Kristiansen, H; Todoroki, K; Bartel, M A; Moller, S P; Charlton, M; Leali, M; Diermaier, M; Kolbinger, B

    2002-01-01

    ASACUSA (\\underline{A}tomic \\underline{S}pectroscopy \\underline{A}nd \\underline{C}ollisions \\underline{U}sing \\underline{S}low \\underline{A}ntiprotons) is a collaboration between a number of Japanese and European research institutions, with the goal of studying bound and continuum states of antiprotons with simple atoms.\\\\ Three phases of experimentation are planned for ASACUSA. In the first phase, we use the direct $\\overline{p}$ beam from AD at 5.3 MeV and concentrate on the laser and microwave spectroscopy of the metastable antiprotonic helium atom, $\\overline{p}$He$^+$, consisting of an electron and antiproton bound by the Coulomb force to the helium nucleus. Samples of these are readily created by bringing AD antiproton beam bunches to rest in helium gas. With the help of techniques developed at LEAR for resonating high precision laser beams with antiproton transitions in these atoms, ASACUSA achieved several of these first-phase objectives during a few short months of AD operation in 2000. Six atomic tr...

  12. Measurement of Balmer and Lyman X-rays in antiprotonic hydrogen isotopes at pressures below 300 hPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacher, R.; Bluem, P.; Gotta, D.; Heitlinger, K.; Rohmann, D.; Schneider, M.; Egger, J.; Simons, L.M.; Elsener, K.

    1989-09-01

    X-rays of Balmer and Lyman transitions in antiprotonic hydrogen and of Balmer transitions in antiprotonic deuterium were observed at pressures below 300 hPa using Si(Li) semiconductor detectors. The measurement was performed at the LEAR-facility at a beam momentum of 202 MeV/c. In order to stop antiprotons in a low pressure gaseous target with high efficiency, a novel technique, the cyclotron trap has been used. Absolute yields were determined and compared with cascade calculations. A distinct difference in the cascade of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium is found. The parameters of strong interaction in antiprotonic hydrogen are determined to be /epsilon//sub 1s/=-(620+-100) eV, /Gamma//sub 1s/=(1130+-170) eV and /Gamma//sub 2p/=(32+-10) meV. (orig.).

  13. Antiprotons get biological

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    After its final run in September, the first results of the Antiproton Cell Experiment (ACE) look very promising. It was the first experiment to take data on the biological effects of antiproton beams to evaluate the potential of antiprotons in radiation therapy.

  14. Blindness and Insight in King Lear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳元玉

    2008-01-01

    This paper intends to explore how William Shakespeare illustrates the theme of blindness and insight in his great tragedy "King Lear".Four characters’ deeds and their fate are used as a case study to examine what blindness is,what insight is,and the relationship between the two.The writer finds that by depicting the characters’ deeds and their fate in a double plot,Shakespeare renders the folly of blindness,the transition from blindness to insight,and the use of reason and thought to understand the truth.

  15. View of the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) and portrait of Prof. Tommy Eriksson, in charge of the AD machine.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) is a storage ring at the CERN laboratory in Geneva. It started operation in 2000. It decelerates antiprotons before sending them to several experiments studying antimatter : ALPHA, ASACUSA, ATRAP and ACE.

  16. antiproton focusing horn

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Was used for the AA (antiproton accumulator). Making an antiproton beam took a lot of time and effort. Firstly, protons were accelerated to an energy of 26 GeV in the PS and ejected onto a metal target. From the spray of emerging particles, a magnetic horn picked out 3.6 GeV antiprotons for injection into the AA through a wide-aperture focusing quadrupole magnet. For a million protons hitting the target, just one antiproton was captured, 'cooled' and accumulated. It took 3 days to make a beam of 3 x 10^11 - three hundred thousand million - antiprotons.

  17. Antiproton Focus Horn

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    Was used for the AA (antiproton accumulator). Making an antiproton beam took a lot of time and effort. Firstly, protons were accelerated to an energy of 26 GeV in the PS and ejected onto a metal target. From the spray of emerging particles, a magnetic horn picked out 3.6 GeV antiprotons for injection into the AA through a wide-aperture focusing quadrupole magnet.For a million protons hitting the target, just one antiproton was captured, 'cooled' and accumulated. It took 3 days to make a beam of 3 x 10^11 -, three hundred thousand million - antiprotons.

  18. Beam position pickup for antiprotons to the ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    The Antiproton Project, launched for proton-antiproton collisions in the SPS (SPS collider), had a side-line for p-pbar collisions in the ISR. A new transfer line, TT6, was constructed to transport antiprotons from the 26 GeV PS to the injection line TT1 of ISR ring 2. Antiprotons were a scarce commodity. For setting up the lines, beam diagnostic devices in the antiproton path had to work reliably and precisely with just a few low-intensity pilot pules: single bunches of about 2x10**9 antiprotons every few hours. Electrostatic pickup electrodes were used to measure beam position. They could be mounted for measurement in the horizontal plane, as in this picture, or at 90 deg, for the vertical plane.

  19. X-rays from antiprotonic3He and4He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M.; Bacher, R.; Blüm, P.; Gotta, D.; Heitlinger, K.; Kunold, W.; Rohmann, D.; Egger, J.; Simons, L. M.; Elsener, K.

    1991-06-01

    Antiprotonic X-rays from the helium isotopes have been observed at pressures of 36, 72, 375 and 600 mbar. The antiproton beam from LEAR with momenta of 309 and 202 MeV/c has been stopped at these pressures using the cyclotron trap. The X-rays were detected with Si (Li) and intrinsic Ge semiconductor detectors. Absolute X-ray yields were determined and the strong-interaction 2p shifts and the 2p and 3d broadenings measured to be ɛ2p=(-17±4) eV, Γ2p=(25±9) eV and Γ3d=(2.14 ±0.18) meV for ¯p3He and ɛ2p=(-18±2) eV, Γ2p =(45±5) eV and Γ3d=(2.36±0.10) meV for ¯p4He.

  20. Towards an antiproton measurement with AMS-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachlechner, Andreas [RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    AMS-02 is a multi-purpose high-precision particle detector. It has been onboard the International Space Station since May 2011. The antiprotons measurement is an important part of the AMS-02 physics program. An excess above the expected spectrum due to interactions of cosmic rays with the interstellar matter can hint at exotic sources like dark matter annihilation. The antiproton-to-proton ratio and the antiproton flux itself may also improve the understanding of the origin and propagation of cosmic rays. Due to the very small fraction of antiprotons in the cosmic radiation of about 10{sup -5} compared to protons a very precise particle identification is needed. The main backgrounds are other singly charged particles like protons, electrons, and pions produced within the detector material itself. At lower energies the ring-imaging Cherenkov detector and the time-of-flight system help to separate light particles from protons. The electromagnetic calorimeter and the transition radiation detector redundantly suppress the electron background. The reconstruction of the charge sign by the magnetic spectrometer is limited by its resolution and has to be taken into account carefully. The strategies to identify antiprotons in the cosmic-ray measurement in different energy regions are presented. Methods to suppress and the effect of the backgrounds to the antiproton-to-proton ratio are discussed.

  1. Laser Spectroscopy of Antiprotonic Helium Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %PS205 %title\\\\ \\\\Following the discovery of metastable antiprotonic helium atoms ($\\overline{p}He^{+} $) at KEK in 1991, systematic studies of their properties were made at LEAR from 1991 to 1996. In the first two years the lifetime of $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ in liquid and gaseous helium at various temperatures and pressures was measured and the effect of foreign gases on the lifetime of these atoms was investigated. Effects were also discovered which gave the antiproton a 14\\% longer lifetime in $^4$He than in $^3$He, and resulted in important differences in the shape of the annihilation time spectra in the two isotopes.\\\\ \\\\Since 1993 laser spectroscopy of the metastable $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atoms became the main focus of PS205. Transitions were stimulated between metastable and non-metastable states of the $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atom by firing a pulsed dye laser beam into the helium target every time an identified metastable atom was present (Figure 1). If the laser frequency matched the transition energy, the...

  2. Study of Antineutron Production at LEAR

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is the study of antineutron ($\\bar{n}$) production at LEAR as a first step for the investigation of $\\bar{n}$-p $\\bar{n}$-n physics. A good method of producing high-quality $\\bar{n}$ beams is that of using the charge-exchange (CEX) reaction @*p~@A~$\\bar{n}$n on an external LH^2 target. The production of $\\bar{n}$ at 0|0 (see figure) may be most useful for some experiments, the production at different angles with the simultaneous detection of the associated neutron (tagged beam) most powerful for other measurements.\\\\ \\\\ The $\\bar{n}$ calorimeter consists of ten equal modules: each one is made of an iron slab, a scintillator wall and a plane of x-y streamer tubes, with a detecting area of @=~1~m|2. The $\\bar{n}$ calorimeter allows the determination of the time and the location of $\\bar{n}$ annihilations.

  3. ASACUSA hits antiproton jackpot

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The Japanese-European ASACUSA collaboration, which takes its name from the oldest district of Tokyo, approaches the antimatter enigma in a different way from the other two AD experiments, by inserting antiprotons into ordinary atoms. Last month the collaboration succeeded in trapping about a million antiprotons. The ASACUSA antiproton trap (lower cylinder), surmounted by its liquid helium reservoir. Looking on are Ken Yoshiki-Franzen, Zhigang Wang, Takahito Tasaki, Suzanne Reed, John Eades, Masaki Hori, Yasunori Yamazaki, Naofumi Kuroda, Jun Sakaguchi, Berti Juhasz, Eberhard Widmann and Ryu Hayano. A key element of the ASACUSA apparatus is its decelerating Radiofrequency Quadrupole magnet, RFQD. After tests with protons in Aarhus, this was installed in ASACUSA's antiproton beam last October (Bulletin 41/2000, 9 October 2000). Constructed by Werner Pirkl's group in PS Division, the RFQD works by applying an electric field to the AD antiproton pulse the opposite direction to its motion. As the antiprotons slo...

  4. Recent Results on Lead-Ion Accumulation in LEAR for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Baird, S A; Broere, J; Carli, Christian; Chanel, M; Hill, C; Ley, R; Lombardi, A M; MacCaferri, R; Maury, S; Möhl, D; Molinari, G; Mulder, H; Tanke, E; Tranquille, G; Varenne, F; Vretenar, Maurizio; Meshkov, I N; Syresin, E M

    1997-01-01

    To prepare dense bunches of lead ions for the LHC it has been proposed to accumulate the 4.2 MeV/u linac beam in a storage ring with electron cooling. A series of experiments is being performed in the low-energy ring LEAR to test this technique. First results were already reported at the Beam Crystallisation Workshop in Erice in November 1995. Two more recent runs to complement these investigations were concerned with: further study of the beam lifetime; the dependence of the cooling time on optical settings of the storage ring and on neutralization of the electron beam; tests in view of multiturn injection. New results obtained in these two runs in December 1995 and in April 1996 will be discussed in this contribution.

  5. Progress in Antiproton Production at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; Drendel, Brian; Gollwitzer, Keith; Johnson, Stan; Lebedev, Valeri; Leveling, Anthony; Morgan, James; Nagaslaev, Vladimir; Peterson, Dave; Sondgeroth, Alan; Werkema, Steve; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Fermilab Collider Run II has been ongoing since 2001. During this time peak luminosities in the Tevatron have increased from approximately 10 x 10{sup 30} cm{sup -2}sec{sup -1} to 300 x 10{sup 30} cm{sup 02}sec{sup -1}. A major contributing factor in this remarkable performance is a greatly improved antiproton production capability. Since the beginning of Run II, the average antiproton accumulation rate has increased from 2 x 10{sup 10}{anti p}/hr to about 24 x 10{sup 10}{anti p}/hr. Peak antiproton stacking rates presently exceed 28 x 10{sup 10}{anti p}/hr. The antiproton stacking rate has nearly doubled since 2005. It is this recent progress that is the focus of this paper. The process of transferring antiprotons to the Recycler Ring for subsequent transfer to the collider has been significantly restructured and streamlined, yielding additional cycle time for antiproton production. Improvements to the target station have greatly increased the antiproton yield from the production target. The performance of the Antiproton Source stochastic cooling systems has been enhanced by upgrades to the cooling electronics, accelerator lattice optimization, and improved operating procedures. In this paper, we will briefly report on each of these modifications.

  6. Concept for the Antiproton Production Target at FAIR

    CERN Document Server

    Knie, K; Franzke, B; Gostishchev, V; Steck, M; Sievers, P

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes the status of the antiproton (pbar) production area at the future FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) complex at GSI, Darmstadt [1]. This area is composed of the pbar production target, a magnetic horn for the collection of the pbars, and the pbar separator between target and Collector Ring (CR). The emphasis is on the optimization of the accumulation rate of antiprotons to maximize the expected peak and average luminosity for the experiment. As the doses in the target area will be very high, also radiation protection issues will be addressed.

  7. Neutrons from Antiproton Irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    Background: Radiotherapy with Antiprotons is currently investigated by the AD-4/ACE collaboration. The hypothesis is that the additional energy released from the antiprotons annihilating at the target nuclei can enable a reduced dose in the entry channel of the primary beam. Furthermore an enhanced...... relative biological effect (RBE) has already been beam measured in spread out Bragg peaks of antiprotons, relative to that found in the plateau region. However, the antiproton annihilation process is associated with a substantial release of secondary particles which contribute to the dose outside...... the neutron spectrum. Additionally, we used a cylindrical polystyrene loaded with several pairs of thermoluminescent detectors containing Lithium-6 and Lithium-7, which effectively detects thermalized neutrons. The obtained results are compared with FLUKA imulations. Results: The results obtained...

  8. Review the Nature and the Humanity in King Lear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhi-lan

    2015-01-01

    Tragedy is the art that purifies the mind. Through richly-drawn impressive characters, King Lear illustrates the same⁃ness of human nature and manifest the common outlook on humanity in Chinese and western culture. King Lear should be studied from the perspectives of dialectics of nature and history of social development.Through manifestation of nature and human beings, King Lear proves to be deeply touching for being earthshaking, society-changing and mind-purifying.The artistic value of this trag⁃edy lies in that the truth, the good and the beauty against the fake,the bad and the ugly. All these contributes to its extraordinary standing in aesthetics, philosophy, anthropology, sociology and psychology.

  9. A Short Take on Protecting Lear in a Storm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Cynthia

    2001-01-01

    Recounts author's experience in teaching 'King Lear' to her community college students. States that many students denounced Shakespeare's work as having little relevance to contemporary society. Argues that the author's plays and poems are relevant and timeless, and that one should "reason not the need" for reading his work. (AUTH/NB)

  10. Shame, recognition and love in Shakespeare’s 'King Lear'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montes Sanchez, Alba

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I explore the experience of shame and its connections to recognition and love as manifested in Shakespeare’s King Lear. My main focus in this paper is the ethical relevance of shame. I start from Sartre’s account of shame in Being and Nothingness, and I consider Webber’s attempt to...

  11. Study of antiproton annihilation on neutrons into $\\omega\\pi^{-} \\pi^{0}$

    CERN Document Server

    Amsler, Claude; Baker, C A; Barnett, B M; Batty, C J; Benayoun, M; Blüm, P; Braune, K; Case, A; Credé, V; Crowe, K M; Doser, Michael; Dünnweber, W; Engelhardt, D; Faessler, M A; Haddock, R P; Heinsius, F H; Hessey, N P; Hidas, P; Jamnik, D; Kalinowsky, H; Kammel, P; Kisiel, J; Klempt, E; Koch, H; Kunze, M; Kurilla, U; Landua, Rolf; Matthäy, H; Meyer, C A; Meyer-Wildhagen, F; Ouared, R; Peters, K; Pick, B; Ratajczak, M; Regenfus, C; Reinnarth, J; Sarantsev, A V; Strohbusch, U; Suffert, Martin; Suh, J S; Thoma, U; Uman, I; Wallis-Plachner, S; Walther, D; Wiedner, U; Wittmack, K

    2004-01-01

    Data are presented on antiproton neutron annihilation at rest into omega pi /sup -/ pi /sup 0/ taken with the Crystal Barrel detector at LEAR (CERN) using a liquid deuterium target. The partial wave analysis shows evidence for at least two omega pi vector resonances above the rho (770) ground-state. Possible evidence for a third rho ' state with a mass around 1180 MeV is discussed. The results are compared to model dependent predictions concerning the nature of the rho ' states. (35 refs).

  12. Biological Effectiveness of Antiproton Annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maggiore, C.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, N.;

    2004-01-01

    from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in ‘‘biological dose’’ in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The background, description, and status...

  13. Design of 2-4 GHz Equalizers for the Antiproton Accumulator Stacktail System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deibele, C.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    1999-01-01

    The antiproton source at Fermilab requires storage of antiprotons during the production of antiprotons. A fundamental part of the storage process involves stochastic cooling, which requires that the frequency spectrum from the pickups has notches at the revolution frequency and harmonics of the revolution frequency of the antiprotons in the storage ring. A system has been developed for broadband notches but suffers from dispersion. The dispersion inhibits the cooling process and therefore an equalizer is required. The process for designing the equalizers is described and results shown.

  14. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; De Marco, John J.; Doser, Michael; Ichioka, Toshiyasu; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Knudsen, Helge V.; Landua, Rolf; Maggiore, Carl; McBride, William H.; Møller, Søren Pape; Petersen, Jorgen; Smathers, James B.; Skarsgard, Lloyd D.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.; Withers, H.Rodney; Vranjes, Sanja; Wong, Michelle; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in “biological dose” in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The experiment has been approved by the CERN Research Board for running at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) as AD-4/ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) and has begun data taking in June of 2003. The background, description and the current status of the experiment are given.

  15. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, M.H.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, Niels;

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in ‘‘biological dose’’ in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct...... measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The experiment has been approved by the CERN Research Board for running at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) as AD-4/ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) and has begun data taking in June of 2003. The background, description and the current...

  16. First experimental detection of antiproton in-flight annihilation on nuclei at 130 keV

    CERN Document Server

    Aghai-Khozani, H; Corradini, M; Hayano, R; Hori, M; Kobayashi, T; Leali, M; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Mascagna, V; Prest, M; Soter, A; Todoroki, K; Vallazza, E; Venturelli, L; Zurlo, N

    2012-01-01

    The existing data of antinucleon-nucleon and antinucleon-nuclei annihilation cross-sections are confined to energies above about 1MeV. Experimental limitations have prevented till now the lower energies data to be achieved in spite of the interest they represent for theoretical models. One of the unresolved question concerns the antiproton annihilation cross-section measured at LEAR on light nuclei in the MeV region, which show a saturation with the mass number of the target nucleus against any naive expectation. With regard to fundamental cosmology, the knowledge of the annihilation cross-sections at energies below 1MeV can contribute to understand the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the Universe. We present here the experimental demonstration of the feasibility of the measurement of antiproton-nuclei annihilation cross-sections in the 100 keV region.

  17. Antiproton Annihilation Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    propulsion system, a nuclear thermal hydrogen propulsion system, and an antiproton annihilation propulsion system. Since hauling chemical fuel into low...greater. Section 8.4 and Appendix B contain a comparative cost study of a storable chemical fuel propulsion system, a liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen

  18. Antiproton Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    of the secondary particles from the antiproton annihilation exihibt high-LET properties. Additionally, the high energy pions are leaving the target with minimal interactions and can be detected external to the body providing a real time feedback on the exact location of the energy deposition. In recent years, we...

  19. Coincidence studies with antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGovern, M; Walters, H R J [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Assafrao, D; Mohallem, J R [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, P.O Box 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Whelan, Colm T, E-mail: mmcgovern06@qub.ac.u [Department of Physics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529-0116 (United States)

    2010-02-01

    We present a short overview of a new method for calculating fully differential cross sections that is able to describe any aspect of coincidence measurements involving heavy projectiles. The method is based upon impact parameter close coupling with pseudostates. Examples from antiproton impact ionization are shown.

  20. A digital energy control system for the LEAR electron cooler

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Fritz; Molinari, G; Ramos, U

    1993-01-01

    A feedback control system has been developed to correct any energy errors that may occur when operating the electron cooler on LEAR. Drifts and, above all, the space charge effects are the main sources of error. Error cancellation must be compatible with the pulsed mode of operation of the electron cooler so that the beam must be stabilized at the right energy before the end of the corresponding flat top is reached.

  1. Short quadrupole, first at the SC, then at LEAR

    CERN Multimedia

    1982-01-01

    Quadrupoles of this type were built for the beam lines of the 600 MeV Synchro-Cylclotron. Surplus ones were installed in the LEAR injection line. The particularity of these quads is that they are very short and that a special design, resembling the "Lambertson magnet", limits and linearizes their stray field. This was achieved by the iron between the poles extending beyond the poles.

  2. Antiproton Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    2007-01-01

    the radiobiological properties using antiprotons at 50 and 125 MeV from the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN. Dosimetry experiments were carried out with ionization chambers, alanine pellets and radiochromic film. Radiobiological experiments were done with Chinese V79 WNRE hamster cells. Monte Carlo particle...... transport codes were investigated and compared with results obtained from the ionization chambers and alanine pellets. A track structure model have been applied on the calculated particle spectrum, and been used to predict the LET-dependent response of the alanine pellets. The particle transport program...... FLUKA produced data which were in excellent agreement with our ionization chamber measurements, and in good agreement with our alanine measurements. FLUKA is now being used to generate a wide range of depth dose data at several energies, including secondary particle–energy spectra, which will be used...

  3. Bubble chamber: antiproton annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    These images show real particle tracks from the annihilation of an antiproton in the 80 cm Saclay liquid hydrogen bubble chamber. A negative kaon and a neutral kaon are produced in this process, as well as a positive pion. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that had been heated to boiling point.

  4. Antiproton compression and radial measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jorgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page R D; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, achieved by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile, and its relation to that of the electron plasma. We also measure the outer radial profile by ejecting antiprotons to the trap wall using an octupole magnet.

  5. ALPHA freezes antiprotons

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Laboratories like CERN can routinely produce many different types of antiparticles. In 1995, the PS210 experiment formed the first antihydrogen atoms and a few years later, in 2002, ATRAP and ATHENA were already able to produce several thousand of them. However, no experiment in the world has succeeded in ‘trapping’ these anti-atoms in order to study them. This is the goal of the ALPHA experiment, which has recently managed to cool down the antiprotons to just a few Kelvin. This represents a major step towards trapping the anti-atom, thus opening a new avenue into the investigation of antimatter properties.   Members of the ALPHA collaboration working on the apparatus in the Antiproton Decelerator experimental hall at CERN. Just like the atom, the anti-atom is neutral. Unlike the atom, the anti-atom is made up of antiprotons (as opposed to protons in the atom) and positrons (as opposed to electrons). In order to thoroughly study the properties of the anti-atoms, scien...

  6. Beam Dynamics Studies and Design Optimisation of New Low Energy Antiproton Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Resta-Lopez, Javier; Welsch, Carsten P

    2016-01-01

    Antiprotons, stored and cooled at low energies in a storage ring or at rest in traps, are highly desirable for the investigation of a large number of basic questions on fundamental interactions. This includes the static structure of antiprotonic atomic systems and the time-dependent quantum dynamics of correlated systems. The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN is currently the worlds only low energy antiproton factory dedicated to antimatter experiments. New antiproton facilities, such as the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) at CERN and the Ultra-low energy Storage Ring (USR) at FLAIR, will open unique possibilities. They will provide cooled, high quality beams of extra-low energy antiprotons at intensities exceeding those achieved presently at the AD by factors of ten to one hundred. These facilities, operating in the energy regime between 100 keV down to 20 keV, face several design and beam dynamics challenges, for example nonlinearities, space charge and scattering effects limiting beam life time....

  7. Experimental investigation of electron cooling and stacking of lead ions in a low energy accumulation ring

    CERN Document Server

    Bosser, Jacques; Chanel, M; Hill, C; Lombardi, A M; MacCaferri, R; Maury, S; Möhl, D; Molinari, G; Rossi, S; Tanke, E; Tranquille, G; Vretenar, Maurizio

    1999-01-01

    This report gives the results of a programme of experimental investigations, which were carried out to test stacking of lead ions in a storage ring (the former Low Energy Antiproton Ring, LEAR) at 4.2 MeV per nucleon. The motivation was to demonstrate the feasibility of gaining the large factor in the phase-space density required for injection into the LHC. In the first part of the report, the layout of the experiments is described, the choice of the parameters of the electron cooling system used for stacking is reported and the multi-turn injection using horizontal- and longitudinal- (and in the final project also vertical-) phase space is discussed. In the second part the experimental results are presented. Factors of vital importance are the stacking efficiency, the beam life-time and the cooling time of the ions. The beam decay owing to charge exchange with the residual gas and to recombination by the capture of cooling electrons was intensively studied. Beam instabilities and space-charge effects in the ...

  8. The PANDA Experiment at FAIR - Subatomic Physics with Antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Messchendorp, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The non-perturbative nature of the strong interaction leads to spectacular phenomena, such as the formation of hadronic matter, color confinement, and the generation of the mass of visible matter. To get deeper insight into the underlying mechanisms remains one of the most challenging tasks within the field of subatomic physics. The antiProton ANnihilations at DArmstadt (PANDA) collaboration has the ambition to address key questions in this field by exploiting a cooled beam of antiprotons at the High Energy Storage Ring (HESR) at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) combined with a state-of-the-art and versatile detector. This contribution will address some of the unique features of PANDA that give rise to a promising physics program together with state-of-the-art technological developments.

  9. ANTIPROTONS PRODUCED IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezhko, E. G.; Ksenofontov, L. T., E-mail: ksenofon@ikfia.sbras.ru [Yu. G. Shafer Institute of Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy, 31 Lenin Avenue, 677891 Yakutsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-20

    We present the energy spectrum of an antiproton cosmic ray (CR) component calculated on the basis of the nonlinear kinetic model of CR production in supernova remnants (SNRs). The model includes the reacceleration of antiprotons already existing in the interstellar medium as well as the creation of antiprotons in nuclear collisions of accelerated protons with gas nuclei and their subsequent acceleration by SNR shocks. It is shown that the production of antiprotons in SNRs produces a considerable effect in their resultant energy spectrum, making it essentially flatter above 10 GeV so that the spectrum at TeV energies increases by a factor of 5. The calculated antiproton spectrum is consistent with the PAMELA data, which correspond to energies below 100 GeV. As a consistency check, we have also calculated within the same model the energy spectra of secondary nuclei and show that the measured boron-to-carbon ratio is consistent with the significant SNR contribution.

  10. AA antiproton production target

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    The first version of the antiproton production target was a tungsten rod, 11 cm long (actually a row of 11 rods, each 1 cm long) and 3 mm in diameter. The rod was embedded in graphite, pressure-seated into an outer casing made of stainless steel. The casing had fins for forced-air cooling. In this picture, the 26 GeV high-intensity beam from the PS enters from the right, where a scintillator screen, with circles every 5 mm in radius, permits precise aim at the target centre. See also 7903034 and 7905094.

  11. AA antiproton production target

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    The first version of the antiproton production target was a tungsten rod, 11 cm long and 3 mm in diameter. The rod was embedded in graphite, pressure-seated into an outer casing of stainless steel. At the entrance to the target assembly was a scintillator screen, imprinted with circles every 5 mm in radius, which allowed to precisely aim the 26 GeV high-intensity proton beam from the PS onto the centre of the target rod. The scintillator screen was a 1 mm thick plate of Cr-doped alumina. See also 7903034 and 7905091.

  12. Thermal excitation of heavy nuclei with 5-15 GeV/c antiproton, proton and pion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Beaulieu, L; Hsi, W C; Lefort, T; Pienkowski, L; Korteling, R G; Wang, G; Back, B B; Bracken, D S; Breuer, H; Cornell, E A; Gimeno-Nogues, F; Ginger, D S; Gushue, S; Huang, M J; Laforest, R; Lynch, W G; Martin, E; Morley, K B; Ramakrishnan, E; Remsberg, L P; Rowland, D; Ruangma, A; Tsang, M B; Viola, V E; Winchester, E M; Xi, H; Yennello, S J

    1999-01-01

    Excitation-energy distributions have been derived from measurements of 5.0-14.6 GeV/c antiproton, proton and pion reactions with $^{197}$Au target nuclei, using the ISiS 4$\\pi$ detector array. The maximum probability for producing high excitation-energy events is found for the antiproton beam relative to other hadrons, $^3$He and $\\bar{p}$ beams from LEAR. For protons and pions, the excitation-energy distributions are nearly independent of hadron type and beam momentum above about 8 GeV/c. The excitation energy enhancement for $\\bar{p}$ beams and the saturation effect are qualitatively consistent with intranuclear cascade code predictions. For all systems studied, maximum cluster sizes are observed for residues with E*/A $\\sim$ 6 MeV.

  13. Autoresonant Excitation of Antiproton Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, Gorm B; Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo; Bertsche, William; Bowe, Paul D; Butler, Eoin; Carpenter, P T; Cesar, Claudio L; Chapman, Steven; Charlton, Michael; Fajans, Joel; Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C; Gill, David R; Hangst, Jeffrey S; Hardy, Walter N; Hayden, Michael E; Humphries, Andrew J; Hurt, J L; Hydomako, Richard; Jonsell, Svante; Madsen, Niels; Menary, Scott; Nolan, Paul; Olchanski, Konstantin; Olin, Art; Povilus, Alexander; Pusa, Petteri; Robicheaux, Francis; Sarid, Eli; Silveira, Daniel M; So, Chukman; Storey, James W; Thompson, Robert I; van der Werf, Dirk P; Wurtele, Jonathan S; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate controllable excitation of the center-of-mass longitudinal motion of a thermal antiproton plasma using a swept-frequency autoresonant drive. When the plasma is cold, dense, and highly collective in nature, we observe that the entire system behaves as a single-particle nonlinear oscillator, as predicted by a recent theory. In contrast, only a fraction of the antiprotons in a warm plasma can be similarly excited. Antihydrogen was produced and trapped by using this technique to drive antiprotons into a positron plasma, thereby initiating atomic recombination.

  14. A reservoir trap for antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Smorra, Christian; Franke, Kurt; Nagahama, Hiroki; Schneider, Georg; Higuchi, Takashi; Van Gorp, Simon; Blaum, Klaus; Matsuda, Yasuyuki; Quint, Wolfgang; Walz, Jochen; Yamazaki, Yasunori; Ulmer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We have developed techniques to extract arbitrary fractions of antiprotons from an accumulated reservoir, and to inject them into a Penning-trap system for high-precision measurements. In our trap-system antiproton storage times > 1.08 years are estimated. The device is fail-safe against power-cuts of up to 10 hours. This makes our planned comparisons of the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons independent from accelerator cycles, and will enable us to perform experiments during long accelerator shutdown periods when background magnetic noise is low. The demonstrated scheme has the potential to be applied in many other precision Penning trap experiments dealing with exotic particles.

  15. The Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Section 06 - 08*) of the AA where the dispersion (and hence the horizontal beam size) is large. One can distinguish (left to right): A vacuum-tank, two bending magnets (BST06 and BST07 in blue) with a quadrupole (QDN07, in red) in between, another vacuum-tank, a wide quadrupole (QFW08) and a further tank . The tanks are covered with heating tape for bake-out. The tank left of BST06 contained the stack core pickup for stochastic cooling (see 7906193, 7906190, 8005051), the two other tanks served mainly as vacuum chambers in the region where the beam was large. Peter Zettwoch works on BST06. *) see: H. Koziol, Antiproton Accumulator Parameter List, PS/AA/Note 84-2 (1984)

  16. S142 set-up to detect X-ray from antiproton-proton atoms (protonium).

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    This experiment was designed by the Daresbury-Mainz-TRIUMF Collaboration and was located in the m14 partially separated antiproton beam in the PS South Hall. It used a gaseous hydrogen target, 1 m long, surrounded by a ring of proportional counters, surrounded in turn by a ring of 36 scintillators strips to aid in the annihilation product identification. Ugo Gastaldi (centre)

  17. Measurement of interaction between antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Star Collaboration; Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Bairathi, V.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de La Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; de Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, Z. M.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, R.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M. K.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-11-01

    One of the primary goals of nuclear physics is to understand the force between nucleons, which is a necessary step for understanding the structure of nuclei and how nuclei interact with each other. Rutherford discovered the atomic nucleus in 1911, and the large body of knowledge about the nuclear force that has since been acquired was derived from studies made on nucleons or nuclei. Although antinuclei up to antihelium-4 have been discovered and their masses measured, little is known directly about the nuclear force between antinucleons. Here, we study antiproton pair correlations among data collected by the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), where gold ions are collided with a centre-of-mass energy of 200 gigaelectronvolts per nucleon pair. Antiprotons are abundantly produced in such collisions, thus making it feasible to study details of the antiproton-antiproton interaction. By applying a technique similar to Hanbury Brown and Twiss intensity interferometry, we show that the force between two antiprotons is attractive. In addition, we report two key parameters that characterize the corresponding strong interaction: the scattering length and the effective range of the interaction. Our measured parameters are consistent within errors with the corresponding values for proton-proton interactions. Our results provide direct information on the interaction between two antiprotons, one of the simplest systems of antinucleons, and so are fundamental to understanding the structure of more-complex antinuclei and their properties.

  18. Elastic scattering, polarization and absorption of relativistic antiprotons on nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Larionov, A B

    2016-01-01

    We perform Glauber model calculations of the antiproton-nucleus elastic and quasielastic scattering and absorption in the beam momentum range $\\sim 0.5\\div10$ GeV/c. A good agreement of our calculations with available LEAR data and with earlier Glauber model studies of the $\\bar p A$ elastic scattering allows us to make predictions at the beam momenta of $\\sim 10$ GeV/c, i.e at the regime of the PANDA experiment at FAIR. The comparison with the proton-nucleus elastic scattering cross sections shows that the diffractive minima are much deeper in the $\\bar p A$ case due to smaller absolute value of the ratio of the real-to-imaginary part of the elementary elastic amplitude. Significant polarization signal for $\\bar p A$ elastic scattering at 10 GeV/c is expected. We have also revealed a strong dependence of the $\\bar p A$ absorption cross section on the slope parameter of the transverse momentum dependence of the elementary $\\bar pN$ amplitude. The $\\bar p A$ optical potential is discussed.

  19. Elastic scattering, polarization and absorption of relativistic antiprotons on nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larionov, A. B.; Lenske, H.

    2017-01-01

    We perform Glauber model calculations of the antiproton-nucleus elastic and quasielastic scattering and absorption in the beam momentum range ∼ 0.5 ÷ 10 GeV / c. A good agreement of our calculations with available LEAR data and with earlier Glauber model studies of the p bar A elastic scattering allows us to make predictions at the beam momenta of ∼10 GeV/c, i.e. at the regime of the PANDA experiment at FAIR. The comparison with the proton-nucleus elastic scattering cross sections shows that the diffractive minima are much deeper in the p bar A case due to smaller absolute value of the ratio of the real-to-imaginary part of the elementary elastic amplitude. Significant polarization signal for p bar A elastic scattering at 10 GeV/c is expected. We have also revealed a strong dependence of the p bar A absorption cross section on the slope parameter of the transverse momentum dependence of the elementary p bar N amplitude. The p bar A optical potential is discussed.

  20. Enhancing trappable antiproton populations through deceleration and frictional cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolotorev, Max; Sessler, Andrew; Penn, Gregory; Wurtele, Jonathan S.; Charman, Andrew E.

    2012-03-20

    CERN currently delivers antiprotons for trapping experiments with the Antiproton Decelerator (AD), which slows the antiprotons down to about 5 MeV.This energy is currently too high for direct trapping, and thick foils are used to slow down the beam to energies which can be trapped.To allow further deceleration to $\\sim 100 \\;\\mbox{keV}$, CERN is initiating the construction of ELENA,consisting of a ring which will combine RF deceleration and electron cooling capabilities. We describe a simple frictionalcooling scheme that can serve to provide significantly improved trapping efficiency, either directly from the AD or first usinga standard deceleration mechanism (induction linac or RFQ). This scheme could be implemented in a short time.The device itself is short in length, uses accessible voltages, and at reasonable cost could serve in the interim beforeELENA becomes operational, or possibly in lieu of ELENA for some experiments. Simple theory and simulations provide a preliminary assessment of theconcept and its strengths and limitations, and highlight important areas for experimental studies, in particular to pin down the level of multiplescattering for low-energy antiprotons. We show that the frictional cooling scheme can provide a similar energy spectrum to that of ELENA,but with higher transverse emittances.

  1. Beam Measurement Systems for the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD)

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, Maria Elena; Ludwig, M; Marqversen, O; Odier, P; Pedersen, F; Raich, U; Søby, L; Tranquille, G; Spickermann, T

    2001-01-01

    The new, low-energy antiproton physics facility at CERN has been successfully commissioned and has been delivering decelerated antiprotons at 100 MeV/c since July 2000. The AD consists of one ring where the 3.5 GeV/c antiprotons produced from a production target are injected, rf manipulated, stochastically cooled, decelerated (with further stages involving additional stochastic and electron cooling and rf manipulation) and extracted at 100 MeV/c. While proton test beams of sufficient intensity could be used for certain procedures in AD commissioning, this was not possible for setting-up and routine operation. Hence, special diagnostics systems had to be developed to obtain the beam and accelerator characteristics using the weak antiproton beams of a few 10E7 particles at all momenta from 3.5 GeV/c down to 100 MeV/c. These include systems for position measurement, intensity, beam size measurements using transverse aperture limiters and scintillators and Schottky-based tools. This paper gives an overall view of...

  2. ASACUSA Anti-protonic Helium_Final

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Audiovisual Production Service; CERN AD; Paola Catapano; Julien Ordan, Arzur Catel; Paola Catapano; ASACUSA COLLABORATION

    2016-01-01

    Latest precision measurement of the mass of the proton and the anti proton though the production of antiprotonic helium by the ASACUSA experiment at CERN's antimatter factory, with a beam from the Antiproton Decelerator

  3. The Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    A section of the AA where the dispersion (and hence the horizontal beam size) is large. One can distinguish (left to right): A large vacuum-tank, a quadrupole (QDN09*), a bending magnet (BST08), another vacuum-tank, a wide quadrupole (QFW08) and (in the background) a further bending magnet (BST08). The tanks are covered with heating tape for bake-out. The tank left of QDN09 contained the kickers for stochastic pre-cooling (see 790621, 8002234, 8002637X), the other one served mainly as vacuum chamber in the region where the beam was large. Peter Zettwoch works on QFW08. * see: H. Koziol, Antiproton Accumulator Parameter List, PS/AA/Note 84-2 (1984) See under 7911303, 7911597X, 8004261 and 8202324. For photos of the AA in different phases of completion (between 1979 and 1982) see: 7911303, 7911597X, 8004261, 8004608X, 8005563X, 8005565X, 8006716X, 8006722X, 8010939X, 8010941X, 8202324, 8202658X, 8203628X .

  4. Experiments on Antiprotons: Antiproton-Nucleon Cross Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Owen; Keller, Donald V.; Mermond, Ronald; Segre, Emilio; Steiner, Herbert M.; Ypsilantis, Tom

    1957-07-22

    In this paper experiments are reported on annihilation and scattering of antiprotons in H{sub 2}O , D{sub 2}O, and O{sub 2}. From the data measured it is possible to obtain an antiproton-proton and an antiproton-deuteron cross section at 457 Mev (lab). Further analysis gives the p-p and p-n cross sections as 104 mb for the p-p reaction cross section and 113 mb for the p-n reaction cross section. The respective annihilation cross sections are 89 and 74 mb. The Glauber correction necessary in order to pass from the p-d to the p-n cross section by subtraction of the p-p cross section is unfortunately large and somewhat uncertain. The data are compared with the p-p and p-n cross sections and with other results on p-p collisions.

  5. Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report the first detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile and its relation to that of the electron plasma.

  6. Nuclear dynamics induced by antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Reaction dynamics in collisions of antiprotons on nuclei is investigated within the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics model. The reaction channels of elastic scattering, annihilation, charge exchange and inelastic collisions of antiprotons on nucleons have been included in the model. Dynamics on particle production, in particular pions, kaons, antikaons and hyperons, is investigated in collisions of $\\overline{p}$ on $^{12}$C, $^{20}$Ne, $^{40}$Ca and $^{181}$Ta from a low to high incident momenta. It is found that the annihilations of $\\overline{p}$ on nucleons are of importance on the dynamics of particle production in phase space. Hyperons are mainly produced via meson induced reactions on nucleons and strangeness exchange collisions, which lead to the delayed emission in antiproton-nucleus collisions.

  7. Seconday-emission profile monitors at LEAR injection

    CERN Multimedia

    1982-01-01

    This is a view against the direction of the beams. Through the right, smaller, opening the beams (protons, antiprotons, H-, later Pb-ions) entered and, after being put on central orbit with septum and kicker, reappeared as circulating beam through the left, larger, opening. Horizontal and vertical position and density profile of the incoming beam were measured with secondary emission grids. The same measurements were made on the beam after it had completed the first turn in the machine. For this purpose it was prevented from circulating with a beam stopper, mounted through the port at left (not mounted at the time the picture was taken).

  8. Antiproton collisions with molecular hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical antiproton and proton cross sections for ionization and excitation of hydrogen molecules as well as energy spectra of the ionized electrons were calculated in the impact-energy range from 8  to  4000  keV. The cross sections were computed with the close-coupling formulation of the sem......Theoretical antiproton and proton cross sections for ionization and excitation of hydrogen molecules as well as energy spectra of the ionized electrons were calculated in the impact-energy range from 8  to  4000  keV. The cross sections were computed with the close-coupling formulation...

  9. Physics at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, M

    2013-01-01

    The Antiproton Decelerator of CERN began operation in 1999 to serve experiments for studies of CPT invariance by precision laser and microwave spectroscopy of antihydrogen ($\\bar{\\rm H}$) and antiprotonic helium ($\\bar{p}{\\rm He}^+$). The first 12 years of operation saw cold $\\bar{\\rm H}$ synthesized by overlapping clouds of positrons ($e^+$) and antiprotons ($\\bar{p}$) confined in magnetic Penning traps. Cold $\\bar{\\rm H}$ was also produced in collisions between Rydberg positronium atoms and $\\bar{p}$. Ground-state $\\bar{\\rm H}$ was later trapped for up to $\\sim 1000$ s in a magnetic bottle trap, and microwave transitions excited between its hyperfine levels. In the $\\bar{p}{\\rm He}^+$ atom, UV transitions were measured to a precision of (2.3-5) $\\times$ $10^{-9}$ by sub-Doppler two-photon laser spectroscopy. From this the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined as $M_{\\bar{p}}/m_e=$1836.1526736(23), which agrees with the p value. Microwave spectroscopy of $\\bar{p}{\\rm He}^+$ yielded a measurement o...

  10. Precision Measurement of the Energies and Line Shapes of Antiprotonic Lyman and Balmer Transitions From Hydrogen and Helium Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS207 \\\\ \\\\ For the study of the antiproton-proton and antiproton-nuclear spin-spin and spin-orbital interaction at threshold a high resolution measurement is proposed of the line shapes and energy shifts of antiprotonic K$\\alpha$ and L$\\alpha$ transitions of hydrogen and helium isotopes. The intense LEAR beam, stopped in the cyclotron trap at low gas pressure, provides a unique~X-ray~source with sufficient brightness. Charge coupled devices with their excellent background rejection and energy resolution allow a precise determination of the strong shifts and widths of the 1s hyperfine states of protonium, in addition the detection of the $\\bar{p}$D K$\\alpha$ transition should be possible. A focussing crystal spectrometer with a resolution $\\Delta$E/E of about l0$ ^- ^{4} $, which is superior in the accuracy of the energy determination by two orders of magnitude as compared to the present detection methods, will be used to measure the energies of the L$\\alpha$ transitions. This permits a first direct measure...

  11. X-rays from antiprotonic sup 3 He and sup 4 He

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M.; Bacher, R.; Bluem, P.; Gotta, D.; Heitlinger, K.; Kunold, W.; Rohmann, D. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Kernphysik Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik); Egger, J.; Simons, L.M. (Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)); Elsener, K. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland))

    1991-02-01

    Antiprotonic X-rays from the helium isotopes have been observed at pressures of 36, 72, 375 and 600 mbar. The antiproton beam from LEAR with momenta of 309 and 202 MeV/c has been stopped at these pressures using the cyclotron trap. The X-rays were detected with Si(Li) and intrinsic Ge semiconductor detectors. Absolute X-ray yields were determined and the strong-interaction 2p shifts and the 2p and 3d broadenings measured to be {epsilon}{sub 2p}=(-17{plus minus}4) eV, {Gamma}{sub 2p}=(25{plus minus}9) eV and {Gamma}{sub 3d}=(2.14{plus minus}0.18) meV for anti p{sup 3}He and {epsilon}{sub 2p}=(-18{plus minus}2) eV, {Gamma}{sub 2p}=(45{plus minus}5) eV and {Gamma}{sub 3d}=(2.36{plus minus}0.10) meV for anti p{sup 4}He. (orig.).

  12. Cosmic ray antiprotons at high energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Martin Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    Cosmic ray antiprotons provide a powerful tool to probe dark matter annihilations in our galaxy. The sensitivity of this important channel is, however, diluted by sizable uncertainties in the secondary antiproton background. In this work, we improve the calculation of secondary antiproton production with a particular focus on the high energy regime. We employ the most recent collider data and identify a substantial increase of antiproton cross sections with energy. This increase is driven by the violation of Feynman scaling as well as by an enhanced strange hyperon production. The updated antiproton production cross sections are made publicly available for independent use in cosmic ray studies. In addition, we provide the correlation matrix of cross section uncertainties for the AMS-02 experiment. At high energies, the new cross sections improve the compatibility of the AMS-02 data with a pure secondary origin of antiprotons in cosmic rays.

  13. PS, septum magnet for ejection of antiprotons

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Antiprotons circulated in the PS in the sense opposite to that of the so far normal protons (or positive ions). A new ejection system with a new septum magnet was installed in straight section 58 for antiproton ejection, first towards the ISR and then to the principal customer, the SPS p-pbar Collider. Later on, when the PS delivered leptons for LEP, the antiproton ejection system was use for the ejection of electrons.

  14. Search for polarization effects in the antiproton production process

    CERN Document Server

    Grzonka, D; Ritman, J.; Sefzick, T.; Oelert, W.; Diermaier, M.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.; Glowacz, B.; Moskal, P.; Zielinski, M.; Wolke, M.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Carmignotto, M.; Horn, T.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Asaturyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Tadevosyan, V.; Zhamkochyan, S.; Malbrunot-Ettenauer, S.; Eyrich, W.; Hauenstein, F.; Zink, A.

    2015-01-01

    For the production of a polarized antiproton beam various methods have been suggested including the possibility that antiprotons may be produced polarized which will be checked experimentally. The polarization of antiprotons produced under typical conditions for antiproton beam preparation will be measured at the CERN/PS. If the production process creates some polarization a polarized antiproton beam could be prepared by a rather simple modification of the antiproton beam facility. The detection setup and the expected experimental conditions are described.

  15. Study of $ \\bar{p} $ and $ \\bar{n} $ annihilations at LEAR with OBELIX, a large acceptance and high resolution detector based on the Open Axial Field Spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS201 Study of $\\bar{p}$ and $\\bar{n}$ annihilations at LEAR with OBELIX, a large acceptance and high resolution detector based on the Open Axial Field Spectrometer \\\\ \\\\OBELIX is designed to study exclusive final states of antiproton and antineutron annihilations at low energies with protons and nuclei. \\\\ \\\\The physics motivations of the experiment are:\\\\ \\\\\\begin{itemize} \\item (gg, ggg), hybrids ($ q \\bar{q} g $), multiquarks ($ q q \\bar{q} \\bar{q} $) and light mesons ($ q \\bar{q} $) produced in $ N \\bar{N} $ annihilations and study of their spectroscopy and decays. Also broad structures will be searched for by comparing identical decay modes in exclusive final states of the same type occuring from initial states with different angular momentum or isospin. \\item Study of the dynamics of $ N \\bar{N} $ interactions and of the dependence of the final and intermediate resonant states of annihilation upon the quantum numbers of the initial $ N \\bar{N} $ state (angular momentum: S and P-wave in $\\bar{p}p $ at...

  16. Low and high resolution protonium spectroscopy at LEAR in ACOL time: Tools for glueball, hybrid and light meson spectroscopy and for measuring the N anti N strong interaction dependence on angular momentum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastaldi, U.

    1987-02-20

    Low energy resolution protonium spectroscopy with a large acceptance and high granularity X-ray Drift Chamber offers a new physical instrument to study the dependence of p anti p annihilation at rest on angular momentum and to search for glueball, hybrid, multiquark and conventional mesonic states with narrow and also broad width. This tool has been developed at LEAR within the ASTERIX experiment and will be systematically or in part employed in ACOL time by two new experiments concerned with hadron spectroscopy and dynamics of nucleon-antinucleon interactions. High energy resolution protonium spectroscopy is feasible with an improvement by a factor 1000 over pre-ACOL experiments by using beams of p anti p atoms produced in flight inside LEAR (where H/sup -/ ions have to co-rotate with the anti p coast) and going to a detection equipment external to the ring. The limit to the best relative energy resolution attainable is given by the relative momentum dispersion ..delta..p/p of the beams stored in LEAR. The shift and broadening induced by strong interactions on the four sublevels of the 2P level become therefore measurable, and precise measurements on these quantities look feasible for the two sublevels of the 1S ground state. In the second part of this paper we review this approach to high resolution protonium spectroscopy (IDEFIX experiment) and its feasibility aspects. 61 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. ‘Crack Nature’s Molds’: Reasoned Madness and Evolution in King Lear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Smith

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available King Lear as a product of evolutionary progressions is logical because the play is framed around two ideas of society and generation in direct confrontation. The sociopolitical ramifications of King Lear are clarified when viewed as an evolutionary progression because societal causality is mirrored in nature. The connection between Lear’s madness and nature’s role in determining societal evolution is demonstrated in the evolutionary notion that “everybody is what he typically is because his progenitors were what they were . . . [i]n the molecular structure of the minute germ of him,” (Maudsley 4 and that and social events are connected with the mechanistic march of nature. When Lear bellows “Crack nature’s molds, all germens spill at once,” (3.2.8 he is requesting the impossible, that the laws of causation be terminated and evolution be put on hold.Keywords: Evolutionary Criticism, reason, philosophy, Shakespeare, King Lear, consilience, evolution, mechanism, madness, nature

  18. JETSET: Physics at LEAR with an Internal Gas Jet Target and an Advanced General Purpose Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment involves an internal gas cluster jet target surrounded by a compact general-purpose detector. The LEAR beam and internal jet target provide several important experimental features: high luminosity $ ( 10 ^{3} ^0 $ cm$^- ^{2} $ sec$^- ^{1} ) $, excellent mass resolution ($\\Delta

  19. The low energy atmospheric antiproton albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J. B.; Ormes, J. F.

    1989-01-01

    The flux of albedo antiprotons in the 100-1000 MeV kinetic energy range produced by the cosmic ray primaries in the atmosphere is calculated. It is shown that this is not a significant background to measurements of the low energy anti-proton cosmic ray flux.

  20. Calculated LET-Spectrum of Antiprotons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    Introduction Antiprotons as a new beam modality in radiotherapy are being investigated by the AD-4/ACE collaboration since 2002. A beam of antiprotons hitting a water phantom exhibit a similar depth-dose curve as that known from protons, except that the Bragg-peak is significantly pronounced due...

  1. Antiproton radiation found effective in cancer research

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "An international collaboration of scientists has completed the first ever antiproton beam experiments designed to reveal the biological effectiveness of antiproton radiation in terminating cells used for cancer research...PBar Labs assembled the collaboration at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research in Geneva) to perform the measurements" (1 page).

  2. Status Report on the Antiproton Decelerator (AD)

    CERN Document Server

    Erikson, T; Möhl, D

    2001-01-01

    CERN's new Antiproton Decelerator (AD) has been delivering a 100 MeV/c antiproton beam to three experiments (ASACUSA, AHENA and ATRAP) since July 10th, 2000. In this status report, we summarise the initial performance of the AD, draw provisional conclusions from the first month of operation and finally give some prospects for the future.

  3. Study of Anti-Hydrogen and Plasma Physics 4.Observation of Antiproton Beams and Nonneutral Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Masaki; Fujiwara, Makoto; Kuroda, Naofumi

    2004-01-01

    Diagnostics of antiproton beams and nonneutral plasmas are described in this chapter. Parallel plate secondary electron emission detectors are used to non-destructively observe the beam position and intensity without loss. Plastic scintillation tracking detectors are useful in determining the position of annihilations of antiprotons in the trap. Three-dimensional imaging of antiprotons in a Penning trap is discussed. The unique capability of antimatter particle imaging has allowed the observation of the spatial distribution of particle loss in a trap. Radial loss is localized to small spots, strongly breaking the azimuthal symmetry expected for an ideal trap. By observing electrostatic eigen-modes of nonneutral plasmas trapped in the Multi-ring electrode trap, the non-destructive measurement of plasma parameters is performed.

  4. That was LEAP 05! or Antiproton Physics in a Nutshell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienle, Paul

    2005-10-01

    A personally flavored review of selected topics of LEAP 05 is given, with focus on some recent interesting developments in low and medium energy antiproton physics, such as fundamental symmetries and antihydrogen, antihadron-hadron systems, antiproton-proton annihilation, nuclear structure studies with antiprotons, and the FAIR facility for antiproton and ion research.

  5. Prospects for Antiproton Experiments at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, Daniel M

    2011-01-01

    Fermilab operates the world's most intense antiproton source. Newly proposed experiments can use those antiprotons either parasitically during Tevatron Collider running or after the end of the Tevatron Collider program. For example, the annihilation of 5 to 8 GeV antiprotons is expected to yield world-leading sensitivities to hyperon rare decays and CP violation. It could also provide the world's most intense source of tagged D^0 mesons, and thus the best near-term opportunity to study charm mixing and, via CP violation, to search for new physics. Other measurements that could be made include properties of the X(3872) and the charmonium system. An experiment using a Penning trap and an atom interferometer could make the world's most precise measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter. These and other potential measurements using antiprotons offer a great opportunity for a broad and exciting physics program at Fermilab in the post-Tevatron era.

  6. Antiproton Induced Fission and Fragmentation of Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The annihilation of slow antiprotons with nuclei results in a large highly localized energy deposition primarily on the nuclear surface. \\\\ \\\\ The study of antiproton induced fission and fragmentation processes is expected to yield new information on special nuclear matter states, unexplored fission modes, multifragmentation of nuclei, and intranuclear cascades.\\\\ \\\\ In order to investigate the antiproton-nucleus interaction and the processes following the antiproton annihilation at the nucleus, we propose the following experiments: \\item A)~Measurement of several fragments from fission and from multifragmentation in coincidence with particle spectra, especially neutrons and kaons. \\item B)~Precise spectra of $\\pi$, K, n, p, d and t with time-of-flight techniques. \\item C)~Installation of the Berlin 4$\\pi$ neutron detector with a 4$\\pi$ Si detector placed inside for fragments and charged particles. This yields neutron multiplicity distributions and consequently distributions of thermal excitation energies and...

  7. Storage rings, internal targets and PEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J.E.

    1986-11-01

    Storage rings with internal targets are described, using PEP as an example. The difference between electrons and heavier particles such as protons, antiprotons, and heavy ions is also discussed because it raises possibilities of bypass insertions for more exotic experiments. PEP is compared to other rings in various contexts to verify the assertion that it is an ideal ring for many fundamental and practical applications that can be carried on simultaneously. (LEW)

  8. The antiproton depth–dose curve in water

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, N; Jäkel, O; Knudsen, H V; Kovacevic, S

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the depth–dose curve of 126 MeV antiprotons in a water phantom using ionization chambers. Since the antiproton beam provided by CERN has a pulsed structure and possibly carries a high-LET component from the antiproton annihilation, it is necessary to correct the acquired charge for ion recombination effects. The results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations and were found to be in good agreement. Based on this agreement we calculate the antiproton depth–dose curve for antiprotons and compare it with that for protons and find a doubling of the physical dose in the peak region for antiprotons.

  9. Antiproton Radiotherapy Peripheral Dose from Secondary Neutrons produced in the Annihilation of Antiprotons in the Target

    CERN Document Server

    Fahimian, Benjamin P; Keyes, Roy; Bassler, Niels; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Zankl, Maria; Holzscheiter, Michael H

    2009-01-01

    The AD-4/ACE collaboration studies the biological effects of antiprotons with respect to a possible use of antiprotons in cancer therapy. In vitro experiments performed by the collaboration have shown an enhanced biological effectiveness for antiprotons relative to protons. One concern is the normal tissue dose resulting from secondary neutrons produced in the annihilation of antiprotons on the nucleons of the target atoms. Here we present the first organ specific Monte Carlo calculations of normal tissue equivalent neutron dose in antiproton therapy through the use of a segmented CT-based human phantom. The MCNPX Monte Carlo code was employed to quantify the peripheral dose for a cylindrical spread out Bragg peak representing a treatment volume of 1 cm diameter and 1 cm length in the frontal lobe of a segmented whole-body phantom of a 38 year old male. The secondary neutron organ dose was tallied as a function of energy and organ.

  10. Antiprotons four times more effective than protons for cell irradiation

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "A pioneering experiment at CERN with potential future application in cancer therapy has produced its first results. Started in 2003, ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) is the first investigation of the biological effects of antiprotons." (1,5 page)

  11. Antiprotons four times more effective than protons for cell irradiation

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "A pioneering experiment at CERN with potential future application in cancer therapy has produced its first results. Started in 2003, ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) is the first investigation of the biological effects of antiprotons." (1,5 page)

  12. A systematic review of antiproton radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin-Immanuel eBittner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiprotons have been proposed as possible particles for radiotherapy; over the past years, the renewed interest in the potential biomedical relevance led to an increased research activity. It is the aim of this review to deliver a comprehensive overview regarding the evidence accumulated so far, analysing the background and depicting the current status of antiprotons in radiotherapy. A literature search has been conducted, including major scientific and commercial databases. All articles and a number of relevant conference abstracts published in the respective field have been included in this systematic review. The physical basis of antiproton radiotherapy is complex; however, the characterisation of the energy deposition profile supports its potential use in radiotherapy. Also the dosimetry improved considerably over the past few years. Regarding the biological properties, data on the effects on cells are presented; however, definite conclusions regarding the relative biological effectiveness cannot be made at the moment and radiobiological evidence of enhanced effectiveness remains scarce. In addition, there is new evidence supporting the potential imaging properties, for example for online dose verification. Clinical settings which might profit from the use of antiprotons have been further tracked. Judging from the evidence available so far, clinical constellations requiring optimal sparing in the entrance region of the beam and re-irradiations might profit most from antiproton radiotherapy. While several open questions remain to be answered, first steps towards a thorough characterisation of this interesting modality have been made.

  13. Constraining the Higgs portal with antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Urbano, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    The scalar Higgs portal is a compelling model of dark matter (DM) in which a renormalizable coupling with the Higgs boson provides the connection between the visible world and the dark sector. In this paper we investigate the constraint placed on the parameter space of this model by the antiproton data. Due to the fact that the antiproton-to-proton ratio has relative less systematic uncertainties than the antiproton absolute flux, we propose and explore the possibility to combine all the available $\\bar{p}/p$ data. Following this approach, we are able to obtain stronger limits if compared with the existing literature. In particular, we show that most of the parameter space close to the Higgs resonance is ruled out by our analysis. Furthermore, by studying the reach of the future AMS-02 antiproton and antideuteron data, we argue that a DM mass of $\\mathcal{O}(150)$ GeV offers a promising discovery potential. The method of combining all the antiproton-to-proton ratio data proposed in this paper is quite general...

  14. Colliding beam physics at Fermilab: interaction regions, beam storage, antiproton cooling, production, and colliding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, J.K. (ed.)

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the colliding beams experment department at Fermilab was to bring about collisions of the stored beams in the energy doubler/saver and main ring, and construct experimental areas with appropriate detectors. To explore the feasibility of using the main ring as a storage device, several studies were carried out to investigate beam growth, loss, and the backgrounds in detectors at possible intersection regions. This range of developments constituted the major topics at the 1977 Summer Study reported here. Emphasis in part one is on interaction regions, beam storage, antiproton cooling, production, and colliding. 40 papers from this part are included in the data base. (GHT)

  15. The Antiproton Depth-Dose Curve in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael; Jäkel, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the depth-dose curve of 126 MeV antiprotons in a water phantom using ionization chambers. Since the antiproton beam provided by CERN has a pulsed structure and possibly carries a high-LET component from the antiproton annihilation, it is necessary to correct the acquired charge...

  16. Antiproton beam polarizer using a dense polarized target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2011-05-01

    We describe considerations regarding the spin filtering method for the antiproton beam. The proposed investigation of the double polarization cross section for antiproton to nucleon interaction is outlined. It will use a single path of the antiproton beam through a dense polarized target, e.g. 3He or CH2, followed by a polarimeter.

  17. Evaporative Cooling of Antiprotons to Cryogenic Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A; Hydomako, R; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wilding, D; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2010-01-01

    We report the application of evaporative cooling to clouds of trapped antiprotons, resulting in plasmas with measured temperature as low as 9~K. We have modeled the evaporation process for charged particles using appropriate rate equations. Good agreement between experiment and theory is observed, permitting prediction of cooling efficiency in future experiments. The technique opens up new possibilities for cooling of trapped ions and is of particular interest in antiproton physics, where a precise CPT test on trapped antihydrogen is a long-standing goal.

  18. Antiproton radiotherapy: peripheral dose from secondary neutrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahimian, Benjamin P.; DeMarco, John J.; Keyes, Roy

    2009-01-01

    is the normal tissue dose resulting from secondary neutrons produced in the annihilation of antiprotons on the nucleons of the target atoms. Here we present the first organ specific Monte Carlo calculations of normal tissue equivalent neutron dose in antiproton therapy through the use of a segmented CT......-based human phantom. The MCNPX Monte Carlo code was employed to quantify the peripheral dose for a cylindrical spread out Bragg peak representing a treatment volume of 1 cm diameter and 1 cm length in the frontal lobe of a segmented whole-body phantom of a 38 year old male. The secondary neutron organ dose...

  19. K-shell ionization by antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehler, G.; Mueller, B.; Greiner, W.; Soff, G.

    1987-08-01

    We present calculations for the impact-parameter dependence of K-shell ionization rates in p-bar-Cu and in p-bar-Ag collisions at various projectile energies. We show that the effect of the attractive Coulomb potential on the Rutherford trajectory and the antibinding effect caused by the negative charge of the antiproton result in a considerable increase of the ionization probability. Total ionization cross sections for proton and antiproton projectiles are compared with each other and with experimental ionization cross sections for protons.

  20. The ASACUSA experiment at CERN's AD antiproton decelerator catches antiprotons in helium, where the antiprotons replace electrons, giving exotics atoms.

    CERN Multimedia

    Loïez, P

    2000-01-01

    Photo 03: Laser beams are prepared for shooting at antiprotonic helium atoms. Left to right: Masaki Hori (Tokyo University) and John Eades (CERN). Photo 01: Dye laser triggered by "YAG" laser. Photo 02: Masaki Hori adjusting optical system of laser beams.

  1. Tests of CP Violation with $\\bar{K^0}$ and $ K^{0} $ at LEAR

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS195 Tests of CP Violation with &bar.K$^0$ and K$^0$ at LEAR \\\\ \\\\The aim of the experiment is to carry out precision tests of CP, T and CPT on the neutral kaon system through $ K ^0 - $\\bar{K}^0 $ interferometry using LEAR as an intense source. A beam of $ ~10^{6}~\\bar{p}$~events/second is brought to rest in a hydrogen target producing $ K ^0 $ and $ $\\bar{K}^0 $ events through the reaction channels : \\\\ \\\\ \\begin{center} $\\bar{p}p~~~~~\\rightarrow~~~~K^0~+~(K^-\\pi^+$) \\\\ \\\\~~~~~~~~$\\rightarrow~~~~\\bar{K}^0~+~(K^+\\pi^-$) \\end{center}\\\\ \\\\The neutral strange particles and their antiparticles are tagged by detecting in the magnetic field the sign of the accompanying charged kaons identified via Cerenkovs and scintillators. The experiment has the unique feature that the decays from particles and antiparticles are recorded under the same operating conditions using tracking chambers and a gas sampling electromagnetic calorimeter. The measured time-dependent $ K ^0 $-$ $\\bar{K}^0 $ asymmetries for non-lepton...

  2. A Cryogenic Current Comparator for the Low Energy Antiproton Facilities at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, M; Welsch, CP

    2014-01-01

    Several laboratories have shown the potential of using Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers together with superconductor magnetic shields to measure beam current intensities in the submicro-Ampere regime. CERN, in collaboration with GSI, Jena university and Helmholtz Institute Jena, is currently working on developing an improved version of such a current monitor for the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) and Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) rings at CERN, aiming for better current resolution and overall system availability. This contribution will present the current design, including theoretical estimation of the current resolution; stability limits of SQUID systems and adaptation of the coupling circuit to the AD beam parameters; the analysis of thermal and mechanical cryostat modes.

  3. The biological effectiveness of antiproton irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Agazaryan, Nzhde;

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Antiprotons travel through tissue in a manner similar to that for protons until they reach the end of their range where they annihilate and deposit additional energy. This makes them potentially interesting for radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to conduct the first e...

  4. Three dimensional biological dose distribution of antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegami, Sara; Boll, Rebecca; Sellner, Stefan [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Welsch, Carsten P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Cockcroft Institute, University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Holzscheiter, Michael H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); University of New Mexico, Albuquerque (United States)

    2010-07-01

    The goal of external beam cancer therapy is to destroy the tumour while sparing the healthy tissue around it. In hadron therapy, the dose profile of heavy charged particles satisfies this request, because most of the energy is deposited at the end of the particle path, in the Bragg peak. Antiprotons are even more promising, thanks to the extra energy released by annihilation when captured in a normal atom at the end of range. The aim of the AD-4/ACE experiment at CERN is to determine the increase in biological dose near the Bragg peak due to densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons. Initial experiments showed the damage to cells inflicted at the end of the beam for identical damage at the skin level to be four times higher for antiprotons than for protons. The radiation field in a spread-out Bragg peak produced with antiprotons is highly mixed and for proper dose planning knowledge of linear energy transfer (LET) and relative biological efficiency (RBE) at any point in the target is needed. We are studying a number of detection methods for their response to mixed radiation fields with the goal to obtain a direct measurement of the 3D LET distribution and report on first results.

  5. Collisions of antiprotons with hydrogen molecular ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Time-dependent close-coupling calculations of the ionization and excitation cross section for antiproton collisions with molecular hydrogen ions are performed in an impact energy range from 0.5 keV to 10 MeV. The Born-Oppenheimer and Franck-Condon approximations as well as the impact parameter...

  6. Study of Interaction of Low-Energy Antiprotons with H$^{2}$,He$^{3}$,He$^{4}$,Ne-Nuclei Using a Streamer Chamber in Magnetic Field

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is the systematic study of the interaction between low-energy antiprotons and the H|2,~He|3,~He|4,~Ne-nuclei using a self shunted streamer chamber in a magnetic field exposed to the antiproton beam of the LEAR facility. The properties of the self shunted streamer chamber, which allows the use of the filling gas (hydrogen, helium, neon at a pressure of l~atm) as a target, permit to carry out experiments also in the very low-energy region. \\\\ \\\\ The experimental apparatus is suitable for a large programme of measurements. We plan to measure the @*H|2 cross section and the spectator momentum distributions at @* momenta lower than 250~MeV/c, where data are lacking. It is interesting to study for the first time the @*He|3 and @*He|4 interactions measuring the cross sections and the emitted particle distributions. Among other things the knowledge of the branching ratio of the @*He|4 annihilation channels clarifies some open cosmological questions. The study of the process of nuclear absor...

  7. Physics at CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, M.; Walz, J.

    2013-09-01

    The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility of CERN began operation in 1999 to serve experiments for studies of CPT invariance by precision laser and microwave spectroscopy of antihydrogen (Hbar ) and antiprotonic helium (pbar He) atoms. The first 12 years of AD operation saw cold Hbar synthesized by overlapping clouds of positrons (e+) and antiprotons (pbar ) confined in magnetic Penning traps. Cold Hbar was also produced in collisions between Rydberg positronium (Ps) atoms and pbar . Ground-state Hbar was later trapped for up to ˜1000 s in a magnetic bottle trap, and microwave transitions excited between its hyperfine levels. In the pbar He atom, deep ultraviolet transitions were measured to a fractional precision of (2.3-5)×10-9 by sub-Doppler two-photon laser spectroscopy. From this the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined as M/me=1836.1526736(23), which agrees with the p value known to a similar precision. Microwave spectroscopy of pbar He yielded a measurement of the pbar magnetic moment with a precision of 0.3%. More recently, the magnetic moment of a single pbar confined in a Penning trap was measured with a higher precision, as μ=-2.792845(12)μ in nuclear magnetons. Other results reviewed here include the first measurements of the energy loss (-dE/dx) of 1-100 keV pbar traversing conductor and insulator targets; the cross sections of low-energy (therapy. New experiments under preparation attempt to measure the gravitational acceleration of Hbar or synthesize H. Several other future experiments will also be briefly described.

  8. Magnetic horn of the Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1988-01-01

    In the 1960s, the invention of this "current sheet lens" has helped to greatly improve the flux of neutrino beams. It was used again at the AA, collecting antiprotons from the production target at angles too large to fit into the acceptance of the AA. It was machined from aluminium to a thickness of 1.4 mm and pulsed at 400 kA for 15 microseconds (half-sine).

  9. The FLUKA study of the secondary particles fluence in the AD-Antiproton Decelerator target area

    CERN Document Server

    Calviani, M

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present Monte Carlo FLUKA simulations [1, 2] carried out to investigate the secondary particles fluence emerging from the antiproton production target and their spatial distribution in the AD target area. The detailed quantitative analysis has been performed for different positions along the magnet dog-leg as well as after the main collimator. These results allow tuning the position of the new beam current transformers (BCT) in the target area, in order to have a precise pulse-by-pulse evaluation of the intensity of negative particles injected in the AD-ring before the deceleration phase.

  10. Antiproton nucleus potentials from global fits to antiprotonic X-rays and radiochemical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mareš, J.

    2005-11-01

    We report on global fits of optical-model parameters to 90 data points for p¯ X-rays and 17 data points of radiochemical data put together. By doing separate fits to the two kinds of data it is possible to determine phenomenologically the radial region where the absorption of antiprotons takes place and to obtain neutron densities which represent the average behaviour over the periodic table. A finite-range attractive and absorptive p¯-nuclear isoscalar potential fits the data well. Self-consistent dynamical calculations within the RMF model demonstrate that the polarization of the nucleus by the atomic antiproton is negligible.

  11. Sub-ppm laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium and a CPT-violation limit on the antiprotonic charge and mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, M; Eades, J; Hayano, R S; Ishikawa, T; Sakaguchi, J; Widmann, E; Yamaguchi, H; Torii, H A; Juhász, B; Horváth, D; Yamazaki, T

    2001-08-27

    Six laser-resonant transitions have been detected in metastable antiprotonic helium atoms produced at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator. They include UV transitions from the last metastable states in the v = n-l-1 = 0 and 1 cascades. Zero-density frequencies were obtained from measured pressure shifts with fractional precisions between 1.3 x 10(-7) and 1.6 x 10(-6). By comparing these with QED calculations and the antiproton cyclotron frequency, we deduce that the antiproton and proton charges and masses agree to within 6 x 10(-8) with a confidence level of 90%.

  12. Twitter, King Lear, and the Freedom of Speech, by John Curtis, and Judicial Allusion as Ornament: A Response to John Curtis’s, ‘Twitter, King Lear, and the Freedom of Speech’ by Professor Gary Watt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Curtis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available On 27 July 2012, in his judgment following ‘The Twitter Joke Trial’, the Lord Chief Justice of England & Wales quoted from King Lear (Folio.  The trial was the first time a British Court had considered the use of Twitter in the context of a bomb hoax.  The judgment was hailed as ‘a victory for common sense’, reversing decisions of two lower courts.  It now provides authority against similar prosecutions.  This paper argues that the use of a four-hundred-year-old Shakespearean text in negotiating modern legal principles is of considerable cultural significance – both through using the familiar to respond to the new – and by invoking Shakespeare’s voice within the powerful social mechanism of the law courts.  It also considers the advantages and disadvantages of literary allusions within legal proceedings, contrasting these two widely reported judgments.This piece is adapted from a transcript of: King Lear, Twitter and the Da Vinci Code given as part of the Sidelights on Shakespeare lecture series at University of Warwick on 29 November 2013.Professor Gary Watt provides a response to Curtis's critical reflection, considering judicial allusion as logic or ornament. Image: Cordelia in the Court of King Lear, Sir John Gilbert (1873

  13. en el sector de autopartes en México. El caso de la red de plantas de Lear Corporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo A. Lara Rivero

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available El propósito de este artículo es describir y analizar el caso de un proveedor de la industria automotriz que, de ser especialista en la producción de asientos, ha evolucionado hasta convertirse en una empresa capaz de suministrar la totalidad del sistema de interiores. El estudio está centrado en la red de plantas de producción que Lear Corporation tiene en México. Se busca examinar el desempeño tecnológico, así como la estrategia de coordinación y cooperación intraempresa (dentro del mercado de América del Norte desarrolladas por Lear en el marco de la producción modular.

  14. ELENA prepares a bright future for antimatter research

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    At its recent session in June, the CERN Council approved the construction of the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) – an upgrade of the existing Antiproton Decelerator. ELENA will allow the further deceleration of antiprotons, resulting in an increased number of particles trapped downstream in the experimental set-ups. This will give an important boost to antimatter research in the years to come.   Layout of the AD experimental hall: the Antiproton Decelerator ring (purple); the ALPHA, ASACUSA, and ATRAP experiments (green); the ACE experiment (not pictured); and the new ELENA ring (blue). The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) is CERN’s widely recognized facility for the study of antimatter properties. The recent successes of the AD experiments are just the latest in a long list of important scientific results that started with LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring). The scientific demand for low-energy antiprotons at the AD continues to grow. There are now four experiments runnin...

  15. Measurement of strong interaction effects in antiprotonic helium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, J.D.; Gorringe, T.P.; Lowe, J.; Nelson, J.M.; Playfer, S.M.; Pyle, G.J.; Squier, G.T.A. (Birmingham Univ. (UK). Dept. of Physics); Baker, C.A.; Batty, C.J.; Clark, S.A.

    1984-09-27

    The strong interaction shift and width for the 2 p level and the width for the 3d level have been measured for antiprotonic helium atoms. The results are compared with optical model calculations. The possible existence of strongly bound antiproton states in nuclei is discussed.

  16. Serach for polarization effects in the antiproton production process

    CERN Multimedia

    It is proposed to study polarization effects in the production of antiprotons at the PS test beam line T11 at 3.5 GeV/c momentum. A polarization in the production process has never been studied but if existing it would allow for a rather simple and cheap way to generate a polarized antiproton beam with the existing facilities at CERN.

  17. Antiproton impact ionization of atomic hydrogen and helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGovern, M; Walters, H R J [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast BT7 INN (United Kingdom); Assafrao, D; Mohallem, J R [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, P.O Box 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Whelan, Colm T, E-mail: mmcgovern06@qub.ac.u [Department of Physics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529-0116 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    We shall present results for antiproton ionization of H and He ranging from fully differential cross sections to total ionization. The calculations have been made in a coupled pseudostate impact parameter approximation. It will be shown that the interaction between the antiproton and the target nucleus is very important at low energies.

  18. Cooling of ions and antiprotons with magnetized electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Mollers, B; Walter, M; Zwicknagel, G; Carli, Christian; Nersisyan, H

    2004-01-01

    Electron cooling is a well-established method to improve the phase space quality of ion beams in storage rings. More recently antiprotons have been cooled in traps, first by electrons and then by positrons in order to produce antihydrogen atoms as simplest form of antimatter for CPT-tests. During these cooling processes the light particles are guided by strong external magnetic fields which imposes a challenge to the theoretical description. Within the binary collision model we treat the Coulomb interaction as second-order perturbation to the helix motion of the light particles and also by numerical simulations. In the complementary dielectric theory we calculate the polarization of the light particles by solving the nonlinear Vlasov-Poisson equation as well as linear response. It turns out that the linearization becomes dubious at low ion velocities. In the presence of a strong magnetic field the numerically expensive solution of the Vlasov-Poisson equation is the method of choice, alternatively one may empl...

  19. Um Processador Rápido de Corte em Momento Transverso para o Trigger da Experiência CP-LEAR

    CERN Document Server

    Machado, Emanuel Tito Mendes

    Neste trabalho pretendemos mostrar alguns aspectos importantes no desenho de instrumentação para sistemas de selecção de eventos (trigger), que se revelaram importantes no desenho do sistema de trigger de CP–LEAR. Para isso, fazemos um zoom progressivo sobre a experiência. Começamos por mostrar o que são sistemas de trigger, quais as suas propriedades e diversidade, e que tipos de sistemas são usados e em que circunstâncias. É também feito um apanhado do state of the art dos diversos componentes e soluções utilizadas para a resolução dos problemas típicos destes sistemas. A seguir, apresentamos CP–LEAR, descrevendo a física em que se apoia o seu método. Aqui introduzimos o conceito de simetrias, e em que circunstâncias podemos falar de violação de simetria. Seguidamente, introduzimos o sistema de kaões neutros, apresentamos o fenómeno de violação CP, e descrevemos o método de CP–LEAR utilizado para o seu estudo. Depois de apresentar o detector utilizado na experiência, começa...

  20. Detailed analysis of observed antiprotons in cosmic rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Davoudifar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the origin of antiprotons observed in cosmic rays (above the atmosphere is analyzed in details. We have considered the origin of the primaries, (which their interactions with the interstellar medium is one of the most important sources of antiprotons is a supernova type II then used a diffusion model for their propagation. We have used the latest parameterization for antiproton production cross section in pp collisions (instead of well known parameterization introduced by Tan et al. as well as our calculated residence time for primaries. The resulted intensity shows the secondary antiprotons produced in pp collisions in the galaxy, have a high population as one can not consider an excess for extragalactic antiprotons. Also there is a high degree of uncertainty in different parameters.

  1. Antiproton cloud compression in the ALPHA apparatus at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, A., E-mail: andrea.gutierrez@triumf.ca [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Ashkezari, M. D. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M. [University of California at Berkeley, Department of Physics (United States); Bertsche, W. [University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Burrows, C. [Swansea University, Department of Physics, College of Science (United Kingdom); Butler, E. [Centre for Cold Matter, Imperial College (United Kingdom); Capra, A. [York University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Cesar, C. L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Física (Brazil); Charlton, M. [Swansea University, Department of Physics, College of Science (United Kingdom); Dunlop, R. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Eriksson, S. [Swansea University, Department of Physics, College of Science (United Kingdom); Evetts, N. [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Fajans, J. [University of California at Berkeley, Department of Physics (United States); Friesen, T. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R. [TRIUMF (Canada); Hangst, J. S. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Hardy, W. N. [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Hayden, M. E. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Isaac, C. A. [Swansea University, Department of Physics, College of Science (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-11-15

    We have observed a new mechanism for compression of a non-neutral plasma, where antiprotons embedded in an electron plasma are compressed by a rotating wall drive at a frequency close to the sum of the axial bounce and rotation frequencies. The radius of the antiproton cloud is reduced by up to a factor of 20 and the smallest radius measured is ∼ 0.2 mm. When the rotating wall drive is applied to either a pure electron or pure antiproton plasma, no compression is observed in the frequency range of interest. The frequency range over which compression is evident is compared to the sum of the antiproton bounce frequency and the system’s rotation frequency. It is suggested that bounce resonant transport is a likely explanation for the compression of antiproton clouds in this regime.

  2. Intensity-Frontier Antiproton Physics with The Antiproton Annihilation Spectrometer (TAPAS) at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apollinari, Giorgio; /Fermilab; Asner, David M.; /PNL, Richland; Baldini, Wander; /INFN, Ferrara; Bartoszek, Larry; Broemmelsiek, Daniel R.; Brown, Charles N.; /Fermilab; Chakravorty, Alak; /St. Xavier U., Chicago; Colas, Paul; /Saclay; Derwent, Paul; /Fermilab; Drutskoy, Alexey; /Moscow, ITEP; Fortner, Michael; /Northern Illinois U. /Saclay /Indian Inst. Tech., Hyderabad

    2011-11-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Source is the world's most intense source of antimatter. With the Tevatron program now behind us, this unique facility can help make the case for Fermilab's continued accelerator operations. The Antiproton Source can be used for unique, dedicated antimatter studies, including medium-energy {bar p}-annihilation experiments. We propose to assemble a powerful, yet cost-effective, solenoidal magnetic spectrometer for antiproton-annihilation events, and to use it at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator to measure the charm production cross section, study rare hyperon decays, search for hyperon CP asymmetry, precisely measure the properties of several charmonium and nearby states, and make the first measurements of the Drell-Yan continuum in medium-energy antiproton annihilation. Should the charm production cross section be as large as some have proposed, we will also be able to measure D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing with high precision and discover (or sensitively limit) charm CP violation. The observation of charm or hyperon CP violation would be evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model, with possible implications for the origin of the baryon asymmetry of the universe - the question of what happened to all the antimatter that must have been produced in the Big Bang. The experiment will be carried out by an international collaboration and will require some four years of running time. As possibly the sole hadron experiment in progress at Fermilab during that time, it will play an important role in maintaining a broad particle physics program at Fermilab and in the U.S. It will thus help us to continue attracting creative and capable young people into science and technology, and introducing them to the important technologies of accelerators, detectors, and data acquisition and analysis - key roles in society that accelerator-based particle physics has historically played.

  3. Strangeness production in antiproton nucleus interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, S. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Bonner Nuclear Labs.; Bonner, B.E. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Bonner Nuclear Labs.; Buchanan, J.A. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Bonner Nuclear Labs.; Carter, P. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Bonner Nuclear Labs.; Chan, C.S.; Clement, J.M.; Eiseman, S.E.; Empl, A.; Etkin, A.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Hallman, T.J.; Kramer, M.A.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Madansky, L.; Mattingly, A.C.; Morris, T.W.; Mutchler, G.S.; Peaslee, D.C.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C.; Toshkov, S.

    1997-06-01

    Results on the measurement of inclusive K{sub S}{sup 0}, {Lambda} and {Lambda} production cross sections and rapidity distributions for antiproton interactions on lead, copper and carbon nuclear targets at beam momenta of 5.2, 7.0 and 8.8 GeV/c are reported. Simulations employing a conventional intra-nuclear cascade model were able to reproduce the experimental results. Hence, no compelling evidence for the formation of exotic quark-gluon states of matter was found. (orig.).

  4. The new large-scale international facility for antiproton and ion research in Europe, FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosner, Guenther [Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR), Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: FAIR is currently the largest project in nuclear and particle physics worldwide, with investment costs of 1.6B euro in its first phase. It has been founded by Finland, France, Germany, India, Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovenia and Sweden in Oct. 2010. The facility will provide the international scientific community with a unique and technically innovative particle accelerator system to perform cutting-edge research in the sciences concerned with the basic structure of matter in: nuclear and particle physics, atomic and anti-matter physics, high density plasma physics, and applications in condensed matter physics, biology and the bio-medical sciences. The work horse of FAIR will be a 1.1 km circumference double ring of rapidly cycling 100 and 300 Tm synchrotrons, which will be used to produce high intensity secondary beams of anti-protons and very short-lived radioactive ions. A subsequent suite of cooler and storage rings will deliver anti-proton and heavy-ion beams of unprecedented quality regarding intensity and resolution. Large experimental facilities are presently being prototyped by the APPA, CBM, NuSTAR and PANDA Collaborations to be used by a global community of more than 3000 scientists from 2018. (author)

  5. Conceptual designs for antiproton space propulsion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassenti, B.N.

    1989-01-01

    Five conceptual designs for antimatter space propulsion systems were compared in terms of their performance characteristics. The systems examined included solid-core liquid-propellant rockets; magnetically confined gaseous-core rockets using liquid or solid propellants; plasma-core rockets; pion rockets, which are driven directly by the mass annihilation products; and ram-augmented rockets, in which antiproton annihilation is used to heat hydrogen collected in interstellar space. It was found that, in general, as the specific impulse of the propulsion system increases, the thrust decreases. The comparison between designs showed that only fusion rockets have the capability to compete in performance with mass annihilation rockets. For very-high-speed interstellar missions, pion rockets, which can have a specific impulse of 20 million sec (although with a thrust-to-engine mass ratios of only 0.01 G) will offer best performance. 36 refs.

  6. Fragmentation of methane molecules by antiproton impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehzadeh, Arash; Kirchner, Tom

    2016-09-01

    Extending previous work for proton impact, we have investigated the fragmentation of methane molecules due to collisions with antiprotons in the 25 keV to 5 MeV impact energy range. The multi-center nature of the problem is addressed by using a spectral representation of the molecular Hartree-Fock-level Hamiltonian and a single-center expansion of the initially populated molecular orbitals. The two-center basis generator method (TC-BGM) is used for orbital propagation. Electron-removal cross sections obtained from the TC-BGM solutions are complemented with a dynamical decay-route fragmentation model to calculate cross sections for the production of fragment ions. Good agreement with the available experimental data is observed for CH4+,CH3+,CH2+and CH+. Work supported by NSERC, Canada.

  7. Antiproton-neon annihilation at 57 MeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Bianconi, A; Bussa, M P; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Venturelli, L; Zenoni, A; Pontecorvo, G B; Guaraldo, C; Balestra, F; Busso, L; Colantoni, M L; Ferrero, A; Ferrero, L; Grasso, A; Maggiora, A; Maggiora, M G; Piragino, G; Tosello, F

    2000-01-01

    The pNe annihilation cross section is measured for the first time in the momentum interval (53/63) MeV/c. About 9000 pictures collected by the Streamer Chamber Collaboration (PS179) at LEAR-CERN have been scanned. Four events are found, corresponding to sigma /sub ann /=2210+or-1105 mb. The result is compared to the set of measurements presently available in the region of low p momentum. (18 refs).

  8. Antiproton cell experiment: antimatter is a better killer

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "European Organization for Nuclear Research is reporting that results from a three year study of antiprotons for neoplasm irrdiation showed a better cellular killer with a smaller lethal dose." (1,5 page)

  9. A new antiproton beam transfer scheme without coalescing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiren Chou et al.

    2003-06-04

    An effective way to increase the luminosity in the Fermilab Tevatron collider program Run2 is to improve the overall antiproton transfer efficiency. During antiproton coalescing in the Main Injector (MI), about 10-15% particles get lost. This loss could be avoided in a new antiproton transfer scheme that removes coalescing from the process. Moreover, this scheme would also eliminate emittance dilution due to coalescing. This scheme uses a 2.5 MHz RF system to transfer antiprotons from the Accumulator to the Main Injector. It is then followed by a bunch rotation in the MI to shorten the bunch length so that it can be captured by a 53 MHz RF bucket. Calculations and ESME simulations show that this scheme works. No new hardware is needed to implement this scheme.

  10. Antiprotons from dark matter annihilation in the Galaxy: astrophysical uncertainties

    CERN Document Server

    Evoli, Carmelo; Grasso, Dario; Maccione, Luca; Ullio, Piero

    2011-01-01

    The latest years have seen steady progresses in WIMP dark matter (DM) searches, with hints of possible signals suggested by both direct and indirect detection experiments. Antiprotons can play a key role validating those interpretations since they are copiously produced by WIMP annihilations in the Galactic halo, and the secondary antiproton background produced by Cosmic Ray (CR) interactions is predicted with fair accuracy and matches the observed spectrum very well. Using the publicly available numerical DRAGON code, we reconsider antiprotons as a tool to constrain DM models discussing its power and limitations. We provide updated constraints on a wide class of annihilating DM models by comparing our predictions against the most up-to-date ap measurements, taking also into account the latest spectral information on the p, He and other CR nuclei fluxes. Doing that, we probe carefully the uncertainties associated to both secondary and DM originated antiprotons, by using a variety of distinctively different as...

  11. Centrality dependence of antiproton production in Au+Au collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beavis, D.; Bennett, M.J.; Carroll, J.B.; Chiba, J.; Chikanian, A.; Crawford, H.; Cronqvist, M.; Dardenne, Y.; Debbe, R.; Doke, T.; Engelage, J.; Greiner, L.; Hallman, T.J.; Hayano, R.S.; Heckman, H.H.; Kashiwagi, T.; Kikuchi, J.; Kumar, S.; Kuo, C.; Lindstrom, P.J.; Mitchell, J.W.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J.L.; Pope, J.K.; Stankus, P.; Tanaka, K.H.; Welsh, R.C.; Zhan, W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York (United States)]|[A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)]|[University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles California (United States)]|[National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan)]|[University of California Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley California (United States)]|[Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan)]|[University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley California (United States)]|[Universities Space Sciences Research Association/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland (United States)]|[Nevis Laboratory, Columbia University, Irvington, New York (United States)]|[Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); (E878 Collaboration)

    1995-11-13

    We have measured the yields of antiprotons in Au+Au interactions in the rapidity range 1.2{lt}{ital y}{lt}2.8 as a function of centrality using a beam line spectrometer. The shapes of the invariant multiplicity distributions at {ital p}{sub {ital t}}=0 are used to explore the dynamics of antiproton production and annihilation. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital The} {ital American} {ital Physical} {ital Society}.

  12. Density shift and broadening of transition lines in antiprotonic helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalov; Jeziorski; Korona; Szalewicz; Tchoukova

    2000-03-13

    The density shift and broadening of the transition lines of antiprotonic helium have been evaluated in the impact approximation using an interatomic potential calculated ab initio with the symmetry-adapted perturbation theory. The results help to remove an uncertainty of up to 10 ppm in the laser spectroscopy data on antiprotonic helium and are of importance in experimental tests of bound state QED and CPT invariance.

  13. Heating nuclei with 8 GeV/c antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Lefort, T; Hsi, W C; Beaulieu, L; Viola, V E; Pienkowski, L; Korteling, R G; Leforest, R; Martin, E; Ramakrishnan, E; Rowland, D; Ruangma, A; Winchester, E M; Yennello, S J; Gushue, S; Remsberg, L P; Back, B B; Breuer, H

    1999-01-01

    Studies of the heating effect of 8 GeV/c pi sup - and antiproton beams incident on a sup 1 sup 9 sup 7 Au nucleus have been conducted at Brookhaven AGS accelerator with the Indiana Silicon Sphere 4 pi detector array. Enhanced energy deposition for antiprotons relative to negative pions and protons in this energy regime is observed. The results are consistent with predictions of an intranuclear cascade code.

  14. Ion trapping in the high-energy storage ring HESR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinterberger, Frank [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik

    2011-10-15

    The problem of ion trapping in the high-energy storage ring HESR is studied in the present report. Positive ions are trapped in the negative potential well of the antiproton beam. The ions are produced by the interaction between the antiproton beam and the residual gas. The adverse effects of ion trapping like tune shifts, tune spreads and coherent instabilities are reviewed. The ion production rate by ionization of the residual gas molecules is estimated. The negative potential well and the corresponding electric fields of the antiproton beam are evaluated in order to study the transverse and longitudinal motion of the ions and the accumulation in trapping pockets. The removal of ions can be achieved using clearing electrodes and under certain conditions resonant transverse beam shaking. Diagnostic tools and measurements of trapped ion effects are sketched. (orig.)

  15. Monte-Carlo simulation of events for (un)polarized Drell-Yan with antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Bianconi, A

    2004-01-01

    The complete knowledge of the nucleon spin structure at leading twist requires also addressing the transverse spin distribution of quarks, or transversity, which is yet unexplored because of its chiral-odd nature. Transversity can be best extracted from single-spin asymmetries in fully polarized Drell-Yan processes with antiprotons, where valence contributions are involved anyway. Alternatively, in single-polarized Drell-Yan the transversity happens convoluted with another chiral-odd function, which is likely to be responsible for the well known (and yet unexplained) violation of the Lam-Tung sum rule in the corresponding unpolarized cross section. We present Monte-Carlo simulations for the unpolarized and single-polarized Drell-Yan $\\bar{p} p^{(\\uparrow)} \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^- X$ with antiproton beam energies of 40 and 15 GeV as a test case, in order to estimate the minimum number of events needed to extract the above chiral-odd distributions from future measurements at the HESR ring at GSI. It is important to stu...

  16. Cryogenic Current Comparator as Low Intensity Beam Current Monitor in the CERN Antiproton Decelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, M; Soby, L; Welsch, CP

    2013-01-01

    In the low-energy Antiproton Decelerator (AD) and the future Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) rings at CERN, an absolute measurement of the beam intensity is essential to monitor any losses during the deceleration and cooling phases. However, existing DC current transformers can hardly reach the μA level, while at the AD and ELENA currents can be as low as 100 nA. A Cryogenic Current Comparator (CCC) based on a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is currently being designed and shall be installed in the AD and ELENA machines. It should meet the following specifications: A current resolution smaller than 10 nA, a dynamic range covering currents between 100 nA and 1 mA, as well as a bandwidth from DC to 1 kHz. Different design options are being considered, including the use of low or high temperature superconductor materials, different CCC shapes and dimensions, different SQUID characteristics, as well as electromagnetic shielding requirements. In this contribution we present first results f...

  17. The "g-2" Muon Storage Ring

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The "g-2" muon storage ring, shortly before completion in June 1974. Bursts of pions (from a target, hit by a proton beam from the 26 GeV PS) are injected and polarized muons from their decay are captured on a stable orbit. When the muons decay too, their precession in the magnetic field of the storage ring causes a modulation of the decay-electron counting rate, from which the muon's anomalous magnetic moment can be determined. In 1977, the "g-2" magnets were modified to build ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment), a proton and antiproton storage ring for testing stochastic and electron cooling. Later on, the magnets had a 3rd life, when the ion storage ring CELSIUS was built from them in Uppsala. For later use as ICE, see 7711282, 7802099, 7809081,7908242.

  18. The CPLEAR particle identification detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelopoulos, A.; Apostolakis, A.; Rozaki, E.; Sakeliou, L. (Univ. Athens (Greece)); Backenstoss, G.; Kuzminski, J.; Rickenbach, R.; Wildi, M. (Univ. Basel (Switzerland)); Carlson, P.; Francis, D.; Jansson, K.; Jon-And, K.; Kerek, A.; Szilagyi, S. (Manne Siegbahn Inst. Stockholm (Sweden)); Carvalho, J.; Cobbaert, H.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Machado, E.; Onofre, A.; Pinto da Cunha, J.; Policarpo, A. (Univ. Coimbra, LIP (Portugal) Technical Univ., Delft (Netherlands)); Charalambous, S.; Chardalas, M.; Dedoussis, S.; Touramanis, C. (Univ. Thessaloniki (Greece)); Fassnacht, P.; Pelucchi, F. (CPPM, Marseille (France) CSNSM, Orsay (France) P. Scherrer Inst., Villingen (Switzerland) DPhPe, CEN-Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); Fetcher, W.; Gerber, H.J. (Inst. fuer Mittelenergiephysik, ETH Villingen (Switzerland)); Fuglesang, C.; Kesseler, G.; Montanet, F. (CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)); Go, A.; Lawry, T.; Miller, J.; Roberts, B.L.; Varner, G.; Warner, D.; Zimmerman, D. (Univ. Boston,; CPLEAR Collaboration

    1992-01-01

    The CPLEAR experiment will measure CP violation parameters in the neutral kaon system, using a low energy antiproton beam from the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. One of its subdetectors, the Particle Identification Detector (PID), makes a fast separation of pions and kaons, which is essential for the experiment. This article describes the design of the PID and its performance during beam tests and during initial runs at LEAR. A pion rejection efficiency of 99.7% for the first level trigger (after 60 ns) is found in the relevant momentum region. (orig.).

  19. The Floor's the Limit (Antiproton energies to hit new low)

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Celebrating the success of the RFQ in Aarhus. Left to right: Alessanda Lombardi (CERN), Iouri Bylinskii (CERN), Alex Csete (Aarhus), Ulrik Uggerhøj (Aarhus), Ryu Hayano (Tokyo, spokesman ASACUSA), Helge Knudsen (Aarhus), Werner Pirkl (CERN), Ryan Thompson (Aarhus), Søren P. Møller (Aarhus). Although in particle physics we are accustomed to strive for higher and higher energies, this is not always the most interesting thing to do with antiprotons. Indeed, as recent issues of the Bulletin have suggested, the signpost on the road to a closer look at the antiproton points towards ever-lower energies. The CERN Antiproton Decelerator decelerates antipro-tons emerging from a target placed in the path of a 26 GeV/c proton beam from 90 % of to about 10 % of the speed of light. However, even this is far too fast for many of the most interesting experiments on antiprotons planned by Danish and Japanese members of the ASACUSA collaboration. Tokyo University has therefore financed the con...

  20. Calculated LET spectrum from antiproton beams stopping in water

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Antiprotons have been proposed as a potential modality for radiotherapy because the annihilation at the end of range leads to roughly a doubling of physical dose in the Bragg peak region. So far it has been anticipated that the radiobiology of antiproton beams is similar to that of protons in the entry region of the beam, but very different in the annihilation region, due to the expected high-LET components resulting from the annihilation. On closer inspection we find that calculations of dose averaged LET in the entry region may suggest that the RBE of antiprotons in the plateau region could significantly differ from unity, which seems to warrant closer inspection of the radiobiology in this region. Materials and Methods. Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA were performed for calculating the entire particle spectrum of a beam of 126 MeV antiprotons hitting a water phantom. Results and Discussion. In the plateau region of the simulated antiproton beam we observe a dose-averaged unrestrict...

  1. CP violation in K/sup 0/ (anti K/sup 0/) -> 2. gamma. decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decker, R.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Zoupanos, G.

    1985-06-01

    With the newly available intense K/sup 0/(anti K/sup 0/) beams of the low energy antiproton ring (LEAR) at CERN, measurements, of CP violation in channels other than K->..pi pi.. are possible. We study CP violation in the K/sup 0/(anti K/sup 0/)->2..gamma.. decay.

  2. Many Facets of Strangeness Nuclear Physics with Stored Antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Pochodzalla, Josef; Lorente, Alicia Sanchez; Rojo, Marta Martinez; Steinen, Marcell; Gerl, Jürgen; Kojouharova, Jasmina; Kojouharova, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Stored antiprotons beams in the GeV range represent a unparalleled factory for hyperon-antihyperon pairs. Their outstanding large production probability in antiproton collisions will open the floodgates for a series of new studies of strange hadronic systems with unprecedented precision. The behavior of hyperons and -- for the first time -- of antihyperons in nuclear systems can be studied under well controlled conditions. The exclusive production of $\\Lambda\\bar{\\Lambda}$ and $\\Sigma^-\\bar{\\Lambda}$ pairs in antiproton-nucleus interactions probe the neutron and proton distribution in the nuclear periphery and will help to sample the neutron skin. For the first time, high resolution $\\gamma$-spectroscopy of doubly strange nuclei will be performed, thus complementing measurements of ground state decays of double hypernuclei with mesons beams at J-PARC or possible decays of particle unstable hypernuclei in heavy ion reactions. High resolution spectroscopy of multistrange $\\Xi$-atoms are feasible and even the pr...

  3. Production of fragments and hyperfragments in antiproton-nucleus collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2016-04-01

    The formation mechanism of fragments with strangeness in collisions of antiprotons on nuclei has been investigated within the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics (LQMD) transport model. Production of strange particles in the antiproton-induced nuclear reactions is modeled within the LQMD model, in which all possible reaction channels such as elastic scattering, annihilation, charge exchange, and inelastic scattering in antibaryon-baryon, baryon-baryon, and meson-baryon collisions have been included. A coalescence approach is developed for constructing hyperfragments in phase space. The hyperfragments are formed within the narrower rapidities. It has the advantage of producing heavier hyperfragments and hypernuclides with strangeness s =-2 (double-Λ fragments) and s =1 (Λ ¯ fragments) in antiproton-induced reactions.

  4. Strangeness production and hypernucleus formation in antiproton induced reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Formation mechanism of fragments with strangeness in collisions of antiprotons on nuclei has been investigated within the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics (LQMD) transport approach combined with a statistical model (GEMINI) for describing the decays of excited fragments. Production of strange particles in the antiproton induced nuclear reactions is modeled within the LQMD model, in which all possible reaction channels such as elastic scattering, annihilation, charge exchange and inelastic scattering in antibaryon-baryon, baryon-baryon and meson-baryon collisions have been included. A coalescence approach is developed for constructing hyperfragments in phase space after de-excitation of nucleonic fragments. The combined approach could describe the production of fragments in low-energy antiproton induced reactions. Hyperfragments are formed within the narrower rapidities and lower kinetic energies. It has advantage to produce heavier hyperfragments and hypernuclides with strangeness s=-2 (double-$\\Lambda$ fra...

  5. Ring blowers. Ring blower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahara, Y.; Okamura, T.; Takahashi, M. (Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-06-10

    Features, structures and several products of ring blowers were outlined. The ring blower is featured by its medium characteristics because it is higher in air pressure than a turboblower and larger in airflow than a vane blower, and it is applicable flexibly to not only air blasting but various industrial fields such as suction transfer. As several products corresponding to various fields, the followings were outlined: the low noise type with optimum shapes of inlet, outlet and casing cover for reducing noises by 10 dB or more, the heat resistant, water-tight and explosion-proof types suitable for severe environmental conditions, the multi-voltage type for every country served at different voltages, the high air pressure type with two pressure rise stages, and the large airflow type with a wide impeller. In addition, as special use products, the glass fiber reinforced unsatulated polyester ring blower for respiration apparatus, and the variable speed blushless DC motor-driven one for medical beds were outlined. 2 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Perspectives for low energy antiproton physics at FAIR

    CERN Document Server

    Widmann, Eberhard

    2014-01-01

    The CRYRING accelerator, previously located at the Manne Siegbahn Laboratory of Stockholm University, has been chosen by the FLAIR collaboration as the central accelerator for the planned facility. It has been modified to allow for high-energy injection and extraction and is capable of providing fast and slow extracted beams of antiprotons and highly charged ions. It is currently being installed at the ESR of GSI Darmstadt where it can be used with highly charged ions. The future possibilities for its use with slow antiprotons will be discussed.

  7. Calculated LET Spectrum from Antiproton Beams Stopping in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael

    2009-01-01

    significantly differ from unity, which seems to warrant closer inspection of the radiobiology in this region. Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA were performed for calculating the entire particle spectrum of a beam of 126 MeV antiprotons hitting a water phantom. In the plateau region of the simulated...... antiproton beam we observe a dose-averaged unrestricted LET of about 4 keV/μm, which is very different from the expected 0.6 keV/μm of an equivalent primary proton beam. Even though the fluence of secondaries is a magnitude less than the fluence of primary particles, the increased stopping power...

  8. High-energy antiprotons from old supernova remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Blasi, Pasquale

    2009-01-01

    A recently proposed model (arXiv:0903.2794) explains the rise in energy of the positron fraction measured by the PAMELA satellite in terms of hadronic production of positrons in aged supernova remnants, and acceleration therein. Here we present a preliminary calculation of the anti-proton flux produced by the same mechanism. While the model is consistent with present data, a rise of the antiproton to proton ratio is predicted at high energy, which strikingly distinguishes this scenario from other astrophysical explanations of the positron fraction (like pulsars). We briefly discuss important implications for Dark Matter searches via antimatter.

  9. High-energy antiprotons from old supernova remnants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasi, Pasquale; Serpico, Pasquale D

    2009-08-21

    A recently proposed model explains the rise in energy of the positron fraction measured by the PAMELA satellite in terms of hadronic production of positrons in aged supernova remnants, and acceleration therein. Here we present a preliminary calculation of the antiproton flux produced by the same mechanism. While the model is consistent with present data, a rise of the antiproton to proton ratio is predicted at high energy, which strikingly distinguishes this scenario from other astrophysical explanations of the positron fraction (such as pulsars). We briefly discuss important implications for dark matter searches via antimatter.

  10. Development of narrowband lasers for spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hori M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We review some lasers developed by the ASACUSA collaboration of CERN, to carry out spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms. These lasers were based on the technique of continuous-wave injection seeding of pulsed lasers. The laser output covered the wavelength regions 264–1154 nm, with peak powers of ~ 1 MW and spectral resolutions of 6–40 MHz. The devices were recently used to measure the transition frequencies of antiprotonic helium atoms to a fractional precision of several parts in ~ 109.

  11. AMS-02 antiprotons from annihilating or decaying dark matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Hamaguchi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently the AMS-02 experiment reported an excess of cosmic ray antiprotons over the expected astrophysical background. We interpret the excess as a signal from annihilating or decaying dark matter and find that the observed spectrum is well fitted by adding contributions from the annihilation or decay of dark matter with mass of O(TeV or larger. Interestingly, Wino dark matter with mass of around 3 TeV, whose thermal relic abundance is consistent with present dark matter abundance, can explain the antiproton excess. We also discuss the implications for the decaying gravitino dark matter with R-parity violation.

  12. Measurement of cosmic-ray antiproton spectrum at solar minimum with a long-duration balloon flight in Antarctica

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Haino, S; Hams, T; Hasegawa, M; Horikoshi, A; Kim, K C; Kusumoto, A; Lee, M H; Makida, Y; Matsuda, S; Matsukawa, Y; Mitchell, J W; Nishimura, J; Nozaki, M; Orito, R; Ormes, J F; Sakai, K; Sasaki, M; Seo, E S; Shinoda, R; Streitmatter, R E; Suzuki, J; Tanaka, K; Thakur, N; Yamagami, T; Yamamoto, A; Yoshida, T; Yoshimura, K

    2011-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray antiprotons has been measured in the range 0.17 to 3.5 GeV, based on 7886 antiprotons collected by the BESS-Polar II instrument during a long-duration flight over Antarctica in the solar minimum period of December 2007 through January 2008. The antiproton spectrum measured by BESS-Polar II shows good consistency with secondary antiproton calculations. Cosmologically primary antiprotons have been searched for by comparing the observed and calculated antiproton spectra. The BESS-Polar II result shows no evidence of primary antiprotons originating from the evaporation of PBH.

  13. Relative Biological Effectiveness and Peripheral Damage of Antiproton Annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    Kavanagh, J N; Kaiser, F; Tegami, S; Schettino, G; Kovacevic, S; Hajdukovic, D; Welsch, C P; Currell, F J; Toelli, H T; Doser, M; Holzscheiter, M; Herrmann, R; Timson, D J; Alsner, J; Landua, R; Knudsen, H; Comor, J; Moller, S P; Beyer, G

    2002-01-01

    The use of ions to deliver radiation to a body for therapeutic purposes has the potential to be significant improvement over the use of low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation because of the improved energy deposition profile and the enhanced biological effects of ions relative to photons. Proton therapy centers exist and are being used to treat patients. In addition, the initial use of heavy ions such as carbon is promising to the point that new treatment facilities are planned. Just as with protons or heavy ions, antiprotons can be used to deliver radiation to the body in a controlled way; however antiprotons will exhibit additional energy deposition due to annihilation of the antiprotons within the body. The slowing down of antiprotons in matter is similar to that of protons except at the very end of the range beyond the Bragg peak. Gray and Kalogeropoulos estimated the additional energy deposited by heavy nuclear fragments within a few millimeters of the annihilation vertex to be approximately 30 MeV (...

  14. Outer casing of the AA antiproton production target

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    The first version of the antiproton production target was a tungsten rod, 11 cm long (actually a row of 11 rods, each 1 cm long) and 3 mm in diameter. The rod was embedded in graphite, pressure-seated into an outer casing made of stainless steel. The casing had fins for forced-air cooling.

  15. The Antiproton Depth Dose Curve Measured with Alanine Detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, Johnny Witterseh; Palmans, Hugo;

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we report on the measurement of the antiproton depth dose curve, with alanine detectors. The results are compared with simulations using the particle energy spectrum calculated by FLUKA, and using the track structure model of Hansen et Olsen for conversion of calculated dose...

  16. Vortex rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhmetov, D.G. [Lavrentiev Institute of Hydrodynamics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-01

    This book presents a comprehensive coverage of the wide field of vortex rings. The book presents the results of systematic experimental investigations, theoretical foundation, as well as the practical applications of vortex rings, such as the extinction of fires at gushing gas and oil wells. All the basic properties of vortex rings as well as their hydrodynamic structures are presented. Special attention is paid to the formation and motion of turbulent vortex rings. (orig.)

  17. Ring theory

    CERN Document Server

    Rowen, Louis H

    1991-01-01

    This is an abridged edition of the author's previous two-volume work, Ring Theory, which concentrates on essential material for a general ring theory course while ommitting much of the material intended for ring theory specialists. It has been praised by reviewers:**""As a textbook for graduate students, Ring Theory joins the best....The experts will find several attractive and pleasant features in Ring Theory. The most noteworthy is the inclusion, usually in supplements and appendices, of many useful constructions which are hard to locate outside of the original sources....The audience of non

  18. Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello and King Lear in the English Teaching at School: a methodological approach - doi: 10.4025/actascieduc.v34i2.15070

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdomiro Polidório

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article we will talk about the relevance of dramatic texts in schools. Therefore we will approach the tragedies Hamlet, Macbeth, Otelo e King Lear de William Shakespeare and how teachers can explore them as a help in the teaching of languages without forgetting that they are dramatic and literary texts. When we refer to languages, we want to say any language, because Shakespearean texts are ageless, may have many meanings and deal with human nature. The theatre is in our lives and in this case it is relevant to quote William Shakespeare himself that said that “life is a stage and we are actors”. Starting from this, we will consider the best ways of using the tragedies Hamlet, Macbeth, Otelo e King Lear in the classroom.  

  19. INITIAL COOLING EXPERIMENT (ICE)

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    ICE was built in 1977, using the modified bending magnets of the g-2 muon storage ring (see 7405430). Its purpose was to verify the validity of stochastic and electron cooling for the antiproton project. Stochastic cooling proved a resounding success early in 1978 and the antiproton project could go ahead, now entirely based on stochastic cooling. Electron cooling was experimented with in 1979. The 26 kV equipment is housed in the cage to the left of the picture, adjacent to the "e-cooler" located in a straight section of the ring. With some modifications, the cooler was later transplanted into LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring) and then, with further modifications, into the AD (Antiproton Decelerator), where it cools antiprotons to this day (2006). See also: 7711282, 7802099, 7809081.

  20. INITIAL COOLING EXPERIMENT (ICE)

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    ICE was built in 1977, in a record time of 9 months, using the modified bending magnets of the g-2 muon storage ring. Its purpose was to verify the validity of stochastic and electron cooling for the antiproton project, to be launched in 1978. Already early in 1978, stochastic cooling proved a resounding success, such that the antiproton (p-pbar)project was entirely based on it. Tests of electron cooling followed later: protons of 46 MeV kinetic energy were cooled with an electron beam of 26 kV and 1.3 A. The cage seen prominently in the foreground houses the HV equipment, adjacent to the "cooler" installed in a straight section of the ring. With some modifications, the cooler was later transplanted into LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring) and then, with further modifications, into the AD (Antiproton Decelerator), where it cools antiprotons to this day (2006). See also: 7711282, 7802099, 7908242.

  1. Planetary Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Tiscareno, Matthew S

    2011-01-01

    Planetary rings are the only nearby astrophysical disks, and the only disks that have been investigated by spacecraft. Although there are significant differences between rings and other disks, chiefly the large planet/ring mass ratio that greatly enhances the flatness of rings (aspect ratios as small as 1e-7), understanding of disks in general can be enhanced by understanding the dynamical processes observed at close-range and in real-time in planetary rings. We review the known ring systems of the four giant planets, as well as the prospects for ring systems yet to be discovered. We then review planetary rings by type. The main rings of Saturn comprise our system's only dense broad disk and host many phenomena of general application to disks including spiral waves, gap formation, self-gravity wakes, viscous overstability and normal modes, impact clouds, and orbital evolution of embedded moons. Dense narrow rings are the primary natural laboratory for understanding shepherding and self-stability. Narrow dusty...

  2. Laser spectroscopy of the antiprotonic helium atom – its energy levels and state lifetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Hidetoshi, Yamaguchi

    2003-01-01

    The antiprotonic atom is a three-body exotic system consisting of an antiproton, an electron and a helium nucleus. Its surprising longevity was found and has been studied for more than 10 years. In this work, transition energies and lifetimes of this exotic atom were systematically studied by using the antiproton beam of AD(Antiproton Decelerator) facility at CERN, with an RFQ antiproton decelerator, a narrow-bandwidth laser, Cerenkov counters with fast-response photomultiplier tubes, and cryogenic helium target systems. Thirteen transition energies were determined with precisions of better than 200 ppb by a laser spectroscopy method, together with the elimination of the shift effect caused by collisions with surrounding atoms. Fifteen lifetimes (decay rates) of short-lived states were determined from the time distributions of the antiproton-annihilation signals and the resonance widths of the atomic spectral lines. The relation between the magnitude of the decay rates and the transition multipolarity was inv...

  3. Spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms and its contribution to the fundamental physical constants

    CERN Document Server

    Hayano, R S

    2010-01-01

    Proceedings of the Japan Academy, Series B Vol. 86 (2010) No. 1 P 1-10 Language: Next Article http://dx.doi.org/10.2183/pjab.86.1 JST.JSTAGE/pjab/86.1 Reviews Spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms and its contribution to the fundamental physical constants Ryugo S. HAYANO1) 1) Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo Released 2010/01/14 Keywords: antiproton, CERN, fundamental physical constants, laser spectroscopy Full Text PDF [1604K] Abstracts References(25) Antiprotonic helium atom, a metastable neutral system consisting of an antiproton, an electron and a helium nucleus, was serendipitously discovered, and has been studied at CERN’s antiproton decelerator facility. Its transition frequencies have recently been measured to nine digits of precision by laser spectroscopy. By comparing these experimental results with three-body QED calculations, the antiproton-to-electron massratio was determined as 1836.152674(5). This result contributed to the CODATA recommended val...

  4. Partial wave analyses of antiproton-proton annihilations in flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pychy, Julian; Koch, Helmut; Kopf, Bertram; Wiedner, Ulrich [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik I, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    To investigate important aspects for the upcoming PANDA experiment, partial wave analyses (PWA) of anti pp-annihilation processes are carried out using data from the Crystal Barrel (LEAR) experiment. A coupled channel analysis of the three reactions resulting in the final states K{sup +}K{sup -}π{sup 0}, π{sup 0}π{sup 0}η and π{sup 0}ηη at a beam momentum of 900 MeV/c is currently in progress. Preliminary results on the determination of resonance contributions and of the spin density matrix (SDM) of different light mesons are presented. The elements of the SDM provide important information about the production process. Furthermore, results of the analyses of the channels ωπ{sup 0}, ωπ{sup 0}η and π{sup +}π{sup -}π{sup 0}π{sup 0} are discussed. These studies are focused on the determination of the contributing angular momenta of the anti pp-system as well as of the SDM of the ω meson. Significant spin-alignment effects depending on the production angle are visible here. These results are compared with those for the φ(1020) in the K{sup +}K{sup -}π{sup 0} channel. All analyses have been performed using PAWIAN, a common, object-oriented and easy-to-use PWA software that is being developed at the Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum. This presentation summarizes recent activities of the Crystal Barrel (LEAR) Collaboration.

  5. Secondary electron emission in antiproton-carbon foil collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komaki, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Kuroki, K. (Inst. of Physics, Coll. of Arts and Sciences, Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)); Andersen, L.H.; Horsdal-Pedersen, E.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Moeller, S.P.; Uggerhoej, E. (Inst. of Physics, Univ. of Aarhus (Denmark)); Elsener, K. (CERN, Geneva (Switzerland))

    1991-04-01

    Energy spectra of electrons emitted in the forward direction by antiproton and proton bombardments on carbon foil targets were measured in the incident energy region from 500 to 750 keV. In the spectra for antiproton impact, no sharp anticusp, which is expected in place of the cusp in the case of the proton impact, is recognized and a small bump is found at 50 eV below the cusp energy. The spectral profile in the equivelocity region, including smearing out of the anticusp, together with the energy and intensity of the bump, is consistent with a theoretical prediction for wake-riding electrons based on the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method. (orig.).

  6. Dark matter for excess of AMS-02 positrons and antiprotons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Hung Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a dark matter explanation to simultaneously account for the excess of antiproton-to-proton and positron power spectra observed in the AMS-02 experiment while having the right dark matter relic abundance and satisfying the current direct search bounds. We extend the Higgs triplet model with a hidden gauge symmetry of SU(2X that is broken to Z3 by a quadruplet scalar field, rendering the associated gauge bosons stable weakly-interacting massive particle dark matter candidates. By coupling the complex Higgs triplet and the SU(2X quadruplet, the dark matter candidates can annihilate into triplet Higgs bosons each of which in turn decays into lepton or gauge boson final states. Such a mechanism gives rise to correct excess of positrons and antiprotons with an appropriate choice of the triplet vacuum expectation value. Besides, the model provides a link between neutrino mass and dark matter phenomenology.

  7. Antiproton beam profile measurements using Gas Electron Multipliers

    CERN Document Server

    Pinto, Serge Duarte; Spanggaard, Jens; Tranquille, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    The new beam profile measurement for the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN is based on a single Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) with a 2D readout structure. This detector is very light, ~0.4% X_0, as required by the low energy of the antiprotons, 5.3 MeV. This overcomes the problems previously encountered with multi-wire proportional chambers (MWPC) for the same purpose, where beam interactions with the detector severely affect the obtained profiles. A prototype was installed and successfully tested in late 2010, with another five detectors now installed in the ASACUSA and AEgIS beam lines. We will provide a detailed description of the detector and discuss the results obtained. The success of these detectors in the AD makes GEM-based detectors likely candidates for upgrade of the beam profile monitors in all experimental areas at CERN. The various types of MWPC currently in use are aging and becoming increasingly difficult to maintain.

  8. A Good Statistics Study of Antiproton Interactions with Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment extends the study of inclusive pion production and the correlation between pions which result from hadron-nucleus collisions at intermediate and high energies to the antiproton-nucleus system. It is part of a long term systematic search for exotic nuclear phenomena. The correlation data will be used to extract, via pion interferometry, the size and coherence of the annihilation source in nuclei. In addition, the reaction @* + A @A p + A* will be studied to look for structure in the proton spectra which antiproton-nucleus bound states.\\\\ \\\\ The experimental system is based on a flexible, broad range, large acceptance (1~steradian) spectrometer which consists of an 80~cm diameter dipole magnet surrounded with detector arrays. These detectors provide momentum, energy loss, Cerenkov and time of flight information for up to ten ejectiles per event. Momentum resolution varies from 1\\% to 3\\%, depending on energy.

  9. Measurement method of the antiproton gravitational mass using the single electron transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchiat, V.; Chardin, G.; Devoret, M.H.; Esteve, D.

    1996-12-31

    We propose a non destructive method to measure the trajectory of a single antiproton in a drift tube using position sensors based on the single electron transistor. We show that this recently developed device has sufficient sensitivity to detect the electric field of a moving charged particle. Comparing the trajectories of antiprotons and H{sup -} ions could allow a reliable determination of the gravitational mass of the antiproton. (authors). 24 refs.

  10. Bubble detector measurements of a mixed radiation field from antiproton annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels; Møller, Søren Pape; Petersen, Jørgen B.; Rahbek, Dennis; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.

    2006-01-01

    In the light of recent progress in the study of the biological potential of antiproton tumour treatment it is important to be able to characterize the neutron intensity arising from antiproton annihilation using simple, compact and reliable detectors. The intensity of fast neutrons from antiproton annihilation on polystyrene has been measured with bubble detectors and a multiplicity has been derived as well as an estimated neutron equivalent dose. Additionally the sensitivity of bubble detectors towards protons was measured.

  11. Selected Papers on Low-Energy Antiprotons and Possible Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, Robert [Fermilab

    1998-09-19

    The only realistic means by which to create a facility at Fermilab to produce large amounts of low energy antiprotons is to use resources which already exist. There is simply too little money and manpower at this point in time to generate new accelerators on a time scale before the turn of the century. Therefore, innovation is required to modify existing equipment to provide the services required by experimenters.

  12. Antiprotons from dark matter annihilation in the Galaxy. Astrophysical uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evoli, Carmelo [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). National Astronomical Observatories; Cholis, Ilias; Ullio, Piero [SISSA, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); Grasso, Dario [INFN, Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Maccione, Luca [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    The latest years have seen steady progresses in WIMP dark matter (DM) searches, with hints of possible signals suggested by both direct and indirect detection experiments. Antiprotons can play a key role validating those interpretations since they are copiously produced by WIMP annihilations in the Galactic halo, and the secondary antiproton background produced by Cosmic Ray (CR) interactions is predicted with fair accuracy and matches the observed spectrum very well. Using the publicly available numerical DRAGON code, we reconsider antiprotons as a tool to constrain DM models discussing its power and limitations. We provide updated constraints on a wide class of annihilating DM models by comparing our predictions against the most up-to-date anti p measurements, taking also into account the latest spectral information on the p, He and other CR nuclei fluxes. Doing that, we probe carefully the uncertainties associated to both secondary and DM originated antiprotons, by using a variety of distinctively different assumptions for the propagation of CRs and for the DM distribution in the Galaxy. We find that the impact of the astrophysical uncertainties on constraining the DM properties can be much stronger, up to a factor of {proportional_to}50, than the one due to uncertainties on the DM distribution ({proportional_to}2-6). Remarkably, even reducing the uncertainties on the propagation parameters derived by local observables, non-local effects can still change DM model constraints even by 50%. Nevertheless, current anti p data place tight constraints on DM models, excluding some of those suggested in connection with indirect and direct searches. Finally we discuss the power of upcoming CR spectral data from the AMS-02 observatory to drastically reduce the uncertainties discussed in this paper and estimate the expected sensitivity of this instrument to some sets of DM models. (orig.)

  13. The Production and Study of Cold Antiprotons and Antihydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-03

    baryon system . A second goal is to compare the antiproton and proton charge-to-mass ratios to higher precision. All interesting comparisons of the...trap designs now being used in devices that analyze pharmaceuticals and chemical compounds. There are hundreds of scientific citations to the reports... theories (QFT) for which there is a CPT theorem if plausible assump- tions (like causality, locality and Lorentz invariance) are made. Of course

  14. Saturation of low-energy antiproton annihilation on nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, A.; Friedman, E.; Batty, C. J.

    2000-10-01

    Recent measurements of very low-energy (pL0, parallels the recent prediction, for /E<0, that the level widths of /p¯ atoms saturate and, hence, that /p¯ deeply bound atomic states are relatively narrow. Antiproton annihilation cross sections are calculated at pL=57 MeV//c across the periodic table, and their dependence on /Z and /A is classified and discussed with respect to the Coulomb focussing effect at very low energies.

  15. A novel antiproton radial diagnostic based on octupole induced ballistic loss

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page, R D; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    We report results from a novel diagnostic that probes the outer radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds. The diagnostic allows us to determine the profile by monitoring the time-history of antiproton losses that occur as an octupole field in the antiproton confinement region is increased. We show several examples of how this diagnostic helps us to understand the radial dynamics of antiprotons in normal and nested Penning-Malmberg traps. Better understanding of these dynamics may aid current attempts to trap antihydrogen atoms.

  16. Single and double ionization of helium by fast antiproton and proton impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, L.H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Mo-dash-barller, S.P.; Elsener, K.; Rensfelt, K.H.; Uggerho-dash-barj, E.

    1986-10-27

    The first ion-atom--collision data obtained with antiprotons are presented. We measured the single- and double-ionization cross section for 0.5-5-MeV antiprotons and protons colliding with helium. For ion energies above --2 MeV, the single-ionization cross section is the same for protons and antiprotons. However, surprisingly, the double-ionization cross section for antiprotons is approximately a factor of 2 larger than that for protons. The present data constitute a challenge for future theoretical models of charged-particle--atom collisions.

  17. Time-dependent density functional calculation of the energy loss of antiprotons colliding with metallic nanoshells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quijada, M. [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Quimicas UPV/EHU, Apartado 1072, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); Donostia International Physics Center DIPC, P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Borisov, A.G. [Donostia International Physics Center DIPC, P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Universite Paris-Sud, Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires (France); CNRS, UMR 8625, Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires, LCAM, Batiment 351, UPS-11, Orsay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Muino, R.D. [Donostia International Physics Center DIPC, P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Centro de Fisica de Materiales, Centro Mixto CSIC-UPV/EHU, Edificio Korta, Avenida de Tolosa 72, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain)

    2008-06-15

    Time-dependent density functional theory is used to study the interaction between antiprotons and metallic nanoshells. The ground state electronic properties of the nanoshell are obtained in the jellium approximation. The energy lost by the antiproton during the collision is calculated and compared to that suffered by antiprotons traveling in metal clusters. The resulting energy loss per unit path length of material in thin nanoshells is larger than the corresponding quantity for clusters. It is shown that the collision process can be interpreted as the antiproton crossing of two nearly bi-dimensional independent metallic systems. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Interpretation of the cosmic ray positron and antiproton fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Lipari, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The spectral shape of cosmic ray positrons and antiprotons has been accurately measured in the broad kinetic energy range 1-350 GeV. In the higher part of this range (E > 30 GeV) the e+ and pbar are both well described by power laws with spectral indices gamma[e+] = 2.77 +-0.02 and gamma[pbar] = 2.78 +- 0.04 that are approximately equal to each other and to the spectral index of protons. In the same energy range the positron/antiproton flux ratio has the approximately constant value 2.04+-0.04, that is consistent with being equal to the ratio e_/pbar calculated for the conventional mechanism of production, where the antiparticles are created as secondaries in the inelastic interactions of primary cosmic rays with interstellar gas. The positron/antiproton ratio at lower energy is significantly higher (reaching the approximate value e+/pbar = 100 for E around 1 GeV), but in the entire energy range 1-350 GeV, the flux ratio is consistent with being equal to ratio of the production rates in the conventional mecha...

  19. Modified Penning-Malmberg Trap for Storing Antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, William H.; Martin, James; Lewis, Raymond

    2005-01-01

    A modified Penning-Malmberg trap that could store a small cloud of antiprotons for a relatively long time (weeks) has been developed. This trap is intended for use in research on the feasibility of contemplated future matter/antimatter-annihilation systems as propulsion sources for spacecraft on long missions. This trap is also of interest in its own right as a means of storing and manipulating antiprotons for terrestrial scientific experimentation. The use of Penning-Malmberg traps to store antiprotons is not new. What is new here is the modified trap design, which utilizes state-of-the-art radiofrequency (RF) techniques, including ones that, heretofore, have been used in radio-communication applications but not in iontrap applications. A basic Penning-Malmberg trap includes an evacuated round tube that contains or is surrounded by three or more collinear tube electrodes. A steady axial magnetic field that reaches a maximum at the geometric center of the tube is applied by an external source, and DC bias voltages that give rise to an electrostatic potential that reaches a minimum at the center are applied to the electrodes. The combination of electric and magnetic fields confines the charged particles (ions or electrons) for which it was designed to a prolate spheroidal central region. However, geometric misalignments and the diffusive cooling process prevent the steady fields of a basic Penning- Malmberg trap from confining the particles indefinitely. In the modified Penning-Malmberg trap, the loss of antiprotons is reduced or eliminated by use of a "rotating-wall" RF stabilization scheme that also heats the antiproton cloud to minimize loss by matter/antimatter annihilation. The scheme involves the superposition of a quadrupole electric field that rotates about the cylindrical axis at a suitably chosen radio frequency. The modified Penning-Malmberg trap (see Figure 1) includes several collinear sets of electrodes inside a tubular vacuum chamber. Each set

  20. Simulation of an antiprotons beam applied to the radiotherapy; Simulacao de um feixe de antiprotons aplicado a radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prata, Leonardo de Almeida

    2006-07-15

    Results for the interaction of a antiproton beam with constituent nuclei of the organic matter are presented. This method regards of the application of an computational algorithm to determine quantitatively the differential cross sections for the scattered particles, starting from the interaction of these antiprotons with the nuclei, what will allow in the future to draw the isodose curve for antiproton therapy, once these beams are expected to be used in cancer treatment soon. The calculation will be done through the application of the concepts of the method of intranuclear cascade, providing yield and differential cross sections of the scattered particles, present in the software MCMC. Th algorithm was developed based on Monte Carlo's method, already taking into account a validate code. The following physical quantities are presented: the yield of secondary particles, their spectral and angular distributions for these interactions. For the energy range taken into account the more important emitted particles are protons, neutrons and pions. Results shown that emitted secondary particles can modify the isodose curves, because they present high yield and energy for transverse directions. (author)

  1. Impedances and beam stability issues of the Fermilab recycler ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, King-Yuen

    1996-04-01

    The Fermilab Recycler Ring (permanent magnets) will be built on top of the Fermilab Main Injector sharing the same tunnel; its main function is to recycle the anti-protons after a store in the Tevatron and to provide storage for them after after accumulation and cooling in the Accumulator. Estimates of coupling impedances show domination by space charge. Examination of longitudinal instabilities shows that microwave instability will not occur if there are only N = 2.53 x 10{sup 12} anti-protons in the beam. Longitudinal coupling-bunch instability during injection stacking does not appear possible because of long bunch lengths/short bunch gaps and lack of sharp resonances. Transverse instability, on the other hand, cannot be Landau damped by the momentum spread in the beam, but it can be cured by a small spread in the betatron tunes (either from space charge or an octupole).

  2. Progress of the stochastic cooling system of the Collector Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Dimopoulou, C; Bohm, R; Dolinskyy, O; Franzke, B; Hettrich, R; Maier, W; Menges, R; Nolden, F; Peschke, C; Petri, P; Steck, M; Thorndahl, L

    2013-01-01

    An overview of the recent achievements and ongoing developments for the stochastic cooling system of the Collector Ring is given. In focus are the hardware developments as well as the progress in predicting the system performance. The system operates in the frequency band 1-2 GHz, it has to provide fast 3D cooling of antiproton, rare isotope and stable heavy ion beams. The main challenges are (i) the cooling of antiprotons by means of cryogenic movable pick-up electrodes and (ii) the fast two-stage cooling (pre-cooling by the Palmer method, followed by the notch filter method) of the hot rare isotope beams (RIBs). Recently, a novel code for simulating the cooling process in the time domain has been developed at CERN. First results for the momentum cooling for heavy ions in the CR will be shown in comparison with results obtained in the frequency domain with the Fokker-Planck approach.

  3. Multiple collision effects on the antiproton production by high energy proton (100 GeV - 1000 GeV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Powell, J.

    1987-01-01

    Antiproton production rates which take into account multiple collision are calculated using a simple model. Methods to reduce capture of the produced antiprotons by the target are discussed, including geometry of target and the use of a high intensity laser. Antiproton production increases substantially above 150 GeV proton incident energy. The yield increases almost linearly with incident energy, alleviating space charge problems in the high current accelerator that produces large amounts of antiprotons.

  4. SUPRAMITRAL RING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh G

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Supra mitral ring is a rare cause for congenital mitral valve obstr uction. The reported incidence of supramitral ring is 0.2-0.4% in general population and 8% in patients with congenital mitral valve disease. The condition is characterized by an abnormal ridge of connective tissue often circumferential in shape ,on the atrial side of the mitral valve encroaching on the orifice of the mitral valve. It may adhere to the leaflets of the valve and restrict their movements. Although a supramitral ring may be rarely nonobstructive, it often results in mitral valve inflow obstruction.

  5. Antiprotonic atom formation and spectroscopy-ASACUSA experiment at CERN-AD

    CERN Document Server

    Widmann, E

    1999-01-01

    This talk describes the experiments on atomic spectroscopy and atomic collisions as proposed by the ASACUSA collaboration for the forthcoming AD facility at CERN. They consist of high-precision spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms, the study of anti-protonic atom formation processes, and stopping power and ionization measurements in low-pressure gases. (18 refs).

  6. Measurement of the antiproton stopping power of gold - the Barkas effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medenwaldt, R.; Møller, S. P.; Uggerhøj, E.; Worm, T.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Elsener, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1991-05-01

    The stopping power of gold has been measured for antiprotons in the energy range 0.2-3 MeV using a novel time-of-flight technique. The antiproton stopping power is found to be less than half the equivalent proton stopping power near the electronic stopping power maximum. In the high-energy limit the two stopping powers merge.

  7. Measurement of the antiproton stopping power of gold - the Barkas effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medenwaldt, R.; Moeller, S.P.; Uggerhoej, E.; Worm, T. (Inst. for Synchrotron Radiation, Aarhus Univ. (Denmark)); Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H. (Inst. of Physics, Univ. of Aarhus (Denmark)); Elsener, K. (CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)); Morenzoni, E. (Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland))

    1991-05-06

    The stopping power of gold has been measured for antiprotons in the energy range 0.2-3 MeV using a novel time-of-flight technique. The antiproton stopping power is found to be less than half the equivalent proton stopping power near the electronic stopping power maximum. In the high-energy limit the two stopping powers merge. (orig.).

  8. Comparison of Optimized Single and Multifield Irradiation Plans of Antiproton, Proton and Carbon Ion Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Kantemiris, Ioannis; Karaiskos, Pantelis;

    2010-01-01

    Antiprotons have been suggested as a possibly superior modality for radiotherapy, due to the energy released when antiprotons annihilate, which enhances the Bragg peak and introduces a high-LET component to the dose. However, concerns are expressed about the inferior lateral dose distribution...

  9. Bubble detector measurements of a mixed radiation field from antiproton annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Knudsen, Helge; Møller, Søren Pape;

    2006-01-01

    In the light of recent progress in the study of the biological potential of antiproton tumour treatment it is important to be able to characterize the neutron intensity arising from antiproton annihilation using simple, compact and reliable detectors. The intensity of fast neutrons from antiproto...

  10. Determinantal rings

    CERN Document Server

    Bruns, Winfried

    1988-01-01

    Determinantal rings and varieties have been a central topic of commutative algebra and algebraic geometry. Their study has attracted many prominent researchers and has motivated the creation of theories which may now be considered part of general commutative ring theory. The book gives a first coherent treatment of the structure of determinantal rings. The main approach is via the theory of algebras with straightening law. This approach suggest (and is simplified by) the simultaneous treatment of the Schubert subvarieties of Grassmannian. Other methods have not been neglected, however. Principal radical systems are discussed in detail, and one section is devoted to each of invariant and representation theory. While the book is primarily a research monograph, it serves also as a reference source and the reader requires only the basics of commutative algebra together with some supplementary material found in the appendix. The text may be useful for seminars following a course in commutative ring theory since a ...

  11. Cave Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    hypothesis, that cave rings are formed in the same manner as coffee rings[3], that is, due to the enhanced deposition at the edges of sessile drops ...ring’ is the deposit formed when a sessile drop of a solution containing dissolved particles, such as coffee or salt, dries. This was investigated by...who expanded on Deegan et al.[3] to find an exact form for the evaporation flux over a sessile drop . It turns out that solving 179 for the flux is

  12. Discriminating between antihydrogen and mirror-trapped antiprotons in a minimum-B trap

    CERN Document Server

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Kurchaninov, L; Jonsell, S; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-01-01

    Recently, antihydrogen atoms were trapped at CERN in a magnetic minimum (minimum-B) trap formed by superconducting octupole and mirror magnet coils. The trapped antiatoms were detected by rapidly turning off these magnets, thereby eliminating the magnetic minimum and releasing any antiatoms contained in the trap. Once released, these antiatoms quickly hit the trap wall, whereupon the positrons and antiprotons in the antiatoms annihilated. The antiproton annihilations produce easily detected signals; we used these signals to prove that we trapped antihydrogen. However, our technique could be confounded by mirror-trapped antiprotons, which would produce seemingly-identical annihilation signals upon hitting the trap wall. In this paper, we discuss possible sources of mirror-trapped antiprotons and show that antihydrogen and antiprotons can be readily distinguished, often with the aid of applied electric fields, by analyzing the annihilation locations and times. We further discuss the general properties of antipr...

  13. Segmented scintillation detectors with silicon photomultiplier readout for measuring antiproton annihilations

    CERN Document Server

    Sótér, A; Kobayashi, T; Barna, D; Horvath, D; Hori, M

    2014-01-01

    The Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons (ASACUSA) experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility of CERN constructed segmented scintillators to detect and track the charged pions which emerge from antiproton annihilations in a future superconducting radiofrequency Paul trap for antiprotons. A system of 541 cast and extruded scintillator bars were arranged in 11 detector modules which provided a spatial resolution of 17 mm. Green wavelength-shifting fibers were embedded in the scintillators, and read out by silicon photomultipliers which had a sensitive area of 1 x 1 mm^2. The photoelectron yields of various scintillator configurations were measured using a negative pion beam of momentum p ~ 1 GeV/c. Various fibers and silicon photomultipliers, fiber end terminations, and couplings between the fibers and scintillators were compared. The detectors were also tested using the antiproton beam of the AD. Nonlinear effects due to the saturation of the silicon photomultiplier were seen a...

  14. La coordinación de recursos en la industria de asientos automotrices: el caso de Lear Tláhuac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro García Garnica

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Con la finalidad de acceder a nuevos conocimientos e información, aumentar sus capacidades tecnológicas, diversificar su producción o introducirse en nuevos mercados, las empresas de la industria automotriz han variado la forma de coordinar sus recursos, utilizan alianzas estratégicas, la integración vertical o la modularización organizacional. El objetivo de este trabajo es describir y analizar las estrategias de coordinación que han seguido algunas empresas de la industria de asientos automotrices en el nivel mundial y, en particular, la planta Tláhuac, de Lear Corporation.

  15. AMS results on positrons and antiprotons in cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kounine, Andrei; AMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    AMS-02 is a particle physics detector collecting data on the International Space Station since May 2011. Precision measurements of charged cosmic ray particles have been performed by AMS using a data sample of 85 billion cosmic ray events collected during the first five years of operations on the Station. The latest AMS results on the fluxes and flux ratios of the cosmic ray particles are presented with the emphasis on the measurements of positrons and antiprotons. They show unique features that require accurate theoretical interpretation as to their origin, be it from dark matter collisions or new astrophysical sources. On behalf of AMS.

  16. Neutron fluence in antiproton radiotherapy, measurements and simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    2010-01-01

    A significant part of the secondary particle spectrum from antiproton annihilation consists of fast neutrons, which may contribute to a significant dose background found outside the primary beam. Using a polystyrene phantom as a moderator, we have performed absolute measurements of the thermalized...... part of the fast neutron spectrum using Lithium-6 and -7 Fluoride TLD pairs. The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with simulations using the Monte Carlo particle transport code FLUKA. The thermal neutron kerma resulting from the measured thermal neutron fluence is insignificant...

  17. The antiproton depth–dose curve measured with alanine detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels; Palmans, Hugo; Holzscheiter, Michael H; Kovacevic, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    n this paper we report on the measurement of the antiproton depth–dose curve, with alanine detectors. The results are compared with simulations using the particle energy spectrum calculated by FLUKA, and using the track structure model of Hansen and Olsen for conversion of calculated dose into response. A good agreement is observed between the measured and calculated relative effectiveness although an underestimation of the measured values beyond the Bragg-peak remains unexplained. The model prediction of response of alanine towards heavy charged particles encourages future use of the alanine detectors for dosimetry of mixed radiation fields.

  18. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandale, Walter

    2015-02-01

    In the last five decades, proton-proton and proton-antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion-ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  19. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter

    2014-01-01

    In the last five decades, proton–proton and proton–antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion–ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  20. Understanding Possible Proton-Antiproton Enhancement Observed by BES Collaboration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Chong-Shou; ZHU Shi-Lin

    2004-01-01

    We comment on the quantum numbers and decay channels of the proton-antiproton enhancement observed by BES Collaboration. Based on the general symmetry consideration and available experimental information, we suggest that the quantum number of this possible signal is very likely to be JPC = 0-+, IG = O+, which cannot decay into final states π+π-, 2π0, KK, 3π. Besides its dissociation into pp, the other important mesonic decay modes could be ηππ, η'ππ, ηηη, 4π, KKπ, ηKK, KKππ, 6π. Experimental search of this signal in these meson final states is strongly called for.

  1. FAIR: The accelerator facility for antiproton and ion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharkov, Boris [FAIR JCR GSI, Darmstad (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    This presentation outlines the current status of the facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR). It is expected that the actual construction of the facility will commence in 2010 as the project has raised more than one billion euro in funding. The sequence and scope of the construction of the accelerator modules in accordance with modularized start version are described. Outstanding research opportunities offered by the modularized start version for all scientific FAIR communities from early on will allow to bridge the time until FAIR's completion with a world-leading research program. The green paper outlining a realistic path to achieve this goal is discussed.

  2. Antiprotonic potentials from global fits to the PS209 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    2004-01-01

    The experimental results for strong interaction effects in antiprotonic atoms by the PS209 collaboration consist of high quality data for several sequences of isotopes along the periodic table. Global analysis of these data in terms of a p¯-nucleus optical potential achieves good description of the data using a s-wave finite-range p¯N interaction. Equally good fits are also obtained with a poorly-defined zero-range potential containing a p-wave term.

  3. D¯ D meson pair production in antiproton-nucleus collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyam, R.; Tsushima, K.

    2016-10-01

    We study the D ¯D (D¯0D0 and D-D+) charm meson pair production in antiproton (p ¯) induced reactions on nuclei at beam energies ranging from threshold to several GeV. Our model is based on an effective Lagrangian approach that has only the baryon-meson degrees of freedom and involves the physical hadron masses. The reaction proceeds via the t -channel exchanges of Λc+, Σc+, and Σc++ baryons in the initial collision of the antiproton with one of the protons of the target nucleus. The medium effects on the exchanged baryons are included by incorporating in the corresponding propagators, the effective charm baryon masses calculated within a quark-meson coupling (QMC) model. The wave functions of the bound proton have been determined within the QMC model as well as in a phenomenological model where they are obtained by solving the Dirac equation with appropriate scalar and vector potentials. The initial- and final-state distortion effects have been approximated by using an eikonal approximation-based procedure. Detailed numerical results are presented for total and double differential cross sections for the D¯0D0 and D-D+ production reactions on 16O and 90Zr targets. It is noted that at p ¯ beam momenta of interest to the P ¯ ANDA experiment, medium effects lead to noticeable enhancements in the charm meson production cross sections.

  4. Light meson emission in (anti)proton induced reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kuraev, E A; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E

    2015-01-01

    Reactions induced by high energy antiprotons on proton on nuclei are accompanied with large probability by the emission of a few mesons. Interesting phenomena can be observed and QCD tests can be performed, through the detection of one or more mesons. The collinear emission from high energy (anti)proton beams of a hard pion or vector meson, can be calculated similarly to the emission of a hard photon from an electron \\cite{Kuraev:2013izz}. This is a well known process in QED, and it is called the "Quasi-Real Electron method", where the incident particle is an electron and a hard photon is emitted leaving an 'almost on shell' electron impinging on the target \\cite{Baier:1973ms}. Such process is well known as Initial State Emission (ISR) method of scanning over incident energy, and can be used, in the hadron case, to produce different kind of particles in similar kinematical conditions. In case of emission of a charged light meson, $\\pi$ or $\\rho$-meson, in proton-proton(anti-proton) collisions, the meson can b...

  5. Study of doubly strange systems using stored antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B.; Erni, W.; Krusche, B.; Steinacher, M.; Walford, N.; Liu, B.; Liu, H.; Liu, Z.; Shen, X.; Wang, C.; Zhao, J.; Albrecht, M.; Erlen, T.; Fink, M.; Heinsius, F.; Held, T.; Holtmann, T.; Jasper, S.; Keshk, I.; Koch, H.; Kopf, B.; Kuhlmann, M.; Kümmel, M.; Leiber, S.; Mikirtychyants, M.; Musiol, P.; Mustafa, A.; Pelizäus, M.; Pychy, J.; Richter, M.; Schnier, C.; Schröder, T.; Sowa, C.; Steinke, M.; Triffterer, T.; Wiedner, U.; Ball, M.; Beck, R.; Hammann, C.; Ketzer, B.; Kube, M.; Mahlberg, P.; Rossbach, M.; Schmidt, C.; Schmitz, R.; Thoma, U.; Urban, M.; Walther, D.; Wendel, C.; Wilson, A.; Bianconi, A.; Bragadireanu, M.; Caprini, M.; Pantea, D.; Patel, B.; Czyzycki, W.; Domagala, M.; Filo, G.; Jaworowski, J.; Krawczyk, M.; Lisowski, E.; Lisowski, F.; Michałek, M.; Poznański, P.; Płażek, J.; Korcyl, K.; Kozela, A.; Kulessa, P.; Lebiedowicz, P.; Pysz, K.; Schäfer, W.; Szczurek, A.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Mindur, B.; Przyborowski, D.; Swientek, K.; Biernat, J.; Kamys, B.; Kistryn, S.; Korcyl, G.; Krzemien, W.; Magiera, A.; Moskal, P.; Psyzniak, A.; Rudy, Z.; Salabura, P.; Smyrski, J.; Strzempek, P.; Wronska, A.; Augustin, I.; Böhm, R.; Lehmann, I.; Nicmorus Marinescu, D.; Schmitt, L.; Varentsov, V.; Al-Turany, M.; Belias, A.; Deppe, H.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Ehret, A.; Flemming, H.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Gromliuk, A.; Gruber, L.; Karabowicz, R.; Kliemt, R.; Krebs, M.; Kurilla, U.; Lehmann, D.; Löchner, S.; Lühning, J.; Lynen, U.; Orth, H.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Saito, T.; Schepers, G.; Schmidt, C. J.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Täschner, A.; Traxler, M.; Ugur, C.; Voss, B.; Wieczorek, P.; Wilms, A.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G.; Arefiev, A.; Astakhov, V. I.; Barabanov, M. Yu.; Batyunya, B. V.; Davydov, Yu. I.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Efremov, A. A.; Fechtchenko, A.; Fedunov, A. G.; Galoyan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Koshurnikov, E. K.; Lobanov, V. I.; Lobanov, Y. Yu.; Makarov, A. F.; Malinina, L. V.; Malyshev, V. L.; Olshevskiy, A.; Perevalova, E.; Piskun, A. A.; Pocheptsov, T.; Pontecorvo, G.; Rodionov, V.; Rogov, Y.; Salmin, R.; Samartsev, A.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Shabratova, G.; Skachkov, N. B.; Skachkova, A. N.; Strokovsky, E. A.; Suleimanov, M.; Teshev, R.; Tokmenin, V.; Uzhinsky, V.; Vodopyanov, A.; Zaporozhets, S. A.; Zhuravlev, N. I.; Zorin, A. G.; Branford, D.; Glazier, D.; Watts, D.; Böhm, M.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Pfaffinger, M.; Uhlig, F.; Dobbs, S.; Seth, K.; Tomaradze, A.; Xiao, T.; Bettoni, D.; Carassiti, V.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dalpiaz, P.; Drago, A.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Savriè, M.; Akishina, V.; Kisel, I.; Kozlov, G.; Pugach, M.; Zyzak, M.; Gianotti, P.; Guaraldo, C.; Lucherini, V.; Bersani, A.; Bracco, G.; Macri, M.; Parodi, R. F.; Biguenko, K.; Brinkmann, K.; Di Pietro, V.; Diehl, S.; Dormenev, V.; Drexler, P.; Düren, M.; Etzelmüller, E.; Galuska, M.; Gutz, E.; Hahn, C.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kesselkaul, M.; Kühn, W.; Kuske, T.; Lange, J. S.; Liang, Y.; Metag, V.; Nanova, M.; Nazarenko, S.; Novotny, R.; Quagli, T.; Reiter, S.; Rieke, J.; Rosenbaum, C.; Schmidt, M.; Schnell, R.; Stenzel, H.; Thöring, U.; Ullrich, M.; Wagner, M. N.; Wasem, T.; Wohlfarth, B.; Zaunick, H.; Ireland, D.; Rosner, G.; Seitz, B.; Deepak, P. N.; Kulkarni, A.; Apostolou, A.; Babai, M.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Lemmens, P.; Lindemulder, M.; Loehner, H.; Messchendorp, J.; Schakel, P.; Smit, H.; Tiemens, M.; van der Weele, J. C.; Veenstra, R.; Vejdani, S.; Dutta, K.; Kalita, K.; Kumar, A.; Roy, A.; Sohlbach, H.; Bai, M.; Bianchi, L.; Büscher, M.; Cao, L.; Cebulla, A.; Dosdall, R.; Gillitzer, A.; Goldenbaum, F.; Grunwald, D.; Herten, A.; Hu, Q.; Kemmerling, G.; Kleines, H.; Lehrach, A.; Nellen, R.; Ohm, H.; Orfanitski, S.; Prasuhn, D.; Prencipe, E.; Pütz, J.; Ritman, J.; Schadmand, S.; Sefzick, T.; Serdyuk, V.; Sterzenbach, G.; Stockmanns, T.; Wintz, P.; Wüstner, P.; Xu, H.; Zambanini, A.; Li, S.; Li, Z.; Sun, Z.; Xu, H.; Rigato, V.; Isaksson, L.; Achenbach, P.; Corell, O.; Denig, A.; Distler, M.; Hoek, M.; Karavdina, A.; Lauth, W.; Liu, Z.; Merkel, H.; Müller, U.; Pochodzalla, J.; Schlimme, S.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Ahmadi, H.; Ahmed, S.; Bleser, S.; Capozza, L.; Cardinali, M.; Dbeyssi, A.; Deiseroth, M.; Feldbauer, F.; Fritsch, M.; Fröhlich, B.; Jasinski, P.; Kang, D.; Khaneft, D.; Klasen, R.; Leithoff, H. H.; Lin, D.; Maas, F.; Maldaner, S.; Martìnez Rojo, M.; Marta, M.; Michel, M.; Mora Espì, M. C.; Morales Morales, C.; Motzko, C.; Nerling, F.; Noll, O.; Pflüger, S.; Pitka, A.; Rodríguez Piñeiro, D.; Sanchez Lorente, A.; Steinen, M.; Valente, R.; Weber, T.; Zambrana, M.; Zimmermann, I.; Fedorov, A.; Korjik, M.; Missevitch, O.; Boukharov, A.; Malyshev, O.; Marishev, I.; Balanutsa, P.; Balanutsa, V.; Chernetsky, V.; Demekhin, A.; Dolgolenko, A.; Fedorets, P.; Gerasimov, A.

    2016-10-01

    Bound nuclear systems with two units of strangeness are still poorly known despite their importance for many strong interaction phenomena. Stored antiprotons beams in the GeV range represent an unparalleled factory for various hyperon-antihyperon pairs. Their outstanding large production probability in antiproton collisions will open the floodgates for a series of new studies of systems which contain two or even more units of strangeness at the P ‾ ANDA experiment at FAIR. For the first time, high resolution γ-spectroscopy of doubly strange ΛΛ-hypernuclei will be performed, thus complementing measurements of ground state decays of ΛΛ-hypernuclei at J-PARC or possible decays of particle unstable hypernuclei in heavy ion reactions. High resolution spectroscopy of multistrange Ξ--atoms will be feasible and even the production of Ω--atoms will be within reach. The latter might open the door to the | S | = 3 world in strangeness nuclear physics, by the study of the hadronic Ω--nucleus interaction. For the first time it will be possible to study the behavior of Ξ‾+ in nuclear systems under well controlled conditions.

  6. Topological rings

    CERN Document Server

    Warner, S

    1993-01-01

    This text brings the reader to the frontiers of current research in topological rings. The exercises illustrate many results and theorems while a comprehensive bibliography is also included. The book is aimed at those readers acquainted with some very basic point-set topology and algebra, as normally presented in semester courses at the beginning graduate level or even at the advanced undergraduate level. Familiarity with Hausdorff, metric, compact and locally compact spaces and basic properties of continuous functions, also with groups, rings, fields, vector spaces and modules, and with Zorn''s Lemma, is also expected.

  7. Beam Performance and Luminosity Limitations in the High-Energy Storage Ring (HESR)

    CERN Document Server

    Lehrach, A; Hinterberger, F; Maier, R; Prasuhn, D

    2006-01-01

    The High-Energy Storage Ring (HESR) of the future International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt is planned as an antiproton synchrotron and storage ring in the momentum range from 1.5 to 15 GeV/c. An important feature of this new facility is the combination of phase space cooled beams with dense internal targets (e.g. pellet targets), resulting in demanding beam parameter of two operation modes: high luminosity mode with peak luminosities up to 2*10^32 cm-2 s-1, and high resolution mode with a momentum spread down to 10^-5, respectively. To reach these beam parameters very powerful phase space cooling is needed, utilizing high-energy electron cooling and high-bandwidth stochastic cooling. The effect of beam-target scattering and intra-beam interaction is investigated in order to study beam equilibria and beam losses for the two different operation modes.

  8. Beam performance and luminosity limitations in the high-energy storage ring (HESR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrach, A.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.; Hinterberger, F.; Maier, R.; Prasuhn, D.

    2006-06-01

    The high-energy storage ring (HESR) of the future International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt is planned as an antiproton synchrotron storage ring in the momentum range 1.5-15 GeV/ c. An important feature of this new facility is the combination of phase space cooled beams and dense internal targets (e.g. pellet targets), which results in demanding beam parameter requirements for two operation modes: high luminosity mode with peak luminosities to 2×10 32 cm -2 s -1, and high-resolution mode with a momentum spread down to 10 -5. To reach these beam parameters one needs a very powerful phase space cooling, utilizing high-energy electron cooling and high-bandwidth stochastic cooling. The effects of beam-target scattering and intra-beam interaction are investigated in order to study beam equilibria and beam losses for the two different operation modes.

  9. SPARC Collaboration: New Strategy for Storage Ring Physics at FAIR

    CERN Document Server

    Stöhlker, Thomas; Bräuning-Demian, Angela; Lestinsky, Michael; Herfurth, Frank; Maier, Rudolf; Prasuhn, Dieter; Schuch, Reinhold; Steck, Markus

    2014-01-01

    SPARC collaboration at FAIR pursues the worldwide unique research program by utilizing storage ring and trapping facilities for highly-charged heavy ions. The main focus is laid on the exploration of the physics at strong, ultra-short electromagnetic fields including the fundamental interactions between electrons and heavy nuclei as well as on the experiments at the border between nuclear and atomic physics. Very recently SPARC worked out a realization scheme for experiments with highly-charged heavy-ions at relativistic energies in the High-Energy Storage Ring HESR and at very low-energies at the CRYRING coupled to the present ESR. Both facilities provide unprecedented physics opportunities already at the very early stage of FAIR operation. The installation of CRYRING, dedicated Low-energy Storage Ring (LSR) for FLAIR, may even enable a much earlier realisation of the physics program of FLAIR with slow anti-protons.

  10. Comparison of electromagnetic and hadronic models generated using Geant 4 with antiproton dose measured in CERN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher; Reiazi, Reza; Mohammadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Jabbari, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    After proposing the idea of antiproton cancer treatment in 1984 many experiments were launched to investigate different aspects of physical and radiobiological properties of antiproton, which came from its annihilation reactions. One of these experiments has been done at the European Organization for Nuclear Research known as CERN using the antiproton decelerator. The ultimate goal of this experiment was to assess the dosimetric and radiobiological properties of beams of antiprotons in order to estimate the suitability of antiprotons for radiotherapy. One difficulty on this way was the unavailability of antiproton beam in CERN for a long time, so the verification of Monte Carlo codes to simulate antiproton depth dose could be useful. Among available simulation codes, Geant4 provides acceptable flexibility and extensibility, which progressively lead to the development of novel Geant4 applications in research domains, especially modeling the biological effects of ionizing radiation at the sub-cellular scale. In this study, the depth dose corresponding to CERN antiproton beam energy by Geant4 recruiting all the standard physics lists currently available and benchmarked for other use cases were calculated. Overall, none of the standard physics lists was able to draw the antiproton percentage depth dose. Although, with some models our results were promising, the Bragg peak level remained as the point of concern for our study. It is concluded that the Bertini model with high precision neutron tracking (QGSP_BERT_HP) is the best to match the experimental data though it is also the slowest model to simulate events among the physics lists.

  11. Comparison of electromagnetic and hadronic models generated using Geant 4 with antiproton dose measured in CERN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Bagher Tavakoli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available After proposing the idea of antiproton cancer treatment in 1984 many experiments were launched to investigate different aspects of physical and radiobiological properties of antiproton, which came from its annihilation reactions. One of these experiments has been done at the European Organization for Nuclear Research known as CERN using the antiproton decelerator. The ultimate goal of this experiment was to assess the dosimetric and radiobiological properties of beams of antiprotons in order to estimate the suitability of antiprotons for radiotherapy. One difficulty on this way was the unavailability of antiproton beam in CERN for a long time, so the verification of Monte Carlo codes to simulate antiproton depth dose could be useful. Among available simulation codes, Geant4 provides acceptable flexibility and extensibility, which progressively lead to the development of novel Geant4 applications in research domains, especially modeling the biological effects of ionizing radiation at the sub-cellular scale. In this study, the depth dose corresponding to CERN antiproton beam energy by Geant4 recruiting all the standard physics lists currently available and benchmarked for other use cases were calculated. Overall, none of the standard physics lists was able to draw the antiproton percentage depth dose. Although, with some models our results were promising, the Bragg peak level remained as the point of concern for our study. It is concluded that the Bertini model with high precision neutron tracking (QGSP_BERT_HP is the best to match the experimental data though it is also the slowest model to simulate events among the physics lists.

  12. Ring interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Malykin, Grigorii B; Zhurov, Alexei

    2013-01-01

    This monograph is devoted to the creation of a comprehensive formalism for quantitative description of polarized modes' linear interaction in modern single-mode optic fibers. The theory of random connections between polarized modes, developed in the monograph, allows calculations of the zero shift deviations for a fiber ring interferometer. The monograph addresses also the

  13. Possibility of resonant capture of antiprotons by highly charged hydrogenlike ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genkin, M.; Lindroth, E.

    2009-02-01

    Recently, an experimental setup was proposed by Lapierre et al. [ Physics with ultra slow antiproton beams, AIP Conference Proceedings (2005), Vol. 793, p. 361] which would allow antiprotons and highly charged ions to collide repeatedly in an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) due to a nested trap configuration. As mentioned by the authors, such a setup may open the possibility to study antiproton capture into well-defined states through a resonant process which involves simultaneous electron excitation. In the present work, we give some theoretical estimations of the feasibility of that process.

  14. On SAP-rings

    OpenAIRE

    Zhixiang, Wu

    2006-01-01

    The rings whose simple right modules are absolutely pure are called right $SAP$-rings. We give a new characterization of right $SAP$ rings, right $V$ rings, and von Neumann regular rings. We also obtain a new decomposition theory of right selfinjective von Neumann regular rings. The relationships between $SAP$-rings, $V$-rings, and von Neumann regular rings are explored. Some recent results obtained by Faith are generalized and the results of Wu-Xia are strengthened.

  15. Learing the 3Cs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Chinese home appliance makers are trying to activate any link between computers, communication and consumer electronics It's a scene that has failed to materialize in the past, but companies in China are trying again: sitting in front of the television, the viewer surfs the Internet, buys things from online shops, plays online games and makes video phone calls. The TV will transform into a catch-all information appliance, to be used as computer and telephone. While the technology is already avail

  16. E-LEARING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Baaboua Florentina

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Electronic learning (or e-Learning or eLearning is a type of Technology supported education/learning (TSL where the medium of instruction is through computer technology, particularly involving digital technologies. E-learning has been defined as "pedago

  17. Understanding Possible Proton-Antiproton Enhancement Observed by BES Collaboration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAOChong-Shou; ZHUShi-Lin

    2004-01-01

    We comment on the quantum numbers and decay channels of the proton-antiproton enhancement observed by BES Collaboration. Based on the general symmetry consideration and available experimental information, we suggest that the quantum number of this possible signal is very likely to be JPC=0-+, IG=0+, which cannot decay into final states π+π-, 2π0, K/%-K,3π. Besides its dissociation into p-p, the other important mesonic decay modes could be ηππ,η'ππ,ηηη, 4π, K-Kπ,ηK-K,K-Kππ, 6π. Experimental search of this signal in these meson final states is strongly called for.

  18. Antineutron and antiproton nuclear interactions at very low energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.

    2014-05-01

    Experimental annihilation cross sections of antineutrons and antiprotons at very low energies are compared. Features of Coulomb focusing are observed for pbar annihilation on protons. Direct comparisons for heavier targets are not straightforward due to lack of overlap between targets and energies of experimental results for pbar and nbar. Nevertheless, the annihilation cross sections for nbar on nuclei cannot be described by an optical potential that fits well all the available data on pbar interactions with nuclei. Comparisons made with the help of this potential reveal in the nbar data features similar to Coulomb focusing. Direct comparisons between nbar and pbar annihilations at very low energies would be possible when pbar cross sections are measured on the same targets and at the same energies as the available cross sections for nbar. Such measurements may be possible in the foreseeable future.

  19. Measurement of Antiproton-proton Cross-Sections at Low Antiproton Momenta

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The experiment is designed to measure four different cross sections in the momentum range 150~MeV/c to 600~MeV/c: 1)~~~~the differential elastic \\\\ \\\\ 2)~~~~the differential charge exchange\\\\ \\\\ 3)~~~~the annihilation into charged and neutral pions\\\\ \\\\ 4)~~~~and the total cross section via the optical theorem. \\\\ \\\\ The experiment allows one to search once again and with good precision for baryonium. Of special interest is the existence of the S-meson, for which a signal of about 20~MeV-mb was found in a 1981 experiment (performed in the East Hall).\\\\ \\\\ A second point of special interest is the momentum region below 300~MeV/c because the cross sections are basically unknown. We will be able to explore the momentum dependence of this region for the first time.\\\\ \\\\ The elastic cross section is measured by a cylindrical multiwire proportional chamber and a scintillator hodoscope placed around a scattering chamber under vacuum. The charge exchange cross section is measured by a ring of 32~anti-neutron detector...

  20. Experimental and computational study of the injection of antiprotons into a positron plasma for antihydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amole, C.; Capra, A.; Menary, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, M3J 1P3 Ontario (Canada); Ashkezari, M. D.; Hayden, M. E. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, V5A 1S6 British Columbia (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Little, A.; So, C.; Zhmoginov, A. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Bertsche, W. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, SA2 8PP Swansea (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Daresbury Laboratory, Cockcroft Institute, WA4 4AD Warrington (United Kingdom); Butler, E. [Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cesar, C. L.; Silveira, D. M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941 (Brazil); Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Isaac, C. A.; Madsen, N.; Napoli, S. C.; Shields, C. R. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, SA2 8PP Swansea (United Kingdom); Collaboration: ALPHA Collaboration; and others

    2013-04-15

    One of the goals of synthesizing and trapping antihydrogen is to study the validity of charge-parity-time symmetry through precision spectroscopy on the anti-atoms, but the trapping yield achieved in recent experiments must be significantly improved before this can be realized. Antihydrogen atoms are commonly produced by mixing antiprotons and positrons stored in a nested Penning-Malmberg trap, which was achieved in ALPHA by an autoresonant excitation of the antiprotons, injecting them into the positron plasma. In this work, a hybrid numerical model is developed to simulate antiproton and positron dynamics during the mixing process. The simulation is benchmarked against other numerical and analytic models, as well as experimental measurements. The autoresonant injection scheme and an alternative scheme are compared numerically over a range of plasma parameters which can be reached in current and upcoming antihydrogen experiments, and the latter scheme is seen to offer significant improvement in trapping yield as the number of available antiprotons increases.

  1. On the Utility of Antiprotons as Drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, L J; Orth, C D; Tabak, M

    2003-10-20

    By contrast to the large mass, complexity and recirculating power of conventional drivers for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), antiproton annihilation offers a specific energy of 90MJ/{micro}g and thus a unique form of energy packaging and delivery. In principle, antiproton drivers could provide a profound reduction in system mass for advanced space propulsion by ICF. We examine the physics underlying the use of antiprotons ({bar p}) to drive various classes of high-yield ICF targets by the methods of volumetric ignition, hotspot ignition and fast ignition. The useable fraction of annihilation deposition energy is determined for both {bar p}-driven ablative compression and {bar p}-driven fast ignition, in association with 0-D and 1-D target burn models. Thereby, we deduce scaling laws for the number of injected antiprotons required per capsule, together with timing and focal spot requirements. The kinetic energy of the injected antiproton beam required to penetrate to the desired annihilation point is always small relative to the deposited annihilation energy. We show that heavy metal seeding of the fuel and/or ablator is required to optimize local deposition of annihilation energy and determine that a minimum of {approx}3x10{sup 15} injected antiprotons will be required to achieve high yield (several hundred megajoules) in any target configuration. Target gains - i.e., fusion yields divided by the available p - {bar p} annihilation energy from the injected antiprotons (1.88GeV/{bar p}) - range from {approx}3 for volumetric ignition targets to {approx}600 for fast ignition targets. Antiproton-driven ICF is a speculative concept, and the handling of antiprotons and their required injection precision - temporally and spatially - will present significant technical challenges. The storage and manipulation of low-energy antiprotons, particularly in the form of antihydrogen, is a science in its infancy and a large scale-up of antiproton production over present supply

  2. Antiproton, positron, and electron imaging with a microchannel plate/phosphor detector

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jørgensen, L V; Kerrigan, S J; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y

    2009-01-01

    A microchannel plate (MCP)/phosphor screen assembly has been used to destructively measure the radial profile of cold, confined antiprotons, electrons, and positrons in the ALPHA experiment, with the goal of using these trapped particles for antihydrogen creation and confinement. The response of the MCP to low energy (10-200 eV, <1 eV spread) antiproton extractions is compared to that of electrons and positrons.

  3. First measurement of the antiproton-nucleus annihilation cross section at 125 keV

    CERN Document Server

    Aghai-Khozani, H; Corradini, M; De Salvador, D; Hayano, R; Hori, M; Kobayashi, T; Leali, M; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Mascagna, V; Prest, M; Seiler, D; Soter, A; Todoroki, K; Vallazza, E; Venturelli, L

    2015-01-01

    The first observation of in-flight antiproton-nucleus annihilation at ∼130 keV obtained with the ASACUSA detector has demonstrated that the measurement of the cross section of the process is feasible at such extremely low energies Aghai-Khozani, H., et al., Eur. Phys. J. Plus 127, 55 (2012). Here we present the results of the data analysis with the evaluations of the antiproton annihilation cross sections on carbon, palladium and platinum targets at 125 keV.

  4. Primary populations of metastable antiprotonic $^{4}He$ and $^{3}He$ atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Masaki; Hayano, R S; Ishikawa, T; Sakuguchi, J; Tasaki, T; Widmann, E; Yamaguchi, H; Torii, H A; Juhász, B; Horváth, D; Yamazaki, T

    2002-01-01

    Initial population distributions of metastable antiprotonic **4He and **3He atoms over principal and angular momentum quantum numbers were investigated using laser spectroscopy. The total fractions of antiprotons captured into the metastable states of the atoms were deduced. Cascade calculations were performed using the measure populations to reproduce the delayed annihilation time spectrum. Results showed agreement between the simulated and measured spectra. (Edited abstract) 30 Refs.

  5. Measurements of Discrete Symmetries in the Neutral Kaon System with the CPLEAR (PS195) Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ruf, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The antiproton storage ring LEAR offered unique opportunities to study the symmetries which exist between matter and antimatter. At variance with other approaches at this facility, CPLEAR was an experiment devoted to the study of T, CPT and CP symmetries in the neutral kaon system. It measured with high precision the time evolution of initially strangeness-tagged $K^0$ and $\\bar{K}^0$ states to determine the size of violations with respect to these symmetries in the context of a systematic study. In parallel, limits concerning quantum-mechanical predictions (EPR paradox, coherence of the wave function) or the equivalence principle of general relativity have been obtained. This article will first discuss briefly the unique low energy antiproton storage ring LEAR followed by a description of the CPLEAR experiment, including the basic formalism necessary to understand the time evolution of a neutral kaon state and the main results related to measurements of discrete symmetries in the neutral kaon system. An exce...

  6. Technical design report for the PANDA (AntiProton Annihilations at Darmstadt) Straw Tube Tracker. Strong interaction studies with antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erni, W.; Keshelashvili, I.; Krusche, B.; Steinacher, M. [Universitaet Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Heng, Y.; Liu, Z.; Liu, H.; Shen, X.; Wang, Q.; Xu, H. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Aab, A.; Albrecht, M.; Becker, J.; Csapo, A.; Feldbauer, F.; Fink, M.; Friedel, P.; Heinsius, F.H.; Held, T.; Klask, L.; Koch, H.; Kopf, B.; Leiber, S.; Leyhe, M.; Motzko, C.; Pelizaeus, M.; Pychy, J.; Roth, B.; Schroeder, T.; Schulze, J.; Sowa, C.; Steinke, M.; Trifterer, T.; Wiedner, U.; Zhong, J. [Universitaet Bochum I. Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Bochum (Germany); Beck, R.; Bianco, S.; Brinkmann, K.T.; Hammann, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Kaiser, D.; Kliemt, R.; Kube, M.; Pitka, A.; Quagli, T.; Schmidt, C.; Schmitz, R.; Schnell, R.; Thoma, U.; Vlasov, P.; Walther, D.; Wendel, C.; Wuerschig, T.; Zaunick, H.G. [Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Bianconi, A. [Universita di Brescia, Brescia (Italy); Bragadireanu, M.; Caprini, M.; Pantea, D.; Pantelica, D.; Pietreanu, D.; Serbina, L.; Tarta, P.D. [Institutul National de C and D pentru Fizica si Inginerie Nucleara ' ' Horia Hulubei' ' , Bukarest-Magurele (Romania); Kaplan, D. [IIT, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago (United States); Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Mindur, B.; Przyborowski, D.; Swientek, K. [AGH, University of Science and Technology, Cracow (Poland)] [and others

    2013-02-15

    This document describes the technical layout and the expected performance of the Straw Tube Tracker (STT), the main tracking detector of the PANDA target spectrometer. The STT encloses a Micro-Vertex-Detector (MVD) for the inner tracking and is followed in beam direction by a set of GEM stations. The tasks of the STT are the measurement of the particle momentum from the reconstructed trajectory and the measurement of the specific energy loss for a particle identification. Dedicated simulations with full analysis studies of certain proton-antiproton reactions, identified as being benchmark tests for the whole PANDA scientific program, have been performed to test the STT layout and performance. The results are presented, and the time lines to construct the STT are described. (orig.)

  7. Measurements of the Decays $B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^0\\proton\\antiproton$, $B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^{*0}\\proton\\antiproton$, $B^0 \\to D^{-}\\proton\\antiproton\\pi^+$, and $B^0 \\to D^{*-}\\proton\\antiproton\\pi^+$

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Bóna, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Y I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Y; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Potter, C T; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Del Re, D; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, S; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-01-01

    We present measurements of branching fractions of $B^0$ decays to multi-body final states containing protons, based on 232 million $\\Upsilon(4S)\\to B\\bar{B}$ decays collected with the BaBar detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy $B$ factory. We measure the branching fractions ${\\cal B}(B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^0\\proton\\antiproton)=(1.13\\pm0.06\\pm0.08)\\times 10^{-4}$, ${\\cal B}(B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^{*0}\\proton\\antiproton)=(1.01\\pm0.10\\pm0.09)\\times 10^{-4}$, ${\\cal B}(B^0 \\to D^{-}\\proton\\antiproton\\pi^+)=(3.38\\pm0.14\\pm0.29)\\times 10^{-4}$, and ${\\cal B}(B^0 \\to D^{*-}\\proton\\antiproton\\pi^+)=(4.81\\pm0.22\\pm0.44)\\times 10^{-4}$ where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. We present a search for the charmed pentaquark state, $\\Theta_c(3100)$ observed by H1 and put limits on the branching fraction ${\\cal B} (B^0 \\to \\Theta_c \\antiproton\\pi^+)\\times{\\cal B}(\\Theta_c \\to D^{*-}\\proton)<14\\times10^{-6}$ and ${\\cal B}(B^0 \\to \\Theta_c \\antiproton\\pi^+)\\times{\\cal B}(\\Theta_c\\to D^-\\proton)<9\\time...

  8. Golden Jubilee photos: Welcome to the antiworld

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Professor Walter Oelert, leader of the team which created the first atoms of antihydrogen at the LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring).Antiparticles were predicted in the work of Paul Dirac in the 1920's, since when physicists have identified all the necessary antiparticle constituents of an antiparticle atom - antielectrons (positrons), antiprotons and antineutrons. However, an antihydrogen atom wasn't produced until the PS210 experiment at CERN in 1995. PS210 used the LEAR accelerator, which was then nearing the end of its lifetime (see Bulletin 28/04), so everything in the experiment had to work first time. After installing the equipment in spring 1995, the experiment took place in the autumn, in two hour periods over 4 weeks. The experiment team collided energetic antiprotons from LEAR with a heavy element, a challenge for them as well as the LEAR operators. Proving that antihydrogen atoms had been formed required several more weeks of data analysis, but the announcement that nine antihydrogen atoms had been ...

  9. Energy and centrality dependence of antiproton and proton production in relativistic Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Alt, C; Baatar, B.; Barna, D.; Bartke, J.; Betev, L.; Bialkowska, H.; Blume, C.; Boimska, B.; Botje, M.; Bracinik, J.; Bramm, R.; Buncic, P.; Cerny, V.; Christakoglou, P.; Chvala, O.; Cramer, J.G.; Csato, P.; Dinkelaker, P.; Eckardt, V.; Flierl, D.; Fodor, Z.; Foka, P.; Friese, V.; Gal, J.; Gazdzicki, M.; Genchev, V.; Georgopoulos, G.; Gladysz, E.; Grebieszkow, K.; Hegyi, S.; Hohne, C.; Kadija, K.; Karev, A.; Kliemant, M.; Kniege, S.; Kolesnikov, V.I.; Kornas, E.; Korus, R.; Kowalski, M.; Kraus, I.; Kreps, M.; Laslo, A.; van Leeuwen, M.; Levai, P.; Litov, L.; Lungwitz, B.; Makariev, M.; Malakhov, A.I.; Mateev, M.; Melkumov, G.L.; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M.; Molnar, J.; Mrowczynski, St.; Nicolic, V.; Palla, G.; Panagiotou, A.D.; Panayotov, D.; Petridis, A.; Pikna, M.; Prindle, D.; Puhlhofer, F.; Renfordt, R.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rybczynski, M.; Rybicki, A.; Sandoval, A.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T.; Seyboth, P.; Sikler, F.; Sitar, B.; Skrzypczak, E.; Stefanek, G.; Stock, R.; Strabel, C.; Strobele, H.; Susa, T.; Szentpetery, I.; Sziklai, J.; Szymanski, P.; Trubnikov, V.; Varga, D.; Vassiliou, M.; Veres, G.I.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vranic, D.; Wetzler, A.; Wlodarczyk, Z.; Yoo, I.K.; Zimanyi, J.

    2005-01-01

    The transverse mass distributions for antiprotons are measured at midrapidity for minimum bias Pb+Pb collisions at 158A GeV and for central Pb+Pb collisions at 20, 30, 40 and 80 A GeV beam energies in the NA49 experiment at the CERN SPS. The rapidity density, inverse slope parameter and mean transverse mass derived from the transverse mass distributions are studied as a function of the incident energy and the collision centrality and compared to the relevant proton data. The shapes of the m_T distributions of antiprotons and protons are very similar. The ratios of the particle yields, antiproton/proton and antilambda/antiproton, are also analysed. The antiproton/proton ratio exhibits an increase with diminishing centrality and a steep rise with increasing beam energy. The antilambda/antiproton ratio increases beyond unity with decreasing beam energy.

  10. Interaction of antiprotons with Rb atoms and a comparison of antiproton stopping powers of the atoms H, Li, Na, K, and Rb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Fischer, Nicolas; Saenz, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Ionization and excitation cross sections as well as electron-energy spectra and stopping powers of the alkali metal atoms Li, Na, K, and Rb colliding with antiprotons were calculated using a time-dependent channel-coupling approach. An impact-energy range from 0.25 to 4000 keV was considered....... The target atoms are treated as effective one-electron systems using a model potential. The results are compared with calculated cross sections for antiproton-hydrogen atom collisions....

  11. Measurement of inclusive antiprotons from Au+Au collisions at square root of s(NN) = 130 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, M L; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; DeMello, M; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grabski, J; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heffner, M; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Hümmler, H; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Y I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamas-Valverde, J; Lamont, M A; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lynn, D; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Y A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Y; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mutchler, G S; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Platner, E; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Radomski, S; Rai, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Symons, T J; de Toledo, A S; Szarwas, P; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Turner, K; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vanyashin, A; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Wenaus, T; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2001-12-24

    We report the first measurement of inclusive antiproton production at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at square root of s(NN) = 130 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The antiproton transverse mass distributions in the measured transverse momentum range of 0.25antiproton rapidity density is found to scale approximately with the negative hadron multiplicity density.

  12. Measurement of the stopping power of silicon for antiprotons between 0. 2 and 3 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medenwaldt, R.; Moeller, S.P.; Uggerhoej, E.; Worm, T. (Inst. for Synchrotron Radiation, Aarhus Univ. (Denmark)); Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H. (Inst. of Physics, Aarhus Univ. (Denmark)); Elsener, K. (CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)); Morenzoni, E. (Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland))

    1991-05-01

    Our previous measurement of the stopping power of silicon power of silicon for antiprotons has been extended down to 200 keV. The antiproton stopping power is found to be more than 30% lower than that for equivelocity protons at 200 keV. The ''Z{sub 1}{sup 3} contribution'' to the stopping power (the Barkas effect) is deduced by comparing the stopping power for protons and antiprotons. Comparisons to theoretical estimates are made. (orig.).

  13. Measurement of the stopping power of silicon for antiprotons between 0.2 and 3 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medenwaldt, R.; Møller, S. P.; Uggerhøj, E.; Worm, T.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Elsener, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1991-05-01

    Our previous measurement of the stopping power of silicon for antiprotons has been extended down to 200 keV. The antiproton stopping power is found to be more than 30% lower than that for equivelocity protons at 200 keV. The " Z13 contribution" to the stopping power (the Barkas effect) is deduced by comparing the stopping power for protons and antiprotons. Comparisons to theoretical estimates are made.

  14. Measurement of the Z31 contribution to the stopping power using MeV protons and antiprotons: The Barkas effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, L. H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Möller, S. P.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Uggerhöj, E.; Elsener, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1989-04-01

    The stopping power for antiprotons has been measured for the first time. The antiproton stopping power of silicon is found to be 3%-19% lower than for equivelocity protons over the energy range 3.01 to 0.538 MeV. The ``Z31 contribution'' to the stopping power (the Barkas effect) is deduced by comparing the stopping power for protons and antiprotons.

  15. Origami rings

    CERN Document Server

    Buhler, Joe; de Launey, Warwick; Graham, Ron

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by a question in origami, we consider sets of points in the complex plane constructed in the following way. Let $L_\\alpha(p)$ be the line in the complex plane through $p$ with angle $\\alpha$ (with respect to the real axis). Given a fixed collection $U$ of angles, let $\\RU$ be the points that can be obtained by starting with $0$ and $1$, and then recursively adding intersection points of the form $L_\\alpha(p) \\cap L_\\beta(q)$, where $p, q$ have been constructed already, and $\\alpha, \\beta$ are distinct angles in $U$. Our main result is that if $U$ is a group with at least three elements, then $\\RU$ is a subring of the complex plane, i.e., it is closed under complex addition and multiplication. This enables us to answer a specific question about origami folds: if $n \\ge 3$ and the allowable angles are the $n$ equally spaced angles $k\\pi/n$, $0 \\le k < n$, then $\\RU$ is the ring $\\Z[\\zeta_n]$ if $n$ is prime, and the ring $\\Z[1/n,\\zeta_{n}]$ if $n$ is not prime, where $\\zeta_n := \\exp(2\\pi i/n)$ is ...

  16. Antiproton Flux in Cosmic Ray Propagation Models with Anisotropic Diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Grajek, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Recently a cosmic ray propagation model has been introduced, where anisotropic diffusion is used as a mechanism to allow for $\\mathcal{O}(100)$ km/s galactic winds. This model predicts a reduced antiproton background flux, suggesting an excess is being observed. We implement this model in GALPROP v50.1 and perform a $\\chi^2$ analysis for B/C, $^{10}$Be/$^{9}$Be, and the recent PAMELA $\\bar{p}/p$ datasets. By introducing a power-index parameter $\\alpha$ that dictates the dependence of the diffusion coefficient $D_{xx}$ on height $|z|$ away from the galactic plane, we confirm that isotropic diffusion models with $\\alpha=0$ cannot accommodate high velocity convective winds suggested by ROSAT, while models with $\\alpha=1$ ($D_{xx}\\propto |z|$) can give a very good fit. A fit to B/C and $^{10}$Be/$^{9}$Be data predicts a lower $\\bar{p}/p$ flux ratio than the PAMELA measurement at energies between approximately 2 GeV to 20 GeV. A combined fit including in addition the $\\bar{p}/p$ data is marginal, suggesting only a...

  17. Constraining pre big-bang-nucleosynthesis expansion using cosmic antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelke, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Torino (Italy); Catena, R. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Fornengo, N. [Torino Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Teorica]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Torino (Italy); Masiero, A. [Pavoa Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padova (Italy); Pietroni, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padova (Italy)

    2006-06-15

    A host of dark energy models and non-standard cosmologies predict an enhanced Hubble rate in the early Universe: perfectly viable models, which satisfy Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN), cosmic microwave background and general relativity tests, may nevertheless lead to enhancements of the Hubble rate up to many orders of magnitude. In this paper we show that strong bounds on the pre-BBN evolution of the Universe may be derived, under the assumption that dark matter is a thermal relic, by combining the dark matter relic density bound with constraints coming from the production of cosmic-ray antiprotons by dark matter annihilation in the Galaxy. The limits we derive can be sizable and apply to the Hubble rate around the temperature of dark matter decoupling. For dark matter masses lighter than 100 GeV, the bound on the Hubble-rate enhancement ranges from a factor of a few to a factor of 30, depending on the actual cosmological model, while for a mass of 500 GeV the bound falls in the range 50-500. Uncertainties in the derivation of the bounds and situations where the bounds become looser are discussed. We finally discuss how these limits apply to some specific realizations of non-standard cosmologies: a scalar-tensor gravity model, kination models and a Randall-Sundrum D-brane model. (Orig.)

  18. Density functional theory investigation of antiproton-helium collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Henkel, N; Lüdde, H J; Kirchner, T; 10.1103/PhysRevA.80.032704

    2011-01-01

    We revisit recent developments in the theoretical foundations of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). TDDFT is then applied to the calculation of total cross sections for ionization processes in the antiproton-Helium collision system. The Kohn-Sham potential is approximated as the sum of the Hartree-exchange potential and a correlation potential that was proposed in the context of laser-induced ionization. Furthermore, some approaches to the problem of calculating the ionization probabilities from the density are discussed. Small projectile energies below 5keV are considered as well as those in the range from 5 to 1000 keV. Results are compared with former calculations and with experimental data. We find that the correlation potential yields no obvious improvement of the results over the exchange-only approximation where the correlation potential is neglected. Furthermore, we find the problem of calculating the desired observables crucial, introducing errors of at least the same order of magnitud...

  19. Time purified/separated antiproton beam at the AGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachman, M.; Barlett, M.L.; Bonner, B.; Borenstein, S.; Bridges, D.; Brown, H.; Buchanan, J.; Clement, J.C.; Daftari, I.; Debbe, R.

    1984-11-15

    A 1 km antiproton beam has been designed for construction at the AGS. The momentum band can be varied between +- 0.3% to +- 1.0%, and the resolution for tagged particles will be deltap/papprox.10/sup -4/ at beam rates as high as 10/sup 6/ p-bar/s. Separation by decay purification will be on the order of 1 p-bar/10(..pi../sup -/+..mu../sup -/). This beam will be used in a detailed investigation of Charmonium including a measurement of the chi widths. We will also search for expected but as yet unseen states, and search for possible I = 1 events which would imply the existence of four quark states. This facility will also lend itself to a wide variety of exciting physics such as the proton form factor including both e/sup +/e/sup -/ and ..gamma gamma.. final states, two-body hadron final states, antinucleus yields, and possibly tagged hadron beams (i.e., ..lambda.., ..gamma.., etc.). When heavy ions become available at the AGS, one can measure various long lived particle yields. Finally, with as many as 10/sup 7/ polarized muons in the beam, one has the possibility to use them for nuclear structure studies.

  20. Time purified/separated antiproton beam at the AGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachman, M.; Barlett, M.L.; Bonner, B.; Borenstein, S.; Bridges, D.; Brown, H.; Buchanan, J.; Clement, J.C.; Daftari, I.; Debbe, R.

    1984-01-01

    A 1 km antiproton beam has been designed for construction at the AGS. The momentum band can be varied between +-0.3% to +-1.0%, and the resolution for tagged particles will be deltap/p approx. 10/sup -4/ at beam rates as high as 10/sup 6/ anti p/s. Separation by decay purification will be on the order of 1 anti p/10(..pi../sup -/+..mu../sup -/). This beam will be used in a detailed investigation of Charmonium including a measurement of the chi widths. We will also search for expected but as yet unseen states, and search for possible I=1 events which would imply the existence of four quark states. This facility will also lend itself to a wide variety of exciting physics such as the proton form factor including both e/sup +/e/sup -/ and ..gamma gamma.. final states, two-body hadron final states, anti-nucleus yields, and possibly tagged hadron beams (i.e., Lambda, E, etc.). When heavy ions become available at the AGS, one can measure various long lived particle yields. Finally, with as many as 10/sup 7/ polarized muons in the beam, one has the possibility to use them for nuclear structure studies.

  1. Multiple ionization of He, Ne, and Ar by fast protons and antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, L.H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Moller, S.P.; Sorensen, A.H.; Elsener, K.; Rensfelt, K.; Uggerhoj, E.

    1987-10-15

    Single and multiple ionization of He, Ne, and Ar has been studied experimentally by impact of fast protons and antiprotons. The single-ionization cross sections obtained with protons and antiprotons are found to be the same. The double-ionization cross sections obtained with antiprotons, however, are much larger than those obtained with protons at equal velocity. This difference is found for all three gases but the effect is largest for He and Ne, where the difference is about a factor of 2 at 1 MeV/amu. The difference is discussed in terms of interference between two collision mechanisms which both result in double-electron escape. Experimental information on the magnitude of the interference term is obtained by inclusion of double-ionization data, partly obtained in this work, for fast electron and ..cap alpha..-particle impact. For triple ionization of Ne, we also find that antiprotons yield much larger cross sections than protons do. Identical cross sections, however, are found for triple ionization of Ar with protons and antiprotons. This is believed to be due to the fact that triple ionization of Ar is mainly a consequence of a single vacancy produced in an inner shell followed by electronic rearrangement. This observation supports the interpretation that the observed charge effect is due to an interference effect in the outermost shell.

  2. Evidence for the Stochastic Acceleration of Secondary Antiprotons by Supernova Remnants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cholis, Ilias [Johns Hopkins U.; Hooper, Dan [Chicago U., KICP; Linden, Tim [Ohio State U.

    2017-01-16

    The antiproton-to-proton ratio in the cosmic-ray spectrum is a sensitive probe of new physics. Using recent measurements of the cosmic-ray antiproton and proton fluxes in the energy range of 1-1000 GeV, we study the contribution to the $\\bar{p}/p$ ratio from secondary antiprotons that are produced and subsequently accelerated within individual supernova remnants. We consider several well-motivated models for cosmic-ray propagation in the interstellar medium and marginalize our results over the uncertainties related to the antiproton production cross section and the time-, charge-, and energy-dependent effects of solar modulation. We find that the increase in the $\\bar{p}/p$ ratio observed at rigidities above $\\sim$ 100 GV cannot be accounted for within the context of conventional cosmic-ray propagation models, but is consistent with scenarios in which cosmic-ray antiprotons are produced and subsequently accelerated by shocks within a given supernova remnant. In light of this, the acceleration of secondary cosmic rays in supernova remnants is predicted to substantially contribute to the cosmic-ray positron spectrum, accounting for a significant fraction of the observed positron excess.

  3. Modeling of the Near-Earth Low-Energy Antiproton Fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. B. Jayanthi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The local interstellar antiproton spectrum is simulated taking into account antineutron decay, (He,p interaction, secondary and tertiary antiproton production, and the solar modulation in the “force field” approximation. Inclusive invariant cross-sections were obtained through a Monte Carlo procedure using the Multistage Dynamical Model code simulating various processes of the particle production. The results of the simulations provided flux values of 4⋅10−3 to 10−2 and 10−2 to 1.7⋅10−2 antiprotons/(2 s sr GeV at energies of 0.2 and 1 GeV, respectively, for the solar maximum and minimum epochs. Simulated flux of the trapped antiprotons in the inner magnetosphere due to galactic cosmic ray (GCR interactions with the atmospheric constituents exceeds the galactic antiproton flux up to several orders. These simulation results considering the assumptions with the attendant limitations are in comprehensive agreement with the experimental data including the PAMELA ones.

  4. New calculation of antiproton production by cosmic ray protons and nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Kachelriess, Michael; Ostapchenko, Sergey S

    2015-01-01

    A dramatic increase in the accuracy and statistics of space-borne cosmic ray (CR) measurements has yielded several breakthroughs over the last several years. The most puzzling is the rise in the positron fraction above ~10 GeV over the predictions of the propagation models assuming pure secondary production. The accuracy of the antiproton production cross section is critical for astrophysical applications and searches for new physics since antiprotons in CRs seem to hold the keys to many puzzles including the origin of those excess positrons. However, model calculations of antiproton production in CR interactions with interstellar gas are often employing parameterizations that are out of date or are using outdated physical concepts. That may lead to an incorrect interpretation of antiproton data which could have broad consequences for other areas of astrophysics. In this work, we calculate antiproton production in pp-, pA-, and AA-interactions using EPOS-LHC and QGSJET-II-04, two of the most advanced Monte Ca...

  5. Direct detection of antiprotons with the Timepix3 in a new electrostatic selection beamline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifico, N.; Aghion, S.; Alozy, J.; Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Bonomi, G.; Bräunig, P.; Bremer, J.; Brusa, R. S.; Cabaret, L.; Caccia, M.; Campbell, M.; Caravita, R.; Castelli, F.; Cerchiari, G.; Chlouba, K.; Cialdi, S.; Comparat, D.; Consolati, G.; Demetrio, A.; Di Noto, L.; Doser, M.; Dudarev, A.; Ereditato, A.; Evans, C.; Ferragut, R.; Fesel, J.; Fontana, A.; Gerber, S.; Giammarchi, M.; Gligorova, A.; Guatieri, F.; Haider, S.; Holmestad, H.; Huse, T.; Jordan, E.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kimura, M.; Krasnický, D.; Lagomarsino, V.; Lansonneur, P.; Lawler, G.; Lebrun, P.; Llopart, X.; Malbrunot, C.; Mariazzi, S.; Marx, L.; Matveev, V.; Mazzotta, Z.; Nebbia, G.; Nedelec, P.; Oberthaler, M.; Pagano, D.; Penasa, L.; Petracek, V.; Pistillo, C.; Prelz, F.; Prevedelli, M.; Ravelli, L.; Resch, L.; Røhne, O. M.; Rotondi, A.; Sacerdoti, M.; Sandaker, H.; Santoro, R.; Scampoli, P.; Smestad, L.; Sorrentino, F.; Spacek, M.; Storey, J.; Strojek, I. M.; Testera, G.; Tietje, I.; Tlustos, L.; Widmann, E.; Yzombard, P.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zmeskal, J.; Zurlo, N.

    2016-09-01

    We present here the first results obtained employing the Timepix3 for the detection and tagging of annihilations of low energy antiprotons. The Timepix3 is a recently developed hybrid pixel detector with advanced Time-of-Arrival and Time-over-Threshold capabilities and has the potential of allowing precise kinetic energy measurements of low energy charged particles from their time of flight. The tagging of the characteristic antiproton annihilation signature, already studied by our group, is enabled by the high spatial and energy resolution of this detector. In this study we have used a new, dedicated, energy selection beamline (GRACE). The line is symbiotic to the AEgIS experiment at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator and is dedicated to detector tests and possibly antiproton physics experiments. We show how the high resolution of the Timepix3 on the Time-of-Arrival and Time-over-Threshold information allows for a precise 3D reconstruction of the annihilation prongs. The presented results point at the potential use of the Timepix3 in antimatter-research experiments where a precise and unambiguous tagging of antiproton annihilations is required.

  6. Direct detection of antiprotons with the Timepix3 in a new electrostatic selection beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacifico, N., E-mail: nicola.pacifico@cern.ch [Institute of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, Allgaten 55, 5007 Bergen (Norway); Aghion, S. [Politecnico of Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); INFN Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Alozy, J. [Physics Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T. [Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Bonomi, G. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Brescia, via Branze 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy); INFN Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Bräunig, P. [Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University, Im Neuenheimer Feld 227, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bremer, J. [Physics Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Brusa, R.S. [Department of Physics, University of Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); TIFPA/INFN Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Cabaret, L. [Laboratory Aimé Cotton, University of Paris-Sud, ENS Cachan, CNRS, University Paris-Saclay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Caccia, M. [INFN Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Department of Science, University of Insubria, Via Valleggio 11, 22100 Como (Italy); Campbell, M. [Physics Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Caravita, R. [Department of Physics, University of Genova, via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); INFN Genova, via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Castelli, F. [INFN Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Cerchiari, G. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Chlouba, K. [Czech Technical University, Prague, Brehov 7, 11519 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); and others

    2016-09-21

    We present here the first results obtained employing the Timepix3 for the detection and tagging of annihilations of low energy antiprotons. The Timepix3 is a recently developed hybrid pixel detector with advanced Time-of-Arrival and Time-over-Threshold capabilities and has the potential of allowing precise kinetic energy measurements of low energy charged particles from their time of flight. The tagging of the characteristic antiproton annihilation signature, already studied by our group, is enabled by the high spatial and energy resolution of this detector. In this study we have used a new, dedicated, energy selection beamline (GRACE). The line is symbiotic to the AEgIS experiment at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator and is dedicated to detector tests and possibly antiproton physics experiments. We show how the high resolution of the Timepix3 on the Time-of-Arrival and Time-over-Threshold information allows for a precise 3D reconstruction of the annihilation prongs. The presented results point at the potential use of the Timepix3 in antimatter-research experiments where a precise and unambiguous tagging of antiproton annihilations is required.

  7. Ion optics and beam dynamics optimization at the HESR storage ring for the SPARC experiments with highly charged heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalenko, Oleksandr

    2015-06-24

    The High-Energy Storage Ring (HESR) is a part of an upcoming International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt. A key part of a scientific program, along with antiproton physics, will be physics with highly-charged heavy ions. Phase-space cooled beams together with fixed internal target will provide an excellent environment for storage ring experiments at the HESR for the SPARC collaboration. Until recently, however, the existing ion optical lattice for the HESR was designed only for the experiments with antiproton beams. The thesis presents a new ion optical mode developed specifically for the operation of the HESR with highly charged heavy ions. The presence of the errors, such as beam momentum spread, magnetic field impurities or magnets misalignments, leads to disruption of beam dynamics: exciting of resonant motion and loss of beam stability. Within the paper, these effects are investigated with the help of numerical codes for particle accelerator design and simulation MAD-X and MIRKO. A number of correction techniques are applied to minimize the nonlinear impact on the beam dynamics and improve the experimental conditions. The application of the analytical and numerical tools is demonstrated in the experiment with uranium U{sup 90+} beam at the existing storage ring ESR, GSI.

  8. Antiproton–to–electron mass ratio determined by two-photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sótér A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ASACUSA collaboration of CERN has recently carried out two-photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms. Three transition frequencies were determined with fractional precisions of 2.3–5 parts in 109. By comparing the results with three-body QED calculations, the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined as 1836.1526736(23.

  9. Energy-dependent partial-wave analysis of all antiproton-proton scattering data below 925 MeV/c

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Daren; Timmermans, Rob G. E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is a renewed experimental interest in antiproton-proton scattering with an intense, possibly polarized antiproton beam. On the theoretical side, significant progress has been made in the understanding of the nuclear force from chiral effective field theory. Purpose: We provide a hi

  10. A silicon multiplicity detector system for an experiment on the interaction of antiprotons with nuclei at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, S.; Bonner, B.E.; Buchanan, J.A.; Clement, J.M.; Empl, A.; Mutchler, G.S.; Toshkov, S. (Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Bonner Nuclear Labs.); Eiseman, S.E.; Etkin, A.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A.; Lindenbaum, S.J. (City Coll., New York, NY (Unit

    1991-01-01

    A Large Angle Multiplicity Detector (LAMD) system has been developed and used at the BNL experiment E854: Antiproton Nucleus Interactions. This system performed well with an energetic antiproton beam. Charged particle multiplicity distributions from pbar annihilations were measured. We discuss the design and performance of the LAMD system in this paper. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  11. A silicon multiplicity detector system for an experiment on the interaction of antiprotons with nuclei at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, S.; Bonner, B.E.; Buchanan, J.A.; Clement, J.M.; Empl, A.; Mutchler, G.S.; Toshkov, S. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Bonner Nuclear Labs.; Eiseman, S.E.; Etkin, A.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A.; Lindenbaum, S.J. [City Coll., New York, NY (United States); Hallman, T.J.; Madansky, L. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Peaslee, D.C. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States)

    1991-12-31

    A Large Angle Multiplicity Detector (LAMD) system has been developed and used at the BNL experiment E854: Antiproton Nucleus Interactions. This system performed well with an energetic antiproton beam. Charged particle multiplicity distributions from pbar annihilations were measured. We discuss the design and performance of the LAMD system in this paper. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  12. A silicon multiplicity detector system for an experiment on the interaction of antiprotons with nuclei at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, S.; Bonner, B.E.; Buchanan, J.A.; Clement, J.M.; Empl, A.; Mutchler, G.S.; Toshkov, S. (Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Bonner Nuclear Labs.); Eiseman, S.E.; Etkin, A.; Foley, K.J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1992-08-01

    A Large Angle Multiplicity Detector (LAMD) system has been developed and used at the BNL experiment E854: Antiproton Nucleus Interactions. This system performed well with an energetic antiproton beam. Charged particle multiplicity distributions from [bar p] annihilations were measured. The authors discuss the design and performance of the LAMD system in this paper.

  13. Prime rings with PI rings of constants

    CERN Document Server

    Kharchenko, V K; Rodríguez-Romo, S

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that if the ring of constants of a restricted differential Lie algebra with a quasi-Frobenius inner part satisfies a polynomial identity (PI) then the original prime ring has a generalized polynomial identitiy (GPI). If additionally the ring of constants is semiprime then the original ring is PI. The case of a non-quasi-Frobenius inner part is also considered.

  14. Antiproton production and antideuteron production limits in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dover, C.B. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Huang, H.Z.; Van Buren, G. [University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Barish, K.N. [University of California at Riverside, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Fadem, B.; Hill, J.C.; Hoversten, R.; Lajoie, J.G.; Libby, B.; Wohn, F.K. [Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Rabin, M.S. [University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Haridas, P.; Pless, I.A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Armstrong, T.A.; Smith, G.A.; Toothacker, W.S. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Davies, R.; Hirsch, A.S.; Porile, N.T.; Rimai, A.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Tincknell, M.L. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Lainis, T. [United States Military Academy, West Point, New York 10996 (United States); Greene, S.V.; Miller, T.E.; Reid, J.D.; Rose, A. [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Bennett, S.J.; Cormier, T.M.; Fachini, P.; Li, Q.; Munhoz, M.G.; Pruneau, C.A. [Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States); Batsoulli, S.; Chikanian, A.; Coe, S.D.; Finch, L.E.; George, N.K.; Kumar, B.S.; Majka, R.D.; Nagle, J.L.; Pope, J.K.; Rotondo, F.S.; Sandweiss, J.; Slaughter, A.J.; Xu, Z. [Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

    1999-05-01

    We present results from Experiment 864 for antiproton production and antideuteron limits in Au + Pb collisions at 11.5 GeV/c per nucleon. We have measured invariant multiplicities for antiprotons for rapidities 1.4{lt}y{lt}2.4 at low transverse momentum as a function of collision geometry. When compared with the results from Experiment 878 our measurements suggest a significant contribution to the measured antiproton yield from the decay of strange antibaryons. We have also searched for antideuterons and see no statistically significant signal. Thus, we set upper limits on the production at approximately 3{times}10{sup {minus}7} per 10{percent} highest multiplicity Au+Pb interaction. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Measurements of Electron Spectra in the Forward Direction in Slow-Antiproton Carbon-Foil Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Yasunori; Kuroki, Kenro; Komaki, Ken-Ichiro; Andersen, Lars H.; Horsdal-Pedersen, Erik; Hvelplund, Preben; Knudsen, Helge; M{ø}ller, S{ø}ren P.; Uggerh{ø}j, Erik; Elsener, Konrad

    1990-08-01

    The spectrta of electrons emitted in the forward direction from antiproton and proton bombardments on carbon foils have been studied for projectile energies from 500 to 750 keV. Our main observation is that at the electron energy where the well-known convoy peak is observed for proton impact, the spectrum for equivelocity antiprotons is smooth, showing no indication of a deep anticusp. However, around 50 eV below the electron energy where the cusp is observed for proton impact, we have observed a small peak for antiproton impact. The energy and the relative intensity of the bump are found to be consistent with those predicted for electrons released from a wake-riding state.

  16. A fussy revisitation of antiprotons as a tool for Dark Matter searches

    CERN Document Server

    Boudaud, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Antiprotons are regarded as a powerful probe for Dark Matter (DM) indirect detection and indeed current data from \\PAMELA\\ have been shown to lead to stringent constraints. However, in order to exploit their constraining/discovery power properly, great attention must be put into effects (linked to their propagation in the Galaxy) which may be perceived as subleading but actually prove to be quite relevant. We revisit the computation of the astrophysical background and of the DM antiproton fluxes fully including the effects of: diffusive reacceleration, energy losses including tertiary component and solar modulation (in a force field approximation). Using the updated proton and helium fluxes just released by the \\AMS\\ experiment we reevaluate the secondary astrophysical antiproton to proton ratio and its uncertainties, and compare it with the ratio preliminarly reported by \\AMS. We find no unambiguous evidence for a significant excess with respect to expectations. Yet, some preference for a flatter energy depe...

  17. Classification of high-energy antiprotons on electrons background based on calorimeter data in PAMELA experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunaeva, O. A.; Alekseev, V. V.; Bogomolov, Yu V.; Lukyanov, A. D.; Malakhov, V. V.; Mayorov, A. G.; Rodenko, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    In modern experimental physics a heterogeneous coordinate-sensitive calorimeters are widely used due to their good characteristics and possibilities to obtain a three-dimensional information of particles interactions. Especially it is important at high-energies when electromagnetic or hadron showers are arise. We propose a quit efficient method to identify antiprotons (positrons) with energies more than 10 GeV on electron (proton) background by calorimeter of such kind. We construct the AdaBoost classifier and SVM to separate particles into two classes, different combinations of energy release along reconstructed particle trajectory were used as feature vector. We test a preliminary version of the method on a calorimeter of the PAMELA magnetic spectrometer. For high-energy particles we got a good quality of classification: it lost about 5 · 10‑2 of antiprotons, and less than 4 · 10‑4 of electrons were classified to antiproton class.

  18. Antiproton signatures from astrophysical and dark matter sources at the galactic center

    CERN Document Server

    Cembranos, J A R; Maroto, A L

    2015-01-01

    The center of our Galaxy is a complex region characterized by extreme phenomena. The presence of the supermassive Sagittarius A* black hole, a high Dark Matter density and an even higher baryonic density are able to produce very energetic processes. Indeed, high energetic gamma rays have been observed by different telescopes, although its origin is not clear. In this work, we constrain the possible antiproton flux component associated to this signal. The expected secondary astrophysical antiproton background already saturates the observed data. It implies that any other important astrophysical source leads to an inconsistent excess, since the theoretical uncertainties corresponding to the mentioned background are small. The constraints depend on the diffusion model and the spectral features of the source. In particular, we consider antiproton spectra described by a power-law, a monochromatic signal and a Standard Model particle-antiparticle channel production.

  19. Advanced space propulsion study - antiproton and beamed-power propulsion. Final report, 1 May 1986-30 June 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forward, R.L.

    1987-10-01

    The contract objective was to monitor the research at the forefront of physics and engineering to discover new spacecraft-propulsion concepts. The major topics covered were antiproton-annihilation propulsion, laser thermal propulsion, laser-pushed lightsails, tether transportation systems, solar sails, and metallic hydrogen. Five papers were prepared and are included as appendices. They covered 1) pellet, microwave, and laser-beamed power systems for interstellar transport; 2) a design for a near-relativistic laser-pushed lightsail using near-term laser technology; 3) a survey of laser thermal propulsion, tether transportation systems, antiproton annihilation propulsion, exotic applications of solar sails, and laser-pushed interstellar lightsails; 4) the status of antiproton annihilation propulsion as of 1986, and 5) the prospects for obtaining antimatter ions heavier than antiprotons. Two additional appendices contain the first seven issues of the Mirror Matter Newsletter concerning the science and technology of antimatter, and an annotated bibliography of antiproton science and technology.

  20. Radical theory of rings

    CERN Document Server

    Gardner, JW

    2003-01-01

    Radical Theory of Rings distills the most noteworthy present-day theoretical topics, gives a unified account of the classical structure theorems for rings, and deepens understanding of key aspects of ring theory via ring and radical constructions. Assimilating radical theory's evolution in the decades since the last major work on rings and radicals was published, the authors deal with some distinctive features of the radical theory of nonassociative rings, associative rings with involution, and near-rings. Written in clear algebraic terms by globally acknowledged authorities, the presentation

  1. The experiment PANDA: physics with antiprotons at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boca, Gianluigi

    2015-05-01

    PANDA is an experiment that will run at the future facility FAIR, Darmstadt, Germany. A high intensity and cooled antiproton beam will collide on a fixed hydrogen or nuclear target covering center-of-mass energies between 2.2 and 5.5 GeV. PANDA addresses various physics aspects from the low energy non-perturbative region towards the perturbative regime of QCD. With the impressive theoretical developments in this field, e.g. lattice QCD, the predictions are becoming more accurate in the course of time. The data harvest with PANDA will, therefore, be an ideal test bench with the aim to provide a deeper understanding of hadronic phenomena such as confinement and the generation of hadron masses. A variety of physics topics will be covered with PANDA, for example: the formation or production of exotic non-qqbar charm meson states connected to the recently observed XYZ spectrum; the study of gluon-rich matter, such as glueballs and hybrids; the spectroscopy of the excited states of strange and charm baryons, their production cross section and their spin correlations; the behaviour of hadrons in nuclear matter; the hypernuclear physics; the electromagnetic proton form factors in the timelike region. The PANDA experiment is designed to achieve the above mentioned physics goals with a setup with the following characteristics: an almost full solid angle acceptance; excellent tracking capabilities with high resolution (1-2 % at 1 GeV/c in the central region); secondary vertex detection with resolution ≈ 100 microns or better; electromagnetic calorimetry for detections of gammas and electrons up to 10 GeV; good particle identification of charge tracks (electrons, muons, pions, kaons, protons); a dedicated interchangeable central apparatus for the hypernuclear physics; detector and data acquisition system capable of working at 20 MHz interaction rate with an intelligent software trigger that can provide maximum flexibility.

  2. First measurement of the antiproton-nucleus annihilation cross section at 125 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghai-Khozani, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik (Germany); Barna, D. [CERN (Switzerland); Corradini, M. [Università degli Studi di Brescia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione (Italy); Salvador, D. De [Università di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia (Italy); Hayano, R. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan); Hori, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik (Germany); Kobayashi, T. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan); Leali, M.; Lodi-Rizzini, E.; Mascagna, V. [Università degli Studi di Brescia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione (Italy); Prest, M. [Università degli Studi dell’Insubria, Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia (Italy); Seiler, D. [TUM Department of Physics E12 (Germany); Soter, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik (Germany); Todoroki, K. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan); Vallazza, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); Venturelli, L., E-mail: venturelli@bs.infn.it [Università degli Studi di Brescia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    The first observation of in-flight antiproton-nucleus annihilation at ∼130 keV obtained with the ASACUSA detector has demonstrated that the measurement of the cross section of the process is feasible at such extremely low energies Aghai-Khozani, H., et al., Eur. Phys. J. Plus 127, 55 (2012). Here we present the results of the data analysis with the evaluations of the antiproton annihilation cross sections on carbon, palladium and platinum targets at ∼125 keV.

  3. Centrifugal separation and equilibration dynamics in an electron-antiproton plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo; Bertsche, William; Bowe, Paul D; Butler, Eoin; Cesar, Claudio L; Chapman, Steven; Charlton, Michael; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, Joel; Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C; Gill, David R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, Jeffrey S; Hardy, Walter N; Hayden, Michael E; Humphries, Andrew J; Hydomako, Richard; Jonsell, Svante; Madsen, Niels; Menary, Scott; Nolan, Paul; Olin, Art; Povilus, Alexander; Pusa, Petteri; Robicheaux, Francis; Sarid, Eli; Silveira, Daniel M; So, Chukman; Storey, James W; Thompson, Robert I; van der Werf, Dirk P; Wurtele, Jonathan S; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    Charges in cold, multiple-species, non-neutral plasmas separate radially by mass, forming centrifugally-separated states. Here, we report the first detailed measurements of such states in an electron-antiproton plasma, and the first observations of the separation dynamics in any centrifugally-separated system. While the observed equilibrium states are expected and in agreement with theory, the equilibration time is approximately constant over a wide range of parameters, a surprising and as yet unexplained result. Electron-antiproton plasmas play a crucial role in antihydrogen trapping experiments.

  4. Antiproton and proton collisions with the alkali-metal atoms Li, Na, and K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    Single-electron ionization and excitation cross sections as well as cross sections for excitation into the first excited p state of the alkali-metal atoms Li(2s), Na(3s), and K(4s) colliding with antiprotons and protons were calculated using a time-dependent channel-coupling approach....... For antiprotons an impact-energy range from 0.25 to 1000 keV and for protons from 2 to 1000 keV was considered. The target atoms are treated as effective one-electron systems using a model potential. The results are compared with theoretical and experimental data from literature and calculated cross sections...

  5. Baryon fraction in the universe, antiproton lifetime, and the diffuse radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, S.A. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Bombay 400005 (India); Finetti, N. [Particle Astrophysics Laboratory, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico 88003 (United States)

    1995-07-01

    We have calculated the diffuse spectrum in the energy region between 0.1 keV and 500 MeV, which arises from the decay of antiprotons in the baryon Symmetric Universe. Comparing this with the observation, we derived a life time of {gt}2.3{times}10 {sup 24} sec for the antiproton, which is 17 orders better than the one determined from laboratory experiments. We predict a cut-off in the diffuse radiation beyond 460 MeV, and if seen, would provide evidence for the existence of antimatter domains in the universe. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  6. Single ionization of helium by 40--3000-keV antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, L.H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Moller, S.P.; Pedersen, J.O.P.; Tang-Petersen, S.; Uggerhoj, E. (Institute of Physics, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)); Elsener, K. (CERN, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland)); Morenzoni, E. (PSI, CH-5234 Villigen (Switzerland))

    1990-06-01

    Measurements of single-ionization cross sections for antiproton impact on helium atoms are reported for impact energies ranging from 40 keV to 3 MeV. It is found that the measured cross sections are in good agreement with recent theoretical estimates based on the continuum-distorted-wave approximation. From a comparison with similar proton data, the ratio between antiproton and proton results is obtained. The energy dependence of this ratio is compared with various theoretical estimates and explained as a result of polarization and binding effects.

  7. Single ionization of helium by 40-3000-keV antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, L. H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Møller, S. P.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Tang-Petersen, S.; Uggerhøj, E.; Elsener, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1990-06-01

    Measurements of single-ionization cross sections for antiproton impact on helium atoms are reported for impact energies ranging from 40 keV to 3 MeV. It is found that the measured cross sections are in good agreement with recent theoretical estimates based on the continuum-distorted-wave approximation. From a comparison with similar proton data, the ratio between antiproton and proton results is obtained. The energy dependence of this ratio is compared with various theoretical estimates and explained as a result of polarization and binding effects.

  8. Operating Procedure Changes to Improve Antiproton Production at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drendel, B.; Morgan, J.P.; Vander Meulen, D.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Since the start of Fermilab Collider Run II in 2001, the maximum weekly antiproton accumulation rate has increased from 400 x 10{sup 10} Pbars/week to approximately 3,700 x 10{sup 10} Pbars/week. There are many factors contributing to this increase, one of which involves changes to operational procedures that have streamlined and automated Antiproton Source production. Automation has been added to the beam line orbit control, stochastic cooling power level management, and RF settings. In addition, daily tuning efforts have been streamlined by implementing sequencer driven tuning software.

  9. Depth-Dose and LET Distributions of Antiproton Beams in Various Target Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Olsen, Sune; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.;

    unrestricted LET is calculated for all configurations. Finally, we investigate which concentrations of gadolinium and boron are needed in a water target in order to observe a significant change in the antiproton depth-dose distribution.  Results Results indicate, that there is no significant change...... in the depth-dose distribution and average LET when substituting the materials. Adding boron and gadolinium up to concentrations of 1 per 1000 atoms to a water phantom, did not change the depth-dose profile nor the average LET. Conclusions  According to our FLUKA calculations, antiproton neutron capture...

  10. Pion, Kaon, Proton and Antiproton Production in Proton-Proton Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2008-01-01

    Inclusive pion, kaon, proton, and antiproton production from proton-proton collisions is studied at a variety of proton energies. Various available parameterizations of Lorentz-invariant differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity are compared with experimental data. The Badhwar and Alper parameterizations are moderately satisfactory for charged pion production. The Badhwar parameterization provides the best fit for charged kaon production. For proton production, the Alper parameterization is best, and for antiproton production the Carey parameterization works best. However, no parameterization is able to fully account for all the data.

  11. Evidence for a Possible Proton-Antiproton Bound State from Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Loan, M

    2006-01-01

    We have used standard techniques of lattice quantum chromodynamics to look for evidence of the spin-zero six quark flavour singlet state ($J^{PC}=0^{-+}$) observed by BES Collaboration, and to determine the splitting between the mass of the possible proton-antiproton and the mass of two protons, its threshold. Ignoring quark loops and quark annihilation, we find indications that for sufficiently light quarks proton- antiproton is below the $2m_{p}$ threshold, making it a possible six-quark bound state.

  12. Proton-Antiproton Pair Production in Two-Photon Collisions at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hakobyan, R S; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Käfer, D; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rosenbleck, C; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2003-01-01

    The reaction e+e- -> e+e- proton antiproton is studied with the L3 detector at LEP. The analysis is based on data collected at e+e- center-of-mass energies from 183 GeV to 209 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 667 pb-1. The gamma gamma -> proton antiproton differential cross section is measured in the range of the two-photon center-of-mass energy from 2.1 GeV to 4.5 GeV. The results are compared to the predictions of the three-quark and quark-diquark models.

  13. 《李尔王》中盲目父爱之解读%The interpretation of the blind father love of"King Lear"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹轶群

    2014-01-01

    莎士比亚描写李尔王和女儿们围绕家庭关系障碍展开的主题:父亲的偏爱导致同胞之间勾心斗角,葛罗斯特伯爵和儿子们的关系出现了类似的问题。莎士比亚通过对家庭关系的剖析,深化了主题--盲目的父爱和毫不质疑的信任会毁掉一个家庭。%Shakespeare wrote of King Lear and daughters focuses on family relationship disorder theme:father preference led to infighting among compatriots, found a similar relationship between the Earl of Gross Te and his sons. Shakespeare through the analysis of the family relations, to deepen the theme--blind father love and no doubt trust will destroy a family.

  14. Stirling engine piston ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, Roy B.

    1983-01-01

    A piston ring design for a Stirling engine wherein the contact pressure between the piston and the cylinder is maintained at a uniform level, independent of engine conditions through a balancing of the pressure exerted upon the ring's surface and thereby allowing the contact pressure on the ring to be predetermined through the use of a preloaded expander ring.

  15. Birth Control Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Birth Control Ring KidsHealth > For Teens > Birth Control Ring A A A What's in this article? ... español Anillo vaginal anticonceptivo What Is It? The birth control ring is a soft, flexible, doughnut-shaped ring ...

  16. Actin Rings of Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwayer, Cornelia; Sikora, Mateusz; Slováková, Jana; Kardos, Roland; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2016-06-20

    Circular or ring-like actin structures play important roles in various developmental and physiological processes. Commonly, these rings are composed of actin filaments and myosin motors (actomyosin) that, upon activation, trigger ring constriction. Actomyosin ring constriction, in turn, has been implicated in key cellular processes ranging from cytokinesis to wound closure. Non-constricting actin ring-like structures also form at cell-cell contacts, where they exert a stabilizing function. Here, we review recent studies on the formation and function of actin ring-like structures in various morphogenetic processes, shedding light on how those different rings have been adapted to fulfill their specific roles.

  17. Alternative loop rings

    CERN Document Server

    Goodaire, EG; Polcino Milies, C

    1996-01-01

    For the past ten years, alternative loop rings have intrigued mathematicians from a wide cross-section of modern algebra. As a consequence, the theory of alternative loop rings has grown tremendously. One of the main developments is the complete characterization of loops which have an alternative but not associative, loop ring. Furthermore, there is a very close relationship between the algebraic structures of loop rings and of group rings over 2-groups. Another major topic of research is the study of the unit loop of the integral loop ring. Here the interaction between loop rings and group ri

  18. Buffer-gas cooling of antiprotonic helium to 1.5 to 1.7 K, and antiproton-to–electron mass ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Masaki; Sótér, Anna; Barna, Daniel; Dax, Andreas; Hayano, Ryugo; Kobayashi, Takumi; Murakami, Yohei; Todoroki, Koichi; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Horváth, Dezső; Venturelli, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Charge, parity, and time reversal (CPT) symmetry implies that a particle and its antiparticle have the same mass. The antiproton-to-electron mass ratio Embedded Image can be precisely determined from the single-photon transition frequencies of antiprotonic helium. We measured 13 such frequencies with laser spectroscopy to a fractional precision of 2.5 × 10−9 to 16 × 10−9. About 2 × 109 antiprotonic helium atoms were cooled to temperatures between 1.5 and 1.7 kelvin by using buffer-gas cooling in cryogenic low-pressure helium gas; the narrow thermal distribution led to the observation of sharp spectral lines of small thermal Doppler width. The deviation between the experimental frequencies and the results of three-body quantum electrodynamics calculations was reduced by a factor of 1.4 to 10 compared with previous single-photon experiments. From this, Embedded Image was determined as 1836.1526734(15), which agrees with a recent proton-to-electron experimental value within 8 × 10−10.

  19. Measurement of 0.25-3.2 GeV antiprotons in the cosmic radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, J.W.; Barbier, L.M.; Christian, E.R.;

    1996-01-01

    The balloon-borne Isotope Matter-Antimatter Experiment (IMAX) was flown from Lynn Lake, Manitoba, Canada on 16-17 July 1992. Using velocity and magnetic rigidity to determine mass, we have directly measured the abundances of cosmic ray antiprotons and protons in the energy range from 0.25 to 3.2 ...

  20. Collisions of low-energy antiprotons with molecular hydrogen: ionization, excitation and stopping power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    A time-dependent coupled-channel approach was used to calculate ionization, excitation, and energy-loss cross sections as well as energy spectra for antiproton and proton collisions with molecular hydrogen for impact energies 8 < E < 4000 keV....

  1. Relative Biological Effect of Antiprotons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael

    nuclear research facility CERN. A beam of 126 MeV antiprotons, corresponding to about 12 cm range in water, was spread out to a SOBP with a width of 1 cm. Dosimetry experiments were carried out with ionization chambers, alanine pellets and radiochromic film, and the results were used for benchmarking...

  2. Closing in on mass-degenerate dark matter scenarios with antiprotons and direct detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garny, Mathias [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Ibarra, Alejandro; Pato, Miguel; Vogl, Stefan [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department

    2012-07-15

    Over the last years both cosmic-ray antiproton measurements and direct dark matter searches have proved particularly effective in constraining the nature of dark matter candidates. The present work focusses on these two types of constraints in a minimal framework which features a Majorana fermion as the dark matter particle and a scalar that mediates the coupling to quarks. Considering a wide range of coupling schemes, we derive antiproton and direct detection constraints using the latest data and paying close attention to astrophysical and nuclear uncertainties. Both signals are strongly enhanced in the presence of degenerate dark matter and scalar masses, but we show that the effect is especially dramatic in direct detection. Accordingly, the latest direct detection limits take the lead over antiprotons. We find that antiproton and direct detection data set stringent lower limits on the mass splitting, reaching 19% at a 300 GeV dark matter mass for a unity coupling. Interestingly, these limits are orthogonal to ongoing collider searches at the Large Hadron Collider, making it feasible to close in on degenerate dark matter scenarios within the next years.

  3. Antiproton-to-proton ratios for ALICE heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tawfik, A., E-mail: atawfik@cern.ch [Egyptian Center for Theoretical Physics (ECTP), MTI University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2011-06-01

    Assuming that the final state of hadronization takes place along the freezeout line, which is defined by a constant entropy density, the antiproton-to-proton ratios produced in heavy-ion collisions are studied in framework of the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model. A phase transition from quark-gluon plasma to hadrons, a hadronization, has been conjectured in order to allow modifications in the phase-space volume and thus in the single-particle distribution function. Implementing both modifications in the grand-canonical partition function and taking into account the experimental acceptance in the heavy-ion collisions, the antiproton-to-proton ratios over center-of-mass energies {radical}(s) ranging from AGS to RHIC are very well reproduced by the HRG model. Comparing with the same particle ratios in pp collisions results in a gradually narrowing discrepancy with increasing {radical}(s). At LHC energy, the ALICE antiproton-to-proton ratios in the pp collisions turn to be very well described by the HRG model as well. It is likely that the ALICE AA-program will produce the same antiproton-to-proton ratios as the pp-one. Furthermore, the ratio gets very close to unity indicating that the matter-antimatter asymmetry nearly vanishes. The chemical potential calculated at this energy strengthens the assumption of almost fully matter-antimatter symmetry up to the LHC energy.

  4. Experimental setup and first measurement of DNA damage induced along and around an antiproton beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kavanagh, J. N.; Currell, F. J.; Timson, D. J.;

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy employs ionizing radiation to induce lethal DNA lesions in cancer cells while minimizing damage to healthy tissues. Due to their pattern of energy deposition, better therapeutic outcomes can, in theory, be achieved with ions compared to photons. Antiprotons have been proposed to offe...

  5. Status Report for Experiment AD-4/ACE Biological Effectiveness of Antiproton Annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Holzscheiter, M H; Angelopoulos, Angelo; Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; Currell, Fred; De Marco, John; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Kavanagh, Joy; Iwamoto, Kei; Jäkel, Oliver; Kantemiris, Ioannis; Knudsen, Helge; Kovacevic, Sandra; McBride, Bill; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen; Ratib, Osman; Schettino, Giuseppe; Timson, David; Singers-Sørensen, Brita; Solberg, Timothy; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Brad

    2009-01-01

    Status report for experiment AD-4/ACE showing recent progress in RBE measurements for V79 Chinese Hamster cells irradiated with antiprotons. Also discussed are initial test experiments using the H2AX assay to study DNA damage to cells and initial experiments using liquid ionization chambers.

  6. Antiproton-nucleus interactions at 5 to 9 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, S. (T.W. Bonner Nuclear Lab., Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)); Bonner, B.E. (T.W. Bonner Nuclear Lab., Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)); Buchanan, J.A. (T.W. Bonner Nuclear Lab., Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)); Chan, C.S. (City Coll. of New York, NY (United States)); Clement, J.M. (T.W. Bonner Nuclear Lab., Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)); Eiseman, S.E. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Empl, A. (T.W. Bonner Nuclear Lab., Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)); Etkin, A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Foley, K.J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Hackenburg, R.W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Hallman, T.J. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)); Kramer, M.A. (City Coll. of New York, NY (United States)); Kruk, J. (T.W. Bonner Nuclear Lab., Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)); Lindenbaum, S.J. (City Coll. of New York, NY (; E854 Collaboration

    1993-06-07

    Antiproton beams of 5, 7 and 9 GeV/c were used to interact with C, Al, Cu, Sn and Pb nuclear targets. Charged particle multiplicity distributions, strange particle production cross sections and rapidity distributions were measured. The charged particle multiplicities are reported in this paper. (orig.)

  7. Report of the Snowmass T4 working group on particle sources: Positron sources, anti-proton sources and secondary beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. Mokhov et al.

    2002-12-05

    This report documents the activities of the Snowmass 2001 T4 Particle Sources Working Group. T4 was charged with examining the most challenging aspects of positron sources for linear colliders and antiproton sources for proton-antiproton colliders, and the secondary beams of interest to the physics community that will be available from the next generation of high-energy particle accelerators. The leading issues, limiting technologies, and most important R and D efforts of positron production, antiproton production, and secondary beams are discussed in this paper. A listing of T4 Presentations is included.

  8. On Antiproton Production in 158 GeV/c Proton-Carbon Collisions and Nuclear Temperature of Interacting System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Hu Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The multisource thermal model is used in this paper to analyze the antiproton (p¯ production process in high-energy proton-carbon (p-C collisions. The transverse momentum, Feynman variable, and rapidity distributions of antiprotons in the nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass system are calculated by using the model. The modeling results are compared and found to be in agreement with the experimental data measured by the NA49 Collaboration at 158 GeV/c beam momentum. As a parameter, the nuclear temperature of interacting system extracted from the antiproton spectrum is estimated to be about 150 MeV.

  9. Longitudinal beam diagnostic from a distributed electrostatic pick-up in CERN's ELENA ring

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, M E; Federmann, S; Molendijk, J; Sanchez-Quesada, J; Secouet, P J; Søby, L; Pedersen, F; Timmins, M

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) Ring is a new synchrotron that will be commissioned in 2016 to further decelerate the antiprotons coming from CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator (AD). Required longitudinal diagnostics include the intensity measurement for bunched and debunched beam and the measurement of Dp/p to assess the electron cooling performance. A novel method for the calculation of these parameters is proposed for ELENA, where signals from the twenty electrostatic Pick-Ups (PU) used for orbit measurements will be combined to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. This requires that the signals be digitally down-converted, rotated and summed so that the many electrostatic PUs will function as a single, distributed PU from the processing system viewpoint. This method includes some challenges and will not be used as the baseline longitudinal diagnostics for the initial ELENA operation. This paper gives an overview of the hardware and digital signal processing involved, as well as of the challenges t...

  10. On JB-Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huanyin CHEN

    2007-01-01

    A ring R is a QB-ring provided that aR + bR = R with a, b ∈ R implies that there exists a y ∈ R such that a+by ∈ R-1q. It is said that a ring R is a JB-ring provided that R/J(R) is a QB-ring, where J(R) is the Jacobson radical of R. In this paper, various necessary and sufficient conditions, under which a ring is a JB-ring, are established. It is proved that JB-rings can be characterized by pseudo-similarity. Furthermore, the author proves that R is a J B-ring iff so is R/J(R)2.

  11. Antiproton annihilation physics in the Monte Carlo particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taasti, Vicki Trier; Knudsen, Helge [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University (Denmark); Holzscheiter, Michael H. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University (Denmark); Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico (United States); Sobolevsky, Nikolai [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences (INR), Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Thomsen, Bjarne [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University (Denmark); Bassler, Niels, E-mail: bassler@phys.au.dk [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University (Denmark)

    2015-03-15

    The Monte Carlo particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A is designed to simulate therapeutic beams for cancer radiotherapy with fast ions. SHIELD-HIT12A allows creation of antiproton beam kernels for the treatment planning system TRiP98, but first it must be benchmarked against experimental data. An experimental depth dose curve obtained by the AD-4/ACE collaboration was compared with an earlier version of SHIELD-HIT, but since then inelastic annihilation cross sections for antiprotons have been updated and a more detailed geometric model of the AD-4/ACE experiment was applied. Furthermore, the Fermi–Teller Z-law, which is implemented by default in SHIELD-HIT12A has been shown not to be a good approximation for the capture probability of negative projectiles by nuclei. We investigate other theories which have been developed, and give a better agreement with experimental findings. The consequence of these updates is tested by comparing simulated data with the antiproton depth dose curve in water. It is found that the implementation of these new capture probabilities results in an overestimation of the depth dose curve in the Bragg peak. This can be mitigated by scaling the antiproton collision cross sections, which restores the agreement, but some small deviations still remain. Best agreement is achieved by using the most recent antiproton collision cross sections and the Fermi–Teller Z-law, even if experimental data conclude that the Z-law is inadequately describing annihilation on compounds. We conclude that more experimental cross section data are needed in the lower energy range in order to resolve this contradiction, ideally combined with more rigorous models for annihilation on compounds.

  12. On semi ring bornologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, A. N.; Rakhimov, I. S.; Husain, Sh. K. Said

    2016-06-01

    Our main focus in this work is to introduce new structure bornological semi rings. This generalizes the theory of algebraic semi rings from the algebraic setting to the framework of bornological sets. We give basic properties for this new structure. As well as, We study the fundamental construction of bornological semi ring as product, inductive limits and projective limits and their extensions on bornological semi ring. Additionally, we introduce the category of bornological semi rings and study product and pullback (fiber product) in the category of bornological semi rings.

  13. Experimental determination of the complete spin structure for anti-proton + proton -> anti-\\Lambda + \\Lambda at anti-proton beam momentum of 1.637 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Paschke, K D; Berdoz, A; Franklin, G B; Khaustov, P; Meyer, C A; Bradtke, C; Gehring, R; Görtz, S; Harmsen, J; Meier, A; Meyer, W; Radtke, E; Reicherz, G; Dutz, H; Plückthun, M; Schoch, B; Dennert, H; Eyrich, W; Hauffe, J; Metzger, A; Moosburger, M; Stinzing, F; Wirth, S; Fischer, H; Franz, J; Heinsius, F H; Kriegler, E; Schmitt, H; Bunker, B; Hertzog, D; Jones, T; Tayloe, R; Bröders, R; Geyer, R; Kilian, K; Oelert, W; Röhrich, K; Sachs, K; Sefzick, T; Bassalleck, B; Eilerts, S; Fields, D E; Kingsberry, P; Lowe, J; Stotzer, R; Johansson, T; Pomp, S; Wirth, St.

    2006-01-01

    The reaction anti-proton + proton -> anti-\\Lambda + \\Lambda -> anti-proton + \\pi^+ + proton + \\pi^- has been measured with high statistics at anti-proton beam momentum of 1.637 GeV/c. The use of a transversely-polarized frozen-spin target combined with the self-analyzing property of \\Lambda/anti-\\Lambda decay allows access to unprecedented information on the spin structure of the interaction. The most general spin-scattering matrix can be written in terms of eleven real parameters for each bin of scattering angle, each of these parameters is determined with reasonable precision. From these results all conceivable spin-correlations are determined with inherent self-consistency. Good agreement is found with the few previously existing measurements of spin observables in anti-proton + proton -> anti-\\Lambda + \\Lambda near this energy. Existing theoretical models do not give good predictions for those spin-observables that had not been previously measured.

  14. Instrumentation for measurement of in-flight annihilations of 130 keV antiprotons on thin target foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todoroki, K.; Barna, D.; Hayano, R. S.; Aghai-Khozani, H.; Sótér, A.; Corradini, M.; Leali, M.; Lodi-Rizzini, E.; Mascagna, V.; Venturelli, L.; Prest, V.; Vallazza, L.; De Salvador, D.; Hori, M.

    2016-11-01

    We describe the instrumentation for an experiment to measure the cross sections of antiprotons with kinetic energies of 130±10 keV annihilating on carbon, palladium, and platinum target foils of sub-100 nm thicknesses. A 120 ns long pulsed beam containing 105 -106 antiprotons was allowed to traverse the foils, and the signal annihilations that resulted from this were isolated using a time-of-flight method. Backgrounds arose from Rutherford scattering of the antiprotons off the target foils, their annihilations in the target chamber walls, and π → μ → e decay of the charged pions that emerged from the annihilations. Some antiprotons slowed down and annihilated in the contamination on the target surfaces. This reduced the signal-to-background ratio of the measurement.

  15. Groups, rings, modules

    CERN Document Server

    Auslander, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    This classic monograph is geared toward advanced undergraduates and graduate students. The treatment presupposes some familiarity with sets, groups, rings, and vector spaces. The four-part approach begins with examinations of sets and maps, monoids and groups, categories, and rings. The second part explores unique factorization domains, general module theory, semisimple rings and modules, and Artinian rings. Part three's topics include localization and tensor products, principal ideal domains, and applications of fundamental theorem. The fourth and final part covers algebraic field extensions

  16. QCD physics at hadron storage rings: From COSY to FAIR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    James Ritman

    2006-05-01

    As a result of the rapid rise of the coupling constant at low momentum transfers, perturbation theory is not an appropriate method to describe the strong interaction. In this kinematic regime other methods such as lattice QCD or effective field theories are more appropriate to investigate the appearance of a still unsettled phenomena: confinement and chiral symmetry breaking. Furthermore, the confinement of quarks and gluons to hadrons allows crucial tests of fundamental symmetries that are inherent to the QCD Lagrangian but are broken in hadronic systems. Thus, high precision measurements of the production and decay of specific hadronic states provides decisive benchmarks to investigate the properties of QCD in this regime. A new series of experiments are being prepared using nearly full acceptance detectors for neutral and charged particles around internal targets in high intensity, phase-space-cooled hadronic beams. Later this year, it is planned to transfer the WASA detector from the CELSIUS to the COSY ring in order to measure the production and various decay channels of the and ' mesons, thereby investigating the violation of P, C, T, and combinations thereof, as well as isospin violation. The experimental and theoretical techniques employed here will provide an important basis to extend these investigations to the static and dynamical properties of hadrons with charm quark content with the high energy storage ring for antiprotons at the new GSI/FAIR facility. Additional related perspectives will be opened at the new facility ranging from the properties of hadrons in dense nuclear matter to measurements of the nucleon's transverse spin distribution in the valence quark region using polarized antiprotons.

  17. On Weakly Semicommutative Rings*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN WEI-XING; CUI SHU-YING

    2011-01-01

    A ring R is said to be weakly scmicommutative if for any a, b ∈ R,ab = 0 implies aRb C_ Nil(R), where Nil(R) is the set of all nilpotcnt elements in R.In this note, we clarify the relationship between weakly semicommutative rings and NI-rings by proving that the notion of a weakly semicommutative ring is a proper generalization of NI-rings. We say that a ring R is weakly 2-primal if the set of nilpotent elements in R coincides with its Levitzki radical, and prove that if R is a weakly 2-primal ring which satisfies oα-condition for an endomorphism α of R (that is, ab = 0 (←→) aα(b) = 0 where a, b ∈ R) then the skew polynomial ring R[π; αα]is a weakly 2-primal ring, and that if R is a ring and I is an ideal of R such that I and R/I are both weakly semicommutative then R is weakly semicommutative.Those extend the main results of Liang et al. 2007 (Taiwanese J. Math., 11(5)(2007),1359-1368) considerably. Moreover, several new results about weakly semicommutative rings and NI-rings are included.

  18. Determination of the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio by precision laser spectroscopy of $\\overline{p}He^{+}$

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, M; Eades, John; Gomikawa, K; Hayano, R S; Ono, N; Pirkl, Werner; Widmann, E; Torii, H A; Juhász, B; Barna, D; Horváth, D

    2006-01-01

    A femtosecond optical frequency comb and continuous-wave pulse- amplified laser were used to measure 12 transition frequencies of antiprotonic helium to fractional precisions of (9-16) 10/sup -9lifetimes hitherto unaccessible to our precision laser spectroscopy method. Comparisons with three-body QED calculations yielded an antiproton-to-electron mass ratio of M/sub pmacron//m/sub e/=1836.152 674(5).

  19. Physics of quantum rings

    CERN Document Server

    Fomin, Vladimir M

    2013-01-01

    This book deals with a new class of materials, quantum rings. Innovative recent advances in experimental and theoretical physics of quantum rings are based on the most advanced state-of-the-art fabrication and characterization techniques as well as theoretical methods. The experimental efforts allow to obtain a new class of semiconductor quantum rings formed by capping self-organized quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Novel optical and magnetic properties of quantum rings are associated with non-trivial topologies at the nanoscale. An adequate characterization of quantum rings is po

  20. Envelopes of Commutative Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rafael PARRA; Manuel SAOR(I)N

    2012-01-01

    Given a significative class F of commutative rings,we study the precise conditions under which a commutative ring R has an F-envelope.A full answer is obtained when.F is the class of fields,semisimple commutative rings or integral domains.When F is the class of Noetherian rings,we give a full answer when the Krull dimension of R is zero and when the envelope is required to be epimorphic.The general problem is reduced to identifying the class of non-Noetherian rings having a monomorphic Noetherian envelope,which we conjecture is the empty class.

  1. RING PROXY SIGNATURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Proxy signatures have been used to enable the transfer of digital signing power within some context and ring signatures can be used to provide the anonymity of a signer. By combining the functionalities of proxy signatures and ring signatures, this paper introduces a new concept, named ring proxy signature, which is a proxy signature generated by an anonymous member from a set of potential signers. The paper also constructs the first concrete ring proxy signature scheme based on the provably secure Schnorr's signatures and two ID-based ring proxy signature schemes. The security analysis is provided as well.

  2. Antiproton-proton annihilation at rest into $K^{+}K^{-}\\pi^{0}$

    CERN Document Server

    Abele, A; Amsler, Claude; Baker, C A; Barnett, B M; Batty, C J; Benayoun, M; Berdoz, A R; Bischoff, S; Blüm, H P; Braune, K; Bugg, D V; Case, T; Cramer, O; Crowe, K M; Degener, T F; Doser, Michael; Dünnweber, W; Engelhardt, D; Faessler, M A; Giarritta, P; Haddock, R P; Heinsius, F H; Heinzelmann, M; Herbstrith, A; Herz, M; Hessey, N P; Hidas, P; Hodd, C; Holtzhaussen, C; Jamnik, D; Kalinowsky, H; Kammel, P; Kisiel, J; Klempt, E; Koch, H; Kunze, M; Kurilla, U; Lakata, M T; Landua, Rolf; Matthäy, H; McCrady, R G; Meier, J; Meyer, C A; Ouared, R; Peters, K; Pick, B; Ratajczak, M; Regenfus, C; Röthel, W; Seibert, R; Spanier, S M; Stöck, H; Strassburger, C; Strohbusch, U; Suffert, Martin; Suh, J S; Thoma, U; Tischhäuser, M; Uman, I; Völcker, C; Wallis-Plachner, S; Walther, D; Wiedner, U; Wittmack, K; Zou Bing Song

    1999-01-01

    The annihilation channel pp to K/sup +/K/sup -/ pi /sup 0/ in liquid hydrogen at rest has been studied with the Crystal Barrel detector at LEAR. The measured branching ratio is: BR(pp to K/sup +/K/sup -/ pi /sup 0/)=(2.37+or-0.15)*10/sup -3/. A partial wave analysis shows that this reaction is dominated by the pi (KK)/sub S/, KK*(892) and pi phi (1020) intermediate states. Weak signals are observed for pi a /sub 2/(1320), pi f/sub 2/(1270), pi f/sub 2/'(1525) and K(K pi )/sub S/. A satisfactory description of the Dalitz plot requires the introduction of pi (KK)/sub P/ intermediate states with at least one pole. (25 refs).

  3. Saturn's largest ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbiscer, Anne J; Skrutskie, Michael F; Hamilton, Douglas P

    2009-10-22

    Most planetary rings in the Solar System lie within a few radii of their host body, because at these distances gravitational accelerations inhibit satellite formation. The best known exceptions are Jupiter's gossamer rings and Saturn's E ring, broad sheets of dust that extend outward until they fade from view at five to ten planetary radii. Source satellites continuously supply the dust, which is subsequently lost in collisions or by radial transport. Here we report that Saturn has an enormous ring associated with its outer moon Phoebe, extending from at least 128R(S) to 207R(S) (Saturn's radius R(S) is 60,330 km). The ring's vertical thickness of 40R(S) matches the range of vertical motion of Phoebe along its orbit. Dynamical considerations argue that these ring particles span the Saturnian system from the main rings to the edges of interplanetary space. The ring's normal optical depth of approximately 2 x 10(-8) is comparable to that of Jupiter's faintest gossamer ring, although its particle number density is several hundred times smaller. Repeated impacts on Phoebe, from both interplanetary and circumplanetary particle populations, probably keep the ring populated with material. Ring particles smaller than centimetres in size slowly migrate inward and many of them ultimately strike the dark leading face of Iapetus.

  4. The contraceptive vaginal ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwardson, Jill; Jamshidi, Roxanne

    2010-03-01

    The contraceptive vaginal ring offers effective contraception that is self-administered, requires less frequent dosing than many other forms of contraception, and provides low doses of hormones. NuvaRing (Organon, Oss, The Netherlands), the only contraceptive vaginal ring approved for use in the United States, contains etonogestrel and ethinyl estradiol. It is inserted into the vagina for 3 weeks, followed by a 1-week ring-free period, and works by inhibiting ovulation. Most women note a beneficial effect on bleeding profiles and are satisfied with NuvaRing. Commonly reported adverse events include vaginitis, leukorrhea, headaches, and device-related events such as discomfort. Serious adverse events are rare. In Chile and Peru, progesterone-only vaginal contraceptive rings are available for nursing women. Studies are ongoing examining new formulations of vaginal contraceptive rings.

  5. Certain near-rings are rings, II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard E. Bell

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate distributively-generated near-rings R which satisfy one of the following conditions: (i for each x,y∈R, there exist positive integers m, n for which xy=ymxn; (ii for each x,y∈R, there exists a positive integer n such that xy=(yxn. Under appropriate additional hypotheses, we prove that R must be a commutative ring.

  6. Antihyperon potentials in nuclei via exclusive antiproton-nucleus reactions at FAIR

    CERN Document Server

    Lorente, Alicia Sanchez; Steinen, Marcell; Pochodzalla, Josef

    2015-01-01

    The exclusive production of hyperon-antihyperon pairs close to their production threshold in antiproton - nucleus collisions offers a unique and hitherto unexplored opportunity to elucidate the behaviour of antihyperons in nuclei. For the first time we analyse these reactions in a microscopic transport model using the the Gie\\ss en Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck transport model. The calculation take the delicate interplay between the strong absorption of antihyperons, their rescattering and refraction at the nuclear surface as well as the Fermi motion of the struck nucleon into account. We find a substantial sensitivity of transverse momentum correlations of coincident $\\Lambda\\overline{\\Lambda}$-pairs to the assumed depth of the $\\overline{\\Lambda}$-potential. Because of the high cross section for this process and the simplicity of the experimental method our results are highly relevant for future activities at the international Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR).

  7. Secondary emission monitor for keV ion and antiproton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Sosa, Alejandro; Bravin, Enrico; Harasimowciz, Janusz; Welsch, C P

    2013-01-01

    Beam profile monitoring of low intensity keV ion and antiproton beams remains a challenging task. A Sec- ondary electron Emission Monitor (SEM) has been de- signed to measure profiles of beams with intensities below 107 and energies as low as 20 keV. The monitor is based on a two stage microchannel plate (MCP) and a phosphor screen facing a CCD camera. Its modular design allows two different operational setups. In this contribution we present the design of a prototype and discuss results from measurements with antiprotons at the AEgIS experiment at CERN. This is then used for a characterization of the monitor with regard to its possible future use at different facilities.

  8. Further studies of double ionization of He, Ne, and Ar by fast and slow antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, L. H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Møller, S. P.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Tang-Petersen, S.; Uggerhøj, E.; Elsener, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1989-12-01

    Measurements of the ratio R between double- and single-ionization cross sections for antiproton impact on He, Ne, and Ar targets are reported for impact energies ranging from 65 keV to 20 MeV. At high energies the results are found to merge with proton results at around 20 MeV, and the high-energy limit of the common ratio is in good agreement with recent first-Born-calculation results for the helium target. The large difference previously observed in the ratio R for protons and antiprotons at energies between 0.5 and 5 MeV is found to persist down to the lowest energies investigated here.

  9. Further studies of double ionization of He, Ne, and Ar by fast and slow antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, L.H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Moller, S.P.; Pedersen, J.O.P.; Tang-Petersen, S.; Uggerhoj, E. (Institute of Physics, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark (Denmark)); Elsener, K. (CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23, (Switzerland)); Morenzoni, E. (PSI, CH-5234 Villigen, (Switzerland))

    1989-12-15

    Measurements of the ratio {ital R} between double- and single-ionization cross sections for antiproton impact on He, Ne, and Ar targets are reported for impact energies ranging from 65 keV to 20 MeV. At high energies the results are found to merge with proton results at around 20 MeV, and the high-energy limit of the common ratio is in good agreement with recent first-Born-calculation results for the helium target. The large difference previously observed in the ratio {ital R} for protons and antiprotons at energies between 0.5 and 5 MeV is found to persist down to the lowest energies investigated here.

  10. 10 GeV dark matter candidates and cosmic-ray antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Lavalle, Julien

    2010-01-01

    Recent measurements performed with some direct dark matter detection experiments, e.g. CDMS-II and CoGENT (after DAMA/LIBRA), have unveiled a few events compatible with WIMP-nuclei interactions. The preferred mass range is around 10 GeV, with a quite large spin-independent cross section of $10^{-43}-10^{-41}\\,{\\rm cm^2}$. In this letter, we recall that a light WIMP with dominant couplings to quarks should also generate cosmic-ray antiprotons. Taking advantage of recent works constraining the Galactic dark matter mass profile on the one hand and on cosmic-ray propagation on the other hand, we point out that considering a thermal annihilation cross section for such low mass candidates unavoidably results in an antiproton flux in tension with the current data, leading either to exclusion or to observable features. This should be taken into account for a consistent interpretation of direct detection signals.

  11. Spectral Intensities of Antiprotons and the lifetime of Cosmic Rays in the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Cowsik, Ramanath

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we note that the spectral intensities of antiprotons observed in Galactic cosmic rays in the energy range ~ 1-100 GeV by BESS, PAMELA and AMS instruments display nearly the same spectral shape as that generated by primary cosmic rays through their interaction with matter in the interstellar medium, without any significant modifications. More importantly, a constant residence time of ~ 2.5 +/-0.7 million years in the Galactic volume, independent of the energy of cosmic rays, matches the observed intensities. A small additional component of secondary antiprotons in the energy below 10 GeV, generated in cocoon-like regions surrounding the cosmic-ray sources, seems to be present. We discuss this result in the context of observations of other secondary components like positrons and Boron, and conclude with general remarks about the origins and propagation of cosmic rays.

  12. Investigation of silicon sensors for their use as antiproton annihilation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacifico, N., E-mail: nicola.pacifico@cern.ch [University of Bergen, Institute of Physics and Technology, Allégaten 55, 5007 Bergen (Norway); Aghion, S. [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Ahlén, O. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Belov, A.S. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Bonomi, G. [University of Brescia, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Via Branze 38, 25133 Brescia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Pavia, Via Agostino Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Bräunig, P. [Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Im Neuenheimer Feld 227, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bremer, J. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Brusa, R.S. [Department of Physics, University of Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); INFN-TIFPA, via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Burghart, G. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cabaret, L. [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, CNRS, Université Paris Sud, ENS Cachan, Bâtiment 505, Campus d' Orsay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Caccia, M. [University of Insubria, Dipartimento di Scienza ed Alta Tecnologia, via Valleggio 11, Como (Italy); Canali, C. [University of Zurich, Physics Institute, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Caravita, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); University of Genoa, Department of Physics, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Castelli, F. [University of Milano, Department of Physics, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); and others

    2014-11-21

    We present here a new application of silicon sensors aimed at the direct detection of antinucleons annihilations taking place inside the sensor's volume. Such detectors are interesting particularly for the measurement of antimatter properties and will be used as part of the gravity measurement module in the AEg{sup ¯}IS experiment at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator. One of the goals of the AEg{sup ¯}IS experiment is to measure the gravitational acceleration of antihydrogen with 1% precision. Three different silicon sensor geometries have been tested with an antiproton beam to investigate their properties as annihilation detection devices: strip planar, 3D pixels and monolithic pixel planar. In all cases we were successfully detecting annihilations taking place in the sensor and we were able to make a first characterization of the clusters and tracks.

  13. Scattered antiproton polarization in pp elastic scattering at 220 MeV in bubble chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Ohsugi, T

    1973-01-01

    The polarization of antiproton scattering in pp elastic collision has been measured in the four intervals of the CM scattering angle theta /sup */ less than 90 degrees by means of double scattering in a bubble chamber. The analysis has been performed on the basis of 999 double elastic events which have been found in about 100K pictures of the 81- cm Saclay hydrogen bubble chamber exposed to a 0.7 GeV/c antiproton beam from the CERN PS. The obtained values of polarization show the maximum value 0.52+or-0.19 at theta /sup */=56 degrees . The polarization for pp scattering seems to be larger than that for pp scattering. The results are also compared with the potential model by Bryan and Phillips (1968) and with the modified diffraction model by Frahn and Venter (1964). Possible systematic errors in the present experiment are discussed in detail. (17 refs).

  14. Collisions of low-energy antiprotons and protons with atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luehr, Armin

    2010-02-18

    Antiproton (anti p) collisions have evolved to a powerful tool for the testing of dynamic electron correlations in atoms and molecules. While advances in the understanding of anti p collisions with the simplest one- and two-electron atoms, H and He, have been achieved experiment and theory did not agree for low-energy anti p+He collisions (<40 keV), stimulating a vivid theoretical activity. On the other hand, only very few theoretical anti p studies can be found considering molecular as well as other atomic targets, in contrast to proton (p) collisions. This is in particular true for anti p impacts on H{sub 2} despite its fundamental role in representing the simplest two-electron molecule. The obtained results may be useful for the anti p experiments at CERN (e.g., antihydrogen production) and in particular for the facility design of low-energy anti p storage rings (e.g., at FLAIR) where a precise knowledge of the anti p interaction with the dominant residual-gas molecule H{sub 2} is needed. In this work a nonperturbative, time-dependent numerical approach is developed which describes ionization and excitation of atoms or molecules by either anti p or p impact based on the impact-parameter method. A spectral close-coupling method is employed for solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in which the scattering wave function is expanded in (effective) one- or two-electron eigenstates of the target. This includes for the first time a full two-electron, two-center description of the H{sub 2} molecule in anti p collisions. The radial part of the one-electron eigenstates is expanded in B splines while the two-electron basis is obtained with a configurationinteraction approach. Calculations are performed for anti p collisions with H, H{sub 2}{sup +}, and H{sub 2} as well as with He and alkali-metal atoms Li, Na, K, and Rb. Additionally, data are obtained for p collisions with H{sub 2}, Li, Na, and K. The developed method is tested and validated by detailed

  15. Probing Matter Radii of Neutron-Rich Nuclei by Antiproton Scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Lenske, H.; P. Kienle

    2005-01-01

    We propose to use antiprotons to investigate the sizes of stable and neutron-rich exotic nuclei by measurements of the $\\pbar A$ absorption cross section along isotopic chains in inverse kinematics. The expected effects are studied theoretically in a microscopic model. The $\\pbar U$ optical potentials are obtained by folding free space $\\pbar N$ scattering amplitudes with HFB ground state densities and solving the scattering equations by direct integration. The mass dependence of absorption c...

  16. Proceedings of the Antiproton Technology Workshop Held in Upton, New York on 10 May 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    Edwards Air Force Base, California 93523-5000 mm~mmmmmmmml mmIl.• ml l iJ m NOTICE When U.S. Government drawings, specifications, or other data are...before at these meetings, ASTER, named after the wildflower . Since I am limited to about ten minutes, I will keep my talk simple. Here is the outline...CALLAS JET PROPULSION LABORATORY CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY PASADENA, CA PRESENTED AT THE ANTIPROTON TECHNOLOGY WORKSHOP HELD AT BROOKHAVEN

  17. Slope analysis for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Okorokov, V. A.

    2008-01-01

    The diffraction slope parameter is investigated for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering based on the all available experimental data at intermediate square of momentum transfer in the main. Energy dependence of the elastic diffraction slope is approximated by various analytic functions in a model-independent fashion. The expanded standard logarithmic approximations allow to describe experimental slopes in all available energy range at qualitative level reasonably. Various f...

  18. Neutrosophic LA-Semigroup Rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumtaz Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrosophic LA-semigroup is a midway structure between a neutrosophic groupoid and a commutative neutrosophic semigroup. Rings are the old concept in algebraic structures. We combine the neutrosophic LA-semigroup and ring together to form the notion of neutrosophic LA-semigroup ring. Neutrosophic LAsemigroup ring is defined analogously to neutrosophic group ring and neutrosophic semigroup ring.

  19. On Exchange QB∞-Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huanyin Chen

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new class of rings, the QB∞-rings. We investigate necessary and sufficient conditions under which an exchange ring is a QB∞-ring. The modules over an exchange QB∞-ring are studied. Also, we prove that every regular square matrix over an exchange QB∞-ring admits a diagonal reduction by pseudo-invertible matrices.

  20. Bayesian analysis of spatial-dependent cosmic-ray propagation: Astrophysical background of antiprotons and positrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jie; Tomassetti, Nicola; Oliva, Alberto

    2016-12-01

    The AMS-02 experiment has reported a new measurement of the antiproton/proton ratio in Galactic cosmic rays (CRs). In the energy range E ˜60 - 450 GeV , this ratio is found to be remarkably constant. Using recent data on CR proton, helium, and carbon fluxes, 10Be/9Be and B/C ratios, we have performed a global Bayesian analysis based on a Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling algorithm under a "two halo model" of CR propagation. In this model, CRs are allowed to experience a different type of diffusion when they propagate in the region close to the Galactic disk. We found that the vertical extent of this region is about 900 pc above and below the disk, and the corresponding diffusion coefficient scales with energy as D ∝E0.15 , describing well the observations on primary CR spectra, secondary/primary ratios, and anisotropy. Under this model, we have carried out improved calculations of antiparticle spectra arising from secondary CR production and their corresponding uncertainties. We made use of Monte Carlo generators and accelerator data to assess the antiproton production cross sections and their uncertainties. While the positron excess requires the contribution of additional unknown sources, we found that the new AMS-02 antiproton data are consistent, within the estimated uncertainties, with our calculations based on secondary production.

  1. Measurements of Wake-Riding Electrons in Antiproton-Carbon-Foil Collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    When a charged particle passes through dielectric media, e.g. a thin carbon foil, a ``wake'' is induced. The characteristic wake-potential shows an oscillatory behaviour, with a wavelength of about $ 2 \\pi v _{p} / \\omega _{p} _{l} $ where $ v _{p} $ is the projectile velocity and $ \\omega _{p} _{l} $ the plasmon energy of the target. This induced wake potential is superimposed on the Coulomb potential of the projectile, the latter leading to a pronounced ``cusp'' of electrons leaving the solid at $ v _{e} app v _{p} $ for positively charged projectiles in the MeV region. Correspondingly, an ``anti-cusp'' is expected for antiprotons. \\\\ \\\\ In the solid, the wake-potential leads to an attractive force on electrons, and a dynamic electronic state is predicted both for proton and antiproton projectiles. In the solid, the wake-riding electrons are travelling with the projectile speed $ v _{p} $ Upon exit of the foil, the electron released from the wake-riding state of an antiproton will suddenly find itself in th...

  2. Limits on the Dark Matter from AMS-02 antiproton and positron fraction data

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Bo-Qiang; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2015-01-01

    We derive limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section and lifetime using measurements of the AMS-02 antiproton ratio and positron fraction data. In deriving the limits, we consider the scenario of secondary particles accelerated in supernova remnants (SNRs) which has been argued to be able to reasonably account for the AMS-02 high energy positron/antiproton fraction data. We parameterize the contribution of secondary particles accelerated in SNRs and then fit the observational data within the conventional cosmic ray propagation model by adopting the GALPROP code. We use the likelihood ratio test to determine the 95$\\%$ confidence level upper limits of the possible dark matter (DM) contribution to the antiproton/positron fractions measured by AMS-02. Our limits are stronger than that set by the Fermi-LAT gamma-ray Pass 8 data of the dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies. We also show that the solar modulation (cosmic ray propagation) parameters can play a non-negligible role in modifying the constraints...

  3. Antiproton-to-Proton Ratios for ALICE Heavy-Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Tawfik, A

    2010-01-01

    Assuming that the final state of hadronization takes place along the freezeout line, which is defined by a constant entropy density, the antiproton-to-proton ratios produced in heavy-ion collisions are studied in framework of the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model. A phase transition from quark--gluon plasma to hadrons, a hadronization, has been conjectured in order to allow modifications in the phase space volume and thus in single--particle distribution function. Implementing both modifications in the grand--canonical partition function and taking into account the experimental acceptance in heavy-ion collisions, the antiproton-to-proton ratios over center-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}$ ranging from AGS to RHIC are very well reproduced by the HRG model. Comparing with the same particle ratios in $pp$ collisions results in a gradually narrowing discrepancy with increasing $\\sqrt{s}$. At LHC energy, the ALICE antiproton-to-proton ratios in $pp$ collisions turn to be very well described by HRG model as well. It is l...

  4. 《李尔王》中父子冲突的伦理法则%Ethical Rules in the Father-son Conflict in King Lear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张松林

    2016-01-01

    戏剧《李尔王》中的父子冲突体现了多重伦理原则。首先,父子冲突体现了社会伦理的演变,父权传统遭到了新思想的挑战,子辈中出现了敢于反抗父权的叛逆者,他们不择手段化解父权带来的焦虑和威胁,并最终在冲突中胜出。其次,父子冲突中对自然法则的崇拜破坏了人类社会文明,力量至上的丛林法则让传统道德伦理蒙羞,使其成为不堪一击的社会稳定遮羞布。从美学原则上看,善恶冲突具有使善者价值更为璀璨的作用,文学往往通过恶来衬托善,并通过恶带来的恶果来反思社会伦理的作用。%The father-son conflict in the play King Lear embodies multiple ethical principles .First, the conflict reflects the evolution of social ethics and the traditional patriarchy was challenged by new ideas .The young gen-eration appeared bold enough to rebel against patriarchy .They did anything to resolve anxiety and threats coming from patriarchy and eventually became the winner of the conflict .Secondly , the conflict shows worship for laws of nature which destroyed the civilization of human society .From aesthetic principles , the conflict between good and evil highlights good .So literature tends to zoom good in the background of evil and reflect social ethics through negative consequences brought by evil .

  5. The production of dense lead-ion beams for the CERN LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bosser, Jacques; Chanel, M; MacCaferri, R; Molinari, G; Maury, S; Möhl, D; Tranquille, G

    2000-01-01

    To reach the design luminosity for lead-ions in the LHC, the present Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) has to be converted into a Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR). Since the present ECR lead-ion source does not provide sufficient intensity, the main goal of LEIR is to act as a low-energy (4.2MeV/u) accumulator where the ion beam is stacked and cooled (with the help of an electron-cooler) to reach the required intensity and emittances. An experimental program has been carried out at LEAR in recent years in order to test the cooling and stacking process with the present electron-cooler. A variety of results have been reported at previous conferences. This paper will focus on the electron cooling aspects resulting from the afore mentioned experiments. Taking into account the experience

  6. Token Ring Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Ionescu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Ring topology is a simple configuration used to connect processes that communicate among themselves. A number of network standards such as token ring, token bus, and FDDI are based on the ring connectivity. This article will develop an implementation of a ring of processes that communicate among themselves via pipe links. The processes are nodes in the ring. Each process reads from its standard input and writes in its standard output. N-1 process redirects the its standard output to a standard input of the process through a pipe. When the ring-structure is designed, the project can be extended to simulate networks or to implement algorithms for mutual exclusion

  7. Gulf ring algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although they rank among the tiniest of the microspcopic phytoplankton, coccolithophore algae aid oceanographers studying the Gulf Stream rings and the ring boundaries. The algal group could help to identify more precisely the boundary of the warm rings of water that spin off from the Gulf Stream and become independent pools of warm water in the colder waters along the northeastern U.S. coast.Coccolithophore populations in the Gulf Stream rings intrigue oceanographers for two reasons: The phytoplankton are subjected to an environment that changes every few days, and population explosions within one coccolithophore species seem to be associated with changes in the characteristics of ocean water, said Pat Blackwelder, an associate professor at the Nova Oceanographic Center in Dania, Fla. She is one of many studying the physics, chemistry, and biology of warm core rings. A special oceanography session on these rings was held at the recent AGU Fall Meeting/ASLO Winter Meeting.

  8. Token ring technology report

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Please note this is a Short Discount publication. This report provides an overview of the IBM Token-Ring technology and products built by IBM and compatible vendors. It consists of two sections: 1. A summary of the design trade-offs for the IBM Token-Ring. 2. A summary of the products of the major token-ring compatible vendors broken down by adapters and components, wiring systems, testing, and new chip technology.

  9. Dusty plasma (Yukawa) rings

    CERN Document Server

    Sheridan, T E

    2010-01-01

    One-dimensional and quasi-one-dimensional strongly-coupled dusty plasma rings have been created experimentally. Longitudinal (acoustic) and transverse (optical) dispersion relations for the 1-ring were measured and found to be in very good agreement with the theory for an unbounded straight chain of particles interacting through a Yukawa (i.e., screened Coulomb or Debye-H\\"uckel) potential. These rings provide a new system in which to study one-dimensional and quasi-one-dimensional physics.

  10. On -Coherent Endomorphism Rings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Li-Xin Mao

    2008-11-01

    A ring is called right -coherent if every principal right ideal is finitely presented. Let $M_R$ be a right -module. We study the -coherence of the endomorphism ring of $M_R$. It is shown that is a right -coherent ring if and only if every endomorphism of $M_R$ has a pseudokernel in add $M_R; S$ is a left -coherent ring if and only if every endomorphism of $M_R$ has a pseudocokernel in add $M_R$. Some applications are given.

  11. Physics of quantum rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fomin, Vladimir M. (ed.) [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Presents the new class of materials of quantum rings. Provides an elemental basis for low-cost high-performance devices promising for electronics, optoelectronics, spintronics and quantum information processing. Explains the physical properties of quantum rings to cover a gap in scientific literature. Presents the application of most advanced nanoengineering and nanocharacterization techniques. This book deals with a new class of materials, quantum rings. Innovative recent advances in experimental and theoretical physics of quantum rings are based on the most advanced state-of-the-art fabrication and characterization techniques as well as theoretical methods. The experimental efforts allow to obtain a new class of semiconductor quantum rings formed by capping self-organized quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Novel optical and magnetic properties of quantum rings are associated with non-trivial topologies at the nanoscale. An adequate characterization of quantum rings is possible on the basis of modern characterization methods of nanostructures, such as Scanning Tunneling Microscopy. A high level of complexity is demonstrated to be needed for a dedicated theoretical model to adequately represent the specific features of quantum rings. The findings presented in this book contribute to develop low-cost high-performance electronic, spintronic, optoelectronic and information processing devices based on quantum rings.

  12. A measurement of the reactions (bar)p/p going to eta/eta, (bar)p/p going to pi(0)/eta and (bar)p/p going to pi(0)/pi(0) from 1.188 GeV/c to 1.445 GeV/c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Johannes Bruno

    The reactions pp-->hh-->4g,pp-->p 0h-->4g and pp-->p0p 0-->4g were investigated at incident antiproton momenta between 1.188 and 1.445 GeV/c using the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. This investigation was part of an overall program searching for exotic resonances in antiproton-proton annihilations, focusing on the region near the ξ(2220). Yields for the reactions pp-->hh-->4g,pp-->p 0h-->4g and pp-->p0p 0-->4g are presented as a function of center-of-mass energy over this region. Upper limits are set for the likelihood of the production of the ξ(2220) in these channels based on its non- observation in the data presented.

  13. Ion Optics of the HESR storage ring at FAIR for operation with heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Dolinskyy, Oleksiy; Litvinov, Yuri; Stoehlker, Thomas [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    High Energy Storage Ring (HESR) of the FAIR project is primarily designed for internal target experiments with stored and cooled antiprotons, which is the main objective of the PANDA collaboration. However, the HESR storage ring also appears to have remarkable properties to carry out physics experiments with heavy ions. This paper proposes a new ion optical design allowing for the heavy ion operation mode of the HESR. The main goal was to provide an optics which meets the requirements of the future experiments with heavy ion beams. In connection, issues like closed orbit correction, dynamic aperture as well as other characteristics of beam dynamics of the new ion optical setup are under analysis in this study.

  14. A leading-edge hardware family for diagnostics applications and low-level RF in CERN's ELENA ring

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, M E; Jaussi, M; Leiononen, P; Levens, T E; Molendijk, J C; Sanchez-Quesada, J; Simonin, J

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) Ring is a new synchrotron that will be commissioned in 2016 to further decelerate the antiprotons transferred from the CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator (AD). The requirements for the acquisition and treatment of signals for longitudinal diagnostics are very demanding, owing to the revolution frequency swing as well as to the digital signal processing required. The requirements for the Low-Level Radio-Frequency (LLRF) system are very demanding as well, especially in terms of revolution frequency swing, dynamic range and low noise required by the cavity voltage control and digital signal processing to be performed. Both sets of requirements will be satisfied by using a leading-edge hardware family, developed to cover the LLRF needs of all synchrotrons in the Meyrin site; it will be first deployed in 2014 in the CERN’s PSB and in the medical machine MedAustron. This paper gives an overview of the main building blocks of the hardware family and of th...

  15. An ultra low-noise AC beam transformer and digital signal processing system for CERN's ELENA ring

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, M E; Caspers, F; Federmann, S; Molendijk, J; Pedersen, F; Sanchez-Quesada, J

    2013-01-01

    CERN’s Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) ring is a new synchrotron that will be commissioned in 2016 to further decelerate the antiprotons coming from CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator (AD). Essential longitudinal diagnostics required for commissioning and operation include the intensity measurement for bunched and debunched beams and the measurement of p/p for debunched beams to assess the electron cooling performance. The beam phase information is also needed by the Low-Level RF (LLRF) system. The baseline system for providing the required beam parameters and signals is based upon two ultra-low-noise AC beam transformers and associated digital signal processing. The AC beam transformers cover different frequency regions and are an adaptation to the ELENA layout of those used in the AD. Two AC beam transformers will also be installed in the extraction lines to provide beam intensity measurements. The digital signal processing will be carried out with the leadingedge hardware family used for ELENA’s L...

  16. Antiproton production in Au + Au collisions at 11.7 A{center_dot}GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, Hiroyuki [Tokyo Univ. (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    We investigated the dependence of antiproton yields on the number of wounded projectile nucleons (N{sub proj}). The dN/dy/N{sub proj} of antiprotons with the beam energy correction is almost constant from p+A to Si+A collisions, while it decreases in Au+Au collisions to 30-60% of the constant. Next, we have compared dependence of ratios of dN/dy, p-bar/{pi}{sup -}, p/{pi}{sup -}, K{sup -}/{pi}{sup -}, K{sup +}/{pi}{sup -}, and {pi}{sup +}/{pi}{sup -} at 1.2antiprotons in Au+Au collisions is much stronger than in p+A and Si+A collisions. We have compared the antiproton data with the RQMD model. In RQMD, antiprotons are produced initially from multi-step excitation processes and some of them are absorbed by nucleons with free NN-bar annihilation cross sections. RQMD reproduces overall tendencies of antiproton yields from p+A to Au+Au collisions within 50%. Finally, we explored the relation between baryon densities and antiproton yields in A+A collisions. We used a model in a static participant volume with the RQMD initial production and the absorption length with the free NN-bar annihilation cross section. In the model, only the antiprotons produced around the surface of the participant volume can survive. The model reproduces the scaling of experimental antiproton yields with the 2/3 power of the number of participants. By comparing the model with the experimental data, it is found that the ratio of the mean baryon density to the surface baryon density is 3-4 independent of collision systems. (J.P.N.). 109 refs.

  17. Ring Around a Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Space Telescope Science Institute astronomers are giving the public chances to decide where to aim NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Guided by 8,000 Internet voters, Hubble has already been used to take a close-up, multi-color picture of the most popular object from a list of candidates, the extraordinary 'polar-ring' galaxy NGC 4650A. Located about 130 million light-years away, NGC 4650A is one of only 100 known polar-ring galaxies. Their unusual disk-ring structure is not yet understood fully. One possibility is that polar rings are the remnants of colossal collisions between two galaxies sometime in the distant past, probably at least 1 billion years ago. What is left of one galaxy has become the rotating inner disk of old red stars in the center. Meanwhile, another smaller galaxy which ventured too close was probably severely damaged or destroyed. The bright bluish clumps, which are especially prominent in the outer parts of the ring, are regions containing luminous young stars, examples of stellar rebirth from the remnants of an ancient galactic disaster. The polar ring appears to be highly distorted. No regular spiral pattern stands out in the main part of the ring, and the presence of young stars below the main ring on one side and above on the other shows that the ring is warped and does not lie in one plane. Determining the typical ages of the stars in the polar ring is an initial goal of our Polar Ring Science Team that can provide a clue to the evolution of this unusual galaxy. The HST exposures were acquired by the Hubble Heritage Team, consisting of Keith Noll, Howard Bond, Carol Christian, Jayanne English, Lisa Frattare, Forrest Hamilton, Anne Kinney and Zolt Levay, and guest collaborators Jay Gallagher (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Lynn Matthews (National Radio Astronomy Observatory-Charlottesville), and Linda Sparke (University of Wisconsin-Madison).

  18. MOBILE LEARING - possibilities and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lasse Juel

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes that SMS (Short Message Service) or text-messaging on mobile devices can serve as an extension or possible create another way of learning traditional scholastic content normally associated with the school system. The potential of the SMS is still very much untapped and largely...... unexplored as a pedagogical tool within teaching and learning domains. This paper is inspired by locative arts and ongoing experiments regarding not only SMS based pervasive systems, but also the more complex usage of mobile devices in investigating urban living conditions and experiences both existentially...... and as an exploring mechanism of the cityscape. This paper aims at discussing the potentials and outlining the possibilities for mobile learning in the traditional school setting. The complexity of these issues derives not only from the traditions of the school system, but also from diverging perspectives...

  19. Illustration of Saturn's Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This illustration shows a close-up of Saturn's rings. These rings are thought to have formed from material that was unable to form into a Moon because of tidal forces from Saturn, or from a Moon that was broken up by Saturn's tidal forces.

  20. Birth Control Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5 of her menstrual cycle. It remains in place for 3 weeks in a row. At the end of the third week, on the same day of the week ... birth control until the ring has been in place for 7 days. If the ring is out for more than 3 hours during your third week wearing it, call your doctor to see ...

  1. Revocable Ring Signature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dennis Y. W. Liu; Joseph K. Liu; Yi Mu; Willy Susilo; Duncan S. Wong

    2007-01-01

    Group signature allows the anonymity of a real signer in a group to be revoked by a trusted party called group manager. It also gives the group manager the absolute power of controlling the formation of the group. Ring signature, on the other hand, does not allow anyone to revoke the signer anonymity, while allowing the real signer to forma group (also known as a ring) arbitrarily without being controlled by any other party. In this paper, we propose a new variant for ring signature, called Revocable Ring Signature. The signature allows a real signer to form a ring arbitrarily while allowing a set of authorities to revoke the anonymity of the real signer. This new variant inherits the desirable properties from both group signature and ring signature in such a way that the real signer will be responsible for what it has signed as the anonymity is revocable by authorities while the real signer still has the freedom on ring formation. We provide a formal security model for revocable ring signature and propose an efficient construction which is proven secure under our security model.

  2. EBT ring physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uckan, N.A. (ed.)

    1980-04-01

    This workshop attempted to evaluate the status of the current experimental and theoretical understanding of hot electron ring properties. The dominant physical processes that influence ring formation, scaling, and their optimal behavior are also studied. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the 27 included papers. (MOW)

  3. Steroidal contraceptive vaginal rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, N N

    2003-06-01

    The development of steroid-releasing vaginal rings over the past three decades is reviewed to illustrate the role of this device as an effective hormonal contraceptive for women. Vaginal rings are made of polysiloxane rubber or ethylene-vinyl-acetate copolymer with an outer diameter of 54-60 mm and a cross-sectional diameter of 4-9.5 mm and contain progestogen only or a combination of progestogen and oestrogen. The soft flexible combined ring is inserted in the vagina for three weeks and removed for seven days to allow withdrawal bleeding. Progesterone/progestogen-only rings are kept in for varying periods and replaced without a ring-free period. Rings are in various stages of research and development but a few, such as NuvaRing, have reached the market in some countries. Women find this method easy to use, effective, well tolerated and acceptable with no serious side-effects. Though the contraceptive efficacy of these vaginal rings is high, acceptability is yet to be established.

  4. Algorithms for finite rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciocanea Teodorescu I.,

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we are interested in describing algorithms that answer questions arising in ring and module theory. Our focus is on deterministic polynomial-time algorithms and rings and modules that are finite. The first main result of this thesis is a solution to the module isomorphism problem in

  5. Planetary rings - Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borderies, Nicole

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical models of planetary-ring dynamics are examined in a brief analytical review. The mathematical description of streamlines and streamline interactions is outlined; the redistribution of angular momentum due to collisions between particles is explained; and problems in the modeling of broad, narrow, and arc rings are discussed.

  6. Jupiter's Rings: Sharpest View

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft took the best images of Jupiter's charcoal-black rings as it approached and then looked back at Jupiter. The top image was taken on approach, showing three well-defined lanes of gravel- to boulder-sized material composing the bulk of the rings, as well as lesser amounts of material between the rings. New Horizons snapped the lower image after it had passed Jupiter on February 28, 2007, and looked back in a direction toward the sun. The image is sharply focused, though it appears fuzzy due to the cloud of dust-sized particles enveloping the rings. The dust is brightly illuminated in the same way the dust on a dirty windshield lights up when you drive toward a 'low' sun. The narrow rings are confined in their orbits by small 'shepherding' moons.

  7. The analysis of tragedy causes and realistic significance based on King Lear%基于《李尔王》悲剧的成因与现实意义分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王俐婷

    2016-01-01

    King Lear is one of the four great tragedies of Shakespeare, which mainly tells an ethical story. This literary works blend a variety of factors, forming a tragic literary effect, so it is easy to resonate with readers. In the study of literary works, Though Shakespeare had already left the world, and the world is constantly changing, reviews about Shakespeare and his literary works is stil ongoing, especialy the study on the causes of the tragedy in King Lear, which has become the focus of the critics. Here we carry out analysis on basis of the cause of tragedy and its practical significance in King Lear, and blame the social phenomenon of human upside down through the characters portrayed, so as to make people resonate in thought and emotion.%《李尔王》是莎士比亚的四大悲剧之一,主要讲述的是一个伦理故事,由于该文学作品糅合了多种因素,形成了悲剧性的文学效应,容易引起读者产生共鸣。在文学作品研究中,虽然莎士比亚早已离开人世,世界也在不断发生变化,但莎士比亚及其文学作品的评论确是长兴不衰,尤其是《李尔王》悲剧的成因的研究,成为了评论家们一直关注的焦点。基于此,对基于《李尔王》悲剧的成因与现实意义进行分析,通过对人物的刻画来谴责人伦颠倒的社会现象,使人们在思想情感上产生共鸣。

  8. The Enceladus Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The Enceladus Ring (labeled) This excellent view of the faint E ring -- a ring feature now known to be created by Enceladus -- also shows two of Saturn's small moons that orbit within the ring, among a field of stars in the background. The E ring extends from three to eight Saturn radii -- about 180,000 kilometers (118,000 miles) to 482,000 kilometers (300,000 miles). Its full extent is not visible in this view. Calypso (22 kilometers, or 14 miles across) and Helene (32 kilometers, or 20 miles across) orbit within the E ring's expanse. Helene skirts the outer parts of the E ring, but here it is projected in front of a region deeper within the ring. Calypso and Helene are trojan satellites, or moons that orbit 60 degrees in front or behind a larger moon. Calypso is a Tethys trojan and Helene is a trojan of Dione. An interesting feature of note in this image is the double-banded appearance of the E-ring, which is created because the ring is somewhat fainter in the ringplane than it is 500-1,000 kilometers (300-600 miles) above and below the ringplane. This appearance implies that the particles in this part of the ring have nonzero inclinations (a similar affect is seen in Jupiter's gossamer ring). An object with a nonzero inclination does not orbit exactly at Saturn's ringplane. Instead, its orbit takes it above and below the ringplane. Scientists are not entirely sure why the particles should have such inclinations, but they are fairly certain that the reason involves Enceladus. One possible explanation is that all the E ring particles come from the plume of icy material that is shooting due south out of the moon's pole. This means all of the particles are created with a certain velocity out of the ringplane, and then they orbit above and below that plane. Another possible explanation is that Enceladus produces particles with a range of speeds, but the moon gravitationally scatters any particles that lie very close to

  9. Antiproton Production in 11.5A GeV/c Au+Pb Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Cataldo, G.; Giglietto, N.; Raino, A.; Spinelli, P. [University of Bari/INFN, Bari (Italy); Dover, C.B. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Huang, H.Z. [University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States); Hill, J.C.; Libby, B.; Wohn, F.K. [Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Rabin, M.S. [University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Haridas, P.; Pless, I.A.; Van Buren, G. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Armstrong, T.A.; Lewis, R.A.; Reid, J.D.; Smith, G.A.; Toothacker, W.S. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Davies, R.; Hirsch, A.S.; Porile, N.T.; Rimai, A.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Srivastava, B.K.; Tincknell, M.L. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Greene, S.V. [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Bennett, S.J.; Cormier, T.M.; Dee, P.; Fachini, P.; Kim, B.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Munhoz, M.G.; Pruneau, C.A.; Wilson, W.K.; Zhao, K. [Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States); Barish, K.N.; Bennett, M.J.; Chikanian, A.; Coe, S.D.; Diebold, G.E.; Finch, L.E.; George, N.K.; Kumar, B.S.; Lajoie, J.G.; Majka, R.D.; Nagle, J.L.; Pope, J.K.; Rotondo, F.S.; Sandweiss, J.; Slaughter, A.J.; Wolin, E.J. [Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

    1997-11-01

    We present the first results from the E864 Collaboration on the production of antiprotons in 10{percent} central 11.5A GeV /c Au+Pb nucleus collisions at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. We report invariant multiplicities for antiproton production in the kinematic region 1.4{lt}y{lt}2.2 and 50{lt} p{sub T}{lt} 300 MeV/c , and compare our data with a first collision scaling model and previously published results from the E878 Collaboration. The differences between the E864 and E878 antiproton measurements and the implications for antihyperon production are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. What Does The PAMELA Antiproton Spectrum Tell Us About Dark Matter?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Dan [Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Linden, Tim [Chicago U., KICP; Mertsch, Philipp [KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2015-03-11

    Measurements of the cosmic ray antiproton spectrum can be used to search for contributions from annihilating dark matter and to constrain the dark matter annihilation cross section. Depending on the assumptions made regarding cosmic ray propagation in the Galaxy, such constraints can be quite stringent. We revisit this topic, utilizing a set of propagation models fit to the cosmic ray boron, carbon, oxygen and beryllium data. We derive upper limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section and find that when the cosmic ray propagation parameters are treated as nuisance parameters (as we argue is appropriate), the resulting limits are significantly less stringent than have been previously reported. We also note (as have several previous groups) that simple GALPROP-like diffusion-reacceleration models predict a spectrum of cosmic ray antiprotons that is in good agreement with PAMELA's observations above ~ 5 GeV, but that significantly underpredict the flux at lower energies. Although the complexity of modeling cosmic ray propagation at GeV-scale energies makes it difficult to determine the origin of this discrepancy, we consider the possibility that the excess antiprotons are the result of annihilating dark matter. Suggestively, we find that this excess is best fit for mDM ~ 35 GeV and σ v ~ 10$-$26 cm3/s (to $b\\bar{_b}$), in good agreement with the mass and cross section previously shown to be required to generate the gamma-ray excess observed from the Galactic Center.

  11. High-precision comparison of the antiproton-to-proton charge-to-mass ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, S.; Smorra, C.; Mooser, A.; Franke, K.; Nagahama, H.; Schneider, G.; Higuchi, T.; van Gorp, S.; Blaum, K.; Matsuda, Y.; Quint, W.; Walz, J.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Invariance under the charge, parity, time-reversal (CPT) transformation is one of the fundamental symmetries of the standard model of particle physics. This CPT invariance implies that the fundamental properties of antiparticles and their matter-conjugates are identical, apart from signs. There is a deep link between CPT invariance and Lorentz symmetry--that is, the laws of nature seem to be invariant under the symmetry transformation of spacetime--although it is model dependent. A number of high-precision CPT and Lorentz invariance tests--using a co-magnetometer, a torsion pendulum and a maser, among others--have been performed, but only a few direct high-precision CPT tests that compare the fundamental properties of matter and antimatter are available. Here we report high-precision cyclotron frequency comparisons of a single antiproton and a negatively charged hydrogen ion (H-) carried out in a Penning trap system. From 13,000 frequency measurements we compare the charge-to-mass ratio for the antiproton to that for the proton and obtain . The measurements were performed at cyclotron frequencies of 29.6 megahertz, so our result shows that the CPT theorem holds at the atto-electronvolt scale. Our precision of 69 parts per trillion exceeds the energy resolution of previous antiproton-to-proton mass comparisons as well as the respective figure of merit of the standard model extension by a factor of four. In addition, we give a limit on sidereal variations in the measured ratio of <720 parts per trillion. By following the arguments of ref. 11, our result can be interpreted as a stringent test of the weak equivalence principle of general relativity using baryonic antimatter, and it sets a new limit on the gravitational anomaly parameter of < 8.7 × 10-7.

  12. Earth: A Ringed Planet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, L. O.; Povenmire, H.

    2010-12-01

    Among the most beautiful findings of the Space Age have been the discoveries of planetary rings. Not only Saturn but also Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune have rings; Saturn’s ring system has structures newly discovered; even Saturn's moon Rhea itself has a ring. All these are apparently supplied by material from the planetary moons (Rhea's ring by Rhea itself). The question naturally arises, why should the Earth not have a ring, and on the other hand, if it does, why has it not been observed? No rings have yet been observed in the inner solar system, but after all, rings in the inner solar system might simply tend to be fainter and more transient than those of the outer solar system: the inner solar system is more affected by the solar wind, and the Sun’s perturbing gravitational influence is greater. J.A. O’Keefe first suggested (1980) that Earth might have a ring system of its own. An Earth ring could account for some climate events. O’Keefe remarked that formation or thickening of a ring system in Earth’s equatorial plane could drive glaciation by deepening the chill of the winter hemisphere. (It is very well established that volcanic dust is an effective agent for the extinction of sunlight; this factor can be overwhelmingly apparent in eclipse observations.) O’Keefe died in 2000 and the speculation was not pursued, but the idea of an Earth ring has a prima facie reasonableness that calls for its renewed consideration. The program of this note is to hypothesize that, as O’Keefe proposed: (a) an Earth ring system exists; (b) it affects Earth's weather and climate; (c) the tektite strewn fields comprise filaments of the ring fallen to Earth's surface on various occasions of disturbance by comets or asteroids. On this basis, and drawing on the world's weather records, together with the Twentieth Century Reanalysis by NCEP/CIRES covering the period 1870-2010 and the geology of the tektite strewn fields, we herein propose the hypothesized Earth ring

  13. Local loop near-rings

    OpenAIRE

    Franetič, Damir

    2015-01-01

    We study loop near-rings, a generalization of near-rings, where the additive structure is not necessarily associative. We introduce local loop near-rings and prove a useful detection principle for localness.

  14. Rapidity distributions of antiprotons in Si+A and Au+A collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiva Kumar, B. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Beavis, D.; Bennett, M.; Carroll, J.B.; Chiba, J.; Crawford, H.J.; Debbe, R.; Doke, T.; Engelage, J.; Greiner, L.; Hayano, R.S.; Hallman, T.J.; Heckman, H.H.; Kashiwagi, T.; Kikuchi, J.; Kuo, C.; Lindstrom, P.J.; Mitchell, J.W.; Nagamiya, S.; Pope, K.; Stankus, P.; Tanaka, K.H.; Welsh, R.C.; Zhan, W.; E858/E878 Collaboration

    1994-01-03

    We have studied the production of {pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}}, p, anti p, and light nuclei in relativistic Si+nucleus and Au+nucleus collisions using a zero degree focusing spectrometer. We find that for the antiprotons, the width of the rapidity distribution measured at p{sub t}=0 increases in going from Si+Al collisions to Au+Au collisions in spite of the lower center of mass energy of the latter measurement. We discuss our data, and the implications of our measurement. We also report sensitivity limits on the production of exotic particles. (orig.)

  15. Antiproton--proton annihilation into pion pairs within effective meson theory

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ying; Tomasi-Gustafsson, Egle

    2015-01-01

    Antiproton--proton annihilation into light mesons is revisited in the few GeV energy domain, in view of a global description of the existing data. An effective meson model is developed, with mesonic and baryonic degrees od freedom in $s$, $t$, and $u$ channels. Regge factors are added to reproduce the proper energy behavior and the forward and backward peaked behavior. A comparison with existing data and predictions for angular distributions and energy dependence are done for charged and neutral pion pair production.

  16. Antiproton stopping at low energies: confirmation of velocity-proportional stopping power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, S P; Csete, A; Ichioka, T; Knudsen, H; Uggerhøj, U I; Andersen, H H

    2002-05-13

    The stopping power for antiprotons in various solid targets has been measured in the low-energy range of 1-100 keV. In agreement with most models, in particular free-electron gas models, the stopping power is found to be proportional to the projectile velocity below the stopping-power maximum. Although a stopping power proportional to velocity has also been observed for protons, the interpretation of such measurements is difficult due to the presence of charge exchange processes. Hence, the present measurements constitute the first unambiguous support for a velocity-proportional stopping power due to target excitations by a pointlike projectile.

  17. Measurement of (anti)deuteron and (anti)proton production in DIS at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Chekanov, S; Magill, S; Musgrave, B; Nicholass, D; Repond, J; Yoshida, R; Mattingly, M C K; Jechow, M; Pavel, N; Yagues-Molina, A G; Antonelli, S; Antonioli, P; Bari, G; Basile, M; Bellagamba, L; Bindi, M; Boscherini, D; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Contin, A; Corradi, M; De Pasquale, S; Iacobucci, G; Margotti, A; Nania, R; Polini, A; Sartorelli, G; Zichichi, A; Bartsch, D; Brock, I; Goers, S; Hartmann, H; Hilger, E; Jakob, H P; Jüngst, M; Kind, O M; Nuncio-Quiroz, A E; Paul, E; Renner, R; Samson, U; Schonberg, V; Shehzadi, R; Wlasenko, M; Brook, N H; Heath, G P; Morris, J D; Namsoo, T; Capua, M; Fazio, S; Mastroberardino, A; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Tassi, E; Kim, J Y; Ma, K J; Ibrahim, Z A; Kamaluddin, B; Wan-Abdullah, W A T; Ning, Y; Ren, Z; Sciulli, F; Chwastowski, J; Eskreys, A; Figiel, J; Galas, A; Gil, M; Olkiewicz, K; Stopa, P; Zawiejski, L; Adamczyk, L; Bold, T; Grabowska-Bold, I; Kisielewska, D; Lukasik, J; Przybycien, M; Suszycki, L; Kotanski, A; Slominski, W; Adler, V; Behrens, U; Bloch, I; Blohm, C; Bonato, A; Borras, K; Ciesielski, R; Coppola, N; Dossanov, A; Drugakov, V; Fourletova, J; Geiser, A; Gladkov, D; Göttlicher, P; Grebenyuk, J; Gregor, I; Haas, T; Hain, W; Horn, C; Huttmann, A; Kahle, B; Katkov, I I; Klein, U; Kötz, U; Kowalski, H; Lobodzinska, E; Löhr, B; Mankel, R; Melzer-Pellmann, I A; Miglioranzi, S; Montanari, A; Notz, D; Rinaldi, L; Roloff, P; Rubinsky, I; Santamarta, R; Schneekloth, U; Spiridonov, A; Stadie, H; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Theedt, T; Wolf, G; Wrona, K; Youngman, C; Zeuner, W; Lohmann, W; Schlenstedt, S; Barbagli, G; Gallo, E; Pelfer, P G; Bamberger, A; Dobur, D; Karstens, F; Vlasov, N N; Bussey, P J; Doyle, A T; Dunne, W; Ferrando, J; Forrest, M; Saxon, D H; Skillicorn, I O; Gialas, I; Papageorgiu, K; Gosau, T; Holm, U; Klanner, R; Lohrmann, E; Salehi, H; Schleper, P; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Sztuk, J; Wichmann, K; Wick, K; Foudas, C; Fry, C; Long, K R; Tapper, A D; Kataoka, M; Matsumoto, T; Nagano, K; Tokushuku, K; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Barakbaev, A N; Boos, E G; Pokrovskiy, N S; Zhautykov, B O; Aushev, V; Son, D; De Favereau, J; Piotrzkowski, K; Barreiro, F; Glasman, C; Jiménez, M; Labarga, L; Del Peso, J; Ron, E; Soares, M; Terron, J; Zambrana, M; Corriveau, F; Liu, C; Walsh, R; Zhou, C; Tsurugai, T; Antonov, A; Dolgoshein, B A; Sosnovtsev, V; Stifutkin, A; Suchkov, S; Dementiev, R K; Ermolov, P F; Gladilin, L K; Khein, L A; Korzhavina, I A; Kuzmin, V A; Levchenko, B B; Lukina, O Yu; Proskuryakov, A S; Shcheglova, L M; Zotkin, D S; Zotkin, S A; Abt, I; Büttner, C; Caldwell, A; Kollar, D; Schmidke, W B; Sutiak, J; Grigorescu, G; Keramidas, A; Koffeman, E; Kooijman, P; Pellegrino, A; Tiecke, H; Vázquez, M; Wiggers, L; Brümmer, N; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Lee, A; Ling, T Y; Allfrey, P D; Bell, M A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Cottrell, A; Devenish, R C E; Foster, B; Korcsak-Gorzo, K; Patel, S; Roberfroid, V; Robertson, A; Straub, P B; Uribe-, C; Estrada; Walczak, R; Bellan, P; Bertolin, A; Brugnera, R; Carlin, R; Dal Corso, F; Dusini, S; Garfagnini, A; Limentani, S; Longhin, A; Stanco, L; Turcato, M; Oh, B Y; Raval, A; Ukleja, J; Whitmore, J J; Iga, Y; D'Agostini, G; Marini, G; Nigro, A; Cole, J E; Hart, J C; Abramowicz, H; Gabareen, A; Ingbir, R; Kananov, S; Levy, A; Kuze, M; Maeda, J; Hori, R; Kagawa, S; Okazaki, N; Shimizu, S; Tawara, T; Hamatsu, R; Kaji, H; Kitamura, S; Ota, O; Ri, Y D; Ferrero, M I; Monaco, V; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Arneodo, M; Ruspa, M; Fourletov, S; Martin, J F; Boutle, S K; Butterworth, J M; Gwenlan, C; Jones, T W; Loizides, J H; Sutton, M R; Wing, M; Brzozowska, B; Ciborowski, J; Grzelak, G; Kulinski, P; Luzniak, P; Malka, J; Nowak, R J; Pawlak, J M; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Zarnecki, A F; Adamus, M; Plucinsky, P P; Eisenberg, Y; Giller, I; Hochman, D; Karshon, U; Rosin, M; Brownson, E; Danielson, T; Everett, A; Kcira, D; Reeder, D D; Ryan, P; Savin, A A; Smith, W H; Wolfe, H; Bhadra, S; Catterall, C D; Cui, Y; Hartner, G; Menary, S; Noor, U; Standage, J; Whyte, J

    2007-01-01

    The first observation of (anti)deuterons in deep inelastic scattering at HERA has been made with the ZEUS detector at a centre-of-mass energy of 300--318 GeV using an integrated luminosity of 120 pb-1. The measurement was performed in the central rapidity region for transverse momentum per unit of mass in the range 0.3anti)proton yield by approximately three orders of magnitude, consistent with the world measurements.

  18. Highlights on gamma rays, neutrinos and antiprotons from TeV Dark Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gammaldi Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that the gamma-ray flux observed by HESS from the J1745-290 Galactic Center source is well fitted as the secondary gamma-rays photons generated from Dark Matter annihilating into Standard Model particles in combination with a simple power law background. The neutrino flux expected from such Dark Matter source has been also analyzed. The main results of such analyses for 50 TeV Dark Matter annihilating into W+W− gauge boson and preliminary results for antiprotons are presented.

  19. Search For Magnetic Monopoles Possibly Produced By Proton-antiproton Collisions At The Tevatron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, W

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic monopoles can be used to explain the quantization of electric charge, and are predicted by gauge field theory. If monopoles exist, they could have been produced by the proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron collider—the highest energy accelerator existing in the world, and trapped in the CDF and DØ detectors. We took Al, Be, and Pb samples from the Tevatron and used the induction technique with SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices) to detect monopoles in the samples. We did not find monopoles, but we have set new limits for the monopole mass and the relavant cross section based on a Drell-Yan model and Monte Carlo calculation.

  20. Heavy ion storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuch, R.

    1987-01-01

    A brief overview of synchrotron storage rings for heavy ions, which are presently under construction in different accelerator laboratories is given. Ions ranging from protons up to uranium ions at MeV/nucleon energies will be injected into these rings using multiturn injection from the accelerators available or being built in these laboratories. After injection, it is planned to cool the phase space distribution of the ions by merging them with cold electron beams or laser beams, or by using stochastic cooling. Some atomic physics experiments planned for these rings are presented.

  1. The g-2 ring

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The precise measurement of "g-2", the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, required a special muon storage ring with electrostatic focussing and very accurate knowledge of the magnetic bending field. For more details see under photo 7405430.

  2. Modified Newton's rings: II

    CERN Document Server

    Chaitanya, T Sai; Krishna, V Sai; Anandh, B Shankar; Umesh, K S

    2010-01-01

    In an earlier work (Shankar kumar Jha, A Vyas, O S K S Sastri, Rajkumar Jain & K S Umesh, 'Determination of wavelength of laser light using Modified Newton's rings setup', Physics Education, vol. 22, no.3, 195-202(2005)) reported by our group, a version of Newton's rings experiment called Modified Newton's rings was proposed. The present work is an extension of this work. Here, a general formula for wavelength has been derived, applicable for a plane of observation at any distance. A relation between the focal length and the radius curvature is also derived for a plano-convex lens which is essentially used as a concave mirror. Tracker, a video analysis software, freely downloadable from the net, is employed to analyze the fringes captured using a CCD camera. Two beams which give rise to interference fringes in conventional Newton's rings and in the present setup are clearly distinguished.

  3. Ringed Seal Distribution Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains GIS layers that depict the known spatial distributions (i.e., ranges) of the five subspecies of ringed seals (Phoca hispida). It was produced...

  4. Measurements of the Ratio Between Double and Single Ionization of Helium for Antiprotons

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The inclusive spectra of @p|0's and @h's associated with @*p annihilation at rest are measured. Peaks in these spectra can be identified either with so far not explicitly observed two mesonic final states such as @p|0@w, @p|0@h, @h@h or @p|0@g, or with production of exotic mesonlike states such as baryonium. The apparatus is also suitable for searching for baryonium through some of its particular decay channels. As a by-product we expect information on direct @g production in @*p annihilations at rest.\\\\ \\\\ The apparatus consists of two modular BGO spectrometers and one array of leadglas detectors. The BGO spectrometers are adjustable in angle relative to each other and to the leadglas matrix, thus allowing to cover an angular range from 9|0 to 180|0, corresponding to momenta of zero to more than 1~GeV/c. The apparatus is designed such as to utilize the full potential of LEAR.

  5. The CERN antiproton target: hydrocode analysis of its core material dynamic response under proton beam impact

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Claudio Torregrosa; Calviani, Marco; Muñoz-Cobo, José-Luis

    2016-01-01

    Antiprotons are produced at CERN by colliding a 26 GeV/c proton beam with a fixed target made of a 3 mm diameter, 55 mm length iridium core. The inherent characteristics of antiproton production involve extremely high energy depositions inside the target when impacted by each primary proton beam, making it one of the most dynamically demanding among high energy solid targets in the world, with a rise temperature above 2000 {\\deg}C after each pulse impact and successive dynamic pressure waves of the order of GPa's. An optimized redesign of the current target is foreseen for the next 20 years of operation. As a first step in the design procedure, this numerical study delves into the fundamental phenomena present in the target material core under proton pulse impact and subsequent pressure wave propagation by the use of hydrocodes. Three major phenomena have been identified, (i) the dominance of a high frequency radial wave which produces destructive compressive-to-tensile pressure response (ii) The existence of...

  6. The proton injector for the accelerator facility of antiproton and ion research (FAIR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullmann, C., E-mail: c.ullmann@gsi.de; Kester, O. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut für Angewandte Physik, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Berezov, R.; Fils, J.; Hollinger, R.; Vinzenz, W. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Chauvin, N.; Delferriere, O. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, IRFU, F-91191-Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2014-02-15

    The new international accelerator facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany, is one of the largest research projects worldwide and will provide an antiproton production rate of 7 × 10{sup 10} cooled pbars per hour. This is equivalent to a primary proton beam current of 2 × 10{sup 16} protons per hour. For this request a high intensity proton linac (p-linac) will be built with an operating rf-frequency of 325 MHz to accelerate a 35 mA proton beam at 70 MeV, using conducting crossed-bar H-cavities. The repetition rate is 4 Hz with beam pulse length of 36 μs. The microwave ion source and low energy beam transport developed within a joint French-German collaboration GSI/CEA-SACLAY will serve as an injector of the compact proton linac. The 2.45 GHz ion source allows high brightness ion beams at an energy of 95 keV and will deliver a proton beam current of 100 mA at the entrance of the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) within an acceptance of 0.3π mm mrad (norm., rms)

  7. Search for Resonances in the Photoproduction of Proton-Antiproton Pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokes, Burnham [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Results are reported on the reaction γp → p$\\bar{p}$p with beam energy in the range 4.8-5.5 GeV. The data were collected at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in CLAS experiment E01-017(G6C). The focus of this study is an understanding of the mechanisms of photoproduction of proton-antiproton pairs, and to search for intermediate resonances, both narrow and broad, which decay to p$\\bar{p}$. The total measured cross section in the photon energy range 4.8-5.5 GeV is σ = 33 ± 2 nb. Measurement of the cross section as a function of energy is provided. An upper limit on the production of a narrow resonance state previously observed with a mass of 2.02 GeV/c2 is placed at 0.35 nb. No intermediate resonance states were observed. Meson exchange production appears to dominate the production of the proton-antiproton pairs.

  8. GAPS - Dark matter search with low-energy cosmic-ray antideuterons and antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    von Doetinchem, P; Boggs, S; Fuke, H; Hailey, C J; Mognet, S I; Ong, R A; Perez, K; Zweerink, J

    2015-01-01

    The GAPS experiment is foreseen to carry out a dark matter search by measuring low-energy cosmic-ray antideuterons and antiprotons with a novel detection approach. It will provide a new avenue to access a wide range of different dark matter models and masses from about 10GeV to 1TeV. The theoretically predicted antideuteron flux resulting from secondary interactions of primary cosmic rays is very low. Well-motivated theories beyond the Standard Model contain viable dark matter candidates, which could lead to a significant enhancement of the antideuteron flux due to annihilation or decay of dark matter particles. This flux contribution is believed to be especially large at low energies, which leads to a high discovery potential for GAPS. The GAPS low-energy antiproton search will provide some of the most stringent constraints on ~30GeV dark matter, will provide the best limits on primordial black hole evaporation on galactic length scales, and explore new discovery space in cosmic-ray physics. GAPS is designed...

  9. A possible dark matter annihilation signal in the AMS-02 antiproton data

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, Ming-Yang; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming; Fan, Yi-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    A new approach has been adopted to probe the dark matter signal using the latest AMS-02 cosmic ray antiproton flux data. Different from previous studies, we do not assume specific propagation, injection, and solar modulation parameters when calculating the antiproton fluxes, but use the results inferred from the B/C ratio and proton data from the recent PAMELA/AMS-02 measurements instead. A joint likelihood method including the likelihood of these background parameters is established within the Bayesian framework. We find that a dark matter signal is favored with a high test statistic value of $\\sim 70$. The rest mass of the dark matter particles is $\\sim 30-70$ GeV and the velocity-averaged hadronic annihilation cross section is about $(1-6)\\times 10^{-26}$ cm$^{3}$s$^{-1}$, in agreement with that needed to account for the Galactic center GeV excess and/or the weak GeV emission from dwarf galaxies Reticulum 2 and Tucana III. Tight constraints on the dark matter annihilation models are also set in a wide mass...

  10. Measurement of the Antiproton-Proton Total Cross-Section at the CERN ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment is a measurement of small angle scattering of antiprotons on protons and of protons on protons at 15/15, 22/22, 26/26 and 31/31 GeV, with the aim of obtaining data on the total cross-section for the scattering of protons on protons, and of determining the ratio of the real to the imaginary scattering amplitude at zero momentum transfer for antiprotons on protons. The measurement is divided into two parts: \\item 1) The measurement of @s^t^o^t(@*p) and @s^t^o^t(pp), using hodoscopes placed at small angles, outside the vacuum pipe, at approximately 9 metres from the intersection point. \\item 2) The measurement of the region in !t!, the momentum transfer squared, around the value !t^c!, where Coulomb and nuclear scattering are equal, in order to deduce the quantity @r = Re f(t=0)/Im f(t=0). This latter measurement is done by employi in earlier @s^t(pp) and @r experiments at the ISR. \\end{enumerate} In both set-ups the measurements are made by recording coincidences between collinear counters in th...

  11. Meas.of the Ratio Between Double and Single Ionization of Helium for Antiprotons

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to measure the ratio between double and single ionization of helium by antiprotons in the energy range $>$~3~MeV. Comparison with already existing proton data will yield information on the mechanisms for double ionization, which could not be extracted from previous comparisons between ratios measured for equivelocity electrons and protons. The most basic information to be obtained from an antiproton experiment will be the amount of correlation existing between the two electrons in the ground-state helium atom.\\\\ \\\\ The equipment consists of a gas cell, which employs slow-ion collection via the so-called condenser-plate method for the absolute sum of partial-ionization cross sections and determination of the relative contribution of multiple charged ions by TOF. The gas cell has movable entrance and exit slits and a grid system to account for secondary emission from the collection of slow ions. Together with a field of 800~V/cm in the collision region, the potentials of the TOF sp...

  12. Novel dark matter constraints from antiprotons in the light of AMS-02

    CERN Document Server

    Cuoco, Alessandro; Korsmeier, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate dark matter (DM) limits from cosmic-ray antiproton observations using the recent precise AMS-02 measurements. We properly take into account cosmic-ray propagation uncertainties fitting at the same time DM and propagation parameters, and marginalizing over the latter. We find a significant (~4.5 sigma) indication of a DM signal for DM masses near 80 GeV, with a hadronic annihilation cross-section close to the thermal value, sigma v ~3e-26 cm3s-1. Intriguingly, this signal is compatible with the DM interpretation of the Galactic center gamma-ray excess. Confirmation of the signal will require a more accurate study of the systematic uncertainties, i.e., the antiproton production cross-section, and modelling of the solar modulation effect. Interpreting the AMS-02 data in terms of upper limits on hadronic DM annihilation, we obtain strong constraints excluding a thermal annihilation cross-section for DM masses below about 50 GeV and in the range between approximately 150 and 500 GeV, even for conservat...

  13. CERN antiproton target: Hydrocode analysis of its core material dynamic response under proton beam impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Claudio Torregrosa; Perillo-Marcone, Antonio; Calviani, Marco; Muñoz-Cobo, José-Luis

    2016-07-01

    Antiprotons are produced at CERN by colliding a 26 GeV /c proton beam with a fixed target made of a 3 mm diameter, 55 mm length iridium core. The inherent characteristics of antiproton production involve extremely high energy depositions inside the target when impacted by each primary proton beam, making it one of the most dynamically demanding among high energy solid targets in the world, with a rise temperature above 2000 °C after each pulse impact and successive dynamic pressure waves of the order of GPa's. An optimized redesign of the current target is foreseen for the next 20 years of operation. As a first step in the design procedure, this numerical study delves into the fundamental phenomena present in the target material core under proton pulse impact and subsequent pressure wave propagation by the use of hydrocodes. Three major phenomena have been identified, (i) the dominance of a high frequency radial wave which produces destructive compressive-to-tensile pressure response (ii) The existence of end-of-pulse tensile waves and its relevance on the overall response (iii) A reduction of 44% in tensile pressure could be obtained by the use of a high density tantalum cladding.

  14. ${\\bar D}D$ meson pair production in antiproton-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Shyam, R

    2016-01-01

    We study the $\\bar D D$ (${\\bar D}^0 D^0$ and $D^-D^+$) charm meson pair production in antiproton (${\\bar p}$) induced reactions on nuclei at beam energies ranging from threshold to several GeV. Our model is based on an effective Lagrangian approach that has only the baryon-meson degrees of freedom and involves the physical hadron masses. The reaction proceeds via the $t$-channel exchanges of $\\Lambda_c^+$, $\\Sigma_c^+$, and $\\Sigma_c^{++}$ baryons in the initial collision of the antiproton with one of the protons of the target nucleus. The medium effects on the exchanged baryons are included by incorporating in the corresponding propagators, the effective charm baryon masses calculated within a quark-meson coupling (QMC) model. The wave functions of the bound proton have been determined within the QMC model as well as in a phenomenological model where they are obtained by solving the Dirac equation with appropriate scalar and vector potentials. The initial- and final-state distortion effects have been approx...

  15. High precision spectroscopy of pionic and antiprotonic atoms; Spectroscopie de precision des atomes pioniques et antiprotoniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, P

    1998-04-15

    The study of exotic atoms, in which an orbiting electron of a normal atom is replaced by a negatively charged particle ({pi}{sup -}, {mu}{sup -}, p, {kappa}{sup -}, {sigma}{sup -},...) may provide information on the orbiting particle and the atomic nucleus, as well as on their interaction. In this work, we were interested in pionic atoms ({pi}{sup -14} N) on the one hand in order to determine the pion mass with high accuracy (4 ppm), and on the other hand in antiprotonic atoms (pp-bar) in order to study the strong nucleon-antinucleon interaction at threshold. In this respect, a high-resolution crystal spectrometer was coupled to a cyclotron trap which provides a high stop density for particles in gas targets at low pressure. Using curved crystals, an extended X-ray source could be imaged onto the detector. Charge-Coupled Devices were used as position sensitive detectors in order to measure the Bragg angle of the transition to a high precision. The use of gas targets resolved the ambiguity owing to the number of K electrons for the value of the pion mass, and, for the first time, strong interaction shift and broadening of the 2p level in antiprotonic hydrogen were measured directly. (author)

  16. Antiproton Flux, Antiproton-to-Proton Flux Ratio, and Properties of Elementary Particle Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M.; Ali Cavasonza, L.; Alpat, B.; Ambrosi, G.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Aupetit, S.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Başeǧmez-du Pree, S.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bindi, V.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Bueno, E. F.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Coste, B.; Creus, W.; Crispoltoni, M.; Cui, Z.; Dai, Y. M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Dong, F.; Donnini, F.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Egorov, A.; Eline, A.; Eronen, T.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Formato, V.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R. J.; Gargiulo, C.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gómez-Coral, D. M.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kang, S. C.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Konak, C.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Li, H. S.; Li, J. Q.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, Hu; Lu, S. Q.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, F.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Nelson, T.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Pilo, F.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Qin, X.; Qu, Z. Y.; Räihä, T.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; Schulz von Dratzig, A.; Schwering, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shi, J. Y.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Song, J. W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vázquez Acosta, M.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Vitale, V.; Vitillo, S.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, N. H.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, X.; Wang, X. Q.; Wang, Z. X.; Wei, C. C.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Willenbrock, M.; Wu, H.; Wu, X.; Xia, X.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Yang, Y.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, S. D.; Zhang, S. W.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhu, Z. Q.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; AMS Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    A precision measurement by AMS of the antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio in primary cosmic rays in the absolute rigidity range from 1 to 450 GV is presented based on 3.49 ×1 05 antiproton events and 2.42 ×1 09 proton events. The fluxes and flux ratios of charged elementary particles in cosmic rays are also presented. In the absolute rigidity range ˜60 to ˜500 GV , the antiproton p ¯, proton p , and positron e+ fluxes are found to have nearly identical rigidity dependence and the electron e- flux exhibits a different rigidity dependence. Below 60 GV, the (p ¯/p ), (p ¯/e+), and (p /e+) flux ratios each reaches a maximum. From ˜60 to ˜500 GV , the (p ¯/p ), (p ¯/e+), and (p /e+) flux ratios show no rigidity dependence. These are new observations of the properties of elementary particles in the cosmos.

  17. Antiproton Flux, Antiproton-to-Proton Flux Ratio, and Properties of Elementary Particle Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M; Ali Cavasonza, L; Alpat, B; Ambrosi, G; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Aupetit, S; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Başeǧmez-du Pree, S; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bindi, V; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Bueno, E F; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Creus, W; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, Y M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Dong, F; Donnini, F; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eronen, T; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Formato, V; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R J; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gómez-Coral, D M; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kang, S C; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Konak, C; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H S; Li, J Q; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, Hu; Lu, S Q; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Nelson, T; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Pauluzzi, M; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Picot-Clemente, N; Pilo, F; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Qin, X; Qu, Z Y; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shi, J Y; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Song, J W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vázquez Acosta, M; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Vitillo, S; Wang, L Q; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, X; Wang, X Q; Wang, Z X; Wei, C C; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Willenbrock, M; Wu, H; Wu, X; Xia, X; Xiong, R Q; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Yang, Y; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, C; Zhang, J; Zhang, J H; Zhang, S D; Zhang, S W; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhu, Z Q; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P

    2016-08-26

    A precision measurement by AMS of the antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio in primary cosmic rays in the absolute rigidity range from 1 to 450 GV is presented based on 3.49×10^{5} antiproton events and 2.42×10^{9} proton events. The fluxes and flux ratios of charged elementary particles in cosmic rays are also presented. In the absolute rigidity range ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the antiproton p[over ¯], proton p, and positron e^{+} fluxes are found to have nearly identical rigidity dependence and the electron e^{-} flux exhibits a different rigidity dependence. Below 60 GV, the (p[over ¯]/p), (p[over ¯]/e^{+}), and (p/e^{+}) flux ratios each reaches a maximum. From ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the (p[over ¯]/p), (p[over ¯]/e^{+}), and (p/e^{+}) flux ratios show no rigidity dependence. These are new observations of the properties of elementary particles in the cosmos.

  18. Descent from the form ring and Buchsbaum rings

    CERN Document Server

    Schenzel, P

    1996-01-01

    There is a spectral sequence technique in order to estimate the local cohomology of a ring by the local cohomology of a certain form ring. As applications there are information on the descent of homological properties (Cohen-Macaulay, Buchsbaum etc.) from the form ring to the ring itself. In the case of Buchsbaum ring there is a discussion of the descent of the surjectivity of a natural map into the local cohomology.

  19. Holomorphic Dynamics and Herman Rings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Christian

    1997-01-01

    Existence theorem for Herman Rings of holomorphic mappings in a certain holomorphic family is given, using quasiconformal mappings. Proofs of topological properties of these Herman rings are given.......Existence theorem for Herman Rings of holomorphic mappings in a certain holomorphic family is given, using quasiconformal mappings. Proofs of topological properties of these Herman rings are given....

  20. Deceleration of MeV antiprotons and muons to keV energies — the anticyclotron A progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Cauz, D.; Chatellard, D.; DeCecco, P.; Eades, J.; Egger, J.-P.; Elsener, K.; Eugster, P.; Formisano, F.; Gorini, G.; Hauser, P.; Kottmann, F.; Krafcsik, I.; Lagomarsino, V.; Manuzio, G.; Missimer, J.; Poggiani, R.; Simons, L. M.; Testera, G.; Torelli, G.; Waldner, F.

    1994-03-01

    A progress report is presented on the development of the anticyclotron — deceleration of antiprotons and negative muons via collisions in a low-pressure gas or thin foils during revolutions in a cyclotron field. Beam tests performed at CERN and PSI are reported and future plans for applications outlined.

  1. Deceleration of MeV antiprotons and muons to keV energies - the anticyclotron. A progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, D.; Aschenauer, E.C.; Cauz, D.; Chatellard, D.; DeCecco, P.; Eades, J.; Egger, J.P.; Elsener, K.; Eugster, P.; Formisano, F.; Gorini, G.; Hauser, P.; Kottmann, F.; Krafcsik, I.; Lagomarsino, V.; Manuzio, G.; Missimer, J.; Poggiani, R.; Simons, L.M.; Testera, G.; Torelli, G.; Waldner, F. (KFKI Research Inst. for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Budapest (Hungary) Pisa Univ. (Italy) INFN, Pisa (Italy) Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland) Univ. di Udine (Italy) Neuchatel Univ. (Switzerland) CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) ETH Zuerich, Villigen (Switzerland) KFKI Research Inst. for Materials Science, Budapest (Hungary) Genova Univ. (Italy) INFN, Genova (Italy))

    1994-03-01

    A progress report is presented on the development of the anticyclotron - deceleration of antiprotons and negative muons via collisions in a low-pressure gas or thin foils during revolutions in a cyclotron field. Beam tests performed at CERN and PSI are reported and future plans for applications outlined. (orig.)

  2. Non-dissociative and dissociative ionisation of H sub 2 by 50-2000 keV antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, L.H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Moeller, S.P.; Pedersen, J.O.P.; Tang-Petersen, S.; Uggerhoej, E. (Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Inst. of Physics); Elsener, K. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)); Morenzoni, E. (Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland))

    1990-08-14

    A beam of antiprotons with energies between 50 keV and 2 MeV has been used for measurements of non-dissociative ionisation and dissociative ionisation cross sections of H{sub 2}. The results are compared with cross sections for equivelocity protons and electrons, and the role of interference effects in two-electron processes is discussed. (author).

  3. Antiproton annihilation physics annihilation physics in the Monte Carlo particle transport code particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taasti, Vicki Trier; Knudsen, Helge; Holzscheiter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The Monte Carlo particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A is designed to simulate therapeutic beams for cancer radiotherapy with fast ions. SHIELD-HIT12A allows creation of antiproton beam kernels for the treatment planning system TRiP98, but first it must be benchmarked against experimental data...

  4. Ringed accretion disks: equilibrium configurations

    CERN Document Server

    Pugliese, D

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a model of ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the General Relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can be then determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We pr...

  5. Thermodynamic black di-rings

    CERN Document Server

    Iguchi, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    Previously the five dimensional $S^1$-rotating black rings have been superposed in concentric way by some solitonic methods and regular systems of two $S^1$-rotating black rings were constructed by the authors and then Evslin and Krishnan (we called these solutions black di-rings). In this place we show some characteristics of the solutions of five dimensional black di-rings, especially in thermodynamic equilibrium. After the summary of the di-ring expressions and their physical quantities, first we comment on the equivalence of the two different solution-sets of the black di-rings. Then the existence of thermodynamic black di-rings are shown, in which both iso-thermality and iso-rotation between the inner black ring and the outer black ring are realized. We also give detailed analysis of peculiar properties of the thermodynamic black di-ring including discussion about a certain kind of thermodynamic stability (instability) of the system.

  6. Saturn's Other Ring Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, F. J.

    2014-04-01

    Saturn's main rings orbit the planet within an atmosphere and ionosphere of water, oxygen and hydrogen, produced by meteoritic impacts on and ultraviolet photodesorbtion of the ring particles [Johnson et al., 2006; Luhmann et al., 2006; Tseng et al., 2010]. The neutral atmosphere itself has only been tentatively detected through ultraviolet fluorescents of OH [Hall et al., 1996] while the ionosphere was observed in situ by the Cassini spacecraft shortly after orbital insertion [Coates et al.,2005; Tokar et al. 2005, Waite et al. 2005]. Although the plasma flow velocity of this ionosphere is not well-constrained, but the close association with the rings suggests that its speed would be couppled to the keplarian velocity of the rings themselves. As a result, the motion of the plasma through Saturn's magnetic field would produce an induced voltage, oriented away from the planet outside synchronous orbit and towards the planet inside synchronous orbit. Such a potential could result in currents flowing across the ring plane and closeing along magnetic field lines and through Saturn's ionosphere at latitudes between 36o and 48o. Cassini observations of whistler-mode plasma wave emissions [Xin et al.,2006] centered on synchronous orbit (1.76 Rs, mapping to 41o latitude) have been interpreted as a product of field-aligned electron beams associated with such a current. This presentation will investigate the magnitude of these currents and the resulting Joule heating of the ionosphere. An important constraint is that no auroral ultraviolet emissions have been observed at the relevant latitudes. In contrast, Joule heating could affect infrared emissions from H3+. Variations in H3+ emission associated with Saturn's rings have been reported by O'Donoghue et al., 2013, and interpreted as a result of ring "rain", i.e. precipitating water group species from the rings which alter ionosphereic chemistry and H3+ densities. As noted by O'Donoghue et al., this interpretation may be

  7. Direct measurement of transition frequencies in isolated pHe+ atoms, and new CPT-violation limits on the antiproton charge and mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, M; Eades, J; Hayano, R S; Ishikawa, T; Pirkl, W; Widmann, E; Yamaguchi, H; Torii, H A; Juhász, B; Horváth, D; Yamazaki, T

    2003-09-19

    A radio frequency quadrupole decelerator and achromatic momentum analyzer were used to decelerate antiprotons and produce p4He+ and p3He+ atoms in ultra-low-density targets, where collision-induced shifts of the atomic transition frequencies were negligible. The frequencies at near-vacuo conditions were measured by laser spectroscopy to fractional precisions of (6-19) x 10(-8). By comparing these with QED calculations and the antiproton cyclotron frequency, we set a new limit of 1 x 10(-8) on possible differences between the antiproton and proton charges and masses.

  8. Antineutron-nucleus annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Botta, E

    2001-01-01

    The n-nucleus annihilation process has been studied by the OBELIX experiment at the CERN Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) in the (50-400) MeV/c projectile momentum range on C, Al, Cu, Ag, Sn, and Pb nuclear targets. A systematic survey of the annihilation cross- section, sigma /sub alpha /(A, p/sub n/), has been performed, obtaining information on its dependence on the target mass number and on the incoming n momentum. For the first time the mass number dependence of the (inclusive) final state composition of the process has been analyzed. Production of the rho vector meson has also been examined. (13 refs).

  9. On Simple Noetherian Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Somyot Plubtieng

    2003-01-01

    A module M is called a CS-module (or extending module [5]) if every submodule of M is essential in a direct summand of M. It is shown that (i) a simple ring R is right noetherian if and only if every cyclic singular right R-module is either a CS-module or a noetherian module; (ii) for a prime ring R, if every proper cyclic right R-module is a direct sum of a quasi-injective module and a finitely cogenerated module, then R is either semisimple artinian or a right Ore domain; and (iii) a prime ring R is right noetherian if and only if every cyclic right R-module is a direct sum of a quasi-injective module and a noetherian module.

  10. Decay ring design

    CERN Document Server

    Chancé, A; Bouquerel, E; Hancock, S; Jensen, E

    The study of the neutrino oscillation between its different flavours needs pureand very intense fluxes of high energy, well collimated neutrinos with a welldetermined energy spectrum. A dedicated machine seems to be necessarynowadays to reach the required flux. A new concept based on the β-decayof radioactive ions which were accelerated in an accelerator chain was thenproposed. After ion production, stripping, bunching and acceleration, the unstableions are then stored in a racetrack-shaped superconducting decay ring.Finally, the ions are accumulated in the decay ring until being lost. The incomingbeam is merged to the stored beam by using a specific RF system, whichwill be presented here.We propose here to study some aspects of the decay ring, such as its opticalproperties, its RF system or the management of the losses which occur in thering (mainly by decay or by collimation).

  11. Almost ring theory

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    This book develops thorough and complete foundations for the method of almost etale extensions, which is at the basis of Faltings' approach to p-adic Hodge theory. The central notion is that of an "almost ring". Almost rings are the commutative unitary monoids in a tensor category obtained as a quotient V-Mod/S of the category V-Mod of modules over a fixed ring V; the subcategory S consists of all modules annihilated by a fixed ideal m of V, satisfying certain natural conditions. The reader is assumed to be familiar with general categorical notions, some basic commutative algebra and some advanced homological algebra (derived categories, simplicial methods). Apart from these general prerequisites, the text is as self-contained as possible. One novel feature of the book - compared with Faltings' earlier treatment - is the systematic exploitation of the cotangent complex, especially for the study of deformations of almost algebras.

  12. Deployable Fresnel Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Timothy F.; Fink, Patrick W.; Chu, Andrew W.; Lin, Gregory Y.

    2014-01-01

    Deployable Fresnel rings (DFRs) significantly enhance the realizable gain of an antenna. This innovation is intended to be used in combination with another antenna element, as the DFR itself acts as a focusing or microwave lens element for a primary antenna. This method is completely passive, and is also completely wireless in that it requires neither a cable, nor a connector from the antenna port of the primary antenna to the DFR. The technology improves upon the previous NASA technology called a Tri-Sector Deployable Array Antenna in at least three critical aspects. In contrast to the previous technology, this innovation requires no connector, cable, or other physical interface to the primary communication radio or sensor device. The achievable improvement in terms of antenna gain is significantly higher than has been achieved with the previous technology. Also, where previous embodiments of the Tri-Sector antenna have been constructed with combinations of conventional (e.g., printed circuit board) and conductive fabric materials, this innovation is realized using only conductive and non-conductive fabric (i.e., "e-textile") materials, with the possible exception of a spring-like deployment ring. Conceptually, a DFR operates by canceling the out-of-phase radiation at a plane by insertion of a conducting ring or rings of a specific size and distance from the source antenna, defined by Fresnel zones. Design of DFRs follow similar procedures to those outlined for conventional Fresnel zone rings. Gain enhancement using a single ring is verified experimentally and through computational simulation. The experimental test setup involves a microstrip patch antenna that is directly behind a single-ring DFR and is radiating towards a second microstrip patch antenna. The first patch antenna and DFR are shown. At 2.42 GHz, the DFR improves the transmit antenna gain by 8.6 dB, as shown in Figure 2, relative to the wireless link without the DFR. A figure illustrates the

  13. Oligomeric ferrocene rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inkpen, Michael S.; Scheerer, Stefan; Linseis, Michael; White, Andrew J. P.; Winter, Rainer F.; Albrecht, Tim; Long, Nicholas J.

    2016-09-01

    Cyclic oligomers comprising strongly interacting redox-active monomer units represent an unknown, yet highly desirable class of nanoscale materials. Here we describe the synthesis and properties of the first family of molecules belonging to this compound category—differently sized rings comprising only 1,1‧-disubstituted ferrocene units (cyclo[n], n = 5-7, 9). Due to the close proximity and connectivity of centres (covalent Cp-Cp linkages; Cp = cyclopentadienyl) solution voltammograms exhibit well-resolved, separated 1e- waves. Theoretical interrogations into correlations based on ring size and charge state are facilitated using values of the equilibrium potentials of these transitions, as well as their relative spacing. As the interaction free energies between the redox centres scale linearly with overall ring charge and in conjunction with fast intramolecular electron transfer (˜107 s-1), these molecules can be considered as uniformly charged nanorings (diameter ˜1-2 nm).

  14. Rings dominate western Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal L., Francisco V.; Vidal L., Victor M. V.; Molero, José María Pérez

    Surface and deep circulation of the central and western Gulf of Mexico is controlled by interactions of rings of water pinched from the gulf's Loop Current. The discovery was made by Mexican oceanographers who are preparing a full-color, 8-volume oceanographic atlas of the gulf.Anticyclonic warm-core rings pinch off the Loop Current at a rate of about one to two per year, the scientists of the Grupo de Estudios Oceanográficos of the Instituto de Investigaciones Eléctricas (GEO-IIE) found. The rings migrate west until they collide with the continental shelf break of the western gulf, almost always between 22° and 23°N latitude. On their westward travel they transfer angular momentum and vorticity to the surrounding water, generating cyclonic circulations and vortex pairs that completely dominate the entire surface and deep circulation of the central and western gulf.

  15. Autocatalytic chemical smoke rings

    CERN Document Server

    Rogers, M C; Rogers, Michael C.; Morris, Stephen W.

    2005-01-01

    Buoyant plumes, evolving free of boundary constraints, may develop well-defined mushroom shaped heads. In normal plumes, overturning flow in the head entrains less buoyant fluid from the surroundings as the head rises, robbing the plume of its driving force. We consider here a new type of plume in which the source of buoyancy is an autocatalytic chemical reaction. The reaction occurs at a sharp front which separates reactants from less dense products. In this type of plume, entrainment assists the reaction, producing new buoyancy which fuels an accelerating plume head. When the head has grown to a critical size, it detaches from the upwelling conduit, forming an accelerating, buoyant vortex ring. This vortex is analogous to a rising smoke ring. A second-generation head then develops at the point of detachment.Multiple generations of chemical vortex rings can detach from a single triggering event.

  16. Tunneling Through Black Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Liu

    2007-01-01

    Hawking radiation of black ring solutions to 5-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory is analyzed by use of the Parikh-Wilczek tunneling method. To get the correct tunneling amplitude and emission rate, we adopt and develop the Angheben-Nadalini-Vanzo-Zerbini covariant approach to cover the effects of rotation and electronic discharge all at once, and the effect of back reaction is also taken into account. This constitutes a unified approach to the tunneling problem. Provided the first law of thermodynamics for black rings holds, the emission rate is proportional to the exponential of the change of Bekenstein-Hawking entropy. Explicit calculation for black ring temperatures agrees exactly with the results obtained via the classical surface gravity method and the quasi-local formalism.

  17. CsI-Silicon Particle detector for Heavy ions Orbiting in Storage rings (CsISiPHOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, M. A.; Dillmann, I.; Bosch, F.; Faestermann, T.; Gao, B.; Gernhäuser, R.; Kozhuharov, C.; Litvinov, S. A.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Maier, L.; Nolden, F.; Popp, U.; Sanjari, M. S.; Spillmann, U.; Steck, M.; Stöhlker, T.; Weick, H.

    2016-11-01

    A heavy-ion detector was developed for decay studies in the Experimental Storage Ring (ESR) at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt, Germany. This detector serves as a prototype for the in-pocket particle detectors for future experiments with the Collector Ring (CR) at FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research). The detector includes a stack of six silicon pad sensors, a double-sided silicon strip detector (DSSD), and a CsI(Tl) scintillation detector. It was used successfully in a recent experiment for the detection of the β+-decay of highly charged 142Pm60+ ions. Based on the ΔE / E technique for particle identification and an energy resolution of 0.9% for ΔE and 0.5% for E (Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM)), the detector is well-suited to distinguish neighbouring isobars in the region of interest.

  18. Sixfold improved single particle measurement of the magnetic moment of the antiproton

    CERN Document Server

    Nagahama, H; Sellner, S; Harrington, J; Higuchi, T; Borchert, M J; Tanaka, T; Besirli, M; Mooser, A; Schneider, G; Blaum, K; Matsuda, Y; Ospelkaus, C; Quint, W; Walz, J; Yamazaki, Y; Ulmer, S

    2017-01-01

    Our current understanding of the Universe comes, among others, from particle physics and cosmology. In particle physics an almost perfect symmetry between matter and antimatter exists. On cosmological scales, however, a striking matter/antimatter imbalance is observed. This contradiction inspires comparisons of the fundamental properties of particles and antiparticles with high precision. Here we report on a measurement of the g-factor of the antiproton with a fractional precision of 0.8 parts per million at 95% confidence level. Our value /2=2.7928465(23) outperforms the previous best measurement by a factor of 6. The result is consistent with our proton g-factor measurement gp/2=2.792847350(9), and therefore agrees with the fundamental charge, parity, time (CPT) invariance of the Standard Model of particle physics. Additionally, our result improves coefficients of the standard model extension which discusses the sensitivity of experiments with respect to CPT violation by up to a factor of 20.

  19. Measurement of (anti)deuteron and (anti)proton production in DIS at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2007-05-15

    The first observation of (anti)deuterons in deep inelastic scattering at HERA has been made with the ZEUS detector at a centre-of-mass energy of 300-318 GeV using an integrated luminosity of 120 pb{sup -1}. The measurement was performed in the central rapidity region for transverse momentum per unit of mass in the range 0.3anti)proton yield by approximately three orders of magnitude, consistent with the world measurements. (orig.)

  20. Stopping power of antiprotons in H, H2, and He targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    The stopping power of antiprotons in atomic and molecular hydrogen as well as helium was calculated in an impact-energy range from 1 keV to 6.4 MeV. In the case of H2 and He the targets were described with a single-active electron model centered on the target. The collision process was treated...... of the corrections to the first-order stopping number, the average energy transferred to the target electrons, and the relative importance of the excitation and the ionization process for the energy loss of the projectile was determined. Finally, the stopping powers of the H, H2, and He targets were directly...

  1. Caloric curve of 8 GeV/c negative pion and antiproton + Au reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ruangma, A; Martin, E; Ramakrishnan, E; Rowland, D J; Veselsky, M; Winchester, E M; Yennello, S J; Beaulieu, L; Hsi, W C; Kwiatkowski, K K; Lefort, T; Viola, V E; Botvina, A; Korteling, R G; Pienkowski, L; Breuer, H; Gushue, S; Remsberg, L P

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between nuclear temperature and excitation energy of hot nuclei formed by 8 GeV/c negative pion and antiproton beams incident on 197Au has been investigated with the ISiS 4-pidetector array at the BNL AGS accelerator. The double-isotope-ratio technique was used to calculate the temperature of the hot system. The two thermometers used (p/d-3He/4He) and (d/t-3He/4He) are in agreement below E*/A ~ 7 MeV when corrected for secondary decay. Comparison of these caloric curves to those from other experiments shows some differences that may be attributable to instrumentation and analysis procedures. The caloric curves from this experiment are also compared with the predictions from the SMM multifragmentation model.

  2. Nuclear fragmentation induced by low-energy antiprotons within a microscopic transport approach

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics (LQMD) transport model, the nuclear fragmentation induced by low-energy antiprotons has been investigated thoroughly. A coalescence approach is developed for constructing the primary fragments in phase space. The secondary decay process of the fragments is described by the well-known statistical code. It is found that the localized energy released in antibaryon-baryon annihilation is deposited in a nucleus mainly via pion-nucleon collisions, which leads to the emissions of pre-equilibrium particles, fission, evaporation of nucleons and light fragments etc. The strangeness exchange reactions dominate the hyperon production. The averaged mass loss increases with the mass number of target nucleus. A bump structure in the domain of intermediate mass for heavy targets appears owing to the contribution of fission fragments.

  3. Theoretical motivation for gravitation experiments on ultra-low energy antiprotons and antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Nieto, Michael Martin; Anderson, J D; Lau, E L; Pérez-Mercader, J; Nieto, Michael Martin; Goldman, T; Anderson, John D; Lau, Eunice L; Perez-Mercader, J

    1994-01-01

    We know that the generally accepted theories of gravity and quantum mechanics are fundamentally incompatible. Thus, when we try to combine these theories, we must beware of physical pitfalls. Modern theories of quantum gravity are trying to overcome these problems. Any ideas must confront the present agreement with general relativity, but yet be free to wonder about not understood phenomena, such as the dark matter problem and the anomalous spacecraft data which we announce here. This all has led some ``intrepid" theorists to consider a new gravitational regime, that of antimatter. Even more ``daring" experimentalists are attempting, or considering attempting, the measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter, including low-energy antiprotons and, perhaps most enticing, antihydrogen.

  4. Decay of Hot Nuclei at Low Spins Produced by Antiproton-Annihilation in Heavy Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS208 \\\\ \\\\ The objective of the experiment is to study (i) the thermal excitation energy distribution of antiproton-induced reactions in heavy nuclei and (ii) the decay properties of hot nuclei at low spins via evaporation, multifragmentation and fission as a function of excitation energy. The experimental set-up consists of 4-$\\pi$ detectors: the Berlin Neutron Ball~(BNB) which is a spherical shell of gadolinium-loaded scintillator liquid with an inner and outer diameter of 40 and 160~cm, respectively. This detector counts the number of evaporated neutrons in each reaction. Inside BNB there is a 4-$\\pi$ silicon ball~(BSIB) with a diameter of 20~cm consisting of 162 detectors which measure energy and multiplicity of all emitted charged nuclear particles. The particles are identified via time of flight, energy and pulse shape correlations.

  5. Nuclear fragmentation induced by low-energy antiprotons within a microscopic transport approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Within the framework of the Lanzhou quantum molecular-dynamics transport model, the nuclear fragmentation induced by low-energy antiprotons has been investigated thoroughly. A coalescence approach is developed for constructing the primary fragments in phase space. The secondary decay process of the fragments is described by a well-known statistical code. It is found that the localized energy released in antibaryon-baryon annihilation is deposited in a nucleus mainly via pion-nucleon collisions, which leads to the emissions of pre-equilibrium particles, fission, evaporation of nucleons, light fragments, etc. The strangeness exchange reactions dominate the hyperon production. The averaged mass loss increases with the mass number of target nucleus. A bump structure in the domain of intermediate mass for heavy targets appears owing to the contribution of fission fragments.

  6. Toward polarized antiprotons: Machine development for spin-filtering experiments at COSY

    CERN Document Server

    Weidemann, C; Stein, H J; Lorentz, B; Bagdasarian, Z; Barion, L; Barsov, S; Bechstedt, U; Bertelli, S; Chiladze, D; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dymov, S; Engels, R; Gaisser, M; Gebel, R; Goslawski, P; Grigoriev, K; Guidoboni, G; Kacharava, A; Kamerdzhiev, V; Khoukaz, A; Kulikov, A; Lehrach, A; Lenisa, P; Lomidze, N; Macharashvili, G; Maier, R; Martin, S; Mchedlishvili, D; Meyer, H O; Merzliakov, S; Mielke, M; Mikirtychiants, M; Mikirtychiants, S; Nass, A; Nikolaev, N N; Oellers, D; Papenbrock, M; Pesce, A; Prasuhn, D; Retzlaff, M; Schleichert, R; Schröer, D; Seyfarth, H; Soltner, H; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Stockhorst, H; Ströher, H; Tabidze, M; Tagliente, G; Engblom, P Thörngren; Trusov, S; Valdau, Yu; Vasiliev, A; Wüstner, P

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes the commissioning of the experimental equipment and the machine studies required for the first spin-filtering experiment with protons at a beam kinetic energy of $49.3\\,$MeV in COSY. The implementation of a low-$\\beta$ insertion made it possible to achieve beam lifetimes of $\\tau_{\\rm{b}}=8000\\,$s in the presence of a dense polarized hydrogen storage-cell target of areal density $d_{\\rm t}=(5.5\\pm 0.2)\\times 10^{13}\\,\\mathrm{atoms/cm^{2}}$. The developed techniques can be directly applied to antiproton machines and allow for the determination of the spin-dependent $\\bar{p}p$ cross sections via spin filtering.

  7. Ring chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C A; Hertz, Jens Michael; Petersen, M B;

    1992-01-01

    A stillborn male child with anencephaly and multiple malformations was found to have the karyotype 46,XY,r(13) (p11q21.1). The breakpoint at 13q21.1, determined by high resolution banding, is the most proximal breakpoint ever reported in patients with ring chromosome 13. In situ hybridisation...

  8. Planetary ring systems

    CERN Document Server

    Miner, Ellis D; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N

    2007-01-01

    This is the most comprehensive and up-to-date book on the topic of planetary rings systems yet written. The book is written in a style that is easily accessible to the interested non expert. Each chapter includes notes, references, figures and tables.

  9. On topologies over rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed M. Fakhruddin

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available In this note, we show that if a topology F¯ over a ring A satisfies a certain finiteness condition, then the Gabriel topology G¯ generated by F¯ can be explicitly constructed and it also satisfies the same finiteness condition.

  10. Fusion Rings for Quantum Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henning Haahr; Stroppel, Catharina

    2012-01-01

    We study the fusion rings of tilting modules for a quantum group at a root of unity modulo the tensor ideal of negligible tilting modules. We identify them in type A with the combinatorial rings from [12] and give a similar description of the sp2n-fusion ring in terms of noncommutative symmetric...... functions. Moreover we give a presentation of all fusion rings in classical types as quotients of polynomial rings. Finally we also compute the fu- sion rings for type G2....

  11. Fusion Rings for Quantum Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henning Haahr; Stroppel, Catharina

    2014-01-01

    We study the fusion rings of tilting modules for a quantum group at a root of unity modulo the tensor ideal of negligible tilting modules. We identify them in type A with the combinatorial rings from Korff, C., Stroppel, C.: The sl(ˆn)k-WZNW fusion ring: a combinato-rial construction and a realis......We study the fusion rings of tilting modules for a quantum group at a root of unity modulo the tensor ideal of negligible tilting modules. We identify them in type A with the combinatorial rings from Korff, C., Stroppel, C.: The sl(ˆn)k-WZNW fusion ring: a combinato-rial construction...

  12. Rings from Close Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    Weve recently discovered narrow sets of rings around two minor planets orbiting in our solar system. How did these rings form? A new study shows that they could be a result of close encounters between the minor planets and giants like Jupiter or Neptune.Unexpected Ring SystemsPositions of the centaurs in our solar system (green). Giant planets (red), Jupiter trojans (grey), scattered disk objects (tan) and Kuiper belt objects (blue) are also shown. [WilyD]Centaurs are minor planets in our solar system that orbit between Jupiter and Neptune. These bodies of which there are roughly 44,000 with diameters larger than 1 km have dynamically unstable orbits that cross paths with those of one or more giant planets.Recent occultation observations of two centaurs, 10199 Chariklo and 2060 Chiron, revealed that these bodies both host narrow ring systems. Besides our four giant planets, Chariklo and Chiron are the only other bodies in the solar system known to have rings. But how did these rings form?Scientists have proposed several models, implicating collisions, disruption of a primordial satellite, or dusty outgassing. But a team of scientists led by Ryuki Hyodo (Paris Institute of Earth Physics, Kobe University) has recently proposed an alternative scenario: what if the rings were formed from partial disruption of the centaur itself, after it crossed just a little too close to a giant planet?Tidal Forces from a GiantHyodo and collaborators first used past studies of centaur orbits to estimate that roughly 10% of centaurs experience close encounters (passing within a distance of ~2x the planetary radius) with a giant planet during their million-year lifetime. The team then performed a series of simulations of close encounters between a giant planet and a differentiated centaur a body in which the rocky material has sunk to form a dense silicate core, surrounded by an icy mantle.Some snapshots of simulation outcomes (click for a closer look!) for different initial states of

  13. An explanation of the elliptic flow difference between proton and anti-proton from the UrQMD model with hadron potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Qingfeng; Wang, Xiaobao; Shen, Caiwan

    2016-01-01

    The time evolution of both proton and anti-proton $v_2$ flows from Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=7.7 GeV are examined by using both pure cascade and mean-field potential versions of the UrQMD model. Due to a stronger repulsion at the early stage introduced by the repulsive potentials and hence much less annihilation probabilities, anti-protons are frozen out earlier with smaller $v_2$ values. Therefore, the experimental data of anti-proton $v_2$ as well as the flow difference between proton and anti-proton can be reasonably described with the potential version of UrQMD.

  14. Measurement of the Antiprotonic Lyman- and Balmer X-rays of $\\overline{p}H$ and $\\overline{p}D$ Atoms at Very Low Target Pressures

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to measure the energies and intensities of the n @A 1 (Lyman) and n @A 2 (Balmer) tansitions with high accuracy in both @*H and @*D, from which the strong interaction effects of the 1s- and 2p-level can be extracted. These observables may be related to the antiproton-proton and antiproton-neutron scattering length. \\\\ \\\\ Since in these targets collisional Stark effect occurs, we will stop the antiprotons in extreme thin gaseous targets (pressure as low as 10 Torr), where no Stark effect occurs and the 2-1 transition is favoured. In order to use antiprotons with high efficiency despite of the low target density, we will trap antiprotons of a momentum of 100 MeV/c in a magnetic field of cyclotron characteristics. The antiprotons are decelerated by their energy loss in the target gas. The focusing properties of the magnetic field serve to compensate the multiple scattering and we will end up with a concentrated stopping distribution at the centre. Due to the long orbiting time, back...

  15. On Skew Triangular Matrix Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Wei-liang; Wang Yao; Ren Yan-li

    2016-01-01

    Letαbe a nonzero endomorphism of a ring R, n be a positive integer and Tn(R,α) be the skew triangular matrix ring. We show that some properties related to nilpotent elements of R are inherited by Tn(R,α). Meanwhile, we determine the strongly prime radical, generalized prime radical and Behrens radical of the ring R[x;α]/(xn), where R[x;α] is the skew polynomial ring.

  16. The Black Ring is Unstable

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Jorge E

    2015-01-01

    We study non-axisymmetric linearised gravitational perturbations of the Emparan-Reall black ring using numerical methods. We find an unstable mode whose onset lies within the "fat" branch of the black ring and continues into the "thin" branch. Together with previous results using Penrose inequalities that fat black rings are unstable, this provides numerical evidence that the entire black ring family is unstable.

  17. Ring closure in actin polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Supurna; Chattopadhyay, Sebanti

    2017-03-01

    We present an analysis for the ring closure probability of semiflexible polymers within the pure bend Worm Like Chain (WLC) model. The ring closure probability predicted from our analysis can be tested against fluorescent actin cyclization experiments. We also discuss the effect of ring closure on bend angle fluctuations in actin polymers.

  18. RINGED ACCRETION DISKS: EQUILIBRIUM CONFIGURATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z., E-mail: d.pugliese.physics@gmail.com, E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@physics.cz [Institute of Physics and Research Centre of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Faculty of Philosophy and Science, Silesian University in Opava, Bezručovo náměstí 13, CZ-74601 Opava (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-15

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  19. Non-Commutative Ring Theory

    CERN Document Server

    López-Permouth, Sergio

    1990-01-01

    The papers of this volume share as a common goal the structure and classi- fication of noncommutative rings and their modules, and deal with topics of current research including: localization, serial rings, perfect endomorphism rings, quantum groups, Morita contexts, generalizations of injectivitiy, and Cartan matrices.

  20. Integrated silicon optofluidic ring resonator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Testa, G.; Huang, Y.; Sarro, P.M.; Zeni, L.; Bernini, R.

    2010-01-01

    The feasibility of an integrated silicon optofluidic ring resonator is demonstrated. Liquid core antiresonant reflecting optical waveguides are used to realize a rectangular ring resonator with a multimode interference liquid core coupler between the ring and the bus waveguide. In this configuration

  1. Liquid helium-free cryostat and hermetically sealed cryogenic microwave cavity for hyperfine spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massiczek, O; Friedreich, S; Juhász, B; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J

    2011-12-11

    The design and properties of a new cryogenic set-up for laser-microwave-laser hyperfine structure spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium - an experiment performed at the CERN-Antiproton Decelerator (AD), Geneva, Switzerland - are described. Similar experiments for (4)He have been performed at the AD for several years. Due to the usage of a liquid helium operated cryostat and therefore necessary refilling of coolants, a loss of up to 10% beamtime occurred. The decision was made to change the cooling system to a closed-circuit cryocooler. New hermetically sealed target cells with minimised (3)He gas volume and different dimensions of the microwave resonator for measuring the (3)He transitions were needed. A new set-up has been designed and tested at Stefan Meyer Institute in Vienna before being used for the 2009 and 2010 beamtimes at the AD.

  2. Liquid helium-free cryostat and hermetically sealed cryogenic microwave cavity for hyperfine spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massiczek, O., E-mail: oswald.massiczek@cern.ch [Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Friedreich, S.; Juhasz, B.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J. [Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-12-11

    The design and properties of a new cryogenic set-up for laser-microwave-laser hyperfine structure spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium - an experiment performed at the CERN-Antiproton Decelerator (AD), Geneva, Switzerland - are described. Similar experiments for {sup 4}He have been performed at the AD for several years. Due to the usage of a liquid helium operated cryostat and therefore necessary refilling of coolants, a loss of up to 10% beamtime occurred. The decision was made to change the cooling system to a closed-circuit cryocooler. New hermetically sealed target cells with minimised {sup 3}He gas volume and different dimensions of the microwave resonator for measuring the {sup 3}He transitions were needed. A new set-up has been designed and tested at Stefan Meyer Institute in Vienna before being used for the 2009 and 2010 beamtimes at the AD.

  3. Saturn's ``Gossamer'' Ring: The F Ring's Inner Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showalter, M. R.; Burns, J. A.; Hamilton, D. P.

    1998-09-01

    Recent Galileo and Earth-based images have revealed for the first time that Jupiter's ``gossamer'' ring is actually composed of two rings, one bounded at the outer edge by Amalthea and the other bounded by Thebe. Dynamical models suggest that these rings are composed of dust grains ejected off the surfaces of the two moons, which then evolve inward under Poynting-Robertson drag. A very faint sheet of material filling the region between Saturn's A and F Rings reported by Burns et al. (BAAS 15, 1013--1014, 1983) may be a dynamically analogous system, in which dust escapes from the F Ring and evolves inward to the A Ring. Unlike Jupiter's gossamer rings, however, the inner sheet of Saturn's F Ring has been well observed from a large range of phase angles and visual wavelengths by Voyager. Voyager images reveal that this faint ring shows a tenfold increase in brightness between phase angles of 125(deg) and 165(deg) , indicating that it is composed of fine dust microns in size. Preliminary estimates of the normal optical depth fall in the range 1--2*E(-4) , depending on the dust size distribution assumed. Initial spectrophotometry reveals that the ring is neutral in color. The ring is uniform in brightness over the entire region between the two rings, with no evidence for internal structure associated with Prometheus and Atlas, suggesting that neither of these embedded moons acts as either a source or a sink. We will refine the aforementioned measurements and develop photometric models to better constrain the properties of the dust in this ring. This will enable us to relate the dust population to that in the F Ring proper, and to better explore the dynamical processes at work.

  4. Precision Measurement of Low-Energy Antiprotons with GAPS for Dark Matter and Primordial Black Hole Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Aramaki, T; von Doetinchem, P; Fuke, H; Hailey, C J; Mognet, S A I; Ong, R A; Perez, K M; Zweerink, J

    2014-01-01

    The general antiparticle spectrometer (GAPS) experiment is an indirect dark matter search focusing on antiparticles produced by WIMP annihilation and decay in the Galactic halo. In addition to the very powerful search channel provided by antideuterons, GAPS has a strong capability to measure low-energy antiprotons (0.07 $\\le$ E $\\le$ 0.25 GeV) as dark matter signatures. This is an especially effective means for probing light dark matter, whose existence has been hinted at in the direct dark matter searches, including the recent result from the CDMS-II experiment. While severely constrained by LUX and other direct dark matter searches, light dark matter candidates are still viable in an isospin- violating dark matter scenario and halo-independent analysis. Along with the excellent antideuteron sensitivity, GAPS will be able to detect an order of magnitude more low-energy antiprotons, compared to BESS and PAMELA, providing a precision measurement of low-energy antiproton flux and a unique channel for probing li...

  5. Measurement of Cosmic Ray antiproton/proton flux ratio at TeV energies with ARGO-YBJ

    CERN Document Server

    Di Sciascio, G

    2011-01-01

    Cosmic ray antiprotons provide an important probe for the study of cosmic-ray propagation in the interstellar space and to investigate the existence of Galactic dark matter. The ARGO-YBJ experiment, located at the Yangbajing Cosmic Ray Laboratory (Tibet, P.R. China, 4300 m a.s.l., 606 g/cm$^2$), is the only experiment exploiting the full coverage approach at very high altitude presently at work. The ARGO-YBJ experiment is particularly effective in measuring the cosmic ray antimatter content via the observation of the cosmic rays Moon shadowing effect. Based on all the data recorded during the period from July 2006 through November 2009 and a full Monte Carlo simulation, we searched for the existence of the shadow produced by antiprotons at the few-TeV energy region. No evidence of the existence of antiprotons was found in this energy region. Upper limits to the antip/p flux ratio are set to 5 % at a median energy of 2 TeV and 6 % at 5 TeV with a confidence level of 90 %. In the few-TeV energy range this resul...

  6. Computational studies of carbodiimide rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damrauer, Robert; Lin, Hai; Damrauer, Niels H

    2014-05-02

    Computational studies of alicyclic carbodiimides (RN═C═NR) (rings five through twelve) at the MP2/6-31G(d,p)//MP2/6-31G(d,p) level of theory were conducted to locate the transition states between carbodiimides isomers. Transition states for rings six through twelve were found. The RNCNR dihedral angle is ∼0° for even-numbered rings, but deviates from 0° for rings seven, nine, eleven, and twelve. The even- and odd-numbered ring transition states have different symmetry point groups. Cs transition states (even rings) have an imaginary frequency mode that transforms as the asymmetric irreducible representation of the group. C2 transition states (odd rings) have a corresponding mode that transforms as the totally symmetric representation. Intrinsic reaction coordinate analyses followed by energy minimization along the antisymmetric pathways led to enantiomeric pairs. The symmetric pathways give diastereomeric isomers. The five-membered ring carbodiimide is a stable structure, possibly isolable. A twelve-membered ring transition state was found only without applying symmetry constraints (C1). Molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics studies of the seven-, eight-, and nine-membered rings gave additional structures, which were then minimized using ab initio methods. No structures beyond those found from the IRC analyses described were found. The potential for optical resolution of the seven-membered ring is discussed.

  7. Magnetic fields in ring galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, D; Silchenko, O; Sokoloff, D; Horellou, C; Beck, R

    2016-01-01

    Many galaxies contain magnetic fields supported by galactic dynamo action. However, nothing definitive is known about magnetic fields in ring galaxies. Here we investigate large-scale magnetic fields in a previously unexplored context, namely ring galaxies, and concentrate our efforts on the structures that appear most promising for galactic dynamo action, i.e. outer star-forming rings in visually unbarred galaxies. We use tested methods for modelling $\\alpha-\\Omega$ galactic dynamos, taking into account the available observational information concerning ionized interstellar matter in ring galaxies. Our main result is that dynamo drivers in ring galaxies are strong enough to excite large-scale magnetic fields in the ring galaxies studied. The variety of dynamo driven magnetic configurations in ring galaxies obtained in our modelling is much richer than that found in classical spiral galaxies. In particular, various long-lived transients are possible. An especially interesting case is that of NGC 4513 where th...

  8. A season in Saturn's rings: Cycling, recycling and ring history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, L. W.; Meinke, B. K.; Albers, N.; Sremcevic, M.

    2012-04-01

    Cassini experiments have watched Saturn's ring system evolve before our eyes. Images and occultations show changes and transient events. The rings are a dynamic and complex geophysical system, incompletely modeled as a single-phase fluid. Key Cassini observations: High resolution images show straw, propellers, embedded moonlets, and F ring objects. Multiple UVIS, RSS and VIMS occutlations indicate multimodal ringlet and edge structure, including free and forced modes along with stochastic perturbations that are most likely caused by nearby mass concentrations. Vertical excursions are evident at ring edges and in other perturbed regions. The rings are occasionally hit by meteorites that leave a signature that may last centuries; meteoritic dust pollutes the rings. Temperature, reflectance and transmission spectra are influenced by the dynamical state of the ring particles. Saturn's Equinox 2009: Oblique lighting exposed vertical structure and embedded objects. The rings were the coldest ever. Images inspired new occultation and spectral analysis that show abundant structure in the perturbed regions. The rings are more variable and complex than we had expected prior to this seasonal viewing geometry. Sub-kilometer structure in power spectral analysis: Wavelet analysis shows features in the strongest density waves and at the shepherded outer edge of the B ring. Edges are variable as shown by multiple occultations and occultations of double stars. F ring kittens: 25 features seen in the first 102 occultations show a weak correlation with Prometheus location. We interpret these features as temporary aggregations. Simulation results indicate that accretion must be enhanced to match the kittens' size distribution. Images show that Prometheus triggers the formation of transient objects. Propellers and ghosts: Occulations and images provide evidence for small moonlets in the A, B and C rings. These indicate accretion occurs inside the classical Roche limit. Implications

  9. New Views of Jupiter's Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J. A.

    1998-09-01

    Jupiter's rings are the archetype of ethereal planetary rings (very-low optical-depth bands containing micron-sized "dust"). As a result of much improved observations by Galileo (Ockert-Bell* -- most citations are et al. and Icarus in press* or this meeting) and Keck (de Pater*), we now understand the nature of such rings. The ring has three components: a 104 km-thick toroidal halo (1.4-1.7 RJ; normal optical depth t = 10-6), a thin main ring (1.7-1.8 RJ; t = 10-6), and a pair of exterior gossamer rings (1.8-3.5RJ; t = 10-7). The main ring has patchy ( 20-30 percent) brightness. The ring is reddish and its particles satisfy a -2.5 differential power-law size distribution. Because particle lifetimes are brief, the rings must be continually regenerated, by collisions into parent bodies, which may be unseen or may be the known small ring-moons (Thomas*, Simonelli). The gossamer ring seems to be collisional ejecta derived from the ring-moons Amalthea and Thebe, and evolving inward by Poynting-Robertson drag (Burns). The particles drift through many electromagnetic resonances, clustering around synchronous orbit, which produce jumps in the particles' inclinations (Hamilton). The main ring is probably debris from Adrastea and Metis, which orbit in the equatorial plane. The halo particles are driven vertically by electromagnetic forces, which may be resonant (Schaffer & Burns) or not (Horanyi & Cravens). When halo orbits become highly distorted, particles are lost into Jupiter. Similar faint rings may be attendant to all small, close-in satellites (Showalter).

  10. Tree Rings: Timekeepers of the Past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, R. L.; McGowan, J.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science issues, this booklet describes the uses of tree rings in historical and biological recordkeeping. Separate sections cover the following topics: dating of tree rings, dating with tree rings, tree ring formation, tree ring identification, sample collections, tree ring cross dating, tree…

  11. The Rings Characterized by Minimal Left Ideals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Chao WEI

    2005-01-01

    We study these rings with every minimal left ideal being a projective, direct summand and a p-injective module, respectively. Some characterizations of these rings are given, and the relations among them are obtained. With these rings, we characterize semisimple rings. Finally, we introduce MC2 rings, and give some characterizations of MC2 rings.

  12. Precision Survey of X-Rays from $\\overline{p}p (\\overline{p}d)$ Atoms Using the Initial LEAR Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The experiment searches for the K and L X-ray series from @*p~(@*d) atoms, then measures their shift and width relative to QED predictions, and investigates their yields as a function of gas density. \\\\ \\\\ The @* are stopped in 1 atmosphere of H2 (D2) gas in a large aluminium flask whose 1 mm wall thickness eliminates externally produced low energy X-rays. The gas is cooled from a remote helium refrigerator and its temperature varied between 30|0K and 300|0K, giving a density range of 10 and large changes in relative line intensities. With 300~mm|2 area and 250~eV resolution FWHM at 5.9~keV, the Si(Li) X-ray detector penetrates the vacuum to come very close to a large beryllium window. Withstanding the large, charged particle flux from @*p annihilations has required special development of the Si(Li) detector. High purity metals are used for flask, window and detector end-housing to reduce background X-ray lines. A NaI ring suppresses the continuum background that comes principally from Compton scattering in t...

  13. Ring-constrained Join

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yiu, Man Lung; Karras, Panagiotis; Mamoulis, Nikos

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a novel spatial join operator, the ring-constrained join (RCJ). Given two sets P and Q of spatial points, the result of RCJ consists of pairs (p, q) (where p ε P, q ε Q) satisfying an intuitive geometric constraint: the smallest circle enclosing p and q contains no other points in P, Q...... R-tree based algorithms for computing RCJ, by exploiting the characteristics of the geometric constraint. We evaluate experimentally the efficiency of our methods on synthetic and real spatial datasets. The results show that our proposed algorithms scale well with the data size and have robust...

  14. Viscosity of ring polymer melts

    KAUST Repository

    Pasquino, Rossana

    2013-10-15

    We have measured the linear rheology of critically purified ring polyisoprenes, polystyrenes, and polyethyleneoxides of different molar masses. The ratio of the zero-shear viscosities of linear polymer melts η0,linear to their ring counterparts η0,ring at isofrictional conditions is discussed as a function of the number of entanglements Z. In the unentangled regime η0,linear/η 0,ring is virtually constant, consistent with the earlier data, atomistic simulations, and the theoretical expectation η0,linear/ η0,ring = 2. In the entanglement regime, the Z-dependence of ring viscosity is much weaker than that of linear polymers, in qualitative agreement with predictions from scaling theory and simulations. The power-law extracted from the available experimental data in the rather limited range 1 < Z < 20, η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.2±0.3, is weaker than the scaling prediction (η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.6±0.3) and the simulations (η0,linear/ η0,ring ∼ Z2.0±0.3). Nevertheless, the present collection of state-of-the-art experimental data unambiguously demonstrates that rings exhibit a universal trend clearly departing from that of their linear counterparts, and hence it represents a major step toward resolving a 30-year-old problem. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  15. Buoyant Norbury's vortex rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyth, Mark; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Salman, Hayder

    2014-11-01

    Norbury's vortices are a one-parameter family of axisymmetric vortex rings that are exact solutions to the Euler equations. Due to their relative simplicity, they are extensively used to model the behavior of real vortex rings found in experiments and in Nature. In this work, we extend the original formulation of the problem to include buoyancy effects for the case where the fluid that lies within the vortex has a different density to that of the ambient. In this modified formulation, buoyancy effects enter the problem through the baroclinic term of the vorticity equation. This permits an efficient numerical solution of the governing equation of motion in terms of a vortex contour method that tracks the evolution of the boundary of the vortex. Finally, we compare our numerical results with the theoretical analysis of the short-time evolution of a buoyant vortex. Funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through grant DPI2011-28356-C03-02 and by the London Mathematical Society.

  16. A Study of the Energy Dependence of the Underlying Event in Proton-Antiproton Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; Amerio, Silvia; Amidei, Dante E; Anastassov, Anton Iankov; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, Giorgio; Appel, Jeffrey A; Arisawa, Tetsuo; Artikov, Akram Muzafarovich; Asaadi, Jonathan A; Ashmanskas, William Joseph; Auerbach, Benjamin; Aurisano, Adam J; Azfar, Farrukh A; Badgett, William Farris; Bae, Taegil; Barbaro-Galtieri, Angela; Barnes, Virgil E; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Barria, Patrizia; Bartos, Pavol; Bauce, Matteo; Bedeschi, Franco; Behari, Satyajit; Bellettini, Giorgio; Bellinger, James Nugent; Benjamin, Douglas P; Beretvas, Andrew F; Bhatti, Anwar Ahmad; Bland, Karen Renee; Blumenfeld, Barry J; Bocci, Andrea; Bodek, Arie; Bortoletto, Daniela; Boudreau, Joseph Francis; Boveia, Antonio; Brigliadori, Luca; Bromberg, Carl Michael; Brucken, Erik; Budagov, Ioulian A; Budd, Howard Scott; Burkett, Kevin Alan; Busetto, Giovanni; Bussey, Peter John; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buzatu, Adrian; Calamba, Aristotle; Camarda, Stefano; Campanelli, Mario; Canelli, Florencia; Carls, Benjamin; Carlsmith, Duncan L; Carosi, Roberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Casal Larana, Bruno; Casarsa, Massimo; Castro, Andrea; Catastini, Pierluigi; Cauz, Diego; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Chen, Yen-Chu; Chertok, Maxwell Benjamin; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chlachidze, Gouram; Cho, Kihyeon; Chokheli, Davit; Clark, Allan Geoffrey; Clarke, Christopher Joseph; Convery, Mary Elizabeth; Conway, John Stephen; Corbo, Matteo; Cordelli, Marco; Cox, Charles Alexander; Cox, David Jeremy; Cremonesi, Matteo; Cruz Alonso, Daniel; Cuevas Maestro, Javier; Culbertson, Raymond Lloyd; D'Ascenzo, Nicola; Datta, Mousumi; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demortier, Luc M; Marchese, Luigi Marchese; Deninno, Maria Maddalena; Devoto, Francesco; D'Errico, Maria; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Dittmann, Jay Richard; D'Onofrio, Monica; Donati, Simone; Dorigo, Mirco; Driutti, Anna; Ebina, Koji; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Erbacher, Robin D; Errede, Steven Michael; Esham, Benjamin; Farrington, Sinead Marie; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Field, Richard D; Flanagan, Gene U; Forrest, Robert David; Franklin, Melissa EB; Freeman, John Christian; Frisch, Henry J; Funakoshi, Yujiro; Galloni, Camilla; Garfinkel, Arthur F; Garosi, Paola; Gerberich, Heather Kay; Gerchtein, Elena A; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Gibson, Karen Ruth; Ginsburg, Camille Marie; Giokaris, Nikos D; Giromini, Paolo; Glagolev, Vladimir; Glenzinski, Douglas Andrew; Gold, Michael S; Goldin, Daniel; Golossanov, Alexander; Gomez, Gervasio; Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim T; González López, Oscar; Gorelov, Igor V; Goshaw, Alfred T; Goulianos, Konstantin A; Gramellini, Elena; Grosso-Pilcher, Carla; Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; Hahn, Stephen R; Han, Ji-Yeon; Happacher, Fabio; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Matthew Frederick; Harr, Robert Francis; Harrington-Taber, Timothy; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Hays, Christopher Paul; Heinrich, Joel G; Herndon, Matthew Fairbanks; Hocker, James Andrew; Hong, Ziqing; Hopkins, Walter Howard; Hou, Suen Ray; Hughes, Richard Edward; Husemann, Ulrich; Hussein, Mohammad; Huston, Joey Walter; Introzzi, Gianluca; Iori, Maurizio; Ivanov, Andrew Gennadievich; James, Eric B; Jang, Dongwook; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha Anjalike; Jeon, Eun-Ju; Jindariani, Sergo Robert; Jones, Matthew T; Joo, Kyung Kwang; Jun, Soon Yung; Junk, Thomas R; Kambeitz, Manuel; Kamon, Teruki; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kasmi, Azeddine; Kato, Yukihiro; Ketchum, Wesley Robert; Keung, Justin Kien; Kilminster, Benjamin John; Kim, DongHee; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Min Jeong; Kim, Soo Bong; Kim, Shin-Hong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kim, Young-Jin; Kimura, Naoki; Kirby, Michael H; Knoepfel, Kyle James; Kondo, Kunitaka; Kong, Dae Jung; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Kotwal, Ashutosh Vijay; Kreps, Michal; Kroll, IJoseph; Kruse, Mark Charles; Kuhr, Thomas; Kurata, Masakazu; Laasanen, Alvin Toivo; Lammel, Stephan; Lancaster, Mark; Lannon, Kevin Patrick; Latino, Giuseppe; Lee, Hyun Su; Lee, Jaison; Leo, Sabato; Leone, Sandra; Lewis, Jonathan D; Limosani, Antonio; Lipeles, Elliot David; Lister, Alison; Liu, Qiuguang; Liu, Tiehui Ted; Lockwitz, Sarah E; Loginov, Andrey Borisovich; Lucà, Alessandra; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lueck, Jan; Lujan, Paul Joseph; Lukens, Patrick Thomas; Lungu, Gheorghe; Lys, Jeremy E; Lysak, Roman; Madrak, Robyn Leigh; Maestro, Paolo; Malik, Sarah Alam; Manca, Giulia; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marino, Christopher Phillip; Matera, Keith; Mattson, Mark Edward; Mazzacane, Anna; Mazzanti, Paolo; McNulty, Ronan; Mehta, Andrew; Mehtala, Petteri; Mesropian, Christina; Miao, Ting; Mietlicki, David John; Mitra, Ankush; Miyake, Hideki; Moed, Shulamit; Moggi, Niccolo; Moon, Chang-Seong; Moore, Ronald Scott; Morello, Michael Joseph; Mukherjee, Aseet; Muller, Thomas; Murat, Pavel A; Mussini, Manuel; Nachtman, Jane Marie; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Naganoma, Junji; Nakano, Itsuo; Napier, Austin; Nett, Jason Michael; Nigmanov, Turgun S; Nodulman, Lawrence J; Noh, Seoyoung; Norniella Francisco, Olga; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oh, Seog Hwan; Oh, Young-do; Okusawa, Toru; Orava, Risto Olavi; Ortolan, Lorenzo; Pagliarone, Carmine Elvezio; Palencia, Jose Enrique; Palni, Prabhakar; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Parker, William Chesluk; Pauletta, Giovanni; Paulini, Manfred; Paus, Christoph Maria Ernst; Phillips, Thomas J; Piacentino, Giovanni M; Pianori, Elisabetta; Pilot, Justin Robert; Pitts, Kevin T; Plager, Charles; Pondrom, Lee G; Poprocki, Stephen; Potamianos, Karolos Jozef; Prokoshin, Fedor; Pranko, Aliaksandr Pavlovich; Ptohos, Fotios K; Punzi, Giovanni; Redondo Fernández, Ignacio; Renton, Peter B; Rescigno, Marco; Rimondi, Franco; Ristori, Luciano; Robson, Aidan; Rodriguez, Tatiana Isabel; Rolli, Simona; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roser, Robert Martin; Rosner, Jonathan L; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz Jimeno, Alberto; Russ, James S; Rusu, Vadim Liviu; Sakumoto, Willis Kazuo; Sakurai, Yuki; Santi, Lorenzo; Sato, Koji; Saveliev, Valeri; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Schlabach, Philip; Schmidt, Eugene E; Schwarz, Thomas A; Scodellaro, Luca; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seidel, Sally C; Seiya, Yoshihiro; Semenov, Alexei; Sforza, Federico; Shalhout, Shalhout Zaki; Shears, Tara G; Shepard, Paul F; Shimojima, Makoto; Shochet, Melvyn J; Shreyber-Tecker, Irina; Simonenko, Alexander V; Sliwa, Krzysztof Jan; Smith, John Rodgers; Snider, Frederick Douglas; Sorin, Maria Veronica; Song, Hao; Stancari, Michelle Dawn; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stentz, Dale James; Strologas, John; Sudo, Yuji; Sukhanov, Alexander I; Suslov, Igor M; Takemasa, Ken-ichi; Takeuchi, Yuji; Tang, Jian; Tecchio, Monica; Teng, Ping-Kun; Thom, Julia; Thomson, Evelyn Jean; Thukral, Vaikunth; Toback, David A; Tokar, Stanislav; Tollefson, Kirsten Anne; Tomura, Tomonobu; Tonelli, Diego; Torre, Stefano; Torretta, Donatella; Totaro, Pierluigi; Trovato, Marco; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Uozumi, Satoru; Vázquez-Valencia, Elsa Fabiola; Velev, Gueorgui; Vellidis, Konstantinos; Vernieri, Caterina; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Vizán Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Vogel, Marcelo; Volpi, Guido; Wagner, Peter; Wallny, Rainer S; Wang, Song-Ming; Waters, David S; Wester, William Carl; Whiteson, Daniel O; Wicklund, Arthur Barry; Wilbur, Scott; Williams, Hugh H; Wilson, Jonathan Samuel; Wilson, Peter James; Winer, Brian L; Wittich, Peter; Wolbers, Stephen A; Wolfe, Homer; Wright, Thomas Roland; Wu, Xin; Wu, Zhenbin; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamato, Daisuke; Yang, Tingjun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yu Chul; Yao, Wei-Ming; Yeh, Gong Ping; Yi, Kai; Yoh, John; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Takuo; Yu, Geum Bong; Yu, Intae; Zanetti, Anna Maria; Zeng, Yu; Zhou, Chen; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    We study charged particle production in proton-antiproton collisions at 300 GeV, 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of eta-phi space; toward, away, and transverse. The average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the underlying event. The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the hard component (initial and final-state radiation) from the beam-beam remnant and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. The center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event are studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  17. Study of the energy dependence of the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Albrow, M.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucá, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We study charged particle production (pT>0.5 GeV /c , |η |<0.8 ) in proton-antiproton collisions at total center-of-mass energies √{s }=300 GeV , 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of η -ϕ space: "toward", "away", and "transverse." The average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the "underlying event." The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the "hard component" (initial and final-state radiation) from the "beam-beam remnant" and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. The center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event is studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  18. Bottom Quark-antiquark Production And Mixing In Proton- Antiproton Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Z

    2003-01-01

    The studies of bottom quark-antiquark production in proton-antiproton collisions play an important role in testing perturbative QCD. Measuring the mixing parameter of B mesons imposes constraints on the quark mixing (CKM) matrix and enhances the understanding of the Standard Model. Multi-GeV pp¯ colliders produce a significant amount of bb¯ pairs and thus enable studies in both of these fields. This thesis presents results of the bb¯ production cross section from pp¯ collisions at s = 1.8 TeV and the time-integrated average BB¯ mixing parameter &parl0;c&parr0; using high- mass dimuon data collected by CDF during its Run IB. There is a high concentration of muon pairs from inclusive semileptonic B decays in this data set. We take advantage of the long lifetime property of B hadrons and isolate the muons from B decays by studying the displacement of the muon pair trajectories. We use an Unbinned Maximum Likelihood Fitting method to fit the two dimensi...

  19. Antihyperon-hyperon production in antiproton-proton annihilations with PANDA at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papenbrock, Michael [Department of Nuclear Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The production of antihyperon-hyperon pairs in antiproton-proton annihilations involves the annihilation of at least one light (u,d) quark-antiquark pair and the creation of a heavier (s,c,b) pair. Production of strange hyperons occur in an energy region in which QCD is difficult to predict. By studying hyperon production we learn about the strong interaction in this energy region, i.e. the confinement domain. It is an open question what the relevant degrees of freedom are: quarks and gluons, or hadrons. Spin observables is an excellent tool in order to better understand the physical processes. These are accessible via the weak, parity violating decay of the hyperon which results in an angular asymmetry of the decay products. The future PANDA experiment at FAIR is going to be ideally suited to study spin physics on hyperons with both high precision and high statistics. Since hyperons decay weakly and thus have long life-times, their decay vertices are displaced with respect to the production point. This sets high demands on precise track reconstruction. A pattern recognition algorithm is currently under development, with the ability to reconstruct tracks originating in displaced vertices. Simulation studies done by the Uppsala group as well as the status of the development will be presented and discussed.

  20. Formation spectra of charmed meson--nucleus systems using an antiproton beam

    CERN Document Server

    Yamagata-Sekihara, J; Nieves, J; Salcedo, L L; Tolos, L

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the structure and formation of charmed meson--nucleus systems, with the aim of understanding the charmed meson--nucleon interactions and the properties of the charmed mesons in the nuclear medium. The $\\bar{D}$ mesic nuclei are of special interest, since they have tiny decay widths due to the absence of strong decays for the $\\bar{D} N$ pair. Employing an effective model for the $\\bar{D} N$ and $D N$ interactions and solving the Klein--Gordon equation for $\\bar{D}$ and $D$ in finite nuclei, we find that the $D^{-}$-${}^{11}\\rm{B}$ system has $1 s$ and $2p$ mesic nuclear states and that the $D^{0}$-${}^{11}\\rm{B}$ system binds in a $1s$ state. In view of the forthcoming experiments by the PANDA and CBM Collaborations at the future FAIR facility and the J-PARC upgrade, we calculate the formation spectra of the $[D^{-}$-${}^{11}\\rm{B}]$ and $[D^{0}$-${}^{11}\\rm{B}]$ mesic nuclei for an antiproton beam on a ${}^{12} \\rm{C}$ target. Our results suggest that it is possible to observe the $2 p$ $D^{-}...