WorldWideScience

Sample records for antioxidant-rich spice added

  1. Use of Spices in Foods

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    treatment of wide range of ailments including digestive disorder, rheumatism, cholera and flatulence (ShibamOto and. Biedanes, 1993). .R'osengarten (1969) reports that spices were also used as perfumes, antidotes against poisons and cosrnetics and ointments. He also notes that it \\vasiuptil lsf'century AD in Rome.

  2. The Okinawan diet: health implications of a low-calorie, nutrient-dense, antioxidant-rich dietary pattern low in glycemic load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcox, D Craig; Willcox, Bradley J; Todoriki, Hidemi; Suzuki, Makoto

    2009-08-01

    Residents of Okinawa, the southernmost prefecture of Japan, are known for their long average life expectancy, high numbers of centenarians, and accompanying low risk of age-associated diseases. Much of the longevity advantage in Okinawa is thought to be related to a healthy lifestyle, particularly the traditional diet, which is low in calories yet nutritionally dense, especially with regard to phytonutrients in the form of antioxidants and flavonoids. Research suggests that diets associated with a reduced risk of chronic diseases are similar to the traditional Okinawan diet, that is, vegetable and fruit heavy (therefore phytonutrient and antioxidant rich) but reduced in meat, refined grains, saturated fat, sugar, salt, and full-fat dairy products. Many of the characteristics of the diet in Okinawa are shared with other healthy dietary patterns, such as the traditional Mediterranean diet or the modern DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet. Features such as the low levels of saturated fat, high antioxidant intake, and low glycemic load in these diets are likely contributing to a decreased risk for cardiovascular disease, some cancers, and other chronic diseases through multiple mechanisms, including reduced oxidative stress. A comparison of the nutrient profiles of the three dietary patterns shows that the traditional Okinawan diet is the lowest in fat intake, particularly in terms of saturated fat, and highest in carbohydrate intake, in keeping with the very high intake of antioxidant-rich yet calorie-poor orange-yellow root vegetables, such as sweet potatoes, and green leafy vegetables. Deeper analyses of the individual components of the Okinawan diet reveal that many of the traditional foods, herbs, or spices consumed on a regular basis could be labeled "functional foods" and, indeed, are currently being explored for their potential health-enhancing properties.

  3. The impact of spices on vegetable consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Zhaoping; Krak, Michael; Zerlin, Alona

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study was conducted to evaluate the impact of spices added to broccoli, cauliflower, and spinach on amount and rate of vegetable consumption. Twenty overweight subjects who routinely ate less than three daily servings of vegetables were recruited. On six occasions, subjects were assigned...... significantly for broccoli with spices compared to plain broccoli, but there was no significant difference for cauliflower or spinach. No significant differences were noted in any of the visual analog scale (VAS) responses. This study suggests that adding spices may increase vegetable intake, but more studies...

  4. Packaging Attributes of Antioxidant-Rich Instant Coffee and Their Influence on the Purchase Intent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinês P. Corso

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to identify the most important packaging attributes for purchasing a product not currently on the Brazilian market: antioxidant-rich instant coffee, a blend of roasted coffee and green coffee. Five package types of the same brand of instant antioxidant-rich coffee marketed in different countries were evaluated through a focus group. The attributes’ glass shape, glass lid color and label, information and brand were selected for the quantitative study. The purchase intent for the packaging images was evaluated with conjoint analysis. In general, an increased purchase intent was verified for more modern packages and browner labels that indicated roasted coffee. The consumers preferred the image of green and roasted coffee beans next to the cup of coffee and valued information about the product’s differentiation (the origin, type, quantity and functions of antioxidants that was presented in the form of explanatory charts on the back of the packaging.

  5. The Roman and Islamic spice trade: New archaeological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Veen, Marijke; Morales, Jacob

    2015-06-05

    Tropical spices have long been utilized in traditional medicine and cuisine. New archaeological evidence highlights temporal changes in the nature and scale of the ancient spice trade and in the ancient usage of these plants. Furthermore, a study of their 'materiality' highlights that the impact of spices extends beyond their material properties. Here the botanical remains of spices recovered from archaeological excavations at a port active in the Roman and medieval Islamic spice trade are evaluated. Recent excavations at Quseir al-Qadim, an ancient port located on the Red Sea coast of Egypt, have provided new evidence for the spice trade. Due to the arid conditions ancient botanical remains were preserved in abundance and these included spices, as well as a wide range of other food plants. Quseir al-Qadim was active as a transport hub during both the Roman and Islamic periods (ca. AD 1-250, known as Myos Hormos, and again during ca. AD 1050-1500, known as Kusayr), and the remains thus facilitate a study of temporal change in the trade and usage of these spices. Standard archaeobotanical methods were used to recover, identify and analyze these remains. At least seven tropical spices were recovered from the excavations, as well as several other tropical imports, including black pepper (Piper nigrum), ginger (Zingiber officinale), cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum), turmeric (Curcuma sp.), fagara (cf. Tetradium ruticarpum), myrobalan (Terminalia bellirica and Terminalia chebula) and betelnut (Areca catechu). A marked contrast between the two chronological periods in the range of spices recovered points to changes in the nature and scale of the trade between the Roman and medieval Islamic periods, while differences in the contexts from which they were recovered help to identify temporal changes in the way in which the spices were utilized during those periods. Archaeological and textual evidence suggest that in antiquity spices were used in ritual (funeral rites

  6. Efficient solvent extraction of antioxidant-rich extract from a tropical diatom, Chaetoceros calcitrans (Paulsen Takano 1968

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Chern Foo

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: Methanol was the recommended solvent for the production of antioxidant rich extract from C. calcitrans. Both carotenoids and phenolic acids were found to be positively correlated to the antioxidant capacities of C. calcitrans. Lead bioactives confirmed by subsequent high performance liquid chromatography studies were fucoxanthin, gallic acid and protocatechuic acid.

  7. Vitamin and antioxidant rich diet increases MLH1 promoter DNA methylation in DMT2 subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzeny, Olivier J; Müllner, Elisabeth; Wagner, Karl-Heinz; Brath, Helmut; Aumüller, Eva; Haslberger, Alexander G

    2012-10-01

    Oxidative stress may lead to an increased level of unrepaired cellular DNA damage, which is discussed as one risk for tumor initiation. Mismatch repair (MMR) enzymes act as proofreading complexes that maintain the genomic integrity and MMR-deficient cells show an increased mutation rate. One important gene in the MMR complex is the MutL homolog 1 (MLH1) gene. Since a diet rich in antioxidants has the potential to counteract harmful effects by reactive oxygen species (ROS), we investigated the impact of an antioxidant, folate, and vitamin rich diet on the epigenetic pattern of MLH1. These effects were analyzed in individuals with non-insulin depended diabetes mellitus type 2 (NIDDM2) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG). In this post-hoc analysis of a randomized trial we analyzed DNA methylation of MLH1, MSH2, and MGMT at baseline and after 8 weeks of intervention, consisting of 300 g vegetables and 25 ml plant oil rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids per day. DNA methylation was quantified using combined bisulfite restriction enzyme analysis (COBRA) and pyrosequencing. MLH1 and DNMT1 mRNA expression were investigated by qRT-PCR. DNA damage was assessed by COMET assay. Student's two-tailed paired t test and one-way ANOVA with Scheffé corrected Post hoc test was used to determine significant methylation and expression differences. Two-tailed Pearson test was used to determine correlations between methylation level, gene expression, and DNA strand break amount. The intervention resulted in significantly higher CpG methylation in two particular MLH1 promoter regions and the MGMT promoter. DNA strand breaks and methylation levels correlated significantly. The expression of MLH1, DNMT1, and the promoter methylation of MSH2 remained stable. CpG methylation levels and gene expression did not correlate. This vitamin and antioxidant rich diet affected the CpG methylation of MLH1. The higher methylation might be a result of the ROS scavenging antioxidant rich diet, leading to

  8. Vitamin and antioxidant rich diet increases MLH1 promoter DNA methylation in DMT2 subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Switzeny Olivier J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxidative stress may lead to an increased level of unrepaired cellular DNA damage, which is discussed as one risk for tumor initiation. Mismatch repair (MMR enzymes act as proofreading complexes that maintain the genomic integrity and MMR-deficient cells show an increased mutation rate. One important gene in the MMR complex is the MutL homolog 1 (MLH1 gene. Since a diet rich in antioxidants has the potential to counteract harmful effects by reactive oxygen species (ROS, we investigated the impact of an antioxidant, folate, and vitamin rich diet on the epigenetic pattern of MLH1. These effects were analyzed in individuals with non-insulin depended diabetes mellitus type 2 (NIDDM2 and impaired fasting glucose (IFG. Methods In this post-hoc analysis of a randomized trial we analyzed DNA methylation of MLH1, MSH2, and MGMT at baseline and after 8 weeks of intervention, consisting of 300 g vegetables and 25 ml plant oil rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids per day. DNA methylation was quantified using combined bisulfite restriction enzyme analysis (COBRA and pyrosequencing. MLH1 and DNMT1 mRNA expression were investigated by qRT-PCR. DNA damage was assessed by COMET assay. Student’s two-tailed paired t test and one-way ANOVA with Scheffé corrected Post hoc test was used to determine significant methylation and expression differences. Two-tailed Pearson test was used to determine correlations between methylation level, gene expression, and DNA strand break amount. Results The intervention resulted in significantly higher CpG methylation in two particular MLH1 promoter regions and the MGMT promoter. DNA strand breaks and methylation levels correlated significantly. The expression of MLH1, DNMT1, and the promoter methylation of MSH2 remained stable. CpG methylation levels and gene expression did not correlate. Conclusion This vitamin and antioxidant rich diet affected the CpG methylation of MLH1. The higher methylation might be a

  9. EPR spectroscopy of spices

    OpenAIRE

    R. T. Тimakova; S. L. Tikhonov; A. N. Tararkov; D. O. Vakhnin

    2016-01-01

    From 01 January 2017 you enter the interstate standard GOST 33271-2015 “Dry Spices, herbs and vegetable seasonings. Manual exposure in order to combat pathogens and other microorganisms” which States that the absorbed dose of radiation to the spices should be from 3 to 30 kGy. The study found that before the introduction of permissive legislative framework in the consumer market of Russia there are irradiated food products (chili, ground chili, ground spicy chili, black pepper). For radiation...

  10. Process optimization for the preparation of antioxidant rich ginger candy using beetroot pomace extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vikas; Kushwaha, Rinku; Goyal, Ankit; Tanwar, Beenu; Kaur, Jaspreet

    2018-04-15

    Now-a-days, there is an increased interest in fruits and vegetables processing by-products due to potential source of phytochemicals and pigments. Beetroot (Beta vulgaris) pomace extract is a rich source of betalain, phenolics and other bioactive components, which possess significant antioxidant activities. In the present study, process optimization was performed for developing ginger (Zingiber officinale) candy enriched with beetroot pomace extract using response surface methodology (RSM). The effect of two process variables: blanching time (0-10 min) and beetroot pomace extract (0-10%) was evaluated on physicochemical characteristics and phytochemicals content of the developed product. Maximum phytochemicals' activities were obtained under optimum conditions of 7.81 min blanching time and 9.24% beetroot pomace extract. FTIR analysis also confirmed the significant effect of beetroot pomace extract and it's blanching on the phytochemical potential of ginger candy. The study would be useful for developing similar novel and antioxidants rich food products supplemented with beetroot pomace extract. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Fungal and bacterial contaminants of six spices and spice products ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The spices and spice products collectively harboured Aeromonas salmonicida, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter amnigenus, Enterobacter agglomerans, Enterobacter sakazakii, Flavobacterium sp, Chromobacterium violaceum, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Acinetobacter sp, Pseudomonas cepacia, ...

  12. Spices as functional foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viuda-Martos, M; Ruiz-Navajas, Y; Fernández-López, J; Pérez-Alvarez, J A

    2011-01-01

    Spices and aromatic herbs have been used since antiquity as preservatives, colorants, and flavor enhancers. Spices, which have long been the basis of traditional medicine in many countries, have also been the subject of study, particularly by the chemical, pharmaceutical, and food industries, because of their potential use for improving health. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated how these substances act as antioxidants, digestive stimulants, and hypolipidemics and show antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and anticancerigenic activities. These beneficial physiological effects may also have possible preventative applications in a variety of pathologies. The aim of this review is to present an overview of the potential of spices and aromatic herbs as functional foods.

  13. EPR spectroscopy of spices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. T. Тimakova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available From 01 January 2017 you enter the interstate standard GOST 33271-2015 “Dry Spices, herbs and vegetable seasonings. Manual exposure in order to combat pathogens and other microorganisms” which States that the absorbed dose of radiation to the spices should be from 3 to 30 kGy. The study found that before the introduction of permissive legislative framework in the consumer market of Russia there are irradiated food products (chili, ground chili, ground spicy chili, black pepper. For radiation monitoring of food safety, we used the method of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR, which allows quickly and with a high degree of reliability to establish the fact of irradiation. It is established that all samples of spices irradiated with dose of 12 kGy (technology radappertization gave typical spectra of the signals established by the method of electron paramagnetic resonance in the domestic EPR spectrometer, the intensity, amplitude and peak width of the EPR signal of samples of spices with the increase of irradiation dose increases. It is proven that repeated exposure no effect accumulation. Integration with 2017 Russia in the global practi ce of using radiation technologies of processing of food products and food raw materials with the purpose of extending shelf life confirms the need for a data Bank on the radiation sensitivity of various food products to determine the optimal doses and the eff ect of radiation doses on the shelf life and quality of products.

  14. SPICE and Chaos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik

    1996-01-01

    Can we believe in the results of our circuit simulators ? Is it possible to distinguish between results due to numerical chaos and resultsdue to the eventual chaotic nature of our modelsof physical systems ?. Three experiments with SPICE are presented: (1) A "stable" active RCcircuit with poles i...

  15. Contact allergy to spices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Van den Akker Th. (W.); I.D. Roesyanto-Mahadi (I.); A.W. van Toorenenbergen (Albert); Th. van Joost (Theo)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractA group of 103 patients suspected of contact allergy was tested with the European standard series, wood tars and spices; paprika, cinnamon, laurel, celery seed, nutmeg, curry, black pepper, cloves, while pepper, coriander, cacao and garlic. 32 patients (Group I) were selected on the

  16. MESSENGER SPICE KERNELS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes the complete set of MESSENGER SPICE data files (''kernel files''), which can be accessed using SPICE software. The SPICE data contains...

  17. CASSINI SPICE KERNELS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes the complete set of Cassini SPICE data files (kernel files''), which can be accessed using SPICE software. The SPICE data contains geometric...

  18. NEAR SPICE KERNELS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes the complete set of NEAR SPICE data files (kernel files'), which can be accessed using SPICE software. The SPICE data contain geometric and...

  19. STARDUST SPICE KERNELS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes the complete set of Stardust SPICE data files (kernel files'), which can be accessed using SPICE software. The SPICE data contains geometric...

  20. MSL SPICE KERNELS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes the MSL SPICE data files (kernel files''), which can be accessed using SPICE software. The SPICE data contain geometric and other ancillary...

  1. Evaluation of biogas production potential of kitchen waste in the presence of spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Nidhi; Sharma, Abhinav; Mishra, Priyanka; Chandrashekhar, B; Sharma, Ganesh; Kapley, Atya; Pandey, R A

    2017-12-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) of kitchen waste (KW) for biogas production is a major challenge to all over the world due to significant compositional variations in KW, such as different types and quantities of spices used for preparing food. Spices may affect the AD process owing to their antimicrobial activity. In this paper, the effect of spices (garlic, red chili, cinnamon, coriander, clove, turmeric, cardamom, black pepper) on AD of KW has been investigated. Batch experiments were carried out to determine the maximum biogas production potential, methane production rate and lag phase for biogas production. Analysis of the results revealed different magnitude of inhibition of the AD process of KW in the presence of different spices. Cinnamon, cardamom and clove resulted >85%, black pepper resulted 75%, while coriander, chili, turmeric and garlic resulted 55-70% reduction in cumulative biogas yield. Elemental analysis showed high concentration of heavy metals in the spices, which along with other bioactive components of the spices could be responsible for the inhibitory effect of the spices on biomethanation. Microbial examination of the digestate also showed a decrease in population of fermentative and methanogenic bacteria in the presence of spices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Spicing things up: synthetic cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaderna, Max; Addy, Peter H; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2013-08-01

    Recently, products containing synthetic cannabinoids, collectively referred to as Spice, are increasingly being used recreationally. The availability, acute subjective effects-including self-reports posted on Erowid-laboratory detection, addictive potential, and regulatory challenges of the Spice phenomenon are reviewed. Spice is sold under the guise of potpourri or incense. Unlike delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the synthetic cannabinoids present in Spice are high-potency, high-efficacy, cannabinoid receptor full agonists. Since standard urine toxicology does not test for the synthetic cannabinoids in Spice, it is often used by those who want to avoid detection of drug use. These compounds have not yet been subjected to rigorous testing in humans. Acute psychoactive effects include changes in mood, anxiety, perception, thinking, memory, and attention. Adverse effects include anxiety, agitation, panic, dysphoria, psychosis, and bizarre behavior. Psychosis outcomes associated with Spice provide additional data linking cannabinoids and psychosis. Adverse events necessitating intervention by Poison Control Centers, law enforcement, emergency responders, and hospitals are increasing. Despite statutes prohibiting the manufacture, distribution, and sale of Spice products, manufacturers are replacing banned compounds with newer synthetic cannabinoids that are not banned. There is an urgent need for better research on the effects of synthetic cannabinoids to help clinicians manage adverse events and to better understand cannabinoid pharmacology in humans. The reported psychosis outcomes associated with synthetic cannabinoids contribute to the ongoing debate on the association between cannabinoids and psychosis. Finally, drug detection tests for synthetic cannabinoids need to become clinically available.

  3. Antimicrobial properties of three spices used in the preparation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of Eugenia aromatica (clove), Allium sativum (garlic) and Piper guineense (brown pepper), three spices commonly used in south-western Nigeria, added to growth media at different concentrations were studied with respect to their inhibitory activity against Bacillus cereus, Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus ...

  4. Irradiation of spices and herbs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saul, C.

    1985-01-01

    Changes in the microbiology, chemistry, mutagenicity and sensory of spices due to gamma irradiation are discussed. This process has been shown to be safe and wholesome with no effect on product quality or flavour

  5. Effect of antioxidant rich diets on lipid profile and blood pressure in cardiovascular patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhtar, M.S.; Ashraf, S.; Bhatty, N.; Ahmad, N.

    2006-01-01

    A sample of 200 patients was randomly selected and interviewed. Various data related to their food consumption in previous weeks and other behavioral attitudes were recorded. Their blood pressure was measured and blood was analyzed for total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and triglycerides (TG). Spearman's correlation coefficient was worked out between blood pressure, serum lipid parameters and tea, vitamin C and fibre intake. Tea showed significant correlation with diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (-0.2373; P<0.02), systolic blood pressure (SBP) (-0.2299; P<0.02) and TC (-0.3454; P<0.01). Vitamin C showed a negatively significant correlation with TC (-0.4676; P<0.01), and LDL-C (-2661; P<0.01) and significant positive correlation with HDL-C (+0.2227; P < 0.05). The tea intake was found strongly correlated with blood pressure as compared to vitamin C, while vitamin C had stronger correlation with TC as compared to tea intake. Fibre was not found significantly correlated with any of the studied parameters. A 30-day control trial on 50 subjects revealed that antioxidant therapy during fat-restricted diet period significantly affected blood pressure and serum lipids. Comparative effect showed that lemon juice showed best results. Lemon juice decreased DBP, SBP, TC, TG and increased HDL-C, while tea added with lemon only significantly decreased DBP, SBP and TC. Salad, especially onion, only improved HDL-C and LDLC levels. Vitamin C supplement also significantly lowered DBP, SBP, TC, LDL-C and TG. Tea had negative correlation with blood pressure and TC, while vitamin C has showed relationship with TC, LDL-C and positive with HDL-C. It is conceivable, therefore, that dietary antioxidants cause a significant improvement in blood pressure and serum lipids than vitamin C supplement and simple fat-restricted diets. (author)

  6. Postharvest Processing and Benefits of Black Pepper, Coriander, Cinnamon, Fenugreek, and Turmeric Spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, S; Roselin, P; Singh, K K; Zachariah, John; Saxena, S N

    2016-07-26

    Spices are prime source for flavor, aroma, and taste in cuisines and play an active role as medicines due to their high antioxidant properties. As medicine or food, the importance of spices cannot be overemphasized. The medicinal values of spices are very well established in treating various ailments like cancer, fever, malaria, stomach offset, nausea, and many more. A spice may be available in several forms: fresh, whole dried, or pre-ground dried which requires further processing to be utilized in the form of value-added product. This review paper deals with the cultivation, postharvesting, chemical composition, uses, health, and medicinal benefits of the selected spice viz., black pepper, coriander, cinnamon, fenugreek, turmeric, and technological advances in processing of spices viz., super critical fluid extraction, cryogenic grinding, and microencapsulation etc. This paper also focuses on issues related to utilization of spices toward its high end-product development and characterization in pharmaceuticals and other medicinal purposes. The availability of different spices and their varietal differences and location have their pertinent characters, which are much demanding to refine postharvest and processing to assure its quality in the international market.

  7. ROSETTA SPICE KERNELS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SPICE deals with ancillary data needed to support the planning for, and analysis of, science instrument data. As well as software (the SPICE toolkit) and...

  8. HAYABUSA SPICE KERNELS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes the complete set of Hayabusa SPICE data files (kernel files'') for the surveying and collection phases of the mission. The SPICE data files,...

  9. Irradiation of spices - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadecka, J.

    2007-01-01

    Food irradiation is a process of exposing food to ionising radiation such as gamma rays emitted from the radioisotopes 60Co and 137Cs, or high energy electrons and X-rays produced by machine sources. The use of ionising radiation to destroy harmful biological organisms in food is considered a safe, well proven process that has found many applications. Depending on the absorbed dose of radiation, various effects can be achieved resulting in reduced storage losses, extended shelf life and/or improved microbiological and parasitological safety of foods. The most common irradiated commercial products are spices and vegetable seasonings. Spice irradiation is increasingly recognised as a method that reduces post-harvest losses, ensures hygienic quality, and facilitates trade with food products. This article reviews recent activities concerning food irradiation, focusing on the irradiation of spices and dried vegetable seasonings from the food safety aspect

  10. Spectrophotometric analysis of irradiated spices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josimovic, L.; Cudina, I.

    1987-01-01

    Seven different spices (thyme, cinnamon, coriander, caraway, pimento, paprika, black pepper) were treated by gamma radiation at an absorbed dose of 10 kGy, and the effect on chemical quality was determined. The effects of this dose were assessed by spectrophotometric analysis of some water-soluble constituents of spices (carbohydrates; carbonyl compounds) and on the content of water-insoluble steam-volatile oils. The colour of paprika and the content of piperine in pepper held in different packaging materials were measured in unirradiated and irradiated samples as a function of storage time. In all cases irradiation does not bring about any distinct qualitative or quantitative chemical changes based on spectrophotometric analysis of spice extracts.

  11. Aflatoxin Contamination Detected in Nutrient and Anti-Oxidant Rich Edible Stink Bug Stored in Recycled Grain Containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musundire, Robert; Osuga, Isaac M; Cheseto, Xavier; Irungu, Janet; Torto, Baldwyn

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there has been multi-agency promotion of entomophagy as an environmentally-friendly source of food for the ever increasing human population especially in the developing countries. However, food quality and safety concerns must first be addressed in this context. We addressed these concerns in the present study using the edible stink bug Encosternum delegorguei, which is widely consumed in southern Africa. We analysed for mycotoxins, and health beneficials including antioxidants, amino acids and essential fatty acids using liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-Qtof-MS) and coupled gas chromatography (GC)-MS. We also performed proximate analysis to determine nutritional components. We identified the human carcinogen mycotoxin (aflatoxin B1) at low levels in edible stink bugs that were stored in traditonally woven wooden dung smeared baskets and gunny bags previously used to store cereals. However, it was absent in insects stored in clean zip lock bags. On the other hand, we identified 10 fatty acids, of which 7 are considered essential fatty acids for human nutrition and health; 4 flavonoids and 12 amino acids of which two are considered the most limiting amino acids in cereal based diets. The edible stink bug also contained high crude protein and fats but was a poor source of minerals, except for phosphorus which was found in relatively high levels. Our results show that the edible stink bug is a nutrient- and antioxidant-rich source of food and health benefits for human consumption. As such, use of better handling and storage methods can help eliminate contamination of the edible stink bug with the carcinogen aflatoxin and ensure its safety as human food.

  12. Kaubanduskeskus Spice Riias = Spice shopping centre in Riga

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Riias Lielirbes iela 29 asuva kaubanduskeskuse Spice sisekujundus. Sisearhitekt Aivar Oja (FRA Disain OÜ), kaasa töötas Riin Luuk (Vaikla Disain). Sisearhitektidest, nende tähtsamad tööd. 2 plaani, 7 värv. vaadet, fotod sisearhitektidest

  13. Decontamination of nuts and spices

    Science.gov (United States)

    The social and economic impacts of outbreaks of foodborne illnesses and food recalls connected to consumption of microbiologically contaminated nuts, spices or their products have become important food safety concerns. Initiatives have been undertaken by regulatory and public health agencies, indust...

  14. Improved Properties and Microbiological Safety of Novel Cottage Cheese Containing Spices

    OpenAIRE

    Josipović, Renata; Knežević, Zvonimira Medverec; Frece, Jadranka; Markov, Ksenija; Kazazić, Snježana; Mrvčić, Jasna

    2015-01-01

    The study focuses on developing novel cott age cheese containing spices with acceptable sensory properties, increased biological value and extended shelf life. Thirty types of cheese with added fresh or dried parsley, dill, pepper, garlic and rosemary were produced. Characterisation of phenolic compounds, antioxidant capacity and antibacterial activity of spices and cheese samples were evaluated. The cheese containing fresh pepper and fresh and dried herbs showed excellent sensory properties,...

  15. [Microbiological study of spices. I. Oregano].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, J E; Krivoruchco, D D; Mitschele, O J

    1984-01-01

    A total of 150 oregano samples from 6 different trade marks were studied. These samples were obtained at retail shops in Buenos Aires city and they were analyzed in order to determine the presence of the following microorganisms: 1) mesophilic aerobic plate count; 2) molds; 3) coliforms and fecal coliforms; 4) enterococci; 5) aerobes sporeforming: a) mesophilic aerobes; a1) total aerobes; a2) mesophilic anaerobes; b) thermophilic; b1) sulfide spoilage sporeformers; b2) total aerobes; b3) thermo-philic Flat sour; 6) pathogens; 6a) Clostridium perfringens 6b) Bacillus cereus and 6c) Staphylococcus aureus. We can conclude from these results that there is no apparent risk for public health. Nevertheless the microbiologic evaluation of the spices becomes important when they are added to packed foodstuff which has not received a minimum thermic treatment.

  16. Effects of irradiation upon spices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-04-01

    ESR studies were performed on untreated and irradiated samples of paprika powder, ground black pepper, and a spice mixture of the following composition: paprika, 55%; black pepper, 14%; allspice, 9%; coriander, 9%; marjoram, 7%; cumin, 4%; and nutmeg, 2%. Gamma radiation doses from 0.5 to 5 Mrad were applied. In the case of paprika samples, the effect of moisture content on the formation and disappearance of radiation-induced free radicals was also investigated. Shortly after irradiation (on the day of radiation treatment) high amounts of free radicals were detected in irradiated spice samples but they diminished upon storage. After a period of 3 months the ESR signals of the irradiated samples approximated those of the controls. The free radicals found in unirradiated ground spices did not disappear during a storage period as long as one year. The formation and disappearance of radiation-induced free radicals were found to be strongly affected by the moisture content of samples. If a sample of low moisture content containing a high free radical concentration after irradiation was placed in an atmosphere of higher moisture content, the free radicals decayed rapidly.

  17. Indian Spices for Healthy Heart - An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Vasanthi, Hannah R; Parameswari, R.P

    2010-01-01

    Spices were some of the most valuable items of trade in the ancient and medieval world. Herbalist and folk practitioners have used plant remedies for centuries, but only recently have scientist begun to study the powers of common herbs and spices. In the current set-up, the anti-proliferative, anti-hypercholesterolemic, anti-diabetic, anti-inflammatory effects of spices have overriding importance, as the key health concern of mankind nowadays is diabetes, cardio-vascular diseases, arthritis a...

  18. Spice Tools Supporting Planetary Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, C.; Bachman, N.; Semenov, B.; Wright, E.

    2016-06-01

    NASA's "SPICE"* ancillary information system has gradually become the de facto international standard for providing scientists the fundamental observation geometry needed to perform photogrammetry, map making and other kinds of planetary science data analysis. SPICE provides position and orientation ephemerides of both the robotic spacecraft and the target body; target body size and shape data; instrument mounting alignment and field-of-view geometry; reference frame specifications; and underlying time system conversions. SPICE comprises not only data, but also a large suite of software, known as the SPICE Toolkit, used to access those data and subsequently compute derived quantities-items such as instrument viewing latitude/longitude, lighting angles, altitude, etc. In existence since the days of the Magellan mission to Venus, the SPICE system has continuously grown to better meet the needs of scientists and engineers. For example, originally the SPICE Toolkit was offered only in Fortran 77, but is now available in C, IDL, MATLAB, and Java Native Interface. SPICE calculations were originally available only using APIs (subroutines), but can now be executed using a client-server interface to a geometry engine. Originally SPICE "products" were only available in numeric form, but now SPICE data visualization is also available. The SPICE components are free of cost, license and export restrictions. Substantial tutorials and programming lessons help new users learn to employ SPICE calculations in their own programs. The SPICE system is implemented and maintained by the Navigation and Ancillary Information Facility (NAIF)-a component of NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS). * Spacecraft, Planet, Instrument, Camera-matrix, Events

  19. NEW HORIZONS SPICE KERNELS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes the complete set of New Horizons (NH) SPICE data files (kernel files'), which can be accessed using SPICE software. The SPICE data contain...

  20. MARS EXPLORATION ROVER 2 SPICE KERNELS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes the complete set of Mars Exploration Rover 2 SPICE data files (kernel files'), which can be accessed using SPICE software. The SPICE data...

  1. ROSETTA ORBITER/LANDER SPICE KERNELS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes the complete set of Rosetta mission SPICE data files (kernel files''), which can be accessed using SPICE software. The SPICE data contains...

  2. MGS MARS SPICE KERNELS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes the complete set of Mars Global Surveyor SPICE data files (kernel files''), which can be accessed using SPICE software. The SPICE data...

  3. MARS EXPLORATION ROVER 1 SPICE KERNELS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes the complete set of Mars Exploration Rover 1 SPICE data files (kernel files''), which can be accessed using SPICE software. The SPICE data...

  4. DEEP SPACE 1 SPICE KERNELS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes the complete set of Deep Space 1 (DS1) SPICE data files (kernel files''), which can be accessed using SPICE software. The SPICE data contains...

  5. CLEMENTINE MOON SPICE KERNELS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes the complete set of Clementine SPICE data files (kernel files''), which can be accessed using SPICE software. The SPICE data contains...

  6. Influence of the Addition of Selected Spices on Sensory Quality and Biological Activity of Honey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Wilczyńska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bee honey is nutritious and has numerous health benefits, but its taste is for many people too bland. Honey with addition of spices could be important to the food industry as a functional product with positive health image and interesting taste. Such product would definitely meet health-driven consumers’ expectations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of addition of selected spices on sensory, antimicrobial, and antioxidant properties of honey. Results showed that the addition of spices significantly affected the taste and the smell of honey (p<0,05 and that honey with the cinnamon was the most desired and easily accepted product by the consumers. The addition of spices had no significant effect on texture and appearance. All tested samples showed the ability to inhibit the growth of bacteria and, contrary to the assumptions, the addition of spices did not cause an increase of antimicrobial activity. The results also showed that the kind and amount of added spice significantly affected the antioxidant activity: ability to scavenge free radicals and total phenolics content. The highest antioxidant activity revealed the honey with cinnamon and the lowest revealed the honey with cardamom addition.

  7. Biochemical and microbiological quality of spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattar, A.; Mahmood, F.; Wahid, M.; Jan, M.; Khan, I.

    1988-06-01

    The spoilage of spices is generally due to microbial contamination as well as development of off-favours due to oxidation of oils. This research was conducted to investigate the influence of irradiation doses (2-10 KGy) on bacterial and fungal contamination as well as col colour and volatile components during storage of spices. The influence of different gamma radiation doses on total mould count of spices such as turmeric, coriander, chilies, cumin and black pepper, was determined and the results are presented. The effect of irradiation on total bacterial counts of these spices is presented. The dose of 10 KGy decreased the bacterial counts to either undetectable or very low levels in various spices. (orig./A.B.)

  8. Spice phenolics inhibit human PMNL 5-lipoxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, N Satya; Raghavendra, R; Lokesh, B R; Naidu, K Akhilender

    2004-06-01

    A wide variety of phenolic compounds and flavonoids present in spices possess potent antioxidant, antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic activities. We examined whether 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), the key enzyme involved in biosynthesis of leukotrienes is a possible target for the spices. Effect of aqueous extracts of turmeric, cloves, pepper, chili, cinnamon, onion and also their respective active principles viz., curcumin, eugenol, piperine, capsaicin, cinnamaldehyde, quercetin, and allyl sulfide were tested on human PMNL 5-LO activity by spectrophotomeric and HPLC methods. The formation of 5-LO product 5-HETE was significantly inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner with IC(50) values of 0.122-1.44 mg for aqueous extracts of spices and 25-83 microM for active principles, respectively. The order of inhibitory activity was of quercetin>eugenol>curcumin>cinnamaldehyde>piperine>capsaicin>allyl sulfide. Quercetin, eugenol and curcumin with one or more phenolic ring and methoxy groups in their structure showed high inhibitory effect, while the non-phenolic spice principle allyl sulfide showed least inhibitory effect on 5-LO. The inhibitory effect of quercetin, curcumin and eugenol was similar to that of synthetic 5-LO inhibitors-phenidone and NDGA. Moreover, the inhibitory potency of aqueous extracts of spice correlated with the active principles of their respective spices. The synergistic or antagonistic effect of mixtures of spice active principles and spice extracts were investigated and all the combinations of spice active principles/extracts exerted synergistic effect in inhibiting 5-LO activity. These findings clearly suggest that phenolic compounds present in spices might have physiological role in modulating 5-LO pathway.

  9. The total antioxidant content of more than 3100 foods, beverages, spices, herbs and supplements used worldwide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barikmo Ingrid

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A plant-based diet protects against chronic oxidative stress-related diseases. Dietary plants contain variable chemical families and amounts of antioxidants. It has been hypothesized that plant antioxidants may contribute to the beneficial health effects of dietary plants. Our objective was to develop a comprehensive food database consisting of the total antioxidant content of typical foods as well as other dietary items such as traditional medicine plants, herbs and spices and dietary supplements. This database is intended for use in a wide range of nutritional research, from in vitro and cell and animal studies, to clinical trials and nutritional epidemiological studies. Methods We procured samples from countries worldwide and assayed the samples for their total antioxidant content using a modified version of the FRAP assay. Results and sample information (such as country of origin, product and/or brand name were registered for each individual food sample and constitute the Antioxidant Food Table. Results The results demonstrate that there are several thousand-fold differences in antioxidant content of foods. Spices, herbs and supplements include the most antioxidant rich products in our study, some exceptionally high. Berries, fruits, nuts, chocolate, vegetables and products thereof constitute common foods and beverages with high antioxidant values. Conclusions This database is to our best knowledge the most comprehensive Antioxidant Food Database published and it shows that plant-based foods introduce significantly more antioxidants into human diet than non-plant foods. Because of the large variations observed between otherwise comparable food samples the study emphasizes the importance of using a comprehensive database combined with a detailed system for food registration in clinical and epidemiological studies. The present antioxidant database is therefore an essential research tool to further elucidate the potential

  10. The total antioxidant content of more than 3100 foods, beverages, spices, herbs and supplements used worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Monica H; Halvorsen, Bente L; Holte, Kari; Bøhn, Siv K; Dragland, Steinar; Sampson, Laura; Willey, Carol; Senoo, Haruki; Umezono, Yuko; Sanada, Chiho; Barikmo, Ingrid; Berhe, Nega; Willett, Walter C; Phillips, Katherine M; Jacobs, David R; Blomhoff, Rune

    2010-01-22

    A plant-based diet protects against chronic oxidative stress-related diseases. Dietary plants contain variable chemical families and amounts of antioxidants. It has been hypothesized that plant antioxidants may contribute to the beneficial health effects of dietary plants. Our objective was to develop a comprehensive food database consisting of the total antioxidant content of typical foods as well as other dietary items such as traditional medicine plants, herbs and spices and dietary supplements. This database is intended for use in a wide range of nutritional research, from in vitro and cell and animal studies, to clinical trials and nutritional epidemiological studies. We procured samples from countries worldwide and assayed the samples for their total antioxidant content using a modified version of the FRAP assay. Results and sample information (such as country of origin, product and/or brand name) were registered for each individual food sample and constitute the Antioxidant Food Table. The results demonstrate that there are several thousand-fold differences in antioxidant content of foods. Spices, herbs and supplements include the most antioxidant rich products in our study, some exceptionally high. Berries, fruits, nuts, chocolate, vegetables and products thereof constitute common foods and beverages with high antioxidant values. This database is to our best knowledge the most comprehensive Antioxidant Food Database published and it shows that plant-based foods introduce significantly more antioxidants into human diet than non-plant foods. Because of the large variations observed between otherwise comparable food samples the study emphasizes the importance of using a comprehensive database combined with a detailed system for food registration in clinical and epidemiological studies. The present antioxidant database is therefore an essential research tool to further elucidate the potential health effects of phytochemical antioxidants in diet.

  11. Antioxidant capacity of vegetables, spices and dressings relevant to nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninfali, Paolino; Mea, Gloria; Giorgini, Samantha; Rocchi, Marco; Bacchiocca, Mara

    2005-02-01

    Vegetables are the most important sources of phenolics in the Mediterranean diet. Phenolics, especially flavonoids, are suggested as being essential bioactive compounds providing health benefits. In this study, twenty-seven vegetables, fifteen aromatic herbs and some spices consumed in Central Italy (the Marches region) were studied to reveal total phenolic, flavonoid and flavanol content as well as their antioxidant capacity measured by the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) method. A comparison in terms of antioxidant capacity was made between different salads, as well as between salads to which aromatic herbs had been added. Lemon balm and marjoram at a concentration of 1.5 % w/w increased by 150 % and 200 % respectively the antioxidant capacity of a salad portion. A 200 g portion of a salad enriched with marjoram corresponded to an intake of 200 (SD 10) mg phenolics and 4000 (SD 300) ORAC units (micromol Trolox equivalents). Olive oils and wine or apple vinegars were the salad dressings that provided the highest increase in antioxidant capacity. Among the spices tested, cumin and fresh ginger made the most significant contribution to the antioxidant capacity. The results are useful in surveying the antioxidant parameters of vegetables, herbs and spices produced and consumed in our geographical area as well as in quantifying the daily intake of phenolics and ORAC units. The results can be used in public health campaigns to stimulate the consumption of vegetables able to provide significant health protection in order to prevent chronic diseases.

  12. Indian spices for healthy heart - an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasanthi, Hannah R; Parameswari, R P

    2010-11-01

    Spices were some of the most valuable items of trade in the ancient and medieval world. Herbalist and folk practitioners have used plant remedies for centuries, but only recently have scientist begun to study the powers of common herbs and spices. In the current set-up, the anti-proliferative, anti-hypercholesterolemic, anti-diabetic, anti-inflammatory effects of spices have overriding importance, as the key health concern of mankind nowadays is diabetes, cardio-vascular diseases, arthritis and cancer. Spices or their active compounds could be used as possible ameliorative or preventive agents for these health disorders. Spices are rich in antioxidants, and scientific studies suggest that they are also potent inhibitors of tissue damage and inflammation caused by high levels of blood sugar and circulating lipids. Because spices have very low calorie content and are relatively inexpensive, they are reliable sources of antioxidants and other potential bioactive compounds in diet. This review outlines the role of some spices used in the Indian kitchen for its flavour and taste which are potential to maintain a healthy heart.

  13. Radurization of spices by irradiation in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez Gil, M.; Rodriguez, M.; Prieto, E.; Pino, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the research results that prove the technical feasibility according to the hygiene conditions existing in Cuba for irradiating different spices. The results show both the possibility and and the benefit of using a one irradiation application to these products. One global average doses of 5 KGy was enough for decontaminating black pepper, paprika, cumin, must meg and oregano without affecting either their chemical components or the quality of their taste. Sausages manufactured with irradiated spices did not irradiating spices is much higher that of fumigation, et has many important social and economic advantages

  14. Spices in the management of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xinyan; Lim, Joseph; Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar

    2017-02-15

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) remains a major health care problem worldwide both in developing and developed countries. Many factors, including age, obesity, sex, and diet, are involved in the etiology of DM. Nowadays, drug and dietetic therapies are the two major approaches used for prevention and control of DM. Compared to drug therapy, a resurgence of interest in using diet to manage and treat DM has emerged in recent years. Conventional dietary methods to treat DM include the use of culinary herbs and/or spices. Spices have long been known for their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-diabetic properties. This review explores the anti-diabetic properties of commonly used spices, such as cinnamon, ginger, turmeric, and cumin, and the use of these spices for prevention and management of diabetes and associated complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Medieval European medicine and Asian spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jong Kuk

    2014-08-01

    This article aimed to explain the reasons why Asian spices including pepper, ginger, and cinnamon were considered as special and valuable drugs with curative powers in the Medieval Europe. Among these spices, pepper was most widely and frequently used as medicine according to medieval medical textbooks. We analyzed three main pharmacology books written during the Middle Ages. One of the main reasons that oriental spices were widely used as medicine was due to the particular medieval medical system fundamentally based on the humoral theory invented by Hippocrates and Galen. This theory was modified by Arab physicians and imported to Europe during the Middle Ages. According to this theory, health is determined by the balance of the following four humors which compose the human body: blood, yellow bile, black bile, and phlegm. Each humor has its own qualities such as cold, hot, wet, and dry. Humoral imbalance was one of the main causes of disease, so it was important to have humoral equilibrium. Asian spices with hot and dry qualities were used to balance the cold and wet European diet. The analysis of several major medical textbooks of the Middle Ages proves that most of the oriental spices with hot and dry qualities were employed to cure diverse diseases, particularly those caused by coldness and humidity. However, it should be noted that the oriental spices were considered to be much more valuable and effective as medicines than the local medicinal ingredients, which were not only easily procured but also were relatively cheap. Europeans mystified oriental spices, with the belief that they have marvelous and mysterious healing powers. Such mystification was related to the terrestrial Paradise. They believed that the oriental spices were grown in Paradise which was located in the Far East and were brought to the Earthly world along the four rivers flowing from the Paradise.

  16. Spices Coffee : Innovation Strategy To Increase Quality On Powder Coffee Farmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, I. T.; Indah, P. N.; Widayanti, S.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the study is a) to analyze the condition of internal environment industry spices coffee, b) to analyze the condition of the external environment industry spices coffee, and c) to determine the technological innovation strategy spices coffee in order to improve the competitiveness of the coffee people. Most of the coffee grown in Tutur district is cultivated by smallholder farms, resulting in low quality. The strategy of coffee spice agro-industry aims to increase the added value of the products so that farmers obtain higher coffee prices. Activities include the provision of raw materials, processing, supply of final products, and marketing.The results showed that the internal environmental conditions that have the highest value is the strengthen factors. The highest score of strengthen factors is the availability of coffee, availability of labor and communications group. The highest score of opportunity factors is technological assistance from the government and other government support for the development of people’s coffee industry and high market potential. The development of agrotourism should improve as well as expand the network to seize market. The strategy should be applied in the development of spices coffee industry is to support aggressive growth (Growth-oriented strategy).

  17. Antioxidant-rich leaf extract of Barringtonia racemosa significantly alters the in vitro expression of genes encoding enzymes that are involved in methylglyoxal degradation III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Kin Weng; Abdul Aziz, Azlina; Razali, Nurhanani; Aminuddin, Norhaniza; Mat Junit, Sarni

    2016-01-01

    Barringtonia racemosa is a medicinal plant belonging to the Lecythidaceae family. The water extract of B. racemosa leaf (BLE) has been shown to be rich in polyphenols. Despite the diverse medicinal properties of B. racemosa, information on its major biological effects and the underlying molecular mechanisms are still lacking. In this study, the effect of the antioxidant-rich BLE on gene expression in HepG2 cells was investigated using microarray analysis in order to shed more light on the molecular mechanism associated with the medicinal properties of the plant. Microarray analysis showed that a total of 138 genes were significantly altered in response to BLE treatment (p Degradation III followed by VDR/RXR activation, TR/RXR activation, PXR/RXR activation and gluconeogenesis. The expression of genes that encode for enzymes involved in methylglyoxal degradation (ADH4, AKR1B10 and AKR1C2) and glycolytic process (ENO3, ALDOC and SLC2A1) was significantly regulated. Owing to the Warburg effect, aerobic glycolysis in cancer cells may increase the level of methylglyoxal, a cytotoxic compound. BLE has the potential to be developed into a novel chemopreventive agent provided that the cytotoxic effects related to methylglyoxal accumulation are minimized in normal cells that rely on aerobic glycolysis for energy supply.

  18. Protective effect of antioxidant rich aqueous curry leaf (Murraya koenigii extract against gastro-toxic effects of piroxicam in male Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Benazir Firdaus

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Piroxicam (chemically 4-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-2-pyridinyl-2H-1,2-benzothiazine-3-carboxamide, a classical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID is orally administered to arthritic patients. Inhibition of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 synthesis and subsequent free hydroxyl radical generation in vivo exert gastro-toxic side effects on piroxicam treatment. Leaves of curry plant are rich in antioxidants with prolific free radical scavenging activities. This led us to investigate the efficiency of the use of curry leaves in ameliorating piroxicam induced gastric damage. Piroxicam was orally (30 mg per kg body weight administered in male albino Wistar rats to generate gastric ulcers. These rats were orally fed with graded doses of aqueous extract of curry or Murraya koenigii leaves (Cu LE prior to piroxicam administration. Oxidative stress biomarkers, activities of antioxidant and pro-oxidant enzymes, mucin content and nature, PGE2 level, activities of mitochondrial enzymes and histomorphology of gastric tissues were studied. Piroxicam treatment altered all the above mentioned parameters whereas, curry leaf extract pre-treated animals were protected against piroxicam induced alterations. Hence, the protective action of the antioxidant rich Cu LE was investigated to propose a new combination therapy or dietary management to arthritic patients using piroxicam.

  19. MARS EXPRESS SPICE KERNELS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SPICE deals with ancillary data needed to support the planning for, and analysis of, science instrument data. As well as software (the SPICE toolkit) and...

  20. Antibacterial and Antifungal Activities of Spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Meng, Xiao; Li, Ya; Zhao, Cai-Ning; Tang, Guo-Yi; Li, Hua-Bin

    2017-06-16

    Infectious diseases caused by pathogens and food poisoning caused by spoilage microorganisms are threatening human health all over the world. The efficacies of some antimicrobial agents, which are currently used to extend shelf-life and increase the safety of food products in food industry and to inhibit disease-causing microorganisms in medicine, have been weakened by microbial resistance. Therefore, new antimicrobial agents that could overcome this resistance need to be discovered. Many spices-such as clove, oregano, thyme, cinnamon, and cumin-possessed significant antibacterial and antifungal activities against food spoilage bacteria like Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas fluorescens , pathogens like Staphylococcus aureus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus, harmful fungi like Aspergillus flavus, even antibiotic resistant microorganisms such as methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Therefore, spices have a great potential to be developed as new and safe antimicrobial agents. This review summarizes scientific studies on the antibacterial and antifungal activities of several spices and their derivatives.

  1. Antimicrobial functions of spices: why some like it hot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billing, J; Sherman, P W

    1998-03-01

    Although spices have been important for centuries in food preparation throughout the world, patterns of spice use differ considerably among cultures and countries. What factors underlie these differences? Why are spices used at all? To investigate these questions, we quantified the frequency of use of 43 spices in the meat-based cuisines of the 36 countries for which we could locate traditional cookbooks. A total of 4578 recipes from 93 cookbooks was analysed. We also complied information on the temperature and precipitation in each country, the ranges of spice plants, and the antibacterial properties of each spice. These data were used to investigate the hypothesis that spices inhibit or kill food-spoilage microorganisms. In support of this is the fact that spice plant secondary compounds are powerful antimicrobial (i.e., antibacterial and antifungal) agents. As mean annual temperatures (an indicator of relative spoilage rates of unrefrigerated foods) increased, the proportion of recipes containing spices, number of spices per recipe, total number of spices used, and use of the most potent antibacterial spices all increased, both within and among countries. Likewise, the estimated fraction of bacterial species inhibited per recipe in each country was positively correlated with annual temperature. Several alternative hypotheses were considered--that spices provide macronutrients, disguise the taste and smell of spoiled foods, or increase perspiration and thus evaporative cooling; it also is conceivable that spice use provides no benefits. However, none of these four alternatives was well supported by our data. The proximate reason spices are used obviously is to enhance food palatability. But the ultimate reason is most likely that spices help cleanse foods of pathogens and thereby contribute to the health, longevity and reproductive success of people who find their flavors enjoyable.

  2. Sauces, spices, and condiments: definitions, potential benefits, consumption patterns, and global markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Casal, Maria Nieves; Peña-Rosas, Juan Pablo; Malavé, Heber Gómez-

    2016-09-01

    Spices and condiments are an important part of human history and nutrition, and have played an important role in the development of most cultures around the world. According to the Codex Alimentarius, the category of salts, spices, soups, sauces, salads, and protein products includes substances added to foods to enhance aroma and taste. Spices have been reported to have health benefits as antioxidant, antibiotic, antiviral, anticoagulant, anticarcinogenic, and anti-inflammatory agents. Health claims about the benefits of condiments for disease prevention or health improvement need to be science based and extensively supported by evidence; data on their preventive or protective potential in humans are currently limited. The condiments market has been growing continuously over the last few years, with the quantity of products sold under the category of sauces, dressings, and condiments during the period 2008-2013 increasing from 31,749,000 to 35,795,000 metric tons. About 50 of the 86 spices produced in the world are grown in India. From 2008 to 2013, the United States was the largest importer of spices, followed by Australia, the United Kingdom, Canada, and Russia. The main buyers of fish sauce are Vietnam and Thailand, with purchases of 333,000 and 284,000 metric tons in 2013, respectively. The sauces and condiments category is dynamic, with large differences in consumption in habits and practices among countries. This paper aims to establish definitions and discuss potential health benefits, consumption patterns, and global markets for sauces, spices, and condiments. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  3. Metabolic effects of spices, teas, and caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet; Diepvens, Kristel; Joosen, Annemiek M C P; Bérubé-Parent, Sonia; Tremblay, Angelo

    2006-08-30

    Consumption of spiced foods or herbal drinks leads to greater thermogenesis and in some cases to greater satiety. In this regard, capsaicin, black pepper, ginger, mixed spices, green tea, black tea and caffeine are relevant examples. These functional ingredients have the potential to produce significant effects on metabolic targets such as satiety, thermogenesis, and fat oxidation. A significant clinical outcome sometimes may appear straightforwardly but also depends too strongly on full compliance of subjects. Nevertheless, thermogenic ingredients may be considered as functional agents that could help in preventing a positive energy balance and obesity.

  4. Forest Spices Market in Anambra State, Nigeria | Ezedinma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The markets for different category of spices were compared in rural and urban markets of Anambra State, Nigeria. Forest spices command low prices and is affected by seasonal price fluctuations. Imported and processed spices command higher and relatively constant seasonal prices. Evidence therefore suggests that the ...

  5. Sterilization of ground prepacked Indian spices by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munasiri, M.A.; Parte, M.N.; Ghanekar, A.S.; Sharma, A.; Padwal Desai, S.R.; Nadkarni, G.B.

    1987-01-01

    A study assessed the efficacy of irradiation for disinfection of 4 prepacked ground dry Indian spices (chilli, coriander, pepper, and turmeric) that were found to be highly contaminated with bacteria and molds. A 10-kGy irradiation dose effectively killed these contaminants without altering spice quality. The irradiated spices retained their quality over a 6-month storage period

  6. Influence of heat sterilization on the organoleptic quality of spices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maarse, H.; Nijssen, L.M.; Nowak, M.

    1982-01-01

    Heat sterilization and storage of food products containing spices often results in a change of their organoleptic quality. Our knowledge about the stability of individual spices, however, is low. Therefore the heat stability of 8 different spices most frequently used has been investigated: cinnamon,

  7. Antioxidant-rich leaf extract of Barringtonia racemosa significantly alters the in vitro expression of genes encoding enzymes that are involved in methylglyoxal degradation III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kin Weng Kong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Barringtonia racemosa is a medicinal plant belonging to the Lecythidaceae family. The water extract of B. racemosa leaf (BLE has been shown to be rich in polyphenols. Despite the diverse medicinal properties of B. racemosa, information on its major biological effects and the underlying molecular mechanisms are still lacking. Methods In this study, the effect of the antioxidant-rich BLE on gene expression in HepG2 cells was investigated using microarray analysis in order to shed more light on the molecular mechanism associated with the medicinal properties of the plant. Results Microarray analysis showed that a total of 138 genes were significantly altered in response to BLE treatment (p < 0.05 with a fold change difference of at least 1.5. SERPINE1 was the most significantly up-regulated gene at 2.8-fold while HAMP was the most significantly down-regulated gene at 6.5-fold. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA revealed that “Cancer, cell death and survival, cellular movement” was the top network affected by the BLE with a score of 44. The top five canonical pathways associated with BLE were Methylglyoxal Degradation III followed by VDR/RXR activation, TR/RXR activation, PXR/RXR activation and gluconeogenesis. The expression of genes that encode for enzymes involved in methylglyoxal degradation (ADH4, AKR1B10 and AKR1C2 and glycolytic process (ENO3, ALDOC and SLC2A1 was significantly regulated. Owing to the Warburg effect, aerobic glycolysis in cancer cells may increase the level of methylglyoxal, a cytotoxic compound. Conclusions BLE has the potential to be developed into a novel chemopreventive agent provided that the cytotoxic effects related to methylglyoxal accumulation are minimized in normal cells that rely on aerobic glycolysis for energy supply.

  8. Antioxidant-Rich Fraction of Urtica dioica Mediated Rescue of Striatal Mito-Oxidative Damage in MPTP-Induced Behavioral, Cellular, and Neurochemical Alterations in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, Rohit; Joshi, Bhuwan Chandra; Kalia, Ajudhiya Nath; Prakash, Atish

    2017-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) having a complex and multi-factorial neuropathology includes mainly the degeneration of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway, which is a cumulative effect of depleted endogenous antioxidant enzymes, increased oxidative DNA damage, mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, and neuroinflammation. The present study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective effect of a potent antioxidant from Urtica dioica in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) model of parkinsonism. MPTP was administered intranigrally for the induction of PD in male Wistar rats. Behavioral alterations were assessed in between the study period. Animals were sacrificed immediately after behavioral session, and different biochemical, cellular, and neurochemical parameters were measured. Intranigrally repeated administration of MPTP showed significant impairment of motor co-ordination and marked increase of mito-oxidative damage and neuroinflammation in rats. Intranigral MPTP significantly decreases the dopamine and its metabolites with impairment of dopaminergic cell density in rat brain. However, post-treatment with the potent antioxidant fraction of Urtica dioica Linn. (UD) (20, 40, 80 mg/kg) improved the motor function, mito-oxidative defense alteration significantly and dose dependently in MPTP-treated rats. In addition, the potent antioxidant fraction of UD attenuated the pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-β) and restored the level of dopamine and its metabolites in MPTP-induced PD in rats. Moreover, minocycline (30 mg/kg) with lower dose of UD (20 mg/kg) had significantly potentiated the protective effect of minocycline as compared to its effect with other individual drug-treated groups. In conclusion, Urtica dioica protected the dopaminergic neurons probably by reducing mito-oxidative damage, neuroinflammation, and cellular alteration along with enhanced neurotrophic potential. The above results revealed that the antioxidant rich

  9. FDSAC-SPICE: fault diagnosis software for analog circuit based on SPICE simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yiqin; Cen, Zhao-Hui; Wei, Jiao-Long

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents a novel fault diagnosis software (called FDSAC-SPICE) based on SPICE simulator for analog circuits. Four important techniques in AFDS-SPICE, including visual user-interface(VUI), component modeling and fault modeling (CMFM), fault injection and fault simulation (FIFS), fault dictionary and fault diagnosis (FDFD), greatly increase design-for-test and diagnosis efficiency of analog circuit by building a fault modeling-injection-simulationdiagnosis environment to get prior fault knowledge of target circuit. AFDS-SPICE also generates accurate fault coverage statistics that are tied to the circuit specifications. With employing a dictionary diagnosis method based on node-signalcharacters and regular BPNN algorithm, more accurate and effective diagnosis results are available for analog circuit with tolerance.

  10. Experience with spice teaching power electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2009-01-01

    A free Spice version allowing general circuit simulation is used teaching power electronics. There is no lock on the circuit size, stabile and user friendly operation is experienced. A collection of transformer, converter and drive system models are implemented to investigate the usability...

  11. 21 CFR 133.190 - Spiced cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable ingredients may be used: (1) Dairy ingredients. Milk, nonfat milk, or cream, as defined in § 133.3, or corresponding products of goat or sheep origin, used..., used as a coagulation aid. (iii) Salt. (iv) Spice oils which do not, alone or in combination with other...

  12. Experience with spice teaching power electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2009-01-01

    A free Spice version allowing general circuit simulation is used teaching power electronics. There is no lock on the circuit size, stabile and user friendly operation is experienced. A collection of transformer, converter and drive system models are implemented to investigate the usability...... of the programme in high power electronics....

  13. Spices: Therapeutic Potential in Cardiovascular Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Subha; Pandey, Madan Mohan; Rawat, Ajay Kumar Singh

    2017-01-01

    Dietary factors play a key role in the development as well as prevention of certain human diseases, including cardiovascular diseases. Currently there has been an increase in global interest to identify medicinal plants that are pharmacologically effective and have low or no side effects for use in preventive medicine. Culinary herbs and spices are an important part of human nutrition in all the cultures of the world. There is a growing amount of literature concerning the potential benefits of these herbs and spices from a health perspective especially in conferring protection against cardiovascular diseases. The objective of this review is to provide information on the recent scientific findings on some common spices that have a distinct place in folk medicine in several of the Asian countries as well as on their traditional uses for the role they can play in the management of heart diseases and which may be useful in defining cost effective and inexpensive interventions for the prevention and control of CVDs. Systematic literature searches were carried out and the available information on various medicinal plants traditionally used for cardiovascular disorders was collected via electronic search (using Pubmed, SciFinder, Scirus, GoogleScholar, JCCC@INSTIRC and Web of Science) and a library search for articles published in peerreviewed journals. No restrictions regarding the language of publication were imposed. This article highlights the recent scientific findings on four common spices viz. Greater cardamom (Amomum subulatum Roxb.), Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.), Turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) and Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe), for the role they can play in the management of heart diseases. Although they have been used by many cultures since ancient times and have been known to exhibit several medicinal properties, current research shows that they can also be effectively used for the prevention and control of CVDs. Although scientific evidences supporting

  14. Mycotoxins in spices and herbs-An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabak, Bulent; Dobson, Alan D W

    2017-01-02

    Spices and herbs have been used since ancient times as flavor and aroma enhancers, colorants, preservatives, and traditional medicines. There are more than 30 spices and herbs of global economic and culinary importance. Among the spices, black pepper, capsicums, cumin, cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, turmeric, saffron, coriander, cloves, dill, mint, thyme, sesame seed, mustard seed, and curry powder are the most popular spices worldwide. In addition to their culinary uses, a number of functional properties of aromatic herbs and spices are also well described in the scientific literature. However, spices and herbs cultivated mainly in tropic and subtropic areas can be exposed to contamination with toxigenic fungi and subsequently mycotoxins. This review provides an overview on the mycotoxin risk in widely consumed spices and aromatic herbs.

  15. The effects spicing on quality of mozzarella cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Akarca

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 3 different spice mixes were added just after blanching to mozzarella cheese produced by high moisture production method. The dough was kneaded and filled into to fibrous cases. After filling process, cheeses were stored for 28 days at 4 °C and 85 % of relative humidity. The following characteristics were measured: color parameters, milk acidity, total dry matter, maturation index, total aerobic mesophilic bacteria, coliform bacteria, coagulase positive staphylococci, lactic acid bacteria, species of Lactococcus bacteria, proteolytic bacteria, lipolytic bacteria and mold /yeast count were examined on 0, 5, 15,21 and 28 days after storage. Although L* (lightness and a* (redness values decreased during storage period, while moreover b* (yellowness values increased. In addition acidity, dry matter and maturation index values increased during storage. Total aerobic mesophilic bacteria, lactic acid bacteria, Lactococcus spp., lipolytic bacteria and mold/ yeast counts decreased, but proteolytic bacteria count increased.

  16. Protective Effects of Indian Spice Curcumin Against Amyloid Beta in Alzheimer’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, P. Hemachandra; Manczak, Maria; Yin, Xiangling; Grady, Mary Catherine; Mitchell, Andrew; Tonk, Sahil; Kuruva, Chandra Sekhar; Bhatti, Jasvinder Singh; Kandimalla, Ramesh; Vijayan, Murali; Kumar, Subodh; Wang, Rui; Adi Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli; Ogunmokun, Gilbert; Thamarai, Kavya

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of our article is to assess the current understanding of Indian spice ‘Curcumin’ against amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced toxicity in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. Natural products, such as ginger, curcumin and gingko biloba have been used as diets and dietary supplements to treat human diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular, respiratory, infectious, diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndromes and neurological disorders. Products derived from plants are known to have protective effe...

  17. SPICE: An innovative, flexible instrument concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Kenji; Cauffman, D. P.; Jurcevich, B.; Mendez, David J.; Ryder, James T.

    Studies and plans for orbital capture of cosmic dust and interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) looked very bright with the advent of space station Freedom (SSF) and formal selection of Cosmic Dust Collection Facility (CDCF) as an attached payload in 1990. Unfortunately it has been downhill since its selection, culminating in CDCF being dropped as attached payload in the SSF redesign process this year. This action was without any input from the science or cosmic dust communities. The Exobiology Intact Capture Experiment (Exo-ICE) as an experiment on CDCF was also lost. Without CDCF, no facility-class instrument for cosmic dust studies is available or planned. When CDCF (and Exo-ICE) was selected as a SSF attached payload, an exercise called the small particle intact capture experiment (SPICE) was started for Exo-ICE to develop an understanding and early testing of the necessary expertise and technology for intact capture of cosmic dust and IDP's. This SPICE activity looks to fly small, meter square or less, collection area experiments on early orbital platforms of opportunity such as EURECA, MIR, WESTAR, and others, including the shuttle. The SPICE activity has focused on developing techniques and instrument concepts to capture particles intact and without inadvertent contamination. It began with a survey and screening of available capture media concepts and then focused on the development of a capture medium that can meet these requirements. Evaluation and development of the chosen capture medium, aerogel (a silicon oxide gel), has so far lived up to the expectations of meeting the requirements and is highlighted in a companion paper at this workshop. Others such as McDonnell's Timeband Capture Cell Experiment (TICCE) on EuReCa and Tsuo's GAS-CAN lid experiments on STS 47 and 57 have flown aerogel, but without addressing the contamination issue/requirement, especially regarding organics. Horz, Zolenskym and others have studied and have also been advocates for its

  18. Polyphenols content and antioxidant activity of paprika and pepper spices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soňa Škrovánková

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Paprika spices (Capsicium annuum and black pepper spices (Piper nigrum are very popular seasonings for culinary and industrial utilization due to the change of sensory quality (taste, aroma, color of foods and meals with their addition; their health promoting properties; and also, relevant antioxidant activity. Polyphenols are often responsible for the antioxidant capacity of plant products therefore in our study the content of polyphenols (TP and antioxidant activity (TAA were assessed in two common culinary spices - paprika spices (12, ground powder spices and pepper spices (20, unground and ground, black, green, white and colored spices of Czech, Austrian, and Slovak producers. These parameters were determined using spectrometric method, for total polyphenols method with Folin-Ciocaulteu reagent; the antioxidant activity (TAA of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of spices was measured by DPPH method with IC50 evaluation. For paprika the total polyphenol content ranged from 14.67 to 28.78 mg GAE.g-1. However, there is only weak connection between the pungency of the spices and the polyphenolic amount, the hotter samples of paprika spices have slightly higher values of TP than sweet types. Also, more pungent paprika products showed a higher potency in scavenging of DPPH free radical than sweeter ones; and ethanolic extracts had slightly higher TAA values (8.73 to 16.17 mg AAE.g-1 than aqueous spice extracts (4.45 to 16.24 mg AAE.g-1. Phenolic amount for pepper spices was assessed in the range of 12.03 to 22.88 mg GAE.g-1. Generally, paprika spices contained more polyphenols than pepper spices. The values of TAA of pepper spices were in the range from 7.07 to 15.81 mg AAE.g-1 for aqueous extracts and from 8.25 to 15.93 mg AAE.g-1 for ethanolic extracts respectively. The highest TAA values were observed for white ground pepper and unground black pepper spices. Unground black pepper samples had higher TAA than ground black pepper. The extent of

  19. SPICE ROUTE: LOGISTIC JOURNEY OF SPICES IN RETAIL SUPPLY CHAIN PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulrajan Rajkumar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to report the findings of the study of the routes and the distance traveled by spices from the farming location to the consumer in traditional and organised retailing. This research study is primarily exploratory in nature, and the research instruments include interviews and survey through questionnaires with players in the spice supply chain. The study is to track the spice routes by the retailers for assessing the current state of the supply chain management practices, and evaluate ‘food mileage’ clocked by them. ‘Food miles’ is a relatively recent concept in retailing and result of this study reveals that significant increase in food miles in the case of organised retailers. Longer food miles of spices are an indicator of the shift towards organised retailing. The speed at which spices reach their destination as well as the time taken between any two points was not observed. This is the limitation of this study, and also the scope for further research. The research study is not aimed at finding the factors related to the food mileage.

  20. Consumer response to irradiated spices in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Khateeb, M.A.; El-Fouly, M.Z.; Farag, M.D.; Abdel Karim, H.A.; Saad El-Din, N.

    2000-01-01

    This study analyses the response of the consumer about irradiated spices. The spices under investigation were black pepper, cumin and coriander. The results of the sensory test the panelists ( 136 person) failed to indicate any difference between the irradiated and unirradiated black pepper, cumin and coriander. The percentages of correct answer were 26.92 29.23, 29.23 and 27.27. Five hundred post card were issued for black pepper to test the opinion of the consumer acceptance for the irradiated black pepper. The result of their opinion were 62.2% of the consumers who would buy irradiated black pepper, 14.6% would not buy it and 23.2% were undecided

  1. MICROBIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF RETAIL HERBS AND SPICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Santoro

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, 80 samples of herbs and spices were analyzed for the presence of Bacillus cereus, Salmonella spp., , Escherichia coli, total and fecal coliforms, Enterobacteriacaee, total mesophilic and psychrophilic aerobic organisms, and fungi. Samples were packaged in polyethylene bags or glass containers.High levels of mesophilic aerobic microorganisms were found in most of the samples. B. cereus was present in 27 samples, Clostrium perfringens was isolated from 3 samples, Salmonella spp. was not detected.

  2. On the Electrical and Magnetic Properties of some Indian Spices

    OpenAIRE

    Baby, Samson. K.; Girish, T. E.

    2010-01-01

    We have made experimental measurements of electrical conductivity, pH and relative magnetic susceptibility of the aqueous solutions of 24 indian spices. The measured values of electrical conductance of these spices are found to be linearly related to their ash content and bulk calorific values reported in literature. The physiological relevance of the pH and diamagnetic susceptibility of spices when consumed as food or medicine will be also discussed.

  3. Detection of enzyme activity in decontaminated spices of industrial use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Müller, R.; Theobald, R.

    1995-01-01

    A range of decontaminated spices of industrial use have been examinated for their enzymes (catalase, peroxidase, amylase, lipase activity). The genuine enzymes remain fully active in irradiated spices, whereas the microbial load is clearly reduced. In contrast steam treated spices no longer demonstrate enzyme activities. Steam treatment offers e.g. black pepper without lipase activity, which can no longer cause fat deterioration. Low microbial load in combination with clearly detectable enzyme activity in spices is an indication for irradiation, whereas, reduced microbial contamination combined with enzyme inactivation indicate steam treatment of raw material [de

  4. Modeling and simulation of biological systems using SPICE language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallement, Christophe; Haiech, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    The article deals with BB-SPICE (SPICE for Biochemical and Biological Systems), an extension of the famous Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis (SPICE). BB-SPICE environment is composed of three modules: a new textual and compact description formalism for biological systems, a converter that handles this description and generates the SPICE netlist of the equivalent electronic circuit and NGSPICE which is an open-source SPICE simulator. In addition, the environment provides back and forth interfaces with SBML (System Biology Markup Language), a very common description language used in systems biology. BB-SPICE has been developed in order to bridge the gap between the simulation of biological systems on the one hand and electronics circuits on the other hand. Thus, it is suitable for applications at the interface between both domains, such as development of design tools for synthetic biology and for the virtual prototyping of biosensors and lab-on-chip. Simulation results obtained with BB-SPICE and COPASI (an open-source software used for the simulation of biochemical systems) have been compared on a benchmark of models commonly used in systems biology. Results are in accordance from a quantitative viewpoint but BB-SPICE outclasses COPASI by 1 to 3 orders of magnitude regarding the computation time. Moreover, as our software is based on NGSPICE, it could take profit of incoming updates such as the GPU implementation, of the coupling with powerful analysis and verification tools or of the integration in design automation tools (synthetic biology). PMID:28787027

  5. Sterilization of ground spices by electron beams irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashigiwa, Masayuki; Nakachi, Ayako; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    Each ground spice (Black Pepper, Turmeric, Ginger, Paprika and Basil), which was packaged into polyethylene film, was irradiated by electron beams at 5 different levels: 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 kGy. Bacteriological tests for total bacterial count were carried out on spices before and after irradiation, but the tests for microfiora were carried out only before irradiation. Total bacterial count decreased in proportion to the level of electron beams. But the decreasing rate for Turmeric, Ginger and Basil was lower compared with that of other spices. The reason seems that rate of contamination by B. pumilus, which is thought as radiation resistant bacteria, was higher on these spices. (author)

  6. Sterilization of ground spices by electron beams irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashigiwa, Masayuki; Nakachi, Ayako; Kobayashi, Hiroshi [K. Kobayashi and Co., Ltd., Kako, Hyogo (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    Each ground spice (Black Pepper, Turmeric, Ginger, Paprika and Basil), which was packaged into polyethylene film, was irradiated by electron beams at 5 different levels: 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 kGy. Bacteriological tests for total bacterial count were carried out on spices before and after irradiation, but the tests for microfiora were carried out only before irradiation. Total bacterial count decreased in proportion to the level of electron beams. But the decreasing rate for Turmeric, Ginger and Basil was lower compared with that of other spices. The reason seems that rate of contamination by B. pumilus, which is thought as radiation resistant bacteria, was higher on these spices. (author)

  7. Improved Properties and Microbiological Safety of Novel Cottage Cheese Containing Spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josipović, Renata; Knežević, Zvonimira Medverec; Frece, Jadranka; Markov, Ksenija; Kazazić, Snježana; Mrvčić, Jasna

    2015-12-01

    The study focuses on developing novel cottage cheese containing spices with acceptable sensory properties, increased biological value and extended shelf life. Thirty types of cheese with added fresh or dried parsley, dill, pepper, garlic and rosemary were produced. Characterisation of phenolic compounds, antioxidant capacity and antibacterial activity of spices and cheese samples were evaluated. The cheese containing fresh pepper and fresh and dried herbs showed excellent sensory properties, with the best results obtained with fresh sweet red pepper. Dry rosemary had the highest antioxidant and antibacterial activity due to high mass fractions of caffeic and rosmarinic acids as well as high mass fractions of flavones and phenolic diterpenes. The plant extracts examined in vitro and in situ effectively reduce numbers of foodborne pathogens like Salmonella typhimurium , Escherichia coli , Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes , and therefore have potential as natural preservatives and antioxidants.

  8. Improved Properties and Microbiological Safety of Novel Cottage Cheese Containing Spices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knežević, Zvonimira Medverec; Frece, Jadranka; Markov, Ksenija; Kazazić, Snježana; Mrvčić, Jasna

    2015-01-01

    Summary The study focuses on developing novel cottage cheese containing spices with acceptable sensory properties, increased biological value and extended shelf life. Thirty types of cheese with added fresh or dried parsley, dill, pepper, garlic and rosemary were produced. Characterisation of phenolic compounds, antioxidant capacity and antibacterial activity of spices and cheese samples were evaluated. The cheese containing fresh pepper and fresh and dried herbs showed excellent sensory properties, with the best results obtained with fresh sweet red pepper. Dry rosemary had the highest antioxidant and antibacterial activity due to high mass fractions of caffeic and rosmarinic acids as well as high mass fractions of flavones and phenolic diterpenes. The plant extracts examined in vitro and in situ effectively reduce numbers of foodborne pathogens like Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes, and therefore have potential as natural preservatives and antioxidants. PMID:27904380

  9. Improved Properties and Microbiological Safety of Novel Cottage Cheese Containing Spices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvonimira Medverec Knežević

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study focuses on developing novel cott age cheese containing spices with acceptable sensory properties, increased biological value and extended shelf life. Thirty types of cheese with added fresh or dried parsley, dill, pepper, garlic and rosemary were produced. Characterisation of phenolic compounds, antioxidant capacity and antibacterial activity of spices and cheese samples were evaluated. The cheese containing fresh pepper and fresh and dried herbs showed excellent sensory properties, with the best results obtained with fresh sweet red pepper. Dry rosemary had the highest antioxidant and antibacterial activity due to high mass fractions of caffeic and rosmarinic acids as well as high mass fractions of flavones and phenolic diterpenes. The plant extracts examined in vitro and in situ effectively reduce numbers of foodborne pathogens like Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes, and therefore have potential as natural preservatives and antioxidants.

  10. Health benefits of herbs and spices: the past, the present, the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapsell, Linda C; Hemphill, Ian; Cobiac, Lynne; Patch, Craig S; Sullivan, David R; Fenech, Michael; Roodenrys, Steven; Keogh, Jennifer B; Clifton, Peter M; Williams, Peter G; Fazio, Virginia A; Inge, Karen E

    2006-08-21

    defined cuisines. Research on the effects of herbs and spices on mental health should distinguish between cognitive decline associated with ageing and the acute effects of psychological and cognitive function. There is level I and II evidence for the effect of some herbal supplements on psychological and cognitive function. There is very limited scientific evidence for the effects of herbs and spices on type 2 diabetes mellitus, with the best evidence being available for the effect of ginseng on glycaemia, albeit based on four studies. More research is required, particularly examining the effects of chronic consumption patterns. With increasing interest in alternatives to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents in the management of chronic inflammation, research is emerging on the use of food extracts. There is level II evidence for the use of ginger in ameliorating arthritic knee pain; however, the improvement is modest and the efficacy of ginger treatment is ranked below that of ibuprofen. More definitive research is required. Recommendations for intakes of food in the Australian guide to healthy eating do not yet include suggested intakes of herbs and spices. Future consideration should be given to including more explicit recommendations about their place in a healthy diet. In addition to delivering antioxidant and other properties, herbs and spices can be used in recipes to partially or wholly replace less desirable ingredients such as salt, sugar and added saturated fat in, for example, marinades and dressings, stir-fry dishes, casseroles, soups, curries and Mediterranean-style cooking. Vegetable dishes and vegetarian options may be more appetising when prepared with herbs and spices. As several metabolic diseases and age-related degenerative disorders are closely associated with oxidative processes in the body, the use of herbs and spices as a source of antioxidants to combat oxidation warrants further attention. Immediate studies should focus on validating the

  11. Raman Spectroscopic Investigation of Dyes in Spices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlemann, Ute; Ramoji, Anuradha; Rösch, Petra; Da Costa Filho, Paulo Augusto; Robert, Fabien; Popp, Jürgen

    2010-08-01

    In this study, a number of synthetic colorants for spices have been investigated by means of Raman spectroscopy, resonance Raman spectroscopy, and surface enhanced (resonance) Raman spectroscopy (SER(S)). The aim of the study was the determination of limits of detection for each dye separately and in binary mixtures of dyes in spiked samples of the spices. Most of the investigated dyes have been azo dyes, some being water-soluble, the other being fat-soluble. Investigating the composition of food preparations is an ongoing and important branch of analytical sciences. On one hand, new ingredients have to be analyzed with regard to their contents, on the other hand, raw materials that have been tampered have to be eliminated from food production processes. In the last decades, the various Raman spectroscopic methods have proven to be successful in many areas of life and materials sciences. The ability of Raman spectroscopy to distinguish even structural very similar analytes by means of their vibrational fingerprint will also be important in this study. Nevertheless, Raman scattering is a very weak process that is oftentimes overlaid by matrix interferences or fluorescence. In order to achieve limits of detection in the nanomolar range, the signal intensity has to be increased. According to the well-known equations, there are several ways of achieving this increase: •increasing sample concentration •increasing laser power •decreasing the laser wavelength •using electronic resonance •increasing the local electromagnetic field In this study, nearly all of the above-mentioned principles were applied. In a first step, all dyes were investigated in solution at different concentrations to determine a limit of detection. In the second step, spiked spice samples have been extracted with a variety of solvents and process parameters tested. To lower the limit of detection even further, SERS spectroscopy has been used as well in as out of electronic resonance.

  12. AdS wormholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, A. [George and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Lue, H. [George and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Interdisciplinary Center of Theoretical Studies, USTC, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Mei, Jianwei [George and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Pope, C.N. [George and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge University, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)], E-mail: pope@physics.tamu.edu

    2009-03-21

    We obtain a large class of smooth Lorentzian p-brane wormholes in supergravities in various dimensions. They connect two asymptotically flat spacetimes. In cases where there is no dilaton involved in the solution, the wormhole can connect an AdS{sub n}xS{sup m} in one asymptotic region to a flat spacetime in the other. We obtain explicit examples for (n,m)=(4,7),(7,4),(5,5),(3,3),(3,2). These geometries correspond to field theories with UV conformal fixed points, and they undergo decompactification in the IR region. In the case of AdS{sub 3}, we compute the central charge of the corresponding conformal field theory.

  13. Heavy metal contamination of selected spices obtained from Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the levels of trace metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Co, Fe, Mn, Ni, Mo, Pb, Zn) in twenty two spices representing four spice groups (seeds, bulbs, leaves, fruit pods and rhizome) from a major market in Northern Nigeria were determined using atomic absorption spectroscopy, and assessed based on regulatory standards.

  14. A Study on Spice Usage Habits of Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin Demircioglu

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study has been carried out on the total of 662 women to determine their habits on the use of spices. The results indicated that 94.6% of women use spices at their home. When they cook meal, they generally use black pepper, red pepper flakes, pepper mint, oregano, red pepper and cumin. Sage, peppers mint and oregano are the most used spices for herbal therapy. Most of the women buy their spices on supermarket in wrapped products (67.1%, look the production and expiration dates of spices products (44.3%, keep them in colorless glass jar (63.6%, never consume expired date spices (88.8% and add spices to meal with a spoon that they use during meal preparation (48.2%. According to the results, the consumers should buy spices in a wrapped product with production and expiration dates from reliable companies. Morover, they must be kept from light, air, moisture and temperature and they must be kept in covered and dark-color glass jars and in cool places. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(3.000: 161-168

  15. Characterization of Bacillus spp. from some spices and assessment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred twenty five samples from five different Ethiopian sauce spices were examined for the incidence and level of contamination of Bacillus species. The spices consisted of fenugreek (Trigenella foenum-graecum), black cumin (Nigella sativa), Ethiopian caraway (Trachyspermum ammi), ginger (Zingiber officinale) ...

  16. 21 CFR 133.193 - Spiced, flavored standardized cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... flavor and/or spice that characterizes the food, in the manner prescribed in § 101.22 of this chapter... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Spiced, flavored standardized cheeses. 133.193 Section 133.193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  17. Anti-Oxidant potentials of Yaji spices | Okpalaugo | International ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... anti-parasitic, anti-helmintic and anti-oxidant potentials. Common amongst these spices are ginger, clove, red pepper and black pepper, which in combination, constitutes the main spices in Yaji –a complex Nigerian Suya-meat sauce that also contain groundnut cake flour, Ajinomoto (monosodium glutamate) and salt.

  18. In vitro antioxidant and hypoglycemic activities of Ethiopian spice blend Berbere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizzo, Monica R; Di Lecce, Giuseppe; Boselli, Emanuele; Bonesi, Marco; Menichini, Federica; Menichini, Francesco; Frega, Natale Giuseppe

    2011-11-01

    The metal chelating activity, antioxidant properties, and the effect on carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzymes of Ethiopian spice blend Berbere have been investigated. Berbere contains a total amount of phenols corresponding to 71.3 mg chlorogenic acid equivalent per gram of extract and a total flavonoid content of 32.5 mg quercetin equivalent per gram of extract. An increase of the resistance towards forced oxidation was obtained when Berbere was added to sunflower oil. In order to evaluate the bioactivity of the non-polar constituents, an n-hexane extract was obtained from Berbere. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed the presence of 19 fatty acids constituents (98.1% of the total oil content). Among them, linoleic acid was the major component (72.0% of the total lipids). The ethanolic extract had the highest ferric-reducing ability power (35.4 μM Fe(II)/g) and DPPH scavenging activity with a concentration giving 50% inhibition (IC(50)) value of 34.8 μg/ml. Moreover, this extract exhibited good hypoglycemic activity against α-amylase (IC(50) = 78.3 μg/ml). In conclusion, Ethiopian spice blend Berbere showed promising antioxidant and hypoglycemic activity via the inhibition of carbohydrate digestive enzymes. These activities may be of interest from functional point of view and for the revalorization of the spice blend in gastronomy also outside the African country.

  19. Quality Evaluation of Herbs and Spices in The Military Food System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-06-01

    contaminated by pathogens . In this regard many spices reportedly contain natural inhibitors which not only control the development of pathogens in the spice ...NUMBER TR 76-52 FEL 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (and Subtl tie) "Quality Evaluation of Herbs and Spices in...HERBS PACKAGING VOLATILITY SPICES SEALED SYSTEMS VOLATILE LOSS

  20. Prebiotic Potential and Chemical Composition of Seven Culinary Spice Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qing-Yi; Summanen, Paula H; Lee, Ru-Po; Huang, Jianjun; Henning, Susanne M; Heber, David; Finegold, Sydney M; Li, Zhaoping

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate prebiotic potential, chemical composition, and antioxidant capacity of spice extracts. Seven culinary spices including black pepper, cayenne pepper, cinnamon, ginger, Mediterranean oregano, rosemary, and turmeric were extracted with boiling water. Major chemical constituents were characterized by RP-HPLC-DAD method and antioxidant capacity was determined by measuring colorimetrically the extent to scavenge ABTS radical cations. Effects of spice extracts on the viability of 88 anaerobic and facultative isolates from intestinal microbiota were determined by using Brucella agar plates containing serial dilutions of extracts. A total of 14 phenolic compounds, a piperine, cinnamic acid, and cinnamaldehyde were identified and quantitated. Spice extracts exhibited high antioxidant capacity that correlated with the total amount of major chemicals. All spice extracts, with the exception of turmeric, enhanced the growth of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. All spices exhibited inhibitory activity against selected Ruminococcus species. Cinnamon, oregano, and rosemary were active against selected Fusobacterium strains and cinnamon, rosemary, and turmeric were active against selected Clostridium spp. Some spices displayed prebiotic-like activity by promoting the growth of beneficial bacteria and suppressing the growth of pathogenic bacteria, suggesting their potential role in the regulation of intestinal microbiota and the enhancement of gastrointestinal health. The identification and quantification of spice-specific phytochemicals provided insight into the potential influence of these chemicals on the gut microbial communities and activities. Future research on the connections between spice-induced changes in gut microbiota and host metabolism and disease preventive effect in animal models and humans is needed. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Food Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Institute of

  1. Modeling and simulation of biological systems using SPICE language.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Madec

    Full Text Available The article deals with BB-SPICE (SPICE for Biochemical and Biological Systems, an extension of the famous Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis (SPICE. BB-SPICE environment is composed of three modules: a new textual and compact description formalism for biological systems, a converter that handles this description and generates the SPICE netlist of the equivalent electronic circuit and NGSPICE which is an open-source SPICE simulator. In addition, the environment provides back and forth interfaces with SBML (System Biology Markup Language, a very common description language used in systems biology. BB-SPICE has been developed in order to bridge the gap between the simulation of biological systems on the one hand and electronics circuits on the other hand. Thus, it is suitable for applications at the interface between both domains, such as development of design tools for synthetic biology and for the virtual prototyping of biosensors and lab-on-chip. Simulation results obtained with BB-SPICE and COPASI (an open-source software used for the simulation of biochemical systems have been compared on a benchmark of models commonly used in systems biology. Results are in accordance from a quantitative viewpoint but BB-SPICE outclasses COPASI by 1 to 3 orders of magnitude regarding the computation time. Moreover, as our software is based on NGSPICE, it could take profit of incoming updates such as the GPU implementation, of the coupling with powerful analysis and verification tools or of the integration in design automation tools (synthetic biology.

  2. The Influence of Herbs, Spices, and Regular Sausage and Chicken Consumption on Liking of Reduced Fat Breakfast and Lunch Items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsky, Sarit; Beck, Jimikaye; Stark, Rebecca A.; Pan, Zhaoxing; Hill, James O.; Peters, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Adults often consume more fat than is recommended. We examined factors that may improve liking of reduced fat and reduced saturated fat foods, including the addition of herbs and spices and habitual consumption of different high-fat and low-fat food items. We randomized adults to taste three different conditions: full fat (FF), reduced fat with no added spice (RF), and reduced fat plus spice (RFS). Subjects rated their liking of French toast, sausage and the overall meal, or chicken, vegetables, pasta and the overall meal on a nine-point hedonic Likert scale. Overall liking of the RF breakfast and lunch meals were lower than the FF and RFS versions (Breakfast: 6.50 RF vs. 6.84 FF, p=0.0061; 6.50 RF vs. 6.82 RFS, p=0.0030; Lunch: 6.35 RF vs. 6.94 FF, pHerbs and spices may be useful for improving the liking of lower-fat foods and helping Americans maintain a diet consistent with the US Dietary Guidelines. PMID:25219391

  3. Beneficial Effects of Spices in Food Preservation and Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Gottardi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Spices have been used since ancient times. Although they have been employed mainly as flavouring and colouring agents, their role in food safety and preservation have also been studied in vitro and in vivo. Spices have exhibited numerous health benefits in preventing and treating a wide variety of diseases such as cancer, aging, metabolic, neurological, cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases. The present review aims to provide a comprehensive summary of the most relevant and recent findings on spices and their active compounds in terms of targets and mode of action; in particular, their potential use in food preservation and enhancement of shelf life as a natural bioingredient.

  4. Irradiation of spices produced in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kairiyama, E.; Narvaiz, P.; Lescano, G.; Kaupert, N.L.

    1988-01-01

    Some spices produced in Argentina ground red pepper, anise, fennel, laurel, paprika, Cayenne pepper, cumin (seed), and mayoram (leaves and flowers), were irradiated to inactivate microbial lead, without causing significant chemical or sensory alterations. They were packed in polyethylene bags of 100 m thickness, and irradiated at the 60 Co semi-industrial facility of the Ezeiza Atomic Center, with doses of 7 and 10 kGy, and dose rate of 93.87 Gy/min. Dosimetric data were evaluated with potassium nitrate. Control and irradiated samples were stored at room temperature. Chemical analysis were performed to verify the Argentine Alimentary Codex specifications: water content; essence; total ash; ash insoluble in acid; alcoholic, volatile ether and non-volatile ether extracts; starch; and crude fiber. Besides, colour and volatile substances were analyzed. No differences were found between control and irradiated samples, with the exception of an increase in the total amount of volatiles released by irradiated spices, and a slight colour loss in mayoram. Microbiological determinations consisted of aerobic plate count, yeasts and moulds, coliform bacteria, Salmonella, Staphylococcus aureus, mesophilic and thermophilic sporeformers, enterococci and Clostridium perfringens. Microbial load in control samples oscillated between 10 3 and 10 6 microorganisms per gram, and was inhibited with 10 kGy to undetectable level. With 7 kGy, survivors were still detected in: cumin, anise, laurel, red pepper, fennel and paprika. So, the purpose of this work was accomplished with the dose of 10 kGy. Great improvement on the quality of those products which being stored at room temperature are consumed in the raw state, would be attained. (Author) [es

  5. Radiation effect on lipid peroxide content of spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Nobutada; Ito, Hitoshi; Ishigaki, Isao

    1990-01-01

    To evaluate the radiation-induced deterioration of lipid in spices, peroxide value, iodine value and acid value were measured after extraction by chloroform. Peroxide values of black pepper and white pepper were not increased by gamma-irradiation with doses below 30 kGy and gradually increased at higher dose up to 80 kGy in this study. On contrary, peroxide values of clove and rosemary increased rather quickly below 20 kGy of gamma-irradiation, and they became stationary at higher dose. Iodine values and acid values had relationship with peroxide values on each kind of spices. On the storage study of irradiated spices, peroxide values decreased quickly during 20 days storage as same as nonirradiated spices, and it became stationary after 20 to 50 days storage at 30degC. Enhancement of oxidized deterioration were not observed even higher irradiation doses up to 80 kGy in this study. (author)

  6. Heavy metal contamination of selected spices obtained from Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    info and www.bioline.org.br/ja. Heavy metal contamination of selected spices obtained from Nigeria ... rhizome) from a major market in Northern Nigeria were determined using atomic absorption ..... sensitive humans (WHO, 1999b). Food is the ...

  7. Disinfestation of whole and ground spices by gamma-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padwal-Desai, S.R.; Sharma, Arun; Amonkar, S.V.

    1987-01-01

    Number of insect species were identified in chilli (Capsicum annum Linn), turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn), ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe), pepper (Piper nigrum Linn) and coriander (Coriandrum sativum) and also in two commercial brands of prepacked ground spices. Lasioderma serricorne (Cigarette beetle), Oryzaephilus surinamensis (Saw toothed grain beetle), Rhizopertha dominica (Lesser grain borer), Sitotroga cerealella (Angoumois grain moth) and Tribolium castaneum (Red flour beetle) were the predominant pest species found in these spices. Exposure of spices to Co 60 gamma irradiation at 1 kGy dose level did not show adult emergence of insects in these species during storage at ambient temperature (28-30degC) indicating that the radiation dose (10 kGy) that has been shown to be effective for microbial decontamination of spices destroys insect pests as well. (author). 8 refs

  8. Traditional spices of Dayak Kenyah society in East Kalimantan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SITI SUSIARTI

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of plant in Indonesia is high, including variety of spices, which have been known by Indonesian society since long time ago. Several very popular plants are clove (Syzygium aromaticum, pepper (Piper nigrum, cinnamon (Cinnamomum burmanii, and nutmeg (Myristica fragrans. Variety of spices has connection with cultures. In each region and society, they have a special spices in their traditional food. The research was conducted in villages in Pujungan district and other places in East Kalimantan Province and commonly Dayak Kenyah society. The methods used for this study was by interviewing of local society and direct observation in the fields where plant spices occurred. The results indicated that traditional Dayak in East Kalimantan used bekai (Albertisia papuana Becc., payang aka (Hodgsonia macrocarpa (Bl. Cogn., payang kurek (Aleurites moluccana (L. Willd., payang kayu (Pangium edule Reinw., payang lengu (Ricinus communis L., and payang salap (Sumbaviopsis albicans (Blume J.J.Sm. for preparing their food with certain method.

  9. Microbiological quality of retail spices in Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koohy-Kamaly-Dehkordy, Paliz; Nikoopour, Houshang; Siavoshi, Farideh; Koushki, Mohammadreza; Abadi, Alireza

    2013-05-01

    The microbiological quality of 351 samples of nine types of spices including black pepper, caraway, cinnamon, cow parsnip, curry powder, garlic powder, red pepper, sumac, and turmeric, collected from retail shops in Tehran during 2007, was determined. The numbers of aerobic mesophilic bacteria, Escherichia coli, and molds exceeded Iran's National Standard limits, at 63.2% (>5 × 10(5) CFU/g), 23.4% (>0.3 MPN/g), and 21.9% (>5 × 10(3) CFU/g) of the studied samples, respectively. Coliform contamination was more than 10(3) MPN/g in 24.8% of samples. High contamination of retail spices is considered an indication of environmental or fecal contamination due to unhygienic practices in their production. Use of spices with high microbial content could increase the chance of food spoilage and transmission of foodborne pathogens. Accordingly, application of food safety measurements to reduce microbial counts in spices is strongly recommended.

  10. Comparative phytochemical analysis and use of some Nigerian spices

    OpenAIRE

    Akeem, Sarafa; Joseph, John; Kayode, Rowland; Kolawole, Fausat

    2016-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative analyses of the bioactive constituents of the aqueous and ethanolic extracts of six commonly consumed spices in Nigeria; namely garlic (Allium sativum), ginger (Zingiber officinale), red onion (Allium cepa), nutmeg (Myristica fragrans), bird pepper and cayenne pepper; which are two varieties of Capsicum frutescens were investigated. The study also assessed the use of the spices through the administration of a structured questionnaire. Alkaloids was the most ab...

  11. Antimicrobial properties of three spices used in the preparation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-18

    May 18, 2009 ... Effect of ground clove, garlic and brown pepper on bacterial growth on nutrient agar. xxx: Abundant growth; xx: growth (numerous separate colonies); x: limited growth; - : no growth. Spice concentrations (%). Clove. Garlic. Brown pepper. Bacteria. No spice 0.5 1.5 3.0. 0.5. 1.5. 3.0. 0.5. 1.5. 3.0. B. cereus xxx.

  12. Irradiation on spices, dried herbs and condiments preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baraldi, D.

    1996-01-01

    Among food irradiation applications, radiation decontamination of spices, condiments and dried herbs has the most immediate application potential in many countries. The article is intended to provide justification for the radiation decontamination of spices, herbs and others vegetables seasonings, compared to conventional methods used today by industry, namely the technique of fumigation with ethylene oxide (ETO). The article provides also information both to industrial users and governmental officers for the necessary authorization of the process [it

  13. The role of herbs and spices in cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaefer, Christine M; Milner, John A

    2008-06-01

    Historically, herbs and spices have enjoyed a rich tradition of use for their flavor enhancement characteristics and for their medicinal properties. The rising prevalence of chronic diseases worldwide and the corresponding rise in health care costs is propelling interest among researchers and the public for multiple health benefits related to these food items, including a reduction in cancer risk and modification of tumor behavior. A growing body of epidemiological and preclinical evidence points to culinary herbs and spices as minor dietary constituents with multiple anticancer characteristics. This review focuses on the antimicrobial, antioxidant, and antitumorigenic properties of herbs and spices; their ability to influence carcinogen bioactivation; and likely anticancer contributions. While culinary herbs and spices present intriguing possibilities for health promotion, more complete information is needed about the actual exposures to dietary components that are needed to bring about a response and the molecular target(s) for specific herbs and spices. Only after this information is obtained will it be possible to define appropriate intervention strategies to achieve maximum benefits from herbs and spices without eliciting ill consequences.

  14. Turmeric: A spice with multifunctional medicinal properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasri Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Curcuma longa (Turmeric, belonging to Zingiberaceae family is one of the most useful herbal medicinal plants. Extensive researches have proven that most of the turmeric activities of the turmeric are due to curcumin. It has various useful properties with antioxidant activities and is useful in conditions such as inflammation, ulcer and cancer. It also has antifungal, antimicrobial renal and hepatoprotective activities. Therefore, it has the potential against various cancer, diabetes, allergies, arthritis, Alzheimer’s disease and other chronic and hard curable diseases. The purpose of this review was to provide a brief summary of the new and current knowledge of the effects of curcumin. The recently published papers in international cites such as PubMed/Medline, Science Citation Index and Google Scholar about turmeric were searched. Recent studies have authenticated the use of turmeric for various diseases especially oxidative stress induced ones such as cancer, diabetes mellitus and inflammatory disorders. It also is used as hepatoprotective, nephroprotective, anticoagulant and anti-HIV to combat AIDS. Curcumin, as a spice, exhibits great promise as a therapeutic agent. It has very low toxicity, too. As the global scenario is now changing towards the use of non-toxic plant products having traditional medicinal use, development of modern drugs from turmeric should be emphasized for the control of various diseases. Further evaluation needs to be carried out on turmeric in order to explore the concealed areas and their practical clinical applications, which can be used for the welfare of mankind.

  15. Traditional Indian spices and their health significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Kamala

    2008-01-01

    India has been recognized all over the world for spices and medicinal plants. Both exhibit a wide range of physiological and pharmacological properties. Current biomedical efforts are focused on their scientific merits, to provide science-based evidence for the traditional uses and to develop either functional foods or nutraceuticals. The Indian traditional medical systems use turmeric for wound healing, rheumatic disorders, gastrointestinal symptoms, deworming, rhinitis and as a cosmetic. Studies in India have explored its anti-inflammatory, cholekinetic and anti-oxidant potentials with the recent investigations focusing on its preventive effect on precarcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and anti atherosclerotic effects in biological systems both under in vitro and in vivo conditions in animals and humans. Both turmeric and curcumin were found to increase detoxifying enzymes, prevent DNA damage, improve DNA repair, decrease mutations and tumour formation and exhibit antioxidative potential in animals. Limited clinical studies suggest that turmeric can significantly impact excretion of mutagens in urine in smokers and regress precancerous palatal lesions. It reduces DNA adducts and micronuclei in oral epithelial cells. It prevents formation of nitroso compounds both in vivo and in vitro. It delays induced cataract in diabetes and reduces hyperlipidemia in obese rats. Recently several molecular targets have been identified for therapeutic / preventive effects of turmeric. Fenugreek seeds, a rich source of soluble fiber used in Indian cuisine reduces blood glucose and lipids and can be used as a food adjuvant in diabetes. Similarly garlic, onions, and ginger have been found to modulate favourably the process of carcinogenesis.

  16. The influence of herbs, spices, and regular sausage and chicken consumption on liking of reduced fat breakfast and lunch items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsky, Sarit; Beck, Jimikaye; Stark, Rebecca A; Pan, Zhaoxing; Hill, James O; Peters, John C

    2014-10-01

    Adults often consume more fat than is recommended. We examined factors that may improve liking of reduced fat and reduced saturated fat foods, including the addition of herbs and spices and habitual consumption of different high-fat and low-fat food items. We randomized adults to taste 3 different conditions: full fat (FF), reduced fat with no added spice (RF), and reduced fat plus spice (RFS). Subjects rated their liking of French toast, sausage and the overall meal, or chicken, vegetables, pasta, and the overall meal on a 9-point hedonic Likert scale. Overall liking of the RF breakfast and lunch meals were lower than the FF and RFS versions (breakfast: 6.50 RF compared with 6.84 FF, P = 0.0061; 6.50 RF compared with 6.82 RFS, P = 0.0030; lunch: 6.35 RF compared with 6.94 FF, P breakfast and lunch meals, French toast, chicken, and vegetable likings were similar. FF and RFS conditions were liked more than RF for the breakfast and lunch meals, French toast, chicken entrée, and vegetables. Liking of all 3 sausage conditions was similar. FF pasta was liked more than RFS and RF (7.47 FF compared with 6.42 RFS, P consumption of roasted chicken was associated with reduced liking of FF chicken (r = -0.23, P = 0.004) and FF pasta (r = -0.23, P = 0.005). Herbs and spices may be useful for improving the liking of lower fat foods and helping Americans maintain a diet consistent with the U.S. Dietary Guidelines. Americans consume more fat than is recommended in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. This study shows that you can take foods like French toast, chicken, or a vegetable side and cut the fat and calories by up to 50% while restoring flavor with herbs and spices. People typically use butter, cheese, or fatty meat to enhance the flavor of their food. We found that even when we reduced the fat in our meals by using lower fat dairy and meat products but then added herbs and spices, we were able to deliver the flavor people desire for a fraction of the calories. © 2014

  17. Prebiotic Potential and Chemical Composition of Seven Culinary Spice Extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qing‐Yi; Summanen, Paula H.; Lee, Ru‐Po; Huang, Jianjun; Henning, Susanne M.; Heber, David; Finegold, Sydney M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to investigate prebiotic potential, chemical composition, and antioxidant capacity of spice extracts. Seven culinary spices including black pepper, cayenne pepper, cinnamon, ginger, Mediterranean oregano, rosemary, and turmeric were extracted with boiling water. Major chemical constituents were characterized by RP‐HPLC‐DAD method and antioxidant capacity was determined by measuring colorimetrically the extent to scavenge ABTS radical cations. Effects of spice extracts on the viability of 88 anaerobic and facultative isolates from intestinal microbiota were determined by using Brucella agar plates containing serial dilutions of extracts. A total of 14 phenolic compounds, a piperine, cinnamic acid, and cinnamaldehyde were identified and quantitated. Spice extracts exhibited high antioxidant capacity that correlated with the total amount of major chemicals. All spice extracts, with the exception of turmeric, enhanced the growth of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. All spices exhibited inhibitory activity against selected Ruminococcus species. Cinnamon, oregano, and rosemary were active against selected Fusobacterium strains and cinnamon, rosemary, and turmeric were active against selected Clostridium spp. Some spices displayed prebiotic‐like activity by promoting the growth of beneficial bacteria and suppressing the growth of pathogenic bacteria, suggesting their potential role in the regulation of intestinal microbiota and the enhancement of gastrointestinal health. The identification and quantification of spice‐specific phytochemicals provided insight into the potential influence of these chemicals on the gut microbial communities and activities. Future research on the connections between spice‐induced changes in gut microbiota and host metabolism and disease preventive effect in animal models and humans is needed. PMID:28678344

  18. Hairy AdS solitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anabalón, Andrés, E-mail: andres.anabalon@uai.cl [Departamento de Ciencias, Facultad de Artes Liberales and Facultad de Ingeniería y Ciencias, Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez, Av. Padre Hurtado 750, Viña del Mar (Chile); Astefanesei, Dumitru, E-mail: dumitru.astefanesei@pucv.cl [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Casilla 4059, Valparaíso (Chile); Choque, David, E-mail: brst1010123@gmail.com [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Casilla 4059, Valparaíso (Chile); Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Av. España 1680, Valparaíso (Chile)

    2016-11-10

    We construct exact hairy AdS soliton solutions in Einstein-dilaton gravity theory. We examine their thermodynamic properties and discuss the role of these solutions for the existence of first order phase transitions for hairy black holes. The negative energy density associated to hairy AdS solitons can be interpreted as the Casimir energy that is generated in the dual filed theory when the fermions are antiperiodic on the compact coordinate.

  19. Turmeric and black pepper spices decrease lipid peroxidation in meat patties during cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanjun; Henning, Susanne M.; Lee, Ru-Po; Huang, Jianjun; Zerlin, Alona; Li, Zhaoping; Heber, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Spices are rich in natural antioxidants and have been shown to be potent inhibitors of lipid peroxidation during cooking of meat. Turmeric contains unique conjugated curcuminoids with strong antioxidant activity. Piperine, one of the main constituents of black pepper, is known to increase the bioavailability of curcuminoids in mouse and human studies when consumed with turmeric. We investigated whether adding black pepper to turmeric powder may further inhibit lipid peroxidation when added to meat patties prior to cooking. The addition of black pepper to turmeric significantly decreased the lipid peroxidation in hamburger meat. When investigating the antioxidant activity of the main chemical markers, we determined that piperine did not exhibit any antioxidant activity. Therefore, we conclude that other black pepper ingredients are responsible for the increased antioxidant activity of combining black pepper with turmeric powder. PMID:25582173

  20. Spicing up a vegetarian diet: chemopreventive effects of phytochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, Johanna W

    2003-09-01

    Thousands of chemical structures have been identified in plant foods. Many are found in spices. Typically, spices are the dried aromatic parts of plants-generally the seeds, berries, roots, pods, and sometimes leaves-that mainly, but not invariably, grow in hot countries. Given the wide range of botanical species and plant parts from which spices are derived, they can contribute significant variety and complexity to the human diet. In the past, the medicinal uses of spices and herbs were often indistinguishable from their culinary uses, and for good reason: people have recognized for centuries both the inherent value, as well as the potential toxicity, of phytochemicals in relation to human health. Plants have the capacity to synthesize a diverse array of chemicals, and understanding how phytochemicals function in plants may further our understanding of the mechanisms by which they benefit humans. In plants, these compounds function to attract beneficial and repel harmful organisms, serve as photoprotectants, and respond to environmental changes. In humans, they can have complementary and overlapping actions, including antioxidant effects, modulation of detoxification enzymes, stimulation of the immune system, reduction of inflammation, modulation of steroid metabolism, and antibacterial and antiviral effects. Embracing a cuisine rich in spice, as well as in fruit and vegetables, may further enhance the chemopreventive capacity of one's diet.

  1. A simple method for identification of irradiated spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behere, A.; Desai, S.R.P.; Nair, P.M.; Rao, S.M.D.

    1992-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) properties of curry powder, a salt containing spice mixture, and three different ground spices, viz, chilli, turmeric and pepper, were compared with TL of table salt. The spices other than curry powder, did not exhibit characteristic TL in the absence of salt. Therefore studies were initiated to develop a simple and reliable method using common salt for distinguishing irradiated spices (10 kGy) from unirradiated ones under normal conditions of storage. Common salt exhibited a characteristic TL glow at 170 o C. However, when present in curry powder, the TL glow of salt showed a shift to 208 o C. It was further observed that upon storage up to 6 months, the TL of irradiated curry powder retained about 10% of the original intensity and still could be distinguished from the untreated samples. From our results it is evident that common salt could be used as an indicator either internally or externally in small sachets for incorporating into prepacked spices. (author)

  2. Development of a microbiological irradiation detection method for spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshikawa, T.; Takekawa, T.; Miyahara, M.

    2009-01-01

    In order to judge whether certain spices had been irradiated or not, we examined the possibility of developing a method based on the microbiological examination of spices. We used the total bacteria count in conjunction with the ratio of B. megaterium and B. cereus to the total bacteria count. The examination results of 6 kinds of spices with or without irradiation (black pepper, white pepper, coriander, paprika, ginger and turmeric), were as follows. Total bacteria counts over 10E5 CFU/g indicated that the samples were 'unirradiated'. When the total bacteria count was less than 10E5 CFU/g, and the ratio of B. megaterium and B. cereus to the total count was more than 30%, a history of irradiation of the samples was indicated. When ratios of B. megaterium and B. cereus were less than 30% and the total bacteria count was also less than 10E5 CFU/g, 'uncertainty' of irradiation was indicated. In this case, it would be possible to confirm whether spices were 'unirradiated' or 'irradiated' by using another detection method. This detection method was applicable to other spices except for paprika. The samples judged as 'irradiated' by using this detection method, surely proved to have a history of irradiation treatment

  3. A simple method for identification of irradiated spices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behere, A.; Desai, S.R.P.; Nair, P.M. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Food Technology and Enzyme Engineering Div.); Rao, S.M.D. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Technical Physics and Prototype Engineering Div.)

    1992-07-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) properties of curry powder, a salt containing spice mixture, and three different ground spices, viz, chilli, turmeric and pepper, were compared with TL of table salt. The spices other than curry powder, did not exhibit characteristic TL in the absence of salt. Therefore studies were initiated to develop a simple and reliable method using common salt for distinguishing irradiated spices (10 kGy) from unirradiated ones under normal conditions of storage. Common salt exhibited a characteristic TL glow at 170{sup o}C. However, when present in curry powder, the TL glow of salt showed a shift to 208{sup o}C. It was further observed that upon storage up to 6 months, the TL of irradiated curry powder retained about 10% of the original intensity and still could be distinguished from the untreated samples. From our results it is evident that common salt could be used as an indicator either internally or externally in small sachets for incorporating into prepacked spices. (author).

  4. Protective Effects of Indian Spice Curcumin Against Amyloid Beta in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, P. Hemachandra; Manczak, Maria; Yin, Xiangling; Grady, Mary Catherine; Mitchell, Andrew; Tonk, Sahil; Kuruva, Chandra Sekhar; Bhatti, Jasvinder Singh; Kandimalla, Ramesh; Vijayan, Murali; Kumar, Subodh; Wang, Rui; Adi Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli; Ogunmokun, Gilbert; Thamarai, Kavya; Quesada, Kandi; Boles, Annette; Reddy, Arubala P

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of our article is to assess the current understanding of Indian spice ‘Curcumin’ against amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced toxicity in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. Natural products, such as ginger, curcumin and gingko biloba have been used as diets and dietary supplements to treat human diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular, respiratory, infectious, diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndromes and neurological disorders. Products derived from plants are known to have protective effects, including anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-arthritis, pro-healing and boosting memory cognitive functions. In the last decade, several groups have designed and synthesized curcumin and its derivatives and extensively tested using cell and mouse models of AD. Recent research on amyloid-β and curcumin has revealed that curcumin prevents amyloid-β aggregation and crosses the blood brain barrier (BBB), reach brain cells and protect neurons from various toxic insults of aging and amyloid-β in humans. Recent research has also reported that curcumin ameliorates cognitive decline and improves synaptic functions in mouse models of AD. Further, recent groups have initiated studies on elderly individuals and patients with AD and the outcome of these studies is currently being assessed. This article highlights the beneficial effects of curcumin on AD. This article also critically assesses the current limitations of curcumin’s bioavailability and urgent need for new formulation to increase its brain levels to treat patients with AD. PMID:29332042

  5. Protective Effects of Indian Spice Curcumin Against Amyloid-β in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, P Hemachandra; Manczak, Maria; Yin, Xiangling; Grady, Mary Catherine; Mitchell, Andrew; Tonk, Sahil; Kuruva, Chandra Sekhar; Bhatti, Jasvinder Singh; Kandimalla, Ramesh; Vijayan, Murali; Kumar, Subodh; Wang, Rui; Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Ogunmokun, Gilbert; Thamarai, Kavya; Quesada, Kandi; Boles, Annette; Reddy, Arubala P

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of our article is to assess the current understanding of Indian spice, curcumin, against amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced toxicity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Natural products, such as ginger, curcumin, and gingko biloba have been used as diets and dietary supplements to treat human diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular, respiratory, infectious, diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndromes, and neurological disorders. Products derived from plants are known to have protective effects, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-arthritis, pro-healing, and boosting memory cognitive functions. In the last decade, several groups have designed and synthesized curcumin and its derivatives and extensively tested using cell and mouse models of AD. Recent research on Aβ and curcumin has revealed that curcumin prevents Aβ aggregation and crosses the blood-brain barrier, reach brain cells, and protect neurons from various toxic insults of aging and Aβ in humans. Recent research has also reported that curcumin ameliorates cognitive decline and improves synaptic functions in mouse models of AD. Further, recent groups have initiated studies on elderly individuals and patients with AD and the outcome of these studies is currently being assessed. This article highlights the beneficial effects of curcumin on AD. This article also critically assesses the current limitations of curcumin's bioavailability and urgent need for new formulations to increase its brain levels to treat patients with AD.

  6. A SPICE synthetic dataset to benchmark global tomographic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Y.; Capdeville, Y.; Maupin, V.; Montagner, J.

    2005-12-01

    The different existing global tomographic methods result in different models of the Earth. Within SPICE (Seismic wave Propagation and Imaging in Complex media: a European network), we have decided to perform a benchmark experiment of global tomographic techniques. A global model has been constructed. It includes 3D heterogeneities in velocity, anisotropy and attenuation, as well as topography of discontinuities. Simplified versions of the model will also be used. Synthetic seismograms will be generated at low frequency by the Spectral Element Method, for a realistic distribution of sources and stations. The synthetic seismograms will be made available to the scientific community at the SPICE website www.spice-rtn.org. Any group wishing to test his tomographic algorithm is encouraged to download the synthetic data.

  7. The industrial potential of herbs and spices - a mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leja, Katarzyna B; Czaczyk, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Herbs and spices have been used for food and medicinal purposes for centuries - the first recorded evidence of their use dates back to 1500BC and the Ebers Papyrus, which mentioned spices such as anise, mustard, saffron, cinnamon, and cassia. Now, in the 21st century, a variety of secondary compounds produced by plants are used in many fields of industry, such as food production (to improve taste, to provide vitamins and macro- and microelements, and also to inhibit food spoilage caused by foodborne bacteria), in medicine (in the treatment of various diseases; in chemoprevention and cancer therapy; as a source of natural antimicrobials for the treatment of infectious disease), and in pharmacology and cosmetology (in dietary supplements, and as a result of the demand for preservative-free cosmetics, to reduce the risk of methylparaben allergies). The aim of this review is to present the major active compounds in herbs and spices and explore their potential applications in industry.

  8. Low-angle X-ray scattering from spices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desouky, Omar S.; Ashour, Ahmed H.; Abdullah, Mohamed I.; Elshemey, Wael M.

    2002-07-01

    Low-angle scattering of X-rays is characterized by the presence of one or more peaks in the forward direction of scattering. These peaks are due to the interference of photons coherently scattered from the molecules of the medium. Thus these patterns are closely linked to the molecular structure of the investigated medium. In this work, low-angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) profiles of five spices; pimpinella anisum (anise), coriandrum sativum (coriander), cuminum cyminum (cumin), foenculum vulgare (fennel) and nigella sativa (nigella or black cumin) are presented after extensive measurements. It is found that all spices exhibit one characteristic peak at a scattering angle around 10°. This is equivalent to a value x=0.0565 Å -1, where x=sin( θ⧸2)⧸ λ. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of this peak is found to be characteristic for each type of the investigated spices. The possibility to detect the irradiation of these spices from their LAXS profiles is also examined after 10, 20, 30 and 40 kGy doses of gamma radiation. Except for anise, coriander and cumin at 40 kGy, there are no detectable deviations from the control samples in the scattering profiles of irradiated samples. These results comply with the recommendations of the FDA (US Food and Drug Administration) which defines 30 kGy as the maximum dose for irradiation of spices. The present technique could be used to detect over-irradiation, which causes damage to the molecular structure of some spices.

  9. Low-angle X-ray scattering from spices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desouky, O.S. E-mail: omardesouky@yahoo.com; Ashour, Ahmed H.; Abdullah, Mohamed I.; Elshemey, Wael M

    2002-07-01

    Low-angle scattering of X-rays is characterized by the presence of one or more peaks in the forward direction of scattering. These peaks are due to the interference of photons coherently scattered from the molecules of the medium. Thus these patterns are closely linked to the molecular structure of the investigated medium. In this work, low-angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) profiles of five spices; pimpinella anisum (anise), coriandrum sativum (coriander), cuminum cyminum (cumin), foenculum vulgare (fennel) and nigella sativa (nigella or black cumin) are presented after extensive measurements. It is found that all spices exhibit one characteristic peak at a scattering angle around 10 deg. This is equivalent to a value x=0.0565 A{sup -1}, where x=sin({theta}/2)/{lambda}. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of this peak is found to be characteristic for each type of the investigated spices. The possibility to detect the irradiation of these spices from their LAXS profiles is also examined after 10, 20, 30 and 40 kGy doses of gamma radiation. Except for anise, coriander and cumin at 40 kGy, there are no detectable deviations from the control samples in the scattering profiles of irradiated samples. These results comply with the recommendations of the FDA (US Food and Drug Administration) which defines 30 kGy as the maximum dose for irradiation of spices. The present technique could be used to detect over-irradiation, which causes damage to the molecular structure of some spices.

  10. Low-angle X-ray scattering from spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desouky, O.S.; Ashour, Ahmed H.; Abdullah, Mohamed I.; Elshemey, Wael M.

    2002-01-01

    Low-angle scattering of X-rays is characterized by the presence of one or more peaks in the forward direction of scattering. These peaks are due to the interference of photons coherently scattered from the molecules of the medium. Thus these patterns are closely linked to the molecular structure of the investigated medium. In this work, low-angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) profiles of five spices; pimpinella anisum (anise), coriandrum sativum (coriander), cuminum cyminum (cumin), foenculum vulgare (fennel) and nigella sativa (nigella or black cumin) are presented after extensive measurements. It is found that all spices exhibit one characteristic peak at a scattering angle around 10 deg. This is equivalent to a value x=0.0565 A -1 , where x=sin(θ/2)/λ. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of this peak is found to be characteristic for each type of the investigated spices. The possibility to detect the irradiation of these spices from their LAXS profiles is also examined after 10, 20, 30 and 40 kGy doses of gamma radiation. Except for anise, coriander and cumin at 40 kGy, there are no detectable deviations from the control samples in the scattering profiles of irradiated samples. These results comply with the recommendations of the FDA (US Food and Drug Administration) which defines 30 kGy as the maximum dose for irradiation of spices. The present technique could be used to detect over-irradiation, which causes damage to the molecular structure of some spices

  11. Effect of Spices Mixture and Gamma Irradiation on Sausage Quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar, M.M.; Sallam, E.M.

    2015-01-01

    This investigation was carried out to study the effect of spices mixture on reducing the oxidation of fat and to improve the quality and organoleptic characteristics as well as extension of shelf-life of beef sausage. Beef sausages were mixed with three different levels (0.5%, 1.5% and 2.5%) of spices mixture (cardamom, clove, cubeb, laurel leaves, cinnamon, black pepper, rosemary, parpicu, fennel and coriander). The sausages were packed in polyethylene bags and irradiated at 2.5, 5 and 7.5 kGy then stored at 5±1°C for 48 days. Microbiological, biochemical and physical analyses as well as organoleptic evaluation were carried out. Results indicated that increasing the spices level decreased the total bacterial count (TBC), molds, yeasts and psychrophilic bacteria (PB) while total volatile nitrogen (TVN), thiobarbituric acid (TBA), peroxide value (PV) and acid value (AV) were increased in treated samples (1.5% and 2.5%) as compared to control (0.5%). On the other hand, the spices decreased TVN, TBA, PV and AV in treated sausages during cold storage while the physical parameters were increased and the best qualities of cold irradiated sausages were observed at the level 2.5% then 1.5% of spices, and the cooking yield and cooking loss and the organoleptic scores (based on over all acceptability) were better than the control sample (0.5%). The results of spices mixture showed that the level 2.5% can reduce oxidation of fat and improve quality and organoleptic characteristics as well as extension of shelf-life of cold irradiated beef sausage stored for 48 days.

  12. Multitargeting by turmeric, the golden spice: From kitchen to clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Subash C; Sung, Bokyung; Kim, Ji Hye; Prasad, Sahdeo; Li, Shiyou; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2013-09-01

    Although much has been published about curcumin, which is obtained from turmeric, comparatively little is known about turmeric itself. Turmeric, a golden spice obtained from the rhizome of the plant Curcuma longa, has been used to give color and taste to food preparations since ancient times. Traditionally, this spice has been used in Ayurveda and folk medicine for the treatment of such ailments as gynecological problems, gastric problems, hepatic disorders, infectious diseases, and blood disorders. Modern science has provided the scientific basis for the use of turmeric against such disorders. Various chemical constituents have been isolated from this spice, including polyphenols, sesquiterpenes, diterpenes, triterpenoids, sterols, and alkaloids. Curcumin, which constitutes 2-5% of turmeric, is perhaps the most-studied component. Although some of the activities of turmeric can be mimicked by curcumin, other activities are curcumin-independent. Cell-based studies have demonstrated the potential of turmeric as an antimicrobial, insecticidal, larvicidal, antimutagenic, radioprotector, and anticancer agent. Numerous animal studies have shown the potential of this spice against proinflammatory diseases, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, depression, diabetes, obesity, and atherosclerosis. At the molecular level, this spice has been shown to modulate numerous cell-signaling pathways. In clinical trials, turmeric has shown efficacy against numerous human ailments including lupus nephritis, cancer, diabetes, irritable bowel syndrome, acne, and fibrosis. Thus, a spice originally common in the kitchen is now exhibiting activities in the clinic. In this review, we discuss the chemical constituents of turmeric, its biological activities, its molecular targets, and its potential in the clinic. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. SPICE modelling of the transient response of irradiated MOSFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouget, V.; Lapuyade, H.; Lewis, D.; Deval, Y.; Fouillat, P.; Sarger, L.

    1999-01-01

    A new SPICE model of irradiated MOSFET taking into account the real response of the 4 electrodes is proposed. The component that has been simulated is an NMOS transistor issued from the AMS BiCMOS 0.8 μm technology. A comparison between SPICE-generated transients and PISCES device simulation demonstrates the accuracy benefits when used in complex electronic architectures. This model could be used when designing electronic circuits able to sustain hardening due to SEE (single event effect), it will be an efficient complement to the physical simulations

  14. SPICE as an IAU Recommendation for Planetary Ephemerides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, Charles; Bachman, Nathaniel; Folkner, William M.; Hilton, James

    2015-08-01

    In 2010 the IAU Commission 4 Working Group (WG) on Standardizing Access to Ephemerides and File Format Specification was formed to define a portable standard for planetary ephemeris files. The standard would have to work for all three sources of ephemerides-NASA/JPL, Institut de mécanique céleste de calcul des éphémérides (IMCCE), and Institute of Applied Astronomy (IAA). The WG decided to base its standard on the existing "SPICE"* Spacecraft/Planet kernel (SPK) format.The SPK format was created for use with the "SPICE" information system, used by many scientists and engineers worldwide to compute the geometry needed to plan and analyze data from robotic missions. SPICE is comprised of both data files and associated software, all freely available. SPICE data files, usually referred to as "kernels," provide ephemerides and size, shape and orientation of solar system bodies; spacecraft trajectory and orientation; reference frame specifications and implementations; instrument field-of-view geometry; and time system conversion data.Standard SPICE ephemeris files use the TDB time system-the WG requested SPICE be extended to accommodate ephemerides based on the TCB time system. Extensions were also needed to accommodate the IAA ephemeris representation as well as the integrated difference between coordinate time and proper time in the form of TT-TDB and TCG-TCB.Software to read the SPK kernels defined to accommodate planetary ephemerides is available in the SPICE toolkit, and also in stand-alone kernel readers available from IMCEE and IAA.SPK is also used within the SPICE community for natural satellites, asteroids, and comets. Future IAU discussions might lead to an expansion of the work done for planets to provide more general standards for these bodies.Portions of the research described in this publication was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  15. Radiation and heat sensitivity of microflora in mixed spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, M. K.; Choudhury, N.; Chowdhury, N. A.; Youssouf, Q.M.

    1994-01-01

    Spices such as coriander, cumin, turmeric, chilli collected from local market were found to be highly contaminated with bacteria and fungi. A dose of 3 kGy without heat treatment reduced the microbial load from 6 log to 3 log and from 5 log to 2 log units depending on the storage temperature whereas the same dose of radiation combined with heat treatment reduced the microbial load from 6 log to 2 log units and from 4 log to below detectable level depending on storage condition. The combination treated spices retained good organoleptic quality in comparison to that of only irradiated species with higher dose. 11 refs., 2 tables (author)

  16. 21 CFR 582.50 - Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Provisions § 582.50 Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts. Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural...

  17. 21 CFR 182.50 - Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Provisions § 182.50 Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts. Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural...

  18. Effect of some Nigerian spices on biodeterioration of tilapia and cat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research is in two phases, one phase investigated the use of spices to inhibit the quick deterioration of fish. Spices used ere Xylopia aethiopica, Capsicum frutescens, Zingiber officinale, Piper guineense. Fishes used were Clarias gariepinus and Tilapia guineensis. Blended spices were applied on the fishes and kept ...

  19. Evaluating of Heavy Metal Contaminations in the Most Applicable Food Spices and Flavors in Hamedan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Bazargani-Gilani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: Iranian food diet contains nutrients and herbal spices. From the most important challenges in relation to these spices is their pollution with various heavy metals. Thus, this study aims to characterize the amounts of heavy metals in collected spices from Hamedan city of Iran during 2015-2016. Materials & Methods: 180 samples of commercially accessible vegetal spices were collected from local stores all over the Hamedan city. The samples were weighted and dried in an electrical oven at 105 ±1 °C for 24 h. Then, samples were grounded to powder by a grinder. Afterwards, the samples were digested by adding 4 ml and 1 ml of concentrated nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide, respectively. After filtration of samples, flamed atomic absorption used for detection of Zinc, Copper, Iron, Nickel, Manganese, Cadmium and Lead concentrations. For the statistical analysis of the results, SPSS version 21 was used. For examining data normality, Kolmogorov-Smirnov test; to compare the mean concentration of elements between spice samples from Tukey test and in order to investigate the correlation between the average concentrations of the heavy metals in the samples, Pearson correlation test were used. Comparing mean concentration of elements with standard values was conducted, using one-sample t-test.                                                                                                                           Results: The mean concentrations of Cadmium as a toxic trace element were low in all samples and no risk threatens consumers. But, lead content in dried mint (6.04±0.85mg/kg was high compared to the standard values. This trend was followed by cinnamon (4.88±1.32, turmeric (2.05±0.63, black pepper (1.51±0.63, sumac (1.17±1.08 and red pepper (0.72±0.85. Conclusion: Lead in dried mint exceeded

  20. SPICE benchmark for global tomographic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yilong; Capdeville, Yann; Maupin, Valerie; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Lebedev, Sergei; Beucler, Eric

    2008-11-01

    The existing global tomographic methods result in different models due to different parametrization, scale resolution and theoretical approach. To test how current imaging techniques are limited by approximations in theory and by the inadequacy of data quality and coverage, it is necessary to perform a global-scale benchmark to understand the resolving properties of each specific imaging algorithm. In the framework of the Seismic wave Propagation and Imaging in Complex media: a European network (SPICE) project, it was decided to perform a benchmark experiment of global inversion algorithms. First, a preliminary benchmark with a simple isotropic model is carried out to check the feasibility in terms of acquisition geometry and numerical accuracy. Then, to fully validate tomographic schemes with a challenging synthetic data set, we constructed one complex anisotropic global model, which is characterized by 21 elastic constants and includes 3-D heterogeneities in velocity, anisotropy (radial and azimuthal anisotropy), attenuation, density, as well as surface topography and bathymetry. The intermediate-period (>32 s), high fidelity anisotropic modelling was performed by using state-of-the-art anisotropic anelastic modelling code, that is, coupled spectral element method (CSEM), on modern massively parallel computing resources. The benchmark data set consists of 29 events and three-component seismograms are recorded by 256 stations. Because of the limitation of the available computing power, synthetic seismograms have a minimum period of 32 s and a length of 10 500 s. The inversion of the benchmark data set demonstrates several well-known problems of classical surface wave tomography, such as the importance of crustal correction to recover the shallow structures, the loss of resolution with depth, the smearing effect, both horizontal and vertical, the inaccuracy of amplitude of isotropic S-wave velocity variation, the difficulty of retrieving the magnitude of azimuthal

  1. SPICE modelling of the transient response of irradiated MOSFETs; Modelisation de la reponse transitoire de MOSFETs irradies avec SPICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pouget, V.; Lapuyade, H.; Lewis, D.; Deval, Y.; Fouillat, P. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., IXL, 33 - Talence (France); Sarger, L. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., CPMOH, 33 - Talence (France)

    1999-07-01

    A new SPICE model of irradiated MOSFET taking into account the real response of the 4 electrodes is proposed. The component that has been simulated is an NMOS transistor issued from the AMS BiCMOS 0.8 {mu}m technology. A comparison between SPICE-generated transients and PISCES device simulation demonstrates the accuracy benefits when used in complex electronic architectures. This model could be used when designing electronic circuits able to sustain hardening due to SEE (single event effect), it will be an efficient complement to the physical simulations.

  2. The role of spices and lactic acid bacteria as antimicrobial agent to extend the shelf life of metata ayib (traditional Ethiopian spiced fermented cottage cheese)

    OpenAIRE

    Geremew, Tsehayneh; Kebede, Ameha; Andualem, Berhanu

    2015-01-01

    Spices and lactic acid bacteria have natural antimicrobial substances and organic compounds having antagonistic activity against microorganisms. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of spices and lactic acid bacteria as antimicrobial agent to extend the shelf life of metata ayib. Antimicrobial activities of spices and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) filtrates were determined by agar well diffusion method against E. coli, S. aureus, S. flexneri and S. peumoniae. Aantimicrobial ac...

  3. Antioxidant Activity of Spices and Their Impact on Human Health: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashin, Alexander; Yashin, Yakov; Xia, Xiaoyan; Nemzer, Boris

    2017-09-15

    Antioxidants are substances that prevent oxidation of other compounds or neutralize free radicals. Spices and herbs are rich sources of antioxidants. They have been used in food and beverages to enhance flavor, aroma and color. Due to their excellent antioxidant activity, spices and herbs have also been used to treat some diseases. In this review article, the chemical composition and antioxidant activity of spices and culinary herbs are presented. The content of flavonoids and total polyphenols in different spices and herbs are summarized. The applications of spices and their impacts on human health are briefly described. The extraction and analytical methods for determination of antioxidant capacity are concisely reviewed.

  4. Influence of spice and wine based marinades on bovine Biceps ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fresh beef slices were marinated by immersion in marinades based on dry red wine, lime-tree honey, salt, spices and seasoning plants as thyme (Thymus vulgaris), marjoram (Majorana hortensis), garlic (Allium sativum) and horseradish (Armoracia rusticana). Control samples were prepared without marinating treatment ...

  5. Effects of Breeds and Spices on Water Holding Capacity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five muscles, semitendinosus (ST), Biceps femoris (BF), Longissimusdorsi, (LD), Triceps brachii (TB) and Brachialis (BC) were excised from twelve Goats buck carcasses of two breeds, the West African Dwarf and Red Sokoto, 50g of each muscle was cooked with four different spices; ginger (A) garlic (B), alligator pepper ...

  6. Application of a thermoluminescence method for detection of irradiated spices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastelum, S.; Osuna, I.; Melendrez, R.; Cruz-Zaragoza, E.; Chernov, V.; Calderon, T.; Barboza-Flores, M

    2002-07-01

    Food irradiation is extremely effective at reducing food-borne illness as well as losses caused by infestation and contamination. Despite the well-established regulations that permit irradiation to control pathogens in spices, there are no widespread methods to detect previously irradiated food. Therefore, it has become necessary to develop new detection and dose determination methods for food subjected previously to irradiation. The present work deals with the application of the thermoluminescence (TL) phenomenon to detect irradiated spices. The process is based upon the thermoluminescence properties exhibited by the polymineral content of the irradiated specimen. After separating the organic material, it is possible to extract some polymineral substances that are suitable for thermoluminescence analysis due to interaction of the spice to ionising radiation. The method was successfully applied to examine irradiated and non-irradiated paprika of Mexican origin. The spice was irradiated with gamma rays at doses of 5, 10 and 15 kGy. The separated thermoluminescent polymineral was found to be composed mainly of quartz and feldspar. The thermoluminescence glow curve of the irradiated specimen shows a side band peaked 228, 268 and 336 deg. C, resembling pretty much the combined TL of quartz and feldspars. The method allows for the determination of the retrospective dose exposure. (author)

  7. The effects of Groundnut, Spices, Monosodium Glutamate and Salt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was intended to determine the effect of salt, groundnut, monosodium glutamate and spices, especially in combinations as used in Yaji, on the histology of the brain. The rats were divided into nine (9) groups (A – I) of eight rats (8) each. Groups A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, constituted the test groups whereas group I ...

  8. Isolation and Analysis of Essential Oils from Spices

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Stephen K.; Von Riesen, Daniel D.; Rossi, Lauren L.

    2012-01-01

    Natural product isolation and analysis provide an opportunity to present a variety of experimental techniques to undergraduate students in introductory organic chemistry. Eugenol, anethole, and carvone were extracted from six common spices using steam-distillation and diethyl ether as the extraction solvent. Students assessed the purity of their…

  9. Screening of natural spices for improving the microbiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2014-04-30

    Apr 30, 2014 ... refrigerator and control samples (Table 1). The optimum concentration to obtain a consistent preservative effect of Sodium benzoate was 1%, at this concentration; the preservative effect was similar to those obtained from the spices (Table 1). Enumeration of the frequency of occurrence of the bacterial ...

  10. Nanopackaging of Silver using Spice Extract and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the present study was to synthesize silver nanoparticles using spice extracts as reducing agents and further evaluate their anti-microbial activities. Silver has been shown to possess antimicrobial activity. The silver nanoparticles were prepared by solvent evaporation method. The silver nanoparticles were ...

  11. SpiceyPy, a Python Wrapper for SPICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annex, A.

    2017-06-01

    SpiceyPy is an open source Python wrapper for the NAIF SPICE toolkit. It is available for macOS, Linux, and Windows platforms and for Python versions 2.7.x and 3.x as well as Anaconda. SpiceyPy can be installed by running: “pip install spiceypy.”

  12. Screening of natural spices for improving the microbiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2014-04-30

    Apr 30, 2014 ... Zobo -making process with a view to improving the microbial quality and safety of this product, thereby increasing the shelf life while also maintaining its excellent nutritional and organoleptic properties using natural spices. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Laboratory preparation of Zobo drink: Six hundred.

  13. In vitro antimicrobial activity of fermented spices and Capsicum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Food preservation is required to maintain for a long period of time. Traditional organic food preservative, “Datta” is spice mainly made up of Chili Peppers which frequently used in southern and western part of Ethiopia. Datta can be consumed almost with every kind of foods and it is believed as appetizer and ...

  14. Assessment of food fraud vulnerability in the spices chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silvis, I.C.J.; Ruth, van S.M.; Fels, van der Ine; Luning, P.A.

    2017-01-01

    Recent scandals have increased the need to strengthen companies’ ability to combat fraud within their own organizations and across their supply chain. Vulnerability assessments are a first step towards the inventory of fraud vulnerability and fraud mitigation plans. Spices are reported frequently

  15. Figurative Expressions, a Spice of Literary Creativity: Echoes From ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is no gainsaying the fact that figurative expressions are important in creative works of art. It is little wonder that literary writers employ these very significant expressions to articulate their ideas in special ways to give particular emphasis or sentiments which they use to communicate so as to beautify and spice up a ...

  16. Heavy metal contamination of some vegetables and spices in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analytical results are presented for the determination of Cd, Pb, Cu, Cr, Ni, Fe and Zn contents in some species of fresh vegetables and spices (Abelmoschus esculentus, Amarathus spinosis, Cucumis sativa, Talinium triangulare, Daucus carrota, Phaseolus vulgaris, Vernonia amygdalina, Piper nigrum, Lycopersicon ...

  17. Physicochemical and sensory qualities of spiced soy-corn milk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soy-corn milk type was produced from a blend of soybean milk and corn milk extract at a ratio of 3:1. The soy-corn milk type was spiced with ginger and garlic extract respectively to improve the taste. Total dissolved solid (TDS), total titrable acidity (TTA) specific gravity (SG), apparent colloidal stability, pH and sensory ...

  18. Effects of extracts from three indigenous spices on the chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fishes are the cheapest source of animal protein and it plays an important role in the diet of many people in both developed and developing countries. It is an important ... Among the three spices, Piper guinensis (uziza) was found to have the most effective preservation potential of smoked-dried fish during storage. This new ...

  19. Bacterial flora of spices and its control by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Zawahry, Y.A.; Youssef, Y.A.; Awny, N.M.; Hussein, H.A.

    1985-01-01

    The bacterial contamination was tested in 26 samples of spices. Chili, allspice and paprika were the most contaminated spices by bacteria. Five bacterial genera were isolated, namely bacillus, staphylococcus, streptococcus, micrococcus, and coccobacillus, all being gram-positive. Most isolates have been related to the genus bacillus. The bacterial isolates were identified as B. alvei, B. circulans, B. megaterium, B. pasteurii, B. pumilus, B. thuringiensis, B. sphaericus, B. incertaesedis, Micrococcus luteus, staphylococcus aureus, streptococcus sp. and coccobacillus sp. Irradiation of spices led to a significant decrease in the bacterial count of all samples. The dose required to inhibit completely the natural bacterial flora was 25 KGY. The most radioresistant isolates were staphylococcus aureus and micrococcus luteus which were subjected to sublethal doses of 15 and 20 KGY respectively. The dose response curves of the 2 most radioresistant isolates showed simple exponential relationship. The D 10-value of S. aureus and M. luteus were 0.9 and 1.1 KGY, respectively. The effect of storage period on the bacterial load of, as well as, the antibacterial activity of the tested spices were investigated. (author)

  20. Spice Up Your Life: Adipose Tissue and Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    Cells of the immune system are now recognized in the adipose tissue which, in obesity, produces proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines. Several herbs and spices have been in use since ancient times which possess anti-inflammatory properties. In this perspective, I discuss and propose the usage of these culinary delights for the benefit of human health. PMID:24701352

  1. Spice Up Your Life: Adipose Tissue and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K. Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cells of the immune system are now recognized in the adipose tissue which, in obesity, produces proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines. Several herbs and spices have been in use since ancient times which possess anti-inflammatory properties. In this perspective, I discuss and propose the usage of these culinary delights for the benefit of human health.

  2. Ethnobotanical studies of traditional leafy vegetables and spices of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traditional leafy vegetables represent inexpensive but high quality nutritional sources, for the poor segment of the population especially where malnutrition is wide spread. The objectives of this research were a) to identify and document the traditional leafy vegetables and spices of Ebonyi State, and b) to assess their ...

  3. Chemoprevention of Rat Mammary Carcinogenesis by Apiaceae Spices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrukh Aqil

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Scientific evidence suggests that many herbs and spices have medicinal properties that alleviate symptoms or prevent disease. In this study, we examined the chemopreventive effects of the Apiaceae spices, anise, caraway, and celery seeds against 17β-estrogen (E2-mediated mammary tumorigenesis in an ACI (August-Copenhagen Irish rat model. Female ACI rats were given either control diet (AIN 93M or diet supplemented with 7.5% (w/w of anise, caraway, or celery seed powder. Two weeks later, one half of the animals in each group received subcutaneous silastic implants of E2. Diet intake and body weight were recorded weekly, and animals were euthanized after 3 and 12 weeks. E2-treatment showed significantly (2.1- and 3.4-fold enhanced growth of pituitary gland at 3 and 12 weeks, respectively. All test spices significantly offset the pituitary growth by 12 weeks, except celery which was effective as early as three weeks. Immunohistochemical analysis for proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA in mammary tissues showed significant reduction in E2-mediated mammary cell proliferation. Test spices reduced the circulating levels of both E2 and prolactin at three weeks. This protection was more pronounced at 12 weeks, with celery eliciting the highest effect. RT-PCR and western blot analysis were performed to determine the potential molecular targets of the spices. Anise and caraway diets significantly offset estrogen-mediated overexpression of both cyclin D1 and estrogen receptor α (ERα. The effect of anise was modest. Likewise, expression of CYP1B1 and CYP1A1 was inhibited by all test spices. Based on short-term molecular markers, caraway was selected over other spices based on its enhanced effect on estrogen-associated pathway. Therefore, a tumor-end point study in ACI rats was conducted with dietary caraway. Tumor palpation from 12 weeks onwards revealed tumor latency of 29 days in caraway-treated animals compared with first tumor appearance at 92

  4. Pediatric lead exposure from imported Indian spices and cultural powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cristiane Gurgel; Schaider, Laurel Anne; Brabander, Daniel Joseph; Woolf, Alan David

    2010-04-01

    Significant lead poisoning has been associated with imported nonpaint products. To describe cases of pediatric lead intoxication from imported Indian spices and cultural powders, determine lead concentrations in these products, and predict effects of ingestion on pediatric blood lead levels (BLLs). Cases and case-study information were obtained from patients followed by the Pediatric Environmental Health Center (Children's Hospital Boston). Imported spices (n = 86) and cultural powders (n = 71) were analyzed for lead by using x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The simple bioaccessibility extraction test was used to estimate oral bioavailability. The integrated exposure uptake biokinetic model for lead in children was used to predict population-wide geometric mean BLLs and the probability of elevated BLLs (>10 microg/dL). Four cases of pediatric lead poisoning from Indian spices or cultural powders are described. Twenty-two of 86 spices and foodstuff products contained >1 microg/g lead (for these 22 samples, mean: 2.6 microg/g [95% confidence interval: 1.9-3.3]; maximum: 7.6 microg/g). Forty-six of 71 cultural products contained >1 microg/g lead (for 43 of these samples, mean: 8.0 microg/g [95% confidence interval: 5.2-10.8]; maximum: 41.4 microg/g). Three sindoor products contained >47% lead. With a fixed ingestion of 5 microg/day and 50% bioavailability, predicted geometric mean BLLs for children aged 0 to 4 years increased from 3.2 to 4.1 microg/dL, and predicted prevalence of children with a BLL of >10 microg/dL increased more than threefold (0.8%-2.8%). Chronic exposure to spices and cultural powders may cause elevated BLLs. A majority of cultural products contained >1 microg/g lead, and some sindoor contained extremely high bioaccessible lead levels. Clinicians should routinely screen for exposure to these products.

  5. Application Of Electronic Nose And Ion Mobility Spectrometer To Quality Control Of Spice Mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banach, U.; Tiebe, C.; Huebert, Th.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to demonstrate the application of electronic nose (e-nose) and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) to quality control and to find out product adulteration of spice mixtures. Therefore the gaseous head space phase of four different spice mixtures (spices for sausages and saveloy) was differed from original composition and product adulteration. In this set of experiments metal-oxide type e-nose (KAMINA-type) has been used, and characteristic patterns of data corresponding to various complex odors of the four different spice mixtures were generated. Simultaneously an ion mobility spectrometer was coupled also to an emission chamber for the detection of gaseous components of spice mixtures. The two main methods that have been used show a clear discrimination between the original spice mixtures and product adulteration could be distinguished from original spice mixtures.

  6. Adding Ajax

    CERN Document Server

    Powers, Shelley

    2007-01-01

    Ajax can bring many advantages to an existing web application without forcing you to redo the whole thing. This book explains how you can add Ajax to enhance, rather than replace, the way your application works. For instance, if you have a traditional web application based on submitting a form to update a table, you can enhance it by adding the capability to update the table with changes to the form fields, without actually having to submit the form. That's just one example.Adding Ajax is for those of you more interested in extending existing applications than in creating Rich Internet Applica

  7. Adding Spice to Vanilla LCDM simulations: Alternative Cosmologies & Lighting up Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahan Elahi, Pascal

    2015-08-01

    Cold Dark Matter simulations have formed the backbone of our theoretical understanding of cosmological structure formation. Predictions from the Lambda Cold Dark Matter (LCDM) cosmology, where the Universe contains two dark components, namely Dark Matter & Dark Energy, are in excellent agreement with the Large-Scale Structures observed, i.e., the distribution of galaxies across cosmic time. However, this paradigm is in tension with observations at small-scales, from the number and properties of satellite galaxies around galaxies such as the Milky Way and Andromeda, to the lensing statistics of massive galaxy clusters. I will present several alternative models of cosmology (from Warm Dark Matter to coupled Dark Matter-Dark Energy models) and how they compare to vanilla LCDM by studying formation of groups and clusters dark matter only and adiabatic hydrodynamical zoom simulations. I will show how modifications to the dark sector can lead to some surprising results. For example, Warm Dark Matter, so often examined on small satellite galaxies scales, can be probed observationally using weak lensing at cluster scales. Coupled dark sectors, where dark matter decays into dark energy and experiences an effective gravitational potential that differs from that experienced by normal matter, is effectively hidden away from direct observations of galaxies. Studies like these are vital if we are to pinpoint observations which can look for unique signatures of the physics that governs the hidden Universe. Finally, I will discuss how all of these predictions are affected by uncertain galaxy formation physics. I will present results from a major comparison study of numerous hydrodynamical codes, the nIFTY cluster comparison project. This comparison aims to understand the code-to-code scatter in the properties of dark matter haloes and the galaxies that reside in them. We find that even in purely adiabatic simulations, different codes form clusters with very different X-ray profiles. The galaxies that form in these simulations, which all use codes that attempt to reproduce the observed galaxy population via not unreasonable subgrid physics, vary in stellar mass, morphology and gas fraction, sometimes by an order of magnitude. I will end with a discussion of precision cosmology in light of these results.

  8. Adding Spice to Vanilla LCDM simulations: From Alternative Cosmologies to Lighting up Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahan Elahi, Pascal

    2015-08-01

    Cold Dark Matter simulations have formed the backbone of our theoretical understanding of cosmological structure formation. Predictions from the Lambda Cold Dark Matter (LCDM) cosmology, in which the Universe contains two major dark components, namely Dark Matter and Dark Energy, are in excellent agreement with the Large-Scale Structures observed, i.e., the distribution of galaxies across cosmic time. However, this paradigm is in tension with observations at small-scales, from the number and properties of satellite galaxies around galaxies such as the Milky Way and Andromeda, to the lensing statistics of massive galaxy clusters. I will present several alternative models of cosmology (from Warm Dark Matter to coupled Dark Matter-Dark Energy models) and how they compare to vanilla LCDM by studying formation of groups and clusters dark matter only and adiabatic hydrodynamical zoom simulations. I will show how modifications to the dark sector can lead to some surprising results. For example, Warm Dark Matter, so often examined on small satellite galaxies scales, can be probed observationally using weak lensing at cluster scales. Coupled dark sectors, where dark matter decays into dark energy and experiences an effective gravitational potential that differs from that experienced by normal matter, is effectively hidden away from direct observations of galaxies. Studies like these are vital if we are to pinpoint observations which can look for unique signatures of the physics that governs the hidden Universe. Of course, all of these predictions are unfortunately affected by uncertain galaxy formation physics. I will end by presenting results from a comparison study of numerous hydrodynamical codes, the nIFTY cluster comparison project, and how even how purely adiabatic simulations run with different codes give in quite different galaxy populations. The galaxies that form in these simulations, which all attempt to reproduce the observed galaxy population via not unreasonable subgrid physics, can and do vary in stellar mass, morphology and gas fraction.

  9. Adding Spice to the Porridge: The development of a synthetic cannabinoid market in an English prison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralphs, Rob; Williams, Lisa; Askew, Rebecca; Norton, Anna

    2017-02-01

    In 2014, the annual report of the Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Prisons (HMIP) for England and Wales raised concerns regarding New Psychoactive Substance (NPS) use in custody, specifically the consumption of synthetic cannabinoids. To date, however, the use of these substances in prison populations, and the markets that have emerged to facilitate it, have been under-researched. Our research was conducted in an English adult male prison using multi-method techniques. These included: in-depth interviews and focus groups with prison staff and prisoners; observations of prisoner-led focus groups, workshops and restorative justice circles involving discussion of synthetic cannabinoid use and markets; and analysis of routinely collected prison data measuring drug seizures, incidents of violence and incidents of self-harm. The findings highlight: (1) the scale and nature of synthetic cannabinoid markets in a custodial setting and the motivations for establishing them; (2) the nature and motivations for synthetic cannabinoids use in prison; and (3) the impact synthetic cannabinoid markets in this setting have upon prisoners, the prison system and the wider criminal justice system. The policy implications of the stated motivations for use and reported problems are discussed in relation to both prison and community settings, and the recently implemented Psychoactive Substance Act (2016). The paper concludes that the rise in synthetic cannabinoid use in custody and the size of the drug market are posing significant challenges to the management of offenders; including healthcare, appropriate detection techniques, license recall and sanctions for both use and supply. We argue that the primary motivation for consumption in this setting is the avoidance of drug use detection, and that this is likely to supersede other motivations for consumption in the future. We propose a revision of the use of mandatory drug tests (MDTs) both in prisons and in the management of offenders in the community. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Adding SPICE to a Library Internet Site: A Recipe to Enhance Usability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Tonnison

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective - To produce a highly- usable intranet site, use the project to explore the practical application of evidence-based librarianship (EBL, and refine the library's project management methodology. Methods - Evidence was gathered via a literature review, an online survey, scenario-based usability testing, and the completion of a usability checlist. Usability issues were then addressed, guided by the Research-Based Web Design and Usability Guidelines. Results - After a preliminary revision, the site achieved a usability index of 79% after application of the "Raward Library Usability Analysis Tool". Finding the information and supporting user tasks were identified as areas of weakness. Usability testing and cleint feedback supported these findings. After these issues were addressed by a major site redeveloment, the usability index increased to 98%. Conclusions - Raward's checklist is an easy and effective tool for measuring and identifying usability issues. Its value was enhanced by scenario-based usability testing, which yielded rich, client specific information. The application of EBL and project management princples ehnanced the outcomes of the project, and the professional development of the project team.

  11. Microbiological status and antifungal properties of irradiated spices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, A.; Ghanekar, A.S.; Padwal-Desai, S.R.; Nadkarni, G.B.

    The bacterial counts of commercially available species were found to be in the range of 10/sup 2/-10/sup 7//g, whereas the fungal counts varied between 10/sup 2/ and 10/sup 3//g. Among the five spices studied, pepper, cardamom, and nutmeg mace had a high microbial load compared to cinnamon and clove. Exposure to ..gamma..-irradiation in the dose range of 7.5-10 kGy was adequate to sterilize all the spices. The essential oil of clove and cinnamon exhibited inhibitory properties against aflatoxin-producing aspergilli. ..gamma..-Irradiation did not affect fungal inhibitory principles present in clove, though marginal reduction was observed in that of cinnamon.

  12. Thermoluminescent characteristics of inorganic dust from black pepper spice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furetta, C.; Cruz Z, E.; Favalli, A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The irradiation of spices is normally used for its sterilization, allowing this procedure to extend the storage time ir different needs, i.e. transportation over large distances from the production places to distribution points for commercialization. The irradiated food allows studying the behaviour and the characteristics of its inorganic content, i.e. minerals. The aim of this work is to study the main thermoluminescent (TL) characteristics of the inorganic dust extracted from Black pepper spice. TL responses as a function of the delivered gamma dose, fading at room temperature, effect of W irradiation are reported. The thermoluminescent kinetic parameters of the glow curves have been accurately analysed using the Computerized Glow Curve Deconvolution (CGCD) method and results are discussed. (Author)

  13. Analysis of ESR measurement parameters for detecting irradiated spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameya, Hiromi; Hagiwara, Shoji; Todoriki, Setsuko

    2015-01-01

    The side signals from irradiated cellulose radical are used for detecting irradiated spices with the electron spin resonance (ESR). The side signals are two signals observed on both sides of a singlet signal (g≒2.00) from organic free radicals. Since the intensities of the side signals are weak, if the width of the singlet signal is large, these signals are covered and cannot be observed. In this study, we analyzed ESR measurement parameters of seven kinds spices (oregano, basil, parsley, coriander, cumin, white pepper, and black pepper) that would lead to narrow width of the singlet signal for detecting side signals. The results were as follows: 4 mW microwave power for basil, parsley, oregano, coriander, and cumin, and 8 mW for white pepper and black pepper, while modulation amplitude of 4 G, time constant of 20 ms were determined to be the optimal ESR measurement parameters. (author)

  14. SPICE Model of Memristor with Nonlinear Dopant Drift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Biolek

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of the prototype of memristor, manufactured in 2008 in Hewlett-Packard Labs, is described in the paper. It is shown that the hitherto published approaches to the modeling of boundary conditions need not conform with the requirements for the behavior of a practical circuit element. The described SPICE model of the memristor is thus constructed as an open model, enabling additional modifications of non-linear boundary conditions. Its functionality is illustrated on computer simulations.

  15. The Role of Herbs and Spices in Cancer Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Kaefer, Christine M.; Milner, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Historically herbs and spices have enjoyed a rich tradition of use for their flavor-enhancement characteristics and for their medicinal properties. The rising prevalence of chronic diseases world-wide and the corresponding rise in health care costs is propelling interest among researchers and the public for these food related items for multiple health benefits, including a reduction in cancer risk and modification of tumor behavior. A growing body of epidemiological and preclinical evidence p...

  16. Estrogen and progestin bioactivity of foods, herbs, and spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zava, D T; Dollbaum, C M; Blen, M

    1998-03-01

    In this study we report on the content and bioactivity of plant (phyto) estrogens and progestins in various foods, herbs, and spices, before and after human consumption. Over 150 herbs traditionally used by herbalists for treating a variety of health problems were extracted and tested for their relative capacity to compete with estradiol and progesterone binding to intracellular receptors for progesterone (PR) and estradiol (ER) in intact human breast cancer cells. The six highest ER-binding herbs that are commonly consumed were soy, licorice, red clover, thyme, tumeric, hops, and verbena. The six highest PR-binding herbs and spices commonly consumed were oregano, verbena, tumeric, thyme, red clover and damiana. Some of the herbs and spices found to contain high phytoestrogens and phytoprogestins were further tested for bioactivity based on their ability to regulate cell growth rate in ER (+) and ER (-) breast cancer cell lines and to induce or inhibit the synthesis of alkaline phosphatase, an end product of progesterone action, in PR (+) cells. In general, we found that ER-binding herbal extracts were agonists, much like estradiol, whereas PR-binding extracts, were neutral or antagonists. The bioavailability of phytoestrogens and phytoprogestins in vivo were studied by quantitating the ER-binding and PR-binding capacity of saliva following consumption of soy milk, exogenous progesterone, medroxyprogesterone acetate, or wild mexican yam products containing diosgenin. Soy milk caused a dramatic increase in saliva ER-binding components without a concomitant rise in estradiol. Consumption of PR-binding herbs increased the progestin activity of saliva, but there were marked differences in bioactivity. In summary, we have demonstrated that many of the commonly consumed foods, herbs, and spices contain phytoestrogens and phytoprogestins that act as agonists and antagonists in vivo.

  17. Microbiological Spoilage of Spices, Nuts, Cocoa, and Coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkas, Joan M.; Battista, Karen; Morille-Hinds, Theodora

    Spices, nuts, cocoa, and coffee are raw materials that may be used alone or as ingredients in the manufacture of processed food products. The control of microbiological spoilage of these raw materials at the ingredient stage will enable the food processor to better assure the production of high-quality foods with an acceptable shelf life. While this chapter is limited to four materials, many of the spoilage control procedures recommended can also be applied to other raw materials of a similar nature.

  18. Natural Occurrence of Aflatoxins Contamination in Commercial Spices in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Jalili

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A total of 80 sample of spices (red pepper, black pepper, turmeric and cinnamon, commercialized in Iran, was analyzed for aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2 content using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC with a fluorescence detector (FD. A mixture of acetonitrile–methanol–water (17:29:54; v/v was used as the mobile phase and an immunoaffinity column (IAC applied as a cleanup method. All kinds of spice samples were spiked with aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2 at levels of 1, 10, and 30 ng/g and recovery values were determined. Results showed recoveries ranged from 76.4±5.6 to 98.3±3.2 for AFG1 in cinnamon (spiked at 1ng/g and AFB2 in turmeric (spiked at 10ng/g respectively. Thirty-two out of 80 (40% samples were contaminated with aflatoxins ranged from 0.85±0.10 to 24.60±0.12. Aflatoxin B1 was detected in all of the contaminated samples at the highest concentration as compared with other aflatoxins. Red pepper was significantly (p≤0.05 more contaminated than other spices.

  19. Microwave Assisted Extraction of Phenolic Compounds from Four Different Spices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Ritieni

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Spices and herbs are known not only for their taste, aroma and flavour, but also for their medical properties and value. Both spices and herbs have been used for centuries in traditional medical systems to cure various kinds of illnesses such as common cold, diabetes, cough and cancers. The aim of this work was the comparison between two different extractive techniques in order to get qualitative and quantitative data regarding bioactive compounds of four different spices (Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Coriandrum sativum, Cuminum cyminum, Crocus sativus. The plants were extracted employing ultrasonication and microwave-assisted extractions. The efficiency of extraction of bioactive compounds obtained with the microwave extraction process was in general about four times higher than that resulting from sonication extraction. The various extracts obtained were analyzed for their antioxidant activity using ABTS, DPPH and FRAP assays and for their total polyphenolic content. It can be concluded that microwave-assisted extractions provide significant advantages in terms of extraction efficiency and time savings.

  20. Cancer cell signaling pathways targeted by spice-derived nutraceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Bokyung; Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2012-01-01

    Extensive research within the last half a century has revealed that cancer is caused by dysregulation of as many as 500 different gene products. Most natural products target multiple gene products and thus are ideally suited for prevention and treatment of various chronic diseases, including cancer. Dietary agents such as spices have been used extensively in the Eastern world for a variety of ailments for millennia, and five centuries ago they took a golden journey to the Western world. Various spice-derived nutraceuticals, including 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate, anethole, capsaicin, cardamonin, curcumin, dibenzoylmethane, diosgenin, eugenol, gambogic acid, gingerol, thymoquinone, ursolic acid, xanthohumol, and zerumbone derived from galangal, anise, red chili, black cardamom, turmeric, licorice, fenugreek, clove, kokum, ginger, black cumin, rosemary, hop, and pinecone ginger, respectively, are the focus of this review. The modulation of various transcription factors, growth factors, protein kinases, and inflammatory mediators by these spice-derived nutraceuticals are described. The anticancer potential through the modulation of various targets is also the subject of this review. Although they have always been used to improve taste and color and as a preservative, they are now also used for prevention and treatment of a wide variety of chronic inflammatory diseases, including cancer.

  1. [Survival of Salmonella in spices and growth in cooked food].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urabe, Yurie; Minai, Yuji; Haga, Minoru; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Ishiguro, Atsushi; Hara-Kudo, Yukiko

    2008-04-01

    Contamination of spices with pathogens has been reported worldwide, and Salmonella might result in foodborne infections. In this study, we investigated the survival of Salmonella in black pepper and red pepper, and the growth of the surviving Salmonella in cooked food. Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Weltevreden and Salmonella Senftenberg were inoculated into spices, and their survival during storage was examined. In black pepper, S. Enteritidis was no longer viable after storage for 28 days, but S. Weltevreden and S. Senftenberg remained viable. In red pepper, S. Weltevreden and S. Senftenberg survived for 28 days although S. Enteritidis was not viable after 7 days. Salmonella Weltevreden and Salmonella Senftenberg were inoculated into cooked food, and their survival during storage was determined. In potato salad, egg salad, namul and kimchi as cooked foods, both pathogens grew at 30 degrees C, but not at 10 degrees C. Our results indicate that cooked food should be stored at low temperature after addition of spices, such as black pepper and red pepper, following the cooking.

  2. Antioxidant Activity of Spices and Their Impact on Human Health: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Yashin, Alexander; Yashin, Yakov; Xia, Xiaoyan; Nemzer, Boris

    2017-01-01

    Antioxidants are substances that prevent oxidation of other compounds or neutralize free radicals. Spices and herbs are rich sources of antioxidants. They have been used in food and beverages to enhance flavor, aroma and color. Due to their excellent antioxidant activity, spices and herbs have also been used to treat some diseases. In this review article, the chemical composition and antioxidant activity of spices and culinary herbs are presented. The content of flavonoids and total polypheno...

  3. Commercial potential of irradiated spices and dried mixes for export and domestic markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padwal-Desai, S.R.

    1994-01-01

    Indian traders who are conventionally exporting non-sterile spices and other dry mixes to several countries, receive not only low value for their produce on account of poor microbiological quality, but also lose the benefits of value addition. Development of gamma ray hygienization facility at the export points could therefore change this scenario. The economic benefits of hygienization and value addition could justifiably be accrued by the spice producing nations like India which has the necessary expertise and technology for supplying quality spices and spice mixes to the world class consumer, besides providing quality product to a huge domestic market. 10 refs

  4. Comparison of electron-irradiation and gamma-irradiation as a decontamination treatment of spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Toru; Todoriki, Setsuko; Mamun.

    1993-01-01

    Electron-irradiation at 10 kGy decontaminated all the eight kinds of spices (black pepper, white pepper, nutmeg, red pepper, parsley, paprika, laurel and onion powder) to the microbial levels lower than 10 2 /g. Similar sterilization effects by the irradiation were observed on heat-resistant bacterial spores. The 10 kGy irradiation did not significantly affect the contents of essential oils and colors of the spices. These results indicate that electron-irradiation at 10 kGy effectively decontaminates spices without notable adverse effect on the qualities. The disinfecting effect of electron beams on spices was smaller than that of gamma-rays. (author)

  5. Antioxidant capacity of 26 spice extracts and characterization of their phenolic constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Bin; Cai, Yizhong Z; Sun, Mei; Corke, Harold

    2005-10-05

    Total equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) and phenolic content of 26 common spice extracts from 12 botanical families were investigated. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of major phenolics in the spice extracts were systematically conducted by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Many spices contained high levels of phenolics and demonstrated high antioxidant capacity. Wide variation in TEAC values (0.55-168.7 mmol/100 g) and total phenolic content (0.04-14.38 g of gallic acid equivalent/100 g) was observed. A highly positive linear relationship (R2= 0.95) obtained between TEAC values and total phenolic content showed that phenolic compounds in the tested spices contributed significantly to their antioxidant capacity. Major types of phenolic constituents identified in the spice extracts were phenolic acids, phenolic diterpenes, flavonoids, and volatile oils (e.g., aromatic compounds). Rosmarinic acid was the dominant phenolic compound in the six spices of the family Labiatae. Phenolic volatile oils were the principal active ingredients in most spices. The spices and related families with the highest antioxidant capacity were screened, e.g., clove in the Myrtaceae, cinnamon in the Lauraceae, oregano in the Labiatae, etc., representing potential sources of potent natural antioxidants for commercial exploitation. This study provides direct comparative data on antioxidant capacity and total and individual phenolics contents of the 26 spice extracts.

  6. Studies on the in vitro absorption of spice principles--curcumin, capsaicin and piperine in rat intestines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, D; Srinivasan, K

    2007-08-01

    A comparative evaluation of the absorbability of three structurally similar and physiologically active spice principles in an in vitro system consisting of everted rat intestinal sacs was made. When everted sacs of rat intestines were incubated with 50-1000 microg of curcumin in 10 ml incubation medium, absorption of the spice principle was maximum at 100 microg concentration. The amount of absorbed curcumin present in the serosal fluid was negligible. This and the comparatively lower recovery of the original compound suggested that curcumin to some extent undergoes a modification during absorption. For similar concentrations of added piperine, about 44-63% of piperine disappeared from the mucosal side. Absorption of piperine which was maximum at 800 microg per 10 ml was about 63%. The absolute amounts of piperine absorbed in this in vitro system exceeded the amounts of curcumin. The absorbed piperine could be traced in both the serosal fluid and in the intestinal tissue, indicating that piperine did not undergo any metabolic change during the process of absorption. 7-12% of the absorbed piperine was found in the serosal fluid. When everted sacs of rat intestines were incubated with 10-500 microg of capsaicin, a maximum of 82-88% absorption could be seen in the lower concentrations, and the amount of absorbed capsaicin did not proportionately increase at higher concentrations. A relatively higher percentage of the absorbed capsaicin could be seen in the serosal fluid as compared to curcumin or piperine. When these spice active principles were associated with mixed micelles, their in vitro intestinal absorption was relatively higher. Curcumin absorption in everted intestinal sac increased from 48.7% to 56.1% when the same was present in micelles. In the case of capsaicin and piperine, increase in absorption was 27.8-44.4% and 43.4-57.4%, respectively, when they were present in micelles as compared to its native form.

  7. Culinary Spice Plants in Dietary Supplement Products and Tested in Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldanha, Leila G; Dwyer, Johanna T; Betz, Joseph M

    2016-03-01

    Dried plant parts used as culinary spices (CSs) in food are permitted as dietary ingredients in dietary supplements (DSs) within certain constraints in the United States. We reviewed the amounts, forms, and nutritional support (structure/function) claims of DSs that contain CS plants listed in the Dietary Supplement Label Database (DSLD) and compared this label information with trial doses and health endpoints for CS plants that were the subject of clinical trials listed in clinicaltrials.gov. According to the DSLD, the CS plants occurring most frequently in DSs were cayenne, cinnamon, garlic, ginger, pepper, rosemary, and turmeric. Identifying the botanical species, categorizing the forms used, and determining the amounts from the information provided on DS labels was challenging. CS plants were typically added as a component of a blend, as the powered biomass, dried extracts, and isolated phytochemicals. The amounts added were declared on about 55% of the labels, rendering it difficult to determine the amount of the CS plant used in many DSs. Clinicaltrials.gov provided little information about the composition of test articles in the intervention studies. When plant names were listed on DS labels and in clinical trials, generally the common name and not the Latin binomial name was given. In order to arrive at exposure estimates and enable researchers to reproduce clinical trials, the Latin binomial name, form, and amount of the CS plant used in DSs and tested in clinical trials must be specified. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  8. Culinary Spice Plants in Dietary Supplement Products and Tested in Clinical Trials123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldanha, Leila G; Dwyer, Johanna T; Betz, Joseph M

    2016-01-01

    Dried plant parts used as culinary spices (CSs) in food are permitted as dietary ingredients in dietary supplements (DSs) within certain constraints in the United States. We reviewed the amounts, forms, and nutritional support (structure/function) claims of DSs that contain CS plants listed in the Dietary Supplement Label Database (DSLD) and compared this label information with trial doses and health endpoints for CS plants that were the subject of clinical trials listed in clinicaltrials.gov. According to the DSLD, the CS plants occurring most frequently in DSs were cayenne, cinnamon, garlic, ginger, pepper, rosemary, and turmeric. Identifying the botanical species, categorizing the forms used, and determining the amounts from the information provided on DS labels was challenging. CS plants were typically added as a component of a blend, as the powered biomass, dried extracts, and isolated phytochemicals. The amounts added were declared on about 55% of the labels, rendering it difficult to determine the amount of the CS plant used in many DSs. Clinicaltrials.gov provided little information about the composition of test articles in the intervention studies. When plant names were listed on DS labels and in clinical trials, generally the common name and not the Latin binomial name was given. In order to arrive at exposure estimates and enable researchers to reproduce clinical trials, the Latin binomial name, form, and amount of the CS plant used in DSs and tested in clinical trials must be specified. PMID:26980817

  9. Microbial contamination of spices used in production of meat products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Klimešová

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available There was investigated microbial quality of spices used in production of meat products (black pepper, allspice, coriander, juniper, cumin, cinnamon, badian, mustard, bay leaf, paprika, rosemary, garlic, ginger, thyme, cardamom. The spices were analysed on the presence of total count of mesophilic, thermoresistant and coliforming microorganisms, Staphylococcus aureus, methicilin resistant S. aureus (MRSA, Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Bacillus cereus, Bacillus licheniformis and moulds. For the detection of fungal contamination was used agar with glucose, yeast extract and oxytetracyklin and dichloran-glycerol agar. The cultivation was performed at 25 ±1°C for 5 - 7 days. The microscopic method was used for species identification. The aflatoxin presence was confirmed by ELISA test in all of tested spices and was performed in ppb (pars per billion = μg/kg. TCM ranged from 200 to 5600000 cfu/g, TRM from 20 to 90000 cfu/g and coliforming bacteria from 30 to 3200 cfu/g. B. cereus was present in juniper, mustard, bay leaf, thyme and cardamom (32%, while B. licheniformis was confirmed in 58% of cases (allspice, pepper, ground juniper, badian, bay leaf, paprika, garlic, thyme and cardamom. S. aureus was detected in whole coriander, cinnamon, badian and mustard but only in law number (30, 40, 20 and 10 cfu/g respectively. No strains S. aureus was identified as MRSA. The presence of Salmonella spp. and E. coli was not confirmed. The fungal contamination was found in 14 spices and the their count varied from 0 to 1550 cfu/g. There were confirmed the presence of Aspergillus flavus (allspice whole and ground, black pepper whole and ground, whole coriander, ground cumin, ground bay leaf, Aspergillus niger (allspice whole and ground, black pepper ground, ground juniper, cumin ground, bay leaf ground, ground rosemary, ground thyme, Penicillium glaucum (allspice whole and ground, whole juniper, whole cinnamon, Penicillium claviforme (whole black pepper

  10. SPICE Modeling of Body Bias Effect in 4H-SiC Integrated Circuit Resistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    2017-01-01

    The DC electrical behavior of n-type 4H-SiC resistors used for realizing 500C durable integrated circuits (ICs) is studied as a function of substrate bias and temperature. Improved fidelity electrical simulation is described using SPICE NMOS model to simulate resistor substrate body bias effect that is absent from the SPICE semiconductor resistor model.

  11. Marketing Of Local Spices In Owerri Municipal Of Imo State, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the marketing of local spices in Owerri municipal of Imo State, Nigeria. The objectives were to examine the costs and margins of the selected spices and analyze the effect of socio-economic variables on the income of the traders. Data for the study were collected from three markets in Owerri municipal ...

  12. An overview of herbs, spices and plant extracts used as seasonings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seasonings include Spices such as pepper, herbs such as the leaves of cloves and bay, vegetable bulbs such as garlic and onions, sweeteners such as sugar and monosodium glutamate, and plant extracts such as that of Ocimum grattisimum or 'scent leaf'. Spices are the bark, roots, seeds, buds or berries of plants, most ...

  13. 21 CFR 101.22 - Foods; labeling of spices, flavorings, colorings and chemical preservatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... convenience of the user, the revised text is set forth as follows: § 101.22 Foods; labeling of spices... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Foods; labeling of spices, flavorings, colorings and chemical preservatives. 101.22 Section 101.22 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION...

  14. Investigation of the Yeast and Mould Floras in Some Ground Spices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydın Vural

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, yeast and mould floras of 60 spices samples that werecollected from different places of Diyarbakır have been investigated. Theyeast spices as Aspergillus flavus, A. fumigatus and A. niger and mouldspices as Candida tropicalis and C. albicans have been commonly isolatedfrom the spices samples.The ratios of yeast contamination in the samples of black pepper,cumin, allspice, ground hot red pepper, flaked pepper (red and flakedpepper (black, investigated in this study, have been found as % 70, % 80,% 90, % 90, % 60 and % 30 respectively. As a result of high amount ofyeast contamination in spices samples, it is thought that there is a high riskof aflatoxin presence.Using the good and hygienically producing techniques at the stages ofharvest, production, processing, storage and selling with decontaminationapplications as sterilization, microwave and irradiation become effectiveeither in to prove the microbiological quality of the spices and eliminatingof the probable aflatoxin risk due to highly yeast contamination.

  15. Possible role of common spices as a preventive and therapeutic agent for Alzheimer′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Mirmosayyeb

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For centuries, spices have been consumed as food additives or medicinal agents. However, there is increasing evidence indicating the plant-based foods in regular diet may lower the risk of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer disease. Spices, as one of the most commonly used plant-based food additives may provide more than just flavors, but as agents that may prevent or even halt neurodegenerative processes associated with aging. In this article, we review the role and application of five commonly used dietary spices including saffron turmeric, pepper family, zingiber, and cinnamon. Besides suppressing inflammatory pathways, these spices may act as antioxidant and inhibit acetyl cholinesterase and amyloid β aggregation. We summarized how spice-derived nutraceuticals mediate such different effects and what their molecular targets might be. Finally, some directions for future research are briefly discussed.

  16. 78 FR 76628 - Draft Risk Profile on Pathogens and Filth in Spices: Availability; Extension of Comment Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Risk Profile on Pathogens and Filth in Spices... period for the notice entitled ``Draft Risk Profile on Pathogens and Filth in Spices: Availability'' that...), we published a notice entitled ``Draft Risk Profile on Pathogens and Filth in Spices: Availability...

  17. Prophage lambda induction (Inductest) of blood of rats fed irradiated spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, J.; Andrassy, E.

    1981-01-01

    Lysogenic Escherichia coli K12 strains Nos. GY 5023: envA uvr + (lambda) and GY 5027: envA uvrB (lambda) were used as test organisms and E.coli strain No. GY 4015 as the indicator to investigate prophage induction (Inductest) of blood samples of CFY rats fed with black pepper and spice mixture treated with gamma radiation. The dose levels applied for the irradiation of spices were 0.5 and 15 kGy. In the rat feed, the applied concentration of ground black pepper was 3.5%, and that of the spice mixture (: mild paprika, black pepper, allspice, coriander, marjoram, cumin and nutmeg) was 25%. Blood samples were taken for prophage induction after six days' feeding with the tested diet. Tests with pepper were performed both within two weaks after irradiation and again after 90 days of storage following irradiation, while with the spice mixture, Inductest was performed with the blood of rats fed with a spice mixture irradiated 90 days before the start of the feeding test. Neither the blood of rats fed with irradiated pepper nor that of rats fed with irradiated spice mixture did increase, to a statistically significant degree, the occurrence of prophage induction as compared with blood samples of rats fed with a diet containing untreated spices or with commercial rat feed. In agreement with earlier microbial mutagenicity tests performed with extracts of irradiated spices and urine of rats fed with irradiated spices, neither did the present results indicate that spices irradiated with 5 and 15 kGy or their metabolites would be of DNA-modofying potential. (author)

  18. Radiosterilization or sterilization by steam. Procedures for sterilization of spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warmbold, J.

    1994-01-01

    The article compares two different methods for the sterilization of spices, namely radiosterilization and sterilization with steam. The first method applies ionizing radiation which can alter the chemical composition of the products. Tests have shown, however, that radiation doses up to 10 kGy will not induce the formation of carcinogenic agents in the foodstuffs, or of toxic substances, and thus are a wholesome method of preservation. Any modifications of taste, color or smell, or loss of vitamins, can be avoided by proper dose control and standard irradiation conditions. Sterilization by steam is a method achieving substantial suppression of the formation of germs, aerobic spores, yeasts, mould, and gramnegative germs, while preserving in most cases the essential oils. It may result in sensoric alterations, i.e affect the color, smell or taste, but in general the spices thus treated preserved their characteristic properties. The method is a good alternative to radiosterilization. The article adds some concluding information on mandatory labelling of irradiated food imported from third countries

  19. Radiation decontamination of three local spices and khebab spice-mix and some aspects of their physiochemical and nutritional properties before and after gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kottoh, D. I

    2011-07-01

    Spices are used for seasoning, garnishing and for their therapeutic or medicinal properties. In this thesis, three local spices namely, 'pepre' (E. caryophyllata), 'Fom wisa' (A. melegueta), 'whentia' (X. aethiopica) and khebab spice-mix were tested to ascertain their storage mycroflora and moisture isotherms under tropical Ghanaian environment at (Environmental Relative Humidities, ERH's of 20, 55, 65, 75, 85 and 95%) simulated by glycerol: water mixtures with view of ascertaining their storage stability and mouldiness potential. Mouldiness was determined by the decimal serial dilution technique up to 1:10 4 dilutions. As background data to ascertain the importance of the spices in the Ghanaian diet, a structured rapid appraisal questionnaire was designed to provide information on the types of spices, marketing strategies and social profile of the traders. The selected spices were packaged in three different packaging materials and treated with varying doses of gamma radiation (0, 5, 10 and 20kGy). Changes in the mycroflora and some selected physiochemical parameters (pH, %, moisture, fat, ash content, crude protein, total carbohydrates) were determined using standard conventional methods from (AOAC, 2000). Elemental composition of the products were examined using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). Finally, the consumer preference of the khebab spice - mix was assessed by sensory evaluation of attributes such as colour, taste, smell, mouthfeel and overall acceptability. A 2X3X4 factorial experiment in a complete Randomised Design was used for the study and data was subjected to statistical analysis using microsoft Excel and Genstats softwares. Analysis was evaluated based on p<0.05 level of significance. The sellers of spices were between 10 - 70 years, but majority were between 30 - 40 years. Spices in the Accra markets were received from seven regions in Ghana and some were imported from West Africa and other foreign countries. The resident microflora in the

  20. String Theory on AdS Spaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, J.

    2000-01-01

    In these notes we discuss various aspects of string theory in AdS spaces. We briefly review the formulation in terms of Green-Schwarz, NSR, and Berkovits variables, as well as the construction of exact conformal field theories with AdS backgrounds. Based on lectures given at the Kyoto YITP Workshop

  1. Ethno botany and antimicrobial perspective of Spices and Honey against Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kothai Nil Seshathri

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In spite of obsessive use of spices in every Ethiopian meal, little has been investigated on the utilization of Ethiopian spices as a cure for oral opportunistic infections. Therefore the aim was to identify spices used in Ethiopian food through ethno botanical survey and study their antifungal activity against Candida albicans. Method: Ethno botanical survey of the selected Kebeles of Jimma, Ethiopia was conducted using a semi structured questionnaire from October 2006 to November 2007. Antifungal nature of the spices and combination of spices and honey were evaluated by agar well diffusion assay from September 2008 to July 2010. Result: Ethno botanical survey indicated fourteen species of spices and honey play a major role in Ethiopian food and beverages. Single plant extract of Trachyspermum copticum showed highest activity against C. albicans. The same plant showed antagonistic effect when combined with brown and white honey. Cinamomum zeylanicum showed highest synergistic effect with both brown and white honey when compared to Allium ursenum, Cuminum cyminum, Nigella sativa, Rosemarinus officinalis and Occimum hodiense. Conclusion: Thus spices used in Ethiopian food could be a preventive as well as a cure for oral candidiasis caused by C.albicans. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2013; 2(2.000: 73-80

  2. Effect of gamma irradiation on essential oils and lipids in spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Nobutada; Ito, Hitoshi; Ishigaki, Isao

    1991-01-01

    Seven kinds of spices were irradiated with gamma-rays at the dose of 5 to 80 kGy. Studies of radiation effect on lipids in each spice were carried out by measuring peroxide value (POV), iodine value (IV), acid value (AV) and analysis of gas-chromatography (GC). POV in each spice was gradually increased with increasing absorbed doses. The increase of POV in nutmeg was higher than those of other spices, and it was suggested that those increase of POV values were related to lipid contents in spices. A little increase of IV and AV were also observed as same amount of POV by the irradiation up to 80 kGy. From the GC analysis of lipids in each spice, components were not changed even irradiated up to 50 kGy of gamma-rays. Radiation effect on components of essential oils in each spice were also analyzed by headspace-GC (HS-GC), and any degradation of components were not observed up to 50 kGy of irradiation even analyzed by GC after separation to hydrocarbon and oxygen compounds. On the contrary, essential oils of cloves sterilized by heat treatment were apparently decreased as compared with irradiated and non-irradiated cloves. (author)

  3. Potent Inhibitory Effect of Chinese Dietary Spices on Fatty Acid Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bing; Liang, Yan; Sun, Xuebing; Liu, Xiaoxin; Tian, Weixi; Ma, Xiaofeng

    2015-09-01

    Dietary spices have been adopted in cooking since ancient times to enhance flavor and also as food preservatives and disease remedies. In China, the use of spices and other aromatic plants as food flavoring is an integral part of dietary behavior, but relatively little is known about their functions. Fatty acid synthase (FAS) has been recognized as a remedy target, and its inhibitors might be applied in disease treatment. The present work was designed to assess the inhibitory activities on FAS of spices extracts in Chinese menu. The in vitro inhibitory activities on FAS of 22 extracts of spices were assessed by spectrophotometrically monitoring oxidation of NADPH at 340 nm. Results showed that 20 spices extracts (90.9 %) exhibited inhibitory activities on FAS, with half inhibition concentration (IC(50)) values ranging from 1.72 to 810.7 μg/ml. Among them, seven spices showed strong inhibitory effect with IC(50) values lower than 10 μg/ml. These findings suggest that a large proportion of the dietary spices studied possess promising inhibitory activities on FAS, and subsequently might be applied in the treatment of obesity and obesity-related human diseases.

  4. Spice MyPlate: Nutrition Education Focusing Upon Spices and Herbs Improved Diet Quality and Attitudes Among Urban High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Adamo, Christopher R; McArdle, Patrick F; Balick, Lyssa; Peisach, Erin; Ferguson, Tenaj; Diehl, Alica; Bustad, Kendall; Bowden, Brandin; Pierce, Beverly A; Berman, Brian M

    2016-05-01

    To determine whether an experiential nutrition education intervention focusing on spices and herbs ("Spice MyPlate") is feasible and improves diet quality and healthy eating attitudes among an urban and predominantly African-American sample of adolescents more than standard nutrition education alone. A nonrandomized controlled trial compared standard nutrition education in U.S. Department of Agriculture MyPlate guidelines (control group) with standard nutrition education plus adjuvant Spice MyPlate curriculum (intervention group). Data were collected at baseline and after 3, 6, and 10 weeks. Study setting was two public high schools in Baltimore, Maryland. A total of 110 students in grades 9 to 12 participated. The 6-week school-based intervention conducted during health class focused on cooking using spices and herbs to eat healthier diets according to MyPlate. Dietary intake reported on 3-day food records and healthy eating attitudes questionnaires was analyzed. Differences in diet quality and healthy eating attitudes between study groups were estimated by t-tests, Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney tests, and covariate-adjusted regression models. Spice MyPlate was feasible and there were modest but significant improvements (p ≤ .05) in the Spice MyPlate group compared with control in whole grains (31.2 g/wk) and protein foods (13.2 ounces per week) intake, and attitudes toward eating vegetables, whole grains, lean protein, and low-fat dairy. Although randomized trials are needed, experiential nutrition education focusing on spices and herbs may help urban and predominantly African-American adolescent populations eat healthier diets. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Effects of herbs and spice on health status of tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus challenged with Streptococcus iniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejdet Gültepe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of different herbal extracts on the growth and immune defense of fish were researched in the last decade. The aim of this study was to determine the dietary effects of thyme (Thymus vulgaris, rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis and fenugreek (Trigonella foenum graecum as a feed additive on haematology, innate immune response, and disease resistance of tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus. In total 228 healthy fish tilapia were divided into four groups (57 fish in one group and fed diets supplemented with thyme, rosemary and fenugreek at levels of 1%, respectively; fish in the control group were fed diet without any spices. Fish were fed ad libitum three times a day for 45 days. All fish of the experimental groups significantly (P P P > 0.05 changed during the whole experiment. After 45 days of feeding, fish were injected intraperitoneally with 100 μl of Streptococcus iniae (8 × 108 colony forming unit. The cumulative mortality was 22%, 27% and 31% in fish receiving diets supplemented with 1% thyme, rosemary and fenugreek, respectively, compared to 61% mortality in the control group. The results indicate that all three supplements used improved the haematological status, non-specific immune response and disease resistance of tilapia against S. iniae; this is the first similar study.

  6. Extract of a spice--omum (Trachyspermum ammi)-shows antiaggregatory effects and alters arachidonic acid metabolism in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, K C

    1988-07-01

    An ethereal extract of omum (Trachyspermum ammi; Hindustani: ajwan)--a frequently consumed spice--was found to inhibit platelet aggregation induced by arachidonic acid (AA), epinephrine and collagen; in this respect it was most effective against AA-induced aggregation. Inhibition of aggregation by omum could be explained by its effect on platelet thromboxane production as suggested by the following experimental observation. (i) Omum reduced TxB2 formation in intact platelet preparations from added arachidonate, and (ii) it reduced the formation of TxB2 from AA-labelled platelets after stimulation with Ca2+-ionophore A23187 by a direct action on cyclooxygenase as it did not affect the release of AA from labelled platelets. An increased formation of lipoxygenase-derived products from exogenous AA in omum-treated platelets was apparently due to redirection of AA from cyclooxygenase to the lipoxygenase pathway.

  7. Curcumin and curcumin-like molecules: from spice to drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchiani, A; Rozzo, C; Fadda, A; Delogu, G; Ruzza, P

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin is the major yellow pigment extracted from turmeric, a commonly used spice in Asian cuisine and extensively employed in ayurvedic herbal remedies. A number of studies have shown that curcumin can be a prevention and a chemotherapeutic agent for colon, skin, oral and intestinal cancers. Curcumin is also well known for its antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties, showing high reactivity towards peroxyl radicals, and thus acting as a free radical scavenger. Recently, experimental studies have demonstrated that curcumin might be used in the prevention and the cure of Alzheimer's disease. Indeed, curcumin injected peripherally in vivo into aged Tg mice crossed the blood-brain barrier and bound to amyloid plaques, reducing amyloid levels and plaque formation decisively. The present review will resume the most recent developments in the medicinal chemistry of curcumin and curcumin-like molecules.

  8. SPICE Modeling and Simulation of a MPPT Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miona Andrejević Stošović

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available One among several equally important subsystems of a standalone photovoltaic (PV system is the circuit for maximum power point tracking (MPPT. There are several algorithms that may be used for it. In this paper we choose such an algorithm based on the maximum simplicity criteria. Then we make some small modifications to it in order to make it more robust. We synthesize a circuit built out of elements from the list of elements recognized by SPICE. The inputs are the voltage and the current at the PV panel to DC-DC converter interface. Its task is to generate a pulse width modulated pulse train whose duty ratio is defined to keep the input impedance of the DC-DC converter at the optimal value.

  9. Antibacterial Activity of Anthraquinone from Aloe on Spiced Pig Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lingyi; Li, Xiao; Cui, Yuqian; Pang, Meixia; Wang, Fang; Qi, Jinghua

    2017-12-01

    [Objective] To optimize the extraction of anthraquinone from Aloe by ultrasonic extraction and its antibacterialactivity. [Method]The influences of different extraction time and ethanol concentration, on anthraquinone contentwere evaluated by asingle factor experiment. And anthraquinone content was determined by ultraviolet spectrophotometry. The bacteriostasis of anthraquinone on spiced pig head’s common putrefying bacteria: Staphylococcus, Serratieae, Bacillus, Proteus and the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) were studied by oxford plate assay system. [Result]The best extraction time was 30 minutes and the best ethanol concentration was 80%. The antibacterial activity of the Aloe anthraquinone on Staphylococcus Aureus, Bacillus Proteus is obviously, the minimum inhibitory concentrations were 0.0625 g/mL, 0.05 g/mL, 0.125 g/mL respectively and no inhibitory effect on Serratieae. [Conclusions] The anthraquinones from Aloe can inhibit a part Of spoilage bacteria inspiced pig heads.

  10. Application of Far Infrared Radiation and Ethanol Vapor as Alternative Treatment Methods for Reduction of Salmonella enterica Tennessee in Dried, Ground Spices

    OpenAIRE

    Nimitz Jr, Stephen Clark

    2013-01-01

    The consumption of spiced food is steadily increasing, subsequently leading to increased incidence of spice-related food illnesses. Many outbreaks can be traced to human pathogens that can survive in low moisture content of spices, prompting development of additional inactivation treatments that reduce bacterial pathogens while maintaining spice quality. Spices are currently treated by fumigation with ethylene oxide, pasteurization with ionizing radiation, or steam treatment. However, these t...

  11. Spices in a Product Affect Emotions: A Study with an Extruded Snack Product †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Brandon; Adhikari, Koushik; Alavi, Sajid; King, Silvia; Haub, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Food commonly is associated with emotion. The study was designed to determine if a spice blend (cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, and cloves) high in antioxidants can evoke changes in consumer emotions. This was an exploratory study to determine the effects of these four spices on emotions. Three extruded, dry snack products containing 0, 4, or a 5% spice blend were tested. One day of hedonic and just-about-right evaluations (n = 100), followed by three days of emotion testing were conducted. A human clinical trial (n = 10), using the control and the 4% samples, measured total antioxidant capacity and blood glucose levels. The emotion “Satisfied” increased significantly in the 5% blend, showing an effect of a higher spice content. The 4% blend was significantly higher in total antioxidant capacity than the baseline, but blood glucose levels were not significantly different. PMID:28820459

  12. VO1/VO2 MARS SPICE KERNELS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes a substantial collection of navigation and other ancillary data for the Viking Orbiter spacecraft (VO1 and VO2) in the form of SPICE kernels,...

  13. Monitoring in vitro antibacterial efficacy of 26 Indian spices against multidrug resistant urinary tract infecting bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibanarayan Rath

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: The most effective and unique 16 spice plants recorded for the in vitro control of MDR uropathogens could further be pursued for the development of complementary and supplementary medicine against MDR bacteria.

  14. Detection of irradiated spices using photo-stimulated luminescence technique (PSL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramli, Ros Anita Ahmad; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Othman, Zainon; Abdullah, Wan Saffiey Wan

    2014-01-01

    Photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) technique was applied to detect irradiated black pepper (Piper nigrum), cinnamon (Cinnamomum verum) and turmeric (Curcuma longa) after dark storage for 1 day, 3 and 6 months. Using screening and calibrated PSL, all samples were correctly discriminated between non-irradiated and spices irradiated with doses 1, 5 and 10 kGy. The PSL photon counts (PCs) of irradiated spices increased with increasing dose, with turmeric showing highest sensitivity index to irradiation compared to black pepper and cinnamon. The differences in response are possibly attributed to the varying quantity and quality of silicate minerals present in each spice sample. PSL signals of all irradiated samples reduced after 3 and 6 months storage. The results of this study provide a useful database on the applicability of PSL technique for the detection of Malaysian irradiated spices

  15. Detection of irradiated spices using photo-stimulated luminescence technique (PSL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramli, Ros Anita Ahmad; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi [Faculty of Science and Technology, National University of Malaysia, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Othman, Zainon; Abdullah, Wan Saffiey Wan [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    Photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) technique was applied to detect irradiated black pepper (Piper nigrum), cinnamon (Cinnamomum verum) and turmeric (Curcuma longa) after dark storage for 1 day, 3 and 6 months. Using screening and calibrated PSL, all samples were correctly discriminated between non-irradiated and spices irradiated with doses 1, 5 and 10 kGy. The PSL photon counts (PCs) of irradiated spices increased with increasing dose, with turmeric showing highest sensitivity index to irradiation compared to black pepper and cinnamon. The differences in response are possibly attributed to the varying quantity and quality of silicate minerals present in each spice sample. PSL signals of all irradiated samples reduced after 3 and 6 months storage. The results of this study provide a useful database on the applicability of PSL technique for the detection of Malaysian irradiated spices.

  16. Ultra-micro trace element contents in spices from Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chery, C.C.; Herremans, S.; Van Lierde, V.; Vanhaecke, F.; Jasekera, R.

    2008-01-01

    Spices were analyzed by ICP-MS for determination of the ultra-micro trace elements in the human adult, Bi, Cd, Co, Ni, Pd, Pt, Se, Sn, Te, Tl, to complement previous results obtained by INAA and by EDXRF. The spices, originating from Sri Lanka, were curry, chilli powder and turmeric powders, coriander, cinnamon, black pepper, fennel, rampeh and curry leaves, and cumin. The analytical procedure was validated by analyzing the certified reference materials NIST SRM 1572 Citrus Leaves and NIST SRM 1573 Tomato Leaves. The results indicate that spices may contribute well to the daily optimal uptake of nutrients of a human adult. The adequacy of spices as a reference material with certified ultra micro trace elements is suggested. (author)

  17. Detection of irradiated spices using photo-stimulated luminescence technique (PSL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramli, Ros Anita Ahmad; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Othman, Zainon; Abdullah, Wan Saffiey Wan

    2014-09-01

    Photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) technique was applied to detect irradiated black pepper (Piper nigrum), cinnamon (Cinnamomum verum) and turmeric (Curcuma longa) after dark storage for 1 day, 3 and 6 months. Using screening and calibrated PSL, all samples were correctly discriminated between non-irradiated and spices irradiated with doses 1, 5 and 10 kGy. The PSL photon counts (PCs) of irradiated spices increased with increasing dose, with turmeric showing highest sensitivity index to irradiation compared to black pepper and cinnamon. The differences in response are possibly attributed to the varying quantity and quality of silicate minerals present in each spice sample. PSL signals of all irradiated samples reduced after 3 and 6 months storage. The results of this study provide a useful database on the applicability of PSL technique for the detection of Malaysian irradiated spices.

  18. Spices in a Product Affect Emotions: A Study with an Extruded Snack Product†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Brandon; Adhikari, Koushik; Chambers, Edgar; Alavi, Sajid; King, Silvia; Haub, Mark

    2017-08-18

    Food commonly is associated with emotion. The study was designed to determine if a spice blend (cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, and cloves) high in antioxidants can evoke changes in consumer emotions. This was an exploratory study to determine the effects of these four spices on emotions. Three extruded, dry snack products containing 0, 4, or a 5% spice blend were tested. One day of hedonic and just-about-right evaluations ( n = 100), followed by three days of emotion testing were conducted. A human clinical trial ( n = 10), using the control and the 4% samples, measured total antioxidant capacity and blood glucose levels. The emotion "Satisfied" increased significantly in the 5% blend, showing an effect of a higher spice content. The 4% blend was significantly higher in total antioxidant capacity than the baseline, but blood glucose levels were not significantly different.

  19. Plant foods in the management of diabetes mellitus: spices as beneficial antidiabetic food adjuncts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, K

    2005-09-01

    Diet has been recognized as a corner stone in the management of diabetes mellitus. Spices are the common dietary adjuncts that contribute to the taste and flavour of foods. Besides, spices are also known to exert several beneficial physiological effects including the antidiabetic influence. This review considers all the available information from animal experimentation as well as clinical trials where spices, their extracts or their active principles were examined for treatment of diabetes. Among the spices, fenugreek seeds (Trigonella foenumgraecum), garlic (Allium sativum), onion (Allium cepa), and turmeric (Curcuma longa) have been experimentally documented to possess antidiabetic potential. In a limited number of studies, cumin seeds (Cuminum cyminum), ginger (Zingiber officinale), mustard (Brassica nigra), curry leaves (Murraya koenigii) and coriander (Coriandrum sativum) have been reported to be hypoglycaemic.

  20. Will it Blend? Getting SPICE-y with DTMs and Planetary Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, L. M.; Silva, V. H.; Estes, N. M.; Boyd, A. K.; Bowley, K. S.

    2017-06-01

    The LROC SOC team developed a method to import regional and global DTMs into the open-source animation and modeling program, Blender. We also developed a tool to associate SPICE information with Blender models.

  1. The effect of irradiation, packaging and storage on the quality of spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langerak, D.I.; Stegeman, H.

    1983-01-01

    Spices are contaminated by nature with micro organisms. The processing industry, however, requires 'clean' spices. The most applied technique has been fumigation with ethylene oxide. However, fumigation causes a number of difficulties; viz. the presence of residues and the possible forming of toxic compounds like ethylene chlorohydrine. The latest method is the decontamination by means of ionizing rays. Research on the effect of irradiation and packaging on the different quality aspects of spices proves that an irradiation dose of 3-8 kGy produces the same or better results with regard to decontamination effect as a fumigation treatment does. The applied dose has no adverse effect on the sensoric and chemical properties of the product. With respect to the wholesomeness the irradiation process can be applied safely. Furthermore, this process offers the possibility to choose an optimal packaging for spices, thus preventing quality deterioration. (orig.)

  2. Magnetic Monopoles in AdS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutcliffe, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Applications to holographic theories have led to some recent interest in magnetic monopoles in four-dimensional Anti-de Sitter (AdS) spacetime. Some analytic and numerical results are discussed for monopoles in AdS, including the symmetries of minimal energy monopoles (which are often Platonic), a connection to Skyrmions, and the emergence of a hexagonal lattice in the large charge limit.

  3. Axion wormholes in AdS compactifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertog, Thomas; Trigiante, Mario; Van Riet, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    We find regular axionic Euclidean wormhole solutions in Type IIB string theory compactified on {AdS}_5× {S}^5/{Z}_k . AdS/CFT enables a precise derivation of the axion content of the Euclidean theory, placing the string theory embedding of the wormholes on firm footing. This further sharpens the paradox posed by these solutions.

  4. Flash spice as a tool for analysing the impact of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlot, J.J.; Alali, O.

    1997-01-01

    The Spice simulator must be enhanced with behavioural capabilities for analysing the effects of hostile environments (e.g. radiation exposure) on components, circuits and systems. One solution for achieving this uses the in-house BVHDLA translator to convert from models in analog VHDL Language to models that will be recognized by Spice. This article gives an example combined with self-heating in a MOS transistor. (authors)

  5. Bioactive Compound Rich Indian Spices Suppresses the Growth of β-lactamase Produced Multidrug Resistant Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eadlapalli Siddhartha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multidrug Resistance (MDR among bacteria become a global concern due to failure of antibiotics, is drawn attention for best antimicrobials from the spices which have been using ancient days in Indian culinary and traditional medicine. Aim and Objectives: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the bioactive compounds and their antibacterial activity in routinely used culinary Indian spices against β-lactamase produced MDR bacteria. Material and Methods: Ethanolic extracts prepared from twenty spices and were evaluated for total phenolics, flavonoids, alkaloids, terpenoids, antioxidant properties, and also assayed their antibacterial activities against β-lactamase producing MDR bacteria (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. β-Lactamase and cell viability assays were performed in MDR bacteria. Results: Among twenty spices, cinnamon and clove exhibited highest levels of phenolics and terpenoids with elevated antioxidant potential and also showing greater reducing potential at lower concentrations of extract (2.3 and 4.06 µg GAE/gm, respectively. Further, the spices extracts were assessed for antimicrobial activity against β-lactamase produced tested MDR bacteria and observed higher antimicrobial activity with cinnamon, garlic, tamarind and clove at lowest concentrations of MIC and MBC at 16 - 32 µg GAE/ml, as compared to standard drug, amoxiclav (16/8 µg/ml. Spices significantly inhibited the β-lactamase activity (80–94% and also cell viability in tested MDR bacteria. Conclusion: Indian spices consist of rich bioactive profile and antioxidant activity inhibited the bacterial growth effectively by suppressing β-lactamase production in MDR bacteria. Results indicating the spices as functional foods and could be used in prevention of antibiotic resistance.

  6. Bioactive Compound Rich Indian Spices Suppresses the Growth of β-lactamase Produced Multidrug Resistant Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Eadlapalli Siddhartha; Vemula Sarojamma; Vadde Ramakrishna

    2017-01-01

    Background: Multidrug Resistance (MDR) among bacteria become a global concern due to failure of antibiotics, is drawn attention for best antimicrobials from the spices which have been using ancient days in Indian culinary and traditional medicine. Aim and Objectives: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the bioactive compounds and their antibacterial activity in routinely used culinary Indian spices against β-lactamase produced MDR bacteria. Material and Methods: Ethanolic extracts p...

  7. Prevalence of toxigenic fungi in common medicinal herbs and spices in India

    OpenAIRE

    Aiko, Visenuo; Mehta, Alka

    2016-01-01

    Mycotoxins are unavoidable contaminants of food grains, feeds, medicinal herbs, and spices, posing as health threat to animals and humans. The objective of this study was to screen medicinal herbs and spices for fungi and mycotoxin contamination and evaluate their safety. Sixty-three samples were examined for fungal contamination and fungal load determined using standard microbiological method. Aflatoxin and citrinin were detected using thin layer chromatography and high-performance chromatog...

  8. Nation-Based Occurrence and Endogenous Biological Reduction of Mycotoxins in Medicinal Herbs and Spices

    OpenAIRE

    Kee Hun Do; Tae Jin An; Sang-Keun Oh; Yuseok Moon

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal herbs have been increasingly used for therapeutic purposes against a diverse range of human diseases worldwide. Moreover, the health benefits of spices have been extensively recognized in recent studies. However, inevitable contaminants, including mycotoxins, in medicinal herbs and spices can cause serious problems for humans in spite of their health benefits. Along with the different nation-based occurrences of mycotoxins, the ultimate exposure and toxicities can be diversely influ...

  9. Scent and synaesthesia: The medical use of spice bags in early China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Di; Lo, Vivienne

    2015-06-05

    The history of Chinese spices has received increasing attention in recent years, but little research been carried out on where they fit on the food-medicine continuum for early China, during the formation of the classical medical system. This paper describes how the synaesthetic qualities of spices attracted a particular analysis in that emerging system which serves to mark them as different to other medical materials and foodstuffs. We aim to clarify the special role created for spices to accommodate their boundary-crossing synaesthetic action on the body. This paper analyses the contents of several spice bags excavated in 1972 from a tomb that was closed in the second century BCE. It uses archaeological reports of material culture together with the early Chinese textual record, extant in both manuscripts and received texts, to bring out the role of spices in ritual, food and medicine. Noting that the flavours and aromas of early China were assigned physiological potency in the first centuries BCE, we argue that by medieval times the unique synaesthetic role that spices played in mediating the senses was systematically medicalised. While being deployed for the purpose of curing disease in medicine, they also remained within the realm of everyday healthcare, and religious practice, deployed both as aromatics to perfume the environment, attracting benign spirits, but also to ward off the agents of disease, as well as for enhancing health through their use in cookery. While foodstuffs entered the digestive system spices were all considered 'pungent' in the emerging clasical medical system. They acted on the body through the nose and lungs, making them neither food nor drug. This implicit categorisation medicalised spices which, like music, could affect the passions and lighten the spirit, codifying observations about the impact on the body of the ritual environment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  10. Antibacterial activity of natural spices on multiple drug resistant Escherichia coli isolated from drinking water, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Shahedur; Parvez, Anowar Khasru; Islam, Rezuanul; Khan, Mahboob Hossain

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Spices traditionally have been used as coloring agents, flavoring agents, preservatives, food additives and medicine in Bangladesh. The present work aimed to find out the antimicrobial activity of natural spices on multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli isolates. Methods Anti-bacterial potentials of six crude plant extracts (Allium sativum, Zingiber officinale, Allium cepa, Coriandrum sativum, Piper nigrum and Citrus aurantifolia) were tested against five Escherichia coli i...

  11. Irradiation of meat products, chicken and use of irradiated spices for sausages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiss, I.F.; Beczner, J.; Zachariev, Gy. (Central Food Research Inst., Budapest (Hungary)); Kovacs, S. (Veterinary and Food Control Centre, Budapest (Hungary))

    1990-01-01

    The shelf-life of packed minced meat has been increased at least threefold at 4{sup 0}C by applying a 2 kGy dose. Results have been confirmed by detailed quantitative microbiological examinations. Sensory evaluations show no significant difference between the unirradiated and irradiated samples. The optimal average dose was 4 kGy for packed-frozen chicken. The number of mesophilic aerobic microbes was reduced by 2, that of psychrotolerant by 2-3 and that of Enterobacteriaceae by 3-4 orders of magnitude by 4 kGy. S. aureus and Salmonella could not be detected in the irradiated samples. in 1984-1985 5100 kg irradiated chickens were marketed labelled as radiation treated. Irradiated spices (5 kGy) were used in the production of sausages (heat-treated and non-heat-treated) under industrial conditions. The microbiological contamination of irradiated spices was lower than that of ethylene oxide treated ones. The cell count in products made with irradiated spices was lower than in those made with unirradiated spices. The sausages proved to be of very good quality. In accordance with the permission, products were marketed and because of the low ratio of spices there was no need to declare them as using irradiated spices. (author).

  12. Irradiation of meat products, chicken and use of irradiated spices for sausages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, I.F.; Beczner, J.; Zachariev, Gy.; Kovacs, S.

    1990-01-01

    The shelf-life of packed minced meat has been increased at least threefold at 4 0 C by applying a 2 kGy dose. Results have been confirmed by detailed quantitative microbiological examinations. Sensory evaluations show no significant difference between the unirradiated and irradiated samples. The optimal average dose was 4 kGy for packed-frozen chicken. The number of mesophilic aerobic microbes was reduced by 2, that of psychrotolerant by 2-3 and that of Enterobacteriaceae by 3-4 orders of magnitude by 4 kGy. S. aureus and Salmonella could not be detected in the irradiated samples. in 1984-1985 5100 kg irradiated chickens were marketed labelled as radiation treated. Irradiated spices (5 kGy) were used in the production of sausages (heat-treated and non-heat-treated) under industrial conditions. The microbiological contamination of irradiated spices was lower than that of ethylene oxide treated ones. The cell count in products made with irradiated spices was lower than in those made with unirradiated spices. The sausages proved to be of very good quality. In accordance with the permission, products were marketed and because of the low ratio of spices there was no need to declare them as using irradiated spices. (author)

  13. Assessment of metal contents in spices and herbs from Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddigi, Z S; Kandhro, G A; Shah, F; Danish, E; Soylak, Mustafa

    2016-02-01

    In the recent years, there has been a growing interest in monitoring heavy metal contamination of spices/herbs. Spices and herbs are sources of many bioactive compounds that can improve the tastes of food as well as influence digestion and metabolism processes. In the present study, the levels of some essential and toxic elements such as iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), cobalt (Co), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and cadmium (Cd), present in common spices/herbs that were purchased from the local market in Saudi Arabia, were analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy after digestion with nitric acid/hydrogen peroxide mixture. Samples from the following spices/herbs were used: turmeric, cloves, black pepper, red pepper, cumin, legume, cinnamon, abazir, white pepper, ginger, and coriander. The concentration ranges for the studied elements were found as 48.8-231, 4.7-19.4, 2.5-10.5, below detection level (BDL)-1.0, 8.8-490, 1.0-2.6, and BDL-3.7 µg g(-1) for Fe, Zn, Cu, Cr, Mn, Ni, and Pb, respectively, while Cd and Co levels were below the detection limit. Consumers of these spices/herbs would not be exposed to any risk associated with the daily intake of 10 g of spices per day as far as metals Fe, Zn, Cu, Cr, Mn, Ni, and Pb are concerned. © The Author(s) 2013.

  14. Dietary intake of spices and herbs in habitual northeast thai diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantipopipat, S; Boonpraderm, A; Charoenkiatkul, S; Wasantwisut, E; Winichagoon, P

    2010-04-01

    Spices and herbs are rich in polyphenols and widely used in habitual diets in the tropical regions. To elucidate their effects on human health, intake of the portion of spices and herbs from habitual diets should be determined. Consumption patterns were determined from 24-hour records or recalls of 181 men and 370 women in Khonkaen and Ubon Ratchathani provinces, representing upper and lower northeast Thailand. There was a slight variation in dishes, but twelve spices/herbs were commonly used in the two areas. The amounts of spices/ herbs in the four most common dishes (Somtum, Jaew, Pon and Kang-Nor-Mai) were estimated by weighing ingredients before and after cooking. The average amount of spices/herbs consumed was 4.9, 26.1, 14 and 11 g/meal, contributing 36.6, 43.1, 20.6 and 29.8 mg polyphenols/meal for Somtum, Jaew, Pon and Kang- Nor-Mai, respectively. Chili was common in all recipes, with an average amount of 8.3-27.5 mg polyphenols/meal. In conclusion, habitual northeast Thai diets contain several spices/herbs and a substantial amount of polyphenols was commonly consumed.

  15. Identification of low amount of irradiated spices (red pepper, garlic, ginger powder) with luminescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byeong-Keun; Akram, Kashif; Kim, Cheong-Tae; Kang, Na-Roo; Lee, Jin-Won; Ryang, Jun-Hwan; Kwon, Joong-Ho

    2012-01-01

    For the identification of irradiated food, current analysis methods have limitations regarding presence and stability of radiation-induced markers. In this study, different spice blends with small quantity of different irradiated (0, 1 and 10 kGy) spice powders, such as red pepper, garlic or ginger, were investigated using PSL and TL techniques. In PSL-based screening analysis, the spice blends containing 10% of irradiated materials (1 or 10 kGy) were determined as intermediate or positive. In TL results, the blends containing 1% of 1 or 10 kGy-irradiated spices showed the typical TL glow curves that could be interpreted as positive. The blends with irradiated garlic powder provided more good results where identification was possible at 0.5% mixing of irradiated sample. However, the TL ratios of all spice blends were <0.1 and only TL glow curve shape and intensity may be used to discriminate the samples having irradiated component. - Highlights: ► Sample blends with small quantities of irradiated spices were evaluated. ► The PSL was inappropriate to detect irradiated ingredient in small quantity. ► TL glow curve shape and intensity could be used as conclusive evidence of irradiation. ► TL ratios of all irradiated and nonirradiated samples were <0.1.

  16. Effect of the dose of irradiation on the conservation of the spice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Abdelkader, Houcine

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the gamma rays treatment emitted by a source of cobalt 60 in dose of 0, 3, 6 and 10 kGy on the microbiological and psycho-chemical properties of three samples of spice (hot pepper, fennel and coriander) have been studied. This study allowed us to measure the effect of these doses of irradiation on the lengthening of the lengthen conservation during storage of eight weeks to ambient temperature. The results show that the irradiation is very effective from a microbiological stand point. In fact, starting from 10 kGy the spices was not contaminated any more. The irradiation until a dose of dose 10 kGy has not generated any significant modifications, mainly in the physico-chemical parameters of the spices. But high diminishing has ac cured in water potency. Regarding colour variation, the irradiation has permitted the creation of a brighter colour for the three spices treated. A long the follow up we have an important multiplication in all bacteria existent in the three spices. Hew ever for the spices treated in 10 kGy we did not get any recontamination. (Author)

  17. Intakes of culinary herbs and spices from a food frequency questionnaire evaluated against 28-days estimated records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Monica H; Blomhoff, Rune; Andersen, Lene F

    2011-05-16

    Worldwide, herbs and spices are much used food flavourings. However, little data exist regarding actual dietary intake of culinary herbs and spices. We developed a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) for the assessment of habitual diet the preceding year, with focus on phytochemical rich food, including herbs and spices. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the intakes of herbs and spices from the FFQ with estimates of intake from another dietary assessment method. Thus we compared the intake estimates from the FFQ with 28 days of estimated records of herb and spice consumption as a reference method. The evaluation study was conducted among 146 free living adults, who filled in the FFQ and 2-4 weeks later carried out 28 days recording of herb and spice consumption. The FFQ included a section with questions about 27 individual culinary herbs and spices, while the records were open ended records for recording of herbs and spice consumption exclusively. Our study showed that the FFQ obtained slightly higher estimates of total intake of herbs and spices than the total intake assessed by the Herbs and Spice Records (HSR). The correlation between the two assessment methods with regard to total intake was good (r = 0.5), and the cross-classification suggests that the FFQ may be used to classify subjects according to total herb and spice intake. For the 8 most frequently consumed individual herbs and spices, the FFQ obtained good estimates of median frequency of intake for 2 herbs/spices, while good estimates of portion sizes were obtained for 4 out of 8 herbs/spices. Our results suggested that the FFQ was able to give good estimates of frequency of intake and portion sizes on group level for several of the most frequently used herbs and spices. The FFQ was only able to fairly rank subjects according to frequency of intake of the 8 most frequently consumed herbs and spices. Other studies are warranted to further explore the intakes of culinary spices and herbs.

  18. Intakes of culinary herbs and spices from a food frequency questionnaire evaluated against 28-days estimated records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blomhoff Rune

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide, herbs and spices are much used food flavourings. However, little data exist regarding actual dietary intake of culinary herbs and spices. We developed a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ for the assessment of habitual diet the preceding year, with focus on phytochemical rich food, including herbs and spices. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the intakes of herbs and spices from the FFQ with estimates of intake from another dietary assessment method. Thus we compared the intake estimates from the FFQ with 28 days of estimated records of herb and spice consumption as a reference method. Methods The evaluation study was conducted among 146 free living adults, who filled in the FFQ and 2-4 weeks later carried out 28 days recording of herb and spice consumption. The FFQ included a section with questions about 27 individual culinary herbs and spices, while the records were open ended records for recording of herbs and spice consumption exclusively. Results Our study showed that the FFQ obtained slightly higher estimates of total intake of herbs and spices than the total intake assessed by the Herbs and Spice Records (HSR. The correlation between the two assessment methods with regard to total intake was good (r = 0.5, and the cross-classification suggests that the FFQ may be used to classify subjects according to total herb and spice intake. For the 8 most frequently consumed individual herbs and spices, the FFQ obtained good estimates of median frequency of intake for 2 herbs/spices, while good estimates of portion sizes were obtained for 4 out of 8 herbs/spices. Conclusions Our results suggested that the FFQ was able to give good estimates of frequency of intake and portion sizes on group level for several of the most frequently used herbs and spices. The FFQ was only able to fairly rank subjects according to frequency of intake of the 8 most frequently consumed herbs and spices. Other studies are warranted

  19. Polarised Black Holes in AdS

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Miguel S.; Oliveira, Miguel; Penedones, João; Santos, Jorge E.

    2016-05-03

    We consider solutions in Einstein-Maxwell theory with a negative cosmological constant that asymptote to global $AdS_{4}$ with conformal boundary $S^{2}\\times\\mathbb{R}_{t}$. At the sphere at infinity we turn on a space-dependent electrostatic potential, which does not destroy the asymptotic $AdS$ behaviour. For simplicity we focus on the case of a dipolar electrostatic potential. We find two new geometries: (i) an $AdS$ soliton that includes the full backreaction of the electric field on the $AdS$ geometry; (ii) a polarised neutral black hole that is deformed by the electric field, accumulating opposite charges in each hemisphere. For both geometries we study boundary data such as the charge density and the stress tensor. For the black hole we also study the horizon charge density and area, and further verify a Smarr formula. Then we consider this system at finite temperature and compute the Gibbs free energy for both $AdS$ soliton and black hole phases. The corresponding phase diagram generalizes the Hawkin...

  20. Investigations on the detection of irradiated food by measuring the viscosity of suspended spices and dried vegetables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heide, L.; Nuernberger, E.; Boegl, K.W. (Federal Health Office, Neuherberg/Muenchen (Germany, F.R.). Inst. for Radiation Hygiene)

    1990-01-01

    Studies on the viscosity behavior were performed with 20 different spices or dried vegetables. In nine spices (cinnamon, ginger, mustard seed, celery, onions, shallots, lemon peel, black and white pepper) differences between unirradiated and irradiated samples were observed. Further lots were investigated to estimate the variations of viscosity depending on the origin of the samples. Additional storage experiments showed that measuring the viscosity may be a simple method to identify some radiation treated spices even after years. (author).

  1. Investigations on the detection of irradiated food by measuring the viscosity of suspended spices and dried vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heide, L.; Nürnberger, E.; Bögl, K. W.

    Studies on the viscosity behavior were performed with 20 different spices or dried vegetables. In nine spices (cinnamon, ginger, mustard seed, celery, onions, shallots, lemon peel, black and white pepper) differences between unirradiated and irradiated samples were observed. Further lots were investigated to estimate the variations of viscosity depending on the origin of the samples. Additional storage experiments showed that measuring the viscosity may be a simple method to identify some radiation treated spices even after years.

  2. Detection of herbs and spices irradiated through optically stimulated luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preciado, S.; Agundez A, Z.; Barboza F, M.; Cruz Z, E.

    2003-01-01

    The irradiation of foods is one of the common practices in several countries of the American and European continents. In spite of the widespread use of irradiation methods and technics of nutritious products, it doesn't exist a method of general use at the present time for the detection of previously submitted foods to irradiation with pasteurization ends or sterilization. In the present work the results are presented obtained in the detection of herbs and spices exposed to radiation in the range of 0.1 - 3 KGy, by means of the photostimulation with light of 470 nm. It was used for it a RIS0 model team TL/OSL-GIVE-15 conditioned with a β ray source, 90 Sr/ 90 Y and a source of light of 50 mW/cm2. samples of chili guajillo were studied, pepper, cumin, mint and camomile; achieving you to detect exhibitions of the order of 8.33x10 -4 KGy that which is indicative of the high sensitivity of the luminescence technique optically stimulated. The answer of the samples with regard to the radiation dose presents a range of lineality for low dose of the order of 0.5 KGy; and supralineal for further dose without to arrive to a saturation stage. (Author)

  3. Antimicrobial polyphenols from small tropical fruits, tea and spice oilseeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Sahar; Naim, Asma; Siddiqi, Rahmanullah; Naz, Shahina

    2014-06-01

    The polyphenolic fractions of fruits: Terminalia catappa, Carissa carandas, Ziziphus nummularia; spice oilseeds: thymol, mustard, fenugreek and poppy seeds; and herb: green and black teas were analyzed for their total phenolics, flavonoids and antimicrobial potential. All fractions from fruits, except anthocyanin of C. carandas, displayed substantial antibacterial activity in accordance to their phenolic contents, the difference in activity being quite significant (p catappa (minimum inhibitory concentration, MIC: 7.8-1000 microg/mL) and lowest for C. carandas (MIC: 62.5-1000 microg/mL). With few exceptions, both green and black teas' fractions inhibited the tested strains, however, green tea fractions (MIC: 15.63-125 microg/mL) were more active than black (MIC: 31.25-1000 microg/mL) and neutral were more active than their corresponding acidic fractions. Oil fractions of all oilseeds were found to be more active than their polyphenolic fractions, their antibacterial action decreased in the order thymol > mustard > fenugreek > poppy seeds (p < 0.05). Though the fruits used for the study are underutilized and have been emphasized for processed products, they may potentially be important to fight against pathogenic bacteria in view of their MICs. The teas and oilseeds, though a small part of total food intake, are more functional and active against the tested bacterial species and may find potential applications in therapeutics and food preservation.

  4. A SPICE Blind Test to Benchmark Global Tomographic Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Y.; Capdeville, Y.; Maupin, V.; Montagner, J.

    2006-12-01

    The different existing global tomographic methods result in different models of the Earth. In order to test how current imaging techniques are limited by approximations in theory and the inadequacy of data quality and coverage, we are undertaking a blind test of global inversion algorithms using complete 3D synthetic seismograms within SPICE (Seismic wave Propagation and Imaging in Complex media: a European network). First, a complex global anisotropic anelastic model has been constructed by summing the 1D reference model, deterministic and random anomalies and anisotropic crystal. This model includes 3D heterogeneities in velocity, anisotropy and attenuation at different scales in the whole mantle, as well as topography and crustal structure. In addition, the rotation and ellipticity are also included. Synthetic seismograms were generated using the Coupling Spectral Element Method with a minimum period of 32s, for a realistic distribution of 29 events and 256 stations. The synthetic seismograms have been made available to the scientific community worldwide at the IPGP website http://www.ipgp.jussieu.fr/~qyl/. Any group willing to test his tomographic technique is encouraged to download the synthetic dataset.g

  5. Gaugino mass in AdS space

    CERN Document Server

    Gripaios, Ben; Rattazzi, Riccardo; Redi, Michele; Scrucca, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    We study supersymmetric QED in AdS4 with massless matter. At 1-loop the ultra-violet regulator of the theory generates a contribution to the gaugino mass that is naively inconsistent with unbroken supersymmetry. We show that this effect, known in flat space as anomaly mediated supersymmetry breaking, is required to cancel an infra-red contribution arising from the boundary conditions in AdS space, which necessarily break chiral symmetry. We also discuss an analogous UV/IR cancellation that is independent of supersymmetry.

  6. Natural occurrence of aflatoxins and ochratoxin A in processed spices marketed in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Norhayati; Hashim, Noor Hasani; Shuib, Nor Shifa

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1 and G2) and ochratoxin A (OTA) was performed in processed spices marketed in Penang, Malaysia, using immunoaffinity columns and HPLC equipped with fluorescence detector (HPLC-FD). The processed powdered spices analysed include dried chilli, fennel, cumin, turmeric, black and white pepper, poppy seed, coriander, 'garam masala', and mixed spices for fish, meat and chicken curry. Two different studies were carried out. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.01 ng g(-1) for each aflatoxin (AF) and 0.10 ng g(-1) for OTA (signal-to-noise ratio = 3:1). In the first study, 34 commercial processed spices analysed with a mean level, range and incidence of positive samples for total AF were 1.61 ng g(-1), 0.01-9.34 ng g(-1) and 85%, respectively, and for AFB1 were 1.38 ng g(-1), 0.01-7.68 ng g(-1) and 85%, respectively. The mean level, range and incidence of positive samples for OTA were 2.21 ng g(-1), 0.14-20.40 ng g(-1) and 79%, respectively. Natural co-occurrence of AF and OTA was found in 25 (74%) samples. In the second study of 24 commercial processed spices, the mean level, range and incidence of positive samples for total AF were 8.38 ng g(-1), 0.32-31.17 ng g(-1) and 88%, respectively, and for AFB1 were 7.31 ng g(-1), 0.32-28.43 ng g(-1) and 83%, respectively. Fifteen positive samples for total AF and two positive samples for OTA exceeded the permissible Malaysian limit of 5 ng g(-1). Contamination of both mycotoxins in spices may represent another route of exposure to consumers due to their frequent and prolonged consumption, as spices are common ingredients in popular dishes among Asian countries.

  7. Comparison of the Effect of New Spice Freon Extracts Towards Ground Spices and Antioxidants for Improving the Quality of Bulgarian-Type Dry-Cured Sausage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balev Dessislav Kostadinov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Ground spices are a source of hazards for dry-fermented meat products. Since dry-cured sausages are not subjected to heat treatment, there is a high risk of microbial cross-contamination and physical impurities. The aim of this study was to determine effects of the replacement of 3 g/kg of ground black pepper (Piper nigrum L., and cumin (Cuminum cyminum with their aliquots of new freon extracts, and compare them with the effect of 0.2 g/kg antioxidant addition (taxifolin extract from Siberian larch (Larix sibirica Ledeb, rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L. extract, and butylated hydroxytoluene on sensory properties, color stability, proximate composition, free amino nitrogen and pH of Bulgarian-type dry-cured „Sudjuk“ sausages. The replacement of natural ground spices with aliquots of their extracts improved sensory properties and stabilized the color characteristics of the final product during 30 days of storage at 0–4°C. The addition of 0.2 g/kg rosemary extract was as effective as the addition of freon extracts on the overall assessment to the 14th day of the experiment. It was determined that the addition of antioxidants or spice extracts had no significant effect on proximate composition, pH, and free amino nitrogen accumulation of the “Sudjuk”. The addition of 0.2 g/kg, taxifolin or rosemary extracts and butylated hydroxytoluene was not so efficient in improving the sensory properties and color stabilization in comparison to the new freon spice extracts. The examined spice extracts can be successfully used to improve the quality of “Sudjuk” sausages.

  8. The role of spices and lactic acid bacteria as antimicrobial agent to extend the shelf life of metata ayib (traditional Ethiopian spiced fermented cottage cheese).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geremew, Tsehayneh; Kebede, Ameha; Andualem, Berhanu

    2015-09-01

    Spices and lactic acid bacteria have natural antimicrobial substances and organic compounds having antagonistic activity against microorganisms. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of spices and lactic acid bacteria as antimicrobial agent to extend the shelf life of metata ayib. Antimicrobial activities of spices and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) filtrates were determined by agar well diffusion method against E. coli, S. aureus, S. flexneri and S. peumoniae. Aantimicrobial activity of garlic was found to be the most effective against all the tested pathogens. Inhibition zones of garlic extract against all pathogens was significantly (P ≤ 0.05) greater than the remaining spice extracts. Inhibition zones (12.50 ± 1.00 to 15.50 ± 1.00 mm) of ginger and R. graveolens ethanol extracts against all tested pathogens were significantly (P ≤ 0.05) greater than the remaining solvent extracts. Inhibition zone of O. basilicum ethanol extract against all pathogenic bacteria was significantly (p ≤ 0.05) greater than hexane and acetone extracts. Lactobacillus isolates were shown the highest antimicrobial activity than the other LAB isolates against all pathogens. The synergistic effect of spices together with LAB might be contributed a lot to preserve and extend shelf life of metata ayib. Their antimicrobial activity can reduce the risk of spoilage and pathogenesis. The possible reason of LAB isolates was may be due to production of lactic acid, acetic acid and secondary metabolites like bacteriocins. Aseptic processing of traditional cottage cheese (ayib) is by far needed to minimize risks associated during consumption of metata ayib.

  9. Current status of AdS instability

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    arXiv:1403.6471 and thoroughly developed in arXiv:1407.6273. On the other hand the negative cosmological constant allows for the existence of stable, time-periodic, asymptotically AdS solutions of Einstein equations [arXiv:1303.3186].

  10. Potential health benefits of Indian spices in the symptoms of the metabolic syndrome: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Abishek; Panchal, Sunil; Poudyal, Hemant; Brown, Lindsay

    2009-12-01

    Spices used in Indian cooking have a long history of use as medicines to prevent and treat diseases. Many studies have confirmed that spices can be useful medicines, but the major challenge is now to provide scientific evidence and plausible mechanisms for their therapeutic responses. This review focuses on the therapeutic potential of Indian spices to treat multiple symptoms of the metabolic syndrome such as insulin resistance, diabetes, obesity, altered lipid profile and hypertension. The metabolic syndrome is prevalent and has become an important financial burden to the healthcare system in both developed and developing countries. Inflammation and oxidative stress have been proposed as initiators of the metabolic syndrome, especially of insulin resistance. Natural products with anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties are found in spices. Adequate doses of these compounds may be effective in treating the metabolic syndrome. Testing these potential treatments requires adequate animal models, usually rodents, so the limitations of these models are important. Furthermore, this review highlights the need for adequate legislation and regulation to ensure the safety and success of evidence-based functional foods and nutraceuticals. Spices, Diabetes, Cardiovascular disease, Metabolic syndrome, Inflammation, Oxidative stress,

  11. Evaluation of identification methods of irradiated spices and dehydrated vegetables in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardes, D.M.L.; Del Mastro, N.L.

    1998-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. This paper deals with the use of analytical methods to determine whether imported or for export Brazilian spices and dehydrated vegetables were irradiated. Viscosimetry, thermoluminescence (TL) and electron spin resonance (ESR) were used for the identification of some irradiated products: black pepper, white pepper, cinnamon, nutmeg, garlic, cumin, oregano, celery, paprika and coriander. Viscosimetry was performed in suspensions of irradiated spices and dehydrated vegetables which had been gellified by heat. Thermoluminescence (TL) is based on the transference of electrons to an excited state by radiation with emission of light when the electrons are thermally stimulated. The thermoluminescent signal of spices can be explained by the presence of mineral grains adhering on the surface of the samples. Free radicals produced by irradiation of spices were analyzed by electron spin resonance (EPR) signals. The results of this study lead to the conclusion that viscosimetry, thermoluminescence and electron spin resonance are analytical methods that can be use to detect whether spices and dehydrated vegetables were irradiated, specially when a combination of different methods was used

  12. Determination of Total Phenolics, Antioxidant Capacity and Antimicrobial Activity of Selected Aromatic Spices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda Nagy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, it has been acknowledged that many spices not only have properties that make food more pleasant and tastier but they also have important preservative and antioxidant properties. The antioxidant properties of many spices are well known, while their prooxidant properties less so. The aim of this study was to perform a comparative evaluation of three selected spice (garlic, black pepper and red pepper, commercially available in Cluj-Napoca’s market, regarding their content in total phenolic compounds, antioxidant capacity and antimicrobial activity. The antioxidant aspects were evaluated by determination of the total phenolic content by the Folin-Ciocalteau method and by the antioxidant activity using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl reagent (DPPH.The total phenolic content was between 3,38 and 0,925 mg GAE/1g, while the antioxidant capacity ranged between 18,41% and 10,9% from dry spice. .Results  showed that garlic extract has the most effective antioxidant capacity in scavenging DPPH radicals, while black pepper and red pepper were less active. In the present study piperine was evaluated for its antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhumurium. Spices showed antimicrobial activity against all tested bacteria with zone of inhibition ranged from 8-15,5 mm.

  13. Lorentzian AdS, Wormholes and Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Arias, Raul E; Silva, Guillermo A

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the structure of two point functions for the QFT dual to an asymptotically Lorentzian AdS-wormhole. The bulk geometry is a solution of 5-dimensional second order Einstein Gauss Bonnet gravity and causally connects two asymptotically AdS space times. We revisit the GKPW prescription for computing two-point correlation functions for dual QFT operators O in Lorentzian signature and we propose to express the bulk fields in terms of the independent boundary values phi_0^\\pm at each of the two asymptotic AdS regions, along the way we exhibit how the ambiguity of normalizable modes in the bulk, related to initial and final states, show up in the computations. The independent boundary values are interpreted as sources for dual operators O^\\pm and we argue that, apart from the possibility of entanglement, there exists a coupling between the degrees of freedom leaving at each boundary. The AdS_(1+1) geometry is also discussed in view of its similar boundary structure. Based on the analysis, we propose a ...

  14. Studies on antimicrobial activities of solvent extracts of different spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Dilek; Toroglu, Sevil

    2011-03-01

    The antimicrobial activities of the ethyl acetate, acetone and methanol extract of 12 plant species were studied. The extract of Capsicum annuum (red pepper) (fruit) Zingiber officinale (ginger) (root), Cuminum cyminum (cumin), Alpinia ficinarum (galingale), Coriandrum sativum (coriander), Cinnamomun zeylanicum Nees (cinnamomun), Origanum onites L. (thyme), Folium sennae (senna), Eugenia caryophyllata (cloves), Flos tiliae (lime), Folium menthae crispae (peppermint) and Piper nigrum (blackpepper) were tested in vitro against 2 fungi and 8 bacterial species by the disc diffusion method. Klebsiella pneumonia 13883, Bacillus megaterium NRS, Pseudomonas aeroginosa ATCC 27859, Staphylococcus aureus 6538 P, Escherichia coil ATCC 8739, Enterobacter cloaca ATCC 13047, Corynebacterium xerosis UC 9165, Streptococcus faecalis DC 74, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Rhodotorula rubra were used in this investigation. The results indicated that extracts of different spices has shown antibacterial activity in the range of 7-24 mm 30 microl(-1) inhibition zone Eugenia caryophyllata (clove), 7-20 mm 30microl(-1) inhibition zone Capsicum annum (red pepper) and Cinnamomun zeylanicum (cinnamon) bark, 7-18 mm 30microl(-1) inhibition zone Folium sennae (senna) leaves, 7-16 mm 30 microl(-1) inhibition zone Zingiber officinale (ginger) root, 7-15 mm 30microl(-1) inhibition zone Cuminum cyminum (cumin) seed, 7-14 mm 30 microl(-1) inhibition zone Folium menthae crispae (peppermint), Origanum onites (thyme) leaves and Alpinia ficinarum (galingale) root, 7-12 mm 30 microl(-1) inhibiton zone Piper nigrum (blackpepper), 7-11 mm 30microl(-1) inhibition zone Flos tiliae (lime) leaves, 7-8 mm 30microl(-1) inhibition zone Coriandrum sativum (coriander) to the microorganisms tested.

  15. Development and Validation of the Student Perceptions of Physician-Pharmacist Interprofessional Clinical Education (SPICE) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorek, Joseph A.; MacLaughlin, Anitra A.; Samiuddin, Mohammed; Young, Rodney B.; MacLaughlin, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To describe the development and validation of an instrument designed to assess student perceptions of physician-pharmacist interprofessional clinical education (SPICE). Methods. Faculty members from pharmacy and medical schools developed items for the instrument, and 179 medical and pharmacy students completed the scale. Psychometric properties, including reliability and construct validity, were assessed using confirmatory factor analysis. Results. The final instrument consisted of 10 items with 3 subscales measuring student perceptions of interprofessional teamwork and team-based practice, roles/responsibilities for collaborative practice, and patient outcomes from collaborative practice. Validity and reliability of the instrument were demonstrated. Conclusion. The SPICE instrument demonstrated promise as a valid and reliable measure of pharmacy and medical student perceptions of interprofessional clinical education. SPICE may serve as a useful instrument for educational researchers in assessing the impact of interprofessional educational experiences. PMID:24249852

  16. Review of Antidiabetic Fruits, Vegetables, Beverages, Oils and Spices commonly consumed in the Diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beidokhti, Maliheh Najari; Jäger, Anna K

    2017-01-01

    of the fruits, vegetables, beverages, oils and spices and the words 'antidiabetic', 'hypoglycemic', 'anti-hyperglycemic', 'type 2 diabetes' were used as keywords for search. RESULTS: Certain fruits and vegetables are functional foods and their consumption reduces the incidence of type 2 diabetes. Hypoglycemic......-hyperglycemic and anti-diabetic activities of some dietary fruits, vegetables, beverages, oils and spices and their active hypoglycemic constituents. Including such plant species in the diet might improve management of type 2 diabetes....... for patients with type 2 diabetes. The ethnopharmacological use of herbal medicines, many of them part of our diet as spices, vegetables and fruits, has been developed for the treatment of diabetes due to inexpensiveness, easy availability and few side effects. AIM OF THE STUDY: Our aim is to present a review...

  17. Improving the determination of irradiation efficacy by the identification of surviving bacteria from irradiated spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshikawa, Tomihiko; Matsushima, Masako; Hironiwa, Takayuki; Takekawa, Tetsuya; Miyahara, Makoto

    2009-01-01

    The identification of the surviving bacteria isolated from 5 kinds of irradiated spices (all-spice, oregano, sage, paprika and black pepper) was carried out to know whether these bacteria were marker organisms to determine the efficacy of the irradiation treatment. Except in paprika, B.megaterium was detected. In allspice, paprika and black pepper B.pumilus was detected. B.cereus was detected in allspice, oregano and black pepper. Gram negative bacteria such as Methylobacterium and Enterobacter genus were also detected in oregano, sage and paprika. These bacteria were strongly resistant to radiation, and can be used as marker organisms for the determination of the efficacy of the irradiation treatment of spices. (author)

  18. Effects of irradiation and fumigation on the antioxidative properties of some spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuruppu, D.P.; Schmidt, K.; Farkas, J.; Langerak, D.I; Duren, M.D.A. van

    1985-01-01

    The effects of gamma irradiation (5.6 kGy) and ethylene oxide fumigation on the antioxidative activity of marjoram, nutmeg, paprika and black pepper were investigated. Sunflower oil in water emulsion (1:1), dark, at 30 deg C, lard, dark, at 40 deg C, lard, illuminated, at 50 deg C, and lard, dark, at 50 deg C were the substrates utilized for the investigation. Oxidation of the substrates in the presence of 0.2% (by weight) of spices were followed by the determination of peroxide value (PO) and free fatty acide value (FFA). No significant effect of irradiation on the antioxidant activities of spices was revealed. Fumigated marjoram tended to be less antioxidative in lard kept in dark storage at 60 deg C than the non-treated or irradiated spice. Marjoram and nutmeg lost their antioxidant properties in the presence of light. This loss, however, was not influenced by the irradiation or fumigation treatments. (author)

  19. Chemical composition and antioxidant activities of some indigenous spices consumed in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ene-Obong, Henrietta; Onuoha, NneOla; Aburime, Lilian; Mbah, Obioma

    2018-01-01

    The chemical compositions and antioxidant capacities of seven spices consumed in Southern Nigeria were determined. They were purchased from majors markets in the study area. Edible portions of the spices were ground into fine powder and their nutrient and phytochemical compositions determined using standard methods. Antioxidant activity were determined on aqueous extract using standard assays, namely, 1,1-diphenyl-2picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical ability and ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP). The spices were rich in macro-and micro-nutrients. Ricinodendron heudelotii had the highest protein (30.6%) and fat (24.6%) contents. Tetrapleura tetraptera had the least fat content. The total phenol, flavonoid and vitamin C contents differed significantly (pspices have good nutrient profile and antioxidant potentials. Their increased consumption is recommended and use as functional foods needs to be exploited. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Screening of selected Asian spices for anti obesity-related bioactivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuliana, Nancy Dewi; Iqbal, Muzamal; Jahangir, Muhammad; Wijaya, Christofora Hanny; Korthout, Henrie; Kottenhage, Marijke; Kim, Hye Kyong; Verpoorte, Robert

    2011-06-15

    The potential health effects of 30 spices, commonly used for daily consumption, were submitted to bioactivity screening with several anti-obesity related bioassays: adenosine A1 receptor binding, cannabinoid CB1 receptor binding, TNF-α and 3T3-L1 adipocytes differentiation induction. Sesame seed and red chilli exhibited high binding activity to the adenosine A1 receptor and nutmeg, mace, black pepper and turmeric to the cannabinoid CB1 receptor, while piment and turmeric showed high inhibition of TNF-α accumulation. Black onion seed proved to be the only spice with high 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation induction activity. Several well known major compounds found in these active spices were tested with the respective bioassays but did not show activity. Thus, it appears that other minor compounds or the synergistic effects of different constituents are responsible for the observed activity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Fascination and Social Togetherness-Discussions about Spice Smoking on a Swedish Internet Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellgren, Anette; Henningsson, Helena; Soussan, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Spice is a smoking mixture containing synthetic cannabinoids with psychoactive effects similar to herbal cannabis. It is sold on the Internet and has become popular among young people. The purpose of the present study was to investigate experiences of intoxication induced by Spice, as described on a Swedish internet-based discussion forum. A systematic search yielded 40 reports, which were analyzed using phenomenological method. A total of 7 themes (composed of 27 categories) emerged from the analysis: 1. Spice use as social ritual; 2. Social secretiveness; 3. Intoxication remarks; 4. Well-being and elation; 5. Altered perception of reality; 6. Fears and coping; 7. Unpleasant physical effects. The results show that smoking was a social activity mostly carried out in small peer-groups, and that the substances induced strong intoxication with both positive and negative effects. Despite fears and unpleasant effects, the intoxication was often considered fascinating and rewarding.

  2. Antibacterial activity of natural spices on multiple drug resistant Escherichia coli isolated from drinking water, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Shahedur; Parvez, Anowar Khasru; Islam, Rezuanul; Khan, Mahboob Hossain

    2011-03-15

    Spices traditionally have been used as coloring agents, flavoring agents, preservatives, food additives and medicine in Bangladesh. The present work aimed to find out the antimicrobial activity of natural spices on multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli isolates. Anti-bacterial potentials of six crude plant extracts (Allium sativum, Zingiber officinale, Allium cepa, Coriandrum sativum, Piper nigrum and Citrus aurantifolia) were tested against five Escherichia coli isolated from potable water sources at kushtia, Bangladesh. All the bacterial isolates were susceptible to undiluted lime-juice. None of them were found to be susceptible against the aqueous extracts of garlic, onion, coriander, pepper and ginger alone. However, all the isolates were susceptible when subjected to 1:1:1 aqueous extract of lime, garlic and ginger. The highest inhibition zone was observed with lime (11 mm). Natural spices might have anti-bacterial activity against enteric pathogens and could be used for prevention of diarrheal diseases. Further evaluation is necessary.

  3. In Vitro Antimicrobial Activity of Spices and Medicinal Herbs against Selected Microbes Associated with Juices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romika Dhiman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, comparison of antimicrobial activities of different spices, Curcuma longa, Zingiber officinale, and Mentha arvensis, and medicinal herbs, such as Withania somnifera, Rauvolfia serpentina, Emblica officinalis, Terminalia arjuna, and Centella asiatica, was evaluated. Different extraction solvents (acetone, methanol, ethanol, and water were used and extracts were examined against Bacillus cereus, Serratia sp., Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Aspergillus flavus, and Penicillium citrinum isolated from juices. Extracts from the medicinal herb and spices have significant activity. B. cereus was the most sensitive and R. mucilaginosa was the most resistant among the microorganisms tested. Ethanolic and methanolic extract of C. asiatica displayed maximum diameter of inhibition zone against bacteria and yeast and percentage mycelial inhibition against moulds. This study confirmed the potential of selected extracts of spices as effective natural food preservative in juices.

  4. AdS solutions through transgression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donos, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Gauntlett, J.P. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Blackett Lab.]|[Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). The Institute for Mathematical Sciences; Kim, Nakwoo [Kyung Hee Univ., Seoul (Korea). Dept. of Physics and Research Inst. of Basic Science

    2008-07-15

    We present new classes of explicit supersymmetric AdS{sub 3} solutions of type IIB supergravity with non-vanishing five-form flux and AdS{sub 2} solutions of D=11 supergravity with electric four-form flux. The former are dual to two-dimensional SCFTs with (0,2) supersymmetry and the latter to supersymmetric quantum mechanics with two supercharges. We also investigate more general classes of AdS{sub 3} solutions of type IIB supergravity and AdS{sub 2} solutions of D=11 supergravity which in addition have non-vanishing three-form flux and magnetic four-form flux, respectively. The construction of these more general solutions makes essential use of the Chern-Simons or ''transgression'' terms in the Bianchi identity or the equation of motion of the field strengths in the supergravity theories. We construct infinite new classes of explicit examples and for some of the type IIB solutions determine the central charge of the dual SCFTs. The type IIB solutions with non-vanishing three-form flux that we construct include a two-torus, and after two T-dualities and an S-duality, we obtain new AdS3 solutions with only the NS fields being non-trivial. (orig.)

  5. Inclusion of Body-Bias Effect in SPICE Modeling of 4H-SiC Integrated Circuit Resistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    2017-01-01

    The DC electrical behavior of n-type 4H-SiC resistors used for realizing 500 C durable integrated circuits (ICs) is studied as a function of substrate bias and temperature. Improved fidelity electrical simulation is described using SPICE NMOS model to simulate resistor substrate body bias effect that is absent from the SPICE semiconductor resistor model.

  6. Inclusion of Body Bias Effect in SPICE Modeling of 4H-SiC Integrated Circuit Resistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    2017-01-01

    The DC electrical behavior of n-type 4H-SiC resistors used for realizing 500 degrees Celsius durable integrated circuits (ICs) is studied as a function of substrate bias and temperature. Improved fidelity electrical simulation is described using SPICE NMOS model to simulate resistor substrate body bias effect that is absent from the SPICE semiconductor resistor model.

  7. 9 CFR 318.15 - Tagging chemicals, preservatives, cereals, spices, etc., “U.S. retained.”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tagging chemicals, preservatives, cereals, spices, etc., âU.S. retained.â 318.15 Section 318.15 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND...; REINSPECTION AND PREPARATION OF PRODUCTS General § 318.15 Tagging chemicals, preservatives, cereals, spices...

  8. Monitoring in vitro antibacterial efficacy of 26 Indian spices against multidrug resistant urinary tract infecting bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Sibanarayan; Padhy, Rabindra N

    2014-09-01

    To screen methanolic extracts of 26 commonly used Indian spices against nine species of uropathogenic bacteria ( Enterococcus faecalis , Staphylococcus aureus , Acinetobacter baumannii , Citrobacter freundii , Enterobacter aerogenes , Escherichia coli , Klebsiella pneumoniae , Proteus mirabilis , and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ), isolated from clinical samples of a tertiary care hospital for antibacterial activity. Bacterial strains were subjected to antibiotic sensitivity testing by Kirby-Bauer's disc diffusion method. Monitoring antibacterial potentiality of spice extracts was done by the agar-well diffusion method with multidrug resistant (MDR) strains of nine uropathogens. The Gram-positive (GP) bacteria E. faecalis and S. aureus were resistant to 16 of the 21 antibiotics used. Among the Gram-negative (GN) bacteria, resistant patterns were A. baumannii and E. aerogenes to 12, C. freundii to 14, E. coli to 12, K. pneumoniae to 10, P. mirabilis to 11, and P. aeruginosa to 15 antibiotics of the 18 antibiotics used. The most effective 15 spices, having at least 25-29 mm as the size of the zone of inhibition, were Allium cepa , Brassica juncea , Cinnamomum tamala , Cinnamomum zeylanicum , Coriandrum sativum , Cuminum cyminum , Curcuma longa , Mentha spicata , Murraya koenigii , Nigella sativa , Papaver somniferum , Piper nigrum , S. aromaticum , Trachyspermum ammi , and Trigonella foenum for at least one of the GP or GN MDR bacterial strains used. Moderate control capacity was registered by nine spices, Curcuma amada , Foeniculum vulgare , Illicium verum , Mentha spicata , Papaver somniferum , Syzygium aromaticum , Trachyspermum ammi , Trigonella foenum , and Zingiber officinale . However, the best two spices for controlling all the pathogens used were C. zeylanicum and C. longa , with the highest value of 29 mm as the inhibition zone size. The most effective and unique 16 spice plants recorded for the in vitro control of MDR uropathogens could further be pursued for

  9. Anti-oncogenic perspectives of spices/herbs: A comprehensive review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Masood Sadiq; Naz, Ambreen; Sultan, Muhammad Tauseef; Qayyum, Mir Muhammad Nasir

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary nutrition regime has focused the attention of the researchers on phytochemicals enriched spices to mitigate various oncological threats. Numerous chemopreventive strategies against malignancy have been developed considering the anticancer perspectives of allied nutraceutical constituents. Current evidences have proven an inverse association of spices with that of oncological incidences. The high antioxidant activity of spices derived bioactives triggers the free radicals scavenging ability at cellular level thereby alleviating various metabolic syndromes. Promising compounds including curcumin and curcuminoids (turmeric), limonene (cardamom), allicin, allyl isothiocyanate (garlic), cinnamic aldehyde, 2-hydroxycinnamaldehyde and eugenol (cinnamon), gingerol, zingiberone, zingiberene (ginger), dipropyle disulfides and quercetin (onion), piperidine piperine, limonene, α- and β-pinene (black pepper), crocetin, crocin and safranal (saffron) have been identified as chemopreventing agents against various malignancies. Chemopreventive properties of spices are mediated by functional bioactive ingredients that arrest the activity of cytochrome P450 and isozymes CYP 1A1, cyclooxygenase-2, reducing activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3) and signal transducer. They are closely associated with tumorigenesis activated by interleukin-6 (IL-6) receptors and epidermal growth factor (EGF) relate to an array of tumors. The bioactive constituents altering the expression of protein involved in cell cycle, activating caspases killer and suppressing Kappa-B activation. Alongside, they also restrain causative agents of cell structure damage as in lipid and protein membrane system and DNA that shifting healthy body towards cancerous state. Spices phytochemicals have established as carcinogenesis blockers by modulating cell proliferation pathways transformation, inflammation, metastasis etc. Furthermore, spices as functional ingredients may act as immune boosters and diminish

  10. Anti-oncogenic perspectives of spices/herbs: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Masood Sadiq; Naz, Ambreen; Sultan, Muhammad Tauseef; Qayyum, Mir Muhammad Nasir

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary nutrition regime has focused the attention of the researchers on phytochemicals enriched spices to mitigate various oncological threats. Numerous chemopreventive strategies against malignancy have been developed considering the anticancer perspectives of allied nutraceutical constituents. Current evidences have proven an inverse association of spices with that of oncological incidences. The high antioxidant activity of spices derived bioactives triggers the free radicals scavenging ability at cellular level thereby alleviating various metabolic syndromes. Promising compounds including curcumin and curcuminoids (turmeric), limonene (cardamom), allicin, allyl isothiocyanate (garlic), cinnamic aldehyde, 2-hydroxycinnamaldehyde and eugenol (cinnamon), gingerol, zingiberone, zingiberene (ginger), dipropyle disulfides and quercetin (onion), piperidine piperine, limonene, α- and β-pinene (black pepper), crocetin, crocin and safranal (saffron) have been identified as chemopreventing agents against various malignancies. Chemopreventive properties of spices are mediated by functional bioactive ingredients that arrest the activity of cytochrome P450 and isozymes CYP 1A1, cyclooxygenase-2, reducing activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3) and signal transducer. They are closely associated with tumorigenesis activated by interleukin-6 (IL-6) receptors and epidermal growth factor (EGF) relate to an array of tumors. The bioactive constituents altering the expression of protein involved in cell cycle, activating caspases killer and suppressing Kappa-B activation. Alongside, they also restrain causative agents of cell structure damage as in lipid and protein membrane system and DNA that shifting healthy body towards cancerous state. Spices phytochemicals have established as carcinogenesis blockers by modulating cell proliferation pathways transformation, inflammation, metastasis etc. Furthermore, spices as functional ingredients may act as immune boosters and diminish

  11. Beneficial effects of herbs, spices and medicinal plants on the metabolic syndrome, brain and cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panickar, Kiran S

    2013-03-01

    Herbs and spices have been used since ancient times to not only improve the flavor of edible food but also to prevent and treat chronic health maladies. While the scientific evidence for the use of such common herbs and medicinal plants then had been scarce or lacking, the beneficial effects observed from such use were generally encouraging. It is, therefore, not surprising that the tradition of using such herbs, perhaps even after the advent of modern medicine, has continued. More recently, due to an increased interest in understanding the nutritional effects of herbs/spices more comprehensively, several studies have examined the cellular and molecular modes of action of the active chemical components in herbs and their biological properties. Beneficial actions of herbs/spices include anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-hypertensive, gluco-regulatory, and anti-thrombotic effects. One major component of herbs and spices is the polyphenols. Some of the aforementioned properties are attributed to the polyphenols and they are associated with attenuating the metabolic syndrome. Detrimental changes associated with the metabolic syndrome over time affect brain and cognitive function. Metabolic syndrome and type-2 diabetes are also risk factors for Alzheimer's disease and stroke. In addition, the neuroprotective effects of herbs and spices have been demonstrated and, whether directly or indirectly, such beneficial effects may also contribute to an improvement in cognitive function. This review evaluates the current evidence available for herbs/spices in potentially improving the metabolic syndrome, as well as their neuroprotective effects on the brain, and cognitive function in animal and human studies.

  12. Spicing Things up by Adding Color and Relieving Pain: The Use of "Napoleon's Buttons" in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucholtz, Kevin M.

    2011-01-01

    For some students, organic chemistry can be a distant subject and unrelated to any courses they have seen in their college careers. To develop a more contextual learning experience in organic chemistry, an additional text, "Napoleon's Buttons: 17 Molecules That Changed History," by Penny Le Couteur and Jay Burreson, was incorporated as a…

  13. Irradiation effect for the control of coliform bacteria in spices and dehydrated vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Yin; Li Xiangling

    2001-01-01

    lrradiation of 6 kGy could make the MPN of coliform bacteria in irradated spices and dehydrated vegetables meet the demands of the national microbiological examination of food hygiene. No new irradiation-resistance organism in coliform bacteria was found in 188 spices samples treated. The mistake in the MPN of coliform bacteria detection was caused mainly by operation. The main cause was that the detected bacteria for lactose refermentation and Gram-stain tests were not picked from the same colony. (authors)

  14. Stability of cellulose radicals produced by radiation in spices as studied by the EPR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehner, K.; Stachowicz, W.

    2003-01-01

    The results are presented of EPR measurements on the stability of cellulose radicals produced in 26 popular spices irradiated with a dose of 7 kGy of gamma rays. EPR measurements were done with the use of an EPR spectrometer EPR-10 MINI at X band (microwave radiation of frequency 9.5 GHz), produced by St. Petersburg Instruments Ltd. The aim of the work was to prove the applicability of the EPR method for the control of irradiation in the investigated spices. (author)

  15. The industrial potential of herbs and spices – a mini review

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna B. Leja; Katarzyna Czaczyk

    2016-01-01

    Herbs and spices have been used for food and medicinal purposes for centuries – the first recorded evidence of their use dates back to 1500BC and the Ebers Papyrus, which mentioned spices such as anise, mustard, saffron, cinnamon, and cassia. Now, in the 21st century, a variety of secondary compounds produced by plants are used in many fields of industry, such as food production (to improve taste, to provide vitamins and macro- and microelements, and also to inhibit fo...

  16. Recalls of spices due to bacterial contamination monitored by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration: the predominance of Salmonellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vij, Vibha; Ailes, Elizabeth; Wolyniak, Cecilia; Angulo, Frederick J; Klontz, Karl C

    2006-01-01

    From 1980 to 2000, the annual per capita consumption of spices in the United States increased by 60% (from 1.0 to 1.6 kg per person per year). Although spices are known to harbor various molds, fungi, and bacteria, relatively few reports have documented this group of foods as the cause of human illness. In recent years, however, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has noted an increased number of recalls of dried spices due to bacterial contamination. Accordingly, we reviewed spice recalls that took place in the United States from fiscal years 1970 to 2003. During the study period, the FDA monitored 21 recalls involving 12 spice types contaminated with bacterial pathogens; in all but one instance, the recalled spices contained Salmonella. Paprika was the spice most often involved in the recalls. A wide variety of countries were the source of the recalled spices. Using data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Salmonella Surveillance System, we were unable to discern any increases in the reported incidence of laboratory-confirmed salmonellosis in states that received spices contaminated with selected rare Salmonella serotypes. A variety of effective methods exist to disinfect spices, procedures that have attained increased importance given the frequent use of spices in ready-to-eat foods and the potential for contaminated spices to cause widespread outbreaks.

  17. SPICE: Sentinel-3 Performance Improvement for Ice Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, M.; Escola, R.; Roca, M.; Thibaut, P.; Aublanc, J.; Shepherd, A.; Remy, F.; Benveniste, J.; Ambrózio, A.; Restano, M.

    2017-12-01

    For the past 25 years, polar-orbiting satellite radar altimeters have provided a valuable record of ice sheet elevation change and mass balance. One of the principle challenges associated with radar altimetry comes from the relatively large ground footprint of conventional pulse-limited radars, which reduces their capacity to make measurements in areas of complex topographic terrain. In recent years, progress has been made towards improving ground resolution, through the implementation of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), or Delay-Doppler, techniques. In 2010, the launch of CryoSat-2 heralded the start of a new era of SAR Interferometric (SARIn) altimetry. However, because the satellite operated in SARIn and LRM mode over the ice sheets, many of the non-interferometric SAR altimeter processing techniques have been optimized for water and sea ice surfaces only. The launch of Sentinel-3, which provides full non-interferometric SAR coverage of the ice sheets, therefore presents the opportunity to further develop these SAR processing methodologies over ice sheets. Here we present results from SPICE, a 2 year study that focuses on (1) developing and evaluating Sentinel-3 SAR altimetry processing methodologies over the Polar ice sheets, and (2) investigating radar wave penetration through comparisons of Ku- and Ka-band satellite measurements. The project, which is funded by ESA's SEOM (Scientific Exploitation of Operational Missions) programme, has worked in advance of the operational phase of Sentinel-3, to emulate Sentinel-3 SAR and pseudo-LRM data from dedicated CryoSat-2 SAR acquisitions made at the Lake Vostok, Dome C and Spirit sites in East Antarctica, and from reprocessed SARIn data in Greenland. In Phase 1 of the project we have evaluated existing processing methodologies, and in Phase 2 we are investigating new evolutions to the Delay-Doppler Processing (DDP) and retracking chains. In this presentation we (1) evaluate the existing Sentinel-3 processing chain by

  18. Predicting AD conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yawu; Mattila, Jussi; Ruiz, Miguel �ngel Mu�oz

    2013-01-01

    To compare the accuracies of predicting AD conversion by using a decision support system (PredictAD tool) and current research criteria of prodromal AD as identified by combinations of episodic memory impairment of hippocampal type and visual assessment of medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) on MRI...

  19. AdS null deformations with inhomogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, K.

    2012-12-01

    We study AdS×X null deformations arising as near horizon limits of D3-brane analogs of inhomogeneous plane waves. Restricting to normalizable deformations for the AdS5 case, these generically correspond in the dual field theory to super Yang-Mills states with light cone momentum density T++ varying spatially, the homogeneous case studied in [K. Narayan, arXiv:1202.5935] corresponding to uniform T++. All of these preserve some supersymmetry. Generically these inhomogeneous solutions exhibit analogs of horizons in the interior where a timelike Killing vector becomes null. From the point of view of x+-dimensional reduction, the circle pinches off on these horizon loci in the interior. We discuss similar inhomogeneous solutions with asymptotically Lifshitz boundary conditions, as well as aspects of Lifshitz singularities in string constructions involving anti-de Sitter null deformations. We also briefly discuss holographic entanglement entropy for some of these.

  20. Adding more value to added-value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marian, Livia

    Recent studies reveal that consumers respond favourably to “organic plus” products with additional ethical attributes. The aim of the current study is to explore whether consumers would notice and value further improvements in the animal welfare standards than those imposed by the organic...... it is probably valued less than expected. The added attributes need to be thoroughly considered when developing and marketing “organic plus” products, as their effect on other product characteristics (e.g. high prices) can detract from their added value....

  1. Effect of infusion of spices into the oil vs. combined malaxation of olive paste and spices on quality of naturally flavoured virgin olive oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caponio, Francesco; Durante, Viviana; Varva, Gabriella; Silletti, Roccangelo; Previtali, Maria Assunta; Viggiani, Ilaria; Squeo, Giacomo; Summo, Carmine; Pasqualone, Antonella; Gomes, Tommaso; Baiano, Antonietta

    2016-07-01

    Olive oil flavouring with aromatic plants and spices is a traditional practice in Mediterranean gastronomy. The aim of this work was to compare the influence of two different flavouring techniques (infusion of spices into the oil vs. combined malaxation of olives paste and spices) on chemical and sensory quality of flavoured olive oil. In particular, oxidative and hydrolytic degradation (by routine and non-conventional analyses), phenolic profiles (by HPLC), volatile compounds (by SPME-GC/MS), antioxidant activity, and sensory properties (by a trained panel and by consumers) of the oils were evaluated. The obtained results evidenced that the malaxation method was more effective in extracting the phenolic compounds, with a significantly lower level of hydrolysis of secoiridoids. As a consequence, antioxidant activity was significantly lower in the oils obtained by infusion, which were characterized by a higher extent of the oxidative degradation. The volatile compounds were not significantly influenced by changing the flavouring method, apart for sulfur compounds that were more abundant in the oils obtained by the combined malaxation method. From a sensory point of view, more intense bitter and pungent tastes were perceived when the infusion method was adopted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. PRODUCTION OF BREAD–SPREAD FROM BLENDS OF SHEA BUTTER (VITELLARIA PARADOXA), GARLIC (ALLIUM SATIVUM), GINGER (ZINGIBER OFFICINALE), SCENT LEAF (OCCIMUM GRATISSIMUM), AND SUYA SPICE

    OpenAIRE

    Beatrice O.T. Ifesan; Olufunmilayo S. Fasasi F.A. Ehoniyotan

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at production of bread-spread from blends of shea butter with spices such as ginger, garlic, scent leaf, and suya spice. Two different ratios, 70% shea butter: 30% spices and 85% shea butter:15% spices were prepared from raw shea butter and various spices. The treatments were packaged in a transparent plastic bowl and stored at room temperature for 4 weeks while samples were taken for analysis at 0, 2 and 4 weeks of storage. Samples were examined for chemical, antioxidant pro...

  3. 78 FR 66010 - Draft Risk Profile on Pathogens and Filth in Spices; Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... making related to the safety of spices in the U.S. food supply. The information may also be useful to... supply chain (e.g., on the farm, at primary processing/manufacturing, at intermediary processing (where... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-N-1204...

  4. Shelf-Life Extension Studies of Akara Spiced with Crude Extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of Aframomum danielli crude antioxidant extract on storability of akara were investigated. Physical and chemical characteristics of oils used for frying were also assessed. Akara balls were spiced with Aframomum danielli crude antioxidant extract at; 100ppm, 200ppm, 300ppm, 400ppm, 500ppm and 1000ppm.

  5. Application of a thermoluminescence method for the detection of irradiated spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastélum, S; Osuna, I; Meléndrez, R; Cruz-Zaragoza, E; Chernov, V; Calderón, T; Barboza-Flores, M

    2002-01-01

    Food irradiation is extremely effective at reducing food-borne illness as well as losses caused by infestation and contamination. Despite the well-established regulations that permit irradiation to control pathogens in spices, there are no widespread methods to detect previously irradiated food. Therefore, it has become necessary to develop new detection and dose determination methods for food subjected previously to irradiation. The present work deals with the application of the thermoluminescence (TL) phenomenon to detect irradiated spices. The process is based upon the thermoluminescence properties exhibited by the polymineral content of the irradiated specimen. After separating the organic material, it is possible to extract some polymineral substances that are suitable for thermoluminescence analysis due to interaction of the spice to ionising radiation. The method was successfully applied to examine irradiated and non-irradiated paprika of Mexican origin. The spice was irradiated with gamma rays at doses of 5, 10 and 15 kGy. The separated thermoluminescent polymineral was found to be composed mainly of quartz and feldspar. The thermoluminescence glow curve of the irradiated specimen shows a wide band peaked 228, 268 and 336 degrees C, resembling closely the combined TL of quartz and feldspars. The method allows for the determination of the retrospective dose exposure.

  6. Mango ginger (Curcuma amada Roxb.)–A promising spice for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mango ginger (Curcuma amada Roxb.) is a unique spice having morphological resemblance with ginger but imparts a raw mango flavour. The main use of mango ginger rhizome is in the manufacture of pickles and culinary preparations. Ayurveda and Unani medicinal systems have given much importance to mango ginger ...

  7. Spices, condiments and medicinal plants in Ethiopia, their taxonomy and agricultural significance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, P.C.M.

    1981-01-01

    The book is the third in a series of publications on useful plants of Ethiopia. It describes 12 spices and condiments and 13 medicinal plants, both from a taxonomic and an agricultural viewpoint.

    The extensive botanical description of each taxon is accompanied by a full-page

  8. Mycobiota and identification of aflatoxin gene cluster in marketed spices in West Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gnonlonfin, G. J. B.; Adjovi, Y. C.; Tokpo, A. F.

    2013-01-01

    of Aspergillus were dominant on all marketed dried and milled spices irrespective of country. Gene characterization and amplification analysis showed that most of the Aspergillus flavus isolates possess the cluster genes for aflatoxin production. Aflatoxin B1 assessment by Thin Layer Chromatography showed...

  9. microbiological quality of spice used in the production of kilishi a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Twenty (20) Samples were collected using a sterile beaker, on different occasions and sample was taken to the laboratory immediately for analysis. Sample Preparation and Serial Dilution. The sample preparation was carried out according to the method described by FAO (1979). In this method,. 25g of sample (spice) was ...

  10. In vitro antioxidant and α-amylase inhibition activities of spiced red ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spiced chili paste (green or red), locally known as Datta, is a traditional popular spicy paste consumed in Ethiopia. This study investigated the total phenolic contents (TPC), total flavonoid contents (TFC), in vitro antioxidant, and α-amylase inhibition activities of water, acetone, petroleum ether, methanol, and 80% methanol ...

  11. Spices with Breast Cancer Chemopreventive and Therapeutic Potentials: A Functional Foods Based-Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Aliyu; Ibrahim, Mohammed Auwal; Erukainure, Ochuko Lucky; Malami, Ibrahim; Adamu, Auwal

    2017-09-12

    Cancer is a disease that affects a significant number of both rural and urban dwellers. Among the various types of cancer, breast cancer is one of the most common diagnosed cancers among females. Its menace can be curbed with locally consumed spices due to their multiple bioactive phytochemicals. This review focuses on the breast cancer chemopreventive and therapeutic potentials of locally consumed spices. The most commonly consumed spices with breast cancer chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic phytochemical include pepper, onions, ginger, garlic, curry and thyme containing many biologically active metabolites ranging from vitamins, fatty acids esters, polyphenols/phenolics, sulfur-containing compounds and anthraquinones with proven antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immuno-modulatory, antitumor and anticancer properties against breast cancer/carcinogenesis. Therefore, extracts and active principles of these spices could be explored in breast cancer chemoprevention and possibly therapeutically which may provide an avenue for reducing the risk and prevalence of breast cancer. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. An improved approach to identify irradiated spices using electronic nose, FTIR, and EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Bhaskar; Ahn, Jae-Jun; Maeng, Jeong-Hwan; Kyung, Hyun-Kyu; Lim, Ha-Kyeong; Sharma, Arun; Kwon, Joong-Ho

    2014-09-01

    Changes in cumin and chili powder from India resulting from electron-beam irradiation were investigated using 3 analytical methods: electronic nose (E-nose), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The spices had been exposed to 6 to 14 kGy doses recommended for microbial decontamination. E-nose measured a clear difference in flavor patterns of the irradiated spices in comparison with the nonirradiated samples. Principal component analysis further showed a dose-dependent variation. FTIR spectra of the samples showed strong absorption bands at 3425, 3007 to 2854, and 1746 cm(-1). However, both nonirradiated and irradiated spice samples had comparable patterns without any noteworthy changes in functional groups. EPR spectroscopy of the irradiated samples showed a radiation-specific triplet signal at g = 2.006 with a hyper-fine coupling constant of 3 mT confirming the results obtained with the E-nose technique. Thus, E-nose was found to be a potential tool to identify irradiated spices. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  13. Nation-Based Occurrence and Endogenous Biological Reduction of Mycotoxins in Medicinal Herbs and Spices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kee Hun Do

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal herbs have been increasingly used for therapeutic purposes against a diverse range of human diseases worldwide. Moreover, the health benefits of spices have been extensively recognized in recent studies. However, inevitable contaminants, including mycotoxins, in medicinal herbs and spices can cause serious problems for humans in spite of their health benefits. Along with the different nation-based occurrences of mycotoxins, the ultimate exposure and toxicities can be diversely influenced by the endogenous food components in different commodities of the medicinal herbs and spices. The phytochemicals in these food stuffs can influence mold growth, mycotoxin production and biological action of the mycotoxins in exposed crops, as well as in animal and human bodies. The present review focuses on the occurrence of mycotoxins in medicinal herbs and spices and the biological interaction between mold, mycotoxin and herbal components. These networks will provide insights into the methods of mycotoxin reduction and toxicological risk assessment of mycotoxin-contaminated medicinal food components in the environment and biological organisms.

  14. Nation-Based Occurrence and Endogenous Biological Reduction of Mycotoxins in Medicinal Herbs and Spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Kee Hun; An, Tae Jin; Oh, Sang-Keun; Moon, Yuseok

    2015-10-14

    Medicinal herbs have been increasingly used for therapeutic purposes against a diverse range of human diseases worldwide. Moreover, the health benefits of spices have been extensively recognized in recent studies. However, inevitable contaminants, including mycotoxins, in medicinal herbs and spices can cause serious problems for humans in spite of their health benefits. Along with the different nation-based occurrences of mycotoxins, the ultimate exposure and toxicities can be diversely influenced by the endogenous food components in different commodities of the medicinal herbs and spices. The phytochemicals in these food stuffs can influence mold growth, mycotoxin production and biological action of the mycotoxins in exposed crops, as well as in animal and human bodies. The present review focuses on the occurrence of mycotoxins in medicinal herbs and spices and the biological interaction between mold, mycotoxin and herbal components. These networks will provide insights into the methods of mycotoxin reduction and toxicological risk assessment of mycotoxin-contaminated medicinal food components in the environment and biological organisms.

  15. Prioritization of chemical hazards in spices and herbs for European monitoring programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asselt, Van E.D.; Banach, J.L.; Fels, van der Ine

    2018-01-01

    Monitoring programs are preferably risk-based, which allows focusing on the most relevant human health risks. In this study, a risk matrix was used to identify those chemical hazards that have the highest human health risk for the following spices and herbs: paprika/chilli powder, black pepper,

  16. Decoupling biogeochemical records, extinction, and environmental change during the Cambrian SPICE event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffbauer, James D.; Huntley, John Warren; Fike, David A.; Jeffrey, Matthew Jarrell; Gregg, Jay M.; Shelton, Kevin L.

    2017-01-01

    Several positive carbon isotope excursions in Lower Paleozoic rocks, including the prominent Upper Cambrian Steptoean Positive Carbon Isotope Excursion (SPICE), are thought to reflect intermittent perturbations in the hydrosphere-biosphere system. Models explaining these secular changes are abundant, but the synchronicity and regional variation of the isotope signals are not well understood. Examination of cores across a paleodepth gradient in the Upper Cambrian central Missouri intrashelf basin (United States) reveals a time-transgressive, facies-dependent nature of the SPICE. Although the SPICE event may be a global signal, the manner in which it is recorded in rocks should and does vary as a function of facies and carbonate platform geometry. We call for a paradigm shift to better constrain facies, stratigraphic, and biostratigraphic architecture and to apply these observations to the variability in magnitude, stratigraphic extent, and timing of the SPICE signal, as well as other biogeochemical perturbations, to elucidate the complex processes driving the ocean-carbonate system. PMID:28275734

  17. Effect of storage time on microbial quality of some spices and dried ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of storage time on the microbial quality of some spices and dried seasonings (SDS) (dawadawa, pepper, ginger, shrimp and fish powders) was studied over a 12-month period. Microbial load and profile of irradiated and unirradiated SDS were assessed at 0, 6 and 12-month periods. The range of total variable ...

  18. Integration of SPICE with TEK LV500 ASIC Design Verification System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Srivastava

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work involves integration of the simulation stage of design of a VLSI circuit and its testing stage. The SPICE simulator, TEK LV500 ASIC Design Verification System, and TekWaves, a test program generator for LV500, were integrated. A software interface in ‘C’ language in UNIX ‘solaris 1.x’ environment has been developed between SPICE and the testing tools (TekWAVES and LV500. The function of the software interface developed is multifold. It takes input from either SPICE2G.6 or SPICE 3e.1. The output generated by the interface software can be given as an input to either TekWAVES or LV500. A graphical user interface has also been developed with OPENWlNDOWS using Xview tool kit on SUN workstation. As an example, a two phase clock generator circuit has been considered and usefulness of the software demonstrated. The interface software could be easily linked with VLSI design such as MAGIC layout editor.

  19. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis of Trace Elements in Some Food Spices Consumed In Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ali asghar fathivand

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction There is a growing interest in determining the concentration of various elements in food spices. In the present study, the instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA was employed to measure the trace elements in 11 commonly food spices consumed in Tehran, Iran. Materials and Methods The levels of K, Mn, Na, Cl, V, Br, Al, and As were determined and their effects on human health were discussed. The results were compared with the values reported in the literature. The accuracy and precision of the analytical procedure was estimated by analyzing the Lichen (IAEA-336 reference material. Results The concentrations of the measured elements in the spices were 3850-29157, 10-335, 153-2849, 186-3063, 0.2-2.8, 2.1-58.7, and 72-2102 ppm for K, Mn, Na, Cl, V, Br, and Al, respectively. As was only detected in thyme (0.8 ppm and plantain (0.42 ppm. Conclusion As the findings of the present study indicated, the concentrations of K and Na in the black pepper, garlic, and ginger were significantly higher than the values reported in other countries. The Mn levels in the black pepper and garlic consumed in Tehran were comparable with those in Poland. Furthermore, the concentration of As in these spices were lower than the maximum permissible limit.

  20. Identification of irradiated spices by the use of thermoluminescence method (TL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharifzadeh, M.; Sohrabpour, M.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper the results of the investigation of identification of irradiated spices by the use of thermoluminescence method is reported. The materials used were black and red peppers, turmeric, cinnamon, and garlic powder. Gamma Cell 220 was used for irradiating samples at dose values of 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10 kGy respectively. The TL intensity of the unirradiated spices as well as the fading characteristics of the irradiated samples having received a dose of 10 kGy have been measured. Post-irradiation temperature treatment of the irradiated (10 kGy) and unirradiated samples at 60 o C and 100 o C for 24 hours have also been performed. The results show that the TL intensities of unirradiated and irradiated samples from different batches of each spice are fairly distributed. A reasonable TL intensity versus dose has been observed in nearly all cases. Based on the observation made it is possible to distinguish irradiated spices after (4-9) months post-irradiation. (author)

  1. Identification of irradiated spices by the use of thermoluminescence method (TL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharifzadeh, M.; Sohrabpour, M. (Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, Teheran (Iran, Islamic Republic of))

    In this paper the results of the investigation of identification of irradiated spices by the use of thermoluminescence method is reported. The materials used were black and red peppers, turmeric, cinnamon, and garlic powder. Gamma Cell 220 was used for irradiating samples at dose values of 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10 kGy respectively. The TL intensity of the unirradiated spices as well as the fading characteristics of the irradiated samples having received a dose of 10 kGy have been measured. Post-irradiation temperature treatment of the irradiated (10 kGy) and unirradiated samples at 60[sup o]C and 100[sup o]C for 24 hours have also been performed. The results show that the TL intensities of unirradiated and irradiated samples from different batches of each spice are fairly distributed. A reasonable TL intensity versus dose has been observed in nearly all cases. Based on the observation made it is possible to distinguish irradiated spices after (4-9) months post-irradiation. (author).

  2. Mango ginger (Curcuma amada Roxb.)–A promising spice for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The various spices belonging to the genus Curcuma are well known for their multiple uses as medicines, cosmetics, dyes, flavourings and neutraceuticals. Extensive work has been carried out on Curcuma longa (turmeric) and Zingber offcinale. (ginger), but Curcuma amada (mango ginger) is an untapped medicinal plant of ...

  3. Monitoring in vitro antibacterial efficacy of 26 Indian spices against multidrug resistant urinary tract infecting bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Rath, Sibanarayan; Padhy, Rabindra N.

    2014-01-01

    Background: To screen methanolic extracts of 26 commonly used Indian spices against nine species of uropathogenic bacteria (Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa), isolated from clinical samples of a tertiary care hospital for antibacterial activity. Methods: Bacterial strains were subjected to antibiotic sensitivity testing b...

  4. Use of Spices in Foods | Oiye | Journal of Food Technology in Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this era of increased concern on safety of chemical food additives, natural methods of preservation and natural preservatives are receiving increased attention. Despite their demonstrated potential use in food as preservatives, spices still remain primarily as food condiments. A lot of research has been done in the effort to ...

  5. A comparative assessment of the role of anoxia during the Cambrian SPICE event

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeRoy, M.; Gill, B. C.; Sperling, E. A.

    2017-12-01

    The Cambrian SPICE (Steptoean Positive Carbon Isotope Excursion) is recognized as a major oceanographic event recorded in globally-distributed stratigraphic sections as positive isotopic excursions in marine carbonates (δ13Ccarb), organic matter (δ13Corg), sulfate (δ34SCAS) and pyrite (δ34Spy). A proposed mechanism for these observed isotopic trends is that a transient increase in the areal extent of anoxic conditions within the oceans fostered enhanced burial of organic carbon and pyrite. However, direct sedimentary (e.g., abundant black shale) and geochemical (e.g., redox proxy) evidence for such a shift is scant. While the antiquity of this event is likely responsible for loss of much of this evidence, through destruction by tectonic processes, a number of stratigraphic successions suitable for investigating this hypothesis exist. Here we explore the relationship between anoxia and the SPICE using previously published and novel data generated from core material from three sedimentary basins distributed along the margins of the Iapetus Ocean. The units studied are: the Nolichucky Formation of eastern Laurentia, the Alum Shale of Baltica, and the Outwoods Shale of Avalonia. Our iron speciation data indicate consistently oxic conditions prior to the SPICE along Laurentia, while Avalonia was oxic with intervals of anoxia, and Baltica was persistently anoxic. With the initiation of the SPICE, anoxic conditions intensified in Laurentia and Avalonia and continued to persist in Baltica. This redox shift was coupled with a sharp rise in δ34Spy at all three locations. Average total organic carbon (TOC) showed little change in relation to the SPICE at the Laurentia location ( 0.15 wt%), but showed an increase in conjunction with the excursion in both the Avalonia ( 1 to 1.5 wt%) and Baltica ( 8 to 12 wt%) sections. Large differences in nutrient availability and sedimentation rates are likely responsible for the between-site disparity in TOC, while overall, anoxia

  6. Assessment of the microbiological safety of dried spices and herbs from production and retail premises in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagoo, S K; Little, C L; Greenwood, M; Mithani, V; Grant, K A; McLauchlin, J; de Pinna, E; Threlfall, E J

    2009-02-01

    A study of dried spices and herbs from retail and production premises to determine the microbiological status of such products was undertaken in the UK during 2004. According to EC Recommendation 2004/24/EC and European Spice Association specifications, 96% of 2833 retail samples and 92% of 132 production batches were of satisfactory/acceptable quality. Salmonella spp. were detected in 1.5% and 1.1% of dried spices and herbs sampled at production and retail, respectively. Overall, 3.0% of herbs and spices contained high counts of Bacillus cereus (1%, > or =10(5) cfu g(-1)), Clostridium perfringens (0.4%, > or =10(3) cfu g(-1)) and/or Escherichia coli (2.1%, > or =10(2) cfu g(-1)). Ninety percent of samples examined were recorded as being 'ready-to-use', 96% of which were of satisfactory/acceptable quality. The potential public health risk of using spices and herbs as an addition to ready-to-eat foods that potentially undergo no further processing is therefore highlighted in this study. Prevention of microbial contamination in dried herbs and spices lies in the application of good hygiene practices during growing, harvesting and processing from farm to fork, and effective decontamination. In addition, the importance of correct food handling practices and usage of herbs and spices by end users cannot be overemphasised.

  7. K2 and Spice use among a cohort of college students in southeast region of the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Kathleen L; Suerken, Cynthia K; Reboussin, Beth A; Spangler, John; Wagoner, Kimberly G; Sutfin, Erin L; Debinski, Beata; Wolfson, Mark

    2015-01-01

    K2 and Spice consist of an herbal blend of plant matter and chemical synthetic cannabinoids. These substances emerged in the early 2000s as a popular alternative to marijuana among youth and young adults. This study sought to identify rates and correlates of K2 and Spice at college entry and first use during college. In Fall 2010, 3146 students at 11 colleges in North Carolina and Virginia were recruited to participate in a longitudinal cohort survey. The cohort was invited to participate in a total of six surveys over their college career. Random-effects logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with lifetime K2 and Spice use at college entry and first use during college, adjusting for clustering within schools and sample weights. Weighted lifetime prevalence of K2 and Spice use at college entry was 7.6%. An additional 6.6% of students reported first use during college. By the cohort's fourth year, 17.0% reported lifetime K2 and Spice use. While lifetime prevalence increased, past 6-month prevalence decreased substantially over time. K2 and Spice use at college entry was associated with sensation seeking; hookah, marijuana, and illicit drug use; and low religiosity. First use during college was associated with having a father with less than a four-year degree; alcohol and hookah use. Universities should ensure that prevention efforts address current substance use, including K2/Spice, and that treatment options are available for first year students who use substances.

  8. Study on Sensory Quality, Antioxidant Properties, and Maillard Reaction Products Formation in Rye-Buckwheat Cakes Enhanced with Selected Spices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Przygodzka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of selected spices included in the recipe of rye-buckwheat cakes on sensory quality, nutritional value, and Maillard reaction (MR products formation was addressed in this study. The cakes with cloves, nutmeg, allspice, cinnamon, vanilla, and spice mix addition revealed the highest overall quality values. Cakes enriched with cloves, allspice, and spice mix showed the highest rutin content and almost threefold higher available lysine contents whereas cakes enhanced with mix, cloves, and cinnamon were the richest source of phenolic compounds. The highest antioxidant capacity showed cakes with cloves and spice mix. The furosine, a marker of early stage of MR, was decreased in cakes with cloves, allspice, spice mix, and vanilla whereas fluorescent intermediatory compounds were reduced in cakes enhanced with cloves, allspice, and cinnamon. In contrast, browning index was increased as compared to cakes without spices. The FAST index was significantly lowered in all cakes enriched with spices, especially with cloves, allspice, and mix addition. The presence of cloves, allspice, and vanilla in cake formula was the most efficient in acrylamide strategy. It can be suggested that cloves, allspice, and vanilla might be used for production of safety and good quality cakes.

  9. Chemometric brand differentiation of commercial spices using direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovich, Matthew J; Dunn, Emily E; Hall, Adam B

    2016-05-15

    Commercial spices represent an emerging class of fuels for improvised explosives. Being able to classify such spices not only by type but also by brand would represent an important step in developing methods to analytically investigate these explosive compositions. Therefore, a combined ambient mass spectrometric/chemometric approach was developed to quickly and accurately classify commercial spices by brand. Direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) was used to generate mass spectra for samples of black pepper, cayenne pepper, and turmeric, along with four different brands of cinnamon, all dissolved in methanol. Unsupervised learning techniques showed that the cinnamon samples clustered according to brand. Then, we used supervised machine learning algorithms to build chemometric models with a known training set and classified the brands of an unknown testing set of cinnamon samples. Ten independent runs of five-fold cross-validation showed that the training set error for the best-performing models (i.e., the linear discriminant and neural network models) was lower than 2%. The false-positive percentages for these models were 3% or lower, and the false-negative percentages were lower than 10%. In particular, the linear discriminant model perfectly classified the testing set with 0% error. Repeated iterations of training and testing gave similar results, demonstrating the reproducibility of these models. Chemometric models were able to classify the DART mass spectra of commercial cinnamon samples according to brand, with high specificity and low classification error. This method could easily be generalized to other classes of spices, and it could be applied to authenticating questioned commercial samples of spices or to examining evidence from improvised explosives. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Prevalence of toxigenic fungi in common medicinal herbs and spices in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiko, Visenuo; Mehta, Alka

    2016-12-01

    Mycotoxins are unavoidable contaminants of food grains, feeds, medicinal herbs, and spices, posing as health threat to animals and humans. The objective of this study was to screen medicinal herbs and spices for fungi and mycotoxin contamination and evaluate their safety. Sixty-three samples were examined for fungal contamination and fungal load determined using standard microbiological method. Aflatoxin and citrinin were detected using thin layer chromatography and high-performance chromatography technique. Fifty-eight out of the 63 samples were contaminated, while five were free from fungal contamination. Analysis revealed that 47 % of the samples had a fungal load above 1 × 10 3 cfu/g which is the permissible limit set by World Health Organization. The samples Mesua ferrea-II and Terminalia chebula-III had the highest fungal load, i.e., 5.0 × 10 4 cfu/g. A total of 187 fungi were isolated, out of which 28 were toxigenic which included 19 aflatoxin-producing Aspergillus flavus and 9 citrinin-producing Penicillium citrinum. The natural contamination with aflatoxin B 1 was detected only in one sample, i.e., Arachis hypogaea (groundnut) which was present beyond the permissible limit. Though toxigenic fungi were isolated, mycotoxins were not detected from any of the medicinal herbs and spices. Medicinal herbs and spices are susceptible to toxigenic fungi; however, they also possess intrinsic factors that inhibit mycotoxin contamination. This study provides a basis in assessing the degree of fungal and potential mycotoxin contamination in medicinal herbs and spices.

  11. Effect of sulfur-containing spices on the bioaccessibility of trace minerals from selected cereals and pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Meena; Platel, Kalpana

    2017-07-01

    Garlic and onion, which are rich in organo-sulfur compounds, are reported to enhance the bioaccessibility of Ca, Mg, Fe and Zn; however, there is a lack of similar information on the bioaccessibility of copper, manganese and chromium. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine the effect of exogenous garlic and onion on the bioaccessibility of these trace minerals from selected food grains. The effect of two levels of garlic (0.25 and 0.5 g/10 g grain -1 ) and onion (1.5 and 3 g/10 g grain -1 ) on the bioaccessibility of these trace minerals from two representative cereals and pulses was determined by employing an in vitro dialysability procedure. Both garlic and onion significantly improved the bioaccessibility of Cu, especially when added at the higher level, in most of the foods examined. The enhancing effect of garlic on Mn bioaccessibility was found in cooked sorghum and chickpea, whereas onion significantly improved Mn bioaccessibility in cooked rice and chickpea. The addition of both spices did not exert any enhancing effect on Cr bioaccessibility from the cereals and pulses. The bioaccessibility of Cu, as well as Mn to a lesser extent, from vegetarian diets can be significantly improved by incorporating garlic and onion in the diet. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. AdS2 holographic dictionary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvetič, Mirjam; Papadimitriou, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    We construct the holographic dictionary for both running and constant dilaton solutions of the two dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton theory that is obtained by a circle reduction from Einstein-Hilbert gravity with negative cosmological constant in three dimensions. This specific model ensures that the dual theory has a well defined ultraviolet completion in terms of a two dimensional conformal field theory, but our results apply qualitatively to a wider class of two dimensional dilaton gravity theories. For each type of solutions we perform holographic renormalization, compute the exact renormalized one-point functions in the presence of arbitrary sources, and derive the asymptotic symmetries and the corresponding conserved charges. In both cases we find that the scalar operator dual to the dilaton plays a crucial role in the description of the dynamics. Its source gives rise to a matter conformal anomaly for the running dilaton solutions, while its expectation value is the only non trivial observable for constant dilaton solutions. The role of this operator has been largely overlooked in the literature. We further show that the only non trivial conserved charges for running dilaton solutions are the mass and the electric charge, while for constant dilaton solutions only the electric charge is non zero. However, by uplifting the solutions to three dimensions we show that constant dilaton solutions can support non trivial extended symmetry algebras, including the one found by Compère, Song and Strominger http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP05(2013)152, in agreement with the results of Castro and Song http://arxiv.org/abs/1411.1948. Finally, we demonstrate that any solution of this specific dilaton gravity model can be uplifted to a family of asymptotically AdS 2 ×S 2 or conformally AdS 2 ×S 2 solutions of the STU model in four dimensions, including non extremal black holes. The four dimensional solutions obtained by uplifting the running dilaton solutions coincide

  13. AdS2 models in an embedding superspace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKeon, D.G.C.; Sherry, T.N.

    2003-01-01

    An embedding superspace, whose bosonic part is the flat (2+1)-dimensional embedding space for AdS 2 , is introduced. Superfields and several supersymmetric models are examined in the embedded AdS 2 superspace

  14. Accumulation of some heavy metals in spice herbs in open-air hydroponics and soil cultures of the Ararat valley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghalachyan, L.M.; Kocharyan, K.A.; Aristakesyan, A.A.; Asatryan, A.Z.

    2015-01-01

    Peculiarities of some heavy metals (HM), (Mn, Ni, Ti, V, Co, Cu, Pb, Mo, Cr, Zr) accumulation have been studied in spice herbs (basil, dill, coriander, savory) grown in open-air hydroponics and soil cultures of the Ararat Valley. It turned out that the amount of HM content in spice herbs grown in open-air hydroponic conditions was less than in the ones grown in soil conditions. The content of Pb and Ni in spice herbs exceeded the allowed concentration limits (ACL), especially in soil plants. Practical recommendations on obtaining ecologically safe agricultural products have been prepared. The biotechnological hydroponics method of producing spice herbs in the Ararat Valley is ecologically more beneficial than the soil method. Practical proposals of obtaining ecologically safe agricultural products have been developed

  15. Mobile ad hoc networking

    CERN Document Server

    John Wiley & Sons

    2004-01-01

    "Assimilating the most up-to-date information on research and development activities in this rapidly growing area, Mobile Ad Hoc Networking covers physical, data link, network, and transport layers, as well as application, security, simulation, and power management issues in sensor, local area, personal, and mobile ad hoc networks. Each of the book's sixteen chapters has been written by a top expert and discusses in-depth the most important topics in the field. Mobile Ad Hoc Networking is an excellent reference and guide for professionals seeking an in-depth examination of topics that also provides a comprehensive overview of the current state-of-the-art."--Jacket.

  16. Data-driven analysis of biomedical literature suggests broad-spectrum benevolence of culinary herbs and spices

    OpenAIRE

    K, Rakhi; Tuwani, Rudraksh; Mukherjee, Jagriti; Bagler, Ganesh

    2018-01-01

    Spices and herbs are key dietary ingredients used across cultures worldwide. Beyond their use as flavoring and coloring agents, the popularity of these aromatic plant products in culinary preparations has been attributed to their antimicrobial properties. Last few decades have witnessed an exponential growth of biomedical literature investigating the impact of spices and herbs on health, presenting an opportunity to mine for patterns from empirical evidence. Systematic investigation of empiri...

  17. AdS3: the NHEK generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bena, Iosif; Heurtier, Lucien; Puhm, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    It was argued in http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP03(2013)028 that the five-dimensional near-horizon extremal Kerr (NHEK) geometry can be embedded in String Theory as the infrared region of an infinite family of non-supersymmetric geometries that have D1, D5, momentum and KK monopole charges. We show that there exists a method to embed these geometries into asymptotically-AdS 3 ×S 3 /ℤ N solutions, and hence to obtain infinite families of flows whose infrared is NHEK. This indicates that the CFT dual to the NHEK geometry is the IR fixed point of a Renormalization Group flow from a known local UV CFT and opens the door to its explicit construction.

  18. Spice drugs are more than harmless herbal blends: a review of the pharmacology and toxicology of synthetic cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seely, Kathryn A; Lapoint, Jeff; Moran, Jeffery H; Fattore, Liana

    2012-12-03

    "K2" and "Spice" drugs (collectively hereafter referred to as Spice) represent a relatively new class of designer drugs that have recently emerged as popular alternatives to marijuana, otherwise characterized as "legal highs". These drugs are readily available on the Internet and sold in many head shops and convenience stores under the disguise of innocuous products like herbal blends, incense, or air fresheners. Although package labels indicate "not for human consumption", the number of intoxicated people presenting to emergency departments is dramatically increasing. The lack of validated and standardized human testing procedures and an endless supply of potential drugs of abuse are primary reasons why researchers find it difficult to fully characterize clinical consequences associated with Spice. While the exact chemical composition and toxicology of Spice remains to be determined, there is mounting evidence identifying several synthetic cannabinoids as causative agents responsible for psychoactive and adverse physical effects. This review provides updates of the legal status of common synthetic cannabinoids detected in Spice and analytical procedures used to test Spice products and human specimens collected under a variety of clinical circumstances. The pharmacological and toxicological consequences of synthetic cannabinoid abuse are also reviewed to provide a future perspective on potential short- and long-term implications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Bibliographic review of works accomplished about irradiated chicken, fish and fish products , spices and condiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardes, B.; Dias Filho, M.

    1983-07-01

    Table of foods that can be irradiated and its respective nominal doses are shown. Bibliographic reviews of works performed about irradiated chicken, fish and fish products, spices and condiments are shown. The irradiation purpose in chicken were to increase the shelf-life and to eliminate the pathogenic microorganism in chicken stored below 10 0 C; in fish and fish products the purposes were to control the insect infestation in dry-fish during the storage and the sell exposure to reduce the macrobian charge in packed and non packed fish and in fish products. To reduce pathogenic microorganism in packing and unpacking fish; in spices and condiments to control the insect infestation, to reduce the microbial contamination. (L.M.J.)

  20. SPICE evaluation of the S/N ratio for Si microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candelori, A.; Paccagnella, A.; Padova Univ.; Nardi, F.

    1999-01-01

    SPICE simulations of AC-coupled single-sided Si microstrip detectors connected to the Pre-Shape 32 read-out chip have been performed in order to determine the geometrical characteristics which maximize the signal-to-noise ratio at room temperature. All the resistive and capacitive elements of the detector have been determined as a function of the ω/ρ ratio, by considering experimental and simulated data available in the literature. The SPICE model takes into account all the main noise source in the detector and read-out electronics. The minimum ionizing particle current signal shape characteristics have been introduced in the simulations. Two read-out configurations have been investigated for 6.4 cm and 12.8 cm long detectors. Finally, general guidelines in the detector design have been proposed starting from the simulation results

  1. Security Process Capability Model Based on ISO/IEC 15504 Conformant Enterprise SPICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitasiunas Antanas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the context of modern information systems, security has become one of the most critical quality attributes. The purpose of this paper is to address the problem of quality of information security. An approach to solve this problem is based on the main assumption that security is a process oriented activity. According to this approach, product quality can be achieved by means of process quality - process capability. Introduced in the paper, SPICE conformant information security process capability model is based on process capability modeling elaborated by world-wide software engineering community during the last 25 years, namely ISO/IEC 15504 that defines the capability dimension and the requirements for process definition and domain independent integrated model for enterprise-wide assessment and Enterprise SPICE improvement

  2. A Recipe for Improved Nonsurgical Cosmetic Outcomes: Know Your Herbs and Spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Hermine

    The nonsurgical cosmetic arena continues to grow, with more people consistently seeking minimally invasive procedures for facial rejuvenation. However, although these prospective patients are not seeking surgical correction to obtain their results, there is still the potential for nonsurgical procedures to yield adverse events posttreatment. Patients often do not realize that their dietary regimens may affect their nonsurgical cosmetic outcomes. For example, many patients desiring these types of treatments are often found to be taking prescription medications, herbs, and spices on a daily basis that may have the capacity to potentiate adverse outcomes such as bleeding and/or bruising. For these reasons, it is important for clinicians to be inclusive while taking health histories and to properly educate their patients so that administered treatments have the best chance of yielding the desired results. The focus of this article is to provide health care providers information on many of the herbs and spices that have the potential to negatively impact nonsurgical cosmetic outcomes.

  3. Smell identification of spices using nanomechanical membrane-type surface stress sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Gaku; Shiba, Kota; Yoshikawa, Genki

    2016-11-01

    Artificial olfaction, that is, a chemical sensor system that identifies samples by smell, has not been fully achieved because of the complex perceptional mechanism of olfaction. To realize an artificial olfactory system, not only an array of chemical sensors but also a valid feature extraction method is required. In this study, we achieved the identification of spices by smell using nanomechanical membrane-type surface stress sensors (MSS). Features were extracted from the sensing signals obtained from four MSS coated with different types of polymers, focusing on the chemical interactions between polymers and odor molecules. The principal component analysis (PCA) of the dataset consisting of the extracted parameters demonstrated the separation of each spice on the scatter plot. We discuss the strategy for improving odor identification based on the relationship between the results of PCA and the chemical species in the odors.

  4. Phytoliths in pottery reveal the use of spice in European prehistoric cuisine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayley Saul

    Full Text Available Here we present evidence of phytoliths preserved in carbonised food deposits on prehistoric pottery from the western Baltic dating from 6,100 cal BP to 5750 cal BP. Based on comparisons to over 120 European and Asian species, our observations are consistent with phytolith morphologies observed in modern garlic mustard seed (Alliaria petiolata (M. Bieb Cavara & Grande. As this seed has a strong flavour, little nutritional value, and the phytoliths are found in pots along with terrestrial and marine animal residues, these findings are the first direct evidence for the spicing of food in European prehistoric cuisine. Our evidence suggests a much greater antiquity to the spicing of foods than is evident from the macrofossil record, and challenges the view that plants were exploited by hunter-gatherers and early agriculturalists solely for energy requirements, rather than taste.

  5. Effect of gamma irradiation on physico-mechanical properties of spice packaging films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizani, Maryam; Sheikh, Nasrin; Ebrahimi, Samad N.; Gerami, Abas; Tavakoli, Farnaz A.

    2009-01-01

    Physico-mechanical properties of two types of laminated films, commercially used for spice packaging, are investigated after gamma irradiation at 8, 10 and 15 kGy. Data showed that polyethylene terephthalate/polyethylene terephthalate/linear low density polyethylene (PET/PET/LLDPE) was more resistant to radiation compared to biaxially oriented polypropylene/cast polypropylene (BOPP/CPP) and its barrier properties slightly improved up to 15 kGy. Oxygen transmission rate of BOPP/CPP was increased by 25%, and the melting peak temperature was decreased by 3.9% at 15 kGy, which may lead to oxidation of packaged spices and loss of their aroma/flavour, respectively.

  6. Antibacterial activity of anthraquinone from cassia seed on spiced pig head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L. Y.; Li, X.; Cui, Y. Q.; Pang, M. X.; Wang, F.; Qi, J. H.

    2018-01-01

    [Objective] To optimize the extraction of anthraquinone from cassia seed by ultrasonic extraction and its antibacterial activity. [Method] The influences of different extraction time and ethanol concentration, on anthraquinone content were evaluated by a single factor experiment. And anthraquinone content was determined by ultraviolet spectrophotometry. The bacteriostasis of anthraquinone on spiced pig head’s common putrefying bacteria: Staphylococcus, Serratieae, Bacillus, Proteus and the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) were studied by oxford plate assay system. [Result] The best extraction time was 30 minutes and the best ethanol concentration was 80%. The antibacterial activity of the cassia seed anthraquinone on Staphylococcus Aureus, Bacillus Proteus is obviously, the minimum inhibitory concentrations were 0.125 g/mL, 0.125 g/mL, 1 g/mL respectively and no inhibitory effect on Serratieae. [Conclusions] The anthraquinones from Cassia seed can inhibit a part of spoilage bacteria in spiced pig heads.

  7. The in vitro antibacterial activity of dietary spice and medicinal herb extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Bin; Cai, Yi-Zhong; Brooks, John D; Corke, Harold

    2007-06-10

    The in vitro antibacterial activities of a total of 46 extracts from dietary spices and medicinal herbs were investigated by agar-well diffusion method against five foodborne bacteria (Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella anatum). Their total phenolic contents were also evaluated. Many herb and spice extracts contained high levels of phenolics and exhibited antibacterial activity against foodborne pathogens. Gram-positive bacteria were generally more sensitive to the tested extracts than Gram-negative ones. S. aureus was the most sensitive, while E. coli was the most resistant. There were highly positive relationships (R(2)=0.73-0.93) between antibacterial activities and phenolic content of the tested extracts against each bacterium. This suggested that the antibacterial activity of the tested extracts was closely associated with their phenolic constituents.

  8. Antimicrobial effect of Thai spices against Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella typhimurium DT104.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongson, Chitsiri; Davidson, P Michael; Mahakarnchanakul, Warapa; Vibulsresth, Preeya

    2005-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the potential antimicrobial activity of extracts and essential oils of spices from Thailand against foodborne pathogenic bacteria. The antimicrobial efficacy of ginger (Zingiber officinale), fingerroot (Boesenbergia pandurata), and turmeric (Curcuma longa) was evaluated against five strains of Listeria monocytogenes and four strains of Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104. Antimicrobial activity was investigated in microbiological media by using an agar dilution assay and enumeration over time and a model food system, apple juice, by monitoring growth over time. In the agar dilution assay, water extracts of the three spices had no effect on L. monocytogenes. Similarly, 50% ethanol extracts of ginger or turmeric had no effect. In contrast, ethanolic fingerroot extracts at 5 to 10% (vol/ vol) inhibited most L. monocytogenes strains for 24 h in the agar dilution assay. Commercial essential oils (EO) of ginger or turmeric inhibited all L. monocytogenes at pathogens in food systems.

  9. Spectral and Polarimetric Imagery Collection Experiment (SPICE) Longwave Infrared Spectral Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    an example the US Air Force sponsored SEBASS LWIR hyperspectral instrument, which requires cooling the FPA of silicon arsenide (SiAs) impurity- band...radiance at the sensor from the sky plate ( aluminum plate) in the scene is dominated by the surface-reflected downwelling sky radiance toward the... aluminum plate deployed at the SPICE site clearly show the surface-reflected downwelling sky radiance 30 corresponding to downwelling in the

  10. Conservation by irradiation of vacuum packed spices (black pepper and curcuma)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassad, Hela

    2007-01-01

    This work has been carried out to study the effectiveness of the irradiation gamma and its influence on the conservation of the black pepper and curcuma. The latter are used for culinary seasoning and conservation. Moreover, they have phytotherapic properties but remain very contaminated for a use without treatment. Accordingly, after packing them in vacuum plastic films, the powder of the black pepper and the one of curcuma are irradiated at a different doses (3, 6, 10 and 12 kGy). The results show that the irradiation is very effective from a microbiological point of view. indeed, from 10 kGy the spices became sterile. Admittedly, this dose radically inhibited the development of the micro-organisms which were present at very high rates in the non treated spices; and eliminated the agents of toxi-infections ( salmonella, staphylococcus aureus). Moreover, the irradiation doses not have a significant effect on the physicochemical and organoleptic parameters, except for the viscosity which decreased. Concerning the black pepper, it proved that the irradiation does have a significant effect on the piperine whose value is maintained almost stable. As for the curcuma the irradiation improves its color; it actually changed from dark yellow to bright yellow. For the packing the amounts used do not generate significant modification of polyethylene. Throughout the follow-up a significant proliferation of all the germs present in non t reated spices was observed. μIn contrast, there was no recontamination for spices treated with 10 kGy. At the end of storage the contents of piperine and curcuminoids decreased but they remain higher that their corresponding standards. Consequently, we conclude that the irradiation increases the shelf life. (Author)

  11. SPICE: A Geometry Information System Supporting Planetary Mapping, Remote Sensing and Data Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, C.; Bachman, N.; Semenov, B.; Wright, E.

    2013-01-01

    SPICE is an information system providing space scientists ready access to a wide assortment of space geometry useful in planning science observations and analyzing the instrument data returned therefrom. The system includes software used to compute many derived parameters such as altitude, LAT/LON and lighting angles, and software able to find when user-specified geometric conditions are obtained. While not a formal standard, it has achieved widespread use in the worldwide planetary science community

  12. SpICE: A program to study small-scale disturbances in the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, T. J.; Cervera, M. A.; Meehan, D. H.

    2012-06-01

    Ionospheric disturbances observed by bottom-side soundings of the ionosphere appear at many temporal and spatial scales. Australia has many simultaneous observations from vertically orientated ionospheric sounders with spatial separations on the scale of 1000 km. However, with this spatial sampling only large scale ionospheric disturbances can be mapped and subsequently modeled. DSTO has an experimental program in progress to investigate the smaller spatial scale disturbances. These are often seen on vertical incidence soundings and are uncorrelated with soundings from greater than 500 km away. They can also be uncorrelated with soundings from the same site only 15 min later. The DSTO program to investigate these ionospheric disturbances is called SpICE, for Spatial Ionospheric Correlation Experiment. SpICE uses a small set of transmitters and receivers with varying separations to achieve a geographically spread set of near-vertical incidence ionospheric “reflection” points separated by 50-150 km, allowing us to probe disturbances at this spatial scale. Using the latest digital receiver technology we can collect amplitude and phase information from the ionospheric returns of the continuous wave transmissions of a nearby transmitter that is rapidly sweeping through the HF band. The returned signal is processed at a very high resolution to achieve good signal-to-noise complex ionograms at better than one-minute time updates. To date there have been three SpICE campaigns. This paper will discuss the SpICE program goals and highlight some of the unusual features observed in the first campaign. Following papers will look more closely at this data set and the subsequent campaigns.

  13. Prioritization of chemical hazards in spices and herbs for European monitoring programs

    OpenAIRE

    Asselt, Van, E.D.; Banach, J.L.; Fels, van der, Ine

    2018-01-01

    Monitoring programs are preferably risk-based, which allows focusing on the most relevant human health risks. In this study, a risk matrix was used to identify those chemical hazards that have the highest human health risk for the following spices and herbs: paprika/chilli powder, black pepper, nutmeg, basil, thyme, and parsley. Both the probability of occurrence and the severity of the hazard were assessed for 36 chemical compounds and classified into low, medium, high, and severe. Probabili...

  14. Role of medicinal plants, herbs, and spices in protecting human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balentine, D A; Albano, M C; Nair, M G

    1999-09-01

    The body of knowledge about plants, herbs, and spices and their respective and collective roles in promoting human health is modest. Flavonoids in tea and anthocyanins in tart cherries were presented as examples of how to move forward in understanding active compounds. Dietary compounds, their roles in maintaining human health, and their interactions with established nutrients were determined to be short-term research priorities.

  15. Spice: A New Legal Herbal Mixture Abused by Young Active Duty Military Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    and GC-MS were negative. All cases were admitted and evaluated by a toxicologist; all 3 had their history corroborated by family or friends , or with...drug paraphernalia. Spice is a new herbal mixture that is increasingly used in the military. Expected effects are similar to cannabis , but may include...corroborated by another friend or family member. None of the cases required intubation or large doses of sedatives. In all 3 of the cases, symptoms

  16. SPICE Simulation of tunnel FET aiming at 32 kHz crystal-oscillator operation

    OpenAIRE

    Tanamoto, Tetsufumi; Tanaka, Chika; Takaya, Satoshi; Koyama, Masato

    2017-01-01

    We numerically investigate the possibility of using Tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET) in a 32 kHz crystal oscillator circuit to reduce power consumption. A simulation using SPICE (Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis) is carried out based on a conventional CMOS transistor model. It is shown that the power consumption of TFET is one-tenth that of conventional low-power CMOS.

  17. Comparing effects of washing, thermal treatments and gamma irradiation on quality of spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farag Zaied, S.E.A.; Aziz, N.H.; Ali, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Samples of 5 selected spices, black pepper (Piper nigrum), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), coriander (Coriandrum sativum) and anise (Pimpinella anisum) seeds, and turmeric (Curcuma longa) rhizomes, obtained from the local market, were washed with pure tap water then dried at room temperature, subjected to a thermal treatment at 70 degrees C for 15 minutes or exposed to a gamma radiation source (5.0 or 10 kGy). The treatments were evaluated using microbiological and chemical studies

  18. Karl Fischer Titration as An Alternative Method for Determing The Water Content of Indonesian Spices

    OpenAIRE

    Supartono, Wahyu

    2017-01-01

    Karl Fischer Titration (KFT) is a well established and effective direct primary method to determine water content in various materials. It is based on a specific chemical reaction and it differs principally from the drying and distillation methods. The KFT was introduced as an alternative method to determine the water content in some Indonesian spices (clove, coriander, ginger and white pepper), which generally contain appreciable amount of volatile compounds to distract accurate moisture. Th...

  19. Collection of Various Medicinal and Spice Crops from Wild Genetic Diversity in Albania

    OpenAIRE

    , F. Voci; , K. Korro

    2012-01-01

    This paper will present the Şndings of a four-year period program related to the collection of germplasm funded by the World Bank and the Albania Government. This project is implemented during 2006-2010 by team Albanian experts. The selection & collecting process was implemented in close collaboration among different specialists and experts and other interested actors in medicinal & spice crops chain in Albania, information on the economic importance of medicinal & spi...

  20. Genetic Diversity, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, and Biofilm Formation of Cronobacter spp. Recovered from Spices and Cereals

    OpenAIRE

    Yuanhong Li; Huan Yu; Hua Jiang; Yang Jiao; Yaodong Zhang; Jihong Shao

    2017-01-01

    Cronobacter species are important food-borne opportunistic pathogens which have been implicated in the cause of necrotizing enterocolitis, sepsis, and meningitis in neonates and infants. However, these bacteria are routinely found in foodstuffs, clinical specimens, and environmental samples. This study investigated the genetic diversity, antimicrobial susceptibility, and biofilm formation of Cronobacter isolates (n = 40) recovered from spices and cereals in China during 2014–2015. Based on th...

  1. Employee Satisfaction and Performance : A Case Study of Sales Department in a Malaysian Spice Marketing Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Ilaventhan, Vijaya

    2014-01-01

    Job Satisfaction plays a vital role in ensuring overall employee satisfaction and work performance. There are many factors contributing towards these and it can be divided into tangible and intangible factors. Organizations should strategically deploy these factors in order to enhance organizational and employee performance. This project examines the current level of job satisfaction among sales staffs in a Malaysian Spice Marketing Company. The job satisfaction factors include rewards (pay),...

  2. ESR detection of free radicals in gamma irradiated spices and other foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilbrow, J.R.; Troup, G.J.; Hutton, D.R.; Hunter, C.R.

    1996-01-01

    Irradiation of various food products, including vegetables, fruits, meats, seafoods, herbs, spices and seeds by appropriate doses of γ-rays has for many years been suggested as a means of killing or sterilizing bacteria, viruses and pests and, therefore, as a means of preserving the foods. The position of food irradiation has been under review in Australia generally, through consumer organisations and by a Federal Government (House of Representatives) inquiry. From these reviews and inquiries, recommendations for irradiation, packaging, and labelling etc., are emerging with, for example, an NH and MRC recommended maximum dose of 10 kGy for Australia, with 6 kGy being a minimum dose for grains and spices. In early studies, electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was used to detect stable free radicals in bone and cuticle and it was demonstrated that γ-irradiation breaks down proteins and DNA. Earlier studies suggested that induced free radical signals in spices rapidly decayed to negligible levels after three weeks, especially if some moisture was present. Although the members of the Monash group do not carry out research formally in the area of food technology, participation in the ADMIT program was appropriate given the availability of suitable ESR and 137 Cs irradiation facilities and interest both politically and amongst consumer groups regarding food irradiation. (author)

  3. Antibacterial activity of natural spices on multiple drug resistant Escherichia coli isolated from drinking water, Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam Rezuanul

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spices traditionally have been used as coloring agents, flavoring agents, preservatives, food additives and medicine in Bangladesh. The present work aimed to find out the antimicrobial activity of natural spices on multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli isolates. Methods Anti-bacterial potentials of six crude plant extracts (Allium sativum, Zingiber officinale, Allium cepa, Coriandrum sativum, Piper nigrum and Citrus aurantifolia were tested against five Escherichia coli isolated from potable water sources at kushtia, Bangladesh. Results All the bacterial isolates were susceptible to undiluted lime-juice. None of them were found to be susceptible against the aqueous extracts of garlic, onion, coriander, pepper and ginger alone. However, all the isolates were susceptible when subjected to 1:1:1 aqueous extract of lime, garlic and ginger. The highest inhibition zone was observed with lime (11 mm. Conclusion Natural spices might have anti-bacterial activity against enteric pathogens and could be used for prevention of diarrheal diseases. Further evaluation is necessary.

  4. PERSEPSI WISATAWAN TERHADAP INOVASI PRODUK “UTAMA SPICE NATURAL AROMATERAPI”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyoman Putri Aras Kembang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini menganalisis produk usaha aromaterapi sebagai salah satu industri kreatif diyakini berkorelasi positif dengan pengembangan pariwisata karena melalui produk usaha aromaterapi rempah-rempah tradisional diperkenalkan kepada wisatawan nusantara dan mancanegara. Penelitian ini adalah penelitian kualitatif yang menerapkan teori persepsi dan teori pariwisata berkelanjutan serta beberapa teori pendukung. Tujuan dari penelitian ini untuk mengetahui jenis-jenis produk, pemanfaatan jenis rempah-rempah pada produk, dan persepsi wisatawan terhadap produk aromaterapi Utama Spice Aromatherapy. Pengumpulan data penelitian ini melalui penyebaran 25 kuesioner yang diisi oleh pelanggan perusahaan tersebut. Analisis data berdasar pada teori persepsi dan teori pariwisata berkelanjutan. Hasil analisis data dipresentasikan secara deskriptif naratif dan juga dalam bentuk tabel. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa jenis-jenis produk aromaterapi Utama Spice Aromateraphy sangat beragam mulai dari perawatan untuk rambut, wajah, dan tubuh. Persepsi wisatawan terhadap produk aromaterapi Utama Spice Aromateraphy cukup baik dan diminati oleh konsumen dalam hal ini wisatawan karena produk yang berbahan dasar alam yang berkualitas sehingga aman digunakan.

  5. [Advances in novel carrier systems of chemical constituents from spice volatile oils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia-jia; Zhu, Yuan; Yu, Jiang-nan; Xu, Xi-ming

    2015-10-01

    Recent years, chemical constituents from spice volatile oils have gained worldwide concern owing to its multiple pharmacological effects and safety for using as the natural antibacterial agents. However, their poor dissolution, strong volatility, serious irritation, weak stability, easy oxidation and low bioavailability characteristics are the major obstacle in the preparation of effective oral formulation and practical application. Therefore, there is an urgent need to select a novel carrier system that can delivery the chemical constituents from spice volatile oils more efficiently with improving their stability as well as alleviating the irritation, and develop the functional food, health products and even medicine for exerting their pharmacological effects, which also is the focus and nodus of the research on their application. This review presents recent systematic studies on their novel carrier systems, including cyclodextrin inclusion complex, liposomes, nanoemulsions, nanoparticles, solid dispersion and so on, and summarizes the characteristics, application range and problems of each novel carrier systems, in order to provide some beneficial thoughts in further developing new products of chemical constituents from spice volatile oils.

  6. Estrogenic properties of spices of the traditional Cameroonian dish "Nkui" in ovariectomized Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchoupang, Edwige Nana; Ateba, Sylvin Benjamin; Zingue, Stéphane; Zehl, Martin; Krenn, Liselotte; Njamen, Dieudonné

    2016-06-01

    Besides the basic role to flavor and color foods, several health benefits have been attributed to spices. The traditional Cameroonian food "Nkui" is prepared using several spices (Afrostyrax lepidophyllus Mildbr., Capsicum frutescens Linn., Fagara leprieurii Guill. et Perr., Fagara tessmannii Engl., Mondia whitei Hook. F. Skell., Pentadiplandra brazzeana Baill., Solanum gilo Raddi., Tetrapleura tetraptera Taub. and Xylopia parviflora A. Rich. Benthane) that are believed to have a positive impact on the female reproductive physiology. Aiming to determine the potential effect of this food on the female reproductive tract, we evaluated the estrogenic properties of aqueous and ethanol extracts of Nkui using a 3-day uterotrophic assay in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. OVX female Wistar rats were randomly separated in several groups of five animals each and submitted to a 3-day uterotrophic assay (per os). At the end of treatment, animals were sacrificed and uterus, vagina and mammary gland collected and fixed in 10 % formalin for histological analysis. These extracts increased the uterine wet weight, the uterine and vaginal epithelial heights, and the lumen and diameter of alveoli in the mammary glands. They also altered the estradiol-induced increase of uterine wet weight. The dichloromethane and methanol fractions of the ethanol extract exhibited estrogenic properties as well by increasing uterine and vaginal endpoints. These results suggest that the spices of "Nkui" contain estrogenic phytoconstituents and this traditional food may be considered as functional.

  7. Prevalence of Aflatoxin Contamination in Herbs and Spices in Different Regions of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaeli, Payam; Mehrabani, Mitra; Heidari, Mahmoud Reza; Asadikaram, Gholamreza; Lari Najafi, Moslem

    2017-11-01

    Mycotoxins are natural toxins, produced by several fungal species and are associated with morbidity or even mortality in animals, plants, and humans. In this study, 120 samples of herbs and spices in both bulk and packaged forms were prepared in order to measure aflatoxin level in different regions of Iran. The aflatoxin was extracted during Mar to May 2015, using 80% methanol and then purified via immunoaffinity column. Measurements were performed, using high-performance liquid chromatography, equipped with a fluorescence detection system at excitation and emission wavelengths of 365 and 435 nm, respectively. The highest prevalence of aflatoxin contamination in food products was attributed to aflatoxin B1 (30.8%). In addition, the highest prevalence of aflatoxin contamination was reported in red pepper (100%). Examination of effective factors indicated the substantial impact of moisture on aflatoxin level ( P =0.046). Even at low levels of aflatoxin, contamination could be a serious threat, given the prevalent use of spices (either raw or not) as ingredients in food preparation. Therefore, regular monitoring of spices, especially chili pepper, is highly recommended.

  8. Thermoluminescent dependence with the particle size of polyminerals in food irradiated of Mexican spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teuffer Z, C.; Cruz Z, E.; Calderon, T.; Chernov, V.; Barboza F, M.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of grain size on Tl was analysed in poly minerals extracted from Mexican spices as Origanum vulgare L. (oregano) y Capsicum annun (chile guajillo). The poly minerals size were selected by Zimmerman method up to 10 μm and exposed to 0.5-10 kGy range from 60 Co. The glow curves were centered at 166 C for Capsicum annun and at 126 C for Origanum vulgare l. In both cases was observed at 5 kGy a weak saturation for Tl response. This behaviour is attributed to feldspar and quartz are present in the samples and this results is in agreement with other european spices obtained. For >10 μm particle size the Tl response increased respect to the doses, and it is possible that increase the organic impurities quantities are present in the samples and contributed to the Tl when the samples were thermally excited. The aim of this work is provide more ideas with regard to the behaviour of luminescence emission as dependent of the size particle in the irradiated spices. The methodology might useful for quality control also in radiation processing. (Author)

  9. Consumer acceptance, market test and market development of irradiated rice, dehydrated vegetables and spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Peixin; Lin Yin

    2001-01-01

    Establishment of irradiation processing parameters, a quality assurance system, consumer acceptance, market test and market development of irradiated rice, dehydrated vegetables and spices were the activities carried out in this project by the Chinese Agricultural Irradiation Center. The results of the studies showed that the process dose for rice was 0.2-0.5 kGy when the non-uniformity was lower than 2.5, dose range for dehydrated vegetables was 5-7 kGy, dose for spices was 7-8 kGy. The system for quality assurance was established. The processing standards for several irradiated food items were set up. Market test showed that more than 70-80% of consumers accepted irradiated food. Industrial companies also accepted irradiated dehydrated vegetables and spices. The latter were successfully introduced to the markets and successful commercialization of irradiated garlic was followed. The economic benefit of operating the Chinese Agricultural Irradiation Center was analyzed and found attractive, especially for low dose irradiation of foods in sufficient supply. (author)

  10. Effect of packaging materials on the quality of irradiated ground spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saputra, T.S.; Maha, Munsiah; Purwanto, Z.I.

    1985-01-01

    These experiments were carried out to determine the suitable packaging materials to be used for irradiated ground spices produced in Indonesia. The materials used were white pepper (Piper album), black pepper (Piper nigrum) nutmeg (Myristica fragrans), turmeric (Curcuma domestica), and ginger (Zangiber officinale R.) packaged in transparent polypropylene bottles, in pouches made of cellophane-aluminum foil and lithopaper-polyethylene laminates. The samples were irradiated at 5 kGy, stored at ambient conditions, and then examined every 3 months from 0 up to 9 months of storage. The parameters observed were total bacterial counts, total moulds and yeast counts, water activity (Aw), moisture content, and organoleptic scores of the samples. Piperine content of white pepper and black pepper, colour of turmeric extract, and rancidity of ginger were also determined. The results showed that the packaging materials used had no significant effect on bacterial load of the samples. Prolonged storage, however, could reduce the microbial load of the ground spices. Irradiation at 5 kGy could effectively increase the hygienic condition as well as storage life of the ground spices under investigation without affecting their organoleptic properties. (author). 8 refs

  11. Detection irradiated shallot (Allium Cepa) and spices using technique of Photo Stimulated Luminescence (PSL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noor Azianti Abd Rashid

    2012-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the effectiveness of Photo Stimulated Luminescence (PSL) in detecting the food that has been irradiated qualitatively and quantitatively. The samples used were onions (Allium Cepa) and spices. The shallots which are from India and Thailand was irradiated using Gamma Cell at dose of 0 kGy, 0.2 kGy, 0.4 kGy and 1.0. While for the spices, there were 10 types of spices used such as powder of paprika, parsley, turmeric, tarragon, coriander, mint leaves, basil, rosemary flower, chives and herbs mixture which was irradiated at the dose of 0 kGy and 8.7 kGy respectively. The result shows that the PSL method could differentiate samples which are irradiated and not irradiated. Even though the PSL value increases proportionally to the radiation dose, the relationship between these two means are not that clearly clarified and needed to be studied furthermore.(author)

  12. Antibacterial activity of natural spices on multiple drug resistant Escherichia coli isolated from drinking water, Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Spices traditionally have been used as coloring agents, flavoring agents, preservatives, food additives and medicine in Bangladesh. The present work aimed to find out the antimicrobial activity of natural spices on multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli isolates. Methods Anti-bacterial potentials of six crude plant extracts (Allium sativum, Zingiber officinale, Allium cepa, Coriandrum sativum, Piper nigrum and Citrus aurantifolia) were tested against five Escherichia coli isolated from potable water sources at kushtia, Bangladesh. Results All the bacterial isolates were susceptible to undiluted lime-juice. None of them were found to be susceptible against the aqueous extracts of garlic, onion, coriander, pepper and ginger alone. However, all the isolates were susceptible when subjected to 1:1:1 aqueous extract of lime, garlic and ginger. The highest inhibition zone was observed with lime (11 mm). Conclusion Natural spices might have anti-bacterial activity against enteric pathogens and could be used for prevention of diarrheal diseases. Further evaluation is necessary. PMID:21406097

  13. Analysis of the Detection Characteristics of Irradiated Dried Spices and Herbs by Photostimulated Luminescence (PSL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, E.R.; Kang, H.S.; Ahn, H.J.; An, K.A.; Cho, S.Y.; Kim, H.Y.; Kim, D.S.; Kim, D.H.; Kang, C.S.

    2010-01-01

    This study attempted to determine whether Photostimulated Luminescence (PSL) is applicable for the detection of post-irradiated foods by measuring the PSL photon counts of unirradiated and irradiated dried spices and herbs. A total of 19 dried spices and herbs was irradiated with a ∨60Co γ-ray source at 1, 5 and 10 kGy followed by measurement of PSL photon. The photon counts of unirradiated samples below 700 correspond to negative. Fifteen samples irradiated over 1 kGy showed photon counts of more than 5,000, indicating irradiation treatment. Intermediate counts (photon count 700-5,000) were observed in irradiated white/black pepper, nutmeg and cinnamon bark at 10 kGy. These results suggest that it is possible to detect whether dried spices and herbs were irradiated by analyzing PSL, with the exception of white/black pepper, nutmeg and cinnamon bark. Irradiated white/black pepper, nutmeg and cinnamon bark containing low levels of minerals were not sensitive to PSL. Therefore, further investigation is suggested to be performed by Thermoluminescence (TL) analysis or another validated or standardized method

  14. Genetic Diversity, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, and Biofilm Formation ofCronobacterspp. Recovered from Spices and Cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanhong; Yu, Huan; Jiang, Hua; Jiao, Yang; Zhang, Yaodong; Shao, Jihong

    2017-01-01

    Cronobacter species are important food-borne opportunistic pathogens which have been implicated in the cause of necrotizing enterocolitis, sepsis, and meningitis in neonates and infants. However, these bacteria are routinely found in foodstuffs, clinical specimens, and environmental samples. This study investigated the genetic diversity, antimicrobial susceptibility, and biofilm formation of Cronobacter isolates ( n = 40) recovered from spices and cereals in China during 2014-2015. Based on the fus A sequencing analysis, we found that the majority (23/40, 57.5%) of Cronobacter isolates in spices and cereals were C. sakazakii , while the remaining strains were C. dublinensis (6/40, 15.0%), C. malonaticus (5/40, 12.5%), C. turicensis (4/40, 10.0%), and C. universalis (2/40, 5.0%). Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis produced 30 sequence types (STs) among the 40 Cronobacter isolates, with 5 STs (ST4, ST13, ST50, ST129, and ST158) related to neonatal meningitis. The pattern of the overall ST distribution was diverse; in particular, it was revealed that ST148 was the predominant ST, presenting 12.5% within the whole population. MLST assigned 12 isolates to 7 different clonal complexes (CCs), 4, 13, 16, 17, 72, 129, and 143, respectively. The results of O-antigen serotyping indicated that C. sakazakii serotype O1 and O2 were the most two prevalent serotypes. The antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that the 40 Cronobacter isolates were susceptible to most of the antibiotics tested except for ceftriaxone, meropenem, and aztreona. Of the 40 Cronobacter strains tested, 13 (32.5%) were assessed as weak bioflim producers, one (2.5%) was a moderate biofilm producer, one (2.5%) was strong biofilm producer, and the others (62.5%) were non-biofilm producers. MLST and O-antigen serotyping have indicated that Cronobacter strains recovered from spices and cereals were genetically diverse. Isolates of clinical origin, particularly the C. sakazakii ST4 neonatal

  15. Genetic Diversity, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, and Biofilm Formation of Cronobacter spp. Recovered from Spices and Cereals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanhong Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cronobacter species are important food-borne opportunistic pathogens which have been implicated in the cause of necrotizing enterocolitis, sepsis, and meningitis in neonates and infants. However, these bacteria are routinely found in foodstuffs, clinical specimens, and environmental samples. This study investigated the genetic diversity, antimicrobial susceptibility, and biofilm formation of Cronobacter isolates (n = 40 recovered from spices and cereals in China during 2014–2015. Based on the fusA sequencing analysis, we found that the majority (23/40, 57.5% of Cronobacter isolates in spices and cereals were C. sakazakii, while the remaining strains were C. dublinensis (6/40, 15.0%, C. malonaticus (5/40, 12.5%, C. turicensis (4/40, 10.0%, and C. universalis (2/40, 5.0%. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST analysis produced 30 sequence types (STs among the 40 Cronobacter isolates, with 5 STs (ST4, ST13, ST50, ST129, and ST158 related to neonatal meningitis. The pattern of the overall ST distribution was diverse; in particular, it was revealed that ST148 was the predominant ST, presenting 12.5% within the whole population. MLST assigned 12 isolates to 7 different clonal complexes (CCs, 4, 13, 16, 17, 72, 129, and 143, respectively. The results of O-antigen serotyping indicated that C. sakazakii serotype O1 and O2 were the most two prevalent serotypes. The antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that the 40 Cronobacter isolates were susceptible to most of the antibiotics tested except for ceftriaxone, meropenem, and aztreona. Of the 40 Cronobacter strains tested, 13 (32.5% were assessed as weak bioflim producers, one (2.5% was a moderate biofilm producer, one (2.5% was strong biofilm producer, and the others (62.5% were non-biofilm producers. MLST and O-antigen serotyping have indicated that Cronobacter strains recovered from spices and cereals were genetically diverse. Isolates of clinical origin, particularly the C. sakazakii ST4 neonatal

  16. Dynamic ad hoc networks

    CERN Document Server

    Rashvand, Habib

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by the exciting new application paradigm of using amalgamated technologies of the Internet and wireless, the next generation communication networks (also called 'ubiquitous', 'complex' and 'unstructured' networking) are changing the way we develop and apply our future systems and services at home and on local, national and global scales. Whatever the interconnection - a WiMAX enabled networked mobile vehicle, MEMS or nanotechnology enabled distributed sensor systems, Vehicular Ad hoc Networking (VANET) or Mobile Ad hoc Networking (MANET) - all can be classified under new networking s

  17. Effect of powdered spice treatments on mycelial growth, sporulation and production of aflatoxins by toxigenic fungi Efeito de tratamentos com condimentos em pó sobre o crescimento micelial, esporulação e produção de aflatoxinas por fungos toxigênicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sára Maria Chalfoun

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ten powdered spice plants was evaluated at the concentration of 1, 2, 3 and 4% to observe the mycelial growth and sporulation of Aspergillus niger and Eurotium repens. The spices were added to the culture media PDA and CYA20S. Clove completely inhibited the mycelial growth of the tested fungi. The other spices: cinnamon, garlic, thyme, mint, anis, oregano and onion were, in a decreasing order, promising antifungals. Bay leaf and basil did not show a pronounced fungistatic effect. The antitoxigenic potential of the spices was tested against one aflatoxin-producing strain of AspergiIIus flavus. The spices were tested at the same concentrations previously mentioned and were added to the culture medium YES, appropriate for the production of those metabolites. Clove completely inhibited the mycelial growth of Aspergillus flavus. Cinnamon and anis totally inhibited the production of Bl and B2 aflatoxin. Both bay leaf and basil inhibited the synthesis of aflatoxin starting from the concentration of 2%. The other spices did not have a pronounced antiaflatoxigenic effect.O efeito de dez plantas condimentares em pó foi avaliado nas concentrações de 1, 2, 3 e 4%, para observar o desenvolvimento micelial e esporulação de Aspergillus niger e Eurotium repens. Os condimentos foram adicionados aos meios de cultura BDA e CYA 20S. O cravo inibiu completamente o desenvolvimento micelial dos fungos testados. Os outros condimentos: canela, alho, tomilho, menta, erva-doce, orégano e cebola foram, em ordem decrescente, antifúngicos promissores. Louro e manjericão não apresentaram um efeito fungistático pronunciado. O potencial antitoxigênico dos condimentos foi testado contra uma cepa de Aspergillus flavus, produtora de aflatoxina. Os condimentos foram testados nas mesmas concentrações previamente mencionadas e foram adicionados ao meio de cultura YES, apropriado para a produção daqueles metabólitos. O cravo inibiu completamente o

  18. Method development and survey of Sudan I-IV in palm oil and chilli spices in the Washington, DC, area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genualdi, Susie; MacMahon, Shaun; Robbins, Katherine; Farris, Samantha; Shyong, Nicole; DeJager, Lowri

    2016-01-01

    Sudan I, II, III and IV dyes are banned for use as food colorants in the United States and European Union because they are toxic and carcinogenic. These dyes have been illegally used as food additives in products such as chilli spices and palm oil to enhance their red colour. From 2003 to 2005, the European Union made a series of decisions requiring chilli spices and palm oil imported to the European Union to contain analytical reports declaring them free of Sudan I-IV. In order for the USFDA to investigate the adulteration of palm oil and chilli spices with unapproved colour additives in the United States, a method was developed for the extraction and analysis of Sudan dyes in palm oil, and previous methods were validated for Sudan dyes in chilli spices. Both LC-DAD and LC-MS/MS methods were examined for their limitations and effectiveness in identifying adulterated samples. Method validation was performed for both chilli spices and palm oil by spiking samples known to be free of Sudan dyes at concentrations close to the limit of detection. Reproducibility, matrix effects, and selectivity of the method were also investigated. Additionally, for the first time a survey of palm oil and chilli spices was performed in the United States, specifically in the Washington, DC, area. Illegal dyes, primarily Sudan IV, were detected in palm oil at concentrations from 150 to 24 000 ng ml(-1). Low concentrations (< 21 µg kg(-1)) of Sudan dyes were found in 11 out of 57 spices and are most likely a result of cross-contamination during preparation and storage and not intentional adulteration.

  19. Analysis, Control, Synchronization and SPICE Implementation of a Novel 4-D Hyperchaotic Rikitake Dynamo System without Equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vaidyanathan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chaos theory has wide applications and its importance can be seen by the voluminous publications on various applications in several branches of science, commerce and engineering. Control, tracking or regulation and synchronization of different types of chaotic systems are importance areas of research in the control literature and various methods have been adopted over the past few decades for tackling these research problems. Also, the discovery of novel chaotic and hyperchaotic systems in various applications, their qualitative properties and the control of such systems are also important research areas in chaos theory. This paper announces a novel 4-D hyperchaotic Rikitake dynamo system, which is derived by adding a state feedback control to the famous 3-D Rikitake two-disk dynamo system (1958. The frequent and irregular reversals of the Earth’s magnetic field inspired a number of early studies involving electrical currents within the Earth’s molten core. One of the first such models to exhibit reversals was Rikitake’s two-disk dynamo system (Rikitake, 1958. This paper discusses the qualitative properties of the novel hyperchaotic Rikitake dynamo system. We note that the novel hyperchaotic Rikitake dynamo system has no equilibrium points. The Lyapunov exponents of the hyperchaotic Rikitake dynamo system are found as �! = 0.09136, �! = 0.02198, �! = 0 and �! = −2.11190. The Kaplan-Yorke fractional dimension of the novel hyperchaotic Rikitake dynamo system is found as �!" = 3.05367. Next, this paper discusses control and synchronization of the novel hyperchaotic Rikitake dynamo system with unknown parameters using adaptive control method. The main results are established using Lyapunov stability theory and numerically illustrated using MATLAB. Finally, for the 4-D novel hyperchaotic system, an electronic circuit realization in SPICE has been described to confirm the feasibility of the theoretical hyperchaotic Rikitake dynamo

  20. Globally regular instability of AdS_3

    OpenAIRE

    Bizon, P.; Jałmużna, J.

    2013-01-01

    We consider three-dimensional AdS gravity minimally coupled to a massless scalar field and study numerically the evolution of small smooth circularly symmetric perturbations of the $AdS_3$ spacetime. As in higher dimensions, for a large class of perturbations, we observe a turbulent cascade of energy to high frequencies which entails instability of $AdS_3$. However, in contrast to higher dimensions, the cascade cannot be terminated by black hole formation because small perturbations have ener...

  1. Nonlinear realization of supersymmetric AdS space isometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, T. E.; Love, S. T.

    2006-01-01

    The isometries of AdS 5 space and supersymmetric AdS 5 xS 1 space are nonlinearly realized on four-dimensional Minkowski space. The resultant effective actions in terms of the Nambu-Goldstone modes are constructed. The dilatonic mode governing the motion of the Minkowski space probe brane into the covolume of supersymmetric AdS 5 space is found to be unstable and the bulk of the AdS 5 space is unable to sustain the brane. No such instability appears in the nonsupersymmetric case

  2. Ads in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wulan Roro Retno

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cosmetics industry created the beauty myth for women through advertising. A cosmetic ad in Indonesia has spread a new concept of white skin: East Asia beauty myth. The white concept of Asia white skin basically derived from colonial legacy. The purpose of the research was analyzing the beauty myth in Indonesia ads using postcolonial perspective. The principal result brought the discourse analysis and postcolonial perspective a new insight in communication research. Particularly on media and cultural studies. Major conclusions showed that the beauty myth since the Dutch colonial period never been change. The main concept is always in colonialism’s idea: “white is better”. The West is better than the East.

  3. Management job ads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgreen, Lise-Lotte

    2014-01-01

    The article asks whether it is not the responsibility of corporations to address the issue of women being underrepresented in Danish management jobs. In other words, it is argued that corporations should be encouraged to engage more actively in the recruitment of both men and women for management...... jobs by discursively constructing job ads that appeal to both sexes. This argument is part of the broader field of corporate social responsibility, corporate citizenship, and stakeholder management, which involves discussions of the obligations of corporations to acknowledge and mitigate...... the increasingly widespread impact that their activities have on communities and social structures. The article emphasises the need for more active engagement on the part of corporations by analysing the discursive construction of preferred candidates in a small sample of Danish management job ads. By means...

  4. Philosophia ad bellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. O. Loboda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the paper «Philosophia ad bellum» is being realized an attempt to classify philosophic approaches to the study of phenomenon of war by the analogy with the structure of «Just war theory» – 1. Philosophia ad bellum – «philosophy for war», where are investigated ways of using of philosophic methods of cognition in applied military sciences; 2. Philosophia supra bello – «philosophy above war», which investigates world­view, historic­philosophic, existential, logic­epistemological aspects of war; 3. Philosophia contra belli – «philosophy against war», where research of the essence of war gets its logical conclusion in grounding of the absurdity of thinking schemes which justify war as an act of violence. In the article was made historic­philosophic overview of the part «Philosophia ad bellum», where were showed tangent questions, which are considered by philosophic logic and theory of strategic intelligence. It was stated, that specialists if military intelligence admit the important role of researches in logic and theory of cognition in their professional work; were defined basic questions, which have the most essential interest for military professionals. There were analyzed ways of using of philosophic methods in developing military strategies, was made a conclusion that philosophy can be a basis of strategic failures and victories as well.

  5. Photo- and thermally stimulated luminescence of polyminerals extracted from herbs and spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz-Zaragoza, E.; Marcazzó, J.; Chernov, V.

    2012-01-01

    Ionizing radiation processing is a widely employed method for preservative treatment of foodstuffs. Usually it is possible to detect irradiated herbs and spices by resorting to luminescence techniques, in particular photo- and thermostimulated luminescence. For these techniques to be useful, it is necessary to characterize the response to radiation of each particular herb or spice. In this work, the thermoluminescence (TL) and photostimulated luminescence (PSL) properties of inorganic polymineral fractions extracted from commercial herbs and spices previously irradiated for disinfestation purposes have been analyzed. Samples of mint, cinnamon, chamomile, paprika, black pepper, coriander and Jamaica flower were irradiated from 50 to 400 Gy by using a beta source. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis has shown that the mineral fractions consist mainly of quartz and feldspars. The PSL and TL response as a function of the absorbed dose, and their fading at room temperature have been determined. The TL glow curves have been deconvolved in order to obtain characteristic kinetics parameters in each case. The results of this work show that PSL and TL are reliable techniques for detection and analysis of irradiated foodstuffs. - Highlights: ► The PSL and TL properties of polyminerals from foodstuffs irradiated are analyzed. ► Quartz and feldspars were identified by XRD in the powder samples. ► The first TL peak (96–102 °C) has a clear influence on PSL and TL fading decay. ► The glow curves show complex structure and six TL peaks were deconvoluted. ► The PSL and TL results are very appropriate for analysis of irradiated foodstuffs.

  6. Determination of Radical Scavenging Activity and Total Phenols of Wine and Spices: A Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugemwa, Fulgentius Nelson; Snyder, Amanda L; Shaikh, Koonj

    2013-07-25

    Thirty eight bottles of red wine (Carbanet Sauvignon) were randomly selected based on vintage, region, price, and age (number of months in a barrel). The total phenolic content of each wine was determined using Folin-Ciocalteau assay. The radical scavenging activity was evaluated using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. Apart from a few bottles that exhibited above average radical scavenging activity and phenolic content, there was no good correlation of those two quantities with region, price or vintage. The average phenolic amount was 2874 mg/L. The lowest phenolic content was found to be 1648 mg/L for an eight dollar wine. Wine with the highest amount of phenol of 4495 mg/L was a 2007, nine dollar bottle from South America. High amount of phenols did not translate into high radical scavenging activity. Barrel-aging did not increase the amount of phenols or the radical scavenging activity of wine. In order to discover new and potent sources of antioxidants from plants, the following spices were studied: ginger, cilantro, cumin, anise, linden, eucalyptus, marjoram, oregano, sage, thyme and rosemary. Whole spices were crushed and extracted for 96 h at room temperature using a combination of ethyl acetate, ethyl alcohol and water in the ratio of 4.5:4.5:1 (v/v/v). The radical scavenging activity of extracts was evaluated using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. The total phenolic content of each spice was also determined using the Folin-Ciocalteau assay. Eucalyptus was found to be the most potent antioxidant with an LC50 of 324.1 mg of phenol/L, followed by marjoram with an LC50 of 407.5 mg of phenol/L, and rosemary with an LC50 of 414.0 mg/L. The least potent antioxidants were ginger and cilantro with LC50 of 7604 mg/L of phenol and 7876 mg of phenol/L, respectively.

  7. Review of antidiabetic fruits, vegetables, beverages, oils and spices commonly consumed in the diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beidokhti, Maliheh Najari; Jäger, Anna K

    2017-04-06

    Type 2 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes and its prevalence is rapidly increasing throughout the world. Modifications of lifestyle such as suitable diet and exercise programs along with pharmacotherapy and education of patients are beneficial therapies for patients with type 2 diabetes. The ethnopharmacological use of herbal medicines, many of them part of our diet as spices, vegetables and fruits, has been developed for the treatment of diabetes due to inexpensiveness, easy availability and few side effects. Our aim is to present a review for researchers who are interested in the biologically active dietary plants traditionally utilized in the treatment of diabetes. Information was obtained from a literature search of electronic databases such as Google Scholar, Pubmed, Sci Finder and Cochrane. Common and scientific name of the fruits, vegetables, beverages, oils and spices and the words 'antidiabetic', 'hypoglycemic', 'anti-hyperglycemic', 'type 2 diabetes' were used as keywords for search. Certain fruits and vegetables are functional foods and their consumption reduces the incidence of type 2 diabetes. Hypoglycemic effects of fruits and vegetables may be due to their inducing nature on pancreatic β-cells for insulin secretion, or bioactive compounds such as flavonoids, alkaloids and anthocyanins, which act as insulin-like molecules or insulin secretagogues. This write-up covers hypoglycemic, anti-hyperglycemic and anti-diabetic activities of some dietary fruits, vegetables, beverages, oils and spices and their active hypoglycemic constituents. Including such plant species in the diet might improve management of type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Multi-institutional Quantitative Evaluation and Clinical Validation of Smart Probabilistic Image Contouring Engine (SPICE) Autosegmentation of Target Structures and Normal Tissues on Computer Tomography Images in the Head and Neck, Thorax, Liver, and Male Pelvis Areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Mingyao; Bzdusek, Karl; Brink, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Clinical validation and quantitative evaluation of computed tomography (CT) image autosegmentation using Smart Probabilistic Image Contouring Engine (SPICE).......Clinical validation and quantitative evaluation of computed tomography (CT) image autosegmentation using Smart Probabilistic Image Contouring Engine (SPICE)....

  9. Karg S., D.E. Robinson (2002): Secondary food plants from medieval sites in Denmark: fruits, nuts, vegetables, herbs and spices. In: K. Viklund, R. Engelmark (eds.) Nordic Archaeobotany-NAG 2000 in Umeå.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karg, Sabine

    2002-01-01

    Secondary food plants from medieval sites in Denmark: fruits, nuts, vegetables, herbs and spices.......Secondary food plants from medieval sites in Denmark: fruits, nuts, vegetables, herbs and spices....

  10. The Health Benefits of Selected Culinary Herbs and Spices Found in the Traditional Mediterranean Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Allyson; Marquez, Susan; de Mejia, Elvira Gonzalez

    2016-12-09

    The Mediterranean diet is considered one of the healthiest diets in the world. This is often attributed to low saturated fat consumption, moderate wine consumption, and high vegetable consumption. However, herbs and spices associated with these diets may also play an important role in the quality of this diet. This review summarizes the most recent research regarding the anti-diabetic, anti-inflammatory, anti-hyperlipidemic and anti-hypertensive properties of this collection of culinary species. Additionally, this review briefly summarizes studies performed on lesser known herbs from around the world, with the goal of identifying new culinary species that may be useful in the treatment or prevention of diseases.

  11. TopSPICE Simulations for Temperature Compensation of ISFET/MEMFET Micro-Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawsen AZZOUZI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, an ISFET (Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistor/MEMFET (Membrane Field Effect Transistor interface circuit with temperature compensation has been successfully designed and simulated. In each interface, we used the macro-model of ISFET/MEMFET based chemical sensors simulated in TopSPICE. The simulation results of the different sensing circuits of ISFET/MEMFETs for temperature compensation show that the readout configuration for ISFET/MEMFET sensors based on Wheatstone-Bridge connection is the most effective with a temperature drift 5´10-6 mV/°C.

  12. Dos enfoques no abordados en los modelos de calidad: CMM y SPICE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudith Rodríguez Pérez

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Muchas organizaciones de software tienden a resolver sus problemas de calidad institucionalizando sus procesos a través de la certificación de un modelo de calidad, sin tener en cuenta que en estos modelos no se abordan aspectos tan importantes en la vida de una organización como son la gestión de los recursos humanos y la gestión de comercialización. Con el objetivo de señalar cuales son las deficiencias de los modelos SPICE y CMM se desarrolla este trabajo.

  13. Análisis de Clima Organizacional de Baltimore Spice C.A.S.A.

    OpenAIRE

    Wong Carranza, Henry Paul

    2004-01-01

    Tesis de maestría -- Universidad de Costa Rica. Posgrado en Administración y Dirección de Empresas. Maestría Profesional en Administración y Dirección de Empresas con énfasis en Gerencia, 2004 El objetivo general del trabajo es realizar un diagnóstico de los elementos que inciden e impactan negativamente en el desempeño del clima organizacional de Baltimore Spice C.A.S.A., que se ven reflejados directa e indirectamente en el rendimiento de los colaboradores en el nivel operativo. La organi...

  14. Evaluation of sensory attributes and some-quality indices of irradiated spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbulakshmi, G.; Udipi, Shobha; Raheja, Reshma; Sharma, Arun; Padwal Desai, S.R.; Nair, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    Ground pepper, chilli, coriander, cumin, turmeric and a spice mix (sambar powder) exposed to an absorbed dose of 10 kGy of gamma irradiation were studied for microbial and sensory quality changes, if any, on storage for 3 months. No significant differences between the irradiated and non-irradiated samples could be observed in their sensory qualities. While no increase in microbial load in sealed irradiated samples could be observed, those that were irradiated but opened repeatedly for daily use did show a marginal increase in microbial load. (author). 8 refs., 1 tab

  15. EPR study of the free radicals in the spices and pigments turmeric and saffron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troup, G.J.; Hutton, D.R.; Hunter, C.A.; Hewitt, D.; Mulinacci, N.; Romani, A.; Giaccherini, K. Anon

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The spices Turmeric (curcuma longa) and Saffron (crocus sativus) have also been used as pigments. The EPR spectrum of each shows a readily detectable free radical signal. EPR spectra of the available pure chief active colorants in solid form also give free radical signals. Curcumin (turmeric) is a 'linear' symmetric phenolic, so is expected to do so. The peptide turmerin (commercially unavailable), containing sulphur, may also contribute to the ESR signal. Crocetin (saffron) is a 'linear' molecule, related to the beta-carotenes, which do not give free radical signals: but it does, presumably because of its particular resonant structure properties

  16. Visualisierung analoger Schaltungen durch 3-D Animation von transienten SPICE-Simulationen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Becker

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Für das Zeichnen analoger Schaltpläne wird oft versucht, die Potentialverteilung in der entsprechenden Schaltung auszunutzen, um eine Platzierung der Bauteile nach abfallendem Potential vorzunehmen. Mit Hilfe von Computerunterstützung gelingt es, eine verallgemeinerte dreidimensionale Platzierungsstrategie anzuwenden, die allein auf Grund der Potentialwerte einer Schaltung die automatische Generierung einer technisch exakten Potentialdarstellung erlaubt. Somit ist es möglich, die Ergebnisse von transienten SPICE-Simulationen in jedem Zeitschritt darzustellen und eine Animation des zeitlichen Verhaltens zu erzeugen. Die Umsetzung dieser Methode zur Einbettung in eine webbasierte Lern – und Arbeitsplattform wird im Folgenden erläutert.

  17. Identifying and assessing Spice and herbs resources for tourism attractions: A case study from Banyuwangi, East Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luchman Hakim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the study was to analyze the potentiality of spices and herbs in agrofotestry garden in Banyuwangi, Indonesia, for further rural tourism development. Fields study was set up at villages in Banyuwangi. Floristic survey, ethnobitanical studies and focus group discussion were performed to evaluate the value of spices and herbs in agroforestry gardens an its potentiality to develop as tourism product. This study found that at least 60 species of spice and herbs with its special value, in which these species has opportunities to developed as tourism attraction in agroforestry garden. There are something to see, something to buy and something to do has been described by group discussion participant. It is raging from farm tourism product, culinary tourism product and heath-wellness tourism product.

  18. A state space averaged duo-mode SPICE model of a four-output current-programmed push-pull converter with Magamp post regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jesse E.; Rodriguez, Francis D.; Schaffner, Ronald J.

    A nonlinear duomode state space-averaged SPICE model of a current-programmed push-pull converter with four outputs and two magamp postregulators is described. Convergence 'tricks' are discussed and simulations are compared to lab measurements. SPICE can be used to estimate the large signal behavior of multioutput push-pull converters under current-programmed control.

  19. Eating ad Libitum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillersdal, Line

    using an ad libitum meal consisting of spaghetti bolognaise. I analyse the entanglement and concurrence of different knowledge practices and show how several scalings of appetite play out, one ex explaining the aim of the test, being to ”measure what your body would want the most” and hence producing...... an eater who: ”shouldn't restrain herself”. Practices of food and eating in the test meal I suggest, will allow us to tackle reductionism by showing the complex cultural context shaping clinical intervention....

  20. LC-PDA-ESI/MS identification of the phenolic components of three compositae spices: chamomile, tarragon, and Mexican arnica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Long-Ze; Harnly, James M

    2012-06-01

    Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.), tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus L.) and Mexican arnica (Heterotheca inuoides) are common compositae spices and herbs found in the US market. They contain flavonoids and hydroxycinnamates that are potentially beneficial to human health. A standardized LC-PDA-ESI/MS profiling method was used to identify 51 flavonoids and 17 hydroxycinnamates. Many of the identifications were confirmed with authentic standards or through references in the literature or the laboratory's database. More than half of the phenol compounds for each spice had not been previously reported. The phenolic profile can be used for plant authentication and to correlate with biological activities.

  1. The effect of sodium reduction and the use of herbs and spices on the quality and safety of bologna sausage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Ivone Carraro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the replacement of 50% NaCl by KCl in Bologna sausage with the addition of herbs and spice blends (coriander, onion, white pepper, cardamom, and Jamaican pepper was evaluated. The formulations tested showed a significant reduction in the sodium content with no major alterations in the emulsion stability, texture, and microbiological characteristics. The use of 50% KCl caused a reduction in the sensory quality leading to a significant decrease in the consumers' purchase intention. The formulations with the addition of herbs and spice blends presented better results in the sensory evaluation indicating that this strategy can reduce the negative effects resulting from the use of KCl.

  2. Hawking radiation from AdS black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubeny, Veronika E; Rangamani, Mukund; Marolf, Donald

    2010-01-01

    We study Hartle-Hawking-like states of quantum field theories on asymptotically AdS black hole backgrounds, with particular regard to the phase structure of interacting theories. By a suitable analytic continuation we show that the equilibrium dynamics of field theories on large asymptotically AdS black holes can be related to the low-temperature states of the same field theory on the AdS soliton (or pure AdS) background. This allows us to gain insight into Hartle-Hawking-like states on large-radius Schwarzschild- or rotating-AdS black holes. Furthermore, we exploit the AdS/CFT correspondence to explore the physics of strongly coupled large N theories on asymptotically AdS black holes. In particular, we exhibit a plausibly complete set of phases for the M2-brane world-volume superconformal field theory on a BTZ black hole background. Our analysis partially resolves puzzles previously raised in connection with Hawking radiation on large AdS black holes.

  3. Diferentes condimentos vegetais: avaliação sensorial e de atividade antibacteriana em preparação alimentar com frango cozido Different spice plants: sensorial evaluation and antibacterial activity in chicken broth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    , individualmente, atividade antibacteriana significativa, mesmo que sem significância quando comparados entre si. Contudo, em relação ao tempo de início da atividade antibacteriana, destacou-se a pimenta dedo-de-moça, enquanto que, em relação ao prolongamento dessa ação no tempo, destacou-se o alho nirá. As 12 plantas condimentares em estudo tiveram atestada a sensorialidade, sendo que as quatro plantas com destaque tiveram a atividade anti-coliforme termo-resistente comprovada in loco. Diferentes condimentos vegetais foram capazes de fornecer qualificação sensorial e sanitária em caldo com frango cozido, em condições domésticas de manuseio.Based on the in vitro antibacterial activity predetermined for 12 spice plants with ethnographic indicator, this feature was tested in loco in the model cooked chicken broth. First, ten evaluators were trained, according to the current legislation for Free and Informed Consent, providing previous knowledge about the plants parsley (Petroselinum sativum, marjoram (Origanum X aplii and Origanum majorana, basil (Ocimum basilicum, common sage (Salvia officinalis, thyme (Thymus vulgaris, anis-like spice (Ocimum selloi, african basilicum (Ocimum gratissimum, nirá garlic (Allium tuberosum, leek (Allium porrum, turmeric (Curcuma longa and "dedo-de-moça" chili (Capsicum baccatum. Those spices were individually added to the chicken broth to perform a Hedonic Scale-like Acceptance Test, selecting four of the twelve spices that had higher sensory acceptance, "dedo-de-moça" chili, nirá garlic, leek and thyme. A new Acceptance Test was then performed using low, medium and high concentrations of those four spices to establish the most acceptable sensory intensities. The elected quantities (0.5 g "dedo-de-moça" chili, 15 g nirá garlic, 15 g leek and 5 g thyme were added to the chicken broth, then challenged with Escherichia coli (ATCC 11229 at a final 10 concentration of CFU/mL, the tolerated limit according to legislation. The control

  4. PRODUCTION OF BREAD–SPREAD FROM BLENDS OF SHEA BUTTER (VITELLARIA PARADOXA, GARLIC (ALLIUM SATIVUM, GINGER (ZINGIBER OFFICINALE, SCENT LEAF (OCCIMUM GRATISSIMUM, AND SUYA SPICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice O.T. Ifesan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at production of bread-spread from blends of shea butter with spices such as ginger, garlic, scent leaf, and suya spice. Two different ratios, 70% shea butter: 30% spices and 85% shea butter:15% spices were prepared from raw shea butter and various spices. The treatments were packaged in a transparent plastic bowl and stored at room temperature for 4 weeks while samples were taken for analysis at 0, 2 and 4 weeks of storage. Samples were examined for chemical, antioxidant properties, anti-nutritional factors and sensory evaluation. Saponification value ranged from 47.7 mg KOH/g -104.5 mg KOH/g while shea butter + spices exhibited lower values compared to 100% shea butter (control. It was observed that iodine value of both the blends and control decreased as storage days increased except for samples of shea butter + ginger (SGG and shea butter + suya spice (SSS at 70:30 ratio. Addition of spices to shea butter increased the 1,1-diphenyl-2 picrylhydrazyl (DPPH values (44.96%-77.98% and total phenol content (0.36 mg TAE/g-0.51 mg TAE/g of the crude shea butter significantly. Phytate content of the blends increased upon addition of spices, whereas, a drastic reduction was observed in the alkaloid contents of the blends from 29.79% (control to 2.29% in shea butter + scent leave. The sensory evaluation result revealed that the general acceptability of shea butter treated with suya spice (70:30 and 100% shea butter were scored above average and were not different significantly.

  5. Processes to Preserve Spice and Herb Quality and Sensory Integrity During Pathogen Inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, Kayla; Amin, Kemia N.; Wright, Melissa; Newkirk, Jordan J.; Ponder, Monica A.; Acuff, Gary R.; Dickson, James S.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Selected processing methods, demonstrated to be effective at reducing Salmonella, were assessed to determine if spice and herb quality was affected. Black peppercorn, cumin seed, oregano, and onion powder were irradiated to a target dose of 8 kGy. Two additional processes were examined for whole black peppercorns and cumin seeds: ethylene oxide (EtO) fumigation and vacuum assisted‐steam (82.22 °C, 7.5 psia). Treated and untreated spices/herbs were compared (visual, odor) using sensory similarity testing protocols (α = 0.20; β = 0.05; proportion of discriminators: 20%) to determine if processing altered sensory quality. Analytical assessment of quality (color, water activity, and volatile chemistry) was completed. Irradiation did not alter visual or odor sensory quality of black peppercorn, cumin seed, or oregano but created differences in onion powder, which was lighter (higher L *) and more red (higher a*) in color, and resulted in nearly complete loss of measured volatile compounds. EtO processing did not create detectable odor or appearance differences in black peppercorn; however visual and odor sensory quality differences, supported by changes in color (higher b *; lower L *) and increased concentrations of most volatiles, were detected for cumin seeds. Steam processing of black peppercorn resulted in perceptible odor differences, supported by increased concentration of monoterpene volatiles and loss of all sesquiterpenes; only visual differences were noted for cumin seed. An important step in process validation is the verification that no effect is detectable from a sensory perspective. PMID:28407236

  6. Antioxidant and chemical properties of essential oil extracted from blend of selected spices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ochuko Lucky Erukainure

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the chemical properties of essential oil extracted from blends of selected Nigerian spices as well as its antioxidant protective potentials against free radical in vitro. Methods: Essential oil was extracted from selected spices blend consisting of Monodora myristica, Myristica fragrans, Tetrapleura tetraptera, and Aframomum sceptrum using a Clevenger type apparatus. Oil obtained was subjected to phytochemical and gas chromatography-mass spectrometer analysis as well as analyzed for antioxidant activity which covers for 1,1-diphenyl-2 picrylhydrazyl, nitric oxide scavenging activities and reducing property. Results: Gas chromatography-mass spectrometer analysis revealed over 50 compoundfs with α-phellandrene being the most predominant compound (27.32%, which was followed by (--β-bourbonene (15.78% and 5-(1-methylethyl-α-phellandrene (11.80%. Phytochemical analysis showed high flavonoid content and a lower phenolic content. The oil showed a dose like dependent effect on the1-diphenyl-2 picrylhydrazyl and nitric oxide scavenging activities, these activities increased with increasing concentration. The same was also observed for the reducing power properties of the oil. Conclusions: The antioxidant activities exhibited by the essential oil in vitro signify its protective potential against free radicals. The chemical constituents, α-phellandrene in particular and the studied phytochemicals may be responsible for these effects. However, in vivo study is needed to further authenticate this potency.

  7. The quality difference between frankfurters seasoned with conventional and organic spices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomašević Igor B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Frankfurters seasoned with conventional and organic garlic or coriander were investigated for the differences in taste and odor intensities, instrumental color and oxidative stability during 35 days of cold storage. Garlic powder, both organic (0.78 mg MDA/kg and conventional (0.71 mg MDA/kg, promoted lipid oxidation compared to control frankfurters without garlic (0.52 mg MDA/kg. Consumers assessed odor (6.68 and taste (6.18 intensities of frankfurters with organic garlic significantly higher compared to the odor (4.73 and taste (4.65 of the frankfurters with conventional garlic. Color of frankfurters with organic or conventional spices was also significantly different. At the 95% confidence level, at least 20% of the consumers could distinguish between the samples with organic and conventional garlic, and at least 14% of the consumers between the samples with organic and conventional coriander. For the first time it is suggested that seasoning with organic instead of conventionally produced spices might improve quality characteristics of meat products.

  8. Selected spices and their combination modulate hypercholesterolemia-induced oxidative stress in experimental rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria A Otunola

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Effect of aqueous extracts of Allium sativum (garlic, Zingiber officinale (ginger, Capsicum fructensces (cayenne pepper and their mixture on oxidative stress in rats fed high Cholesterol/high fat diet was investigated. Rats were randomly distributed into six groups (n = 6 and given different dietary/spice treatments. Group 1 standard rat chow (control, group 2, hypercholesterolemic diet plus water, and groups 3, 4, 5, 6, hypercholesterolemic diet with 0.5 ml 200 mg · kg-1 aqueous extracts of garlic, ginger, cayenne pepper or their mixture respectively daily for 4 weeks. RESULTS: Pronounced oxidative stress in the hypercholesterolemic rats evidenced by significant (p < 0.05 increase in MDA levels, and suppression of the antioxidant enzymes system in rat's liver, kidney, heart and brain tissues was observed. Extracts of spices singly or combined administered at 200 mg.kg-1 body weight significantly (p < 0.05 reduced MDA levels and restored activities of antioxidant enzymes. CONCLUSIONS: It is concluded that consumption of garlic, ginger, pepper, or their mixture may help to modulate oxidative stress caused by hypercholesterolemia in rats.

  9. Anti-inflammatory properties of culinary herbs and spices that ameliorate the effects of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungbauer, Alois; Medjakovic, Svjetlana

    2012-03-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome are increasing global health problems. In addition to the malnutrition of a sedentary lifestyle, high calorie intake leads to obesity with many negative health consequences. Macrophages infiltrate adipose tissue and induce chronic inflammation by secreting pro-inflammatory cytokines, including COX-2 and iNOS, among other mediators of inflammation. Free fatty acids mediate adipose tissue signalling through toll-like receptor 4 and the expression of these pro-inflammatory mediators via NF-κB or JNK. PPAR γ activators can inhibit the activation of NF-κB, down-regulating the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Here we provide an overview of how different culinary herbs and spices exert anti-inflammatory activities and the extent to which they activate PPAR α and PPAR γ, inhibit the activation of NF-κB, and enhance expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Spices can play essential roles as anti-inflammatory agents in our diet, acting as pan PPAR activators and improving insulin sensitivity, counteracting dyslipidaemia and weight gain. The effects of chronic inflammation caused by obesity are counteracted and, consequently, the progression of diseases associated with chronic inflammation slowed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Possibility of fighting food borne bacteria by egyptian folk medicinal herbs and spices extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayel, Ahmed A; El-Tras, Wael F

    2009-01-01

    Phytotherapy (herbal medicine) have a long-standing history in Egypt. Current study investigated the antimicrobial potentialities of twenty five herbs and spices which are widely used in folk medicine by Egyptian housewives to treat gastrointestinal disorders against seven bacterial strains, mostly food borne including pathogens. They were tested by using paper disc diffusion technique as qualitative assay and agar dilution method for determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of herbs extracts. Among screened plants, basil, cardamom, cinnamon, clove, lemon grass, mustard, oregano, rosemary, sage and thyme extracts exhibited notable antimicrobial activities against most of the tested strains. Cinnamon extract was the most inhibitor followed by clove, whereas extracts of chamomile, rose of Jericho, safflower and turmeric showed weak antibacterial activities against most of the tested strains. The most sensitive strain to plant extracts was B. subtilis and the most resistant strain was Ps. fluorescens. herbs and spices extracts -used in Egyptian folk medicine for treating many gastrointestinal disorders - could be successfully applied as natural antimicrobials for elimination of food borne bacteria and pathogens growth.

  11. Commercial spices and industrial ingredients: evaluation of antioxidant capacity and flavonoids content for functional foods development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Roquim Alezandro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate spices and industrial ingredients for the development of functional foods with high phenolic contents and antioxidant capacity. Basil, bay, chives, onion, oregano, parsley, rosemary, turmeric and powdered industrial ingredients (β-carotene, green tea extract, lutein, lycopene and olive extract had their in vitro antioxidant capacity evaluated by means of the Folin-Ciocalteu reducing capacity and DPPH scavenging ability. Flavonoids identification and quantification were performed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC. The results showed that spices presented a large variation in flavonoids content and in vitro antioxidant capacity, according to kind, brand and batches. Oregano had the highest antioxidant capacity and parsley had the highest flavonoid content. The industrial ingredient with the highest antioxidant capacity was green tea extract, which presented a high content of epigalocatechin gallate. Olive extract also showed a high antioxidant activity and it was a good source of chlorogenic acid. This study suggests that oregano, parsley, olive and green tea extract have an excellent potential for the development of functional foods rich in flavonoids as antioxidant, as long as the variability between batches/brands is controlled.

  12. Phytochemistry and gastrointestinal benefits of the medicinal spice, Capsicum annuum L. (Chilli): a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Amal K; Banerji, Pratim

    2016-06-01

    Dietary spices and their active constituents provide various beneficial effects on the gastrointestinal system by variety of mechanisms such as influence of gastric emptying, stimulation of gastrointestinal defense and absorption, stimulation of salivary, intestinal, hepatic, and pancreatic secretions. Capsicum annuum (Solanaceae), commonly known as chilli, is a medicinal spice used in various Indian traditional systems of medicine and it has been acknowledged to treat various health ailments. Therapeutic potential of chilli and capsaicin were well documented; however, they act as double-edged sword in many physiological circumstances. In traditional medicine chilli has been used against various gastrointestinal complains such as dyspepsia, loss of appetite, gastroesophageal reflux disease, gastric ulcer, and so on. In chilli, more than 200 constituents have been identified and some of its active constituents play numerous beneficial roles in various gastrointestinal disorders such as stimulation of digestion and gastromucosal defense, reduction of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms, inhibition of gastrointestinal pathogens, ulceration and cancers, regulation of gastrointestinal secretions and absorptions. However, further studies are warranted to determine the dose ceiling limit of chilli and its active constituents for their utilization as gastroprotective agents. This review summarizes the phytochemistry and various gastrointestinal benefits of chilli and its various active constituents.

  13. Wireless Ad Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Chuan Yang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the energy-efficient configuration of multihop paths with automatic repeat request (ARQ mechanism in wireless ad hoc networks. We adopt a cross-layer design approach and take both the quality of each radio hop and the battery capacity of each transmitting node into consideration. Under certain constraints on the maximum tolerable transmission delay and the required packet delivery ratio, we solve optimization problems to jointly schedule the transmitting power of each transmitting node and the retransmission limit over each hop. Numerical results demonstrate that the path configuration methods can either significantly reduce the average energy consumption per packet delivery or considerably extend the average lifetime of the multihop route.

  14. Effects of a behavioral intervention that emphasizes spices and herbs on adherence to recommended sodium intake: results of the SPICE randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Cheryl A M; Cobb, Laura K; Miller, Edgar R; Woodward, Mark; Hottenstein, Annette; Chang, Alex R; Mongraw-Chaffin, Morgana; White, Karen; Charleston, Jeanne; Tanaka, Toshiko; Thomas, Letitia; Appel, Lawrence J

    2015-09-01

    For decades, dietary sodium intake in the United States has remained high, and few studies have examined strategies for maintaining recommended intakes. We examined the effects of a behavioral intervention, which emphasized spices and herbs, on the maintenance of sodium intake at the recommended intake of 1500 mg/d in individuals to whom the US Dietary Guidelines for Americans apply. We conducted a 2-phase study that included adults ≥18 y of age for whom Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends 1500 mg Na/d. The study was conducted in Baltimore, Maryland, from 2012 to 2014. In phase 1, 55 individuals consumed a low-sodium diet for 4 wk. Participants were provided all foods, snacks, and calorie-containing drinks. In phase 2, 40 participants from phase 1 were randomly assigned to either a behavioral intervention to reduce sodium intake (n = 20) or a self-directed control group (n = 20) for 20 wk. The primary study outcome was the change in mean 24-h urinary sodium excretion during phase 2. Linear regression analyses were used to determine intervention effects on urinary sodium excretion. Participant characteristics were as follows: women: 65%; African American: 88%; hypertension: 63%; diabetes: 18%; mean age: 61 y; and mean body mass index (in kg/m(2)): 30. At the end of phase 2, mean 24-h sodium excretion was lower in the behavioral intervention than in the self-directed group (mean difference: -956.8 mg/d; 95% CI: -1538.7, -374.9 mg/d) after sodium intake at screening was controlled for (P = 0.002). These findings persisted in sensitivity analyses that excluded potentially incomplete urine collections [Mage's equation mean difference: -1090 mg/d (P = 0.001); Joosens' equation mean difference: -796 mg/d (P = 0.04)]. A multifactorial behavioral intervention emphasizing spices and herbs significantly reduced sodium intake. Because of the ubiquity of sodium in the US food supply, multilevel strategies addressing individual behaviors and the food supply are needed

  15. Ad gist : Ad communication in a single eye fixation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, R.; Wedel, M.

    2012-01-01

    Most ads in practice receive no more than a single eye fixation. This study investigates the limits of what ads can communicate under such adverse exposure conditions. We find that consumers already know at maximum levels of accuracy and with high degree of certainty whether something is an ad or is

  16. Exotic spices in flux: Archaeobotanical material from medieval and early modern sites of the Czech lands (Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Preusz, M.; Kodýdková, K.; Kočár, Petr; Vaněček, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 2 (2015), s. 223-236 ISSN 1804-848X Institutional support: RVO:67985912 Keywords : exotic spices * luxury food * imports * New World * Asia * Europe * archaeobotany * macro-remains Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology https://www.iansa.eu/papers/IANSA-2015-02-preusz.pdf

  17. Public acceptance and trade development of irradiated food in Sri Lanka with special reference to spices and onions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson Wijeratnam, R.S.; Sivakumar, D.

    2001-01-01

    Sri Lankan spices, onion, shallots and dried chillies suffer considerable storage losses due to inadequate preservation method. Irradiation to a dose 7 kGy was found to be effective technique to reduce storage losses and improve quality of different spices. Preliminary results showed prospect of using irradiation for large scale preservation of dried chillis. But due to lack of irradiation, facility scaled- up irradiation and storage trials could not be undertaken. Based on study conducted by the Ceylon Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, a report was submitted to the Atomic Energy Authority of Sri Lanka on the current demand for a multi-purpose irradiation facility. The food items identified for irradiation processing include spices, desiccated coconut, shrimps for export; and onions, chillies and dried fish products, foliage plants and medical products for local trade. The volume of products for commercial processing has also been indicated in the survey report. Steps for approval of the Harmonised Regulations on Food Irradiation as adopted in the RCA Workshop in Seoul, 1998 are at the processing level for submission as a parliamentary bill. A consumer acceptance survey was carried out in 1997; the outcome showed a low acceptance for irradiated spices. About 200 participants comprising private exporters, govt. officials and students were made aware of the irradiation process and benefits of irradiation treatment through the training programmes on post-harvest management at the CISIR. (author)

  18. Anticarcinogenic Effect of Spices Due to Phenolic and Flavonoid Compounds—In Vitro Evaluation on Prostate Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Lackova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study shows the effects of spices, and their phenolic and flavonoid compounds, on prostate cell lines (PNT1A, 22RV1 and PC3. The results of an MTT assay on extracts from eight spices revealed the strongest inhibitory effects were from black pepper and caraway seed extracts. The strongest inhibitory effect on prostatic cells was observed after the application of extracts of spices in concentration of 12.5 mg·mL−1. An LC/MS analysis identified that the most abundant phenolic and flavonoid compounds in black pepper are 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde and naringenin chalcone, while the most abundant phenolic and flavonoid compounds in caraway seeds are neochlorogenic acid and apigenin. Using an MTT assay for the phenolic and flavonoid compounds from spices, we identified the IC50 value of ~1 mmol·L−1 PNT1A. The scratch test demonstrated that the most potent inhibitory effect on PNT1A, 22RV1 and PC3 cells is from the naringenin chalcone contained in black pepper. From the spectrum of compounds assessed, the naringenin chalcone contained in black pepper was identified as the most potent inhibitor of the growth of prostate cells.

  19. Mycobiota and Natural Incidence of Aflatoxins, Ochratoxin A, and Citrinin in Indian Spices Confirmed by LC-MS/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punam Jeswal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nine different Indian spices (red chilli, black pepper, turmeric, coriander, cumin, fennel, caraway, fenugreek, and dry ginger commonly cultivated and highly used in India were analysed for natural occurrence of toxigenic mycoflora and aflatoxins (AFs, ochratoxin A (OTA, and citrinin (CTN contamination. Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus niger were the most dominant species isolated from all types of spices. Red chilli samples were highly contaminated with aflatoxins (85.4% followed by dry ginger (77.7%. 56% Aspergillus flavus from red chilli and 45% Aspergillus ochraceus from black pepper were toxigenic and produced aflatoxins and ochratoxin A, respectively. Qualitative detection and quantitative detection of mycotoxins in spices were analyzed by ELISA and further confirmed by LC-MS/MS. Penicillium citrinum produced citrinin in red chilli, black pepper, coriander, cumin, fenugreek, and dry ginger samples. The highest amount of AFs was found in red chilli (219.6 ng/g, OTA was in black pepper (154.1 ng/g, and CTN was in dry ginger samples (85.1 ng/g. The results of this study suggest that the spices are susceptible substrate for growth of mycotoxigenic fungi and further mycotoxin production. This is the first report of natural occurrence of citrinin in black pepper and dry ginger from India.

  20. Oxygen-isotope trends and seawater temperature changes across the Late Cambrian Steptoean positive carbon-isotope excursion (SPICE event)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrick, M.; Rieboldt, S.; Saltzman, M.; McKay, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    The globally recognized Late Cambrian Steptoean positive C-isotope excursion (SPICE) is characterized by a 3???-5??? positive ??13C shift spanning thermohaline circulation rates contributed to decreased dissolved O2 concentrations, which enhanced the preservation/burial of Corg causing the positive ??13C shift. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  1. ad hoc networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Alicia Correa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Los métodos de agrupamiento permiten que las MANET (redes móviles ad hoc presenten un mejor desempeño en cuanto a la rapidez de conexión, el enrutamiento y el manejo de la topología. En este trabajo se presenta una revisión sobre las técnicas de agrupamiento para MANET. Se introducen algunos temas preliminares que forman la base para el desarrollo de los algoritmos de agrupamiento, tales como: la topología de la red, el enrutamiento, la teoría de grafos y los algoritmos de movilidad. Adicionalmente, se describen algunas de las técnicas de agrupamiento más conocidas como Lowest-ID heuristic, Highest degree heuristic, DMAC (distributed mobility-adaptive clustering, WCA (weighted clustering algorithm, entre otros. El propósito central es ilustrar los conceptos principales respecto a las técnicas de agrupamiento en MANET.

  2. Added masses of ship structures

    CERN Document Server

    Korotkin, Alexandr I

    2008-01-01

    This essentially self-contained reference book contains data on added masses of ships and various ship and marine engineering structures. Theoretical and experimental methods for determining added masses of these objects are described.

  3. Biorefining of by-product streams from sunflower-based biodiesel production plants for integrated synthesis of microbial oil and value-added co-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva-Candia, D E; Tsakona, S; Kopsahelis, N; García, I L; Papanikolaou, S; Dorado, M P; Koutinas, A A

    2015-08-01

    This study focuses on the valorisation of crude glycerol and sunflower meal (SFM) from conventional biodiesel production plants for the separation of value-added co-products (antioxidant-rich extracts and protein isolate) and for enhancing biodiesel production through microbial oil synthesis. Microbial oil production was evaluated using three oleaginous yeast strains (Rhodosporidium toruloides, Lipomyces starkeyi and Cryptococcus curvatus) cultivated on crude glycerol and nutrient-rich hydrolysates derived from either whole SFM or SFM fractions that remained after separation of value-added co-products. Fed-batch bioreactor cultures with R. toruloides led to the production of 37.4gL(-1) of total dry weight with a microbial oil content of 51.3% (ww(-1)) when a biorefinery concept based on SFM fractionation was employed. The estimated biodiesel properties conformed with the limits set by the EN 14214 and ASTM D 6751 standards. The estimated cold filter plugging point (7.3-8.6°C) of the lipids produced by R. toruloides is closer to that of biodiesel derived from palm oil. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. AdS5 black holes with fermionic hair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrington, Benjamin A.; Liu, James T.; Sabra, W. A.

    2005-01-01

    The study of new Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) objects in AdS 5 has led to a deeper understanding of AdS/CFT. To help complete this picture, and to fully explore the consequences of the supersymmetry algebra, it is also important to obtain new solutions with bulk fermions turned on. In this paper we construct superpartners of the 1/2 BPS black hole in AdS 5 using a natural set of fermion zero modes. We demonstrate that these superpartners, carrying fermionic hair, have conserved charges differing from the original bosonic counterpart. To do so, we find the R-charge and dipole moment of the new system, as well as the mass and angular momentum, defined through the boundary stress tensor. The complete set of superpartners fits nicely into a chiral representation of AdS 5 supersymmetry, and the spinning solutions have the expected gyromagnetic ratio, g=1

  5. Determination of Radical Scavenging Activity and Total Phenols of Wine and Spices: A Randomized Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulgentius Nelson Lugemwa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Thirty eight bottles of red wine (Carbanet Sauvignon were randomly selected based on vintage, region, price, and age (number of months in a barrel. The total phenolic content of each wine was determined using Folin-Ciocalteau assay. The radical scavenging activity was evaluated using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl (DPPH assay. Apart from a few bottles that exhibited above average radical scavenging activity and phenolic content, there was no good correlation of those two quantities with region, price or vintage. The average phenolic amount was 2874 mg/L. The lowest phenolic content was found to be 1648 mg/L for an eight dollar wine. Wine with the highest amount of phenol of 4495 mg/L was a 2007, nine dollar bottle from South America. High amount of phenols did not translate into high radical scavenging activity. Barrel-aging did not increase the amount of phenols or the radical scavenging activity of wine. In order to discover new and potent sources of antioxidants from plants, the following spices were studied: ginger, cilantro, cumin, anise, linden, eucalyptus, marjoram, oregano, sage, thyme and rosemary. Whole spices were crushed and extracted for 96 h at room temperature using a combination of ethyl acetate, ethyl alcohol and water in the ratio of 4.5:4.5:1 (v/v/v. The radical scavenging activity of extracts was evaluated using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl (DPPH assay. The total phenolic content of each spice was also determined using the Folin-Ciocalteau assay. Eucalyptus was found to be the most potent antioxidant with an LC50 of 324.1 mg of phenol/L, followed by marjoram with an LC50 of 407.5 mg of phenol/L, and rosemary with an LC50 of 414.0 mg/L. The least potent antioxidants were ginger and cilantro with LC50 of 7604 mg/L of phenol and 7876 mg of phenol/L, respectively.

  6. Spore prevalence and toxigenicity of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis isolates from U.S. retail spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariram, Upasana; Labbé, Ronald

    2015-03-01

    Recent incidents of foodborne illness associated with spices as the vehicle of transmission prompted this examination of U.S. retail spices with regard to Bacillus cereus. This study focused on the levels of aerobic-mesophilic spore-forming bacteria and B cereus spores associated with 247 retail spices purchased from five states in the United States. Samples contained a wide range of aerobic-mesophilic bacterial spore counts ( 10(7) CFU/g). Using a novel chromogenic agar, B. cereus and B. thuringiensis spores were isolated from 77 (31%) and 11 (4%) samples, respectively. Levels of B. cereus were thuringiensis isolates possessed at least one type of enterotoxin gene: HBL (hemolysin BL) or nonhemolytic enterotoxin (NHE). None of the 88 isolates obtained in this study possessed the emetic toxin gene (ces). Using commercially available immunological toxin detection kits, the toxigenicity of the isolates was confirmed. The NHE enterotoxin was expressed in 98% of B. cereus and 91% of B. thuringiensis isolates that possessed the responsible gene. HBL enterotoxin was detected in 87% of B. cereus and 100% of B. thuringiensis PCR-positive isolates. Fifty-two percent of B. cereus and 54% of B. thuringiensis isolates produced both enterotoxins. Ninety-seven percent of B. cereus isolates grew at 12°C, although only two isolates grew well at 9°C. The ability of these spice isolates to form spores, produce diarrheal toxins, and grow at moderately abusive temperatures makes retail spices an important potential vehicle for foodborne illness caused by B. cereus strains, in particular those that produce diarrheal toxins.

  7. Bioavailability of herbs and spices in humans as determined by ex vivo inflammatory suppression and DNA strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, Susan S; Vanden Heuvel, John P; Nieves, Carmelo J; Montero, Cindy; Migliaccio, Andrew J; Meadors, Joanna

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the bioavailability of herbs and spices after human consumption by measuring the ability to protect lymphocytes from an oxidative injury and by examining the impact on inflammatory biomarkers in activated THP-1 cells. Ten to 12 subjects in each of 13 groups consumed a defined amount of herb or spice for 7 days. Blood was drawn from subjects before consumption and 1 hour after taking the final herb or spice capsules. Subject serum and various extractions of the herbs and spices were analyzed for antioxidant capacity by oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) analysis or by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrzyl (DPPH). Subject peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in medium with10% autologous serum were incubated with hydrogen peroxide to induce DNA strand breaks. Subject serum was also used to treat activated THP-1 cells to determine relative quantities of 3 inflammatory cytokine (tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-α], interleukin-1α [IL-1α], and IL-6) mRNAs. Herbs and spices that protected PBMCs against DNA strand breaks were paprika, rosemary, ginger, heat-treated turmeric, sage, and cumin. Paprika also appeared to protect cells from normal apoptotic processes. Of the 3 cytokine mRNAs studied (TNF-α, IL-1α, and IL-6), TNF-α was the most sensitive responder to oxidized LDL-treated macrophages. Clove, ginger, rosemary, and turmeric were able to significantly reduce oxidized LDL-induced expression of TNF-α. Serum from those consuming ginger reduced all three inflammatory biomarkers. Ginger, rosemary, and turmeric showed protective capacity by both oxidative protection and inflammation measures. DNA strand breaks and inflammatory biomarkers are a good functional measure of a food's bioavailability.

  8. Different views of AEGIS / AD-6 Experiment (AD facility) AD-6

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    Different views of AEGIS / AD-6 Experiment (AD facility) in July of 2012. The visible parts are the positron accumulator (blue structures on top of of the antiproton extraction line) and the 5T magnet which traps the antiprotons.

  9. AdS Black Hole with Phantom Scalar Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limei Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an AdS black hole solution with Ricci flat horizon in Einstein-phantom scalar theory. The phantom scalar fields just depend on the transverse coordinates x and y, which are parameterized by the parameter α. We study the thermodynamics of the AdS phantom black hole. Although its horizon is a Ricci flat Euclidean space, we find that the thermodynamical properties of the black hole solution are qualitatively the same as those of AdS Schwarzschild black hole. Namely, there exists a minimal temperature and the large black hole is thermodynamically stable, while the smaller one is unstable, so there is a so-called Hawking-Page phase transition between the large black hole and the thermal gas solution in the AdS space-time in Poincare coordinates. We also calculate the entanglement entropy for a strip geometry dual to the AdS phantom black holes and find that the behavior of the entanglement entropy is qualitatively the same as that of the black hole thermodynamical entropy.

  10. Inhibition of iron induced lipid peroxidation and antioxidant activity of Indian spices and Acacia in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Amit Singh; Bhatnagar, Deepak

    2010-03-01

    The spices used in the Indian foods such as Star anise (Illicium verum), Bay leaves (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) and Cobra's saffron (Mesua ferrea), and Acacia (Acacia catechu), which have medicinal value, were used as test samples, to find their effect on in vitro lipid peroxidation (LPO). Rat liver post mitochondrial supernatant (PMS) in Tris HCl buffer, pH 7.4 was incubated for 0 and 1 h, with various test extracts in three different oxidant systems. The results show that addition of test samples to FeCl(3) medium at 0 h significantly stop the initiation of the LPO. However, the propagation phase of LPO was inhibited by Cobra's saffron and Acacia and not by Star anise and Bay leaves. The test samples also showed strong reducing power and superoxide radical scavenging activity. Cobra's saffron and Acacia showed the highest antioxidant activity, probably due to the higher polyphenol content as compared to other test samples.

  11. Is variety the spice of life? It all depends on the rate of consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Galak

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Is variety of the spice of life? The present research suggests that the answer depends on the rate of consumption. In three experiments, we find that, whereas a variety of stimuli is preferred to repetition of even a better-liked single stimulus when consumption is continuous, this preference reverses when the satiation associated with repetition is reduced by slowing down the rate of consumption. Decision makers, however, seem to under-appreciate the influence of consumption rate on preference for (and satisfaction with variety. At high rates of consumption, they correctly anticipate their own, high, desire for variety, but at low rates of consumption people tend to overestimate their own desire for variety. These results complicate the picture presented by prior research on the ``diversification bias'', suggesting that people overestimate their own desire for variety only when consumption is spaced out over time.

  12. Labrador tea--the aromatic beverage and spice: a review of origin, processing and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dampc, Anna; Luczkiewicz, Maria

    2015-06-01

    Labrador tea is a name for the dried leaves of Rhododendron groenlandicum, R. tomentosum or R. neoglandulosum (family Ericaceae, previously genus Ledum) as well as for the beverage native to North America, which is made from them. The above species are rich in the essential oil, which gives a conifer aroma to the tisane. Labrador tea is a valuable source of ascorbic acid, with tonic, improving digestion and relaxing activity. However, this beverage should not be drunk more than once daily because of the ledol and grayanotoxin toxicity. The common recipe for making Labrador tea is to add one teaspoonful of dried leaves to one cup of boiling water and to brew for 5 min. It is often sweetened or enriched with other flavors. Additionally, Labrador tea dried leaves are used to spice meat, soups, sauces, salads, beer, cakes and other dishes. In agriculture, its insecticidal properties can be useful for controlling pests. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Curcumin, a component of golden spice: from bedside to bench and back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Gupta, Subash C; Tyagi, Amit K; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2014-11-01

    Although the history of the golden spice turmeric (Curcuma longa) goes back thousands of years, it is only within the past century that we learned about the chemistry of its active component, curcumin. More than 6000 articles published within the past two decades have discussed the molecular basis for the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, and anticancer activities assigned to this nutraceutical. Over sixty five clinical trials conducted on this molecules, have shed light on the role of curcumin in various chronic conditions, including autoimmune, cardiovascular, neurological, and psychological diseases, as well as diabetes and cancer. The current review provides an overview of the history, chemistry, analogs, and mechanism of action of curcumin. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Potential application of spice and herb extracts as natural preservatives in cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Bin; Cai, Yi-Zhong; Brooks, John D; Corke, Harold

    2011-03-01

    This study investigated the antibacterial efficiency of five spice and herb extracts (cinnamon stick, oregano, clove, pomegranate peel, and grape seed) against Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and Salmonella enterica in cheese at room temperature (~ 23°C). The lipid oxidation (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances) of cheese was periodically tested by oxidative analyses. The results showed that all five plant extracts were effective against three foodborne pathogens in cheese. Treatments with these extracts increased the stability of cheese against lipid oxidation. Clove showed the highest antibacterial and antioxidant activity. The reduction of foodborne pathogen numbers and the inhibition of lipid oxidation in cheese indicated that the extracts of these plants (especially clove) have potential as natural food preservatives.

  15. The Antioxidant and Starch Hydrolase Inhibitory Activity of Ten Spices in an In Vitro Model of Digestion: Bioaccessibility of Anthocyanins and Carotenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayawardena, Nilakshi; Watawana, Mindani I.; Jayathilaka, Ruchini T.; Waisundara, Viduranga Y.

    2015-01-01

    The antioxidant and starch hydrolase inhibitory activities of cardamom, cloves, coriander, cumin seeds, curry leaves, fenugreek, mustard seeds, nutmeg, sweet cumin, and star anise extracts were investigated in an in vitro model of digestion mimicking the gastric and duodenal conditions. The total phenolic contents in all spice extracts had statistically significantly (P spice extracts showed statistically significant changes in the initial starch hydrolase enzyme inhibitory values prior to gastric and duodenal digestion. In conclusion, this study was able to prove that the 10 spices were a significant source of total phenolics, antioxidant, and starch hydrolase inhibitory activities. PMID:26693245

  16. Chemical Composition and Fatty Acid Content of Some Spices and Herbs under Saudi Arabia Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Mohammed Al-Jasass

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Some Saudi herbs and spices were analyzed. The results indicated that mustard, black cumin, and cress seeds contain high amount of fat 38.45%, 31.95% and 23.19%, respectively, as compared to clove (16.63%, black pepper (5.34% and fenugreek (4.51% seeds. Cress, mustard, black cumin and black pepper contain higher protein contents ranging from 26.61 to 25.45%, as compared to fenugreek (12.91% and clove (6.9%. Crude fiber and ash content ranged from 6.36 to 23.6% and from 3.57 to 7.1%, respectively. All seeds contain high levels of potassium (ranging from 383 to 823 mg/100g, followed by calcium (ranging from 75 to 270 mg/100g, Magnesium (ranged from 42 to 102 mg/100g and iron (ranged from 20.5 to 65 mg/100g. However, zinc, manganese and copper were found at low levels. The major fatty acids in cress and mustard were linolenic acid (48.43% and erucic acid (29.81%, respectively. The lenoleic acid was the major fatty acid in black cumin, fenugreek, black pepper and clove oils being 68.07%, 34.85%, 33.03% and 44.73%, respectively. Total unsaturated fatty acids were 83.24, 95.62, 86.46, 92.99, 81.34 and 87.82% for cress, mustard, black cumin, fenugreek, black pepper and clove, respectively. The differences in the results obtained are due to environmental factors, production areas, cultivars used to produce seeds and also due to the different methods used to prepare these local spices.

  17. Marijuana, Spice 'herbal high', and early neural development: implications for rescheduling and legalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psychoyos, Delphine; Vinod, K Yaragudri

    2013-01-01

    Marijuana is the most widely used illicit drug by pregnant women in the world. In utero exposure to Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ⁹-THC), a major psychoactive component of marijuana, is associated with an increased risk for anencephaly and neurobehavioural deficiencies in the offspring, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), learning disabilities, and memory impairment. Recent studies demonstrate that the developing central nervous system (CNS) is susceptible to the effects of Δ⁹-THC and other cannabimimetics, including the psychoactive ingredients of the branded product 'Spice' branded products. These exocannabinoids interfere with the function of an endocannabinoid (eCB) system, present in the developing CNS from E12.5 (week 5 of gestation in humans), and required for proliferation, migration, and differentiation of neurons. Until recently, it was not known whether the eCB system is also present in the developing CNS during the initial stages of its ontogeny, i.e. from E7.0 onwards (week 2 of gestation in humans), and if so, whether this system is also susceptible to the action of exocannabinoids. Here, we review current data, in which the presence of an eCB system during the initial stage of development of the CNS is demonstrated. Furthermore, we focus on recent advances on the effect of canabimimetics on early gestation. The relevance of these findings and potential adverse developmental consequences of in utero exposure to 'high potency' marijuana, Spice branded products and/or cannabinoid research chemicals during this period is discussed. Finally, we address the implication of these findings in terms of the potential dangers of synthetic cannabinoid use during pregnancy, and the ongoing debate over legalization of marijuana. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Asymptotically AdS spacetimes with a timelike Kasner singularity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Jie [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2016-07-21

    Exact solutions to Einstein’s equations for holographic models are presented and studied. The IR geometry has a timelike cousin of the Kasner singularity, which is the less generic case of the BKL (Belinski-Khalatnikov-Lifshitz) singularity, and the UV is asymptotically AdS. This solution describes a holographic RG flow between them. The solution’s appearance is an interpolation between the planar AdS black hole and the AdS soliton. The causality constraint is always satisfied. The entanglement entropy and Wilson loops are discussed. The boundary condition for the current-current correlation function and the Laplacian in the IR is examined. There is no infalling wave in the IR, but instead, there is a normalizable solution in the IR. In a special case, a hyperscaling-violating geometry is obtained after a dimensional reduction.

  19. New massive gravity and AdS(4) counterterms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatkar, Dileep P; Sinha, Aninda

    2011-04-29

    We show that the recently proposed Dirac-Born-Infeld extension of new massive gravity emerges naturally as a counterterm in four-dimensional anti-de Sitter space (AdS(4)). The resulting on-shell Euclidean action is independent of the cutoff at zero temperature. We also find that the same choice of counterterm gives the usual area law for the AdS(4) Schwarzschild black hole entropy in a cutoff-independent manner. The parameter values of the resulting counterterm action correspond to a c=0 theory in the context of the duality between AdS(3) gravity and two-dimensional conformal field theory. We rewrite this theory in terms of the gauge field that is used to recast 3D gravity as a Chern-Simons theory.

  20. Instantons from geodesics in AdS moduli spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, Daniele; Trigiante, Mario; Van Riet, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    We investigate supergravity instantons in Euclidean AdS5 × S5/ℤk. These solutions are expected to be dual to instantons of N = 2 quiver gauge theories. On the supergravity side the (extremal) instanton solutions are neatly described by the (lightlike) geodesics on the AdS moduli space for which we find the explicit expression and compute the on-shell actions in terms of the quantised charges. The lightlike geodesics fall into two categories depending on the degree of nilpotency of the Noether charge matrix carried by the geodesic: for degree 2 the instantons preserve 8 supercharges and for degree 3 they are non-SUSY. We expect that these findings should apply to more general situations in the sense that there is a map between geodesics on moduli-spaces of Euclidean AdS vacua and instantons with holographic counterparts.

  1. Twistor description of spinning particles in AdS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitakis, Alex S.; Barns-Graham, Alec E.; Townsend, Paul K.

    2018-01-01

    The two-twistor formulation of particle mechanics in D-dimensional anti-de Sitter space for D = 4 , 5 , 7, which linearises invariance under the AdS isometry group Sp(4; K ) for K=R,C,H, is generalized to the massless N -extended "spinning particle". The twistor variables are gauge invariant with respect to the initial N local worldline supersymmetries; this simplifies aspects of the quantum theory such as implications of global gauge anomalies. We also give details of the two-supertwistor form of the superparticle, in particular the massive superparticle on AdS5.

  2. AdS5 magnetized solutions in minimal gauged supergravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis Blázquez-Salcedo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We construct a generalization of the AdS charged rotating black holes with two equal magnitude angular momenta in five-dimensional minimal gauged supergravity. In addition to the mass, electric charge and angular momentum, the new solutions possess an extra-parameter associated with a non-zero magnitude of the magnetic potential at infinity. In contrast with the known cases, these new black holes possess a non-trivial zero-horizon size limit which describes a one parameter family of spinning charged solitons. All configurations reported in this work approach asymptotically an AdS5 spacetime in global coordinates and are free of pathologies.

  3. AdS5 magnetized solutions in minimal gauged supergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blázquez-Salcedo, Jose Luis; Kunz, Jutta; Navarro-Lérida, Francisco; Radu, Eugen

    2017-08-01

    We construct a generalization of the AdS charged rotating black holes with two equal magnitude angular momenta in five-dimensional minimal gauged supergravity. In addition to the mass, electric charge and angular momentum, the new solutions possess an extra-parameter associated with a non-zero magnitude of the magnetic potential at infinity. In contrast with the known cases, these new black holes possess a non-trivial zero-horizon size limit which describes a one parameter family of spinning charged solitons. All configurations reported in this work approach asymptotically an AdS5 spacetime in global coordinates and are free of pathologies.

  4. Holography in Lovelock Chern-Simons AdS gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetković, Branislav; Miskovic, Olivera; Simić, Dejan

    2017-08-01

    We analyze holographic field theory dual to Lovelock Chern-Simons anti-de Sitter (AdS) gravity in higher dimensions using first order formalism. We first find asymptotic symmetries in the AdS sector showing that they consist of local translations, local Lorentz rotations, dilatations and non-Abelian gauge transformations. Then, we compute 1-point functions of energy-momentum and spin currents in a dual conformal field theory and write Ward identities. We find that the holographic theory possesses Weyl anomaly and also breaks non-Abelian gauge symmetry at the quantum level.

  5. Stringy N = (2, 2) holography for AdS3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Shouvik; Eberhardt, Lorenz; Gaberdiel, Matthias R.

    2018-01-01

    We propose a class of AdS3/CFT2 dualities with N = (2, 2) supersymmetry. These dualities relate string theory on {AdS}_3× ({S}^3× T^4)/G to marginal deformations of the symmetric product orbifold of T^4/G , where G is a dihedral group. We demonstrate that the BPS spectrum calculated from supergravity and string theory agrees with that of the dual CFT. Moreover, the supergravity elliptic genus is shown to reproduce the CFT answer, thus providing further non-trivial evidence in favour of the proposal.

  6. Mystery cloud of AD 536

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stothers, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    The possible cause of the densest and most persistent dry fog on record, which was observed in Europe and the Middle East during AD 536 and 537, is discussed. The fog's long duration toward the south and the high sulfuric acid signal detected in Greenland in ice cores dated around AD 540 support the theory that the fog was due to the explosion of the Rabaul volcano, the occurrence of which has been dated at about AD 540 by the radiocarbon method.

  7. Penrose inequality for asymptotically AdS spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itkin, Igor [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Oz, Yaron, E-mail: yaronoz@post.tau.ac.il [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2012-02-28

    In general relativity, the Penrose inequality relates the mass and the entropy associated with a gravitational background. If the inequality is violated by an initial Cauchy data, it suggests a creation of a naked singularity, thus providing means to consider the cosmic censorship hypothesis. We propose a general form of Penrose inequality for asymptotically locally AdS spaces.

  8. Penrose inequality for asymptotically AdS spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itkin, Igor; Oz, Yaron

    2012-01-01

    In general relativity, the Penrose inequality relates the mass and the entropy associated with a gravitational background. If the inequality is violated by an initial Cauchy data, it suggests a creation of a naked singularity, thus providing means to consider the cosmic censorship hypothesis. We propose a general form of Penrose inequality for asymptotically locally AdS spaces.

  9. Internet Advertising. Google AdWords versus Facebook Ads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul PAŞCU

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article describes how to use the applications for Internet advertising, Google AdWords and Facebook Ads. Our attempt is to present the advantages and disadvantages of each of them, the costs and benefits, a useful aspect for companies that plan to start advertising campaigns on the Internet.

  10. Internet Advertising. Google AdWords versus Facebook Ads

    OpenAIRE

    Paul PAŞCU

    2014-01-01

    This article describes how to use the applications for Internet advertising, Google AdWords and Facebook Ads. Our attempt is to present the advantages and disadvantages of each of them, the costs and benefits, a useful aspect for companies that plan to start advertising campaigns on the Internet.

  11. Muhammad As`ad Bugis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinessen, M.M. van

    1998-01-01

    MUHAMMAD AS`AD BUGIS [Wajo, South Sulawesi, Indonesia, 1907-1953] [Dictionnaire biographique des savants et grandes figures du monde musulman périphérique, du XIXe siècle à nos jours, Fasc. no 2. Paris: CNRS-EHESS, 1998, p. 22-23] Muhammad As`ad was one of the greatest `ulamâ of South

  12. AdS vacua from dilaton tadpoles and form fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mourad

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe how unbounded three-form fluxes can lead to families of AdS3×S7 vacua, with constant dilaton profiles, in the USp(32 model with “brane supersymmetry breaking” and in the U(32 0'B model, if their (projective-disk dilaton tadpoles are taken into account. We also describe how, in the SO(16×SO(16 heterotic model, if the torus vacuum energy Λ is taken into account, unbounded seven-form fluxes can support similar AdS7×S3 vacua, while unbounded three-form fluxes, when combined with internal gauge fields, can support AdS3×S7 vacua, which continue to be available even if Λ is neglected. In addition, special gauge field fluxes can support, in the SO(16×SO(16 heterotic model, a set of AdSn×S10−n vacua, for all n=2,..,8. String loop and α′ corrections appear under control when large form fluxes are allowed.

  13. Anti-tumor promoting potential of selected spice ingredients with antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activities: a short review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surh, Young-Joon

    2002-08-01

    A wide variety of phenolic substances derived from spice possess potent antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic activities. Examples are curcumin, a yellow colouring agent, contained in turmeric (Curcuma longa L., Zingiberaceae), [6]-gingerol, a pungent ingredient present in ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe, Zingiberaceae) and capsaicin, a principal pungent principle of hot chili pepper (Capsicum annuum L, Solanaceae). The chemopreventive effects exerted by these phytochemicals are often associated with their antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. Cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) has been recognized as a molecular target of many chemopreventive as well as anti-inflammatory agents. Recent studies have shown that COX-2 is regulated by the eukaryotic transcription factor NF-kappaB. This short review summarizes the molecular mechanisms underlying chemopreventive effects of the aforementioned spice ingredients in terms of their effects on intracellular signaling cascades, particularly those involving NF-kappaB and mitogen-activated protein kinases.

  14. SPICE modelling of a coupled piezoelectric-bimetal heat engine for autonomous Wireless Sensor Nodes (WSN) power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boughaleb, J; Monfray, S; Vine, G; Arnaud, A; Puscasu, O; Maitre, C; Trochut, S; Hasbani, F; Di Gilio, T; Heinrich, V; Urard, P; Grasset, J C; Boeuf, F; Skotnicki, T; Cottinet, P J; Guyomar, D; Boisseau, S; Duret, A B; Quenard, S

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with an electrical modelling and optimization of a thermal energy harvester dedicated to power autonomous systems. Such devices based on bimetal strips and piezoceramics turn thermal gradients into electricity by a two-step conversion mechanism. This work focuses first on a demonstration of a ST-WSN (GreenNet demonstration platform) supplied by the harvester to validate, for the first time, the harvesters viability. That demonstration focuses attention on the need for an optimized power management circuit for piezoelectric generators able to reach output voltages up to 20 V. The work deals then with the proposal of an equivalent lumped element model of the piezoelectric transducer with its SPICE implementation to enable the optimization of a dedicated power management circuit based on the Pulsed Synchronous Charge Extractor (PSCE). Simulations using the SPICE model and the power management circuit lead to an increased extracted power by 144%

  15. SPICE modelling of a coupled piezoelectric-bimetal heat engine for autonomous Wireless Sensor Nodes (WSN) power supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughaleb, J.; Monfray, S.; Vine, G.; Cottinet, P. J.; Arnaud, A.; Boisseau, S.; Duret, A. B.; Quenard, S.; Puscasu, O.; Maitre, C.; Trochut, S.; Hasbani, F.; Di Gilio, T.; Heinrich, V.; Urard, P.; Grasset, J. C.; Boeuf, F.; Guyomar, D.; Skotnicki, T.

    2014-11-01

    This paper deals with an electrical modelling and optimization of a thermal energy harvester dedicated to power autonomous systems. Such devices based on bimetal strips and piezoceramics turn thermal gradients into electricity by a two-step conversion mechanism. This work focuses first on a demonstration of a ST-WSN (GreenNet demonstration platform) supplied by the harvester to validate, for the first time, the harvesters viability. That demonstration focuses attention on the need for an optimized power management circuit for piezoelectric generators able to reach output voltages up to 20 V. The work deals then with the proposal of an equivalent lumped element model of the piezoelectric transducer with its SPICE implementation to enable the optimization of a dedicated power management circuit based on the Pulsed Synchronous Charge Extractor (PSCE). Simulations using the SPICE model and the power management circuit lead to an increased extracted power by 144%.

  16. Characterization of the phenolic and antioxidant profiles of selected culinary herbs and spices: caraway, turmeric, dill, marjoram and nutmeg

    OpenAIRE

    Vallverdú-Queralt,Anna; Regueiro,Jorge; Alvarenga,José Fernando Rinaldi; Martinez-Huelamo,Miriam; Leal,Leonel Neto; Lamuela-Raventos,Rosa Maria

    2015-01-01

    Culinary herbs and spices have long been considered essentially as flavor enhancers or preservatives, with little attention given to their potential health-promoting properties. Nevertheless, recent research has shown them to be significant dietary sources of bioactive phenolic compounds. Despite noteworthy efforts performed in recent years to improve our knowledge of their chemical composition, a detailed phenolic profile of these plant-based products is still lacking. In the present work, a...

  17. Mimotopes for Api g 5, a Relevant Cross-reactive Allergen, in the Celery-Mugwort-Birch-Spice Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukschal, Anna; Wallmann, Julia; Bublin, Merima; Hofstetter, Gerlinde; Mothes-Luksch, Nadine; Breiteneder, Heimo; Pali-Schöll, Isabella; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2016-03-01

    In the celery-mugwort-birch-spice syndrome, a significant proportion of IgE is directed against high molecular weight (HMW) glycoproteins, including the celery allergen Api g 5. BIP3, a monoclonal antibody originally raised against birch pollen, recognizes HMW allergens in birch and mugwort pollens, celery, and Apiaceae spices. Our aim was to generate mimotopes using BIP3 for immunization against the HMW allergens relevant in the celery-mugwort-birch-spice cross reactivity syndrome. Mimotopes were selected from a random-peptide display library by BIP3 and applied in IgE inhibition assays. The 3 phage clones with the highest inhibitory capacity were chosen for immunization of BALB/c mice. Mouse immune sera were tested for IgG binding to blotted birch pollen extract and used for inhibiting patients' IgE binding. Furthermore, sera were tested for binding to Api g 5, to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as a second glycoprotein, or to non-glycosylated control allergen Phl p 5 in ELISA, and the specific Api g 5-specific IgG titers were determined. Three rounds of biopanning resulted in phage clones exhibiting 7 different sequences including 1 dominant, 1-6-cyclo-CHKLRCDKAIA. Three phage clones had the capacity to inhibit human IgE binding and induced IgG to the HMW antigen when used for immunizing BALB/c mice. The induced BIP3-mimotope IgG reached titers of 1:500 specifically to Api g 5, but hardly reacted to glycoprotein HRP, revealing a minor role of carbohydrates in their epitope. The mimotopes characterized in this study mimic the epitope of BIP3 relevant for Api g 5, one of the cross-reactive HMW allergens relevant in the celery-mugwort-birch-spice syndrome. BIP3 mimotopes may be used in the future for hyposensitization in this clinical syndrome by virtue of good and specific immunogenicity.

  18. Materials of seminar ''Problem of microbiologic infection of spices and methods for improvement of their hygienic state''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Radiation methods for food preservation by reduction of initial microbiologic infection have been presented on example of spices. The technical aspects of food irradiation, dose control, microbiologic infection control have been shown. The legal aspects and international regulations have been performed. Biological radiation effects in irradiated food have been discussed also from the view point of consumer health hazard. The false public opinion have been rectified by scientific explanation of some basic effects connected with irradiation of food and agriculture products

  19. Essential oils of culinary herbs and spices display agonist and antagonist activities at human aryl hydrocarbon receptor AhR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoňková, Iveta; Dvořák, Zdeněk

    2018-01-01

    Essential oils (EOs) of culinary herbs and spices are used to flavor, color and preserve foods and drinks. Dietary intake of EOs is significant, deserving an attention of toxicologists. We examined the effects of 31 EOs of culinary herbs and spices on the transcriptional activity of human aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), which is a pivotal xenobiotic sensor, having also multiple roles in human physiology. Tested EOs were sorted out into AhR-inactive ones (14 EOs) and AhR-active ones, including full agonists (cumin, jasmine, vanilla, bay leaf), partial agonists (cloves, dill, thyme, nutmeg, oregano) and antagonists (tarragon, caraway, turmeric, lovage, fennel, spearmint, star anise, anise). Major constituents (>10%) of AhR-active EOs were studied in more detail. We identified AhR partial agonists (carvacrol, ligustilide, eugenol, eugenyl acetate, thymol, ar-turmerone) and antagonists (trans-anethole, butylidine phtalide, R/S-carvones, p-cymene), which account for AhR-mediated activities of EOs of fennel, anise, star anise, caraway, spearmint, tarragon, cloves, dill, turmeric, lovage, thyme and oregano. We also show that AhR-mediated effects of some individual constituents of EOs differ from those manifested in mixtures. In conclusion, EOs of culinary herbs and spices are agonists and antagonists of human AhR, implying a potential for food-drug interactions and interference with endocrine pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessment of endocrine disruption potential of essential oils of culinary herbs and spices involving glucocorticoid, androgen and vitamin D receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoňková, Iveta; Dvořák, Zdeněk

    2018-04-25

    Essential oils (EOs) of culinary herbs and spices are consumed on a daily basis. They are multicomponent mixtures of compounds with already demonstrated biological activities. Taking into account regular dietary intake and the chemical composition of EOs, they may be considered as candidates for endocrine-disrupting entities. Therefore, we examined the effects of 31 EOs of culinary herbs and spices on transcriptional activities of glucocorticoid receptor (GR), androgen receptor (AR) and vitamin D receptor (VDR). Using reporter gene assays in stably transfected cell lines, weak anti-androgen and anti-glucocorticoid activity was observed for EO of vanilla and nutmeg, respectively. Moderate augmentation of calcitriol-dependent VDR activity was caused by EOs of ginger, thyme, coriander and lemongrass. Mixed anti-glucocorticoid and VDR-stimulatory activities were displayed by EOs of turmeric, oregano, dill, caraway, verveine and spearmint. The remaining 19 EOs were inactive against all receptors under investigation. Analyses of GR, AR and VDR target genes by means of RT-PCR confirmed the VDR-stimulatory effects, but could not confirm the anti-glucocorticoid and anti-androgen effects of EOs. In conclusion, although we observed minor effects of several EOs on transcriptional activities of GR, AR and VDR, the toxicological significance of these effects is very low. Hence, 31 EOs of culinary herbs and spices may be considered safe, in terms of endocrine disruption involving receptors GR, AR and VDR.

  1. Characterization of the phenolic and antioxidant profiles of selected culinary herbs and spices: caraway, turmeric, dill, marjoram and nutmeg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Vallverdú-Queralt

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Culinary herbs and spices have long been considered essentially as flavor enhancers or preservatives, with little attention given to their potential health-promoting properties. Nevertheless, recent research has shown them to be significant dietary sources of bioactive phenolic compounds. Despite noteworthy efforts performed in recent years to improve our knowledge of their chemical composition, a detailed phenolic profile of these plant-based products is still lacking. In the present work, antioxidant activities and phenolic composition of five herbs and spices, namely caraway, turmeric, dill, marjoram and nutmeg, have been studied. The use of liquid chromatography coupled to LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry enabled the identification of up to 42 phenolic compounds. To the best of our knowledge, two of them, apigenin-C-hexoside-C-pentoside and apigenin-C-hexoside-C-hexoside have not been previously reported in turmeric. Qualitative and quantitative differences were observed in polyphenol profiles, with the highest phenolic content found in caraway. Multivariate statistical treatment of the results allowed the detection of distinctive features among the studied herbs and spices.

  2. Occurrence of toxigenic fungi and determination of mycotoxins by HPLC-FLD in functional foods and spices in China markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Weijun; Wei, Riwei; Logrieco, Antonio F; Wei, Jianhe; Wen, Jing; Xiao, Xiaohe; Yang, Meihua

    2014-03-01

    Twenty-four samples including 14 functional foods and 10 spices obtained from Chinese markets were examined for their mould profile. The mycotoxin contamination levels were also determined by an optimized HPLC-FLD method. 124 fungal isolates belonging to four different genera were recovered with Aspergillus and Penicillium as predominant fungi, with an incidence of 66.1% and 15.3%, respectively. In functional foods Aspergillus niger section (57.1%) was isolated more frequently, followed by Aspergillus flavi section (50.0%) and Aspergillus ochraceus section (21.4%), with the most contaminated samples being Coix seeds. Similar fungal presence and frequency were encountered in spice with A. niger section group (60.0%) and A. flavi section (40.0%) as main fungi. Cumin and Pricklyash peel samples showed the highest fungal contamination. Four functional foods and three spices were found to be positive at low levels for mycotoxins including aflatoxin B1 (up to 0.26μg/kg) and ochratoxin A (OTA) (5.0μg/kg). The more frequently detected mycotoxin was AFB1 (16.7%). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Thermodynamics of Einstein-Proca AdS black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hai-Shan [Institute for Advanced Physics & Mathematics, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310023 (China); Lü, H. [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Pope, C.N. [George P. & Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge University, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 OWA (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-18

    We study static spherically-symmetric solutions of the Einstein-Proca equations in the presence of a negative cosmological constant. We show that the theory admits solutions describing both black holes and also solitons in an asymptotically AdS background. Interesting subtleties can arise in the computation of the mass of the solutions and also in the derivation of the first law of thermodynamics. We make use of holographic renormalisation in order to calculate the mass, even in cases where the solutions have a rather slow approach to the asymptotic AdS geometry. By using the procedure developed by Wald, we derive the first law of thermodynamics for the black hole and soliton solutions. This includes a non-trivial contribution associated with the Proca “charge”. The solutions cannot be found analytically, and so we make use of numerical integration techniques to demonstrate their existence.

  4. Oscillating shells and oscillating balls in AdS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Avik; Kundu, Arnab; Roy, Pratik; Virmani, Amitabh

    2017-07-01

    It has recently been reported that certain thin timelike shells undergo oscillatory motion in AdS. In this paper, we compute two-point function of a probe field in the geodesic approximation in such an oscillating shell background. We confirm that the two-point function exhibits an oscillatory behaviour following the motion of the shell. We show that similar oscillatory dynamics is possible when the perfect fluid on the shell has a polytropic equation of state. Moreover, we show that certain ball like configurations in AdS also exhibit oscillatory motion and comment on how such a solution can be smoothly matched to an appropriate exterior solution. We also demonstrate that the weak energy condition is satisfied for these oscillatory configurations.

  5. Smoothed transitions in higher spin AdS gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Shamik; Shenker, Stephen; Castro, Alejandra; Hellerman, Simeon; Hijano, Eliot; Lepage-Jutier, Arnaud; Maloney, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We consider CFTs conjectured to be dual to higher spin theories of gravity in AdS 3 and AdS 4 . Two-dimensional CFTs with W N symmetry are considered in the λ = 0 (k → ∞) limit where they are conjectured to be described by continuous orbifolds. The torus partition function is computed, using reasonable assumptions, and equals that of a free-field theory. We find no phase transition at temperatures of order 1; the usual Hawking–Page phase transition is removed by the highly degenerate light states associated with conical defect states in the bulk. Three-dimensional Chern–Simons matter CFTs with vector-like matter are considered on T 3 , where the dynamics is described by an effective theory for the eigenvalues of the holonomies. Likewise, we find no evidence for a Hawking–Page phase transition at a large level k. (paper)

  6. The Mixed Phase of Charged AdS Black Holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyabut Burikham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the mixed phase of charged AdS black hole and radiation when the total energy is fixed below the threshold to produce a stable charged black hole branch. The coexistence conditions for the charged AdS black hole and radiation are derived for the generic case when radiation particles carry charge. The phase diagram of the mixed phase is demonstrated for both fixed potential and charge ensemble. In the dual gauge picture, they correspond to the mixed phase of quark-gluon plasma (QGP and hadron gas in the fixed chemical potential and density ensemble, respectively. In the nuclei and heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies, the mixed phase of exotic QGP and hadron gas could be produced. The mixed phase will condense and evaporate into the hadron gas as the fireball expands.

  7. AdS gravity and the scalar glueball spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vento, Vicente [Departament de Fisica Teorica, Universitat de Valencia y Institut de Fisica Corpuscular, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain)

    2017-09-15

    The scalar glueball spectrum has attracted much attention since the formulation of Quantum Chromodynamics. Different approaches give very different results for the glueball masses. We revisit the problem from the perspective of the AdS/CFT correspondence. (orig.)

  8. AdS sub 2 supergravity and superconformal quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Astorino, M; Klemm, D; Zanon, D

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the asymptotic dynamics of topological anti-de Sitter supergravity in two dimensions. Starting from the formulation as a BF theory, it is shown that the AdS sub 2 boundary conditions imply that the asymptotic symmetries form a super-Virasoro algebra. Using the central charge of this algebra in Cardy's formula, we exactly reproduce the thermodynamical entropy of AdS sub 2 black holes. Furthermore, we show that the dynamics of the dilaton and its superpartner reduces to that of superconformal transformations that leave invariant one chiral component of the stress tensor supercurrent of a two-dimensional conformal field theory. This dynamics is governed by a supersymmetric extension of the de Alfaro-Fubini-Furlan model of conformal quantum mechanics. Finally, two-dimensional de Sitter gravity is also considered, and the dS sub 2 entropy is computed by counting CFT states.

  9. Bjorken flow from an AdS Schwarzschild black hole

    OpenAIRE

    Alsup, James; Siopsis, George

    2007-01-01

    We consider a large black hole in asymptotically AdS spacetime of arbitrary dimension with a Minkowski boundary. By performing an appropriate slicing as we approach the boundary, we obtain via holographic renormalization a gauge theory fluid obeying Bjorken hydrodynamics in the limit of large longitudinal proper time. The metric we obtain reproduces to leading order the metric recently found as a direct solution of the Einstein equations in five dimensions. Our results are also in agreement w...

  10. Generalised structures for N=1 AdS backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coimbra, André [Institut für Theoretische Physik & Center for Quantum Engineering and Spacetime Research,Leibniz Universität Hannover,Appelstraße 2, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Strickland-Constable, Charles [Institut de physique théorique, Université Paris Saclay, CEA, CNRS, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2016-11-16

    We expand upon a claim made in a recent paper [http://arxiv.org/abs/1411.5721] that generic minimally supersymmetric AdS backgrounds of warped flux compactifications of Type II and M theory can be understood as satisfying a straightforward weak integrability condition in the language of E{sub d(d)}×ℝ{sup +} generalised geometry. Namely, they are spaces admitting a generalised G-structure set by the Killing spinor and with constant singlet generalised intrinsic torsion.

  11. Aspects of holography and rotating AdS black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, D S

    1999-01-01

    A comparison is made between the thermodynamics of weakly and stronglycoupled Yang-Mills with fixed angular momentum. The free energy of the stronglycoupled Yang-Mills is calculated by using a dual supergravity descriptioncorresponding to a rotating black hole in an Anti de Sitter (AdS) background.All thermodynamic quantities are shown have the same ratio of 3/4 (independentof angular momentum) between strong and weak coupling.

  12. ADS Bumblebee comes of age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Kurtz, Michael J.; Henneken, Edwin; Grant, Carolyn S.; Thompson, Donna M.; Chyla, Roman; McDonald, Steven; Shaulis, Taylor J.; Blanco-Cuaresma, Sergi; Shapurian, Golnaz; Hostetler, Timothy W.; Templeton, Matthew R.; Lockhart, Kelly E.

    2018-01-01

    The ADS Team has been working on a new system architecture and user interface named “ADS Bumblebee” since 2015. The new system presents many advantages over the traditional ADS interface and search engine (“ADS Classic”). A new, state of the art search engine features a number of new capabilities such as full-text search, advanced citation queries, filtering of results and scalable analytics for any search results. Its services are built on a cloud computing platform which can be easily scaled to match user demand. The Bumblebee user interface is a rich javascript application which leverages the features of the search engine and integrates a number of additional visualizations such as co-author and co-citation networks which provide a hierarchical view of research groups and research topics, respectively. Displays of paper analytics provide views of the basic article metrics (citations, reads, and age). All visualizations are interactive and provide ways to further refine search results. This new search system, which has been in beta for the past three years, has now matured to the point that it provides feature and content parity with ADS Classic, and has become the recommended way to access ADS content and services. Following a successful transition to Bumblebee, the use of ADS Classic will be discouraged starting in 2018 and phased out in 2019. You can access our new interface at https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu

  13. Enthalpy and the mechanics of AdS black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastor, David; Traschen, Jennie; Ray, Sourya

    2009-01-01

    We present geometric derivations of the Smarr formula for static AdS black holes and an expanded first law that includes variations in the cosmological constant. These two results are further related by a scaling argument based on Euler's theorem. The key new ingredient in the constructions is a two-form potential for the static Killing field. Surface integrals of the Killing potential determine the coefficient of the variation of Λ in the first law. This coefficient is proportional to a finite, effective volume for the region outside the AdS black hole horizon, which can also be interpreted as minus the volume excluded from a spatial slice by the black hole horizon. This effective volume also contributes to the Smarr formula. Since Λ is naturally thought of as a pressure, the new term in the first law has the form of effective volume times change in pressure that arises in the variation of the enthalpy in classical thermodynamics. This and related arguments suggest that the mass of an AdS black hole should be interpreted as the enthalpy of the spacetime.

  14. Ad skepticisms: Antecedents and consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafique Ahmed

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Engaging customer is the burning issue for companies especially the service sector, either online or offline. Minimizing the customer disengagement is the same like reducing dissatisfaction or churn. Customer disengagement may be caused by many factors, ad skepticism is one of them; ad skepticism has two main antecedents personality variable and consumption/influencing varia-bles. This research explores the relationship of ad skepticism with customer disengagement through personality variables which are cynicism, reactance and self-esteem. The unit of analysis is the telecom and banking industry of Pakistan which is foreseeing an era of virtual currency and both are customer oriented industries. Only offline disengagement is researched and data is collected from the Business centers of telecom and banking branches dealing with virtual curren-cy in Pakistan. Hypothetical model is given after digging the relevant literature; model is tested through confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling. Eight hypotheses were purposed from the connections of model, all hypotheses are accepted except the cynicism posi-tive effect on social ad skepticism. This can be due to commonality of social and charity in Paki-stani society, Muslims consider charity as a pious act and they do not think for cynic behavior in charity or social related works. The results manifest that customers in telecom industry are hav-ing ad skepticism and that is becoming the cause of their disengagement. Further, social ad skep-ticism has more impact on the customer disengagement than the general ad skepticism. While the reactance has more effect on general ad skepticism than other antecedents and cynicism has the lowest impact on social ad skepticism than other antecedents.

  15. Study of bioactive compounds in spices (Syzygium aromaticum L, Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume and Myristica fragrans Houtt) processed by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, Renato Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Spices and aromatic herbs are divided into leaves, flowers, bud, seeds bark or dry roots from different plants and it is possible to define them as products of highly flavored vegetal origin that volatize easily when incorporated in small quantities to food products and contribute to its aroma, flavor, color or even to its preservation. Nowadays, people look for its functional properties, bioactive compounds and sensory qualities. A big problem is the reduction of the quantity of these compounds throughout the production chain from the harvest process, storage and distribution. For a long time researchers and industries have concentrated on perfecting the processes of the production chain seeking to guarantee the sanitary and food safety, preserving foodstuffs for a long period and an increase in its lifespan without drastically altering its properties. Due to homemade products and the lack of compliance with good practices in its production chain, the spices can contain a high amount of microbiology causing serious complications to the health of the consumer and the radiation processing is often used for reduce these problems. With this finding, the objectives of this work were: Analyze the oil antifungal properties of spices irradiated with average doses (2.5; 5; 7.5 and 10 kGy); Study the average doses (5 and 10 kGy) and high dose (20 and 30 kGy) effects of gamma radiation 60 Co in the bioactive compounds of the spices - cloves, cinnamon and nutmeg; Identify the oils compounds; Identify the volatile compounds in the headspace of the oils and the in natura spices. Identify the compounds of the nonvolatile part of the nutmeg; Identify the chiral compounds of the cinnamon. Comparing the control samples (not irradiated) with the processed at the described doses, regarding the oil antifungal properties it was possible to verify the efficiency and later that the irradiation did not interfered in its efficiency; Regarding to the others tests in this work, the compounds

  16. Survey on medicinal plants and spices used in Beni-Sueif, Upper Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdelhalim A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was conducted to identify medicinal plants and spices used for medicine by the community of Beni-Sueif, Upper Egypt. Methods Ethnobotanical data from local people was collected using direct interviews and a semi-structured questionnaire. Results Forty-eight plant species belonging to twenty-seven families and forty-seven genera were encountered during the study. Their botanical and vernacular names, plant parts used and medicinal uses are given. Results of the study were analyzed using two quantitative tools. The factor informant consensus indicated the agreement in the use of plants and the fidelity level indicated the ratio between the number of informants who independently suggested the use of a species for the same major purpose and the total number of informants who mentioned the plant for any use. The results of the factor informant consensus showed that the cardiovascular category has the greatest agreement, followed by the immunological, gastrointestinal and respiratory categories. The most important species according to their fidelity are: Hibiscus sabdariffa L. for the cardiovascular category; Trigonella foenum-graecum L. for the immunological category; Mentha piperita L. for the gastrointestinal category and Pimpinella anisum L. for the respiratory category. Conclusions Medicinal plants are still used for treatment in Beni-Sueif community despite the availability of prescribed medications. Documentation of this ethnomedicinal knowledge is important. Evaluation of pharmacological activity for the promising medicinal plants is suggested.

  17. The study of setting 60Co-γ irradiation does of spice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jun; Li Jiao; Zhao Mouming

    2010-01-01

    Effects of gamma irradiation on the sterilization effects and the impacts of irradiation dose and microbial sensitivity factors were analyzed. The results showed that cumin powder, prickly ashpowder, fennel, paprika was polluted seriously by coliforms and the value could reach 1.1 x 10 6 -4.6 x 10 6 MPN/100 g. Gamma irradiation could reduce significantly the total population of mesophilic bacteria and coliforms. The D 10 va1ue of coliforms was 2.05-3.21 kGy, which were sensitive to irradiation and were the indicating bacteria of radiation dose setting. Microbiological numbers of irradiation samples reduced significantly during the 60 days, 150 days and one year of storage at room temperature, which proves obvious subsequent domino effects. The D 10 value was volatile with water activity, which was difficult to set dose. As for the production stability, the using of control charts to monitor the initial bacteria pollution of spices, could rapidly and accurately determine irradiation dose of Cumin powder. (authors)

  18. Photostimulated luminescence detection and radiation effects on cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) spice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcazzó, J; Sanchez-Barrera, C E; Urbina-Zavala, A; Cruz-Zaragoza, E

    2015-10-01

    The increase of disease borne pathogens in foods has promoted the use of new technologies in order to eliminate these pathogen microorganisms and extend the shelf-life of the foodstuffs. In particular, Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) contains an important number of pathogen microorganisms and it is frequently sterilized by gamma radiation. However, it is important to develop the detection methods for irradiated food in order to keep the dose control and also to analyze the radiation effects in their chemical property. This work reports (i) the photostimulated luminescence (PSL) detection of irradiated cinnamon and thermoluminescence (TL) detection of the inorganic polymineral fraction separated from this spice, and (ii) the proximate chemical analysis carried out on fat, protein and dietetic fiber contents. The detection limits using the PSL and TL methods were 500 Gy and 10 Gy, respectively, and the fat content was increased significantly with the gamma dose that could be related to the lipid oxidation in the cinnamon. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus Using iPS Cells and Spice Polyphenols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Ge

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that threatens human health. The disease is caused by a metabolic disorder of the endocrine system, and long-term illness can lead to tissue and organ damage to the cardiovascular, endocrine, nervous, and urinary systems. Currently, the disease prevalence is 11.4%, the treatment rate is 48.2%, and the mortality rate is 2.7% worldwide. Comprehensive and effective control of diabetes, as well as the use of insulin, requires further study to develop additional treatment options. Here, we reviewed the current reprogramming of somatic cells using specific factors to induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells capable of repairing islet β cell damage in diabetes patients to treat patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. We also discuss the shortcomings associated with clinical use of iPS cells. Additionally, certain polyphenols found in spices might improve glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance in diabetes patients, thereby constituting promising options for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  20. Biological studies using mammalian cell lines and the current status of the microbeam irradiation system, SPICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Iso, H.; Yasuda, N.; Oikawa, M.; Higuchi, Y.; Kato, T.; Hafer, K.; Kodama, K.; Hamano, T.; Suya, N.; Imaseki, H.

    2009-06-01

    The development of SPICE (single-particle irradiation system to cell), a microbeam irradiation system, has been completed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The beam size has been improved to approximately 5 μm in diameter, and the cell targeting system can irradiate up to 400-500 cells per minute. Two cell dishes have been specially designed: one a Si 3N 4 plate (2.5 mm × 2.5 mm area with 1 μm thickness) supported by a 7.5 mm × 7.5 mm frame of 200 μm thickness, and the other a Mylar film stretched by pressing with a metal ring. Both dish types may be placed on a voice coil stage equipped on the cell targeting system, which includes a fluorescent microscope and a CCD camera for capturing cell images. This microscope system captures images of dyed cell nuclei, computes the location coordinates of individual cells, and synchronizes this with the voice coil motor stage and single-particle irradiation system consisting of a scintillation counter and a beam deflector. Irradiation of selected cells with a programmable number of protons is now automatable. We employed the simultaneous detection method for visualizing the position of mammalian cells and proton traversal through CR-39 to determine whether the targeted cells are actually irradiated. An immuno-assay was also performed against γ-H2AX, to confirm the induction of DNA double-strand breaks in the target cells.

  1. Biological studies using mammalian cell lines and the current status of the microbeam irradiation system, SPICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Iso, H.; Yasuda, N.; Oikawa, M.; Higuchi, Y.; Kato, T.; Hafer, K.; Kodama, K.; Hamano, T.; Suya, N.; Imaseki, H.

    2009-01-01

    The development of SPICE (single-particle irradiation system to cell), a microbeam irradiation system, has been completed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The beam size has been improved to approximately 5 μm in diameter, and the cell targeting system can irradiate up to 400-500 cells per minute. Two cell dishes have been specially designed: one a Si 3 N 4 plate (2.5 mm x 2.5 mm area with 1 μm thickness) supported by a 7.5 mm x 7.5 mm frame of 200 μm thickness, and the other a Mylar film stretched by pressing with a metal ring. Both dish types may be placed on a voice coil stage equipped on the cell targeting system, which includes a fluorescent microscope and a CCD camera for capturing cell images. This microscope system captures images of dyed cell nuclei, computes the location coordinates of individual cells, and synchronizes this with the voice coil motor stage and single-particle irradiation system consisting of a scintillation counter and a beam deflector. Irradiation of selected cells with a programmable number of protons is now automatable. We employed the simultaneous detection method for visualizing the position of mammalian cells and proton traversal through CR-39 to determine whether the targeted cells are actually irradiated. An immuno-assay was also performed against γ-H2AX, to confirm the induction of DNA double-strand breaks in the target cells.

  2. Studies on genetic divergence among Indian varieties of a spice herb, Coriandrum sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S K; Kakani, R K; Meena, R S; Pancholy, Anjly; Pathak, Rakesh; Raturi, Aparna

    2012-07-01

    Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) is an annual spice herb that belongs to umbel family Apiaceae with diversified uses. We investigated the extent of variability among 22 Indian varieties of coriander using phenotypic and genetic markers. Multilocus genotyping by nine RAPD primers detected an average of intraspecific variations amounting to 66.18% polymorphism in banding patterns. Analysis of molecular variance indicated that a greater proportion of total genetic variation exists within population (98%) rather than among populations (2%). Higher values of Nei's gene diversity (h) and Shannon Information Index (i) and genetic distance analysis validate wider genetic diversity among Indian coriander varieties. Besides total internal transcribed spacer (ITS) length variations and single nucleotide polymorphisms, insertions/deletions (INDELS) were detected at seven sites in ITS-1 region. Multiple sequence alignment of 12 sequenced varieties revealed cent per cent identities of 5.8S gene region (162 bp) that validates its conserved nature. Multiple sequence alignment of ITS-1 region may be of phylogenetic significance in distinguishing and cataloguing of coriander germplasm. The representative sequences of each subgroup and all distinct varieties of RAPD clusters have been submitted to NCBI database and assigned Gen Accession numbers HQ 377194-377205. The measures of relative genetic distances among the varieties of coriander did not completely correlate the geographical places of their development. Eventually, the knowledge of their genetic relationships and DNA bar coding will be of significance.

  3. Recreational stimulants, herbal, and spice cannabis: The core psychobiological processes that underlie their damaging effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Andrew C; Hayley, Amie C; Downey, Luke A

    2017-05-01

    Recreational drugs are taken for their positive mood effects, yet their regular usage damages well-being. The psychobiological mechanisms underlying these damaging effects will be debated. The empirical literature on recreational cannabinoids and stimulant drugs is reviewed. A theoretical explanation for how they cause similar types of damage is outlined. All psychoactive drugs cause moods and psychological states to fluctuate. The acute mood gains underlie their recreational usage, while the mood deficits on withdrawal explain their addictiveness. Cyclical mood changes are found with every central nervous system stimulant and also occur with cannabis. These mood state changes provide a surface index for more profound psychobiological fluctuations. Homeostatic balance is altered, with repetitive disturbances of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and disrupted cortisol-neurohormonal secretions. Hence, these drugs cause increased stress, disturbed sleep, neurocognitive impairments, altered brain activity, and psychiatric vulnerability. Equivalent deficits occur with novel psychoactive stimulants such as mephedrone and artificial "spice" cannabinoids. These psychobiological fluctuations underlie drug dependency and make cessation difficult. Psychobiological stability and homeostatic balance are optimally restored by quitting psychoactive drugs. Recreational stimulants such as cocaine or MDMA (3.4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) and sedative drugs such as cannabis damage human homeostasis and well-being through similar core psychobiological mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Combined effects of gamma-irradiation and modified atmosphere packaging on quality of some spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkin, Celale; Mitrevski, Blagoj; Gunes, Gurbuz; Marriott, Philip J

    2014-07-01

    Thyme (Thymus vidgaris L.), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) and cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.) in ground form were packaged in either air or 100% N2 and γ-irradiated at 3 different irradiation levels (7kGy, 12kGy, 17kGy). Total viable bacterial count, yeast and mould count, colour, essential oil yield and essential oil composition were determined. Microbial load was not detectable after 12kGy irradiation of all samples. Irradiation resulted in significant changes in colour values of rosemary and black pepper. The discolouration of the irradiated black pepper was lower in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) compared to air packaging. Essential oil yield of irradiated black pepper and cumin was lower in air packaging compared to MAP. Gamma-irradiation generally decreased monoterpenes and increased oxygenated compounds, but the effect was lower in MAP. Overall, spices should be irradiated under an O2-free atmosphere to minimise quality deterioration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Testing and development of transfer functions for weighing precipitation gauges in WMO-SPICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kochendorfer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Weighing precipitation gauges are used widely for the measurement of all forms of precipitation, and are typically more accurate than tipping-bucket precipitation gauges. This is especially true for the measurement of solid precipitation; however, weighing precipitation gauge measurements must still be adjusted for undercatch in snowy, windy conditions. In WMO-SPICE (World Meteorological Organization Solid Precipitation InterComparison Experiment, different types of weighing precipitation gauges and shields were compared, and adjustments were determined for the undercatch of solid precipitation caused by wind. For the various combinations of gauges and shields, adjustments using both new and previously existing transfer functions were evaluated. For most of the gauge and shield combinations, previously derived transfer functions were found to perform as well as those more recently derived. This indicates that wind shield type (or lack thereof is more important in determining the magnitude of wind-induced undercatch than the type of weighing precipitation gauge. It also demonstrates the potential for widespread use of the previously developed transfer functions. Another overarching result was that, in general, the more effective shields, which were associated with smaller unadjusted errors, also produced more accurate measurements after adjustment. This indicates that although transfer functions can effectively reduce measurement biases, effective wind shielding is still required for the most accurate measurement of solid precipitation.

  6. Tastes of the 'Mongrel' City: Geographies of Memory, Spice, Hospitality and Forgiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Duruz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article examines cultural fragments – local places, people’s gestures, stories, tastes, affective landscapes – to map geographies of ‘Africa’ in a historically ‘mixed’ urban Australian neighbourhood. Focusing on a small Ethiopian business, Addis Ababa Café, the article develops an analysis framed by economies of nostalgic flavours and intimations of transnational belonging. Conceptually, the article approaches the question of how different people manage the task of living together in ‘our mongrel cities’ from two directions. Firstly, it reworks Giard’s celebrations of ‘doing-cooking’ as embedded knowledge to argue that, in the postcolonial city, memories and spices together constitutes significant cultural capital for identity-based trading. Secondly, it worries at Derrida’s arguments that hospitality and forgiveness are paradoxical. Do their contradictions actually preclude productive analytical connections, even when connections are haunted by ambivalence? Commensality based on alliances of ‘others’ might question at least ethnocentric assumptions of who offers hospitality, who forgives.

  7. Evaluation of coriander spice as a functional food by using in vitro bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuan-Rui; Dissanayake, Amila A; Kevseroğlu, Kudret; Nair, Muraleedharan G

    2015-01-15

    Coriander leaves and seeds are widely used as a condiment and spice. The use of roasted coriander seeds in food and beverage is very common. In this study, we investigated raw and roasted coriander seeds for their functional food quality using antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and human tumour cell proliferation inhibitory assays. The hexane and methanolic extracts of raw and roasted coriander seeds showed identical chromatographic and bioassay profiles. Chromatographic purification of the roasted seed extracts afforded tripetroselinin as the predominant component. Other isolates were petroselinic acid, 1,3-dipetroselinin, 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol, 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-O-β-d-glucopyranoside and linalool. Hexane and methanolic extracts of both raw and roasted seeds and pure isolates from them showed comparable antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities to the positive controls used in the assays, and inhibited the growth of human tumour cells AGS (gastric carcinoma), DU-145 and LNCaP (prostate carcinoma), HCT-116 (colon carcinoma), MCF-7 (breast carcinoma) and NCI-H460 (lung carcinoma) by 4-34%, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of high frequency spice models for ferrite core inductors and transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyshondt, G. Patrick; Portnoy, William M.

    In this work high frequency SPICE models were developed to simulate the hysteresis and saturation effects of toroidal shaped ferrite core inductors and transformers. The models include the nonlinear, multi-valued B-H characteristic of the core material, leakage flux, stray capacitances, and core losses. The saturation effects were modeled using two diode clamping arrangements in conjunction with nonlinear dependent sources. Two possible controlling schemes were developed for the saturation switch. One of the arrangements used the current flowing through a series RC branch to control the switch, while the other used a NAND gate. The NAND gate implementation of the switch proved to be simpler and the parameters associated with it were easier to determine from the measurements and the B-H characteristics of the material. Lumped parameters were used to simulate the parasitic effects. Techniques for measuring these effects are described. The models were verified using manganese-zinc ferrite-type toroidal cores and they have general applicability to all circuit analysis codes equivalent function blocks such as multipliers, adders, and logic components.

  9. Radiosensitivity of toxigenic Aspergillus isolated from spices and destruction of aflatoxins by gamma-irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Tamikazu; Ito, Hitoshi; Soedarman, Harsono; Ishigaki, Isao

    Radiosensitivities of Aspergillus flavus var columnaris isolated from spices were investigated. The D10 values and induction doses were 267-293 Gy and 75-165 Gy in wet conditions, respectively. In dry conditions, the survival curves were exponential and D10 values were 538-600 Gy. The survival curves of standard strain of A. parasiticus IFO 30179 were similar both in wet and dry conditions. The necessary dose of 8 kGy for the destruction of these toxigenic Aspergillus was calculated from these values. Two of 11 strains of A. flavus var columnaris produced aflatoxins and the content of B 1 was especially high. In the study of irradiation effect on aflatoxins produced on polished rice, aflatoxins G 1 and B 1 were more radiosensitive than G 2 and B 2. However, these aflatoxins were very stable to radiation and the dose required for destruction was found to be more than 500 kGy. It is therfore concluded that the decontamination of molds by irradiation is necessary prior to their production of aflatoxins.

  10. Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus Using iPS Cells and Spice Polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Qi; Chen, Liang; Chen, Keping

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that threatens human health. The disease is caused by a metabolic disorder of the endocrine system, and long-term illness can lead to tissue and organ damage to the cardiovascular, endocrine, nervous, and urinary systems. Currently, the disease prevalence is 11.4%, the treatment rate is 48.2%, and the mortality rate is 2.7% worldwide. Comprehensive and effective control of diabetes, as well as the use of insulin, requires further study to develop additional treatment options. Here, we reviewed the current reprogramming of somatic cells using specific factors to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells capable of repairing islet β cell damage in diabetes patients to treat patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. We also discuss the shortcomings associated with clinical use of iPS cells. Additionally, certain polyphenols found in spices might improve glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance in diabetes patients, thereby constituting promising options for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  11. Characterization of butter spoiling yeasts and their inhibition by some spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagdic, Osman; Ozturk, Ismet; Bayram, Okan; Kesmen, Zulal; Yilmaz, Mustafa Tahsin

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to identify the yeasts in packaged and unpackaged butters and screen antiyeast activity of spices, including marjoram (Origanum majorana L.), summer savory (Satureja hortensis L.), and black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) against the most dominant yeast species in the packaged and unpackaged butters. Mean total yeast populations were 5.40 log CFU/g in unpackaged butter samples and 2.22 log CFU/g in packaged butter samples, indicating better hygienic quality of packaged samples. Forty-nine yeast species were isolated and identified from butter samples with the most prevalent isolates belonging to genera Candida-C. kefyr, C. zeylanoides, and C. lambica-and with moderate number of isolates belonging to genera Cryptococcus, Rhodotorula, Saccharomyces, and Zygosaccharomyces. Black cumin exhibited the highest antiyeast activity against C. zeylanoides and C. lambica species, even inhibited these species, while summer savory inhibited C. kefyr. The results of this study revealed clear antimicrobial potential of black cumin against the yeast species isolated from butters. Marjoram, summer savory, and black cumin could be used as natural antimicrobial agents against spoilage yeasts in food preservation, especially in butter. © 2010 Institute of Food Technologists®

  12. Curcumin: An Anti-Inflammatory Molecule from a Curry Spice on the Path to Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purusotam Basnet

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative damage and inflammation have been pointed out in preclinical studies as the root cause of cancer and other chronic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, Alzheimer’s disease, etc. Epidemiological and clinical studies have suggested that cancer could be prevented or significantly reduced by treatment with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory drugs, therefore, curcumin, a principal component of turmeric (a curry spice showing strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, might be a potential candidate for the prevention and/or treatment of cancer and other chronic diseases. However, curcumin, a highly pleiotropic molecule with an excellent safety profile targeting multiple diseases with strong evidence on the molecular level, could not achieve its optimum therapeutic outcome in past clinical trials, largely due to its low solubility and poor bioavailability. Curcumin can be developed as a therapeutic drug through improvement in formulation properties or delivery systems, enabling its enhanced absorption and cellular uptake. This review mainly focuses on the anti-inflammatory potential of curcumin and recent developments in dosage form and nanoparticulate delivery systems with the possibilities of therapeutic application of curcumin for the prevention and/or treatment of cancer.

  13. Curcumin: an anti-inflammatory molecule from a curry spice on the path to cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basnet, Purusotam; Skalko-Basnet, Natasa

    2011-06-03

    Oxidative damage and inflammation have been pointed out in preclinical studies as the root cause of cancer and other chronic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, Alzheimer's disease, etc. Epidemiological and clinical studies have suggested that cancer could be prevented or significantly reduced by treatment with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory drugs, therefore, curcumin, a principal component of turmeric (a curry spice) showing strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, might be a potential candidate for the prevention and/or treatment of cancer and other chronic diseases. However, curcumin, a highly pleiotropic molecule with an excellent safety profile targeting multiple diseases with strong evidence on the molecular level, could not achieve its optimum therapeutic outcome in past clinical trials, largely due to its low solubility and poor bioavailability. Curcumin can be developed as a therapeutic drug through improvement in formulation properties or delivery systems, enabling its enhanced absorption and cellular uptake. This review mainly focuses on the anti-inflammatory potential of curcumin and recent developments in dosage form and nanoparticulate delivery systems with the possibilities of therapeutic application of curcumin for the prevention and/or treatment of cancer.

  14. Hard cap espresso extraction and liquid chromatography determination of bioactive compounds in vegetables and spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Sena, María Teresa; de la Guardia, Miguel; Esteve-Turrillas, Francesc A; Armenta, Sergio

    2017-12-15

    A new analytical procedure, based on liquid chromatography with diode array and fluorescence detection, has been proposed for the determination of bioactive compounds in vegetables and spices after hard cap espresso extraction. This novel extraction system has been tested for the determination of capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin from fresh chilli and sweet pepper, piperine from ground pepper, curcumin from turmeric and curry, and myristicin from nutmeg. Extraction efficiency was evaluated by using acetonitrile:water and ethanol:water mixtures. The proposed method allows the extraction of samples with 100mL of 60% (v/v) ethanol in water. The obtained limits of quantification for the proposed procedure ranged from 0.07 to 0.30mgg -1 and results were statistically comparable with those obtained by ultrasound assisted extraction. Hard cap espresso machines offer a fast, effective and quantitative tool for the extraction of bioactive compounds from food samples with an extraction time lower than 30s, using a global available and low cost equipment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Inhibitory effects of spices and herbs towards Shigella sonnei and S. flexneri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagamboula, C F; Uyttendaele, M; Debevere, J

    2001-01-01

    The use of spices and herbs, their essential oils or their active compounds as means of control of pathogens constitutes an alternative to chemical additives In the present study the antibacterial activities of cloves, thyme, oregano, rosemary and basil on Shigella have been established. Although in a model system in agar media addition of 1% basil could contribute to the 'hurdle' principle and delay outgrowth of Shigella sp. this was not confirmed in real food conditions: the presence of 1% basil did not affect growth of Shigella in potato puree at 22 degrees C or survival at 7 degrees C in spaghetti sauce. Thyme and essential oils and thymol and carvacrol showed inhibition of Shigella sp. in the agar well diffusion method (MIC 0.1-1.0%) and they have potential to be used as a desinfectant in the washing water e.g. in the process line of minimal processed vegetables. However, more studies combining sensoric properties with microbial analysis are needed to investigated the possible use of these compounds.

  16. Antibacterial activity of essential oils of edible spices, Ocimum canum and Xylopia aethiopica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyry Wouatsa, N A; Misra, Laxminarain; Venkatesh Kumar, R

    2014-05-01

    The essential oils of 2 Cameroonian spices, namely, Xylopia aethiopica and Ocimum canum, were chemically investigated and screened for their antibacterial activity. The essential oils were analyzed by means of GC, GC/MS, and NMR. X. aethiopica oil contained myrtenol (12%), a monoterpenoid in highest concentration. The essential oil of O. canum belonged to the known linalool (44%) rich chemotype. The results of the antibacterial screening against the food spoiling bacteria revealed a significant and broad spectrum of activity for these essential oils. The present material of X. aethiopica, which is having myrtenol in relatively higher concentration, has shown moderate antibacterial activity. The bioassay-guided fractionation of Ocimum canum oil through flash chromatography showed that minor compounds, namely, α-terpineol, chavicol, chavibetol, and trans-p-mentha-2,8-dien-ol, significantly contributed for the overall activity observed. Hence, these results evidenced the possible potential of the essential oil of O. canum as a suitable antibacterial for controlling food-borne pathogens whereas the X. aethiopica oil has moderate possibility. There is a strong global demand for the microbe-free, safe, and healthy foods. In this study, we showed that the essential oil of O. canum (wild basil) can be used as antibacterial for food items. Also, we showed that a value addition in the antibacterial potential of O. canum oil can be done by processing the essential oil through flash chromatographic separations. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  17. AD status and consolidation plans

    CERN Document Server

    Eriksson, T; Arnaudon, L; Belochitskii, P; Bojtar, L; Calviani, M; Caspers, F; Federmann, S; Jørgensen, L; Louwerse, R; Oliveira, C; Tranquille, G

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) has now completed its 12th year of supplying low-energy antiproton beams for the successful physics program. Most of the machine’s key components are in operation since more than 25 years and prompted by the approval of the ELENA project, a substantial consolidation program is now being launched to ensure continued reliable operation. Over the course of the next few years a progressive renovation of the AD-Target area and the AD-ring with all the associated systems will take place. Status and performance of the AD are presented along with an overview of planned and ongoing consolidation activities with emphasis on stochastic and electron beam cooling.

  18. Wilson lines for AdS5 black strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hristov, Kiril; Katmadas, Stefanos

    2015-01-01

    We describe a simple method of extending AdS 5 black string solutions of 5d gauged supergravity in a supersymmetric way by addition of Wilson lines along a circular direction in space. When this direction is chosen along the string, and due to the specific form of 5d supergravity that features Chern-Simons terms, the existence of magnetic charges automatically generates conserved electric charges in a 5d analogue of the Witten effect. Therefore we find a rather generic, model-independent way of adding electric charges to already existing solutions with no backreaction from the geometry or breaking of any symmetry. We use this method to explicitly write down more general versions of the Benini-Bobev black strings (http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.061601, http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP06(2013)005) and comment on the implications for the dual field theory and the similarities with generalizations of the Cacciatori-Klemm black holes (http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP01(2010)085) in AdS 4 .

  19. Hyperchaos, adaptive control and synchronization of a novel 5-D hyperchaotic system with three positive Lyapunov exponents and its SPICE implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidyanathan Sundarapandian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research work, a twelve-term novel 5-D hyperchaotic Lorenz system with three quadratic nonlinearities has been derived by adding a feedback control to a ten-term 4-D hyperchaotic Lorenz system (Jia, 2007 with three quadratic nonlinearities. The 4-D hyperchaotic Lorenz system (Jia, 2007 has the Lyapunov exponents L1 = 0.3684,L2 = 0.2174,L3 = 0 and L4 =−12.9513, and the Kaplan-Yorke dimension of this 4-D system is found as DKY =3.0452. The 5-D novel hyperchaotic Lorenz system proposed in this work has the Lyapunov exponents L1 = 0.4195,L2 = 0.2430,L3 = 0.0145,L4 = 0 and L5 = −13.0405, and the Kaplan-Yorke dimension of this 5-D system is found as DKY =4.0159. Thus, the novel 5-D hyperchaotic Lorenz system has a maximal Lyapunov exponent (MLE, which is greater than the maximal Lyapunov exponent (MLE of the 4-D hyperchaotic Lorenz system. The 5-D novel hyperchaotic Lorenz system has a unique equilibrium point at the origin, which is a saddle-point and hence unstable. Next, an adaptive controller is designed to stabilize the novel 5-D hyperchaotic Lorenz system with unknown system parameters. Moreover, an adaptive controller is designed to achieve global hyperchaos synchronization of the identical novel 5-D hyperchaotic Lorenz systems with unknown system parameters. Finally, an electronic circuit realization of the novel 5-D hyperchaotic Lorenz system using SPICE is described in detail to confirm the feasibility of the theoretical model.

  20. Plant extracts, spices, and essential oils inactivate Escherichia coli O157:H7 and reduce formation of potentially carcinogenic heterocyclic amines in cooked beef patties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounds, Liliana; Havens, Cody M; Feinstein, Yelena; Friedman, Mendel; Ravishankar, Sadhana

    2012-04-11

    Meats need to be heated to inactivate foodborne pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7. High-temperature treatment used to prepare well-done meats increases the formation of carcinogenic heterocyclic amines (HCAs). We evaluated the ability of plant extracts, spices, and essential oils to simultaneously inactivate E. coli O157:H7 and suppress HCA formation in heated hamburger patties. Ground beef with added antimicrobials was inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 (10(7) CFU/g). Patties were cooked to reach 45 °C at the geometric center, flipped, and cooked for 5 min. Samples were then taken for microbiological and mass spectrometry analysis of HCAs. Some compounds were inhibitory only against E. coli or HCA formation, while some others inhibited both. Addition of 5% olive or apple skin extracts reduced E. coli O157:H7 populations to below the detection limit and by 1.6 log CFU/g, respectively. Similarly, 1% lemongrass oil reduced E. coli O157:H7 to below detection limits, while clove bud oil reduced the pathogen by 1.6 log CFU/g. The major heterocyclic amines 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) were concurrently reduced with the addition of olive extract by 79.5% and 84.3% and with apple extract by 76.1% and 82.1%, respectively. Similar results were observed with clove bud oil: MeIQx and PhIP were reduced by 35% and 52.1%, respectively. Addition of onion powder decreased formation of PhIP by 94.3%. These results suggest that edible natural plant compounds have the potential to prevent foodborne infections as well as carcinogenesis in humans consuming heat-processed meat products.

  1. Fermionic currents in AdS spacetime with compact dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, S.; Saharian, A. A.; Vardanyan, V.

    2017-09-01

    We derive a closed expression for the vacuum expectation value (VEV) of the fermionic current density in a (D +1 )-dimensional locally AdS spacetime with an arbitrary number of toroidally compactified Poincaré spatial dimensions and in the presence of a constant gauge field. The latter can be formally interpreted in terms of a magnetic flux treading the compact dimensions. In the compact subspace, the field operator obeys quasiperiodicity conditions with arbitrary phases. The VEV of the charge density is zero and the current density has nonzero components along the compact dimensions only. They are periodic functions of the magnetic flux with the period equal to the flux quantum and tend to zero on the AdS boundary. Near the horizon, the effect of the background gravitational field is small and the leading term in the corresponding asymptotic expansion coincides with the VEV for a massless field in the locally Minkowski bulk. Unlike the Minkowskian case, in the system consisting of an equal number of fermionic and scalar degrees of freedom, with same masses, charges and phases in the periodicity conditions, the total current density does not vanish. In these systems, the leading divergences in the scalar and fermionic contributions on the horizon are canceled and, as a consequence of that, the charge flux, integrated over the coordinate perpendicular to the AdS boundary, becomes finite. We show that in odd spacetime dimensions the fermionic fields realizing two inequivalent representations of the Clifford algebra and having equal phases in the periodicity conditions give the same contribution to the VEV of the current density. Combining the contributions from these fields, the current density in odd-dimensional C -,P - and T -symmetric models are obtained. As an application, we consider the ground state current density in curved carbon nanotubes described in terms of a (2 +1 )-dimensional effective Dirac model.

  2. Bjorken flow from an AdS Schwarzschild black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsup, James; Siopsis, George

    2008-04-01

    We consider a large black hole in asymptotically AdS spacetime of arbitrary dimension with a Minkowski boundary. By performing an appropriate slicing as we approach the boundary, we obtain via holographic renormalization a gauge theory fluid obeying Bjorken hydrodynamics in the limit of large longitudinal proper time. The metric we obtain reproduces to leading order the metric recently found as a direct solution of the Einstein equations in five dimensions. Our results are also in agreement with recent exact results in three dimensions.

  3. Scalar charges in asymptotic AdS geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hai-Shan, E-mail: hsliu.zju@gmail.com [Institute for Advanced Physics and Mathematics, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310023 (China); Lü, H., E-mail: mrhonglu@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2014-03-07

    We show that for n-dimensional Einstein gravity coupled to a scalar field with mass-squared m{sub 0}{sup 2}=−n(n−2)/(4ℓ{sup 2}), the first law of thermodynamics of (charged) AdS black holes will be modified by the boundary conditions of the scalar field at asymptotic infinity. Such scalars can arise in gauged supergravities in four and six dimensions, but not in five or seven. The result provides a guiding principle for constructing designer black holes and solitons in general dimensions, where the properties of the dual field theories depend on the boundary conditions.

  4. Introducing ADS 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Kurtz, M. J.; Henneken, E. A.; Grant, C. S.; Thompson, D.; Luker, J.; Chyla, R.; Murray, S. S.

    2014-01-01

    In the spring of 1993, the Smithsonian/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) first launched its bibliographic search system. It was known then as the ADS Abstract Service, a component of the larger Astrophysics Data System effort which had developed an interoperable data system now seen as a precursor of the Virtual Observatory. As a result of the massive technological and sociological changes in the field of scholarly communication, the ADS is now completing the most ambitious technological upgrade in its twenty-year history. Code-named ADS 2.0, the new system features: an IT platform built on web and digital library standards; a new, extensible, industrial strength search engine; a public API with various access control capabilities; a set of applications supporting search, export, visualization, analysis; a collaborative, open source development model; and enhanced indexing of content which includes the full-text of astronomy and physics publications. The changes in the ADS platform affect all aspects of the system and its operations, including: the process through which data and metadata are harvested, curated and indexed; the interface and paradigm used for searching the database; and the follow-up analysis capabilities available to the users. This poster describes the choices behind the technical overhaul of the system, the technology stack used, and the opportunities which the upgrade is providing us with, namely gains in productivity and enhancements in our system capabilities.

  5. AdS pure spinor superstring in constant backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandia, Osvaldo [Departamento de Ciencias, Facultad de Artes Liberales, Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez,Facultad de Ingeniería y Ciencias, Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez,Diagonal Las Torres 2640, Peñalolén, Santiago (Chile); Bevilaqua, L. Ibiapina [Escola de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte,Caixa Postal 1524, 59072-970, Natal, RN (Brazil); Vallilo, Brenno Carlini [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Andres Bello,Republica 220, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-06-05

    In this paper we study the pure spinor formulation of the superstring in AdS{sub 5}×S{sup 5} around point particle solutions of the classical equations of motion. As a particular example we quantize the pure spinor string in the BMN background.

  6. Classification and prediction of gamma-irradiation of ten commercial herbs and spices by multivariate evaluation of properties of their extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polovka, M.; Suhaj, M.

    2013-01-01

    Antioxidant activity, dry matter content, extractability, total phenolic compounds content and CIE L*a*b* colour characteristics of methanolic extracts of 10 spices exposed to γ-irradiation doses from 0 kGy (reference) to 30 kGy were evaluated in different time intervals after the irradiation by means of UV-VIS spectrophotometry in order to assess the influence of γ-irradiation and post-irradiation storage on spices quality. Experimental data revealed that γ-irradiation itself did not cause so dramatic changes as the subsequent post-irradiation storage, or, that the changes were, at least, comparable. Multivariate statistical methods (factor analysis, canonical discriminant analysis and kth-nearest neighbour classification) facilitated differentiation of irradiated spices from the corresponding references and γ-radiation dose prediction on the basis of processing of experimentally determined characteristics of their extracts. In case of samples exposed to 0 kGy, 10 kGy and 30 kGy, differentiation and classification correctness higher than 85% was reached. In case of 0 kGy and 30 kGy samples differentiation, for 8 spices absolutely correct recognition was achieved and, for remaining 2 spices, still sufficient recognition correctness of 75% and 92.8%, respectively, was achieved. By the statistical models used, more than 90% correctness of dose prediction was achieved in the majority of cases. (author)

  7. Spice-y Kidney Failure: A Case Report and Systematic Review of Acute Kidney Injury Attributable to the Use of Synthetic Cannabis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarifi, Ceyda; Vyas, Shuchi

    2017-01-01

    Spice is a synthetic cannabinoid that is readily available for purchase in smoke shops at relatively low cost. Spice is not detectable upon routine drug screening, making it an increasingly popular new street drug. A 21-year-old man presented with new-onset seizures. During the next 2 days, he developed uncontrollable hypertension, agitation, respiratory failure requiring intubation, pulmonary hypertension, and acute kidney injury (AKI) with a maximum blood urea nitrogen/creatinine level of 54/7.90 mg/dL. A complete renal workup was negative, but his urine sediment revealed granular casts. A discussion with family and friends revealed that this patient had smoked Spice during the last month. His renal function started to improve with supportive therapy, and his AKI resolved by the time of discharge without renal replacement therapy. Spice differs from marijuana because it is a cannabinoid receptor type 1 and 2 agonist. The pathologic mechanism of AKI remains unclear, but the condition likely is attributable to acute tubular necrosis or acute interstitial nephritis, as proven by biopsies performed in previous case series. It is important to raise awareness that a new Spice strain that may be circulating in the Southern California Inland Empire can endanger young users who may develop seizures, respiratory failure, and AKI.

  8. shRNA target prediction informed by comprehensive enquiry (SPICE): a supporting system for high-throughput screening of shRNA library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamatuka, Kenta; Hattori, Masahiro; Sugiyama, Tomoyasu

    2016-12-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) screening is extensively used in the field of reverse genetics. RNAi libraries constructed using random oligonucleotides have made this technology affordable. However, the new methodology requires exploration of the RNAi target gene information after screening because the RNAi library includes non-natural sequences that are not found in genes. Here, we developed a web-based tool to support RNAi screening. The system performs short hairpin RNA (shRNA) target prediction that is informed by comprehensive enquiry (SPICE). SPICE automates several tasks that are laborious but indispensable to evaluate the shRNAs obtained by RNAi screening. SPICE has four main functions: (i) sequence identification of shRNA in the input sequence (the sequence might be obtained by sequencing clones in the RNAi library), (ii) searching the target genes in the database, (iii) demonstrating biological information obtained from the database, and (iv) preparation of search result files that can be utilized in a local personal computer (PC). Using this system, we demonstrated that genes targeted by random oligonucleotide-derived shRNAs were not different from those targeted by organism-specific shRNA. The system facilitates RNAi screening, which requires sequence analysis after screening. The SPICE web application is available at http://www.spice.sugysun.org/.

  9. Determination of Ochratoxin A in Black and White Pepper, Nutmeg, Spice Mix, Cocoa, and Drinking Chocolate by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Fluorescence Detection: Collaborative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubero-Leon, Elena; Bouten, Katrien; Senyuva, Hamide; Stroka, Joerg

    2017-09-01

    A method validation study for the determination of ochratoxin A in black and white pepper (Piper spp.), nutmeg (Myristica fragrans), spice mix (blend of ginger, turmeric, pepper, nutmeg, and chili), cocoa powder, and drinking chocolate was conducted according to the International Harmonized Protocol of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. The method is based on the extraction of samples with aqueous methanol, followed by a cleanup of the extract with an immunoaffinity column. The determination is carried out by reversed-phase LC coupled with a fluorescence detector. The study involved 25 participants representing a cross-section of research, private, and official control laboratories from 12 European Union (EU) Member States, together with Turkey and Macedonia. Mean recoveries ranged from 71 to 85% for spices and from 85 to 88% for cocoa and drinking chocolate. The RSDr values ranged from 5.6 to 16.7% for spices and from 4.5 to 18.7% for cocoa and drinking chocolate. The RSDR values ranged from 9.5 to 22.6% for spices and from 13.7 to 30.7% for cocoa and drinking chocolate. The resulting Horwitz ratios ranged from 0.4 to 1 for spices and from 0.6 to 1.4 for cocoa and drinking chocolate according to the Horwitz function modified by Thompson. The method showed acceptable within-laboratory and between-laboratory precision for each matrix, and it conforms to requirements set by current EU legislation.

  10. The PredictAD project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antila, Kari; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Thurfjell, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    can be managed. Today the significance of early and precise diagnosis of AD is emphasized in order to minimize its irreversible effects on the nervous system. When new drugs and therapies enter the market it is also vital to effectively identify the right candidates to benefit from these. The main...... objective of the PredictAD project was to find and integrate efficient biomarkers from heterogeneous patient data to make early diagnosis and to monitor the progress of AD in a more efficient, reliable and objective manner. The project focused on discovering biomarkers from biomolecular data...... candidates and implement the framework in software. The results are currently used in several research projects, licensed to commercial use and being tested for clinical use in several trials....

  11. Facilities Management and Added Value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2010-01-01

    Aim: This paper aims to present different models of the concept of the added value of Facilities Management (FM), including the FM Value Map, which forms the basis of research group in EuroFM, and to present some of the results of this research collaboration. Approach and methodology: The paper...... is based on literature reviews of the most influential journals within the academic fields of FM, Corporate Real Estate Management and Business to Business Marketing and discussions between participants of the research group working on a further exploration and testing of the FM Value Map. Conclusions......: The research shows a number of different definitions and focus points of Added Value of FM, dependent on the academic field and the area of application. The different research perspectives explored a holistic view on the added value of FM by the integration of an external market based view (with a focus...

  12. Free radical scavenging activity of ethanolic extracts from herbs and spices commercialized in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Regina Barros Mariutti

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Ethanolic extracts from 23 different dried herbs and spices commercialized in Brazil were investigated for their free radical scavenging properties using the stable free radicals 2,2'-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH• and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS•+, and Trolox as reference (TEAC for both radicals. The kinetic curves for both radicals showed to follow the first order kinetics model and the decay rate constant (k obs was calculated. For all the samples, the two methods showed a good linear TEAC correlation, indicating that the average reactivity of the compounds present in the ethanolic extracts was similar. Sage and rosemary extracts showed the highest free radical scavenging capacities, while onion showed negligible activity and colorifico, one of the most consumed spices in Brazil, showed low ABTS•+ scavenging activity. Three distinct situations were found for the extracts concerning the DPPH• scavenging capacities: (1 extracts, like rosemary and laurel, that presented the same efficient concentrations (EC50 but differed in the TEAC values and velocities of action (k obs, (2 extracts, such as garlic and basil, that showed similar EC50 and TEAC values, but different k obs values and (3 extracts that reacted at the same velocities but completely differed in the free radical scavenging capacities, like black pepper, savory, nutmeg, rosemary and sage. Similar considerations could be done for the ABTS•+ results. For the first time the ABTS•+ scavenging activity for allspice, basil, cardamom, chives, colorifico, cumin, dill, laurel, marjoram, parsley and tarragon was reported.Extratos etanólicos de 23 ervas e condimentos desidratados comercializados no Brasil foram analisados quanto as suas propriedades antioxidantes utilizando os radicais 2,2'-difenil-β-picrilhidrazil (DPPH• e ácido 2,2'-azino-bis(3-etilbenzotiazolina-6-sulfônico (ABTS•+, Trolox foi usado como referência para ambos radicais

  13. Smooth causal patches for AdS black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Suvrat

    2017-06-01

    We review the paradox of low energy excitations of a black hole in anti-de Sitter space (AdS). An appropriately chosen unitary operator in the boundary theory can create a locally strong excitation near the black hole horizon, whose global energy is small as a result of the gravitational redshift. The paradox is that this seems to violate a general rule of statistical mechanics, which states that an operator with energy parametrically smaller than k T cannot create a significant excitation in a thermal system. When we carefully examine the position dependence of the boundary unitary operator that produces the excitation and the bulk observable necessary to detect the anomalously large effect, we find that they do not both fit in a single causal patch. This follows from a remarkable property of position-space AdS correlators that we establish explicitly and resolves the paradox in a generic state of the system, since no combination of observers can both create the excitation and observe its effect. As a special case of our analysis, we show how this resolves the "Born rule" paradox of Marolf and Polchinski [J. High Energy Phys. 01 (2016) 008, 10.1007/JHEP01(2016)008] and we verify our solution using an independent calculation. We then consider boundary states that are finely tuned to display a spontaneous excitation outside the causal patch of the infalling observer, and we propose a version of causal patch complementarity in AdS/CFT that resolves the paradox for such states as well.

  14. Nigella Sativa and Oriental Spices with Protective Role in Iron Intoxication: in vivo Experiments on Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Ahmadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Homeostasis of hematological parameters is essential for assuring a general health status for any living organism. Iron is one of the essential mineral, involved in many vital processes – mainly in blood cells production, but in the same way it can become toxic in very high concentration. Hemoglobin and red blood cells are directed related with the iron ion, due to the high quantity (70% of total iron from organism being part of the blood (hemoglobin and muscle (myoglobin cells. Ferrous ion is part of hemoglobin structure, and red blood cells. But, the administration of high doses of iron can negatively affect the general health status, because the iron alters the enzymatic system in the vital organs. The aim of our experimental study was to verify the hypothesis that in rabbit’s organism, after intraperitoneal administration of 15g Fe2+/body weight as ferrous-gluconate hydro solution, a special diet based on a complex, fresh, organic vegetables (roots and leaves protects the organism by iron intoxication and help the hematological homeostasis. The research experiment was conducted during 43 days in summer time, on German Lop Eared breed young rabbits, which were protected with a diet that consisted of administration of Nigella sativa, some oriental spices (Allium ampeloprasum, Allium tuberosum, Coriandrum sativum, Eruca sativa, Cucumis sativus, Raphanus sativus, Trigonella foenum-graecum and other vegetables (Trifolium, Petroselinum crispum, Dacus carrota subsp.sativus and Cucumis sativus. At the final of experiment we collected blood samples for hematological test and we evaluated the erythrocytes, leukocytes, platelets, hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and red cell distribution width. The results were analytical evaluated and only for hemoglobin we obtained significant increase value in experimental rabbits compared to control group of rabbits.

  15. Analysis of Indonesian Spice Essential Oil Compounds That Inhibit Locomotor Activity in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas Subarnas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Some fragrance components of spices used for cooking are known to have an effect on human behavior. The aim of this investigation was to examine the effect of the essential oils of basil (Ocimum formacitratum L. leaves, lemongrass (Cymbopogon citrates L. herbs, ki lemo (Litsea cubeba L. bark, and laja gowah (Alpinia malaccencis Roxb. rhizomes on locomotor activity in mice and identify the active component(s that might be responsible for the activity. The effect of the essential oils was studied by a wheel cage method and the active compounds of the essential oils were identified by GC/MS analysis. The essential oils were administered by inhalation at doses of 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 mL/cage. The results showed that the four essential oils had inhibitory effects on locomotor activity in mice. Inhalation of the essential oils of basil leaves, lemongrass herbs, ki lemo bark, and laja gowah rhizomes showed the highest inhibitory activity at doses of 0.5 (57.64%, 0.1 (55.72%, 0.5 (60.75%, and 0.1 mL/cage (47.09%, respectively. The major volatile compounds 1,8-cineole, α-terpineol, 4-terpineol, citronelol, citronelal, and methyl cinnamate were identified in blood plasma of mice after inhalation of the four oils. These compounds had a significant inhibitory effect on locomotion after inhalation. The volatile compounds of essential oils identified in the blood plasma may correlate with the locomotor-inhibiting properties of the oil when administered by inhalation.

  16. SPICE Work Package 3: Modelling the Effects of Stratospheric Aerosol Geoengineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Simon

    2015-04-01

    This talk presents the results of the SPICE Work Package 3. There is an obvious need for methods to verify the accuracy of geoengineering given no observations of a geoengineering programme. Accordingly, model ability in reproducing the observed dynamical response to volcanic eruptions is discussed using analysis of CMIP5 data and different configurations of the HadGEM2 model. With the HadGEM2-L60 model shown to be substantially better in reproducing the observed dynamical response to volcanic eruptions, simulations of GeoMIP's G4 scenario are performed. Simulated impacts of geoengineering are described, and asymmetries between the immediate onset and immediate cessation ('termination') of geoengineering are analysed. Whilst a rapid large increase in stratospheric sulphate aerosols (such as from volcanic eruptions) can cause substantial damage, most volcanic eruptions in general are not catastrophic. One may therefore suspect that an 'equal but opposite' change in radiative forcing from termination may therefore not be catastrophic, if the climatic response is simulated to be symmetric. HadGEM2 simulations reveal a substantially more rapid change in variables such as near-surface temperature and precipitation following termination than the onset, indicating that termination may be substantially more damaging and even catastrophic. Some suggestions for hemispherically asymmetric geoengineering have been proposed as a way to reduce Northern Hemisphere sea ice, for example, with lesser impacts on the rest of the climate. However, HadGEM2 simulations are performed and observations analysed following volcanic eruptions. Both indicate substantial averse consequences from hemispherically asymmetric loading of stratospheric loading on precipitation in the Sahelian region - a vulnerable region where drought has caused hundreds of thousands of deaths and created millions of refugees in the past.

  17. Fumigant toxicity of essential oils from some common spices against pulse beetle, Callosobruchus chinensis (Coleoptera: Bruchidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaubey, Mukesh Kumar

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, the essential oil from seven common spices, Anethum graveolens, Cuminum cyminum, Illicium verum, Myristica fragrans, Nigella sativa, Piper nigrum and Trachyspermum ammi was isolated and its insecticidal, oviposition, egg hatching and developmental inhibitory activities were determined against pulse beetle, Callosobruchus chinensis. Essential oils were isolated by hydrodistillation method using Clevenger apparatus. These essential oils caused death of adults and larvae of Callosobruchus chinensis when fumigated. The 24-h LC(50) values against the adults of the insect were 8.9 mul, 10.8 mul, 11.0 mul, 12.5 mul, 13.6 mul, 14.8 mul and 15.6 mul for N. sativa, A. graveolens, C. cyminum, I. verum, P. nigrum, M. fragrans and T. ammi oils respectively. On the other hand, against larval stage these values were 6.4 mul, 7.9 mul, 8.9 mul, 11.1 mul, 11.7 mul, 12.2 mul and 13.5 mul for N. sativa, A. graveolens, C. cyminum, I. verum, P. nigrum, M. fragrans and T. ammi respectively. These essential oils reduced the oviposition potential, egg hatching rate, pupal formation and emergence of adults of F(1) progeny of the insect when fumigated with sublethal concentrations. These essential oils also caused chronic toxicity as the fumigated insects caused less damage to the stored grains. The essential oil of N. sativa was found most effective against all the different stages of the Callosobruchus chinensis followed by A. graveolens, C. cyminum, I. verum, P. nigrum, M. fragrans and T. ammi oils. All the responses were found concentration-dependent. The toxic and developmental inhibitory effects may be due to suffocation and inhibition of various biosynthetic processes of the insects at different developmental stages.

  18. Marijuana, Spice ‘herbal high’, and early neural development: implications for rescheduling and legalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psychoyos, Delphine; Vinod, K. Yaragudri

    2014-01-01

    Marijuana is the most widely used illicit drug by pregnant women in the world. In utero exposure to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), a major psychoactive component of marijuana, is associated with an increased risk for anencephaly and neurobehavioural deficiencies in the offspring, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), learning disabilities, and memory impairment. Recent studies demonstrate that the developing central nervous system (CNS) is susceptible to the effects of Δ9-THC and other cannabimimetics, including the psychoactive ingredients of the branded product ‘Spice’ branded products. These exocannabinoids interfere with the function of an endocannabinoid (eCB) system, present in the developing CNS from E12.5 (week 5 of gestation in humans), and required for proliferation, migration, and differentiation of neurons. Until recently, it was not known whether the eCB system is also present in the developing CNS during the initial stages of its ontogeny, i.e. from E7.0 onwards (week 2 of gestation in humans), and if so, whether this system is also susceptible to the action of exocannabinoids. Here, we review current data, in which the presence of an eCB system during the initial stage of development of the CNS is demonstrated. Furthermore, we focus on recent advances on the effect of canabimimetics on early gestation. The relevance of these findings and potential adverse developmental consequences of in utero exposure to ‘high potency’ marijuana, Spice branded products and/or cannabinoid research chemicals during this period is discussed. Finally, we address the implication of these findings in terms of the potential dangers of synthetic cannabinoid use during pregnancy, and the ongoing debate over legalization of marijuana. PMID:22887867

  19. Discovery of curcumin, a component of golden spice, and its miraculous biological activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Subash C; Patchva, Sridevi; Koh, Wonil; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2012-03-01

    1. Curcumin is the active ingredient of the dietary spice turmeric and has been consumed for medicinal purposes for thousands of years. Modern science has shown that curcumin modulates various signalling molecules, including inflammatory molecules, transcription factors, enzymes, protein kinases, protein reductases, carrier proteins, cell survival proteins, drug resistance proteins, adhesion molecules, growth factors, receptors, cell cycle regulatory proteins, chemokines, DNA, RNA and metal ions. 2. Because of this polyphenol's potential to modulate multiple signalling molecules, it has been reported to possess pleiotropic activities. First demonstrated to have antibacterial activity in 1949, curcumin has since been shown to have anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, pro-apoptotic, chemopreventive, chemotherapeutic, antiproliferative, wound healing, antinociceptive, antiparasitic and antimalarial properties as well. Animal studies have suggested that curcumin may be active against a wide range of human diseases, including diabetes, obesity, neurological and psychiatric disorders and cancer, as well as chronic illnesses affecting the eyes, lungs, liver, kidneys and gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems. 3. Although many clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of curcumin against human ailments have already been completed, others are still ongoing. Moreover, curcumin is used as a supplement in several countries, including India, Japan, the US, Thailand, China, Korea, Turkey, South Africa, Nepal and Pakistan. Although inexpensive, apparently well tolerated and potentially active, curcumin has not been approved for the treatment of any human disease. 4. In the present article, we discuss the discovery and key biological activities of curcumin, with a particular emphasis on its activities at the molecular and cellular levels, as well as in animals and humans. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology © 2011 Blackwell

  20. Antibacterial activity in spices and local medicinal plants against clinical isolates of Karachi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nafisa Hassan; Faizi, Shaheen; Kazmi, Shahana Urooj

    2011-08-01

    Development of resistance in human pathogens against conventional antibiotic necessitates searching indigenous medicinal plants having antibacterial property. Twenty-seven medicinal plants used actively in folklore, ayurvedic and traditional system of medicine were selected for the evaluation of their antimicrobial activity for this study. Eleven plants chosen from these 27 are used as spices in local cuisine. Evaluation of the effectiveness of some medicinal plant extracts against clinical isolates. Nonedible plant parts were extracted with methanol and evaporated in vacuo to obtain residue. Powdered edible parts were boiled three times and cooled in sterile distilled water for 2 min each and filtrate collected. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of plant extracts and filtrates/antibiotics was evaluated against clinical isolates by microbroth dilution method. Water extract of Syzygium aromaticum L. (Myrtaceae) buds, methanol extracts of Ficus carica L. (Moraceae) and Olea europaea L. (Oleaceae) leaves and Peganum harmala L. (Nitrariaceae) seeds had MIC ranges of 31.25-250 µg/ml. S. aromaticum inhibited growth of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. F. carica and O. europaea inhibited growth of S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and S. pyogenes whereas P. harmala was effective against S. aureus, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Candida albicans. Ampicillin, velosef, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline and ceftazidime, cefotaxime, cefepime, which are used as control, had MIC ≥ 50 and 1.5 µg/ml, respectively, for organisms sensitive to extracts. Mono/multiextract from identified plants will provide an array of safe antimicrobial agents to control infections by drug-resistant bacteria.