WorldWideScience

Sample records for antimetabolites

  1. Antimetabolites: Established cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjul Tiwari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell death has been divided into two main types: programmed cell death, in which the cell plays an active role, and passive (necrotic cell death. Senescence arrest, accelerated senescence and differentiation are also responses that can be induced in response to DNA-damaging agents. Apoptosis may occur as a primary event following chemotherapy, in which genes that regulate apoptosis will influence the outcome of therapy or, alternatively, as an event secondary to the induction of lethal damage that involves the subsequent processing of cellular damage. The particular type of response induced is highly dependent on the agent and dose employed, the type of DNA damage induced as well as the genetic and cellular phenotypes. It has been proposed that apoptosis may play a lesser role in tumor response to radiation in comparison with the induction of cell death through mitotic catastrophe or a senescence-like irreversible growth arrest. However, in comparison with the induction of apoptosis, there is a lack of as much definitive information on other cell death processes that occur in cancer cells in response to chemotherapeutic agents, including antimetabolites. This article reviews what is known about these processes at the present time in response to experimental or clinically used agents that are analogs of 5-fluorouracil, cytidine or purines, hydroxyurea, or that belong to the family of folate antagonists.

  2. Outcome of trabeculectomies without adjunctive antimetabolites ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Outcome Measure: Successful intraocular pressure control defined as IOP less than 22 mmHg or a reduction of 30% if pre-operative pressure was already less than 22mmHg. Results: There were ... Lower IOP levels needed to control progressive visual field loss may require the use antimetabolites. Keywords: intraocular ...

  3. Optimisation of cancer therapy : glucose antimetabolites as adjuvants in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, V.K.

    1980-01-01

    Inhibiting the repair of radiation damage in the neoplastic cells and thus differentially increasing radiation damage can be one of the ways to improve efficiency of radiotherapy of cancer. The glucose antimetabolite 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) which is known to inhibit glycolysis and ATP production in different cell systems, has been studied as to its effects on energy supply and repair of radiation damage in wild type yeast cells which are analogous to normal cells, and in respirator-deficient (RD) mutants which are analogous to hypoxic tumour cells. Results indicate that : (1) 2-DG/glucose in molar cencentration ratio of 1 completely inhibits the repair of potentially lethal X-radiation damage in RD mutants, (2) 2-DG enhances repair of sublethal radiation damage in wild-type yeast cells, (3) 2-DG induces a sharp fall in ATP level in RD-mutants as compared to that in wild type cells, (4) 2-DG inhibits repair of potentially lethal X-radiation damage in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells, (5) 2-DG induces greater cell loss from the hypoxic as well as euoxic tumour cell population of sarcoma tumour-180 in mice, and (6) 2-DG increases the survival of normal mice when given whole-body gamma irradiaition. These results, therefore, show that 2-DG may differentially inhibit the repair process in tumours while enhancing repair in normal tissues. (M.G.B.)

  4. Antimetabolites in cataract surgery to prevent failure of a previous trabeculectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Roger E; Crichton, Andrew; Thomas, Bennett C

    2014-07-28

    Patients having cataract surgery have often earlier undergone a trabeculectomy for glaucoma. However, cataract surgery may be associated with failure of the previous glaucoma surgery and antimetabolites may be used with cataract surgery to prevent such failure. There is no systematic review on whether antimetabolites with cataract surgery prevent failure of a previous trabeculectomy. To assess the effects of antimetabolites with cataract surgery on functioning of a previous trabeculectomy. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 5), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to June 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to June 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to June 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 10 June 2014. We also searched the Science Citation Index database (July 2013) and reference lists of potentially relevant studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of antimetabolites with cataract surgery in people with a functioning trabeculectomy. Two review authors independently reviewed the titles and abstracts from the electronic searches. Two review authors independently assessed relevant full-text articles and entered data. We identified no RCTs to test the effectiveness of antimetabolites with cataract surgery in individuals with the intention of preventing failure of a previous trabeculectomy. There are no RCTs of antimetabolites with cataract surgery in people with a functioning trabeculectomy. Appropriately powered RCTs

  5. Gene set analysis of purine and pyrimidine antimetabolites cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridley, Brooke L; Batzler, Anthony; Li, Liang; Li, Fang; Matimba, Alice; Jenkins, Gregory D; Ji, Yuan; Wang, Liewei; Weinshilboum, Richard M

    2011-11-01

    Responses to therapies, either with regard to toxicities or efficacy, are expected to involve complex relationships of gene products within the same molecular pathway or functional gene set. Therefore, pathways or gene sets, as opposed to single genes, may better reflect the true underlying biology and may be more appropriate units for analysis of pharmacogenomic studies. Application of such methods to pharmacogenomic studies may enable the detection of more subtle effects of multiple genes in the same pathway that may be missed by assessing each gene individually. A gene set analysis of 3821 gene sets is presented assessing the association between basal messenger RNA expression and drug cytotoxicity using ethnically defined human lymphoblastoid cell lines for two classes of drugs: pyrimidines [gemcitabine (dFdC) and arabinoside] and purines [6-thioguanine and 6-mercaptopurine]. The gene set nucleoside-diphosphatase activity was found to be significantly associated with both dFdC and arabinoside, whereas gene set γ-aminobutyric acid catabolic process was associated with dFdC and 6-thioguanine. These gene sets were significantly associated with the phenotype even after adjusting for multiple testing. In addition, five associated gene sets were found in common between the pyrimidines and two gene sets for the purines (3',5'-cyclic-AMP phosphodiesterase activity and γ-aminobutyric acid catabolic process) with a P value of less than 0.0001. Functional validation was attempted with four genes each in gene sets for thiopurine and pyrimidine antimetabolites. All four genes selected from the pyrimidine gene sets (PSME3, CANT1, ENTPD6, ADRM1) were validated, but only one (PDE4D) was validated for the thiopurine gene sets. In summary, results from the gene set analysis of pyrimidine and purine therapies, used often in the treatment of various cancers, provide novel insight into the relationship between genomic variation and drug response.

  6. Trabeculectomy bleb needling and antimetabolite administration practices in the UK: a glaucoma specialist national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercieca, Karl; Drury, Brett; Bhargava, Archana; Fenerty, Cecilia

    2017-12-06

    To evaluate, describe and quantify the diversity in postoperative antimetabolite administration and bleb needling practices among glaucoma specialists performing trabeculectomy surgery within the UK and Ireland. A cross-sectional online survey was distributed to all consultant glaucoma specialists who are on the United Kingdom and Eire Glaucoma Society (UKEGS) contact list. Participants were asked specific questions about their current practices for post-trabeculectomy antimetabolite administration followed by questions directly related to bleb needling procedures. 60 (83%) of UKEGS glaucoma subspecialty consultants completed the survey. 70% of respondents administered 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in their clinic room while 30% used a separate treatment room. Doses of 5-FU varied considerably but 70% used 5 mg as standard. Techniques used to reduce corneal toxicity included precipitation with amethocaine (44%) or benoxinate (14%), saline wash (14%) and modified injection technique (8%). Topical antibiotics and/or betadine were used to prevent infection following 5-FU injection in just over 50%. Bleb needling was exclusively performed in operating theatre by 56% of respondents and solely at the slit lamp in the clinic room by 12%. A further 30% used a combination of both theatre and outpatient clinic rooms. Anti-metabolites used were 5-FU (72%) and mitomycin C (22%) with 12% using either of the two substances. There is a significantly wide variety of current practices for antimetabolite administration and bleb needling within the UK and Ireland. This may be influenced by a glaucoma surgeon's specific experience and audit results as well as particular clinical set-up, availability of antimetabolite and clinic room space. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Resistance to chemotherapeutic antimetabolites: a function of salvage pathway involvement and cellular response to DNA damage.

    OpenAIRE

    Kinsella, A. R.; Smith, D.; Pickard, M.

    1997-01-01

    The inherent or acquired (induced) resistance of certain tumours to cytotoxic drug therapy is a major clinical problem. There are many categories of cytotoxic agent: the antimetabolites, e.g. methotrexate (MTX), N-phosphonacetyl-L-aspartate (PALA), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), 6-mercaptopurine (6-TG), hydroxyurea (HU) and 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (AraC); the alkylating agents, e.g. the nitrogen mustards and nitrosoureas; the antibiotics, e.g. doxorubicin and mitomycin C; the plant alkaloid...

  8. The Antimetabolite ara-CTP Blocks Long-Term Memory of Conditioned Taste Aversion

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jianpeng; Ren, Keqin; Pérez, Javier; Silva, Alcino J.; Peña de Ortiz, Sandra

    2003-01-01

    We examined the hypothesis that processes related to DNA recombination and repair are involved in learning and memory. Rats received intracerebroventricular (icv) infusions of the antimetabolite 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine triphosphate (ara-CTP) or its precursor cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) 30 min prior to conditioned taste aversion (CTA) training. Both ara-CTP and ara-C caused significant impairments in long-term memory (LTM) of CTA. Control experiments indicate that the effect of ara-...

  9. Cell death in response to antimetabolites directed at ribonucleotide reductase and thymidylate synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asuncion Valenzuela, Malyn M; Castro, Imilce; Gonda, Amber; Diaz Osterman, Carlos J; Jutzy, Jessica M; Aspe, Jonathan R; Khan, Salma; Neidigh, Jonathan W; Wall, Nathan R

    2015-01-01

    New agent development, mechanistic understanding, and combinatorial partnerships with known and novel modalities continue to be important in the study of pancreatic cancer and its improved treatment. In this study, known antimetabolite drugs such as gemcitabine (ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor) and 5-fluorouracil (thymidylate synthase inhibitor) were compared with novel members of these two drug families in the treatment of a chemoresistant pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1. Cellular survival data, along with protein and messenger ribonucleic acid expression for survivin, XIAP, cIAP1, and cIAP2, were compared from both the cell cytoplasm and from exosomes after single modality treatment. While all antimetabolite drugs killed PANC-1 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner, neither family significantly altered the cytosolic protein level of the four inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) investigated. Survivin, XIAP, cIAP1, and cIAP2 were found localized to exosomes where no significant difference in expression was recorded. This inability for significant and long-lasting expression may be a reason why pancreatic cancer lacks responsiveness to these and other cancer-killing agents. Continued investigation is required to determine the responsibilities of these IAPs in their role in chemoresistance in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:25767396

  10. The antimetabolite ara-CTP blocks long-term memory of conditioned taste aversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianpeng; Ren, Keqin; Pérez, Javier; Silva, Alcino J; Peña de Ortiz, Sandra

    2003-01-01

    We examined the hypothesis that processes related to DNA recombination and repair are involved in learning and memory. Rats received intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusions of the antimetabolite 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine triphosphate (ara-CTP) or its precursor cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) 30 min prior to conditioned taste aversion (CTA) training. Both ara-CTP and ara-C caused significant impairments in long-term memory (LTM) of CTA. Control experiments indicate that the effect of ara-CTP on CTA memory is related to interference with learning. Furthermore, as it was previously demonstrated for the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin, ara-CTP had no effect on CTA memory when it was injected 1 h after training. Importantly, although both ara-CTP and anisomycin significantly blocked LTM in the task, short-term memory (STM) measured 1 h after training was not affected by either of the drugs. Finally, ara-CTP had no effect on in vitro transcription, but it did effectively block nonhomologous DNA end joining (NHEJ) activity of brain protein extracts. We suggest that DNA ligase-mediated DNA recombination and repair processes are necessary for the expression of LTM in the brain.

  11. Structure and Function of Neisseria gonorrhoeae MtrF Illuminates a Class of Antimetabolite Efflux Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chia Su

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Neisseria gonorrhoeae is an obligate human pathogen and the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea. The control of this disease has been compromised by the increasing proportion of infections due to antibiotic-resistant strains, which are growing at an alarming rate. N. gonorrhoeae MtrF is an integral membrane protein that belongs to the AbgT family of transporters for which no structural information is available. Here, we describe the crystal structure of MtrF, revealing a dimeric molecule with architecture distinct from all other families of transporters. MtrF is a bowl-shaped dimer with a solvent-filled basin extending from the cytoplasm to halfway across the membrane bilayer. Each subunit of the transporter contains nine transmembrane helices and two hairpins, posing a plausible pathway for substrate transport. A combination of the crystal structure and biochemical functional assays suggests that MtrF is an antibiotic efflux pump mediating bacterial resistance to sulfonamide antimetabolite drugs.

  12. A Bayesian Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Antimetabolite Therapies for Non-Infectious Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Erica N; Rathinam, Sivakumar R; Kanakath, Anuradha; Thundikandy, Radhika; Babu, Manohar; Lietman, Thomas M; Acharya, Nisha R

    2017-02-01

    To conduct a Bayesian analysis of a randomized clinical trial (RCT) for non-infectious uveitis using expert opinion as a subjective prior belief. A RCT was conducted to determine which antimetabolite, methotrexate or mycophenolate mofetil, is more effective as an initial corticosteroid-sparing agent for the treatment of intermediate, posterior, and pan-uveitis. Before the release of trial results, expert opinion on the relative effectiveness of these two medications was collected via online survey. Members of the American Uveitis Society executive committee were invited to provide an estimate for the relative decrease in efficacy with a 95% credible interval (CrI). A prior probability distribution was created from experts' estimates. A Bayesian analysis was performed using the constructed expert prior probability distribution and the trial's primary outcome. A total of 11 of the 12 invited uveitis specialists provided estimates. Eight of 11 experts (73%) believed mycophenolate mofetil is more effective. The group prior belief was that the odds of treatment success for patients taking mycophenolate mofetil were 1.4-fold the odds of those taking methotrexate (95% CrI 0.03-45.0). The odds of treatment success with mycophenolate mofetil compared to methotrexate was 0.4 from the RCT (95% confidence interval 0.1-1.2) and 0.7 (95% CrI 0.2-1.7) from the Bayesian analysis. A Bayesian analysis combining expert belief with the trial's result did not indicate preference for one drug. However, the wide credible interval leaves open the possibility of a substantial treatment effect. This suggests clinical equipoise necessary to allow a larger, more definitive RCT.

  13. Development of new promising antimetabolite, DFP-11207 with self-controlled toxicity in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukushima M

    2017-06-01

    -FU-related toxicities, such as a decrease in body weights, GI injury, and myelosuppression, especially thrombocytopenia. Taken together, the preclinical evaluation of DFP-11207 strongly indicates that DFP-11207 be a potential new version of the oral fluoropyrimidine prodrug for further clinical development. Keywords: antimetabolite, 5-FU, citrazinic acid, 5-chloro-2,4-dihydroxypyridine, antitumor activity, myelo-toxicity

  14. The Antibiotic CJ-15,801 is an Antimetabolite which Hijacks and then Inhibits CoA Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Westhuyzen, Renier; Hammons, Justin C.; Meier, Jordan L.; Dahesh, Samira; Moolman, Wessel J. A.; Pelly, Stephen C.; Nizet, Victor; Burkart, Michael D.; Strauss, Erick

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The natural product CJ-15,801 is an inhibitor of Staphylococcus aureus, but not other bacteria. Its close structural resemblance to pantothenic acid, the vitamin precursor of coenzyme A (CoA), and its Michael acceptor moiety suggest that it irreversibly inhibits an enzyme involved in CoA biosynthesis or utilization. However, its mode of action and the basis for its specificity have not been elucidated to date. We demonstrate that CJ-15,801 is transformed by the uniquely selective S. aureus pantothenate kinase, the first CoA biosynthetic enzyme, into a substrate for the next enzyme, phosphopantothenoylcysteine synthetase, which is inhibited through formation of a tight-binding structural mimic of its native reaction intermediate. These findings reveal CJ-15,801 as a vitamin biosynthetic pathway antimetabolite with a mechanism similar to that of the sulfonamide antibiotics, and highlight CoA biosynthesis as a viable antimicrobial drug target. PMID:22633408

  15. Outcomes of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease: a subanalysis from a randomized clinical trial of antimetabolite therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Elizabeth; Rathinam, Sivakumar R.; Babu, Manohar; Kanakath, Anuradha; Thundikandy, Radhika; Lee, Salena M.; Browne, Erica N.; Porco, Travis C.; Acharya, Nisha R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report outcomes of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) disease from a clinical trial of antimetabolite therapies. Design Subanalysis from an observer-masked randomized clinical trial for non-infectious intermediate, posterior, and pan- uveitis. Methods Setting clinical practice at Aravind Eye Hospitals, India Patient Population Forty-three of 80 patients enrolled (54%) diagnosed with VKH. Intervention Patients were randomized to either 25mg oral methotrexate weekly or 1g mycophenolate mofetil twice daily, with a corticosteroid taper. Main outcome measures Primary outcome was corticosteroid-sparing control of inflammation at 5 and 6 months. Secondary outcomes included visual acuity, central subfield thickness, and adverse events. Patients were categorized as acute (diagnosis ≤3 months prior to enrollment) or chronic (diagnosis >3 months prior to enrollment). Results Twenty-seven patients were randomized to methotrexate and 16 to mycophenolate mofetil; 30 had acute VKH. The odds of achieving corticosteroid-sparing control of inflammation with methotrexate were 2.5 times (95% CI: 0.6, 9.8; P=0.20) the odds with mycophenolate mofetil, a difference which was not statistically significant. The average improvement in visual acuity was 12.5 Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) letters. On average, visual acuity for patients with acute VKH improved by 14 more ETDRS letters than those with chronic VKH (P<0.001), but there was no difference in corticosteroid-sparing control of inflammation (P=0.99). All 26 eyes with a serous retinal detachment at baseline resolved, and 88% achieved corticosteroid-sparing control of inflammation. Conclusions The majority of patients treated with antimetabolites and corticosteroids were able to achieve corticosteroid-sparing control of inflammation by 6 months. Although patients with acute VKH gained more visual improvement than those with chronic VKH, this did not correspond with a higher rate of controlled inflammation. PMID

  16. Neutron activation analysis for antimetabolites. [in food samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Determination of metal ion contaminants in food samples is studied. A weighed quantity of each sample was digested in a concentrated mixture of nitric, hydrochloric and perchloric acids to affect complete solution of the food products. The samples were diluted with water and the pH adjusted according to the specific analysis performed. The samples were analyzed by neutron activation analysis, polarography, and atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The solid food samples were also analyzed by neutron activation analysis for increased sensitivity and lower levels of detectability. The results are presented in tabular form.

  17. Challenges in implementing individualized medicine illustrated by antimetabolite therapy of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nersting, Jacob; Borst, Louise; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2011-01-01

    illustrated by studies involving childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), where each patient may receive up to 13 different anticancer agents over a period of 2-3 years. The challenges include i) addressing important, but low-frequency outcomes, ii) difficulties in interpreting the impact of single drug...

  18. Challenges in implementing individualized medicine illustrated by antimetabolite therapy of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nersting, Jacob; Borst, Louise; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2011-01-01

    , but also multiplied the complex interaction of genetic and other laboratory parameters that can be used for therapy adjustments. Thus, with the advances in the laboratory techniques, post laboratory issues have become major obstacles for treatment individualization. Many of these challenges have been...

  19. Physiologic Aging of Mature Porcine Erythrocytes: Effects of Various Metabolites, Antimetabolites, and Physical Stressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-10-01

    Amino-L-tvrosine to the level of the 4 C control. 1.49 ma’i 45 C 550 126 4 45 1 100 id of a 1:30 dilution of RBC < 24 hours after collection that had...glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate; C4 = ery-throse; C7 = sedoheptulose: 2,3DPG = 2.3- diphosphoglycerate : 3PG = nonlabeled cells treated with base was 5...0.007 vs 0.243 - 0.004; P < 0.005, un- diphosphoglycerate and adenosine triphosphate.’ Both paired, 2-tailed Student’s t test). metabolites are required

  20. Role of diamine oxidase during the treatment of tumour-bearing mice with combinations of polyamine anti-metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallio, A; Jänne, J

    1983-01-01

    Treatment of mice bearing L1210 leukaemia with 2-difluoromethylornithine, a specific inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.17), produced a profound depletion of putrescine and spermidine in the tumour cells. Sequential combination of methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone), an inhibitor of adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.50), with difluoromethylornithine largely reversed the polyamine depletion and led to a marked accumulation of cadaverine in the tumour cells. Experiments carried out with the combination of difluoromethylornithine and aminoguanidine, a potent inhibitor of diamine oxidase (EC 1.4.3.6), indicated that the methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone)-induced reversal of polyamine depletion was mediated by the known inhibition of diamine oxidase by the diguanidine. In spite of the normalization of the tumour cell polyamine pattern upon administration of methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) to difluoromethylornithine-treated animals, the combination of these two drugs produced a growth-inhibitory effect not achievable with either of the compounds alone. PMID:6411077

  1. Transfer of intestine-derived diamines into tumour cells during treatment of Ehrlich-ascites--carcinoma-bearing mice with polyamine anti-metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallio, A; Nikula, P; Jänne, J

    1984-01-01

    Treatment of Ehrlich-ascites-carcinoma-bearing mice with methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) alone or in combination with 2-difluoromethylornithine greatly enhanced the transfer of intragastrically administered radioactive putrescine and cadaverine into the carcinoma cells. Difluoromethylornithine alone did not have any effect on the accumulation of intestine-derived diamines in the tumour cells. The frequently reported restoration of difluoromethylornithine-induced polyamine depletion on administration of methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) is in all likelihood attributable to a profound inhibition of intestinal diamine oxidase (EC 1.4.3.6), resulting in an enhanced entry of intestinal (bacterial) diamines into general circulation and finally into tumour cells. PMID:6424664

  2. Comparative study between trabeculectomy with photodynamic therapy (BCECF-AM and trabeculectomy with antimetabolite (MMC in the treatment of primary open angle glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed AM

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed M SaeedOphthalmology Department, Benha University, Benha, EgyptBackground: Various methods have been investigated to avoid postoperative scarring of the filtering bleb in modern glaucoma surgery. Most deal with the application of antimetabolic drugs such as mitomycin C (MMC. 2’,7’-bis-(2-carboxyethyl-5-(and-6-carboxyfluorescein, acetoxymethyl ester (BCECF-AM is a locally acting intracellular photosensitizer which could control and decrease postoperative fibrosis at the trabeculectomy site.Purpose: To compare the effect of photodynamic therapy in combination with trabeculectomy to the effect of MMC combined with the same procedure in controlling postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP in patients with medically uncontrolled primary open angle glaucoma (1ry OAG.Methods: A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 76 eyes of 76 patients divided into three groups undergoing trabeculectomy, trabeculectomy with BCECF-AM (group A, trabeculectomy with MMC (group B, and trabeculectomy only as a control group (group C. Patients were reviewed postoperatively for clinical evaluation and photo documentation of the blebs with a fundus camera and ultrasonic biomicroscopy (UBM. The desirable effect of the adjunctive material was evaluated according to the clinical efficacy, tolerability, and safety by comparison with the control group.Setting: Benha University Hospital, Benha, Egypt.Results: After a mean follow-up of 24 months, all procedures succeeded in lowering IOP. The cumulative probability of complete success at the 24 month follow-up was 91% for group B, compared to 82% and 81.5% for group A and group C, respectively. The percentage of complete success was highest for group B, second highest for group A, and lowest for group C over the follow-up period; however, these differences were not statistically significant (P > 0.05. Regarding the bleb morphology and UBM reflectivity, the differences were not statistically significant (P > 0.05. The mean bleb height and breadth were larger in groups A and B in comparison to group C over the study period. The mean aqueous drainage route was similar in groups A and C, but less than in group B at 3 and 12 months postoperatively. Complications were generally mild and less marked in group A and C than group B.Conclusion: Cellular photoablation using BCECF-AM seems to be a feasible new method to use in combination with glaucoma filtration surgery. Although MMC might be considered a more potent adjunctive to trabeculectomy in promoting IOP reduction, photodynamic therapy carries relatively less risk of adverse effects and complications. Cellular photoablation using BCECF-AM could be considered efficient, tolerable and relatively safer in managing patients with 1ry OAG. Further studies are necessary to determine the safety and the reliability of this therapy.Keywords: photodynamic therapy, mitomycin C, trabeculectomy, open angle glaucoma, ultrasonic biomicroscopy

  3. Dgroup: DG00687 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 974 ... Fluorouracil sodium salt Antineoplastic ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic ... DG01935 ... Fluoropyrimidine antineopla...stic ... DG01935 ... Fluoropyrimidine antineoplastic Unclassified ... DG02018 ... Antimetabolit...e ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic ... DG01935 ... Fluoropyrimidine antineoplastic... ATC code: L01BC02 Antineoplastics, Antimetabolite TYMS [HSA:7298] [KO:K00560] Enzyme: DPYD [HSA:1806] ...

  4. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa antimetabolite L-2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid (AMB is made from glutamate and two alanine residues via a thiotemplate-linked tripeptide precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson eRojas Murcia

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin L-2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid (AMB is a non-proteinogenic amino acid which is toxic for prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Production of AMB requires a five-gene cluster encoding a putative LysE-type transporter (AmbA, two nonribosomal peptide synthetases (AmbB and AmbE, and two iron(II/α-ketoglutarate-dependent oxygenases (AmbC and AmbD. Bioinformatics analysis predicts one thiolation (T domain for AmbB and two T domains (T1 and T2 for AmbE, suggesting that AMB is generated by a processing step from a precursor tripeptide assembled on a thiotemplate. Using a combination of ATP-PPi exchange assays, aminoacylation assays, and mass spectrometry-based analysis of enzyme-bound substrates and pathway intermediates, the AmbB substrate was identified to be L-alanine (L-Ala, while the T1 and T2 domains of AmbE were loaded with L-glutamate (L-Glu and L-Ala, respectively. Loading of L-Ala at T2 of AmbE occurred only in the presence of AmbB, indicative of a trans loading mechanism. In vitro assays performed with AmbB and AmbE revealed the dipeptide L-Glu-L-Ala at T1 and the tripeptide L-Ala-L-Glu-L-Ala attached at T2. When AmbC and AmbD were included in the assay, these peptides were no longer detected. Instead, an L-Ala-AMB-L-Ala tripeptide was found at T2. These data are in agreement with a biosynthetic model in which L-Glu is converted into AMB by the action of AmbC, AmbD and tailoring domains of AmbE. The importance of the flanking L-Ala residues in the precursor tripeptide is discussed.

  5. Experimente ueber den Einflusse von Metaboliten und Antimetaboliten am Modell von Trichomonas Vaginalis. VI. (Experiments on the Influence of Metabolites and Antimetabolites on the Model of Trichomonas Vaginalis. VI. Communication: Effect of Vitamins and Vitamin-Like Substances),

    Science.gov (United States)

    A number of substances (folic acid, axerophtol, tokopherol and others) stimulate the growth of Trichomonas vaginalis and, therefore, are very well...group of vitamins (thiamine, lactoflavin, pyridoxine and others) are without recognizeable effect upon the growth of Trichomonas vaginalis . The third...inhibiting effect upon the growth of Trichomonas vaginalis . Further investigations with these substances within a combined inhibition system seem to be important. (Modified author abstract)

  6. Dgroup: DG00684 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DG00684 Chemical ... DGroup Tioguanine ... D08603 ... Tioguanine (INN) D06109 ... Thioguanine (USP) ... Antineoplastic... ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic Unclassified ... DG02018 ... Antimetabo...lite ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic ATC code: L01BB03 Antineoplastics, Antimetabolite ...

  7. Dgroup: DG00686 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Cytarabine ocfosphate hydrate (JAN) ... D03637 ... Cytarabine hydrochloride (USAN) Antineoplastic ... DG01958 ... Nuc...leic acid derivative, antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic...acid derivative, antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic ATC code: L01BC01 Antineoplastics, Antimetabolite DNA polymerase ... ... Unclassified ... DG02018 ... Antimetabolite ... DG01958 ... Nucleic

  8. Dgroup: DG00688 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available itabine hydrochloride (JAN/USAN) ... D10222 ... Gemcitabine elaidate (USAN/INN) Antineoplastic ... DG01958 ... Nucleic... acid derivative, antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic...ic ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic ATC code: L01BC05 Antineoplastics, Antimetabolite RRM1 [HSA:6240] [KO:K10807] ... ... Unclassified ... DG02018 ... Antimetabolite ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplast

  9. Dgroup: DG00685 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ne phosphate (JAN/USP) ... Antineoplastic ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabin...ofuranosyl type antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic Unclassified ... DG02018 ... Antimet...abolite ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplasti...c ATC code: L01BB05 Antineoplastics, Antimetabolite RRM [HSA:6240 6241 50484] [KO:K10807 K10808] DNA polymerase RNA polymerase ...

  10. [Ahmed valve in glaucoma surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikbov, M M; Khusnitdinov, I I

    This is a review on Ahmed valve application in glaucoma surgery. It contains, in particular, data on the Ahmed valve efficiency, results of experimental and histological studies of filtering bleb encapsulation, examines the use of antimetabolites and anti-VEGF agents, and discusses implantation techniques. The current appraisal of antimetabolites delivery systems integrated into the Ahmed valve is presented. Various complications encountered in practice and preventive measures are also covered.

  11. Effect of the TNF-α inhibitor adalimumab in patients with recalcitrant sarcoidosis: a prospective observational study using FDG-PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, Nils; Graudal, Niels; Loft, Annika

    2012-01-01

    -PET) in patients with recalcitrant sarcoidosis treated with adalimumab. Methods: Prospective 24-week observational study. Patients continued medication with steroids and antimetabolites and received adalimumab 40 mg subcutaneously every other week. Ten patients with biopsy-proven sarcoidosis (two men) were...

  12. Riboflavin analogs as antiinfectives: occurrence, mode of action, metabolism and resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrolli, Danielle Biscaro; Jankowitsch, Frank; Schwarz, Julia; Langer, Simone; Nakanishi, Shinobu; Frei, Eva; Mack, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Antimetabolites are molecules, which are structurally similar to molecules needed to carry out primary metabolic reactions.The inhibitory activity of an antimetabolite depends on its successful competition with the natural substrate, ligand, modulator or cofactor of a given biomolecule. Antimetabolites are indispensable as molecular tools in order to understand biological processes. Beyond that,antimetabolites have a large variety of applications in the pharmaceutical and food industries. The identification of the structural riboflavin(vitamin B2) analog roseoflavin in Streptomyces davawensis demonstrates that anti-vitamins/cofactor analogs may serve as lead structures for the development of novel antibiotics. The latter is supported by the recent finding that roseoflavin had a profound inhibiting effect on the growth and infectivity of the human bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes at very low concentrations. Roseoflavin is studied in our laboratory as a model compound. We investigate the biosynthesis, the possible large-scale production, the metabolization,the mechanism of action and the resistance mechanism of the producer organism in order to pave the way for the structured analysis of other vitamin analogs yet to be discovered. These compounds hopefully will help to replenish the arsenal of antimicrobials urgently needed to fight multiresistant bacterial pathogens.

  13. Drug: D01633 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D01633 Drug Enocitabine (JAN/INN); Sunrabin (TN) ... C31H55N3O6 D01633.gif ... Antineoplastic... ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic ... D...G01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic Unclassified ... DG02018 ... Antimetabolite ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic... ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic Therap

  14. Drug: D05134 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 5 D05134.gif ... Antineoplastic ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic... ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic Unclassified ... DG02018 ... Antimetabolite ... ...DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic... D05134 Drug Nelarabine (JAN/USAN/INN); Nelzarabine (USAN); Arranon (TN) ... C11H15N5O

  15. Drug: D04134 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D04134 Drug Fazarabine (USAN/INN) ... C8H12N4O5 D04134.gif ... Antineoplastic ... DG01958... ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplas...tic Unclassified ... DG02018 ... Antimetabolite ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic... ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic ... arabinofuranosyl de

  16. Drug: D01309 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D01309 Drug Doxifluridine (JP17/INN); Furtulon (TN) ... C9H11FN2O5 D01309.gif ... Antineoplastic... ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic ... DG01935 ... Fluoropyrimidine antineoplastic ... DG0...1935 ... Fluoropyrimidine antineoplastic Unclassified ... DG02018 ... Antimetabolite ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic... ... DG01935 ... Fluoropyrimidine antineoplastic Same as: C12739 Th

  17. Drug: D06221 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D06221 Drug Triciribine phosphate (USAN) ... C13H17N6O7P D06221.gif ... Antineoplastic... ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic Unclassified ... DG02018 ... Antimetabolite ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic... ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic ... CAS: 6

  18. Drug: D02368 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D02368 Drug Gemcitabine (USAN/INN) ... C9H11F2N3O4 D02368.gif ... Antineoplastic ... DG01...958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabi...nofuranosyl type antineoplastic Unclassified ... DG02018 ... Antimetabolite ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic... ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic Same as: C07650 ATC

  19. Drug: D09712 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D09712 Drug Elacytarabine (USAN/INN) ... C27H45N3O6 D09712.gif ... Antineoplastic ... DG0...1958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arab...inofuranosyl type antineoplastic Unclassified ... DG02018 ... Antimetabolite ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic... ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic ... Elacytarabine i

  20. Drug: D06100 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D06100 Drug Tezacitabine (USAN); Tezacitabine monohydrate ... C10H12FN3O4. H2O D06100.gif ... Antineoplastic... ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic... ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic Unclassified ... DG02018 ... Antimetabolite ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic

  1. Drug: D04197 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D04197 Drug Floxuridine (USP/INN); FUDR (TN) ... C9H11FN2O5 D04197.gif ... Antineoplastic... ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic ... DG01935 ... Fluoropyrimidine antineoplastic ... DG01935 ... F...luoropyrimidine antineoplastic Unclassified ... DG02018 ... Antimetabolite ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic... ... DG01935 ... Fluoropyrimidine antineoplastic Same as: C11736 ... TYMS [

  2. Drug: D10222 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D10222 Drug Gemcitabine elaidate (USAN/INN) ... C27H43F2N3O5 D10222.gif ... Antineoplastic... ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic ... DG01...439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic Unclassified ... DG02018 ... Antimetabolite ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic... ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic ATC code:

  3. Drug: D01651 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D01651 Drug Ancitabine hydrochloride (JAN) ... C9H11N3O4. HCl D01651.gif ... Antineoplastic... ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic ... DG0...1439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic Unclassified ... DG02018 ... Antimetabolite ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic... ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic Same as:

  4. Drug: D07974 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D07974 Drug Fluorouracil sodium salt; Fluorouracil (TN) ... C4H3FN2O2. xNa D07974.gif ... Antineoplastic... ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic ... DG01935 ... Fluoropyrimidine antineoplastic... ... DG01935 ... Fluoropyrimidine antineoplastic Unclassified ... DG02018 ... Antimetabolite ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplasti...c ... DG01935 ... Fluoropyrimidine antineoplastic ATC code:

  5. Drug: D09722 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D09722 Drug Sapacitabine (USAN/INN) ... C26H42N4O5 D09722.gif ... Antineoplastic ... DG01...958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabi...nofuranosyl type antineoplastic Unclassified ... DG02018 ... Antimetabolite ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic... ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic ... nucleoside analo

  6. Drug: D04233 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D04233 Drug Flurocitabine (USAN/INN) ... C9H10FN3O4 D04233.gif ... Antineoplastic ... DG0...1958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arab...inofuranosyl type antineoplastic Unclassified ... DG02018 ... Antimetabolite ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic... ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic ... CAS: 37717-

  7. Drug: D03637 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D03637 Drug Cytarabine hydrochloride (USAN) ... C9H13N3O5. HCl D03637.gif ... Antineoplastic... ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic ... DG...01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic Unclassified ... DG02018 ... Antimetabolite ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic... ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic ATC cod

  8. Early combined immunosuppression for the management of Crohn's disease (REACT): a cluster randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khanna, Reena; Bressler, Brian; Levesque, Barrett G.; Zou, Guangyong; Stitt, Larry W.; Greenberg, Gordon R.; Panaccione, Remo; Bitton, Alain; Paré, Pierre; Vermeire, Séverine; D'Haens, Geert; MacIntosh, Donald; Sandborn, William J.; Donner, Allan; Vandervoort, Margaret K.; Morris, Joan C.; Feagan, Brian G.; Anderson, Frank; Atkinson, Kenneth; Bacchus, Rahman; Berezny, Gary; Borthistle, Bruce; Buckley, Alan; Chiba, Naoki; Cockeram, Alan; Elkashab, Magdy; Fashir, Baroudi; Gray, James; Hemphill, Douglas; Hoare, Connie; Holland, Stephen; Hurowitz, Eric; Kaal, Nuri; Laflamme, Pierre; Borromee, Saint-Charles; Lau, Helena; McMullen, William; Memiche, Reshat; Menon, Krishna; Miller, D. Alexander; O'Hara, William; Oravec, Michael; Penner, Robert; Petrunia, Denis; Pluta, Henryk; Prabhu, Umesh; Prest, Marcia; Shaaban, Hani; Sheppard, Duane; Shulman, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Conventional management of Crohn's disease features incremental use of therapies. However, early combined immunosuppression (ECI), with a TNF antagonist and antimetabolite might be a more effective strategy. We compared the efficacy of ECI with that of conventional management for treatment of

  9. Deoxyribonucleotide pool analysis: functional association of thymidylate synthase with the other enzymes of DNA biosynthesis in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, G.P.V.; Christiansen, E.

    1986-01-01

    Allosteric interaction between thymidylate synthase (TS) and the other enzymes of DNA biosynthesis was suggested from the authors observation that inhibitors of ribonucleotide reductase, topoisomerase of DNA polymerase-α inhibit TS in intact S phase CHEF/18 cells, but not in their soluble extracts. In addition the authors observed that 4'-(9-acridinylamino)-methanesulfon-m-anisidide (m-AMSA), a poison of topoisomerase II, had similar effects on TS activity in mammalian cells. They have examined if the inhibitory effects of these antimetabolites on TS is due to the accumulation of thymidine nucleotide(s) in intact cells, rather than to an allosteric interaction in the replitase complex. A novel method of nucleotide pool analysis revealed that in the presence of these antimetabolites the incorporation of radioactivity from 3 H-deoxyuridine (dUrd) into thymidine nucleotide pools inside the cell did not increase as compared to the control. Furthermore, TS activity as measured in-vitro was not inhibited by supraphysiological concentrations (50μM) of thymidine mono- or tri-phosphates. None of these antimetabolites dramatically influenced the uptake of dUrd and its subsequent phosphorylation to deoxyuridine monophosphate. Therefore, they suggest that the inhibitory effect of these antimetabolites is due to the functional association of their target enzymes with TS

  10. Drug: D07966 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D07966 Drug Fludarabine (INN); Fluradosa (TN) ... C10H12FN5O4 D07966.gif ... Antineoplastic... ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic ... DG0...1439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic Unclassified ... DG02018 ... Antimetabolite ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic... ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic Same as:

  11. Comparative studies on the effect of radiation-sensitizing agents used in radiating VX2 Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migita, Hidenobu

    1975-01-01

    The effects of 5-Fu and BUdR as radiation-sensitizing agents macroscopically were investigated in 122 VX2 Carcinomas transplanted into the calves of the hind legs of rabbits. Experimental groups and contrast groups are divided into six as follows: A: No treatment, B: 5-Fu infusion, C: BUdR+Antimetabolite infusion, D: Radiation, E: 5-Fu infusion and radiation, and F: BUdR+Antimetabolite infusion and radiation. The amount of agent given to each was 5 mg/kg/day of 5-Fu and 50 mg/kg/day of BUdR, and the amount of radiation was 300 rad/day. 5-Fu was used as the Antimetabolite, and its amount was one-tenth of that in the 5-Fu Infusion Group. The agent and the radiation were given for five days. 1. In the 300 rad/day Group, the radiation was not enough to result in a complete cure. 2. In the two Agent Infusion Group, 5-Fu and BUdR+Antimetabolite proved to be anti-cancer, but neither of them resulted in effective treatment. 3. The 5-Fu Infusion and Radiation Group, showed a strong degenerative change in the tumor cell and a radiosensitive effect from 5-Fu, but the tumor was not lessened. 4. In the BUdR-Antimetabolite Infusion and Radiation Group, the tumor began to reduce on the third day. On the seventh and fourteenth days, necrosis of the greater part of tumor was seen, and the rest of the tumor cells were found to be in degenerative change. On the twenty first day, no live tumor cell was found, only dead remains of tumor cells. The results were confirmed both macroscopically and histopathologically. 5. BUdR can be expected to be effective in clinical application to oral malignant tumors. (Evans, J.)

  12. Comparative studies on the effect of radiation-sensitizing agents used in radiating VX2 Carcinoma. With reference to 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migita, H [Kyushu Dental Coll., Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan)

    1975-11-01

    The effects of 5-Fu and BUdR as radiation-sensitizing agents macroscopically were investigated in 122 VX2 Carcinomas transplanted into the calves of the hind legs of rabbits. Experimental groups and contrast groups are divided into six as follows: A: No treatment, B: 5-Fu infusion, C: BUdR+Antimetabolite infusion, D: Radiation, E: 5-Fu infusion and radiation, and F: BUdR+Antimetabolite infusion and radiation. The amount of agent given to each was 5 mg/kg/day of 5-Fu and 50 mg/kg/day of BUdR, and the amount of radiation was 300 rad/day. 5-Fu was used as the Antimetabolite, and its amount was one-tenth of that in the 5-Fu Infusion Group. The agent and the radiation were given for five days. 1. In the 300 rad/day Group, the radiation was not enough to result in a complete cure. 2. In the two Agent Infusion Group, 5-Fu and BUdR+Antimetabolite proved to be anti-cancer, but neither of them resulted in effective treatment. 3. The 5-Fu Infusion and Radiation Group, showed a strong degenerative change in the tumor cell and a radiosensitive effect from 5-Fu, but the tumor was not lessened. 4. In the BUdR-Antimetabolite Infusion and Radiation Group, the tumor began to reduce on the third day. On the seventh and fourteenth days, necrosis of the greater part of tumor was seen, and the rest of the tumor cells were found to be in degenerative change. On the twenty first day, no live tumor cell was found, only dead remains of tumor cells. The results were confirmed both macroscopically and histopathologically. 5. BUdR can be expected to be effective in clinical application to oral malignant tumors.

  13. Biochemical and chemical characterization of trifluoromethylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone), a close analog of the antileukemic drug mitoguazone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elo, H; Mutikainen, I

    1988-01-01

    In order to study the structure-activity relationships of bis(guanylhydrazone) type polyamine antimetabolites, trifluoromethylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (CF3-GBG), a close analog of the antileukemic drug methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (mitoguazone, MGBG) was synthesized according to a novel modification of previous methods, yielding single crystals. Single-crystal X-ray crystallography revealed the presence of an isomer different from the one detected in the case of MGBG and all other bis(guanylhydrazones) so far studied. In contrast to MGBG, CF3-GBG was shown to be a very weak inhibitor of yeast adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, being thus devoid of value as a polyamine antimetabolite. In addition, the compound did not have antiproliferative activity against mouse L1210 leukemia cells in vitro. As long as analogous isomers of the two compounds are not available, no conclusions can be drawn about the reasons lying behind the drastical differences between their biological properties.

  14. Drug: D03046 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available arasid (TN) ... C27H49N3O8P. Na. H2O D03046.gif ... Antineoplastic ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic... ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic Unclassi...fied ... DG02018 ... Antimetabolite ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic ... ... DG01439 ... Arabinofuranosyl type antineoplastic Therapeutic category: 4224 ATC code: L01BC01 Chemical group

  15. Drug: D01244 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D01244 Drug Tegafur (JP17/USAN/INN); Atillon (TN) ... C8H9FN2O3 D01244.gif ... Antineoplastic... ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic ... DG01935 ... Fluoropyrimidine antineoplastic ... DG0193...5 ... Fluoropyrimidine antineoplastic Cyp substrate ... DG01638 ... CYP2A6 substrate Unclassified ... DG02018 ... Antimetab...olite ... DG01958 ... Nucleic acid derivative, antineoplastic ... DG01935 ... Fluoropyrimidine antineoplastic

  16. Immunosuppressive potential of bardoxolone methyl using a modified murine local lymph node assay (LLNA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsukawa, Mika; Tsuchiyama, Hiromi; Maeda, Akihisa; Oshida, Keiyu; Miyamoto, Yohei

    2014-08-01

    2-Cyano-3, 12-dioxooleana-1, 9-dien-28-oic acid methyl ester (CDDO-Me; bardoxolone methyl) is one of the synthetic oleanane triterpenoids (SOs). It is known that it is the strongest Nrf2/ARE signaling inducer of SOs and slightly inhibits immune response. Little was known about the immunomodulatory action of CDDO-Me in vivo. We assessed its immunosuppressive potential by using the modified mouse lymph node assay (LLNA) including immunosuppression-related gene expression analysis. In the modified LLNA, CDDO-Me showed a significant decrease in lymph node weight and changes in expressions of the immunosuppression-related genes, Zfp459 and Fmo2. It has been already reported that a decrease in lymph node weight was induced by several types of immunosuppressive chemicals such as calcineurin inhibitors, antimetabolites, steroids, and alkylators. In addition, changes in Zfp459 and Fmo2 expression was reported in response after only treatment of antimetabolites. From these results, CDDO-Me is considered to have an immunosuppressive action and similar mechanism to antimetabolites.

  17. Trabeculectomy with scleral patch graft for advanced glaucoma in ehler–danlos syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanya Cheriyath

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of secondary glaucoma in Ehler–Danlos syndrome (EDS Type VI, which was uncontrolled with maximal medical therapy, and was subsequently managed surgically. EDS comprises a subgroup of heritable connective tissue disorders characterized by generalized joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and tissue fragility. The surgical challenges in these patients are presence of scleral thinning, vascular fragility, and poor wound healing. Surgical intervention such as trabeculectomy in EDS has not been reported in the literature. With this case report, we share our trials and tribulations in managing this patient with trabeculectomy without antimetabolites, with unexpected modification in the surgery and success.

  18. A Review of the Course and Treatment of Non-Infectious Uveitis during Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotting, Lindsay A; Papaliodis, George N

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory conditions such as autoimmune uveitis often occur in women of childbearing age. During pregnancy, women may experience exacerbations of their disease in the first trimester. In the later stages of pregnancy, however, the uveitis tends to remain less active. The management of uveitis during pregnancy is a challenging task, forcing the physician to re-evaluate the patient's current therapy and offer alternative options that pose the least risk to the patient and fetus. This article will review treatments widely used for uveitis, including corticosteroid therapy, anti-metabolites, calcineurin inhibitors, and biologic therapy. It will evaluate the use of these medications in pregnancy and the postpartum state.

  19. Immunosuppressive therapy in non-infections uveitis and retinovasculitis

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. Drozdova

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the immunosuppressive therapy for severe forms of non-infections uveitis and retinovasculitis.Methods: 107 patients (62 males and 45 females aged 9 to 54 years) who received low dose methotrexate — 7.5-20 mg once a week (n=79) cyclosporine A 3.5-5.0 mg/kg/d (n=21) with prednisone or other antimetabolites and local corticosteroid therapy for severe forms of inflammatory eye diseases.Results: the efficacy of methotrexate as monotherapy was 51.8% o...

  20. Interferon synthesis in mouse peritoneal cells damaged by x irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szolgay, E; T' alas, M

    1976-01-01

    NDV-induced interferon of peritoneal cells of irradiated (x-rays, 400 R) and control mice was investigated in vitro. Irradiation or treatment with hydroxyurea (10(-5) M) and mitomycin C (25 microng/ml) did not change interferon synthesis in spite of an 80 to 90% inhibition of 3H-thymidine incorporation. Increased doses of mitomycin C and treatment with actinomycin D and puromycin blocked interferon production. De novo interferon synthesis occurred in cells with damaged replicative activity of DNA caused by irradiation or by treatment with antimetabolites.

  1. Chemotherapy in combined and multimodality treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that chemotherapy of tumors of various localizations developes intensively in the last few years. It is connected with discovery and adoption of new active antitumoral preparations, such as alkylating preparations, antimetabolites, antitumoral antibiotics, hormonal preparations. To create the rational effective conditions of chemotherapy a study was made on kinetics of tumor gowth, molecular mechanisms of interaction of cytostatics and cells of malignant tumor. Main factors of chemotherapy combination with radiotherapy when treating numerous malignant tumors were considered. Effectiveness of using chemotherapy in combination with other methods of treatment was shown

  2. Theoretical, clinical and pharmacokinetic aspects of cancer chemotherapy administered by continuous infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikic, B.I.

    1986-01-01

    This chapter reviews some of the theoretical and empirical aspects of the administration of anti-cancer drugs by continuous intravenous infusion in conjunction with radiation therapy. The variables contributing to schedule dependence of anti-cancer drugs are discussed. A table shows the improved therapeutic index of Bleomycin by continuous infusion in mice. The use of Cytarabine, a pyrimidine anti-metabolite which kills cells during S-phase or DNA synthesis, is examined. Fluorouracil and Doxorubicin are examined and several other drugs including vincristine, vinblastine, etoposide, and cisplatin are discussed

  3. Combined radiochemotherapy. Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konecny, M; Mechl, Z [Onkologicky Ustav, Brno (Czechoslovakia). Betatronove Pracoviste

    1978-09-01

    Physical, chemical, biochemical and biological modifications are described of the radiation reaction. The biochemical modification with antimetabolites has so far been the one most frequently used in clinical oncology. It has not yet been clarified whether treatment should begin with irradiation or chemotherapy. Conclusions are presented of the study of simultaneous chemotherapy and radiotherapy applications, ie., the attempt at synchronization of the tumor population. The present-time existence of a great number of combined treatment plans is more a consequence of empirical data which have not yet been clinically confirmed.

  4. Use of electroporation to study the cytotoxic effects of fluorodeoxyuridylate in intact cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastreboff, M M; Sokoloski, J A; Bertino, J R; Narayanan, R

    1987-04-15

    The introduction of 2'-deoxyuridine 5'-monophosphate and its analog, 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine 5'-monophosphate, into intact CCRF-CEM and NIH3T3 cells was achieved by electroporation. Following electroporation, cells were shown to be fully functional as monitored by the incorporation of deoxyuridylate, after conversion to thymidylate, into DNA. Pretreatment of cells with fluorodeoxyuridine completely abolished this effect. In contrast, introduction of the fluoro analog into cells by electroporation markedly inhibited both DNA synthesis and cell growth in a time-dependent manner. Thus, electroporation offers a powerful tool to permeabilize cells to a variety of cellular metabolites and antimetabolites.

  5. Control of plant defense mechanisms and fire blight pathogenesis through the regulation of 6-thioguanine biosynthesis in Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Sébastien; Litomska, Agnieszka; Chizzali, Cornelia; Khalil, Mohammed N A; Richter, Klaus; Beerhues, Ludger; Hertweck, Christian

    2014-02-10

    Fire blight is a devastating disease of Rosaceae plants, such as apple and pear trees. It is characterized by necrosis of plant tissue, caused by the phytopathogenic bacterium Erwinia amylovora. The plant pathogen produces the well-known antimetabolite 6-thioguanine (6TG), which plays a key role in fire blight pathogenesis. Here we report that YcfR, a member of the LTTR family, is a major regulator of 6TG biosynthesis in E. amylovora. Inactivation of the regulator gene (ycfR) led to dramatically decreased 6TG production. Infection assays with apple plants (Malus domestica cultivar Holsteiner Cox) and cell cultures of Sorbus aucuparia (mountain ash, rowan) revealed abortive fire blight pathogenesis and reduced plant response (biphenyl and dibenzofuran phytoalexin production). In the presence of the ΔycfR mutant, apple trees were capable of activating the abscission machinery to remove infected tissue. In addition to unveiling the regulation of 6TG biosynthesis in a major plant pathogen, we demonstrate for the first time that this antimetabolite plays a pivotal role in dysregulating the plant response to infection. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. para-Aminosalicylic acid is a prodrug targeting dihydrofolate reductase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jun; Rubin, Eric J; Bifani, Pablo; Mathys, Vanessa; Lim, Vivian; Au, Melvin; Jang, Jichan; Nam, Jiyoun; Dick, Thomas; Walker, John R; Pethe, Kevin; Camacho, Luis R

    2013-08-09

    para-Aminosalicylic acid (PAS) is one of the antimycobacterial drugs currently used for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Although it has been in clinical use for over 60 years, its mechanism(s) of action remains elusive. Here we report that PAS is a prodrug targeting dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) through an unusual and novel mechanism of action. We provide evidences that PAS is incorporated into the folate pathway by dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) and dihydrofolate synthase (DHFS) to generate a hydroxyl dihydrofolate antimetabolite, which in turn inhibits DHFR enzymatic activity. Interestingly, PAS is recognized by DHPS as efficiently as its natural substrate para-amino benzoic acid. Chemical inhibition of DHPS or mutation in DHFS prevents the formation of the antimetabolite, thereby conferring resistance to PAS. In addition, we identified a bifunctional enzyme (riboflavin biosynthesis protein (RibD)), a putative functional analog of DHFR in a knock-out strain. This finding is further supported by the identification of PAS-resistant clinical isolates encoding a RibD overexpression mutation displaying cross-resistance to genuine DHFR inhibitors. Our findings reveal that a metabolite of PAS inhibits DHFR in the folate pathway. RibD was shown to act as a functional analog of DHFR, and as for DHFS, both were shown to be associated in PAS resistance in laboratory strains and clinical isolates.

  7. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, S.M.; Finn, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Our goal is to improve the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The grant includes 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry/Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. The radiochemistry group seeks to develop innovative cyclotron targetry, radiopharmaceuticals, and radiolabeled antibodies, which are then used to assess important unanswered questions in tumor pharmacology and immunology. Examples include selected positron emitting radionuclides, such as Iodine-124, and Ga-66; I-124, I-123, I-131 labeled iododeoxyuridine, C-11 colchicine, and antimetabolites, like C-11 methotrexate; and radiolabeled antibodies, 3F8, M195, A33, and MRK16 for application in the pharmacology and immunology projects. The pharmacology program studies tumor resistance to chemotherapy, particularly the phenomenon of multidrug resistance and the relationship between tumor uptake and retention and the tumor response for anti-metabolite drugs. The immunology program studies the physiology of antibody localization at the tissue level as the basis for novel approaches to improving tumor localization such as through the use of an artificial lymphatic system which mechanically reduces intratumoral pressures in tumors in vivo. Quantitative imaging approaches based on PET and SPECT in radioimmunotherapy are studied to give greater insight into the physiology of tumor localization and dosimetry

  8. Functional and genetic evidence that nucleoside transport is highly conserved in Leishmania species: Implications for pyrimidine-based chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Khalid J H; Ali, Juma A M; Eze, Anthonius A; Looi, Wan Limm; Tagoe, Daniel N A; Creek, Darren J; Barrett, Michael P; de Koning, Harry P

    2017-08-01

    Leishmania pyrimidine salvage is replete with opportunities for therapeutic intervention with enzyme inhibitors or antimetabolites. Their uptake into cells depends upon specific transporters; therefore it is essential to establish whether various Leishmania species possess similar pyrimidine transporters capable of drug uptake. Here, we report a comprehensive characterization of pyrimidine transport in L. major and L. mexicana. In both species, two transporters for uridine/adenosine were detected, one of which also transported uracil and the antimetabolites 5-fluoruracil (5-FU) and 5F,2'deoxyuridine (5F,2'dUrd), and was designated uridine-uracil transporter 1 (UUT1); the other transporter mediated uptake of adenosine, uridine, 5F,2'dUrd and thymidine and was designated Nucleoside Transporter 1 (NT1). To verify the reported L. donovani model of two NT1-like genes encoding uridine/adenosine transporters, and an NT2 gene encoding an inosine transporter, we cloned the corresponding L. major and L. mexicana genes, expressing each in T. brucei. Consistent with the L. donovani reports, the NT1-like genes of either species mediated the adenosine-sensitive uptake of [ 3 H]-uridine but not of [ 3 H]-inosine. Conversely, the NT2-like genes mediated uptake of [ 3 H]-inosine but not [ 3 H]-uridine. Among pyrimidine antimetabolites tested, 5-FU and 5F,2'dUrd were the most effective antileishmanials; resistance to both analogs was induced in L. major and L. mexicana. In each case it was found that the resistant cells had lost the transport capacity for the inducing drug. Metabolomics analysis found that the mechanism of action of 5-FU and 5F-2'dUrd was similar in both Leishmania species, with major changes in deoxynucleotide metabolism. We conclude that the pyrimidine salvage system is highly conserved in Leishmania species - essential information for the development of pyrimidine-based chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights

  9. Functional and genetic evidence that nucleoside transport is highly conserved in Leishmania species: Implications for pyrimidine-based chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid J.H. Alzahrani

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania pyrimidine salvage is replete with opportunities for therapeutic intervention with enzyme inhibitors or antimetabolites. Their uptake into cells depends upon specific transporters; therefore it is essential to establish whether various Leishmania species possess similar pyrimidine transporters capable of drug uptake. Here, we report a comprehensive characterization of pyrimidine transport in L. major and L. mexicana. In both species, two transporters for uridine/adenosine were detected, one of which also transported uracil and the antimetabolites 5-fluoruracil (5-FU and 5F,2′deoxyuridine (5F,2′dUrd, and was designated uridine-uracil transporter 1 (UUT1; the other transporter mediated uptake of adenosine, uridine, 5F,2′dUrd and thymidine and was designated Nucleoside Transporter 1 (NT1. To verify the reported L. donovani model of two NT1-like genes encoding uridine/adenosine transporters, and an NT2 gene encoding an inosine transporter, we cloned the corresponding L. major and L. mexicana genes, expressing each in T. brucei. Consistent with the L. donovani reports, the NT1-like genes of either species mediated the adenosine-sensitive uptake of [3H]-uridine but not of [3H]-inosine. Conversely, the NT2-like genes mediated uptake of [3H]-inosine but not [3H]-uridine. Among pyrimidine antimetabolites tested, 5-FU and 5F,2′dUrd were the most effective antileishmanials; resistance to both analogs was induced in L. major and L. mexicana. In each case it was found that the resistant cells had lost the transport capacity for the inducing drug. Metabolomics analysis found that the mechanism of action of 5-FU and 5F-2′dUrd was similar in both Leishmania species, with major changes in deoxynucleotide metabolism. We conclude that the pyrimidine salvage system is highly conserved in Leishmania species - essential information for the development of pyrimidine-based chemotherapy. Keywords: Leishmania, Pyrimidine metabolism, Uracil

  10. Drug repositioning for enzyme modulator based on human metabolite-likeness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon Hyeok; Choi, Hojae; Park, Seongyong; Lee, Boah; Yi, Gwan-Su

    2017-05-31

    Recently, the metabolite-likeness of the drug space has emerged and has opened a new possibility for exploring human metabolite-like candidates in drug discovery. However, the applicability of metabolite-likeness in drug discovery has been largely unexplored. Moreover, there are no reports on its applications for the repositioning of drugs to possible enzyme modulators, although enzyme-drug relations could be directly inferred from the similarity relationships between enzyme's metabolites and drugs. We constructed a drug-metabolite structural similarity matrix, which contains 1,861 FDA-approved drugs and 1,110 human intermediary metabolites scored with the Tanimoto similarity. To verify the metabolite-likeness measure for drug repositioning, we analyzed 17 known antimetabolite drugs that resemble the innate metabolites of their eleven target enzymes as the gold standard positives. Highly scored drugs were selected as possible modulators of enzymes for their corresponding metabolites. Then, we assessed the performance of metabolite-likeness with a receiver operating characteristic analysis and compared it with other drug-target prediction methods. We set the similarity threshold for drug repositioning candidates of new enzyme modulators based on maximization of the Youden's index. We also carried out literature surveys for supporting the drug repositioning results based on the metabolite-likeness. In this paper, we applied metabolite-likeness to repurpose FDA-approved drugs to disease-associated enzyme modulators that resemble human innate metabolites. All antimetabolite drugs were mapped with their known 11 target enzymes with statistically significant similarity values to the corresponding metabolites. The comparison with other drug-target prediction methods showed the higher performance of metabolite-likeness for predicting enzyme modulators. After that, the drugs scored higher than similarity score of 0.654 were selected as possible modulators of enzymes for

  11. Systemic Treatments for Noninfectious Vitreous Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitreous inflammation, or vitritis, may result from many causes, including both infectious and noninfectious, including rheumatologic and autoimmune processes. Vitritis is commonly vision threatening and has serious sequelae. Treatment is frequently challenging, but, today, there are multiple methods of systemic treatment for vitritis. These categories include corticosteroids, antimetabolites, alkylating agents, T-cell inhibitors/calcineurin inhibitors, and biologic agents. These treatment categories were reviewed last year, but, even over the course of just a year, many therapies have made progress, as we have learned more about their indications and efficacy. We discuss here discoveries made over the past year on both existing and new drugs, as well as reviewing mechanisms of action, clinical dosages, specific conditions that are treated, adverse effects, and usual course of treatment for each class of therapy.

  12. Safety and efficacy of pralatrexate in the management of relapsed or refractory peripheral T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodd, Annabelle L; Ververis, Katherine; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) represents a relatively rare group of heterogeneous non-Hodgkin lymphomas, with generally poor prognosis. Historically, there has been a lack of consensus regarding appropriate therapeutic measures for the disease, with conventional frontline chemotherapies being utilized in most cases. Following promising results obtained in 2009, the methotrexate analogue, pralatrexate, became the first drug to gain US FDA approval for the treatment of refractory PTCL. This antimetabolite was designed to have a higher affinity for reduced folate carrier (RFC) and folylpolyglutamate synthetase (FPGS). RFC is the principal transporter for cell entrance of folates and antifolates. Once inside the cell, pralatrexate is efficiently polyglutamated by FPGS. Pralatrexate has demonstrated varying degrees of efficacy in peripheral T-cell lymphoma, with response rates differing between the multiple subtypes of the disease. While phase III studies are still to be completed, early clinical trials indicate that pralatrexate is promising new therapeutic for PTCL.

  13. Hydroxyurea-induced oral ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Maha; Almazrooa, Soulafa; Azher, Fatima; Alsayes, Fatin

    2015-12-01

    Hydroxyurea is an antimetabolite that is widely used in the treatment of many benign and malignant conditions. This drug is usually well tolerated but has a number of side effects that vary in incidence. In cases of clinically significant adverse events, hydroxyurea is usually discontinued either temporarily or permanently, depending on treatment need versus harm caused by side effects. Here, we report a case of oral ulceration associated with hydroxyurea treatment in a patient who had chronic myelogenous leukemia. The patient rapidly developed an oral ulcer 12 days after administration of the drug. Hydroxyurea was discontinued, and the oral lesion appreciably decreased in size and severity. Physicians and dentists should be aware of the association between hydroxyurea and oral lesions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Hydroxyurea-induced pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, A; Ricordel, C; Poullot, E; Claeyssen, V; Decaux, O; Desrues, B; Delaval, P; Jouneau, S

    2014-05-01

    Hydroxyurea is an antimetabolite drug used in the treatment of myeloproliferative disorders. Common adverse effects include haematological, gastrointestinal cutaneous manifestations, and fever. Hydroxyurea-induced pneumonitis is unusual. A female patient was treated with hydroxyurea for polycythemia vera. She was admitted 20 days after commencing treatment with a high fever, productive cough, clear sputum and nausea. A chest CT-scan showed diffuse ground-glass opacities. Microbiological investigations were negative. The symptoms disappeared a few days after discontinuation of the drug and rechallenge led to a relapse of symptoms. Our case and 15 earlier cases of hydroxyurea-induced pneumonitis are reviewed. Two patterns of this disease may exist: an acute febrile form occurring within 1 month of introduction of hydroxyurea and a subacute form without fever. Even if uncommon, one should be aware of this complication of hydroxyurea. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  15. Effects of caffeine on purine metabolism and ultraviolet light-induced lethality in cultured mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldren, C.A.; Patterson, D.

    1979-01-01

    Caffeine, at doses which enhance the killing action of ultraviolet light, inhibits both de novo synthesis and the utilization of exogenous purines in cultured CHO-K1, a Chinese hamster ovary cell line. The effect is dose dependent, with a caffeine concentration of 7.5 mM producing a 90% reduction in 15 min. Interference with utilization of exogenous purines was seen as a substantial decrease in the conversion of [14C]hypoxanthine, [14C]adenine, or [14C]guanine into their respective di- and triphosphates in the presence of caffeine. Thus, one of the ways by which antimetabolites and caffeine act to enhance ultraviolet light killing may be by interference with the supply of purine nucleotides needed for repair

  16. Selective small-molecule inhibition of an RNA structural element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, John A.; Wang, Hao; Fischmann, Thierry O.; Balibar, Carl J.; Xiao, Li; Galgoci, Andrew M.; Malinverni, Juliana C.; Mayhood, Todd; Villafania, Artjohn; Nahvi, Ali; Murgolo, Nicholas; Barbieri, Christopher M.; Mann, Paul A.; Carr, Donna; Xia, Ellen; Zuck, Paul; Riley, Dan; Painter, Ronald E.; Walker, Scott S.; Sherborne, Brad; de Jesus, Reynalda; Pan, Weidong; Plotkin, Michael A.; Wu, Jin; Rindgen, Diane; Cummings, John; Garlisi, Charles G.; Zhang, Rumin; Sheth, Payal R.; Gill, Charles J.; Tang, Haifeng; Roemer , Terry (Merck)

    2015-09-30

    Riboswitches are non-coding RNA structures located in messenger RNAs that bind endogenous ligands, such as a specific metabolite or ion, to regulate gene expression. As such, riboswitches serve as a novel, yet largely unexploited, class of emerging drug targets. Demonstrating this potential, however, has proven difficult and is restricted to structurally similar antimetabolites and semi-synthetic analogues of their cognate ligand, thus greatly restricting the chemical space and selectivity sought for such inhibitors. Here we report the discovery and characterization of ribocil, a highly selective chemical modulator of bacterial riboflavin riboswitches, which was identified in a phenotypic screen and acts as a structurally distinct synthetic mimic of the natural ligand, flavin mononucleotide, to repress riboswitch-mediated ribB gene expression and inhibit bacterial cell growth. Our findings indicate that non-coding RNA structural elements may be more broadly targeted by synthetic small molecules than previously expected.

  17. Methotrexate Toxicity in Growing Long Bones of Young Rats: A Model for Studying Cancer Chemotherapy-Induced Bone Growth Defects in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiaming Fan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The advancement and intensive use of chemotherapy in treating childhood cancers has led to a growing population of young cancer survivors who face increased bone health risks. However, the underlying mechanisms for chemotherapy-induced skeletal defects remain largely unclear. Methotrexate (MTX, the most commonly used antimetabolite in paediatric cancer treatment, is known to cause bone growth defects in children undergoing chemotherapy. Animal studies not only have confirmed the clinical observations but also have increased our understanding of the mechanisms underlying chemotherapy-induced skeletal damage. These models revealed that high-dose MTX can cause growth plate dysfunction, damage osteoprogenitor cells, suppress bone formation, and increase bone resorption and marrow adipogenesis, resulting in overall bone loss. While recent rat studies have shown that antidote folinic acid can reduce MTX damage in the growth plate and bone, future studies should investigate potential adjuvant treatments to reduce chemotherapy-induced skeletal toxicities.

  18. Crystal structure of the Alcanivorax borkumensis YdaH transporter reveals an unusual topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolla, Jani Reddy; Su, Chih-Chia; Delmar, Jared A.; Radhakrishnan, Abhijith; Kumar, Nitin; Chou, Tsung-Han; Long, Feng; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Yu, Edward W.

    2015-04-01

    The potential of the folic acid biosynthesis pathway as a target for the development of antibiotics has been clinically validated. However, many pathogens have developed resistance to these antibiotics, prompting a re-evaluation of potential drug targets within the pathway. The ydaH gene of Alcanivorax borkumensis encodes an integral membrane protein of the AbgT family of transporters for which no structural information was available. Here we report the crystal structure of A. borkumensis YdaH, revealing a dimeric molecule with an architecture distinct from other families of transporters. YdaH is a bowl-shaped dimer with a solvent-filled basin extending from the cytoplasm to halfway across the membrane bilayer. Each subunit of the transporter contains nine transmembrane helices and two hairpins that suggest a plausible pathway for substrate transport. Further analyses also suggest that YdaH could act as an antibiotic efflux pump and mediate bacterial resistance to sulfonamide antimetabolite drugs.

  19. Cytotoxic evaluation upon cis-platinum aminodiacetic acid complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almah binti Awaluddin; Parsons, Peter G.; Lean, Jenny M.; Jacobs, Jeffrey J.

    1990-01-01

    Cytoxic study of cis-platinum aminodiacetic acid complexes. Three novel platinum complexes have been synthesised and characterised by Awaluddin et. al (1987). This introduces a new area of radiopharmaceuticals based on technician and platinum. Cytotoxic studies were conducted on these complexes using four different types of cell lines. The para amina was found to be highly active against multi-resistant ovarian tumor cells compared to normal cells (fibroblast) and other tumor cells. The chemical structure of para-amina appears to be devoid of any functional group resembling current antitumor drugs except for a distant similarity to metotrexate with respect to the p-aminobenzoic type structure. However cell lines such as Hela and MM 253c-1, which is sensitive to metotrexate, were not sensitive to the para amina. Preliminary studies have shown that cells are blocked in the G phase of the cell cycle, suggesting an antimetabolite effect

  20. PREVALENCE OF PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY AFTER CHEMOTHERAPY IN PATIENTS TREATED IN A SERVICE OF ONCOLOGY: A RETROSPECTIVE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Yuriko Kameo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To perform a clinical-epidemiological analysis of cancer patients who had been treated with chemotherapy and had peripheral neuropathy and relate it to nursing diagnosis chronic pain (00133. Methods: A descriptive, retrospective study and data were collected from medical records of cancer patients in Aracaju, Sergipe, Brazil. Results: 5.6% had peripheral neuropathy resulting from chemotherapy. 50% made use of taxanes, 28.5% of monoclonal antibodies and 21.5% platinum derivatives, antibiotic and antimetabolite. Pain was the main complaint of these patients, and result in nerve damage, chronic use of certain drugs (vincristine, cisplatin and paclitaxel or be associated with some diseases. Conclusion: there was a high frequency of changes in sensitivity, highlighting the presence of neuropathic pain, paresthesia and dysesthesia. Professionals should seek training to be able to contribute effectively to the relief of this uncomfortable symptom to be performed properly.

  1. [Methods of gonad protection against effects of chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, A

    1994-05-01

    Together with increasing therapeutic effectiveness neoplastic diseases, the interest in late consequences of adverse effects of chemotherapy is increasing. Such problems include disturbances of gonad function. Treatment of neoplastic diseases leads frequently to infertility and hormonal disturbances resulting from damages to the gonads. Many attempts have been undertaken at protection of the gonads against unfavourable action of drugs. They are based mainly on the "interruption" of the hypothalamo-hypophyseo-gonadal axis in order to make the gonads quiescent. Other direction includes the influence on the metabolism of oncological drugs aimed at inhibition of the development of gonadotoxic derivatives. Another method includes appropriate choice of cytostatics: antimetabolites exert weaker unfavourable action on the gonads than alkylating drugs. The problem of gonad protection remains open. Searching is necessary for drugs without gonadotoxic action and effective methods of protection.

  2. Studies on the Growth Effects of the Canaline-Urea Cycle Amino Acids with Lemna minor L. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Gerald A.; Gulati, Dushyant K.; Sabharwal, P. S.

    1975-01-01

    The aquatic microphyte, Lemna minor L., was utilized to assess the relative toxicity and general growth effects of canavanine, canaline, ureidohomoserine (UHS), and canavaninosuccinate (CSA). These amino acids are constituents of the canaline-urea cycle and structural analogues of the ornithine-urea cycle amino acids. Comparative growth studies with L. minor revealed that the canaline-urea cycle amino acids are potent antimetabolites. With the exception of CSA, they are extremely toxic at a concentration of 5 μm. Over a concentration range of 1 to 4 μm, canavanine is the most growth-inhibiting of the canaline-urea cycle amino acids. At or above 5 μm, canavanine and canaline possess comparable toxicity. UHS is less growth-inhibiting than canavanine or canaline, and CSA is the least toxic of the canaline-urea cycle intermediates. PMID:16659316

  3. Study of the use possibility of the chemical-biological adduct of the 1,1-bis-[5-bromopyrimidine-2’,4’-diono-1’-il]-2-bromo-2’-chloroethylene and bacterial lectin for the treatment of the Pliss’ lymphosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Welchinska

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Study of the pyrimidine metabolism antimetabolites that can be preformed compounds in the link of biosynthetic processes and can brake tumour’s growth is a more successful, perspective finding direction of new antitumor medications. New original chemical-biological adduct was studied as potential antitumor agent. Methods and results. It was obtained on the base of 1,1-bis-[5-bromopyrimidine-2’,4’-diono-1’-il]-2-bromo-2’-chloroethylene and antitumour bacterial lectin from Bacillus polymyxa. It was found that new chemical-biological adduct of bis-derivative of pyrimidine and bacterial lectin has little toxic preparation (LD50=635 mg/kg and demonstrates considerable antitumour effect upon to 65.5% on Pliss Limphosarcoma tumour. Conclusion. It confirms that new chemical-biological adduct is perspective for the future investigation as substance with a little toxicity and high antitumour activity on the Pliss Limphosarcoma.

  4. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy and 5-Fluorouracil: Getting to the Heart of the Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Hui-Su Lim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a rare but increasingly recognized phenomenon, which can occur as a side-effect of chemotherapeutic agents, in particular, the antimetabolite 5-fluorouracil. We describe a case of delayed Takotsubo cardiomyopathy after 3 weeks of adjuvant 5-fluorouracil for resected rectal adenocarcinoma in a 66-year-old female, supported by angiographic, electrocardiographic, and echocardiographic features. As a complication, she developed an apical mural thrombus with subsequent cerebral thromboembolic events and was successfully anticoagulated to make a full recovery. We present a review of the literature on Takotsubo cardiomyopathy secondary to 5-fluorouracil and the rare occurrence of thromboembolic complications. As this is a significant clinical phenomenon which involves a multispeciality approach to management, oncologists and cardiologists need to recognize it as a potential toxicity of a widely administered chemotherapeutic drug.

  5. Adjuvant chemotherapy and cancer cure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertino, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    The use of chemotherapy as an adjuvant to surgery and/or radiotherapy is well founded in experimental tumor systems and appears to be effective in patients in some circumstances. It is clear from both clinical and experimental studies that (1) the dose is important, (2) the earlier chemotherapy is started after primary therapy the better, and (3) combination chemotherapy may be more effective than single-agent treatment. The better the estimation of risk of recurrence, the better the assessment of the risk-benefit ratio with adjuvant therapy. Salvage therapy as well as relative risk of recurrence are considerations in the choice of patients to be treated. Finally, some evidence is presented to indicate that alkylating agents may not be necessary in combination regimens for adjuvant therapy if effective antimetabolite combinations are available

  6. Glucose-mediated repression of autolysis and conidiogenesis in Emericella nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emri, Tamás; Molnár, Zsolt; Veres, Tünde; Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Dudás, Gábor; Pócsi, István

    2006-10-01

    Glucose-mediated repression of autolysis and sporulation was studied in submerged Emericellanidulans (anam. Aspergillus nidulans) cultures. Null mutation of the creA gene, which encodes the major carbon catabolite repressor CreA in E. nidulans, resulted in a hyperautolytic phenotype characterized by increased extracellular hydrolase production and dry cell mass declination. Interestingly, glucose, as well as the glucose antimetabolite 2-deoxy-d-glucose, repressed autolysis and sporulation in both the control and the creA null mutant strains suggesting that these processes were also subjected to CreA-independent carbon regulation. For example, the glucose-mediated, but CreA-independent, repression of the sporulation transcription factor BrlA was likely to contribute to the negative regulation of conidiogenesis by glucose. Although CreA played a prominent role in the regulation of autolysis via the repression of genes encoding important autolytic hydrolases like ChiB chitinase and PrtA protease the age-related production of the chitinase activity was also negatively affected by the down-regulation of brlA expression. However, neither CreA-dependent nor CreA-independent elements of carbon regulation affected the initiation and regulation of cell death in E. nidulans under carbon starvation.

  7. Hepatocyte SLAMF3 reduced specifically the multidrugs resistance protein MRP-1 and increases HCC cells sensitization to anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouquet, Grégory; Debuysscher, Véronique; Ouled-Haddou, Hakim; Eugenio, Mélanie Simoes; Demey, Baptiste; Singh, Amrathlal Rabbind; Ossart, Christèle; Al Bagami, Mohammed; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc; Nguyen-Khac, Eric; Naassila, Mickael; Marcq, Ingrid; Bouhlal, Hicham

    2016-05-31

    Multidrug resistance MDR proteins (MRPs) are members of the C family of a group of proteins named ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. MRPs can transport drugs including anticancer drugs, nucleoside analogs, antimetabolites and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Drugs used in HCC therapy, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib, are substrates of uptake and/or efflux transporters. Variable expression of MRPs at the plasma membrane of tumor cells may contribute to drug resistance and subsequent clinical response. Recently, we reported that the hepatocyte SLAMF3 expression (Signaling Lymphocytic Activation Molecule Family member 3) was reduced in tumor cells from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared to its high expression in adjacent tissues. In the present study, we make a strong correlation between induced SLAMF3 overexpression and the specific loss of MRP-1 expression and its functionalities as a drugs resistance transporter. No changes were observed on expression of ABCG2 and MDR. More importantly, we highlight a strong inverse correlation between MRP-1 and SLAMF3 expression in patients with HCC. We propose that the SLAMF3 overexpression in cancerous cells could represent a potential therapeutic strategy to improve the drugs sensibility of resistant cells and thus control the therapeutic failure in HCC patients.

  8. Factors modifying 3-aminobenzamide cytotoxicity in normal and repair-deficient human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boorstein, R.J.; Pardee, A.B.

    1984-01-01

    3-Aminobenzamide (3-AB), an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribosylation), is lethal to human fibroblasts with damaged DNA. Its cytotoxicity was determined relative to a number of factors including the types of lesions, the kinetics of repair, and the availability of alternative repair systems. A variety of alkylating agent, UV or gamma irradiation, or antimetabolites were used to create DNA lesions. 3-AB enhanced lethality with monofunctional alkylating agents only. Within this class of compounds, methylmethanesulfonate (MMS) treatments made cells more sensitive to 3-AB than did treatment with methylnitrosourea (MNU) or methylnitronitrosoguanidine (MNNG). 3-AB interfered with a dynamic repair process lasting several days, since human fibroblasts remained sensitive to 3-AB for 36-48 hours following MMS treatment. During this same interval 3-AB caused these cells to arrest in G 2 phase. Alkaline elution analysis also revealed that this slow repair was delayed further by 3-AB. Human mutant cell defective in DNA repair differed in their responses to 3-AB. Greater lethality with 3-AB could be dependent on inability of the mutant cells to repair damage by other processes

  9. TUG1 mediates methotrexate resistance in colorectal cancer via miR-186/CPEB2 axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changfeng; Gao, Yongjian; Li, Yongchao; Ding, Dayong

    2017-09-16

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common malignancy, most of which remain unresponsive to chemotherapy. Methotrexate (MTX) is one of the earliest cytotoxic drugs and serves as an anti-metabolite and anti-folate chemotherapy for various types of cancer. However, MTX resistance prevents its clinical application in cancer therapy. Thereby, overcoming the drug resistance is an alternative strategy to maximize the efficacy of MTX therapies in clinics. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have gained widespread attention in recent years. More and more evidences have shown that lncRNAs play regulatory roles in various biological activities and disease progression including drug resistance in cancer cells. Here, we observed lncRNA TUG1 was associated to the MTX resistant in colorectal cancer cells. Firstly, quantitative analysis indicated that TUG1 was significantly increased in tumors which were resistant to MTX treatment. TUG1 knockdown re-sensitized the MTX resistance in colorectal cancer cells, which were MTX-resistant colorectal cell line. Furthermore, bioinformatics analysis showed that miR-186 could directly bind to TUG1, suggesting TUG1 might worked as a ceRNA to sponge miR-186. Extensively, our study also showed that CPEB2 was the direct target of miR-186 in colorectal cancer cells. Taken together, our study suggests that lncRNA TUG1 mediates MTX resistance in colorectal cancer via miR-186/CPEB2 axis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Inhibition of DNA and protein synthesis in UV-irradiated mouse skin by 2-difluoromethylornithine, methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone), and their combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaepyaho, K.; Lauharanta, J.; Jaenne, J.

    1983-08-01

    Exposure of mouse skin to UVB irradiation greatly enhanced the biosynthesis and accumulation of putrescine and spermidine before or concomitantly with stimulation of epidermal macromolecular (DNA and protein) synthesis. Topical treatment of UV-exposed skin with 2 inhibitors of polyamine biosynthesis, 2-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) prevented the enhanced epidermal accumulation of polyamines, especially spermidine, and also inhibited the incorporation of radioactive precursors into DNA and protein. When applied in combination, these 2 antimetabolites of polyamines produced an inhibition of macromolecular synthesis that was at least additive: (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation decreased by 80% and (/sup 14/C)leucine incorporation by 44% as compared with the UVB-irradiated control mice. A slight decrease in the ratio of (/sup 3/H)histidine/(/sup 14/C)leucine incorporation indicated that protein synthesis of the differentiating cell layers was also affected by the inhibitors. The effects of the combined DFMO and MGBG treatment were partially reversed by concomitant topical application of spermidine.

  11. Diethylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone): a novel highly potent inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase with promising properties for potential chemotherapeutic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elo, H; Mutikainen, I; Alhonen-Hongisto, L; Laine, R; Jänne, J

    1988-07-01

    Diethylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (DEGBG), a novel analog of the antileukemic agent methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) was synthesized. It was found to be the most powerful inhibitor of yeast S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC) so far studied (Ki approx. 9 nM). This property, together with the finding that the compound is a weaker inhibitor of intestinal diamine oxidase than are MGBG and its glyoxal, ethylglyoxal and ethylmethylglyoxal analogs, makes the compound a promising candidate as a polyamine antimetabolite for chemotherapy studies. DEGBG was also found to potentiate the antiproliferative effect of the ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor alpha-difluoromethyl ornithine against mouse L1210 leukemia cells in vitro. DEGBG increased several-fold the intracellular putrescine concentration of cultured L1210 cells, just as MGBG and its ethylglyoxal analog are known to do. The results strongly suggest that DEGBG is worth further studies. Combined with previous studies, they also made possible the construction of some empirical rules concerning the structure-activity relationships of bis(guanylhydrazone) type inhibitors of AdoMetDC. The identity of DEGBG was confirmed by a single-crystal X-ray analysis and by 1H- and 13C-NMR spectroscopy. It consisted of the same isomer as MGBG and several of its analogs are known to consist of.

  12. Inhibition of DNA and protein synthesis in UV-irradiated mouse skin by 2-difluoromethylornithine, methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone), and their combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaepyaho, K.; Lauharanta, J.; Jaenne, J.

    1983-01-01

    Exposure of mouse skin to UVB irradiation greatly enhanced the biosynthesis and accumulation of putrescine and spermidine before or concomitantly with stimulation of epidermal macromolecular (DNA and protein) synthesis. Topical treatment of UV-exposed skin with 2 inhibitors of polyamine biosynthesis, 2-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) prevented the enhanced epidermal accumulation of polyamines, especially spermidine, and also inhibited the incorporation of radioactive precursors into DNA and protein. When applied in combination, these 2 antimetabolites of polyamines produced an inhibition of macromolecular synthesis that was at least additive: [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation decreased by 80% and [ 14 C]leucine incorporation by 44% as compared with the UVB-irradiated control mice. A slight decrease in the ratio of [ 3 H]histidine/[ 14 C]leucine incorporation indicated that protein synthesis of the differentiating cell layers was also affected by the inhibitors. The effects of the combined DFMO and MGBG treatment were partially reversed by concomitant topical application of spermidine

  13. Novel agents in the management of lung cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennedy, B

    2012-01-31

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Survival remains poor as approximately 80% of cases present with advanced stage disease. However, new treatments are emerging which offer hope to patients with advanced disease. Insights into cell biology have identified numerous intracellular and extracellular peptides that are pivotal in cancer cell signalling. Disrupting the function of these peptides inhibits intracellular signal transduction and diminishes uncontrolled proliferation, resistance to apoptosis and tumour angiogenesis. The most widely studied signalling pathway is the Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) pathway. EGF signalling can be disrupted at numerous points. Blockade of the cell surface receptor is achieved by the monoclonal antibody cetuximab; intracellular tyrosine kinase activity is inhibited by erlotinib. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) regulates another pathway important for tumour growth. Inhibition of VEGF impairs angiogenesis and disrupts metastatic spread. Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody that binds to VEGF and blocks interaction with its cell surface receptor. Clinical trials have demonstrated that disruption of these signalling pathways can improve survival in advanced lung cancer. New compounds including folate antimetabolites such as pemetrexed, proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib, modified glutathione analogues such as TLK286, and other agents such as epothilones and other small molecules are currently being evaluated in patients with lung cancer. As more and more signalling peptides are targeted for manipulation, it is hoped that a new era is dawning in the treatment of advanced stage lung cancer. This review will focus on emerging new therapies in the management of lung cancer.

  14. Metabolic profiling using HPLC allows classification of drugs according to their mechanisms of action in HL-1 cardiomyocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strigun, Alexander; Wahrheit, Judith; Beckers, Simone; Heinzle, Elmar; Noor, Fozia

    2011-01-01

    Along with hepatotoxicity, cardiotoxic side effects remain one of the major reasons for drug withdrawals and boxed warnings. Prediction methods for cardiotoxicity are insufficient. High content screening comprising of not only electrophysiological characterization but also cellular molecular alterations are expected to improve the cardiotoxicity prediction potential. Metabolomic approaches recently have become an important focus of research in pharmacological testing and prediction. In this study, the culture medium supernatants from HL-1 cardiomyocytes after exposure to drugs from different classes (analgesics, antimetabolites, anthracyclines, antihistamines, channel blockers) were analyzed to determine specific metabolic footprints in response to the tested drugs. Since most drugs influence energy metabolism in cardiac cells, the metabolite 'sub-profile' consisting of glucose, lactate, pyruvate and amino acids was considered. These metabolites were quantified using HPLC in samples after exposure of cells to test compounds of the respective drug groups. The studied drug concentrations were selected from concentration response curves for each drug. The metabolite profiles were randomly split into training/validation and test set; and then analysed using multivariate statistics (principal component analysis and discriminant analysis). Discriminant analysis resulted in clustering of drugs according to their modes of action. After cross validation and cross model validation, the underlying training data were able to predict 50%-80% of conditions to the correct classification group. We show that HPLC based characterisation of known cell culture medium components is sufficient to predict a drug's potential classification according to its mode of action.

  15. A patient case highlighting the myriad of cutaneous adverse effects of prolonged use of hydroxyurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, Brett; Ryser, Ted; Neill, John; Aires, Daniel; Rajpara, Anand

    2017-11-15

    Hydroxyurea is an antimetabolite primarily used to treat myeloproliferative disorders, and chronic treatment is associated with many cutaneous adverse effects ranging in severity from ichthyosis to aggressive nonmelanoma skin cancer. We report a 67-year-oldman with a history of polycythemia vera who was referred for management of progressively worsening dorsal hand lesions. The patient presented withhyperpigmentation, ichthyosis, plantar keratoderma, dermatomyositis-like eruptions, two squamous cell carcinomas, and actinic keratoses. The adversereactions observed were acknowledged to be related to chronic hydroxyurea use. The patient underwent Mohs excision of the squamous cell carcinomas and thehydroxyurea was promptly discontinued; subsequent cutaneous improvement of the dermatomyositislike lesions ensued. Another clinically suspicious aggressive squamous cell carcinoma was suspected and the patient was referred to the plastic surgery department for complete excision because of the size of the lesion. The patient remains on periodic dermatology follow up. We report a case that exemplifies the cutaneous adverse effects of chronic hydroxyurea therapy. Although many cases improve after drug discontinuation, strict photoprotection and ongoing surveillance are indicated given the recently proposed premalignant potential of dermatomyositis-like eruptions and the aggressive nature of hydroxyurea-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer.

  16. Synchronization of tumor cells with 5-fluorouracil plus uracil and with vinblastine and irradiation of synchronized cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severin, E.; Hagenhoff, B.

    1988-01-01

    In this article, some arguments are put forward which support the conception of a combined radio-chemotherapy acting by a reversible inhibition of tumor cells with cytostatic drugs in a not cytocidal dose and the following selective killing by irradiation of the cells blocked in a radiosensitive phase. The two cytostatic drugs 5-fluorouracil (FU) and vinblastine (VLB), as inhibitors of DNA synthesis and mitosis, respectively, are tested in vitro both separately and combined in two tumor cell lines of the mouse, i.e. the Ehrlich ascites tumor and the sarcoma S 180. A cell-proliferative and, as far as possible, not cytocidal dose is used because of the inevitable side effects exerted by these drugs on normal tissues. A reversible synchronization of the ascites tumor is achieved even in the young mouse by FU in a dose of 15 ng to 500 ng (applied seven times every two hours), if the synchronization is controlled by applying the antimetabolite together with uracil in an equimolar concentration and then stimulating the growth of the cells inhibited during DNA synthesis by the administration of thymidine. The statistical analysis of dose-effect curves after X-ray irradiation shows an increased radiosensitivity of the synchronized cell population, provided that the optimum moment had been chosen for the irradiation. (orig.) [de

  17. Short-chain analogs of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone containing cytotoxic moieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janáky, T; Juhász, A; Rékási, Z; Serfözö, P; Pinski, J; Bokser, L; Srkalovic, G; Milovanovic, S; Redding, T W; Halmos, G

    1992-11-01

    Five hexapeptide and heptapeptide analogs of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) were synthesized for use as carriers for cytotoxic compounds. These short analogs were expected to enhance target selectivity of the antineoplastic agents linked to them. Native LH-RH-(3-9) and LH-RH-(4-9) containing D-lysine and D-ornithine at position 6 were amidated with ethylamine and acylated on the N terminus. The receptor-binding affinity of one hexapeptide carrier AJ-41 (Ac-Ser-Tyr-D-Lys-Leu-Arg-Pro-NH-Et) to human breast cancer cell membranes was similar to that of [D-Trp6]LH-RH. Alkylating nitrogen mustards (melphalan, Ac-melphalan), anthraquinone derivatives including anticancer antibiotic doxorubicin, antimetabolite (methotrexate), and cisplatin-like platinum complex were linked to these peptides through their omega-amino group at position 6. The hybrid molecules showed no LH-RH agonistic activity in vitro and in vivo but had nontypical antagonistic effects on pituitary cells in vitro at the doses tested. These analogs showed a wide range of receptor-binding affinities to rat pituitaries and cell membranes of human breast cancer and rat Dunning prostate cancer. Several of these conjugates exerted some cytotoxic effects on MCF-7 breast cancer cell line.

  18. Cellular mechanisms in drug - radiation interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trott, K.R.

    1979-01-01

    Some cytotoxic drugs, especially those belonging to the group of antibiotics and antimetabolites, sensitize the cells having survived drug treatment to the subsequent irradiation by either increasing the slope of the radiation dose response curves or by decreasing extrapolation number. Bleomycin was found to interact with radiation in L-cells and FM3A cells, but not in HeLa-cells. The data with EMT-6 cells suggest that the interaction depends on drug dose: no interaction occurred after the exposure to bleomycin which killed only 20 - 40% of the cells; yet the exposure to bleomycin which killed 90% of the cells in addition sensitized the surviving cells by the DMF of 1.3. The sensitization found 24 hr after the exposure of HeLa cells to methotrexate was due to cell synchronization. Other cytostatic drugs were found to synchronize proliferating cells even better. Therefore, the fluctuation of radiosensitivity has been commonly observed after the termination of exposure to these drugs. Preirradiation may lead to the change in drug dose response curves. The recruitment of resting cells into cycle occurs hours or days later, in some irradiated normal and malignant tissues. Since many cytostatic drugs are far more active in proliferating cells than in resting cells, the recruitment after irradiation may lead to the sudden increase in drug sensitivity, days after the irradiation. No single, simple theory seems to exist to classify and predict the cellular response to combined modality treatment. (Yamashita, S.)

  19. A review and update on orphan drugs for the treatment of noninfectious uveitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Caiyun; Sahawneh, Haitham F; Ma, Lina; Kubaisi, Buraa; Schmidt, Alexander; Foster, C Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Uveitis, a leading cause of preventable blindness around the world, is a critically underserved disease in regard to the medications approved for use. Multiple immunomodulatory therapy (IMT) drugs are appropriate for uveitis therapy but are still off-label. These IMT agents, including antimetabolites, calcineurin inhibitors, alkylating agents, and biologic agents, have been designated as “orphan drugs” and are widely used for systemic autoimmune diseases or organ transplantation. Area covered The purpose of this paper is to comprehensively review and summarize the approved orphan drugs and biologics that are being used to treat systemic diseases and to discuss drugs that have not yet received approval as an “orphan drug for treating uveitis” by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Our perspective IMT, as a steroid-sparing agent for uveitis patients, has shown promising clinical results. Refractory and recurrent uveitis requires combination IMT agents. IMT is continued for a period of 2 years while the patient is in remission before considering tapering medication. Our current goals include developing further assessments regarding the efficacy, optimal dose, and safety in efforts to achieve FDA approval for “on-label” use of current IMT agents and biologics more quickly and to facilitate insurance coverage and expand access to the products for this orphan disease. PMID:28203051

  20. Treatment of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis-Associated Uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlknur Tuğal-Tutkun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric uveitis may be a serious health problem because of the lifetime burden of vision loss due to severe complications if the problem is not adequately treated. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA-associated uveitis is characterized by insidious onset and potentially blinding chronic anterior uveitis. Periodic ophthalmologic screening is of utmost importance for early diagnosis of uveitis. Early diagnosis and proper immunomodulatory treatment are essential for good visual prognosis. The goal of treatment is to achieve enduring drug-free remission. The choice of therapeutic regimen needs to be tailored to each individual case. One must keep in mind that patients under immunomodulatory treatment should be monitored closely due to possible side effects. Local and systemic corticosteroids have long been the mainstay of therapy; however, long-term corticosteroid therapy should be avoided due to serious side effects. Steroid-sparing agents in the treatment of JIA-associated uveitis include antimetabolites and biologic agents in refractory cases. Among the various immunomodulatory agents, methotrexate is generally the first choice, as it has a well-established safety and efficacy profile in pediatric cases and does not appear to increase the risk of cancer. Other classic immunomodulators that may also be used in combination with methotrexate include azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and cyclosporin A. Biologic agents, primarily tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors including infliximab or adalimumab, should be considered in cases of treatment failure with classic immunomodulatory agents.

  1. Immunosuppressive therapy in non-infections uveitis and retinovasculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Drozdova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the immunosuppressive therapy for severe forms of non-infections uveitis and retinovasculitis.Methods: 107 patients (62 males and 45 females aged 9 to 54 years who received low dose methotrexate — 7.5-20 mg once a week (n=79 cyclosporine A 3.5-5.0 mg/kg/d (n=21 with prednisone or other antimetabolites and local corticosteroid therapy for severe forms of inflammatory eye diseases.Results: the efficacy of methotrexate as monotherapy was 51.8% of patients with chronic uveitis. Control of acute inflammation was achived in 71.1% patients, who received methotrexate in combination with prednisolone. Cyclosporine A was more effective in controlling inflammatory of the eye: remission of uveitis was achived in 85.7% in combination with glucocorticoids. No significant side effects have been noted.Conclusion: Methotrexate and cyclosporine A with low dose of prednisolone are well tolerated immunosuppressive agents andrather effective in the treatment of non-infectious uveitis and retinovasculitis that fails to respond to conventional steroid treatment.

  2. Emerging Drugs for Uveitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Theresa; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Sen, H. Nida

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the Field Uveitis is a challenging disease covering both infectious and noninfectious conditions. The current treatment strategies are hampered by the paucity of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and few trials comparing efficacy of different agents. Areas Covered in this Review This review describes the current and future treatments of uveitis. A literature search was performed in PUBMED from 1965 to 2010 on drugs treating ocular inflammation with emphasis placed on more recent, larger studies. What the Reader Will Gain Readers should gain a basic understanding of current treatment strategies beginning with corticosteroids and transitioning to steroid sparing agents. Steroid sparing agents include the antimetabolites which include methotrexate, azathioprine, and mycophenolate mofetil; the calcineurin inhibitors which include cyclosporine, tacrolimus; alkylating agents which include cyclophosphamide and chlorambucil; and biologics which include the TNF-α inhibitors infliximab, adalimumab, and etanercept; daclizumab, interferon α2a, and rituximab. Take Home Message Newer agents are typically formulated from existing drugs or developed based on new advances in immunology. Future treatment will require a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in autoimmune diseases and better delivery systems in order to provide targeted treatment with minimal side effects. PMID:21210752

  3. Treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis: challenges and update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, C Egla

    2011-09-01

    To update the current understanding of the risk factors for poor outcomes in juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis. In addition, current therapies, both traditional and biological, are reviewed. Male sex, independent of age or antinuclear antibody status, is associated with increased ocular morbidity. Having anterior chamber inflammation on first exam increases the risk of developing vision-threatening eye complications. Presence of one complication increases the risk of developing another. Risk of cataract development associated with topical glucocorticoid use is better defined. Longer duration of remission on therapy has been found to decrease the risk of disease flare after discontinuation of methotrexate. Recent studies of both nonbiological and biological therapies for arthritis-related uveitis are discussed. With a better understanding of risk factors associated with the ocular morbidity of uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, aggressive therapies can be targeted for improved visual outcomes. Alternative treatments to avoid long-term corticosteroid use include the use of antimetabolites and biological therapies. More prospective comparator studies and/or use of multicenter databases are needed to better understand best treatments.

  4. Immunosuppressive therapy in non-infections uveitis and retinovasculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Drozdova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the immunosuppressive therapy for severe forms of non-infections uveitis and retinovasculitis.Methods: 107 patients (62 males and 45 females aged 9 to 54 years who received low dose methotrexate — 7.5-20 mg once a week (n=79 cyclosporine A 3.5-5.0 mg/kg/d (n=21 with prednisone or other antimetabolites and local corticosteroid therapy for severe forms of inflammatory eye diseases.Results: the efficacy of methotrexate as monotherapy was 51.8% of patients with chronic uveitis. Control of acute inflammation was achived in 71.1% patients, who received methotrexate in combination with prednisolone. Cyclosporine A was more effective in controlling inflammatory of the eye: remission of uveitis was achived in 85.7% in combination with glucocorticoids. No significant side effects have been noted.Conclusion: Methotrexate and cyclosporine A with low dose of prednisolone are well tolerated immunosuppressive agents andrather effective in the treatment of non-infectious uveitis and retinovasculitis that fails to respond to conventional steroid treatment.

  5. Comparative Genomic Analyses of Multiple Pseudomonas Strains Infecting Corylus avellana Trees Reveal the Occurrence of Two Genetic Clusters with Both Common and Distinctive Virulence and Fitness Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelletti, Simone; Scortichini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The European hazelnut (Corylus avellana) is threatened in Europe by several pseudomonads which cause symptoms ranging from twig dieback to tree death. A comparison of the draft genomes of nine Pseudomonas strains isolated from symptomatic C. avellana trees was performed to identify common and distinctive genomic traits. The thorough assessment of genetic relationships among the strains revealed two clearly distinct clusters: P. avellanae and P. syringae. The latter including the pathovars avellanae, coryli and syringae. Between these two clusters, no recombination event was found. A genomic island of approximately 20 kb, containing the hrp/hrc type III secretion system gene cluster, was found to be present without any genomic difference in all nine pseudomonads. The type III secretion system effector repertoires were remarkably different in the two groups, with P. avellanae showing a higher number of effectors. Homologue genes of the antimetabolite mangotoxin and ice nucleation activity clusters were found solely in all P. syringae pathovar strains, whereas the siderophore yersiniabactin was only present in P. avellanae. All nine strains have genes coding for pectic enzymes and sucrose metabolism. By contrast, they do not have genes coding for indolacetic acid and anti-insect toxin. Collectively, this study reveals that genomically different Pseudomonas can converge on the same host plant by suppressing the host defence mechanisms with the use of different virulence weapons. The integration into their genomes of a horizontally acquired genomic island could play a fundamental role in their evolution, perhaps giving them the ability to exploit new ecological niches. PMID:26147218

  6. Management of glaucoma in pregnancy: risks or choices, a dilemma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harinder Singh Sethi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of glaucoma in and around pregnancy offers the unique challenge of balancing the risk of vision loss to the mother as against the potential harm to the fetus or newborn. Most anti-glaucoma drugs (i.e. beta-blockers, prostaglandin analogues, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors topical and systemic, cholinergics, anticholinesterases, and apraclonidine are considered category C agents and ophthalmologists are usually limited to treating patients with the category B drugs of brimonidine and dipivefrin. Brimonidine is generally the preferred first-line drug in the first, second and early third trimester. Late in the third trimester, brimonidine should be discontinued because it can induce central nervous system depression in newborns wherein topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors may be the optimal choice. Glaucoma surgery can be performed with caution in second and third trimester if the patients have a strong indication for the procedure. However, anesthetics, sedative agents, and antimetabolites still have potential risk for the fetus. Argon laser trabeculoplasty (ALT or selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT is an alternative treatment that can be performed in all trimesters. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and β-blockers are certified by the American Academy of Pediatrics for use during nursing. However, low doses of these medications should be considered when used in the breast feeding period. Optimum treatment for glaucoma in pregnancy must not be withheld so as to prevent any further deterioration in progressive vision loss and quality of life.

  7. Enhancing Photodynamyc Therapy Efficacy by Combination Therapy: Dated, Current and Oncoming Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postiglione, Ilaria; Chiaviello, Angela; Palumbo, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Combination therapy is a common practice in many medical disciplines. It is defined as the use of more than one drug to treat the same disease. Sometimes this expression describes the simultaneous use of therapeutic approaches that target different cellular/molecular pathways, increasing the chances of killing the diseased cell. This short review is concerned with therapeutic combinations in which PDT (Photodynamyc Therapy) is the core therapeutic partner. Besides the description of the principal methods used to assess the efficacy attained by combinations in respect to monotherapy, this review describes experimental results in which PDT was combined with conventional drugs in different experimental conditions. This inventory is far from exhaustive, as the number of photosensitizers used in combination with different drugs is very large. Reports cited in this work have been selected because considered representative. The combinations we have reviewed include the association of PDT with anti-oxidants, chemotherapeutics, drugs targeting topoisomerases I and II, antimetabolites and others. Some paragraphs are dedicated to PDT and immuno-modulation, others to associations of PDT with angiogenesis inhibitors, receptor inhibitors, radiotherapy and more. Finally, a look is dedicated to combinations involving the use of natural compounds and, as new entries, drugs that act as proteasome inhibitors

  8. Treatment of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis-Associated Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oray, Merih; Tuğal-Tutkun, İlknur

    2016-04-01

    Pediatric uveitis may be a serious health problem because of the lifetime burden of vision loss due to severe complications if the problem is not adequately treated. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis is characterized by insidious onset and potentially blinding chronic anterior uveitis. Periodic ophthalmologic screening is of utmost importance for early diagnosis of uveitis. Early diagnosis and proper immunomodulatory treatment are essential for good visual prognosis. The goal of treatment is to achieve enduring drug-free remission. The choice of therapeutic regimen needs to be tailored to each individual case. One must keep in mind that patients under immunomodulatory treatment should be monitored closely due to possible side effects. Local and systemic corticosteroids have long been the mainstay of therapy; however, long-term corticosteroid therapy should be avoided due to serious side effects. Steroid-sparing agents in the treatment of JIA-associated uveitis include antimetabolites and biologic agents in refractory cases. Among the various immunomodulatory agents, methotrexate is generally the first choice, as it has a well-established safety and efficacy profile in pediatric cases and does not appear to increase the risk of cancer. Other classic immunomodulators that may also be used in combination with methotrexate include azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and cyclosporin A. Biologic agents, primarily tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors including infliximab or adalimumab, should be considered in cases of treatment failure with classic immunomodulatory agents.

  9. Management of patients with ocular manifestations in vesiculobullous disorders affecting the mouth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, M S; Klefter, O N; Julian, H O; Lynge Pedersen, A M; Heegaard, S

    2017-10-01

    Pemphigoid and pemphigus diseases as well as Stevens-Johnson syndrome present as vesiculobullous disorders of the skin and may additionally involve both the oral cavity and the ocular surface. Ocular involvement ranges from mild irritation and dry eye disease to chronic conjunctivitis, symblepharon, eyelid malposition, ocular surface scarring and severe visual loss. In addition to diagnostic assessments, ophthalmologists must treat the dry eye and meibomian gland dysfunction components of these diseases using a stepladder approach, including eyelid hygiene and lubricants. Topical anti-inflammatory therapy is used to treat acute inflammatory exacerbations of the ocular surface, but it cannot prevent scarring alone. Intralesional antimetabolite therapy can cause regression of conjunctival pathology in selected cases. Hence, patients with vesiculobullous disorders should be managed by a multidisciplinary team representing ophthalmology, dermatology, otolaryngology, oral medicine and pathology, internal medicine and intensive care. Systemic treatments including corticosteroids, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil help control inflammation. Intravenous immunoglobulins, plasmapheresis and targeted antibody therapy can be used in selected, severe and treatment-resistant cases. Local surgical management may include debridement of pseudomembranes, lysis of symblepharon, amniotic and mucous membrane grafting as well as reconstructive procedures. Prospective, multicentre, international studies are recommended to further support evidence-based practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. In vitro study on the schedule-dependency of the interaction between pemetrexed, gemcitabine and irradiation in non-small cell lung cancer and head and neck cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wouters, An; Pauwels, Bea; Lardon, Filip; Pattyn, Greet GO; Lambrechts, Hilde AJ; Baay, Marc; Meijnders, Paul; Vermorken, Jan B

    2010-01-01

    Based on their different mechanisms of action, non-overlapping side effects and radiosensitising potential, combining the antimetabolites pemetrexed (multitargeted antifolate, MTA) and gemcitabine (2',2'-difluorodeoxycytidine, dFdC) with irradiation (RT) seems promising. This in vitro study, for the first time, presents the triple combination of MTA, dFdC and irradiation using various treatment schedules. The cytotoxicity, radiosensitising potential and cell cycle effect of MTA were investigated in A549 (NSCLC) and CAL-27 (SCCHN) cells. Using simultaneous or sequential exposure schedules, the cytotoxicity and radiosensitising effect of 24 h MTA combined with 1 h or 24 h dFdC were analysed. Including a time interval between MTA exposure and irradiation seemed favourable to MTA immediately preceding or following radiotherapy. MTA induced a significant S phase accumulation that persisted for more than 8 h after drug removal. Among different MTA/dFdC combinations tested, the highest synergistic interaction was produced by 24 h MTA followed by 1 h dFdC. Combined with irradiation, this schedule showed a clear radiosensitising effect. Results from our in vitro model suggest that the sequence 24 h MTA → 1 h dFdC → RT is the most rational design and would, after confirmation in an in vivo setting, possibly provide the greatest benefit in the clinic

  11. Chain-modified radioiodinated fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    Several carbon chain manipulations have been studied in terms of their effects on myocardial activity levels and residence time. The manipulations examined included: chain length, chain branching, chain unsaturation, and carbon-iodine bond stabilization. It was found that chain length affects myocardial activity levels for both straight-chain alkyl acids and branched chain alkyl and aryl acids. Similar results have been reported for the straight-chain aryl acids. Generally, the longer chain lengths correlated with higher myocardial activity levels and longer residence times. This behavior is attributed to storage as triglycerides. Branched chain acids are designed to be anti-metabolites but only the aryl β-methyl acids possessed the expected time course of constant or very slowly decreasing activity levels. The alkyl β-methyl acids underwent rapid deiodination - a process apparently independent of β-oxidation. Inhibition of β-oxidation by incorporation of carbon-carbon double and triple bonds was studied. Deiodination of ω-iodo alkyl fatty acids prevented an assessment of suicide inhibition using an unsaturated alkynoic acid. Stabilization of the carbon-iodine bond by attachment of iodine to a vinylic or aryl carbon was studied. The low myocardial values and high blood values observed for an eleven carbon ω-iodo vinylic fatty acid were not encouraging but ω-iodo aryl fatty acids appear to avoid the problems of rapid deiodination. (Auth.)

  12. Successful pregnancy after mucinous cystic neoplasm with invasive carcinoma of the pancreas in a patient with polycystic ovarian syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloman, Conisha; Carlan, S J; Sundharkrishnan, Lohini; Guzman, Angela; Madruga, Mario

    2017-07-11

    The incidence of invasive cancer within a mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas varies between 6 and 36%. Polycystic ovarian syndrome is a disorder characterized by hyperandrogenism and anovulatory infertility. One surgical treatment that can restore endocrine balance and ovulation in polycystic ovarian syndrome is partial ovarian destruction. Successful pregnancies following preconception pancreaticoduodenectomies (Whipple procedures) and chemoradiation to treat pancreatic neoplasms have been reported rarely but none were diagnosed with pre-cancer polycystic ovarian syndrome-associated infertility. Gemcitabine is an antimetabolite drug used for the treatment of pancreatic cancer that can have profound detrimental effects on oogenesis and ovarian function. Whether the ovarian destructive property of gemcitabine could act as a method to restore ovulation potential in polycystic ovarian syndrome is unknown. A 40-year-old white American woman with a history of pancreatic cancer treatment with a Whipple procedure and chemoradiation with gemcitabine had a successful pregnancy after years of pre-cancerous anovulatory infertility and polycystic ovarian syndrome. She received no fertility agents and delivered full term via a spontaneous vaginal delivery with no pregnancy complications. Gemcitabine treatment for pancreatic cancer may result in resumption of ovulation in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome and these women should be counseled accordingly.

  13. In Silico Screening, Synthesis and In Vitro Evaluation of Some Quinazolinone and Pyridine Derivatives as Dihydrofolate Reductase Inhibitors for Anticancer Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Nerkar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR is the important target for anticancer drugs belonging to the class of antimetabolites as the enzyme plays important role in the de novo purine synthesis. We here report the in silico screening to obtain best fit molecules as DHFR inhibitors, synthesis of some ʻbest fitʼ quinazolinone from 2-phenyl-3-(substituted-benzilidine-amino quinazolinones (Quinazolinone Shiff's bases QSB1-5 and pyridine-4-carbohydrazide Shiff's bases (ISB1-5 derivatives and their in vitro anticancer assay. Synthesis of the molecules was performed using microwave assisted synthesis. The structures of these molecules were elucidated by IR and 1H-NMR. These compounds were then subjected for in vitro anticancer evaluation against five human cancer cell-lines for anticancer cyto-toxicity assay. Methotrexate (MTX was used as standard for this evaluation to give a comparable inhibition of the cell proliferation by DHFR inhibition. Placlitaxel, adriamycin and 5-fluoro-uracil were also used as standard to give a comparable activity of these compounds with other mechanism of anticancer activity. ISB3 (4-(N, N-dimethyl-amino-phenyl Schiff''s base derivative of pyridine carbohydrazide showed equipotent activity with the standards used in in vitro anticancer assay as per the NCI (National Cancer Institute guidelines.

  14. Role of hydroxycarbamide in prevention of complications in patients with sickle cell disease

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    NM Wiles

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available NM Wiles, J HowardDepartment of Haematology, St Thomas’ Hospital, Westminster, Bridge Road, London, SE1 7EH, UKAbstract: Sickle cell disease (SCD is a genetically inherited condition caused by a point mutation in the beta globin gene. This results in the production of the abnormal hemoglobin, sickle hemoglobin (HbS. Hydroxycarbamide, is an antimetabolite/cytotoxic which works by inhibiting ribonucleotide reductase, blocking the synthesis of DNA and arresting cells in the S phase. In sickle cell anemia, it promotes fetal hemoglobin (HbF synthesis, improves red cell hydration, decreases neutrophil and platelet count, modifies red cell endothelial cell interactions and acts as a nitric oxide donor. Trials have shown the clinical benefit of hydroxycarbamide in a subpopulation of adult patients with SCD, with a 44% reduction in the median annual rate of painful crises, a decrease in the incidence of acute chest syndrome and an estimated 40% reduction in overall mortality over a 9-year observational period. Its use in pediatrics has also been well established; trials have shown it is well tolerated and does not impair growth or development. In addition it decreases the number and duration of hospital attendences. A number of emerging uses of hydroxycarbamide currently are being investigated, such as stroke prevention.Keywords: sickle cell anemia, hydroxycarbamide, hydroxyurea, maximum tolerated dose, vaso-occlusive crisis

  15. Gemcitabine-loaded liposomes: rationale, potentialities and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cinzia Federico, Valeria M Morittu, Domenico Britti, Elena Trapasso, Donato CoscoDepartment of Health Sciences, Building of BioSciences, University “Magna Græcia” of Catanzaro, Campus Universitario “S Venuta”, Germaneto, ItalyAbstract: This review describes the strategies used in recent years to improve the biopharmaceutical properties of gemcitabine, a nucleoside analog deoxycytidine antimetabolite characterized by activity against many kinds of tumors, by means of liposomal devices. The main limitation of using this active compound is the rapid inactivation of deoxycytidine deaminase following administration in vivo. Consequently, different strategies based on its encapsulation/complexation in innovative vesicular colloidal carriers have been investigated, with interesting results in terms of increased pharmacological activity, plasma half-life, and tumor localization, in addition to decreased side effects. This review focuses on the specific approaches used, based on the encapsulation of gemcitabine in liposomes, with particular attention to the results obtained during the last 5 years. These approaches represent a valid starting point in the attempt to obtain a novel, commercializable drug formulation as already achieved for liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil®, Caelyx®.Keywords: gemcitabine, liposomes, multidrug, poly(ethylene glycol, tumors

  16. Optimal Anti-cancer Drug Profiles for Effective Penetration of the Anti-cancer Drug Market by Generic Drugs in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Shoyo; Matsushita, Maiko; Saito, Yoshimasa; Suzuki, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    The increased use of generic drugs is a good indicator of the need to reduce the increasing costs of prescription drugs. Since there are more expensive drugs compared with other therapeutic areas, "oncology" is an important one for generic drugs. The primary objective of this article was to quantify the extent to which generic drugs in Japan occupy each level of the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification system. The dataset used in this study was created from publicly available information obtained from the IMS Japan Pharmaceutical Market database. Data on the total amount of sales and number of prescriptions for anti-cancer drugs between 2010 and 2016 in Japan were selected. The data were categorized according to the third level of the ATC classification system. All categories of the ATC classification system had increased market shares in Japan between 2010 and 2016. The barriers to market entry were relatively low in L01F (platinum anti-neoplastics), L01C (plant-based neoplastics), L02B (cytostatic hormone antagonists), and L01D (anti-neoplastic antibiotics) but were high in L02A (cytostatic hormones), L01H (protein kinase inhibitors), and L01B (anti-metabolites). Generic cancer drugs could bring savings to Japanese health care systems. Therefore, their development should be directed toward niche markets, such as L02A, L01H, and L01B, and not competitive markets.

  17. Dual-Targeting Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the Staphylococcus aureus FMN Riboswitch Disrupt Riboflavin Homeostasis in an Infectious Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Mann, Paul A; Xiao, Li; Gill, Charles; Galgoci, Andrew M; Howe, John A; Villafania, Artjohn; Barbieri, Christopher M; Malinverni, Juliana C; Sher, Xinwei; Mayhood, Todd; McCurry, Megan D; Murgolo, Nicholas; Flattery, Amy; Mack, Matthias; Roemer, Terry

    2017-05-18

    Riboswitches are bacterial-specific, broadly conserved, non-coding RNA structural elements that control gene expression of numerous metabolic pathways and transport functions essential for cell growth. As such, riboswitch inhibitors represent a new class of potential antibacterial agents. Recently, we identified ribocil-C, a highly selective inhibitor of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) riboswitch that controls expression of de novo riboflavin (RF, vitamin B2) biosynthesis in Escherichia coli. Here, we provide a mechanistic characterization of the antibacterial effects of ribocil-C as well as of roseoflavin (RoF), an antimetabolite analog of RF, among medically significant Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Enterococcus faecalis. We provide genetic, biophysical, computational, biochemical, and pharmacological evidence that ribocil-C and RoF specifically inhibit dual FMN riboswitches, separately controlling RF biosynthesis and uptake processes essential for MRSA growth and pathogenesis. Such a dual-targeting mechanism is specifically required to develop broad-spectrum Gram-positive antibacterial agents targeting RF metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of methotrexate on the bone healing of mandibular condylar process fracture: an experimental study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Samantha Cristine Santos X B; Corrêa, Luciana; Mello, Suzana Beatriz Veríssimo; Luz, João Gualberto C

    2014-10-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is an anti-metabolite used in rheumatology and oncology. High doses are indicated for oncological treatment, whereas low doses are indicated for chronic inflammatory diseases. This study evaluated the effect of two MTX treatment schedules on the bone healing of the temporomandibular joint fracture in rats. Seventy-five adult male Wistar rats were used to generate an experimental unilateral medially rotated condylar fracture model that allows an evaluation of bone healing and the articular structures. The animals were subdivided into three groups that each received one of the following treatments intraperitoneally: saline (1 mL/week), low-dose MTX (3 mg/kg/week) and high-dose MTX (30 mg/kg). The histological study comprised fracture site and temporomandibular joint evaluations and bone neoformation was evaluated by histomorphometric analysis. A biochemical parameter of bone formation was also assessed. When compared with saline, high-dose MTX delayed bone fracture repairs. In this latter group, after 90 days, the histological analysis revealed atrophy of the fibrocartilage and the presence of fibrous tissue in the joint space. The histomorphometric analysis revealed diminished bone neoformation. The alkaline phosphatase levels also decreased after MTX treatment. It was concluded that high-dose MTX impaired mandibular condyle repair and induced degenerative articular changes. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. An inhibitor of potentially lethal damage (PLD) repair reduces the frequency of γ-ray mutations in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoiyama, A.; Kada, T.; Kuroda, Y.

    1992-01-01

    Cordycepin (3'-deoxyadenosine, 3 - dA) is an RNA antimetabolite and a radiosensitizer in cultured mammalian cells. In the present paper, the effects of 3'-dA on γ-ray-induced lethality and 6-thioguanine (6TG)-resistant mutations in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells were examined. 3'-dA had the effect of sensitizing the lethality induced by γ-rays. The potentially lethal damage (PLD) repair produced by post-incubation cells in Hanks' solution after γ-irradiation was almost completely suppressed by 5x10 -5 M 3'-dA. When cells were irradiated with 10 Gy γ-rays and incubated with 3'-dA for 5 h, the frequency of 6TG-resistant mutations induced by γ-rays decreased to 1/6 of that of the irradiated cells incubated without 3'-dA. The decrease in the frequency of γ-ray-induced mutations was dependent on the length of incubation time with 3'-dA. It is suggested that the inhibition of PLD repair by 3'-dA may be that of error-prone repair. (author). 26 refs.; 5 figs

  20. The mbo operon is specific and essential for biosynthesis of mangotoxin in Pseudomonas syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrión, Víctor J; Arrebola, Eva; Cazorla, Francisco M; Murillo, Jesús; de Vicente, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Mangotoxin is an antimetabolite toxin produced by certain Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strains. This toxin is an oligopeptide that inhibits ornithine N-acetyl transferase, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of ornithine and arginine. Previous studies have reported the involvement of the putative nonribosomal peptide synthetase MgoA in virulence and mangotoxin production. In this study, we analyse a new chromosomal region of P. syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158, which contains six coding sequences arranged as an operon (mbo operon). The mbo operon was detected in only mangotoxin-producing strains, and it was shown to be essential for the biosynthesis of this toxin. Mutants in each of the six ORFs of the mbo operon were partially or completely impaired in the production of the toxin. In addition, Pseudomonas spp. mangotoxin non-producer strains transformed with the mbo operon gained the ability to produce mangotoxin, indicating that this operon contains all the genetic information necessary for mangotoxin biosynthesis. The generation of a single transcript for the mbo operon was confirmed and supported by the allocation of a unique promoter and Rho-independent terminator. The phylogenetic analysis of the P. syringae strains harbouring the mbo operon revealed that these strains clustered together.

  1. Urgencias hematológicas. III. Toxicidad por metotrexato Hematological emergencies. III. Methotrexate toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Jaime-Fagundo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available El metotrexato es un antimetabolito que inhibe competitivamente la enzima dihidrofolato reductasa y posee actividad antiproliferativa e inmunosupresora, por lo que se emplea en el tratamiento de diferentes hemopatías malignas. Los principales efectos adversos son mielosupresión, insuficiencia renal, mucositis y alteraciones neurológicas. Es de gran importancia que el manejo de la intoxicación por esta droga sea rápido y adecuado, ya que una acción a tiempo es capaz no solo revertir de el daño, sino de salvar la vida del paciente. Se hace una revisión de la conducta frente a la toxicidad aguda por este medicamento.Methotrexate is an antimetabolite which competitively inhibits the dihydrofolate reductase enzyme and has anti-proliferative and immunosuppressive activity and therefore it is used in the treatment of various hematological malignancies. The main adverse effects are myelosuppression, renal insufficiency, mucositis and neurological disorders. The adequate management of intoxication by this drug is very important since fast and appropriate actions can reverse the damage and save the patient's life. A review of the behaviour against acute toxicity by this drug is reported.

  2. Life-threatening interaction between the root extract of Pueraria lobata and methotrexate in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, H.-M.; Fang, S.-H.; Wen, K.-C.; Hsiu, S.-L.; Tsai, Shang-Yuan; Hou, Y.-C.; Chi, Y.-C.; Lee Chao, Pei-Dawn

    2005-01-01

    Isoflavone supplements are nowadays widely used as alternative for hormone replacement therapy. However, the safety remains unanswered. This study attempted to investigate the effect of Pueraria lobata root decoction (PLRD), an isoflavone-rich herb, on the pharmacokinetics of methotrexate (MTX), a bicarboxylate antimetabolite with narrow therapeutic window. Rats were orally and intravenously given methotrexate alone and coadministered with PLRD. Blood samples were withdrawn via cardiopuncture at specific time points after drug administration. Serum methotrexate concentrations were assayed by specific monoclonal fluorescence polarization immunoassay method. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using noncompartment model of WINNONLIN for both oral and intravenous data of MTX. Our results showed that coadministration of 4.0 g/kg and 2.0 g/kg of PLRD significantly increased the AUC 0-t by 207.8% and 127.9%, prolonged the mean residence time (MRT) by 237.8 and 155.2%, respectively, finally resulted in surprisingly high mortalities of 57.1% and 14.3% in rats. When MTX was given intravenously, the coadministration of PLRD at 4.0 g/kg significantly increased the half-life by 53.9% and decreased the clearance by 47.9%. In conclusion, the coadministration of PLRD significantly decreased the elimination and resulted in markedly increased exposure of MTX in rats

  3. Combined Treatment of MCF-7 Cells with AICAR and Methotrexate, Arrests Cell Cycle and Reverses Warburg Metabolism through AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK and FOXO1.

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    Tamás Fodor

    Full Text Available Cancer cells are characterized by metabolic alterations, namely, depressed mitochondrial oxidation, enhanced glycolysis and pentose phosphate shunt flux to support rapid cell growth, which is called the Warburg effect. In our study we assessed the metabolic consequences of a joint treatment of MCF-7 breast cancer cells with AICAR, an inducer of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK jointly with methotrexate (MTX, a folate-analog antimetabolite that blunts de novo nucleotide synthesis. MCF7 cells, a model of breast cancer cells, were resistant to the individual application of AICAR or MTX, however combined treatment of AICAR and MTX reduced cell proliferation. Prolonged joint application of AICAR and MTX induced AMPK and consequently enhanced mitochondrial oxidation and reduced the rate of glycolysis. These metabolic changes suggest an anti-Warburg rearrangement of metabolism that led to the block of the G1/S and the G2/M transition slowing down cell cycle. The slowdown of cell proliferation was abolished when mitotropic transcription factors, PGC-1α, PGC-1β or FOXO1 were silenced. In human breast cancers higher expression of AMPKα and FOXO1 extended survival. AICAR and MTX exerts similar additive antiproliferative effect on other breast cancer cell lines, such as SKBR and 4T1 cells, too. Our data not only underline the importance of Warburg metabolism in breast cancer cells but nominate the AICAR+MTX combination as a potential cytostatic regime blunting Warburg metabolism. Furthermore, we suggest the targeting of AMPK and FOXO1 to combat breast cancer.

  4. Radiotherapy combined with Tegafur (FT-207s) for brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Yoshiro

    1981-01-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) has anti-tumor effects as an anti-metabolite, but it cannot pass the Blood-Brain-Barrier (BBB). FT-207 a masked-compound of 5-FU, is easily lipid soluble and is able to pass the BBB. Twenty eight patients of primary brain tumor and 8 patients of metastatic brain tumor were treated with irradiation combined with 750 mg of FT-207 suppository. Twenty four patients of primary brain tumor were treated only with irradiation as control. The mean survival time was 20.4 +- 11.8 months for the combined therapy group and 17.6 +- 8.6 months for the control. The concentration of FT-207 and 5-FU in serum and in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was investigated after administration of 750 mg of FT-207 suppository per annum. The maximum concentration of FT-207 and of 5-FU in serum was 20.4 +- 11.8 mcg/ml and 0.06 +- 0.02 mcg/ml, respectively. There were observed several side effects, such as anorexia, nausea, exanthema and etc. These side effects were not so great as to interrupt the therapy at the dose level of 750 mg of FT-207. However, at the dose of 1500 mg, one case showed disturbance of consciousness, to which attention should be called. (author)

  5. Elevated Levels of DNA Strand Breaks Induced by a Base Analog in the Human Cell Line with the P32T ITPA Variant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisertreiger, Irina S.-R.; Menezes, Miriam R.; Randazzo, James; Pavlov, Youri I.

    2010-01-01

    Base analogs are powerful antimetabolites and dangerous mutagens generated endogenously by oxidative stress, inflammation, and aberrant nucleotide biosynthesis. Human inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase (ITPA) hydrolyzes triphosphates of noncanonical purine bases (i.e., ITP, dITP, XTP, dXTP, or their mimic: 6-hydroxyaminopurine (HAP) deoxynucleoside triphosphate) and thus regulates nucleotide pools and protects cells from DNA damage. We demonstrate that the model purine base analog HAP induces DNA breaks in human cells and leads to elevation of levels of ITPA. A human polymorphic allele of the ITPA, 94C->A encodes for the enzyme with a P32T amino-acid change and leads to accumulation of nonhydrolyzed ITP. The polymorphism has been associated with adverse reaction to purine base-analog drugs. The level of both spontaneous and HAP-induced DNA breaks is elevated in the cell line with the ITPA P32T variant. The results suggested that human ITPA plays a pivotal role in the protection of DNA from noncanonical purine base analogs. PMID:20936128

  6. Studies on activated cytostatic fluorouracil as photosensitizer: to use in eye tumor treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascu, Mihail-Lucian; Carstocea, Benone D.; Brezeanu, Mihail; Voicu, Letitia; Staicu, Angela; Gazdaru, Doina M.; Pascu, Ruxandra A.

    2004-09-01

    Hydroxypyrimidine 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) belongs to the cytostatics group known as antimetabolites. The effect of UV irradiation on 5-FU was investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The study of the photosensitizer properties of 5-FU was made since their effects could be enhanced by exposure to UV radiation at different doses. Solutions 2.5x10-4M in natural saline water (0.8% NaCl), irradiated with optical beams emitted by N2 laser and UV Hg classic lamp, were used. The 5-FU was chosen due to its strong absorption along a large spectral range which makes possible the fluorescence excitation in UV. The absorption spectra exhibit bands between 250 - 450 nm. The emission fluorescence was measured in the 400-550 nm spectral range, with λex=320 and 350 nm for samples irradiated with Hg lamp and with λex=360 nm for samples irradiated with N2 laser. The excitation fluorescence was measured in the spectral range 200-400 nm, with λem=440 nm for samples irradiated with N2 laser. The spectra reveal a fluorescence enhancement with the exposure time, with a maximum at 3 min due to the transformation of 5-FU molecule into a fluorescent tautomeric form. The destruction more rapid than usual of the neovascularisation was observed for conjunctive of rabbit eyes, when they are impregnated with 5-FU solution and exposed to incoherent UV and visible light.

  7. Increasing the radiosensitivity of tumours in an hypoxic environment using inhibitors of the pentose phosphate pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahasrabudhe, M.B.; Bhonsle, S.R.; Krishnamurti, K.; Tilak, B.D.

    1977-01-01

    Rapidly growing tumours contain few blood vessels in the tumour mass. Cells in such tumours obtain nutrients and oxygen from the periphery by diffusion, resulting in a diminishing oxygen and nutrient gradient from the periphery to centre of the tumour mass. In normal tissues, oxygen is utilized via a tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle; in tumour cells oxygen is utilized via a hexose monophosphate (HMP) pathway and through the TCA cycle at a 30% reduced level. Interference with the HMP pathway selectively inhibits the utilization of oxygen by tumour cells, thus increasing the availability of oxygen to hypoxic cells situated deeper in the tumour mass. This effect has been exploited for increasing the radiosensitivity of tumour cells situated in an hypoxic environment. The influence of sixteen potential antimetabolites on the HMP pathway has been studied. Of these, six compounds, namely, (1) 2-carboxy 5-hydroxymethyl thiophene, (2) the sodium salt of 2:5 dicarbethoxy 3:4 dihydroxy thiophene, (3) the dihydrazide of 2:5 dicarboxy thiophene, (4) the dihydrazide of 3:4 dimethoxy 2:5 dicarboxy thiophene, (5) trithiocyanuric acid, and (6) cyanuric trithioglycollic acid showed an inhibiting effect on the HMP pathway without any influence on the TCA cycle. Influence of administration of compounds (1), (2) and (4) prior to radiation on the growth of transplanted fibrosarcomas in mice has been studied and is reported here. These three compounds showed marked potentiation of radiosensitivity of tumours. (author)

  8. Glaucoma Surgery in Pregnancy: A Case Series and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Razeghinejad

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma management in pregnant patients is a real challenge, especially when the glaucoma is not controlled with medications. We report the results of 6 incisional glaucoma surgeries for the management of medically uncontrolled glaucoma patients during pregnancy. This retrospective, case series was conducted on the 6 eyes of 3pregnant patients with uncontrolled glaucoma using maximum tolerable medications. Details of the glaucoma surgical management of these patients as well as their postoperative care and pregnancy and clinical outcomes on longitudinal follow-up are discussed. All 3 patients had juvenile open-angle glaucoma and were on various anti-glaucoma medications, including oral acetazolamide. The first case described underwent trabeculectomy without antimetabolites in both eyes because of uncontrolled intraocular pressure with topical medications. The surgery was done with topical lidocaine jelly and subconjunctival lidocaine during the second and third trimesters. The second patient had an Ahmed valve implantation in both eyes during the second and third trimesters because of uncontrolled IOP with topical medications and no response to selective laser trabeculoplasty. Surgery was done with topical tetracaine and subconjunctival and sub-Tenon’s lidocaine. The third case had a Baerveldt valve implantation under general anesthesia in the second trimester. In selected pregnant glaucoma patients with medically uncontrolled intraocular pressure threatening vision, incisional surgery may lead to good outcomes for the patient with no risk for the fetus.

  9. Antifungal susceptibility profiles of 1698 yeast reference strains revealing potential emerging human pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Desnos-Ollivier

    Full Text Available New molecular identification techniques and the increased number of patients with various immune defects or underlying conditions lead to the emergence and/or the description of novel species of human and animal fungal opportunistic pathogens. Antifungal susceptibility provides important information for ecological, epidemiological and therapeutic issues. The aim of this study was to assess the potential risk of the various species based on their antifungal drug resistance, keeping in mind the methodological limitations. Antifungal susceptibility profiles to the five classes of antifungal drugs (polyens, azoles, echinocandins, allylamines and antimetabolites were determined for 1698 yeast reference strains belonging to 992 species (634 Ascomycetes and 358 Basidiomycetes. Interestingly, geometric mean minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of all antifungal drugs tested were significantly higher for Basidiomycetes compared to Ascomycetes (p<0.001. Twenty four strains belonging to 23 species of which 19 were Basidiomycetes seem to be intrinsically "resistant" to all drugs. Comparison of the antifungal susceptibility profiles of the 4240 clinical isolates and the 315 reference strains belonging to 53 shared species showed similar results. Even in the absence of demonstrated in vitro/in vivo correlation, knowing the in vitro susceptibility to systemic antifungal agents and the putative intrinsic resistance of yeast species present in the environment is important because they could become opportunistic pathogens.

  10. Effects of cancer, radiotherapy and cytotoxic drugs on intestinal structure and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, M T; Spector, M H; Ladman, A J [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque (USA)

    1979-09-01

    Intestinal malabsorption and the structural changes in the small intestine in relation to cancer, radiotherapy and cytotoxic drugs are reviewed. Primary intestinal malignancies are often associated with malabsorption; further studies have shown that tumours outside the gastrointestinal tract may also be accompanied by changes in intestinal structure resulting in malabsorption. Abdominal radiotherapy of cancer patients has been shown to result in ultrastructural changes in the small intestine, a decrease in intestinal enzyme activity and malabsorption of nutrients. The effects of cytotoxic drugs on the small intestinal structure and function are reviewed in more detail. The drugs discussed include the alkylating agents such as nitrogen mustard, cyclophosphamide, iphosphamide, 1,3-bis (2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea and 1(2-chloroethyl)-3-(4-methylcyclohexyl)-1-nitrosourea. The effects of antimetabolites such as aminopterin, methotrexate, 5-fluoracil, cytosine arabinoside and 6-mercaptorpurine are also reviewed. Other drugs discussed were adriamycin, vincrinstine sulfate, vinblastine and hydroxyurea. Studies of the effects of combination chemotherapy on small intestinal structure and function are also described. It is concluded that chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation therapy may aggravate a malabsorptive state in view of their toxicity to the small intestinal cell, or may by themselves be responsible for malabsorption with resultant increase in cachexia and weight loss.

  11. Effects of cancer, radiotherapy and cytotoxic drugs on intestinal structure and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, M.T.; Spector, M.H.; Ladman, A.J.

    1979-01-01

    Intestinal malabsorption and the structural changes in the small intestine in relation to cancer, radiotherapy and cytotoxic drugs are reviewed. Primary intestinal malignancies are often associated with malabsorption; further studies have shown that tumours outside the gastrointestinal tract may also be accompanied by changes in intestinal structure resulting in malabsorption. Abdominal radiotherapy of cancer patients has been shown to result in ultrastructural changes in the small intestine, a decrease in intestinal enzyme activity and malabsorption of nutrients. The effects of cytotoxic drugs on the small intestinal structure and function are reviewed in more detail. The drugs discussed include the alkylating agents such as nitrogen mustard, cyclophosphamide, iphosphamide, 1,3-bis (2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea and 1(2-chloroethyl)-3-(4-methylcyclohexyl)-1-nitrosourea. The effects of antimetabolites such as aminopterin, methotrexate, 5-fluoracil, cytosine arabinoside and 6-mercaptorpurine are also reviewed. Other drugs discussed were adriamycin, vincrinstine sulfate, vinblastine and hydroxyurea. Studies of the effects of combination chemotherapy on small intestinal structure and function are also described. It is concluded that chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation therapy may aggravate a malabsorptive state in view of their toxicity to the small intestinal cell, or may by themselves be responsible for malabsorption with resultant increase in cachexia and weight loss. (UK)

  12. Myeloproliferative disorders in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urowitz, M.B.; Rider, W.D.

    1985-01-01

    Four patients with refractory rheumatoid arthritis were treated with total body irradiation administered in two sittings, 300 to 400 rads to each half of the body. All four patients had taken antimetabolites prior to receiving total body irradiation, and two continued to use them after total body irradiation. Two patients had taken alkylating agents before, and one had used them after total body irradiation. All patients showed clinical improvement. However, in two patients myeloproliferative disorders developed: a myelodysplastic preleukemia at 40 months after total body irradiation in one and acute myelogenous leukemia at 25 months in the other. Total body irradiation differs from total nodal irradiation in the total dose of irradiation (300 to 400 rads versus 2,000 to 3,000), and in the duration of the therapy (two sittings versus treatment over several weeks to months). Furthermore, the patients in the total body irradiation study frequently used cytotoxic drugs before and/or after irradiation, whereas in one total nodal irradiation study, azathioprine (2 mg/kg per day or less) was permitted, but no other cytotoxic agents were allowed. Rheumatologists may therefore face a binding decision when deciding to treat a patient with rheumatoid arthritis with either a cytotoxic drug or irradiation

  13. Possible role of reassortment in tumor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terashima, Toyozo

    1976-01-01

    On the basis of age-dependent response pattern of cultured mammalian cells, various exogenous agents, such as x-ray, antimetabolites, and antitumor drugs, were classified into two groups, i.e., x-ray type (A) and hydroxyurea type (B). Each type of agent was specific not only for the pattern of survival response during the cell cycle but also for the inhibition of progression. The treatment of cycling cell population with either type of agent results in the reassortment of cells in relation to cell age, thereby providing a chance for successive administrations of either type of agent. Taking advantage of such specific effects of agents on the tumor cell cycle, possible schedules for efficient cell sterilization were suggested: B.X(simultaneous administration) and A-X, X-B(two successive administrations at a scheduled interval) were found promissing. Finally, it was emphasized that much more information must be collected to formulate the cellular response of cycling and non-cycling fractions of the tumor to various exogenous agents. (J.P.N.)

  14. Methotrexate use in allergic contact dermatitis: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ashaki; Burns, Erin; Burkemper, Nicole M

    2018-03-01

    Methotrexate, a folate antimetabolite, is used to treat atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Although methotrexate's therapeutic efficacy has been noted in the literature, there are few data on the efficacy of methotrexate treatment for allergic contact dermatitis. To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of methotrexate in treating allergic contact dermatitis at a single institution, and also to assess methotrexate efficacy in patients with chronic, unavoidable allergen exposure. We performed a retrospective chart review of 32 patients diagnosed with allergic contact dermatitis by positive patch test reactions, and who received treatment with methotrexate from November 2010 to November 2014. Demographic and treatment-associated data were collected from electronic medical records. Ten patients were identified as allergen non-avoiders secondary to their occupation, and were subgrouped as such. Seventy-eight per cent (25/32) of patients showed either a partial or a complete response. Methotrexate had a comparable efficacy rate in the allergen non-avoiders subset, at 10 of 10. Of the 32 patients, 23% (5/22) had complete clearance of their dermatitis, and 1/10 of allergen non-avoiders had complete clearance of their dermatitis. Methotrexate is a well-tolerated and effective treatment for allergic contact dermatitis, and shows comparable efficacy to immunomodulatory agents such as cyclosporine and azathioprine, with robust efficacy despite persistent allergen exposure in patients with allergic contact dermatitis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The cell's nucleolus: an emerging target for chemotherapeutic intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, Amanda J; Bierbach, Ulrich

    2013-09-01

    The transient nucleolus plays a central role in the up-regulated synthesis of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) to sustain ribosome biogenesis, a hallmark of aberrant cell growth. This function, in conjunction with its unique pathohistological features in malignant cells and its ability to mediate apoptosis, renders this sub-nuclear structure a potential target for chemotherapeutic agents. In this Minireview, structurally and functionally diverse small molecules are discussed that have been reported to either interact with the nucleolus directly or perturb its function indirectly by acting on its dynamic components. These molecules include all major classes of nucleic-acid-targeted agents, antimetabolites, kinase inhibitors, anti-inflammatory drugs, natural product antibiotics, oligopeptides, as well as nanoparticles. Together, these molecules are invaluable probes of structure and function of the nucleolus. They also provide a unique opportunity to develop novel strategies for more selective and therefore better-tolerated chemotherapeutic intervention. In this regard, inhibition of RNA polymerase-I-mediated rRNA synthesis appears to be a promising mechanism for killing cancer cells. The recent development of molecules targeted at G-quadruplex-forming rRNA gene sequences, which are currently undergoing clinical trials, seems to attest to the success of this approach. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Effects of Streptococcus thermophilus TH-4 in a rat model of doxorubicin-induced mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hanru; Brook, Caitlin L; Whittaker, Alexandra L; Lawrence, Andrew; Yazbeck, Roger; Howarth, Gordon S

    2013-08-01

    Mucositis is a debilitating intestinal side effect of chemotherapeutic regimens. Probiotics have been considered a possible preventative treatment for mucositis. Streptococcus thermophilus TH-4 (TH-4), a newly identified probiotic, has been shown to partially alleviate mucositis induced by administration of the antimetabolite chemotherapy drug, methotrexate in rats; likely mediated through a mechanism of folate production. However, its effects against other classes of chemotherapy drug have yet to be determined. The authors investigated the effects of TH-4 in a rat model of mucositis induced by the anthracycline chemotherapy drug, doxorubicin. Gastrointestinal damage was induced in female Dark Agouti rats (148.3 ± 1.5 g) by intraperitoneal injection of doxorubicin (20 mg/kg). Animals recieved a daily oral gavage of TH-4 at 10(9) cfu/ml or skim milk (vehicle) from days 0 to 8. At day 6, rats were injected with either saline or doxorubicin. At kill, small intestinal tissues were collected for determination of sucrase and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities and histological assessment. Body weight was significantly decreased by doxorubicin compared with normal controls (p TH-4 partially prevented the loss of body weight induced by doxorubicin (2.3% compared with 4%), but provided no further therapeutic benefit. The minimal amelioration of doxorubicin-induced mucositis by TH-4 further supports folate production as a likely mechanism of TH-4 action against methotrexate-induced mucositis. Further studies into TH-4 are required to confirm its applicability to other conventional chemotherapy regimens.

  17. Pretreatment with Saccharomyces boulardii does not prevent the experimental mucositis in Swiss mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maioli, Tatiani Uceli; de Melo Silva, Brenda; Dias, Michelle Nobre; Paiva, Nivea Carolina; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento; Fernandes, Simone Odilia; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; Dos Santos Martins, Flaviano; de Vasconcelos Generoso, Simone

    2014-04-11

    The antimetabolite chemotherapy 5-Fluorouracil is one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in clinical cancer treatment. Although this drug is not specific for cancer cells and also acts on healthy cells, it can cause mucositis, a common collateral effect. Dysbiosis has also been described in 5-fluorouracil-induced mucositis and is likely to contribute to the overall development of mucositis. In light of this theory, the use of probiotics could be a helpful strategy to alleviate mucositis. So the aim of this study was evaluate the impact of the probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii in a model of mucositis. After induced of mucositis, mice from the Mucositis groups showed a decrease in food consumption (p Saccharomyces boulardii did not reverse this effect (p > 0.05). Mucositis induced an increase in intestinal permeability and intestinal inflammation (p  0.05) in mice pretreated with S. boulardii. S. boulardii was not able to prevent the effects of experimental mucositis induced by 5- Fluorouracil.

  18. Mitomycin-C in dacryocystorhinostomy: From experimentation to implementation and the road ahead: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay Gopinathan Nair

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR is the procedure of choice in patients with epiphora due to primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction. The evolution of surgical tools, fiber-optic endoscopes, effective anesthesia techniques, and the adjunct use of antimetabolites intraoperatively; namely mitomycin-C (MMC have significantly contributed to the advancement of DCR surgery. MMC is a systemic chemotherapeutic agent derived from Streptomyces caespitosus that inhibits the synthesis of DNA, cellular RNA, and protein by inhibiting the synthesis of collagen by fibroblasts. Even the cellular changes in the human nasal mucosal fibroblasts induced by MMC at an ultrastructural level have been documented. There, however, seems to be a lack of consensus regarding MMC: The dosage, the route of delivery/application, the time of exposure and subsequently what role each of these variables plays in the final outcome of the surgery. In this review, an attempt is made to objectively examine all the evidence regarding the role of MMC in DCR. MMC appears to improve the success rate of DCR.

  19. Vitamin D in combination cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingyu Ma, Donald L. Trump, Candace S. Johnson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available As a steroid hormone that regulates mineral homeostasis and bone metabolism, 1α, 25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (calcitriol also has broad spectrum anti-tumor activities as supported by numerous epidemiological and experimental studies. Calcitriol potentiates the anti-tumor activities of multiple chemotherapeutics agents including DNA-damaging agents cisplatin, carboplatin and doxorubicin; antimetabolites 5-fluorouracil, cytarabine, hydroxyurea, cytarabine and gemcitabine; and microtubule-disturbing agents paclitaxel and docetaxel. Calcitriol elicits anti-tumor effects mainly through the induction of cancer cell apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, differentiation, angiogenesis and the inhibition of cell invasiveness by a number of mechanisms. Calcitriol enhances the cytotoxic effects of gamma irradiation and certain antioxidants and naturally derived compounds. Inhibition of calcitriol metabolism by 24-hydroxylase promotes growth inhibition effect of calcitriol. Calcitriol has been used in a number of clinical trials and it is important to note that sufficient dose and exposure to calcitriol is critical to achieve anti-tumor effect. Several trials have demonstrated that safe and feasible to administer high doses of calcitriol through intermittent regimen. Further well designed clinical trials should be conducted to better understand the role of calcitriol in cancer therapy.

  20. Elevated Levels of DNA Strand Breaks Induced by a Base Analog in the Human Cell Line with the P32T ITPA Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina S.-R. Waisertreiger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Base analogs are powerful antimetabolites and dangerous mutagens generated endogenously by oxidative stress, inflammation, and aberrant nucleotide biosynthesis. Human inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase (ITPA hydrolyzes triphosphates of noncanonical purine bases (i.e., ITP, dITP, XTP, dXTP, or their mimic: 6-hydroxyaminopurine (HAP deoxynucleoside triphosphate and thus regulates nucleotide pools and protects cells from DNA damage. We demonstrate that the model purine base analog HAP induces DNA breaks in human cells and leads to elevation of levels of ITPA. A human polymorphic allele of the ITPA, 94C->A encodes for the enzyme with a P32T amino-acid change and leads to accumulation of nonhydrolyzed ITP. The polymorphism has been associated with adverse reaction to purine base-analog drugs. The level of both spontaneous and HAP-induced DNA breaks is elevated in the cell line with the ITPA P32T variant. The results suggested that human ITPA plays a pivotal role in the protection of DNA from noncanonical purine base analogs.

  1. Pharmacogenetics of thiopurines. Can posology be guided by laboratory data?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stocco, G.; Decorti, G.; Bartoli, F.; Giraldi, T.; Martelossi, S.; Ventura, A.; Malusa, N.

    2004-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between the presence of mutations in the TPMT gene, the consequent reduced enzymatic activity, and the clinical toxicity of the treatment with thiopurine antimetabolite drugs. Materials and methods. The study was performed on 44 patients with inflammatory bowel disease treated with AZA. DNA was extracted from blood samples collected from each patient, and genotyping was performed using specific polymerase chain reaction assays in order to detect the three more frequent mutations of the gene. Enzymatic activity was measured on red blood cell lysates by HPLC. Results. Among the subjects, 4 (9.0%) were heterozygous for mutations in the TPMT gene; no subject was homozygous for mutations in the TPMT gene. A complete concordance between TPMT mutated genotype and reduced enzymatic activity could be determined. The incidence of toxicity in the subjects with a mutated genotype was not different from that observed in the patients with a normal TPMT gene. Conclusion. Genotyping methods provide a simple and reliable DNA-based strategy to identify TPMT homozygotes that should avoid thiopurines administration. However, it seems that the most common, less dangerous forms of thiopurine toxicity could be caused by factors different from TPMT gene mutations examined. (author)

  2. Advances and challenges in hereditary cancer pharmacogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascorbi, Ingolf; Werk, Anneke Nina

    2017-01-01

    Cancer pharmacogenetics usually considers tumor-specific targets. However, hereditary genetic variants may interfere with the pharmacokinetics of antimetabolites and other anti-cancer drugs, which may lead to severe adverse events. Areas covered: Here, the impact of hereditary genes considered in drug labels such as thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UTG1A1) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) are discussed with respect to guidelines of the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC). Moreover, the association between genetic variants of drug transporters with the clinical outcome is comprehensively discussed. Expert opinion: Precision therapy in the field of oncology is developing tremendously. There are a number of somatic tumor genetic markers that are indicative for treatment with anti-cancer drugs. By contrast, for some hereditary variants, recommendations have been developed. Although we have vast knowledge on the association between drug transporter variants and clinical outcome, the overall data is inconsistent and the predictability of the related phenotype is low. Further developments in research may lead to the discovery of rare, but functionally relevant single nucleotide polymorphisms and a better understanding of multiple genomic, epigenomic as well as phenotypic factors, contributing to drug response in malignancies.

  3. Chemiclearance of food irradiation process: Its scientific basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynjolfsson, A.

    1981-01-01

    Irradiation can facilitate preservation and distribution of food; it can reduce the need for chemical additives and pesticides; and it can reduce the overall use of energy. Often, industry must make changes because of seasonal variation in supply. Application of food irradiation will be difficult, therefore, unless industry can adjust to these changes, which require a broad clearance, or that food irradiation be cleared as a process. Basic to such broad clearance is a thorough understanding of the changes that take place so that the results of animal feeding studies can be extrapolated to foods similar to those used in the animal feeding studies. Such extrapolation is sometimes called chemiclearance. The extensive research on the safety of irradiated foods is summarized and the following major categories discussed: (a) theory of interaction of radiation with food; (b) chemical analysis of the radiolytic products and measurements of their yields as a function of the chemical composition of the food, temperature, dose, and dose-rates; (c) toxicological evaluation of the radiolytic compounds; and (d) toxicological evaluation of short-term and long-term animal feeding studies, mutagenicity studies, teratogenicity studies, and anti-metabolite studies. (author)

  4. [Molecular-kinetic parameters of thiamine enzymes and the mechanism of antivitamin action of hydroxythiamine in animal organisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovskiĭ KuM; Voskoboev, A I; Gorenshtenĭn, B I; Dosta, G A

    1979-09-01

    The molecula-kinetic parameters (Km, Ki) of three thiamine enzymes, e. g. thiamine pyrophosphokinase (EC 2.7.6.2), pyruvate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.4.1) and transketolase (EC 2.2.1.1) with respect to the effects of the thiamine antimetabolite hydroxythiamine in the whole animal organism have been compared. It has been shown that only the first two enzymes, which interact competitively with the vitamin, antivitamin or their pyrophosphate ethers, obey the kinetic parameters obtained for the purified enzymes in vitro. The anticoenzymic effect of hydroxythiamine pyrophosphate with respect to transketolase is not observed in vivo at maximal concentration of the anticoenzyme in tissues due to the absence of competitive interactions with thiamine pyrophosphate. The incorporation of the true and false coenzymes into transketolase occurs only during de novo transketolase synthesis (the apoform is absent in tissues, with the exception of erythrocytes) and proceeds slowly with a half-life time equal to 24--30 hrs. After a single injection of hydroxythiamine at a large dose (70--400 mg/kg) the maximal inhibition of the transketolase activity in tissues (liver, heart, kidney, muscle, spleen, lungs adrenal grands) manifests itself by the 48th--72nd hour, when the concentration of free hydroxythiamine and its pyrophosphate is minimal and the whole anticoenzyme is tightly bound to the protein, forming the false holoenzyme. The use of hydroxythiamine for inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase or transketolase in animal organism is discussed.

  5. Mangotoxin production of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae is regulated by MgoA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrión, Víctor J; van der Voort, Menno; Arrebola, Eva; Gutiérrez-Barranquero, José A; de Vicente, Antonio; Raaijmakers, Jos M; Cazorla, Francisco M

    2014-02-21

    The antimetabolite mangotoxin is a key factor in virulence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strains which cause apical necrosis of mango trees. Previous studies showed that mangotoxin biosynthesis is governed by the mbo operon. Random mutagenesis led to the identification of two other gene clusters that affect mangotoxin biosynthesis. These are the gacS/gacA genes and mgo operon which harbors the four genes mgoBCAD. The current study shows that disruption of the nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene mgoA resulted in loss of mangotoxin production and reduced virulence on tomato leaves. Transcriptional analyses by qPCR and promoter reporter fusions revealed that mbo expression is regulated by both gacS/gacA and mgo genes. Also, expression of the mgo operon was shown to be regulated by gacS/gacA. Heterologous expression under the native promoter of the mbo operon resulted in mangotoxin production in non-producing P. syringae strains, but not in other Pseudomonas species. Also introduction of the mbo and mgo operons in nonproducing P. protegens Pf-5 did not confer mangotoxin production but did enhance transcription of the mbo promoter. From the data obtained in this study, we conclude that both mbo and mgo operons are under the control of the gacS/gacA two-component system and that the MgoA product acts as a positive regulator of mangotoxin biosynthesis.

  6. The bioenergetic signature of isogenic colon cancer cells predicts the cell death response to treatment with 3-bromopyruvate, iodoacetate or 5-fluorouracil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Aragó, María; Cuezva, José M

    2011-02-08

    Metabolic reprogramming resulting in enhanced glycolysis is a phenotypic trait of cancer cells, which is imposed by the tumor microenvironment and is linked to the down-regulation of the catalytic subunit of the mitochondrial H+-ATPase (β-F1-ATPase). The bioenergetic signature is a protein ratio (β-F1-ATPase/GAPDH), which provides an estimate of glucose metabolism in tumors and serves as a prognostic indicator for cancer patients. Targeting energetic metabolism could be a viable alternative to conventional anticancer chemotherapies. Herein, we document that the bioenergetic signature of isogenic colon cancer cells provides a gauge to predict the cell-death response to the metabolic inhibitors, 3-bromopyruvate (3BrP) and iodoacetate (IA), and the anti-metabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The bioenergetic signature of the cells was determined by western blotting. Aerobic glycolysis was determined from lactate production rates. The cell death was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Cellular ATP concentrations were determined using bioluminiscence. Pearson's correlation coefficient was applied to assess the relationship between the bioenergetic signature and the cell death response. In vivo tumor regression activities of the compounds were assessed using a xenograft mouse model injected with the highly glycolytic HCT116 colocarcinoma cells. We demonstrate that the bioenergetic signature of isogenic HCT116 cancer cells inversely correlates with the potential to execute necrosis in response to 3BrP or IA treatment. Conversely, the bioenergetic signature directly correlates with the potential to execute apoptosis in response to 5-FU treatment in the same cells. However, despite the large differences observed in the in vitro cell-death responses associated with 3BrP, IA and 5-FU, the in vivo tumor regression activities of these agents were comparable. Overall, we suggest that the determination of the bioenergetic signature of colon carcinomas could

  7. Differential effects of 2-difluoromethylornithine and methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) on the testosterone-induced growth of ventral prostate and seminal vesicles of castrated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käpyaho, K; Kallio, A; Jänne, J

    1984-05-01

    2-Difluoromethylornithine totally prevented any increases in putrescine and spermidine concentrations in the ventral prostate of castrated rats during a 6-day testosterone treatment. Prostatic ornithine decarboxylase activity was inhibited by 80%, whereas S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase was stimulated by more than 9-fold. In seminal vesicle, the inhibition of putrescine and spermidine accumulation, as well as of ornithine decarboxylase activity, was only minimal, and no stimulation of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase was observed. Administration of methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) to castrated androgen-treated rats resulted in a marked increase in concentrations of all prostatic polyamines. Prostatic ornithine decarboxylase activity was nearly 2 times and adenosylmethionine decarboxylase activity 9 times higher than that of the testosterone-treated animals. In contrast with ventral prostate, methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) treatment inhibited moderately the accumulation of spermidine and spermine in seminal vesicle, although both ornithine decarboxylase and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase activities were stimulated. Difluoromethylornithine inhibited significantly the weight gain of ventral prostate, but methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) produced a substantial increase in prostatic weight. These changes were largely due to the fact that the volume of prostatic secretion was greatly decreased by difluoromethylornithine, whereas methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) increased the amount of secretion. Treatment with difluoromethylornithine strikingly increased the methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) content of both ventral prostate and seminal vesicle, but even under these conditions the drug concentration remained low in comparison with other tissues. The results indicate that a combined use of these two polyamine anti-metabolites does not necessarily result in a synergistic growth inhibition of the androgen-induced growth of male accessory sexual glands.

  8. Combined Use of α‐Difluoromethylornithine and an Inhibitor of S‐Adenosylmethionine Decarboxylase in Mice Bearing P388 Leukemia or Lewis Lung Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaike, Shiro; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Terao, Kiyoshi; Iio, Kokoro

    1988-01-01

    The antitumor and antimetastatic effects of α‐difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, combined with an inhibitor of S‐adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, either methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) or ethylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (EGBG), were studied in mice bearing P388 leukemia or Lewis lung carcinoma. Although EGBG is a more specific inhibitor of polyamine biosynthesis than the widely used MGBG, the antitumor effect of the DFMO‐EGBG combination on P388 leukemia‐bearing mice was less than that of the DFMO‐MGBG combination. The prolongation of survival time by the DFMOC1000 mg/kg)‐MGBG(25 mg/kg) combination was 2.65‐fold, while that of the DFMO(1000 mg/kg)‐EGBG(50 mg/kg) combination was 1.34‐fold. When mice were fed a polyamine‐deficient diet, stronger antitumor effects were exerted; the prolongation of survival time by the DFMO‐MGBG and the DFMO‐EGBG combinations was 2.89‐fold and 2.03‐fold, respectively. The antitumor effect of combined use of the two polyamine antimetabolites with mice on normal and polyamine‐deficient diets correlated with a decrease of polyamine charge contents in the tumor cells. The above in vivo results were confirmed clearly in the KB cell culture system. The antimetastatic activity of DFMO on Lewis lung carcinoma‐bearing mice was strengthened by the addition of MGBG or EGBG. The antimetastatic activity of the DFMO‐MGBG or DFMO‐EGBG combination did not parallel the polyamine charge contents in the primary tumor and blood. PMID:3133338

  9. Increased sensitivity of p53-deficient cells to anticancer agents due to loss of Pms2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedier, A; Ruefenacht, U B; Schwarz, V A; Haller, U; Fink, D

    2002-01-01

    A large fraction of human tumours carries mutations in the p53 gene. p53 plays a central role in controlling cell cycle checkpoint regulation, DNA repair, transcription, and apoptosis upon genotoxic stress. Lack of p53 function impairs these cellular processes, and this may be the basis of resistance to chemotherapeutic regimens. By virtue of the involvement of DNA mismatch repair in modulating cytotoxic pathways in response to DNA damaging agents, we investigated the effects of loss of Pms2 on the sensitivity to a panel of widely used anticancer agents in E1A/Ha-Ras-transformed p53-null mouse fibroblasts either proficient or deficient in Pms2. We report that lack of the Pms2 gene is associated with an increased sensitivity, ranging from 2–6-fold, to some types of anticancer agents including the topoisomerase II poisons doxorubicin, etoposide and mitoxantrone, the platinum compounds cisplatin and oxaliplatin, the taxanes docetaxel and paclitaxel, and the antimetabolite gemcitabine. In contrast, no change in sensitivity was found after treatment with 5-fluorouracil. Cell cycle analysis revealed that both, Pms2-deficient and -proficient cells, retain the ability to arrest at the G2/M upon cisplatin treatment. The data indicate that the concomitant loss of Pms2 function chemosensitises p53-deficient cells to some types of anticancer agents, that Pms2 positively modulates cell survival by mechanisms independent of p53, and that increased cytotoxicity is paralleled by increased apoptosis. Tumour-targeted functional inhibition of Pms2 may be a valuable strategy for increasing the efficacy of anticancer agents in the treatment of p53-mutant cancers. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 87, 1027–1033. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600599 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12434296

  10. Effects of 5-fluorouracil on morphology, cell cycle, proliferation, apoptosis, autophagy and ROS production in endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Focaccetti

    Full Text Available Antimetabolites are a class of effective anticancer drugs interfering in essential biochemical processes. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU and its prodrug Capecitabine are widely used in the treatment of several solid tumors (gastro-intestinal, gynecological, head and neck, breast carcinomas. Therapy with fluoropyrimidines is associated with a wide range of adverse effects, including diarrhea, dehydration, abdominal pain, nausea, stomatitis, and hand-foot syndrome. Among the 5-FU side effects, increasing attention is given to cardiovascular toxicities induced at different levels and intensities. Since the mechanisms related to 5-FU-induced cardiotoxicity are still unclear, we examined the effects of 5-FU on primary cell cultures of human cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells, which represent two key components of the cardiovascular system. We analyzed at the cellular and molecular level 5-FU effects on cell proliferation, cell cycle, survival and induction of apoptosis, in an experimental cardioncology approach. We observed autophagic features at the ultrastructural and molecular levels, in particular in 5-FU exposed cardiomyocytes. Reactive oxygen species (ROS elevation characterized the endothelial response. These responses were prevented by a ROS scavenger. We found induction of a senescent phenotype on both cell types treated with 5-FU. In vivo, in a xenograft model of colon cancer, we showed that 5-FU treatment induced ultrastructural changes in the endothelium of various organs. Taken together, our data suggest that 5-FU can affect, both at the cellular and molecular levels, two key cell types of the cardiovascular system, potentially explaining some manifestations of 5-FU-induced cardiovascular toxicity.

  11. Effects of repeated administration of chemotherapeutic agents tamoxifen, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil on the acquisition and retention of a learned response in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, John J.; Clark-Vetri, Rachel; Raffa, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale A number of cancer chemotherapeutic agents have been associated with a loss of memory in breast cancer patients although little is known of the causality of this effect. Objectives To assess the potential cognitive effects of repeated exposure to chemotherapeutic agents, we administered the selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen or the antimetabolite chemotherapy, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil, alone and in combination to mice and tested them in a learning and memory assay. Methods Swiss-Webster male mice were injected with saline, 32 mg/kg tamoxifen, 3.2 or 32 mg/kg methotrexate, 75 mg/kg 5-fluorouracil, 3.2 or 32 mg/kg methotrexate in combination with 75 mg/kg 5-fluorouracil once per week for 3 weeks. On days 23 and 24, mice were tested for acquisition and retention of a nose-poke response in a learning procedure called autoshaping. In addition, the acute effects of tamoxifen were assessed in additional mice in a similar procedure. Results The chemotherapeutic agents alone and in combination reduced body weight relative to saline treatment over the course of 4 weeks. Repeated treatment with tamoxifen produced both acquisition and retention effects relative to the saline-treated group although acute tamoxifen was without effect except at a behaviorally toxic dose. Repeated treatment with methotrexate in combination with 5-fluorouracil produced effects on retention, but the magnitude of these changes depended on the methotrexate dose. Conclusions These data demonstrate that repeated administration of tamoxifen or certain combination of methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil may produce deficits in the acquisition or retention of learned responses which suggest potential strategies for prevention or remediation might be considered in vulnerable patient populations. PMID:21537942

  12. H19 mediates methotrexate resistance in colorectal cancer through activating Wnt/β-catenin pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ke-feng [Guangdong Key Laboratory for Research and Development of Natural Drugs, Guangdong Medical University, Zhanjiang, Guangdong (China); Liang, Wei-Cheng [School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Feng, Lu [Department of Orthopaedics & Traumatology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong (China); Pang, Jian-xin [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Waye, Mary Miu-Yee [School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Zhang, Jin-Fang [Department of Orthopaedics & Traumatology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong (China); Fu, Wei-Ming, E-mail: fuweiming76@smu.edu.cn [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common malignancy, most of which remain unresponsive to chemotherapy. As one of the earliest cytotoxic drugs, methotrexate (MTX) serves as an anti-metabolite and anti-folate chemotherapy for various cancers. Unfortunately, MTX resistance prevents its clinical application in cancer therapy. Thereby, overcoming the drug resistance is an alternative strategy to maximize the therapeutic efficacy of MTX in clinics. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have gained widespread attention in recent years. More and more emerging evidences have demonstrated that they play important regulatory roles in various biological activities and disease progression including drug resistance. In the present study, a MTX-resistant colorectal cell line HT-29 (HT-29-R) was developed, which displayed the active proliferation and shortened cell cycle. LncRNA H19 was found to be significantly upregulated in this resistant cell line. Further investigation showed that H19 knockdown sensitized the MTX resistance in HT-29-R cells while its overexpression improved the MTX resistance in the parental cells, suggesting that H19 mediate MTX resistance. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling was activated in HT-29-R cells, and H19 knockdown suppressed this signaling in the parental cells. In conclusion, H19 mediated MTX resistance via activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which help to develop H19 as a promising therapeutic target for MTX resistant CRC. - Highlights: • A methotrexate (MTX) -resistant colorectal cancer cell line HT-29 (HT-29-R) has been developed. • H19 was upregulated in HT-29-R cells. • H19 mediated MTX resistance in colorectal cancer (CRC). • Wnt/β-catenin pathway was involved in the H19-mediated MTX resistance in CRC cells.

  13. A review and update on orphan drugs for the treatment of noninfectious uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You C

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Caiyun You,1–3 Haitham F Sahawneh,1,2 Lina Ma,1,2 Buraa Kubaisi,1,2 Alexander Schmidt,1,2 C Stephen Foster1,2,4 1Massachusetts Eye Research and Surgery Institution (MERSI, Waltham, 2Ocular Immunology and Uveitis Foundation, Weston, MA, USA; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China; 4Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Introduction: Uveitis, a leading cause of preventable blindness around the world, is a critically underserved disease in regard to the medications approved for use. Multiple immunomodulatory therapy (IMT drugs are appropriate for uveitis therapy but are still off-label. These IMT agents, including antimetabolites, calcineurin inhibitors, alkylating agents, and biologic agents, have been designated as “orphan drugs” and are widely used for systemic autoimmune diseases or organ transplantation.Area covered: The purpose of this paper is to comprehensively review and summarize the approved orphan drugs and biologics that are being used to treat systemic diseases and to discuss drugs that have not yet received approval as an “orphan drug for treating uveitis” by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA.Our perspective: IMT, as a steroid-sparing agent for uveitis patients, has shown promising clinical results. Refractory and recurrent uveitis requires combination IMT agents. IMT is continued for a period of 2 years while the patient is in remission before considering tapering medication. Our current goals include developing further assessments regarding the efficacy, optimal dose, and safety in efforts to achieve FDA approval for “on-label” use of current IMT agents and biologics more quickly and to facilitate insurance coverage and expand access to the products for this orphan disease. Keywords: immunomodulatory, orphan drug, steroid sparing, uveitis

  14. Immunosuppressive Treatment of Non-infectious Uveitis: History and Current Choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chan; Zhang, Meifen

    2017-04-10

    Non-infectious uveitis is one of the leading causes of preventable blindness worldwide. Long-term immunosuppressive treatment is generally required to achieve durable control of inflammation in posterior and panuveitis. Although systemic corticosteroids have been the gold standard of immunosup- pressive treatment for uveitis since first introduced in 1950s, its side effects of long-term use often warrant an adjuvant treatment to reduce the dosage/duration of corticosteroids needed to maintain disease control. Conventional immunosuppressive drugs, classified into alkylating agent, antimetabolites and T cell inhibitors, have been widely used as corticosteroid-sparing agents, each with characteristic safety/tolerance profiles on different uveitis entities. Recently, biologic agents, which target specific molecules in immunopathogenesis of uveitis, have gained great interest as alternative treatments for refractory uveitis based on their favorable safety and effectiveness in a variety of uveitis entities. However, lack of large randomized controlled clinical trials, concerns about efficacy and safety of long-term usage, and economic burden are limiting the use of biologics in non-infectious uveitis. Local administration of immunosuppressive drugs (from corticosteroids to biologics) through intraocular drug delivery systems represent another direction for drug development and is now under intense investigation, but more evidences are needed to support their use as regular alternative treatments for uveitis. With the numerous choices belonging to different treatment modalities (conventional immunosuppressive agents, biologics and local drug delivery systems) on hand, the practice patterns have been reported to vary greatly from center to center. Factors influence uveitis specialists' choices of immunosuppressive agents may be complex and may include personal familiarity, treatment availability, safety/tolerability, effectiveness, patient compliance, cost concerns and

  15. Current trends in the management of ocular symptoms in Adamantiades-Behçet’s disease

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    Fouad R Zakka

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Fouad R Zakka,1 Peter Y Chang,1 Gian P Giuliari,1 C Stephen Foster1,21Massachusetts Eye Research and Surgery institution (MERSI, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USAAbstract: Adamantiades-Behçet’s disease (ABD is a multisystemic vasculitic disease. It is most prevalent in the Eastern Mediterranean countries and the Eastern region of Asia. Its effect on the eye can range from mild to debilitating, resulting in total blindness. A necrotizing and obliterative vasculitis affects both arteries and veins of organs. Recurrent attacks of uveitis, oral aphthous ulcers, skin lesions, and genital ulcers are common. Topical and systemic corticosteroids have been the mainstay in the treatment of ocular inflammation for many years; however, due to the several known side effects of corticosteroids and thanks to scientific advances, more novel approaches to ABD treatment have been emerging. Antimetabolites such as methotrexate and azathioprine have been utilized with the latter showing positive results. Chlorambucil has been utilized effectively for ocular manifestations of ABD. Interferon alpha has shown encouraging results in the management of refractory ocular inflammation associated with ABD, either alone or in combination with other immunosuppressive agents. Surgical interventions to deal with complications from ABD can be safely done if adequate control of inflammation is achieved peri-operatively. Early detection and aggressive treatment, when needed, have proven to be essential in the management of this relentlessly explosive disease.Keywords: Adamantiades-Behçet’s disease, Behçet’s disease, ocular inflammation, uveitis, immunomodulatory therapy, immunosuppressive therapy

  16. The frequency of secondary glaucoma in patients with iridocorneal endothelial syndrome in correlation to the presence of uveal ectropion

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    Marković Vujica

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/Objective. Iridocorneal endothelial (ICE syndrome incudes 3 clinical forms: progressive iris atrophy, Chandler’s syndrome, and Cogan–Reese syndrome. It is characterized by various degrees of iris atrophy, corneal endothelial changes, uveal ectropion, corectopia, peripheral anterior synechiae (PAS and secondary glaucoma. The aim of the study was to illustrate forms of ICE syndrome, determine frequency of secondary glaucoma with emphasis on cases with uveal ectropion, analyze response to medicament treatment and the need for surgical treatment in intraocular pressure (IOP control. Methods. Patients underwent slit lamp examination, applanation tonometry, gonioscopy, ophthalmoscopy, Humphrey visual field testing and Heidelberg retina tomography. Patients were divided into two groups: group I, without uveal ectropion (22 patients and group II, with uveal ectropion (14 patients. Results. A total of 36 patients were examined in a 10-year period. The average age was 38 years, male to female ratio 1:2. Secondary glaucoma was confirmed in 26 (72.2% patients, out of which 12 (54.5% in group I and 14 (100% in group II. PAS were more frequent in group II. In group I, mean initial IOP was 37 mmHg, and after medicament treatment 26 mmHg. Secondary glaucoma was controlled in 50% and remaining 50% underwent surgical treatment. In group II, mean initial IOP was 49 mmHg, and after medicament treatment 32 mmHg. All 14 patients (100% underwent surgical treatment in order to achieve IOP control. Conclusion. ICE syndrome is a rare, progressive disease, with high incidence of secondary glaucoma, which is more frequent in cases with uveal ectropion. In these cases, medicament treatment is not effective and trabeculectomy with antimetabolite application is necessary.

  17. H19 mediates methotrexate resistance in colorectal cancer through activating Wnt/β-catenin pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Ke-feng; Liang, Wei-Cheng; Feng, Lu; Pang, Jian-xin; Waye, Mary Miu-Yee; Zhang, Jin-Fang; Fu, Wei-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common malignancy, most of which remain unresponsive to chemotherapy. As one of the earliest cytotoxic drugs, methotrexate (MTX) serves as an anti-metabolite and anti-folate chemotherapy for various cancers. Unfortunately, MTX resistance prevents its clinical application in cancer therapy. Thereby, overcoming the drug resistance is an alternative strategy to maximize the therapeutic efficacy of MTX in clinics. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have gained widespread attention in recent years. More and more emerging evidences have demonstrated that they play important regulatory roles in various biological activities and disease progression including drug resistance. In the present study, a MTX-resistant colorectal cell line HT-29 (HT-29-R) was developed, which displayed the active proliferation and shortened cell cycle. LncRNA H19 was found to be significantly upregulated in this resistant cell line. Further investigation showed that H19 knockdown sensitized the MTX resistance in HT-29-R cells while its overexpression improved the MTX resistance in the parental cells, suggesting that H19 mediate MTX resistance. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling was activated in HT-29-R cells, and H19 knockdown suppressed this signaling in the parental cells. In conclusion, H19 mediated MTX resistance via activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which help to develop H19 as a promising therapeutic target for MTX resistant CRC. - Highlights: • A methotrexate (MTX) -resistant colorectal cancer cell line HT-29 (HT-29-R) has been developed. • H19 was upregulated in HT-29-R cells. • H19 mediated MTX resistance in colorectal cancer (CRC). • Wnt/β-catenin pathway was involved in the H19-mediated MTX resistance in CRC cells.

  18. Probing the mechanistic consequences of 5-fluorine substitution on cytidine nucleotide analogue incorporation by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Adrian S; Schinazi, Raymond F; Murakami, Eisuke; Basavapathruni, Aravind; Shi, Junxing; Zorca, Suzana M; Chu, Chung K; Anderson, Karen S

    2003-05-01

    Beta-D and beta-L-enantiomers of 2',3'-dideoxycytidine analogues are potent chain-terminators and antimetabolites for viral and cellular replication. Seemingly small modifications markedly alter their antiviral and toxicity patterns. This review discusses previously published and recently obtained data on the effects of 5- and 2'-fluorine substitution on the pre-steady state incorporation of 2'-deoxycytidine-5'-monophosphate analogues by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) in light of their biological activity. The addition of fluorine at the 5-position of the pyrimidine ring altered the kinetic parameters for all nucleotides tested. Only the 5-fluorine substitution of the clinically relevant nucleosides (-)-beta-L-2',3'-dideoxy-3'-thia-5-fluorocytidine (L-FTC, Emtriva), and (+)-beta-D-2',3'-didehydro-2',3'-dideoxy-5-fluorocytidine (D-D4FC, Reverset), caused a higher overall efficiency of nucleotide incorporation during both DNA- and RNA-directed synthesis. Enhanced incorporation by RT may in part explain the potency of these nucleosides against HIV-1. In other cases, a lack of correlation between RT incorporation in enzymatic assays and antiviral activity in cell culture illustrates the importance of other cellular factors in defining antiviral potency. The substitution of fluorine at the 2' position of the deoxyribose ring negatively affects incorporation by RT indicating the steric gate of RT can detect electrostatic perturbations. Intriguing results pertaining to drug resistance have led to a better understanding of HIV-1 RT resistance mechanisms. These insights serve as a basis for understanding the mechanism of action for nucleoside analogues and, coupled with studies on other key enzymes, may lead to the more effective use of fluorine to enhance the potency and selectivity of antiviral agents.

  19. Use of radiation and radioisotopes for investigating metabolic diseases of animals in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, S P [National Dairy Research Inst., Karnal (India). Div. of Dairy Cattle Nutrition and Physiology

    1980-03-01

    In the last decade, radioisotopes have been used to investigate certain metabolic diseases of animals and radiation is being utilized to produce parasitic vaccines to vaccinate animals. Some studies in which radioisotopes have been used to investigate certain metabolic disorders are reviewed. In experiments where radioimmunoassay technique for the estimation of hormones, has been utilized, the results reveal that the animals on low level of nutrition show greater oestrous cycle lengths or even long anoestrous periods. On the other hand, irradiation has been used as a tool to produce vaccines as well as degradation of certain dietary molecules for increased utilization. A number of studies wherein /sup 35/S and /sup 15/N isotopes have been used, reveal that sulphur supplementation is essential for optimum utilization of nitrogen in the ratio of 1:10. There are certain antimetabolites in feed ingredients which affect endocrine function. Evidence indicates that high nitrate forages disturb thyroid function when sup(131)I is used to elucidate its secretion rate. Similarly certain toxic substances such as tannins have been shown to affect protein metabolism and phosphorus utilization when sup(32)P isotope is used in such studies. The use of radioisotopes has also been helpful to investigate the cause of ''Degnala'' disease prevalent in village cattle in certain states of India. With the help of sup(75)Se it has been possible to trace the metabolic disturbances which lead to the onset of this disease. Another deficiency disease, hyperkeratosis, has been shown to be caused not only because of vitamin A deficiency, but also because of zinc deficiency. The latter helps in the mobilization of a normal quantity of vitamin A from the liver into the blood vitamin A pool. There is wide scope for use of radioisotopes to investigate other metabolic diseases prevalent in livestock in this country.

  20. Smad4 sensitizes colorectal cancer to 5-fluorouracil through cell cycle arrest by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt/CDC2/survivin cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Binhao; Leng, Chao; Wu, Chao; Zhang, Zhanguo; Dou, Lei; Luo, Xin; Zhang, Bixiang; Chen, Xiaoping

    2016-03-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), a cell cycle-specific antimetabolite, is one of the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agents for colorectal cancer (CRC). Yet, resistance to 5-FU-based chemotherapy is still an obstacle to the treatment of this malignancy. Mutation or loss of Smad4 in CRC is pivotal for chemoresistance. However, the mechanism by which Smad4 regulates the chemosensitivity of CRC remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of Smad4 in the chemosensitivity of CRC to 5-FU, and whether Smad4-regulated cell cycle arrest is involved in 5-FU chemoresistance. We used Smad4-expressing CT26 and Smad4-null SW620 cell lines as experimental models, by knockdown or transgenic overexpression. Cells or tumors were treated with 5-FU to determine chemosensitivity by cell growth, tumorigenicity assay and a mouse model. Cell cycle distribution was examined with flow cytometric analysis, and cell cycle-related proteins were examined by western blotting. Smad4 deficiency in CT26 and SW620 cells induced chemoresistance to 5-FU both in vitro and in vivo. Smad4 deficiency attenuated G1 or G2 cell cycle arrest by activating the PI3K/Akt/CDC2/survivin pathway. The PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, reversed the activation of the Akt/CDC2/survivin cascade in the Smad4-deficient cells, while it had little effect on cells with high Smad4 expression. In conclusion, we discovered a novel mechanism mediated by Smad4 to trigger 5-FU chemosensitivity through cell cycle arrest by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt/CDC2/survivin cascade. The present study also implies that LY294002 has potential therapeutic value to reverse the chemosensitivity of CRC with low Smad4 expression.

  1. Characteristics of pediatric chemotherapy medication errors in a national error reporting database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke, Michael L; Shore, Andrew D; Morlock, Laura; Hicks, Rodney W; Miller, Marlene R

    2007-07-01

    Little is known regarding chemotherapy medication errors in pediatrics despite studies suggesting high rates of overall pediatric medication errors. In this study, the authors examined patterns in pediatric chemotherapy errors. The authors queried the United States Pharmacopeia MEDMARX database, a national, voluntary, Internet-accessible error reporting system, for all error reports from 1999 through 2004 that involved chemotherapy medications and patients aged error reports, 85% reached the patient, and 15.6% required additional patient monitoring or therapeutic intervention. Forty-eight percent of errors originated in the administering phase of medication delivery, and 30% originated in the drug-dispensing phase. Of the 387 medications cited, 39.5% were antimetabolites, 14.0% were alkylating agents, 9.3% were anthracyclines, and 9.3% were topoisomerase inhibitors. The most commonly involved chemotherapeutic agents were methotrexate (15.3%), cytarabine (12.1%), and etoposide (8.3%). The most common error types were improper dose/quantity (22.9% of 327 cited error types), wrong time (22.6%), omission error (14.1%), and wrong administration technique/wrong route (12.2%). The most common error causes were performance deficit (41.3% of 547 cited error causes), equipment and medication delivery devices (12.4%), communication (8.8%), knowledge deficit (6.8%), and written order errors (5.5%). Four of the 5 most serious errors occurred at community hospitals. Pediatric chemotherapy errors often reached the patient, potentially were harmful, and differed in quality between outpatient and inpatient areas. This study indicated which chemotherapeutic agents most often were involved in errors and that administering errors were common. Investigation is needed regarding targeted medication administration safeguards for these high-risk medications. Copyright (c) 2007 American Cancer Society.

  2. Glucose-mediated control of ghrelin release from primary cultures of gastric mucosal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Ichiro; Park, Won-Mee; Walker, Angela K.; Piper, Paul K.; Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Osborne-Lawrence, Sherri

    2012-01-01

    The peptide hormone ghrelin is released from a distinct group of gastrointestinal cells in response to caloric restriction, whereas its levels fall after eating. The mechanisms by which ghrelin secretion is regulated remain largely unknown. Here, we have used primary cultures of mouse gastric mucosal cells to investigate ghrelin secretion, with an emphasis on the role of glucose. Ghrelin secretion from these cells upon exposure to different d-glucose concentrations, the glucose antimetabolite 2-deoxy-d-glucose, and other potential secretagogues was assessed. The expression profile of proteins involved in glucose transport, metabolism, and utilization within highly enriched pools of mouse ghrelin cells and within cultured ghrelinoma cells was also determined. Ghrelin release negatively correlated with d-glucose concentration. Insulin blocked ghrelin release, but only in a low d-glucose environment. 2-Deoxy-d-glucose prevented the inhibitory effect of high d-glucose exposure on ghrelin release. mRNAs encoding several facilitative glucose transporters, hexokinases, the ATP-sensitive potassium channel subunit Kir6.2, and sulfonylurea type 1 receptor were expressed highly within ghrelin cells, although neither tolbutamide nor diazoxide exerted direct effects on ghrelin secretion. These findings suggest that direct exposure of ghrelin cells to low ambient d-glucose stimulates ghrelin release, whereas high d-glucose and glucose metabolism within ghrelin cells block ghrelin release. Also, low d-glucose sensitizes ghrelin cells to insulin. Various glucose transporters, channels, and enzymes that mediate glucose responsiveness in other cell types may contribute to the ghrelin cell machinery involved in regulating ghrelin secretion under these different glucose environments, although their exact roles in ghrelin release remain uncertain. PMID:22414807

  3. Characterisation of the mgo operon in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158 that is required for mangotoxin production

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Mangotoxin is an antimetabolite toxin that is produced by strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae; mangotoxin-producing strains are primarily isolated from mango tissues with symptoms of bacterial apical necrosis. The toxin is an oligopeptide that inhibits ornithine N-acetyl transferase (OAT), a key enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of the essential amino acids ornithine and arginine. The involvement of a putative nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene (mgoA) in mangotoxin production and virulence has been reported. Results In the present study, we performed a RT-PCR analysis, insertional inactivation mutagenesis, a promoter expression analysis and terminator localisation to study the gene cluster containing the mgoA gene. Additionally, we evaluated the importance of mgoC, mgoA and mgoD in mangotoxin production. A sequence analysis revealed an operon-like organisation. A promoter sequence was located upstream of the mgoB gene and was found to drive lacZ transcription. Two terminators were located downstream of the mgoD gene. RT-PCR experiments indicated that the four genes (mgoBCAD) constitute a transcriptional unit. This operon is similar in genetic organisation to those in the three other P. syringae pathovars for which complete genomes are available (P. syringae pv. syringae B728a, P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and P. syringae pv. phaseolicola 1448A). Interestingly, none of these three reference strains is capable of producing mangotoxin. Additionally, extract complementation resulted in a recovery of mangotoxin production when the defective mutant was complemented with wild-type extracts. Conclusions The results of this study confirm that mgoB, mgoC, mgoA and mgoD function as a transcriptional unit and operon. While this operon is composed of four genes, only the last three are directly involved in mangotoxin production. PMID:22251433

  4. Use of the radiometric method at creation cell test-systems for pre-screening of anticancer preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsova, N.N.; Khashimova, Z.S.; Sadikov, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Development of cancer chemotherapy is tightly bound with investigation of biological activity of different compounds on in vitro test systems. Our research has been directed on definition of sensitivity of the cell line KML removed by us from passed of mice melanoma B-16. We had been investigated action of 18 clinical antineoplastic preparations of different classes: alkylating - sarcolysinum, thiophosphamide, dopan, fhthordopan; antimetabolites - cytararibinum, methotrexatum, 6-mercaptopurinum, 5-fhthorouracilum, fhthorafur; antineoplastic antibiotics- adriamycinum, neomycinum, rubomycinum, bruneomycinum, carminomycinum, olivomycinum; plant substances - vinblastinum, colchaminum (component of ointment which used at treatment of skin cancer) and other - carboplatin. Cytotoxic effect of preparations estimated two methods - radiometric on inclusion of 3H - timidine in cells and spectrophotometric by definition of total amount nucleic acids and protein. For this purpose KML cells passed in quantity of 120 thousand in 3 ml of nutrient medium RPMI 1640, 10 % calf embryo serum in bottles and after 24 hours entered substances in dozes from 0,01 up to 100 μg/ml. Contact of substances to cells was 24 hours, then 10 μ Ci 3 H - timidine was injected on bottles at 1 hour. Cells transferred on GFC-filters, washed from not connected label. Filters transferred in scintillation liquid and a level of a radio-activity determined on β-counter. All tested clinical preparations appeared active within the criteria of activity, thus the radiometric method was more sensitive, than spectrophotometric. Thus, testing results of model have shown that stable cell line KML was sensitive to action of 18 clinical preparations with various mechanisms of action by different estimations of damaging action. This model can be used for biological activity of new potential cancerolytics pre-screening. This work was supported by the Center of Science and Technology of the Republic of

  5. Relationships among cell survival, O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity, and reactivation of methylated adenovirus 5 and herpes simplex virus type 1 in human melanoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maynard, K.; Parsons, P.G.; Cerny, T.; Margison, G.P. (Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Herston (Australia))

    1989-09-01

    O6-Alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (ATase) activity and host cell reactivation (HCR) of 5-(3-methyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide (MTIC)-methylated viruses were compared in human melanoma cell lines that were sensitive or resistant to killing by the antitumor DNA-methylating agent MTIC. Enhanced HCR of adenovirus 5 (defined as the Mer+ phenotype) generally showed a semiquantitative correlation with the natural or induced resistance of the host cells to the toxic effects of MTIC and to the level of ATase activity. However, one MTIC-resistant cell line was found (MM170) which had a low level of ATase and intermediate HCR of adenovirus. The HCR of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was enhanced in the Mer+ cells that had natural resistance to MTIC compared with Mer- cells. On the other hand, HCR of HSV-1 in Mer+ cells with induced resistance to MTIC was similar to that in Mer- cells. Neither adenovirus 5 nor HSV-1 infection induced ATase activity in Mer- cells. This indicates that resistance to the toxic effects of methylating agents is not invariably associated with high levels of ATase activity in human melanoma cells. Furthermore, while induction of the Mer+ phenotype from Mer- cells was usually accompanied by the recovery of ATase activity, induced Mer+ cells had less proficient repair than natural Mer+ cells, as judged quantitatively by slightly lower cellular resistance and qualitatively by deficient HCR response for HSV-1. These results suggest that the Mer- and induced Mer+ cells lack an ATase-independent DNA repair mechanism. No differences in MTIC-induced DNA repair synthesis or strand breaks were found between the Mer-, natural Mer+, and induced Mer+ phenotypes. However, UV-induced DNA repair synthesis was higher in the natural Mer+ than in the Mer- or induced Mer+ cells, both of which had increased cellular sensitivity to the antimetabolites methotrexate and hydroxyurea.

  6. Cutaneous adverse reactions of chemotherapy in cancer patients: A clinicoepidemiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumita Ghosh Biswal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The diagnosis of cutaneous adversities in the cancer patient is especially difficult, given the complexity of their illness and combination protocols used for the treatment. The present study was undertaken to know the spectrum of cutaneous adversities in patients undergoing chemotherapy and the drug(s most commonly associated with it. Materials and Methods: A total of 1000 patients with malignancies under chemotherapy in the oncology ward and outpatient department were screened in this observational study from January 2013 to February 2015. Relevant investigations for diagnosis of malignancies under chemotherapy and dermatological disorders were carried out. Results: Three hundred and eighty-four patients presented with cutaneous adversities of chemotherapy. The most common was anagen effluvium (78.6%, followed by xerosis (4.4%, thrombophlebitis (3.1%, generalised pruritus (2.9%, melanonychia (2.9%, hand-foot syndrome (2.6%, extravasation reactions (1.8%, flagellate dermatosis (1.3%, prurigo nodularis (0.8%, exfoliation (0.5%, ichthyosis (0.5%, papulopustular rash (0.3%, bullous photodermatitis (0.3%, and Sweet's syndrome (0.3%. Chemotherapeutic drugs were mostly given in combinations. Most common drugs to cause anagen effluvium were alkylating agents in combinations, hand-foot syndrome by taxanes (docetaxel, flagellate dermatoses by antitumour antibiotics (bleomycin, and exfoliation by antimetabolites (methotrexate. The limitation of this study was to imply a specific drug as the causation of the cutaneous adversities since the chemotherapy mostly consisted of combination protocols. Therefore, we have tried to associate the drug combination itself. Conclusion: Chemotherapeutic drugs produce a range of cutaneous adversities, certain specific adversities pertaining to drugs, and their combinations have been implicated which should be looked for and managed accordingly. Knowledge of the adverse effects of anticancer drugs will help

  7. Tissue distribution of crizotinib and gemcitabine combination in a patient-derived orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Honeywell

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacokinetics focuses on the question whether a drug actually reaches its target in therapeutic concentrations or accumulates elsewhere, potentially causing toxicological or unpredictable side effects. We determined tissue distribution of gemcitabine, an antimetabolite, and crizotinib, a tyrosine-kinase inhibitor targeted against the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK and mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (c-Met receptors, in a validated orthotopic mouse model for pancreatic cancer. Mice with pancreatic cancer were treated with either oral crizotinib at 25 mg/kg, gemcitabine at 100 mg/kg or with their combination. Two hours after the last gemcitabine dose mice were sacrificed and all available blood/organs/tissues were sampled. Tissue was subsequently analyzed for drug concentrations using a validated liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS technique. In whole blood gemcitabine was about 1.0 µM and crizotinib 2.4 µM in the single treatment, whereas in the combination crizotinib increased the levels of gemcitabine. Crizotinib was found in all major tissues, being highest in the intestine. Comparison of crizotinib alone to the gemcitabine-crizotinib combination showed that crizotinib tissue concentrations were 3-6 fold lower in liver, lung, kidney and spleen, 30-fold lower in the skin, heart and pancreas and 200-fold lower in the brain. Tissue gemcitabine was highest in spleen and skin, being about 5-10 fold higher than in the other tissues, including brain, which still had a relatively high accumulation. In conclusion, both gemcitabine and crizotinib accumulate at clinically active but variable levels in tissues, possibly relating to the effects exerted by these drugs.

  8. Toxicity profile and treatment delays in NOPHO ALL2008-comparing adults and children with Philadelphia chromosome-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toft, Nina; Birgens, Henrik; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Griškevičius, Laimonas; Hallböök, Helene; Heyman, Mats; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfeldt; Jónsson, Ólafur Gísli; Palk, Katrin; Pruunsild, Kaie; Quist-Paulsen, Petter; Vaitkeviciene, Goda; Vettenranta, Kim; Asberg, Ann; Helt, Louise Rold; Frandsen, Thomas; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2016-02-01

    Cure rates improve when adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are treated according to pediatric protocols. Assumed risks of toxicities and associated delays in treatment have played a role in setting upper age limits. The aim of this study was to examine the toxicity profile and treatment delays in NOPHO ALL2008 comparing children and adults. We collected information on 19 treatment-related toxicities, systematically captured at 3-month intervals throughout therapy, and time intervals between 12 consecutive treatment phases for 1076 patients aged 1-45 yrs treated according to the Nordic/Baltic ALL2008 protocol. No adults died during induction. The duration of induction therapy and postinduction treatment phases did not differ between children and adults, except for patients 18-45 yrs being significantly delayed during two of nine high-risk blocks (median number of days for patients 1-9, 10-17, and 18-45 yrs; the glucocorticosteroid/antimetabolite-based block B1: 24, 26, and 29 d, respectively, P = 0.001, and Block 5 (in most cases also a B block): 29, 29, and 37 d, respectively, P = 0.02). A higher incidence of thrombosis with increasing age was found; highest odds ratio 5.4 (95% CI: (2.6;11.0)) for patients 15-17 yrs compared with children 1-9 yrs (P children, although thrombosis and avascular osteonecrosis was most common among adolescents. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Drugs in development for prophylaxis of rejection in kidney-transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanders ML

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Marion Lee Sanders,1 Anthony James Langone2 1Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, 2Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: Transplantation is the preferred treatment option for individuals with end-stage renal disease. Individuals who undergo transplantation must chronically be maintained on an immunosuppression regimen for rejection prophylaxis to help ensure graft survival. Current rejection prophylaxis consists of using a combination of calcineurin inhibitors, mTOR inhibitors, antimetabolite agents, and/or corticosteroids. These agents have collectively improved the short-term outcomes of renal transplantation, but improvements in late/chronic graft loss and recipient survival have lagged significantly behind challenging the field of transplantation to develop novel prophylactic agents. There have been several clinical trials conducted within the last 5 years in an attempt to bring such novel agents to the commercial market. These trials have resulted in the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA approval of extended-release tacrolimus, as well as belatacept, which has the potential to replace calcineurin inhibitors for rejection prophylaxis. Other trials have focused on the development of novel calcineurin inhibitors (voclosporin, costimulation blockade (ASKP1240 and alefacept, kinase inhibitors (tofacitinib and sotrastaurin, and inhibitors of leukocyte migration (efalizumab. While these later agents have not been FDA-approved for use in transplantation, they remain noteworthy, as these agents explore pathways not previously targeted for allograft-rejection prophylaxis. The purpose of this review was to consolidate available clinical trial data with regard to the recent developments in rejection prophylaxis in kidney transplantation. Keywords: rejection, prophylaxis, immunosuppression

  10. Use of radiation and radioisotopes for investigating metabolic diseases of animals in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, S.P.

    1980-01-01

    In the last one decade, radioisotopes are being used to investigate certain metabolic diseases of animals and radiations are being utilized to produce parasitic vaccines to vaccinate animals. Some studies in which radioisotopes have been used to investigate certain metabolic disorders are reviewed. In experiments, where radioimmunoassay technique for the estimation of hormones, has been utilized, the results reveal that the animals on low plane of nutrition show greater oestrous cycle lengths or even long anoestrous periods. On the other hand, irradiation has been used as a tool to produce vaccines as well as degradation of certain dietary molecules for increased utilization. A number of studies wherein 35 S and 15 N isotopes have been used, reveal that sulphur supplementation is essential for optimum utilization of nitrogen in the ratio of 1:10. There are certain antimetabolites in feed ingredients which affect endocrine function. Evidence indicates that high nitrate forages disturb thyroid function when sup(131)I is used to elucidate its secretion rate. Similarly certain toxic substances such as tannins have been shown to affect protein metabolism and phosphorus utilization when sup(32)P isotope is used in such studies. The use of radioisotopes have also been helpful to investigate the cause of ''Degnala'' disease prevalent in village cattle in certain states of India. With the help of sup(75)Se it has been possible to trace out the metabolic disturbances which lead to the onset of this disease. Another deficiency disease, hyperkeratosis, has been shown to be caused not only because of Vitamin A deficiency, but also because of zinc deficiency. The latter helps in the mobilization of normal quantity of vitamin A from the liver into the blood vitamin A pool. There is wide scope to use radioisotopes to investigate other metabolic diseases prevalent in livestock in this country. (auth.)

  11. Relationships among cell survival, O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity, and reactivation of methylated adenovirus 5 and herpes simplex virus type 1 in human melanoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynard, K.; Parsons, P.G.; Cerny, T.; Margison, G.P.

    1989-01-01

    O6-Alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (ATase) activity and host cell reactivation (HCR) of 5-(3-methyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide (MTIC)-methylated viruses were compared in human melanoma cell lines that were sensitive or resistant to killing by the antitumor DNA-methylating agent MTIC. Enhanced HCR of adenovirus 5 (defined as the Mer+ phenotype) generally showed a semiquantitative correlation with the natural or induced resistance of the host cells to the toxic effects of MTIC and to the level of ATase activity. However, one MTIC-resistant cell line was found (MM170) which had a low level of ATase and intermediate HCR of adenovirus. The HCR of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was enhanced in the Mer+ cells that had natural resistance to MTIC compared with Mer- cells. On the other hand, HCR of HSV-1 in Mer+ cells with induced resistance to MTIC was similar to that in Mer- cells. Neither adenovirus 5 nor HSV-1 infection induced ATase activity in Mer- cells. This indicates that resistance to the toxic effects of methylating agents is not invariably associated with high levels of ATase activity in human melanoma cells. Furthermore, while induction of the Mer+ phenotype from Mer- cells was usually accompanied by the recovery of ATase activity, induced Mer+ cells had less proficient repair than natural Mer+ cells, as judged quantitatively by slightly lower cellular resistance and qualitatively by deficient HCR response for HSV-1. These results suggest that the Mer- and induced Mer+ cells lack an ATase-independent DNA repair mechanism. No differences in MTIC-induced DNA repair synthesis or strand breaks were found between the Mer-, natural Mer+, and induced Mer+ phenotypes. However, UV-induced DNA repair synthesis was higher in the natural Mer+ than in the Mer- or induced Mer+ cells, both of which had increased cellular sensitivity to the antimetabolites methotrexate and hydroxyurea

  12. Evaluation of a UCMK/dCK fusion enzyme for gemcitabine-mediated cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Adam J.; Brown, Melissa N.; Black, Margaret E.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Goal was to enhance dFdC cytotoxicity by the creation of a UCMK/dCK fusion enzyme. ► The UCMK/dCK fusion enzyme possesses both native activities. ► The fusion renders cells equally sensitive to dFdC relative to dCK expression alone. ► Dual activities of fusion not sufficient to augment cell dFdC sensitivity in vitro. ► Data may warrant the implementation of UCMK mutagenesis studies. -- Abstract: While gemcitabine (2′-2′-difluoro-2′-deoxycytidine, dFdC) displays wide-ranging antineoplastic activity as a single agent, variable response rates and poor intracellular metabolism often limit its clinical efficacy. In an effort to enhance dFdC cytotoxicity and help normalize response rates, we created a bifunctional fusion enzyme that combines the enzymatic activities of deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) and uridine/cytidine monophosphate kinase (UCMK) in a single polypeptide. Our goal was to evaluate whether the created fusion could induce beneficial, functional changes toward dFdC, expedite dFdC conversion to its active antimetabolites and consequently amplify cell dFdC sensitivity. While kinetic analyses revealed the UCMK/dCK fusion enzyme to possess both native activities, the fusion rendered cells sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of dFdC at the same level as dCK expression alone. These results suggest that increased wild-type UCMK expression does not provide a significant enhancement in dFdC-mediated cytotoxicity and may warrant the implementation of studies aimed at engineering UCMK variants with improved activity toward gemcitabine monophosphate.

  13. Lurbinectedin induces depletion of tumor-associated macrophages, an essential component of its in vivo synergism with gemcitabine, in pancreatic adenocarcinoma mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céspedes, María Virtudes; Guillén, María José; López-Casas, Pedro Pablo; Sarno, Francesca; Gallardo, Alberto; Álamo, Patricia; Cuevas, Carmen; Hidalgo, Manuel; Galmarini, Carlos María; Allavena, Paola; Avilés, Pablo; Mangues, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We explored whether the combination of lurbinectedin (PM01183) with the antimetabolite gemcitabine could result in a synergistic antitumor effect in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) mouse models. We also studied the contribution of lurbinectedin to this synergism. This drug presents a dual pharmacological effect that contributes to its in vivo antitumor activity: (i) specific binding to DNA minor grooves, inhibiting active transcription and DNA repair; and (ii) specific depletion of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). We evaluated the in vivo antitumor activity of lurbinectedin and gemcitabine as single agents and in combination in SW-1990 and MIA PaCa-2 cell-line xenografts and in patient-derived PDA models (AVATAR). Lurbinectedin-gemcitabine combination induced a synergistic effect on both MIA PaCa-2 [combination index (CI)=0.66] and SW-1990 (CI=0.80) tumor xenografts. It also induced complete tumor remissions in four out of six patient-derived PDA xenografts. This synergism was associated with enhanced DNA damage (anti-γ-H2AX), cell cycle blockage, caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. In addition to the enhanced DNA damage, which is a consequence of the interaction of the two drugs with the DNA, lurbinectedin induced TAM depletion leading to cytidine deaminase (CDA) downregulation in PDA tumors. This effect could, in turn, induce an increase of gemcitabine-mediated DNA damage that was especially relevant in high-density TAM tumors. These results show that lurbinectedin can be used to develop ‘molecularly targeted’ combination strategies. PMID:27780828

  14. Lurbinectedin induces depletion of tumor-associated macrophages, an essential component of its in vivo synergism with gemcitabine, in pancreatic adenocarcinoma mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Virtudes Céspedes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We explored whether the combination of lurbinectedin (PM01183 with the antimetabolite gemcitabine could result in a synergistic antitumor effect in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA mouse models. We also studied the contribution of lurbinectedin to this synergism. This drug presents a dual pharmacological effect that contributes to its in vivo antitumor activity: (i specific binding to DNA minor grooves, inhibiting active transcription and DNA repair; and (ii specific depletion of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs. We evaluated the in vivo antitumor activity of lurbinectedin and gemcitabine as single agents and in combination in SW-1990 and MIA PaCa-2 cell-line xenografts and in patient-derived PDA models (AVATAR. Lurbinectedin-gemcitabine combination induced a synergistic effect on both MIA PaCa-2 [combination index (CI=0.66] and SW-1990 (CI=0.80 tumor xenografts. It also induced complete tumor remissions in four out of six patient-derived PDA xenografts. This synergism was associated with enhanced DNA damage (anti-γ-H2AX, cell cycle blockage, caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. In addition to the enhanced DNA damage, which is a consequence of the interaction of the two drugs with the DNA, lurbinectedin induced TAM depletion leading to cytidine deaminase (CDA downregulation in PDA tumors. This effect could, in turn, induce an increase of gemcitabine-mediated DNA damage that was especially relevant in high-density TAM tumors. These results show that lurbinectedin can be used to develop ‘molecularly targeted’ combination strategies.

  15. UCLA Translational Biomarker Development Program (UTBD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czernin, Johannes [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The proposed UTBD program integrates the sciences of diagnostic nuclear medicine and (radio)chemistry with tumor biology and drug development. UTBD aims to translate new PET biomarkers for personalized medicine and to provide examples for the use of PET to determine pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) drug properties. The program builds on an existing partnership between the Ahmanson Translational Imaging Division (ATID) and the Crump Institute of Molecular Imaging (CIMI), the UCLA Department of Chemistry and the Division of Surgical Oncology. ATID provides the nuclear medicine training program, clinical and preclinical PET/CT scanners, biochemistry and biology labs for probe and drug development, radiochemistry labs, and two cyclotrons. CIMI provides DOE and NIH-funded training programs for radio-synthesis (START) and molecular imaging (SOMI). Other participating entities at UCLA are the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and the Division of Surgical Oncology. The first UTBD project focuses on deoxycytidine kinase, a rate-limiting enzyme in nucleotide metabolism, which is expressed in many cancers. Deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) positive tumors can be targeted uniquely by two distinct therapies: 1) nucleoside analog prodrugs such as gemcitabine (GEM) are activated by dCK to cytotoxic antimetabolites; 2) recently developed small molecule dCK inhibitors kill tumor cells by starving them of nucleotides required for DNA replication and repair. Since dCK-specific PET probes are now available, PET imaging of tumor dCK activity could improve the use of two different classes of drugs in a wide variety of cancers.

  16. Randomized Phase IIA Trial of Gemcitabine Compared With Bleomycin Plus Vincristine for Treatment of Kaposi’s Sarcoma in Patients on Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in Western Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naftali W. Busakhala

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS is a spindle cell tumor resulting from growth dysregulation in the setting of infection with human herpes virus-8 (also called KS herpes virus. Advanced KS is characterized by poor responses to antiretroviral therapy and some of the chemotherapy readily accessible to patients in low-resource areas. Gemcitabine induced partial and complete regression of AIDS-associated KS (AIDS-KS in 11 of 24 patients in a pilot study. The current study compares the antimetabolite gemcitabine with the standard care bleomycin and vincristine (BV in the treatment of chemotherapy-naïve patients with AIDS-KS in a resource-limited setting. Patients and Methods: Patients with persistent or progressive KS despite treatment with combined antiretroviral therapy were randomly assigned to receive gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m2 or bleomycin 15 IU/ m2 and vincristine 1.4 mg/m2 given twice weekly. The main end point was objective response by bidirectional measurement, adverse events, and quality of life after three cycles of chemotherapy. Results: Of 70 participants enrolled, 36 received gemcitabine and 34 received BV. Complete response was achieved in 12 patients (33.3% in the gemcitabine arm and six (17.6% in the BV arm (P = .175. The partial response rate was 52.8% (n = 19 in the gemcitabine arm and 58.8% (n = 20 in the BV arm. Both study arms reported similar neurologic and hematologic adverse events; there was statistically significant baseline to post-treatment improvement in health-related quality-of-life scores. Conclusion: The results of this randomized, phase IIA trial demonstrate gemcitabine activity in chemotherapy-naïve patients with AIDS-KS, on the basis of response rates, adverse events, and health-related quality-of-life scores.

  17. Irinotecan and oxaliplatin: an overview of the novel chemotherapeutic options for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Grivicich

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent malignancies in humans and an important cause of cancer death. Metastatic colorectal cancer remains incurable with available systemic therapeutic options. The most active cytotoxic drug against this malignancy, the antimetabolite 5-fluorouracil, was developed more than forty years ago, and as a single agent produces responses in only 10 to 15% of patients which in general last less than one year. Efforts to ameliorate these poor results resulted in the 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin combination, which enhances response rates about two-fold, without, however, significantly improving survival rates. The recent emergence of a handful of new 5-fluorouracil analogues and folate antagonists, as well as the topoisomerase I inhibitor irinotecan, and the third-generation platinum compound oxaliplatin, is likely to alter this gloomy scenario. These agents are at least as effective as 5-fluorouracil in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma, both untreated and previously treated with 5-fluorouracil-based regimens. This has led to the approval of irinotecan as second-line treatment for 5-fluorouracil-refractory disease, while the use of oxaliplatin has been suggested for patients having a defective 5-fluorouracil catabolism. Recently, FDA approved the combination of irinotecan with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin for first-line treatment of advanced colon cancer. Based on the synergistic preclinical antitumor effects of some of these agents, their meaningful single-agent activity, distinct mechanisms of cytotoxicity and resistance, and only partially overlapping toxicity profiles, effective combination regimens are now being developed, which are likely to lead to a new, more hopeful era for patients suffering from advanced colorectal carcinoma.

  18. Neurotoxicity of cytarabine (Ara-C) in dorsal root ganglion neurons originates from impediment of mtDNA synthesis and compromise of mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Ming; Gorgun, Murat F; Englander, Ella W

    2018-06-01

    Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) neurotoxicity caused by cancer drugs hinders attainment of chemotherapy goals. Due to leakiness of the blood nerve barrier, circulating chemotherapeutic drugs reach PNS neurons and adversely affect their function. Chemotherapeutic drugs are designed to target dividing cancer cells and mechanisms underlying their toxicity in postmitotic neurons remain to be fully clarified. The objective of this work was to elucidate progression of events triggered by antimitotic drugs in postmitotic neurons. For proof of mechanism study, we chose cytarabine (ara-C), an antimetabolite used in treatment of hematological cancers. Ara-C is a cytosine analog that terminates DNA synthesis. To investigate how ara-C affects postmitotic neurons, which replicate mitochondrial but not genomic DNA, we adapted a model of Dorsal Root Ganglion (DRG) neurons. We showed that DNA polymerase γ, which is responsible for mtDNA synthesis, is inhibited by ara-C and that sublethal ara-C exposure of DRG neurons leads to reduction in mtDNA content, ROS generation, oxidative mtDNA damage formation, compromised mitochondrial respiration and diminution of NADPH and GSH stores, as well as, activation of the DNA damage response. Hence, it is plausible that in ara-C exposed DRG neurons, ROS amplified by the high mitochondrial content shifts from physiologic to pathologic levels signaling stress to the nucleus. Combined, the findings suggest that ara-C neurotoxicity in DRG neurons originates in mitochondria and that continuous mtDNA synthesis and reliance on oxidative phosphorylation for energy needs sensitize the highly metabolic neurons to injury by mtDNA synthesis terminating cancer drugs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium experience in liver transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantisani, G P C; Zanotelli, M L; Gleisner, A L M; de Mello Brandão, A; Marroni, C A

    2006-04-01

    Mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS) has been shown to be as effective and as safe as mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in renal transplant patients. Nevertheless, compared to MMF its use in liver transplant patients has been limited. The purpose of this study was to analyze the efficacy of EC-MPS as a primary immunosuppressant or as a replacement for MMF in liver transplant patients. Ninety among 470 liver transplant recipients were receiving or had added an antimetabolite to their immunosuppressant therapy. The most common reason for this change was renal dysfunction (47.8%) or diabetes (32.2%). EC-MPS was started at a median of 30 months after liver transplantation. The mean administered daily dose was 720 mg/d. At least one gastrointestinal symptom was reported by 25 patients. Abdominal pain (16.6%) and diarrhea (14.5%) were the most frequent. EC-MPS had to be discontinued in two patients, while six others required dose reduction to resolve the symptoms. Hematological adverse events were infrequent: three patients had leukopenia and one, anemia, all of which responded to dosage reduction. There was a creatinine reduction within 6 months of drug commencement and maintenance of the lower creatinine levels at 1 year among patients who began EC-MPS for renal dysfunction. Serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels were significantly lower among patients on EC-MPS than on MMF. In conclusion, EC-MPS appears to have a similar efficacy and safety profile as MMF in liver transplant patients. Hematological and gastrointestinal adverse events were infrequent; seldom had the drug to be discontinued.

  20. Modulation of the ribonucleotide reductase M1-gemcitabine interaction in vivo by N-ethylmaleimide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhengming; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Yingtao [Developmental Therapeutics Program, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI (United States); Bepler, Gerold, E-mail: beplerg@karmanos.org [Developmental Therapeutics Program, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Gemcitabine induces a RRM1 conformational change in tumor cell lines and xenografts. {yields} The 110 kDa RRM1 is unique to gemcitabine interaction among 12 cytotoxic agents. {yields} The 110 kDa RRM1 can be stabilized by the thiol alkylator N-ethylmaleimide. {yields} C218A, C429A, and E431A mutations in RRM1 abolished the conformational change. {yields} The 110 kDa RRM1 may be a specific biomarker of gemcitabine's therapeutic efficacy. -- Abstract: Ribonucleotide reductase M1 (RRM1) is the regulatory subunit of the holoenzyme that catalyzes the conversion of ribonucleotides to 2'-deoxyribonucleotides. Its function is indispensible in cell proliferation and DNA repair. It also serves as a biomarker of therapeutic efficacy of the antimetabolite drug gemcitabine (2',2'-difluoro-2'-deoxycytidine) in various malignancies. However, a mechanistic explanation remains to be determined. This study investigated how the alkylating agent N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) interacts with the inhibitory activity of gemcitabine on its target protein RRM1 in vivo. We found, when cells were treated with gemcitabine in the presence of NEM, a novel 110 kDa band, along with the 90 kDa native RRM1 band, appeared in immunoblots. This 110 kDa band was identified as RRM1 by mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and represented a conformational change resulting from covalent labeling by gemcitabine. It is specific to gemcitabine/NEM, among 11 other chemotherapy drugs tested. It was also detectable in human tumor xenografts in mice treated with gemcitabine. Among mutations of seven residues essential for RRM1 function, C218A, C429A, and E431A abolished the conformational change, while N427A, C787A, and C790A diminished it. C444A was unique since it was able to alter the conformation even in absence of gemcitabine treatment. We conclude that the thiol alkylator NEM can stabilize the gemcitabine-induced conformational change of RRM1, and this stabilized RRM1

  1. Degradation of 5-FU by means of advanced (photo)oxidation processes: UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, UV/Fe{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and UV/TiO{sub 2} — Comparison of transformation products, ready biodegradability and toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutterbeck, Carlos Alexandre, E-mail: lutterbeck@leuphana.de [Sustainable Chemistry and Material Resources, Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Faculty of Sustainability, Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Scharnhorststraße 1/C13, DE-21335 Lüneburg (Germany); Graduate Program in Environmental Technology, Universidade de Santa Cruz do Sul — UNISC, Av. Independência, 2293, CEP 96815-900 Santa Cruz do Sul, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Wilde, Marcelo Luís, E-mail: wilde@leuphana.de [Sustainable Chemistry and Material Resources, Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Faculty of Sustainability, Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Scharnhorststraße 1/C13, DE-21335 Lüneburg (Germany); Baginska, Ewelina, E-mail: ewelina.baginska@leuphana.de [Sustainable Chemistry and Material Resources, Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Faculty of Sustainability, Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Scharnhorststraße 1/C13, DE-21335 Lüneburg (Germany); Leder, Christoph, E-mail: cleder@leuphana.de [Sustainable Chemistry and Material Resources, Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Faculty of Sustainability, Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Scharnhorststraße 1/C13, DE-21335 Lüneburg (Germany); Machado, Ênio Leandro, E-mail: enio@unisc.br [Graduate Program in Environmental Technology, Universidade de Santa Cruz do Sul — UNISC, Av. Independência, 2293, CEP 96815-900 Santa Cruz do Sul, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); and others

    2015-09-15

    The present study investigates the degradation of the antimetabolite 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) by three different advanced photo oxidation processes: UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, UV/Fe{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and UV/TiO{sub 2}. Prescreening experiments varying the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} concentrations were performed in order to set the best catalyst concentrations in the UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and UV/TiO{sub 2} experiments, whereas the UV/Fe{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} process was optimized varying the pH, Fe{sup 2+} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations by means of the Box–Behnken design (BBD). 5-FU was quickly removed in all the irradiation experiments. The UV/Fe{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and UV/TiO{sub 2} processes achieved the highest degree of mineralization, whereas the lowest one resulted from the UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment. Six transformation products were formed during the advanced (photo)oxidation processes and identified using low and high resolution mass spectrometry. Most of them were formed and further eliminated during the reactions. The parent compound of 5-FU was not biodegraded, whereas the photolytic mixture formed in the UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment after 256 min showed a noticeable improvement of the biodegradability in the closed bottle test (CBT) and was nontoxic towards Vibrio fischeri. In silico predictions showed positive alerts for mutagenic and genotoxic effects of 5-FU. In contrast, several of the transformation products (TPs) generated along the processes did not provide indications for mutagenic or genotoxic activity. One exception was TP with m/z 146 with positive alerts in several models of bacterial mutagenicity which could demand further experimental testing. Results demonstrate that advanced treatment can eliminate parent compounds and its toxicity. However, transformation products formed can still be toxic. Therefore toxicity screening after advanced treatment is recommendable. - Highlights: • Full primary elimination of 5-FU was

  2. The bioenergetic signature of isogenic colon cancer cells predicts the cell death response to treatment with 3-bromopyruvate, iodoacetate or 5-fluorouracil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuezva José M

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic reprogramming resulting in enhanced glycolysis is a phenotypic trait of cancer cells, which is imposed by the tumor microenvironment and is linked to the down-regulation of the catalytic subunit of the mitochondrial H+-ATPase (β-F1-ATPase. The bioenergetic signature is a protein ratio (β-F1-ATPase/GAPDH, which provides an estimate of glucose metabolism in tumors and serves as a prognostic indicator for cancer patients. Targeting energetic metabolism could be a viable alternative to conventional anticancer chemotherapies. Herein, we document that the bioenergetic signature of isogenic colon cancer cells provides a gauge to predict the cell-death response to the metabolic inhibitors, 3-bromopyruvate (3BrP and iodoacetate (IA, and the anti-metabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU. Methods The bioenergetic signature of the cells was determined by western blotting. Aerobic glycolysis was determined from lactate production rates. The cell death was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Cellular ATP concentrations were determined using bioluminiscence. Pearson's correlation coefficient was applied to assess the relationship between the bioenergetic signature and the cell death response. In vivo tumor regression activities of the compounds were assessed using a xenograft mouse model injected with the highly glycolytic HCT116 colocarcinoma cells. Results We demonstrate that the bioenergetic signature of isogenic HCT116 cancer cells inversely correlates with the potential to execute necrosis in response to 3BrP or IA treatment. Conversely, the bioenergetic signature directly correlates with the potential to execute apoptosis in response to 5-FU treatment in the same cells. However, despite the large differences observed in the in vitro cell-death responses associated with 3BrP, IA and 5-FU, the in vivo tumor regression activities of these agents were comparable. Conclusions Overall, we suggest that the

  3. Modulation of the ribonucleotide reductase M1-gemcitabine interaction in vivo by N-ethylmaleimide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhengming; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Yingtao; Bepler, Gerold

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Gemcitabine induces a RRM1 conformational change in tumor cell lines and xenografts. → The 110 kDa RRM1 is unique to gemcitabine interaction among 12 cytotoxic agents. → The 110 kDa RRM1 can be stabilized by the thiol alkylator N-ethylmaleimide. → C218A, C429A, and E431A mutations in RRM1 abolished the conformational change. → The 110 kDa RRM1 may be a specific biomarker of gemcitabine's therapeutic efficacy. -- Abstract: Ribonucleotide reductase M1 (RRM1) is the regulatory subunit of the holoenzyme that catalyzes the conversion of ribonucleotides to 2'-deoxyribonucleotides. Its function is indispensible in cell proliferation and DNA repair. It also serves as a biomarker of therapeutic efficacy of the antimetabolite drug gemcitabine (2',2'-difluoro-2'-deoxycytidine) in various malignancies. However, a mechanistic explanation remains to be determined. This study investigated how the alkylating agent N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) interacts with the inhibitory activity of gemcitabine on its target protein RRM1 in vivo. We found, when cells were treated with gemcitabine in the presence of NEM, a novel 110 kDa band, along with the 90 kDa native RRM1 band, appeared in immunoblots. This 110 kDa band was identified as RRM1 by mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and represented a conformational change resulting from covalent labeling by gemcitabine. It is specific to gemcitabine/NEM, among 11 other chemotherapy drugs tested. It was also detectable in human tumor xenografts in mice treated with gemcitabine. Among mutations of seven residues essential for RRM1 function, C218A, C429A, and E431A abolished the conformational change, while N427A, C787A, and C790A diminished it. C444A was unique since it was able to alter the conformation even in absence of gemcitabine treatment. We conclude that the thiol alkylator NEM can stabilize the gemcitabine-induced conformational change of RRM1, and this stabilized RRM1 conformation has the potential to serve as a specific

  4. Analogues of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone containing cytotoxic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janáky, T; Juhász, A; Bajusz, S; Csernus, V; Srkalovic, G; Bokser, L; Milovanovic, S; Redding, T W; Rékási, Z; Nagy, A

    1992-02-01

    In an attempt to produce better cytotoxic analogues, chemotherapeutic antineoplastic radicals including an alkylating nitrogen mustard derivative of D-phenylalanine (D-melphalan), reactive cyclopropane, anthraquinone derivatives [2-(hydroxymethyl)anthraquinone and the anticancer antibiotic doxorubicin], and an antimetabolite (methotrexate) were coupled to suitably modified agonists and antagonists of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH). Analogues with D-lysine6 and D-ornithine6 or N epsilon-(2,3-diaminopropionyl)-D-lysine and N delta-(2,3-diaminopropionyl)-D-ornithine were used as carriers for one or two cytotoxic moieties. The enhanced biological activities produced by the incorporation of D amino acids into position 6 of the agonistic analogues were further increased by the attachment of hydrophobic cytotoxic groups, resulting in compounds with 10-50 times higher activity than LH-RH. Most of the monosubstituted agonistic analogues showed high affinities for the membrane receptors of human breast cancer cells, while the receptor binding affinities of peptides containing two cytotoxic side chains were lower. Antagonistic carriers [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(4Cl)2,D-Trp3,Arg5,D-Lys6,D-Ala10] LH-RH [where Nal(2) is 3-(2-naphthyl)alanine], [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(4Cl)2,D-Trp3,Arg5,N epsilon-(2,3-diaminopropionyl)-D-Lys6,D-Ala10]LH-RH, and their D-Pal(3)3 homologs [Pal(3) is 3-(3-pyridyl)alanine] as well as [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(4Cl)2,D-Pal(3)3,Tyr5,N epsilon-(2,3-diamino-propionyl)-D-Lys6,D-Ala10]LH-RH were linked to cytotoxic compounds. The hybrid molecules inhibited ovulation in rats at doses of 10 micrograms and suppressed LH release in vitro. The receptor binding of cytotoxic analogues was decreased compared to the precursor peptides, although analogues with 2-(hydroxymethyl)anthraquinone hemiglutarate had high affinities. All of the cytotoxic analogues tested inhibited [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA in cultures of human breast and prostate cancer cell lines

  5. Sensitization of human cancer cells to gemcitabine by the Chk1 inhibitor MK-8776: cell cycle perturbation and impact of administration schedule in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montano, Ryan; Thompson, Ruth; Chung, Injae; Hou, Huagang; Khan, Nadeem; Eastman, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Chk1 inhibitors have emerged as promising anticancer therapeutic agents particularly when combined with antimetabolites such as gemcitabine, cytarabine or hydroxyurea. Here, we address the importance of appropriate drug scheduling when gemcitabine is combined with the Chk1 inhibitor MK-8776, and the mechanisms involved in the schedule dependence. Growth inhibition induced by gemcitabine plus MK-8776 was assessed across multiple cancer cell lines. Experiments used clinically relevant “bolus” administration of both drugs rather than continuous drug exposures. We assessed the effect of different treatment schedules on cell cycle perturbation and tumor cell growth in vitro and in xenograft tumor models. MK-8776 induced an average 7-fold sensitization to gemcitabine in 16 cancer cell lines. The time of MK-8776 administration significantly affected the response of tumor cells to gemcitabine. Although gemcitabine induced rapid cell cycle arrest, the stalled replication forks were not initially dependent on Chk1 for stability. By 18 h, RAD51 was loaded onto DNA indicative of homologous recombination. Inhibition of Chk1 at 18 h rapidly dissociated RAD51 leading to the collapse of replication forks and cell death. Addition of MK-8776 from 18–24 h after a 6-h incubation with gemcitabine induced much greater sensitization than if the two drugs were incubated concurrently for 6 h. The ability of this short incubation with MK-8776 to sensitize cells is critical because of the short half-life of MK-8776 in patients’ plasma. Cell cycle perturbation was also assessed in human pancreas tumor xenografts in mice. There was a dramatic accumulation of cells in S/G 2 phase 18 h after gemcitabine administration, but cells had started to recover by 42 h. Administration of MK-8776 18 h after gemcitabine caused significantly delayed tumor growth compared to either drug alone, or when the two drugs were administered with only a 30 min interval. There are two reasons why delayed

  6. Biological therapy of hematologic malignancies: toward a chemotherapy-free era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klener, Pavel; Etrych, Tomas; Klener, Pavel

    2017-10-06

    Less than 70 years ago, the vast majority of hematologic malignancies were untreatable diseases with fatal prognoses. The development of modern chemotherapy agents, which had begun after the Second World War, was markedly accelerated by the discovery of the structure of DNA and its role in cancer biology and tumor cell division. The path travelled from the first temporary remissions observed in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with single-agent antimetabolites until the first cures achieved by multi-agent chemotherapy regimens was incredibly short. Despite great successes, however, conventional genotoxic cytostatics suffered from an inherently narrow therapeutic index and extensive toxicity, which in many instances limited their clinical utilization. In the last decade of the 20th century, increasing knowledge on the biology of certain malignancies resulted in the conception and development of first molecularly targeted agents designed to inhibit specific druggable molecules involved in the survival of cancer cells. Advances in technology and genetic engineering enabled the production of structurally complex anticancer macromolecules called biologicals, including therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, antibody-drug conjugates and antibody fragments. The development of drug delivery systems (DDSs), in which conventional drugs were attached to various types of carriers including nanoparticles, liposomes or biodegradable polymers, represented an alternative approach to the development of new anticancer agents. Despite the fact that the antitumor activity of drugs attached to DDSs was not fundamentally different, the improved pharmacokinetic profiles, decreased toxic side effects and significantly increased therapeutic indexes resulted in their enhanced antitumor efficacy compared to conventional (unbound) drugs. Approval of the first immune checkpoint inhibitor for the treatment of cancer in 2011 initiated the era of cancer immunotherapy. Checkpoint

  7. What is the impact of immunosuppressive treatment on the post-transplant renal osteopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaslov, Kristina; Katalinic, Lea; Kes, Petar; Spasovski, Goce; Smalcelj, Ruzica; Basic-Jukic, Nikolina

    2014-05-01

    Although glucocorticoid therapy is considered to be the main pathogenic factor, a consistent body of evidence suggests that other immunosuppressants might also play an important role in the development of the post-transplant renal osteopathy (PRO) through their pleiotropic pharmacological effects. Glucocorticoids seem to induce osteoclasts' activity suppressing the osteoblasts while data regarding other immunosuppressive drugs are still controversial. Mycophenolate mofetil and azathioprine appear to be neutral regarding the bone metabolism. However, the study analyzing any independent effect of antimetabolites on bone turnover has not been conducted yet. Calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) induce trabecular bone loss in rodent, with contradictory results in renal transplant recipients. Suppression of vitamin D receptor is probably the underlying mechanism of renal calcium wasting in renal transplant recipients receiving CNI. In spite of an increased 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D level, the kidney is not able to reserve calcium, suggesting a role of vitamin D resistance that may be related to bone loss. More efforts should be invested to determine the role of CNI in PRO. In particular, data regarding the role of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi), such as sirolimus and everolimus, in the PRO development are still controversial. Rapamycin markedly decreases bone longitudinal growth as well as callus formation in experimental models, but also lowers the rate of bone resorption markers and glomerular filtration in clinical studies. Everolimus potently inhibits primary mouse and human osteoclast activity as well as the osteoclast differentiation. It also prevents the ovariectomy-induced loss of cancellous bone by 60 %, an effect predominantly associated with a decreased osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, resulting in a partial preservation of the cancellous bone. At present, there is no clinical study analyzing the effect of everolimus on bone turnover in renal

  8. Formulación de metotrexato 50 mg solución inyectable Formulation of metotrexate 50 mg injectable solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Gato del Monte

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available El metotrexato es un antimetabolito que se agrupa entre los antagonistas del ácido fólico, para el tratamiento de cariocarcinoma gestacional, cariocarcinoma destructivo y lunar hidatiforme, leucemia linfocítica aguda, profilaxis y tratamiento de leucemias meníngeas y terapia de mantenimiento en combinación con otros agentes quimioterapéuticos en diferentes tumores sólidos y linfomas no Hogkin, así como en artritis y psoriasis. Para desarrollar este producto se elaboraron los ensayos preliminares en la etapa de preformulación, se determinaron las características organolépticas, el pH y la concentración del principio activo. Mediante estos estudios se logró obtener una formulación de metotrexato 50 mg solución inyectable con características adecuadas, estable física, química, biológica y microbiológicamente. La formulación que se obtuvo se escaló industrialmente, la cual se envasó en bulbos que cumplen satisfactoriamente con los parámetros de calidad establecidos. Mediante el estudio de estabilidad realizado a estos lotes se comprobaron los parámetros de calidad al producto terminado, que aparecen en la Farmacopea de los Estados Unidos 26 (USP. Se le estableció al medicamento una fecha de vencimiento de 2 años bajo las condiciones de temperatura controlada de 2-8 °C y protegido de la luzMetotrexate is an antimetabolite that groups itslef among the folic acid antagonists for the treatment of gestational choriocarcinoma, destructive choriocarcinoma, lunar hydatidiform choriocarcinoma, acute lymphocytic leukemia, prophylaxis and treatment of meningeal leukemias and maintenance therapy combined with other chemotherapeutic agents in different solid tumors and non-Hodgkin lymphomas, as well as in arthritis and psoriasis. To develop this product, preliminary trials were made in the preformulation stage, and the organoleptic characteristics, pH, and the active principle concentration were determined. By these studies, it was

  9. Radiation recall gastritis secondary to erlotinib in a patient with pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziani, Casey; Hegde, Sanjay; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-12-01

    Radiation recall refers to chemotherapy-triggered inflammation in healthy areas previously exposed to irradiation. Chemotherapeutics known to be associated with radiation recall phenomenon include anthracyclines, taxanes and antimetabolites, such as gemcitabine and capecitabine. Case reports detailing radiation recall dermatitis and pneumonitis associated with erlotinib have been previously described in the literature, however, there are no reported cases describing radiation gastritis associated with erlotinib. We report a patient with pancreatic cancer who developed gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to radiation recall gastritis related to erlotinib exposure. A 57-year-old Hispanic male with pancreatic cancer initially received 7 cycles of FOLFIRINOX followed by capecitabine with radiation therapy for 28 fractions for a total of 5,040 cGy. Re-staging with computed tomography demonstrated stable disease. The patient was then treated with erlotinib and capecitabine for approximately two months before restaging demonstrated progressive disease. Shortly after discontinuing erlotinib and capecitabine, the patient reported maroon colored stools. Laboratory studies demonstrated a precipitous drop in hemoglobin and hematocrit from pre-treatment baseline, ultimately requiring transfusion with packed red blood cells. Subsequent esophagogastroduodenoscopy demonstrated findings consistent with radiation gastritis, with oozing in the gastric body and antrum, which was treated therapeutically with argon plasma coagulation. The patient's gastrointestinal bleed was difficult to control. Over the course of a two-month period - the patient required multiple admissions, repeat therapeutic esophagogastroduodenoscopies and transfusions. Radiation recall from erlotinib is rare but can potentially arise in any site that has been previously irradiated. There may be an association between the pathogenesis of radiation recall and erlotinib's up-regulation of the angiogenic growth factor

  10. Application of HPLC to study the kinetics of a branched bi-enzyme system consisting of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and xanthine oxidase--an important biochemical system to evaluate the efficiency of the anticancer drug 6-mercaptopurine in ALL cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Sukirti; Paul, Manash K; Balaram, Hemalatha; Mukhopadhyay, Anup Kumar

    2007-05-01

    The thiopurine antimetabolite 6-mercaptopurine (6MP) is an important chemotherapeutic drug in the conventional treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). 6MP is mainly catabolized by both hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) and xanthine oxidase (XOD) to form thioinosinic monophosphate (TIMP) (therapeutically active metabolite) and 6-thiouric acid (6TUA) (inactive metabolite), respectively. The activity of both the enzymes varies among ALL patients governing the active and the inactive metabolite profile within the immature lymphocytes. Therefore, an attempt was made to study the kinetic nature of the branched bi-enzyme system acting on 6MP and to quantitate TIMP and 6TUA formed when the two enzymes are present in equal and variable ratios. The quantification of the branched kinetics using spectrophotometric method presents problem due to the closely apposed lambda(max) of the substrates and products. Hence, employing an HPLC method, the quantification of the products was done with the progress of time. The limit of quantification (LOQ) of substrate was found to be 10nM and for products as 50 nM. The limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 1 nM for the substrate and the products. The method exhibited linearity in the range of 0.01-100 microM for 6MP and 0.05-100 microM for both 6TUA and TIMP. The amount of TIMP formed was higher than that of 6TUA in the bi-enzyme system when both the enzymes were present in equivalent enzymatic ratio. It was further found that enzymatic ratios play an important role in determining the amounts of TIMP and 6TUA. This method was further validated using actively growing T-ALL cell line (Jurkat) to study the branched kinetics, wherein it was observed that treatment of 50 microM 6MP led to the generation of 12 microM TIMP and 0.8 microM 6TUA in 6 h at 37 degrees C.

  11. Surgical outcomes of the Ex-PRESS glaucoma filtration device in African American and white glaucoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim S

    2012-06-01

    postoperative complications, and overall reduced inflammation. Keywords: glaucoma, trabeculectomy, Ex-PRESS glaucoma filtration device, antimetabolites, African American, White

  12. Tendiendo puentes: la utilidad de la historia de la ciencia para comprender el proceso de investigación y desarrollo de medicamentos Filling the gap: the usefulness of history of science to understand the process of drug research and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Bosch

    2010-12-01

    use of two cases is outlined that were successfully completed and awarded the Nobel Prize: the modification of neurotransmitters´ structure to obtain new drugs (emasculated hormones by James Black, and the application of the antimetabolite concept to design drugs for infectious, cancer and endocrine diseases. Conclusion. A teaching approach is remarkably successful in helping students understand the complexities of research and drug development.

  13. Closing Remarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed

    1996-01-01

    -related conditions were developed. * The only three drugs to date that have been specifically approved for the treatment of AIDS-AZT, DDI, and DDC-were developed under the guidance of the DCT, with Bruce Chabner as Scientific Director. * The first clinical trials conducted with each of these agents-AZT, DDI, and DDC-were performed in the Intramural Program of the DCT. * Concurrently, many of the exciting findings reported by the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project over the past 10 years (as well as other cooperative groups) were a direct result of the strong support shown by Bruce Chabner during his tenure as Director of the Division of Cancer Treatment. Further, the list above does not include his personal labortory and clinical accomplishments, some of which are: * Development of the principles of use of important antimetabolites, such as methotrexate. * Elucidation of biochemical pathways affected, and the mechanisms of action, of antifols and other antimetabolites. * The conduct of seminal studies in the clinical staging of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, using laparoscopy as a primary tool. * Important contributions to the development of multiagent regimens in the clinical treatment of lymphomas, and of Hodgkin's disease. * Developed and is editor of the textbook which is considered to be the primary reference source for anticancer chemotherapeutic agents [1]. With all of these accomplishments, his career is long from over. Having just become the Medical Director of the Cancer Center at the Massachusetts General Hospital, Bruce Chabner is uniquely poised to have an even more far-reaching impact on a discipline in which he has played such a strong seminal role. This author was never a postdoctoral fellow in Bruce Chabner's laboratory. However, more than any other single person, he has played a central role in my professional development. I know of many others for whom the same statement would be true. It is a pleasure for me to witness the launching of the second phase

  14. Mitomycin C versus 5-Fluorouracil for wound healing in glaucoma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabourne, Emily; Clarke, Jonathan C K; Schlottmann, Patricio G; Evans, Jennifer R

    2015-11-06

    Raised intraocular pressure is a risk factor for glaucoma. One treatment option is glaucoma drainage surgery (trabeculectomy). Antimetabolites are used during surgery to reduce postoperative scarring during wound healing. Two agents in common use are mitomycin C (MMC) and 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU). To assess the effects of MMC compared to 5-FU as an antimetabolite adjunct in trabeculectomy surgery. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2015 Issue 9), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to October 2015), EMBASE (January 1980 to October 2015), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to October 2015), the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 2 October 2015. We included randomised controlled trials where wound healing had been modified with MMC compared to 5-FU. Two review authors independently selected trials and collected data. The primary outcome was failure of a functioning trabeculectomy one year after surgery. Secondary outcomes included mean intraocular pressure at one year. We considered three subgroups: high risk of trabeculectomy failure (people with previous glaucoma surgery, extracapsular cataract surgery, African origin and people with secondary glaucoma or congenital glaucoma); medium risk of trabeculectomy failure (people undergoing trabeculectomy with extracapsular cataract surgery) and low risk of trabeculectomy failure (people who have received no previous surgical eye intervention). We identified 11 trials that enrolled 687 eyes of 679 participants. The

  15. Mitomicina C colírio como tratamento para granuloma piogênico em cavidade anoftámica Mitomicyn C eye drops as alternative treatment for pyogenic granuloma in anophthalmic socket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hérika Danielle de Miranda Santos

    2006-10-01

    after two weeks using 0.02% MMC (one complete cycle. In other two patients, the resolution of the lesion occurred after five weeks that is, at the beginning of the second cycle. 0.02% MMC was not successful in only one patient whose lesion persisted after two cycles of the treatment. None of the patients presented complications after the use of 0.02% MMC. CONCLUSION: The topical use of 0.02% MMC proved efficacy in the treatment of anophthalmic socket pyogenic granuloma. A small number of patients took part in this study, therefore another randomized and comparative research is necessary in order to compare the efficacy of 0.02% MMC with other drugs such as corticosteroids and antimetabolites.

  16. Early combined immunosuppression for the management of Crohn's disease (REACT): a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Reena; Bressler, Brian; Levesque, Barrett G; Zou, Guangyong; Stitt, Larry W; Greenberg, Gordon R; Panaccione, Remo; Bitton, Alain; Paré, Pierre; Vermeire, Séverine; D'Haens, Geert; MacIntosh, Donald; Sandborn, William J; Donner, Allan; Vandervoort, Margaret K; Morris, Joan C; Feagan, Brian G

    2015-11-07

    Conventional management of Crohn's disease features incremental use of therapies. However, early combined immunosuppression (ECI), with a TNF antagonist and antimetabolite might be a more effective strategy. We compared the efficacy of ECI with that of conventional management for treatment of Crohn's disease. In this open-label cluster randomised controlled trial (Randomised Evaluation of an Algorithm for Crohn's Treatment, REACT), we included community gastroenterology practices from Belgium and Canada that were willing to be assigned to either of the study groups, participate in all aspects of the study, and provide data on up to 60 patients with Crohn's disease. These practices were randomly assigned (1:1) to either ECI or conventional management. The computer-generated randomisation was minimised by country and practice size. Up to 60 consecutive adult patients were assessed within practices. Patients who were aged 18 years or older; documented to have Crohn's disease; able to speak or understand English, French, or Dutch; able to access a telephone; and able to provide written informed consent were followed up for 2 years. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients in corticosteroid-free remission (Harvey-Bradshaw Index score ≤ 4) at 12 months at the practice level. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01030809. This study took place between March 15, 2010, and Oct 1, 2013. Of the 60 practices screened, 41 were randomly assigned to either ECI (n=22) or conventional management (n=19). Two practices (one in each group) discontinued because of insufficient resources. 921 (85%) of the 1084 patients at ECI practices and 806 (90%) of 898 patients at conventional management practices completed 12 months follow-up and were included in an intention-to-treat analysis. The 12 month practice-level remission rates were similar at ECI and conventional management practices (66·0% [SD 14·0] and 61·9% [16·9]; adjusted difference 2·5%, 95

  17. Radiobiological research needed for the improvement of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    . Hyperthermia appears to be a promising way of treating various types of cancer either alone or in combination with radiation. Although the mechanisms of action of hyperthermia on tumour and normal cells is obscure at the moment, it has increased the radiation sensitivity of many types of tumours. Hyperthermia also increases cytotoxic effects of conventional chemotherapeutic agents and may therefore prove useful in combination with chemotherapy. The chemotherapy drugs extensively used in cancer treatment can be classified as alkylating agents, antimetabolites, mitotic inhibitors, anti-tumour antibiotics, and miscellaneous other chemicals whose mechanism of action has not been understood. Combination of radiation therapy with chemotherapy has proved to be the best mode of cancer treatment. During the discussions it became evident that radiation effects on cells are understood to a greater extent than are the effects of chemotherapeutic agents. It was therefore emphasized that more basic research ought to be done on the mechanism of action of chemotherapeutic drugs. Use of heavily ionizing radiations, such as neutrons, rr-mesons and stripped nuclei, has been advocated for treatment of certain tumours. Intensive research is underway on the effects of such radiations in the USA, Canada and Western Europe. In a panel discussion on future radiobiological research needs for radiotherapy, it was pointed out that radiobiologists and radiotherapists have so far worked on different platforms. Whereas the radiotherapist has been overburdened with treatment of patients, radiobiologists have mainly concentrated their efforts on in vitro systems which may or may not be of use in patient treatment. It was therefore emphasized that radiotherapy clinics must have consultant radiobiologists, and that radiobiologists ought to be familiar with the clinical problems in hospitals. In the UK and USA such arrangements have been mutually profitable. (author)

  18. Biochemical criteria of toxicity of therapy with high doses of methotrexate in children with osteosarcoma

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    A. M. Strizhevskaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Methotrexate (Mtx is a cytotoxic drug from the group of antimetabolites, folic acid antagonists. High-dose (HD Mtx in pediatric oncology are used for the treatment of osteosarcoma (OS, and other types of tumors. This therapy has allowed to achieve a five-year relapse-free survival rates up to 80 % in patients with OS. However, the high toxicity of Mtx is a serious constraint in achieving the maximum therapeutic effect, which in most cases poses the occurrence of side effects in patients on various organs and systems. Treatment should be under strict laboratory monitoring, primarily therapeutic drug monitoring the concentration of Mtx in serum.246 children (boys – 125, girls – 121 aged 5 to 16 years with osteosarcoma (mean age 12.2 years who were treated in N.N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center from 2006 to 2013. Patients were conducted from 1 to 8 courses HD Mtx at a dose of 8 or 12 g/m2 , administered within 4 h of infusion on the background of alkaline prehydrate. Leucovorin was administered intravenously, every 6 hours, starting 24 h from the start of the Mtx infusion. 1137 courses of HD Mtx were conducted with FPIA method (analyzer TDx/Flx, Abbott, USA. The technique of monitoring of homocysteine (Hcy in the blood serum by analyzer Vitros 5/1FS (Johnson & Johnson, USA during the entire course of high-dose Mtx was tested. In groups calculated pharmacokinetic parameters Mtx were tested: area under the pharmacokinetic curve (MtxAUC, clearance of methotrexate (ClMtx, the elimination half-life (T1/2 and the total time of excretion (Ttotal. Normal excretion of Mtx was revealed at 1050 courses Mtx, corresponding to the following values: 4 h – 1109 ± 283 μmol/l; 24 h – 4,67 ± 0,95 μmol/l; 42 h – 0,38 ± 0.16 µmol/l; 48 h – less than 0,23 ± 0.04 µmol/l; 72 h of 0.07 ± 0,03 µmol/l; 96 h of 0.03 ± 0.01 µmol/l. At 87 courses identified delayed Mtx excretion, accounting for 7.6 % of all courses. In all measured parameters

  19. Distinct Paths for Basic Amino Acid Export in Escherichia coli: YbjE (LysO) Mediates Export of L-Lysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathania, Amit; Sardesai, Abhijit A

    2015-06-15

    In Escherichia coli, argO encodes an exporter for L-arginine (Arg) and its toxic analogue canavanine (CAN), and its transcriptional activation and repression, by Arg and L-lysine (Lys), respectively, are mediated by the regulator ArgP. Accordingly argO and argP mutants are CAN supersensitive (CAN(ss)). We report the identification of ybjE as a gene encoding a predicted inner membrane protein that mediates export of Lys, and our results confirm the previous identification with a different approach of YbjE as a Lys exporter, reported by Ueda and coworkers (T. Ueda, Y. Nakai, Y. Gunji, R. Takikawa, and Y. Joe, U.S. patents 7,629,142 B2 [December 2009] and 8,383,363 B1 [February 2013] and European patent 1,664,318 B1 [September 2009]). ybjE was isolated as a multicopy suppressor of the CAN(ss) phenotype of a strain lacking ArgO. The absence of YbjE did not confer a CAN(ss) phenotype but instead conferred hypersensitivity to the lysine antimetabolite thialysine and led to growth inhibition by the dipeptide lysylalanine, which is associated with elevated cellular Lys content. YbjE overproduction resulted in Lys excretion and syntrophic cross-feeding of a Lys auxotroph. Constitutive overexpression of argO promoted Lys cross-feeding that is indicative of a latent Lys export potential of ArgO. Arg modestly repressed ybjE transcription in an ArgR-dependent manner, and ArgR displayed Arg-sensitive binding to the ybjE promoter region in vitro. Our studies suggest that the reciprocal repression of argO and ybjE, respectively, by Lys and Arg confers the specificity for basic amino acid export by distinct paths and that such cross-repression contributes to maintenance of cytoplasmic Arg/Lys balance. We propose that YbjE be redesignated LysO. This work ascribes a lysine export function to the product of the ybjE gene of Escherichia coli, leading to a physiological scenario wherein two proteins, ArgO and YbjE, perform the task of separately exporting arginine and lysine

  20. Polymorphism in the Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase and Thymidylate Synthase Gene Predicts for Response to Fluorouracil-based Chemotherapy in Advanced Gastric Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwei Lu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Fluorouracil (5-FU is widely used in the treatment of gastric cancer. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR and thymidylate synthetase (TS are important targets of many antimetabolites, including 5-FU. The relationship between polymorphism in the MTHFR (C677T, A1298C and TS (5`-TUR, 3`-UTR genotypes and sensitivity of gastric cancer to 5-FU-based chemotherapy is investigated in the present study. Methods: 173 patients with advanced gastric cancer were analyzed. All patients were treated with 5-FU-based chemotherapy (FOLFOX, FP and DCF regimen. DNA from peripheral blood leukocytes was obtained before the treatment. All genotypes were detected by PCR-RFLP. 12 germline polymorphisms within 2 genes were analyzed. The genotypes of MTHFR C677T, A1298C and TS 3`-TUR were analyzed in 173 patients while TS 5`-TUR in 135 patients. Results: The overall response rate (RR was 35.8%. The RR of the DCF regimen group was significantly higher than that of the FP and FOLFOX regimen groups (55.8% vs. 27.1%, 31.1%; P=0.006. The RR of the MTHFR C677T T/T genotype was significantly higher than that of the C/ C and C/T genotypes (73.3% vs. 28.0%; P=0.000. In MTHFR A1298C, a higher RR was observed in A/A genotype compared with the C/C and A/C genotypes (41.8% vs. 21.6%, P=0.011. The RR of -6/-6 bp and -6/+6 bp genotypes in TS 3`UTR was significantly higher than that of +6/+6 bp genotype (40.3% vs. 17.6%, P=0.014. There was no difference in RR according to TS 5`UTR polymorphism (2R/2R and 2R/3R: 41.7% vs. 3R/3R: 36.8%, P=0.487. The RR of MTHFR C677T T/T genotypes in FOLFOX or FP regimens was significantly higher than that of C/C and C/T genotypes (P=0.008, P=0.000 while no difference in DCF regimen. The RR of DCF regimen wassignificantly higher than that of FOLFOX and FP regimens in C/T and C/C genotypes (P=0.000. The MTHFR C677T T/T genotypes had a significantly higher incidence of grade 3/4 emesis (66.7% and stomatitis (30.0% than patients with C/T or

  1. Flavor vs Energy Sensing in Brain Reward Circuits

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    Ivan E De Araujo

    2014-07-01

    intake produces significantly greater levels of dopamine efflux compared to artificial sweetener intake in dorsal striatum, whereas disrupting glucose oxidation suppresses dorsal striatum dopamine efflux; conversely, inhibiting striatal dopamine receptor signalling during glucose intake in sweet-naïve animals resulted in reduced, artificial sweetener-like intake of glucose during subsequent glucoprivation [1]. This is consistent with data using physiological preparations demonstrating that intravenous administration of the glucose anti-metabolite 2-deoxy-D-glucose robustly suppresses dopamine efflux in dorsal striatum, an effect annulled by subsequent infusions of glucose via the same route [2]. Of note is the fact that the same study demonstrates that glucose utilization rates control both nutrient choice in tasteless mutant mice. Overall, these results point to the notion that glucose oxidation controls intake levels of sweet tastants by regulating the midbrain dopaminergic nigro-striatal pathway, and suggest that glucose utilization is one critical physiological signal involved in the control of goal-directed sweetener intake [1]. It is equally striking, on the other hand, that the other major midbrain dopaminergic system, the mesolimbic pathway, is considerably less selective in their responses to sweeteners: sweetness and energy appear to independently stimulate dopamine release into the nucleus accumbens of ventral striatum, in the absence of any apparent additive effects; in fact, while artificial sweeteners cause dopamine to be released in ventral striatum of wild-type mice, sugar (bot not sweeteners induces similar effluxes in ventral striatum of tasteless mutant mice [3]. Such nigro-striatal selectivity to energy-containing sweeteners may have a deeper behavioral meaning: dopamine release into dorsal striatum is not only critical for motivation to eat [4], but also for the formation of compulsive behavioral habits (whereas the nucleus accumbens seem to play a

  2. Genetical Studies On Haploid Production In Some Ornamental Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MOSTAFA, M.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    growth, (2) resistant, which resist specific drugs, antimetabolites, or abnormal environmental or nutritional condition and (3) autotrophic mutants, that grow in deficient media and are capable of synthesizing some substances normally required for wild lines. The use of mutagenesis and in vitro induce mutation should provide a new input to the solution if breeding problems in crop plant (Ancora and Sonnino, 1987). The aim of the present investigation is production of haploid plants through anther culture in N. alata and study the effect of gamma rays, salt stress and combined effect between them on it. Morever, determining the changes in the internal composition of the cell as proline and protein. Also, to study the molecure diversity as revealed by; Protein Acrylamid Gel Electrophoresis - SDS (PAGE-SDS), Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) .

  3. Applications of Fluorine-18 in Biological Studies with Special Reference to Bone and Thyroid Physiology; Emploi du Fluor-18 dans des Études Biologiques, Notamment sur la Physiologie des Os et de la Thyroïde; ИСПОЛЬЗОВАНИЕ ФТОРА-18 В БИОЛОГИЧЕСКИХ ИССЛЕДОВАНИЯХ С УДЕЛЕНИЕМ ОСОБОГО ВНИМАНИЯ ВОПРОСАМ ФИЗИОЛОГИИ КОСТЕЙ И ФИЗИОЛОГИИ ПИТОВИДНОЙ ЖЕЛЕЗЫ; Aplicaciones del Fluor-18 en Estudios Biologicos, con Especial Referencia a la Fisiologia del Esqueleto y de la Tiroides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anbar, M. [Weizmann Institute of Science (Israel); IAEC Soreq Research Establishment, Rehovot (Israel)

    1963-03-15

    the trapping of fluoroborate, although they diminish the overall iodine uptake. Next, it was demonstrated that the trapping stage is much less radiosensitive than the stages of thyroxine formation and release. A quite different application of F{sup 16}-labelled fluoroborate ions was in the localization of brain tumours, by directional coincidence scanning owing to the limited permeability of these ions via the intact blood- brain barrier. Fluorine-18 labelled fluoraromatic chelating agents were prepared and applied to problems in bone physiology. Fluorine-18 labelled aromatic vital dyes were used in investigating problems of permeability through biological membranes. Fluorine-18 labelled fluorine containing antimetabolites including 5-fluorouracyl and fluoro-orotic acid, have been prepared and applied to physiological problems, including cancer research. (author) [French] Dans les laboratoires de la CEAI, le fluor-18 a ete utilise au cours des trois dernieres annees pour resoudre de nombreux problemes de biologie et de medecine. Des methodes ont ete mises au point pour preparer le fluor par chacune des reactions {sup 18}O (p, n), {sup 16}O(H{sup 3}, n) et {sup 18}F(n, 2n). Des composes marques au radiofluor ont ete prepares par echange isotopique, synthese, marquage par recul et retention du fluor dans des composes fluores organiques soumis a la reaction (n, 2n). Des techniques speciales de comptage ont ete mises au point pour mesurer les faibles activites de doses traceuses de composes fluores organiques. Les ions {sup 18}F{sup -} ont ete utilises pour des etudes sur la physiologie des os. On a constate que l'ion F' est semblable au calcium en de nombreux aspects de son comportement physiologique; on a observe que la fixation F par l'os augmente sous l'influence de la vitamine D et de la testosterone tandis que la cortisone et les oestrogenes reduisent le taux de fixation. Le mode de distribution du fluor dans l'organisme se modifie lorsqu'il est administre sous la

  4. Device-modified trabeculectomy for glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue; Khan, Rabeea; Coleman, Anne

    2015-12-01

    Glaucoma is an optic neuropathy that leads to vision loss and blindness. It is the second most common cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. The main treatment for glaucoma aims to reduce intraocular pressure (IOP) in order to slow or prevent further vision loss. IOP can be lowered with medications, and laser or incisional surgeries. Trabeculectomy is the most common incisional surgical procedure to treat glaucoma. Device-modified trabeculectomy is intended to improve drainage of the aqueous humor to lower IOP. Trabeculectomy-modifying devices include Ex-PRESS, Ologen, amniotic membrane, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (E-PTFE) membrane, Gelfilm and others. However, the effectiveness and safety of these devices are uncertain. To assess the relative effectiveness, primarily with respect to IOP control and safety, of the use of different devices as adjuncts to trabeculectomy compared with standard trabeculectomy in eyes with glaucoma. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (2014, Issue 12), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to December 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to December 2014), PubMed (1948 to December 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to December 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic search for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 22 December 2014. We included randomized controlled trials comparing devices used during trabeculectomy with trabeculectomy alone. We also included studies where antimetabolites were used in either or both treatment groups. We used standard procedures