WorldWideScience

Sample records for antimicrobial drug resistanceestudio

  1. ANTIMICROBIAL HERBAL DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nishteswar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available An anti-microbial is a substance that kills or inhibits the growth of microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, or protozoans. Antimicrobial drugs either kill microbes (microbiocidal or prevent the growth of microbes (microbiostatic. Sulphonamide drugs were the first antimicrobial drugs, and paved the way for the antibiotic revolution in medicine. The first sulfonamide, trade named Prontosil, was actually a prodrug. However, with the development of antimicrobials, microorganisms have adapted and become resistant to previous antimicrobial agents. In view of certain side effects caused due to usage of modern antimicrobial drugs and antibiotics scientists have made some attempts to screen some of the Ayurvedic herbs, which possess broader spectrum of safety. Some selected herbs which are used by tribal and rural people for curing various infective diseases caused due to bacteria, virus and fungi have been reported to possess anti-microbial properties. In the present paper and attempt is made to review about the indigenous medicinal plant which exhibited antimicrobial properties.

  2. Antimicrobial Drugs in the Home

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2006-10-19

    Survey participants in the United Kingdom admitted keeping leftover antimicrobial drugs for future use and taking them without medical advice. Dr. J. Todd Weber, director of CDC's Office of Antimicrobial Resistance, advises against the practice, which can be dangerous and can promote antimicrobial drug resistance.  Created: 10/19/2006 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 10/26/2006.

  3. The safety of antimicrobial drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Ćupić Vitomir; Jezdimirović Milanka; Dobrić Silva; Ivanović Saša; Ćupić-Miladinović Dejana

    2016-01-01

    The discovery and introduction of antimicrobial drugs in clinical practice has been recorded as one of the greatest achievements in the history of medicine. The application of these drugs, made a big, almost revolutionary upheaval in treatment of many infectious diseases. Its significance for the humanity lies in the fact that hundreds of thousands of people, until then condemned to a certain death, has been saved now. However, it was shown that antimicrobi...

  4. The safety of antimicrobial drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćupić Vitomir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery and introduction of antimicrobial drugs in clinical practice has been recorded as one of the greatest achievements in the history of medicine. The application of these drugs, made a big, almost revolutionary upheaval in treatment of many infectious diseases. Its significance for the humanity lies in the fact that hundreds of thousands of people, until then condemned to a certain death, has been saved now. However, it was shown that antimicrobial therapy carries some risk of possible occurrence of undesirable and toxic effects, such as direct toxic effects, development of resistance, the impact on the normal microflora or disorder of micropopulation metabolic functions in digestive tract of ruminants, unwanted interactions with other drugs, damage or necrosis of the tissue at the injection site, residues in foodstuff intended for human consumption, suppression of immune system or defense mechanisms of the body, and damage of fetal or neonatal tissue. All mentioned, directly or indirectly, to a greater or lesser degree can reduce the safety of these drugs.

  5. Antimicrobial Peptides: Multifunctional Drugs for Different Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea-Jessica Albrecht

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (APs are an important part of the innate immune system in epithelial and non-epithelial surfaces. So far, many different antimicrobial peptides from various families have been discovered in non-vertebrates and vertebrates. They are characterized by antibiotic, antifungal and antiviral activities against a variety of microorganisms. In addition to their role as endogenous antimicrobials, APs participate in multiple aspects of immunity. They are involved in septic and non-septic inflammation, wound repair, angiogenesis, regulation of the adaptive immune system and in maintaining homeostasis. Due to those characteristics AP could play an important role in many practical applications. Limited therapeutic efficiency of current antimicrobial agents and the emerging resistance of pathogens require alternate antimicrobial drugs. The purpose of this review is to highlight recent literature on functions and mechanisms of APs. It also shows their current practical applications as peptide therapeutics and bioactive polymers and discusses the possibilities of future clinical developments.

  6. 77 FR 44177 - Antimicrobial Animal Drug Sales and Distribution Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-27

    ... addressing the judicious use of medically important antimicrobial drugs in food-producing animals (Ref. 2... information about the extent of antimicrobial drug use in food-producing animals. Specifically, the Agency is... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 514 Antimicrobial Animal Drug Sales...

  7. Using C. elegans for antimicrobial drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desalermos, Athanasios; Muhammed, Maged; Glavis-Bloom, Justin; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The number of microorganism strains with resistance to known antimicrobials is increasing. Therefore, there is a high demand for new, non-toxic and efficient antimicrobial agents. Research with the microscopic nematode Caenorhabditis elegans can address this high demand for the discovery of new antimicrobial compounds. In particular, C. elegans can be used as a model host for in vivo drug discovery through high-throughput screens of chemical libraries. Areas covered This review introduces the use of substitute model hosts and especially C. elegans in the study of microbial pathogenesis. The authors also highlight recently published literature on the role of C. elegans in drug discovery and outline its use as a promising host with unique advantages in the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs. Expert opinion C. elegans can be used, as a model host, to research many diseases, including fungal infections and Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, high-throughput techniques, for screening chemical libraries, can also be facilitated. Nevertheless, C. elegans and mammals have significant differences that both limit the use of the nematode in research and the degree by which results can be interpreted. That being said, the use of C. elegans in drug discovery still holds promise and the field continues to grow, with attempts to improve the methodology already underway. PMID:21686092

  8. Antimicrobial drug use in hospitalized children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liem, T.B.Y.

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of antibiotics represents one of the milestones in modern medicine and has since the beginning of the 20th century made a major contribution to the reduction in mortality and morbidity from infectious diseases. The shadow side of their success is antimicrobial drug resistance which is

  9. Antimicrobial drug use in a small Indian community hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, M; Jensen, M Blomberg; Henry, A;

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial drug use and overuse have been a topic of interest for many years, lately focusing on the growing resistance worldwide. This study was conducted in a small Indian hospital, where more than 80% of all admitted patients received antimicrobial drugs. Penicillin, gentamycin, co-trimoxaz......Antimicrobial drug use and overuse have been a topic of interest for many years, lately focusing on the growing resistance worldwide. This study was conducted in a small Indian hospital, where more than 80% of all admitted patients received antimicrobial drugs. Penicillin, gentamycin, co...

  10. Veterinary Medicine Needs New Green Antimicrobial Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Louis TOUTAIN

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Given that: (1 the worldwide consumption of antimicrobial drugs (AMDs used in food-producing animals will increase over the coming decades; (2 the prudent use of AMDs will not suffice to stem the rise in human antimicrobial resistance (AMR of animal origin; (3 alternatives to AMD use are not available or not implementable, there is an urgent need to develop novel AMDs for food-producing animals. This is not for animal health reasons, but to break the link between human and animal resistomes. In this review we establish the feasibility of developing for veterinary medicine new AMDs, termed green antibiotics, having minimal ecological impact on the animal commensal and environmental microbiomes.We first explain why animal and human commensal microbiota comprise a turnstile exchange, between the human and animal resistomes. We then outline the ideal physico-chemical, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of a veterinary green antibiotic and conclude that they can be developed through a rational screening of currently used AMD classes. The ideal drug will be hydrophilic, of relatively low potency, slow clearance and small volume of distribution. It should be eliminated principally by the kidney as inactive metabolite(s. For oral administration, bioavailability can be enhanced by developing lipophilic pro-drugs. For parenteral administration, slow-release formulations of existing eco-friendly AMDs with a short elimination half-life can be developed. These new eco-friendly veterinary AMDs can be developed from currently used drug classes to provide alternative agents to those currently used in veterinary medicine and mitigate animal contributions to the human AMR problem.

  11. Veterinary Medicine Needs New Green Antimicrobial Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutain, Pierre-Louis; Ferran, Aude A; Bousquet-Melou, Alain; Pelligand, Ludovic; Lees, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Given that: (1) the worldwide consumption of antimicrobial drugs (AMDs) used in food-producing animals will increase over the coming decades; (2) the prudent use of AMDs will not suffice to stem the rise in human antimicrobial resistance (AMR) of animal origin; (3) alternatives to AMD use are not available or not implementable, there is an urgent need to develop novel AMDs for food-producing animals. This is not for animal health reasons, but to break the link between human and animal resistomes. In this review we establish the feasibility of developing for veterinary medicine new AMDs, termed "green antibiotics," having minimal ecological impact on the animal commensal and environmental microbiomes. We first explain why animal and human commensal microbiota comprise a "turnstile" exchange, between the human and animal resistomes. We then outline the ideal physico-chemical, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic properties of a veterinary green antibiotic and conclude that they can be developed through a rational screening of currently used AMD classes. The ideal drug will be hydrophilic, of relatively low potency, slow clearance and small volume of distribution. It should be eliminated principally by the kidney as inactive metabolite(s). For oral administration, bioavailability can be enhanced by developing lipophilic pro-drugs. For parenteral administration, slow-release formulations of existing eco-friendly AMDs with a short elimination half-life can be developed. These new eco-friendly veterinary AMDs can be developed from currently used drug classes to provide alternative agents to those currently used in veterinary medicine and mitigate animal contributions to the human AMR problem.

  12. Emerging Infections Program as Surveillance for Antimicrobial Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridkin, Scott K; Cleveland, Angela A; See, Isaac; Lynfield, Ruth

    2015-09-01

    Across the United States, antimicrobial drug-resistant infections affect a diverse population, and effective interventions require concerted efforts across various public health and clinical programs. Since its onset in 1994, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Emerging Infections Program has provided robust and timely data on antimicrobial drug-resistant infections that have been used to inform public health action across a spectrum of partners with regard to many highly visible antimicrobial drug-resistance threats. These data span several activities within the Program, including respiratory bacterial infections, health care-associated infections, and some aspects of foodborne diseases. These data have contributed to estimates of national burden, identified populations at risk, and determined microbiological causes of infection and their outcomes, all of which have been used to inform national policy and guidelines to prevent antimicrobial drug-resistant infections.

  13. Study of antimicrobial property of some hypoglycemic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar Dash

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a comparative antimicrobial study of different hypoglycemic drugs (Metformin, Phenformin, and Rosiglitazone was carried out. The main objective was to ascertain the antimicrobial activity by using "non-antibiotics" as the test substances. The antimicrobial activity was carried out against different bacteria and fungi namely Bacillus liceniformis, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella flexneri, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus subspp., and Staphylococcus epidermidis by using disc diffusion method and agar dilution method. Ciprofloxacin was taken as the standard antibiotic. The entire procedure was carried out in an aseptic area under the laminar flow by inoculating the bacterial strain to the agar media in which the drug solution was added. Different concentrations (300 and 400 μg/ml of the standard antibiotic and selected drugs were subjected for minimum inhibitory concentration, and zone of inhibition tests and the antimicrobial activity of the selected drugs were determined.

  14. Use and Misuse of Antimicrobial Drugs in Poultry and Livestock: Mechanisms of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Poole* and Cynthia Sheffield

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Food safety begins on the farm with management practices that contribute to an abundant, safe, and affordable food supply. To attain this goal antimicrobials have been used in all stages of food animal production in the United States and elsewhere around the world at one time or another. Among food–production animals antimicrobials are used for growth promotion, disease prophylaxis or disease treatment, and are generally administered to the entire flock or herd. Over many decades bacteria have become resistant to multiple antimicrobial classes in a cumulative manner. Bacteria exhibit a number of well characterized mechanisms of resistance to antimicrobials that include: 1 modification of the antimicrobial; 2 alteration of the drug target; 3 decreased access of drug to target; and 4 implementation of an alternative metabolic pathway not affected by the drug. The mechanisms of resistance are complex and depend on the type of bacterium involved (e.g. Gram–positive or Gram–negative and the class of drug. Some bacterial species have accumulated resistance to nearly all antimicrobial classes due to a combination of intrinsic and acquired processes. This has and will continue to lead to clinical failures of antimicrobial treatment in both human and animal medicine.

  15. Microbial transformations of antimicrobial quinolones and related drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshikov, Igor A; Sutherland, John B

    2012-12-01

    The quinolones are an important group of synthetic antimicrobial drugs used for treating bacterial diseases of humans and animals. Microorganisms transform antimicrobial quinolones (including fluoroquinolones) and the pharmacologically related naphthyridones, pyranoacridones, and cinnolones to a variety of metabolites. The biotransformation processes involve hydroxylation of methyl groups; hydroxylation of aliphatic and aromatic rings; oxidation of alcohols and amines; reduction of carboxyl groups; removal of methyl, carboxyl, fluoro, and cyano groups; addition of formyl, acetyl, nitrosyl, and cyclopentenone groups; and cleavage of aliphatic and aromatic rings. Most of these reactions greatly reduce or eliminate the antimicrobial activity of the quinolones.

  16. Antimicrobial drug susceptibility of Neisseria meningitidis strains isolated from carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayamí García

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available When it is necessary to determine the susceptibility of Neisseria meningitidis (Nm strains to antimicrobial drugs, it is important to consider that it should be analyzed in a double context. One of them related to the use of drugs in a specific medical treatment; and the other; to chemoprophylatic drugs, both with the same purpose: the accurate selection of the “in vivo” antimicrobial agent. This requires the study of the sensitivity and resistance of strains isolated in both carriers and patients. With the aim of further studying the behavior of the strains that currently circulate in Cuba, an antimicrobial drug susceptibility study was conducted in 90 strains isolated from carriers during the first half of 1998. The agar dilution method was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs to: penicillin, ampicillin, rifampin, sulfadiazine, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime. The study of the three latter drugs was done for the first time in our country. The search for β- lactamase-producer strains was also performed. There was a predominance of penicillin sensitive strains (82,2% with an intermediate sensitivity to ampicillin (57,8%, while 70% of the strains were sensitive to sulfadiazine. Regarding the rest of the antimicrobial drugs, 100% of the strains were sensitive. The paper shows the MICs for each drug as well as the phenotypic characteristics of the strains with the penicillin and sulfadiazine sensitivity and resistance patterns. No β-lactamase-producer strains were found.

  17. Antimicrobial resistance in commensal Escherichia coli in veal calves is associated with antimicrobial drug use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman, A.B.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Stegeman, J.A.; Vernooij, J.C.M.; Mevius, D.J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between farm management factors, including antimicrobial drug usage, and resistance in commensal Escherichia coli isolates from the faeces of white veal calves. Ninety E. coli isolates from one pooled sample per farm (n = 48) were tested for the

  18. Antimicrobial drug resistance ofStaphylococcus aureus in dairy products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sasidharan S; Prema B; Yoga Latha L

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the prevalence of multidrug resistantStaphylococcus aureus(S. aureus) in dairy products.Methods:Isolation and identification ofS. aureus were performed in3 dairy-based food products. The isolates were tested for their susceptibility to5 different common antimicrobial drugs.Results:Of50 samples examined,5 (10%) were contaminated with S. aureus. Subsequently, the5 isolates were subjected to antimicrobial resistance pattern using five antibiotic discs (methicillin, vancomycin, kanamycin, chloramphenicol and tetracycline). Sample 29 showed resistance to methicillin and vancomycin. Sample18 showed intermediate response to tetracycline. The other samples were susceptible to all the antibiotics tested.Conclusions:The results provide preliminary data on sources of food contamination which may act as vehicles for the transmission of antimicrobial-resistantStaphylococcus.Therefore, it enables us to develop preventive strategies to avoid the emergence of new strains of resistantS. aureus.

  19. 78 FR 59308 - Antimicrobial Animal Drug Sales and Distribution Annual Summary Report Data Tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-26

    ... antimicrobial new animal drugs approved for use in food-producing animals by amending section 512(l) of the FD&C... sponsors of antimicrobial new animal drugs approved for use in food-producing animals, and further provides... Summary Report on Antimicrobials Sold or Distributed for Use in Food-Producing Animals......

  20. Antimicrobial peptides: a new class of antimalarial drugs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno eVale

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A range of antimicrobial peptides (AMP exhibit activity on malaria parasites, Plasmodium spp, in their blood or mosquito stages, or both. These peptides include a diverse array of both natural and synthetic molecules varying greatly in size, charge, hydrophobicity and secondary structure features. Along with an overview of relevant literature reports regarding AMP that display antiplasmodial activity, this review makes a few considerations about those molecules as a potential new class of antimalarial drugs.

  1. Drug monitoring and individual dose optimization of antimicrobial drugs : oxazolidinones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cattaneo, Dario; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem; Neely, Michael

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Oxazolidinones are synthetic antibiotics with bacteriostatic activity against Gram-positive pathogens. Linezolid, the first marketed oxazolidinone, has shown also activity against Mycobaterium tuberculosis, including multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant strains. Recently,

  2. 77 FR 59156 - Antimicrobial Animal Drug Sales and Distribution Reporting; Extension of Comment Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 514 Antimicrobial Animal Drug Sales and... antimicrobial new animal drugs. The Agency is taking this action in response to requests for an extension to... use in food-producing animals. The Agency has received requests for a 60-day extension of the...

  3. Antimicrobial drug concentrations and sampling techniques in the equine lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winther, Lotte

    2012-08-01

    The distribution of antimicrobial drugs in the equine lung is important in designing optimal dosage regimens for the treatment of lower airway infections. Several studies in horses and other species have shown that the pharmacokinetics of a drug in the lung cannot necessarily be predicted by its behaviour in plasma, and influencing factors include the class of drug, the animal species and the chosen sampling technique. This review provides a description of the target site for bacterial lower airway infections and describes the penetration of antibiotics into lung matrices. It also offers an overview of published equine pulmonary pharmacokinetic studies and considers the different sampling methods used and the influence existing methodological problems can have on the interpretation of data. An awareness of these factors is important in establishing optimal dosage regimes to treat lower airway infections in horses.

  4. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions of antimicrobial drugs : a systematic review on oxazolidinones, rifamycines, macrolides, fluoroquinolones, and Beta-lactams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, Mathieu S; Panday, Prashant N; Pranger, Arianna D; Kosterink, Jos G W; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C

    2011-01-01

    Like any other drug, antimicrobial drugs are prone to pharmacokinetic drug interactions. These drug interactions are a major concern in clinical practice as they may have an effect on efficacy and toxicity. This article provides an overview of all published pharmacokinetic studies on drug interactio

  5. 75 FR 37450 - Draft Guidance: The Judicious Use of Medically Important Antimicrobial Drugs in Food-Producing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-29

    ... use of medically important antimicrobial drugs in food-producing animals. In regard to the use of... measures as follows: (1) Limiting medically important antimicrobial drugs to uses in food-producing animals... Antimicrobial Drugs in Food-Producing Animals; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS....

  6. 77 FR 22328 - Guidance for Industry on the Judicious Use of Medically Important Antimicrobial Drugs in Food...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... thinking on the use of medically important antimicrobial drugs in animal agriculture. DATES: Submit either... entitled ``The Judicious Use of Medically Important Antimicrobial Drugs in Food- Producing Animals... Important Antimicrobial Drugs in Food-Producing Animals; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug...

  7. Quantitative bioassay to identify antimicrobial drugs through drug interaction fingerprint analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Zohar B; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2017-02-16

    Drug interaction analysis, which reports the extent to which the presence of one drug affects the efficacy of another, is a powerful tool to select potent combinatorial therapies and predict connectivity between cellular components. Combinatorial effects of drug pairs often vary even for drugs with similar mechanism of actions. Therefore, drug interaction fingerprinting may be harnessed to differentiate drug identities. We developed a method to analyze drug interactions for the application of identifying active pharmaceutical ingredients, an essential step to assess drug quality. We developed a novel approach towards the identification of active pharmaceutical ingredients by comparing drug interaction fingerprint similarity metrics such as correlation and Euclidean distance. To expedite this method, we used bioluminescent E. coli in a simplified checkerboard assay to generate unique drug interaction fingerprints of antimicrobial drugs. Of 30 antibiotics studied, 29 could be identified based on their drug interaction fingerprints. We present drug interaction fingerprint analysis as a cheap, sensitive and quantitative method towards substandard and counterfeit drug detection.

  8. Antimicrobial Drug Resistance of Vibrio cholerae, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwanda, Berthe; Moore, Sandra; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Nguefack-Tsague, Georges; Kabangwa, Ickel Kakongo; Ndjakani, Daniel Yassa; Mutreja, Ankur; Thomson, Nicholas; Thefenne, Helene; Garnotel, Eric; Tshapenda, Gaston; Kakongo, Denis Kandolo; Kalambayi, Guy; Piarroux, Renaud

    2015-05-01

    We analyzed 1,093 Vibrio cholerae isolates from the Democratic Republic of the Congo during 1997-2012 and found increasing antimicrobial drug resistance over time. Our study also demonstrated that the 2011-2012 epidemic was caused by an El Tor variant clonal complex with a single antimicrobial drug susceptibility profile.

  9. Drug discovery of antimicrobial photosensitizers using animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sulbha K; Dai, Tianhong; Kharkwal, Gitika B; Huang, Ying-Ying; Huang, Liyi; De Arce, Vida J Bil; Tegos, George P; Hamblin, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) is an emerging alternative to antibiotics motivated by growing problems with multi-drug resistant pathogens. aPDT uses non-toxic dyes or photosensitizers (PS) in combination with harmless visible of the correct wavelength to be absorbed by the PS. The excited state PS can form a long-lived triplet state that can interact with molecular oxygen to produce reactive oxygen species such as singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radical that kill the microbial cells. To obtain effective PS for treatment of infections it is necessary to use cationic PS with positive charges that are able to bind to and penetrate different classes of microbial cells. Other drug design criteria require PS with high absorption coefficients in the red/near infra-red regions of the spectrum where light penetration into tissue is maximum, high photostability to minimize photobleaching, and devising compounds that will selectively bind to microbial cells rather than host mammalian cells. Several molecular classes fulfill many of these requirements including phenothiazinium dyes, cationic tetrapyrroles such as porphyrins, phthalocyanines and bacteriochlorins, cationic fullerenes and cationic derivatives of other known PS. Larger structures such as conjugates between PS and cationic polymers, cationic nanoparticles and cationic liposomes that contain PS are also effective. In order to demonstrate in vivo efficacy it is necessary to use animal models of localized infections in which both PS and light can be effectively delivered into the infected area. This review will cover a range of mouse models we have developed using bioluminescent pathogens and a sensitive low light imaging system to non-invasively monitor the progress of the infection in real time. Effective aPDT has been demonstrated in acute lethal infections and chronic biofilm infections; in infections caused by Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria and fungi; in infections in wounds, third degree burns

  10. Antimicrobial drug resistance of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry abattoir workers at risk and broilers on antimicrobials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.W. Oguttu

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial usage in food animals increases the prevalence of antimicrobial drug resistance among their enteric bacteria. It has been suggested that this resistance can in turn be transferred to people working with such animals, e.g. abattoir workers. Antimicrobial drug resistance was investigated for Escherichia coli from broilers raised on feed supplemented with antimicrobials, and the people who carry out evisceration, washing and packing of intestines in a high-throughput poultry abattoir in Gauteng, South Africa. Broiler carcasses were sampled from 6 farms, on each of which broilers are produced in a separate 'grow-out cycle'. Per farm, 100 caeca were randomly collected 5 minutes after slaughter and the contents of each were selectively cultured for E. coli. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of each isolate was determined for the following antimicrobials : doxycycline, trimethoprim, sulphamethoxazole, ampicillin, enrofloxacin, fosfomycin, ceftriaxone and nalidixic acid. The same was determined for the faeces of 29 abattoir workers and 28 persons used as controls. The majority of isolates from broilers were resistant, especially to antimicrobials that were used on the farms in the study. Overall median MICs and the number of resistant isolates from abattoir workers (packers plus eviscerators tended to be higher than for the control group. However, no statistically significant differences were observed when the median MICs of antimicrobials used regularly in poultry and percentage resistance were compared, nor could an association between resistance among the enteric E. coli from packers and those from broilers be demonstrated.

  11. A Multidisciplinary Hospital-based Antimicrobial Use Program: Impact on Hospital Pharmacy Expenditures and Drug Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzette Salama

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors’ hospital embarked on a three-component, multidisciplinary, hospital-based antimicrobial use program to cut costs and reduce inappropriate antimicrobial use. Initially, antimicrobial use patterns and costs were monitored for 12 months. For the next two years, an antimicrobial use program was implemented consisting of three strategies: automatic therapeutic interchanges; antimicrobial restriction policies; and parenteral to oral conversion. The program resulted in a reduction in the antimicrobial portion of the total pharmacy drug budget from 41.6% to 28.2%. Simultaneously, the average cost per dose per patient day dropped from $11.88 in 1991 to $10.16 in 1994. Overall, mean monthly acquisition cost savings rose from $6,810 in 1992 to $27,590 in 1994. This study demonstrates that a multidisciplinary antimicrobial use program in a Canadian hospital can effect dramatic cost savings and serve as a quality assurance activity of physician antimicrobial prescribing behaviour.

  12. WATER SOLUBLE MAGNETITE NANOPARTICLES FOR ANTIMICROBIAL DRUGS DELIVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Eduard Mihaiescu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Water-soluble magnetite has been prepared through precipitation approach. These nanoparticles coated with sulfanilic acid could be dispersed in hydrated aqueous systems. The product was characterized with X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS and the in vitro efficacy as antibiotic delivery vehicles as well as their influence on the eukariotic cells. The XRD pattern confirm the product to be Fe3O4. The nanoparticles with average size 10.45 nanometers are not cytotoxic and do not influence the eukariotic HeLa cell cycle, representing potential tools for the delivery of drugs in a safe manner. Water soluble magnetite improves the activity of currently used antibiotics, representing potential as a nanocarrier for these antimicrobial substances, to achieve extracellular and intracellular targets.

  13. DRUG LAG FOR ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS: COMPARISON OF THE US, EU AND INDIA APPROVALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaven C Kataria

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antimicrobial resistance is a global problem and the need for new antimicrobial agents is greater in both developed and developing nations. However, there is a difference in timing of introduction of new antimicrobial agents between India and developed markets. Aim: Assess the drug lag for new antimicrobial agents approved in the United States, European Union and India. Materials and Methods: The new antimicrobial agents approved in the United States, European Union and India between 1999 and 2011 were identified and information was gathered primarily from the websites of regulatory agencies of the three regions. We assessed absolute and relative drug lag for new antimicrobial agents approved in the three regions. Results: Of the 70 new antimicrobial agents, 59 (84.28% were approved in the United States, 59 (84.28% in the European Union and 58 (82.85% in India. The median approval lag for India (39.7 months was substantially high as compared to the United States (0 month and European Union (6.5 months. Conclusion: This study confirms that India’s drug lag in the case of new antimicrobial agents is quite substantial. Further detailed analyses are necessary to find the background factors and impacts of drug lag for antimicrobial agents in India. [National J of Med Res 2012; 2(3.000: 264-268

  14. Distribution of putative virulence genes and antimicrobial drug resistance in Vibrio harveyi

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parvathi, A.; Mendez, D.; Anto, C.

    environments for understanding the distribution of putative virulence genes and antimicrobial drug resistance. The putative genes targeted for PCR detection included four reversible toxin (Rtx)/hemolysin genes, a gene encoding homologue of Vibrio cholerae...

  15. Quinoline based polymeric drug for biological applications: synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial, and drug releasing studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uma, P; Suresh, J; Selvaraj, Revathy; Karthik, S; Arun, A

    2015-01-01

    Novel acrylate monomer of quinoline-based chalcone 1-(4-(7-chloroquinolin-4-ylamino)phenyl) acrylate (CPA) was synthesized using (4-(2-chloroquinolin-5-ylamino)phenyl)-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (CPE) and acryloyl chloride. CPA is characterized by different techniques like IR, (1)H NMR and UV-visible spectrometry techniques. Poly(CPA), poly(CPA-co-AA) and poly(CPA-co-HEA) are prepared by solution polymerization technique using CPA, acrylic acid (AA) and hydroxyethylacrylate (HEA), respectively. The antimicrobial activities of the compounds are tested using four different micro-organisms. In vitro cumulative drug release studies are done using UV visible spectroscopic technique. The molecular weights of these polymers are found to be around 5000 g/mol. The synthesized polymers showed two stages of thermal decomposition temperature centred around 220 and 350 °C, respectively. The antimicrobial activity of the polymer sample is found to be very high and especially for gram-negative bacteria with a minimum value of 3.91 μg/mL. The in vitro drug-releasing rate is dependent on the comonomer, pH and temperature of the medium.

  16. Antimicrobial drugs usage in a tertiary care hospital –A descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priestly Vivekkumar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emergence of resistant organisms is alarmingly high all over the world. Irrational and inappropriate prescription of antimicrobials is the major contributing factor for developing drug resistance in addition to poor patient compliance. It is the high time to create awareness of antimicrobial resistance among physicians and patients. Encouraging physicians/surgeons to undergo training programmes on infectious disease control periodically would be beneficial to combat the resistant organisms, so called super bugs.Objectives: To assess the pattern of antimicrobial usage in a tertiary care hospital, to determine whether antimicrobials are prescribed judiciously.Methods: A retrospective study was conducted to determine the current antimicrobial prescribing practices at Tagore Medical College Hospital. A randomised sample of 100 inpatient case sheets of General Medicine, OBG, General Surgery, Paediatrics, Chest Medicine, Skin, and ENT from Medical Records Department was analysed with respect to oral and parenteral (iv administration of antimicrobials.Results: In this study, 53% were males and 47% were females. Majority of patients were middle aged (17-60yrs. A total of 16 antimicrobials were prescribed for 100 inpatients. The most frequently used were Metronidazole and Ciprofloxacin. Duration of treatment was minimum 3 days, maximum of 13 days and mean duration was 5.5 days. The common route by which antimicrobials were administered was Parenteral as the patients were inpatients. The Parenteral (iv drugs were Metronidazole (52%, Ciprofloxacin (42%, Cefotaxime (27%, Amikacin (7%, Ceftriaxone (7%. Among 100 prescriptions, 63% were empirical prescriptions, 12% were directed and 25% were targeted prescriptions.Conclusions: The most frequently used antimicrobials were Metronidazole and Ciprofloxacin and the condition for which the antimicrobials were commonly used was acute gastroenteritis. The proportion of targeted prescriptions was low

  17. The impact of an antimicrobial stewardship programme on the use of antimicrobials and the evolution of drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Arco, A; Tortajada, B; de la Torre, J; Olalla, J; Prada, J L; Fernández, F; Rivas, F; García-Alegría, J; Faus, V; Montiel, N

    2015-02-01

    Misuse of antibiotics can provoke increased bacterial resistance. There are no immediate prospects of any new broad-spectrum antibiotics, especially any with activity against enterobacteria, coming onto the market. Therefore, programmes should be implemented to optimise antimicrobial therapy. In a quasi-experimental study, the results for the pre-intervention year were compared with those for the 3 years following the application of an antimicrobial stewardship programme. We describe 862 interventions carried out as part of the stewardship programme at the Hospital Costa del Sol from 2009 to 2011. We examined the compliance of the empirical antimicrobial treatment with the programme recommendations and the treatment optimisation achieved by reducing the antibiotic spectrum and adjusting the dose, dosing interval and duration of treatment. In addition, we analysed the evolution of the sensitivity profile of the principal microorganisms and the financial savings achieved. 93 % of the treatment recommendations were accepted. The treatment actions taken were to corroborate the empirical treatment (46 % in 2009 and 31 % in 2011) and to reduce the antimicrobial spectrum taking into account the antibiogram results (37 % in 2009 and 58 % in 2011). The main drugs assessed were imipenem/meropenem, used in 38.6 % of the cases, and cefepime (20.1 %). The sensitivity profile of imipenem against Pseudomonas aeruginosa increased by 10 % in 2011. Savings in annual drug spending (direct costs) of 30,000 Euros were obtained. Stewardship programmes are useful tools for optimising antimicrobial therapy. They may contribute to preventing increased bacterial resistance and to reducing the long-term financial cost of antibiotic treatment.

  18. Ethnobotanical bioprospection of candidates for potential antimicrobial drugs from Brazilian plants: state of art and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benko-Iseppon, Ana Maria; Crovella, Sergio

    2010-05-01

    Despite of the high biological diversity and traditional use of medicinal plants in Brazil, no comprehensive ethnobotanic review of plants with potential antimicrobial effects is available. In the present work own field information is aggregated with a literature review, identifying 433 Brazilian plant species potentially useful for identification of antimicrobial peptides. They included mainly woody species, distributed on 100 plant families (93 angiosperms and 7 pteridophytes) and 266 genera, covering all Brazilian regions and ecosystems. Main plant parts and indications for their use are presented and discussed, revealing the high potential that these plants present for the future planning strategies regarding the future development of antimicrobial drugs.

  19. Quorum sensing inhibitory drugs as next generation antimicrobials: worth the effort?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2008-01-01

    as biofilms are more tolerant to antibiotics than their planktonic counterparts. Therefore, research should identify new antimicrobial agents and their corresponding targets to decrease the biofilm-forming capability or persistence of the infectious bacteria. Here, we review one such drug target: bacterial......Bacterial resistance poses a major challenge to the development of new antimicrobial agents. Conventional antibiotics have an inherent obsolescence because they select for development of resistance. Bacterial infections have again become a serious threat in developed countries. Particularly...

  20. ANTIMICROBIAL, PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL QUALITIES OF MEDICINAL ANTISEPTIC DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paliy D. V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In our research results of the study of antimicrobial, physical and chemical qualities of antiseptic medicines of decamethoxin (DCM. Antimicrobial activity of DCM, palisan, decasan, deseptol against srains of S.aureus (n 56, S.epidermidis (n 26, E.coli (n 24, P.mirabilis (n 11, P.vulgaris (n 8 was studied by means of method of serial dilutions. Obtained data of mass spectrometry study of antimicrobial compositions with constant concentrations of DCM have shown that medicinal forms of DCM are complex physical and chemical systems, because of different origin and number of adjuvant ingredients used during their fabrication. Among synthetic quaternary ammonium agents there have been found the substance (commercial name of medicine is decamethoxin to have high antimicrobial activity against strains of grampositive and gram-negative microorganisms, an also C.albicans. There was found that antimicrobial activity of antiseptic palisan had been higher comparably to DCM in equivalent concentration. The composition and concentrations of acting agents and the methodology of preparation of palisan have been substantiated on the basis of microbiological, mass spectrometry characteristics of antiseptics DCM, palisan.

  1. Workshop report: the 2012 antimicrobial agents in veterinary medicine: exploring the consequences of antimicrobial drug use: a 3-D approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, M; Blondeau, J; Cerniglia, C E; Fink-Gremmels, J; Guenther, S; Hunter, R P; Li, X-Z; Papich, M; Silley, P; Soback, S; Toutain, P-L; Zhang, Q

    2014-02-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global challenge that impacts both human and veterinary health care. The resilience of microbes is reflected in their ability to adapt and survive in spite of our best efforts to constrain their infectious capabilities. As science advances, many of the mechanisms for microbial survival and resistance element transfer have been identified. During the 2012 meeting of Antimicrobial Agents in Veterinary Medicine (AAVM), experts provided insights on such issues as use vs. resistance, the available tools for supporting appropriate drug use, the importance of meeting the therapeutic needs within the domestic animal health care, and the requirements associated with food safety and food security. This report aims to provide a summary of the presentations and discussions occurring during the 2012 AAVM with the goal of stimulating future discussions and enhancing the opportunity to establish creative and sustainable solutions that will guarantee the availability of an effective therapeutic arsenal for veterinary species.

  2. Heat stable antimicrobial activity of Burkholderia gladioli OR1 against clinical drug resistant isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Pratibha; Anand, Vivek; Chander, Jagdish; Singh, Inder Pal; Singh, Tej Vir; Tewari, Rupinder

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Drug resistant microbes are a serious challenge to human health. During the search for novel antibiotics/inhibitors from the agricultural soil, a bacterial colony was found to inhibit the growth of clinical isolates including Staphylococcus (resistant to amikacin, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, clinafloxacin, erythromycin, gentamicin and methicillin) and Candida (resistant to fluconazole and itraconazole). The culture was identified as Burkholderia gladioli and produced at least five different antimicrobial compounds which were highly stable at high temperature (121°C) and in the broad pH range (3.0-11.0). We report here the antimicrobial activity of B. gladioli against drug resistant bacterial pathogens. Methods: The bacterial culture was identified using morphological, biochemical and 16S rRNA gene sequencing techniques. The antimicrobial activity of the identified organism against a range of microbial pathogens was checked by Kirby-Bauer's disc diffusion method. The antimicrobial compounds in the cell free supernatant were chloroform-extracted and separated by thin layer chromatography (TLC). Results: B. gladioli OR1 exhibited broad spectrum antimicrobial activity against drug resistant clinical isolates belonging to various genera of bacteria (Staphylococcus, Enterobacter, Enterococcus, Acinetobacter and Citrobacter) and a fungus (Candida). Based on TLC profile and bioautography studies, the chloroform extract of B. gladioli OR1 consisted of at least three anti-staphylococcal and two anti-Candida metabolites. The antimicrobial activity was heat stable (121°C/20 min) as well as pH stable (3.0-11.0). Interpretation & conclusions: The bacterial soil isolate, B. gladioli OR1 possessed the ability to kill various drug resistant bacteria and a fungus. This organism produced many antimicrobial metabolites which might have the potential to be used as antibiotics in future. PMID:22771597

  3. A long and winding road; evolution of antimicrobial drug development - crisis management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echols, Roger M

    2012-11-01

    The development of antimicrobial drugs has evolved from observational case reports to complex randomized prospective clinical trials in specific treatment indications. Beginning around the year 2000, the US FDA has evolved its approach on study design and other study characteristics, which has made the conduct of these studies more difficult and the outcomes for sponsors more risky. This has contributed to the decline in the discovery and development of new antimicrobials, which are needed to address the increasing problem of bacterial resistance to existing marketed products. This study reviews the historical basis for the current regulatory climate including the various crises that have led to considerable political pressures on the agency. Recent efforts to resolve development uncertainties and to provide economic incentives for future antimicrobial drug development are presented.

  4. Triple-acting antimicrobial treatment for drug-resistant and intracellular Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multi-drug resistant bacteria are a persistent problem in modern health care, food safety and animal health. There is a need for new antimicrobials to replace over-used conventional antibiotics. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a notorious pathogen for both animal and human health with multi-d...

  5. Therapeutic Potential of Plants as Anti-Microbials for Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramar Perumal Samy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The uses of traditional medicinal plants for primary health care have steadily increased worldwide in recent years. Scientists are in search of new phytochemicals that could be developed as useful anti-microbials for treatment of infectious diseases. Currently, out of 80% of pharmaceuticals derived from plants, very few are now being used as anti-microbials. Plants are rich in a wide variety of secondary metabolites that have found anti-microbial properties. This review highlights the current status of traditional medicine, its contribution to modern medicine, recent trends in the evaluation of anti-microbials with a special emphasis upon some tribal medicine, in vitro and in vivo experimental design for screening, and therapeutic efficacy in safety and human clinical trails for commercial outlet. Many of these commercially available compounds are crude preparations administered without performing human clinical trials. Recent methods are useful to standardize the extraction for scientific investigation of new phytochemicals and anti-microbials of traditionally used plants. It is concluded that once the local ethnomedical preparations of traditional sources are scientifically evaluated before dispensing they should replace existing drugs commonly used for the therapeutic treatment of infection. This method should be put into practice for future investigations in the field of ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry, ethnobotany and other biological fields for drug discovery.

  6. Evaluation of antimicrobial activity and bronchodialator effect of apolyherbal drug-Shrishadi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Divya Kumari Kajaria; Mayank Gangwar; Dharmendra Kumar; Amit Kumar Sharma; Ragini Tilak; Gopal Nath; Yamini Bhusan Tripathi; JS Tripathi; SK Tiwari

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate antimicrobial and bronchodialator effect of hydroalcholic extract of polyherbal drug Shirishadi containing Shirisha (Albezzia lebbeck), Nagarmotha (Cyprus rotandus)& Kantakari (Solanum xanthocarpum). Methods: Antimicrobial activity was evaluated by disc diffusion method and MIC, MBC, MFC were calculated by micro dilution method. Hydroalcholic extract of this preparation was investigated for its phytochemical analysis, phenol and flavonoid were determined by spectrophotometric method and in vivo bronchodilator effect was analysed by convulsion time. Results: The phytochemical tests revealed presence of alkaloids, anthraquinones, carbohydrates, flavonoids, saponins and tannins. The antimicrobial result showed the MIC of 6.25 mg/mL against Staphylococcus aureus and 12.5 mg/mL for Escherichia coli and 12.5 mg/mL against remaining bacteria tested, with strong antifungal activity. The maximum inhibition zone is found against Pseudomonas aeruginosa with MIC 16 mg/mL. Drug showed significant bronchodilator effect with 27.86% & 36.13% increase in preconvulsion time of guinea pigs pretreated with 100 & 200 mg/kg body weight of extract. Conclusions: The study reveals that the extracts possess antibacterial activity and antifungal activity in a dose dependent manner. This antimicrobial property may be due to presence of several saponins, further studies are highly needed for the drug development.

  7. Susceptibility of Urinary Tract Bacteria to Newer Antimicrobial Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjula Mehta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTIs are among the commonest types of bacterial infections. The antibiotic treatment for UTIs is associated with important medical and economic implications. Many different microorganisms can cause UTIs though the most common pathogens are E. coli and members of family Enterobacteriaceae. The knowledge of etiology and antibiotic resistance pattern of the organisms causing urinary tract infection is essential. The present study was undertaken to evaluate trends of antibiotic susceptibility of commonly isolated uropathogens using newer antimicrobial agents, prulifloxacin, fosfomycin (FOM and doripenem. We conclude that maintaining a record of culture results and the antibiogram may help clinicians to determine the empirical and/or specific treatment based on the antibiogram of the isolate for better therapeutic outcome.

  8. Susceptibility of Aeromonas Hydophila Isolates to Antimicrobial Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Stojanov

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Aeromonas hydrophila is a microorganism widely distributed in nature: in water, soil, food. It is also part of the normal bacterial flora of many animals. As an opportune microorganism it is a secondary biological agent that contributes to the occurrence of a fish disease and its deterioration. Frequently, its presence is an indication of bad zoohygiene and zootechnical conditions in fish ponds. Reduced quality and quantity of feed, mechanical injuries, parasitosis, seasonal oscillation in temperature present some of the factors that produce favorable conditions for bacterial proliferation of aeromonas in fish ponds, so clinical symptoms of the disease occur. Aeromonas is almost always present in clinical isolates and may be unjustly accused for bad health of fish. Antibiotic therapy is applied even when the clinical findings are clear, what certainly effects the susceptibility to chemotherapeutics. The subject of our work was bacteriological examination of the material obtained from the carps with the observed skin changes and the carps without these changes. Also, antimicrobial susceptibility of Aeromonas hydrophila was tested. The aim of this research was to determined the presence of Aeromonas hydrophilia in the carp ponds and to test antibiotic susceptibility. The material consisted of the samples from the fish ponds where the carps were with and without changed skin. The method the isolation of Aeromonas hydrophila was used. The diffusion disk technique was used for testing antibiotic susceptibility. The isolates were tested for their susceptibility to Florephenikol, Flumequine, Olaqindox and Oxitetracycline. The obtained results point that antimicrobial susceptibility was the same regardless of the origin of the samples, i.e. the resistance was the same for both groups of samples (the strains isolated from the fish with skin changes and the strains from fish without changes on skin. The strains were highly resistant: 35% were resistant to

  9. Thiamin (Vitamin B1 Biosynthesis and Regulation: A Rich Source of Antimicrobial Drug Targets?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinglin Du, Honghai Wang, Jianping Xie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance of pathogens has necessitated the identification of novel targets for antibiotics. Thiamin (vitamin B1 is an essential cofactor for all organisms in its active form thiamin diphosphate (ThDP. Therefore, its metabolic pathways might be one largely untapped source of antibiotics targets. This review describes bacterial thiamin biosynthetic, salvage, and transport pathways. Essential thiamin synthetic enzymes such as Dxs and ThiE are proposed as promising drug targets. The regulation mechanism of thiamin biosynthesis by ThDP riboswitch is also discussed. As drug targets of existing antimicrobial compound pyrithiamin, the ThDP riboswitch might serves as alternative targets for more antibiotics.

  10. Synergism between plant extract and antimicrobial drugs used on Staphylococcus aureus diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Elaine Cristina Betoni

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Searches for substances with antimicrobial activity are frequent, and medicinal plants have been considered interesting by some researchers since they are frequently used in popular medicine as remedies for many infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to verify the synergism between 13 antimicrobial drugs and 8 plant extracts - "guaco" (Mikania glomerata, guava (Psidium guajava, clove (Syzygium aromaticum, garlic (Allium sativum, lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus, ginger (Zingiber officinale, "carqueja" (Baccharis trimera, and mint (Mentha piperita - against Staphylococcus aureus strains, and for this purpose, the disk method was the antimicrobial susceptibility test performed. Petri dishes were prepared with or without dilution of plant extracts at sub-inhibitory concentrations in Mueller-Hinton Agar (MHA, and the inhibitory zones were recorded in millimeters. In vitro anti-Staphylococcus aureus activities of the extracts were confirmed, and synergism was verified for all the extracts; clove, guava, and lemongrass presented the highest synergism rate with antimicrobial drugs, while ginger and garlic showed limited synergistic capacity.

  11. Drug Utilization Study on Antimicrobial Use in Urinary Tract Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil S Gidamudi

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: The DDD/1000inhabitant/day of ceftriaxone was the highest (12.9. Third generation cephalosporins were used as first line drug in most cases. This group should be reserved for complicated UTIs. [Natl J Med Res 2015; 5(3.000: 216-221

  12. Antimicrobial drug resistance of Salmonella isolates from meat and humans, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Marianne; Andersen, Jens Strodl; Aabo, Søren

    2007-01-01

    We compared 8,144 Salmonella isolates collected from meat imported to or produced in Denmark, as well as from Danish patients. Isolates from imported meat showed a higher rate of antimicrobial drug resistance, including multidrug resistance, than did isolates from domestic meat. Isolates from hum...... humans showed resistance rates lower than those found in imported meat but higher than in domestic meat. These findings indicate that programs for controlling resistant Salmonella spp. are a global issue.......We compared 8,144 Salmonella isolates collected from meat imported to or produced in Denmark, as well as from Danish patients. Isolates from imported meat showed a higher rate of antimicrobial drug resistance, including multidrug resistance, than did isolates from domestic meat. Isolates from...

  13. Antimicrobial drug resistance of Salmonella isolates from meat and humans, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Marianne Nielsine; Andersen, Jens Strodl; Aabo, Søren

    2007-01-01

    We compared 8,144 Salmonella isolates collected from meat imported to or produced in Denmark, as well as from Danish patients. Isolates from imported meat showed a higher rate of antimicrobial drug resistance, including multidrug resistance, than did isolates from domestic meat. Isolates from hum...... humans showed resistance rates lower than those found in imported meat but higher than in domestic meat. These findings indicate that programs for controlling resistant Salmonella spp. are a global issue......We compared 8,144 Salmonella isolates collected from meat imported to or produced in Denmark, as well as from Danish patients. Isolates from imported meat showed a higher rate of antimicrobial drug resistance, including multidrug resistance, than did isolates from domestic meat. Isolates from...

  14. Quorum sensing inhibitory drugs as next generation antimicrobials: worth the effort?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, M.

    2008-01-01

    , elderly, immunocompromised, and hospitalized patients are susceptible to infections caused by bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. These bacteria form chronic, biofilm-based infections, which are challenging because bacterial cells living...... as biofilms are more tolerant to antibiotics than their planktonic counterparts. Therefore, research should identify new antimicrobial agents and their corresponding targets to decrease the biofilm-forming capability or persistence of the infectious bacteria. Here, we review one such drug target: bacterial...

  15. High frequency of antimicrobial drug resistance of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli in infants in Peru.

    OpenAIRE

    Theresa J. Ochoa; Ruiz, Joaquím; Molina, Margarita; Luis J. Del Valle; Vargas, Martha; Gil, Ana I.; Ecker, Lucie; Barletta, Francesca; Hall, Eric; Cleary, Thomas G.; Lanata, Claudio F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. In a prospective passive diarrhea surveillance cohort study of 1,034 infants of low socioeconomic communities in Lima, Peru, we determined the prevalence and antimicrobial drug susceptibility of the diarrheagenic Escherichia coli . The prevalence of diarrheagenic E. coli was 29% (161 of 557) in children with gastroenteritis and 30% (58 of 195) in the control group without diarrhea. The most common E. coli pathogens in diarrhea were enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) (14%),...

  16. Assessment of antimicrobial drug residues in beef in Abuja, the Federal Capital Territory, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omeiza, Gabriel K; Ajayi, Itopa E; Ode, Okwoche J

    2012-01-01

    Drugs administered to food-producing animals close to the time of slaughter often result in prohibited antimicrobial residues in the animal tissues at slaughter. Evidence based on the Premi® test confirmed the occurrence of antimicrobial drug residues in 89.3% of kidney and urine samples from cattle slaughtered within Abuja town where the residents rely heavily on beef as a source of protein. The administration of antibiotics close to the time of slaughter by marketers/herd owners and transporters was found to be significantly (p<0.05) higher when compared with butchers and abattoir workers. The practice of administering antibiotics to animals close to the time of slaughter was believed to be profit-motivated. The research suggests that awareness campaigns amongst the stakeholders, the enactment of appropriate laws for the control of antibiotic use and the empowerment of veterinary public health practitioners in food regulatory agencies as some of the strategies which may positively reduce the risk of antimicrobial drug residues in food animals in Nigeria.

  17. Penetration of antimicrobials to pulmonary epithelial lining fluid and muscle and impact of drug physicochemical properties determined by microdialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottbøll, Lisa Amanda Holm; Friis, Christian

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objectives of this study were to characterize antimicrobial drug penetration into the pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (PELF) and extracellular fluid (ECF) of muscle in relation to physicochemical properties of the drugs (molecular mass, Log D, polar surface area and charge......), using intrabronchial microdialysis. The series of drugs tested include gentamicin, sulfadiazine, cefquinome, minocycline and colistin. METHODS: Drug concentrations were measured during 2h of steady state plasma drug concentrations at therapeutic levels in anesthetized pigs. Microdialysis probes were...

  18. Isolation of Helicobacter pylori in gastric mucosa and susceptibility to five antimicrobial drugs in Southern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Otth

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori colonizes more than 50% of the world population thus, it is considered an important cause of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the isolation frequency of H. pylori in Southern Chile from patients with symptomatology compatible with gastritis or gastric ulcer and to correlate these findings with demographic parameters of infected patients and the susceptibility profiles of the isolated strains to the antimicrobial drugs used in the eradication treatments. A total of 240 patients were enrolled in the study. Each gastric biopsy was homogenized and seeded onto blood agar plates containing a selective antibiotics mixture (DENT supplement. Plates were incubated at 37° C in a microaerophilic environment for five days. The susceptibility profiles to amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, tetracycline and metronidazole were determined using the E-test method. H. pylori was isolated from 99 patients (41.3% with slightly higher frequency in female (42% positive cultures than male (40.2% positive cultures. With regard to age and educational level, the highest isolation frequencies were obtained in patients between 21-30 (55% and 41-50 (52.6% years old, and patients with secondary (43.9% and university (46.2% educational levels. Nineteen (21.6% strains showed resistance to at least one antimicrobial drug. Tetracycline was the most active antimicrobial in vitro, whereas metronidazole was the less active. One strain (5.3% showed resistance to amoxicillin, clarithomycin and metronidazole, simultaneously.

  19. Antimicrobial drug use in Austrian pig farms: plausibility check of electronic on-farm records and estimation of consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauffler, M; Griesbacher, A; Fuchs, K; Köfer, J

    2014-10-25

    Electronic drug application records from farmers from 75 conventional pig farms were revised and checked for their plausibility. The registered drug amounts were verified by comparing the farmers' records with veterinarians' dispensary records. The antimicrobial consumption was evaluated from 2008 to 2011 and expressed in weight of active substance(s), number of used daily doses (nUDD), number of animal daily doses (nADD) and number of product-related daily doses (nPrDD). All results were referred to one year and animal bodyweight (kg biomass). The data plausibility proof revealed about 14 per cent of unrealistic drug amount entries in the farmers' records. The annual antimicrobial consumption was 33.9 mg/kg/year, 4.9 UDDkg/kg/year, 1.9 ADDkg/kg/year and 2.5 PrDDkg/kg/year (average). Most of the antimicrobials were applied orally (86 per cent) and at group-level. Main therapy indications were metaphylactic/prophylactic measures (farrow-to-finish and fattening farms) or digestive tract diseases (breeding farms). The proportion of the 'highest priority critically important antimicrobials' was low (12 per cent). After determination of a threshold value, farms with a high antimicrobial use could be detected. Statistical tests showed that the veterinarian had an influence on the dosage, the therapy indication and the active substance. Orally administered antimicrobials were mostly underdosed, parenterally administered antimicrobials rather correctly or overdosed.

  20. Metabolic network analysis-based identification of antimicrobial drug targets in category A bioterrorism agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Yeol Ahn

    Full Text Available The 2001 anthrax mail attacks in the United States demonstrated the potential threat of bioterrorism, hence driving the need to develop sophisticated treatment and diagnostic protocols to counter biological warfare. Here, by performing flux balance analyses on the fully-annotated metabolic networks of multiple, whole genome-sequenced bacterial strains, we have identified a large number of metabolic enzymes as potential drug targets for each of the three Category A-designated bioterrorism agents including Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis. Nine metabolic enzymes- belonging to the coenzyme A, folate, phosphatidyl-ethanolamine and nucleic acid pathways common to all strains across the three distinct genera were identified as targets. Antimicrobial agents against some of these enzymes are available. Thus, a combination of cross species-specific antibiotics and common antimicrobials against shared targets may represent a useful combinatorial therapeutic approach against all Category A bioterrorism agents.

  1. Metabolic network analysis-based identification of antimicrobial drug targets in category A bioterrorism agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yong-Yeol; Lee, Deok-Sun; Burd, Henry; Blank, William; Kapatral, Vinayak

    2014-01-01

    The 2001 anthrax mail attacks in the United States demonstrated the potential threat of bioterrorism, hence driving the need to develop sophisticated treatment and diagnostic protocols to counter biological warfare. Here, by performing flux balance analyses on the fully-annotated metabolic networks of multiple, whole genome-sequenced bacterial strains, we have identified a large number of metabolic enzymes as potential drug targets for each of the three Category A-designated bioterrorism agents including Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis. Nine metabolic enzymes- belonging to the coenzyme A, folate, phosphatidyl-ethanolamine and nucleic acid pathways common to all strains across the three distinct genera were identified as targets. Antimicrobial agents against some of these enzymes are available. Thus, a combination of cross species-specific antibiotics and common antimicrobials against shared targets may represent a useful combinatorial therapeutic approach against all Category A bioterrorism agents.

  2. Antimicrobial resistance determinant microarray for analysis of multi-drug resistant isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taitt, Chris Rowe; Leski, Tomasz; Stenger, David; Vora, Gary J.; House, Brent; Nicklasson, Matilda; Pimentel, Guillermo; Zurawski, Daniel V.; Kirkup, Benjamin C.; Craft, David; Waterman, Paige E.; Lesho, Emil P.; Bangurae, Umaru; Ansumana, Rashid

    2012-06-01

    The prevalence of multidrug-resistant infections in personnel wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan has made it challenging for physicians to choose effective therapeutics in a timely fashion. To address the challenge of identifying the potential for drug resistance, we have developed the Antimicrobial Resistance Determinant Microarray (ARDM) to provide DNAbased analysis for over 250 resistance genes covering 12 classes of antibiotics. Over 70 drug-resistant bacteria from different geographic regions have been analyzed on ARDM, with significant differences in patterns of resistance identified: genes for resistance to sulfonamides, trimethoprim, chloramphenicol, rifampin, and macrolide-lincosamidesulfonamide drugs were more frequently identified in isolates from sources in Iraq/Afghanistan. Of particular concern was the presence of genes responsible for resistance to many of the last-resort antibiotics used to treat war traumaassociated infections.

  3. Antimicrobial Activity and Modulatory Effect of Essential Oil from the Leaf of Rhaphiodon echinus (Nees & Mart Schauer on Some Antimicrobial Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Eliene Duarte

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rhaphiodon echinus is a weed plant used in the Brazilian folk medicinal for the treatment of infectious diseases. In this study, the essential oil of R. echinus leaf was investigated for its antimicrobial properties. Methods: The chemical constituents of the essential oil were characterized by GC-MS. The antimicrobial properties were determined by studying by the microdilution method the effect of the oil alone, and in combination with antifungal or antibiotic drugs against the fungi Candida albicans, Candida krusei and Candida tropicalis and the microbes Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas. In addition, the iron (II chelation potential of the oil was determined. Results: The results showed the presence of β-caryophyllene and bicyclogermacrene in major compounds, and revealed a low antifungal and antibacterial activity of the essential oil, but a strong modulatory effect on antimicrobial drugs when associated with the oil. The essential oil showed iron (II chelation activity. Conclusions: The GC-MS characterization revealed the presence of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes in the essential oil and metal chelation potential, which may be responsible in part for the modulatory effect of the oil. These findings suggest that essential oil of R. echinus is a natural product capable of enhancing the antibacterial and antifungal activity of antimicrobial drugs.

  4. In vitro drug resistance of clinical isolated Brucella against antimicrobial agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-Li Xu; Xiao Chen; Pei-Hong Yang; Jia-Yun Liu; Xiao-Ke Hao

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To explore the antibiotic resistance of Brucella melitensisand instruct rational use of antimicrobial agents in clinical treatment ofBrucella infection.Methods:Bacteria were cultured and identified byBACTEC9120 andVITEKⅡ automicrobic system.E-test was used to detect the minimal inhibitory concentration(MIC) of antimicrobial agents in the drug susceptivity experiment.Results:A total of19 brucella strains(allBrucella melitensis) wereisolated from19 patients, who had fever betweenJanuary2010 andJune2012, and17 samples were blood, one was bone marrow, the other sample was cerebrospinal fluid.TheMIC range of ceftazidime was2.0-8.0 mg/L, rifampicin was0.06-2.0 mg/L, amikacin was4.0-12.0 mg/L, levofloxacin was2.0-8.0 mg/L, doxycycline was8.0-32.0 mg/L, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim was4.0-16.0 mg/L, ampicillin was1.5-2.0 mg/L and gentamicin was0.50-0.75 mg/L.Conclusions:The drugs used in this experiment cover common drugs for treatingBrcella.Meanwhile, the results are consistent with clinical efficacy.It is suggested personalized regimen according to patients’ status in treatment of Brucella.

  5. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & ... antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, the use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the development ...

  6. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility test for identification of new therapeutics and drug combinations against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Wei; Weingarten, Rebecca A.; Xu, Miao; Southall, Noel; Dai, Sheng; Shinn, Paul; Sanderson, Philip E.; Williamson, Peter R.; Frank, Karen M.; Zheng,Wei

    2016-01-01

    Current antimicrobial susceptibility testing has limited screening capability for identifying empirical antibiotic combinations to treat severe bacterial infections with multidrug-resistant (MDR) organisms. We developed a new antimicrobial susceptibility assay using automated ultra-high-throughput screen technology in combination with a simple bacterial growth assay. A rapid screening of 5170 approved drugs and other compounds identified 25 compounds with activities against MDR Klebsiella pne...

  7. Prescription of antimicrobial drugs in Norwegian aquaculture with an emphasis on "new" fish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grave, Kari; Hansen, Magne Kjerulf; Kruse, Hilde; Bangen, Marit; Kristoffersen, Anja Bråthen

    2008-02-01

    The usage of antimicrobial (AM) drugs in farmed fish in Norwegian aquaculture for the period 2000-2005 was investigated by using prescription data. These data were validated against national sales data of AM drugs sold for use in farmed fish and were found to be highly valid. The defined course dose (DCD) was applied as the unit of measurement to correct for the variations in the dosages between different AM drugs. The DCD(kg) was the amount of an AM drug recommended for the treatment of a 1-kg fish. The calculated number of prescribed DCD(kg)s is an estimate of the biomass of farmed fish that can be treated with a certain amount AM drug. In the present study, the number of prescriptions issued (i.e., numbers of initiated treatments), weight of active substance prescribed and biomass treated were applied to describe the usage. An increase, although modest, in the AM drug usage in Norwegian aquaculture was observed from 2002 to 2005. This increase was accounted for by new-farmed fish species (other than Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout), especially Atlantic cod. The increased usage of AM drugs in cod in the study period was significantly positively correlated to the biomass produced; even so from 2001 to 2005 the number of prescriptions for cod relative to the produced biomass declined. The AM drug usage in Atlantic halibut as well as the production varied during the study period. For other species such as turbot, coalfish and wolffish the usage of AM drugs was found to be negligible. "Mono-therapy" with quinolones may present a selective pressure in regard to development of quinolone resistance.

  8. [Investigation of antimicrobial and antibiofilm effects of some preservatives used in drugs, cosmetics and food products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güven, Nihal; Kaynak Onurdağ, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    Preservatives are added to food, drugs and other pharmaceutical products to avoid microbial contamination. For antimicrobial activity testing and preservative efficacy testing, vegetative forms of the standard test organisms are used. However, microbial biofilm formation may occur on living tissues, medical implants, industrial or drinking water pipes, natural aquatic systems, glass and plastic surfaces. In our study, it was aimed to determine the antimicrobial and antibiofilm effects of some preservatives used in drug, cosmetics and food products and to compare the minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC) of microbial biofilm formed on glass surfaces which are commonly used in those areas and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of the planktonic forms. In the study Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Salmonella Thyphimurium SL1344, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Staphylococcus epidermidis NCTC 11047, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212 and Candida albicans ATCC 10231 were used as the standard strains; sodium nitrate, methylparaben, prophylparaben, potassium sorbate and sodium benzoate as the preservatives; ampicillin, vancomycin, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, amphotericin B and itraconazole as the antimicrobial agents. MIC values were determined through the guidelines of CLSI M100-S18 and M27-A3 protocols. BioTimer method was used to determine the MBIC values. The value of "colony forming unit (CFU)/glass beads" was calculated using the graphics drawn by plotting the time of color change for phenol red or resazurin against log10CFU. All experiments were done with four media at different pH values namely pH: 7, pH: 6.5, pH: 6 and pH: 5.5. According to the results of tests on planktonic forms of the microorganisms, sodium benzoate was determined to be the most effective preservative against all the microorganisms tested except S.aureus and E.faecalis. The most effective preservative against S.aureus and E.faecalis was prophylparaben. Prophylparaben

  9. Surface Modifications of Titanium Implants by Multilayer Bioactive Coatings with Drug Delivery Potential: Antimicrobial, Biological, and Drug Release Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordikhani, Farideh; Zustiak, Silviya Petrova; Simchi, Abdolreza

    2016-04-01

    Recent strategies to locally deliver antimicrobial agents to combat implant-associated infections—one of the most common complications in orthopedic surgery—are gaining interest. However, achieving a controlled release profile over a desired time frame remains a challenge. In this study, we present an innovative multifactorial approach to combat infections which comprises a multilayer chitosan/bioactive glass/vancomycin nanocomposite coating with an osteoblastic potential and a drug delivery capacity. The bioactive drug-eluting coating was prepared on the surface of titanium foils by a multistep electrophoretic deposition technique. The adopted deposition strategy allowed for a high antibiotic loading of 1038.4 ± 40.2 µg/cm2. The nanocomposite coating exhibited a suppressed burst release with a prolonged sustained vancomycin release for up to 6 weeks. Importantly, the drug release profile was linear with respect to time, indicating a zero-order release kinetics. An in vitro bactericidal assay against Staphylococcus aureus confirmed that releasing the drug reduced the risk of bacterial infection. Excellent biocompatibility of the developed coating was also demonstrated by in vitro cell studies with a model MG-63 osteoblast cell line.

  10. Effect of Antimicrobial Use in Agricultural Animals on Drug-resistant Foodborne Campylobacteriosis in Humans: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrackin, M A; Helke, Kristi L; Galloway, Ashley M; Poole, Ann Z; Salgado, Cassandra D; Marriott, Bernadette P

    2016-10-02

    Controversy continues concerning antimicrobial use in food animals and its relationship to drug-resistant infections in humans. We systematically reviewed published literature for evidence of a relationship between antimicrobial use in agricultural animals and drug-resistant foodborne campylobacteriosis in humans. Based on publications from the United States (U.S.), Canada and Denmark from 2010 to July 2014, 195 articles were retained for abstract review, 50 met study criteria for full article review with 36 retained for which data are presented. Two publications reported increase in macrolide resistance of Campylobacter coli isolated from feces of swine receiving macrolides in feed, and one of these described similar findings for tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones. A study in growing turkeys demonstrated increased macrolide resistance associated with therapeutic dosing with Tylan® in drinking water. One publication linked tetracycline-resistant C. jejuni clone SA in raw cow's milk to a foodborne outbreak in humans. No studies that identified farm antimicrobial use also traced antimicrobial-resistant Campylobacter from farm to fork. Recent literature confirms that on farm antibiotic selection pressure can increase colonization of animals with drug-resistant Campylobacter spp. but is inadequately detailed to establish a causal relationship between use of antimicrobials in agricultural animals and prevalence of drug-resistant foodborne campylobacteriosis in humans.

  11. Antimicrobial potential of Pakistani medicinal plants against multi-drug resistance Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahat Ejaz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine resistance patterns of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus isolated from different areas of Pakistan and to identify antimicrobial agents against multi-drug resistant S. aureus strains. Methods: A total of 67 samples (sewerage, nasal and milk were collected from different farm areas of Pakistan to identify local strains of S. aureus. Sixteen out of 67 samples were positive for S. aureus. Only 6 out of 16 S. aureus strains showed resistance to antibiotics. Then the antibacterial effect of 29 medicinal plants was evaluated on these S. aureus isolates and a standard S. aureus strain ATCC 25923. The solvents used for the extraction of plants were acetone, dimethyl sulfoxide and methanol. The in vitro antibacterial activity was performed using agar disc diffusion method. Moreover, minimum inhibitory concentration of effective medicinal plant extracts was identified through micro-dilution method to find out their 50% inhibitory concentration. Results: Plant extracts of 5 medicinal plants (Psidium guajava, Nigella sativa, Piper nigrum, Valeriana jatamansi, and Cucurbita pepo exhibited antibacterial activity against locally isolated multidrug resistant strains of S. aureus. The minimum inhibitory concentration of these extracts was ranged from 0.328 to 5.000 mg/mL. Conclusions: Plant extracts of Psidium guajava, Piper nigrum seed, Valeriana jatamansi, Cucurbita pepo and Nigella sativa showed significant in vitro antibacterial activity and thus, such findings may serve as valuable contribution in the treatment of infection and may contribute to the development of potential antimicrobial agents against multi drug resistant strains of S. aureus

  12. Antimicrobial potential of Pakistani medicinal plants against multi-drug resistance Staphylococcus aureus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rahat Ejaz; Usman A Ashfaq; Sobia Idrees

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine resistance patterns of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) isolated from different areas of Pakistan and to identify antimicrobial agents against multi-drug resistant S.aureus strains. Methods: A total of 67 samples (sewerage, nasal and milk) were collected from different farm areas of Pakistan to identify local strains of S. aureus. Sixteen out of 67 samples were positive for S.aureus. Only 6 out of 16 S. aureus strains showed resistance to antibiotics. Then the antibacterial effect of 29 medicinal plants was evaluated on these S. aureus isolates and a standard S. aureus strain ATCC 25923. The solvents used for the extraction of plants were acetone, dimethyl sulfoxide and methanol. The in vitro antibacterial activity was performed using agar disc diffusion method. Moreover, minimum inhibitory concentration of effective medicinal plant extracts was identified through micro-dilution method to find out their 50% inhibitory concentration.Results:Plant extracts of 5 medicinal plants (Psidium guajava, Nigella sativa, Piper nigrum, Valeriana jatamansi, and Cucurbita pepo) exhibited antibacterial activity against locally isolated multidrug resistant strains of S. aureus. The minimum inhibitory concentration of these extracts was ranged from 0.328 to 5.000 mg/mL. Conclusions: Plant extracts of Psidium guajava, Piper nigrum seed, Valeriana jatamansi, Cucurbita pepo and Nigella sativa showed significant in vitro antibacterial activity and thus, such findings may serve as valuable contribution in the treatment of infection and may contribute to the development of potential antimicrobial agents against multi drug resistant strains of S. aureus.

  13. Improved antimicrobial property and controlled drug release kinetics of silver sulfadiazine loaded ordered mesoporous silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Jangra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the loading of silver sulfadiazine into ordered mesoporous silica material by post-impregnation method and its effect on the in vitro release kinetics and antimicrobial property of the drug. The formulated SBA-15 silica material with rope-like morphology and SBA-15-silver sulfadiazine (SBA-AgSD were characterized by UV–visible spectrophotometer, small and wide-angle powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD, field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM. Thermo-gravimetric analysis of SBA-AgSD revealed a high loading amount of 52.87%. Nitrogen adsorption–desorption analysis confirmed the drug entrapment into host material by revealing a reduced surface area (214 m2/g and pore diameter (6.7 nm of the SBA-AgSD. The controlled release of silver sulfadiazine drug from the mesoporous silica to simulated gastric, intestinal and body fluids was evaluated. The Korsmeyer–Peppas model fits the drug release data with the non-Fickian diffusion model and zero order kinetics of SBA-AgSD. The antibacterial performance of the SBA-AgSD was evaluated with respect to Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The controlled drug delivery of the SBA-AgSD revealed improved antibacterial activity, thus endorsing its applicability in effective wound dressing.

  14. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, the use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the development of resistant strains of bacteria, complicating clinician's efforts to select the appropriate antimicrobial ...

  15. Effects of antimicrobial use in agricultural animals on drug-resistant foodborne salmonellosis in humans: A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helke, Kristi L; McCrackin, M A; Galloway, Ashley M; Poole, Ann Z; Salgado, Cassandra D; Marriott, Bernadette P

    2017-02-11

    Controversy continues concerning antimicrobial use in food animals and its relationship to drug-resistant infections in humans. We systematically reviewed published literature for evidence of a relationship between antimicrobial use in agricultural animals and drug-resistant meat or dairy-borne non-typhoidal salmonellosis in humans. Based on publications from the United States (U.S.), Canada, and Denmark from January 2010 to July 2014, 858 articles received title and abstract review, 104 met study criteria for full article review with 68 retained for which data are presented. Antibiotic exposure in both cattle and humans found an increased likelihood of Salmonella colonization, whereas in chickens, animals not exposed to antibiotics (organic) were more likely to be Salmonella positive and those that had antibiotic exposure were more likely to harbor antimicrobial resistant Salmonella organisms. In swine literature, only tylosin exposure was examined and no correlation was found among exposure, Salmonella colonization, or antimicrobial resistance. No studies that identified farm antimicrobial use also traced antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella from farm to fork.

  16. RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH THE PRESENCE OF ANTIMICROBIAL DRUG RESIDUES IN MEAT PRODUCTS AND PRODUCTS OF ANIMAL SLAUGHTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Bataeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The risks associated with the presence of antimicrobial drug residues in meat and products of animal slaughter were determined. One of them is the emergence of antimicrobial resistance in pathogenic and conditionally pathogenic microorganisms isolated from meat and products of animal slaughter. It was established that Escherichia coli, Salmonella and Pseudomonas were resistant to ampicillin, tetracycline, tylosin and cephalolexin. However, Listeria monocytogenes did not have resistance to these antibiotics. It was also established that when entering an animal body, antimicrobials were accumulated mostly in liver and kidneys of an animal followed by meat and, to the least degree, in fat. It was found that up to 65% of the tested samples were contaminated with antimicrobials to a greater or lesser degree.

  17. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility test for identification of new therapeutics and drug combinations against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Weingarten, Rebecca A; Xu, Miao; Southall, Noel; Dai, Sheng; Shinn, Paul; Sanderson, Philip E; Williamson, Peter R; Frank, Karen M; Zheng, Wei

    2016-11-09

    Current antimicrobial susceptibility testing has limited screening capability for identifying empirical antibiotic combinations to treat severe bacterial infections with multidrug-resistant (MDR) organisms. We developed a new antimicrobial susceptibility assay using automated ultra-high-throughput screen technology in combination with a simple bacterial growth assay. A rapid screening of 5170 approved drugs and other compounds identified 25 compounds with activities against MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae. To further improve the efficacy and reduce the effective drug concentrations, we applied a targeted drug combination approach that integrates drugs' clinical antimicrobial susceptibility breakpoints, achievable plasma concentrations, clinical toxicities and mechanisms of action to identify optimal drug combinations. Three sets of three-drug combinations were identified with broad-spectrum activities against 10 MDR clinical isolates including K. pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter cloacae and Escherichia coli. Colistin-auranofin-ceftazidime and colistin-auranofin-rifabutin suppressed >80% growth of all 10 MDR strains; while rifabutin-colistin-imipenem inhibited >75% of these strains except two Acinetobacter baumannii isolates. The results demonstrate this new assay has potential as a real-time method to identify new drugs and effective drug combinations to combat severe clinical infections with MDR organisms.

  18. 5-Fluorouracil Loaded Chitosan-PVA/Na+MMT Nanocomposite Films for Drug Release and Antimicrobial Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A Babul Reddy; B Manjula; T Jayaramudu; E R Sadiku; P Anand Babu; S Periyar Selvam

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, chitosan and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) were blended with different concentrations of sodium montmorillonite (Na?MMT) clay solution by a solvent casting method. X-ray diffraction and transition electron microscope results show that the film properties are related to the co-existence of Na?MMT intercalation/exfoliation in the blend and the interaction between chitosan–PVA and Na?MMT. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) was loaded with chitosan–PVA/Na?MMT nanocomposite films for in vitro drug delivery study. The antimicrobial activity of the chitosan–PVA/Na?MMT films showed significant effect against Salmonella (Gram-negative) and Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive), whereas 5-FU encapsulated chitosan–PVA/Na?MMT bio-nanocomposite films did not show any inhibition against bacteria. Our results indicate that combination of a flexible and soft polymeric material with high drug loading ability of a hard inorganic porous material can produce improved control over degradation and drug release. It will be an economically viable method for preparation of advanced drug delivery vehicles and biodegradable implants or scaffolds.

  19. STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS NASAL CARRIAGE AMONG INJECTING AND NON-INJECTING DRUG USERS AND ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Varshochi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus Aureus (SA is one of the most prevalent bacterial pathogens in human beings. Approximately 20% of healthy persons are persistent carriers and 60% are intermittent carriers of SA. Nasal cavity is one of the most important sites of its colonization. Intravenous (IV drug abuse has been proposed as a risk factor for colonization of SA in the nasal mucosa. The goal of this study was to determine the frequency of SA carriers in nasal cavity among IV and non-IV drug abusers (addicts, as well as to assess the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of the positive cases. In a cross-sectional analysis of 300 drug addicts (Group I: 100 non-injecting addicts, Group II: 100 IV injecting drug addicts in rehab, Group III: 100 IV injecting drug addicts not in rehab in the infectious diseases clinics of Tabriz’s Imam Reza and Sina teaching hospitals and the rehabilitation center of Razi hospital, were investigated. Hospitalized addicts, insulin-dependent diabetic cases, HIV positive patients and those on chronic hemodialysis were excluded. The nasal mucosal sample was prepared from each case for SA isolation and its antimicrobial susceptibility was investigated by antibiogram. Eighty-four cases (28% were culture positive for SA, including 26 cases in group one, 32 cases in group two and 26 cases in group three (p = 0.55. There was only one MRSA isolate present in all the cases studied (1.2%. No resistance to linozolid, rifampin and vancomycin was observed. The resistance to erythromycin, cefoxitin, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, co-trimoxazol and gentamicin were 3.6, 4.8, 2.4, 3.6, 1.2 and 2.4% respectively. No statistically significant differences existed between the three groups in antibacterial susceptibility pattern. Sensitivity to oxacillin using the E-test results and disc diffusion were completely consistent. The percentage of carries of SA in the anterior nasal mucosa among IV and non-IV drug addicts is not considerably higher than the

  20. Use of antimicrobial growth promoters in food animals and Enterococcus faecium resistance to therapeutic antimicrobial drugs in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    1999-01-01

    Supplementing animal feed with antimicrobial agents to enhance growth has been common practice for more than 30 years and is estimated to constitute more than half the total antimicrobial use worldwide. The potential public health consequences of this use have been debated; however, until recently......, clear evidence of a health risk was not available. Accumulating evidence now indicates that the use of the glycopeptide avoparcin as a growth promoter has created in food animals a major reservoir of Enterococcus faecium, which contains the high level glycopeptide resistance determinant vanA, located...... on the Tn1546 transposon. Furthermore, glycopeptide-resistant strains, as well as resistance determinants, can be transmitted from animals to humans. Two antimicrobial classes expected to provide the future therapeutic options for treatment of infections with vancomycin-resistant enterococci have analogues...

  1. Cationic vesicles based on biocompatible diacyl glycerol-arginine surfactants: physicochemical properties, antimicrobial activity, encapsulation efficiency and drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavano, L; Pinazo, A; Abo-Riya, M; Infante, M R; Manresa, M A; Muzzalupo, R; Pérez, L

    2014-08-01

    Physicochemical characteristics of cationic vesicular systems prepared from biocompatible diacyl glycerol-arginine surfactants are investigated. These systems form stable cationic vesicles by themselves and the average diameter of the vesicles decreases as the alkyl chain length of the surfactant increases. The addition of DPPC also modifies the physicochemical properties of these vesicles. Among the drugs these cationic formulations can encapsulate, we have considered Ciprofloxacin and 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU). We show that the percentage of encapsulated drug depends on both the physicochemical properties of the carrier and the type of drug. The capacity of these systems to carry different molecules was evaluated performing in vitro drug release studies. Finally, the antimicrobial activity of empty and Ciprofloxacin-loaded vesicles against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria has been determined. Three bacteria were tested: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The in vitro drug release from all formulations was effectively delayed. Empty cationic vesicles showed antimicrobial activity and Ciprofloxacin-loaded vesicles showed similar or higher antimicrobial activity than the free drug solution. These results suggest that our formulations represent a great innovation in the pharmaceutical field, due to their dual pharmacological function: one related to the nature of the vehiculated drug and the other related to the innate antibacterial properties of the surfactant-based carriers.

  2. Emerging novel and antimicrobial-resistant respiratory tract infections: new drug development and therapeutic options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Memish, Ziad A; Maeurer, Markus; Bates, Matthew; Mwaba, Peter; Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Denning, David W; Hayden, Frederick G; Hui, David S

    2014-11-01

    The emergence and spread of antimicrobial-resistant bacterial, viral, and fungal pathogens for which diminishing treatment options are available is of major global concern. New viral respiratory tract infections with epidemic potential, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome, swine-origin influenza A H1N1, and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection, require development of new antiviral agents. The substantial rise in the global numbers of patients with respiratory tract infections caused by pan-antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and multiazole-resistant fungi has focused attention on investments into development of new drugs and treatment regimens. Successful treatment outcomes for patients with respiratory tract infections across all health-care settings will necessitate rapid, precise diagnosis and more effective and pathogen-specific therapies. This Series paper describes the development and use of new antimicrobial agents and immune-based and host-directed therapies for a range of conventional and emerging viral, bacterial, and fungal causes of respiratory tract infections.

  3. In vitro and in vivo analysis of antimicrobial agents alone and in combination against multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songzhe eHE

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the in vitro and in vivo antibacterial activities of tigecycline and other 13 common antimicrobial agents, alone or in combination, against multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.MethodsAn in vitro susceptibility test of 101 Acinetobacter baumannii was used to detect minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs. A mouse lung infection model of multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii,established by the ultrasonic atomization method, was used to define in vivo antimicrobial activities.Results Multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii showed high sensitivity to tigecycline (98% inhibition, polymyxin B (78.2% inhibition, and minocycline (74.2% inhibition. However, the use of these antimicrobial agents in combination with other antimicrobial agents produced synergistic or additive effects. In vivo data showed that white blood cell (WBC counts in drug combination groups C (minocycline + amikacin and D (minocycline + rifampicin were significantly higher than in groups A (tigecycline and B (polymyxin B (P < 0.05, after administration of the drugs 24h post-infection. Lung tissue inflammation gradually increased in the model group during the first 24h after ultrasonic atomization infection; vasodilation, congestion with hemorrhage were observed 48h post infection. After three days of anti-infective therapy in groups A, B, C and D, lung tissue inflammation in each group gradually recovered with clear structures. The mortality rates in drug combination groups (groups C and D were much lower than in groups A and B.ConclusionThe combination of minocycline with either rifampicin or amikacin is more effective against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii than single-agent tigecycline or polymyxin B. In addition, the mouse lung infection by ultrasonic atomization is a suitable model for drug screening and analysis of infection mechanism.

  4. Veterinary drug usage and antimicrobial resistance in bacteria of animal origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2005-01-01

    In the production of food animals, large amounts of antimicrobial agents are used for therapy and prophylaxis of bacterial infections and in feed to promote growth. There are large variations in the amounts of antimicrobial agents used to produce the same amount of meat among the different Europe...... monitoring the occurrence and development of resistance and consumption of antimicrobial agents are strongly desirable, as is research into the most appropriate ways to use antimicrobial agents in veterinary medicine....

  5. Travel-associated antimicrobial drug-resistant nontyphoidal Salmonellae, 2004-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Russell S; Debess, Emilio E; Winthrop, Kevin L; Lapidus, Jodi A; Vega, Robert; Cieslak, Paul R

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate trends in and risk factors for acquisition of antimicrobial-drug resistant nontyphoidal Salmonella infections, we searched Oregon surveillance data for 2004-2009 for all culture-confirmed cases of salmonellosis. We defined clinically important resistance (CIR) as decreased susceptibility to ampicillin, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, or trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Of 2,153 cases, 2,127 (99%) nontyphoidal Salmonella isolates were obtained from a specific source (e.g., feces, urine, blood, or other normally sterile tissue) and had been tested for drug susceptibility. Among these, 347 (16%) isolates had CIR. The odds of acquiring CIR infection significantly increased each year. Hospitalization was more likely for patients with than without CIR infections. Among patients with isolates that had been tested, we analyzed data from 1,813 (84%) who were interviewed. Travel to eastern or Southeast Asia was associated with increased CIR. Isolates associated with outbreaks were less likely to have CIR. Future surveillance activities should evaluate resistance with respect to international travel.

  6. New drugs for the treatment of complicated intra-abdominal infections in the era of increasing antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syue, Ling-Shan; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Ko, Wen-Chien; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2016-04-01

    The continuing increase in multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) worldwide has created new challenges in treating complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAIs). A number of novel antimicrobial agents have been developed against resistant pathogens. To target extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing pathogens, novel β-lactam antibiotics, such as ceftolozane/tazobactam, ceftazidime/avibactam, aztreonam/avibactam, imipenem/relebactam and S-649266, are antimicrobial alternatives for cIAIs. Two new drugs, eravacycline and plazomicin, have activity against Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae, carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and ESBL-producers. New lipoglycopeptides and oxazolidinones provide feasible options against resistant Gram-positive pathogens. These novel antimicrobials may play a role in improving the clinical outcomes of cIAIs caused by MDROs.

  7. Identification of pyruvate kinase in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as a novel antimicrobial drug target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoraghi, Roya; See, Raymond H; Axerio-Cilies, Peter; Kumar, Nag S; Gong, Huansheng; Moreau, Anne; Hsing, Michael; Kaur, Sukhbir; Swayze, Richard D; Worrall, Liam; Amandoron, Emily; Lian, Tian; Jackson, Linda; Jiang, Jihong; Thorson, Lisa; Labriere, Christophe; Foster, Leonard; Brunham, Robert C; McMaster, William R; Finlay, B Brett; Strynadka, Natalie C; Cherkasov, Artem; Young, Robert N; Reiner, Neil E

    2011-05-01

    Novel classes of antimicrobials are needed to address the challenge of multidrug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Using the architecture of the MRSA interactome, we identified pyruvate kinase (PK) as a potential novel drug target based upon it being a highly connected, essential hub in the MRSA interactome. Structural modeling, including X-ray crystallography, revealed discrete features of PK in MRSA, which appeared suitable for the selective targeting of the bacterial enzyme. In silico library screening combined with functional enzymatic assays identified an acyl hydrazone-based compound (IS-130) as a potent MRSA PK inhibitor (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] of 0.1 μM) with >1,000-fold selectivity over human PK isoforms. Medicinal chemistry around the IS-130 scaffold identified analogs that more potently and selectively inhibited MRSA PK enzymatic activity and S. aureus growth in vitro (MIC of 1 to 5 μg/ml). These novel anti-PK compounds were found to possess antistaphylococcal activity, including both MRSA and multidrug-resistant S. aureus (MDRSA) strains. These compounds also exhibited exceptional antibacterial activities against other Gram-positive genera, including enterococci and streptococci. PK lead compounds were found to be noncompetitive inhibitors and were bactericidal. In addition, mutants with significant increases in MICs were not isolated after 25 bacterial passages in culture, indicating that resistance may be slow to emerge. These findings validate the principles of network science as a powerful approach to identify novel antibacterial drug targets. They also provide a proof of principle, based upon PK in MRSA, for a research platform aimed at discovering and optimizing selective inhibitors of novel bacterial targets where human orthologs exist, as leads for anti-infective drug development.

  8. ANTIMICROBIAL DRUG RESISTANCE IN STRAINS OF Escherichia coli ISOLATED FROM FOOD SOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Uddin Rasheed

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A variety of foods and environmental sources harbor bacteria that are resistant to one or more antimicrobial drugs used in medicine and agriculture. Antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli is of particular concern because it is the most common Gram-negative pathogen in humans. Hence this study was conducted to determine the antibiotic sensitivity pattern of E. coli isolated from different types of food items collected randomly from twelve localities of Hyderabad, India. A total of 150 samples comprising; vegetable salad, raw egg-surface, raw chicken, unpasteurized milk, and raw meat were processed microbiologically to isolate E. coli and to study their antibiotic susceptibility pattern by the Kirby-Bauer method. The highest percentages of drug resistance in isolates of E. coli were detected from raw chicken (23.3% followed by vegetable salad (20%, raw meat (13.3%, raw egg-surface (10% and unpasteurized milk (6.7%. The overall incidence of drug resistant E. coli was 14.7%. A total of six (4% Extended Spectrum β-Lactamase (ESBL producers were detected, two each from vegetable salads and raw chicken, and one each from raw egg-surface and raw meat. Multidrug resistant strains of E. coli are a matter of concern as resistance genes are easily transferable to other strains. Pathogen cycling through food is very common and might pose a potential health risk to the consumer. Therefore, in order to avoid this, good hygienic practices are necessary in the abattoirs to prevent contamination of cattle and poultry products with intestinal content as well as forbidding the use of untreated sewage in irrigating vegetables.

  9. In Vitro Potential of Equine DEFA1 and eCATH1 as Alternative Antimicrobial Drugs in Rhodococcosis Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Schlusselhuber, Margot; Jung, Sascha; Bruhn, Oliver; Goux, Didier; Leippe, Matthias; Leclercq, Roland; Laugier, Claire; Grötzinger, Joachim; Cauchard, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi, the causal agent of rhodococcosis, is a severe pathogen of foals but also of immunodeficient humans, causing bronchopneumonia. The pathogen is often found together with Klebsiella pneumoniae or Streptococcus zooepidemicus in foals. Of great concern is the fact that some R. equi strains are already resistant to commonly used antibiotics. In the present study, we evaluated the in vitro potential of two equine antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), eCATH1 and DEFA1, as new drugs agains...

  10. Haemophilus paragallinarum in chickens in Indonesia: III. Antimicrobial drug sensitivity test ofHaemophilus paragallinarum from chickens suffering of coryza

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    An agar disc diffusion method was used to examine the sensitivity of 27 Haemophilus paragallinarum (Hpg) isolates consisted of 23 local isolates, 4 standard isolates (serotype A) and Escherichia coli ATCC 24922 as a control to eight antimicrobial drugs (ampicillin, erythromycin, oxytetracycline, doxycycline, neomycin, streptomycin, colistine and sulphanlethoxazole-trimethoprim) . Twenty one out of 23 local isolates of Hpg were sensitive to doxycycline, 19 isolates to ampsllin, 18 isolates to ...

  11. An update discussion on the current assessment of the safety of veterinary antimicrobial drug residues in food with regard to their impact on the human intestinal microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerniglia, Carl E; Pineiro, Silvia A; Kotarski, Susan F

    2016-05-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract ecosystem consists of complex and diverse microbial communities that have now been collectively termed the intestinal microbiome. Recent scientific breakthroughs and research endeavours have increased our understanding of the important role the intestinal microbiome plays in human health and disease. The use of antimicrobial new animal drugs in food-producing animals may result in the presence of low levels of drug residues in edible foodstuffs. There is concern that antimicrobial new animal drugs in or on animal-derived food products at residue-level concentrations could disrupt the colonization barrier and/or modify the antimicrobial resistance profile of human intestinal bacteria. Therapeutic doses of antimicrobial drugs have been shown to promote shifts in the intestinal microbiome, and these disruptions promote the emergence of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. To assess the effects of antimicrobial new animal drug residues in food on human intestinal bacteria, many national regulatory agencies and international committees follow a harmonized process, VICH GL36(R), which was issued by a trilateral organization of the European Union, the USA, and Japan called the International Cooperation on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Veterinary Medicinal Products (VICH). The guidance describes a general approach currently used by national regulatory agencies and international committees to assess the effects of antimicrobial new animal drug residues in animal-derived food on human intestinal bacteria. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of this current approach as part of the antimicrobial new animal drug approval process in participating countries, give insights on the microbiological endpoints used in this safety evaluation, and discuss the availability of new information. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & ... antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, the use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the development ...

  13. Haemophilus paragallinarum in chickens in Indonesia: III. Antimicrobial drug sensitivity test ofHaemophilus paragallinarum from chickens suffering of coryza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Poernomo

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available An agar disc diffusion method was used to examine the sensitivity of 27 Haemophilus paragallinarum (Hpg isolates consisted of 23 local isolates, 4 standard isolates (serotype A and Escherichia coli ATCC 24922 as a control to eight antimicrobial drugs (ampicillin, erythromycin, oxytetracycline, doxycycline, neomycin, streptomycin, colistine and sulphanlethoxazole-trimethoprim . Twenty one out of 23 local isolates of Hpg were sensitive to doxycycline, 19 isolates to ampsllin, 18 isolates to oxytetracycline, 17 isolates to sulphametoxazole-trimethoprim, 16 isolates to erythromycin, and 13 isolates to neomycin, while 13 isolates were resistance to colistine and 11 isolates were also resistance to streptomycin .

  14. In vitro sensitivities to antimicrobial drugs of ureaplasmas isolated from the bovine respiratory tract, genital tract and eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishima, M; Hashimoto, K

    1979-09-01

    The sensitivity to 18 antimicrobial drugs was examined for 66 strains of Ureaplasma sp isolated from respiratory tracts of calves suffering from enzootic pneumonia, urinary tracts of bulls and eyes of cows suffering from infectious bovine kerato-conjunctivitis. Furamizole, tiamulin fumarate, erythromycin lactobionate, malidomycin C, doxycycline hydrochloride, kitasamycin tartrate, tylosin tartrate, T-2636C, tetracycline hydrochloride, oxytetracycline hydrochloride, chlortetracycline hydrochloride, oleandomycin phosphate, furazolidone, spiramycin adipate, chloramphenicol and thiophenicol showed strong inhibiting activity on all the test strains. Among them, furamizole, tiamulin fumarate and erythromycin lactobionate were most active. Kanamycin sulphate showed weak activity on all the strains tested. The differences in origin of the test strains did not affect their sensitivity to any of the drugs.

  15. Comparison of the In vitro Activity of Five Antimicrobial Drugs against Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferran, Aude A.; Liu, JingJing; Toutain, Pierre-Louis; Bousquet-Mélou, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Resistance in canine pathogenic staphylococci is necessitating re-evaluation of the current antimicrobial treatments especially for biofilm-associated infections. Long, repeated treatments are often required to control such infections due to the tolerance of bacteria within the biofilm. To comply with the goal of better antibiotic stewardship in veterinary medicine, the efficacies of the available drugs need to be directly assessed on bacterial biofilms. We compared the activities of amoxicillin, cefalexin, clindamycin, doxycycline, and marbofloxacin on in vitro biofilms of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Staphylococcus aureus. Exposure of biofilms for 15 h to maximum concentrations of the antibiotics achievable in canine plasma only reduced biofilm bacteria by 0.5–2.0 log10 CFU, compared to the control, except for marbofloxacin which reduced S. aureus biofilms by 5.4 log10 CFU. Two-antibiotic combinations did not improve, and even decreased, bacterial killing. In comparison, 5 min-exposure to 2% chlorhexidine reduced biofilms of the two tested strains by 4 log10 CFU. Our results showed that S. pseudintermedius and S. aureus biofilms were highly tolerant to all the drugs tested, consistent with the treatment failures observed in practice. Under our in vitro conditions, the use of chlorhexidine was more efficacious than antimicrobials to reduce S. pseudintermedius biofilm. PMID:27531995

  16. Comparison of the In vitro Activity of Five Antimicrobial Drugs against Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferran, Aude A; Liu, JingJing; Toutain, Pierre-Louis; Bousquet-Mélou, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Resistance in canine pathogenic staphylococci is necessitating re-evaluation of the current antimicrobial treatments especially for biofilm-associated infections. Long, repeated treatments are often required to control such infections due to the tolerance of bacteria within the biofilm. To comply with the goal of better antibiotic stewardship in veterinary medicine, the efficacies of the available drugs need to be directly assessed on bacterial biofilms. We compared the activities of amoxicillin, cefalexin, clindamycin, doxycycline, and marbofloxacin on in vitro biofilms of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Staphylococcus aureus. Exposure of biofilms for 15 h to maximum concentrations of the antibiotics achievable in canine plasma only reduced biofilm bacteria by 0.5-2.0 log10 CFU, compared to the control, except for marbofloxacin which reduced S. aureus biofilms by 5.4 log10 CFU. Two-antibiotic combinations did not improve, and even decreased, bacterial killing. In comparison, 5 min-exposure to 2% chlorhexidine reduced biofilms of the two tested strains by 4 log10 CFU. Our results showed that S. pseudintermedius and S. aureus biofilms were highly tolerant to all the drugs tested, consistent with the treatment failures observed in practice. Under our in vitro conditions, the use of chlorhexidine was more efficacious than antimicrobials to reduce S. pseudintermedius biofilm.

  17. Fabrication and anti-microbial evaluation of drug loaded polylactide space filler intended for ridge preservation following tooth extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nebu George Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The preservation or reduction of alveolar ridge resorption following tooth extraction is important in patients especially for those intended for implants at a later stage. One way to achieve this is by using membranes, graft materials, and biodegradable space fillers to prevent alveolar bone resorption and promote regeneration. A major attraction for using biodegradable and biocompatible polymers as space fillers for ridge preservation is their safety profile in comparison to xenograft materials like lyophilized bone and collagen. Materials and Methods: Biocompatible polylactide space fillers were fabricated by fusing porous polylactide particles. The sponges were loaded with drugs by placing them in the respective solutions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from a chronic periodontitis patient and in vitro anti-microbial evaluation was done with the drug loaded sponges. Results: Chlorhexidine loaded space filler showed significant anti microbial effect against multiple drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from a patient with chronic periodontitis. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that biodegradable drug releasing polylactide space fillers has the potential to be used for ridge preservation following tooth extraction. Release of drugs in the socket may prove useful in preventing development of alveolar osteitis post extraction which can interfere with normal healing of the socket. Synthetic biodegradable polymers also exhibit a controlled degradation rate to achieve complete resorption within the intended time.

  18. ANTI-MICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF THE CRUDE DRUGS AND THE POLYHERBAL FORMULATION (RVSPHF567 BY STANDARDIZED CUP AND PLATE METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S. Kandasamy

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial study of crude drugs (Ajowan, Cardamom, Cumin, Mace, Clove, and Nutmeg and the Polyherbal formulation RVSPHF567 was assayed by standardized cup and plate method by using bacterial andfungal culture. The microorganisms used are Aspergillus niger (fungus, Streptococcus aureus (G+ve bacteria and Escherchia coli (G-ve bacteria. These microbes were cultured in a suitable nutritional media for their growth. The extractions of crude drugs were achieved by dissolving their powdered drugs in the suitable solvent. The solvents used for extracting crude drugs were alcohol and water, the solvent used for the preparation of the Polyherbal formulation RVSPHF567 was red tender coconut water. These extracted crude drugs and the Polyherbal formulation RVSPHF567 were then transferred to the pits on the solidified agar media, previously incubated with the different micro-organism separately. Then the plates were streaked with bacterial cultures and kept in an incubator at 37oC for 24hrs for growth of bacterial cultures, and plates streaked with fungal culture were incubated at 25°C for 24hrs. After the incubation period the growth of microbes and their zone of inhibition surrounding the extracts of the crude drugs and the Polyherbal formulation RVSPHF567 were observed and measured. All the crude drugs and the Polyherbal formulation RVSPHF567 were found to bespecifically effective against bacterial and fungal strain. Ajowan, Cardamom, Clove, Cumin, and Mace is highly active against Aspergillus niger. Nutmeg is highly active against Streptococcus, Polyherbal formulation RVSPHF567 is highly active against all the three organisms namely Aspergillus niger, Streptococcus aureus, Escherchia coli.

  19. Use of natural antimicrobials to increase antibiotic susceptibility of drug resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniappan, Kavitha; Holley, Richard A

    2010-06-15

    Plant-derived antibacterial compounds may be of value as a novel means for controlling antibiotic resistant zoonotic pathogens which contaminate food animals and their products. Individual activity of natural antimicrobials (eugenol, thymol, carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, allyl isothiocyanate (AIT)) and activity when paired with an antibiotic was studied using broth microdilution and checkerboard methods. In the latter assays, fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) values were calculated to characterize interactions between the inhibitors. Bacteria tested were chosen because of their resistance to at least one antibiotic which had a known genetic basis. Substantial susceptibility of these bacteria toward the natural antimicrobials and a considerable reduction in the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC's) of the antibiotics were noted when paired combinations of antimicrobial and antibiotic were used. In the interaction study, thymol and carvacrol were found to be highly effective in reducing the resistance of Salmonella Typhimurium SGI 1 (tet A) to ampicillin, tetracycline, penicillin, bacitracin, erythromycin and novobiocin (FIC<0.4) and resistance of Streptococcus pyogenes ermB to erythromycin (FIC<0.5). With Escherichia coli N00 666, thymol and cinnamaldehyde were found to have a similar effect (FIC<0.4) in reducing the MIC's of ampicillin, tetracycline, penicillin, erythromycin and novobiocin. Carvacrol, thymol (FIC<0.3) and cinnamaldehyde (FIC<0.4) were effective against Staphylococcus aureus blaZ and in reducing the MIC's of ampicillin, penicillin and bacitracin. Allyl isothiocyanate (AIT) was effective in reducing the MIC of erythromycin (FIC<0.3) when tested against S. pyogenes. Fewer combinations were found to be synergistic when the decrease in viable population (log DP) was calculated. Together, fractional inhibitory concentrations < or = 0.5 and log DP<-1 indicated synergistic action between four natural antimicrobials and as many as three antibiotics

  20. New perspectives for natural antimicrobial peptides: application as antinflammatory drugs in a murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capparelli Rosanna

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are an ancient group of defense molecules. AMPs are widely distributed in nature (being present in mammals, birds, amphibians, insects, plants, and microorganisms. They display bactericidal as well as immunomodulatory properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities of a combination of two AMPs (temporin B and the royal jellein I against Staphylococcus epidermidis. Results The temporin B (TB-KK and the royal jelleins I, II, III chemically modified at the C terminal (RJI-C, RJII-C, RJIII-C, were tested for their activity against 10 different Staphylococcus epidermidis strains, alone and in combination. Of the three royal jelleins, RJI-C showed the highest activity. Moreover, the combination of RJI-C and TB-KK (MIX displayed synergistic activity. In vitro, the MIX displayed low hemolytic activity, no NO2- production and the ability to curb the synthesis of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ to the same extent as acetylsalicylic acid. In vivo, the MIX sterilized mice infected with Staphylococcus epidermidis in eleven days and inhibited the expression of genes encoding the prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (COX-2 and CD64, two important parameters of inflammation. Conclusion The study shows that the MIX – a combination of two naturally occurring peptides - displays both antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities.

  1. Antibiotic Conjugated Fluorescent Carbon Dots as a Theranostic Agent for Controlled Drug Release, Bioimaging, and Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukeshchand Thakur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel report on microwave assisted synthesis of bright carbon dots (C-dots using gum arabic (GA and its use as molecular vehicle to ferry ciprofloxacin hydrochloride, a broad spectrum antibiotic, is reported in the present work. Density gradient centrifugation (DGC was used to separate different types of C-dots. After careful analysis of the fractions obtained after centrifugation, ciprofloxacin was attached to synthesize ciprofloxacin conjugated with C-dots (Cipro@C-dots conjugate. Release of ciprofloxacin was found to be extremely regulated under physiological conditions. Cipro@C-dots were found to be biocompatible on Vero cells as compared to free ciprofloxacin (1.2 mM even at very high concentrations. Bare C-dots (∼13 mg mL−1 were used for microbial imaging of the simplest eukaryotic model—Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast. Bright green fluorescent was obtained when live imaging was performed to view yeast cells under fluorescent microscope suggesting C-dots incorporation inside the cells. Cipro@C-dots conjugate also showed enhanced antimicrobial activity against both model gram positive and gram negative microorganisms. Thus, the Cipro@C-dots conjugate paves not only a way for bioimaging but also an efficient new nanocarrier for controlled drug release with high antimicrobial activity, thereby serving potential tool for theranostics.

  2. Enhancement of the Antifungal Activity of Antimicrobial Drugs by Eugenia uniflora L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Karla K.A.; Matias, Edinardo F.F.; Tintino, Saulo R.; Souza, Celestina E.S.; Braga, Maria F.B.M.; Guedes, Gláucia M.M.; Costa, José G.M.; Menezes, Irwin R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Candidiasis is the most frequent infection by opportunistic fungi such as Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, and Candida krusei. Ethanol extract from Eugenia uniflora was assayed, for its antifungal activity, either alone or combined with four selected chemotherapeutic antimicrobial agents, including anphotericin B, mebendazole, nistatin, and metronidazole against these strains. The obtained results indicated that the association of the extract of E. uniflora to metronidazole showed a potential antifungal activity against C. tropicalis. However, no synergistic activity against the other strains was observed, as observed when the extract was associated with the other, not enhancing their antifungal activity. PMID:23819641

  3. Utilização de antimicrobianos em uma população urbana Use of antimicrobial drugs in an urban population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura S Berquó

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: A emergência de cepas microbianas com crescentes níveis de resistência aos antimicrobianos tem sido objeto de preocupação em todo o mundo. Entre as causas apontadas para o fenômeno, está o uso abusivo e indiscriminado de drogas antimicrobianas. O presente estudo visa fornecer informações sobre o padrão de utilização dessas drogas em uma população urbana. MÉTODOS: Em um estudo transversal, de base populacional, 6.145 indivíduos de todas as idades residentes na zona urbana de Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, foram entrevistados sobre o uso de antimicrobianos nos 30 dias que antecederam a entrevista. RESULTADOS: A prevalência global de utilização de antimicrobianos encontrada foi de 8%. Essa foi maior entre as crianças até quatro anos de idade (14%; pOBJECTIVE: The emergence of multiresistant microorganisms has been a concerning matter worldwide in the last decades. Indiscriminate use of antibiotics has been associated to this phenomenon. The present study was designed to determine the pattern of antimicrobial drug use in an urban community. METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional study was carried out and 6,145 subjects of all ages living in the urban area of Pelotas, Brazil, were interviewed on the use of antimicrobial drugs in the 30 days previous to the interview. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of antimicrobial drug use was 8%. It was higher for children under 4 years of age (14%; p<0.001, women (9%; p=0.004 and divorced subjects (10%; p=0.02. The clinical conditions most frequently associated with antimicrobial drug use were respiratory tract infections (50%, urinary tract infections (16%, and dental infections (9%. Penicillins (41%, sulphas (17%, and tetracycline (8% were the most commonly used drugs. CONCLUSIONS: Abuse of last generation antimicrobial drugs, a concern of many experts, was not confirmed in this study. Antimicrobial drug use could be further reduced as respiratory illnesses, most frequently

  4. Antimicrobial and Herbal Drug Resistance in Enteric Bacteria Isolated from Faecal Droppings of Common House Lizard/Gecko (Hemidactylus frenatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhoj R. Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available From 194 faecal dropping samples of common house geckos collected from offices (60, houses (88, integrated farm units (IFS,18 and hostels, guest houses, and dining rooms of different canteen/mess (HGM, 28, 326 bacterial isolates of enteric bacteria belonging to 17 genera and 34 species were detected. Escherichia coli were the most frequently (39 isolated followed by Citrobacter freundii (33, Klebsiella pneumonia (27, Salmonella indica (12, Enterobacter gergoviae (12, and Ent. agglomerans (11. Other important bacteria isolated from gecko droppings were Listonella damsela (2, Raoultella terrigena (3, S. salamae (2, S. houtenae (3, Edwardsiella tarda (4, Edwardsiella hoshinae (1, and Klebsiella oxytoca (2. Of the 223 isolates tested for antimicrobial drug sensitivity, 27 (12.1% had multiple drug resistance (MDR. None of the salmonellae or edwardsiellae had MDR however, MDR strains were significantly more common among Escherichia spp. (P=1.9×10-5 and isolates from IFS units (P=3.58×10-23. The most effective herbal drug, Ageratum conyzoides extract, inhibited growth of only 27.8% of strains tested followed by ethanolic extract of Zanthoxylum rhetsa (13.9%, eucalyptus oil (5.4%, patchouli oil (5.4%, lemongrass oil (3.6%, and sandalwood oil (3.1%, and Artemisia vulgaris essential oil (3.1%.

  5. Antimicrobial activity of PVP from an Antarctic bacterium, Janthinobacterium sp. Ant5-2, on multi-drug and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jonathan P.

    2012-04-11

    Multiple drug resistant (MDR) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have become increasingly prevalent as a community acquired infection. As a result limited treatment options are available with conventional synthetic antibiotics. Bioprospecting natural products with potent antimicrobial activity show promise for developing new drugs against this pathogen. In this study, we have investigated the antimicrobial activity of a purple violet pigment (PVP) from an Antarctic bacterium, Janthinobacterium sp. Ant5-2 on 15 clinical MDR and MRSA strains. The colorimetric resazurin assay was employed to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC90) of PVP against MDR and MRSA. The MIC90 ranged between 1.57 µg/mL and 3.13 µg/mL, which are significantly lower than many antimicrobials tested from natural sources against this pathogen. The spectrophotometrically determined growth analysis and total microscopic counts using Live/dead® BacLight™ fluorescent stain exhibited a steady decrease in viability of both MDR and MRSA cultures following treatment with PVP at the MIC levels. In silico predictive molecular docking study revealed that PVP could be a DNA-targeting minor groove binding antimicrobial compound. The continued development of novel antimicrobials derived from natural sources with the combination of a suite of conventional antibiotics could stem the rising pandemic of MDR and MRSA along with other deadly microbial pathogens.

  6. Distribution, Detection of Enterotoxigenic Strains and Antimicrobial Drug Susceptibility Patterns of Bacteroides Fragilis Group in Diarrheic and Non-Diarrheic Feces from Brazilian Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Débora Paula; Silva, Vânia Lúcia; Guimarães, Danielle Aparecida; Coelho, Cíntia Marques; Zauli, Danielle Alves Gomes; Farias, Luiz Macêdo; Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora Roque; Diniz, Claudio Galuppo

    2010-01-01

    Despite the importance of gastrointestinal diseases and their global distribution, affecting millions of individuals around the world, the role and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of anaerobic bacteria such as those in the Bacteroides fragilis group (BFG) are still unclear in young children. This study investigated the occurrence and distribution of species in the BFG and enterotoxigenic strains in the fecal microbiota of children and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Diarrheic (n=110) and non-diarrheic (n=65) fecal samples from children aged 0–5 years old were evaluated. BFG strains were isolated and identified by conventional biochemical, physiological and molecular approaches. Alternatively, bacteria and enterotoxigenic strains were detected directly from feces by molecular biology. Antimicrobial drug susceptibility patterns were determined by the agar dilution method according to the guidelines for isolated bacteria. BFG was detected in 64.3% of the fecal samples (55% diarrheic and 80.4% non-diarrheic), and 4.6% were enterotoxigenic. Antimicrobial resistance was observed against ampicillin, ampicillin/sulbactam, piperacillin/tazobactam, meropenem, ceftriaxone, clindamycin and chloramphenicol. The data show that these bacteria are prevalent in fecal microbiota at higher levels in healthy children. The molecular methodology was more effective in identifying the B. fragilis group when compared to the biochemical and physiological techniques. The observation of high resistance levels stimulates thoughts about the indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs in early infancy. Further quantitative studies are needed to gain a better understanding of the role of these bacteria in acute diarrhea in children. PMID:24031535

  7. Distribution, detection of enterotoxigenic strains and antimicrobial drug susceptibility patterns of bacteroides fragilis group in diarrheic and non-diarrheic feces from brazilian infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Débora Paula; Silva, Vânia Lúcia; Guimarães, Danielle Aparecida; Coelho, Cíntia Marques; Zauli, Danielle Alves Gomes; Farias, Luiz Macêdo; Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora Roque; Diniz, Claudio Galuppo

    2010-07-01

    Despite the importance of gastrointestinal diseases and their global distribution, affecting millions of individuals around the world, the role and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of anaerobic bacteria such as those in the Bacteroides fragilis group (BFG) are still unclear in young children. This study investigated the occurrence and distribution of species in the BFG and enterotoxigenic strains in the fecal microbiota of children and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Diarrheic (n=110) and non-diarrheic (n=65) fecal samples from children aged 0-5 years old were evaluated. BFG strains were isolated and identified by conventional biochemical, physiological and molecular approaches. Alternatively, bacteria and enterotoxigenic strains were detected directly from feces by molecular biology. Antimicrobial drug susceptibility patterns were determined by the agar dilution method according to the guidelines for isolated bacteria. BFG was detected in 64.3% of the fecal samples (55% diarrheic and 80.4% non-diarrheic), and 4.6% were enterotoxigenic. Antimicrobial resistance was observed against ampicillin, ampicillin/sulbactam, piperacillin/tazobactam, meropenem, ceftriaxone, clindamycin and chloramphenicol. The data show that these bacteria are prevalent in fecal microbiota at higher levels in healthy children. The molecular methodology was more effective in identifying the B. fragilis group when compared to the biochemical and physiological techniques. The observation of high resistance levels stimulates thoughts about the indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs in early infancy. Further quantitative studies are needed to gain a better understanding of the role of these bacteria in acute diarrhea in children.

  8. Distribution, detection of enterotoxigenic strains and antimicrobial drug susceptibility patterns of Bacteroides fragilis group in diarrheic and non-diarrheic feces from Brazilian infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Paula Ferreira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of gastrointestinal diseases and their global distribution, affecting millions of individuals around the world, the role and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of anaerobic bacteria such as those in the Bacteroides fragilis group (BFG are still unclear in young children. This study investigated the occurrence and distribution of species in the BFG and enterotoxigenic strains in the fecal microbiota of children and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Diarrheic (n=110 and non-diarrheic (n=65 fecal samples from children aged 0-5 years old were evaluated. BFG strains were isolated and identified by conventional biochemical, physiological and molecular approaches. Alternatively, bacteria and enterotoxigenic strains were detected directly from feces by molecular biology. Antimicrobial drug susceptibility patterns were determined by the agar dilution method according to the guidelines for isolated bacteria. BFG was detected in 64.3% of the fecal samples (55% diarrheic and 80.4% non-diarrheic, and 4.6% were enterotoxigenic. Antimicrobial resistance was observed against ampicillin, ampicillin/sulbactam, piperacillin/tazobactam, meropenem, ceftriaxone, clindamycin and chloramphenicol. The data show that these bacteria are prevalent in fecal microbiota at higher levels in healthy children. The molecular methodology was more effective in identifying the B. fragilis group when compared to the biochemical and physiological techniques. The observation of high resistance levels stimulates thoughts about the indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs in early infancy. Further quantitative studies are needed to gain a better understanding of the role of these bacteria in acute diarrhea in children.

  9. Metal complexes of the fourth generation quinolone antimicrobial drug gatifloxacin: Synthesis, structure and biological evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeek, Sadeek A.; El-Shwiniy, Walaa H.

    2010-08-01

    Three metal complexes of the fourth generation quinolone antimicrobial agent gatifloxacin (GFLX) with Y(ΙΙΙ), Zr(ΙV) and U(VΙ) have been prepared and characterized with physicochemical and spectroscopic techniques. In these complexes, gatifloxacin acts as a bidentate deprotonated ligand bound to the metal through the ketone oxygen and a carboxylato oxygen. The complexes are six-coordinated with distorted octahedral geometry. The kinetic parameters for gatifloxacin and the three prepared complexes have been evaluated from TGA curves by using Coats-Redfern (CR) and Horowitz-Metzeger (HM) methods. The calculated bond length and force constant, F(U dbnd O), for the UO 2 bond in uranyl complex are 1.7522 Å and 639.46 N m -1. The antimicrobial activity of the complexes has been tested against microorganisms, three bacterial species, such as Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus), Escherichia coli ( E. coli) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ( P. aeruginosa) and two fungi species, penicillium ( P. rotatum) and trichoderma ( T. sp.), showing that they exhibit higher activity than free ligand.

  10. Resistance to antimicrobials drugs and control measures of Salmonella spp in the poultry industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velhner Maja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide prevalence of multiple resistant Salmonella spp is described. Clonally distributed Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 and Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 are among the most pathogenic strains for humans. Recently there have been reports on the prevalence of ST “like” monophasic 4(5,12:i strains in some countries. Vaccination strategy and antimicorbial agent therapy is also briefly discussed. Products of animal origin must be safe and without the risk of antimicrobial resistance. Subsequently, the good management practice at farm level and HACCP in feed factories are required to cope with salmonella infections. Poultry producers in developed countries have been motivated to participate in salmonella control programs, because of public awareness on safe food and risks in the food chain. Export of poultry and poultry products is more successful in the regions where Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium have been eradicated. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR31071

  11. Adverse drug reaction and toxicity caused by commonly used antimicrobials in canine practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Arunvikram

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available An adverse drug reaction (ADR is a serious concern for practicing veterinarians and other health professionals, and refers to an unintended, undesired and unexpected response to a drug that negatively affects the patient's health. It may be iatrogenic or genetically induced, and may result in death of the affected animal. The ADRs are often complicated and unexpected due to myriad clinical symptoms and multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction. Toxicity due to commonly used drugs is not uncommon when they are used injudiciously or for a prolonged period. Licosamides, exclusively prescribed against anaerobic pyoderma, often ends with diarrhoea and vomiting in canines. Treatment with Penicillin and β-lactam antibiotics induces onset of pemphigious vulgare, drug allergy or hypersensitivity. Chloroamphenicol and aminoglycosides causes Gray's baby syndrome and ototoxicity in puppies, respectively. Aminoglycosides are very often associated with nephrotoxicity, ototoxicity and neuromuscular blockage. Injudicious use of fluroquinones induces the onset of arthropathy in pups at the weight bearing joints. The most effective therapeutic measure in managing ADR is to treat the causative mediators, followed by supportive and symptomatic treatment. So, in this prospective review, we attempt to bring forth the commonly occurring adverse drug reactions, their classification, underlying mechanism, epidemiology, treatment and management as gleaned from the literature available till date and the different clinical cases observed by the authors.

  12. Electrospun microfiber membranes embedded with drug-loaded clay nanotubes for sustained antimicrobial protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jiajia; Niu, Yuzhao; Gong, Min; Shi, Rui; Chen, Dafu; Zhang, Liqun; Lvov, Yuri

    2015-02-24

    Guided tissue regeneration/guided bone regeneration membranes with sustained drug delivery were developed by electrospinning drug-loaded halloysite clay nanotubes doped into poly(caprolactone)/gelatin microfibers. Use of 20 wt % nanotube content in fiber membranes allowed for 25 wt % metronidazole drug loading in the membrane. Nanotubes with a diameter of 50 nm and a length of 600 nm were aligned within the 400 nm diameter electrospun fibers, resulting in membranes with doubling of tensile strength along the collector rotating direction. The halloysite-doped membranes acted as barriers against cell ingrows and have good biocompatibility. The metronidazole-loaded halloysite nanotubes incorporated in the microfibers allowed for extended release of the drugs over 20 days, compared to 4 days when directly admixed into the microfibers. The sustained release of metronidazole from the membranes prevented the colonization of anaerobic Fusobacteria, while eukaryotic cells could still adhere to and proliferate on the drug-loaded composite membranes. This indicates the potential of halloysite clay nanotubes as drug containers that can be incorporated into electrospun membranes for clinical applications.

  13. In vitro potential of equine DEFA1 and eCATH1 as alternative antimicrobial drugs in rhodococcosis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlusselhuber, Margot; Jung, Sascha; Bruhn, Oliver; Goux, Didier; Leippe, Matthias; Leclercq, Roland; Laugier, Claire; Grötzinger, Joachim; Cauchard, Julien

    2012-04-01

    Rhodococcus equi, the causal agent of rhodococcosis, is a severe pathogen of foals but also of immunodeficient humans, causing bronchopneumonia. The pathogen is often found together with Klebsiella pneumoniae or Streptococcus zooepidemicus in foals. Of great concern is the fact that some R. equi strains are already resistant to commonly used antibiotics. In the present study, we evaluated the in vitro potential of two equine antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), eCATH1 and DEFA1, as new drugs against R. equi and its associated pathogens. The peptides led to growth inhibition and death of R. equi and S. zooepidemicus at low micromolar concentrations. Moreover, eCATH1 was able to inhibit growth of K. pneumoniae. Both peptides caused rapid disruption of the R. equi membrane, leading to cell lysis. Interestingly, eCATH1 had a synergic effect together with rifampin. Furthermore, eCATH1 was not cytotoxic against mammalian cells at bacteriolytic concentrations and maintained its high killing activity even at physiological salt concentrations. Our data suggest that equine AMPs, especially eCATH1, may be promising candidates for alternative drugs to control R. equi in mono- and coinfections.

  14. Comparison of the in vitro activity of five antimicrobial drugs on Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aude A Ferran

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Resistance in canine pathogenic staphylococci is necessitating re-evaluation of the current antimicrobial treatments especially for biofilm-associated infections. Long, repeated treatments are often required to control such infections due to the tolerance of bacteria within the biofilm. To comply with the goal of better antibiotic stewardship in veterinary medicine, the efficacies of the available drugs need to be directly assessed on bacterial biofilms.We compared the activities of amoxicillin, cefalexin, clindamycin, doxycycline and marbofloxacin on in vitro biofilms of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Staphylococcus aureus. Exposure of biofilms for 15 hours to maximum concentrations of the antibiotics achievable in canine plasma only reduced biofilm bacteria by 0.5 to 2.0 log10 CFU, compared to the control, except for marbofloxacin which reduced S. aureus biofilms by 5.4 log10 CFU. Two-antibiotic combinations did not improve, and even decreased, bacterial killing. In comparison, 5 min-exposure to 2 % chlorhexidine reduced biofilms of the 2 tested strains by 4 log10 CFU. Our results showed that S. pseudintermedius biofilm, unlike S. aureus biofilm, was highly tolerant to all the drugs tested, consistent with the treatment failures observed in practice. Under our conditions, the use of topical chlorhexidine would probably be the best currently available strategy to reduce S. pseudintermedius biofilm.

  15. Utilization Evaluation of Antimicrobial Agents in Neutropenic Cancer Patients in a Teaching hospital: Urgent of Drug Utilization Evaluation Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Hamishehkar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: More than 80% of patients with hematologic malignancies will develop fever during more than one chemotherapy cycle combined with neutropenia. We aim to evaluate empiric antibiotic strategies in Febrile Neutropenic (FN cancer patients.Methods: This is a concurrent study performed in the “Shahid Ghazi” teaching hospital, hematology-oncology center of Tabriz, Iran during the period of December 2011 to September2012. During this period, patients with FN were evaluated in view of antibiotics utilization based on Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA and National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN instructions.Results: Seventy patients had a total of 91 episodes of FN in the duration of this study. Among them 63 (90% patients were the cases of acute leukemia. For 88 (96.7 % patients, imipenem was used as the initial empirical antibiotic regimen. It was changed to piperacillin/tazobactam in 8 (8.8% of them without indication. Cultures didn’t obtain before the initiation of empirical therapy in 19 (20.9% episodes. Empiric vancomycin didn’t discontinue after 3 days even if it was not warranted in 23 episodes. In 16 cases vancomycin was switched to teicoplanin. The fluconazole dosages generally given to patients were all suboptimal. Adjusting the dosages of vancomycin or imipenem was not done correctly in 13 (14.29% episodes.Conclusion: The results of this study showed that choosing antimicrobial agents and their dosing for prophylaxis and treatment of FN patients and discharge antimicrobial planning of FN patients do not follow the evaluated guidelines. Drug Usage Evaluation studies need to be done regularly in such a center.

  16. Resistance to antimicrobial drugs in different surface waters and wastewaters of Guadeloupe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyomard-Rabenirina, Stéphanie; Dartron, Celia; Falord, Mélanie; Sadikalay, Syndia; Ducat, Célia; Richard, Vincent; Breurec, Sébastien; Gros, Olivier; Talarmin, Antoine

    2017-01-01

    Objective The first aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial resistance of Enterobacteriaceae in different water environments of Guadeloupe and especially those impacted by waste water treatment plants (WWTP) effluents. The second objective was to characterize the genetic basis for antibiotic resistance of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and AmpC beta-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates (ESBLE and AmpCE). Methods We have collected 70 surface waters (river and sea samples) impacted or not by WWTP and 18 waste waters from 2 WWTPs in 2012 and 2013. We i) determined the total and resistant bacterial counts and ii) tested isolated Enterobacteriaceae for their antimicrobial susceptibility. We also studied the genetic basis for antibiotic resistance of ESBLE and AmpCE, and the genetic background of Escherichia coli. Results In rivers, contamination with Escherichia coli and antibiotic resistant coliforms (ARC) increased from the source to the mouth. Highest levels of river contamination with E. coli (9.26 x 105 MPN/100mL) and ARC (2.26 x 108 CFU/mL) were observed in surface water sampled near the discharge. A total of 246 Enterobacteriaceae strains resistant to antibiotics were isolated, mostly from waste waters and from river water collected near the discharge. Among these strains, 33 were Extended Spectrum Beta Lactamase (ESBLE) and 8 E. coli were AmpC beta-lactamase producers. All the ESBLE were isolated from waste waters or from river water collected near the discharge. The blaCTX-M gene was present in 29 of the 33 ESBLE strains, with 24 belonging to group 1. Numerous strains (68.7%) showed more than one acquired antibiotic resistance mechanism. E. coli strains belonged to different phylogenetic groups; among the B2 group, most strains belonged to the ST131 clone. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that many human activities can supply antibiotic-resistant bacteria in surface water. Nevertheless, WWTPs were the most important supplier

  17. Gemifloxacin, a Fluoroquinolone Antimicrobial Drug, Inhibits Migration and Invasion of Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Yu Kan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gemifloxacin (GMF is an orally administered broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agent used to treat acute bacterial exacerbation of pneumonia and bronchitis. Although fluoroquinolone antibiotics have also been found to have anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects, studies on the effect of GMF on treating colon cancer have been relatively rare. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the antimetastasis activities of GMF in colon cancer and the possible mechanisms involved. Results have shown that GMF inhibits the migration and invasion of colon cancer SW620 and LoVo cells and causes epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT. In addition, GMF suppresses the activation of NF-κB and cell migration and invasion induced by TNF-α and inhibits the TAK1/TAB2 interaction, resulting in decreased IκB phosphorylation and NF-κB nuclear translocation in SW620 cells. Furthermore, Snail, a critical transcriptional factor of EMT, was downregulated after GMF treatment. Overexpression of Snail by cDNA transfection significantly decreases the inhibitory effect of GMF on EMT and cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, GMF may be a novel anticancer agent for the treatment of metastasis in colon cancer.

  18. The human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide LL-37 and mimics are potential anticancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kengo eKuroda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs play a critical role in innate host defense against microbial pathogens in many organisms. The human cathelicidin LL-37 has a net positive charge and is amphiphilic, and can eliminate pathogenic microbes directly via electrostatic attraction toward negatively charged bacterial membranes. A number of studies have shown that LL-37 participates in various host immune systems, such as inflammatory responses and tissue repair, in addition to its antibacterial properties. Moreover, recent evidence suggests that it is also involved in the regulation of cancer. Indeed, previous studies have suggested that human LL-37 is involved in carcinogenesis via multiple reporters such as FPR2 (FPRL1, EGFR, and ERBb2, although LL-37 and its fragments and analogues also show anticancer effects in various cancer cell lines. This discrepancy can be attributed to peptide-based factors, host membrane-based factors, and signal regulation. Here, we describe the association between AMPs and cancer with a focus on anticancer peptide functions and selectivity in an effort to understand potential therapeutic implications.

  19. CONTROL OF ANTIMICROBIAL DRUGS: ANALYSIS FROM THE RDC 44 OF OCTOBER 26, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Gonçalves

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The indiscriminate use of antibiotics has been reported as an agent for predisposing episodes of bacterial resistance, the bacteria along of the time spent to develop various coping mechanisms. ANVISA considering the increase in cases of hospital infections by antibiotic-resistant microorganisms determined the RDC 44, 2010 which regulates the dispensing of medicines made from classified as antimicrobial substances. This work it is a descriptive literature review that evaluated studies related to prescribing, dispensing and use of antibiotics before and after the RDC 44 of 2010. It was observed that the most of used in therapeutic classes of antibiotics before the current legislation are the same as those after the law. About knowledge and acceptance by the population, 87.2% were satisfied and understood the new regulatory measures, who disagreed (2.4% with such changes, the need for medical consultation to obtain prescription was the point of discontent. There are still some drugstores, where professionals do not require that there be a prescription (25%, analyzing the prescriptions it was noted that 100% contained the prescribing data and 87.7% contained the date of issue. According to the results obtained can be seen that there was rather changes in relation to consumption of antibiotics after the RDC 44, 2010, however, there are still cases where the law is not fully enforced, for this, it is necessary that there is better control by public health managers.

  20. Differential roles of antimicrobials in the acquisition of drug resistance through activation of the SOS response in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, Luis M; Cortés, Pilar; Bou, Germán; Barbé, Jordi; Aranda, Jesús

    2015-07-01

    The effect of antimicrobials on SOS-mediated mutagenesis induction depends on the bacterial species and the antimicrobial group. In this work, we studied the effect of different families of antimicrobial agents used in clinical therapy against Acinetobacter baumannii in the induction of mutagenesis in this multiresistant Gram-negative pathogen. The data showed that ciprofloxacin and tetracycline induce SOS-mediated mutagenesis, whereas colistin and meropenem, which are extensively used in clinical therapy, do not.

  1. Development and characterization of novel hydrogel containing antimicrobial drug for treatment of burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Vaishali; Korat, Vaishali; Baldaniya, Lalji; Gohel, Mukesh; Gandhi, Tejal; Patel, Nirav

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of burn management and therapy is fast healing and epithelisation to prevent infection. The present study is concerned with the development and characterization of a novel nanaoparticulate system; cubosomes, loaded with silver sulfadiazine (SSD) and Aloe vera for topical treatment of infected burns. Methods: Cubosome dispersions were formulated by an emulsification technique using different concentrations of a lipid phase Glyceryl Monooleate (GMO) and Poloxamer 407. The optimum formulae were incorporated in an aloe vera gel containing carbopol 934, to form cubosomal hydrogels (cubogels). The cubogels were characterized by in vitro release of SSD, rheological properties, pH, bioadhesion, Transmission Electron Microscopy and in-vivo Wound Healing Study. Results: The results show that the different concentration of GMO had significant effect on particle size, % EE and in vitro drug release. From the in-vitro drug release pattern and similarity factor (f2), it was concluded that batch CG3 (15% GMO and 1% P407) exhibited complete and controlled drug release within 12 hour (i.e. 98.25%), better bio adhesion and superior burn healing as compared to the marketed product. Conclusion: The in vivo burns healing study in rats revealed that the prepared optimized cubogel containing SSD and aloe vera has superior burns healing rate than cubogel with only SSD and marketed preparation so, it may be successfully used in the treatment of deep second degree burn. PMID:27606259

  2. Differential roles of RND efflux pumps in antimicrobial drug resistance of sessile and planktonic Burkholderia cenocepacia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buroni, Silvia; Matthijs, Nele; Spadaro, Francesca; Van Acker, Heleen; Scoffone, Viola C; Pasca, Maria Rosalia; Riccardi, Giovanna; Coenye, Tom

    2014-12-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is notorious for causing respiratory tract infections in people with cystic fibrosis. Infections with this organism are particularly difficult to treat due to its high level of intrinsic resistance to most antibiotics. Multidrug resistance in B. cenocepacia can be ascribed to different mechanisms, including the activity of efflux pumps and biofilm formation. In the present study, the effects of deletion of the 16 operons encoding resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type efflux pumps in B. cenocepacia strain J2315 were investigated by determining the MICs of various antibiotics and by investigating the antibiofilm effect of these antibiotics. Finally, the expression levels of selected RND genes in treated and untreated cultures were investigated using reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Our data indicate that the RND-3 and RND-4 efflux pumps are important for resistance to various antimicrobial drugs (including tobramycin and ciprofloxacin) in planktonic B. cenocepacia J2315 populations, while the RND-3, RND-8, and RND-9 efflux systems protect biofilm-grown cells against tobramycin. The RND-8 and RND-9 efflux pumps are not involved in ciprofloxacin resistance. Results from the RT-qPCR experiments on the wild-type strain B. cenocepacia J2315 suggest that there is little regulation at the level of mRNA expression for these efflux pumps under the conditions tested.

  3. Board game versus lecture-based seminar in the teaching of pharmacology of antimicrobial drugs--a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbownik, Michał S; Wiktorowska-Owczarek, Anna; Kowalczyk, Edward; Kwarta, Paulina; Mokros, Łukasz; Pietras, Tadeusz

    2016-04-01

    The effectiveness of an educational board game developed to teach the pharmacology of antimicrobial drugs to medical students was compared with the lecture-based seminar as a supplemental tool to improve short- and long-term knowledge retention and the perception of the learning method by students. A group of 124 students was randomized to board game and control groups. Short-term knowledge retention was assessed by comparing differences in post- and pre-tests scores, and long-term knowledge retention by comparing final examination scores. Both didactic methods seem to improve short-term knowledge retention to similar extent. Long-term knowledge retention of board game seminar participants was higher than those who attended the lecture-based seminar (ANCOVA, P = 0.035). The effect was most pronounced within 14 days after the intervention (ANOVA, P = 0.007). The board game was well perceived by the students. The board game seems to be a promising didactic tool, however, it should be further tested to assess its full educational utility.

  4. Potential of berberine to enhance antimicrobial activity of commonly used antibiotics for dairy cow mastitis caused by multiple drug-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X; Yang, C; Li, Y; Liu, X; Wang, Y

    2015-08-19

    Berberine is a plant alkaloid with antimicrobial activity against a variety of microorganisms. In this study, the antimicrobial properties of berberine against multi-drug resistant field isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis were investigated using berberine alone or in combination with a commonly used antibiotics in veterinary clinics, including penicillin, lincomycin, and amoxicillin. The results indicated that the minimum inhibitory concentrations of berberine, penicillin, lincomycin, and amoxicillin against field S. epidermidis isolates were 2-512, 0.8-213, 0.4-1024, and 0.4-256 mg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, the synergistic effects of antimicrobial activity against these multi-drug resistant isolates were observed when the berberine was combined with penicillin, lincomycin, or amoxicillin; no antagonistic effect of the combination was detected in any of the clinical isolates. These observations were further confirmed using a time-killing assay, in which a combination of 2 agents yielded a greater than 2.03-2.44 log10 decrease in colony-forming unit/mL compared with each agent alone. These findings suggest that berberine is a promising compound for preventing and treating multi-drug resistant S. epidermidis infected mastitis in dairy cows either alone or in combination with other commonly used antibiotics, such as penicillin, lincomycin, and amoxicillin.

  5. Drug use and antimicrobial resistance among Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. isolates from chicken and turkey flocks slaughtered in Quebec, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulianne, Martine; Arsenault, Julie; Daignault, Danielle; Archambault, Marie; Letellier, Ann; Dutil, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    An observational study was conducted of chicken and turkey flocks slaughtered at federal processing plants in the province of Quebec, Canada. The objectives were to estimate prevalence of drug use at hatchery and on farm and to identify antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in cecal Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. isolates and factors associated with AMR. Eighty-two chicken flocks and 59 turkey flocks were sampled. At the hatchery, the most used antimicrobial was ceftiofur in chickens (76% of flocks) and spectinomycin in turkeys (42% of flocks). Virginiamycin was the antimicrobial most frequently added to the feed in both chicken and turkey flocks. At least 1 E. coli isolate resistant to third-generation cephalosporins was present in all chicken flocks and in a third of turkey flocks. Resistance to tetracycline, streptomycin, and sulfisoxazole was detected in > 90% of flocks for E. coli isolates. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) was observed to bacitracin, erythromycin, lincomycin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, and tetracycline in both chicken and turkey flocks for Enterococcus spp. isolates. No resistance to vancomycin was observed. The use of ceftiofur at hatchery was significantly associated with the proportion of ceftiofur-resistant E. coli isolates in chicken flocks. In turkey flocks, ceftiofur resistance was more frequent when turkeys were placed on litter previously used by chickens. Associations between drug use and resistance were observed with tetracycline (turkey) in E. coli isolates and with bacitracin (chicken and turkey), gentamicin (turkey), and tylosin (chicken) in Enterococcus spp. isolates. Further studies are needed to provide producers and veterinarians with alternative management practices and tools in order to reduce the use of antimicrobial feed additives in poultry.

  6. Drug use and antimicrobial resistance among Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. isolates from chicken and turkey flocks slaughtered in Quebec, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulianne, Martine; Arsenault, Julie; Daignault, Danielle; Archambault, Marie; Letellier, Ann; Dutil, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    An observational study was conducted of chicken and turkey flocks slaughtered at federal processing plants in the province of Quebec, Canada. The objectives were to estimate prevalence of drug use at hatchery and on farm and to identify antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in cecal Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. isolates and factors associated with AMR. Eighty-two chicken flocks and 59 turkey flocks were sampled. At the hatchery, the most used antimicrobial was ceftiofur in chickens (76% of flocks) and spectinomycin in turkeys (42% of flocks). Virginiamycin was the antimicrobial most frequently added to the feed in both chicken and turkey flocks. At least 1 E. coli isolate resistant to third-generation cephalosporins was present in all chicken flocks and in a third of turkey flocks. Resistance to tetracycline, streptomycin, and sulfisoxazole was detected in > 90% of flocks for E. coli isolates. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) was observed to bacitracin, erythromycin, lincomycin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, and tetracycline in both chicken and turkey flocks for Enterococcus spp. isolates. No resistance to vancomycin was observed. The use of ceftiofur at hatchery was significantly associated with the proportion of ceftiofur-resistant E. coli isolates in chicken flocks. In turkey flocks, ceftiofur resistance was more frequent when turkeys were placed on litter previously used by chickens. Associations between drug use and resistance were observed with tetracycline (turkey) in E. coli isolates and with bacitracin (chicken and turkey), gentamicin (turkey), and tylosin (chicken) in Enterococcus spp. isolates. Further studies are needed to provide producers and veterinarians with alternative management practices and tools in order to reduce the use of antimicrobial feed additives in poultry. PMID:26733732

  7. Antimicrobial polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anjali; Duvvuri, L Sailaja; Farah, Shady; Beyth, Nurit; Domb, Abraham J; Khan, Wahid

    2014-12-01

    Better health is basic requirement of human being, but the rapid growth of harmful pathogens and their serious health effects pose a significant challenge to modern science. Infections by pathogenic microorganisms are of great concern in many fields such as medical devices, drugs, hospital surfaces/furniture, dental restoration, surgery equipment, health care products, and hygienic applications (e.g., water purification systems, textiles, food packaging and storage, major or domestic appliances etc.) Antimicrobial polymers are the materials having the capability to kill/inhibit the growth of microbes on their surface or surrounding environment. Recently, they gained considerable interest for both academic research and industry and were found to be better than their small molecular counterparts in terms of enhanced efficacy, reduced toxicity, minimized environmental problems, resistance, and prolonged lifetime. Hence, efforts have focused on the development of antimicrobial polymers with all desired characters for optimum activity. In this Review, an overview of different antimicrobial polymers, their mechanism of action, factors affecting antimicrobial activity, and application in various fields are given. Recent advances and the current clinical status of these polymers are also discussed.

  8. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Skip to common links HHS U.S. Department of Health and Human Services U.S. Food and Drug Administration ... Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet ...

  9. Modulating the properties of sunflower oil based novel emulgels using castor oil fatty acid ester: prospects for topical antimicrobial drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, B; Biswal, D; Uvanesh, K; Srivastava, A K; Bhattacharya, Mrinal K; Paramanik, K; Pal, K

    2015-04-01

    The current study describes the effect of polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR) on the properties of sunflower oil and span-40 based emulgels. The prepared emulgels contained PGPR in varied concentrations. The microstructure of the emulgels was characterized by bright-field microscopy. The molecular interactions amongst the components of the emulgels were studied using FTIR spectroscopy. The flow and mechanical behaviors of the emulgels were studied using cone-and-plate viscometer and static mechanical tester, respectively. The efficiency of the metronidazole-loaded emulgels as antimicrobial formulations was tested in vitro. E. coli was used as the model microorganism for the antimicrobial study. The emulgels were also explored for iontophoretic delivery applications. The biocompatibility of the emulgels was tested using human keratinocytes (HaCaT). The microscopic evaluation of the emulgels indicated formation of biphasic formulations. FTIR studies suggested a decrease in the hydrogen bonding amongst the components of the emulgels as the concentration of the PGPR was increased. Viscosity studies indicated shear-thinning property of the emulgels. An increase in the PGPR concentration resulted in the reduction in the mechanical properties of the emulgels. Incorporation of PGPR resulted in the decrease in the drug released (both passive and iontophoresis) from the emulgels. The emulgels were found to be cytocompatible in the presence of keratinocytes. The drug loaded emulgels showed good antimicrobial activity against E. coli. In gist, the developed emulgels can be tried for controlled delivery of antimicrobial drugs. The physical and the release properties of the emulgels can be modulated by incorporating PGPR in varied proportions.

  10. General principles of antimicrobial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leekha, Surbhi; Terrell, Christine L; Edson, Randall S

    2011-02-01

    Antimicrobial agents are some of the most widely, and often injudiciously, used therapeutic drugs worldwide. Important considerations when prescribing antimicrobial therapy include obtaining an accurate diagnosis of infection; understanding the difference between empiric and definitive therapy; identifying opportunities to switch to narrow-spectrum, cost-effective oral agents for the shortest duration necessary; understanding drug characteristics that are peculiar to antimicrobial agents (such as pharmacodynamics and efficacy at the site of infection); accounting for host characteristics that influence antimicrobial activity; and in turn, recognizing the adverse effects of antimicrobial agents on the host. It is also important to understand the importance of antimicrobial stewardship, to know when to consult infectious disease specialists for guidance, and to be able to identify situations when antimicrobial therapy is not needed. By following these general principles, all practicing physicians should be able to use antimicrobial agents in a responsible manner that benefits both the individual patient and the community.

  11. Sensitivites in vitro to antimicrobial drugs of bovine mycoplasmas isolated from respiratory and genital tracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishima, M; Hashimoto, K; Minato, H

    1978-01-01

    A total of 155 Mycoplasma strains were examined for sensitivity to nine antibiotics and four nitrofurans by the agar dilution method. They consisted of 69 strains of Mycoplasma bovirhinis, 33 strains of M. bovigenitalium, 49 strains of Acholeplasma laidlawii and four strains of A. modicum isolated from the nasal secretions, tracheas and lungs of calves manifesting respiratory symptoms and from bovine genital tracts collected at a slaughterhouse. As a result, furamizole and mitomycin C showed the strongest growth-inhibiting effect on all the strains. They were followed in this effect by kitasamycin tartrate, spiramycin adipate, tylosin tartrate, tetracycline-HCl and chloramphenicol. Furthermore, these five drugs were followed in the effect by furazolidone, nitrofurantoin and sodium nifurstyrenate. Fradiomycin sulfate and kanamycin sulfate showed only little effect on all the strains. Erythromycin lactobionate showed a strong growth-inhibiting effect on the Acholeplasma strains, but not on the Mycoplasma strains. There were some cross resistant strains of the Acholeplasma species to the effects of the macrolides.

  12. Characterization of C-S Lyase from C. diphtheriae: A Possible Target for New Antimicrobial Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Astegno

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of antibiotic resistance in microbial pathogens requires the identification of new antibacterial drugs. The biosynthesis of methionine is an attractive target because of its central importance in cellular metabolism. Moreover, most of the steps in methionine biosynthesis pathway are absent in mammals, lowering the probability of unwanted side effects. Herein, detailed biochemical characterization of one enzyme required for methionine biosynthesis, a pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP- dependent C-S lyase from Corynebacterium diphtheriae, a pathogenic bacterium that causes diphtheria, has been performed. We overexpressed the protein in E. coli and analyzed substrate specificity, pH dependence of steady state kinetic parameters, and ligand-induced spectral transitions of the protein. Structural comparison of the enzyme with cystalysin from Treponema denticola indicates a similarity in overall folding. We used site-directed mutagenesis to highlight the importance of active site residues Tyr55, Tyr114, and Arg351, analyzing the effects of amino acid replacement on catalytic properties of enzyme. Better understanding of the active site of C. diphtheriae C-S lyase and the determinants of substrate and reaction specificity from this work will facilitate the design of novel inhibitors as antibacterial therapeutics.

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Adem Bahar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill “superbugs” emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics.

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of hetero- and homodimers of ribosome-targeting antibiotics: antimicrobial activity, in vitro inhibition of translation, and drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkov-Zrihen, Yifat; Green, Keith D; Labby, Kristin J; Feldman, Mark; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie; Fridman, Micha

    2013-07-11

    In this study, we describe the synthesis of a full set of homo- and heterodimers of three intact structures of different ribosome-targeting antibiotics: tobramycin, clindamycin, and chloramphenicol. Several aspects of the biological activity of the dimeric structures were evaluated including antimicrobial activity, inhibition of in vitro bacterial protein translation, and the effect of dimerization on the action of several bacterial resistance mechanisms that deactivate tobramycin and chloramphenicol. This study demonstrates that covalently linking two identical or different ribosome-targeting antibiotics may lead to (i) a broader spectrum of antimicrobial activity, (ii) improved inhibition of bacterial translation properties compared to that of the parent antibiotics, and (iii) reduction in the efficacy of some drug-modifying enzymes that confer high levels of resistance to the parent antibiotics from which the dimers were derived.

  15. Trends in Drug Resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii over a 10-year Period: Nationwide Data from the China Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Lyu, Yuan; Li, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an important pathogen causing a variety of infections. Using data from the China Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance Program conducted biennially, we investigated the secular changes in the resistance of 2917 isolates of A. baumannii from 2004 to 2014 to differ antimicrobial agents. Methods: Pathogen samples were collected from 17 to 20 hospitals located in the eastern, central, and western regions of China. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by a 2-fold agar dilution method, and antimicrobial susceptibility was established using the 2014 Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute-approved breakpoints. Isolates not susceptible to all the tested aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, β-lactams, β-lactam/β-lactam inhibitors and carbapenems were defined as extensively drug resistant. Results: The rates of nonsusceptibility to common antimicrobial agents remained high (>65%) over the years with some fluctuations to certain agents. The prevalence of imipenem-resistant A. baumannii (IRAB) increased from 13.3% in 2004 to 70.5% in 2014 and that of extensively drug-resistant A. baumannii (XDRAB) increased from 11.1% in 2004 to 60.4% in 2014. The activity of tigecycline was stable with MIC90 ≤4 mg/L against A. baumannii from 2009 to 2014. Susceptibility to colistin remained high (97.0%) from 2009 to 2014. The prevalence of XDRAB increased in all the three surveillance regions over the years and was significantly higher in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) wards than non-ICU wards. Conclusions: This longitudinal multicenter surveillance program revealed the nationwide emergence of A. baumannii in China and showed a significant increase in prevalence from 2004 to 2014. High levels of bacterial resistance were detected among samples collected from clinical settings in China, with IRAB and XDRAB being especially prevalent. This study will help to guide empirical therapy and identify at-risk groups requiring more

  16. Antimicrobial activity of selected Iranian medicinal plants against a broad spectrum of pathogenic and drug multiresistant micro-organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedini, A; Roumy, V; Mahieux, S; Gohari, A; Farimani, M M; Rivière, C; Samaillie, J; Sahpaz, S; Bailleul, F; Neut, C; Hennebelle, T

    2014-10-01

    The antimicrobial activities of 44 methanolic extracts from different parts of Iranian indigenous plant species used in traditional medicines of Iran were tested against a panel of 35 pathogenic and multiresistant bacteria and 1 yeast. The antimicrobial efficacy was determined using Müller-Hinton agar in Petri dishes seeded by a multiple inoculator and minimal inhibition concentration (MIC) method. The 21 most active extracts (MIC micro-organisms) were submitted to a more refined measurement. The best antibacterial activity was obtained by 10 plants. Microdilution assays allowed to determinate the MIC and MBC of the 21 most active extracts. The lowest achieved MIC value was 78 μg ml(-1), with 4 extracts. This work confirms the antimicrobial activity of assayed plants and suggests further examination to identify the chemical structure of their antimicrobial compounds. Significance and impact of the study: This study describes the antimicrobial screening of Iranian plant extracts chosen according to traditional practice against 36 microbial strains, from reference culture collections or recent clinical isolates, and enables to select 4 candidates for further chemical characterization and biological assessment: Dorema ammoniacum, Ferula assa-foetida, Ferulago contracta (seeds) and Perovskia abrotanoides (aerial parts). This may be useful in the development of potential antimicrobial agents, from easily harvested and highly sustainable plant parts. Moreover, the weak extent of cross-resistance between plant extracts and antibiotics warrants further research and may promote a strategy based on less potent but time-trained products.

  17. The effects of antimicrobial agents rectification in clinical rational drug use%抗菌药物专项整治对临床合理用药的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶红; 李绍军

    2014-01-01

    目的:分析抗菌药物专项整治对医院抗菌药物使用的影响。方法结合消耗金额统计法和用药频度(DDDs)分析法,回顾性分析医院使用抗菌药物的数据。结果抗菌药的DDDs及消耗金额都呈现下降趋势,其中注射类药物的DDDs下降比较明显。非限制类抗菌药物的使用比例上升,特殊类抗菌药物的使用比例有比较明显的下降。结论专项整治效果明显,但仍存在部分抗菌药物用药过度、用药结构不合理、用药集中等问题,应该加强抗菌药物的管理,合理的临床用药。%Objective To analyze the effects of antimicrobial agents rectification in clinical rational drug use.Methods The data of antimicrobial drugs used in hospital was retrospectively analyzed, combined with the amount of statistics and drug consumption frequency(DDDs) analysis.Results The amount of consumption of antimicrobial drugs DDDs had shown a downward trend, in which injectable drugs DDDs decreased obviously ; Non-restricted use of antibiotics proportion rose, the proportion of the use of a special class of antimicrobial drugs declined obviously .Conclusion The rectification effect is obvious, but it may also have antimicrobial drug overdose, medication irrational structure, centralized administration and other issues, and the management of antimicrobial drugs, rational clinical use should be strengthened.

  18. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Respond to Pre-Award Requests Manage Your Award Negotiation & Initial Award After Award ... New Trial Launched in West Africa to Evaluate Three Vaccination Strategies , April 6, 2017 Monoclonal Antibody Cures Marburg Infection ...

  19. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Respond to Pre-Award Requests Manage Your Award Negotiation & Initial Award After Award ... New Trial Launched in West Africa to Evaluate Three Vaccination Strategies , April 6, 2017 Monoclonal Antibody Cures Marburg Infection ...

  20. Report of adverse reaction of antimicrobial drug used in 190 cases%抗菌药物不良反应190例报告分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘清安

    2014-01-01

    目的:分析我院抗菌药物不良反应的主要特点和相关规律,为合理用药提供几点依据。方法对我院2010年至2013年出现的190例抗菌药物不良反应数据进行统计和分析。结果190例抗菌药物不良反应报告中,主要涉及5类抗菌药物,包括头孢菌素类88例,占46.32%,为不良反应首位,其次为喹诺酮类50例,占26.32%。结论抗菌药物使用不良反应与多种因素有关,因此应该注重相关检测工作,合理使用抗菌药物,减少不良反应的出现。%Objective to analyze the main features and relevant regulations of adverse reactions in antimicrobial drugs and to provide the basis for rational drug use.Methods the data of 190 cases of adverse reaction in antibacterial drug use in our hospital from 2010 to 2013 were statistically analyzed.Results in reports of 190 cases of adverse reaction in antibacterial drugs, they mainly referred to 5 kinds of antibiotics, including 88 cases of cephalosporin, accounting for 46.32%, as the first place for adverse reaction, and followed by quinolones in 50 cases, accounting for 26.32%.Conclusion the adverse reaction of antibiotics use associated with many factors, therefore we ought to focus on correlation detection and rational use of antimicrobial drugs to reduce the appearance of adverse reactions.

  1. In vitro drug release behavior, mechanism and antimicrobial activity of rifampicin loaded low molecular weight PLGA-PEG-PLGA triblock copolymeric nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajendiran, M; Divakar, S; Raaman, N; Balasubramanian, S

    2013-12-01

    Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA (92:8)) and a series of PLGA-PEG-PLGA tri block copolymers were synthesized by direct melt polycondensation. The copolymers were characterized by FTIR, and 1HNMR spectroscopic techniques, viscosity, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and powder x-ray diffraction (XRD). The rifampicin (RIF) loaded polymeric nanospheres (NPs) were prepared by ultrasonication-W/O emulsification technique. The NPs have been characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), TEM, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), UVvisible spectroscopy and DLS measurements. The drug loaded triblock copolymeric NPs have five folds higher drug content and drug loading efficiency than that of PLGA microspheres (MPs). The in vitro drug release study shows that the drug loaded NPs showed an initial burst release after that sustained release up to 72 h. All the triblock copolymeric NPs follow anomalous drug diffusion mechanism while the PLGA MPs follow non-Fickian super case-II mechanism up to 12 h. The overall in-vitro release follows second order polynomial kinetics up to 72 h. The antimicrobial activity of the RIF loaded polymer NPs was compared with that of pure RIF and tetracycline (TA). The RIF loaded triblock copolymeric NPs inhibited the bacterial growth more effectively than the pure RIF and TA.

  2. Antimicrobial drug use and infection control practices associated with the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in European hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, F M; Bruce, J; Struelens, M J; Goossens, H; Mollison, J; Gould, I M

    2007-03-01

    Major regional variations in the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are observed across Europe. This study investigated hospital MRSA prevalence in relation to patterns of antimicrobial use and infection control policies in an observational, cross-sectional study that used retrospective data from 2001 and linear regression to model relationships. MRSA prevalence (median 20.8%, n = 173 hospitals) and antimicrobial consumption (median 55.2 defined daily doses/100 bed-days, n = 140 hospitals) both varied significantly according to geographical region (p antimicrobial consumption data were provided by 128 hospitals, and showed a strong statistical relationship between macrolide use and MRSA prevalence. Use of (i) third-generation cephalosporins, (ii) all antimicrobial agents, and (iii) all antimicrobial agents except glycopeptides was also associated with MRSA prevalence. Up to 146 hospitals provided data on MRSA prevalence and key infection control parameters. Adjusted linear regression modelling provided strong evidence that infection control policy recommendations associated with lower MRSA prevalence rates were (i) use of alcohol-based solutions for hand hygiene (mean difference 10.3%, 99% CI 1.2-10.3), and (ii) placement of MRSA patients in single rooms (mean difference 11.2%, 99% CI 1.4-20.9). Hospitals with problems in implementing isolation policies had higher resistance levels (mean difference 12%, 99% CI 3.8-20.1). Additional recommendations showed less evidence of association with a low MRSA prevalence. Overall, this study highlighted significant associations between MRSA prevalence, antimicrobial use and various key infection control parameters, all of which showed significant individual variations according to geographical region.

  3. Antimicrobial drugs for persistent diarrhoea of unknown or non-specific cause in children under six in low and middle income countries: systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hart C Anthony

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A high proportion of children with persistent diarrhoea in middle and low income countries die. The best treatment is not clear. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate the effectiveness of antimicrobial drug treatment for persistent diarrhoea of unknown or non-specific cause. Methods We included randomized comparisons of antimicrobial drugs for the treatment of persistent diarrhoea of unknown or non-specific cause in children under the age of six years in low and middle income countries. We searched the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, WEB OF SCIENCE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL to May 2008 for relevant randomized or quasi randomized controlled trials. We summarised the characteristics of the eligible trials, assessed their quality using standard criteria, and extracted relevant outcomes data. Where appropriate, we combined the results of different trials. Results Three trials from South East Asia and one from Guatemala were included, all were small, and three had adequate allocation concealment. Two were in patients with diarrhoea of unknown cause, and two were in patients in whom known bacterial or parasitological causes of diarrhoea had been excluded. No difference was demonstrated for oral gentamicin compared with placebo (presence of diarrhoea at 6 or 7 days; 2 trials, n = 151; and for metronidazole compared with placebo (presence of diarrhoea at 3, 5 and 7 days; 1 trial, n = 99. In one small trial, sulphamethoxazole-trimethoprim appeared better than placebo in relation to diarrhoea at seven days and total stool volume (n = 55. Conclusion There is little evidence as to whether or not antimicrobials help treat persistent diarrhoea in young children in low and middle income countries.

  4. The antimicrobial effects of cinnamon oil against multi-drug resistant Salmonella Newport on organic leafy greens

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is generally no kill-step when preparing salad vegetables, so there is a risk for foodborne illness outbreaks due to consumption of these vegetables. Some essential oils have antimicrobial activities and could provide a natural way to reduce pathogens on fresh produce. The use of a cinnamon ...

  5. Descriptors for antimicrobial peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard

    2011-01-01

    of antimicrobial drugs, and computational methods utilizing molecular descriptors can significantly accelerate the development of new peptide drug candidates. Areas covered: This paper gives a broad overview of peptide and amino-acid scale descriptors available for AMP modeling and highlights which...

  6. TiO2 nanotube arrays deposited on Ti substrate by anodic oxidation and their potential as a long-term drug delivery system for antimicrobial agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseke, Claus; Hage, Felix; Vorndran, Elke; Gbureck, Uwe

    2012-05-01

    Nanotube arrays on medical titanium surfaces were fabricated by two different anodization methods and their potential for storage and release of antimicrobial substances was evaluated. The treatment of the Ti surfaces in fluoride containing electrolytes on water as well as on polyethylene glycol basis led to the formation of TiO2 nanotubes with up to 6.54 μm length and average diameters of up to 160 nm. Drug release experiments with the model antibiotic vancomycin and with antibacterial silver ions showed that the increased surface area of the anodized samples enabled them to be loaded with up to 450% more active agent than the untreated Ti surfaces. Significant surface-dependent differences in the release kinetics of vancomycin were observed. In comparison to surfaces anodized in an aqueous electrolyte, the release of the antibiotic from surfaces anodized in an electrolyte based on ethylene glycol was significantly retarded, with a release of noticeable amounts over a period of more than 300 days. Loading of nanotube surfaces fabricated in aqueous electrolyte with silver ions revealed increased amounts of adsorbed silver by up to 230%, while the release kinetics showed significant differences in comparison to untreated Ti. It was concluded that nanotube arrays on favored medical implant materials have a high potential for loading with antimicrobial agents and also provide the possibility of tailored release kinetics by variation of anodization parameters.

  7. Antimicrobial activity of green tea extract against isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maksum Radji; Rafael Adi Agustama; Berna Elya; Conny Riana Tjampakasari

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate antibacterial activity of the Indonesian water soluble green tea extract,Camellia sinensis, against clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) (MRSA) and multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-P. aeruginosa). Methods:Antimicrobial activity of green tea extract was determined by the disc diffusion method and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by the twofold serial broth dilutions method. The tested bacteria using in this study were the standard strains and multi-drug resistant clinical isolates of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, obtained from Laboratory of Clinical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Indonesia. Results:The results showed that the inhibition zone diameter of green tea extracts for S. aureus ATCC 25923 and MRSA were (18.970±0.287) mm, and (19.130±0.250) mm respectively. While the inhibition zone diameter for P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and MDR-P. aeruginosa were (17.550±0.393) mm and (17.670±0.398) mm respectively. The MIC of green tea extracts against S. aureus ATCC 25923 and MRSA were 400 µg/mL and 400 µg/mL, respectively, whereas the MIC for P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and MDR-P. aeruginosa were 800 µg/mL, and 800 µg/mL, respectively. Conclusions: Camellia sinensis leaves extract could be useful in combating emerging drug-resistance caused by MRSA and P. aeruginosa.

  8. Pharmacogenomics of antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Ar Kar; Haas, David W; Hulgan, Todd; Phillips, Elizabeth J

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial efficacy and toxicity varies between individuals owing to multiple factors. Genetic variants that affect drug-metabolizing enzymes may influence antimicrobial pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, thereby determining efficacy and/or toxicity. In addition, many severe immune-mediated reactions have been associated with HLA class I and class II genes. In the last two decades, understanding of pharmacogenomic factors that influence antimicrobial efficacy and toxicity has rapidly evolved, leading to translational success such as the routine use of HLA-B*57:01 screening to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity reactions. This article examines recent advances in the field of antimicrobial pharmacogenomics that potentially affect treatment efficacy and toxicity, and challenges that exist between pharmacogenomic discovery and translation into clinical use.

  9. Antimicrobial Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jump to main content US EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Pesticides Share Facebook Twitter Google+ ... of antimicrobial pesticides (Part 158W) Antimicrobials play an important role in public health and safety. While providing ...

  10. Alternative Antimicrobial Approach: Nano-Antimicrobial Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurit Beyth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite numerous existing potent antibiotics and other antimicrobial means, bacterial infections are still a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Moreover, the need to develop additional bactericidal means has significantly increased due to the growing concern regarding multidrug-resistant bacterial strains and biofilm associated infections. Consequently, attention has been especially devoted to new and emerging nanoparticle-based materials in the field of antimicrobial chemotherapy. The present review discusses the activities of nanoparticles as an antimicrobial means, their mode of action, nanoparticle effect on drug-resistant bacteria, and the risks attendant on their use as antibacterial agents. Factors contributing to nanoparticle performance in the clinical setting, their unique properties, and mechanism of action as antibacterial agents are discussed in detail.

  11. Effects of Silver Nanoparticles on Multiple Drug-Resistant Strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Mastitis-Infected Goats: An Alternative Approach for Antimicrobial Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Guo Yuan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs have been widely used in various applications as antimicrobial agents, anticancer, diagnostics, biomarkers, cell labels, and drug delivery systems for the treatment of various diseases. Microorganisms generally acquire resistance to antibiotics through the course of antibacterial therapy. Multi-drug resistance (MDR has become a growing problem in the treatment of infectious diseases, and the widespread use of broad-spectrum antibiotics has resulted in the development of antibiotic resistance by numerous human and animal bacterial pathogens. As a result, an increasing number of microorganisms are resistant to multiple antibiotics causing continuing economic losses in dairy farming. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of alternative, cost-effective, and efficient antimicrobial agents that overcome antimicrobial resistance. Here, AgNPs synthesized using the bio-molecule quercetin were characterized using various analytical techniques. The synthesized AgNPs were highly spherical in shape and had an average size of 11 nm. We evaluated the efficacy of synthesized AgNPs against two MDR pathogenic bacteria, namely, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, which were isolated from milk samples produced by mastitis-infected goats. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of AgNPs against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were found to be 1 and 2 μg/mL, respectively. Our findings suggest that AgNPs exert antibacterial effects in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Results from the present study demonstrate that the antibacterial activity of AgNPs is due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, malondialdehyde (MDA, and leakage of proteins and sugars in bacterial cells. Results of the present study showed that AgNP-treated bacteria had significantly lower lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH and lower adenosine triphosphate (ATP levels compared to the control. Furthermore, Ag

  12. Effect of a policy for restriction of selected classes of antibiotics on antimicrobial drug cost and resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falagas, M E; Bliziotis, I A; Michalopoulos, A; Sermaides, G; Papaioannou, V E; Nikita, D; Choulis, N

    2007-04-01

    Based on the instructions of the National Organization of Pharmaceutical Agents (Greece) from July 1, 2003, quinolones, 3( rd )and 4(th )generation cephalosporins, carbapenems, monobactams, glycopeptides, oxazolidinones, and streptogramins were considered as "restricted" antibiotics that could be used only with the approval of an Infectious Disease specialist. We analyzed the effect of the policy on the consumption and cost of antibiotics as a group and of specific classes, adjusted for the patient load, as well as on the antimicrobial resistance of isolated bacteria. We analyzed 5 trimesters (2 prior and 3 after the implementation of the new policy). A 20% and 16% reduction in adjusted consumption [in daily defined doses (DDDs)] and cost, respectively, of the restricted antibiotics was accomplished during the first trimester after implementation of the new policy. However, this was accompanied by a 36% and 56% increase in adjusted consumption and cost, respectively, of unrestricted antibiotics. A logistic regression model that we performed showed that the new policy had an independent positive effect on the in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (p=0.051) but not of Acinetobacter baumannii and Escherichia coli isolates. Our data suggest that there are considerable limitations to the programs aiming to reduce the consumption of restricted antibiotics through the approval of their use by specialists, at least in some settings.

  13. Combating antimicrobial resistance: antimicrobial stewardship program in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shu-Hui; Lee, Chun-Ming; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Chang, Shan-Chwen; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Yen, Muh-Yong; Hwang, Kao-Pin; Leu, Hsieh-Shong; Yen, Che-Chieh; Chang, Feng-Yee

    2012-04-01

    Multi-drug-resistant organisms are increasingly recognized as a global public health issue. Healthcare-associated infection and antimicrobial resistance are also current challenges to the treatment of infectious diseases in Taiwan. Government health policies and the health care systems play a crucial role in determining the efficacy of interventions to contain antimicrobial resistance. National commitment to understand and address the problem is prerequisite. We analyzed and reviewed the antibiotic resistance related policies in Taiwan, USA, WHO and draft antimicrobial stewardship program to control effectively antibiotic resistance and spreading in Taiwan. Antimicrobial stewardship program in Taiwan includes establishment of national inter-sectoral antimicrobial stewardship task force, implementing antimicrobial-resistance management strategies, surveillance of HAI and antimicrobial resistance, conducting hospital infection control, enforcement of appropriate regulations and audit of antimicrobial use through hospital accreditation, inspection and national health insurance payment system. No action today, no cure tomorrow. Taiwan CDC would take a multifaceted, evidence-based approach and make every effort to combat antimicrobial resistance with stakeholders to limit the spread of multi-drug resistant strains and to reduce the generation of antibiotic resistant bacteria in Taiwan.

  14. Antimicrobial stewardship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allerberger, F; Mittermayer, H

    2008-03-01

    The aim of antimicrobial management or stewardship programmes is to ensure proper use of antimicrobial agents in order to provide the best treatment outcomes, to lessen the risk of adverse effects (including antimicrobial resistance), and to promote cost-effectiveness. Increasingly, long-term sustainability is found to be the major focus of antimicrobial stewardship. Implementing structural measures in healthcare institutions is therefore a major, but not the sole, focus of attention in promoting prudent use of antibiotics. The problem of antimicrobial resistance requires common strategies at all levels--for the prescribers and at ward, departmental, hospital, national and international levels.

  15. Danish Integrated Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring and Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Ole E.; Emborg, Hanne-Dorthe; Bagger-Skjøt, Line; Jensen, Vibeke F.; Rogues, Anne-Marie; Skov, Robert L.; Agersø, Yvonne; Brandt, Christian T.; Seyfarth, Anne Mette; Muller, Arno; Hovgaard, Karin; Ajufo, Justin; Bager, Flemming; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Wegener, Henrik C.; Monnet, Dominique L.

    2007-01-01

    Resistance to antimicrobial agents is an emerging problem worldwide. Awareness of the undesirable consequences of its widespread occurrence has led to the initiation of antimicrobial agent resistance monitoring programs in several countries. In 1995, Denmark was the first country to establish a systematic and continuous monitoring program of antimicrobial drug consumption and antimicrobial agent resistance in animals, food, and humans, the Danish Integrated Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring and Research Program (DANMAP). Monitoring of antimicrobial drug resistance and a range of research activities related to DANMAP have contributed to restrictions or bans of use of several antimicrobial agents in food animals in Denmark and other European Union countries. PMID:18217544

  16. Susceptibilidad in vitro de Arcobacter butzleri a seis drogas antimicrobianas In vitro susceptibility of Arcobacter butzleri to six antimicrobial drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Otth

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Se determinaron los patrones de susceptibilidad de 50 cepas de A. butzleri mediante el método del E-test. Ninguna cepa fue resistente a gentamicina y tetraciclina, pero, hubo cepas resistentes a eritromicina (2% y ciprofloxacina (2%. Además, el 90 y el 98% de las cepas fueron resistentes a ampicilina y cloramfenicol respectivamente. Solamente dos de las 45 cepas ampicilina-resistentes fueron productoras de ß-lactamasa. Palabras clave: Arcobacter butzleri, susceptibilidad antimicrobiana, bacterias emergentes, E-test, ß-lactamasaThe susceptibility patterns of 50 A. butzleri strains to six antimicrobial agents were determined using the E-test method. No strain was found to be resistant to gentamicin and tetracycline, but two different strains (2% were resistant to erythromycin and ciprofloxacin. Ninety and 98% of the strains were resistant to ampicillin and chloramphenicol, respectively. Only two of the 45 ampicillin resistant strains were able to produce ß-lactamase.

  17. In vitro susceptibility to antimicrobial agents and ultrastructural characteristics related to swimming motility and drug action in Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabe, Shizuka; Higuchi, Wataru; Takano, Tomomi; Razvina, Olga; Iwao, Yasuhisa; Isobe, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2010-06-01

    Campylobacter jejuni has recently been noted as the most common cause of bacterial food-borne diseases in Japan. In this study, we examined in vitro susceptibility to 36 antimicrobial agents of 109 strains of C. jejuni and C. coli isolated from chickens and patients with enteritis or Guillain-Barré syndrome from 1996 to 2009. Among these agents, carbapenems (imipenem, meropenem, panipenem, and biapenem) showed the greatest activity [minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC)(90), 0.03-0.125 microg/ml]. This was followed by sitafloxacin (MIC(90), 0.25 microg/ml), furazolidone and azithromycin (MIC(90), 0.5 microg/ml), gentamicin and clindamycin (MIC(90), 1 microg/ml), and clavulanic acid (beta-lactamase inhibitor; MIC(90), 2 microg/ml). All or most strains were resistant to aztreonam, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim. Marked resistance was also observed for levofloxacin and tetracyclines. Resistance was not present for macrolides and rare for clindamycin. C. jejuni (and C. coli) exhibited high swimming motility and possessed a unique end-side (cup-like) structure at both ends, in contrast to Helicobacter pylori and Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139. The morphology of C. jejuni (and C. coli) changed drastically after exposure to imipenem (coccoid formation), meropenem (bulking and slight elongation), and sitafloxacin (marked elongation), and exhibited reduced motility. In the HEp-2 cell adherence model, unusually elongated bacteria were also observed for sitafloxacin. The data suggest that although resistance to antimicrobial agents (e.g., levofloxacin) has continuously been noted, carbapenems, sitafloxacin, and others such as beta-lactamase inhibitors alone showed good in vitro activity and that C. jejuni (and C. coli) demonstrated a unique ultrastructural nature related to high swimming motility and drug action.

  18. Potential of novel antimicrobial peptide P3 from bovine erythrocytes and its analogs to disrupt bacterial membranes in vitro and display activity against drug-resistant bacteria in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinghua; Xu, Yanzhao; Wang, Qing; Hang, Bolin; Sun, Yawei; Wei, Xiaoxiao; Hu, Jianhe

    2015-05-01

    With the emergence of many antibiotic-resistant strains worldwide, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are being evaluated as promising alternatives to conventional antibiotics. P3, a novel hemoglobin peptide derived from bovine erythrocytes, exhibited modest antimicrobial activity in vitro. We evaluated the antimicrobial activities of P3 and an analog, JH-3, both in vitro and in vivo. The MICs of P3 and JH-3 ranged from 3.125 μg/ml to 50 μg/ml when a wide spectrum of bacteria was tested, including multidrug-resistant strains. P3 killed bacteria within 30 min by disrupting the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane and disturbing the intracellular calcium balance. Circular dichroism (CD) spectrometry showed that P3 assumed an α-helical conformation in bacterial lipid membranes, which was indispensable for antimicrobial activity. Importantly, the 50% lethal dose (LD50) of JH-3 was 180 mg/kg of mouse body weight after intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, and no death was observed at any dose up to 240 mg/kg body weight following subcutaneous (s.c.) injection. Furthermore, JH-3 significantly decreased the bacterial count and rescued infected mice in a model of mouse bacteremia. In conclusion, P3 and an analog exhibited potent antimicrobial activities and relatively low toxicities in a mouse model, indicating that they may be useful for treating infections caused by drug-resistant bacteria.

  19. Antimicrobial synergy between carprofen and doxycycline against methicill-inresistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius ST71

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brochmann, Rikke Prejh; Helmfrid, Linn Alexandra; Jana, Bimal

    2016-01-01

    . Seven non-antimicrobial drugs (bromhexine, acepromazine, amitriptyline, clomipramine, carprofen, fluoxetine and ketoconazole) displayed minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranging between 32 and >4096 mg/L, and enhanced antimicrobial activity of one or more antimicrobials. Secondary screening...

  20. Antimicrobial Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Natural products of higher plants may possess a new source of antimicrobial agents with possibly novel mechanisms of action. They are effective in the treatment of infectious diseases while simultaneously mitigating many of the side effects that are often associated with conventional antimicrobials. A method using scanning electron microscope (SEM) to study the morphology of the bacterial and fungal microbes and thus determining antimicrobial activity is presented in the chapter.

  1. Evaluation of antimicrobial and phytochemical screening of Fennel, Juniper and Kalonji essential oils against multi drug resistant clinical isolates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sharmishtha Purkayastha; Rittee Narain; Praveen Dahiya

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The inhibitory effects of essential oils including fennel, juniper and kalonji from Foeniculum Vulgare, Juniperus Osteosperma and Nigella Sativa on multi drug resistant clinical isolates were investigated. All the oils have been evaluated for phytochemical constituents, antibacterial activity and TLC bioautography assay. Methods: Preliminary phytochemical analysis was performed. The antibacterial potential of essential oils from fennel, juniper and kalonji fennel, juniper and kalonji was evaluated by agar well diffusion method against multi drug resistant clinical isolates. The antibacterial effect was investigated using the TLC-bioautographic method. Results: Preliminary phytochemical analysis demonstrated the presence of most of the phytochemicals including saponins, cardiac glycosides, steroids, terpenoids, flavonoids and tannins. Antibacterial activity of essential oils was assessed on eight multi-drug resistant (MDR) clinical isolates from both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and two standard strains. All the oils tested showed significant to moderate antibacterial activity toward all tested strains except Acinetobacter sp and Staphylococcus aureus MRSA. The maximum zone of inhibition was found to be 25依0.12 mm for juniper oil followed by 21依0.085 mm for kalonji oil againstStaphylococcus aureus 2. Thin layer chromatography and bioautography assay demonstrated well-defined growth inhibition zones against Staphylococcus aureus 2 and E. coli for juniper essential oil in correspondence with tannins observed at Rf values of 0.07 and 0.57. Conclusions: Based on the present study, the essential oils from juniper and kalonji possess antibacterial activity against several multi drug resistant pathogenic bacteria and thus can be used as a base for the development of new potent drugs and phytomedicine.

  2. Antimicrobial Drug Resistance of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi in Asia and Molecular Mechanism of Reduced Susceptibility to the Fluoroquinolones▿

    OpenAIRE

    Chau, Tran Thuy; Campbell, James Ian; Galindo, Claudia M; Van Minh Hoang, Nguyen; Diep, To Song; Nga, Tran Thu Thi; van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Tuan, Phung Quoc; Page, Anne Laure; Ochiai, R Leon; Schultsz, Constance; Wain, John; Zulfiqar A. Bhutta; Parry, Christopher M.; Bhattacharya, Sujit K.

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the pattern and extent of drug resistance in 1,774 strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi isolated across Asia between 1993 and 2005 and characterizes the molecular mechanisms underlying the reduced susceptibilities to fluoroquinolones of these strains. For 1,393 serovar Typhi strains collected in southern Vietnam, the proportion of multidrug resistance has remained high since 1993 (50% in 2004) and there was a dramatic increase in nalidixic acid resistance between ...

  3. Efficient induction of antimicrobial activity with vancomycin nanoparticle-loaded poly(trimethylene carbonate) localized drug delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Liang, Ruo-jia; Xu, Jiao-jiao; Shen, Li-feng; Gao, Jian-qing; Wang, Xu-ping; Wang, Na-ni; Shou, Dan; Hu, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Surgery and the local placement of an antibiotic are the predominant therapies to treat chronic osteomyelitis. Vancomycin-loaded N-trimethyl chitosan nanoparticles (VCM/TMC NPs) as a potential drug delivery system have high intracellular penetration and effective intracellular antibacterial activity. This study investigated the effects of a biocompatible material, poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC), to increase the sustained effectiveness of an intracellular antibiotic and its potential application in antibiotic delivery. VCM/TMC NP-PTMC was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to determine the morphology, stability and chemical interaction of the drug with the polymer. Further, the biodegradation, antibacterial activity, protein adsorption, cell proliferation and drug release characteristics were evaluated. In addition, a Staphylococcus aureus-induced osteomyelitis rabbit model was used to investigate the antibiotic activity and bone repair capability of VCM/TMC NP-PTMC. The results showed that the composite beads of VCM/TMC NPs followed a sustained and slow release pattern and had excellent antibacterial activity and a higher protein adsorption and cell proliferation rate than the VCM-PTMC in vitro. Furthermore, VCM/TMC NP-PTMC inhibits bacteria and promotes bone repair in vivo. Thus, VCM/TMC NP-PTMC might be beneficial in periodontal management to reduce the bacterial load at the infection site and promote bone repair.

  4. [Increasing trend of antimicrobial drug-resistance in organisms causing bacteremia at a tertiary-care hospital: 1995 to 2000].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato-Maeda, Midori; Bautista-Alavez, Anabertha; Rolón-Montes-de-Oca, Ana Lilia; Ramos-Hinojosa, Ancelmo; Ponce-de-León, Alfredo; Bobadilla-del-Valle, Miriam; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo; Sifuentes-Osornio, José

    2003-01-01

    We described the trends of drug-resistant organisms isolated in blood cultures from patients detected in a teaching hospital from 1995 to 2000. We found an increase in the number of clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter spp, Serratia spp, Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis and Enterococcus spp, resistant to antibiotics commonly used to treat infections caused by these organisms. The frequency of gram-negative bacilli resistant to third-generation cephalosporins and quinolones increased during the period of study, and in 2000 more than 20% of the isolates were resistant. In contrast, the frequency of resistance to aminoglycosides and carbapenems was less than 20%. The frequency of resistant staphylococci increased exuberantly fifty fold to quinolones and five fold to oxacillin during the study period, therefore in 2000, 26.1% of S. aureus isolates and 61% of S. epidermidis were resistant to oxacillin. The frequency of resistant enterococci also increased, and in 2000, 50% were resistant to ampicillin, and 37.5% to gentamicin. The increase of drug resistant organisms isolated in blood had a direct impact in the empirical treatment of severely infected patients in our hospital. It is important to continuously supervise antibiotic use, and to adopt more strict control measures to decrease the frequency of infections caused by drug resistant organisms.

  5. Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Sadredinamin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are extensive group of molecules that produced by variety tissues of invertebrate, plants, and animal species which play an important role in their immunity response. AMPs have different classifications such as; biosynthetic machines, biological sources, biological functions, molecular properties, covalent bonding patterns, three dimensional structures, and molecular targets.These molecules have multidimensional properties including antimicrobial activity, antiviral activity, antifungal activity, anti-parasite activity, biofilm control, antitumor activity, mitogens activity and linking innate to adaptive immunity that making them promising agents for therapeutic drugs. In spite of this advantage of AMPs, their clinical developments have some limitation for commercial development. But some of AMPs are under clinical trials for the therapeutic purpose such as diabetic foot ulcers, different bacterial infections and tissue damage. In this review, we emphasized on the source, structure, multidimensional properties, limitation and therapeutic applications of various antimicrobial peptides.

  6. Aqueous and Organic Solvent-Extracts of Selected South African Medicinal Plants Possess Antimicrobial Activity against Drug-Resistant Strains of Helicobacter pylori: Inhibitory and Bactericidal Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collise Njume

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify sources of cheap starting materials for the synthesis of new drugs against Helicobacter pylori. Solvent-extracts of selected medicinal plants; Combretum molle, Sclerocarya birrea, Garcinia kola, Alepidea amatymbica and a single Strychnos species were investigated against 30 clinical strains of H. pylori alongside a reference control strain (NCTC 11638 using standard microbiological techniques. Metronidazole and amoxicillin were included in these experiments as positive control antibiotics. All the plants demonstrated anti-H. pylori activity with zone diameters of inhibition between 0 and 38 mm and 50% minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC50 values ranging from 0.06 to 5.0 mg/mL. MIC50 values for amoxicillin and metronidazole ranged from 0.001 to 0.63 mg/mL and 0.004 to 5.0 mg/mL respectively. The acetone extracts of C. molle and S. birrea exhibited a remarkable bactericidal activity against H. pylori killing more than 50% of the strains within 18 h at 4× MIC and complete elimination of the organisms within 24 h. Their antimicrobial activity was comparable to the control antibiotics. However, the activity of the ethanol extract of G. kola was lower than amoxicillin (P < 0.05 as opposed to metronidazole (P > 0.05. These results demonstrate that S. birrea, C. molle and G. kola may represent good sources of compounds with anti-H. pylori activity.

  7. Antimicrobial use in food and companion animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, John F

    2008-12-01

    The vast literature on antimicrobial drug use in animals has expanded considerably recently as the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) crisis in human medicine leads to questions about all usage of antimicrobial drugs, including long-term usage in intensively managed food animals for growth promotion and disease prevention. Attention is also increasingly focusing on antimicrobial use and on bacterial resistance in companion animals, which are in intimate contact with the human population. They may share resistant bacteria with their owners, amplify resistant bacteria acquired from their owners, and act as a reservoir for human infection. Considerable effort is being made to describe the basis of AMR in bacterial pathogens of animals. Documentation of many aspects of use of antimicrobials in animals is, however, generally less developed and only a few countries can describe quantities of drugs used in animals to kg levels annually. In recent years, many national veterinary associations have produced 'prudent use guidelines' to try to improve antimicrobial drug use and decrease resistance, but the impact of guidelines is unknown. Within the evolving global movement for 'antimicrobial stewardship', there is considerable scope to improve many aspects of antimicrobial use in animals, including infection control and reduction of use, with a view to reducing resistance and its spread, and to preserving antimicrobial drugs for the future.

  8. Phytochemical screening and antimicrobial activity of some medicinal plants against multi-drug resistant bacteria from clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Dahiya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro antibacterial activity of various solvents and water extracts of aloe vera, neem, bryophyllum, lemongrass, tulsi, oregano, rosemary and thyme was assessed on 10 multi-drug resistant clinical isolates from both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and two standard strains including Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922. The zone of inhibition as determined by agar well diffusion method varied with the plant extract, the solvent used for extraction, and the organism tested. Klebsiella pneumoniae 2, Escherichia coli 3 and Staphylococcus aureus 3 were resistant to the plant extracts tested. Moreover, water extracts did not restrain the growth of any tested bacteria. Ethanol and methanol extracts were found to be more potent being capable of exerting significant inhibitory activities against majority of the bacteria investigated. Staphylococcus aureus 1 was the most inhibited bacterial isolate with 24 extracts (60% inhibiting its growth whereas Escherichia coli 2 exhibited strong resistance being inhibited by only 11 extracts (28%. The results obtained in the agar diffusion plates were in fair correlation with that obtained in the minimum inhibitory concentration tests. The minimum inhibitory concentration of tulsi, oregano, rosemary and aloe vera extracts was found in the range of 1.56-6.25 mg/ml for the multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates tested whereas higher values (6.25-25 mg/ml were obtained against the multi-drug resistant isolates Klebsiella pneumoniae 1 and Escherichia coli 1 and 2. Qualitative phytochemical analysis demonstrated the presence of tannins and saponins in all plants tested. Thin layer chromatography and bioautography agar overlay assay of ethanol extracts of neem, tulsi and aloe vera indicated flavonoids and tannins as major active compounds against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

  9. Phytochemical Screening and Antimicrobial Activity of Some Medicinal Plants Against Multi-drug Resistant Bacteria from Clinical Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Praveen; Dahiya, P; Purkayastha, Sharmishtha

    2012-09-01

    The in vitro antibacterial activity of various solvents and water extracts of aloe vera, neem, bryophyllum, lemongrass, tulsi, oregano, rosemary and thyme was assessed on 10 multi-drug resistant clinical isolates from both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and two standard strains including Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922. The zone of inhibition as determined by agar well diffusion method varied with the plant extract, the solvent used for extraction, and the organism tested. Klebsiella pneumoniae 2, Escherichia coli 3 and Staphylococcus aureus 3 were resistant to the plant extracts tested. Moreover, water extracts did not restrain the growth of any tested bacteria. Ethanol and methanol extracts were found to be more potent being capable of exerting significant inhibitory activities against majority of the bacteria investigated. Staphylococcus aureus 1 was the most inhibited bacterial isolate with 24 extracts (60%) inhibiting its growth whereas Escherichia coli 2 exhibited strong resistance being inhibited by only 11 extracts (28%). The results obtained in the agar diffusion plates were in fair correlation with that obtained in the minimum inhibitory concentration tests. The minimum inhibitory concentration of tulsi, oregano, rosemary and aloe vera extracts was found in the range of 1.56-6.25 mg/ml for the multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates tested whereas higher values (6.25-25 mg/ml) were obtained against the multi-drug resistant isolates Klebsiella pneumoniae 1 and Escherichia coli 1 and 2. Qualitative phytochemical analysis demonstrated the presence of tannins and saponins in all plants tested. Thin layer chromatography and bioautography agar overlay assay of ethanol extracts of neem, tulsi and aloe vera indicated flavonoids and tannins as major active compounds against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

  10. Ion Channel Blockers as Antimicrobial Agents, Efflux Inhibitors, and Enhancers of Macrophage Killing Activity against Drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Machado

    Full Text Available Given the ability of M. tuberculosis to survive as an intracellular pathogen and its propensity to develop resistance to the existing antituberculosis drugs, its treatment requires new approaches. Here the antimycobacterial properties of verapamil, thioridazine, chlorpromazine, flupenthixol and haloperidol were investigated against a panel of drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains, both in vitro and on human-infected macrophages. These compounds are efflux inhibitors that share among them the characteristic of being ion channel blockers. In vitro, all compounds exhibited synergistic inhibitory activities when combined with isoniazid and rifampicin, and were able to inhibit active efflux, demonstrating their role as efflux inhibitors. Gene expression analysis showed that M. tuberculosis efflux genes were overexpressed in response to antibiotic exposure, in vitro and within macrophages, irrespective of their resistance pattern. These compounds displayed a rapid and high killing activity against M. tuberculosis, associated with a decrease in intracellular ATP levels demonstrating that the bactericidal action of the ion channel blockers against M. tuberculosis clinical strains is associated with their interference with energy metabolism. The compounds led to a decrease in the intracellular mycobacterial load by increasing phagosome acidification and activating lysosomal hydrolases. The results presented in this study enable us to propose the following mechanism of action for these compounds: a in the bacteria, the compounds generate a cascade of events involving the inhibition of the respiratory chain complexes and energy production for efflux activity. Indirectly, this reduce the resistance level to antituberculosis drugs potentiating their activity; b on the host cell, the treatment with the ion channel blockers increases phagosome acidification and induces the expression of phagosomal hydrolases, leading to bacterial growth restriction

  11. Antimicrobials, stress and mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandro Rodríguez-Rojas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cationic antimicrobial peptides are ancient and ubiquitous immune effectors that multicellular organisms use to kill and police microbes whereas antibiotics are mostly employed by microorganisms. As antimicrobial peptides (AMPs mostly target the cell wall, a microbial 'Achilles heel', it has been proposed that bacterial resistance evolution is very unlikely and hence AMPs are ancient 'weapons' of multicellular organisms. Here we provide a new hypothesis to explain the widespread distribution of AMPs amongst multicellular organism. Studying five antimicrobial peptides from vertebrates and insects, we show, using a classic Luria-Delbrück fluctuation assay, that cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs do not increase bacterial mutation rates. Moreover, using rtPCR and disc diffusion assays we find that AMPs do not elicit SOS or rpoS bacterial stress pathways. This is in contrast to the main classes of antibiotics that elevate mutagenesis via eliciting the SOS and rpoS pathways. The notion of the 'Achilles heel' has been challenged by experimental selection for AMP-resistance, but our findings offer a new perspective on the evolutionary success of AMPs. Employing AMPs seems advantageous for multicellular organisms, as it does not fuel the adaptation of bacteria to their immune defenses. This has important consequences for our understanding of host-microbe interactions, the evolution of innate immune defenses, and also sheds new light on antimicrobial resistance evolution and the use of AMPs as drugs.

  12. Recent Advances in Antimicrobial Polymers: A Mini-Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keng-Shiang Huang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human safety and well-being is threatened by microbes causing numerous infectious diseases resulting in a large number of deaths every year. Despite substantial progress in antimicrobial drugs, many infectious diseases remain difficult to treat. Antimicrobial polymers offer a promising antimicrobial strategy for fighting pathogens and have received considerable attention in both academic and industrial research. This mini-review presents the advances made in antimicrobial polymers since 2013. Antimicrobial mechanisms exhibiting either passive or active action and polymer material types containing bound or leaching antimicrobials are introduced. This article also addresses the applications of these antimicrobial polymers in the medical, food, and textile industries.

  13. Recent Advances in Antimicrobial Polymers: A Mini-Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Keng-Shiang; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Shu-Ling; Chen, Cheng-You; Lu, Yuan-Yi; Lin, Yung-Sheng

    2016-09-20

    Human safety and well-being is threatened by microbes causing numerous infectious diseases resulting in a large number of deaths every year. Despite substantial progress in antimicrobial drugs, many infectious diseases remain difficult to treat. Antimicrobial polymers offer a promising antimicrobial strategy for fighting pathogens and have received considerable attention in both academic and industrial research. This mini-review presents the advances made in antimicrobial polymers since 2013. Antimicrobial mechanisms exhibiting either passive or active action and polymer material types containing bound or leaching antimicrobials are introduced. This article also addresses the applications of these antimicrobial polymers in the medical, food, and textile industries.

  14. Analysis of Anthrax Immune Globulin Intravenous with Antimicrobial Treatment in Injection Drug Users, Scotland, 2009–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xizhong; Nolen, Leisha D.; Sun, Junfeng; Booth, Malcolm; Donaldson, Lindsay; Quinn, Conrad P.; Boyer, Anne E.; Hendricks, Katherine; Shadomy, Sean; Bothma, Pieter; Judd, Owen; McConnell, Paul; Bower, William A.

    2017-01-01

    We studied anthrax immune globulin intravenous (AIG-IV) use from a 2009–2010 outbreak of Bacillus anthracis soft tissue infection in injection drug users in Scotland, UK, and we compared findings from 15 AIG-IV recipients with findings from 28 nonrecipients. Death rates did not differ significantly between recipients and nonrecipients (33% vs. 21%). However, whereas only 8 (27%) of 30 patients at low risk for death (admission sequential organ failure assessment score of 0–5) received AIG-IV, 7 (54%) of the 13 patients at high risk for death (sequential organ failure assessment score of 6–11) received treatment. AIG-IV recipients had surgery more often and, among survivors, had longer hospital stays than did nonrecipients. AIG-IV recipients were sicker than nonrecipients. This difference and the small number of higher risk patients confound assessment of AIG-IV effectiveness in this outbreak. PMID:27983504

  15. Antimicrobial Drug Resistance of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi in Asia and Molecular Mechanism of Reduced Susceptibility to the Fluoroquinolones▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Tran Thuy; Campbell, James Ian; Galindo, Claudia M.; Van Minh Hoang, Nguyen; Diep, To Song; Nga, Tran Thu Thi; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Tuan, Phung Quoc; Page, Anne Laure; Ochiai, R. Leon; Schultsz, Constance; Wain, John; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Parry, Christopher M.; Bhattacharya, Sujit K.; Dutta, Shanta; Agtini, Magdarina; Dong, Baiqing; Honghui, Yang; Anh, Dang Duc; Canh, Do Gia; Naheed, Aliya; Albert, M. John; Phetsouvanh, Rattanaphone; Newton, Paul N.; Basnyat, Buddha; Arjyal, Amit; La, Tran Thi Phi; Rang, Nguyen Ngoc; Phuong, Le Thi; Van Be Bay, Phan; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Dougan, Gordon; Clemens, John D.; Vinh, Ha; Hien, Tran Tinh; Chinh, Nguyen Tran; Acosta, Camilo J.; Farrar, Jeremy; Dolecek, Christiane

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the pattern and extent of drug resistance in 1,774 strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi isolated across Asia between 1993 and 2005 and characterizes the molecular mechanisms underlying the reduced susceptibilities to fluoroquinolones of these strains. For 1,393 serovar Typhi strains collected in southern Vietnam, the proportion of multidrug resistance has remained high since 1993 (50% in 2004) and there was a dramatic increase in nalidixic acid resistance between 1993 (4%) and 2005 (97%). In a cross-sectional sample of 381 serovar Typhi strains from 8 Asian countries, Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Laos, Nepal, Pakistan, and central Vietnam, collected in 2002 to 2004, various rates of multidrug resistance (16 to 37%) and nalidixic acid resistance (5 to 51%) were found. The eight Asian countries involved in this study are home to approximately 80% of the world's typhoid fever cases. These results document the scale of drug resistance across Asia. The Ser83→Phe substitution in GyrA was the predominant alteration in serovar Typhi strains from Vietnam (117/127 isolates; 92.1%). No mutations in gyrB, parC, or parE were detected in 55 of these strains. In vitro time-kill experiments showed a reduction in the efficacy of ofloxacin against strains harboring a single-amino-acid substitution at codon 83 or 87 of GyrA; this effect was more marked against a strain with a double substitution. The 8-methoxy fluoroquinolone gatifloxacin showed rapid killing of serovar Typhi harboring both the single- and double-amino-acid substitutions. PMID:17908946

  16. Antimicrobial resistance of thermophilic Campylobacter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Engberg, J.

    2001-01-01

    Campylobacter has become the leading cause of zoonotic enteric infections in developed and developing countries world-wide. Antimicrobial resistance has emerged among Campylobacter mainly as a consequence of the use of antimicrobial agents in food animal production. Resistance to drugs of choice...... for the treatment of infections, macrolides and fluoroquinolones has emerged as a clinical problem and interventions to reduce this are recommended. Resistance to fluoroquinolones and macrolides is mediated by chromosomal mutations. Resistance to other relevant antimicrobial agents, mediated by acquired resistance...

  17. 2008-2011年剖宫产围手术期抗菌药物使用分析%Analysis of perioperative use of antimicrobial drugs in cesarean section from 2008 to 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴秀萍; 张丽萍

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the use of antibacterial drugs during caesarean operation in the recent four years in our hospital, and to evaluate the rationality of drug use. Methods: One hundred and ninety-five ce-sarean section cases from 2008 to 2011 in our hospital were randomly sampled. The choice of antibiotics, medication time, medication duration, antimicrobial drug cost and other aspects were analyzed. Results: All of the 195 cases prophylacticly used antibacterial drugs. In 2008, the drugs were chosen based on experience, the first dose was given after the cesarean section, penicillin sodium or lincomycin was used in combination with metronidazole, and the average duration was 3. 21 days. Since 2009, the use of antimicrobial drugs was standardized. Cefazolin sodium or clindamycin DX was used, the first dose was given after umbilical cord cutting, and the average duration was 2. 36 days. The ratios of antimicrobial drug costs to hospitalization expense in the four years were all less than 1.00% . Conclusion: The perioperative antimicrobial use for caesarean operation in the last four years in our hospital has been changing for more rational, but the medication duration was too long.%目的:了解我院近4年剖宫产围手术期抗菌药物使用情况,评价用药的合理性.方法:随机抽查2008 -2011年我院剖宫产病历195份,从抗菌药物品种的选择、首次用药时机、使用疗程、抗菌药物费用等方面进行分析.结果:195例剖宫产手术患者中,100%预防性使用抗菌药物.2008年凭经验预防用药,首剂均在术后开始,选用青霉素钠或林可霉素联用甲硝唑,平均用药3.21 d.2009年开始规范用药,单用头孢唑啉钠或克林霉素,首剂于断脐后使用,平均用药2.36 d.4年抗菌药物费用占住院费用比均<1.00%.结论:4年来,我院剖宫产围手术期抗菌药物使用逐年规范,但预防用药时间偏长,欠合理.

  18. Danish integrated antimicrobial in resistance monitoring and research program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, Anette Marie; Heuer, Ole Eske; Emborg, Hanne-Dorthe

    2007-01-01

    Resistance to antimicrobial agents is an emerging problem worldwide. Awareness of the undesirable consequences of its widespread occurrence has led to the initiation of antimicrobial agent resistance monitoring programs in several countries. In 1995, Denmark was the first country to establish a s...... activities related to DANMAP have contributed to restrictions or bans of use of several antimicrobial agents in food animals in Denmark and other European Union countries....... a systematic and continuous monitoring program of antimicrobial drug consumption and antimicrobial agent resistance in animals, food, and humans, the Danish Integrated Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring and Research Program (DANMAP). Monitoring of antimicrobial drug resistance and a range of research......Resistance to antimicrobial agents is an emerging problem worldwide. Awareness of the undesirable consequences of its widespread occurrence has led to the initiation of antimicrobial agent resistance monitoring programs in several countries. In 1995, Denmark was the first country to establish...

  19. Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... emergence and spread of antibacterial resistance, including optimal use of antibiotics in both humans and animals. A global action plan on antimicrobial resistance was adopted by Member States at the ...

  20. Erros de administração de antimicrobianos identificados em estudo multicêntrico brasileiro Antimicrobial drug administration errors identified in Brazilian multicentric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane Cristina Marques

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Erros de administração de antimicrobianos são relevantes, pois podem interferir na segurança do paciente e no desenvolvimento de resistência microbiana. O objetivo desse estudo foi identificar os antimicrobianos associados a erros de administração de medicamentos. Estudo multicêntrico, descritivo e exploratório, realizado em unidades de clínica médica de cinco hospitais por meio de técnica observacional, durante 30 dias. Os erros foram classificados em categorias: dose, medicamento não prescrito, via, paciente e horário. A classificação farmacológica dos antimicrobianos foi realizada segundo o Sistema Anatômico Terapêutico Químico (ATC. Os fármacos de intervalo terapêutico estreito foram identificados. A análise estatística descritiva foi realizada no software SPSS 11.5. Foram identificados 1500 erros, sendo 277 (18,5% com antimicrobianos. Os tipos de erros foram: de horário 87,7%; de dose 6,9%; de medicamento não autorizado 3,2%, de via 1,5% e de paciente 0,7%. Foram identificados 36 antimicrobianos e as classes ATC mais freqüentes foram: fluorquinolonas 13,9%, combinações de penicilinas 13,9%, macrolídeos 8,3% e cefalosporina de terceira geração 5,6%. Os fármacos de intervalo terapêutico estreito corresponderam a 16,7% dos antimicrobianos. Os erros com antimicrobianos analisados podem ser fontes de estudo e melhoria no processo de utilização racional de medicamentos e segurança do paciente.Medication administration errors (MAE are the most frequent kind of medication errors. Errors with antimicrobial drugs (AD are relevant because they may interfere in patient safety and in the development of microbial resistance. The aim of this study is to analyze the AD errors detected in a Brazilian multicentric study of MAE. It was a descriptive and exploratory study carried out in clinical units in five Brazilian teaching hospitals. The hospitals were investigated during 30 days. MAE were detected by observation

  1. 几种多重耐药细菌耐药性分析%Antimicrobial resistance surveillance study of multi-drug resistant bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李熙建; 肖亚雄; 王昌蓉

    2012-01-01

    目的 分析我院2008~2011年临床分离的几种多重耐药细菌的分布和对抗菌药物的耐药性,为临床用药和控制感染提供依据.方法 共收集非重复的1812株临床分离细菌,采用Vitek-2 Compact全自动细菌鉴定/药敏分析仪对菌株进行鉴定及药敏试验,采用WHONE5.5软件进行药敏结果分析.结果 共分离2998株细菌,其中大肠埃希菌占21.11% (633/2998),克雷伯菌占14.28% (428/2998),肺炎链球菌占1.20% (36/2998),葡萄球菌占23.85% (715/2998).大肠埃希氏菌,克雷伯氏菌中产超广谱β内酰胺酶(extended-spectrum beta-lactamases,ESBLs)的检出率分别为58.93%(373/633),43.22% (185/428),肠杆菌科中产ESBLs株对药物的敏感率比非产ESBLs株低,亚胺培南、哌拉西林/他唑巴坦、阿米卡星的敏感性仍较高.肺炎链球菌分离株中青霉素中介的肺炎链球菌(penicillin-intermediate streptococcus pneumoniae,PISP)和青霉素耐药的肺炎链球菌(penicillin-resistant streptococcus pneumoniae,PRSP)的检出率分别为16.67%、13.89%,对左氧氟沙星、万古霉素、利奈唑胺、莫西沙星仍保持较高的敏感性.葡萄球菌中的耐甲氧西林金黄色葡萄球菌(MRSA)和耐甲氧西林凝固酶阴性葡萄球菌(MRCNS)的检出比例平均为12.87%和50.21%,葡萄球菌中甲氧西林耐药株对β内酰胺类抗生素和其它测试药的耐药率显著高于甲氧西林敏感株,万古霉素、替考拉宁、替加环素和利奈唑胺仍是敏感性较高的药物.结论 细菌耐药性仍呈增长趋势,尤其是多重耐药菌的增多,对临床构成严重威胁,加强耐药性的监测,临床应结合药敏试验结果合理选择抗菌药物.%Objective To investigated distribution and antimicrobial resistance of multi-drug resistant bacteria of clinical isolates from our hospital, and provide the fact for clinical application of antibiotics and infection control. Methods A total of 1812 non

  2. Antimicrobial technology in orthopedic and spinal implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltorai, Adam EM; Haglin, Jack; Perera, Sudheesha; Brea, Bielinsky A; Ruttiman, Roy; Garcia, Dioscaris R; Born, Christopher T; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-01-01

    Infections can hinder orthopedic implant function and retention. Current implant-based antimicrobial strategies largely utilize coating-based approaches in order to reduce biofilm formation and bacterial adhesion. Several emerging antimicrobial technologies that integrate a multidisciplinary combination of drug delivery systems, material science, immunology, and polymer chemistry are in development and early clinical use. This review outlines orthopedic implant antimicrobial technology, its current applications and supporting evidence, and clinically promising future directions. PMID:27335811

  3. Associations between Antimicrobial Resistance Phenotypes, Antimicrobial Resistance Genes, and Virulence Genes of Fecal Escherichia coli Isolates from Healthy Grow-Finish Pigs ▿

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Escherichia coli often carries linked antimicrobial resistance genes on transmissible genetic elements. Through coselection, antimicrobial use may select for unrelated but linked resistance or virulence genes. This study used unconditional statistical associations to investigate the relationships between antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and antimicrobial resistance genes in 151 E. coli isolates from healthy pigs. Phenotypic resistance to each drug was significantly associated with phenotyp...

  4. Availability and estimates of veterinary antimicrobial use in British Columbia

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The amount of antimicrobial use is a significant selection pressure that alters the frequency of antimicrobial resistance. This paper summarizes attempts to estimate the weight of antimicrobial purchases in British Columbia for use in animals. The data reported here do not capture all sources of veterinary antimicrobial use in British Columbia. This paper highlights how information deficits on veterinary drug use complicate the development of an evidence-based policy framework for combating a...

  5. Recent Advances in Antimicrobial Polymers: A Mini-Review

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Keng-Shiang; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Shu-Ling; Chen, Cheng-You; Lu, Yuan-Yi; Lin, Yung-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Human safety and well-being is threatened by microbes causing numerous infectious diseases resulting in a large number of deaths every year. Despite substantial progress in antimicrobial drugs, many infectious diseases remain difficult to treat. Antimicrobial polymers offer a promising antimicrobial strategy for fighting pathogens and have received considerable attention in both academic and industrial research. This mini-review presents the advances made in antimicrobial polymers since 2013....

  6. Antimicrobial hydrogels for the treatment of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Ana Salomé; Schneider, Joel P

    2013-11-01

    The increasing prevalence of microbial infections, especially those associated with impaired wound healing and biomedical implant failure has spurred the development of new materials having antimicrobial activity. Hydrogels are a class of highly hydrated material finding use in diverse medical applications such as drug delivery, tissue engineering, as wound fillers, and as implant coatings, to name a few. The biocompatible nature of many gels make them a convenient starting platform to develop selectively active antimicrobial materials. Hydrogels with antimicrobial properties can be obtained through the encapsulation or covalent immobilization of known antimicrobial agents, or the material itself can be designed to possess inherent antimicrobial activity. In this review we present an overview of antimicrobial hydrogels that have recently been developed and when possible provide a discussion relevant to their mechanism of action.

  7. Tolerance Survey of Escherichia coli Isolated from pig to Antimicrobial Drugs in Karamay City of Xinjiang%新疆克拉玛依市猪源大肠杆菌耐药性调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高娟; 夏利宁; 夏绪进; 程伟华

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the drug resistance of Escherichia coli isolated from pig manuer of large⁃scale pig farm and local farmer�s piggeries on commonly used antimicrobial drugs in Baijiantan region of Karamay City, Xinjiang, this experiment conducted test with minimal inhibitory concentrations ( MIC) of antimicrobial drugs on these isolates by broth micro⁃dilution method. The results showed that 701 Escherichia coli were isolated from 703 fecal samples ( including 549 isolates from large⁃scale pig farm and 152 isolates from farmer�s piggeries) . The isolated Escherichia coli were highly resistant to ampicillin and amoxicillin / clavulanic by over 77.0%. These isolates were very sensitive to amikacin. Their tolerant rate reached 11.1%. Isolates tolerant to 3 or more than 3 antimicrobial drugs accounted for 17.0%. In this region, the tolerance of pig Escherichia coli to commonly used antimicrobial drugs was very serious, so in clinical treatment of bacterial diseases, the use of insensitive antimicrobial drugs should be avoid. The tolerant rate of Escherichia coli isolated from large⁃scale pig farm was lower than that from the farmer�s piggeries.%为调查新疆克拉玛依市白碱滩地区规模化猪场和养殖户家猪粪样中分离的大肠杆菌对临床常用抗菌药物的耐药情况。对该地区猪场及周边养殖户家猪粪样分离的大肠杆菌采用微量肉汤稀释法进行最小抑菌浓度测定。结果显示:采集的703份粪样中分离出大肠杆菌701株(包括规模化养殖场549株和养殖户152株),分离的大肠杆菌对氨苄西林和阿莫西林/克拉维酸耐药率最高,达77.0%以上;对阿米卡星最敏感,耐药率也达11.1%;3耐以上的菌株占17.0%。该地区猪源大肠杆菌对常用抗菌药物耐药情况较为严重,须在临床治疗细菌性疾病中避开使用不敏感的抗菌药物。规模化养殖场分离的猪源大肠杆菌相比养殖户分离的

  8. The third quarter of 2012 antimicrobial drug use survey analysis in our hospital%我院2012年三季度抗菌药物使用调查分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨作英

    2013-01-01

      目的:探讨我院抗菌药物使用情况,为临床合理用药提供参考。方法:利用计算机软件管理系统检索2012年三季度抗菌药物使用情况。结果:数量、金额排序前两位的分别是“阿莫西林胶囊、注射用哌拉西林钠他唑巴坦钠”、“注射用头孢美唑钠、注射用头孢哌酮钠他唑巴坦钠”。结论:特殊使用级抗菌药物有过度使用的现象,有待干预。%Objective:Explore our hospital antimicrobial use, and provide a reference for the clinical use of drugs.Methods:Computer software management system to retrieve the third quarter of 2012,the use of antimicrobial agents.Results:Quantity, the amount of sort 2 are“amoxicillin capsules”,“Piperacillin Sodium and Tazobactam Sodium for Injection”,“Cefmetazole Sodium for Injection”,“Cefoperzone Sodium and Tazobactam Sodium for Injection”.Conclusions:Excessive use of special use grade antibacterial drugs to be intervention.

  9. Survey on antimicrobial residues in raw milk and antimicrobial use in dairy farms in the Emilia-Romagna region, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Serraino

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This survey investigated the antimicrobials most commonly used in dairy herds and antimicrobial residues most frequently detected in milk to evaluate the suitability of rapid screening tests to determine antimicrobial residues in milk. The investigation was carried out in 45 dairy herds consulting the farm administration records and in a national dairy industry collecting milk from almost all the dairy farms studied. Data were recorded on: i treatments with drugs containing antimicrobials during the 12 months prior to the visit; ii antimicrobial active substances present in the drugs; iii data from routine controls to detect antimicrobial residues (52,771 samples. The antimicrobial classes most commonly used were penicillins, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, sulphonamides, tetracyclines, aminoglycosides and lyncosamides; the most frequently used antimicrobial not belonging to any of the previous groups was riphaximin. Sixty-four samples collected from milk trucks yielded antimicrobial residues exceeding the detection limit of the screening test used: sulphonamide residues were the most prevalent (3.4%, followed by tetracycline (0.3% and penicillins and cephalosporins (0.03%. The antimicrobial classes most commonly used on dairy farms are the same as the residues most frequently detected in milk. The association of several commercially available rapid test kits proved satisfactory for determination of the veterinary antimicrobial drugs most used on dairy farms but at least five kits are required. Therefore, knowledge of the most frequently used veterinary drugs and periodic monitoring are required for the dairy industry to develop a targeted and effective control plan.

  10. [Antimicrobial mechanisms of action].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Jorge; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2009-01-01

    A large number of families and groups of antimicrobial agents are of clinical interest. The mechanisms by which compounds with antibacterial activity inhibit growth or cause bacterial death are varied and depend on the affected targets. The bacterial cell wall-a unique structure in most bacteria that is absent in eukaryotic cells-can be affected in several ways: at different stages of synthesis (fosfomycin, cycloserine) or transport (bacitracin, mureidomycins) of its metabolic precursors, or by a direct action on its structural organization (beta-lactams, glycopeptides). The main drugs affecting the cytoplasmic membrane are polymyxins and daptomycin. Protein synthesis can be blocked by a large variety of compounds that affect any of the phases of this process, including activation (mupirocin), initiation (oxazolidinones, aminoglycosides), binding of the tRNA amino acid complex to ribosomes (tetracyclines, glycylcyclines) and elongation (amphenicols, lincosamides, macrolides, ketolides, streptogramins, fusidic acid). The metabolism of nucleic acids can be altered at the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase or in the process of DNA coiling (quinolones); some compounds affect DNA directly (nitroimidazoles, nitrofurans). Trimethoprim and sulfamides (often used in combination) are examples of antimicrobial agents that block bacterial metabolic pathways. Some compounds are unable to inhibit or kill bacteria in themselves, but can block bacterial mechanisms of resistance, enhancing the activity of other antimicrobials administered in combination. Among this group of agents, only certain beta-lactamase inhibitors are currently in clinical use.

  11. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... Veterinary Medicine is cited as the corporate author. Animation Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (WMV - 19.2MB) 9: ...

  12. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... produced a nine-minute animation explaining how antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, ...

  13. Measuring Appropriate Antimicrobial Use: Attempts at Opening the Black Box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, Emily S; Cosgrove, Sara E; Srinivasan, Arjun

    2016-12-15

    Indiscriminate antimicrobial use has plagued medicine since antibiotics were first introduced into clinical practice >70 years ago. Infectious diseases physicians and public health officials have advocated for preservation of these life-saving drugs for many years. With rising burden of antimicrobial-resistant organisms and Clostridium difficile infections, halting unnecessary antimicrobial use has become one of the largest public health concerns of our time. Inappropriate antimicrobial use has been quantified in various settings using numerous definitions; however, no established reference standard exists. With mounting national efforts to improve antimicrobial use, a consensus definition and standard method of measuring appropriate antimicrobial use is imperative. We review existing literature on systematic approaches to define and measure appropriate antimicrobial use, and describe a collaborative effort at developing standardized audit tools for assessing the quality of antimicrobial prescribing.

  14. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... More in Antimicrobial Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring ... Note: If you need help accessing information in different file formats, see Instructions for Downloading ...

  15. 阳离子抗菌肽的杀菌及抗药性机制的研究进展%Research Progress on Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides in Antibacterial and Drug-resistant Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪军; 胡建业

    2012-01-01

    阳离子抗菌肽是生物体抵御外源性病原微生物入侵而产生的一类小分子多肽,广泛分布于生物体内,具有广谱抗菌活性,是生物体先天性免疫防御系统的重要组成部分.除了具有抗细菌功能外,还具有抗真菌、抗原虫、抗病毒及抑制肿瘤细胞等功能,并对正常的真核细胞毒性较低,是新一代抗生素的理想替代品,但是同抗生素一样,部分细菌也能对抗菌肽产生抗药性.作者将从阳离子抗菌肽的杀菌及抗药性机制等方面进行阐述.%Cationic antimicrobial peptides were a class of small peptides with anti-extrogenous pathogen invasion. As an important component of congenital immune defense system against infections, they were widely distributed in vivo. It exhibited potent and broad-spectrum activities against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, fungi, viruses, protozoa, and cancer cells,and normal eukaryotic cells with low toxicity. It was an ideal alternative to a new generation of antibiotics. However, the same as antibiotics, some bacteria were resistant to certain antimicrobial peptides. The antibacterial and drug-resistant mechanism of the cationic antimicrobial peptides were summarized in the article to provide certain reference.

  16. Antimicrobial Resistance of Faecal Escherichia coli Isolates from Pig Farms with Different Durations of In-feed Antimicrobial Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, J F; Boland, F; Egan, J; Fanning, S; Markey, B K; Leonard, F C

    2016-05-01

    Antimicrobial use and resistance in animal and food production are of concern to public health. The primary aims of this study were to determine the frequency of resistance to 12 antimicrobials in Escherichia coli isolates from 39 pig farms and to identify patterns of antimicrobial use on these farms. Further aims were to determine whether a categorization of farms based on the duration of in-feed antimicrobial use (long-term versus short-term) could predict the occurrence of resistance on these farms and to identify the usage of specific antimicrobial drugs associated with the occurrence of resistance. Escherichia coli were isolated from all production stages on these farms; susceptibility testing was carried out against a panel of antimicrobials. Antimicrobial prescribing data were collected, and farms were categorized as long term or short term based on these. Resistance frequencies and antimicrobial use were tabulated. Logistic regression models of resistance to each antimicrobial were constructed with stage of production, duration of antimicrobial use and the use of 5 antimicrobial classes included as explanatory variables in each model. The greatest frequencies of resistance were observed to tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole and streptomycin with the highest levels of resistance observed in isolates from first-stage weaned pigs. Differences in the types of antimicrobial drugs used were noted between long-term and short-term use farms. Categorization of farms as long- or short-term use was sufficient to predict the likely occurrence of resistance to 3 antimicrobial classes and could provide an aid in the control of resistance in the food chain. Stage of production was a significant predictor variable in all models of resistance constructed and did not solely reflect antimicrobial use at each stage. Cross-selection and co-selection for resistance was evident in the models constructed, and the use of trimethoprim/sulphonamide drugs in particular was

  17. Antimicrobial resistance and the activities of the Codex Alimentarius Commission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, A V; Mackay, Carolissen

    2012-04-01

    The Codex Alimentarius Commission has been working on the subject of antimicrobial resistance, mainly through the activities of the Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs in Foods and the ad hoc Intergovernmental Task Force on Antimicrobial Resistance. Principal texts developed by Codex include the 'Code of Practice to Minimize and Contain Antimicrobial Resistance (CAC/RCP 61-2005) and 'Guidelines for Risk Analysis of Foodborne Antimicrobial Resistance' (CAC/GL 77-2011). The successful containment of antimicrobial resistance requires the collaboration of a wide range of stakeholders, working together to protect consumer health by ensuring the safety of food products of animal origin.

  18. Antimicrobial resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llor, Carl; Bjerrum, Lars

    2014-01-01

    is associated with an increased risk of adverse effects, more frequent re-attendance and increased medicalization of self-limiting conditions. Antibiotic overprescribing is a particular problem in primary care, where viruses cause most infections. About 90% of all antibiotic prescriptions are issued by general......-the-counter sale of antibiotics, the use of antimicrobial stewardship programmes, the active participation of clinicians in audits, the utilization of valid rapid point-of-care tests, the promotion of delayed antibiotic prescribing strategies, the enhancement of communication skills with patients with the aid...

  19. Antimicrobial resistant bacteria in the food chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    2003-01-01

    Antimicrobials are used for treatment and prevention of disease in food animals and as feed additives for growth promotion. All uses lead to the development of resistant bacteria, some of which are pathogenic to humans. Current main concerns are with resistance in Salmonella and Campylobacter...... to fluoroquinolones, which are used for empirical treatment of diarrhea in humans. Resistance to vancomycin and Synercid((R)) in enterococci is associated with use of similar drugs as growth promoters in food animals. Danish food animal producers have terminated the use of antimicrobial growth promoters. This has...... reduced the total use of antimicrobials by more than 50% and markedly reduced levels of resistance. There is an urgent need to implement globally, WHO principles for prudent use of antimicrobials in food animals. Use of antimicrobials as growth promoters could and should be terminated completely....

  20. Functions of antimicrobial peptides in host defense and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisswenger, Christoph; Bals, Robert

    2005-06-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are effector molecules of the innate immune system. AMPs have a broad antimicrobial spectrum and lyse microbial cells by interaction with biomembranes. Besides their direct antimicrobial function, they have multiple roles as mediators of inflammation with impact on epithelial and inflammatory cells influencing diverse processes such as cytokine release, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, wound healing, chemotaxis, immune induction, and protease-antiprotease balance. Furthermore, AMPs qualify as prototypes of innovative drugs that may be used as antibiotics, anti-lipopolysaccharide drugs, or modifiers of inflammation. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the basic and applied biology of antimicrobial peptides and discusses features of AMPs in host defense and inflammation.

  1. 我院Ⅰ类切口手术病历抗菌药物预防用药点评%Ⅰ incision surgery in our hospital medical records antimicrobial drug prophylaxis Reviews

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓彩霞

    2013-01-01

    目的监测和评价我院Ⅰ类切口手术病历预防用药的现状,为我院持续改进、合理用药工作提供参考信息。方法抽取我院2012年第三季度(7-9月份)Ⅰ类切口{腹股沟疝修补术(包括补片修补术)、甲状腺疾病手术、乳腺疾病手术、冠状动脉造影术,脑动脉造影术}499份病历。依据《抗菌药物临床应用指导原则》、《卫生部办公厅关于抗菌药物临床应用管理有关问题的通知》等相关规定,对抗菌药物预防用药情况逐份进行点评。结果我院清洁手术预防用抗菌药物使用率27.61%;介入诊断预防用抗菌药物使用率1.28%;清洁手术预防用抗菌药物用药时机合理率92.43%;清洁手术预防用抗菌药物品种选择合率92.33%;清洁手术预防用抗菌药物使用疗程<24h占91.42%;清洁手术预防用抗菌药物联合用药0.2%。结论通过Ⅰ类切口手术病历点评,提高了临床医师合理用药水平,特别是提高抗菌药物的合理应用水平,为提高医院医疗质量提供了基础,延缓细菌耐药性的产生提供积极的作用。%Objective: Monitoring and evaluating the status of TypeⅠincision surgery medical records prophylaxis in our hospital, in order to make continuous improvement for our hospital and rational use of drugs to provide reference information. Method: Extract the third quarter of 2012, (July September) the Ⅰ class incision 499 medical records in our hospital {inguinal hernia repair (including patch repair), thyroid disease surgery, breast disease surgery, coronary angiography, cerebral artery angiography} as samples. Based on the clinical use of antibiotics guiding principles, "the General Office of the Ministry of Health on the issues related to the clinical use of antibiotics management notice", we make collate reviews on provisions of antimicrobial prophylaxis medication. Results: The rate of utilization of clean surgical prophylaxis with

  2. Polymyxins resistance: old antimicrobials, last therapeutic options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Girardello

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Polymyxins are polypeptide antimicrobials that act in the cell membranes and promote decrease of the cell wall integrity. These antimicrobials are used in the clinical practice for treatment of the multi-drug resistant Gram negative bacilli infections as the last therapeutic option. The polymyxin resistance involves lipopolysaccharide modifi cations that decrease the affi nity of the antimicrobial with the cell surface. These modifi cations are regulated by two component systems that are active by environmental infl uences as cation presence, pH or polymyxin exposure. The environmental infl uences initiate the action of the genes that develop the polymyxins resistant phenotype. The polymyxins viability maintenance is essential for the treatment for multi-drug resistant bacilli infections, while new therapeutic options are not available.KEYWORDS polimixins antimicrobial resistance

  3. Prevalence of enterobacteriaceae in Tupinambis merianae (Squamata: Teiidae from a captive facility in Central Brazil, with a profile of antimicrobial drug resistance in Salmonella enterica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa de Moraes Carvalho

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports the presence of enterobacteriaceae in Tegu Lizards (Tupinambis merianaefrom a captive facility in central Brazil. From a total of 30 animals, 10 juveniles and 20 adults (10 males, 10 females, 60 samples were collected, in two periods separated by 15 days. The samples were cultivated in Xylose-lysine-deoxycholate agar (XLT4 and MacConkey agar. The Salmonella enterica were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. A total of 78 bacteria was isolated, of wich 27 were from juveniles of T. merianae, 30 from adult males and 21 from adult females. Salmonella enterica was the most frequent bacteria followed by Citrobacter freundii, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter sakasakii, Kluivera sp., Citrobacter amalonaticus, Serratia marcescens, Citrobacter diversus, Yersinia frederiksenii, Serratia odorifera, and Serratia liquefaciens. Salmonella enterica subsp. diarizonae and houtenae showed resistance to cotrimoxazole, and serum Salmonella enterica Worthington showed resistance to tetracycline and gentamicin. Salmonella enterica Panama and S. enterica subsp. diarizonae showed intermediate sensitivity to cotrimoxazole. In addition to Enterobacteriaceae in the Tegu lizard, pathogenic serotypes of S. enterica also occur, and their antimicrobial resistance was confirmed.

  4. Analysis on the Use of Antimicrobial Drugs in some Grade a class-three Special hospital during January~September in 2013%2013年1~9月某三甲专科医院抗菌药物使用情况分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赖延锦

    2014-01-01

    Objective To survey the use of antimicrobial drugs in some grade a class-three special hospital and analyse the statistical results.Methods By using the hospital information management system to statistical the usage and amount of antimicrobial drugs,and calculate the using frequency (DDS),defined daily cost (DDC) and antimicrobia drug precedence ratio.Results Its main use of antimicrobial agents for antifungal drugs,cephalosporins and penicil ium carbon alkene,mainly including cephalosporins during January~September in 2013.Conclusion Thel overal antimicrobial drug use in the hosptial is reasonable,but itexists problems include some antimicrobial selection of higher grade,expensive and excessive use.%目的:调查某三甲专科医院2013年1~9月抗菌药物的使用情况,并对统计结果加以分析。方法利用医院信息管理系统统计抗菌药物的使用量、使用金额,并计算使用频度(DDS)、药品限定日费用(DDC)及抗菌药物的位次比等指标。结果2013年1~9月该院主要使用的抗菌药物为抗真菌药物、头孢类及碳青霉烯类,其中头孢类为主。结论该院整体抗菌药物使用合理,存在部分抗菌药物选择的档次较高、价格昂贵及使用过量的问题。

  5. 78 FR 75570 - Guidance for Industry on New Animal Drugs and New Animal Drug Combination Products Administered...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-12

    ... Judicious Use of Medically Important Antimicrobial Drugs in Food-Producing Animals,'' and to set timelines... antimicrobial drugs intended for use in food-producing animals, as well as data on antimicrobial resistance... Animals: Recommendations for Drug Sponsors for Voluntarily Aligning Product Use Conditions With...

  6. Evaluation of Carbohydrate-Derived Fulvic Acid (CHD-FA) as a Topical Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial for Drug-Resistant Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    cutaneous wound model in rats with the drug resistant Gram negative bacteria Acinetobacter baumannii , Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and...wound model in rats with the drug resistant Gram negative bacteria Acinetobacter baumannii , Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and pathogenic mold...organisms respectively. Section 3. Establishing the wound infection in rats with Acinetobacter baumannii strain ATCC BAA-747 (specific aim 2). Q5

  7. Novel histone-derived antimicrobial peptides use different antimicrobial mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavia, Kathryn E; Spinella, Sara A; Elmore, Donald E

    2012-03-01

    The increase in multidrug resistant bacteria has sparked an interest in the development of novel antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides that operate by crossing the cell membrane may also have the potential to deliver drugs to intracellular targets. Buforin 2 (BF2) is an antimicrobial peptide that shares sequence identity with a fragment of histone subunit H2A and whose bactericidal mechanism depends on membrane translocation and DNA binding. Previously, novel histone-derived antimicrobial peptides (HDAPs) were designed based on properties of BF2, and DesHDAP1 and DesHDAP3 showed significant antibacterial activity. In this study, their DNA binding, permeabilization, and translocation abilities were assessed independently and compared to antibacterial activity to determine whether they share a mechanism with BF2. To investigate the importance of proline in determining the peptides' mechanisms of action, proline to alanine mutants of the novel peptides were generated. DesHDAP1, which shows significant similarities to BF2 in terms of secondary structure, translocates effectively across lipid vesicle and bacterial membranes, while the DesHDAP1 proline mutant shows reduced translocation abilities and antimicrobial potency. In contrast, both DesHDAP3 and its proline mutant translocate poorly, though the DesHDAP3 proline mutant is more potent. Our findings suggest that a proline hinge can promote membrane translocation in some peptides, but that the extent of its effect on permeabilization depends on the peptide's amphipathic properties. Our results also highlight the different antimicrobial mechanisms exhibited by histone-derived peptides and suggest that histones may serve as a source of novel antimicrobial peptides with varied properties.

  8. Antimicrobial resistance: a global response.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, R.; Coast, J.

    2002-01-01

    Resistance to antimicrobial therapies reduces the effectiveness of these drugs, leading to increased morbidity, mortality, and health care expenditure. Because globalization increases the vulnerability of any country to diseases occurring in other countries, resistance presents a major threat to global public health, and no country acting on its own can adequately protect the health of its population against it. International collective action is therefore essential. Nevertheless, responsibil...

  9. Determination of the Antimicrobial Effects of Hydro-Alcoholic Extract of Cannabis Sativa on Multiple Drug Resistant Bacteria Isolated from Nosocomial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Sarmadyan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The science of identification and employment of medicinal plants dates back to the early days of man on earth. Cannabis (hashish is the most common illegal substance used in the United States and was subjected to extensive research as a powerful local disinfecting agent for mouth cavity and skin and an anti-tubercular agent in 1950. Methods: Clinical strains were isolated from hospitalized patients in Vali-e-Asr Hospital of Arak. The hydro-alcoholic extract of cannabis (5 g was prepared following liquid-liquid method and drying in 45˚C. The antimicrobial properties of the extract were determined through disk diffusion and determination of MIC (Minimum Inhibitory Concentration. Results: First, the sensitivity of bacteria was detected based on disk diffusion method and the zone of inhibition was obtained for MRSA (12 mm, S.aureus 25923 (14 mm, E. coli ESBL+: (10 mm, and Klebsiella pneumoniae (7 mm. Disk diffusion for Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter demonstrated no inhibitory zones. Through Broth dilution method, MIC of cannabis extract on the bacteria was determined: E.coli 25922: 50µg/ml, E.coli ESBL+:100 µg/ml, S.aureus 25923:25 µg/ml, MRSA: 50 µg/ml, Pseudomona aeroginosaESBL+> 100 µg/ml, Pseudomonas: 100 µg/ml, Klebsiella pneumoniae: 100 µg/ml, and Acinetobacter baumannii> 1000. Conclusion: The maximum anti-microbial effect of the hydro-alcoholic extract of cannabis was seen for gram positive cocci, especially S. aureus, whereas non-fermentative gram negatives presented resistance to the extract. This extract had intermediate effect on Enterobacteriacae family. Cannabis components extracted through chemical analysis can perhaps be effective in treatment of nosocomial infections.

  10. 新疆不同动物源大肠埃希菌耐药性比较%Comparison of Antimicrobial Drugs Resistance of E .coli Isolates to f rom Different Animals in Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    底丽娜; 赵红琼; 夏利宁; 南海辰

    2015-01-01

    In order to compare the antimicrobial drug resistance of E .coli isolates to from different animals in Xinjiang ,454 isolates from pigs ,638 isolates from sheep and 89 isolates from cattle were conformed . Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of the antimicrobial drugs (including β‐lactams ,fluoroquinolo‐nes ,aminoglycosides and phenicol) to these isolates from pigs ,sheep and cattle were determined by the broth micro‐dilution method .The resistance rates of E .coli from pigs to ampicillin and amoxicillin/clavu‐lanic acid were 67 .0% and 63 .7% ,respectively ,resistance rates to other drugs between 10 .4%‐41 .2% ;the resistance rates of E .coli from sheep to apramycin and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid were 33 .9% and 21 . 2% ,respectively ,resistance rates to other drugs between 3 .1%‐15 .6% ;the resistance rates of E .coli from cattle to ampicillin and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid were 24 .4% and 8 .9% ,respectively ,resistance rates to other drugs between 1 .1%‐6 .7% .Multidrug resistance results ,showed that resistance to 2‐5 an‐timicrobials was dominated among E .coli isolates from pigs ;resistance to 0‐2 antimicrobials was domina‐ted among E .coli isolates from sheep ;resistance to 0‐1 antimicrobial was dominated among E .coli iso‐lates from cattle .Serious degree of resistance of E .coli to antimicrobial drugs descending order was iso‐lates from pig ,sheep and cattle ;multidrug resistance of E .coli from pigs was the most serious in Xin‐jiang .%为了比较新疆不同动物源大肠埃希菌对临床常用抗菌药物的耐药情况。从猪场、羊场和牛场分别分离猪源大肠埃希菌454株、羊源大肠埃希菌638株和牛源大肠埃希菌89株。用微量肉汤法对上述菌进行临床常用β‐内酰胺类、氟喹诺酮类、氨基糖苷类和酰胺醇类抗菌药物最小抑菌浓度测定。猪源大肠埃希菌对氨苄西林(67.0%)和阿莫西林/克拉维酸(63.7%)耐药

  11. Antimicrobial Drug Long-term Medication Effects on Mice Intestinal Microbiome Diversity%抗微生物药长期给药对小鼠肠道微生物组多样性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭鹏

    2016-01-01

    To study the antimicrobial drug long-term drug effects on mice intestinal microbiomediversity,this paper selected in April 2015 ~ April 2016 of the experimental mice a center as the research object, continuous dosing 15 d, berberine, ciprofloxacin and metronidazole, to respectively analyze the change of the gut microbes in mice group.The results showed that the team of intestinal flora in mice abundance and all degrees were lower than the control group, which reduced the highest proportion of metronidazole, followed by berberine, finally to ciprofloxacin; The effect of ciprofloxacin and metronidazole on the high abundance of OTUs in the intestinal flora of mice was larger, but the effect on the low abundance OTUs was small. It followed that the antimicrobial drugs for a long time to give medicine in mice intestinal microbiome diversity had a certain influence, metronidazole influence was most obvious.%为探讨抗微生物药长期给药对小鼠肠道微生物组多样性的影响,选取2015年4月-2016年4月某中心提供的实验小鼠为研究对象,连续给药15d,分别为黄连素、环丙沙星与甲硝唑,分析小鼠肠道微生物组的变化。结果表明:研究组小鼠肠道菌群丰度与均度均低于对照组,其中降低比重最高的为甲硝唑,其次为黄连素,最后为环丙沙星;环丙沙星与甲硝唑对小鼠肠道菌群结构高丰度OTUs影响较大,而对低丰度OTUs影响较小。由此得出,抗微生物药长期给药对小鼠肠道微生物组多样性有一定的影响,其中甲硝唑影响最为明显。

  12. Tendencia del perfil de sensibilidad antimicrobiana de los aislamientos de sangre en un hospital oncológico (1998-2003 Trend of antimicrobial drug-susceptibility of blood isolates at an oncological center (1998-2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Cornejo-Juárez

    2005-07-01

    oncological hospital. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All strains obtained from blood cultures from 1998 to 2003 were included and processed using the Bactec and Microscan system to determinate isolates and susceptibility to antimicrobials. The percent difference (increase or decrease was obtained by comparing the frequency of resistance at baseline and at the end of the study. RESULTS: A total of 2 071 positive blood cultures were obtained; 59.7% of isolates were Gram negative bacteria, 35.7% Gram-positive bacteria and 4.6% were yeasts. E.coli was the most frequent isolated (18.6%, followed by Staphylococcus. epidermidis (12.7% and Klebsiella spp (9%. Throughout the study the susceptibility of Gram negative bacteria was stable and over 88% for most of the antimicrobials tested (except for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Ciprofloxacin susceptibility for Escherichia coli stayed around 50%. Susceptibility to amikacin was higher than that to gentamicin. Staphylococcus aureus susceptibility for oxacillin was 96% and that for vancomycin 100%. S. epidermidis susceptibility for oxacillin was 14% and for vancomycin was 98.6%. No strains of vancomycin-resistant enterococci were found. All Streptococcus pneumoniae strains were penicillin susceptible. CONCLUSIONS: The drug-resistance found in this hospital is the result of the control in the use of antimicrobials, the hospital nosocomial infection program and the use of drug combination in all patients with bacteremia.

  13. Role of MRP transporters in regulating antimicrobial drug inefficacy and oxidative stress-induced pathogenesis during HIV-1 and TB infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Upal; Barber, Paul; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching; Batrakova, Elena V; Mondal, Debasis; Nair, Madhavan

    2015-01-01

    Multi-Drug Resistance Proteins (MRPs) are members of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) drug-efflux transporter superfamily. MRPs are known to regulate the efficacy of a broad range of anti-retroviral drugs (ARV) used in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and antibacterial agents used in Tuberculus Bacilli (TB) therapy. Due to their role in efflux of glutathione (GSH) conjugated drugs, MRPs can also regulate cellular oxidative stress, which may contribute to both HIV and/or TB pathogenesis. This review focuses on the characteristics, functional expression, and modulation of known members of the MRP family in HIV infected cells exposed to ARV drugs and discusses their known role in drug-inefficacy in HIV/TB-induced dysfunctions. Currently, nine members of the MRP family (MRP1-MRP9) have been identified, with MRP1 and MRP2 being the most extensively studied. Details of the other members of this family have not been known until recently, but differential expression has been documented in inflammatory tissues. Researchers have found that the distribution, function, and reactivity of members of MRP family vary in different types of lymphocytes and macrophages, and are differentially expressed at the basal and apical surfaces of both endothelial and epithelial cells. Therefore, the prime objective of this review is to delineate the role of MRP transporters in HAART and TB therapy and their potential in precipitating cellular dysfunctions manifested in these chronic infectious diseases. We also provide an overview of different available options and novel experimental strategies that are being utilized to overcome the drug resistance and disease pathogenesis mediated by these membrane transporters.

  14. Role of MRP Transporters in Regulating Antimicrobial Drug Inefficacy and Oxidative Stress-induced Pathogenesis during HIV-1 and TB Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upal eRoy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Multi-Drug Resistance Proteins (MRPs are members of the ATP binding cassette (ABC drug-efflux transporter superfamily. MRPs are known to regulate the efficacy of a broad range of anti-retroviral drugs (ARV used in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART and antibacterial agents used in Tuberculus Bacilli (TB therapy. Due to their role in efflux of glutathione (GSH conjugated drugs, MRPs can also regulate cellular oxidative stress, which may contribute to both HIV and/or TB pathogenesis. This review focuses on the characteristics, functional expression, and modulation of known members of the MRP family in HIV infected cells exposed to ARV drugs and discusses their known role in drug-inefficacy in HIV/TB-induced dysfunctions. Currently, nine members of the MRP family (MRP1-MRP9 have been identified, with MRP1 and MRP2 being the most extensively studied. Details of the other members of this family have not been known until recently, but differential expression has been documented in inflammatory tissues. Researchers have found that the distribution, function and reactivity of members of MRP family vary in different types of lymphocytes and macrophages, and are differentially expressed at the basal and apical surfaces of both endothelial and epithelial cells. Therefore, the prime objective of this review is to delineate the role of MRP transporters in HAART and TB therapy and their potential in precipitating cellular dysfunctions manifested in these chronic infectious diseases. We also provide an overview of different available options and novel experimental strategies that are being utilized to overcome the drug resistance and disease pathogenesis mediated by these membrane transporters.

  15. The Risk of Some Veterinary Antimicrobial Agents on Public Health Associated with Antimicrobial Resistance and their Molecular Basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Haihong; Sander, Pascal; Iqbal, Zahid; Wang, Yulian; Cheng, Guyue; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    The risk of antimicrobial agents used in food-producing animals on public health associated with antimicrobial resistance continues to be a current topic of discussion as related to animal and human public health. In the present review, resistance monitoring data, and risk assessment results of some important antimicrobial agents were cited to elucidate the possible association of antimicrobial use in food animals and antimicrobial resistance in humans. From the selected examples, it was apparent from reviewing the published scientific literature that the ban on use of some antimicrobial agents (e.g., avoparcin, fluoroquinolone, tetracyclines) did not change drug resistance patterns and did not mitigate the intended goal of minimizing antimicrobial resistance. The use of some antimicrobial agents (e.g., virginiamycin, macrolides, and cephalosporins) in food animals may have an impact on the antimicrobial resistance in humans, but it was largely depended on the pattern of drug usage in different geographical regions. The epidemiological characteristics of resistant bacteria were closely related to molecular mechanisms involved in the development, fitness, and transmission of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:27803693

  16. Helical Antimicrobial Sulfono- {gamma} -AApeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yaqiong; Wu, Haifan; Teng, Peng; Bai, Ge; Lin, Xiaoyang; Zuo, Xiaobing; Cao, Chuanhai; Cai, Jianfeng

    2015-06-11

    Host-defense peptides (HDPs) such as magainin 2 have emerged as potential therapeutic agents combating antibiotic resistance. Inspired by their structures and mechanism of action, herein we report the fi rst example of antimicrobial helical sulfono- γ - AApeptide foldamers. The lead molecule displays broad-spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against multi-drug-resistant Gram- positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Time-kill studies and fl uorescence microscopy suggest that sulfono- γ -AApeptides eradicate bacteria by taking a mode of action analogous to that of HDPs. Clear structure - function relationships exist in the studied sequences. Longer sequences, presumably adopting more-de fi ned helical structures, are more potent than shorter ones. Interestingly, the sequence with less helical propensity in solution could be more selective than the stronger helix-forming sequences. Moreover, this class of antimicrobial agents are resistant to proteolytic degradation. These results may lead to the development of a new class of antimicrobial foldamers combating emerging antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  17. Uses of antimicrobials in plant agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidaver, Anne K

    2002-06-01

    Bacterial diseases of plants are less prevalent than diseases caused by fungi and viruses. Antimicrobials for prophylactic treatment of bacterial diseases of plants are limited in availability, use, and efficacy, and therapeutic use is largely ineffective. Most applications are by spray treatments in orchards. Monitoring and surveillance for drug resistance are not routinely done. In the United States, data on use of antimicrobials for treatment of bacterial diseases of plants are limited to streptomycin and oxytetracycline. Resistance to streptomycin has become widespread among bacterial phytopathogens; no resistance among these bacteria has yet been reported for oxytetracycline. No human health effects have been documented since inception of use of antimicrobials in plants in the 1950s. Transfer of antimicrobial resistance from marker genes in transgenic plants to bacteria has not been documented under natural conditions in field-grown plants. However, antimicrobial-resistance genes are being eliminated from use as marker genes because of concerns about possible transfer from plant genomes back to bacteria, with further horizontal transfer to the bacteria in the environment, or from plant genomes to animals by plant consumption. No new antimicrobials are expected to be used in plant agriculture because of high costs of development, regulatory constraints, and environmental and human health concerns. Alternatives to antimicrobials, such as biocontrol agents, transgenic plants, and novel chemicals, are being developed and marketed, although their efficacy remains to be determined.

  18. Antimicrobial Activities of Methanol, Ethanol and Supercritical CO2 Extracts of Philippine Piper betle L. on Clinical Isolates of Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria with Transferable Multiple Drug Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demetrio L Valle

    Full Text Available Piper betle L. has traditionally been used in alternative medicine in different countries for various therapeutic purposes, including as an anti-infective agent. However, studies reported in the literature are mainly on its activities on drug susceptible bacterial strains. This study determined the antimicrobial activities of its ethanol, methanol, and supercritical CO2 extracts on clinical isolates of multiple drug resistant bacteria which have been identified by the Infectious Disease Society of America as among the currently more challenging strains in clinical management. Assay methods included the standard disc diffusion method and the broth microdilution method for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and the minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC of the extracts for the test microorganisms. This study revealed the bactericidal activities of all the P. betle leaf crude extracts on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE, extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, with minimum bactericidal concentrations that ranged from 19μg/ml to 1250 μg/ml. The extracts proved to be more potent against the Gram positive MRSA and VRE than for the Gram negative test bacteria. VRE isolates were more susceptible to all the extracts than the MRSA isolates. Generally, the ethanol extracts proved to be more potent than the methanol extracts and supercritical CO2 extracts as shown by their lower MICs for both the Gram positive and Gram negative MDRs. MTT cytotoxicity assay showed that the highest concentration (100 μg/ml of P. betle ethanol extract tested was not toxic to normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDFn. Data from the study firmly established P. betle as an alternative source of anti-infectives against multiple drug resistant

  19. Antimicrobial Activities of Methanol, Ethanol and Supercritical CO2 Extracts of Philippine Piper betle L. on Clinical Isolates of Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria with Transferable Multiple Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Demetrio L; Cabrera, Esperanza C; Puzon, Juliana Janet M; Rivera, Windell L

    2016-01-01

    Piper betle L. has traditionally been used in alternative medicine in different countries for various therapeutic purposes, including as an anti-infective agent. However, studies reported in the literature are mainly on its activities on drug susceptible bacterial strains. This study determined the antimicrobial activities of its ethanol, methanol, and supercritical CO2 extracts on clinical isolates of multiple drug resistant bacteria which have been identified by the Infectious Disease Society of America as among the currently more challenging strains in clinical management. Assay methods included the standard disc diffusion method and the broth microdilution method for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) of the extracts for the test microorganisms. This study revealed the bactericidal activities of all the P. betle leaf crude extracts on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, with minimum bactericidal concentrations that ranged from 19μg/ml to 1250 μg/ml. The extracts proved to be more potent against the Gram positive MRSA and VRE than for the Gram negative test bacteria. VRE isolates were more susceptible to all the extracts than the MRSA isolates. Generally, the ethanol extracts proved to be more potent than the methanol extracts and supercritical CO2 extracts as shown by their lower MICs for both the Gram positive and Gram negative MDRs. MTT cytotoxicity assay showed that the highest concentration (100 μg/ml) of P. betle ethanol extract tested was not toxic to normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDFn). Data from the study firmly established P. betle as an alternative source of anti-infectives against multiple drug resistant bacteria.

  20. SecA inhibitors: next generation antimicrobials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weixuan Chen; Arpana Chaudhary; Jianmei Cui; Jinshan Jin; Yinghsin Hsieh; Hsiuchin Yang; Yingju Huang; Phang C. Tai; Binghe Wang

    2012-01-01

    Health problems caused by bacterial infection have become a major public health concern in recent years due to the widespread emergence of drug-resistant bacterial strains.Therefore,the need for the development of new types of antimicrobial agents,especially those with a novel mechanism of action,is urgent.SecA,one of the key components of the secretion (Sec) pathway,is a new promising target for antimicrobial agent design.In recent years,promising leads targeting SecA have been identified and the feasibility of developing antimicrobial agents through the inhibition of SecA has been demonstrated.We hope this review will help stimulate more research in this area so that new antimicrobials can be obtained by targeting SecA.

  1. The interaction between human antimicrobial use and the risk of foodborne zoonotic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koningstein, Maike

    animals and the consequent dissemination of antimicrobial drug resistance have been well described in literature. Much less investigated is the association between human antimicrobial drug use and the adverse consequences it may have on human infections. This thesis addresses the relation between......Salmonella enterica, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are the most common causes of foodborne bacterial infections worldwide. Both bacterial species have many modes for transmission in the food chain through which humans can be infected. The widespread use of antimicrobial drugs for food...... antimicrobial drug use in humans, and the acquisition of infection with antimicrobial resistant non-typhoidal Salmonella, Campylobacter coli (C. coli), and Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni). The main objectives were: 1) To assess if the history of human use of antimicrobial drugs is a risk factor for acquiring...

  2. Antimicrobial profiles of bacterial clinical isolates from the Gabonese National Laboratory of Public Health: data from routine activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Léonard Kouegnigan Rerambiah

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: The antimicrobial resistance profiles seen here are of concern. To control the spread of drug-resistant bacteria, clinicians should be cognizant of their local antimicrobial resistance patterns.

  3. Effects of infection control measures on acquisition of five antimicrobial drug-resistant microorganisms in a tetanus intensive care unit in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultsz, C.; Bootsma, M.C.J.; Loan, H.T.; Nga, T.T.; le Thao, T.P.; Thuy, T.T.; Campbell, J.; le Vien, M.; Hoa, N.T.; Hoang, N.V.; Wit, F.; Chau, N.V.; Farrar, J.; Bonten, M.J.M.; Yen, L.M.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To quantify the effects of barrier precautions and antibiotic mixing on prevalence and acquisition of five drug-resistant microorganisms within a single tetanus intensive care unit at a tertiary referral hospital in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. METHODS: All patients admitted within the study

  4. Antimicrobial synergy between carprofen and doxycycline against methicill-inresistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius ST71

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brochmann, Rikke Prejh; Helmfrid, Linn Alexandra; Jana, Bimal;

    2016-01-01

    to restore antimicrobial susceptibility in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP). Results: A total of 216 antimicrobial/non-antimicrobial drug combinations were screened by disk diffusion using a clinical MRSP sequence type (ST) 71 strain resistant to all six antimicrobials tested...... by checkerboard assay revealed a synergistic antimicrobial effect between carprofen and doxycycline, with the sum of the fractional inhibitory concentration indexes (Sigma FICI) ranging between 0.3 and 0.5 depending on drug concentration. Checkerboard testing of multiple MRSP strains revealed a clear association...

  5. Antimicrobial interactions (synergy) of teicoplanin with two broad-spectrum drugs (cefotaxime, ofloxacin) tested against gram-positive isolates from Germany and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R N; Marshall, S A; Grimm, H

    1997-10-01

    Teicoplanin, a glycopeptide, has been widely used in some nations alone and in empiric therapy combinations to address infections caused by Gram-positive cocci. However, glycopeptide resistance and the increasing incidence of oxacillin-resistant staphylococci have compromised contemporary chemotherapy. In this study, teicoplanin was tested in combinations with ampicillin, cefotaxime with and without desacetylcefotaxime, and ofloxacin against 151 Gram-positive cocci to assess the potential for enhanced action. The strains included recent isolates from the United States and Germany having well-characterized resistance mechanisms (oxacillin-resistant staphylococci, vancomycin-resistant enterococci), each tested by NCCLS methods, checkerboard synergy tests, and kill-curves. Teicoplanin alone was active (MIC90s, 0.25-2 micrograms/mL) against all species except vanA enterococci. Drug interactions of teicoplanin with beta-lactams revealed synergy and partial synergy versus oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. (67-100%) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (70-100%), many at clinically achievable drug concentrations. However, confirming kill-curve experiments showed static action and no significant bactericidal effect. Combinations of ofloxacin with teicoplanin or cefotaxime plus desacetylcefotaxime showed a dominant additive and indifferent interaction. Teicoplanin continues to be a viable alternative to vancomycin, especially in combination therapy with selected broad-spectrum cephalosporins or fluoroquinolones. Many emerging pathogens that test resistant to individual drugs appear to be inhibited by tested combinations, extending their potential clinical utility.

  6. Pharmacy intervention on antimicrobial management of critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ijo I

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Frequent, suboptimal use of antimicrobial drugs has resulted in the emergence of microbial resistance, compromised clinical outcomes and increased costs, particularly in the intensive care unit (ICU. Mounting on these challenges is the paucity of new antimicrobial agents.Objectives: The study aims to determine the impact of prospective pharmacy-driven antimicrobial stewardship in the ICU on clinical and potential financial outcomes. The primary objectives were to determine the mean length of stay (LOS and mortality rate in the ICU resulting from prospective pharmacy interventions on antimicrobial therapy. The secondary objective was to calculate the difference in total drug acquisition costs resulting from pharmacy infectious diseases (ID-related interventions.Methods: In collaboration with an infectious disease physician, the ICU pharmacy team provided prospective audit with feedback to physicians on antimicrobial therapies of 70 patients over a 4-month period in a 31-bed ICU. In comparison with published data, LOS and mortality of pharmacy-monitored ICU patients were recorded. Daily cost savings on antimicrobial drugs and charges for medication therapy management (MTM services were added to calculate potential total cost savings. Pharmacy interventions focused on streamlining, dose optimization, intravenous-to-oral conversion, antimicrobial discontinuation, new recommendation and drug information consult. Antimicrobial education was featured in oral presentations and electronic newsletters for pharmacists and clinicians.Results: The mean LOS in the ICU was 6 days, which was lower than the published reports of LOS ranging from 11 to 36 days. The morality rate of 14% was comparable to the reported range of 6 to 20% in published literature. The total drug cost difference was a negative financial outcome or loss of USD192 associated with ID-related interventions.Conclusion: In collaboration with the infectious disease physician, prospective

  7. Risk factors in the management of antimicrobial agents in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Consolação dos Santos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Current retrospective, descriptive, document-based study identified the risk factors in the administration of antimicrobial drugs by the nursing team. The hospital records at the Hematology and Oncology clinics of patients treated with antimicrobial agents in a hospital in the center-western region of the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, between January 2008 and December 2011, were analyzed. Data were investigated with IBM program, Statistical Package of Social Sciences (SPSS 21.0 and inferential statistics. Chi-square and Fisher´s exact tests were employed to assess the differences between the categorical variables. Risk factors related to the administration of antimicrobial agents by the nursing team comprised lack of records of phlogistic infection signs; inadequate schedules for the administration of antimicrobial drugs; lack of precaution and isolation measures and of swab sampling. Continuous education programs for nurses, focusing on safe administration of antimicrobial agents, are highly relevant.

  8. Anti-antimicrobial Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Lloyd; Lamarre, Baptiste; Diu, Ting; Ravi, Jascindra; Judge, Peter J.; Temple, Adam; Carr, Matthew; Cerasoli, Eleonora; Su, Bo; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Martyna, Glenn; Crain, Jason; Watts, Anthony; Ryadnov, Maxim G.

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial or host defense peptides are innate immune regulators found in all multicellular organisms. Many of them fold into membrane-bound α-helices and function by causing cell wall disruption in microorganisms. Herein we probe the possibility and functional implications of antimicrobial antagonism mediated by complementary coiled-coil interactions between antimicrobial peptides and de novo designed antagonists: anti-antimicrobial peptides. Using sequences from native helical families such as cathelicidins, cecropins, and magainins we demonstrate that designed antagonists can co-fold with antimicrobial peptides into functionally inert helical oligomers. The properties and function of the resulting assemblies were studied in solution, membrane environments, and in bacterial culture by a combination of chiroptical and solid-state NMR spectroscopies, microscopy, bioassays, and molecular dynamics simulations. The findings offer a molecular rationale for anti-antimicrobial responses with potential implications for antimicrobial resistance. PMID:23737519

  9. [Antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, José Miguel; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Mensa, José; Trilla, Antoni; Cainzos, Miguel

    2002-01-01

    Antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery refers to a very brief course of an antimicrobial agent initiated just before the start of the procedure. The efficacy of antimicrobials to prevent postoperative infection at the site of surgery (incisional superficial, incisional deep, or organ/space infection) has been demonstrated for many surgical procedures. Nevertheless, the majority of studies centering on the quality of preoperative prophylaxis have found that a high percentage of the antimicrobials used are inappropriate for this purpose. This work discusses the scientific basis for antimicrobial prophylaxis, provides general recommendations for its correct use and specific recommendations for various types of surgery. The guidelines for surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis are based on results from well-designed studies, whenever possible. These guidelines are focussed on reducing the incidence of infection at the surgical site while minimizing the contribution of preoperative administration of antimicrobials to the development of bacterial resistance.

  10. The quest for optimal antimicrobial therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, Petrus Gerardus Maria

    2005-01-01

    Since the discovery of sulphonam ides and penicillin in the 1930's, and their widespread use in clinical practice during World War II a plethora of new antimicrobial agents have entered the market. Initial optim ism has faded that these new drugs would eliminate infectious diseases as killer disease

  11. Prospective assessment of antimicrobial prescribing pattern at a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Selvaraj

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antimicrobial agents (AMA are the greatest contribution to 20th century, which are used for cure and prevention of infections. Widespread use of antimicrobials has facilitated the development of resistance. Aim: The present study was done to screen rational use of antimicrobials in the medicine outpatient department of a teaching hospital. Methods: A total of 650 prescriptions were collected from the medicine OPD. Prescriptions containing antimicrobial drugs were analyzed for appropriateness in dosage, duration of therapy and fixed dose drug combinations (FDCs. The antimicrobials were grouped using the anatomical therapeutic chemical (ATC codes. Statistical analysis: Data was analyzed by percentage. Results: Out of 650 patients, 180 patients (27.65% received antimicrobials. Among them 25.33% patients were prescribed one antimicrobial and 18.88% were prescribed antimicrobial FDCs. Out of the 180 prescriptions, 47% were irrational. The most commonly prescribed antimicrobial categories were β-lactam antimicrobials (35.09%, followed by fluoroquinolones (18.88% and combinations of antimicrobials from different groups (13.85%. Conclusion: Higher frequency of irrational antimicrobial prescriptions suggests that antimicrobial restriction policies and a multidisciplinary effort to reduce usage are urgently required.

  12. Evaluation of Carbohydrate-Derived Fulvic Acid (CHD-FA) as a Topical Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial for Drug-Resistant Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    with regenerated skin . By day 10 the regenerated skin has normal activity with the presence of fur. Wound measurement in this model was not practical...in quarterly report Q9.01.2015. Therefore, the dermal pH value in the open wound of rat skin was measured in vivo using a pH micro- electrode over a...restricting the penetration of the drug. During the next quarter and throughout next year, we will perform studies with a modified application method

  13. 77 FR 22327 - Draft Guidance for Industry on New Animal Drugs and New Animal Drug Combination Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... applications for new animal drug products containing medically important antimicrobial new animal drugs for use... recommends that the use of medically important antimicrobial drugs be limited to uses in animals that are... Animals: Recommendations for Drug Sponsors for Voluntarily Aligning Product Use Conditions With GFI......

  14. Antimicrobial peptide action on parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrent, Marc; Pulido, David; Rivas, Luis; Andreu, David

    2012-08-01

    Diseases caused by protozoan parasites can pose a severe thread to human health and are behind some serious neglected tropical diseases like malaria and leishmaniasis. Though several different drugs have been developed in order to eradicate these diseases, a successful candidate has not yet been discovered. Among the most active compounds tested, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are particularly appealing because of their wide spectrum of action. AMPs have been described to perturb protozoan homeostasis by disrupting the cellular membranes but also by interfering with key processes in the parasite metabolism. In this review we describe the diverse mechanisms of action of AMPs on protozoan targets and how they can be exploited to treat diseases. Moreover, we describe with detail the antimicrobial action of AMPs on two major parasitical infections: leishmaniasis and malaria. All the features reviewed here show that AMPs are promising drugs to target protozoan parasites and that further understanding of the mechanism of action of these compounds will lead to improved drugs that could be worth to test in a clinical phase.

  15. Variation in Outpatient Oral Antimicrobial Use Patterns among Canadian Provinces, 2000 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiona K Glass-Kaastra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The volume and patterns of antimicrobial drug use are key variables to consider when developing guidelines for prescribing, and programs to address stewardship and combat the increasing prevalence of antimicrobial resistant pathogens. Because drug programs are regulated at the provincial level, there is an expectation that antibiotic use may vary among provinces.

  16. Antimicrobials in beekeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reybroeck, Wim; Daeseleire, Els; De Brabander, Hubert F; Herman, Lieve

    2012-07-06

    The bee diseases American and European foulbrood and nosemosis can be treated with anti-infectious agents. However, in the EU and the USA the use of these agents in beekeeping is strictly regulated due to the lack of tolerance (e.g. Maximum Residue Limit) for residues of antibiotics and chemotherapeutics in honey. This article reviews the literature dealing with antimicrobials of interest in apiculture, stability of these antimicrobials in honey, and disposition of the antimicrobials in honeybee hives.

  17. Antimicrobial Action of Compounds from Marine Seaweed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Pérez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Seaweed produces metabolites aiding in the protection against different environmental stresses. These compounds show antiviral, antiprotozoal, antifungal, and antibacterial properties. Macroalgae can be cultured in high volumes and would represent an attractive source of potential compounds useful for unconventional drugs able to control new diseases or multiresistant strains of pathogenic microorganisms. The substances isolated from green, brown and red algae showing potent antimicrobial activity belong to polysaccharides, fatty acids, phlorotannins, pigments, lectins, alkaloids, terpenoids and halogenated compounds. This review presents the major compounds found in macroalga showing antimicrobial activities and their most promising applications.

  18. Antimicrobial price variation: Conundrum of medical profession!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rataboli P

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacoeconomics plays a pivotal role in clinical practice. High medicine prices can adversely affect a patient′s finances and compliance. The Indian pharmaceutical industry has become a cornucopia of medicines with wide variation in prices for the same medicine marketed under different brand names. Price list of available antimicrobial brands was procured from a commercial drug directory. Average price of widely prescribed oral antimicrobials was found and price variation between different brands was calculated. The variation in medicine prices was found to be from 95% lower to more than 350% higher than the average price. Implications of price variation in clinical practice are discussed and remedial measures suggested.

  19. Drug: D00858 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available gard (TN) C22H30Cl2N10. (C6H12O7)2 896.3198 897.7572 D00858.gif Antimicrobial Same as: C08038 Therapeutic ca...of drugs in Japan [BR:br08301] 2 Agents affecting individual organs 26 Epidermides 261 Antimicrobial

  20. [The theory and practice of the creation of antisignature oligodeoxyribonucleotides as universal antimicrobial agents (the principles of a drug technology of the 21st century)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrypal', I H

    1997-01-01

    Gene-directed and anti-sense (mRNA-directed) synthetic oligonucleotides (SO) have a common main shortcoming. That is the necessity to introduce intercalators to their composition for the stronger interaction with targets to prevent their separation from the latter by DNA-polymerase and RNA-polymerase complexes which work on genome or with mRNA by ribosomes moving along them. Intercalation leads to considerable loss of SO selectivity in respect to the target. The author substantiates advantages of another type of SO which action is directed to blocking of the function of signature sequences of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) that completely ceases the self-assembly of ribosomal subunits and totally excludes the process of translation and synthesis of proteins. Such type SO advantages are as follows: a) a short chain which includes 8-13 nucleotides altogether; b) absence of the necessity of intercalation; c) high specificity in respect to targets; d) high stability in respect to nucleases action under modification by one of the methods of internucleotide bonds and, e) a possibility to deliver any microorganism to the cells when allowing for auxotrophy of the latter in respect to one or another substance. It is foreseen that antisignature SO can become most promising among the drugs called to block the functions of nucleic acids of the agents of the disease.

  1. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System 2014 NARMS ... Note: If you need help accessing information in different file formats, see Instructions for Downloading ...

  2. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more understandable to non-scientists by showing how bacterial antimicrobial resistance can develop and spread. All FDA CVM ... Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local ...

  3. Study of the chemical chelates and anti-microbial effect of some metal ions in nanostructural form on the efficiency of antibiotic therapy "norfloxacin drug"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refat, Moamen S.; El-Hawary, W. F.; Mohamed, Mahmoud A.

    2012-04-01

    This paper has reviewed the chemical and biological impact resulting from the interaction between norfloxacin (norH) antibiotic drug and two lanthanide (lanthanum(III) and cerium(III)) metal ions, which prepared in normal and nano-features. La(III) and Ce(III) complexes were synthesized with chemical formulas [La(nor)3]·3H2O and [Ce(nor)3]·2H2O. Lanthanum and cerium(III) ions coordinated toward norH with a hexadentate geometry. The norH acts as deprotonated bidentate ligand through the oxygen atom of carbonyl group and the oxygen atom of carboxylic group. Elemental analysis, FT-IR spectral, electrical conductivity, thermal analysis (TG/DTA), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements have been used to characterize the mentioned isolated complexes. The Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger integral methods are used to estimate the kinetic parameters for the major successive steps detectable in the TG curve. The brightness side in this study is to take advantage for the preparation and characterization of single phases of La2O3 and CeO2 nanoparticles using urea as precursors via a solid-state decomposition procedure. The norH ligand in comparison with both cases (normal and nano-particles) of lanthanide complexes were screened against for antibacterial (Escherichia Coli, Staphylococcus Aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and antifungal (Aspergillus Flavus and Candida Albicans) activities. The highest antibacterial and antifungal activities data of the nano-particles complexes were observed with more potent than the free norH and normal lanthanide complexes.

  4. Monitoring of bacterial drug resistance and their analysis of antimicrobial susceptibility in our hospital%我院细菌耐药性监测与抗菌药物敏感性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖俊艳

    2014-01-01

    Objective To understand the antimicrobial susceptibility of the bacteria in our hospital, and guide the application of antibiotics.Methods In the Luozhuang center hospital of Linyi in 2012, the drug resistance of clinically isolated strains was monitored, and their antimicrobial susceptibility were analyzed by disc diffusion method recommended by CLSI, using WHONET5.3 software to analyze the results.Results According to the moni-toring programme, the result of susceptibility test of 780 strains of bacteria to antimicrobial agents were obtained, in-cluding 239 strains of gram-positive bacteria, accounting for 30.6%;541 strains of gram-negative bacteria, account-ing for 69.4%.Except for pseudomonas aeruginosa, drug sensitive rate of all gram-negative bacillus to carbapenems were over 85.7%, those of piperacillin-tazobactam were more than 79.6%;those of all the staphylococcus aureus to vancomycin were 100.0%.Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus(MRSA)detection rate was 51.1%, sensitive rate of MRSA to chloromycetin was 80.0%, with resistance to other antibiotics;the sensitive rate of faecium and fae-calis to vancomycin and linezolid were the highest (96.6%,100.0%;100.0%,100.0%).Conclusion The sensi-tive rates of klebsiella pneumoniae, escherichia coli, acinetobacter and enterobacter to carbapenems were higher, but the drug resistence rate of pseudomonas aeruginosa to it was higher.The sensitive rates of staphylococcus aureus to vancomycin, linezolid and teicoplanin were higher.%目的:了解该院细菌对抗菌药物的敏感性,指导临床抗菌药物合理应用。方法监测该院2012年临床分离菌株的耐药性,以美国临床和实验室标准协会( CLSI)推荐的纸片扩散法测定其抗菌药物敏感性,用WHONET5.3软件分析结果。结果按照监测方案,共获得780株细菌对抗菌药物敏感性结果,其中革兰阳性菌239株,占30.6%;革兰阴性菌541株,占69.4%。除绿脓杆菌外,所有革兰阴

  5. The Role of Antimicrobial Peptides in Preventing Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Infections and Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Soo Hahm

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, decreasing effectiveness of conventional antimicrobial-drugs has caused serious problems due to the rapid emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens. Furthermore, biofilms, which are microbial communities that cause serious chronic infections and dental plaque, form environments that enhance antimicrobial resistance. As a result, there is a continuous search to overcome or control such problems, which has resulted in antimicrobial peptides being considered as an alternative to conventional drugs. Antimicrobial peptides are ancient host defense effector molecules in living organisms. These peptides have been identified in diverse organisms and synthetically developed by using peptidomimic techniques. This review was conducted to demonstrate the mode of action by which antimicrobial peptides combat multidrug-resistant bacteria and prevent biofilm formation and to introduce clinical uses of these compounds for chronic disease, medical devices, and oral health. In addition, combinations of antimicrobial peptides and conventional drugs were considered due to their synergetic effects and low cost for therapeutic treatment.

  6. Mechanisms of Antimicrobial Resistance in ESKAPE Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirijan Santajit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ESKAPE pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species are the leading cause of nosocomial infections throughout the world. Most of them are multidrug resistant isolates, which is one of the greatest challenges in clinical practice. Multidrug resistance is amongst the top three threats to global public health and is usually caused by excessive drug usage or prescription, inappropriate use of antimicrobials, and substandard pharmaceuticals. Understanding the resistance mechanisms of these bacteria is crucial for the development of novel antimicrobial agents or other alternative tools to combat these public health challenges. Greater mechanistic understanding would also aid in the prediction of underlying or even unknown mechanisms of resistance, which could be applied to other emerging multidrug resistant pathogens. In this review, we summarize the known antimicrobial resistance mechanisms of ESKAPE pathogens.

  7. Antimicrobial peptides in innate immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Ole E; Borregaard, Niels; Cole, Alexander M

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are ancient effector molecules in the innate immune response of eukaryotes. These peptides are important for the antimicrobial efficacy of phagocytes and for the innate immune response mounted by epithelia of humans and other mammals. AMPs are generated either by de novo synthesis or by proteolytic cleavage from antimicrobially inactive proproteins. Studies of human diseases and animal studies have given important clues to the in vivo role of AMPs. It is now evident that dysregulation of the generation of AMPs in innate immune responses plays a role in certain diseases like Crohn's disease and atopic dermatitis. AMPs are attractive candidates for development of novel antibiotics due to their in vivo activity profile and some peptides may serve as templates for further drug development.

  8. Drug: D03318 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D03318 Drug Wood creosote (JP16); Creosote (TN) Therapeutic category: 2619 ATC code: R05CA08 Therapeutic...mides 261 Antimicrobial agents 2619 Others D03318 Wood creosote (JP16) Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC)

  9. Drug: D04732 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available drugs in Japan [BR:br08301] 2 Agents affecting individual organs 26 Epidermides 261 Antimicrobial agents 2619 Others D04732 Isopropanol - methylated alcohol mixt PubChem: 17398151 ...

  10. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CVM produced material may be copied, reproduced, and distributed as long as FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine ... More in Antimicrobial Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring ... Note: If you need help accessing information in different file formats, see Instructions for Downloading ...

  11. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms.

  12. Archetypal tryptophan-rich antimicrobial peptides: properties and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagaghi, Nadin; Palombo, Enzo A; Clayton, Andrew H A; Bhave, Mrinal

    2016-02-01

    Drug-resistant microorganisms ('superbugs') present a serious challenge to the success of antimicrobial treatments. Subsequently, there is a crucial need for novel bio-control agents. Many antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) show a broad-spectrum activity against bacteria, fungi or viruses and are strong candidates to complement or substitute current antimicrobial agents. Some AMPs are also effective against protozoa or cancer cells. The tryptophan (Trp)-rich peptides (TRPs) are a subset of AMPs that display potent antimicrobial activity, credited to the unique biochemical properties of tryptophan that allow it to insert into biological membranes. Further, many Trp-rich AMPs cross bacterial membranes without compromising their integrity and act intracellularly, suggesting interactions with nucleic acids and enzymes. In this work, we overview some archetypal TRPs derived from natural sources, i.e., indolicidin, tritrpticin and lactoferricin, summarising their biochemical properties, structures, antimicrobial activities, mechanistic studies and potential applications.

  13. Evaluation of Antimicrobial Activity of Root Extracts of Abitulon indicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Rao MORTHA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial activity of Abitulon indicum roots was studied against seven pathogenic bacteria and three fungal strains by agar well diffusion method. Antimicrobial activity was recorded for hexane, chloroform, methanol, ethanol and aqueous extracts. Alcohol (ethanol and methanol extracts exhibited the highest degree of antimicrobial activity compared to aqueous, chloroform and hexane extracts. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was turned out to be the most susceptible bacterium to the crude root chemical constituents, using the standard Tetracycline and Clotrimazole. Minimum inhibition concentration values of hexane, chloroform, methanol, ethanol and aqueous extracts were determined by the agar dilution method and ranged between 62.5 and 1,000 µg. The study suggested that the root extracts possess bioactive compounds with antimicrobial activity against the tested bacteria and fungi, revealing a significant scope to develop a novel broad spectrum of antimicrobial drug formulation from Abitulon indicum.

  14. Quantitative studies of antimicrobial peptide-lipid membrane interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper

    into such novel therapeutics. However, limited understanding of the mechanisms underlying microbicidal activity of antimicrobial peptides has slowed down this development. A central step toward understanding the microbicidal mechanisms of action of antimicrobial peptides is to understand the mechanisms by which......The increasing occurrence of multi-drug-resistant bacteria poses a serious threat to modern society. Therefore, novel types of anti-infective therapeutics are highly warranted. Antimicrobial peptides are a class of naturally occurring host-defense molecules that potentially might be developed...... antimicrobial peptides interact with phospholipid membranes. Motivated by that fact, the scope of this thesis is to study these antimicrobial peptide-lipid membrane interactions. In particular, we attempt to study these interactions with a quantitative approach. For that purpose, we consider the three...

  15. Antimicrobial Lemongrass Essential Oil-Copper Ferrite Cellulose Acetate Nanocapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakos, Ioannis L; Abdellatif, Mohamed H; Innocenti, Claudia; Scarpellini, Alice; Carzino, Riccardo; Brunetti, Virgilio; Marras, Sergio; Brescia, Rosaria; Drago, Filippo; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2016-04-20

    Cellulose acetate (CA) nanoparticles were combined with two antimicrobial agents, namely lemongrass (LG) essential oil and Cu-ferrite nanoparticles. The preparation method of CA nanocapsules (NCs), with the two antimicrobial agents, was based on the nanoprecipitation method using the solvent/anti-solvent technique. Several physical and chemical analyses were performed to characterize the resulting NCs and to study their formation mechanism. The size of the combined antimicrobial NCs was found to be ca. 220 nm. The presence of Cu-ferrites enhanced the attachment of LG essential oil into the CA matrix. The magnetic properties of the combined construct were weak, due to the shielding of Cu-ferrites from the polymeric matrix, making them available for drug delivery applications where spontaneous magnetization effects should be avoided. The antimicrobial properties of the NCs were significantly enhanced with respect to CA/LG only. This work opens novel routes for the development of organic/inorganic nanoparticles with exceptional antimicrobial activities.

  16. Antimicrobial prophylaxis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzler, Mark J; Berbari, Elie; Osmon, Douglas R

    2011-07-01

    Antimicrobial prophylaxis is commonly used by clinicians for the prevention of numerous infectious diseases, including herpes simplex infection, rheumatic fever, recurrent cellulitis, meningococcal disease, recurrent uncomplicated urinary tract infections in women, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with cirrhosis, influenza, infective endocarditis, pertussis, and acute necrotizing pancreatitis, as well as infections associated with open fractures, recent prosthetic joint placement, and bite wounds. Perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis is recommended for various surgical procedures to prevent surgical site infections. Optimal antimicrobial agents for prophylaxis should be bactericidal, nontoxic, inexpensive, and active against the typical pathogens that can cause surgical site infection postoperatively. To maximize its effectiveness, intravenous perioperative prophylaxis should be administered within 30 to 60 minutes before the surgical incision. Antimicrobial prophylaxis should be of short duration to decrease toxicity and antimicrobial resistance and to reduce cost.

  17. Human Health Consequences of Use of Antimicrobial Agents in Aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuer, Ole Eske; Kruse, H.; Grave, K.

    2009-01-01

    industry in many regions of the world and the widespread, intensive, and often unregulated use of antimicrobial agents in this area of animal production, efforts are needed to prevent development and spread of antimicrobial resistance in aquaculture to reduce the risk to human health.......Intensive use of antimicrobial agents in aquaculture provides a selective pressure creating reservoirs of drug-resistant bacteria and transferable resistance genes in fish pathogens and other bacteria in the aquatic environment. From these reservoirs, resistance genes may disseminate by horizontal...... gene transfer and reach human pathogens, or drug-resistant pathogens from the aquatic environment may reach humans directly. Horizontal gene transfer may occur in the aquaculture environment, in the food chain, or in the human intestinal tract. Among the antimicrobial agents commonly used...

  18. Amino acid–based surfactants: New antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinazo, A; Manresa, M A; Marques, A M; Bustelo, M; Espuny, M J; Pérez, L

    2016-02-01

    The rapid increase of drug resistant bacteria makes necessary the development of new antimicrobial agents. Synthetic amino acid-based surfactants constitute a promising alternative to conventional antimicrobial compounds given that they can be prepared from renewable raw materials. In this review, we discuss the structural features that promote antimicrobial activity of amino acid-based surfactants. Monocatenary, dicatenary and gemini surfactants that contain different amino acids on the polar head and show activity against bacteria are revised. The synthesis and basic physico-chemical properties have also been included.

  19. 75 FR 33317 - Antibacterial Resistance and Diagnostic Device and Drug Development Research for Bacterial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... Development Research for Bacterial Diseases; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION.... The workshop will address antibacterial drug resistance, mechanisms of resistance, epidemiology of... Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Office of Antimicrobial Products, 10903...

  20. Mechanisms and Biological Costs of Bacterial Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Lofton Tomenius, Hava

    2016-01-01

    The global increasing problem of antibiotic resistance necessarily drives the pursuit and discovery of new antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) initially seemed like promising new drug candidates. Already members of the innate immune system, it was assumed that they would be bioactive and non-toxic. Their common trait for fundamental, non-specific mode of action also seemed likely to reduce resistance development. In this thesis, we demonstrate the ease with which two species o...

  1. Fatty acid conjugation enhances the activities of antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhining; Yuan, Penghui; Xing, Meng; He, Zhumei; Dong, Chuanfu; Cao, Yongchang; Liu, Qiuyun

    2013-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are small molecules that play a crucial role in innate immunity in multi-cellular organisms, and usually expressed and secreted constantly at basal levels to prevent infection, but local production can be augmented upon an infection. The clock is ticking as rising antibiotic abuse has led to the emergence of many drug resistance bacteria. Due to their broad spectrum antibiotic and antifungal activities as well as anti-viral and anti-tumor activities, efforts are being made to develop antimicrobial peptides into future microbial agents. This article describes some of the recent patents on antimicrobial peptides with fatty acid conjugation. Potency and selectivity of antimicrobial peptide can be modulated with fatty acid tails of variable length. Interaction between membranes and antimicrobial peptides was affected by fatty acid conjugation. At concentrations above the critical miscelle concentration (CMC), propensity of solution selfassembly hampered binding of the peptide to cell membranes. Overall, fatty acid conjugation has enhanced the activities of antimicrobial peptides, and occasionally it rendered inactive antimicrobial peptides to be bioactive. Antimicrobial peptides can not only be used as medicine but also as food additives.

  2. Fast disinfecting antimicrobial surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madkour, Ahmad E; Dabkowski, Jeffery M; Nusslein, Klaus; Tew, Gregory N

    2009-01-20

    Silicon wafers and glass surfaces were functionalized with facially amphiphilic antimicrobial copolymers using the "grafting from" technique. Surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was used to grow poly(butylmethacrylate)-co-poly(Boc-aminoethyl methacrylate) from the surfaces. Upon Boc-deprotection, these surfaces became highly antimicrobial and killed S. aureus and E. coli 100% in less than 5 min. The molecular weight and grafting density of the polymer were controlled by varying the polymerization time and initiator surface density. Antimicrobial studies showed that the killing efficiency of these surfaces was independent of polymer layer thickness or grafting density within the range of surfaces studied.

  3. Continued intervention classⅠ incision surgery to prevent antimicrobial resistance of rational drug use%持续干预措施对Ⅰ类切口手术预防抗菌药物使用合理性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵倩

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveTo investigate the influence on rational use of prevent antimicrobial agents in classⅠ incision surgery treated with the continued interventions.Methods 150 patients with class I incision before intervention group were collected from January 2012 to January 2013 in our hospital, 150 cases after the intervention group were collected from January 2014 to January 2015, the continuous intervention on prevent use of the antibiotics rationality in Class I incision was from October 2013.ResultsThe antibiotics use rate, within 24 hours discontinuation rate, antimicrobial drug costs, antimicrobial agents/total hospital costs of after intervention group were lower than before intervention group, rational of drug selection, Medication time was higher than before intervention group(P<0.05).Conclusion After the implementation of the of our hospital continued intervention class I incision of antibiotics incision surgery to prevent inappropriate drug significantly improved utilization and deactivation rates lower within 24 hours, easing the financial burden of patients, improve the antimicrobial rational drug use.%目的:探讨持续干预措施对Ⅰ类切口手术预防抗菌药物使用合理性的影响。方法干预前组150例患者均来自2012年1月~2013年1月我院Ⅰ类切口手术患者,干预后组150例患者均来自2014年1月~2015年1月,我院于2013年10月对Ⅰ类切口手术预防抗菌药物使用合理性进行持续干预。结果干预后抗菌药物使用率、24h内停用率、抗菌药物费用、抗菌药物/总住院费用均低于干预前,药物选择、用药时限合理性高于干预前(P<0.05)。结论我院实施持续干预措施后Ⅰ类切口手术预防抗菌药物不合理用药现象明显改善,使用率及24h内停用率均降低,缓解了患者的经济负担,提高了抗菌药物使用的合理性。

  4. Investigation on Antimicrobial Drug Resistance to Escherichia coli Isolates from A Farm in Tacheng Xinj iang%新疆塔城某规模化养殖场大肠埃希菌耐药性调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    南海辰; 夏利宁; 刘英玉; 翟少华; 底丽娜

    2014-01-01

    为了解新疆塔城某规模化养殖场分离的大肠埃希菌对临床常用抗菌药物的耐药情况,从该规模化养殖场中采集的水样、饲料样、牛粪样及羊粪样中分离大肠埃希菌。采用微量肉汤法检测其对抗菌药物的耐药情况。结果表明,采集牛源饮用水样35份,分离率100.0%(35/35),分离的大肠埃希菌仅对阿莫西林/克拉维酸(31.4%)和氨苄西林(20.0%)2种抗菌药物耐药;牛源饲料样15份,分离率86.7%(13/15),分离的大肠埃希菌对氨苄西林(30.8%)、阿莫西林/克拉维酸(23.1%)、安普霉素(15.4%)、诺氟沙星(7.7%)、恩诺沙星(7.7%)和庆大霉素(7.7%)6种抗菌药物耐药;牛粪样20份,分离率100.0%(20/20),分离的大肠埃希菌对氨苄西林(60.0%)、阿莫西林/克拉维酸(50.0%)、恩诺沙星(40.0%)、庆大霉素(40.0%)、头孢噻呋(35.0%)、阿米卡星(25.0%)、诺氟沙星(10.0%)和环丙沙星(10.0%)8种抗菌药物耐药;羊粪样55份,分离率100.0%(55/55),分离的大肠埃希菌对阿莫西林/克拉维酸(25.5%)、氨苄西林(12.7%)、庆大霉素(5.5%)、头孢噻呋(3.6%)、诺氟沙星(1.8%)、恩诺沙星(1.8%)和阿米卡星(1.8%)7种抗菌药物耐药。新疆塔城牛源大肠埃希菌对常用抗菌药物多药耐药情况较严重,临床用药需谨慎,且可能存在粪源菌污染水源和饲料的风险。%In order to investigate commonly used antimicrobial drug resistance to Escherichia coli isolates from a farm in Tacheng,Xinj iang,the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC)of the antimicrobial drugs to these isolates from drinking water,feed,bovine feces and ovine feces were determined by the broth mi-cro-dilution method.The results showed that:3 5 E.coli isolates were confirmed

  5. Suggested guidelines for using systemic antimicrobials in bacterial skin infections: part 2-- antimicrobial choice, treatment regimens and compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beco, L; Guaguère, E; Lorente Méndez, C; Noli, C; Nuttall, T; Vroom, M

    2013-02-09

    Systemic antimicrobials are critically important in veterinary healthcare, and resistance is a major concern. Antimicrobial stewardship will be important in maintaining clinical efficacy by reducing the development and spread of antimicrobial resistance. Bacterial skin infections are one of the most common reasons for using systemic antimicrobials in dogs and cats. Appropriate management of these infections is, therefore, crucial in any policy for responsible antimicrobial use. The goals of therapy are to confirm that an infection is present, identify the causative bacteria, select the most appropriate antimicrobial, ensure that the infection is treated correctly, and to identify and manage any underlying conditions. This is the second of two articles that provide evidence-led guidelines to help practitioners address these issues. Part 1 discussed the use of clinical signs, cytology and culture in diagnosis. This article will cover the rationale for topical and systemic antimicrobial therapy, including choice of first-, second- and third-line drugs, the dose, duration of therapy, compliance and identification of underlying predisposing conditions. In addition, there is guidance on cases of therapeutic failure and environmental hygiene. These guidelines will help veterinarians avoid the development and propagation of antimicrobial-resistant bacterial strains.

  6. Antimicrobial resistance in Dschang, Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fusi-Ngwa Catherine Kesah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health-care-associated and community infections remain problematic in most of Africa where the increasing incidences of diseases, wars, poverty, malnutrition, and general environmental deterioration have led to the gradual collapse of the health-care system. Detection of antimicrobial resistance (AMR remains imperative for the surveillance purposes and optimal management of infectious diseases. This study reports the status of AMR in pathogens in Dschang. Materials and Methods: From May 2009 to March 2010, the clinical specimens collected at two hospitals were processed accorded to the standard procedures. Antibiotic testing was performed by E test, and antimycotics by disc-agar diffusion, as recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute on pathogens comprising Staphylococcus aureus (100 strains, Enterococcus faecalis (35, Klebsiella pneumoniae (75, Escherichia coli (50, Proteus mirabilis (30, Pseudomonas aruginosa (50, Acinetobacter species (20, and Candida albicans (150 against common antimicrobials. Results: There was no vancomycin resistance in the cocci, the minimum inhibitory concentration for 90% of these strains MIC 90 was 3 μg/ml, methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA was 43%, benzyl penicillin 89% resistance in S. aureus as opposed to 5.7% in E. faecalis. Low resistance (<10% was recorded to cefoxitin, cefotaxime, and nalidixic acid (MIC 90 3-8 μg/ml against the coliforms, and to ticarcillin, aztreonam, imipenem, gentamicin, and ciprofloxacin among the non-enterobacteria; tetracycline, amoxicillin, piperacillin, and chloramphenicol were generally ineffective. Resistance rates to fluconazole, clotrimazole, econazole, and miconazole were <55% against C. albicans. The pathogens tested exhibited multidrug-resistance. Conclusion: The present findings were intended to support antimicrobial stewardship endeavors and empiric therapy. The past, present, and the future investigations in drug efficacy will continue

  7. Antimicrobial and biofilm inhibiting diketopiperazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, M P; Abraham, W-R

    2012-01-01

    Diketopiperazines are the smallest cyclic peptides known. 90% of Gram-negative bacteria produce diketopiperazines and they have also been isolated from Gram-positive bacteria, fungi and higher organisms. Biosynthesis of cyclodipeptides can be achieved by dedicated nonribosomal peptide synthetases or by a novel type of synthetases named cyclopeptide synthases. Since the first report in 1924 a large number of bioactive diketopiperazines was discovered spanning activities as antitumor, antiviral, antifungal, antibacterial, antiprion, antihyperglycemic or glycosidase inhibitor agents. As infections are of increasing concern for human health and resistances against existing antibiotics are growing this review focuses on the antimicrobial activities of diketopiperazines. The antibiotic bicyclomycin is a diketopiperazine and structure activity studies revealed the unique nature of this compound which was finally developed for clinical applications. The antimicrobial activities of a number of other diketopiperazines along with structure activity relationships are discussed. Here a special focus is on the activity-toxicity problem of many compounds setting tight limitations to their application as drugs. Not only these classical antimicrobial activities but also proposed action in modulating bacterial communication as a new target to control biofilms will be evaluated. Pathogens organized in biofilms are difficult to eradicate because of the increase of their tolerance for antibiotics for several orders. Diketopiperazines were reported to modulate LuxR-mediated quorum-sensing systems of bacteria, and they are considered to influence cell-cell signaling offering alternative ways of biofilm control by interfering with microbial communication. Concluding the review we will finally discuss the potential of diketopiperazines in the clinic to erase biofilm infections.

  8. The quality of outpatient antimicrobial prescribing: A comparison between two areas of northern and southern Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malo, Sara; Bjerrum, Lars; Feja, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Institute for Health Data and Disease Control in Denmark, and from the Aragon Information System of Drug Consumption. The number of Defined Daily Doses (DDD) of the different substances were calculated, and the quality of the antimicrobial prescription was analysed using the 'Drug Utilization 90 %' method...... and the European Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption (ESAC) quality indicators for outpatient antimicrobial use. RESULTS: The majority of the prescriptions (90 % of total DDD) were comprised of 14 (of 39) different antimicrobials in Denmark, based mainly on narrow spectrum penicillin, and 11 (of 59......PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to analyse and compare the quality of outpatient antimicrobial prescribing in Denmark and Aragon (in northeastern Spain), with the objective of assessing inappropriate prescribing. METHODS: Outpatient antimicrobial prescription data were obtained from the National...

  9. 抗菌肽histatherin研究进展%Research Progress of Antimicrobial Peptide Histatherin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高帅; 鞠志花; 宿烽; 王长法

    2011-01-01

    抗菌肽产于机体组织、具有广谱抗菌活性和独特抗菌的机制.对抗菌肽的研究有助于开发抗菌肽药物、进行动物抗性育种和培育抗菌肽转基因动物.论文对一种新的牛抗菌肽histatherin的研究进展进行概述.%As the drug-resistance and challenge to food safety caused by the abuse of antibiotics is becoming serious , more and more attentions have been attracted to the antimicrobial peptides, which has characteristics of antimicrobial mechanism and wide antimicrobial spectrum. The research on antimicrobial peptides will contribute to antimicrobial peptides drug development, resistive breeding, and transgenic animal breeding. This article introduced the studies about a new bovine antimicrobial peptide-histatherin.

  10. 75 FR 16001 - New Animal Drugs; Removal of Obsolete and Redundant Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    ... had a new strategy and concept for assessing the safety of antimicrobial new animal drugs, including subtherapeutic use of antimicrobials in animal feed, with regard to their microbiological effects on bacteria of... results of studies on the long-term administration of then-marketed antimicrobial drugs in animal feed...

  11. 77 FR 69630 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; New Animal Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-20

    ... antimicrobial new animal drugs. FDA requests that an applicant accompany NADAs, supplemental NADAs, and requests... associated with this collection of information. \\2\\ NADAs and supplements regarding antimicrobial animal drugs that use a recommended approach to assessing antimicrobial concerns as part of the...

  12. Novel antimicrobial textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Unchin

    2003-10-01

    Many microorganisms can survive, and perhaps proliferate on textiles, generating adverse effects such as: disease transmission, odor generation, pH changes, staining, discoloration and loss of performance. These adverse effects may threaten users' health, deteriorate textile properties and degrade service quality. It may, therefore, be desirable to incorporate antimicrobials on textiles for controlling the growth of microorganisms. This dissertation focuses on the development of antimicrobial fibers and fabrics by integration of antimicrobials with these textiles. The applications of hydantoin-based halamines were mainly investigated in the research. The typical process is that hydantoin containing compounds are grafted onto textiles and transformed to halamine by chlorination. Hydantoin-based halamines are usually chloramines that release chlorine (Cl+) via cleavage of the -NCl functional group which attacks and kills microbes. The antimicrobial behavior is rechargeable many times by rinsing the fiber or fabric with chlorine-containing solution. Some quaternary ammonium type antimicrobials were also investigated in this research. The choice of integrating techniques is dependant on both the textile and antimicrobial compounds. In this dissertation, the nine approaches were studied for incorporating antimicrobial with various textiles: (1) co-extrusion of fibers with halamine precursor additive; (2) grafting of the quaternary ammonium compounds onto ethylene-co-acrylic acid fiber for creating quaternary ammonium type antimicrobial fiber; (3) entrapment of the additives in thermally bonded bicomponent nonwoven fabrics; (4) attaching antimicrobial additives to surfaces with latex adhesive coating; (5) grafting of antimicrobial compounds onto rubber latex via UV exposure; (6) reaction of halamine with needle-punched melamine formaldehyde nonwoven fabric and laminates; (7) coating melamine resin onto tent fabrics and laminates; (8) synthesis of super absorbent polymer

  13. Antimicrobial compounds in tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Alison M

    2013-12-01

    The tear film coats the cornea and conjunctiva and serves several important functions. It provides lubrication, prevents drying of the ocular surface epithelia, helps provide a smooth surface for refracting light, supplies oxygen and is an important component of the innate defense system of the eye providing protection against a range of potential pathogens. This review describes both classic antimicrobial compounds found in tears such as lysozyme and some more recently identified such as members of the cationic antimicrobial peptide family and surfactant protein-D as well as potential new candidate molecules that may contribute to antimicrobial protection. As is readily evident from the literature review herein, tears, like all mucosal fluids, contain a plethora of molecules with known antimicrobial effects. That all of these are active in vivo is debatable as many are present in low concentrations, may be influenced by other tear components such as the ionic environment, and antimicrobial action may be only one of several activities ascribed to the molecule. However, there are many studies showing synergistic/additive interactions between several of the tear antimicrobials and it is highly likely that cooperativity between molecules is the primary way tears are able to afford significant antimicrobial protection to the ocular surface in vivo. In addition to effects on pathogen growth and survival some tear components prevent epithelial cell invasion and promote the epithelial expression of innate defense molecules. Given the protective role of tears a number of scenarios can be envisaged that may affect the amount and/or activity of tear antimicrobials and hence compromise tear immunity. Two such situations, dry eye disease and contact lens wear, are discussed here.

  14. Antimicrobial outcomes in plasma medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Thomas P.; Stalder, Kenneth R.; Woloszko, Jean

    2015-03-01

    Plasma is referred to as the fourth state of matter and is frequently generated in the environment of a strong electric field. The result consists of highly reactive species--ions, electrons, reactive atoms and molecules, and UV radiation. Plasma Medicine unites a number of fields, including Physics, Plasma Chemistry, Cell Biology, Biochemistry, and Medicine. The treatment modality utilizes Cold Atmospheric Plasma (CAP), which is able to sterilize and treat microbes in a nonthermal manner. These gas-based plasma systems operate at close to room temperature and atmospheric pressure, making them very practical for a range of potential treatments and are highly portable for clinical use throughout the health care system. The hypothesis is that gas based plasma kills bacteria, fungus, and viruses but spares mammalian cells. This paper will review systematic work which shows examples of systems and performance in regards to antimicrobial effects and the sparing of mammalian cells. The mechanism of action will be discussed, as well as dosing for the treatment of microbial targets, including sterilization processes, another important healthcare need. In addition, commercial systems will be overviewed and compared, along with evidence-based, patient results. The range of treatments cover wound treatment and biofilms, as well as antimicrobial treatment, with little chance for resistance and tolerance, as in drug regimens. Current clinical studies include applications in dentistry, food treatment, cancer treatment, wound treatment for bacteria and biofilms, and systems to combat health care related infections.

  15. 某医院儿科抗菌药物使用情况调查及分析%Investigation of pediatric medical records and analysis of antimicrobial drug application in a certain hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍明初; 陈育光; 吴秀廉

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the application of antibacterials in clinical pediatry , so as to provide evidence for ration-al application of antimicrobials clinically .Methods Two hundred and forty filed medical records from pediatric patients discharged from the hospital in 2012 were selected and analyzed .The medical data included gender , age, length of hospital stay , diagnosis upon admission and discharge , the application of antibiotics , compatibility and combination of drugs , microbial laboratory detection etc . Results (1) Respiratory diseases were the most common disorders among the pediatric patients , accounting for 31.18%, and were followed by nervous system diseases , accounting for 18.63%.(2) The application rate of antibacterials among the 227 pediatric pa-tients was 94.58%, and the percentage of antibacterial drug combination accounted for 56.83%.(3) The rate of microbial laboratory detection was 17.18%, and of the 52 samples sent for laboratory detection , 16 samples had pathogenic bacteria growth (30.77%). Conclusion Irrational use of antibacterials in the pediatric department of the hospital was quite common , which remained to be rectified .%目的:调查儿科临床抗菌药物使用情况,为临床合理使用抗菌药物提供参考。方法抽取某医院儿科2012年出院归档病历240份进行分析,内容包括患儿性别、年龄、住院时间、入(出)院诊断及转归,抗菌药物的用法、配伍、联合用药、微生物送检等情况。结果(1)本组患儿以呼吸系统疾病最多,占31.18%,神经系统疾病次之,占18.63%;(2)227例患儿使用了抗菌药物,使用率94.58%,抗菌药物联用比例占56.83%;(3)微生物检验样本送检率17.18%,送检的52份标本中16份有致病菌生长(30.77%)。结论该院儿科临床滥用、乱用抗菌药物的现象较普遍,有待进一步规范管理。

  16. THE ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF SOME EXTRACTS OF FERN GAMETOPHYTES

    OpenAIRE

    Ionica Deliu; Carmen Bejan; Emilia Vişoiu; Liliana Cristina Soare

    2013-01-01

    The nature freely offers us many resources for health and beauty. The ferns and their therapeutic properties are less exploit in Romania, except Lycopodium clavatum and Equisetum arvense. Some of the fern properties were demonstrated, like antioxidant, antimicrobial, antiviral, antihelmintic properties. Plants are reasonable alternative to synthetic drugs, avoid the side effect and high cost of synthetic drugs production. Also, the drug resistance bacteria can be controlled using plant derive...

  17. Guidelines for the diagnosis and antimicrobial therapy of canine superficial bacterial folliculitis (Antimicrobial Guidelines Working Group of the International Society for Companion Animal Infectious Diseases)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillier, Andrew; Lloyd, David H.; Weese, J. Scott

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Superficial bacterial folliculitis (SBF) is usually caused by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and routinely treated with systemic antimicrobial agents. Infection is a consequence of reduced immunity associated with alterations of the skin barrier and underlying diseases that may be di...... will improve antimicrobial use and reduce selection of MRSP and other multidrug-resistant bacteria affecting animal and human health....... of an internationally available resource guiding practitioners in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of SBF. DEVELOPMENT OF THE GUIDELINES: The guidelines were developed by the Antimicrobial Guidelines Working Group of the International Society for Companion Animal Infectious Diseases, with consultation and advice...... on infection control. Guidance is given for topical and systemic modalities, including approaches suitable for MRSP. Systemic drugs are classified in three tiers. Tier one drugs are used when diagnosis is clear cut and risk factors for antimicrobial drug resistance are not present. Otherwise, tier two drugs...

  18. Survey of antimicrobial resistance in clinical Burkholderia pseudomallei isolates over two decades in Northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Amornchai, Premjit; Saiprom, Natnaree; Chantratita, Narisara; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Koh, Gavin C K W; Chaowagul, Wipada; Day, Nicholas P J; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Peacock, Sharon J

    2011-11-01

    A 21-year survey conducted in northeast Thailand of antimicrobial resistance to parenteral antimicrobial drugs used to treat melioidosis identified 24/4,021 (0.6%) patients with one or more isolates resistant to ceftazidime (n = 8), amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (n = 4), or both drugs (n = 12). Two cases were identified at admission, and the remainder were detected a median of 15 days after starting antimicrobial therapy. Resistance to carbapenem drugs was not detected. These findings support the current prescribing recommendations for melioidosis.

  19. Delivering on Antimicrobial Resistance Agenda Not Possible without Improving Fungal Diagnostic Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlin, David S.; Muldoon, Eavan G.; Colombo, Arnaldo Lopes; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Richardson, Malcolm D.; Sorrell, Tania C.

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance, a major public health concern, largely arises from excess use of antibiotic and antifungal drugs. Lack of routine diagnostic testing for fungal diseases exacerbates the problem of antimicrobial drug empiricism, both antibiotic and antifungal. In support of this contention, we cite 4 common clinical situations that illustrate this problem: 1) inaccurate diagnosis of fungal sepsis in hospitals and intensive care units, resulting in inappropriate use of broad-spectrum antibacterial drugs in patients with invasive candidiasis; 2) failure to diagnose chronic pulmonary aspergillosis in patients with smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis; 3) misdiagnosis of fungal asthma, resulting in unnecessary treatment with antibacterial drugs instead of antifungal drugs and missed diagnoses of life-threatening invasive aspergillosis in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; and 4) overtreatment and undertreatment of Pneumocystis pneumonia in HIV-positive patients. All communities should have access to nonculture fungal diagnostics, which can substantially benefit clinical outcome, antimicrobial stewardship, and control of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:27997332

  20. Assessing appropriateness of antimicrobial therapy: in the eye of the interpreter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePestel, Daryl D; Eiland, Edward H; Lusardi, Katherine; Destache, Christopher J; Mercier, Renée-Claude; McDaneld, Patrick M; Lamp, Kenneth C; Chung, Thomas J; Hermsen, Elizabeth D

    2014-10-15

    To address the increase of drug-resistant bacteria and widespread inappropriate use of antimicrobials, many healthcare institutions have implemented antimicrobial stewardship programs to promote appropriate use of antimicrobials and optimize patient outcomes. However, a consensus definition of appropriate use is lacking. We conducted a multicenter observational study to compare 4 definitions of appropriateness--a study site-specific definition, use supported by susceptibility data, use supported by electronic drug information resources (Clinical Pharmacology/Micromedex), or study site principal investigator (PI) opinion-among patients receiving 1 or more of 13 identified antimicrobials. Data were collected for 262 patients. Overall, appropriateness with the 4 definitions ranged from 79% based on PI opinion to 94% based on susceptibility data. No single definition resulted in consistently high appropriate use for all target antimicrobials. For individual antimicrobials, the definitions with the highest rate of appropriate use were Clinical Pharmacology/Micromedex support (6 of 7 antimicrobials) and susceptibility data (5 of 7 antimicrobials). For specific indications, support from susceptibility data resulted in the highest rate of appropriate use (4 of 7 indications). Overall comparisons showed that appropriateness assessed by PI opinion differed significantly compared with other definitions when stratified by either target antimicrobial or indication. The significant variability in the rate of appropriate use highlights the difficulty in developing a standardized definition that can be used to benchmark judicious antimicrobial use.

  1. Antimicrobial peptides of multicellular organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasloff, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Multicellular organisms live, by and large, harmoniously with microbes. The cornea of the eye of an animal is almost always free of signs of infection. The insect flourishes without lymphocytes or antibodies. A plant seed germinates successfully in the midst of soil microbes. How is this accomplished? Both animals and plants possess potent, broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides, which they use to fend off a wide range of microbes, including bacteria, fungi, viruses and protozoa. What sorts of molecules are they? How are they employed by animals in their defence? As our need for new antibiotics becomes more pressing, could we design anti-infective drugs based on the design principles these molecules teach us?

  2. [Heterogenous expression of antimicrobial peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shanshan; Hu, Guobin; Dong, Xianzhi

    2009-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a class of short proteins with a broad spectrum of antibacterial activities, are isolated from a wide variety of animals, both vertebrates and invertebrates, and plants as well as from bacteria and fungi. They are a key component of the innate immune response in most multicellular organisms. Owing to their potent, broad-spectrum antibacterial activities and uneasy developing of drug resistance, these peptides are of great clinical significance. However, preparation of AMPs at a large scale is a severe challenge to the development of the commercial products. Undoubtedly, construction of high-level biological expression systems for the production of AMPs is the key in its clinical application process. Herein, we summarize the progress in researches on heterogenous expression of AMPs in prokaryotic expression systems and eukaryotic expression systems.

  3. ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE AND ITS GLOBAL SPREAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R P Sharma

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Since their discovery during the 20th century, antimicrobial agents (antibiotics and related medicinal drugs have substantially reduced the threat posed by infectious diseases. The use of these “wonder drugs”, combined with improvements in sanitation, housing, and nutrition, and the advent of widespread immunization programmes, has led to a dramatic drop in deaths from diseases that were previously widespread, untreatable, and frequently fatal. Over the years, antimicrobials have saved the lives and eased the suffering of millions of people. By helping to bring many serious infectious diseases under control, these drugs hav also contributed to the major gains in life expectancy experienced during the latter part of the last century. These gains are now seriously jeopardized by another recent development: the emergence and spread of microbes that are resistant to cheap and effective first-choice, or “first- line” drugs. The bacterial infections which contribute most to human disease are also those in which emerging microbial resistance is most evident: diarrhoeal diseases, respiratory tract infections, meningitis, sexually transmitted infections, and hospital-acquired infections. Some important examples include penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, multi-resistant salmonellae, and multi-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The development of resistance to drugs commonly used to treat malaria is of particular concern, as is the emerging resistance to anti-HIV drugs. Treatment, resu.lting in prolonged illness and greater risk of death, Treatment failures also lead to longer periods of infectivity, which increase the numbers of infected people moving in the community and thus expose the general population to the risk of contracting a resistant strain of infection. When infections become resistant to first-line antimicrobials, treatment has to be switched

  4. Antimicrobial compounds from Coleonema album (Rutaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterhuizen, Lindy L; Meyer, Riaan; Dubery, Ian A

    2006-01-01

    Coleonema album, a member of the South African fynbos biome, was evaluated for its antimicrobial activity associated with its secondary metabolites. Ethanol- and acetone-based extracts obtained from plants from two different geographical areas were analyzed. A bioassay-guided fractionation methodology was followed for rapid and effective screening for the presence of bioactive compounds. The TLC-bioautographic method, used to screen the plant extracts for antimicrobial activity and localization of the active compounds, indicated the presence of a number of inhibitory compounds with activity against the microorganisms (E. coli, B. subtilis, E. faecalis, P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, M. smegmatis, M. tuberculosis, C. albicans, C. cucumerinum) tested. Evaluation of the inhibitory strength of each extract by the serial microdilution assay indicated that the C. album extracts inhibited effectively all the microorganisms, with the minimum inhibitory concentrations in the low mg ml(-1) range. Identification and structural information of the bioactive components were obtained by a combination of preparative TLC and LC-MS. It revealed the presence of coumarin aglycones which were responsible for the observed antimicrobial activities. The results of this study indicate that C. album possesses strong antimicrobial activity against a wide range of microorganisms that warrants further investigation into the use of the extracts or their active constituents as a potential source for novel drugs.

  5. Antimicrobial peptides in echinoderm host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun; Blencke, Hans-Matti; Haug, Tor; Stensvåg, Klara

    2015-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important effector molecules in innate immunity. Here we briefly summarize characteristic traits of AMPs and their mechanisms of antimicrobial activity. Echinoderms live in a microbe-rich marine environment and are known to express a wide range of AMPs. We address two novel AMP families from coelomocytes of sea urchins: cysteine-rich AMPs (strongylocins) and heterodimeric AMPs (centrocins). These peptide families have conserved preprosequences, are present in both adults and pluteus stage larvae, have potent antimicrobial properties, and therefore appear to be important innate immune effectors. Strongylocins have a unique cysteine pattern compared to other cysteine-rich peptides, which suggests a novel AMP folding pattern. Centrocins and SdStrongylocin 2 contain brominated tryptophan residues in their native form. This review also includes AMPs isolated from other echinoderms, such as holothuroidins, fragments of beta-thymosin, and fragments of lectin (CEL-III). Echinoderm AMPs are crucial molecules for the understanding of echinoderm immunity, and their potent antimicrobial activity makes them potential precursors of novel drug leads.

  6. Antimicrobial Peptides in Innate Immunity against Mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-Min; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2011-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides/proteins are ancient and naturallyoccurring antibiotics in innate immune responses in a variety of organisms. Additionally, these peptides have been recognized as important signaling molecules in regulation of both innate and adaptive immunity. During mycobacterial infection, antimicrobial peptides including cathelicidin, defensin, and hepcidin have antimicrobial activities against mycobacteria, making them promising candidates for future drug development. Additionally, antimicrobial peptides act as immunomodulators in infectious and inflammatory conditions. Multiple crucial functions of cathelicidins in antimycobacterial immune defense have been characterized not only in terms of direct killing of mycobacteria but also as innate immune regulators, i.e., in secretion of cytokines and chemokines, and mediating autophagy activation. Defensin families are also important during mycobacterial infection and contribute to antimycobacterial defense and inhibition of mycobacterial growth both in vitro and in vivo. Hepcidin, although its role in mycobacterial infection has not yet been characterized, exerts antimycobacterial effects in activated macrophages. The present review focuses on recent efforts to elucidate the roles of host defense peptides in innate immunity to mycobacteria.

  7. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2014-05-01

    medicine to combat drug-resistant superbugs, fungi, viruses, parasites, or cancer. Alternatively, multiple factors (e.g., albumin, arginine, butyrate, calcium, cyclic AMP, isoleucine, short-chain fatty acids, UV B light, vitamin D, and zinc are able to induce the expression of antimicrobial peptides, opening new avenues to the development of anti-infectious drugs.

  8. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activities of leaves of sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L. herb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadush Gebrehiwot

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: So, the study has showed that the observed antimicrobial effect of O. basilicum essential oil on the bacterial and fungal isolate, though in vitro appear interesting and promising. So, emphasize have to made on the antimicrobial activities of the plant during the time of drug extraction. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(5.000: 869-875

  9. Streptococcus pneumoniae: the evolution of antimicrobial resistance to beta-lactams, fluoroquinolones and macrolides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornick, J E; Bentley, S D

    2012-07-01

    Multi drug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae constitute a major public health concern worldwide. In this review we discuss how the transformable nature of the pneumococcus, in parallel with antimicrobial induced stress, contributes to the evolution of antimicrobial resistance; and how the introduction of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine has affected the situation.

  10. The human gut microbiota as a reservoir for antimicrobial resistance genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bülow, E.

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades, the emergence and spread of resistant opportunistic pathogens is compromising the effectiveness of antimicrobial therapies. Understanding the emergence and global spread of drug-resistant microorganisms is thus crucial to combat antimicrobial resistance. The human gut harbors a

  11. The antimicrobial polymer PHMB enters cells and selectively condenses bacterial chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chindera, Kantaraja; Mahato, Manohar; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar;

    2016-01-01

    To combat infection and antimicrobial resistance, it is helpful to elucidate drug mechanism(s) of action. Here we examined how the widely used antimicrobial polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) kills bacteria selectively over host cells. Contrary to the accepted model of microbial membrane disruption...

  12. An economic perspective on policy to reduce antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coast, J; Smith, R D; Millar, M R

    1998-01-01

    Resistance to antimicrobial drugs is increasing worldwide. This resistance is, at least in part, associated with high antimicrobial usage. Despite increasing awareness, economists (and policy analysts more generally) have paid little attention to the problem. In this paper antimicrobial resistance is conceptualised as a negative externality associated with the consumption of antimicrobials and is set within the broader context of the costs and benefits associated with antimicrobial usage. It is difficult to determine the overall impact of attempting to reduce resistance, given the extremely limited ability to model the epidemiology of resistant and sensitive micro-organisms. It is assumed for the purposes of the paper, however, that dealing with resistance by reducting antimicrobial usage would lead to a positive societal benefit. Three policy options traditionally associated with environmental economics (regulation, permits and charges) are examined in relation to their potential ability to impact upon the problem of resistance. The primary care sector of the U.K.'s National Health Service provides the context for this examination. Simple application of these policies to health care is likely to be problematic, with difficulties resulting particularly from the potential reduction in clinical freedom to prescribe when appropriate, and from the desire for equity in health care provision. The paper tentatively concludes that permits could offer the best policy response to antimicrobial resistance, with the caveat that empirical research is needed to develop the most practical and efficient system. This research must be conducted alongside the required epidemiological research.

  13. Drug-induced diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassany, O; Michaux, A; Bergmann, J F

    2000-01-01

    Diarrhoea is a relatively frequent adverse event, accounting for about 7% of all drug adverse effects. More than 700 drugs have been implicated in causing diarrhoea; those most frequently involved are antimicrobials, laxatives, magnesium-containing antacids, lactose- or sorbitol-containing products, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, prostaglandins, colchicine, antineoplastics, antiarrhythmic drugs and cholinergic agents. Certain new drugs are likely to induce diarrhoea because of their pharmacodynamic properties; examples include anthraquinone-related agents, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, lipase inhibitors and cholinesterase inhibitors. Antimicrobials are responsible for 25% of drug-induced diarrhoea. The disease spectrum of antimicrobial-associated diarrhoea ranges from benign diarrhoea to pseudomembranous colitis. Several pathophysiological mechanisms are involved in drug-induced diarrhoea: osmotic diarrhoea, secretory diarrhoea, shortened transit time, exudative diarrhoea and protein-losing enteropathy, and malabsorption or maldigestion of fat and carbohydrates. Often 2 or more mechanisms are present simultaneously. In clinical practice, 2 major types of diarrhoea are seen: acute diarrhoea, which usually appears during the first few days of treatment, and chronic diarrhoea, lasting more than 3 or 4 weeks and which can appear a long time after the start of drug therapy. Both can be severe and poorly tolerated. In a patient presenting with diarrhoea, the medical history is very important, especially the drug history, as it can suggest a diagnosis of drug-induced diarrhoea and thereby avoid multiple diagnostic tests. The clinical examination should cover severity criteria such as fever, rectal emission of blood and mucus, dehydration and bodyweight loss. Establishing a relationship between drug consumption and diarrhoea or colitis can be difficult when the time elapsed between the start of the drug and the onset of symptoms is long, sometimes up to several

  14. Antimicrobial Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Khanal

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pneumococcal infections are important cause of morbidity and mortality. Knowledge of antimicrobial susceptibility patterns plays important role in the selection of appropriate therapy. Present study was undertaken to analyze the susceptibility patterns of pneumococcal isolates against commonly used antimicrobials with special reference to determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of penicillin in a tertiary care hospital in eastern Nepal. Methods: Twenty-six strains of S. pneumoniae isolated from various clinical specimens submitted to microbiology laboratory were evaluated. All isolates were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility by disk diffusion method. MIC of penicillin was tested by broth dilution method. Results: Of the total isolates 19 (73% were from invasive infections. Seven isolates were resistant to cotrimoxazole. No resistance to penicillin was seen in disk diffusion testing. Less susceptibility to penicillin (MIC 0.1-1.0 mg/L was observed in five (17% isolates. High level resistance to penicillin was not detected. One isolate was multidrug resistant. Conclusions: S. pneumoniaeisolates with intermediate resistance to penicillin prevail in Tertiary Care Hospital in eastern Nepal, causing invasive and noninvasive infections. As intermediate resistance is not detected in routine susceptibility testing, determination of MIC is important. It helps not only in the effective management of life threatening infections but is also essential in continuous monitoring and early detection of resistance. In addition, further study on pneumococcal infections, its antimicrobial resistance profile and correlation with clinical and epidemiological features including serotypes and group prevalence is recommended in future. Keywords: antimicrobial susceptibility pattern, penicillin, Streptococcus pneumoniae.

  15. Antimicrobial resistance in commensal faecal Escherichia coli of hospitalised horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Jill

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this study was to examine the impact of hospitalisation and antimicrobial drug administration on the prevalence of resistance in commensal faecal E. coli of horses. Faecal samples were collected from ten hospitalised horses treated with antimicrobials, ten hospitalised horses not treated with antimicrobials and nine non-hospitalised horses over a consecutive five day period and susceptibility testing was performed on isolated E. coli. Results revealed that hospitalisation alone was associated with increased prevalence of antimicrobial resistance and multidrug resistance in commensal E. coli of horses. Due to the risk of transfer of resistance between commensal and pathogenic bacteria, veterinarians need to be aware of possible resistance in commensal bacteria when treating hospitalised horses.

  16. Antimicrobial stewardship: Limits for implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinha, Bhanu

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic stewardship programme (ASP) is a multifaceted approach to improve patients' clinical outcomes, prevent the emergence of antimicrobial resistance, and reduce hospital costs by prudent and focused antimicrobial use. Development of local treatment guidelines according to local ecology, rapid

  17. Factors associated with the inappropriate use of antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, W; Dean, W

    2015-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance continues to grow and antimicrobial use in food animal production and to a lesser extent in human patients is under fire. Much of the criticism has to do with the misapplication of these drugs in both settings. Research indicates that patients, food animal producers, physicians and veterinarians have all played a part in misusing antimicrobials, often because of mistaken beliefs. This paper reviews this research and introduces a theoretical perspective, the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), which broadens our understanding of the motivations for misuse. In particular this approach shows that individuals making decisions about antimicrobial use take into account social pressures from and a sense of obligation to significant others in their social networks. Our own work summarized in this paper indicates that both feedlot veterinarians and feedlot managers' antimicrobial decisions are influenced by both expectations from and obligations to a variety of actors in the feedlot network (other veterinarians, feedlot clients, consumers, pharmaceutical companies, and regulatory bodies). Generally across 4 circumstances of antimicrobial use (for acutely sick cattle, chronically-sick cattle, at-risk cattle, high-risk cattle), it is largely the perception that peers and clients expect feedlot veterinarians to use antimicrobials and feedlot veterinarians sense of obligation to these groups that have the most influence on their decisions to recommend antimicrobials. Based on these findings, the question of engaging in changing the choices made by those working with food animals must start with those who influence the decision to proscribe or use antimicrobials. As our data come from the United States and may be unique relative to other countries, these efforts should begin by ascertaining who influences these decisions. The next step is to then change the beliefs of these significant others.

  18. Determination of antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harish, Belgode N; Menezes, Godfred A

    2015-01-01

    Infections with Salmonella are an important public health problem worldwide. Salmonella are one of the most common causes of food-borne illness in humans. There are many types of Salmonella but they can be divided into two broad categories: those that cause typhoid and those that do not. The typhoidal Salmonella (TS), such as S. enterica subsp. enterica serovars Typhi and S. Paratyphi only colonize humans and are usually acquired by the consumption of food or water contaminated with human fecal material. The much broader group of non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) usually results from improperly handled food that has been contaminated by animal or human fecal material. Antimicrobials are critical to the successful outcome of invasive Salmonella infections and enteric fever. Due to resistance to the older antimicrobials, ciprofloxacin [fluoroquinolone (FQ)] has become the first-line drug for treatment. Nevertheless, switch to FQ has led to a subsequent increase in the occurrence of salmonellae resistant to this antimicrobial agent. The exact mechanism of this FQ resistance is not fully understood. FQ resistance has driven the use of third-generation cephalosporins and azithromycin. However, there are sporadic worldwide reports of high level resistance to expanded-spectrum cephalosporins (such as ceftriaxone) in TS and in NTS it has been recognized since 1988 and are increasing in prevalence worldwide. Already there are rare reports of azithromycin resistance leading to treatment failure. Spread of such resistance would further greatly limit the available therapeutic options, and leave us with only the reserve antimicrobials such as carbapenem and tigecycline as possible treatment options. Here, we describe the methods involved in the genotypic characterization of antimicrobial resistance in clinical isolates of salmonellae.

  19. 77 FR 735 - New Animal Drugs; Cephalosporin Drugs; Extralabel Animal Drug Use; Order of Prohibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-06

    ... antimicrobial drugs (not including cephapirin) in cattle, swine, chickens, and turkeys: (1) For disease... cephalosporin drugs in food-producing major animal species (cattle, swine, chickens, and turkeys) including: (1... setting, and cephalosporins contribute 14 percent of the total outpatient antibiotic prescriptions....

  20. A strategy for antimicrobial regulation based on fluorescent conjugated oligomer-DNA hybrid hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ali; Tang, Yanli; Liu, Yue; Yuan, Huanxiang; Liu, Libing

    2013-06-21

    New fluorescent oligo(phenylene ethynylene)-DNA hydrogels have been prepared and used for the controllable biocidal activity driven by DNase. This study opens a new way of controllable drug release and antimicrobial regulation.

  1. The dlt genes play a role in antimicrobial tolerance of Streptococcus mutans biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Carl Martin Peter; Rybtke, Morten; Givskov, Michael;

    2016-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are tolerant to antibiotic treatment and therefore cause problematic infections. Knowledge about the molecular mechanisms underlying biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance will aid the development of antibiofilm drugs. Screening of a Streptococcus mutans transposon mutant...

  2. Therapeutic antimicrobial peptides may compromise natural immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habets, Michelle G J L; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2012-06-23

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been proposed as a promising new class of antimicrobials despite warnings that therapeutic use could drive the evolution of pathogens resistant to our own immunity peptides. Using experimental evolution, we demonstrate that Staphylococcus aureus rapidly evolved resistance to pexiganan, a drug-candidate for diabetic leg ulcer infections. Evolved resistance was costly in terms of impaired growth rate, but costs-of-resistance were completely ameliorated by compensatory adaptation. Crucially, we show that, in some populations, experimentally evolved resistance to pexiganan provided S. aureus with cross-resistance to human-neutrophil-defensin-1, a key component of the innate immune response to infection. This unintended consequence of therapeutic use could drastically undermine our innate immune system's ability to control and clear microbial infections. Our results therefore highlight grave potential risks of AMP therapies, with implications for their development.

  3. STUDY OF PRESCRIBING PATTERNS OF ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS IN THE PAEDIATRIC WARDS AT TERTIARY TEACHING CARE HOSPITAL, GUJARAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipul Prajapati* and J.D. Bhatt

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prescription of drugs, which needs to be continuously assessed and refined according to disease progression. It not only reflects the physician’s knowledge about drugs but also his/her skill in diagnose and attitude towards selecting the most appropriate cost-effective treatment. Antimicrobials are among the most commonly prescribed drugs in hospital. As per literature, they account for over 50% of total value of drugs sold in our country. Such studies have been sparse from Gujarat and hence, this study was undertaken.Methods: Retrospective study was carried out by collecting 350 prescriptions containing antimicrobial agents in paediatric department at Sir Sayajirao General (SSG Hospital, Vadodara to assess the prescribing patterns of antimicrobial agents. All information about the drugs details recorded in pre-tested Proforma that was finalized by our Pharmacology department. Results: Total 350 prescriptions containing 690 antimicrobial drugs were prescribed in patients during study. Of them aminoglycosides (233; 33.77% was frequently prescribed followed by β-lactam group (191; 27.68 and cephalosporins (176; 25.5%. Average numbers of antimicrobials per prescription was 1.97.Out of 690 antimicrobial prescribed, 576(83.48% were prescribed by generic name, while 114(16.52% were prescribed by trade name. Total numbers of antimicrobial prescribed by parenteral route were 599 (86.81%, while only 91(13.18% antimicrobial agents were prescribed by oral route. Out of 350 prescriptions two or more than two antimicrobial agents were prescribed in 249(71.14% prescriptions, while 101(28.85% prescriptions constitute one antimicrobial agent. Conclusion: Results indicates need for improving the prescribing pattern of drugs and minimizing the use of antimicrobial agents. It is suggested that further detail analysis to judge the rationality of the therapy is necessary.

  4. Rationality of utilization of antimicrobial agents in medical intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnendu Mondal

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: Overall extensive poly-pharmacy and drugs with non-generic name noticed among the prescriptions. Few interventional programs should be aimed at control of infections, rational antimicrobial drug prescription to minimize adverse drug events, emergence of bacterial resistance and attenuating unnecessary cost. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(5.000: 2168-2173

  5. Thiazole-based chalcones as potent antimicrobial agents. Synthesis and biological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaras, K; Geronikaki, A; Glamočlija, J; Cirić, A; Soković, M

    2011-05-15

    As part of ongoing studies in developing new antimicrobials, we report the synthesis of a new class of structurally novel derivatives, that incorporate two known bioactive structures a thiazole and chalcone, to yield a class of compounds with interesting antimicrobial properties. Evaluation of antibacterial activity showed that almost all the compounds exhibited greater activity than reference drugs and thus could be promising novel drug candidates.

  6. Peptide consensus sequence determination for the enhancement of the antimicrobial activity and selectivity of antimicrobial peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaaytah, Ammar; Ajingi, Ya’u; Abualhaijaa, Ahmad; Tarazi, Shadi; Alshar’i, Nizar; Al-Balas, Qosay

    2017-01-01

    The rise of multidrug-resistant bacteria is causing a serious threat to the world’s human population. Recent reports have identified bacterial strains displaying pan drug resistance against antibiotics and generating fears among medical health specialists that humanity is on the dawn of entering a post-antibiotics era. Global research is currently focused on expanding the lifetime of current antibiotics and the development of new antimicrobial agents to tackle the problem of antimicrobial resistance. In the present study, we designed a novel consensus peptide named “Pepcon” through peptide consensus sequence determination among members of a highly homologous group of scorpion antimicrobial peptides. Members of this group were found to possess moderate antimicrobial activity with significant toxicity against mammalian cells. The aim of our design method was to generate a novel peptide with an enhanced antimicrobial potency and selectivity against microbial rather than mammalian cells. The results of our study revealed that the consensus peptide displayed potent antibacterial activities against a broad range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Our membrane permeation studies displayed that the peptide efficiently induced membrane damage and consequently led to cell death through the process of cell lysis. The microbial DNA binding assay of the peptide was found to be very weak suggesting that the peptide is not targeting the microbial DNA. Pepcon induced minimal cytotoxicity at the antimicrobial concentrations as the hemolytic activity was found to be zero at the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs). The results of our study demonstrate that the consensus peptide design strategy is efficient in generating peptides. PMID:28096686

  7. Antimicrobial Lactoferrin Peptides: The Hidden Players in the Protective Function of a Multifunctional Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Mau; Kaushik, Sanket; Kaur, Punit; Singh, Tej P.

    2013-01-01

    Lactoferrin is a multifunctional, iron-binding glycoprotein which displays a wide array of modes of action to execute its primary antimicrobial function. It contains various antimicrobial peptides which are released upon its hydrolysis by proteases. These peptides display a similarity with the antimicrobial cationic peptides found in nature. In the current scenario of increasing resistance to antibiotics, there is a need for the discovery of novel antimicrobial drugs. In this context, the structural and functional perspectives on some of the antimicrobial peptides found in N-lobe of lactoferrin have been reviewed. This paper provides the comparison of lactoferrin peptides with other antimicrobial peptides found in nature as well as interspecies comparison of the structural properties of these peptides within the native lactoferrin. PMID:23554820

  8. Antimicrobial Lactoferrin Peptides: The Hidden Players in the Protective Function of a Multifunctional Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mau Sinha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactoferrin is a multifunctional, iron-binding glycoprotein which displays a wide array of modes of action to execute its primary antimicrobial function. It contains various antimicrobial peptides which are released upon its hydrolysis by proteases. These peptides display a similarity with the antimicrobial cationic peptides found in nature. In the current scenario of increasing resistance to antibiotics, there is a need for the discovery of novel antimicrobial drugs. In this context, the structural and functional perspectives on some of the antimicrobial peptides found in N-lobe of lactoferrin have been reviewed. This paper provides the comparison of lactoferrin peptides with other antimicrobial peptides found in nature as well as interspecies comparison of the structural properties of these peptides within the native lactoferrin.

  9. Antimicrobial Prophylaxis in Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Enzler, Mark J.; Berbari, Elie; Osmon, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial prophylaxis is commonly used by clinicians for the prevention of numerous infectious diseases, including herpes simplex infection, rheumatic fever, recurrent cellulitis, meningococcal disease, recurrent uncomplicated urinary tract infections in women, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with cirrhosis, influenza, infective endocarditis, pertussis, and acute necrotizing pancreatitis, as well as infections associated with open fractures, recent prosthetic joint placement...

  10. Antimicrobial resistance in typhoidal salmonellae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B N Harish

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections with Salmonella are an important public health problem worldwide. On a global scale, it has been appraised that Salmonella is responsible for an estimated 3 billion human infections each year. The World Health Organization (WHO has estimated that annually typhoid fever accounts for 21.7 million illnesses (217,000 deaths and paratyphoid fever accounts for 5.4 million of these cases. Infants, children, and adolescents in south-central and South-eastern Asia experience the greatest burden of illness. In cases of enteric fever, including infections with S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi A and B, it is often necessary to commence treatment before the results of laboratory sensitivity tests are available. Hence, it is important to be aware of options and possible problems before beginning treatment. Ciprofloxacin has become the first-line drug of choice since the widespread emergence and spread of strains resistant to chloramphenicol, ampicillin, and trimethoprim. There is increase in the occurrence of strains resistant to ciprofloxacin. Reports of typhoidal salmonellae with increasing minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and resistance to newer quinolones raise the fear of potential treatment failures and necessitate the need for new, alternative antimicrobials. Extended-spectrum cephalosporins and azithromycin are the options available for the treatment of enteric fever. The emergence of broad spectrum β-lactamases in typhoidal salmonellae constitutes a new challenge. Already there are rare reports of azithromycin resistance in typhoidal salmonellae leading to treatment failure. This review is based on published research from our centre and literature from elsewhere in the world. This brief review tries to summarize the history and recent trends in antimicrobial resistance in typhoidal salmonellae.

  11. Triclosan antimicrobial polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Petersen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Triclosan antimicrobial molecular fluctuating energies of nonbonding electron pairs for the oxygen atom by ether bond rotations are reviewed with conformational computational chemistry analyses. Subsequent understanding of triclosan alternating ether bond rotations is able to help explain several material properties in Polymer Science. Unique bond rotation entanglements between triclosan and the polymer chains increase both the mechanical properties of polymer toughness and strength that are enhanced even better through secondary bonding relationships. Further, polymer blend compatibilization is considered due to similar molecular relationships and polarities. With compatibilization of triclosan in polymers a more uniform stability for nonpolar triclosan in the polymer solid state is retained by the antimicrobial for extremely low release with minimum solubility into aqueous solution. As a result, triclosan is projected for long extended lifetimes as an antimicrobial polymer additive. Further, triclosan rapid alternating ether bond rotations disrupt secondary bonding between chain monomers in the resin state to reduce viscosity and enhance polymer blending. Thus, triclosan is considered for a polymer additive with multiple properties to be an antimicrobial with additional benefits as a nonpolar toughening agent and a hydrophobic wetting agent. The triclosan material relationships with alternating ether bond rotations are described through a complete different form of medium by comparisons with known antimicrobial properties that upset bacterial cell membranes through rapid fluctuating mechanomolecular energies. Also, triclosan bond entanglements with secondary bonding can produce structural defects in weak bacterial lipid membranes requiring pliability that can then interfere with cell division. Regarding applications with polymers, triclosan can be incorporated by mixing into a resin system before cure, melt mixed with thermoplastic polymers

  12. Triclosan antimicrobial polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan antimicrobial molecular fluctuating energies of nonbonding electron pairs for the oxygen atom by ether bond rotations are reviewed with conformational computational chemistry analyses. Subsequent understanding of triclosan alternating ether bond rotations is able to help explain several material properties in Polymer Science. Unique bond rotation entanglements between triclosan and the polymer chains increase both the mechanical properties of polymer toughness and strength that are enhanced even better through secondary bonding relationships. Further, polymer blend compatibilization is considered due to similar molecular relationships and polarities. With compatibilization of triclosan in polymers a more uniform stability for nonpolar triclosan in the polymer solid state is retained by the antimicrobial for extremely low release with minimum solubility into aqueous solution. As a result, triclosan is projected for long extended lifetimes as an antimicrobial polymer additive. Further, triclosan rapid alternating ether bond rotations disrupt secondary bonding between chain monomers in the resin state to reduce viscosity and enhance polymer blending. Thus, triclosan is considered for a polymer additive with multiple properties to be an antimicrobial with additional benefits as a nonpolar toughening agent and a hydrophobic wetting agent. The triclosan material relationships with alternating ether bond rotations are described through a complete different form of medium by comparisons with known antimicrobial properties that upset bacterial cell membranes through rapid fluctuating mechanomolecular energies. Also, triclosan bond entanglements with secondary bonding can produce structural defects in weak bacterial lipid membranes requiring pliability that can then interfere with cell division. Regarding applications with polymers, triclosan can be incorporated by mixing into a resin system before cure, melt mixed with thermoplastic polymers that set on cooling

  13. Evaluation of the flora of northern Mexico for in vitro antimicrobial and antituberculosis activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Salinas, G M; Pérez-López, A; Becerril-Montes, P; Salazar-Aranda, R; Said-Fernández, S; de Torres, N Waksman

    2007-02-12

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential antimicrobial activity of 14 plants used in northeast México for the treatment of respiratory diseases, against drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae type b and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Forty-eight organic and aqueous extracts were tested against these bacterial strains using a broth microdilution test. No aqueous extracts showed antimicrobial activity, whereas most of the organic extracts presented antimicrobial activity against at least one of the drug-resistant microorganisms tested. Methanol-based extracts from the roots and leaves of Leucophyllum frutescens and ethyl ether extract from the roots of Chrysanctinia mexicana showed the greatest antimicrobial activity against the drug-resistant strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis; the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) were 62.5, 125 and 62.5 microg/mL, respectively; methanol-based extract from the leaves of Cordia boissieri showed the best antimicrobial activity against the drug-resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus (MIC 250 microg/mL); the hexane-based extract from the fruits of Schinus molle showed considerable antimicrobial activity against the drug-resistant strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae (MIC 62.5 microg/mL). This study supports that selecting plants by ethnobotanical criteria enhances the possibility of finding species with activity against resistant microorganisms.

  14. Antimicrobial use in Swiss dairy farms: quantification and evaluation of data quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, S Menéndez; Steiner, A; Gassner, B; Regula, G

    2010-06-01

    Data on antimicrobial use play a key role in the development of policies for the containment of antimicrobial resistance. On-farm data could provide a detailed overview of the antimicrobial use, but technical and methodological aspects of data collection and interpretation, as well as data quality need to be further assessed. The aims of this study were (1) to quantify antimicrobial use in the study population using different units of measurement and contrast the results obtained, (2) to evaluate data quality of farm records on antimicrobial use, and (3) to compare data quality of different recording systems. During 1 year, data on antimicrobial use were collected from 97 dairy farms. Antimicrobial consumption was quantified using: (1) the incidence density of antimicrobial treatments; (2) the weight of active substance; (3) the used daily dose and (4) the used course dose for antimicrobials for intestinal, intrauterine and systemic use; and (5) the used unit dose, for antimicrobials for intramammary use. Data quality was evaluated by describing completeness and accuracy of the recorded information, and by comparing farmers' and veterinarians' records. Relative consumption of antimicrobials depended on the unit of measurement: used doses reflected the treatment intensity better than weight of active substance. The use of antimicrobials classified as high priority was low, although under- and overdosing were frequently observed. Electronic recording systems allowed better traceability of the animals treated. Recording drug name or dosage often resulted in incomplete or inaccurate information. Veterinarians tended to record more drugs than farmers. The integration of veterinarian and farm data would improve data quality.

  15. New Approaches to Antibiotic Use and Review of Recently Approved Antimicrobial Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Andrew W; Jain, Rupali; Spach, David H

    2016-07-01

    Antimicrobial drug-resistance continues to force adaptation in our clinical practice. We explore new evidence regarding adjunctive antibiotic therapy for skin and soft tissue abscesses as well as duration of therapy for intra-abdominal abscesses. As new evidence refines optimal practice, it is essential to support clinicians in adopting practice patterns concordant with evidence-based guidelines. We review a simple approach that can 'nudge' clinicians towards concordant practices. Finally, the use of novel antimicrobials will play an increasingly important role in contemporary therapy. We review five new antimicrobials recently FDA-approved for use in drug-resistant infections: dalbavancin, oritavancin, ceftaroline, ceftolozane-tazobactam, and ceftazidime-avibactam.

  16. Antimicrobial Use: A Risk Factor or a Protective Factor for Acquiring Campylobacteriosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koningstein, Maike; Simonsen, Jacob; Helms, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Background. It is well acknowledged that the use of antimicrobial drugs in food animals leads to antimicrobial drug resistance in foodborne bacteria such as Campylobacter; however, the role of human antimicrobial usage is much less investigated. The aim of this study was to quantify the odds...... was reduced 1 month after exposure to macrolides (OR, 0.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.56–0.92). Macrolide exposure 1 month to 2 years before infection was associated with an increased risk of a Campylobacter diagnosis (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.4–1.6). A history of fluoroquinolone use was also associated...

  17. World Health Organization Ranking of Antimicrobials According to Their Importance in Human Medicine: A Critical Step for Developing Risk Management Strategies to Control Antimicrobial Resistance From Food Animal Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collignon, Peter C; Conly, John M; Andremont, Antoine; McEwen, Scott A; Aidara-Kane, Awa

    2016-10-15

    Antimicrobial use in food animals selects for antimicrobial resistance in bacteria, which can spread to people. Reducing use of antimicrobials-particularly those deemed to be critically important for human medicine-in food production animals continues to be an important step for preserving the benefits of these antimicrobials for people. The World Health Organization ranking of antimicrobials according to their relative importance in human medicine was recently updated. Antimicrobials considered the highest priority among the critically important antimicrobials were quinolones, third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins, macrolides and ketolides, and glycopeptides. The updated ranking allows stakeholders in the agriculture sector and regulatory agencies to focus risk management efforts on drugs used in food animals that are the most important to human medicine. In particular, the current large-scale use of fluoroquinolones, macrolides, and third-generation cephalosporins and any potential use of glycopeptides and carbapenems need to be addressed urgently.

  18. Discovering new in silico tools for antimicrobial peptide prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrent, Marc; Nogués, M Victòria; Boix, Ester

    2012-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important effectors of the innate immune system and play a vital role in the prevention of infections. Due to the increased emergence of new antibiotic-resistant bacteria, new drugs are constantly under investigation. AMPs in particular are recognized as promising candidates because of their modularity and wide antimicrobial spectrum. However, the mechanisms of action of AMPs, as well as their structure-activity relationships, are not completely understood. AMPs display no conserved three-dimensional structure and poor sequence conservation, which hinders rational design. Several bioinformatics tools have been developed to generate new templates with appealing antimicrobial properties with the aim of finding highly active peptide compounds with low cytotoxicity. The current tools reviewed here allow for the prediction and design of new active peptides with reasonable accuracy. However, a reliable method to assess the antimicrobial activity of AMPs has not yet been developed. The standardization of procedures to experimentally evaluate the antimicrobial activity of AMPs, together with the constant growth of current well-established databases, may allow for the future development of new bioinformatics tools to accurately predict antimicrobial activity.

  19. Antimicrobial Stewardship for a Geriatric Behavioral Health Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Ellis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance is a growing public health concern. Antimicrobial stewardship and multi-disciplinary intervention can prevent inappropriate antimicrobial use and improve patient care. Special populations, especially older adults and patients with mental health disorders, can be particularly in need of such intervention. The purpose of this project was to assess the impact of pharmacist intervention on appropriateness of antimicrobial prescribing on a geriatric psychiatric unit (GPU. Patients ≥18 years old prescribed oral antibiotics during GPU admission were included. Antimicrobial appropriateness was assessed pre- and post-pharmacist intervention. During the six-month pre- and post-intervention phase, 63 and 70 patients prescribed antibiotics were identified, respectively. Subjects in the post-intervention group had significantly less inappropriate doses for indication compared to the pre-intervention group (10.6% vs. 23.9%, p = 0.02, and significantly less antibiotics prescribed for an inappropriate duration (15.8% vs. 32.4%, p < 0.01. There were no significant differences for use of appropriate drug for indication or appropriate dose for renal function between groups. Significantly more patients in the post intervention group had medications prescribed with appropriate dose, duration, and indication (51% vs. 66%, p = 0.04. Pharmacist intervention was associated with decreased rates of inappropriate antimicrobial prescribing on a geriatric psychiatric unit.

  20. Antimicrobial activity ofGymnema sylvestre (Asclepiadaceae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Beverly C. David; G. Sudarsanam

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate antimicrobial activities of aqueous, methanol, chloroform and hexane extract of leaves plant ofGymnema sylvestre(G. sylvestre).Methods:The antimicrobial screening of the extracts ofG. sylvestre against most prevalent microbes likeStaphylococcus aureus(S. aureus),Bacillus cereus(B. cereus),Klebsiella pneumoniae(K. pneumoniae),Escherichia coli(E. coli),Candida albicans(C. albicans),Candida tropicalis(C. tropicalis),Candida krusei(C. krusei) andCandida kefyr(C. kefyr) by agar well diffusion method, minimum inhibitory concentration, minimum bactericidal concentration, minimum fungicidal concentration were carried out. Results:The aqueous and methanol leaf extract showed significant antibacterial and antifungal activities against the selected microorganisms when compared to the standard drugs respectively. Conclusions:The dried scale leaves ofG. sylvestre might represent a new antimicrobial source with stable, biologically active components that can establish a scientific base for the use in modern medicine.

  1. Antimicrobial and biocompatible properties of nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ul-Islam, M; Shehzad, A; Khan, S; Khattak, W A; Ullah, M W; Park, J K

    2014-01-01

    The rapid development of drug-resistant characteristics in pathogenic viral, bacterial, and fungal species and the consequent spread of infectious diseases are currently receiving serious attention. Indeed, there is a pressing demand to explore novel materials and develop new strategies that can address these issues of serious concern. Nanomaterials are currently proving to be the most capable therapeutic agents to cope with such hazards. The exceptional physiochemical properties and impressive antimicrobial capabilities of nanoparticles have provoked their utilization in biomedical fields. Nanomaterials of both organic and inorganic nature have shown the capabilities of disrupting microbial cells through different mechanisms. Along with the direct influence on the microbial cell membrane, DNA and proteins, these nanomaterials produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that damage cell components and viruses. Currently, a serious hazard associated with these antimicrobial nanomaterials is their toxicity to human and animal cells. Extensive studies have reported the dose, time, and cell-dependent toxicology of various nanomaterials, and some have shown excellent biocompatible properties. Nevertheless, there is still debate regarding the use of nanomaterials for medical applications. Therefore, in this review, the antimicrobial activities of various nanomaterials with details of their acting mechanisms were compiled. The relative toxic and biocompatible behavior of nanomaterials emphasized in this study provides information pertaining to their practical applicability in medical fields.

  2. Antimicrobial peptides in Echinoderms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Li

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are important immune effector molecules for invertebrates, including echinoderms, which lack a vertebrate-type adaptive immune system. Here we summarize the knowledge of such peptides in echinoderms. Strongylocins are a novel family of cysteine-rich AMPs, recently identified in the sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis and S. purpuratus. Although these molecules present diverse amino acid sequences, they share an identical cysteine arrangement pattern, dissimilar to other known AMPs. A family of heterodimeric AMPs, named centrocins, are also present in S. droebachiensis. Lysozymes and fragments of larger proteins, such as beta-thymocins, actin, histone 2A and filamin A have also been shown to display antimicrobial activities in echinoderms. Future studies on AMPs should be aimed in revealing how echinoderms use these AMPs in the immune response against microbial pathogens.

  3. Triclosan antimicrobial polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan antimicrobial molecular fluctuating energies of nonbonding electron pairs for the oxygen atom by ether bond rotations are reviewed with conformational computational chemistry analyses. Subsequent understanding of triclosan alternating ether bond rotations is able to help explain several material properties in Polymer Science. Unique bond rotation entanglements between triclosan and the polymer chains increase both the mechanical properties of polymer toughness and strength that are ...

  4. Antimicrobial Peptides in Echinoderms

    OpenAIRE

    Li, C; Haug, T; K Stensvåg

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important immune effector molecules for invertebrates, including echinoderms, which lack a vertebrate-type adaptive immune system. Here we summarize the knowledge of such peptides in echinoderms. Strongylocins are a novel family of cysteine-rich AMPs, recently identified in the sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis and S. purpuratus. Although these molecules present diverse amino acid sequences, they share an identical cysteine arrangement pattern, d...

  5. [Neruda and antimicrobial resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotera, Alejandro

    2011-07-01

    Antimicrobial resistance has been a problem in medicine, since their incorporation to clinical practice. Numerous papers have been written on the subject. The analysis of two poems by Pablo Neruda "How much does a man live" and "Larynx", included in the volume "Estravagario" and published for the first time in 1957 and 1958, give us an incredible revelation about the concept of resistance. In these poems aureomycin, the first antimicrobial of the family of tetracyclines, was included as a poetic figure and the therapeutic action of antimicrobials was described. "Never so much bugs died I tons of them fell I but the few that remained olive I manifested their perversity". These writings incorporated novel concepts, even for physicians of that time and described the closeness of death that a patient may perceive during the course of a given disease. The capacity of Pablo Neruda to extract the essence of situations and to anticipate to conditions that only years later became clinically relevant problems, is noteworthy.

  6. Human neutrophil antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, E L; Lehrer, R I; Rest, R F

    1988-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes (PMNs) take up opsonized microorganisms into phagosomes that fuse with secretory granules in the PMN cytoplasm to form phagolysosomes. Killing and digestion of microorganisms take place within phagolysosomes. Antimicrobial activities in phagolysosomes are divided into two classes. Oxygen (O2)-dependent mechanisms are expressed when PMNs undergo the "respiratory burst." An NADPH oxidase in the phagolysosome membrane is activated and reduces O2 to superoxide (O2-). O2 reduction is the first step in a series of reactions that produce toxic oxidants. For example, .O2- dismutases to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and the azurophil granule enzyme myeloperoxidase catalyzes the oxidation of Cl- by H2O2 to yield hypochlorous acid (HOCl). The reaction of HOCl with ammonia and amines modulates the toxicity of this oxidant. O2-independent antimicrobial mechanisms include the activities of lysosomal proteases, other hydrolytic enzymes, and proteins and peptides that bind to microorganisms and disrupt essential processes or structural components. For example, the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein, cathepsin G, and the defensins are released into phagolysosomes from the azurophil granules. Proposed mechanisms of action of neutrophil antimicrobial agents, their range of microbial targets, and their possible interactions within phagolysosomes are discussed.

  7. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Health and Human Services U.S. Food and Drug Administration A to Z Index Follow FDA En ... Search FDA Submit search Popular Content Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics ...

  8. Intracerebroventricular administration of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Aaron M; Mieure, Katherine D; Owen, Robert D; Pesaturo, Adam B; Hatton, Jimmi

    2009-07-01

    Intracerebroventricular drug administration is a method that bypasses the blood-brain barrier and other mechanisms that limit drug distribution into the brain, allowing high drug concentrations to enter the central compartment. Instillation of drugs directly into the ventricles of the brain must be done carefully and with full consideration of factors affecting the efficacy and safety of this route of administration. These factors include the osmolarity, pH, volume, and presence of preservatives and diluents of the drug solution being administered. Very few studies have formally investigated intraventricular therapies, and dosing recommendations may vary widely depending on the agent and the patient. Many antimicrobials have been given intraventricularly, although very few prospective studies have evaluated this strategy. There are wide variations among the reports regarding dosage regimens and the pharmacokinetics of the antimicrobials used. Guidance on appropriate formulations and their use is lacking. Clinicians should be aware of their patients' ongoing disease processes and neurologic status, as well as pertinent physiochemical properties of drugs when formulating them for intracerebroventricular administration; a high index of suspicion should be maintained when monitoring patients for adverse drug events after instillation.

  9. THE ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF SOME EXTRACTS OF FERN GAMETOPHYTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionica Deliu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The nature freely offers us many resources for health and beauty. The ferns and their therapeutic properties are less exploit in Romania, except Lycopodium clavatum and Equisetum arvense. Some of the fern properties were demonstrated, like antioxidant, antimicrobial, antiviral, antihelmintic properties. Plants are reasonable alternative to synthetic drugs, avoid the side effect and high cost of synthetic drugs production. Also, the drug resistance bacteria can be controlled using plant derived remedies. In this study the antimicrobial effect of methanolic and ethanolic extracts from three fern species were tested. The extracts were gained from gametophytic stage of ferns obtained in vitro. The most obvious effect was observed for Asplenium trichomanes-ramosum extract. The total polyphenols and flavonoids content were established, too.

  10. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Studies of New Series of Pyrazoline Bearing Bis-Heterocycles via 1,3-Dipolar Cycloaddition Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Jayashankara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Biologically interesting bis-heterocycles bearing pyrazoline and imidazole moieties have been synthesized. 1H NMR, 13C NMR, IR and elemental analyses characterized the newly synthesized compounds. All the synthesized compounds were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity and were compared with the standard drugs. All the compounds demonstrated potent to weak antimicrobial activity.

  11. Antimicrobial management of intra-abdominal infections:Literature's guidelines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Massimo Sartelli; Fausto Catena; Federico Coccolini; Antonio Daniele Pinna

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial management of severe intra-abdominal infections (IAIs) involves a delicate balance of optimizing empirical therapy,which has been shown to improve clinical outcomes,while simultaneously reducing unnecessary antimicrobial use.Two sets of guidelines for the management of intra-abdominal infections were recently published.In 2010,the Surgical Infection Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (SIS-IDSA)created guidelines for the diagnosis and management of complicated IAIs.The new SIS-IDSA guidelines replace those previously published in 2002 and 2003.The World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) guidelines represent additional contributions,made by specialists worldwide,to the debate regarding proper antimicrobial drug methodology.These guidelines represent the conclusions of the consensus conference held in Bologna,Italy,in July 2010 during the first congress of the WSES.

  12. Antimicrobial properties of nudibranchs tissues extracts from South Andaman, India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kota Veeraswamy Reddy; Raju Mohanraju; Kada Narayana Murthy; Chatragadda Ramesh; Perumal Karthick

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the antimicrobial properties of tissues extracts of different nudibranchs such asPhyllidia varicosa, Plakobranchus ocellatus, Phyllidiella rosans andHalgerda stricklandi against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Methods: Nudibranchs tissue samples were subjected to organic solvent extraction for antimicrobial activity by well diffusion method. Results: The crude extract 50μL (0.2 mg) ofPhyllidia varicosa showed the maximum inhibitory zone (22 mm) againstShigella flexneri.Plakobranchus ocellatus extract of 50μL (0.2 mg) showed the maximum inhibitory zone againstShigella flexneri (22 mm) and Staphylococcus aureus (19 mm) and no significant activity was found against the fungal pathogens. Conclusions:This work reveals that nudibranch tissues contain the antimicrobial secondary metabolites, which leads the significant activity against bacterial pathogens and further emphasizes detailed study on novel drug discovery from nudibranch tissues against certain human bacterial infections.

  13. Phytochemical characterization and antimicrobial activity of Curcuma xanthorrhiza Roxb.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mary Helen PA; Susheela Gomathy K; Jayasree S; Nizzy AM; Rajagopal B; Jeeva S

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the antimicrobial activity and phytochemical characterization of essential oil isolated from the rhizome of Curcuma xanthorrhiza against pathogenic bacteria and fungi.Methods:Fresh rhizomes of Curcuma xanthorrhiza were subjected to hydro distillation process to obtain essential oil and characterized by Gas Chromatography- Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS). The essential oil was evaluated for antibacterial and antifungal activity against thirteen pathogenic bacteria and six fungi by the disc diffusion method. Results: GC – MS analysis of the essential oil extracted from the rhizome of Curcuma xanthorrhiza contained the derivatives of xanthorihizol, camphene and curcumene, monoterpene hydrocarbons, oxygenated monoterpenes, sesquiterpene, hydrocarbons and other minor compounds. The antimicrobial activity of the oil showed significant inhibitory activity against the human pathogenic bacteria, no activity was observed against the fungi Aspergillus niger and Fusarium oxysporum. Conclusions: The findings of the present study indicate that the rhizome extract of Curcuma xanthorrhiza possess secondary metabolites and potential to develop antimicrobial drugs.

  14. Antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects of Mexican medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobo-Salcedo, Maria del Rosario; Alonso-Castro, Angel Josabad; Salazar-Olivo, Luis A; Carranza-Alvarez, Candy; González-Espíndola, Luis Angel; Domínguez, Fabiola; Maciel-Torres, Sandra Patricia; García-Lujan, Concepción; González-Martínez, Marisela del Rocio; Gómez-Sánchez, Maricela; Estrada-Castillón, Eduardo; Zapata-Bustos, Rocio; Medellin-Milán, Pedro; García-Carrancá, Alejandro

    2011-12-01

    The antimicrobial effects of the Mexican medicinal plants Guazuma ulmifolia, Justicia spicigera, Opuntia joconostle, O. leucotricha, Parkinsonia aculeata, Phoradendron longifolium, P. serotinum, Psittacanthus calyculatus, Tecoma stans and Teucrium cubense were tested against several human multi-drug resistant pathogens, including three Gram (+) and five Gram (-) bacterial species and three fungal species using the disk-diffusion assay. The cytotoxicity of plant extracts on human cancer cell lines and human normal non-cancerous cells was also evaluated using the MTT assay. Phoradendron longifolium, Teucrium cubense, Opuntia joconostle, Tecoma stans and Guazuma ulmifolia showed potent antimicrobial effects against at least one multidrug-resistant microorganism (inhibition zone > 15 mm). Only Justicia spicigera and Phoradendron serotinum extracts exerted active cytotoxic effects on human breast cancer cells (IC50 plant species may be important sources of antimicrobial and cytotoxic agents.

  15. Size-dependent antimicrobial properties of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žalnėravičius, Rokas; Paškevičius, Algimantas; Kurtinaitiene, Marija; Jagminas, Arūnas

    2016-10-01

    The growing resistance of bacteria to conventional antibiotics elicited considerable interest to non-typical drugs. In this study, antimicrobial investigations were performed on low-size dispersion cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (Nps) fabricated by co-precipitation approach in several average sizes, in particular, 15.0, 5.0, and 1.65 nm. A variety of experimental tests demonstrated that the size of these Nps is determinant for antimicrobial efficiency against S. cerevisiae and several Candida species, in particular, C. parapsilosis, C. krusei, and C. albicans. The small and ultra-small fractions of CoFe2O4 Nps possess especially strong antimicrobial activity against all tested microorganisms. The possible reasons are discussed. Nps were characterized by means of transmission and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy, chemical analysis and magnetic measurements.

  16. Natural Cinnamic Acids, Synthetic Derivatives and Hybrids with Antimicrobial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan David Guzman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial natural preparations involving cinnamon, storax and propolis have been long used topically for treating infections. Cinnamic acids and related molecules are partly responsible for the therapeutic effects observed in these preparations. Most of the cinnamic acids, their esters, amides, aldehydes and alcohols, show significant growth inhibition against one or several bacterial and fungal species. Of particular interest is the potent antitubercular activity observed for some of these cinnamic derivatives, which may be amenable as future drugs for treating tuberculosis. This review intends to summarize the literature data on the antimicrobial activity of the natural cinnamic acids and related derivatives. In addition, selected hybrids between cinnamic acids and biologically active scaffolds with antimicrobial activity were also included. A comprehensive literature search was performed collating the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of each cinnamic acid or derivative against the reported microorganisms. The MIC data allows the relative comparison between series of molecules and the derivation of structure-activity relationships.

  17. Ammonium derivatives of chromenones and quinolinones as lead antimicrobial agents

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shilpi Gupta; Seema Singh; Abha Kathuria; Manish Kumar; Sweta Sharma; Ram Kumar; Virinder S Parmar; Bharat Singh; Anjali Gupta; Erik Van Der Eycken; Gainda L Sharma; Sunil K Sharma

    2012-03-01

    A series of novel ammonium derivatives were synthesized and examined for their antimicrobial efficacy. Comparison of antimicrobial spectrum revealed that compounds 9, 11, 16 and 23 had strong potential against pathogens in vitro. Cytotoxicity results showed compound 9 to be least toxic, it is non-toxic to A549 and U87 cells in MTT assay and exhibits marginal toxicity (15-20%) to human erythrocytes at a concentration of 1000 g/ml as compared to 100% lysis of cells by 31.25 g/ml of the standard drug amphotericin B. This compound has MIC values in the range of 1.95-31.25 g/disc in DDA against different pathogens and may considered to be an important lead antimicrobial molecule for further exploration.

  18. Antimicrobial Potential Of Azadirachta Indica Against Pathogenic Bacteria And Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Asif

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Drugs from natural sources are used for treating various diseases since the ancient times. From the literature it is clear that various type of pharmacological and biological activities are associated with Azadirachta indica. Theleave oil of A. indica is known to have good antimicrobial potential. The oil of A. indica leaves, was tested against the different infectious microorganisms [Gram positive bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria], such as bacterial strains; S. aureus, E. coli, B. cerus, P. vulgaris, S. typhi, K. pneumonae, S. dysenterae and Fungal strains; F. oxysporum, A. flavus, A. fumigates, A. niger, C. albicans, Cladosporium sp., M. canis, M. gypseum, T. rubrum, T. mentagrophytes, P. notatum and P. citrinum etc.The results showed that level of antimicrobial activities of the A.indica oil depends on both the protein and carbohydrate contents. Generally, the high level of protein and carbohydrate contents of extract had better antimicrobial activities.

  19. Antimicrobial therapy in critically ill patients: a review of pathophysiological conditions responsible for altered disposition and pharmacokinetic variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pea, Federico; Viale, Pierluigi; Furlanut, Mario

    2005-01-01

    Antimicrobials are among the most important and commonly prescribed drugs in the management of critically ill patients. Selecting the appropriate antimicrobial at the commencement of therapy, both in terms of spectrum of activity and dose and frequency of administration according to concentration or time dependency, is mandatory in this setting. Despite appropriate standard dosage regimens, failure of the antimicrobial treatment may occur because of the inability of the antimicrobial to achieve adequate concentrations at the infection site through alterations in its pharmacokinetics due to underlying pathophysiological conditions. According to the intrinsic chemicophysical properties of antimicrobials, hydrophilic antimicrobials (beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, glycopeptides) have to be considered at much higher risk of inter- and intraindividual pharmacokinetic variations than lipophilic antimicrobials (macrolides, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, chloramphenicol, rifampicin [rifampin]) in critically ill patients, with significant frequent fluctuations of plasma concentrations that may require significant dosage adjustments. For example, underexposure may occur because of increased volume of distribution (as a result of oedema in sepsis and trauma, pleural effusion, ascites, mediastinitis, fluid therapy or indwelling post-surgical drainage) and/or enhanced renal clearance (as a result of burns, drug abuse, hyperdynamic conditions during sepsis, acute leukaemia or use of haemodynamically active drugs). On the other hand, overexposure may occur because of a drop in renal clearance caused by renal impairment. Care with all these factors whenever choosing an antimicrobial may substantially improve the outcome of antimicrobial therapy in critically ill patients. However, since these situations may often coexist in the same patient and pharmacokinetic variability may be unpredictable, the antimicrobial policy may further benefit from real-time application of therapeutic

  20. Absorbent silver (I) antimicrobial fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years, silver in form of silver ions, has been gaining importance in the wound management as an effective broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent. Silver has a long history as an antimicrobial agent, especially in the treatment of wounds. Alginates and carboxymethyl (CM) cotton contain carboxyl...

  1. Antimicrobial stewardship: philosophy versus practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds Ashley, Elizabeth S; Kaye, Keith S; DePestel, Daryl D; Hermsen, Elizabeth D

    2014-10-15

    To promote the judicious use of antimicrobials and preserve their usefulness in the setting of growing resistance, a number of policy-making bodies and professional societies have advocated the development of antimicrobial stewardship programs. Although these programs have been implemented at many institutions in the United States, their impact has been difficult to measure. Current recommendations advocate the use of both outcome and process measures as metrics for antimicrobial stewardship. Although patient outcome metrics have the greatest impact on the quality of care, the literature shows that antimicrobial use and costs are the indicators measured most frequently by institutions to justify the effectiveness of antimicrobial stewardship programs. The measurement of more meaningful outcomes has been constrained by difficulties inherent to these measures, lack of funding and resources, and inadequate study designs. Antimicrobial stewardship can be made more credible by refocusing the antimicrobial review process to target specific disease states, reassessing the usefulness of current metrics, and integrating antimicrobial stewardship program initiatives into institutional quality and safety efforts.

  2. How to fight antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucault, Cédric; Brouqui, Philippe

    2007-03-01

    Antimicrobial misuse results in the development of resistance and superbugs. Over recent decades, resistance has been increasing despite continuing efforts to control it, resulting in increased mortality and cost. Many authorities have proposed local, regional and national guidelines to fight against this phenomenon, and the usefulness of these programmes has been evaluated. Multifaceted intervention seems to be the most efficient method to control antimicrobial resistance. Monitoring of bacterial resistance and antibiotic use is essential, and the methodology has now been homogenized. The implementation of guidelines and infection control measures does not control antimicrobial resistance and needs to be reinforced by associated measures. Educational programmes and rotation policies have not been evaluated sufficiently in the literature. Combination antimicrobial therapy is inefficient in controlling antimicrobial resistance.

  3. Antimicrobial screening of Mnium stellare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerem Canli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Many plants contain active substances that are known to be effective in both enhancing the wound healing process and lowering the incidence of wound infections. Previous studies have shown that bryophytes produce a variety of secondary metabolites that present pharmaceutical activities including antimicrobial activity against various pathogenic bacteria and fungi. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of Mnium stellare against 17 bacterial and 1 fungal strains. Our present study has shown that the ethanol extract of M. stellare has antimicrobial activity against several Gram positive and Gram negative microorganism tested, but its antimicrobial activity is notable especially against B. subtilis, S. typhimirium, S. aureus, S. carnosus, and S. epidermidis. These results are the very first report of the antimicrobial activity of M. stellare.

  4. Antimicrobial properties of the skin secretions of frogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriaan J. Esterhuyse

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance results in increased morbidity and mortality, and increased health-care costs. Therefore the need to develop new classes of antibiotics is indispensable. Antimicrobial peptides are a relatively new class of potential antibiotics which are fast acting, possess broad-spectrum activity and are able to escape many of the currently known mechanisms of drug resistance. They have been shown to be active against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, fungi, enveloped viruses and even cancer cells. However, toxicity to healthy host cells remains a concern and has affected the clinical development of therapeutics based on antimicrobial peptides. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent advances in research focused on antimicrobial peptides from frogs and the challenges in conducting research in this area in southern Africa. An extensive literature review of relevant articles published between 1980 and the present was conducted using PubMed, ScienceDirect, Sabinet, Elsevier and GoogleScholar. There has been little research done on anurans from southern Africa which are endemic to the region, and there is therefore a need to focus on this group for the purposes of bioprospecting for potentially new antimicrobial peptide compounds.

  5. Antimicrobial Lemongrass Essential Oil—Copper Ferrite Cellulose Acetate Nanocapsules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis L. Liakos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose acetate (CA nanoparticles were combined with two antimicrobial agents, namely lemongrass (LG essential oil and Cu-ferrite nanoparticles. The preparation method of CA nanocapsules (NCs, with the two antimicrobial agents, was based on the nanoprecipitation method using the solvent/anti-solvent technique. Several physical and chemical analyses were performed to characterize the resulting NCs and to study their formation mechanism. The size of the combined antimicrobial NCs was found to be ca. 220 nm. The presence of Cu-ferrites enhanced the attachment of LG essential oil into the CA matrix. The magnetic properties of the combined construct were weak, due to the shielding of Cu-ferrites from the polymeric matrix, making them available for drug delivery applications where spontaneous magnetization effects should be avoided. The antimicrobial properties of the NCs were significantly enhanced with respect to CA/LG only. This work opens novel routes for the development of organic/inorganic nanoparticles with exceptional antimicrobial activities.

  6. 78 FR 14801 - Veterinary Oversight of Antimicrobial Use in Livestock: Impact on Stakeholders; Public Meetings...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Veterinary Oversight of Antimicrobial Use in Livestock... areas that may lack access to adequate veterinary services. The meetings are jointly sponsored by FDA...: Patricia Arnwine, Center for Veterinary Medicine (HFV-6), Food and Drug Administration, 7519 Standish...

  7. Antimicrobial and cell-penetrating properties of penetratin analogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahnsen, Jesper Søborg; Franzyk, Henrik; Sandberg-Schaal, Anne;

    2013-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) show great potential as drug delivery vectors and new antibiotic drug entities, respectively. The current study deals with the properties of a variety of peptide analogs derived from the well-known CPP penetratin as well as octaar......Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) show great potential as drug delivery vectors and new antibiotic drug entities, respectively. The current study deals with the properties of a variety of peptide analogs derived from the well-known CPP penetratin as well...... as octaarginine and different Tat sequences. The effects of peptide length, guanidinium content, and sequence of non-cationic residues were assessed in mammalian and bacterial cells. The arginine (Arg) content in the penetratin analogs was found to influence eukaryotic cell uptake efficiency, antimicrobial...... activity towards both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as eukaryotic cell viability. All examined analogs retained the ability to cross eukaryotic membranes giving rise to a distribution within the vacuolar apparatus. Interestingly, a series of shuffled analogs of penetratin...

  8. World Health Organization ranking of antimicrobials according to their importance in human medicine: A critical step for developing risk management strategies for the use of antimicrobials in food production animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collignon, Peter; Powers, John H; Chiller, Tom M; Aidara-Kane, Awa; Aarestrup, Frank M

    2009-07-01

    The use of antimicrobials in food animals creates an important source of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria that can spread to humans through the food supply. Improved management of the use of antimicrobials in food animals, particularly reducing the usage of those that are "critically important" for human medicine, is an important step toward preserving the benefits of antimicrobials for people. The World Health Organization has developed and applied criteria to rank antimicrobials according to their relative importance in human medicine. Clinicians, regulatory agencies, policy makers, and other stakeholders can use this ranking when developing risk management strategies for the use of antimicrobials in food production animals. The ranking allows stakeholders to focus risk management efforts on drugs used in food animals that are the most important to human medicine and, thus, need to be addressed most urgently, such as fluoroquinolones, macrolides, and third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins.

  9. World Health Organization Ranking of Antimicrobials According to Their Importance in Human Medicine: A Critical Step for Developing Risk Management Strategies for the Use of Antimicrobials in Food Production Animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collignon, P.; Powers, J. H.; Chiller, T. M.

    2009-01-01

    The use of antimicrobials in food animals creates an important source of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria that can spread to humans through the food supply. Improved management of the use of antimicrobials in food animals, particularly reducing the usage of those that are "critically important...... stakeholders can use this ranking when developing risk management strategies for the use of antimicrobials in food production animals. The ranking allows stakeholders to focus risk management efforts on drugs used in food animals that are the most important to human medicine and, thus, need to be addressed......" for human medicine, is an important step toward preserving the benefits of antimicrobials for people. The World Health Organization has developed and applied criteria to rank antimicrobials according to their relative importance in human medicine. Clinicians, regulatory agencies, policy makers, and other...

  10. Eight-year Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance among Enterococcus Spp. Isolated in the First Bethune Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiancheng; Wang, Liqiang; Wang, Kai; Zhou, Qi

    This study was to investigate the antimicrobial resistance of Enterococcus spp. isolated in 8 consecutive years in the First Bethune Hospital. Disk diffusion test was used to study the antimicrobial resistance. The data were analyzed by WHONET 5 software according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Most of 1446 strains of Enterococcus spp. were collected from urine 640 (44.3%), sputum 315 (21.8%), secretions and pus 265 (18.3%) during the past 8 years. The rates of high-level aminoglycoside resistance in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium were 57.4%∼75.9% and 69.0%∼93.8% during the past 8 years, respectively. No Enterococcus spp. was resistant to vancomycin. The antimicrobial resistance of Enterococcus spp. had increased in recent 8 years. The change of the antimicrobial resistance should be investigated in order to direct rational drug usage in the clinic and prevent bacterial strain of drug resistance from being transmitted.

  11. Increasing antimicrobial resistance and narrowing therapeutics in typhoidal salmonellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaurthe, Jaspal

    2013-03-01

    Multidrug-resistant typhoid fever (MDRTF) is a major public health problem in developing countries and is an emerging problem in the developed world. Because of the difficulties in preventing typhoid by public health measures or immunization in developing countries, great reliance is placed on antimicrobial chemotherapy. The treatment should commence as soon as the clinical diagnosis is made rather than after the results of antimicrobial susceptibility tests but the existence of MDRTF poses a serious clinical dilemma in the selection of empiric antimicrobial therapy. With the widespread emergence and spread of strains resistant to chloramphenicol, ampicillin and trimethoprim, ciprofloxacin became the drug of choice for the treatment of typhoid fever. However, of late the efficacy of fluoroquinolones too has been questioned, mainly due to increasing reports of increasing defervescence time and poor patient response. This indicates that the organism has begun to develop resistance to fluoroquinolones, and is corroborated by a steady increase in Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of ciprofloxacin. The therapeutics of ciprofloxacin-resistant enteric fever narrows down to third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins and azithromycin. However, the emergence of extended-spectrum b-lactamases (ESBLs) in typhoidal Salmonellae poses a new challenge and would greatly limit the therapeutic options leaving only tigecycline and carbepenems as secondary antimicrobial drugs. This increasing resistance is alarming and emphasizes the need of effective preventive measures to control typhoid and to limit the unnecessary use of antibiotics.

  12. Drug: D04726 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D04726 Drug Medicinal soap (JP16); Medicinal soap (TN) Therapeutic category: 2359 2...ual organs 23 Digestive organ agents 235 Purgatives, clysters 2359 Others D04726 Medicinal soap (JP16) 26 Ep...idermides 261 Antimicrobial agents 2616 Medical soaps D04726 Medicinal soap (JP16) PubChem: 17398150 ...

  13. Drug: D05662 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D05662 Drug Pyrithione sodium (USAN); Sodium omadine (TN) C5H4NOS. Na 148.9911 149.1461 D05662.gif Antimicro...bial [topical] CAS: 15922-78-8 PubChem: 47207323 LigandBox: D05662 NIKKAJI: J66.622

  14. Drug: D00068 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CYP2E1 [HSA:1571] Therapeutic category of drugs in Japan [BR:br08301] 2 Agents affecting individual organs 26 Epidermides 261 Antimic...robial agents 2615 Alcohols D00068 Anhydrous ethanol (JP16); Alcohol (USP) 4 Agents

  15. Drug: D00240 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00240 Drug Aztreonam (JP16/USP/INN); AZT; Azactam (TN) C13H17N5O8S2 435.0519 435.4328 D00240.gif Antimicrob...ial Same as: C06840 Therapeutic category: 6122 ATC code: J01DF01 penicillin binding

  16. Drug: D01078 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D01078 Drug Telithromycin (JAN/USAN/INN); TEL; Ketek (TN) C43H65N5O10 811.4731 812.0037 D01078.gif Antimicro...bial [via inhibition of bacterial protein synthesis] Same as: C12009 ATC code: J01F

  17. Drug: D06144 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 305 643.7312 D06144.gif Antimicrobial penicillin binding proteins inhibitor ko00550 Peptidoglycan biosynthes...D06144 Drug Tigemonam dicholine (USAN); Tigemen (TN) C12H13N5O9S2. (C5H14NO)2 643.2

  18. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... U.S. Department of Health and Human Services U.S. Food and Drug Administration A to Z Index Follow ... Español Search FDA Submit search Popular Content Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & ...

  19. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... links HHS U.S. Department of Health and Human Services U.S. Food and Drug Administration A to Z Index Follow FDA En Español Search FDA Submit search Popular Content Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products ...

  20. Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of Echinophora spinosa L. (Apiaceae Essential Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina M. Glamočlija

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to investigate the chemical composition and effectiveness of the essential oil isolated from Echinophora spinosa on different bacterial and fungal species. Chemical analysis (GC/MS showed that δ³-carene (60,86 %, α-phellandrene (7,12%, p-cymene (6,22 %, myrcene (4,82 % and β-phellandrene (2,73 % were dominant components in this oil. Essential oil tested showed good antimicrobial activity. Antimicrobial potential of this oil was higher than potential of commercial antimicrobial drugs tested, streptomycin, bifonozole and ketoconazole.

  1. Purification and in vitro Activity of an Antimicrobial Peptide from Skin of Rana Temporaria Chensinensis, David

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jie; MENG Qing-fan; XU Xue-song; TIAN Xiao-le; JIANG Fu-jia; LI Qing-shan; TENG Li-rong

    2007-01-01

    In this study, an antimicrobial component (RTCI) was purified from the skin of Rana temporaria chensinensis,David. Antimicrobial activities of RTCI against clinical multi-drug resistant bacterial strains, including Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureaus, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis, and Proteus mirabilis were measured in vitro by means of minimal inhibitory concentration and time-kill studies.The results indicate that RTCI could inhibit the growth of these bacteria at a proper concentration and suggest that RTCI shows a better antimicrobial activity to Gram-negative bacterial strains than to Gram-positive bacterial strains.

  2. In vitro antimicrobial activity of five essential oils on multidrug resistant Gram-negative clinical isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Sakkas, Hercules; Gousia, Panagiota; Economou, Vangelis; Sakkas, Vassilios; Petsios, Stefanos; Papadopoulou, Chrissanthy

    2016-01-01

    Aim/Background: The emergence of drug-resistant pathogens has drawn attention on medicinal plants for potential antimicrobial properties. The objective of the present study was the investigation of the antimicrobial activity of five plant essential oils on multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Materials and Methods: Basil, chamomile blue, origanum, thyme, and tea tree oil were tested against clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 6), Escherichia coli (n = 4), Klebsiella pneum...

  3. Zinc pyrithione in alcohol-based products for skin antisepsis: persistence of antimicrobial effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthery, Eugene; Seal, Lawton A; Anderson, Edward L

    2005-02-01

    Alcohol-based products for skin antisepsis have a long history of safety and efficacy in the United States and abroad. However, alcohol alone lacks the required antimicrobial persistence to provide for the sustained periods of skin antisepsis desired in the clinical environment. Therefore, alcohol-based products must have a preservative agent such as iodine/iodophor compounds, chlorhexidine gluconate, or zinc pyrithione, to extend its antimicrobial effects. Iodine, iodophors, and chlorhexidine gluconate are well-characterized antimicrobials and preservatives. The thrust of our effort was to examine the characteristics of the lesser-known zinc pyrithione and to evaluate its utility as a preservative in the formulation of alcohol-based products for skin antisepsis. This work includes a literature review of current zinc pyrithione applications in drugs and cosmetics, a safety and toxicity evaluation, consideration of the proposed mechanisms of antimicrobial action, in vitro and in vivo efficacy data, and a discussion of the mechanisms that confer the desired antimicrobial persistence. In addition, alcohol-based, zinc pyrithione-preserved, commercially available products of skin antisepsis are compared with other commercially available antimicrobials used for skin antisepsis and with additional alcohol-based products with different preservatives. The authors' conclusion is that zinc pyrithione is not only a safe and effective antimicrobial but that its use in certain alcohol-based formulations results in antimicrobial efficacy exceeding that of iodine and chlorhexidine gluconate.

  4. Nanoparticles: Alternatives Against Drug-Resistant Pathogenic Microbes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudepalya Renukaiah Rudramurthy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial substances may be synthetic, semisynthetic, or of natural origin (i.e., from plants and animals. Antimicrobials are considered “miracle drugs” and can determine if an infected patient/animal recovers or dies. However, the misuse of antimicrobials has led to the development of multi-drug-resistant bacteria, which is one of the greatest challenges for healthcare practitioners and is a significant global threat. The major concern with the development of antimicrobial resistance is the spread of resistant organisms. The replacement of conventional antimicrobials by new technology to counteract antimicrobial resistance is ongoing. Nanotechnology-driven innovations provide hope for patients and practitioners in overcoming the problem of drug resistance. Nanomaterials have tremendous potential in both the medical and veterinary fields. Several nanostructures comprising metallic particles have been developed to counteract microbial pathogens. The effectiveness of nanoparticles (NPs depends on the interaction between the microorganism and the NPs. The development of effective nanomaterials requires in-depth knowledge of the physicochemical properties of NPs and the biological aspects of microorganisms. However, the risks associated with using NPs in healthcare need to be addressed. The present review highlights the antimicrobial effects of various nanomaterials and their potential advantages, drawbacks, or side effects. In addition, this comprehensive information may be useful in the discovery of broad-spectrum antimicrobial drugs for use against multi-drug-resistant microbial pathogens in the near future.

  5. Polymyxins: Antimicrobial susceptibility concerns and therapeutic options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Balaji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae poses a great challenge to the treating physicians. The paucity of newer effective antimicrobials has led to renewed interest in the polymyxin group of drugs, as a last resort for treatment of gram-negative bacterial infections. There is a dearth of information on the pharmacological properties of colistin, leading to difficulties in selecting the right dose, dosing interval, and route of administration for treatment, especially in critically-ill patients. The increasing use of colistin over the last few years necessitates the need for accurate and reliable in vitro susceptibility testing methods. Development of heteroresistant strains as a result of colistin monotherapy is also a growing concern. There is a compelling need from the clinicians to provide options for probable and possible colistin combination therapy for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections in the ICU setting. Newer combination drug synergy determination tests are being developed and reported. There are no standardized recommendations from antimicrobial susceptibility testing reference agencies for the testing and interpretation of these drug combinations. Comparison and analysis of these reported methodologies may help to understand and assist the microbiologist to choose the best method that produces accurate results at the earliest. This will help clinicians to select the appropriate combination therapy. In this era of multidrug resistance it is important for the microbiology laboratory to be prepared, by default, to provide timely synergistic susceptibility results in addition to routine susceptibility, if warranted. Not as a favour or at request, but as a responsibility.

  6. Novel Formulations for Antimicrobial Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Carmona-Ribeiro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Peptides in general hold much promise as a major ingredient in novel supramolecular assemblies. They may become essential in vaccine design, antimicrobial chemotherapy, cancer immunotherapy, food preservation, organs transplants, design of novel materials for dentistry, formulations against diabetes and other important strategical applications. This review discusses how novel formulations may improve the therapeutic index of antimicrobial peptides by protecting their activity and improving their bioavailability. The diversity of novel formulations using lipids, liposomes, nanoparticles, polymers, micelles, etc., within the limits of nanotechnology may also provide novel applications going beyond antimicrobial chemotherapy.

  7. [Antimicrobial susceptibility in Chile 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes-D, Marcela; Silva, Francisco; García, Patricia; Bello, Helia; Briceño, Isabel; Calvo-A, Mario; Labarca, Jaime

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria antimicrobial resistance is an uncontrolled public health problem that progressively increases its magnitude and complexity. The Grupo Colaborativo de Resistencia, formed by a join of experts that represent 39 Chilean health institutions has been concerned with bacteria antimicrobial susceptibility in our country since 2008. In this document we present in vitro bacterial susceptibility accumulated during year 2012 belonging to 28 national health institutions that represent about 36% of hospital discharges in Chile. We consider of major importance to report periodically bacteria susceptibility so to keep the medical community updated to achieve target the empirical antimicrobial therapies and the control measures and prevention of the dissemination of multiresistant strains.

  8. Design and characterization of antimicrobial usnic acid loaded-core/shell magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taresco, Vincenzo; Francolini, Iolanda; Padella, Franco; Bellusci, Mariangela; Boni, Adriano; Innocenti, Claudia; Martinelli, Andrea; D'Ilario, Lucio; Piozzi, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    The application of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in medicine is considered much promising especially because they can be handled and directed to specific body sites by external magnetic fields. MNPs have been investigated in magnetic resonance imaging, hyperthermia and drug targeting. In this study, properly functionalized core/shell MNPs with antimicrobial properties were developed to be used for the prevention and treatment of medical device-related infections. Particularly, surface-engineered manganese iron oxide MNPs, produced by a micro-emulsion method, were coated with two different polymers and loaded with usnic acid (UA), a dibenzofuran natural extract possessing antimicrobial activity. Between the two polymer coatings, the one based on an intrinsically antimicrobial cationic polyacrylamide (pAcDED) resulted to be able to provide MNPs with proper magnetic properties and basic groups for UA loading. Thanks to the establishment of acid-base interactions, pAcDED-coated MNPs were able to load and release significant drug amounts resulting in good antimicrobial properties versus Staphylococcus epidermidis (MIC = 0.1 mg/mL). The use of pAcDED having intrinsic antimicrobial activity as MNP coating in combination with UA likely contributed to obtain an enhanced antimicrobial effect. The developed drug-loaded MNPs could be injected in the patient soon after device implantation to prevent biofilm formation, or, later, in presence of signs of infection to treat the biofilm grown on the device surfaces.

  9. The fight against Antimicrobial Resistance: Important recent publications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo

    2014-01-01

    to be tackled on a global level. That something is indeed being done to tackle these problems on an international level is documented by the Progress report of the Transatlantic Taskforce on Antimicrobial Resistance (TATFAR), which was published in May 2014. This report summarizes the progress and the outcomes...... with regard to 17 recommendations that were identified in an earlier TATFAR report to strengthen EU and US communication and cooperation in the area of AMR. These recommendations fall into three key areas: (1) appropriate use of antimicrobial drugs in medicine; (2) prevention of drug resistant infections...... for a period of at least two years. Major outcomes, such as consensus papers, meeting reports, and periodic progress reports, will be posted on the TATFAR website. The extension of the TATFAR mandate is an important and necessary step that can only be welcomed. By re-affirming their commitment, the US...

  10. Antimicrobial properties of hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheshadri, Preethi; Abraham, Jayanthi

    2012-12-01

    Hemoglobin consists of a heme containing component and a globin unit. It exists as a tetramer with 2 α subunits and 2 β subunits in adults and with 2 α subunits and 2 γ chains in infants. On proteolytic cleavage, hemoglobin breaks down to produce many biologically active compounds, among which are hemocidins, those which exhibit antimicrobial property. The generation of these peptides does not depend on the blood group, Rhesus factor, age and sex of the healthy donors. The microbicidal activity has been observed against a variety of gram positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and against filamentous fungi, yeast and even certain parasites. The discovery of hemocidins opens a new field for research into the details of the peptides acting as second line of defence in boosting the innate immune system of the organisms.

  11. Atividade antimicrobiana do extrato de Anacardium occidentale Linn. em amostras multiresistentes de Staphylococcus aureus Antimicrobial activity of the hydroalcoholic extract of Anacardium occidentale Linn. against multi-drug resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackeline G. da Silva

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Plantas medicinais com propriedades terapêuticas são de grande relevância em todo o mundo, principalmente em países em desenvolvimento. A planta Anacardium occidentale Linn. é largamente usada na medicina tradicional na nossa região, como antidiarréico, para amigdalite, bronquites, artrites, e antiiflamatório. No presente estudo avaliou-se a ação antimicrobiana do extrato hidroalcóolico da casca do caule do cajueiro frente a amostras de Staphylococcus aureus resistentes e sensíveis à meticilina, obtidas a partir de pacientes internados do Hospital Universitário/Universidade Federal da Paraíba. A atividade antimicrobiana foi determinada pelo método de difusão em meio sólido para a determinação da Concentração Inibitória Mínima do extrato, e foi observada no total de 30 amostras, pela presença ou não do halo de inibição. Todas as amostras ensaiadas mostraram-se sensíveis à ação do extrato do cajueiro, com diâmetros dos halos de inibição variando de 10 a 20 mm, demonstrando grande eficácia do cajueiro. Assim, o uso desta planta na nossa região pode inferir uma alternativa terapêutica eficiente e de baixo custo, contra infecções bacterianas causadas por Staphylococcus aureus.Medicinal plants with therapeutical properties are of great significance in the whole world, especially in developing countries. Anacardium occidentale Linn. is a plant widely used in the traditional medicine in our region against diarrhea, tonsillitis, bronchitis, arthritis, and inflammation. In this paper, the antimicrobial activity of the hydroalcoholic extract of the cashew tree stem was evaluated against samples of meticillin-resistant and meticillin-sensible Staphylococcus aureus, attained from patients interned at Hospital Universitário/Universidade Federal da Paraíba. The antimicrobial activity was determined by the diffusion method in solid milieu to determine the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC of the extract, and it was

  12. Analysis of Drug Resistance and Resistant Genes of Salmonella toβ-lactams Antimicrobial Agents Isolated from Pigs in Guizhou Province%贵州省猪源沙门氏菌对β-内酰胺类药耐药性及耐药基因分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹正花; 谭艾娟; 吕世明; 王雄; 杜国琴

    2016-01-01

    In order to analyse the resistance toβ-lactams antimicrobial agents and the prevalence of resistant genes of Salmonella in Guizhou province,130 Salmonella strains were isolated and iden-tified from 9 different regions of scale pig farms.The drug sensitivity to 8 kinds ofβ-lactams anti-microbial agents were determined by using the broth microdilution method.Allβ-lactams resistant isolates were detected for the presences of TEM,OXA,CTX-M and SHV genes by PCR.The re-sults showed that drug resistance of Salmonella to the commonly usedβ-lactams antimicrobial agents was very serious,and the resistance rate to ceftazidime was the highest (100%),followed by ampicillin and amoxicillin,were 76.15% and 80.77%,respectively.The resistance rates of ceft-iofur and cephalexin were the lowest (46.15%).Salmonella strains were all of multiple drug re-sistance,of which double resistance was at lowest (2.31%),and eightfold resistance was highest (4.62%),multidrug resistance mainly concentrated in fourfold to sevenfold,accounted for 88.46%.PCR results showed that TEM,OXA,CTX-M genes detection rate were 85%,75% and 46%,respectively,while the SHV gene was not inspected.Resistant phenotype was basically con-sistent with resistant genes.The results indicated that the resistance of Salmonella stains from pig toβ-lactams antimicrobial agents were widespread,and ceftazidime was particularly serious. The TEM,OXA and CTX-M genes were mainly carriedβ-lactams resistant genes in Salmonella isolates from Guizhou province.It had a great relationship between the prevalence of resistance genes and growth of antimicrobial resistance.%为了解贵州省猪源沙门氏菌对β-内酰胺类抗菌药物耐药性及其耐药基因的流行情况,本试验从贵州省9个地区规模养猪场中分离鉴定130株沙门氏菌,采用微量肉汤稀释法测定其对常用的8种β-内酰胺类抗菌药物的敏感性,并用PCR法对β-内酰胺酶耐药基因进行检测。结果显示,沙门氏菌对常

  13. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) produced a nine-minute animation explaining how ... and distributed as long as FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine is cited as the corporate author. Animation Animation ...

  14. Staphylococcus aureus resistance to topical antimicrobials in atopic dermatitis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessa, Giancarlo Rezende; Quinto, Vanessa Petry; Machado, Daiane Corrêa; Lipnharski, Caroline; Weber, Magda Blessmann; Bonamigo, Renan Rangel; D'Azevedo, Pedro Alves

    2016-01-01

    Background Topical antimicrobial drugs are indicated for limited superficial pyodermitis treatment, although they are largely used as self-prescribed medication for a variety of inflammatory dermatoses, including atopic dermatitis. Monitoring bacterial susceptibility to these drugs is difficult, given the paucity of laboratory standardization. Objective To evaluate the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus topical antimicrobial drug resistance in atopic dermatitis patients. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of children and adults diagnosed with atopic dermatitis and S. aureus colonization. We used miscellaneous literature reported breakpoints to define S. aureus resistance to mupirocin, fusidic acid, gentamicin, neomycin and bacitracin. Results A total of 91 patients were included and 100 S. aureus isolates were analyzed. All strains were methicillin-susceptible S. aureus. We found a low prevalence of mupirocin and fusidic acid resistance (1.1% and 5.9%, respectively), but high levels of neomycin and bacitracin resistance (42.6% and 100%, respectively). Fusidic acid resistance was associated with more severe atopic dermatitis, demonstrated by higher EASI scores (median 17.8 vs 5.7, p=.009). Our results also corroborate the literature on the absence of cross-resistance between the aminoglycosides neomycin and gentamicin. Conclusions Our data, in a southern Brazilian sample of AD patients, revealed a low prevalence of mupirocin and fusidic acid resistance of S. aureus atopic eczema colonizer strains. However, for neomycin and bacitracin, which are commonly used topical antimicrobial drugs in Brazil, high levels of resistance were identified. Further restrictions on the use of these antimicrobials seem necessary to keep resistance as low as possible. PMID:27828633

  15. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Evaluation of Some New Fluoro Formazans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Taterao Shinde

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A series of fluoro substituted formazan derivatives has been synthesized from the salt of diazonium chloride & fluoro schiff base in pyridine. The structure of newly synthesized formazans were established based on IR, 1H NMR and mass spectral data. All the synthesized compounds were screened for their antimicrobial activity. Some of the compounds showed very good activity compared to standard drugs against all pathogenic bacteria and fungi.

  16. Synthetic RNA silencing in bacteria - antimicrobial discovery and resistance breaking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E.M. Stach

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasing incidence and prevalence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria threatens the antibiotic miracle. Conventional antimicrobial drug development has failed to replace the armamentarium needed to combat this problem, and novel solutions are urgently required. Here we review both natural and synthetic RNA silencing and its potential to provide new antibacterials through improved target selection, evaluation and screening. Furthermore, we focus on synthetic RNA silencers as a novel class of antibacterials and review their unique properties.

  17. Antimicrobial constituents of Foeniculum vulgare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yong Soo; Choi, Won Gyu; Kim, Won Jun; Kim, Woo Kyung; Kim, Myong Jo; Kang, Won Hee; Kim, Chang Min

    2002-04-01

    A phenyl propanoid derivative, dillapional(1) was found to be a antimicrobial principle of the stems of Foeniculum vulgare (Umbelliferae) with MIC values of 125, 250 and 125/ against Bacillus subtilis, Aspergillus niger and Cladosporium cladosporioides, respectively. A coumarin derivative, scopoletin(2) was also isolated as marginally antimicrobial agent along with inactive compounds, dillapiol(3), bergapten(4), imperatorin(5) and psolaren(6) from this plant. The isolates 1-6 were not active against the Escherichia coli.

  18. Antimicrobials for bacterial bioterrorism agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Atkins, Helen S

    2011-06-01

    The limitations of current antimicrobials for highly virulent pathogens considered as potential bioterrorism agents drives the requirement for new antimicrobials that are suitable for use in populations in the event of a deliberate release. Strategies targeting bacterial virulence offer the potential for new countermeasures to combat bacterial bioterrorism agents, including those active against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Although early in the development of antivirulence approaches, inhibitors of bacterial type III secretion systems and cell division mechanisms show promise for the future.

  19. Distinct Profiling of Antimicrobial Peptide Families

    KAUST Repository

    Khamis, Abdullah M.

    2014-11-10

    Motivation: The increased prevalence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) pathogens heightens the need to design new antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) exhibit broad-spectrum potent activity against MDR pathogens and kills rapidly, thus giving rise to AMPs being recognized as a potential substitute for conventional antibiotics. Designing new AMPs using current in-silico approaches is, however, challenging due to the absence of suitable models, large number of design parameters, testing cycles, production time and cost. To date, AMPs have merely been categorized into families according to their primary sequences, structures and functions. The ability to computationally determine the properties that discriminate AMP families from each other could help in exploring the key characteristics of these families and facilitate the in-silico design of synthetic AMPs. Results: Here we studied 14 AMP families and sub-families. We selected a specific description of AMP amino acid sequence and identified compositional and physicochemical properties of amino acids that accurately distinguish each AMP family from all other AMPs with an average sensitivity, specificity and precision of 92.88%, 99.86% and 95.96%, respectively. Many of our identified discriminative properties have been shown to be compositional or functional characteristics of the corresponding AMP family in literature. We suggest that these properties could serve as guides for in-silico methods in design of novel synthetic AMPs. The methodology we developed is generic and has a potential to be applied for characterization of any protein family.

  20. Medicamentos utilizados em transplante de medula óssea: um estudo sobre combinações dos antimicrobianos potencialmente interativos Medicamentos utilizados en casos de trasplante de médula ósea: un estudio sobre combinaciones antimicrobianas potencialmente interactivas Drugs used in bone marrow transplantation: a study about combinations of antimicrobial potentially interactives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosimeire Barbosa Fonseca

    2008-12-01

    ón de medicamentos potencialmente interactivos fue frecuente en estos pacientes, condición que asociada a la polifarmacia y a la distribución simultánea de horarios en su administración podría predisponer al paciente a efectos adversos, afectando la seguridad en el tratamiento.The study aimed at characterizing the profile of the drugs and identify combinations between potentially interactive anti-microbial drugs used in patients who underwent bone marrow transplantation (BMT. The analysis covered 70 prescription medications for BMT patients hospitalized at Instituto do Coração, São Paulo, Brazil. Medications were classified according to the Alpha system, listing their interactive potential and pharmacological characteristics according to literature. Data were analyzed through descriptive statistics. Results showed that 72.7% of drugs presented an interactive potential, with precipitators (79.2% and fluconazole (85.7%, high-lighted as the most involved anti-microbial in the combinations, associated to omeprazole in 40% of the samples. BMT patients were frequently administered combinations of potentially interactive drugs. This condition, when associated with simultaneous schedules, could predispose patients to undesirable events, thus affecting the security of the therapy.

  1. The difficulties of polytherapy: examples from antimicrobial chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzei, Teresita

    2011-10-01

    Medical therapy in patients with more than one pathology means using more pharmaceuticals, which results in a higher risk of drug interactions which are modifications in the action of one drug when it is administered in the presence of another. The consequences can be diminished therapeutic effect or increased adverse reactions. The pharmacological interactions can be either physico-chemical, pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic, on the basis of their mechanisms. Pharmacokinetic interactions are the most important and can emerge during various phases of absorption, distribution, metabolism and drug elimination. The absorption of many antimicrobial agents can be modified through various mechanisms. Some drugs (for example the anticholinergics and opiates) or food can slow gastric motility, slowing the absorption and reducing maximum concentrations of the antibiotic. Variations in gastric pH can alter the solubility or chemical stability of molecules such as the beta-lactams, the natural macrolides and some azoles. The bioavailability of these drugs can be reduced due to molecules used to raise gastric pH. Antibiotics such as tetracycline or the fluoroquinolones have reduced bioavailability due to chelation from bi- and trivalent cations. The primary number of clinically relevant pharmacological interactions is correlated with modifications of biotransformation of drugs due to Cytochrome P450 (CYP) hepatic enzymes which are involved in oxidative drug processes, including lipophilic antimicrobial drugs such as the macrolides, the fluoroquinolones (to be considered amphoteric) and the antifungal azole derivatives. CYP3A is probably one of the most important isoenzymes since it contributes to at least the partial transformation of 60% of drugs that undergo oxidation: erythromycin and clarithromycin are CYP3A4 substrates. Many isoenzymes can also be inhibited by antimicrobial drugs, including both antibacterials and antifungals (for example the macrolides, fluoroquinolones

  2. Antimicrobial resistance trends among Escherichia coli isolates obtained from dairy cattle in the northeastern United States, 2004-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Kevin J; Aprea, Victor A; Altier, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring antimicrobial resistance trends among bacteria isolated from food animals and people is necessary to inform risk analyses and guide public policy regarding antimicrobial use. Our objectives were to describe the antimicrobial resistance status of Escherichia coli isolates from dairy cattle in the northeastern United States and to identify trends in resistance to selected antimicrobial agents over time. We collected data retrospectively for all bovine E. coli isolates that were obtained from samples submitted to Cornell University's Animal Health Diagnostic Center between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2011. We investigated temporal trends in the prevalence of resistant E. coli for each antimicrobial agent using the Cochran-Armitage trend test. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on 3373 bovine E. coli isolates from clinical samples submitted during the study period. Overall resistance to each antimicrobial agent ranged from 2.7% (enrofloxacin) to 91.3% (oxytetracycline). There was evidence of a significantly decreasing trend in prevalence of resistance to several agents: chlortetracycline, florfenicol, neomycin, oxytetracycline, spectinomycin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. However, a significantly increasing trend in prevalence of resistance to enrofloxacin was also evident. These results do not support the idea that current antimicrobial use practices on dairy operations are driving a general increase in the emergence and dissemination of drug-resistant E. coli in the region served by the laboratory. However, resistance to some drugs remained consistently high during the study period, and increasing resistance to enrofloxacin is a key area of concern.

  3. Towards the establishment and standardization of a veterinary antimicrobial resistance surveillance and monitoring programme in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nel

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to establish a repeatable, standardized laboratory procedure for monitoring the development of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria isolated from animals and food of animal origin in South Africa, with reagents prepared in-house. The emergence of resistance and the spread of resistant bacteria can be limited by implementing a veterinary antimicrobial drug policy, in which inter alia systematic monitoring and prudent use play essential roles. The bacteria included in this study represented three different categories, namely zoonotic bacteria (Salmonella, indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium and veterinary pathogens (Mannheimia haemolytica. Thirty isolates of each species were collected with the aim of standardizing the laboratory methodology for a future national veterinary surveillance and monitoring programme. Susceptibility to ten selected antimicrobial drugs was determined by means of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs using the microdilution method. The method according to the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards was used as the standard. Multi-well plates containing varying dilutions of antimicrobial drugs and prepared in-house for MIC determinations, yielded repeatable results. Storage of plates for 2 months at -70 oC did not influence results meaningfully. Within this limited sample of bacteria, MIC results did not indicate meaningful resistance against any of the ten selected antimicrobial drugs. The findings of the study will be used to establish a national veterinary antimicrobial resistance surveillance and monitoring programme in South Africa. To allow for international comparison of data, harmonisation of the surveillance and monitoring programme in accordance with global trends is encouraged. Ideally it should be combined with a programme monitoring the quantities of antimicrobial drugs used. The aim is to contribute to slowing down

  4. Editorial of the Special Issue Antimicrobial Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iolanda Francolini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The special issue “Antimicrobial Polymers” includes research and review papers concerning the recent advances on preparation of antimicrobial polymers and their relevance to industrial settings and biomedical field. Antimicrobial polymers have recently emerged as promising candidates to fight microbial contamination onto surfaces thanks to their interesting properties. In this special issue, the main strategies pursued for developing antimicrobial polymers, including polymer impregnation with antimicrobial agents or synthesis of polymers bearing antimicrobial moieties, were discussed. The future application of these polymers either in industrial or healthcare settings could result in an extremely positive impact not only at the economic level but also for the improvement of quality of life.

  5. Peptides with Dual Antimicrobial and Anticancer Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felício, Mário R.; Silva, Osmar N.; Gonçalves, Sônia; Santos, Nuno C.; Franco, Octávio L.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the number of people suffering from cancer and multi-resistant infections has increased, such that both diseases are already seen as current and future major causes of death. Moreover, chronic infections are one of the main causes of cancer, due to the instability in the immune system that allows cancer cells to proliferate. Likewise, the physical debility associated with cancer or with anticancer therapy itself often paves the way for opportunistic infections. It is urgent to develop new therapeutic methods, with higher efficiency and lower side effects. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found in the innate immune system of a wide range of organisms. Identified as the most promising alternative to conventional molecules used nowadays against infections, some of them have been shown to have dual activity, both as antimicrobial and anticancer peptides (ACPs). Highly cationic and amphipathic, they have demonstrated efficacy against both conditions, with the number of nature-driven or synthetically designed peptides increasing year by year. With similar properties, AMPs that can also act as ACPs are viewed as future chemotherapeutic drugs, with the advantage of low propensity to resistance, which started this paradigm in the pharmaceutical market. These peptides have already been described as molecules presenting killing mechanisms at the membrane level, but also acting toward intracellular targets, which increases their success compartively to one-target specific drugs. This review will approach the desirable characteristics of small peptides that demonstrated dual activity against microbial infections and cancer, as well as the peptides engaged in clinical trials. PMID:28271058

  6. Antimicrobial resistance in bacteria from horses: Epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, T W; Clegg, P D; Williams, N J; Pinchbeck, G L

    2015-11-01

    Antimicrobial resistance poses a significant threat to the continued successful use of antimicrobial agents for the treatment of bacterial infections. While the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria from man has been studied extensively, less work has been undertaken in companion animals, particularly horses. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has been identified as a cause of infections, with a low prevalence of nasal carriage by horses in the community but higher for hospitalised horses. Molecular characterisation has shown methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains either to be predominantly of types associated with horses or of sequence type ST398. Antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli (including multidrug-resistant and extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing isolates) have caused infections and been documented in faecal carriage by horses, with many significant resistance mechanisms identified. More sporadic reports and molecular characterisation exist for resistance in other bacteria such as enterococci, Salmonella, Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas species. Limited work has been undertaken evaluating risk factors and much of the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria from horses remains to be determined.

  7. Antimicrobial activity of flavonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushnie, T P Tim; Lamb, Andrew J

    2005-11-01

    Flavonoids are ubiquitous in photosynthesising cells and are commonly found in fruit, vegetables, nuts, seeds, stems, flowers, tea, wine, propolis and honey. For centuries, preparations containing these compounds as the principal physiologically active constituents have been used to treat human diseases. Increasingly, this class of natural products is becoming the subject of anti-infective research, and many groups have isolated and identified the structures of flavonoids possessing antifungal, antiviral and antibacterial activity. Moreover, several groups have demonstrated synergy between active flavonoids as well as between flavonoids and existing chemotherapeutics. Reports of activity in the field of antibacterial flavonoid research are widely conflicting, probably owing to inter- and intra-assay variation in susceptibility testing. However, several high-quality investigations have examined the relationship between flavonoid structure and antibacterial activity and these are in close agreement. In addition, numerous research groups have sought to elucidate the antibacterial mechanisms of action of selected flavonoids. The activity of quercetin, for example, has been at least partially attributed to inhibition of DNA gyrase. It has also been proposed that sophoraflavone G and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate inhibit cytoplasmic membrane function, and that licochalcones A and C inhibit energy metabolism. Other flavonoids whose mechanisms of action have been investigated include robinetin, myricetin, apigenin, rutin, galangin, 2,4,2'-trihydroxy-5'-methylchalcone and lonchocarpol A. These compounds represent novel leads, and future studies may allow the development of a pharmacologically acceptable antimicrobial agent or class of agents.

  8. Antimicrobial peptides in crustaceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RD Rosa

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Crustaceans are a large and diverse invertebrate animal group that mounts a complex and efficient innate immune response against a variety of microorganisms. The crustacean immune system is primarily related to cellular responses and the production and release of important immune effectors into the hemolymph. Antimicrobial proteins and/or peptides (AMPs are key components of innate immunity and are widespread in nature, from bacteria to vertebrate animals. In crustaceans, 15 distinct AMP families are currently recognized, although the great majority (14 families comes from members of the order Decapoda. Crustacean AMPs are generally cationic, gene-encoded molecules that are mainly produced by circulating immune-competent cells (hemocytes or are derived from unrelated proteins primarily involved in other biological functions. In this review, we tentatively classified the crustacean AMPs into four main groups based on their amino acid composition, structural features and multi-functionality. We also attempted to summarize the current knowledge on their implication both in an efficient response to microbial infections and in crustacean survival.

  9. Antimicrobial peptides in annelids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Tasiemski

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene encoded antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are widely distributed among living organisms including plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. They constitute important effectors of the innate immune response by exerting multiple roles as mediators of inflammation with impact on epithelial and inflammatory cells influencing diverse processes such as cytokine release, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, wound healing, chemotaxis and immune induction. In invertebrates, most of the data describe the characterization and/or the function of AMPs in the numerically and economically most representative group which are arthropods. Annelids are among the first coelomates and are therefore of special phylogenetic interest. Compared to other invertebrate groups, data on annelid’s immunity reveal heavier emphasis on the cellular than on the humoral response suggesting that immune defense of annelids seems to be principally developed as cellular immunity.This paper gives an overview of the variety of AMPs identified in the three classes of annelids, i.e. polychaetes, oligochaetes and achaetes. Their functions, when they have been studied, in the humoral or cellular response of annelids are also mentioned.

  10. Evaluation of antimicrobial consumption in Campania Region, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Cammarota

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the antibiotic usage in Italy is above the European average. From several years the Campania was the first Italian region in terms of antimicrobial consumption. Aim: to evaluate antibiotic utilisation in primary health care in Campania, a region of approximately 5.7 million inhabitants in the south of Italy. Method: we collected, from an electronic database, all prescription drugs reimbursed in 2005. The cohort was defined as the population of subjects receiving at least one prescription of any antimicrobial agent for systemic use, classified according to their therapeutic role using Anatomic Therapeutic Chemical (ATC classification. Drugs cost and consumption were quantified using National Health Service (NHS prospective and Defined Daily Dose system (DDD respectively. All costs were expressed in Euro 2005. Results: antiinfectives agents (ATC J was the second class of drugs in terms of cost, representing 16.1% of the regional drug expenditure. Their consumption were 33 DDD/1000 inhabitants/day. Stratifying by age antibiotic use was highest in children and elderly subjects. Penicillins, macrolides and cephalosporins were the most prescribed antibiotic classes in all age groups. Discussion: despite guidelines introduced to limit the prescription of parenteral antibiotics to the patients who are most likely to benefit from it, they were mostly prescribed. This represented a serious problem for the development of drug-resistant bacteria.

  11. Drug interactions of anti-microbial agents used in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation Interacciones medicamentosas de antimicrobianos utilizados en trasplante de células madre hematopoyéticas Interações medicamentosas de antimicrobianos utilizados em transplante de células-tronco hematopoéticas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosimeire Barbosa Fonseca Guastaldi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed potential drug interactions (PDIs of antimicrobials used in patients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and identified associated factors. The sample consisted of 70 patients admitted to a hospital in São Paulo. The PDIs were analyzed through the consultation of the Drug Interactions Facts and Drug Interactions Handbook. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used. Half of the sample was exposed to 13 PDIs, which occurred with fluconazole (53.8%, ciprofloxacin (30.8% and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (15.4%. Most (92.3% were of moderate severity, with good evidence (61.6%, early delayed effect (61.5% and need to have their therapy monitored (76.9%. Patients with four or more medications (pEl estudio analizó interacciones medicamentosas potenciales (IMP de antimicrobianos usados en pacientes sometidos a trasplante de células madre hematopoyéticas e identificó los factores asociados las IMP. La casuística fue compuesta por 70 pacientes internados en un Hospital de Sao Paulo. Las IMP fueron a través de la consulta al Drug Interactions Facts y Drug Interactions Handbook. En el análisis de los datos se utilizó estadística descriptiva y regresión logística. Mitad de la muestra fue expuesta a 13 IMP, que ocurrieron con fluconazol (53,8%, ciprofloxacina (30,8% y sulfametoxazol+trimetoprima (15,4%. La mayoría (92,3% presentó gravedad moderada, inicio de efecto demorado (61,5% y necesidad de monitorizar la terapia (76,9%. Cuatro o más medicamentos (pNeste estudo, analisaram-se as interações medicamentosas potenciais (IMP de antimicrobianos, usados em pacientes submetidos a transplante de células-tronco hematopoiéticas e foram identificdos os fatores associados às IMPs. A casuística foi composta por 70 pacientes internados em hospital do município de São Paulo. As IMPs foram analisadas através da consulta ao Drug Interactions Facts e Drug Interactions Handbook. Na análise dos dados, utilizou

  12. Nontyphoid salmonella infection: microbiology, clinical features, and antimicrobial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hung-Ming; Wang, Yue; Su, Lin-Hui; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2013-06-01

    Nontyphoid Salmonella is the most common bacterial pathogen causing gastrointestinal infection worldwide. Most nontyphoid Salmonella infection is limited to uncomplicated gastroenteritis that seldom requires antimicrobial treatment. Nevertheless, invasive infections, such as bacteremia, osteomyelitis, and meningitis, may occur and require antimicrobial therapy. Continuous genetic and genomic evolution in Salmonella leading to increased virulence and resistance to multiple drugs are of significant public health concern. Two major changes in the epidemiology of nontyphoid salmonellosis in Europe and in the USA occurred in the second half of the 20(th) century: the emergence of foodborne human infections caused by Salmonella enterica serotype Enteriditis and by multidrug-resistant strains of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium. In the 21(st) century, a worsening situation is the increasing resistance to fluoroquinolones and third-generation cephalosporins in nontyphoid Salmonella. Clinical isolates showing carbapenem resistance also have been identified. Although antimicrobial therapy is usually not indicated for uncomplicated Salmonella gastroenteritis, recent studies indicated that a short-course ceftriaxone therapy (3-5 days) for patients with severe gastroenteritis would lead to a faster clinical recovery. Continuous surveillance of Salmonella in both humans and animals is mandatory. A better understanding of the mechanisms that lead to the emergence of antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella may help in the devising of better interventional strategies to reduce the spread of resistant Salmonella between humans and reservoirs along the food chain.

  13. Antimicrobial activity of carvacrol: current progress and future prospectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nostro, Antonia; Papalia, Teresa

    2012-04-01

    During the last few years the scientific community has shown a considerable interest in the study of plant materials as sources of new compounds to be processed into antimicrobial agents. In this context, carvacrol, a monoterpenic phenol, has emerged for its wide spectrum activity extended to food spoilage or pathogenic fungi, yeast and bacteria as well as human, animal and plant pathogenic microorganisms including drug-resistant and biofilm forming microorganisms. The antibacterial activity of carvacrol has been attributed to its considerable effects on the structural and functional properties of cytoplasmatic membrane. The data reported in this review provide an overview of the published literature regarding the antimicrobial properties of carvacrol and the recent patents claimed in order to highlight its future applications as a new antimicrobial agent. These could concern either the natural preservation in the cosmetic and food industries or an alternative which supports the conventional antimicrobial protocols. Interestingly, carvacrol alone or associated with one or more synergistic products could be incorporated in different formulations for biomedical and food packaging applications. However, more detailed safety investigations and in vivo studies should be carried out so that this molecule could be used in the future.

  14. The antimicrobial activity of liposomal lauric acids against Propionibacterium acnes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Darren; Pornpattananangkul, Dissaya; Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Chan, Michael; Carson, Dennis; Huang, Chun-Ming; Zhang, Liangfang

    2009-10-01

    This study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of lauric acid (LA) and its liposomal derivatives against Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), the bacterium that promotes inflammatory acne. First, the antimicrobial study of three free fatty acids (lauric acid, palmitic acid and oleic acid) demonstrated that LA gives the strongest bactericidal activity against P. acnes. However, a setback of using LA as a potential treatment for inflammatory acne is its poor water solubility. Then the LA was incorporated into a liposome formulation to aid its delivery to P. acnes. It was demonstrated that the antimicrobial activity of LA was not only well maintained in its liposomal derivatives but also enhanced at low LA concentration. In addition, the antimicrobial activity of LA-loaded liposomes (LipoLA) mainly depended on the LA loading concentration per single liposomes. Further study found that the LipoLA could fuse with the membranes of P. acnes and release the carried LA directly into the bacterial membranes, thereby killing the bacteria effectively. Since LA is a natural compound that is the main acid in coconut oil and also resides in human breast milk and liposomes have been successfully and widely applied as a drug delivery vehicle in the clinic, the LipoLA developed in this work holds great potential of becoming an innate, safe and effective therapeutic medication for acne vulgaris and other P. acnes associated diseases.

  15. Enhancing US-Japan cooperation to combat antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbin, C Sachi

    2014-01-01

    The Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) is aimed at preventing, detecting, and responding to infectious disease threats. To move toward these goals, the United States has committed to partner with at least 30 countries around the world. One of the objectives of the GHSA includes "[p]reventing the emergence and spread of antimicrobial drug resistant organisms." Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has become a growing global health security problem, with inappropriate use of antimicrobial medications in humans and animals and a lack of new antimicrobial medications contributing to this problem. While AMR is a growing global concern, working on it regionally can make this multifaceted problem more manageable. The United States and Japan, both world leaders in the life sciences, are close allies that have established cooperative programs in medical research and global health that can be used to work on combating AMR and advance the GHSA. Although the United States and Japan have cooperated on health issues in the past, their cooperation on the growing problem of AMR has been limited. Their existing networks, cooperative programs, and close relationships can and should be used to work on combating this expanding problem.

  16. Antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter: prevalence and trends in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igimi, S; Okada, Y; Ishiwa, A; Yamasaki, M; Morisaki, N; Kubo, Y; Asakura, H; Yamamoto, S

    2008-09-01

    Campylobacter is one of the most frequently diagnosed bacterial causes of human gastroenteritis in Japan and throughout the world. Resistance to quinolones in Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli isolated from humans has emerged in many countries during the past 15 years because fluoroquinolones are the drug of choice for the treatment of suspected bacterial gastroenteritis. Food contaminated with Campylobacter is the usual source of human infection; therefore, the presence of antimicrobial resistance strains in the food chain has raised concerns that the treatment of human infections will be compromised. The use of antimicrobial agents for food animals and in veterinary medicine is suspected to be correlated with an increase in quinolone-resistant strains of Campylobacter in food animals, especially in poultry products. In contrast to macrolide resistance in C. jejuni and C. coli isolated from humans showing a stable low rate, resistant Campylobacter spp. to quinolones have emerged in Japan. The paper summarizes food-borne Campylobacter infection in Japan, and the prevalence and trends of antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter from the authors' data and other Japanese papers which reported the antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter.

  17. Mechanistic Basis of Antimicrobial Action of Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tikam Chand Dakal

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance of the pathogenic microorganisms to the antimicrobial drugs has become a major impediment toward successful diagnosis and management of infectious diseases. Recent advancements in nanotechnology-based medicines have opened new horizons for combating multidrug resistance in microorganisms. In particular, the use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs as a potent antibacterial agent has received much attention. The most critical physico-chemical parameters that affect the antimicrobial potential of AgNPs include size, shape, surface charge, concentration and colloidal state. AgNPs exhibits their antimicrobial potential through multifaceted mechanisms. AgNPs adhesion to microbial cells, penetration inside the cells, ROS and free radical generation, and modulation of microbial signal transduction pathways have been recognized as the most prominent modes of antimicrobial action. On the other side, AgNPs exposure to human cells induces cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and inflammatory response in human cells in a cell-type dependent manner. This has raised concerns regarding use of AgNPs in therapeutics and drug delivery. We have summarized the emerging endeavors that address current challenges in relation to safe use of AgNPs in therapeutics and drug delivery platforms. Based on research done so far, we believe that AgNPs can be engineered so as to increase their efficacy, stability, specificity, biosafety and biocompatibility. In this regard, three perspectives research directions have been suggested that include 1 synthesizing AgNPs with controlled physico-chemical properties, 2 examining microbial development of resistance towards AgNPs, and 3 ascertaining the susceptibility of cytoxicity, genotoxicity, and inflammatory response to human cells upon AgNPs exposure.

  18. Survey of metals on antimicrobial and deodorant agents in household Necessities; Mukikei kokinsei kakoseihin no shiyojittai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, Teruo

    1999-11-01

    It measured the metal bearing quantity in household necessities in order to clarify use actual condition of the metal system drug. And, it tried the detection of the drug used from detected metal. Too there is the report until now in the investigation of the metallic element in household necessities. However, metals examined this time are silver and zinc, four of copper and aluminum that it says that it has the antimicrobial action and is Key element of inorganic system antimicrobial agent. And, it carried out the analysis by inductive coupling plasma emission analysis method, after the wet digestion of the sample was done. (NEDO)

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and drug resistance mechanisms to macrolides%肺炎支原体对抗菌药物敏感性及对大环内酯类的耐药机制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵茂茂; 宋波; 蒲增惠; 于红霞

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the prevalence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in the adults and teenagers with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) ,observe the drug susceptibility to the commonly used antibiotics ,and define the drug resistance mechanisms to the macrolides .METHODS From Oct 2010 to Mar 2012 , the throat swab specimens were collected during the acute stage to isolate and culture the M .pneumoniae .The molecular identification of the clinical isolates was performed by using polymerase-chain-reaction , the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of macrolides ,quinolones ,and tetracyclines were determined with the use of microdilution method .The 23S rRNA gene sequencing was performed for the macrolides-resistant strains and was compared with the gene sequencing of the standard strain MPFH (ATCC 15531) .RESULTS A total of 20 strains of M .pneumoniae have been isolated from the throat swab specimens obtained from the 129 CAP patients ,with the isolation rate of 15 .50% ;the strains were highly susceptible to tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones and were resistant to all the macrolides ,and both of the resistance mechanisms were the mutation of locus 2063 of 23 rRNA from A to G .CONCLUSIONS The situation of the drug resistance of M .pneumoniae to macrolides is harsh ,and the mutation of locus of the 23S rRNA is the major drug resistance mechanism .%目的:了解成人及青少年社区获得性肺炎(CAP)中肺炎支原体(MP)感染状况及其对常用抗菌药物的敏感性,明确M P对大环内酯类的耐药机制。方法2010年10月-2012年3月129例C A P患者取急性期咽拭子标本进行肺炎支原体分离培养,应用聚合酶链反应(PC R )对临床分离株进行分子鉴定;采用微量稀释法测定肺炎支原体对大环内酯类、喹诺酮类及四环素类抗菌药物的最低抑菌浓度(M IC );对大环内酯类耐药株进行23S rRNA 基因测序,并与标准菌株MPFH (ATCC 15531)基

  20. Deep Subseafloor Fungi as an Untapped Reservoir of Amphipathic Antimicrobial Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarri, Marion; Jégou, Camille; Meslet-Cladière, Laurence; Brillet, Benjamin; Barbier, Georges; Burgaud, Gaëtan; Fleury, Yannick

    2016-03-10

    The evolving global threat of antimicrobial resistance requires a deep renewal of the antibiotic arsenal including the isolation and characterization of new drugs. Underexplored marine ecosystems may represent an untapped reservoir of novel bioactive molecules. Deep-sea fungi isolated from a record-depth sediment core of almost 2000 m below the seafloor were investigated for antimicrobial activities. This antimicrobial screening, using 16 microbial targets, revealed 33% of filamentous fungi synthesizing bioactive compounds with activities against pathogenic bacteria and fungi. Interestingly, occurrence of antimicrobial producing isolates was well correlated with the complexity of the habitat (in term of microbial richness), as higher antimicrobial activities were obtained at specific layers of the sediment core. It clearly highlights complex deep-sea habitats as chemical battlefields where synthesis of numerous bioactive compounds appears critical for microbial competition. The six most promising deep subseafloor fungal isolates were selected for the production and extraction of bioactive compounds. Depending on the fungal isolates, antimicrobial compounds were only biosynthesized in semi-liquid or solid-state conditions as no antimicrobial activities were ever detected using liquid fermentation. An exception was made for one fungal isolate, and the extraction procedure designed to extract amphipathic compounds was successful and highlighted the amphiphilic profile of the bioactive metabolites.

  1. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of bacteria causing otitis externa in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamankhan Malayeri, Hamed; Jamshidi, Shahram; Zahraei Salehi, Taghi

    2010-06-01

    Bacterial agents are considered important pathogens causing external otitis in dogs. It is essential to carry out bacterial culture and antimicrobial susceptibility test in the case of otitis externa, particularly for chronic or recurring cases. Sterile swab samples were obtained from terminal part of vertical ear canals of 74 dogs with otitis externa for cytology, bacterial culture and antimicrobial susceptibility test. Cytologic smears were stained using Gram and Giemsa staining methods. Aerobic bacterial culture performed on blood agar and MacConkey agar. Among total number of 92 isolated bacteria, 68 were Staphylococcus intermedius. Other isolated bacteria included: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli, Pasteurella canis, and six other species of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus. Antimicrobial susceptibility test were performed for all isolated bacteria using 14 antibiotics. Based on the results of this study, all isolated Staphylococcus spp. were sensitive to amikacin, enrofloxacin, and rifampin, and had low resistance to gentamicin, cephalothin and ceftriaxone. More than half of gram-positive isolates were resistant to penicillin and ampicillin. Generally, all isolated gram-negative bacteria, were sensitive to amikacin and enrofloxacin, and had low resistance to ceftriaxone and gentamicin. They were highly resistant to penicillin, eythromycin, and cephalothin. Regarding the results of this study, in cases of uncomplicated otitis externa, it is possible to select antimicrobial drugs merely based on cytology, but it is recommended to perform bacterial culture and antimicrobial susceptibility test. However, in complicated or refractory cases, antimicrobials should be selected based on bacterial culture and antimicrobial susceptibility test.

  2. Development of chitosan-vancomycin antimicrobial coatings on titanium implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, T E; Cheng, X; Friedrich, C

    2011-05-01

    Techniques for titanium surface modification have been studied for applications in orthopedic implants specifically for local drug delivery. The extensive research in surface modification is driving the development of devices that integrate infection prevention, osseointegration, and functionality in a structural role. In this study, vancomycin was applied to modified titanium surfaces to determine the effect of surface morphology on drug loading and release profiles. The antimicrobial effectiveness of the released vancomycin was evaluated and found to have a similar effect as the standard vancomycin. The engineered surfaces included sandblasted, sandblasted acid etched, electrochemically etched, and sandblasted electrochemically etched. The antibiotic release was observed to be independent of the measured surface parameters of the engineered surfaces. The development of an implantable device in which the surface morphology can be tailored for an application with no effect on the total drug released would be beneficial to more precisely control the biological response while maintaining local drug delivery for infection prevention.

  3. Antimicrobial activities of squalamine mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, K; Bernard, E M; Sadownik, A; Regen, S L; Armstrong, D

    1997-07-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial properties of compounds with structural features that were designed to mimic those of squalamine, an antibiotic isolated from the stomach of the dogfish shark. The mimics, like squalamine, are sterol-polyamine conjugates. Unlike squalamine, the mimics were simple to prepare, at high yield, from readily available starting materials. Several squalamine mimics showed activity against gram-negative rods, gram-positive cocci including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, and fungi. Some had little or no hemolytic activity. The hydrophobicity of the sterol backbone and the length and the cationic charge of the side chains appeared to be critical determinants of activity. One of the squalamine mimics, SM-7, was bactericidal against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and S. aureus; its activity was decreased by divalent or monovalent cations and by bovine serum albumin. Subinhibitory concentrations of SM-7 markedly enhanced the antimicrobial activity of rifampin against gram-negative rods. These results suggest that the compounds may disrupt an outer membrane of gram-negative rods. Squalamine mimics are a new class of broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. The antagonism of their activity by serum and albumin and their hemolytic properties may limit their use as systemic agents. The squalamine mimics, because of their potencies, broad spectra of antimicrobial activity, and potential for systemic toxicity, appear to be good candidates for development as topical antimicrobial agents.

  4. Synthesis of Novel 1,2,4-Triazole Derivatives as Antimicrobial Agents via the Japp-Klingemann Reaction: Investigation of Antimicrobial Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasneem Taj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, 1,2,4-triazole appended to pyrazoline and pyrazole rings (4a–g using N-arylsydnone as synthon was prepared. The title compounds were subjected to Osiris property explorer for the oral bioavailability to analyze their drug likeness and drug score. Further, the compounds were subjected to the antimicrobial activity and analyzed the IC 50 and MIC values.

  5. A review on antimicrobial efficacy of some traditional medicinal plants in Tamilnadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HEMALATHA MUNUSWAMY

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases are one of the major problems in developing as well as developed countries. Traditional medicinal plants are widely used to treat the microbial diseases due to their rich source of antimicrobial activity and less cost. The different plant parts such as seed, fruit, root, bark, stem, leaf and even the whole plant were extracted using different solvents like ethanol, methanol, chloroform, acetone, petroleum ether, alcohol, and ethyl acetate. These extracts were tested by diffusion method against gram positive, gram negative bacteria and fungi to assess their antimicrobial activity. This review provides a lucid data of nearly 70 traditional medicinal plants with antimicrobial activity and this would open up the scope for further analysis of medicinal plant extracts to develop effective antimicrobial drugs.

  6. The Design and Construction of K11: A Novel α-Helical Antimicrobial Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Jin-Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Amphipathic α-helical antimicrobial peptides comprise a class of broad-spectrum agents that are used against pathogens. We designed a series of antimicrobial peptides, CP-P (KWKSFIKKLTSKFLHLAKKF and its derivatives, and determined their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, their minimum hemolytic concentrations (MHCs for human erythrocytes, and the Therapeutic Index (MHC/MIC ratio. We selected the derivative peptide K11, which had the highest therapeutic index (320 among the tested peptides, to determine the MICs against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and 22 clinical isolates including Acinetobacter baumannii, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Klebsiella pneumonia. K11 exhibited low MICs (less than 10 μg/mL and broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, especially against clinically isolated drug-resistant pathogens. Therefore, these results indicate that K11 is a promising candidate antimicrobial peptide for further studies.

  7. Antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella that caused foodborne disease outbreaks: United States, 2003-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A C; Grass, J E; Richardson, L C; Nisler, A L; Bicknese, A S; Gould, L H

    2017-03-01

    Although most non-typhoidal Salmonella illnesses are self-limiting, antimicrobial treatment is critical for invasive infections. To describe resistance in Salmonella that caused foodborne outbreaks in the United States, we linked outbreaks submitted to the Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System to isolate susceptibility data in the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System. Resistant outbreaks were defined as those linked to one or more isolates with resistance to at least one antimicrobial drug. Multidrug resistant (MDR) outbreaks had at least one isolate resistant to three or more antimicrobial classes. Twenty-one per cent (37/176) of linked outbreaks were resistant. In outbreaks attributed to a single food group, 73% (16/22) of resistant outbreaks and 46% (31/68) of non-resistant outbreaks were attributed to foods from land animals (P foodborne Salmonella outbreaks can help determine which foods are associated with resistant infections.

  8. The antimicrobial polymer PHMB enters cells and selectively condenses bacterial chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chindera, Kantaraja; Mahato, Manohar; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar

    2016-01-01

    To combat infection and antimicrobial resistance, it is helpful to elucidate drug mechanism(s) of action. Here we examined how the widely used antimicrobial polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) kills bacteria selectively over host cells. Contrary to the accepted model of microbial membrane disruption...... by PHMB, we observed cell entry into a range of bacterial species, and treated bacteria displayed cell division arrest and chromosome condensation, suggesting DNA binding as an alternative antimicrobial mechanism. A DNA-level mechanism was confirmed by observations that PHMB formed nanoparticles when...... to bacterial and mammalian cellular DNA and selectively binds and condenses bacterial chromosomes. Because acquired resistance to PHMB has not been reported, selective chromosome condensation provides an unanticipated paradigm for antimicrobial action that may not succumb to resistance....

  9. A review on antimicrobial efficacy of some traditional medicinal plants in Tamilnadu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MUNUSWAMY HEMALATHA; Thirunavukkarasu Thirumalai; Rajamani Saranya; Erusan Kuppan Elumalai; Ernest David

    2013-01-01

    Infectious diseases are one of the major problems in developing as well as developed countries. Traditional medicinal plants are widely used to treat the microbial diseases due to their rich source of antimicrobial activity and less cost.The different plant parts such as seed, fruit, root, bark, stem, leaf and even the whole plant were extracted using different solvents like ethanol, methanol, chloroform, acetone, petroleum ether, alcohol, and ethyl acetate.These extracts were tested by diffusion method against gram positive, gram negative bacteria and fungi to assess their antimicrobial activity.This review provides a lucid data of nearly70 traditional medicinal plants with antimicrobial activity and this would open up the scope for further analysis of medicinal plant extracts to develop effective antimicrobial drugs.

  10. Antimicrobial stewardship in small animal veterinary practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guardabassi, Luca; Prescott, John F

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasing recognition of the critical role for antimicrobial stewardship in preventing the spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria, examples of effective antimicrobial stewardship programs are rare in small animal veterinary practice. This article highlights the basic requirements...

  11. 某院2009年至2011年抗菌药物的利用分析%Antimicrobial Drug Utilization Analysis in A Hspital from 2009 to 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王亚峰; 马全明

    2013-01-01

    目的:了解我院抗菌药物应用情况及趋势。方法统计、分析2009~2011年各类抗菌药物销售金额、用药频度(DDDS)。结果抗菌药物销售金额在逐年增加,但抗菌药物销售金额占药品总销售金额的比例在2011年大幅下降;头孢菌素类销售金额均占抗菌药物销售金额的55%以上,头孢菌素类及青霉类的DDDS排序一直居前三位。结论我院使用最多的抗菌药物是头孢菌素类、青霉素类、碳青霉烯和其他β-内酰胺类,不合理使用抗菌药物的现象正在改观,需进一步加强抗菌药物临床应用管理,促进合理使用。%Objective To understand the application and trend of the antibacterials in our hospital. Methods To gather statistics and analyze the amount of sales and the frequence of drug use (DDDS) of all kinds of the antibacterials from 2009 to 2011. Results The amount of sales of the antibacterials have increased year by year, but the proportion in the total amount of sales of drugs declined sharply in 2011. The amount of sales of the cephalosporines accounted for more than 50%of the amount of sales of the antibacterials. The DDDS of the cephalosporines and the penicillines have been in the top three. Conclusion The cephalosporines, the penicillines, the carbapenems and otherβ-Lactams were used at most in our hospital, and the unreasonable application has been changed. The management of the clinical application of the antibacterials needs further strengthening to promote the rational use.

  12. Susceptibility profiles of Nocardia spp. to antimicrobial and antituberculotic agents detected by a microplate Alamar Blue assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pan; Zhang, Xiujuan; Du, Pengcheng; Li, Guilian; Li, Luxi; Li, Zhenjun

    2017-01-01

    Nocardia species are ubiquitous in natural environments and can cause nocardiosis. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole has long been the monotherapy treatment of choice, but resistance to this treatment has recently emerged. In this study, we used microplate Alamar Blue assays to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of 65 standard Nocardia isolates, including 28 type strains and 20 clinical Nocardia isolates, to 32 antimicrobial agents, including 13 little studied drugs. Susceptibility to the most commonly used drug, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, was observed in 98% of the isolates. Linezolid, meropenem, and amikacin were also highly effective, with 98%, 95%, and 90% susceptibility, respectively, among the isolates. The isolates showed a high percentage of resistance or nonsusceptibility to isoniazid, rifampicin, and ethambutol. For the remaining antimicrobials, resistance was species-specific among isolates and was observed in traditional drug pattern types. In addition, the antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of a variety of rarely encountered standard Nocardia species are reported, as are the results for rarely reported clinical antibiotics. We also provide a timely update of antimicrobial susceptibility patterns that includes three new drug pattern types. The data from this study provide information on antimicrobial activity against specific Nocardia species and yield important clues for the optimization of species-specific Nocardia therapies. PMID:28252662

  13. Comparative study on susceptibility of physical antimicrobial film and common antibiotics against drug-resistant strains isolated from diabetic foot%物理抗微生物膜与常用抗菌药物对糖尿病足耐药菌株药敏情况的比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅清华; 范翠琼; 杨茵; 李明友; 林茂锐

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study susceptibility of innovative physical method against resistant strains isolated from clinical diabetic foot.Methods Pathogens from 168 cases of patients with diabetic foot infections were isolated and cultured,minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) dilution method was adopted for susceptibility test to compare drug resistance of Physical Antimicrobial Film and common antibiotics.Results 63 strains were cultured and isolated from affected parts of diabetic foot patients.According to ratio,the strains from the maximum to minimum were:Staphylococcus aureus,Pseudomonas aeruginosa,Enterobacter aerogenes,Enterobacter cloacae,Acinetobacter,Staphylococcus epidermidis.The drug-resistant rates of Staphylococcus aureus to penicillin,levofloxacin,ampicillin,oxacillin,piperacillin,gentamicin,cefazolin,ceftazidime were 23.5% to 100%; those of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to eight antibiotics were 23.5% to 97.8%;those of Enterobacter aerogenes to eight antibiotics were 7.5% to 75.3%; those of Enterobacter cloacae to eight antibiotics were 30.5% to 94.6%; those of Acinetobacter to eight antibiotics were 21.6% to 94.6%;those of Staphylococcus epidermidis to eight antibiotics were 5.6% to 83.8%.The drug-resistant rates of the above six isolated strains to Physical Antimicrobial Film JUC Spray Dressing were 0.Conclusion Physical Antimicrobial Film has the characteristics of broad-spectrum antimicrobe,with high sensitive rates to a variety of bacteria.It provides a new effective anti-infective physics (not chemical or biological) method and can avoid drug resistance for the clinical treatment of diabetic foot.%目的 研究创新物理抗微生物膜对临床糖尿病足耐药菌株的药敏情况.方法 对168例糖尿病足感染患者行病原菌分离培养,以最低抑菌浓度(MIC)稀释法进行药敏试验,比较常用抗菌药物及物理抗微生物膜的耐药情况.结果 分离出的63株菌株按构成比例由多到少依次为:金

  14. Antimicrobial resistance in India: A review

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is an important concern for the public health authorities at global level. However, in developing countries like India, recent hospital and some community based data showed increase in burden of antimicrobial resistance. Research related to antimicrobial use, determinants and development of antimicrobial resistance, regional variation and interventional strategies according to the existing health care situation in each country is a big challenge. This paper discusses ...

  15. Application of whonet for the surveillance of antimicrobial resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma A

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available World over antimicrobial resistance is a major public health problem. The WHONET software program puts each laboratory data into a common code and file format, which can be merged for national or global collaboration of antimicrobial resistance surveillance. In this study, antimicrobial sensitivity of 4,289 bacterial isolates was studied by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. -lactamase production was assessed by iodometric test method. Extended spectrum -lactamase (ESBLs were screened by ceftazidime disk sensitivity. Drug resistance was high in most of the isolates. It was maximum (80-94% for ampicillin, nalidixic acid and cotrimoxazole. It varied between 40-60% for gentamicin, clindamycin, fluoroquinolones and coamoxyclav. It ranged from 21 to 38% for amikacin and third generation cephalosporins. Constitutive -lactamase production was highest in S.aureus (28.9% and ESBL production was maximum in Klebsiella spp. (53.6%. WHONET software has in-built analysis program which helps in forming hospital drug policy, identification of hospital outbreaks and recognition of quality control problems in the laboratory.

  16. Antimicrobial susceptibility of staphylococci isolated from otitis externa in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilenbaum, W; Veras, M; Blum, E; Souza, G N

    2000-07-01

    Samples were obtained from 65 unmedicated adult dogs, processed for isolation of Staphylococcus species and tested for susceptibility to penicillin G, gentamicin, oxacillin, tetracycline, trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole, streptomycin, ampicillin and rifampin. Forty-four isolates were obtained, which represents 67.7% of samples. Coagulase-negative species were most commonly found, and the most frequently isolated staphylococcus species were Staph. epidermidis and Staph. aureus. Other species, such as Staph. simulans, Staph. haemolyticus, Staph. saprophyticus and Staph. intermedius were also isolated. Resistance to antibiotics was frequently observed, with 90.9% of the isolates showing resistance to at least one drug. The most active antimicrobial agents against staphylococci isolated from otitis externa of dogs were rifampin and oxacillin. Multidrug resistance was a common finding, and one strain of Staph. haemolyticus species, was resistant to all tested antimicrobial agents. Resistance to three or more different drugs was a common finding, observed in 16 strains (36.4%) of both coagulase-positive and coagulase-negative staphylococci. This study highlights the emergence of cases of otitis externa determined by coagulase-negative staphylococcus strains and once more emphasizes the need for bacterial culture with species identification and susceptibility testing of swab specimens from the ear canal in order to choose appropriate antimicrobial agents.

  17. Water Soluble Usnic Acid-Polyacrylamide Complexes with Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iolanda Francolini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Usnic acid, a potent antimicrobial and anticancer agent, poorly soluble in water, was complexed to novel antimicrobial polyacrylamides by establishment of strong acidic-base interactions. Thermal and spectroscopic analysis evidenced a molecular dispersion of the drug in the polymers and a complete drug/polymer miscibility for all the tested compositions. The polymer/drug complexes promptly dissolved in water and possessed a greater antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis than both the free drug and the polymer alone. The best results were obtained with the complex based on the lowest molecular weight polymer and containing a low drug content. Such a complex showed a larger inhibition zone of bacterial growth and a lower minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC with respect to usnic acid alone. This improved killing effect is presumably due to the reduced size of the complexes that allows an efficient cellular uptake of the antimicrobial complexes. The killing effect extent seems to be not significantly dependent on usnic acid content in the samples.

  18. Antimicrobial Properties of Titanium Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdural, B. K.; Yurum, A.; Bakir, U.; Karakas, G.

    In the present study, nanostructured titania particles were synthesized using hydrothermal processing and their photocatalytic antimicrobial activities were characterized. Sol-gel synthesized TiO2 samples were treated with a two step hydrothermal treatment. The first stage treatment was the alkaline treatment with 10 M of NaOH for 48 h at 130°C, followed with the second step which applied with distilled water for 48 h at 200°C. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images showed that alkaline treatment yields lamellar structure particles from the sol-gel synthesized anatase. Further treatment of nanoplates with distilled water results in crystal growth and the formation of nano structured thorn like particles. The photocatalytic antimicrobial activities of samples were determined against Escherichia coli under solar irradiation for 4 h. It was observed that the samples treated under alkaline conditions have higher antimicrobial activity than the untreated samples.

  19. Origins of Combination Therapy for Tuberculosis: Lessons for Future Antimicrobial Development and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerantzas, Christopher A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tuberculosis is a global health problem that causes the death of approximately 1.5 million people worldwide each year (WHO, p. 1–126, Global Tuberculosis Report, 2015). Treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis requires combination antimicrobial therapy with a minimum of four antimicrobial agents applied over the course of 6 months. The first instance of combination antimicrobial therapy applied to tuberculosis was the joint use of streptomycin and para-aminosalicylic acid as documented by the Medical Research Council of the United Kingdom in 1950. These antimicrobial drugs were the product of many decades of investigation into both organism-derived antibiotics and synthetic chemotherapy and were the first agents in those respective categories to show substantial clinical efficacy and widespread use for tuberculosis. The events leading to the discovery and application of these two agents demonstrate that investments in all aspects of research, from basic science to clinical application, are necessary for the continued success of science in finding treatments for human disease. This observation is especially worth considering given the expanded role that combination therapy may play in combating the current rise in resistance to antimicrobial drugs. PMID:28292983

  20. Preparation, spectroscopic and thermal characterization of new La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) complexes of enalapril maleate drug. In vitro antimicrobial assessment studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Al-Azab, Fathi M.; Al-Maydama, Hussein M. A.; Amin, Ragab R.; Jamil, Yasmin M. S.

    2014-02-01

    The 1:1 M ratio metal complexes of enalapril maleate hypertensive drug with La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) were synthesized. The suggested structures of the resulted complexes based on the results of elemental analyses, molar conductivity, (infrared, UV-visible and fluorescence) spectra, effective magnetic moment, thermal analysis (TG), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were discussed. The infrared spectral data were suggested that enalapril reacts with metal ions as an ionic bidentate ligand through its carboxylate oxygen and the amide carbonyl oxygen, but in case of the Sm(III) complex, it reacted as a monodentate through its amide carbonyl oxygen. Maleate moiety acts with all these metals as bidentate ligand through its carboxylate or carbonyl oxygen. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters such as: Ea, ΔH*, ΔS* and ΔG* were estimated from the DTG curves. The antibacterial evaluation of the enalapril maleate and their complexes were also performed against some gram positive and negative bacteria as well as fungi.

  1. In Vitro Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oil of Thymus schimperi, Matricaria chamomilla, Eucalyptus globulus, and Rosmarinus officinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Awol; Yitayew, Berhanu; Tesema, Alemnesh; Taddese, Solomon

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the in vitro antimicrobial activities of four plant essential oils (T. schimperi, E. globulus, R. officinalis, and M. Chamomilla) were evaluated against bacteria and fungi. The studies were carried out using agar diffusion method for screening the most effective essential oils and agar dilution to determine minimum inhibitory concentration of the essential oils. Results of this study revealed that essential oils of T. schimperi, E. globulus, and R. officinalis were active against bacteria and some fungi. The antimicrobial effect of M. chamomilla was found to be weaker and did not show any antimicrobial activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration values of T. schimperi were chamomilla, T. Schimperi, and R. officinalis. The results indicated that T. schimperi have shown strong antimicrobial activity which could be potential candidates for preparation of antimicrobial drug preparation.

  2. Uses of antimicrobial genes from microbial genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorek, Rotem; Rubin, Edward M.

    2013-08-20

    We describe a method for mining microbial genomes to discover antimicrobial genes and proteins having broad spectrum of activity. Also described are antimicrobial genes and their expression products from various microbial genomes that were found using this method. The products of such genes can be used as antimicrobial agents or as tools for molecular biology.

  3. Sixty years of antimicrobial use in animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guardabassi, Luca

    2013-01-01

    This, the last in our series of feature articles celebrating 125 years of Veterinary Record, aims to provide an overview of antimicrobial use in animals. Starting with a journey through the history of antimicrobial use in animals, Luca Guardabassi gives his opinion on the current zoonotic risks...... associated with antimicrobial resistance and on how these risks might be tackled in the years to come....

  4. Multirresistência antimicrobiana em cepas de Escherichia coli isoladas de cadelas com piometra Antimicrobial multi-resistance of Escherichia coli strains isolated from bitches with pyometra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Lara

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial sensibility of Escherichia coli strains isolated from the uterine content of bitches was evaluated. Fifteen E. coli strains were tested in relation to their susceptibility to different antimicrobials. The results demonstrated 100% of resistance to all tested drugs, being a quite conflicting finding compared to other works, which observed variable resistance of those bacteria to different antimicrobials but not the same multi-resistance pattern. The detection of those multi-resistance strains configures a problem, with important implications on the antimicrobial therapy. Therefore, additional investigations for a best characterization and extension of this problem are needed.

  5. A prospective assessment of antimicrobial agents utilization pattern in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sartaj Hussain

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The antimicrobial resistance is increasing globally and, concurrently, downward trend in development of newer antibiotics is leading to a serious public health problem and economic consequences. Methods: Prescriptions with at least one antimicrobial were included in the study. A total of 242 prescriptions were included in the study. The antimicrobials were classified into different classes based on WHO-ATC classification. Results: A total of 281 antimicrobials prescribed in 242 prescriptions with an average of 1.16 per prescription. In most of the prescriptions, 1 antimicrobial were prescribed (88.43%. The routes of the antimicrobial administration were mostly oral 268 (95.37% followed by injectable 13 (4.63%. The most commonly prescribed classes of antimicrobial in this study were antibacterials for systemic use (J01 (74.02% followed by antimycobacterials (J04 (13.88%, antiparasitic drugs (P (8.19%, antimycotics for systemic use (J02 (2.49% and antivirals for systemic use (J05 (1.42%. Among antibacterials, the most commonly prescribed classes of antibacterial was various antibacterial FDCs (19.22%, followed by quinolones (18.86%, macrolides (18.15%, β-lactams (11.03% cephalosporins (6.76%, penicillins (4.27%, aminoglycosides (2.84%, metronidazole (1.78%, clindamycin (1.78% and tetracycline (0.36%. The total percentage of antimicrobials prescribed as Fixed Dose Combinations (FDCs were 32.38%. Conclusions: The present study has reported that most commonly prescribed antimicrobials were quinolones followed by macrolides and β-lactams. Recommendations to change the ongoing prescribing practices should be based on the Standard Treatment Guidelines, EDL and Antibiotic policy or by following the information, education, and communication (IEC interventions.

  6. From antimicrobial to anticancer peptides. A review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana eGaspar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are part of the innate immune defense mechanism of many organisms. Although AMPs have been essentially studied and developed as potential alternatives for fighting infectious diseases, their use as anticancer peptides (ACPs in cancer therapy either alone or in combination with other conventional drugs has been regarded as a therapeutic strategy to explore. As human cancer remains a cause of high morbidity and mortality worldwide, an urgent need of new, selective and more efficient drugs is evident. Even though ACPs are expected to be selective towards tumor cells without impairing the normal body physiological functions, the development of a selective ACP has been a challenge. It is not yet possible to predict antitumor activity based on ACPs structures. ACPs are unique molecules when compared to the actual chemotherapeutic arsenal available for cancer treatment and display a variety of modes of action which in some types of cancer seem to co-exist. Regardless the debate surrounding the definition of structure-activity relationships for ACPs, great effort has been invested in ACP design and the challenge of improving effective killing of tumor cells remains. As detailed studies on ACPs mechanisms of action are crucial for optimizing drug development, in this review we provide an overview of the literature concerning peptides’ structure, modes of action, selectivity and efficacy and also summarize some of the many ACPs studied and/or developed for targeting different solid and hematologic malignancies with special emphasis on the first group. Strategies described for drug development and for increasing peptide selectivity towards specific cells while reducing toxicity are also discussed.

  7. Antimicrobial use in paediatric patients in a teaching hospital in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebede, Hafte Kahsay; Gesesew, Hailay Abrha; Woldehaimanot, Tewodros Eyob; Goro, Kabaye Kumela

    2017-01-01

    Background Antibiotics use in in children are different from adults due to a lack of data on pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, efficacy and safety of drugs, different physiological spectrum, pediatrics populations being vulnerable to the majority of the illnesses, and the adverse effect of their irrational use is more serious. However, antibiotic use is not explored much in a paediatric population. The current study focused on antibiotic use among pediatric population using data from a tertiary hospital in Ethiopia. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional study collated data from 614 pediatrics patients admitted in pediatrics ward at Jimma University Teaching Hospital, Southwest Ethiopia. Descriptive analyses were performed to describe the type and pattern of antibiotics. The number of prescriptions per a patient was also compared with the WHO standard. Data analysis was carried out using SPSS version 20 for mackintosh. Results Antimicrobials were prescribed for 407(86.4%) patients of which 85.9% were in the form of injectables. A total of 1241 (90%) medicines were administered parenterally followed by oral 110 (8%). The maximum number of medicines per prescription was eight for all types of drugs in general, and five for antimicrobials in particular. All antimicrobials were prescribed empirically without any microbiological evidence. Pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis were the main reasons for antimicrobial use in the ward. Out of the total of 812 antibiotics prescribed; Penicillin G crystalline was the most (20%) frequently prescribed, followed by gentamicin (19%) and ampicillin (16). Conclusions Majority of the prescribed antibiotics were antimicrobials, and was in the form of injectables. Antimicrobials were over prescribed and the number of drugs per prescription was also far from WHO recommendation. Strict prescribing standard guidelines and treatment habits should be developed in the country, to prevent antimicrobial resistance. PMID:28264021

  8. Antimicrobial resistance of bacterial strains isolated from avian cellulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MM Santos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Avian cellulitis is an inflammatory process in the subcutaneous tissue, mainly located in the abdomen and thighs. This problem is commonly observed in poultry at slaughter and it is considered one of the major causes of condemnation of carcasses in Brazil. The aim of this study was to perform the microbial isolation of lesions of avian cellulitis from a processing plant located in the State of Goiás in order to analyze antimicrobial resistance by antibiogram test and to detect resistance genes by polymerase chain reaction. A total of 25 samples of avian cellulitis lesions were analyzed, from which 30 bacterial strains were isolated. There were eleven (44% strains of Escherichia coli, nine (36% strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis, seven (28% strains of Proteus mirabilis and three (12% strains of Manheimiahaemolytica. The antibiogram test showed that all strains were resistant to at least one antimicrobial. The gene of antimicrobial resistance tetB was detected in E. coli, S. epidermidis and P. mirabilis strains, and was the most frequently observed gene. The gene of antimicrobial resistance Sul1 was detected in all bacterial species, while tetA was found in E. coli and S. epidermidis strains, SHV in E. coli strains, S. epidermidis and P. mirabilis,and cat1 in one P. mirabilis strain. The results suggest a potential public health hazard due to the ability of these microorganisms to transmit antimicrobial resistancegenes to other microorganisms present in the intestinal tract of humans and animals, which may affect clinical-medical usage of these drugs.

  9. EMERGING ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE IN HOSPITAL A THREAT TO PUBLIC HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vichal Rastogi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antimicrobial resistance(AMR threatens the health of many throughout the world, since both old and new infectious diseases remain a formidable public health threat. When pathogenic microorganisms can multiply beyond some critical mass in the face of invading antimicrobials, treatment outcome is compromised. This phenomenon is referred as antimicrobial resistance (AMR. Objective: This retrospective study was conducted to assess the overall antimicrobial resistance in bacterial isolates from tertiary care hospitals as majority of patients here receive empirical antibiotics therapy. Method: This retrospective study was carried out in teaching hospital, Greater Noida to determine prevalence of multidrug resistance in patients in relation to empirical antibiotic therapy in hospital. Various samples (pus,urine,blood were collected for bacterial culture and antibiotic sensitivity. Results: Total 500 bacterial strains isolated from ICU, surgery, obstetrics & gynaecology and orthopaedics and their sensitivity pattern was compared in this study. The highest number of resistant bacterias were of pseudomonas sp. i.e. 21(33.87% followed by 16(25.80% of staphylococcus aureus, 12(19.35% of Escherichia coli, Klebseilla sp & Proteus vulgaris were 05(8.06% each & Citrobacter sp. 03(4.83%. Total 62(12.4% bacterial isolates were found to be resistant to multiple drugs. The 31 (50% of these resistant bacteria were prevalent in ICU, 12(19.35% in Surgery, 11(17.74% in Gynaecology, 08(12.90% in Orthopaedics.. All the bacterial strains were resistant to common antibiotics like Penicillin, Amoxicillin, Doxycycline & Cotrimoxazole and some were even resistant to Imipenem. Conclusion: Therefore we have outlined the nature of the antimicrobial resistance problem as an important health issue for national and international community. It is advised to avoid use of empirical antibiotics therapy.

  10. Preparation and characterization of antimicrobial nano-hydroxyapatite composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Juhong [The Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Materials and Textiles, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Chu, Xiaobing [The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang Chinese Medicine University, Hangzhou 310006 (China); Cai, Yurong [The Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Materials and Textiles, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Tong, Peijian [The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang Chinese Medicine University, Hangzhou 310006 (China); Yao, Juming, E-mail: yaoj@zstu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Materials and Textiles, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Deep infection of prosthesis is one of the most frequent complications after joint replacement. One of the most effective ways is to introduce directly some antibiotics in the local site of the surgery. In the present study, an antimicrobial composite has been fabricated using nano-hydroxyapatite particles as carriers for the antimicrobial drug of vancomycin hydrochloride (VAN) and the mixture of oxidation sodium alginate (OSA) and gelatin (GT) as a sticky matrix. Samples have been characterized using X-ray diffraction instrument (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) methods, the rotational rheometer and the texture analyzer. The release of VAN from nano-hydroxyapatite (nHAP) particles was detected by the ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) spectrophotometer and then bactericidal property of the composite was evaluated using the Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) as a bacterial model. Experimental results showed that the composite possessed an adhesive property derived from the gel of OSA and GT, which implied that the composite could bond directly to the fracture surface of bones in surgery. Furthermore, VAN was loaded efficiently on the surface of nHAP particles and could be released slowly from these particles, which endowed the composite with an obvious and continuous antimicrobial performance. The sticky and antimicrobial composite may has a potential application in arthroplasty to overcome deep infection in a simple and direct manner. - Highlights: • A sticky and antimicrobial composite has been designed to overcome deep infection. • The composite was composed of antibiotic, antibiotic carrier and a viscous matrix. • The sticky matrix was obtained by blending of oxidation sodium alginate and gelatin. • Hydroxyapatite nanoparticle could be used as carrier to control release of antibiotic.

  11. Compliance with antimicrobial therapy: Evaluating the related factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Moradi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Uncontrolled and irrational use of antibiotics increases the rate of antimicrobial resistance and treatment failure. Compliance with antibiotics is an important indicator to show how patients use their prescribed drugs and it can explain the relationship between drug administration and treatment outcome that needs to be monitored and promoted. We decided to evaluate compliance to antimicrobial drugs in this study.Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 100 patients referring to 4 different specialists’ offices were enrolled. The rate and type of non prescribed antibiotic administration were evaluated using predesigned questionnaires. The data were analyzed by SPSS 17.0 software using descriptive statistics and chi-square test for categorical data.Results: Our results showed that 62.4% of the study population had poor compliance and 37.6 % had good compliance with their prescribed regimen. “Feeling better “and “getting worse” on prescribed regimen were major reasons for drug discontinuation. About 70% of our study population get non prescribed antibiotic from pharmacies at least once a year. Most of the requested antibiotics were not first line options. Level of education was the only factor significantly related to the rate of patient compliance. Conclusion: This study shows the high rate of non prescribed antibiotic administration and low rate of compliance among the study population that emerge the need for particular patient education and putting restrictive rules to bound  non-prescribed and unsupervised  antibiotic marketing.

  12. Synchronizing nonfouling and antimicrobial properties in a zwitterionic hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Luo; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2012-12-01

    In this work, we report a new approach to integrate antimicrobial and nonfouling properties into a single platform without compromising each other. To achieve this, a zwitterionic hydrogel is conjugated with an antimicrobial agent as a leaving group in a way that maintains the zwitterionic form of the hydrogel before, during and after drug release, preventing bacteria surface adhesion and bulk proliferation simultaneously. The antibacterial salicylate anion contributes the negative charge to the initial zwitterionic state and is released through the ester linkage hydrolysis. The hydrogel then switches to its final zwitterionic state with the carboxylate as its new negatively charged group. We prove that this hydrogel can reach one-salicylate-per-monomer drug loading while still retaining the nonfouling property at protein and bacteria levels. It was also shown that its drug release profile was dictated by the hydrolysis rate of the monomer, making it possible to control and tailor the release rate of small hydrophilic drugs from the highly hydrated nonfouling polymer matrix.

  13. PHYTOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS AND ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF CASIA OCCIDENTALIS (L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkanna Lunavath

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The trend of using natural products has increased and the active plant extracts are frequently screened for new drug discoveries. The present study deals with the screening of Casia occidentalis leaves for their antimicrobial activity against various strains of bacteria. Plant Cassia occidentalis belongs to family Caesalpiniaceae, is a diffuse offensively odorous under shrub. Casia occidentalis were shade dried, powered and was extracted using solvents Methanol. The antimicrobial activity test performed by the disc diffusion method. Preliminary phytochemical analysis of the plant extracts fractions of HXF, CTF, CFF and AQF showed the presence of carbohydrates, amino acids, phytosterols, fixed oils and phenolic compounds. The AQF fraction of C. occidentalis showed high activity across pseudomonas aeuruginosa and staphylococcus aureus bacteria. The present study indicates the potential usefulness of Casia occidentalis leaves in the treatment of various diseases caused by micro-organisms.

  14. Repurposing the antihistamine terfenadine for antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlmutter, Jessamyn I; Forbes, Lauren T; Krysan, Damian J; Ebsworth-Mojica, Katherine; Colquhoun, Jennifer M; Wang, Jenna L; Dunman, Paul M; Flaherty, Daniel P

    2014-10-23

    Staphylococcus aureus is a rapidly growing health threat in the U.S., with resistance to several commonly prescribed treatments. A high-throughput screen identified the antihistamine terfenadine to possess, previously unreported, antimicrobial activity against S. aureus and other Gram-positive bacteria. In an effort to repurpose this drug, structure-activity relationship studies yielded 84 terfenadine-based analogues with several modifications providing increased activity versus S. aureus and other bacterial pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mechanism of action studies revealed these compounds to exert their antibacterial effects, at least in part, through inhibition of the bacterial type II topoisomerases. This scaffold suffers from hERG liabilities which were not remedied through this round of optimization; however, given the overall improvement in activity of the set, terfenadine-based analogues provide a novel structural class of antimicrobial compounds with potential for further characterization as part of the continuing process to meet the current need for new antibiotics.

  15. Synthesis of New Macrocyclic Polyamides as Antimicrobial Agent Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama I. Abd El-Salam

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of macrocyclic imides and Schiff-bases have been prepared via the cyclocondensation of pyridine-2,6-dicarbonyl dichloride (1 with L-ornithine methyl ester to give the corresponding macrocyclic bisester 2. Treatment of 2 with hydrazine hydrate gave macrocyclic bisacid hydrazide 3, which was used as starting material. Condensation of bishydrazide 3 with diacid anhydrides or aromatic aldehydes in refluxing acetic acid or ethanol gave the corresponding macrocyclic bisimides 4, 5a,b and macrocyclic bis- hydrazones 6a–j, respectively. The structure assignments of the new compounds were based on chemical and spectroscopic evidence. The antimicrobial screening showed that many of these newly synthesized compounds have good antimicrobial activities, comparable to ampicillin and ketaconazole used as reference drugs.

  16. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The Link Between Drug Use and HIV/AIDS Recovery & Treatment Drug Treatment Facts Does Drug Treatment Work? ... and Family Can Help Find Treatment/Rehab Resources Prevent Drug Use Help Children and Teens Stay Drug- ...

  17. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Addiction? Addiction Risk Factors Does Addiction Run in Families? Why Is It So Hard to Quit Drugs? ... Drug Use Hurts Other People Drug Use Hurts Families Drug Use Hurts Kids Drug Use Hurts Unborn ...

  18. Drug Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss of consciousness Other conditions resulting from drug allergy Less common drug allergy reactions occur days or ... you take the drug. Drugs commonly linked to allergies Although any drug can cause an allergic reaction, ...

  19. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Use Hurts Unborn Children Drug Use Hurts Your Health Drug Use Hurts Bodies Drug Use Hurts Brains Drug Use and Mental Health Problems Often Happen Together The Link Between Drug ...

  20. Antimicrobial Activity of Ceftriaxone Compared with Cefotaxime in the Presence of Serum Albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapan K Nath

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of serum albumin on the antimicrobial activity of ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, and a 1:1 ratio of cefotaxime and its desacetyl metabolite against nonpseudomonal Gram-negative bacilli was determined. Antimicrobial activity of drugs was evaluated by measuring minimum inhibitory (mic and bactericidal (mbc concentrations in broth with and without human serum albumin. The analysis of logarithmically transformed mean mics and mbcs showed that there was a highly significant interaction between drug and serum albumin (P<0.0001. The inhibitory and bactericidal activities were greatest for cefotaxime followed by cefotaxime/desacetylcefotaxime and ceftriaxone (P<0.01. Time-kill kinetics demonstrated that ceftriaxone was less bactericidal than cefotaxime in broth with albumin. On the basis of these results it was concluded that the in vitro antimicrobial activity of ceftriaxone compared with that of cefotaxime was significantly diminished in the presence of serum albumin.

  1. [In vitro study of antimicrobial activity of lactoferrins from various sources].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammatikova, N E; Rezvan, S P; Nemtsova, E R; Bezborodova, O A; Tutykhina, I L; Naroditskiĭ, B S; Iakubovskaia, R I

    2010-01-01

    Comparative antimicrobial activity of lactoferrins from various sources (native lactoferrin from Laprot, human hololactoferrin, recombinant human lactoferrin isolated from the cultural medium of permissive cell culture transfected using pseudoadenovirus nanostructure with the human lactoferrin gene, and native bovine lactoferrin) was studied to prove the possibility of their use for development of antimicrobial drugs. It was shown that all the substances were active against the Bacillus standard strains. The antibacterial activity was almost independent of the degree of saturation the lactoferrin molecules with Fe3+. The native human lactoferrin was more active than hololactoferrin against Candida when evaluated by the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Fe(3+)-Non aturated recombinant human lactoferrin demonstrated the antimicrobial activity (by MIC) similar to that of the native human lactoferrin. The results showed that native and recombinant human lactoferrins might be used for the development of intravenous and intracavitary dosage forms, while the native bovine lactoferrin could be useful in development of oral drugs.

  2. Study of the nanomaterials and their antimicrobial activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadi, Muntaha

    In the last decade, the world faced huge problems associated with the spread of antimicrobial resistant infections that are essentially untreatable such as methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. These infections have begun to occur in both hospital and community environments. Developing new antimicrobial surface coatings can hold a great promise to minimize and control various problems that associated with the spreading of infections and biofilms formation, these coatings can be used in medicine where medical devices associated with severe infections, in construction industry and the in food packaging industry. It has been established that single-walled CNTs exhibit a strong antimicrobial activity and can pierce bacterial cell walls. Recently, nanomaterial structures that made from pure carbon such as CNTs have been seen as promising candidates for many potential applications in Biotechnology and bioscience due to the combination of their extraordinary properties that arise from surface area, light weight, strength, flexibility, unique electrical conductivity and many more novel physical and chemical properties at nanoscale level. CNTs have been used widely in biomedical field including drug delivery, gene therapy and creating new biomedical devices with novel properties. Researchers have now made a first step to add carbon nanotubes to antimicrobial agents list. There are two types of CNTs have been used in biomedical research. The first one is a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and the second is a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT). Recent in vitro studies suggest that carbon nanotubes have antimicrobial activity and coating CNTs with nickel nanoparticle could enhance the antimicrobial activity of cabon nanotubes. In order to test this hypothesis, nickel nanoparticles were deposited on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by electrochemical deposition. The carbon nanotubes used in this study were XD-CNTs, SWNTs and Ni-coated CNTs. The structure and

  3. Durable and Rechargeable Antimicrobial Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    investigator (PI), Dr. Zhengbing Cao, has 8 years of experience in the development of antimicrobial materials, such as silver, zinc , quaternary...for persons with diabetes , as well as other R&D activities. The PI is in close contact with other researchers exploring the N-halamine technique for

  4. Antimicrobial activity of Securidaca longipedunculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajali, U; Chukwurah, B K C

    2004-11-01

    The folk herbal uses of Securidaca longipedunculata in the treatment of diarrhea, boils, gonorrhea, and cough prompted phytochemical analyses and antimicrobial activity screening of extracts of the root. Some flavonoids isolated showed activity against many micro-organisms. These flavonoids were isolated using chromatographic methods.

  5. Antimicrobial Polymers with Metal Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Palza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Metals, such as copper and silver, can be extremely toxic to bacteria at exceptionally low concentrations. Because of this biocidal activity, metals have been widely used as antimicrobial agents in a multitude of applications related with agriculture, healthcare, and the industry in general. Unlike other antimicrobial agents, metals are stable under conditions currently found in the industry allowing their use as additives. Today these metal based additives are found as: particles, ions absorbed/exchanged in different carriers, salts, hybrid structures, etc. One recent route to further extend the antimicrobial applications of these metals is by their incorporation as nanoparticles into polymer matrices. These polymer/metal nanocomposites can be prepared by several routes such as in situ synthesis of the nanoparticle within a hydrogel or direct addition of the metal nanofiller into a thermoplastic matrix. The objective of the present review is to show examples of polymer/metal composites designed to have antimicrobial activities, with a special focus on copper and silver metal nanoparticles and their mechanisms.

  6. Antimicrobial Activity of Resveratrol Analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Chalal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Stilbenes, especially resveratrol and its derivatives, have become famous for their positive effects on a wide range of medical disorders, as indicated by a huge number of published studies. A less investigated area of research is their antimicrobial properties. A series of 13 trans-resveratrol analogues was synthesized via Wittig or Heck reactions, and their antimicrobial activity assessed on two different grapevine pathogens responsible for severe diseases in the vineyard. The entire series, together with resveratrol, was first evaluated on the zoospore mobility and sporulation level of Plasmopara viticola (the oomycete responsible for downy mildew. Stilbenes displayed a spectrum of activity ranging from low to high. Six of them, including the most active ones, were subsequently tested on the development of Botrytis cinerea (fungus responsible for grey mold. The results obtained allowed us to identify the most active stilbenes against both grapevine pathogens, to compare the antimicrobial activity of the evaluated series of stilbenes, and to discuss the relationship between their chemical structure (number and position of methoxy and hydroxy groups and antimicrobial activity.

  7. Quantitative analysis of catechins in Saraca asoca and correlation with antimicrobial activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amey Shirolkar; Anjum Gahlaut; Anil K. Chhillar; Rajesh Dabur

    2013-01-01

    Herbal medicines are highly complex and have unknown mechanisms in diseases treatment. Saraca asoca (Roxb.), De. Wild has been recommended to treat gynecological disorders and used in several commercial polyherbal formulations. In present study, efforts have been made to explore antimicrobial activity and its co-relation with the distributions of catechins in the organs of S. asoca using targeted MS/MS. Eight extracts (cold and hot water) from four different organs of S. asoca and two drugs were prepared and antimicrobial activity was assessed by microbroth dilution assay. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of catechins in crude extracts was done by using targeted and auto-MS/MS and correlated with antimicrobial activity. (þ)-Catechin and (þ)-epicatechin and their biosynthesis related compound were found to be up-regulated in regenerated bark and leaves extracts. (?)-Epigallocatechin was found to be significantly higher in bark water extract as compared to others but showed low antimicrobial activity. Result showed down-regulation of (?)-epigallocatechin and up-regulation of (þ)-catechin and (þ)-epicatechin in the regenerated bark and leaves of S. asoca. It might be the contributing factor in the antimicrobial activity of regenerated bark and leaves of the plant. The concentration of (þ)-epicatechin in processed drugs (Ashokarishta) from Baidyanath was found to be seven times higher than that of Dabur Pvt. Ltd., but no antimicrobial activity was observed, indicating the variations among the plant based drugs. This will be helpful in rational use of S. asoca parts. Furthermore, the analytical method developed is sensitive, repeatable and reliable; therefore, it is suitable for quality control of herbal drugs.

  8. A review of 40 years of enteric antimicrobial resistance research in Eastern Africa: what can be done better?

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The emergence and persistence of antimicrobial resistance is driven by varied factors including the indiscriminate use of antibiotics and variable drug efficacy and presents a major threat to the control of infectious diseases. Despite the high burden of disease in sub-Saharan Africa and the potential health and economic consequences, the level of research on antimicrobial resistance in the region remains unknown. Little data exists to quantify the contribution of different factors to the cur...

  9. Combating Antimicrobial Resistance in Foodborne Microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Edward P C; Iqbal, Zafar; Avis, Tyler J

    2016-02-01

    This review addresses an important public health hazard affecting food safety. Antimicrobial agents are used in foods to reduce or eliminate microorganisms that cause disease. Many traditional organic compounds, novel synthetic organic agents, natural products, peptides, and proteins have been extensively studied for their effectiveness as antimicrobial agents against foodborne Campylobacter spp., Escherichia coli, Listeria spp. and Salmonella. However, antimicrobial resistance can develop in microorganisms, enhancing their ability to withstand the inhibiting or killing action of antimicrobial agents. Knowledge gaps still exist with regard to the actual chemical and microbiological mechanisms that must be identified to facilitate the search for new antimicrobial agents. Technical implementation of antimicrobial active packing films and coatings against target microorganisms must also be improved for extended product shelf life. Recent advances in antimicrobial susceptibility testing can provide researchers with new momentum to pursue their quest for a resistance panacea.

  10. Mono- and combined antimicrobial agents efficiency in experimental wound infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталія Ігорівна Філімонова

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern problems of antibiotic therapy are shown by wide range of side effects, both on organism and microbiological levels: the spread of allergies, toxic for organ systems reactions, dysbiosis development, and resistant pathogens formation and dissemination. Therefore the necessity of search for new effective drugs with significant antimicrobial activity applied for the wounds treatment arises. Development of combined remedies on the background of different origin antimicrobial agents’ derivatives is one of the fight directions against infectious diseases in the skin pathology. Recently among the existing antimicrobial agents one should focus on antiseptic drugs, due to degenerative and dysfunctional effect on microbial cell.Aim of research. The comparison of mono- and combined antimicrobial agents chemotherapeutic efficiency in the treatment of localized purulent infection under experimental conditions.Metods. The study of chemotherapeutic efficiency was carried out on the model of localized purulent Staphylococcus infection on albino mice weighting 14 – 16 g. S.aureus ATCC 25923 strains were used as infectious agents. The contamination was performed subcutaneously to the right side of mice’s skin after depilation. The animals were randomly divided into 4 groups: the 1st group – infected mice without treatment (control; the 2nd group – infected mice treated with a ciprofloxacin; the 3rd group – infected mice treated with a Ciprofloxacin and Decamethoxin combination; the 4th group – infected mice treated with a combined drug on the base of mutual prodrugs (Hexamethylenetetramine and Phenyl salicylate.Results. The efficiency of mono- and combined antimicrobial agents under experimental Staphylococcus wound infection conditions was studied. It was found that localized purulent staph center was formed more slowly in comparison with control and mono preparation use (2nd group of animals. The average index of skin lesions in comparison

  11. European Surveillance of antimicrobial consumption (ESAC) : quality indicators for outpatient antibiotic use in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, Samuel; Ferech, Matus; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; Butler, Chris C.; Stichele, Robert H. Vander; Verheij, Theo J. M.; Monnet, Dominique L.; Goossens, Paul Little Herman

    2007-01-01

    Background and objective: Indicators to measure the quality of healthcare are increasingly used by healthcare professionals and policy makers. In the context of increasing antimicrobial resistance, this study aimed to develop valid drug- specific quality indicators for outpatient antibiotic use in E

  12. Chemical-biology based approaches to discovering and characterizing antimicrobial peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    't Hart, P.

    2016-01-01

    As more and more bacteria become resistance against the drugs currently used in the clinic we are in dire need of novel antimicrobial compounds. To prevent resistance to occur against novel compounds it is important to carefully select the target against which such novel compounds act. Lipid II is a

  13. Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance and integrons in Escherichia Coli from Punjab, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idrees Muhammad

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance was studied in Escherichia coli strains isolated from urine samples of 457 patients suffering from urinary tract infection. High prevalence of class 1 integrons (43.56%, sulfamethoxazole resistance genes sul1 (45.54% and sul2 (51.48% along with occurrence of quinolone resistance genes was detected in multi drug resistance isolates.

  14. Anti-microbial and anti-biofilm compounds from Indonesian medicinal plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pratiwi, Sylvia U.T.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilms causing elevated resistance to both most anti-microbial drugs and the host defense systems, which often results in persistent and difficult-to-treat infections. The discovery of anti-infective agents which are active against planktonic and biofilm microorganisms are therefore urge

  15. Development of Colorimetric Microtiter Plate Assay for Assessment of Antimicrobials against Acanthamoeba

    OpenAIRE

    McBride, James; Ingram, Paul R.; Henriquez, Fiona L.; Roberts, Craig W.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed and optimized a 96-well microtiter plate assay, based on the reduction of alamarBlue, to assess the efficacies of much needed new antimicrobials against Acanthamoeba species. This assay has been optimized for determination of drug efficacy against two potentially pathogenic species, Acanthamoeba castellanii and Acanthamoeba polyphaga, and has been validated by comparison of their relative susceptibilities to chlorhexidine, a drug widely used to treat Acanthamoeba keratitis. ...

  16. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis and Detection of Antimicrobial Peptides of the American Cockroach Periplaneta americana (Linnaeus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Woo Kim

    Full Text Available Cockroaches are surrogate hosts for microbes that cause many human diseases. In spite of their generally destructive nature, cockroaches have recently been found to harbor potentially beneficial and medically useful substances such as drugs and allergens. However, genomic information for the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana is currently unavailable; therefore, transcriptome and gene expression profiling is needed as an important resource to better understand the fundamental biological mechanisms of this species, which would be particularly useful for the selection of novel antimicrobial peptides. Thus, we performed de novo transcriptome analysis of P. americana that were or were not immunized with Escherichia coli. Using an Illumina HiSeq sequencer, we generated a total of 9.5 Gb of sequences, which were assembled into 85,984 contigs and functionally annotated using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST, Gene Ontology (GO, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG database terms. Finally, using an in silico antimicrobial peptide prediction method, 86 antimicrobial peptide candidates were predicted from the transcriptome, and 21 of these peptides were experimentally validated for their antimicrobial activity against yeast and gram positive and -negative bacteria by a radial diffusion assay. Notably, 11 peptides showed strong antimicrobial activities against these organisms and displayed little or no cytotoxic effects in the hemolysis and cell viability assay. This work provides prerequisite baseline data for the identification and development of novel antimicrobial peptides, which is expected to provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of innate immunity in similar species.

  17. RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF ANTIMICROBIAL RESIDUES AND RESISTANCE IN SWINE IN ABA ABIA STATE, NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. NWIYI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobials are used by livestock farmers to prevent and control infection. Antimicrobials are also included at sub-therapeutic doses in animal feed as growth promoters and to improve feed efficiency in intensive farming. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial residues and resistance that could arise due to antimicrobial use in swine. The study was carried out between September 10th and December 10th 2013 in some selected swine farms in Ogbor Hill water side in Aba, Abia state. The study involved visiting the various farms, evaluating the records of previous treatment. Also the state zonal veterinary clinics visited and record of farms was collected for analysis. From the result obtained, in raining season in a given year, the frequency of tetracycline usage recorded 83.3%, penicillin recorded 75.0%, while sulfonamide recorded 25.0%. Tylosin and ivermox were the least and recorded 8.4% usage each. The swine treatment was done by the farmers hence there was consistent over-dosage of antimicrobials to the pigs as the manufacture’s guide was not complied with. The report from the records showed that some of the pigs were slaughtered and sold in the market at any time without recourse to drug with-draw. This result could be one of the responsible reasons for antimicrobial residues and resistance in swine and indeed livestock.

  18. Nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems: promising approaches against infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranghar, Shweta; Sirohi, Parul [Department of Applied Mechanics, Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology, Allahabad (India); Verma, Pritam; Agarwal, Vishnu, E-mail: vishnu_agarwal02@rediffmail.com [Department of Biotechnology, Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology, Allahabad (India)

    2014-03-15

    Despite the fact that many new drugs and technologies have been developed to combat the infectious diseases, these have continued to be global health challenges. The use of conventional antimicrobial agents against these infections is always associated with problems such as the development of multiple drug resistance and adverse side effects. In addition, the inefficient traditional drug delivery system results in inadequate therapeutic index, low bioavailability of drugs and many other limitations. In this regard, antimicrobial nanoparticles and nanosized drug delivery carriers have emerged as potent effective agents against the infections. Nanoparticles have unique properties owing to their ultra small and controllable size such as high surface area, enhanced reactivity, and functionalizable structure. This review focused on different classes of antimicrobial nanoparticles, including metal, metal oxide and others along with their mechanism of action and their potential use against the infections. The review also focused on the development of nanoparticle systems for antimicrobial drug delivery and use of these systems for delivery of various antimicrobial agents, giving an overview about modern nanoparticle based therapeutic strategies against the infections. (author)

  19. Drug allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allergic reaction - drug (medication); Drug hypersensitivity; Medication hypersensitivity ... A drug allergy involves an immune response in the body that produces an allergic reaction to a medicine. The ...

  20. Drugs and Drug Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastas, Robert, Comp.; And Others.

    GRADES OR AGES: Secondary grades. SUBJECT MATTER: Drugs and drug abuse. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The guide is divided into several sections, each of which is in outline or list form. It is xeroxed and spiral-bound with a paper cover. OBJECTIVES AND ACTIVITIES: No objectives are mentioned. The major portion of the guide contains a…

  1. Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Effect of Chitosan/Polyvinyl Alcohol Electrospun Nanofibers Containing Mafenide Acetate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaspour, Mohammadreza; Sharif Makhmalzadeh, Behzad; Rezaee, Behjat; Shoja, Saeed; Ahangari, Zohreh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chitosan, an important biodegradable and biocompatible polymer, has demonstrated wound-healing and antimicrobial properties. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the antimicrobial properties of mafenide acetate-loaded nanofibrous films, prepared by the electrospinning technique, using chitosan and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Materials and Methods: A 32 full factorial design was used for formulating electrospinning solutions. The chitosan percentage in chitosan/PVA solutions (0%, 10%, and 30%) and the drug content (0%, 20%, and 40%) were chosen as independent variables. The release rate of mafenide acetate from nanofibrous films and their microbial penetration were evaluated. The antimicrobial activity of different nanofibrous film formulations against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was studied. Results: The results indicated that all nanofibrous films, with and without drug, can prevent bacterial penetration. Incorporation of mafenide acetate into chitosan/PVA nanofibers enhanced their antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. Conclusions: Overall, the results showed that chitosan/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibrous films are applicable for use as a wound dressing with protective, healing, and antimicrobial effects. PMID:26587214

  2. Study of antimicrobial effects of vancomycin loaded PLGA nanoparticles against enterococcus clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfipour, F; Abdollahi, S; Jelvehgari, M; Valizadeh, H; Hassan, M; Milani, M

    2014-07-01

    Researchers have demonstrated that antimicrobial agents in nanoparticle (NP) forms have better activities. Vancomycin (VCM), as a glycopeptide antibiotic with antimicrobial activity against gram positive bacteria, is poorly absorbed from the intestinal tract. Enterococcus is a genus of bacteria that became resistant to a wide range of antibiotics in last decades, and cause severe infections in hospitalized patients. This paper describes preparation of VCM--loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs and compares the antimicrobial effects with drug solution against clinical Enterococcus isolates. VCM-loaded PLGA NPs were fabricated by W1/O/W2 solvent evaporation method. The comparison of obtained Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values showed a significant decrease in the antimicrobial effect of VCM -loaded NPs. Results also indicated that the potency of the NPs against VCM resistant isolates of Enterococcus was less than VCM susceptible isolates. The reduced antimicrobial effect of formulated NPs in invitro condition is perhaps related to the strong electrostatic linkage between hydrophilic drug (VCM) and hydrophobic polymer (PLGA) that lead to the slow release of the antibiotic from polymeric NPs.

  3. Performance evaluation of nanoclay enriched anti-microbial hydrogels for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonali Karnik

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A major factor contributing to the failure of orthopedic and orthodontic implants is post-surgical infection. Coating metallic implant surfaces with anti-microbial agents has shown promise but does not always prevent the formation of bacterial biofilms. Furthermore, breakdown of these coatings within the human body can cause release of the anti-microbial drugs in an uncontrolled or unpredictable fashion. In this study, we used a calcium alginate and calcium phosphate cement (CPC hydrogel composite as the base material and enriched these hydrogels with the anti-microbial drug, gentamicin sulfate, loaded within a halloysite nanotubes (HNTs. Our results demonstrate a sustained and extended release of gentamicin from hydrogels enriched with the gentamicin-loaded HNTs. When tested against the gram-negative bacteria, the hydrogel/nanoclay composites showed a pronounced zone of inhibition suggesting that anti-microbial doped nanoclay enriched hydrogels can prevent the growth of bacteria. The release of gentamicin sulfate for a period of five days from the nanoclay-enriched hydrogels would supply anti-microbial agents in a sustained and controlled manner and assist in preventing microbial growth and biofilm formation on the titanium implant surface. A pilot study, using mouse osteoblasts, confirmed that the nanoclay enriched surfaces are also cell supportive as osteoblasts readily, proliferated and produced a type I collagen and proteoglycan matrix.

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility and distribution of antimicrobial-resistance genes among Enterococcus and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus isolates recovered from poultry litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simjee, Shabbir; McDermott, Patrick F; White, David G; Hofacre, Charles; Berghaus, Roy D; Carter, Peggy J; Stewart, Leigh; Liu, Tongrui; Maier, Marie; Maurer, John J

    2007-12-01

    Data on the prevalence of antimicrobial resistant enterococci and staphylococci from the poultry production environment are sparse in the United States. This information is needed for science-based risk assessments of antimicrobial use in animal husbandry and potential public-health consequences. In this study, we assessed the susceptibility of staphylococci and enterococci isolated from poultry litter, recovered from 24 farms across Georgia, to several antimicrobials of veterinary and human health importance. Among the 90 Enterococcus isolates recovered, E. hirae (46%) was the most frequently encountered species, followed by E. faecium (27%), E. gallinarum (12%), and E. faecalis (10%). Antimicrobial resistance was most often observed to tetracycline (96%), followed by clindamycin (90%), quinupristin-dalfopristin (62%), penicillin (53%), erythromycin (50%), nitrofurantoin (49%), and clarithromycin (48%). Among the 110 staphylococci isolates recovered, only coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) were identified with the predominant Staphylococcus species being S. sciuri (38%), S. lentus (21%), S. xylosus (14%) and S. simulans (12%). Resistance was less-frequently observed among the Staphylococcus isolates for the majority of antimicrobials tested, as compared with Enterococcus isolates, and was primarily limited to clarithromycin (71%), erythromycin (71%), clindamycin (48%), and tetracycline (38%). Multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotypes were prevalent in both Enterococcus and Staphylococcus; however, Enterococcus exhibited a statistically significant difference in the median number of antimicrobials to which resistance was observed (median = 5.0) compared with Staphylococcus species (median = 3.0). Because resistance to several of these antimicrobials in gram-positive bacteria may be attributed to the shuttling of common drug-resistance genes, we also determined which common antimicrobial-resistance genes were present in both enterococci and staphylococci. The

  5. Nanostructured mesoporous silica: new perspectives for fighting antimicrobial resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voicu, Georgeta; Dogaru, Ionuţ; Meliţă, Daniela; Meştercă, Raluca; Spirescu, Vera; Stan, Eliza; Tote, Eliza [Politehnica University of Bucharest, Department of Science and Engineering of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science (Romania); Mogoantă, Laurenţiu [University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Craiova, Research Center for Microscopic Morphology and Immunology (Romania); Mogoşanu, George Dan [University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Craiova, Department of Pharmacognosy & Phytotherapy, Faculty of Pharmacy (Romania); Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai, E-mail: grumezescu@yahoo.com [Politehnica University of Bucharest, Department of Science and Engineering of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science (Romania); Truşcă, Roxana [Metav SA-CD S.A. (Romania); Vasile, Eugeniu [Politehnica University of Bucharest, Department of Science and Engineering of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science (Romania); Iordache, Florin [Institute of Cellular Biology and Pathology of Romanian Academy, “Nicolae Simionescu”, Department of Fetal and Adult Stem Cell Therapy (Romania); Chifiriuc, Mariana-Carmen [University of Bucharest, Microbiology Department, Faculty of Biology (Romania); Holban, Alina Maria [Politehnica University of Bucharest, Department of Science and Engineering of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science (Romania)

    2015-05-15

    This paper investigates the antimicrobial potential of nanostructured mesoporous silica (NMS) functionalized with essential oils (EOs) and antibiotics (ATBs). The NMS networks were obtained by the basic procedure from cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and tetraethyl orthosilicate in the form of granules with diameters ranging from 100 to 300 nm with an average pore diameter of 2.2 nm, as confirmed by the BET–TEM analyses. The Salvia officinalis (SO) and Coriandrum sativum (CS) EOs and the streptomycin and neomycin ATBs were loaded in the NMS pores. TG analysis was performed in order to estimate the amount of the entrapped volatile EOs. The results of the biological analyses revealed that NMS/SO and NMS/CS exhibited a very good antimicrobial activity to an extent comparable or even superior to the one triggered by ATB, and a good in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility. Due to their regular pores, high biocompatibility, antimicrobial activity, and capacity to stabilize the volatile EOs, the obtained NMS can be used as an efficient drug delivery system for further biomedical applications.

  6. In Vitro Antimicrobial and Antiproliferative Activity of Amphipterygium adstringens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rodriguez-Garcia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amphipterygium adstringens is a plant widely used in Mexican traditional medicine for its known anti-inflammatory and antiulcer properties. In this work, we evaluated the in vitro antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities of the methanolic extract of A. adstringens against oral pathogens such as Streptococcus mutans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Candida albicans, and Candida dubliniensis, using microdilution (MIC and agar diffusion methods (MBC, and the antiproliferative activity evaluating total growth inhibition (TGI by staining the protein content with sulforhodamine B (SRB, using nine human cancer cell lines. Crude extract (CE of A. adstringens showed some degree of activity against one or more of the strains with a MIC from 0.125 mg/mL to 63 mg/mL and MBC from 1.6 to 6.3 mg/mL and cytotoxic activity, particularly against NCI-ADR/RES, an ovarian cell line expressing multiple resistance drugs phenotype. The CE is a complex mixture of possible multitarget metabolites that could be responsible for both antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities, and further investigation is required to elucidate the identity of active compounds. Nevertheless the CE itself is useful in the development of new antimicrobial treatment based on natural products to prevent oral diseases and as alternative natural source for cancer treatment and prevention.

  7. Antimicrobial resistance in Enterococcus strains isolated from healthy domestic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelloni, Fabrizio; Salvadori, Claudia; Lotti, Giulia; Cerri, Domenico; Ebani, Valentina Virginia

    2016-12-15

    Enterococci are opportunistic bacteria that cause severe infections in animals and humans, capable to acquire, express, and transfer antimicrobial resistance. Susceptibility to 21 antimicrobial agents was tested by the disk diffusion method in 222 Enterococcus spp. strains isolated from the fecal samples of 287 healthy domestic dogs. Vancomycin and ampicillin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and high-level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR) tests were also performed. Isolates showed resistance mainly to streptomycin (88.7%), neomycin (80.6%), and tetracycline (69.4%). Forty-two (18.9%) isolates showed an HLAR to streptomycin and 15 (6.7%) to gentamicin. Vancomycin and ampicillin MIC values showed 1 and 18 resistant strains, respectively. One hundred and thirty-six (61.2%) strains were classified as multidrug resistant and six (2.7%) strains as possibly extensively drug-resistant bacteria. Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis were the most prevalent antimicrobial resistant species. Companion animals, which often live in close contact with their owners and share the same environment, represent a serious source of enterococci resistant to several antibiotics; for this reason, they may be a hazard for public health by providing a conduit for the entrance of resistance genes into the community.

  8. Antimicrobial Probiotics Reduce Salmonella enterica in Turkey Gastrointestinal Tracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkus, Brittany; Ritter, Seth; Vlysidis, Michail; Geldart, Kathryn; Kaznessis, Yiannis N.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the arsenal of technologies employed to control foodborne nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS), infections have not declined in decades. Poultry is the primary source of NTS outbreaks, as well as the fastest growing meat sector worldwide. With recent FDA rules for phasing-out antibiotics in animal production, pressure is mounting to develop new pathogen reduction strategies. We report on a technology to reduce Salmonella enteritidis in poultry. We engineered probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917, to express and secrete the antimicrobial peptide, Microcin J25. Using in vitro experiments and an animal model of 300 turkeys, we establish the efficacy of this technology. Salmonella more rapidly clear the ceca of birds administered the modified probiotic than other treatment groups. Approximately 97% lower Salmonella carriage is measured in a treated group, 14 days post-Salmonella challenge. Probiotic bacteria are generally regarded as safe to consume, are bile-resistant and can plausibly be modified to produce a panoply of antimicrobial peptides now known. The reported systems may provide a foundation for platforms to launch antimicrobials against gastrointestinal tract pathogens, including ones that are multi-drug resistant. PMID:28094807

  9. Antimicrobial and antihyperglycemic activities of Musa paradisiaca flowers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sunil Jawla; Y Kumar; MSY Khan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To screen the antimicrobial and antihyperglycemic activities of Musa paradisiaca (M. paradisiaca) flowers. Methods: The EtOH and EtOH: water (1:1) extracts of M. paradisiaca flowers were screened for antibacterial and antifungal activity against standard strains of Bacillussubtilis (K. pneumoniae), Proteus mirabilis (P. mirabilis), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa),Streptococcus pneumoniae (B. subtilis), Bacillus cereus (B. cereus), Escherichia coli (E. coli), Klebsiella pneumoniae typhimurium (S. typhimurium) and Candida albicans (C. albicans), Cryptococcus albidus (C.albidus (S. pneumoniae), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Salmonella ) against amikacin and clotrimazole respectively. Both the extracts were also administered to normal and alloxan induced diabetic rats. The blood glucose levels were measured daily after oral administration of extracts at doses of 100, 250 and 500 mg/(kg.d). Result: The EtOH and EtOH:water (1:1) extracts exhibited antimicrobial activity with minimum inhibitory concentrations ranging from 5.62-25.81 and 7.60-31.50 μg/mL respectively. Both the extracts reversed the permanent hyperglycemia within a week in alloxan induced diabetic rats. The EtOH extract (250 mg/kg) was found to be 7.69% more potent hypoglycemic effect than standard oral hypoglycemic drug, glibenclamide 0.2 mg/kg b.w., respectively. Conclusion: The alcoholic extracts of M. paradisiaca flowers showed potent antihyperglycemic and moderate antimicrobial activities.

  10. Diversity, evolution and medical applications of insect antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Muhammed, Maged; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2016-05-26

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are short proteins with antimicrobial activity. A large portion of known AMPs originate from insects, and the number and diversity of these molecules in different species varies considerably. Insect AMPs represent a potential source of alternative antibiotics to address the limitation of current antibiotics, which has been caused by the emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant pathogens. To get more insight into AMPs, we investigated the diversity and evolution of insect AMPs by mapping their phylogenetic distribution, allowing us to predict the evolutionary origins of selected AMP families and to identify evolutionarily conserved and taxon-specific families. Furthermore, we highlight the use of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a whole-animal model in high-throughput screening methods to identify AMPs with efficacy against human pathogens, including Acinetobacter baumanii and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus We also discuss the potential medical applications of AMPs, including their use as alternatives for conventional antibiotics in ectopic therapies, their combined use with antibiotics to restore the susceptibility of multidrug-resistant pathogens, and their use as templates for the rational design of peptidomimetic drugs that overcome the disadvantages of therapeutic peptides.The article is part of the themed issue 'Evolutionary ecology of arthropod antimicrobial peptides'.

  11. Nanostructured mesoporous silica: new perspectives for fighting antimicrobial resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voicu, Georgeta; Dogaru, Ionuţ; Meliţă, Daniela; Meştercă, Raluca; Spirescu, Vera; Stan, Eliza; Tote, Eliza; Mogoantă, Laurenţiu; Mogoşanu, George Dan; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Truşcă, Roxana; Vasile, Eugeniu; Iordache, Florin; Chifiriuc, Mariana-Carmen; Holban, Alina Maria

    2015-05-01

    This paper investigates the antimicrobial potential of nanostructured mesoporous silica (NMS) functionalized with essential oils (EOs) and antibiotics (ATBs). The NMS networks were obtained by the basic procedure from cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and tetraethyl orthosilicate in the form of granules with diameters ranging from 100 to 300 nm with an average pore diameter of 2.2 nm, as confirmed by the BET-TEM analyses. The Salvia officinalis (SO) and Coriandrum sativum (CS) EOs and the streptomycin and neomycin ATBs were loaded in the NMS pores. TG analysis was performed in order to estimate the amount of the entrapped volatile EOs. The results of the biological analyses revealed that NMS/SO and NMS/CS exhibited a very good antimicrobial activity to an extent comparable or even superior to the one triggered by ATB, and a good in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility. Due to their regular pores, high biocompatibility, antimicrobial activity, and capacity to stabilize the volatile EOs, the obtained NMS can be used as an efficient drug delivery system for further biomedical applications.

  12. Antimicrobial activities of endophytic fungi isolated from Ophiopogon japonicus (Liliaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Hanqiao

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug resistance in bacteria has become a global concern and the search for new antibacterial agents is urgent and ongoing. Endophytes provide an abundant reservoir of bioactive metabolites for medicinal exploitation, and an increasing number of novel compounds are being isolated from endophytic fungi. Ophiopogon japonicus, containing compounds with antibacterial activity, is a traditional Chinese medicinal plant used for eliminating phlegm, relieving coughs, latent heat in the lungs, and alleviating diabetes mellitus. We investigated the antimicrobial activities of 30 strains of O. japonicus. Methods Fungal endophytes were isolated from roots and stems of O. japonicus collected from Chongqing City, southwestern China. Mycelial extracts (MC and fermentation broth (FB were tested for antimicrobial activity using peptide deformylase (PDF inhibition fluorescence assays and MTT cell proliferation assays. Results A total of 30 endophytic strains were isolated from O. japonicus; 22 from roots and eight from stems. 53.33% of the mycelial extracts (MC and 33.33% of the fermentation broths (FB displayed potent inhibition of PDF. 80% of MC and 33.33% of FB significantly inhibited Staphylococcus aureus. 70% of MC and 36.67% of FB showed strong activities against Cryptococcus neoformans. None showed influence on Escherichia coli. Conclusion The secondary metabolites of endophytic fungi from O. japonicus are potential antimicrobial agents.

  13. Antimicrobial peptides: key components of the innate immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasupuleti, Mukesh; Schmidtchen, Artur; Malmsten, Martin

    2012-06-01

    Life-threatening infectious diseases are on their way to cause a worldwide crisis, as treating them effectively is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) form an ancient type of innate immunity found universally in all living organisms, providing a principal first-line of defense against the invading pathogens. The unique diverse function and architecture of AMPs has attracted considerable attention by scientists, both in terms of understanding the basic biology of the innate immune system, and as a tool in the design of molecular templates for new anti-infective drugs. AMPs are gene-encoded short (antimicrobial activity. AMPs have been the subject of natural evolution, as have the microbes, for hundreds of millions of years. Despite this long history of co-evolution, AMPs have not lost their ability to kill or inhibit the microbes totally, nor have the microbes learnt to avoid the lethal punch of AMPs. AMPs therefore have potential to provide an important breakthrough and form the basis for a new class of antibiotics. In this review, we would like to give an overview of cationic antimicrobial peptides, origin, structure, functions, and mode of action of AMPs, which are highly expressed and found in humans, as well as a brief discussion about widely abundant, well characterized AMPs in mammals, in addition to pharmaceutical aspects and the additional functions of AMPs.

  14. Inhaled formulations and pulmonary drug delivery systems for respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qi Tony; Leung, Sharon Shui Yee; Tang, Patricia; Parumasivam, Thaigarajan; Loh, Zhi Hui; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2015-05-01

    Respiratory infections represent a major global health problem. They are often treated by parenteral administrations of antimicrobials. Unfortunately, systemic therapies of high-dose antimicrobials can lead to severe adverse effects and this calls for a need to develop inhaled formulations that enable targeted drug delivery to the airways with minimal systemic drug exposure. Recent technological advances facilitate the development of inhaled anti-microbial therapies. The newer mesh nebulisers have achieved minimal drug residue, higher aerosolisation efficiencies and rapid administration compared to traditional jet nebulisers. Novel particle engineering and intelligent device design also make dry powder inhalers appealing for the delivery of high-dose antibiotics. In view of the fact that no new antibiotic entities against multi-drug resistant bacteria have come close to commercialisation, advanced formulation strategies are in high demand for combating respiratory 'super bugs'.

  15. Club Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... uses. Other uses of these drugs are abuse. Club drugs are also sometimes used as "date rape" drugs, to make someone unable to say no to or fight back against sexual assault. Abusing these drugs can ...

  16. Cholic acid derivatives: novel antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, P B; Li, C

    2000-02-01

    Mimics of squalamine and polymyxin B (PMB) have been prepared from cholic acid in hope of finding new antimicrobial agents. The squalamine mimics include the polyamine and sulphate functionalities found in the parent antibiotic, however, the positions relative to the steroid nucleus have been exchanged. The PMB mimics include the conservation of functionality among the polymyxin family of antibiotics, the primary amine groups and a hydrophobic chain. Although the squalamine and PMB mimics are morphologically dissimilar, they display similar activities. Both are simple to prepare and demonstrate broad spectrum antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms. Specific examples may be inactive alone, yet effectively permeabilise the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria rendering them sensitive to hydrophobic antibiotics. Problems associated with some of the squalamine and PMB mimics stem from their haemolytic activity and interactions with serum proteins, however, examples exist without these side effects which can sensitise Gram-negative bacteria to hydrophobic antibiotics.

  17. Antimicrobial Activity of Commercial Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajjar, Priyanka; Pettee, Brian; Britt, David W.; Huang, Wenjie; Johnson, William P.; Anderson, Anne J.

    2009-07-01

    Engineered nanoparticles are finding increased use in applications ranging from biosensors to prophylactic antimicrobials embedded in socks. The release of heavy metal-containing nanoparticles (NP) into the environment may be harmful to the efficacy of beneficial microbes that function in element cycling, pollutant degradation, and plant growth. Antimicrobial activity of commercial NP of Ag, CuO, and ZnO is demonstrated here against the beneficial soil microbe, Pseudomonas putida KT2440, which was modified to serve as a bioluminescent sentinel organism. "As manufactured" preparations of nano- Ag, -CuO, and -ZnO caused rapid, dose dependent loss of light output in the biosensor. Bulk equivalents of these products showed no inhibitory activity, indicating that particle size was determinant in activity.

  18. APD: the Antimicrobial Peptide Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Wang, Guangshun

    2004-01-01

    An antimicrobial peptide database (APD) has been established based on an extensive literature search. It contains detailed information for 525 peptides (498 antibacterial, 155 antifungal, 28 antiviral and 18 antitumor). APD provides interactive interfaces for peptide query, prediction and design. It also provides statistical data for a select group of or all the peptides in the database. Peptide information can be searched using keywords such as peptide name, ID, length, net charge, hydrophobic percentage, key residue, unique sequence motif, structure and activity. APD is a useful tool for studying the structure-function relationship of antimicrobial peptides. The database can be accessed via a web-based browser at the URL: http://aps.unmc.edu/AP/main.html.

  19. Antimicrobial peptides in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yanhua; Zhang, Kai; Schluesener, Hermann J

    2010-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an evolutionarily conserved component of the innate immune system of many species. The brain is an immunologically privileged organ but can produce a robust immune response against pathogens and cell debris, promoting rapid and efficient clearance. AMPs may be critically involved in the innate immune system of the brain. Though the mechanisms of AMPs' action in the brain still need further elucidation, many studies have shown that AMPs are multifunctional molecules in the brain. In addition to antimicrobial action, they take part in congenital and adaptive immune reactions (immunoregulation), function as signaling molecules in tissue repair, inflammation and other important processes through different mechanisms, and they might, in addition, become diagnostic markers of brain disease.

  20. Combination therapy: the propitious rationale for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phougat, Neetu; Khatri, Savita; Singh, Anu; Dangi, Mrridula; Kumar, Manish; Dabur, Rajesh; Chhillar, Anil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic options for many infections are extremely limited and at crisis point. We run the risk of entering a second pre-antibiotic era. There had been no miracle drug for the patients infected by resistant microbial pathogens. Most of the very few new drugs under development have problems with their toxicity, or pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. We are already decades behind in the discovery, characterization and development of new antimicrobials. In that scenario, we could not imagine surviving without newer and effective antimicrobial agents. Bacteria have been the champions of evolution and are still evolving continuously, where they pose serious challenges for humans. Along with the crisis of evolving resistance, the condition is made worst by the meager drug pipeline for new antimicrobials. Despite ongoing efforts only 2 new antibiotics (Telavancin in 2009 and Ceftaroline fosamil in 2010) have been approved since 2009 pipeline status report of Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA). Recent approval of new combination based antiviral drugs such as Stribild (combination of four drugs for HIV treatment) and Menhibrix (combination vaccine to prevent meningococcal disease and Haemophilus influenzae type b in children) proves that combination therapy is still the most promising approach to combat the ever evolving pathogens. Combination therapy involves the drug repurposing and regrouping of the existing antimicrobial agents to provide a synergistic approach for management of infectious diseases. This review article is an effort to highlight the challenges in new drug development and potential of combination drug therapy to deal with them.

  1. A European study on the relationship between antimicrobial use and antimicrobial resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronzwaer, SLAM; Cars, O; Buchholz, U; Molstad, S; Goettsch, W; Veldhuijzen, IK; Kool, JL; Sprenger, MJW; Degener, JE

    2002-01-01

    In Europe, antimicrobial resistance has been monitored since 1998 by the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System (EARSS). We examined the relationship between penicillin nonsusceptibility of invasive isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae and antibiotic sales. Information was collected o

  2. Antimicrobial activities of squalamine mimics.

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial properties of compounds with structural features that were designed to mimic those of squalamine, an antibiotic isolated from the stomach of the dogfish shark. The mimics, like squalamine, are sterol-polyamine conjugates. Unlike squalamine, the mimics were simple to prepare, at high yield, from readily available starting materials. Several squalamine mimics showed activity against gram-negative rods, gram-positive cocci including methicillin-resistant Staphyl...

  3. APD: the Antimicrobial Peptide Database

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhe; Wang, Guangshun

    2004-01-01

    An antimicrobial peptide database (APD) has been established based on an extensive literature search. It contains detailed information for 525 peptides (498 antibacterial, 155 antifungal, 28 antiviral and 18 antitumor). APD provides interactive interfaces for peptide query, prediction and design. It also provides statistical data for a select group of or all the peptides in the database. Peptide information can be searched using keywords such as peptide name, ID, length, net charge, hydrophob...

  4. Antimicrobial stewardship in wound care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipsky, Benjamin A; Dryden, Matthew; Gottrup, Finn

    2016-01-01

    of experts in infectious diseases/clinical microbiology (from the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy) and wound management (from the European Wound Management Association) who, after thoroughly reviewing the available literature and holding teleconferences, jointly produced this guidance document...... be as narrowly focused, and administered for the shortest duration, as possible. AMS teams should be interdisciplinary, especially including specialists in infection and pharmacy, with input from administrative personnel, the treating clinicians and their patients. CONCLUSIONS: Available evidence is limited...

  5. Antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadlec, Kristina; Schwarz, Stefan

    2012-08-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, Staphylococcus intermedius and Staphylococcus delphini together comprise the S. intermedius group (SIG). Within the SIG, S. pseudintermedius represents the major pathogenic species and is involved in a wide variety of infections, mainly in dogs, but to a lesser degree also in other animal species and humans. Antimicrobial agents are commonly applied to control S. pseudintermedius infections; however, during recent years S. pseudintermedius isolates have been identified that are meticillin-resistant and have also proved to be resistant to most of the antimicrobial agents approved for veterinary applications. This review deals with the genetic basis of antimicrobial resistance properties in S. pseudintermedius and other SIG members. A summary of the known resistance genes and their association with mobile genetic elements is given, as well as an update of the known resistance-mediating mutations. These data show that, in contrast to other staphylococcal species, S. pseudintermedius seems to prefer transposon-borne resistance genes, which are then incorporated into the chromosomal DNA, over plasmid-located resistance genes.

  6. Antimicrobial resistance risk factors and characterisation of faecal E. coli isolated from healthy Labrador retrievers in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Vanessa M; Pinchbeck, Gina L; Nuttall, Tim; McEwan, Neil; Dawson, Susan; Williams, Nicola J

    2015-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistant bacteria are increasingly detected from canine samples but few studies have examined commensal isolates in healthy community dogs. We aimed to characterise faecal Escherichia coli from 73 healthy non-veterinarian-visiting and non-antimicrobial treated Labrador retrievers, recruited from dog shows in the North West United Kingdom between November 2010 and June 2011. Each enrolled dog provided one faecal sample for our study. E. coli were isolated from 72/73 (99%) faecal samples. Disc diffusion susceptibility tests were determined for a range of antimicrobials, including phenotypic extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and AmpC-production. PCR assay detected phylogenetic groups and resistance genes (blaCTX-M, blaSHV, blaTEM, blaOXA, blaCIT, qnr), and conjugation experiments were performed to investigate potential transfer of mobile genetic elements. Multivariable logistic regression examined potential risk factors from owner-questionnaires for the presence of antimicrobial resistant faecal E. coli. Antimicrobial resistant, multi-drug resistant (≥3 antimicrobial classes; MDR) and AmpC-producing E. coli were detected in 63%, 30% and 16% of samples, respectively. ESBL-producing E. coli was detected from only one sample and conjugation experiments found that blaCTX-M and blaCIT were transferred from commensal E. coli to a recipient strain. Most isolates were phylogenetic groups B1 and A. Group B2 isolates were associated with lower prevalence of resistance to at least one antimicrobial (PE. coli were surprisingly prevalent in this group of non-antimicrobial treated and non-veterinarian-visiting dogs and consumption of raw meat was a significant risk factor for antimicrobial resistance. These findings are of concern due to the increasing popularity of raw-meat canine diets, and the potential for opportunistic infection, zoonotic transmission and transmission of antimicrobial resistant determinants from commensal isolates to potential pathogenic

  7. Antimicrobial polymer films for food packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concilio, S.; Piotto, S.; Sessa, L.; Iannelli, P.; Porta, A.; Calabrese, E. C.; Galdi, M. R.; Incarnato, L.

    2012-07-01

    New antimicrobial polymeric systems were realized introducing new antimicrobial azo compounds in PP and LDPE matrices. The polymeric materials containing different percentage of azo compounds were mold-casted and the obtained film were tested in vitro against Gram+ and Gram- bacteria and fungi. These results hold promise for the fabrication of bacteria-resistant polymer films by means of simple melt processing with antimicrobial azo-dyes.

  8. Insect inducible antimicrobial peptides and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzati-Tabrizi, Reyhaneh; Farrokhi, Naser; Talaei-Hassanloui, Reza; Alavi, Seyed Mehdi; Hosseininaveh, Vahid

    2013-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found as important components of the innate immune system (host defense) of all invertebrates. These peptides can be constitutively expressed or induced in response to microbial infections. Indeed, they vary in their amino acid sequences, potency and antimicrobial activity spectra. The smaller AMPs act greatly by disrupting the structure or function of microbial cell membranes. Here, the insect innate immune system with emphasis on inducible antimicrobial peptide properties against microbial invaders has been discussed.

  9. In vitro studies of Dermatophilus congolensis antimicrobial susceptibility by determining minimal inhibitory and bacteriocidal concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermoso de Mendoza, J; Arenas, A; Rey, J; Alonso, J M; Gil, M C; Naranjo, G; Hermoso de Mendoza, M

    1994-01-01

    The Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and Minimal Bacteriocidal Concentration (MBC) of 19 antimicrobials on 16 isolates of D. congolensis were determined. The potential field efficacy of the agents was evaluated by comparing the results with serum levels of drug unbound to proteins and the in vitro and in vivo findings of other authors. A modified standard microtechnique was used for serial dilution-antimicrobial sensitivity and found to be easy and reproducible. Erythromycin, spiramycin, penicillin G, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, the streptomycin, amoxicillin, the tetracyclines and novobiocin had high serum concentrations in comparison with their MBCs and were shown to have potential use for the treatment of dermatophilosis.

  10. Isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from dental office environments and units in Barretos, state of São Paulo, Brazil, and analysis of their susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs Isolamento de cepas de Pseudomonas aeruginosa provenientes do meio ambiente e de equipos dentarios em clinicas dentarias em Barretos, São Paulo, Brasil; analises da susceptibilidade das cepas a drogas antimicrobianas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia de Oliveira

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A wide variety of opportunistic pathogens has been detected in the tubing supplying water to odontological equipment, in special in the biofilm lining of these tubes. Among these pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections, is frequently found in water lines supplying dental units. In the present work, 160 samples of water, and 200 fomite samples from forty dental units were collected in the city of Barretos, State of São Paulo, Brazil and evaluated between January and July, 2005. Seventy-six P. aeruginosa strains, isolated from the dental environment (5 strains and water system (71 strains, were tested for susceptibility to six antimicrobial drugs most frequently used against P. aeruginosa infections. Susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, followed by meropenem was the predominant profile. The need for effective means of reducing the microbial burden within dental unit water lines is emphasized, and the risk of exposure and cross-infection in dental practice, in special when caused by opportunistic pathogens like P. aeruginosa, are highlighted.Uma ampla variedade de patógenos oportunistas tem sido detectadas nos tubos de alimentação de água dos equipos odontológicos, particularmente no biofilme formado na superfície do tubo. Entre os patógenos oportunistas encontrados nos tubos de água, Pseudomonas aeruginosa é reconhecida como uma das principais causadoras de infecções nosocomiais. Foram coletadas 160 amostras de água e 200 amostras de fomites em quarenta clinicas odontológicas na cidade de Barretos, São Paulo, Brasil, durante o período de Janeiro a Julho de 2005. Setenta e seis cepas de P. aeruginosa, isoladas a partir dos fomites (5 cepas e das amostras de água (71 cepas, foram analisadas quanto à susceptibilidade à seis drogas antimicrobianas freqüentemente utilizadas para o tratamento de infecções provocadas por P. aeruginosa. As principais suscetibilidades observadas foram para a

  11. Evaluation of antimicrobial efficacy of flavonoids of Withania somnifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study antimicrobial activity of Withania somnifera L. Dunal (Solanaceae has been evaluated against selected pathogens. Free and bound flavonoids of different parts (root, stem, leaf and fruit of W. somnifera have been studied for their antimicrobial activity using disc diffusion assay against three Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli MTCC 46, Proteus mirabilis MTCC 3310 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa MTCC 1934, one Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus MTCC 3160 and three fungi (Candida albicans MTCC 183, Aspergillus flavus MTCC 277 and Aspergillus niger MTCC 282. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of the extracts was evaluated through micro broth dilution method, while minimum bactericidal/fungicidal concentration was determined by sub culturing the relevant samples. C. albicans was found to be the most susceptible organism followed by S. aureus, P. mirabilis, E. coli and P. aeruginosa. Out of the tested organisms, A flavus and A. niger were observed to be resistant as none of the tested extracts showed activity against them. Total activity (TA of extracts (ml/g against each sensitive pathogens was also evaluated. Bound flavonoid extract of root showed best activity against C. albicans (IZ 30, MIC 0.039, MFC 0.039, respectively. However all the microorganisms were found to be sensitive against the extracts tested. Total activity of bound flavonoid extract of root was found to be same for E.coli, P. mirabilis, S. aureus and C. albicans (153.84 ml/g. Results of the present study reveal that extracts of W. somnifera showing great antimicrobial potential against test microorganisms may be exploited for future antimicrobial drugs.

  12. Effect of preweaned dairy calf housing system on antimicrobial resistance in commensal Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, R V; Siler, J D; Ng, J C; Davis, M A; Warnick, L D

    2014-12-01

    Group housing of preweaned dairy calves is a growing practice in the United States. The objective of this practice is to increase the average daily gain of calves in a healthy and humane environment while reducing labor requirements. However, feeding protocols, commingling of calves, and occurrence of disease in different calf-housing systems may affect the prevalence of antimicrobial drug-resistant bacteria. This study evaluated the effect of a group pen-housing system and individual pen-housing system on antimicrobial resistance trends in fecal Escherichia coli of preweaned dairy calves and on the prevalence of environmental Salmonella. Twelve farms from central New York participated in the study: 6 farms using an individual pen-housing system (IP), and 6 farms using a group pen-housing system (GP). A maximum of 3 fecal E. coli isolates per calf was tested for susceptibility to 12 antimicrobial drugs using a Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion assay. Calves in GP had a significantly higher proportion of E. coli resistant to ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid, whereas calves in IP had a significantly higher proportion of E. coli resistant to ampicillin, ceftiofur, gentamycin, streptomycin, and tetracycline. Calf-housing system had an effect on resistance to individual antimicrobial drugs in E. coli, but no clear-cut advantage to either system was noted with regard to overall resistance frequency. No outstanding difference in the richness and diversity of resistant phenotypes was observed between the 2 calf-housing systems.

  13. Prevalence of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes in Salmonella spp. isolated from commercial chickens and human clinical isolates from South Africa and Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver T. Zishiri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Salmonellosis is a significant public health concern around the world. The injudicious use of antimicrobial agents in poultry production for treatment, growth promotion and prophylaxis has resulted in the emergence of drug resistant strains of Salmonella. The current study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes from Salmonella isolated from South African and Brazilian broiler chickens as well as human clinical isolates. Out of a total of 200 chicken samples that were collected from South Africa 102 (51% tested positive for Salmonella using the InvA gene. Of the overall 146 Salmonella positive samples that were screened for the iroB gene most of them were confirmed to be Salmonella enterica with the following prevalence rates: 85% of human clinical samples, 68.6% of South African chicken isolates and 70.8% of Brazilian chicken samples. All Salmonella isolates obtained were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing with 10 antibiotics. Salmonella isolates from South African chickens exhibited resistance to almost all antimicrobial agents used, such as tetracycline (93%, trimethoprim-sulfamthoxazole (84%, trimethoprim (78.4%, kanamycin (74%, gentamicin (48%, ampicillin (47%, amoxicillin (31%, chloramphenicol (31%, erythromycin (18% and streptomycin (12%. All samples were further subjected to PCR in order to screen some common antimicrobial and virulence genes of interest namely spiC, pipD, misL, orfL, pse-1, tet A, tet B, ant (3"-la, sul 1 and sul. All Salmonella positive isolates exhibited resistance to at least one antimicrobial agent; however, antimicrobial resistance patterns demonstrated that multiple drug resistance was prevalent. The findings provide evidence that broiler chickens are colonised by pathogenic Salmonella harbouring antimicrobial resistance genes. Therefore, it is evident that there is a need for prudent use of antimicrobial agents in poultry production systems in

  14. Novel Halogenated Pyrazine-Based Chalcones as Potential Antimicrobial Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Kucerova-Chlupacova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chalcones, i.e., compounds with the chemical pattern of 1,3-diphenylprop-2-en-1-ones, exert a wide range of bio-activities, e.g., antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, anti-infective etc. Our research group has been focused on pyrazine analogues of chalcones; several series have been synthesized and tested in vitro on antifungal and antimycobacterial activity. The highest potency was exhibited by derivatives with electron withdrawing groups (EWG in positions 2 and 4 of the ring B. As halogens also have electron withdrawing properties, novel halogenated derivatives were prepared by Claisen-Schmidt condensation. All compounds were submitted for evaluation of their antifungal and antibacterial activity, including their antimycobacterial effect. In the antifungal assay against eight strains of selected fungi, growth inhibition of Candida glabrata and Trichophyton interdigitale (formerly T. mentagrophytes was shown by non-alkylated derivatives with 2-bromo or 2-chloro substitution. In the panel of selected bacteria, 2-chloro derivatives showed the highest inhibitory effect on Staphylococcus sp. In addition, all products were also screened for their antimycobacterial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37RV My 331/88, M. kansasii My 235/80, M. avium 152/80 and M. smegmatis CCM 4622. Some of the examined compounds, inhibited growth of M. kansasii and M. smegmatis with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs comparable with those of isoniazid.

  15. Hybrid Nanostructures Containing Sulfadiazine Modified Chitosan as Antimicrobial Drug Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanel Silvestru Munteanu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan (CH nanofibrous structures containing sulfadiazine (SDZ or sulfadiazine modified chitosan (SCH in the form of functional nanoparticles attached to nanofibers (hybrid nanostructures were obtained by mono-axial and coaxial electrospinning. The mono-axial design consisted of a SDZ/CH mixture solution fed through a single nozzle while the coaxial design consisted of SCH and CH solutions separately supplied to the inner and outer nozzle (or in reverse order. The CH ability to form nanofibers assured the formation of a nanofiber mesh, while SDZ and SCH, both in form of suspensions in the electrospun solution, assured the formation of active nanoparticles which remained attached to the CH nanofiber mesh after the electrospinning process. The obtained nanostructures were morphologically characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM. The SDZ release profiles and kinetics were analyzed. The SDZ or SCH nanoparticles loosely attached at the surface of the nanofibers, provide a burst release in the first 20 min, which is important to stop the possible initial infection in a wound, while the SDZ and SCH from the nanoparticles which are better confined (or even encapsulated into the CH nanofibers would be slowly released with the erosion/disruption of the CH nanofiber mesh.

  16. From microbial gene essentiality to novel antimicrobial drug targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mobegi, Fredrick M; van Hijum, Sacha Aft; Burghout, Peter; Bootsma, Hester J; de Vries, Stefan Pw; Jongh, Christa E van der Gaast-de; Simonetti, Elles; Langereis, Jeroen D; Hermans, Peter Wm; de Jonge, Marien I; Zomer, Aldert

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bacterial respiratory tract infections, mainly caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis are among the leading causes of global mortality and morbidity. Increased resistance of these pathogens to existing antibiotics necessitates the search for

  17. [Adequate antimicrobial drug use in a third level pediatric hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte-Raya, Fidencia; Rodríguez-Lechuga, Manuel; De Anda-Gómez, Manuel Alberto; Granados-Ramírez, Martha Patricia; Vargas-Rodríguez, Alexia Gisselle

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: el uso inadecuado de antimicrobianos contribuye al desarrollo de la resistencia bacteriana, reduce la efectividad de los tratamientos establecidos e incrementa los gastos y la mortalidad por enfermedades infecciosas. El objetivo de este artículo es evaluar si el uso de antimicrobianos en pacientes pediátricos hospitalizados se realiza de forma adecuada. Métodos: estudio epidemiológico observacional, transversal en la UMAE No. 48 de León, Guanajuato. Muestra no probabilística, con un 60 % de tratamientos adecuados esperados, desviación estándar 4. Se utilizó la técnica estadística de análisis de distribución de frecuencias por calificación final de tratamiento administrado: profiláctico, terapéutico, restringido, justificado y adecuado. Se realiza chi cuadrada para comparación de porcentajes. Resultados: se evalúan 283 prescripciones antimicrobianas en 217 pacientes, hombres (53 %) y mujeres (47 %). De los cuales fueron tratamientos adecuados: general 51.2 %, justificado 66 %, terapéutico 53.4 %, restringido 40.8 % y profiláctico 48 %. Comparación de porcentajes con chi cuadrada, asociación estadística significativa de tratamiento adecuado en neonatos (chi cuadrada 8.287; p 0.004) y tratamiento inadecuado en prematuros (chi cuadrada 4.853; p 0.028) con p antimicrobianos se prescriben de forma adecuada.

  18. Antimicrobial activity of Gymnema sylvestre leaf extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satdive, R K; Abhilash, P; Fulzele, Devanand P

    2003-12-01

    The ethanolic extract of Gymnema sylvestre leaves demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Bacillus pumilis, B. subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus and inactivity against Proteus vulgaris and Escherichia coli.

  19. Synthesis of Aminolaurylpyridinium Chloride as Antimicrobial Agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Tao; SONG Xin-yuan; SUN Gang

    2008-01-01

    4-amino-laurylpyridinium chloride (ALPC) was synthesized and employed in antimicrobial finishing of wool fabrics. The structures of the salt was fully characterized by using FTIR, 1 H-NMR and 13 C-NMR analysis. The effects of pH conditions of finishing baths, finishing time and temperature, and salt concentrations were investigated. ALPC could form ionic interactions with anionic groups on wool, which contribute to durable antimicrobial functions. The finished wool fabrics exhibited antimicrobial efficacy against Escherichia coli. The washing durability of antimicrobial functions on the finished wool fabrics was also studied.

  20. Molecular cloning, expression and in vitro analysis of soluble cationic synthetic antimicrobial peptide from salt-inducible Escherichia coli GJ1158

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jawahar Babu Peravali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides are the upcoming therapeutic molecules as alternative drugs to the existing antibiotics owing to their potent action against pathogenic microorganisms. In this study, to obtain an antimicrobial peptide with a broad range of activity, the synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptide was designed by using in silico tools viz., antimicrobial peptide database, protparam, hierarchical neural network. Later, the peptide was translated back into a core nucleotide sequence and the gene for the peptide was constructed by overlapping PCR. The amplified gene was cloned into pRSET–A vector and transformed into salt inducible expression host E. coli GJ1158. The expression results show high yields of soluble recombinant fusion peptide (0.52 g/L from salt-inducible E. coli. The recombinant peptide was purified by the IMAC purification system and cleaved by enterokinase. The digested product was further purified and 0.12 g/L of biologically active recombinant cationic antimicrobial peptide was obtained. In vitro analysis of the purified peptide demonstrated high antimicrobial activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria devoid of hemolytic activity. Therefore, this synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptide could serves as an promising agent over chemical antibiotics. In this study, a synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptide was designed, cloned and expressed from salt-inducible E. coli GJ1158 using cost effective media in the large scale production of antimicrobial peptide and its biological activity was analysed against different Gram positive and negative organisms.