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Sample records for antigen-presenting cell imprinting

  1. Original encounter with antigen determines antigen-presenting cell imprinting of the quality of the immune response in mice.

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    Valérie Abadie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obtaining a certain multi-functionality of cellular immunity for the control of infectious diseases is a burning question in immunology and in vaccine design. Early events, including antigen shuttling to secondary lymphoid organs and recruitment of innate immune cells for adaptive immune response, determine host responsiveness to antigens. However, the sequence of these events and their impact on the quality of the immune response remain to be elucidated. Here, we chose to study Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA which is now replacing live Smallpox vaccines and is proposed as an attenuated vector for vaccination strategies against infectious diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed in vivo mechanisms triggered following intradermal (i.d. and intramuscular (i.m. Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA administration. We demonstrated significant differences in the antigen shuttling to lymphoid organs by macrophages (MPhis, myeloid dendritic cells (DCs, and neutrophils (PMNs. MVA i.d. administration resulted in better antigen distribution and more sustained antigen-presenting cells (APCs recruitment into draining lymph nodes than with i.m. administration. These APCs, which comprise both DCs and MPhis, were differentially involved in T cell priming and shaped remarkably the quality of cytokine-producing virus-specific T cells according to the entry route of MVA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study improves our understanding of the mechanisms of antigen delivery and their consequences on the quality of immune responses and provides new insights for vaccine development.

  2. Harnessing Dendritic Cells for Tumor Antigen Presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells that are crucial for the induction of anti-tumor T cell responses. As a consequence, research has focused on the harnessing of DCs for therapeutic interventions. Although current strategies employing ex vivo-generated and tumor-antigen loaded DCs have been proven feasible, there are still many obstacles to overcome in order to improve clinical trial successes and offset the cost and complexity of customized cell therapy. This review focuses on one of these obstacles and a pivotal step for the priming of tumor-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells; the in vitro loading of DCs with tumor antigens

  3. Harnessing Dendritic Cells for Tumor Antigen Presentation

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    Nierkens, Stefan [Department of Tumor Immunology, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 28, Nijmegen 6525 GA (Netherlands); Janssen, Edith M., E-mail: edith.janssen@cchmc.org [Division of Molecular Immunology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Research Foundation, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)

    2011-04-26

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells that are crucial for the induction of anti-tumor T cell responses. As a consequence, research has focused on the harnessing of DCs for therapeutic interventions. Although current strategies employing ex vivo-generated and tumor-antigen loaded DCs have been proven feasible, there are still many obstacles to overcome in order to improve clinical trial successes and offset the cost and complexity of customized cell therapy. This review focuses on one of these obstacles and a pivotal step for the priming of tumor-specific CD8{sup +} and CD4{sup +} T cells; the in vitro loading of DCs with tumor antigens.

  4. Defective antigen-presenting cell function in human neonates

    OpenAIRE

    Velilla, Paula A.; Rugeles, Maria T.; Chougnet, Claire A.

    2006-01-01

    Immaturity of the immune system has been suggested as an underlying factor for the high rate of morbidity and mortality from infections in newborns. Functional impairment of neonatal T cells is frequently quoted as the main underlying mechanism for such immaturity. However, recent studies suggest that neonatal antigen-presenting cells (APCs) also exhibit functional alterations, which could lead to secondary defects of adaptive T cell responses. In this review, we summarize what is known on th...

  5. Stratification of Antigen-presenting Cells within the Normal Cornea

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    Jared E. Knickelbein

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The composition and location of professional antigen presenting cells (APC varies in different mucosal surfaces. The cornea, long considered an immune-privileged tissue devoid of APCs, is now known to host a heterogeneous network of bone marrow-derived cells. Here, we utilized transgenic mice that express enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP from the CD11c promoter (pCD11c in conjunction with immunohistochemical staining to demonstrate an interesting stratification of APCs within non-inflamed murine corneas. pCD11c+ dendritic cells (DCs reside in the basal epithelium, seemingly embedded in the basement membrane. Most DCs express MHC class II on at least some dendrites, which extend up to 50 µm in length and traverse up 20 µm tangentially towards the apical surface of the epithelium. The DC density diminishes from peripheral to central cornea. Beneath the DCs and adjacent to the stromal side of the basement membrane reside pCD11c-CD11b+ putative macrophages that express low levels of MHC class II. Finally, MHC class IIpCD11c-CD11b+ cells form a network throughout the remainder of the stroma. This highly reproducible stratification of bone marrow-derived cells is suggestive of a progression from an APC function at the exposed corneal surface to an innate immune barrier function deeper in the stroma.

  6. Dendritic cell function and antigen presentation in malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockburn, Ian A; Zavala, Fidel

    2016-06-01

    Due to the diverse roles T cells play in protection against malaria as well as pathogenesis it is critical to know which cells present antigen and the nature of the antigens they present. During pre-erythrocytic stages of infection, cutting-edge imaging studies have shown how Plasmodium antigens are presented during both the priming and effector phases of the protective CD8+ T cell response. During blood stages, pathology is in part due to the loss of DC function and the action of pathogenic T cells in the brain. Recently endothelial cells presenting malaria antigen to cognate T cells have emerged as critical players in malaria pathogenesis. Manipulating these processes may inform both vaccine design and the development of therapies for cerebral malaria. PMID:26845735

  7. A Population Dynamics Analysis of the Interaction between Adaptive Regulatory T Cells and Antigen Presenting Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fouchet, David; Regoes, Roland

    2008-01-01

    Background Regulatory T cells are central actors in the maintenance of tolerance of self-antigens or allergens and in the regulation of the intensity of the immune response during infections by pathogens. An understanding of the network of the interaction between regulatory T cells, antigen presenting cells and effector T cells is starting to emerge. Dynamical systems analysis can help to understand the dynamical properties of an interaction network and can shed light on the different tasks t...

  8. Hepatitis C virus and ethanol alter antigen presentation in liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natalia A Osna

    2009-01-01

    Alcoholic patients have a high incidence of hepatitis Cvirus (HCV) infection. Alcohol consumption enhances the severity of the HCV disease course and worsens the outcome of chronic hepatitis C. The accumulation of virally infected cells in the liver is related to the HCVinduced inability of the immune system to recognizeinfected cells and to develop the immune responses. This review covers the effects of HCV proteins and ethanol on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) classⅠ- and class Ⅱ-restricted antigen presentation. Here, we discuss the liver which functions as an immune privilege organ; factors, which affect cleavage and loading of antigenic peptides onto MHC classⅠand class Ⅱ in hepatocytes and dendritic cells, and the modulating effects of ethanol and HCV on antigen presentation by liver cells. Altered antigen presentation in the liver limits the ability of the immune system to clear HCV and infected cells and contributes to disease progression. HCV by itself affects dendritic cell function, switching their cytokine profile to the suppressive phenotype of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) predominance,preventing cell maturation and allostimulation capacity.The synergistic action of ethanol with HCV results in the suppression of MHC class Ⅱ-restricted antigen presentation. In addition, ethanol metabolism and HCV proteins reduce proteasome function and interferon signaling, thereby suppressing the generation of peptides for MHC classⅠ-restricted antigen presentation.Collectively, ethanol exposure further impairs antigen presentation in HCV-infected liver cells, which may provide a partial explanation for exacerbations and the poor outcome of HCV infection in alcoholics.

  9. Pros and Cons of Antigen-Presenting Cell Targeted Tumor Vaccines

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    Cleo Goyvaerts

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In therapeutic antitumor vaccination, dendritic cells play the leading role since they decide if, how, when, and where a potent antitumor immune response will take place. Since the disentanglement of the complexity and merit of different antigen-presenting cell subtypes, antitumor immunotherapeutic research started to investigate the potential benefit of targeting these subtypes in situ. This review will discuss which antigen-presenting cell subtypes are at play and how they have been targeted and finally question the true meaning of targeting antitumor-based vaccines.

  10. Molecular signals in antigen presentation. II. Activation of cytolytic cells in vitro after ultraviolet radiation or combined gamma and ultraviolet radiation treatment of antigen-presenting cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murine low-density spleen cells have potent antigen-presenting ability in a hapten-specific cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) system using the hapten azobenzenearsonate (ABA). Exposure of these cells to 0.33 KJ/m2 of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) after coupling to hapten results in markedly inhibited antigen-presenting function that can be substantially corrected or bypassed by interleukin 1 (IL 1). These results have been interpreted to reflect an inhibition of Lyt-1+ T cell activation by UVR-treated APC. Treatment of these cells sequentially with 1500 rad of γ-radiation (GR) prior to hapten coupling, followed by 0.33 KJ/m2 of UVR radiation after coupling, results in an antigen-resenting defect only minimally improved by IL 1. However, partially purified interleukin 2 (IL 2) can completely bypass or correct this defect. Thus, combined Cr and UVR induces a different or more profound defect in APC function when compared to UVR alone. However, these cells do provide a signal(s) other than hapten necessary for CTL activation because ABA-coupled high density spleen cells do not activate CTL cells, even with the addition of IL 2. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis demonstrates that exposure of these low density spleen cells to GP or UVR results in decreased I-A antigen expression at 24 hr; exposure to both GR and UVR results in a greater decrease in I-A antigen expression at 24 hr than either alone. The addition of nonhapten-coupled low-density APC partially reconstitutes the ability of combined GR/UVR-treated LD-APC to present antigen, and this effect is enhanced by the administration of exogenous IL 1

  11. Vaccine delivery by penetratin: mechanism of antigen presentation by dendritic cells.

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    Pouniotis, Dodie; Tang, Choon-Kit; Apostolopoulos, Vasso; Pietersz, Geoffrey

    2016-08-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) or membrane-translocating peptides such as penetratin from Antennapedia homeodomain or TAT from human immunodeficiency virus are useful vectors for the delivery of protein antigens or their cytotoxic (Tc) or helper (Th) T cell epitopes to antigen-presenting cells. Mice immunized with CPP containing immunogens elicit antigen-specific Tc and/or Th responses and could be protected from tumor challenges. In the present paper, we investigate the mechanism of class I and class II antigen presentation of ovalbumin covalently linked to penetratin (AntpOVA) by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells with the use of biochemical inhibitors of various pathways of antigen processing and presentation. Results from our study suggested that uptake of AntpOVA is via a combination of energy-independent (membrane fusion) and energy-dependent pathways (endocytosis). Once internalized by either mechanism, multiple tap-dependent or independent antigen presentation pathways are accessed while not completely dependent on proteasomal processing but involving proteolytic trimming in the ER and Golgi compartments. Our study provides an understanding on the mechanism of antigen presentation mediated by CPP and leads to greater insights into future development of vaccine formulations. PMID:27138940

  12. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein lipidation and control of CD1d on antigen-presenting cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dougan, Stephanie K.; Salas, Azucena; Rava, Paul; Agyemang, Amma; Kaser, Arthur; Morrison, Jamin; Khurana, Archana; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Johnson, Caroline; Exley, Mark; Hussain, M. Mahmood; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2005-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone that loads lipids onto apolipoprotein B, also regulates CD1d presentation of glycolipid antigens in the liver and intestine. We show MTP RNA and protein in antigen-presenting cells (APCs) by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and by immunoblotting of mouse liver mononuclear cells and mouse and human B cell lines. Functional MTP, demonstrated by specific triglyceride transfer activity, is prese...

  13. Distinctive localization of antigen-presenting cells in human lymph nodes

    OpenAIRE

    Angel, Catherine E.; Chen, Chun-Jen J.; Horlacher, Oliver C.; Winkler, Sintia; John, Thomas; Browning, Judy; MacGregor, Duncan; Cebon, Jonathan; Dunbar, P. Rod

    2009-01-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are sentinel cells of the immune system that present antigen to T lymphocytes and mediate an appropriate immune response. It is therefore surprising that knowledge of the professional APCs in human lymph nodes is limited. Using 3-color immunohistochemistry, we have identified APCs in human lymph nodes, excluding plasmacytoid APCs, that fall into 2 nonoverlapping classes: (1) CD209+ APCs, coexpressing combinations of CD206, CD14, and CD68, that occu...

  14. Circulating human basophils lack the features of professional antigen presenting cells

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    Sharma, Meenu; Hegde, Pushpa; Aimanianda, Vishukumar; Beau, Remi; Sénéchal, Helene; Poncet, Pascal; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Kaveri, Srini V; Bayry, Jagadeesh

    2013-01-01

    Recent reports in mice demonstrate that basophils function as antigen presenting cells (APC). They express MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86, capture and present soluble antigens or IgE-antigen complexes and polarize Th2 responses. Therefore, we explored whether human circulating basophils possess the features of professional APC. We found that unlike dendritic cells (DC) and monocytes, steady-state circulating human basophils did not express HLA-DR and co-stimulatory mo...

  15. Antigen Presentation and T-Cell Activation Are Critical for RBP4-Induced Insulin Resistance.

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    Moraes-Vieira, Pedro M; Castoldi, Angela; Aryal, Pratik; Wellenstein, Kerry; Peroni, Odile D; Kahn, Barbara B

    2016-05-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) inflammation contributes to impaired insulin action, which is a major cause of type 2 diabetes. RBP4 is an adipocyte- and liver-derived protein with an important role in insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and AT inflammation. RBP4 elevation causes AT inflammation by activating innate immunity, which elicits an adaptive immune response. RBP4-overexpressing mice (RBP4-Ox) are insulin resistant and glucose intolerant and have increased AT macrophages and T-helper 1 cells. We show that high-fat diet-fed RBP4(-/-) mice have reduced AT inflammation and improved insulin sensitivity versus wild type. We also elucidate the mechanism for RBP4-induced macrophage antigen presentation and subsequent T-cell activation. In RBP4-Ox, AT macrophages display enhanced c-Jun N-terminal kinase, extracellular signal-related kinase, and p38 phosphorylation. Inhibition of these pathways and of NF-κB reduces activation of macrophages and CD4 T cells. MyD88 is an adaptor protein involved in proinflammatory signaling. In macrophages from MyD88(-/-) mice, RBP4 fails to stimulate secretion of tumor necrosis factor, IL-12, and IL-6 and CD4 T-cell activation. In vivo blockade of antigen presentation by treating RBP4-Ox mice with CTLA4-Ig, which blocks costimulation of T cells, is sufficient to reduce AT inflammation and improve insulin resistance. Thus, MyD88 and downstream mitogen-activated protein kinase and NF-κB pathways are necessary for RBP4-induced macrophage antigen presentation and subsequent T-cell activation. Also, blocking antigen presentation with CTLA4-Ig improves RBP4-induced insulin resistance and macrophage-induced T-cell activation. PMID:26936962

  16. Interaction between antigen presenting cells and autoreactive T cells derived from BXSB mice with murine lupus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Yang; Bo Li; Ping Lv; Yan Zhang; XiaoMing Gao

    2007-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a typical autoimmune disease involving multiple systems and organs. Ample evidence suggests that autoreactive T cells play a pivotal role in the development of this autoimmune disorder. This study was undertaken to investigate the mechanisms of interaction between antigen presenting cells (APCs) and an autoreactive T cell (ATL1) clone obtained from lupus-prone BXSB mice. ATL1 cells, either before or after γ-ray irradiation, were able to activate naive B cells, as determined by B cell proliferation assays. Macrophages from BXSB mice were able to stimulate the proliferation of resting ATL1 cells at a responder/stimulator (R/S) ratio of 1/2.5. Dendritic cells (DCs) were much more powerful stimulators for ATL1 cells on a per cell basis. The T cell stimulating ability of macrophages and B cells, but not DCs, was sensitive toγ-ray irradiation. Monoclonal antibodies against mouse MHC-Ⅱand CD4 were able to block DC-mediated stimulation of ATL1 proliferation, indicating cognate recognition between ATL1 and APCs. Our data suggest that positive feedback loops involving macrophages, B cells and autoreactive T cells may play a pivotal role in keeping the momentum of autoimmune responses leading to autoimmune diseases.

  17. A Novel Laser Vaccine Adjuvant Increases the Motility of Antigen Presenting Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Farinelli, Bill; Doukas, Apostolos; Gelfand, Jeffrey Alan; Anderson, Richard Rox; Mei X. Wu; Chen, Xinyuan; Kim, Pilhan; Yun, Seok-Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Background Development of a potent vaccine adjuvant without introduction of any side effects remains an unmet challenge in the field of the vaccine research. Methodology/Principal Findings We found that laser at a specific setting increased the motility of antigen presenting cells (APCs) and immune responses, with few local or systemic side effects. This laser vaccine adjuvant (LVA) effect was induced by brief illumination of a small area of the skin or muscle with a nondestructive...

  18. Antigen-presenting cells transfected with Hsp65 messenger RNA fail to treat experimental tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last several years, the use of dendritic cells has been studied as a therapeutic strategy against tumors. Dendritic cells can be pulsed with peptides or full-length protein, or they can be transfected with DNA or RNA. However, comparative studies suggest that transfecting dendritic cells with messenger RNA (mRNA) is superior to other antigen-loading techniques in generating immunocompetent dendritic cells. In the present study, we evaluated a new therapeutic strategy to fight tuberculosis using dendritic cells and macrophages transfected with Hsp65 mRNA. First, we demonstrated that antigen-presenting cells transfected with Hsp65 mRNA exhibit a higher level of expression of co-stimulatory molecules, suggesting that Hsp65 mRNA has immunostimulatory properties. We also demonstrated that spleen cells obtained from animals immunized with mock and Hsp65 mRNA-transfected dendritic cells were able to generate a mixed Th1/Th2 response with production not only of IFN-γ but also of IL-5 and IL-10. In contrast, cells recovered from mice immunized with Hsp65 mRNA-transfected macrophages were able to produce only IL-5. When mice were infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and treated with antigen-presenting cells transfected with Hsp65 mRNA (therapeutic immunization), we did not detect any decrease in the lung bacterial load or any preservation of the lung parenchyma, indicating the inability of transfected cells to confer curative effects against tuberculosis. In spite of the lack of therapeutic efficacy, this study reports for the first time the use of antigen-presenting cells transfected with mRNA in experimental tuberculosis

  19. Antigen-presenting cells transfected with Hsp65 messenger RNA fail to treat experimental tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, C.D.; Trombone, A.P.F.; Lorenzi, J.C.C.; Almeida, L.P.; Gembre, A.F.; Padilha, E. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Ramos, S.G. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Silva, C.L.; Coelho-Castelo, A.A.M. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2012-09-21

    In the last several years, the use of dendritic cells has been studied as a therapeutic strategy against tumors. Dendritic cells can be pulsed with peptides or full-length protein, or they can be transfected with DNA or RNA. However, comparative studies suggest that transfecting dendritic cells with messenger RNA (mRNA) is superior to other antigen-loading techniques in generating immunocompetent dendritic cells. In the present study, we evaluated a new therapeutic strategy to fight tuberculosis using dendritic cells and macrophages transfected with Hsp65 mRNA. First, we demonstrated that antigen-presenting cells transfected with Hsp65 mRNA exhibit a higher level of expression of co-stimulatory molecules, suggesting that Hsp65 mRNA has immunostimulatory properties. We also demonstrated that spleen cells obtained from animals immunized with mock and Hsp65 mRNA-transfected dendritic cells were able to generate a mixed Th1/Th2 response with production not only of IFN-γ but also of IL-5 and IL-10. In contrast, cells recovered from mice immunized with Hsp65 mRNA-transfected macrophages were able to produce only IL-5. When mice were infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and treated with antigen-presenting cells transfected with Hsp65 mRNA (therapeutic immunization), we did not detect any decrease in the lung bacterial load or any preservation of the lung parenchyma, indicating the inability of transfected cells to confer curative effects against tuberculosis. In spite of the lack of therapeutic efficacy, this study reports for the first time the use of antigen-presenting cells transfected with mRNA in experimental tuberculosis.

  20. Anticancer chemotherapy-induced intratumoral recruitment and differentiation of antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuting; Adjemian, Sandy; Mattarollo, Stephen R; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Aymeric, Laetitia; Yang, Heng; Portela Catani, João Paulo; Hannani, Dalil; Duret, Helene; Steegh, Kim; Martins, Isabelle; Schlemmer, Frederic; Michaud, Mickaël; Kepp, Oliver; Sukkurwala, Abdul Qader; Menger, Laurie; Vacchelli, Erika; Droin, Nathalie; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Krzysiek, Roman; Gordon, Siamon; Taylor, Philip R; Van Endert, Peter; Solary, Eric; Smyth, Mark J; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2013-04-18

    The therapeutic efficacy of anthracyclines relies on antitumor immune responses elicited by dying cancer cells. How chemotherapy-induced cell death leads to efficient antigen presentation to T cells, however, remains a conundrum. We found that intratumoral CD11c(+)CD11b(+)Ly6C(hi) cells, which displayed some characteristics of inflammatory dendritic cells and included granulomonocytic precursors, were crucial for anthracycline-induced anticancer immune responses. ATP released by dying cancer cells recruited myeloid cells into tumors and stimulated the local differentiation of CD11c(+)CD11b(+)Ly6C(hi) cells. Such cells efficiently engulfed tumor antigens in situ and presented them to T lymphocytes, thus vaccinating mice, upon adoptive transfer, against a challenge with cancer cells. Manipulations preventing tumor infiltration by CD11c(+)CD11b(+)Ly6C(hi) cells, such as the local overexpression of ectonucleotidases, the blockade of purinergic receptors, or the neutralization of CD11b, abolished the immune system-dependent antitumor activity of anthracyclines. Our results identify a subset of tumor-infiltrating leukocytes as therapy-relevant antigen-presenting cells. PMID:23562161

  1. Photoaffinity labeling demonstrates binding between Ia molecules and nominal antigen on antigen-presenting cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, M L; Yip, C C; Shevach, E M; Delovitch, T L

    1986-01-01

    We have used radioiodinated photoreactive bovine insulin as antigen to examine the molecular nature of immunogenic complexes that form on antigen-presenting cells. The probe was allowed to bind to either insulin-presenting B-hybridoma cells, lipopolysaccharide-stimulated blasts, or bovine insulin-specific helper-T-hybridoma cells in the dark. Samples were then exposed to light to induce crosslinkage, solubilized, and analyzed by gel electrophoresis. Two protein bands at about 36 kDa and 27 kD...

  2. Survival and signaling changes in antigen presenting cell subsets after radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jennifer Janell

    Radiation therapy is a widely used cancer treatment that has the potential to influence anti-tumor immune responses. Both myeloablative and non-myeloablative radiation are often used as part of preparatory regimens for hematopoetic stem cell transplantation, in combination with other chemotherapy or immuno-modulatory (e.g. Anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG)) therapies for both cytotoxic and immune modulatory purposes. However, the mechanisms responsible for the effect of radiation on antigen presenting cell (APC) responsiveness and radioresistance are poorly understood. The first studies described in this thesis were designed to identify and characterize early radiation-induced signaling changes in antigen presenting cells and to determine the effects of these signaling changes on APC receptor expression and function. The NFkappaB pathway in antigen presenting cells was chosen for study because it is activated by radiation in a wide range of other cell types and plays a vital role in the maintenance and regulation of the immune system. The effects of therapeutically relevant doses radiation (2 and 20 Gy) were compared at various timepoints in the human monocytic cell line (U937) using phospho-flow cytometry staining methods and cytometric analysis. These studies demonstrated that radiation-induced changes in the phosphorylation state of NFkappaB family members that were p53 independent. However, these changes were dependent upon activation of ATM in response to single or double-stranded breaks in DNA, as shown in experiments using an inhibitor of ATM and ATM siRNA knockdown U937 cells. In addition, studies examining the effect of radiation on co-stimulatory receptors with and without inhibition of the NFkappaB pathway via phospho-flow cytometry revealed that radiation-induced phosphorylation of NEMO promoted the activation and functional maturation of U937 cells. Furthermore, functional studies using both phospho-flow cytometry and/or mixed lymphocyte reactions to

  3. Antigen presenting cells costimulatory signaling during pre-implantation pregnancy 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sławek

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available  Success of pregnancy depends on many factors. Three phenomena inducing immune tolerance against semi-allogeneic conceptus may play a crucial role in the pre-implantation period of pregnancy: influence of sex hormones in sex cycle, presence of oocyte or embryo and the presence of semen in the female reproductive tract. On the other hand dendritic cells are the most effective antigen-presenting cells in regulation of immune phenomena and also are considered as potent participants in inducing immune tolerance in the pregnancy. They communicate with T cells in cell contact-dependent manner or via cytokines. During cell-cell contacts, costimulatory molecules play a key role and their expression is often dependent on cytokines milieu. Both costimulatory molecules and cytokines influence generation of T regulatory cells. Interactions of these molecules are closely related. In this paper we would like to pay attention to the importance of antigen presenting cells costimulatory potency in immune regulation during a pre-implantation period of pregnancy.

  4. ImmunoChip Study Implicates Antigen Presentation to T Cells in Narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faraco, Juliette; Lin, Ling; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek;

    2013-01-01

    with hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy and 10,421 controls, all of European ancestry, using a custom genotyping array (ImmunoChip). Three loci located outside the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) region on chromosome 6 were significantly associated with disease risk. In addition to a strong signal in the T...... cell receptor alpha (TRA@), variants in two additional narcolepsy loci, Cathepsin H (CTSH) and Tumor necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily member 4 (TNFSF4, also called OX40L), attained genome-wide significance. These findings underline the importance of antigen presentation by HLA Class II to T cells...

  5. A population dynamics analysis of the interaction between adaptive regulatory T cells and antigen presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fouchet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regulatory T cells are central actors in the maintenance of tolerance of self-antigens or allergens and in the regulation of the intensity of the immune response during infections by pathogens. An understanding of the network of the interaction between regulatory T cells, antigen presenting cells and effector T cells is starting to emerge. Dynamical systems analysis can help to understand the dynamical properties of an interaction network and can shed light on the different tasks that can be accomplished by a network. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a mathematical model to describe a interaction network of adaptive regulatory T cells, in which mature precursor T cells may differentiate into either adaptive regulatory T cells or effector T cells, depending on the activation state of the cell by which the antigen was presented. Using an equilibrium analysis of the mathematical model we show that, for some parameters, the network has two stable equilibrium states: one in which effector T cells are strongly regulated by regulatory T cells and another in which effector T cells are not regulated because the regulatory T cell population is vanishingly small. We then simulate different types of perturbations, such as the introduction of an antigen into a virgin system, and look at the state into which the system falls. We find that whether or not the interaction network switches from the regulated (tolerant state to the unregulated state depends on the strength of the antigenic stimulus and the state from which the network has been perturbed. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that the interaction network studied in this paper plays an essential part in generating and maintaining tolerance against allergens and self-antigens.

  6. Pollen-induced antigen presentation by mesenchymal stem cells and T cells from allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mauli B; Gavrilova, Tatyana; Liu, Jianjun; Patel, Shyam A; Kartan, Saritha; Greco, Steven J; Capitle, Eugenio; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2013-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising cellular suppressor of inflammation. This function of MSCs is partly due to their licensing by inflammatory mediators. In cases with reduced inflammation, MSCs could become immune-enhancer cells. MSCs can suppress the inflammatory response of antigen-challenged lymphocytes from allergic asthma. Although allergic rhinitis (AR) is also an inflammatory response, it is unclear if MSCs can exert similar suppression. This study investigated the immune effects (suppressor vs enhancer) of MSCs on allergen-stimulated lymphocytes from AR subjects (grass or weed allergy). In contrast to subjects with allergic asthma, MSCs caused a significant (Pcells (antigen-presenting cells (APCs)). This correlated with increased production of inflammatory cytokines from T cells, and increased expressions of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-II and CD86 on MSCs. The specificity of APC function was demonstrated in APC assay using MSCs that were knocked down for the master regulator of MHC-II transcription, CIITA. The difference in the effects of MSCs on allergic asthma and AR could not be explained by the sensitivity to the allergen, based on skin tests. Thus, we deduced that the contrasting immune effects of MSCs for antigen-challenged lymphocytes on AR and allergic asthma could be disease specific. It is possible that the enhanced inflammation from asthma might be required to license the MSCs to become suppressor cells. This study underscores the need for robust preclinical studies to effectively translate MSCs for any inflammatory disorder. PMID:25505949

  7. Antigen-presenting cells in human cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania major

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ElHassan, A M; Gaafar, A; Theander, T G

    1995-01-01

    In this study biopsies from skin lesions and draining lymph nodes of patients suffering from cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major were examined by immunohistochemistry, and by light and electron microscopy to identify the types of antigen-presenting cells (APC) and their location. APC......, identified morphologically and by their expression of specific cell markers, included Langerhans cells, macrophages, follicular dendritic cells, and interdigitating reticulum cells of the paracortex of lymph nodes. These cells expressed MHC class II antigens and contained Leishmania antigen. Since some...... keratinocytes and endothelial cells also showed these characteristics, they may also act as APC. By examining tissue samples from skin lesions and draining lymph nodes it was possible to follow the probable route of trafficking of various inflammatory cells between the skin lesion and lymph nodes. Leishmania...

  8. The perivascular phagocyte of the mouse pineal gland: An antigen-presenting cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten; Rath, Martin F; Klein, David C

    2006-01-01

    The perivascular space of the rat pineal gland is known to contain phagocytic cells that are immunoreactive for leukocyte antigens, and thus they appear to belong to the macrophage/microglial cell line. These cells also contain MHC class II proteins. We investigated this cell type in the pineal...... gland of mice. Actively phagocytosing cells with a prominent lysosomal system were found in the pericapillary spaces of the mouse pineal gland following intravenous injection of horseradish peroxidase. The cells also exhibited strong acid phosphatase activity. Perivascular cells were immunopositive for...... MHC class II protein and for CD68, a marker of monocytes/phagocytes. This study verifies that perivascular phagocytes with antigen-presenting properties are present in the mouse pineal gland....

  9. Antigen presenting cells in the skin of a patient with hair loss and systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Context: Hair loss is one of the most striking clinical features of active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, however, very few studies have investigated the immunological features of this process. Case report: We describe a 33 years old female who presented with scalp hair loss and arthralgias. Physical examination revealed erythematous plaques on the nose and scalp, with bitemporal hair loss. Scalp biopsies revealed epidermal hyperkeratosis, with a mild interface infiltrate of lymphocytes and histiocytes and a superficial and deep, perivascular and periadnexal infiltrate of mostly CD4 positive cells. Antibodies to HAM 56, CD68, CD1a, S-100, mast cell tryptase and c-kit/CD117 were strongly positive around the hair follicles, and in the adjacent sebaceous glands. Conclusion: We present the first report showing a significant presence of several antigen presenting cells around the hair follicular units in a patient with alopecia in active SLE. Today, antigen presenting cells and dendritic cells (DC are modeled as the master regulators of human immunity. One aspect that has become clearly appreciated is the great diversity of DC subtypes, each with considerable functional differences. Thus, we suggest that APC and DCs are equipped with Pattern Recognition Receptors (PRRs to some hair follicular unit antigens; that these innate sensors recognize conserved molecular patterns on self- tissue, and play a significant role in the pathophysiology of alopecia in SLE patients.

  10. Antigen presenting cells in the skin of a patient with hair loss and systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Hair loss is one of the most striking clinical features of active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, however, very few studies have investigated the immunological features of this process. Case report: We describe a 33 years old female who presented with scalp hair loss and arthralgias. Physical examination revealed erythematous plaques on the nose and scalp, with bitemporal hair loss. Scalp biopsies revealed epidermal hyperkeratosis, with a mild interface infiltrate of lymphocytes and histiocytes and a superficial and deep, perivascular and periadnexal infiltrate of mostly CD4 positive cells. Antibodies to HAM 56, CD68, CD1a, S-100, mast cell tryptase and c-kit/CD117 were strongly positive around the hair follicles, and in the adjacent sebaceous glands. Conclusion : We present the first report showing a significant presence of several antigen presenting cells around the hair follicular units in a patient with alopecia in active SLE. Today, antigen presenting cells and dendritic cells (DC are modeled as the master regulators of human immunity. One aspect that has become clearly appreciated is the great diversity of DC subtypes, each with considerable functional differences. Thus, we suggest that APC and DCs are equipped with Pattern Recognition Receptors (PRRs to some hair follicular unit antigens; that these innate sensors recognize conserved molecular patterns on self- tissue, and play a significant role in the pathophysiology of alopecia in SLE patients

  11. Antigen presentation by murine epidermal langerhans cells and its alteration by ultraviolet B light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mice that are chronically exposed in vivo to ultraviolet B light (UV-B) display altered immunologic reactivity to various antigenic stimuli. A possible mode of UV-B action is that it exerts adverse effects on antigen-presenting cell function. Because the epidermis is the only tissue that is naturally subject to UV exposure we investigated if murine epidermal cells (EC) could perform an antigen presentation function and, if so, could this function be altered by UV-B irradiation. For this purpose, T cells immune to purified protein derivative of tuberculin (PPD) and dinitrophenylated ovalbumin (DNP6-OVA) from either BALB/c or C3H/He mice were incubated with syngeneic, semisyngeneic, or allogeneic EC or, for control purposes, with peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) that had been pulse-exposed to either the immunizing antigens or, as controls, left unpulsed, or pulsed to human serum albumin (HSA). After 4 days of culture, T cell proliferation was assessed by 3H-thymidine incorporation. PPD- and DNP/6-OVA pulsed, but not HSA-pulsed EC and PEC, induced vigorous proliferation of syngeneic and semisyngeneic, but not allogeneic, immune T cells. Pretreatment of stimulator cells with specific anti-Ia serum and complement virtually abolished this response, which indicated that among EC, Ia-bearing Langerhans cells are the critical stimulators. Exposure of EC either before or after pulsing to UV-B resulted in a dose-dependent impairment of antigen-specific T cell proliferation; the T proliferative response was abolished after administration of 20 mJ/cm2 UV-B. UV-B in the dose range employed did not produce immediate lethal cell damage, premature death of cultured EC, or toxic factors inhibitory for T cell proliferation

  12. Cinnamon extract suppresses experimental colitis through modulation of antigen-presenting cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ho-Keun Kwon; Zee Yong Park; Sin-Hyeog Im; Ji-Sun Hwang; Choong-Gu Lee; Jae-Seon So; Anupama Sahoo; Chang-Rok Im; Won Kyung Jeon; Byoung Seob Ko; Sung Haeng Lee

    2011-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of cinnamon extract and elucidate its mechanisms for targeting the function of antigen presenting cells. METHODS:Cinnamon extract was used to treat murine macrophage cell line (Raw 264.7),mouse primary antigen-presenting cells (APCs,MHCII+) and CD11c+ dendritic cells to analyze the effects of cinnamon extract on APC function.The mechanisms of action of cinnamon extract on APCs were investigated by analyzing cytokine production,and expression of MHC antigens and co-stimulatory molecules by quantitative real-time PCR and flow cytometry.In addition,the effect of cinnamon extract on antigen presentation capacity and APC-dependent T-cell differentiation were analyzed by [H3]-thymidine incorporation and cytokine analysis,respectively. To confirm the anti-inflammatory effects of cinnamon extract in vivo ,cinnamon or PBS was orally administered to mice for 20 d followed by induction of experimental colitis with 2,4,6 trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid.The protective effects of cinnamon extract against experimental colitis were measured by checking clinical symptoms,histological analysis and cytokine expression profiles in inflamed tissue. RESULTS:Treatment with cinnamon extract inhibited maturation of MHCII+ APCs or CD11c+ dendritic cells (DCs) by suppressing expression of co-stimulatory molecules (B7.1,B7.2,ICOS-L),MHCII and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2.Cinnamon extract induced regulatory DCs (rDCs) that produce low levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1β,IL-6,IL-12,interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α] while expressing high levels of immunoregulatory cytokines (IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β).In addition, rDCs generated by cinnamon extract inhibited APC-dependent T-cell proliferation,and converted CD4+ T cells into IL-10high CD4+ T cells.Furthermore,oral administration of cinnamon extract inhibited development and progression of intestinal colitis by inhibiting expression of COX-2 and pro

  13. Engineered nanomaterials cause cytotoxicity and activation on mouse antigen presenting cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanomaterials improve everyday products but their safety for human health is poorly known. In this study we explored immunological effects of five different nanomaterials on antigen presenting cells (APC) in vitro. Nanomaterials studied were rutile titanium dioxide (TiO2), amorphous silica-coated rutile titanium dioxide (TiO2-silica), zinc oxide (ZnO), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). APCs included mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7 cell line) and murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (bmDC). All studied particles were cytotoxic to bmDCs, and ZnO, TiO2 and TiO2-silica-induced dose-dependently cell death also in macrophages. ZnO had the most drastic immunological effects leading to high expression of proinflammatory cytokine, IL-1β, and enhanced production of neutrophil chemoattractant CXCL-9 on both cell types. TiO2 and TiO2-silica stimulated the expression of IL-6, MIP-1α and TNF-α in macrophages, and increased their maturation, antigen presentation and co-stimulation activity. In contrast, SWCNT or MWCNT did not seem to have any significant immunological effects on the cell types studied suggesting that APCs might not be the target cells for carbon nanotubes. Due to diverse effects on different nanomaterials on immune cells we suggest that each new nanomaterial should be extensively studied in vitro and in vivo for risk assessment before their use in final products.

  14. Modulation of innate antigen-presenting cell function by pre-patent schistosome infection.

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    Christine E Ferragine

    Full Text Available Schistosomes are intravascular helminths that infect over 200 million people worldwide. Deposition of eggs by adult schistosomes stimulates Th2 responses to egg antigens and induces granulomatous pathology that is a hallmark of schistosome infection. Paradoxically, schistosomes require host immune function for their development and reproduction and for egress of parasite eggs from the host. To identify potential mechanisms by which immune cells might influence parasite development prior to the onset of egg production, we assessed immune function in mice infected with developing schistosomes. We found that pre-patent schistosome infection is associated with a loss of T cell responsiveness to other antigens and is due to a diminution in the ability of innate antigen-presenting cells to stimulate T cells. Diminution of stimulatory capacity by schistosome worms specifically affected CD11b(+ cells and did not require concomitant adaptive responses. We could not find evidence for production of a diffusible inhibitor of T cells by innate cells from infected mice. Rather, inhibition of T cell responsiveness by accessory cells required cell contact and only occurred when cells from infected mice outnumbered competent APCs by more than 3∶1. Finally, we show that loss of T cell stimulatory capacity may in part be due to suppression of IL-12 expression during pre-patent schistosome infection. Modulation of CD4(+ T cell and APC function may be an aspect of host immune exploitation by schistosomes, as both cell types influence parasite development during pre-patent schistosome infection.

  15. ImmunoChip study implicates antigen presentation to T cells in narcolepsy.

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    Juliette Faraco

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the identification of susceptibility genes and environmental exposures provide broad support for a post-infectious autoimmune basis for narcolepsy/hypocretin (orexin deficiency. We genotyped loci associated with other autoimmune and inflammatory diseases in 1,886 individuals with hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy and 10,421 controls, all of European ancestry, using a custom genotyping array (ImmunoChip. Three loci located outside the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA region on chromosome 6 were significantly associated with disease risk. In addition to a strong signal in the T cell receptor alpha (TRA@, variants in two additional narcolepsy loci, Cathepsin H (CTSH and Tumor necrosis factor (ligand superfamily member 4 (TNFSF4, also called OX40L, attained genome-wide significance. These findings underline the importance of antigen presentation by HLA Class II to T cells in the pathophysiology of this autoimmune disease.

  16. Comparison of microglia and infiltrating CD11c+ cells as antigen presenting cells for T cell proliferation and cytokine response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; Løbner, Morten; Cédile, Oriane;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tissue-resident antigen-presenting cells (APC) exert a major influence on the local immune environment. Microglia are resident myeloid cells in the central nervous system (CNS), deriving from early post-embryonic precursors, distinct from adult hematopoietic lineages. Dendritic cells...... (DC) and macrophages infiltrate the CNS during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Microglia are not considered to be as effective APC as DC or macrophages. METHODS: In this work we compared the antigen presenting capacity of CD11c+ and CD11c- microglia subsets with infiltrating CD11c......+ APC, which include DC. The microglial subpopulations (CD11c- CD45dim CD11b+ and CD11c+ CD45dim CD11b+) as well as infiltrating CD11c+ CD45high cells were sorted from CNS of C57BL/6 mice with EAE. Sorted cells were characterised by flow cytometry for surface phenotype and by quantitative real-time PCR...

  17. HAM56 and CD68 antigen presenting cells surrounding a sarcoidal granulomatous tattoo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context : Tattoos are produced by introducing colorants of various compositions into the skin, either accidentally or for cosmetic purposes. Case Report: A 62-year-old male presented with a cosmetic tattoo and requested a total excision of the lesion. Dermatopathologic analysis of the excised tissue with hematoxylin and eosin examination, as well as immunohistochemistry was performed. H&E staining demonstrated classic histologic features of a tattoo. Utilizing immunohistochemistry, dermal histiocytic antigen presenting cells stained with HAM56 and CD68 antibodies; the staining was present surrounding the tattoo pigment. Conclusions : We identified two macrophage markers (HAM56 and CD68 surrounding dermal tattoo pigment. A minimal dermal inflammatory immune was noted to the tattoo pigment. Moreover, the immune response and/or tolerance to tattoos is not well characterized. We suggest that tattoo materials and techniques could be utilized in therapeutic delivery for diseases such recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, potentially preventing immune rejection of gene therapy agents.

  18. Neutrophil elastase enhances antigen presentation by upregulating human leukocyte antigen class I expression on tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Akhil; Alatrash, Gheath; Philips, Anne V; Qiao, Na; Sukhumalchandra, Pariya; Kerros, Celine; Diaconu, Iulia; Gall, Victor; Neal, Samantha; Peters, Haley L; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Molldrem, Jeffrey J; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) is an innate immune cell-derived inflammatory mediator that we have shown increases the presentation of tumor-associated peptide antigens in breast cancer. In this study, we extend these observations to show that NE uptake has a broad effect on enhancing antigen presentation by breast cancer cells. We show that NE increases human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I expression on the surface of breast cancer cells in a concentration and time-dependent manner. HLA class I upregulation requires internalization of enzymatically active NE. Western blots of NE-treated breast cancer cells confirm that the expression of total HLA class I as well as the antigen-processing machinery proteins TAP1, LMP2, and calnexin does not change following NE treatment. This suggests that NE does not increase the efficiency of antigen processing; rather, it mediates the upregulation of HLA class I by stabilizing and reducing membrane recycling of HLA class I molecules. Furthermore, the effects of NE extend beyond breast cancer since the uptake of NE by EBV-LCL increases the presentation of HLA class I-restricted viral peptides, as shown by their increased sensitivity to lysis by EBV-specific CD8+ T cells. Together, our results show that NE uptake increases the responsiveness of breast cancer cells to adaptive immunity by broad upregulation of membrane HLA class I and support the conclusion that the innate inflammatory mediator NE enhances tumor cell recognition and increases tumor sensitivity to the host adaptive immune response. PMID:27129972

  19. Antigen presenting cell abnormalities in the Cln3(-/-) mouse model of juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersrud, Samantha L; Kovács, Attila D; Pearce, David A

    2016-07-01

    Mutations of the CLN3 gene lead to juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL), an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder that causes progressive neurodegeneration in children and adolescents. There is evidence of immune system involvement in pathology that has been only minimally investigated. We characterized bone marrow stem cell-derived antigen presenting cells (APCs), peritoneal macrophages, and leukocytes from spleen and blood, harvested from the Cln3(-/-) mouse model of JNCL. We detected dramatically elevated CD11c surface levels and increased total CD11c protein in Cln3(-/-) cell samples compared to wild type. This phenotype was specific to APCs and also to a loss of CLN3, as surface levels did not differ from wild type in other leukocyte subtypes nor in cells from two other NCL mouse models. Subcellularly, CD11c was localized to lipid rafts, indicating that perturbation of surface levels is attributable to derangement of raft dynamics, which has previously been shown in Cln3 mutant cells. Interrogation of APC function revealed that Cln3(-/-) cells have increased adhesiveness to CD11c ligands as well as an abnormal secretory pattern that closely mimics what has been previously reported for Cln3 mutant microglia. Our results show that CLN3 deficiency alters APCs, which can be a major contributor to the autoimmune response in JNCL. PMID:27101989

  20. Regulation of Hemichannels and Gap Junction Channels by Cytokines in Antigen-Presenting Cells

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    Pablo J. Sáez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autocrine and paracrine signals coordinate responses of several cell types of the immune system that provide efficient protection against different challenges. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs coordinate activation of this system via homocellular and heterocellular interactions. Cytokines constitute chemical intercellular signals among immune cells and might promote pro- or anti-inflammatory effects. During the last two decades, two membrane pathways for intercellular communication have been demonstrated in cells of the immune system. They are called hemichannels (HCs and gap junction channels (GJCs and provide new insights into the mechanisms of the orchestrated response of immune cells. GJCs and HCs are permeable to ions and small molecules, including signaling molecules. The direct intercellular transfer between contacting cells can be mediated by GJCs, whereas the release to or uptake from the extracellular milieu can be mediated by HCs. GJCs and HCs can be constituted by two protein families: connexins (Cxs or pannexins (Panxs, which are present in almost all APCs, being Cx43 and Panx1 the most ubiquitous members of each protein family. In this review, we focus on the effects of different cytokines on the intercellular communication mediated by HCs and GJCs in APCs and their impact on purinergic signaling.

  1. Photoaffinity labeling demonstrates binding between Ia and antigen on antigen-presenting cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) bind and present antigens to immunocompetent T lymphocytes in the context of Ia molecules: however, the molecular nature of the immunogenic complexes on the surface of these cells is unknown. They have used radioiodinated photoreactive Beef insulin (BI) derivatized in the B29 position with (n-[4-(4'-azido-3'-[125]iodophenylazo)benzoyl]-3-aminopropyl-n-oxy-succinimide) (B29-AZAP) as antigen to examine the nature of these molecular complexes. The probe was reacted with either of two B hybridoma APCs, TA3 (Ia/sup k/d/) and LB(Ia/sup d/b/) which present insulin on I-A/sup d/ and I-A/sub b/ respectively, to appropriately restricted, BI specific T helper lymphocytes (T/sub H/). Samples were photolyzed, solubilized and then analyzed by SDS-PAGE. Two protein bands of 36-kDa and 27-kDa were specifically labeled on TA3 and LB cells. Treatment of these bands with dithiothreitol or endo-N-β-glycosidase F demonstrates that each is composed of a single glycoprotein. These bands are immunoprecipitable with haplotype specific but not control anti-Ia antibodies. This identifies the labeled bands as the α- and β- subunits of class II MHC antigens. They conclude that a molecular complex may form between Ia and antigen on APCs and that formation of this complex does not require the presence of an antigen specific T/sub H/ cell receptor

  2. Equine infectious anemia virus-infected dendritic cells retain antigen presentation capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine if equine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) were susceptible to equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection, ex vivo-generated DC were infected with virus in vitro. EIAV antigen was detected by immunofluorescence 3 days post-infection with maximum antigen being detected on day 4, whereas there was no antigen detected in DC incubated with the same amount of heat-inactivated EIAV. No cytolytic activity was observed after EIAVWSU5 infection of DC. These monocyte-derived DC were more effective than macrophages and B cells in stimulating allogenic T lymphocytes. Both infected macrophages and DC stimulated similar levels of memory CTL responses in mixtures of CD8+ and CD4+ cells as detected with 51Cr-release assays indicating that EIAV infection of DC did not alter antigen presentation. However, EIAV-infected DC were more effective than infected macrophages when used to stimulate memory CTL in isolated CD8+ cells. The maintenance of antigen processing and presenting function by EIAV-infected DC in vitro suggests that this function is maintained during in vivo infection

  3. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela Ramirez, J E; Roychoudhury, R; Habte, H H; Cho, M W; Pohl, N L B; Narasimhan, B

    2014-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs), and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by DCs. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and APCs and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  4. Generation of competent bone marrow-derived antigen presenting cells from the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrell Regina M

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human infections with Sin Nombre virus (SNV and related New World hantaviruses often lead to hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS, a sometimes fatal illness. Lungs of patients who die from HCPS exhibit cytokine-producing mononuclear infiltrates and pronounced pulmonary inflammation. Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus are the principal natural hosts of SNV, in which the virus establishes life-long persistence without conspicuous pathology. Little is known about the mechanisms SNV employs to evade the immune response of deer mice, and experimental examination of this question has been difficult because of a lack of methodologies for examining such responses during infection. One such deficiency is our inability to characterize T cell responses because susceptible syngeneic deer mice are not available. Results To solve this problem, we have developed an in vitro method of expanding and generating competent antigen presenting cells (APC from deer mouse bone marrow using commercially-available house mouse (Mus musculus granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor. These cells are capable of processing and presenting soluble protein to antigen-specific autologous helper T cells in vitro. Inclusion of antigen-specific deer mouse antibody augments T cell stimulation, presumably through Fc receptor-mediated endocytosis. Conclusions The use of these APC has allowed us to dramatically expand deer mouse helper T cells in culture and should permit extensive characterization of T cell epitopes. Considering the evolutionary divergence between deer mice and house mice, it is probable that this method will be useful to other investigators using unconventional models of rodent-borne diseases.

  5. Genome-wide promoter analysis of histone modifications in human monocyte-derived antigen presenting cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson Hedi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs are important in inflammatory processes and are often used for immunotherapeutic approaches. Blood monocytes can be differentiated into macrophages and DCs, which is accompanied with transcriptional changes in many genes, including chemokines and cell surface markers. Results To study the chromatin modifications associated with this differentiation, we performed a genome wide analysis of histone H3 trimethylation on lysine 4 (H3K4me3 and 27 (H3K27me3 as well as acetylation of H3 lysines (AcH3 in promoter regions. We report that both H3K4me3 and AcH3 marks significantly correlate with transcriptionally active genes whereas H3K27me3 mark is associated with inactive gene promoters. During differentiation, the H3K4me3 levels decreased on monocyte-specific CD14, CCR2 and CX3CR1 but increased on DC-specific TM7SF4/DC-STAMP, TREM2 and CD209/DC-SIGN genes. Genes associated with phagocytosis and antigen presentation were marked by H3K4me3 modifications. We also report that H3K4me3 levels on clustered chemokine and surface marker genes often correlate with transcriptional activity. Conclusion Our results provide a basis for further functional correlations between gene expression and histone modifications in monocyte-derived macrophages and DCs.

  6. Antigen presenting cell-selective drug delivery by glycan-decorated nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenz, Theresa; Grabski, Elena; Durán, Verónica; Hozsa, Constantin; Stępczyńska, Anna; Furch, Marcus; Gieseler, Robert K; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2015-09-01

    Targeted drug delivery systems hold promise for selective provision of active compounds to distinct tissues or cell subsets. Thus, locally enhanced drug concentrations are obtained that would confer improved efficacy. As a consequence adverse effects should be diminished, as innocent bystander cells are less affected. Currently, several controlled drug delivery systems based on diverse materials are being developed. Some systems exhibit material-associated toxic effects and/or show low drug loading capacity. In contrast, liposomal nanocarriers are particularly favorable because they are well tolerated, poorly immunogenic, can be produced in defined sizes, and offer a reasonable payload capacity. Compared with other immune cells, professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) demonstrate enhanced liposome uptake mediated by macropinocytosis, phagocytosis and presumably also by clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis. In order to further enhance the targeting efficacy toward APCs, receptor-mediated uptake appears advisable. Since APC subsets generally do not express single linage-specific receptors, members of the C-type lectin receptor (CLR) family are compelling targets. Examples of CLR expressed by APCs include DEC-205 (CD205) expressed by myeloid dendritic cells (DC) and monocytes, the mannose receptor C type 1 (MR, CD206) expressed by DC, monocytes and macrophages, DC-SIGN (CD209) expressed by DC, and several others. These receptors bind glycans, which are typically displayed by pathogens and thus support pathogen uptake and endocytosis. Further research will elucidate whether glycan-decorated liposomes will not only enhance APCs targeting but also enable preferential delivery of their payload to discrete subcellular compartments. PMID:25701806

  7. Aluminum hydroxide adjuvant induces macrophage differentiation towards a specialized antigen-presenting cell type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimaniol, Anne-Cécile; Gras, Gabriel; Verdier, François; Capel, Francis; Grigoriev, Vladimir B; Porcheray, Fabrice; Sauzeat, Elisabeth; Fournier, Jean-Guy; Clayette, Pascal; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Dormont, Dominique

    2004-08-13

    Aluminum hydroxide (AlOOH) has been used for many years as a vaccine adjuvant, but little is known about its mechanism of action. We investigated in this study the in vitro effect of aluminum hydroxide adjuvant on isolated macrophages. We showed that AlOOH-stimulated macrophages contain large and persistent intracellular crystalline inclusions, a characteristic property of muscle infiltrated macrophages described in animal models of vaccine injection, as well as in the recently described macrophagic myofasciitis (MMF) histological reaction in humans. AlOOH-loaded macrophages exhibited phenotypical and functional modifications, as they expressed the classical markers of myeloid dendritic cells (HLA-DR(high)/CD86(high)/CD83(+)/CD1a(-)/CD14(-)) and displayed potent ability to induce MHC-II-restricted antigen specific memory responses, but kept a macrophage morphology. This suggests a key role of macrophages, in the reaction to AlOOH-adjuvanted vaccines and these mature antigen-presenting macrophages may therefore be of particular importance in the establishment of memory responses and in vaccination mechanisms leading to long-lasting protection. PMID:15297065

  8. A novel approach for reliable detection of cathepsin S activities in mouse antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steimle, Alex; Kalbacher, Hubert; Maurer, Andreas; Beifuss, Brigitte; Bender, Annika; Schäfer, Andrea; Müller, Ricarda; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Frick, Julia-Stefanie

    2016-05-01

    Cathepsin S (CTSS) is a eukaryotic protease mostly expressed in professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Since CTSS activity regulation plays a role in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, atherosclerosis, Sjögren's syndrome and psoriasis as well as in cancer progression, there is an ongoing interest in the reliable detection of cathepsin S activity. Various applications have been invented for specific detection of this enzyme. However, most of them have only been shown to be suitable for human samples, do not deliver quantitative results or the experimental procedure requires technical equipment that is not commonly available in a standard laboratory. We have tested a fluorogen substrate, Mca-GRWPPMGLPWE-Lys(Dnp)-DArg-NH2, that has been described to specifically detect CTSS activities in human APCs for its potential use for mouse samples. We have modified the protocol and thereby offer a cheap, easy, reproducible and quick activity assay to detect CTSS activities in mouse APCs. Since most of basic research on CTSS is performed in mice, this method closes a gap and offers a possibility for reliable and quantitative CTSS activity detection that can be performed in almost every laboratory. PMID:26899824

  9. Seoul virus suppresses NF-κB-mediated inflammatory responses of antigen presenting cells from Norway rats

    OpenAIRE

    Au, Rebecca Y.; Jedlicka, Anne E.; Li, Wei; Pekosz, Andrew; Klein, Sabra L.

    2010-01-01

    Hantavirus infection reduces antiviral defenses, increases regulatory responses, and causes persistent infection in rodent hosts. To address whether hantaviruses alter the maturation and functional activity of antigen presenting cells (APCs), rat bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) and macrophages (BMDMs) were generated and infected with Seoul virus (SEOV) or stimulated with TLR ligands. SEOV infected both DCs and macrophages, but copies of viral RNA, viral antigen, and infectious vir...

  10. Cytokine profiles and phenotype regulation of antigen presenting cells by genotype-I porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Gimeno Mariona; Darwich Laila; Diaz Ivan; de la Torre Eugenia; Pujols Joan; Martín Marga; Inumaru Shigeki; Cano Esmeralda; Domingo Mariano; Montoya Maria; Mateu Enric

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The present study examined the immunological response of antigen presenting cells (APC) to genotype-I isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection by analysing the cytokine profile induced and evaluating the changes taking place upon infection on immunologically relevant cell markers (MHCI, MHCII, CD80/86, CD14, CD16, CD163, CD172a, SWC9). Several types of APC were infected with 39 PRRSV isolates. The results show that different isolates were able...

  11. CD8+ T cell priming by dendritic cell vaccines requires antigen transfer to endogenous antigen presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice W Yewdall

    Full Text Available Immunotherapeutic strategies to stimulate anti-tumor immunity are promising approaches for cancer treatment. A major barrier to their success is the immunosuppressive microenvironment of tumors, which inhibits the functions of endogenous dendritic cells (DCs that are necessary for the generation of anti-tumor CD8+ T cells. To overcome this problem, autologous DCs are generated ex vivo, loaded with tumor antigens, and activated in this non-suppressive environment before administration to patients. However, DC-based vaccines rarely induce tumor regression.We examined the fate and function of these DCs following their injection using murine models, in order to better understand their interaction with the host immune system. Contrary to previous assumptions, we show that DC vaccines have an insignificant role in directly priming CD8+ T cells, but instead function primarily as vehicles for transferring antigens to endogenous antigen presenting cells, which are responsible for the subsequent activation of T cells.This reliance on endogenous immune cells may explain the limited success of current DC vaccines to treat cancer and offers new insight into how these therapies can be improved. Future approaches should focus on creating DC vaccines that are more effective at directly priming T cells, or abrogating the tumor induced suppression of endogenous DCs.

  12. Tubulin and actin interplay at the T cell and Antigen-presenting cell interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa B Martín-Cófreces

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available T cells reorganize their actin and tubulin-based cytoskeletons to provide a physical basis to the immune synapse. However, growing evidence shows that their roles on T cell activation are more dynamic than merely serving as tracks or scaffold for different molecules. The cross-talk between both skeletons may be important for the formation and movement of the lamella at the IS by increasing the adhesion of the T cell to the APC, thus favoring the transport of components towards the plasma membrane and in turn regulating the T-APC intercellular communication. Microtubules and F-actin appear to be essential for the transport of the different signaling microclusters along the membrane, therefore facilitating the propagation of the signal. Finally, they can also be important for regulating the endocytosis, recycling and degradation of the TCR signaling machinery, thus helping both to sustain the activated state and to switch it off.

  13. Direct stimulation of T cells by membrane vesicles from antigen-presenting cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovář, Marek; Boyman, O.; Shen, X.; Hwang, I.; Kohler, R.; Sprent, J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 31 (2006), s. 11671-11676. ISSN 0027-8424 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : immunotherapy * t cell priming * tumors Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 9.643, year: 2006

  14. Neoantigen Load, Antigen Presentation Machinery, and Immune Signatures Determine Prognosis in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Hirokazu; Sato, Yusuke; Karasaki, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Tohru; Kume, Haruki; Ogawa, Seishi; Homma, Yukio; Kakimi, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-01

    Tumors commonly harbor multiple genetic alterations, some of which initiate tumorigenesis. Among these, some tumor-specific somatic mutations resulting in mutated protein have the potential to induce antitumor immune responses. To examine the relevance of the latter to immune responses in the tumor and to patient outcomes, we used datasets of whole-exome and RNA sequencing from 97 clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) patients to identify neoepitopes predicted to be presented by each patient's autologous HLA molecules. We found that the number of nonsilent or missense mutations did not correlate with patient prognosis. However, combining the number of HLA-restricted neoepitopes with the cell surface expression of HLA or β2-microglobulin(β2M) revealed that an A-neo(hi)/HLA-A(hi) or ABC-neo(hi)/β2M(hi) phenotype correlated with better clinical outcomes. Higher expression of immune-related genes from CD8 T cells and their effector molecules [CD8A, perforin (PRF1) and granzyme A (GZMA)], however, did not correlate with prognosis. This may have been due to the observed correlation of these genes with the expression of other genes that were associated with immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment (CTLA-4, PD-1, LAG-3, PD-L1, PD-L2, IDO1, and IL10). This suggested that abundant neoepitopes associated with greater antitumor effector immune responses were counterbalanced by a strongly immunosuppressive microenvironment. Therefore, immunosuppressive molecules should be considered high-priority targets for modulating immune responses in patients with ccRCC. Blockade of these molecular pathways could be combined with immunotherapies targeting neoantigens to achieve synergistic antitumor activity. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(5); 463-71. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26980598

  15. Corruption of dendritic cell antigen presentation during acute GVHD leads to regulatory T-cell failure and chronic GVHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Koyama, Motoko; Le Texier, Laetitia; Markey, Kate A; Cheong, Melody; Kuns, Rachel D; Lineburg, Katie E; Teal, Bianca E; Alexander, Kylie A; Clouston, Andrew D; Blazar, Bruce R; Hill, Geoffrey R; MacDonald, Kelli P A

    2016-08-11

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a major cause of late mortality following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and is characterized by tissue fibrosis manifesting as scleroderma and bronchiolitis obliterans. The development of acute GVHD (aGVHD) is a powerful clinical predictor of subsequent cGVHD, suggesting that aGVHD may invoke the immunologic pathways responsible for cGVHD. In preclinical models in which sclerodermatous cGVHD develops after a preceding period of mild aGVHD, we show that antigen presentation within major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II of donor dendritic cells (DCs) is markedly impaired early after BMT. This is associated with a failure of regulatory T-cell (Treg) homeostasis and cGVHD. Donor DC-restricted deletion of MHC class II phenocopied this Treg deficiency and cGVHD. Moreover, specific depletion of donor Tregs after BMT also induced cGVHD, whereas adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated it. These data demonstrate that the defect in Treg homeostasis seen in cGVHD is a causative lesion and is downstream of defective antigen presentation within MHC class II that is induced by aGVHD. PMID:27338097

  16. A Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain that improves stimulation of antigen-presenting cells does not enhance vaccine efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanna M Schmitt

    Full Text Available Vaccination is a proven strategy to mitigate morbidity and mortality of infectious diseases. The methodology of identifying and testing new vaccine candidates could be improved with rational design and in vitro testing prior to animal experimentation. The tularemia vaccine, Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS, does not elicit complete protection against lethal challenge with a virulent type A Francisella strain. One factor that may contribute to this poor performance is limited stimulation of antigen-presenting cells. In this study, we examined whether the interaction of genetically modified LVS strains with human antigen-presenting cells correlated with effectiveness as tularemia vaccine candidates. Human dendritic cells infected with wild-type LVS secrete low levels of proinflammatory cytokines, fail to upregulate costimulatory molecules, and activate human T cells poorly in vitro. One LVS mutant, strain 13B47, stimulated higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines from dendritic cells and macrophages and increased costimulatory molecule expression on dendritic cells compared to wild type. Additionally, 13B47-infected dendritic cells activated T cells more efficiently than LVS-infected cells. A deletion allele of the same gene in LVS displayed similar in vitro characteristics, but vaccination with this strain did not improve survival after challenge with a virulent Francisella strain. In vivo, this mutant was attenuated for growth and did not stimulate T cell responses in the lung comparable to wild type. Therefore, stimulation of antigen-presenting cells in vitro was improved by genetic modification of LVS, but did not correlate with efficacy against challenge in vivo within this model system.

  17. Bone marrow-derived thymic antigen-presenting cells determine self-recognition of Ia-restricted T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors previously have demonstrated that in radiation-induced bone marrow chimeras, T-cell self-Ia restriction specificity appeared to correlate with the phenotype of the bone marrow-derived antigen-presenting (or dendritic) cell in the thymus during T-cell development. However, these correlations were necessarily indirect because of the difficulty in assaying thymic function directly by adult thymus transplant, which has in the past been uniformly unsuccessful. They now report success in obtaining functional T cells from nude mice grafted with adult thymuses reduced in size by treatment of the thymus donor with anti-thymocyte globulin and cortisone. When (B10 Scn X B10.D2)F1 nude mice (I-Ab,d) are given parental B10.D2 (I-Ad) thymus grafts subcutaneously, their T cells are restricted to antigen recognition in association with I-Ad gene products but not I-Ab gene products. Furthermore, thymuses from (B10 X B10.D2)F1 (I-Ab,d)----B10 (I-Ab) chimeras transplanted 6 months or longer after radiation (a time at which antigen-presenting cell function is of donor bone marrow phenotype) into (B10 X B10.D2)F1 nude mice generate T cells restricted to antigen recognition in association with both I-Ad and I-Ab gene products. Thymuses from totally allogeneic bone marrow chimeras appear to generate T cells of bone marrow donor and thymic host restriction specificity. Thus, when thymus donors are radiation-induced bone marrow chimeras, the T-cell I-region restriction of the nude mice recipients is determined at least in part by the phenotype of the bone marrow-derived thymic antigen presenting cells or dendritic cells in the chimeric thymus

  18. Interleukin-15-induced CD56(+) myeloid dendritic cells combine potent tumor antigen presentation with direct tumoricidal potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguille, Sébastien; Lion, Eva; Tel, Jurjen; de Vries, I Jolanda M; Couderé, Karen; Fromm, Phillip D; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F; Smits, Evelien L; Berneman, Zwi N

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the quintessential antigen-presenting cells of the human immune system and play a prime role in coordinating innate and adaptive immune responses, explaining the strong and still growing interest in their application for cancer immunotherapy. Much current research in the field of DC-based immunotherapy focuses on optimizing the culture conditions for in vitro DC generation in order to assure that DCs with the best possible immunogenic qualities are being used for immunotherapy. In this context, monocyte-derived DCs that are alternatively induced by interleukin-15 (IL-15 DCs) have attracted recent attention due to their superior immunostimulatory characteristics. In this study, we show that IL-15 DCs, in addition to potent tumor antigen-presenting function, possess tumoricidal potential and thus qualify for the designation of killer DCs. Notwithstanding marked expression of the natural killer (NK) cell marker CD56 on a subset of IL-15 DCs, we found no evidence of a further phenotypic overlap between IL-15 DCs and NK cells. Allostimulation and antigen presentation assays confirmed that IL-15 DCs should be regarded as bona fide myeloid DCs not only from the phenotypic but also from the functional point of view. Concerning their cytotoxic activity, we demonstrate that IL-15 DCs are able to induce apoptotic cell death of the human K562 tumor cell line, while sparing tumor antigen-specific T cells. The cytotoxicity of IL-15 DCs is predominantly mediated by granzyme B and, to a small extent, by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) but is independent of perforin, Fas ligand and TNF-α. In conclusion, our data provide evidence of a previously unappreciated role for IL-15 in the differentiation of human monocytes towards killer DCs. The observation that IL-15 DCs have killer DC capacity lends further support to their implementation in DC-based immunotherapy protocols. PMID:23284789

  19. Loss of proliferation and antigen presentation activity following internalization of polydispersed carbon nanotubes by primary lung epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandavi Kumari

    Full Text Available Interactions between poly-dispersed acid functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (AF-SWCNTs and primary lung epithelial (PLE cells were studied. Peritoneal macrophages (PMs, known phagocytic cells were used as positive controls in this study. Recovery of live cells from cultures of PLE cells and PMs was significantly reduced in the presence of AF-SWCNTs, in a time and dose dependent manner. Both PLE cells as well as PMs could take up fluorescence tagged AF-SWCNTs in a time dependent manner and this uptake was significantly blocked by cytochalasin D, an agent that blocks the activity of acto-myosin fibers and therefore the phagocytic activity of cells. Confocal microscopic studies confirmed that AF-SWCNTs were internalized by both PLE cells and PMs. Intra-trachially instilled AF-SWCNTs could also be taken up by lung epithelial cells as well as alveolar macrophages. Freshly isolated PLE cells had significant cell division activity and cell cycling studies indicated that treatment with AF-SWCNTs resulted in a marked reduction in S-phase of the cell cycle. In a previously standardized system to study BCG antigen presentation by PLE cells and PMs to sensitized T helper cells, AF-SWCNTs could significantly lower the antigen presentation ability of both cell types. These results show that mouse primary lung epithelial cells can efficiently internalize AF-SWCNTs and the uptake of nanotubes interfered with biological functions of PLE cells including their ability to present BCG antigens to sensitized T helper cells.

  20. Luciferase mRNA Transfection of Antigen Presenting Cells Permits Sensitive Nonradioactive Measurement of Cellular and Humoral Cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tana A. Omokoko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy is rapidly evolving as an effective treatment option for many cancers. With the emerging fields of cancer vaccines and adoptive cell transfer therapies, there is an increasing demand for high-throughput in vitro cytotoxicity assays that efficiently analyze immune effector functions. The gold standard 51Cr-release assay is very accurate but has the major disadvantage of being radioactive. We reveal the development of a versatile and nonradioactive firefly luciferase in vitro transcribed (IVT RNA-based assay. Demonstrating high efficiency, consistency, and excellent target cell viability, our optimized luciferase IVT RNA is used to transfect dividing and nondividing primary antigen presenting cells. Together with the long-lasting expression and minimal background, the direct measurement of intracellular luciferase activity of living cells allows for the monitoring of killing kinetics and displays paramount sensitivity. The ability to cotransfect the IVT RNA of the luciferase reporter and the antigen of interest into the antigen presenting cells and its simple read-out procedure render the assay high-throughput in nature. Results generated were comparable to the 51Cr release and further confirmed the assay’s ability to measure antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The assay’s combined simplicity, practicality, and efficiency tailor it for the analysis of antigen-specific cellular and humoral effector functions during the development of novel immunotherapies.

  1. Distribution of primed T cells and antigen-loaded antigen presenting cells following intranasal immunization in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Ciabattini

    Full Text Available Priming of T cells is a key event in vaccination, since it bears a decisive influence on the type and magnitude of the immune response. T-cell priming after mucosal immunization via the nasal route was studied by investigating the distribution of antigen-loaded antigen presenting cells (APCs and primed antigen-specific T cells. Nasal immunization studies were conducted using the model protein antigen ovalbumin (OVA plus CpG oligodeoxynucleotide adjuvant. Trafficking of antigen-specific primed T cells was analyzed in vivo after adoptive transfer of OVA-specific transgenic T cells in the presence or absence of fingolimod, a drug that causes lymphocytes sequestration within lymph nodes. Antigen-loaded APCs were observed in mediastinal lymph nodes, draining the respiratory tract, but not in distal lymph nodes. Antigen-specific proliferating T cells were first observed within draining lymph nodes, and later in distal iliac and mesenteric lymph nodes and in the spleen. The presence at distal sites was due to migration of locally primed T cells as shown by fingolimod treatment that caused a drastic reduction of proliferated T cells in non-draining lymph nodes and an accumulation of extensively divided T cells within draining lymph nodes. Homing of nasally primed T cells in distal iliac lymph nodes was CD62L-dependent, while entry into mesenteric lymph nodes depended on both CD62L and α4β7, as shown by in vivo antibody-mediated inhibition of T-cell trafficking. These data, elucidating the trafficking of antigen-specific primed T cells to non-draining peripheral and mucosa-associated lymph nodes following nasal immunization, provide relevant insights for the design of vaccination strategies based on mucosal priming.

  2. Self-antigen presentation by dendritic cells and lymphoid stroma and its implications for autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Lukacs-Kornek, Veronika; Turley, Shannon J.

    2010-01-01

    The induction and maintenance of T cell tolerance is essential to prevent autoimmunity. A combination of central and peripheral mechanisms acts to control autoreactive T cells. In secondary lymphoid organs, dendritic cells (DCs) presenting self-antigen were thought to play a major role in the induction of peripheral T cell tolerance. Multiple recent studies have demonstrated that DCs are not absolutely essential to induce and maintain tolerance. Furthermore, it has also been recently shown th...

  3. B lymphocytes as natural antigen-presenting cells (APC) of their own Ig receptor determinants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors use Igk-lb allotype-specific rat T cell proliferation(Pr) in vitro as a model of natural Ig determinants B cell presentation in Ig-specific T-B cell interactions. As shown before Igk-lb-specific responsiveness of AUG(RT-l/sup c/, Igk-la) and WAG (RT-l, Igk-la) rats is controlled by dominant Ir gene, linked to RT-l/sup c/. Only IgG(Igk-lb)-pulsed splenic APC of AUG(responder) but not WAG(non-responder) origin induce specific F1 (WAGxAUG) T cell Pr. The same restriction was observed if purified B cells from Igk-l congeneic AUG-lb and WAG-lb rats were used as APC. B cell presentation was found to be sensitive to high irradiation dose(2000 rad). Anti-RT-l monoclonal antibody inhibition studies suggested RT-lB(I-A) molecule as a main restricting element of Igk-lb T cell recognition. B cell and splenic APC presentation of Igk-lb allotype was not inhibited by poly- and monoclonal anti-Igk-lb antibodies. Allelic exclusion of Igk-lb presentation by B cells from heterozygous F1 (WAG-lbx AUG) rats was demonstrated by panning with antiallotypic reagents. Important, that irradiated anti-Igk-lb T cells induce specific Pr of normal Igk-lb-positive B cells. The data demonstrate MHC-restricted B cell presentation of their own receptor determinants, distinct from serologically-defined epitopes. T cell recognition of these determinants induce specific Pr of Ig-recognizing T cells and Ig-presenting B lymphocytes

  4. Nano-clustering of ligands on surrogate antigen presenting cells modulates T cell membrane adhesion and organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillard, Pierre; Pi, Fuwei; Lellouch, Annemarie C; Limozin, Laurent; Sengupta, Kheya

    2016-03-14

    We investigate the adhesion and molecular organization of the plasma membrane of T lymphocytes interacting with a surrogate antigen presenting cell comprising glass supported ordered arrays of antibody (α-CD3) nano-dots dispersed in a non-adhesive matrix of polyethylene glycol (PEG). The local membrane adhesion and topography, as well as the distribution of the T cell receptors (TCRs) and the kinase ZAP-70, are influenced by dot-geometry, whereas the cell spreading area is determined by the overall average density of the ligands rather than specific characteristics of the dots. TCR clusters are recruited preferentially to the nano-dots and the TCR cluster size distribution has a weak dot-size dependence. On the patterns, the clusters are larger, more numerous, and more enriched in TCRs, as compared to the homogeneously distributed ligands at comparable concentrations. These observations support the idea that non-ligated TCRs residing in the non-adhered parts of the proximal membrane are able to diffuse and enrich the existing clusters at the ligand dots. However, long distance transport is impaired and cluster centralization in the form of a central supramolecular cluster (cSMAC) is not observed. Time-lapse imaging of early cell-surface contacts indicates that the ZAP-70 microclusters are directly recruited to the site of the antibody dots and this process is concomitant with membrane adhesion. These results together point to a complex interplay of adhesion, molecular organization and activation in response to spatially modulated stimulation. PMID:26887857

  5. Hepatitis B virus-like particles access major histocompatibility class I and II antigen presentation pathways in primary dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Jessica M; Cheong, Wan-Shoo; Villadangos, José A; Mintern, Justine D; Netter, Hans J

    2013-04-26

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) represent high density displays of viral proteins that efficiently trigger immunity. VLPs composed of the small hepatitis B virus envelope protein (HBsAgS) are useful vaccine platforms that induce humoral and cellular immune responses. Notably, however, some studies suggest HBsAgS VLPs impair dendritic cell (DC) function. Here we investigated HBsAgS VLP interaction with DC subsets and antigen access to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II antigen presentation pathways in primary DCs. HBsAgS VLPs impaired plasmacytoid DC (pDC) interferon alpha (IFNα) production in response to CpG in vitro, but did not alter conventional DC (cDC) or pDC phenotype when administered in vivo. To assess cellular immune responses, HBsAgS VLPs were generated containing the ovalbumin (OVA) model epitopes OVA(257-264) and OVA(323-339) to access MHCI and MHCII antigen presentation pathways, respectively; both in vitro and following immunisation in vivo. HBsAgS VLP-OVA(257-264) elicited CTL responses in vivo that were not enhanced by inclusion of an additional MHCII helper epitope. HBsAgS VLP-OVA(257-264) administered in vivo was cross-presented by CD8(+) DCs, but not CD8(-) DCs. Therefore, HBsAgS VLPs can deliver antigen to both MHCI and MHCII antigen presentation pathways in primary DCs and promote cytotoxic and helper T cell priming despite their suppressive effect on pDCs. PMID:23473776

  6. Increased generation of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells by manipulating antigen presentation in the thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiqiang; Yang, Lu; Silva, Hernandez Moura; Trzeciak, Alissa; Choi, Yongwon; Schwab, Susan R; Dustin, Michael L; Lafaille, Juan J

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T-cell (Treg) selection in the thymus is essential to prevent autoimmune diseases. Although important rules for Treg selection have been established, there is controversy regarding the degree of self-reactivity displayed by T-cell receptors expressed by Treg cells. In this study we have developed a model of autoimmune skin inflammation, to determine key parameters in the generation of skin-reactive Treg cells in the thymus (tTreg). tTreg development is predominantly AIRE dependent, with an AIRE-independent component. Without the knowledge of antigen recognized by skin-reactive Treg cells, we are able to enhance skin-specific tTreg cell generation using three approaches. First, we increase medullary thymic epithelial cells by using mice lacking osteoprotegerin or by adding TRANCE (RANKL, Tnfsf11). Second, we inject intrathymically peripheral dendritic cells from skin-draining sites. Finally, we inject skin tissue lysates intrathymically. These findings have implications for enhancing the generation of organ-specific Treg cells in autoimmune diseases. PMID:26923114

  7. Sinks, suppressors and antigen presenters: how lymphodepletion enhances T cell-mediated tumor immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Khong, Hung T.; Antony, Paul A.; Douglas C Palmer; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2005-01-01

    Lymphodepletion followed by adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of autologous, tumor-reactive T cells boosts antitumor immunotherapeutic activity in mouse and in humans. In the most recent clinical trials, lymphodepletion together with ACT has an objective response rate of 50% in patients with solid metastatic tumors. The mechanisms underlying this recent advance in cancer immunotherapy are beginning to be elucidated and include: the elimination of cellular cytokine ‘sinks’ for homeostatic γC-cytoki...

  8. Evasion of peptide, but not lipid antigen presentation, through pathogen-induced dendritic cell maturation

    OpenAIRE

    Hava, David L.; van der Wel, Nicole ,; Cohen, Nadia; Dascher, Christopher C.; Houben, Diane; León, Luis; Agarwal, Sandeep; Sugita, Masahiko; van Zon, Maaike; Kent, Sally C.; Shams, Homayoun; Peters, Peter J.; Brenner, Michael B.

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) present lipid and peptide antigens to T cells on CD1 and MHC Class II (MHCII), respectively. The relative contribution of these systems during the initiation of adaptive immunity after microbial infection is not characterized. MHCII molecules normally acquire antigen and rapidly traffic from phagolysosomes to the plasma membrane as part of DC maturation, whereas CD1 molecules instead continually recycle between these sites before, during, and after DC maturation. We find ...

  9. Cytokine profiles and phenotype regulation of antigen presenting cells by genotype-I porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno, Mariona; Darwich, Laila; Diaz, Ivan; de la Torre, Eugenia; Pujols, Joan; Martín, Marga; Inumaru, Shigeki; Cano, Esmeralda; Domingo, Mariano; Montoya, Maria; Mateu, Enric

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the immunological response of antigen presenting cells (APC) to genotype-I isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection by analysing the cytokine profile induced and evaluating the changes taking place upon infection on immunologically relevant cell markers (MHCI, MHCII, CD80/86, CD14, CD16, CD163, CD172a, SWC9). Several types of APC were infected with 39 PRRSV isolates. The results show that different isolates were able to induce different patterns of IL-10 and TNF-α. The four possible phenotypes based on the ability to induce IL-10 and/or TNF-α were observed, although different cell types seemed to have different capabilities. In addition, isolates inducing different cytokine-release profiles on APC could induce different expression of cell markers. PMID:21314968

  10. Cytokine profiles and phenotype regulation of antigen presenting cells by genotype-I porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gimeno Mariona

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study examined the immunological response of antigen presenting cells (APC to genotype-I isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV infection by analysing the cytokine profile induced and evaluating the changes taking place upon infection on immunologically relevant cell markers (MHCI, MHCII, CD80/86, CD14, CD16, CD163, CD172a, SWC9. Several types of APC were infected with 39 PRRSV isolates. The results show that different isolates were able to induce different patterns of IL-10 and TNF-α. The four possible phenotypes based on the ability to induce IL-10 and/or TNF-α were observed, although different cell types seemed to have different capabilities. In addition, isolates inducing different cytokine-release profiles on APC could induce different expression of cell markers.

  11. Type I Interferons as Regulators of Human Antigen Presenting Cell Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Gessani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFNs are pleiotropic cytokines, initially described for their antiviral activity. These cytokines exhibit a long record of clinical use in patients with some types of cancer, viral infections and chronic inflammatory diseases. It is now well established that IFN action mostly relies on their ability to modulate host innate and adaptive immune responses. Work in recent years has begun to elucidate the mechanisms by which type I IFNs modify the immune response, and this is now recognized to be due to effects on multiple cell types, including monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs, NK cells, T and B lymphocytes. An ensemble of results from both animal models and in vitro studies emphasized the key role of type I IFNs in the development and function of DCs, suggesting the existence of a natural alliance between these cytokines and DCs in linking innate to adaptive immunity. The identification of IFN signatures in DCs and their dysregulation under pathological conditions will therefore be pivotal to decipher the complexity of this DC-IFN interaction and to better exploit the therapeutic potential of these cells.

  12. A novel system of artificial antigen-presenting cells efficiently stimulates Flu peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Adoptive immunotherapy depends on relevant numbers of cytolytic T lymphocytes. → An ideal artificial APCs system was successfully prepared in vivo. → Controlled release of IL-2 leads to much more T-cell expansion. → This system is better than general cellular APCs on T-cell expansion. -- Abstract: Therapeutic numbers of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are key effectors in successful adoptive immunotherapy. However, efficient and reproducible methods to meet the qualification remain poor. To address this issue, we designed the artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) system based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). A modified emulsion method was used for the preparation of PLGA particles encapsulating interleukin-2 (IL-2). Biotinylated molecular ligands for recognition and co-stimulation of T cells were attached to the particle surface through the binding of avidin-biotin. These formed the aAPC system. The function of aAPCs in the proliferation of specific CTLs against human Flu antigen was detected by enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT) and MTT staining methods. Finally, we successfully prepared this suitable aAPC system. The results show that IL-2 is released from aAPCs in a sustained manner over 30 days. This dramatically improves the stimulatory capacity of this system as compared to the effect of exogenous addition of cytokine. In addition, our aAPCs promote the proliferation of Flu antigen-specific CTLs more effectively than the autologous cellular APCs. Here, this aAPC platform is proved to be suitable for expansion of human antigen-specific T cells.

  13. A novel system of artificial antigen-presenting cells efficiently stimulates Flu peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Hui [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing 100044 (China); Peng, Ji-Run, E-mail: pengjr@medmail.com.cn [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing 100044 (China); Chen, Peng-Cheng; Gong, Lei [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing 100044 (China); Qiao, Shi-Shi [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China); Wang, Wen-Zhen; Cui, Zhu-Qingqing; Yu, Xin; Wei, Yu-Hua [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing 100044 (China); Leng, Xi-Sheng, E-mail: lengxs2003@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Adoptive immunotherapy depends on relevant numbers of cytolytic T lymphocytes. {yields} An ideal artificial APCs system was successfully prepared in vivo. {yields} Controlled release of IL-2 leads to much more T-cell expansion. {yields} This system is better than general cellular APCs on T-cell expansion. -- Abstract: Therapeutic numbers of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are key effectors in successful adoptive immunotherapy. However, efficient and reproducible methods to meet the qualification remain poor. To address this issue, we designed the artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) system based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). A modified emulsion method was used for the preparation of PLGA particles encapsulating interleukin-2 (IL-2). Biotinylated molecular ligands for recognition and co-stimulation of T cells were attached to the particle surface through the binding of avidin-biotin. These formed the aAPC system. The function of aAPCs in the proliferation of specific CTLs against human Flu antigen was detected by enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT) and MTT staining methods. Finally, we successfully prepared this suitable aAPC system. The results show that IL-2 is released from aAPCs in a sustained manner over 30 days. This dramatically improves the stimulatory capacity of this system as compared to the effect of exogenous addition of cytokine. In addition, our aAPCs promote the proliferation of Flu antigen-specific CTLs more effectively than the autologous cellular APCs. Here, this aAPC platform is proved to be suitable for expansion of human antigen-specific T cells.

  14. An Alternative and Effective HIV Vaccination Approach Based on Inhibition of Antigen Presentation Attenuators in Dendritic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current efforts to develop HIV vaccines that seek to stimulate immune responses have been disappointing, underscoring the inability of natural immune responses to control HIV-1 infection. Here we tested an alternative strategy to induce anti-HIV immune responses by inhibiting a host's natural immune inhibitor. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used small interfering RNA (siRNA to inhibit suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS 1, a key negative regulator of the JAK/STAT pathway, and investigated the effect of this silencing on the ability of dendritic cells (DCs to induce anti-HIV-1 immunity. We found that SOCS1-silenced DCs broadly induced enhanced HIV-1 envelope (Env-specific CD8(+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes and CD4(+ T helper cells, as well as antibody responses, in mice. Importantly, SOCS1-silenced DCs were more resistant to HIV Env-mediated suppression and were capable of inducing memory HIV Env-specific antibody and T cell responses. SOCS1-restricted signaling, as well as production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-12 by DCs, play a critical role in regulating the anti-HIV immune response. Furthermore, the potency of HIV DNA vaccination is significantly enhanced by coimmunization with SOCS1 siRNA expressor DNA. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that SOCS1 functions as an antigen presentation attenuator to control both HIV-1-specific humoral and cellular responses. This study represents the first, to our knowledge, attempt to elicit HIV-specific T cell and antibody responses by inhibiting a host's antigen presentation attenuator, which may open a new and alternative avenue to develop effective therapeutic and prophylactic HIV vaccines.

  15. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 inhibits proliferation but not the suppressive function of regulatory T cells in the absence of antigen-presenting cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoo, A.L.; Joosten, I.; Michels, M.; Woestenenk, R.M.; Preijers, F.W.M.B.; He, X.; Netea, M.G.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Koenen, H.J.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin D3 is known to induce regulatory T (Treg) cells by rendering antigen-presenting cells tolerogenic, its direct effect on human naturally occurring Treg cells is unclear. Here, we investigated if and how 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1,25(OH)2D3] can directly affect the proliferation and functio

  16. Immunomodulation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG)-derived soluble factors on antigen-presenting cells of healthy blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Fiona Long Yan; Kirjavainen, Pirkka V; El-Nezami, Hani

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) cells have been shown to promote type-1 immune responsiveness; however knowledge of immunomodulation of soluble factors secreted by LGG is limited. This is the first study to investigate whether LGG soluble factors promote a comparable immune responsiveness as the bacterial cells. Both treatments - LGG conditioned medium with (CM + LGG) or without (CM) LGG cells, in this study increased expression of several toll-like receptors (TLRs) in all studied cell types and antigen presentation-associated receptor HLA-DR in macrophages and "intermediate" monocytes; but decreased that of activation markers on monocytes and macrophages and production of IL-10, IL-12 and TNFα in macrophages. In co-culture with mononuclear cells, CM increased Th1-type cytokine profile but not as pronounced as CM + LGG. This study suggests that LGG soluble factors exert similar immunomodulatory effects as the intact cells, but cells may be required for optimal type-1 immune responsiveness polarizing capacity of this probiotic strain. PMID:26961406

  17. CD80 and CD86 Differentially Regulate Mechanical Interactions of T-Cells with Antigen-Presenting Dendritic Cells and B-Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tong Seng Lim; James Kang Hao Goh; Alessandra Mortellaro; Chwee Teck Lim; Hämmerling, Günter J.; Paola Ricciardi-Castagnoli

    2012-01-01

    Functional T-cell responses are initiated by physical interactions between T-cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs), including dendritic cells (DCs) and B-cells. T-cells are activated more effectively by DCs than by B-cells, but little is known about the key molecular mechanisms that underpin the particular potency of DC in triggering T-cell responses. To better understand the influence of physical intercellular interactions on APC efficacy in activating T-cells, we used single cell force ...

  18. Antigen presentation by small intestinal epithelial cells uniquely enhances IFN-γ secretion from CD4+ intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs). •sIECs are able to induce antigen specific proliferation of CD4+ IELs. •sIECs induce markedly enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4+ IELs. •Induction of enhanced IFN-γ secretion by sIECs is uniquely observed in CD4+ IELs. -- Abstract: Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs) express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules even in a normal condition, and are known to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) at least in vitro. These findings raised the possibility that sIECs play an important role in inducing immune responses against luminal antigens, especially those of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs). We herein showed that antigenic stimulation with sIECs induced markedly greater secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4+ IELs, but not interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17 although the proliferative response was prominently lower than that with T cell-depleted splenic APCs. In contrast, no enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4+ LPLs and primed splenic CD4+ T cells was observed when stimulated with sIECs. Taken together, these results suggest that sIECs uniquely activate CD4+ IELs and induce remarkable IFN-γ secretion upon antigenic stimulation in vivo

  19. Self-Antigen Presentation by Keratinocytes in the Inflamed Adult Skin Modulates T-Cell Auto-Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Michael; Tounsi, Amel; Gaffal, Evelyn; Bald, Tobias; Papatriantafyllou, Maria; Ludwig, Julia; Pougialis, Georg; Bestvater, Felix; Klotz, Luisa; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Tüting, Thomas; Hämmerling, Günter J; Arnold, Bernd; Oelert, Thilo

    2015-08-01

    Keratinocytes have a pivotal role in the regulation of immune responses, but the impact of antigen presentation by these cells is still poorly understood, particularly in a situation where the antigen will be presented only in adult life. Here, we generated a transgenic mouse model in which keratinocytes exclusively present a myelin basic protein (MBP) peptide covalently linked to the major histocompatibility complex class II β-chain, solely under inflammatory conditions. In these mice, inflammation caused by epicutaneous contact sensitizer treatment resulted in keratinocyte-mediated expansion of MBP-specific CD4(+) T cells in the skin. Moreover, repeated contact sensitizer application preceding a systemic MBP immunization reduced the reactivity of the respective CD4(+) T cells and lowered the symptoms of the resulting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. This downregulation was CD4(+) T-cell-mediated and dependent on the presence of the immune modulator Dickkopf-3. Thus, presentation of a neo self-antigen by keratinocytes in the inflamed, adult skin can modulate CD4(+) T-cell auto-aggression at a distal organ. PMID:25835957

  20. Antigen presentation by small intestinal epithelial cells uniquely enhances IFN-γ secretion from CD4{sup +} intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Ryo; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Iwamoto, Taku; Maeda, Nana; Emoto, Tetsuro; Shimizu, Makoto; Totsuka, Mamoru, E-mail: atotuka@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs). •sIECs are able to induce antigen specific proliferation of CD4{sup +} IELs. •sIECs induce markedly enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} IELs. •Induction of enhanced IFN-γ secretion by sIECs is uniquely observed in CD4{sup +} IELs. -- Abstract: Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs) express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules even in a normal condition, and are known to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) at least in vitro. These findings raised the possibility that sIECs play an important role in inducing immune responses against luminal antigens, especially those of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs). We herein showed that antigenic stimulation with sIECs induced markedly greater secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4{sup +} IELs, but not interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17 although the proliferative response was prominently lower than that with T cell-depleted splenic APCs. In contrast, no enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} LPLs and primed splenic CD4{sup +} T cells was observed when stimulated with sIECs. Taken together, these results suggest that sIECs uniquely activate CD4{sup +} IELs and induce remarkable IFN-γ secretion upon antigenic stimulation in vivo.

  1. Human sunlight-induced basal-cell-carcinoma-associated dendritic cells are deficient in T cell co-stimulatory molecules and are impaired as antigen-presenting cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Nestle, F.O.; Burg, G.; Fäh, J; Wrone-Smith, T; Nickoloff, B. J.

    1997-01-01

    Immune surveillance of skin cancer involves the stimulation of effector T cells by tumor-derived antigens and antigen-presenting cells (APCs). An effective APC must not only display processed antigen in the context of MHC molecules but also express co-stimulatory molecules that are required to fully activate T cells. One of the most common cutaneous neoplasms is basal cell carcinoma. To investigate expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2) on tumor-associated dend...

  2. Neonatal colonisation expands a specific intestinal antigen-presenting cell subset prior to CD4 T-cell expansion, without altering T-cell repertoire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte F Inman

    Full Text Available Interactions between the early-life colonising intestinal microbiota and the developing immune system are critical in determining the nature of immune responses in later life. Studies in neonatal animals in which this interaction can be examined are central to understanding the mechanisms by which the microbiota impacts on immune development and to developing therapies based on manipulation of the microbiome. The inbred piglet model represents a system that is comparable to human neonates and allows for control of the impact of maternal factors. Here we show that colonisation with a defined microbiota produces expansion of mucosal plasma cells and of T-lymphocytes without altering the repertoire of alpha beta T-cells in the intestine. Importantly, this is preceded by microbially-induced expansion of a signal regulatory protein α-positive (SIRPα(+ antigen-presenting cell subset, whilst SIRPα(-CD11R1(+ antigen-presenting cells (APCs are unaffected by colonisation. The central role of intestinal APCs in the induction and maintenance of mucosal immunity implicates SIRPα(+ antigen-presenting cells as orchestrators of early-life mucosal immune development.

  3. Gene Related to Anergy in Lymphocytes (GRAIL) Expression in CD4+ T Cells Impairs Actin Cytoskeletal Organization during T Cell/Antigen-presenting Cell Interactions*

    OpenAIRE

    Schartner, Jill M.; Simonson, William T; Wernimont, Sarah A.; Nettenstrom, Lauren M.; Huttenlocher, Anna; Seroogy, Christine M.

    2009-01-01

    GRAIL (gene related to anergy in lymphocytes), is an E3 ubiquitin ligase with increased expression in anergic CD4+ T cells. The expression of GRAIL has been shown to be both necessary and sufficient for the induction of T cell (T) anergy. To date, several subsets of anergic T cells have demonstrated altered interactions with antigen-presenting cells (APC) and perturbed TCR-mediated signaling. The role of GRAIL in mediating these aspects of T cell anergy remains unclear. We used flow cytometry...

  4. Changes in antigen-presenting cell function in the spleen and lymph nodes of ultraviolet-irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been previously reported that mice exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation exhibit a decrease in splenic antigen-presenting cell (APC) function. The results presented here confirm this observation and further demonstrate that animals exposed daily to UV for extended periods of time (5 weeks instead of 6 days) no longer exhibit this depressed capability. In spite of the depression in splenic APC activity found in 6-day UV-irradiated mice, lymph node APC function from these same animals was elevated compared with that found in the lymph nodes from normal animals. Lymph node APC activity in animals that were splenectomized prior to the UV irradiation, however, was not enhanced over controls. Treatment of animals with a chemical irritant (turpentine) also caused a depression in splenic APC function without modifying lymph node activity. Collectively, our findings suggest that the observed decrease in splenic APC activity, found after the first week of UV exposures, may be attributable to the migration of splenic APC to peripheral lymphoid tissue which drain the site of epidermal inflammation

  5. Rationally designed inhibitor targeting antigen-trimming aminopeptidases enhances antigen presentation and cytotoxic T-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervoudi, Efthalia; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Birtley, James R; Seregin, Sergey S; Reeves, Emma; Kokkala, Paraskevi; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Amalfitano, Andrea; Mavridis, Irene M; James, Edward; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2013-12-01

    Intracellular aminopeptidases endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases 1 and 2 (ERAP1 and ERAP2), and as well as insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) process antigenic epitope precursors for loading onto MHC class I molecules and regulate the adaptive immune response. Their activity greatly affects the antigenic peptide repertoire presented to cytotoxic T lymphocytes and as a result can regulate cytotoxic cellular responses contributing to autoimmunity or immune evasion by viruses and cancer cells. Therefore, pharmacological regulation of their activity is a promising avenue for modulating the adaptive immune response with possible applications in controlling autoimmunity, in boosting immune responses to pathogens, and in cancer immunotherapy. In this study we exploited recent structural and biochemical analysis of ERAP1 and ERAP2 to design and develop phosphinic pseudopeptide transition state analogs that can inhibit this family of enzymes with nM affinity. X-ray crystallographic analysis of one such inhibitor in complex with ERAP2 validated our design, revealing a canonical mode of binding in the active site of the enzyme, and highlighted the importance of the S2' pocket for achieving inhibitor potency. Antigen processing and presentation assays in HeLa and murine colon carcinoma (CT26) cells showed that these inhibitors induce increased cell-surface antigen presentation of transfected and endogenous antigens and enhance cytotoxic T-cell responses, indicating that these enzymes primarily destroy epitopes in those systems. This class of inhibitors constitutes a promising tool for controlling the cellular adaptive immune response in humans by modulating the antigen processing and presentation pathway. PMID:24248368

  6. The T-cell anergy induced by Leishmania amazonensis antigens is related with defective antigen presentation and apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta O. Pinheiro

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania amazonensis is the main agent of diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis, a disease associated with anergic immune responses. In this study we show that the crude antigen of Leishmania amazonensis (LaAg but not L. braziliensis promastigotes (LbAg contains substances that suppress mitogenic and spontaneous proliferative responses of T cells. The suppressive substances in LaAg are thermoresistant (100ºC/1h and partially dependent on protease activity. T cell anergy was not due to a decreased production of growth factors as it was not reverted by addition of exogenous IL-2, IL-4, IFN-gamma or IL-12. LaAg did not inhibit anti-CD3-induced T cell activation, suggesting that anergy was due to a defect in antigen presentation. It was also not due to cell necrosis, but was accompanied by expressive DNA fragmentation in lymph node cells, indicative of apoptosis. Although pre-incubation of macrophages with LaAg prevented their capacity to present antigens, this effect was not due to apoptosis of the former. These results suggest that the T cell anergy found in diffuse leishmaniasis may be the result of parasite antigen-driven apoptosis of those cells following defective antigen presentation.A Leishmania amazonensis é o principal agente etiológico da leishmaniose cutânea difusa, uma doença associada a respostas imunes anérgicas. Neste estudo nós mostramos que o extrato bruto de promastigotas de Leishmania amazonensis (LaAg, mas não de L. braziliensis (LbAg, contém substâncias que suprimem respostas proliferativas, espontâneas e mitogênicas, de células T. As substâncias supressoras no LaAg são termo-resistentes (100°C/1h e parcialmente dependentes da atividade de proteases. A anergia de células T não foi devida à diminuição na produção de fatores de crescimento, uma vez que não foi revertida pela adição de: IL-2, IL-4, IFN-gama ou IL-12. O LaAg não inibiu a ativação de células T induzida por anti-CD3, sugerindo que a anergia

  7. Human parvovirus B19 induced apoptotic bodies contain altered self-antigens that are phagocytosed by antigen presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanoktip Thammasri

    Full Text Available Human parvovirus B19 (B19V from the erythrovirus genus is known to be a pathogenic virus in humans. Prevalence of B19V infection has been reported worldwide in all seasons, with a high incidence in the spring. B19V is responsible for erythema infectiosum (fifth disease commonly seen in children. Its other clinical presentations include arthralgia, arthritis, transient aplastic crisis, chronic anemia, congenital anemia, and hydrops fetalis. In addition, B19V infection has been reported to trigger autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. However, the mechanisms of B19V participation in autoimmunity are not fully understood. B19V induced chronic disease and persistent infection suggests B19V can serve as a model for viral host interactions and the role of viruses in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Here we investigate the involvement of B19V in the breakdown of immune tolerance. Previously, we demonstrated that the non-structural protein 1 (NS 1 of B19V induces apoptosis in non-permissive cells lines and that this protein can cleave host DNA as well as form NS1-DNA adducts. Here we provide evidence that through programmed cell death, apoptotic bodies (ApoBods are generated by B19V NS1 expression in a non-permissive cell line. Characterization of purified ApoBods identified potential self-antigens within them. In particular, signature self-antigens such as Smith, ApoH, DNA, histone H4 and phosphatidylserine associated with autoimmunity were present in these ApoBods. In addition, when purified ApoBods were introduced to differentiated macrophages, recognition, engulfment and uptake occurred. This suggests that B19V can produce a source of self-antigens for immune cell processing. The results support our hypothesis that B19V NS1-DNA adducts, and nucleosomal and lysosomal antigens present in ApoBods created in non-permissive cell lines, are a source of self-antigens.

  8. Host MHC class II+ antigen-presenting cells and CD4 cells are required for CD8-mediated graft-versus-leukemia responses following delayed donor leukocyte infusions

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraverty, Ronjon; Eom, Hyeon-Seok; Sachs, Jessica; Buchli, Jennifer; Cotter, Pete; Hsu, Richard; Zhao, Guiling; Sykes, Megan

    2006-01-01

    Following bone marrow transplantation, delayed donor leukocyte infusions (DLIs) can induce graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effects without graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). These antitumor responses are maximized by the presence of host hematopoietic antigen-presenting cells (APCs) at the time of DLI. Using a tumor-protection model, we demonstrate here that GVL activity following administration of DLIs to established mixed chimeras is dependent primarily on reactivity to allogeneic MHC antigens r...

  9. Immunologic effects of whole body ultraviolet (uv) irradiation. II. Defect in splenic adherent cell antigen presentation for stimulation of T cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultraviolet (uv) irradiation has been shown to alter many parameters of the immunologic reactivity of mice. The altered responsiveness of uv-irradiated mice, as measured by delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and primary in vitro plaque-forming cell (PFC) responses to T-dependent antigens, has recently been correlated with a functional defect in the splenic adherent cell population of these animals. The present studies describe a model of this altered responsiveness, which allows further clarification of the effects of external uv irradiation on the splenic antigen-presenting cell (APC) in its interactions with T cells

  10. PD-L1-deficient mice show that PD-L1 on T cells, antigen-presenting cells, and host tissues negatively regulates T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Latchman, Yvette E.; Liang, Spencer C.; Wu, Yin; Chernova, Tatyana; Sobel, Raymond A.; Klemm, Martina; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Freeman, Gordon J; Sharpe, Arlene H.

    2004-01-01

    Both positive and negative regulatory roles have been suggested for the B7 family member PD-L1(B7-H1). PD-L1 is expressed on antigen-presenting cells (APCs), activated T cells, and a variety of tissues, but the functional significance of PD-L1 on each cell type is not yet clear. To dissect the functions of PD-L1 in vivo, we generated PD-L1-deficient (PD-L1–/–) mice. CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses were markedly enhanced in PD-L1–/– mice compared with wild-type mice in vitro and in vivo. PD-L1–...

  11. Use of human antigen presenting cell gene array profiling to examine the effect of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax on primary human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Jaya; Kampani, Karan; Datta, Suman; Wigdahl, Brian; Flaig, Katherine E; Jain, Pooja

    2006-02-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is etiologically linked to adult T-cell leukemia and a progressive demyelinating disorder termed HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). One of the most striking features of the immune response in HAM/TSP centers on the expansion of HTLV-1-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) compartment in the peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid. More than 90% of the HTLV-1-specific CTLs are directed against the viral Tax (11-19) peptide implying that Tax is available for immune recognition by antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs). DCs obtained from HAM/TSP patients have been shown to be infected with HTLV-1 and exhibit rapid maturation. Therefore, we hypothesized that presentation of Tax peptides by activated DCs to naIve CD8(+) T cells may play an important role in the induction of a Tax-specific CTL response and neurologic dysfunction. In this study, a pathway-specific antigen presenting cell gene array was used to study transcriptional changes induced by exposure of monocyte-derived DCs to extracellular HTLV-1 Tax protein. Approximately 100 genes were differentially expressed including genes encoding toll-like receptors, cell surface receptors, proteins involved in antigen uptake and presentation and adhesion molecules. The differential regulation of chemokines and cytokines characteristic of functional DC activation was also observed by the gene array analyses. Furthermore, the expression pattern of signal transduction genes was also significantly altered. These results have suggested that Tax-mediated DC gene regulation might play a critical role in cellular activation and the mechanisms resulting in HTLV-1-induced disease. PMID:16595374

  12. Analysis of detergent-free lipid rafts isolated from CD4+ T cell line: interaction with antigen presenting cells promotes coalescing of lipid rafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Colleen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipid rafts present on the plasma membrane play an important role in spatiotemporal regulation of cell signaling. Physical and chemical characterization of lipid raft size and assessment of their composition before, and after cell stimulation will aid in developing a clear understanding of their regulatory role in cell signaling. We have used visual and biochemical methods and approaches for examining individual and lipid raft sub-populations isolated from a mouse CD4+ T cell line in the absence of detergents. Results Detergent-free rafts were analyzed before and after their interaction with antigen presenting cells. We provide evidence that the average diameter of lipid rafts isolated from un-stimulated T cells, in the absence of detergents, is less than 100 nm. Lipid rafts on CD4+ T cell membranes coalesce to form larger structures, after interacting with antigen presenting cells even in the absence of a foreign antigen. Conclusions Findings presented here indicate that lipid raft coalescence occurs during cellular interactions prior to sensing a foreign antigen.

  13. CD80 and CD86 differentially regulate mechanical interactions of T-cells with antigen-presenting dendritic cells and B-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Tong Seng; Goh, James Kang Hao; Mortellaro, Alessandra; Lim, Chwee Teck; Hämmerling, Günter J; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Functional T-cell responses are initiated by physical interactions between T-cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs), including dendritic cells (DCs) and B-cells. T-cells are activated more effectively by DCs than by B-cells, but little is known about the key molecular mechanisms that underpin the particular potency of DC in triggering T-cell responses. To better understand the influence of physical intercellular interactions on APC efficacy in activating T-cells, we used single cell force spectroscopy to characterize and compare the mechanical forces of interactions between DC:T-cells and B:T-cells. Following antigen stimulation, intercellular interactions of DC:T-cell conjugates were stronger than B:T-cell interactions. DCs induced higher levels of T-cell calcium mobilization and production of IL-2 and IFNγ than were elicited by B-cells, thus suggesting that tight intercellular contacts are important in providing mechanically stable environment to initiate T-cell activation. Blocking antibodies targeting surface co-stimulatory molecules CD80 or CD86 weakened intercellular interactions and dampen T-cell activation, highlighting the amplificatory roles of CD80/86 in regulating APC:T-cell interactions and T-cell functional activation. The variable strength of mechanical forces between DC:T-cells and B:T-cell interactions were not solely dependent on differential APC expression of CD80/86, since DCs were superior to B-cells in promoting strong interactions with T-cells even when CD80 and CD86 were inhibited. These data provide mechanical insights into the effects of co-stimulatory molecules in regulating APC:T-cell interactions. PMID:23024807

  14. CD80 and CD86 differentially regulate mechanical interactions of T-cells with antigen-presenting dendritic cells and B-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Seng Lim

    Full Text Available Functional T-cell responses are initiated by physical interactions between T-cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs, including dendritic cells (DCs and B-cells. T-cells are activated more effectively by DCs than by B-cells, but little is known about the key molecular mechanisms that underpin the particular potency of DC in triggering T-cell responses. To better understand the influence of physical intercellular interactions on APC efficacy in activating T-cells, we used single cell force spectroscopy to characterize and compare the mechanical forces of interactions between DC:T-cells and B:T-cells. Following antigen stimulation, intercellular interactions of DC:T-cell conjugates were stronger than B:T-cell interactions. DCs induced higher levels of T-cell calcium mobilization and production of IL-2 and IFNγ than were elicited by B-cells, thus suggesting that tight intercellular contacts are important in providing mechanically stable environment to initiate T-cell activation. Blocking antibodies targeting surface co-stimulatory molecules CD80 or CD86 weakened intercellular interactions and dampen T-cell activation, highlighting the amplificatory roles of CD80/86 in regulating APC:T-cell interactions and T-cell functional activation. The variable strength of mechanical forces between DC:T-cells and B:T-cell interactions were not solely dependent on differential APC expression of CD80/86, since DCs were superior to B-cells in promoting strong interactions with T-cells even when CD80 and CD86 were inhibited. These data provide mechanical insights into the effects of co-stimulatory molecules in regulating APC:T-cell interactions.

  15. The HIV-1 gp120/V3 modifies the response of uninfected CD4 T cells to antigen presentation: mapping of the specific transcriptional signature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spandidos Demetrios A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The asymptomatic phase of HIV-1 infection is characterized by a progressive depletion of uninfected peripheral effector/memory CD4+ T cells that subsequently leads to immune dysfunction and AIDS symptoms. We have previously demonstrated that the presence of specific gp120/V3 peptides during antigen presentation can modify the activation of normal T-cells leading to altered immune function. The aim of the present study was to map the specific transcriptional profile invoked by an HIV-1/V3 epitope in uninfected T cells during antigen presentation. Methods We exposed primary human peripheral blood monocytes to V3 lipopeptides using a liposome delivery system followed by a superantigen-mediated antigen presentation system. We then evaluated the changes in the T-cell transcriptional profile using oligonucleotide microarrays and performed Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA and DAVID analysis. The results were validated using realtime PCR, FACS, Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Results Our results revealed that the most highly modulated transcripts could almost entirely be categorized as related to the cell cycle or transcriptional regulation. The most statistically significant enriched categories and networks identified by IPA were associated with cell cycle, gene expression, immune response, infection mechanisms, cellular growth, proliferation and antigen presentation. Canonical pathways involved in energy and cell cycle regulation, and in the co-activation of T cells were also enriched. Conclusions Taken together, these results document a distinct transcriptional profile invoked by the HIV-1/V3 epitope. These data could be invaluable to determine the underlying mechanism by which HIV-1 epitopes interfere with uninfected CD4+ T-cell function causing hyper proliferation and AICD.

  16. Autophagy and ATP-induced anti-apoptosis in antigen presenting cells (APC) follows the cytokine storm in patients after major trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, E Marion; Flacke, Sarah; Liu, Fengguang; Lorenz, Myriam R.; Schilling, Patricia; Nass, Max E.; Foehr, Karl J.; Huber-Lang, Markus; Weiss, Manfred E.

    2011-01-01

    Severe trauma and the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) occur as a result of a cytokine storm which is in part due to ATP released from damaged tissue. This pathology also leads to increased numbers of immature antigen presenting cells (APC) sharing properties of dendritic cells (DC) or macrophages (MΦ). The occurrence of immature APC appears to coincide with the reactivation of herpes virus infections such as Epstein Barr virus (EBV). The aim of this study was the comparative an...

  17. Prolonged antigen presentation by immune complex-binding dendritic cells programs the proliferative capacity of memory CD8 T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Beatriz; Ballesteros-Tato, André; Randall, Troy D; Lund, Frances E

    2014-07-28

    The commitment of naive CD8 T cells to effector or memory cell fates can occur after a single day of antigenic stimulation even though virus-derived antigens (Ags) are still presented by DCs long after acute infection is resolved. However, the effects of extended Ag presentation on CD8 T cells are undefined and the mechanisms that regulate prolonged Ag presentation are unknown. We showed that the sustained presentation of two different epitopes from influenza virus by DCs prevented the premature contraction of the primary virus-specific CD8 T cell response. Although prolonged Ag presentation did not alter the number of memory CD8 T cells that developed, it was essential for programming the capacity of these cells to proliferate, produce cytokines, and protect the host after secondary challenge. Importantly, prolonged Ag presentation by DCs was dependent on virus-specific, isotype-switched antibodies (Abs) that facilitated the capture and cross-presentation of viral Ags by FcγR-expressing DCs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that B cells and Abs can regulate the quality and functionality of a subset of antiviral CD8 T cell memory responses and do so by promoting sustained Ag presentation by DCs during the contraction phase of the primary T cell response. PMID:25002751

  18. Availability of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 to antigen presenting cells controls the balance between regulatory and inflammatory T cell responses

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffery, Louisa E.; Wood, Alice M; Qureshi, Omar S.; Hou, Tie Zheng; Gardner, David; Briggs, Zoe; Kaur, Satdip; Raza, Karim; Sansom, David M

    2012-01-01

    1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), the active form of vitamin D, exerts potent effects on several tissues including cells of the immune system, where it affects T cell activation, differentiation and migration. The circulating, inactive form of vitamin D, 25(OH)D3, is generally used as an indication of “vitamin D status”. However, utilization of this precursor depends on its uptake by cells and subsequent conversion by the enzyme 25(OH)D3-1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1) into active 1,25(OH)2D3....

  19. T-cell brain infiltration and immature antigen-presenting cells in transgenic models of Alzheimer's disease-like cerebral amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, M T; Merlini, M; Späni, C; Gericke, C; Schweizer, N; Enzmann, G; Engelhardt, B; Kulic, L; Suter, T; Nitsch, R M

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral beta-amyloidosis, one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD), elicits a well-characterised, microglia-mediated local innate immune response. In contrast, it is not clear whether cells of the adaptive immune system, in particular T-cells, react to cerebral amyloidosis in AD. Even though parenchymal T-cells have been described in post-mortem brains of AD patients, it is not known whether infiltrating T-cells are specifically recruited to the extracellular deposits of beta-amyloid, and whether they are locally activated into proliferating, effector cells upon interaction with antigen-presenting cells (APCs). To address these issues we have analysed by confocal microscopy and flow-cytometry the localisation and activation status of both T-cells and APCs in transgenic (tg) mice models of AD-like cerebral amyloidosis. Increased numbers of infiltrating T-cells were found in amyloid-burdened brain regions of tg mice, with concomitant up-regulation of endothelial adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, compared to non-tg littermates. The infiltrating T-cells in tg brains did not co-localise with amyloid plaques, produced less interferon-gamma than those in controls and did not proliferate locally. Bona-fide dendritic cells were virtually absent from the brain parenchyma of both non-tg and tg mice, and APCs from tg brains showed an immature phenotype, with accumulation of MHC-II in intracellular compartments. These results indicate that cerebral amyloidosis promotes T-cell infiltration but interferes with local antigen presentation and T-cell activation. The inability of the brain immune surveillance to orchestrate a protective immune response to amyloid-beta peptide might contribute to the accumulation of amyloid in the progression of the disease. PMID:26872418

  20. Human sunlight-induced basal-cell-carcinoma-associated dendritic cells are deficient in T cell co-stimulatory molecules and are impaired as antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestle, F O; Burg, G; Fäh, J; Wrone-Smith, T; Nickoloff, B J

    1997-02-01

    Immune surveillance of skin cancer involves the stimulation of effector T cells by tumor-derived antigens and antigen-presenting cells (APCs). An effective APC must not only display processed antigen in the context of MHC molecules but also express co-stimulatory molecules that are required to fully activate T cells. One of the most common cutaneous neoplasms is basal cell carcinoma. To investigate expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2) on tumor-associated dendritic cells (TADCs), cryosections from basal cell carcinomas were immunostained. In basal cell carcinomas, only 1 to 2% of intratumor and 5 to 10% of peritumor APCs expressed CD80 or CD86. In contrast, biopsies of immunological/inflammatory dermatoses revealed that 38 to 73% of APCs expressed CD80 and CD86. To further evaluate their phenotype and function, TADCs were isolated from tissue samples of basal cell carcinomas; they were non-adherent to plastic, displayed a typical dendritic morphology, and expressed high levels of major histocompatibility class II molecules on their surface. When TADCs were compared with dendritic cells from blood for presentation of superantigens (staphylococcal enterotoxins A and B) to resting autologous T cells, TADCs were consistently weaker stimulators of T cell proliferation than blood dendritic cells. When analyzed by flow cytometry, TADCs expressed high levels of HLA-DR, but only 5 to 10% co-expressed CD80 or CD86. A 3-day culture in granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor-containing medium partially reconstituted the TADC expression of CD80 and CD86 as well as their immunostimulatory capacity. Thus, in this common skin cancer, although there are prominent collections of HLA-DR-positive APCs in and around tumor cells, the TADCs are deficient in important co-stimulatory molecules as well as being weak stimulators of T cell proliferation. The paucity of co-stimulatory molecule expression and functional activity of TADCs may explain why

  1. Target antigen expression on a professional antigen-presenting cell induces superior proliferative antitumor T-cell responses via chimeric T-cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossig, Claudia; Bär, Annette; Pscherer, Sibylle; Altvater, Bianca; Pule, Martin; Rooney, Cliona M; Brenner, Malcolm K; Jürgens, Heribert; Vormoor, Josef

    2006-01-01

    Human T cells expressing tumor antigen-specific chimeric receptors fail to sustain their growth and activation in vivo, which greatly reduces their therapeutic value. The defective proliferative response to tumor cells in vitro can partly be overcome by concomitant CD28 costimulatory signaling. We investigated whether T-cell activation via chimeric receptors (chRec) can be further improved by ligand expression on antigen-presenting cells of B-cell origin. We generated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) expressing a CD19-specific chRec. These CTLs are provided with native receptor stimulation by autologous EBV-transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) but exclusively with chRec (CD19-specific) stimulation by allogeneic, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched CD19+ LCLs. CD19zeta-transduced EBV-specific CTLs specifically lysed both allogeneic EBV targets and CD19+ tumor cells through the chRec in a major histocompatibility complex-independent manner, while maintaining their ability to recognize autologous EBV targets through the native T-cell receptor. The transduced CTLs failed to proliferate in response to CD19+ tumor targets even in the presence of CD28 costimulatory signaling. By contrast, CD19 expressed on HLA-mismatched LCL-induced T-cell activation and long-term proliferation that essentially duplicated the result from native receptor stimulation with autologous LCLs, suggesting that a deficit of costimulatory molecules on target cells in addition to CD28 is indeed responsible for inadequate chRec-mediated T-cell function. Hence, effective tumor immunotherapy may be favored if engagement of the chRec on modified T cells is complemented by interaction with multiple costimulator molecules. The use of T cells with native specificity for EBV may be one means of attaining this objective. PMID:16365597

  2. Intracellular transport of MHC class II and associated invariant chain in antigen presenting cells from AP-3-deficient mocha mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla, L M; Richter, S S; Miller, J

    2001-06-15

    MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation requires trafficking of newly synthesized class II-invariant chain complexes from the trans-Golgi network to endosomal, peptide-loading compartments. This transport is mediated by dileucine-like motifs within the cytosolic tail of the invariant chain. Although these signals have been well characterized, the cytosolic proteins that interact with these dileucine signals and mediate Golgi sorting and endosomal transport have not been identified. Recently, an adaptor complex, AP-3, has been identified that interacts with dileucine motifs and mediates endosomal/lysosomal transport in yeast, Drosophila, and mammals. In this report, we have assessed class II-invariant chain trafficking in a strain of mice (mocha) which lacks expression of AP-3. Our studies demonstrate that the lack of AP-3 does not affect the kinetics of invariant chain degradation, the route of class II-invariant chain transport, or the rate and extent of class II-peptide binding as assessed by the generation of SDS-stable dimers. The possible role of other known or unknown adaptor complexes in class II-invariant chain transport is discussed. PMID:11520080

  3. Effects of low dose X-ray irradiation on antigen presentation and IL-12 secretion in human dendritic cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the effects of low dose X-ray irradiation on the ability of antigen presentation and IL-12 secretion in human dendritic cells that had been cultured for different time in vitro. Methods: The human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were collected and differentiated to dendritic cells (DCs) by rhGM-CSF and rhIL-4 treatment in vitro. The DCs were divided into 3 groups, group A: DCs were cultured for 2 d and then irradiated with 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.5 Gy X-rays; group B: DCs were cultured for 6 d and then irradiated as above; group C:DCs were cultured without irradiation.At 8 d of cell culture, the DCs were applied to activate T cells and CCK-8 was used to detect MLR (mixed lymphocyte reaction), and the antigen presentation ability of DCs was evaluated. MTT assay was also used to test the cell-killing effect of the activated T-cells on A549 cells. IL-12 in the culture medium of DCs was detected by ELISA. Results: After irradiation with 0.2 and 0.5 Gy X-rays, the antigen presentation ability of DCs was decreased in group A (t=2.79 and 3.71, P<0.05), but significantly increased in group B (t=3.60 and 3.11, P<0.05). The ability of the T cell activation was detected and the proliferation of A549 cells was slightly inhibited by the DCs in group A (t=2.89 and 2.91, P<0.05), but was obviously inhibited by the DCs in group B (t=2.91 and 2.82, P<0.05). Meanwhile,the level of IL-12 was dramatically decreased in group A (t=4.44 and 6.93, P<0.05), but was increased in group B (t=3.51 and 4.12, P<0.05). Conclusions: The abilities of antigen presentation and proliferation inhibition of DCs could be down-regulated by low dose (<0.5 Gy) of X-ray irradiation at the early stage of DCs, but was up-regulated at the late stage of DCs culture. (authors)

  4. Human antigen-presenting cells respond differently to gut-derived probiotic bacteria but mediate similar strain-dependent NK and T cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Lisbeth N; Zeuthen, Louise H; Ferlazzo, Guido; Frøkiaer, Hanne

    2007-12-01

    The intestinal microbiota is essential for homeostasis of the local and systemic immune system, and particularly strains of lactic acid bacteria and Escherichia coli have been shown to have balancing effects on inflammatory conditions such as allergy and inflammatory bowel disease. However, in vitro assessment of the immunomodulatory effects of distinct strains may depend strongly on the cell type used as a model. To select the most appropriate model for screening of beneficial bacteria in human cells, the response to strains of intestinal bacteria of three types of antigen-presenting cells (APC) was compared; blood myeloid dendritic cells (DC), monocyte-derived DC and monocytes, and the effector response of natural killer cells and naïve T cells was characterized. Maturation induced by gut-derived bacteria differed between APC, with blood DC and monocytes responding with the production of IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha to bacteria, which elicited mainly IL-10 in monocyte-derived DC. In contrast, comparable IFN-gamma production patterns were found in both natural killer cells and T cells induced by all bacteria-matured APC. An inhibitory effect of certain strains on this IFN-gamma production was also mediated by all types of APC. The most potent responses were induced by monocyte-derived DC, which thus constitute a sensitive screening model. PMID:17903206

  5. Tunable chemokine production by antigen presenting dendritic cells in response to changes in regulatory T cell frequency in mouse reactive lymph nodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Dal Secco

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although evidence exists that regulatory T cells (Tregs can suppress the effector phase of immune responses, it is clear that their major role is in suppressing T cell priming in secondary lymphoid organs. Recent experiments using two photon laser microscopy indicate that dendritic cells (DCs are central to Treg cell function and that the in vivo mechanisms of T cell regulation are more complex than those described in vitro. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we have sought to determine whether and how modulation of Treg numbers modifies the lymph node (LN microenvironment. We found that pro-inflammatory chemokines -- CCL2 (MCP-1 and CCL3 (MIP-la -- are secreted in the LN early (24 h after T cell activation, that this secretion is dependent on antigen-specific DC-T cell interactions, and that it was inversely related to the frequency of Tregs specific for the same antigen. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Tregs modify the chemoattractant properties of antigen-presenting DCs, which, as the frequency of Tregs increases, fail to produce CCL2 and CCL3 and to attract antigen-specific T cells. CONCLUSIONS: These results substantiate a major role of Tregs in LN patterning during antigen-specific immune responses.

  6. Immunomodulation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG)-derived soluble factors on antigen-presenting cells of healthy blood donors

    OpenAIRE

    Fiona Long Yan Fong; Kirjavainen, Pirkka V.; Hani El-Nezami

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) cells have been shown to promote type-1 immune responsiveness; however knowledge of immunomodulation of soluble factors secreted by LGG is limited. This is the first study to investigate whether LGG soluble factors promote a comparable immune responsiveness as the bacterial cells. Both treatments − LGG conditioned medium with (CM + LGG) or without (CM) LGG cells, in this study increased expression of several toll-like receptors (TLRs) in all studied cell types...

  7. Rainbow trout CK9, a CCL25-like ancient chemokine that attracts and regulates B cells and macrophages, the main antigen presenting cells in fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilino, Carolina; Granja, Aitor G.; Castro, Rosario; Wang, Tiehui; Abos, Beatriz; Parra, David; Secombes, Christopher J.; Tafalla, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    CK9 is a rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) CC chemokine phylogenetically related to mammalian CCL25. Although CK9 is known to be transcriptionally regulated in response to inflammation particularly in mucosal tissues, its functionality has never been revealed. In the current work, we have demonstrated that CK9 is chemoattractant for antigen presenting cells (APCs) expressing major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) on the cell surface. Among these APCs, CK9 has a strong chemotactic capacity for both B cells (IgM+ and IgT+) and macrophages. Along with its chemotactic capacities, CK9 modulated the MHC II turnover of B lymphocytes and up-regulated the phagocytic capacity of both IgM+ cells and macrophages. Although CK9 had no lymphoproliferative effects, it increased the survival of IgT+ lymphocytes. Furthermore, we have established that the chemoattractant capacity of CK9 is strongly increased after pre-incubation of leukocytes with a T-independent antigen, whereas B cell receptor (BCR) cross-linking strongly abrogated their capacity to migrate to CK9, indicating that CK9 preferentially attracts B cells at the steady state or under BCR-independent stimulation. These results point to CK9 being a key regulator of B lymphocyte trafficking in rainbow trout, able to modulate innate functions of teleost B lymphocytes and macrophages. PMID:27003360

  8. Inhibition of antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells resulting from UV irradiation of murine skin is restored by in vitro photorepair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposing skin to UVB (280-320 nm) radiation suppresses contact hypersensitivity by a mechanism that involves an alteration in the activity of cutaneous antigen-presenting cells (APC). UV-induced DNA damage appears to be an important molecular trigger for this effect. The specific target cells in the skin that sustain DNA damage relevant to the immunosuppressive effect have yet to be identified. We tested the hypothesis that UV-induced DNA damage in the cutaneous APC was responsible for their impaired ability to present antigen after in vivo UV irradiation. Cutaneous APC were collected from the draining lymph nodes of UVB-irradiated, hapten-sensitized mice and incubated in vitro with liposomes containing a photolyase, which, upon absorption of photoreactivating light, splits UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Photosome treatment followed by photoreactivating light reduced the number of dimer-containing APC, restored the in vivo antigen-presenting activity of the draining lymph node cells, and blocked the induction of suppressor T cells. Neither Photosomes nor photoreactivating light alone, nor photoreactivating light given before Photosomes, restored APC activity, and Photosomes treatment did not reverse the impairment of APC function when isopsoralen plus UVA (320-400 nm) radiation was used instead of UVB. These controls indicate that the restoration of APC function matched the requirements of Photosome-mediated DNA repair for dimers and post-treatment photoreactivating light. These results provide compelling evidence that it is UV-induced DNA damage in cutaneous APC that leads to reduced immune function

  9. Antigen-presenting cells represent targets for R5 HIV-1 infection in the first trimester pregnancy uterine mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Marlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During the first trimester of pregnancy, HIV-1 mother-to-child transmission is relatively rare despite the permissivity of placental cells to cell-to-cell HIV-1 infection. The placenta interacts directly with maternal uterine cells (decidual cells but the physiological role of the decidua in the control of HIV-1 transmission and whether decidua could be a source of infected cells is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To answer to this question, decidual mononuclear cells were exposed to HIV-1 in vitro. Decidual cells were shown to be more susceptible to infection by an R5 HIV-1, as compared to an X4 HIV-1. Infected cells were identified by flow cytometry analysis. The results showed that CD14(+ cells were the main targets of HIV-1 infection in the decidua. These infected CD14(+ cells expressed DC-SIGN, CD11b, CD11c, the Fc gamma receptor CD16, CD32 and CD64, classical MHC class-I and class-II and maturation and activation molecules CD83, CD80 and CD86. The permissivity of decidual tissue was also evaluated by histoculture. Decidual tissue was not infected by X4 HIV-1 but was permissive to R5 HIV-1. Different profiles of infection were observed depending on tissue localization. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The presence of HIV-1 target cells in the decidua in vitro and the low rate of in utero mother-to-child transmission during the first trimester of pregnancy suggest that a natural control occurs in vivo limiting cell-to-cell infection of the placenta and consequently infection of the fetus.

  10. Dendritic Cell Migration and Antigen Presentation Are Coordinated by the Opposing Functions of the Tetraspanins CD82 and CD37.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Eleanor L; Wee, Janet L; Demaria, Maria C; Blakeley, Jessica; Ho, Po Ki; Vega-Ramos, Javier; Villadangos, Jose A; van Spriel, Annemiek B; Hickey, Michael J; Hämmerling, Günther J; Wright, Mark D

    2016-02-01

    This study supports a new concept where the opposing functions of the tetraspanins CD37 and CD82 may coordinate changes in migration and Ag presentation during dendritic cell (DC) activation. We have previously published that CD37 is downregulated upon monocyte-derived DC activation, promotes migration of both skin and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs), and restrains Ag presentation in splenic and BMDCs. In this article, we show that CD82, the closest phylogenetic relative to CD37, appears to have opposing functions. CD82 is upregulated upon activation of BMDCs and monocyte-derived DCs, restrains migration of skin and BMDCs, supports MHC class II maturation, and promotes stable interactions between T cells and splenic DCs or BMDCs. The underlying mechanism involves the rearrangement of the cytoskeleton via a differential activation of small GTPases. Both CD37(-/-) and CD82(-/-) BMDCs lack cellular projections, but where CD37(-/-) BMDCs spread poorly on fibronectin, CD82(-/-) BMDCs are large and spread to a greater extent than wild-type BMDCs. At the molecular level, CD82 is a negative regulator of RhoA, whereas CD37 promotes activation of Rac-1; both tetraspanins negatively regulate Cdc42. Thus, this study identifies a key aspect of DC biology: an unactivated BMDC is CD37(hi)CD82(lo), resulting in a highly motile cell with a limited ability to activate naive T cells. By contrast, a late activated BMDC is CD37(lo)CD82(hi), and thus has modified its migratory, cytoskeletal, and Ag presentation machinery to become a cell superbly adapted to activating naive T cells. PMID:26729805

  11. Cathepsin B in antigen-presenting cells controls mediators of the Th1 immune response during Leishmania major infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris J Gonzalez-Leal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Resistance and susceptibility to Leishmania major infection in the murine model is determined by the capacity of the host to mount either a protective Th1 response or a Th2 response associated with disease progression. Previous reports involving the use of cysteine cathepsin inhibitors indicated that cathepsins B (Ctsb and L (Ctsl play important roles in Th1/Th2 polarization during L. major infection in both susceptible and resistant mouse strains. Although it was hypothesized that these effects are a consequence of differential patterns of antigen processing, the mechanisms underlying these differences were not further investigated. Given the pivotal roles that dendritic cells and macrophages play during Leishmania infection, we generated bone-marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC and macrophages (BMM from Ctsb-/- and Ctsl-/- mice, and studied the effects of Ctsb and Ctsl deficiency on the survival of L. major in infected cells. Furthermore, the signals used by dendritic cells to instruct Th cell polarization were addressed: the expression of MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules, and cytokine production. We found that Ctsb-/- BMDC express higher levels of MHC class II molecules than wild-type (WT and Ctsl-/- BMDC, while there were no significant differences in the expression of co-stimulatory molecules between cathepsin-deficient and WT cells. Moreover, both BMDC and BMM from Ctsb-/- mice significantly up-regulated the levels of interleukin 12 (IL-12 expression, a key Th1-inducing cytokine. These findings indicate that Ctsb-/- BMDC display more pro-Th1 properties than their WT and Ctsl-/- counterparts, and therefore suggest that Ctsb down-regulates the Th1 response to L. major. Moreover, they propose a novel role for Ctsb as a regulator of cytokine expression.

  12. Constitutive expression of a costimulatory ligand on antigen-presenting cells in the nervous system drives demyelinating disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zehntner, Simone P; Brisebois, Marcel; Tran, Elise;

    2003-01-01

    that transgenic mice constitutively expressing the costimulatory ligand B7.2/CD86 on microglia in the central nervous system (CNS) and on related cells in the proximal peripheral nervous tissue spontaneously develop autoimmune demyelinating disease. Disease-affected nervous tissue in transgenic mice showed...

  13. Pharmacologic IKK/NF-κB inhibition causes antigen presenting cells to undergo TNFα dependent ROS-mediated programmed cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilstra, Jeremy S.; Gaddy, Daniel F.; Zhao, Jing; Davé, Shaival H.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Plevy, Scott E.; Robbins, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Monocyte-derived antigen presenting cells (APC) are central mediators of the innate and adaptive immune response in inflammatory diseases. As such, APC are appropriate targets for therapeutic intervention to ameliorate certain diseases. APC differentiation, activation and functions are regulated by the NF-κB family of transcription factors. Herein, we examined the effect of NF-κB inhibition, via suppression of the IκB Kinase (IKK) complex, on APC function. Murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and dendritic cells (DC), as well as macrophage and DC lines, underwent rapid programmed cell death (PCD) after treatment with several IKK/NF-κB inhibitors through a TNFα-dependent mechanism. PCD was induced proximally by reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, which causes a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of a caspase signaling cascade. NF-κB-inhibition-induced PCD of APC may be a key mechanism through which therapeutic targeting of NF-κB reduces inflammatory pathologies.

  14. Freezing and thawing of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells does not later their immunophenotype and antigen presentation characteristics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mendoza, Luis; Bubeník, Jan; Indrová, Marie; Bieblová, Jana; Vonka, V.; Šímová, Jana

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 6 (2002), s. 242-245. ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC7148; GA ČR GA301/00/0114; GA ČR GA301/01/0985; GA AV ČR IAA7052002; GA AV ČR IAA5052203 Grant ostatní: Liga proti rakovině(CZ) - Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : dendritic cells * tumour lysate * DC priming Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 0.615, year: 2002

  15. Expression of Scavenger receptor A on antigen presenting cells is important for CD4+ T-cells proliferation in EAE mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levy-Barazany Hilit

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple sclerosis (MS is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS characterized by damage to the neuronal myelin sheath. One of the key effectors for inflammatory injury is the antigen-presenting cell (APC. The class A scavenger receptor (SRA, constitutively expressed by APCs, such as macrophages and dendritic cells in peripheral tissues and the CNS, was shown to play a role in the phagocytosis of myelin; however, the role of SRA in the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE and autoimmune reaction in the periphery has not yet been studied. Methods We investigated EAE progression in wild-type (WT vs. SRA−/− mice using clinical score measurements and characterized CNS pathology using staining. Furthermore, we assessed SRA role in mediating anti myelin pro-inflammatory response in cell cultures. Results We discovered that EAE progression and CNS demyelination were significantly reduced in SRA−/− mice compared to WT mice. In addition, there was a reduction of infiltrating peripheral immune cells, such as T cells and macrophages, in the CNS lesion of SRA−/− mice, which was associated with reduced astrogliosis. Immunological assessment showed that SRA deficiency resulted in significant reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines that play a major role in EAE progression, such as IL-2, IFN-gamma, IL-17 and IL-6. Furthermore, we discovered that SRA−/− APCs showed impairments in activation and in their ability to induce pro-inflammatory CD4+ T cell proliferation. Conclusion Expression of SRA on APCs is important for CD4+ T-cells proliferation in EAE mouse model. Further studies of SRA-mediated cellular pathways in APCs may offer useful insights into the development of MS and other autoimmune diseases, providing future avenues for therapeutic intervention.

  16. Mitomycin C-treated antigen-presenting cells as a tool for control of allograft rejection and autoimmunity: from bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terness, Peter; Kleist, Christian; Simon, Helmut; Sandra-Petrescu, Flavius; Ehser, Sandra; Chuang, Jing-Jing; Mohr, Elisabeth; Jiga, Lucian; Greil, Johann; Opelz, Gerhard

    2009-07-01

    Cells have been previously used in experimental models for tolerance induction in organ transplantation and autoimmune diseases. One problem with the therapeutic use of cells is standardization of their preparation. We discuss an immunosuppressive strategy relying on cells irreversibly transformed by a chemotherapeutic drug. Dendritic cells (DCs) of transplant donors pretreated with mitomycin C (MMC) strongly prolonged rat heart allograft survival when injected into recipients before transplantation. Likewise, MMC-DCs loaded with myelin basic protein suppressed autoreactive T cells of MS patients in vitro and prevented experimental autoimmune encephalitis in mice. Comprehensive gene microarray analysis identified genes that possibly make up the suppressive phenotype, comprising glucocorticoid leucine zipper, immunoglobulin-like transcript 3, CD80, CD83, CD86, and apoptotic genes. Based on these findings, a hypothetical model of tolerance induction by MMC-treated DCs is delineated. Finally, we describe the first clinical application of MMC-treated monocyte-enriched donor cells in an attempt to control the rejection of a haploidentical stem cell transplant in a sensitized recipient and discuss the pros and cons of using MMC-treated antigen-presenting cells for tolerance induction. Although many questions remain, MMC-treated cells are a promising clinical tool for controlling allograft rejection and deleterious immune responses in autoimmune diseases. PMID:19393276

  17. Enhancement in number and function of antigen-presenting cells in the lymphatic tissue of rats after in vivo administration of diphenylhydantoin (DPH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrasch, S; Wacker, H H; Zou, P; Bechtold, D; Brittinger, G

    1989-01-01

    We present a monoclonal IgG1 antibody, KiMy1R, which is specific for macrophages and their derivatives in the lymphatic tissue of the rat, and evaluate the distribution of subsets of mononuclear cells in popliteal and para-aortal lymph nodes of Wistar rats after injection of 50 mg DPH into the hindpads. Compared with resting lymphatic tissue and lymph nodes of animals treated with phenobarbital, DPH induced a significant increase (P less than 0.01) of the proportion of phagocytic cells. Furthermore, the soluble antigen alkaline phosphatase was traced after inoculation into the footpads of rats: in locoregional lymph nodes the percentage (mean 12.8/10(3] and the total number (mean 476 x 10(3) cells/lymph node) of cells with membrane-bound or intracytoplasmic alkaline phosphatase, as detected by a monoclonal anti-alkaline phosphatase antibody, were significantly higher (P less than 0.001) in animals pretreated with DPH than in rats pretreated with phenobarbital (mean 2.1/10(3); 31.2 x 10(3) cells/lymph node) and in untreated animals (mean 1.9/10(3); 4.1 x 10(3) cells/lymph node). If verified in humans, the effect of DPH in enhancing the number and function of macrophages and other antigen-presenting cells may exert favourable effects in patients with impairment of the mononuclear phagocytic system. Images Fig. 1 PMID:2805417

  18. Candida soluble cell wall β-glucan facilitates ovalbumin-induced allergic airway inflammation in mice: Possible role of antigen-presenting cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamura Hiroshi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although fungi have been implicated as initiating/deteriorating factors for allergic asthma, their contributing components have not been fully elucidated. We previously isolated soluble β-glucan from Candida albicans (CSBG (Ohno et al., 2007. In the present study, the effects of CSBG exposure on airway immunopathology in the presence or absence of other immunogenic allergen was investigated in vivo, and their cellular mechanisms were analyzed both in vivo and in vitro. Methods In vivo, ICR mice were divided into 4 experimental groups: vehicle, CSBG (25 μg/animal, ovalbumin (OVA: 2 μg/animal, and CSBG + OVA were repeatedly administered intratracheally. The bronchoalveolar lavage cellular profile, lung histology, levels of cytokines and chemokines in the lung homogenates, the expression pattern of antigen-presenting cell (APC-related molecules in the lung digests, and serum immunoglobulin values were studied. In vitro, the impacts of CSBG (0–12.5 μg/ml on the phenotype and function of immune cells such as splenocytes and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs were evaluated in terms of cell proliferation, the surface expression of APC-related molecules, and OVA-mediated T-cell proliferating activity. Results In vivo, repeated pulmonary exposure to CSBG induced neutrophilic airway inflammation in the absence of OVA, and markedly exacerbated OVA-related eosinophilic airway inflammation with mucus metaplasia in mice, which was concomitant with the amplified lung expression of Th2 cytokines and IL-17A and chemokines related to allergic response. Exposure to CSBG plus OVA increased the number of cells bearing MHC class II with or without CD80 in the lung compared to that of others. In vitro, CSBG significantly augmented splenocyte proliferation in the presence or absence of OVA. Further, CSBG increased the expression of APC-related molecules such as CD80, CD86, and DEC205 on BMDCs and amplified OVA-mediated T-cell

  19. Characterization of Yellow Fever Virus Infection of Human and Non-human Primate Antigen Presenting Cells and Their Interaction with CD4+ T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Yu; McArthur, Monica A; Cohen, Melanie; Jahrling, Peter B; Janosko, Krisztina B; Josleyn, Nicole; Kang, Kai; Zhang, Tengfei; Holbrook, Michael R

    2016-05-01

    Humans infected with yellow fever virus (YFV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, can develop illness ranging from a mild febrile disease to hemorrhagic fever and death. The 17D vaccine strain of YFV was developed in the 1930s, has been used continuously since development and has proven very effective. Genetic differences between vaccine and wild-type viruses are few, yet viral or host mechanisms associated with protection or disease are not fully understood. Over the past 20 years, a number of cases of vaccine-associated disease have been identified following vaccination with 17D; these cases have been correlated with reduced immune status at the time of vaccination. Recently, several studies have evaluated T cell responses to vaccination in both humans and non-human primates, but none have evaluated the response to wild-type virus infection. In the studies described here, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and dendritic cells (MoDC) from both humans and rhesus macaques were evaluated for their ability to support infection with either wild-type Asibi virus or the 17D vaccine strain and the host cytokine and chemokine response characterized. Human MoDC and MDM were also evaluated for their ability to stimulate CD4+ T cells. It was found that MoDC and MDM supported viral replication and that there were differential cytokine responses to infection with either wild-type or vaccine viruses. Additionally, MoDCs infected with live 17D virus were able to stimulate IFN-γ and IL-2 production in CD4+ T cells, while cells infected with Asibi virus were not. These data demonstrate that wild-type and vaccine YFV stimulate different responses in target antigen presenting cells and that wild-type YFV can inhibit MoDC activation of CD4+ T cells, a critical component in development of protective immunity. These data provide initial, but critical insight into regulatory capabilities of wild-type YFV in development of disease. PMID:27191161

  20. Runx1 Regulates Myeloid Precursor Differentiation Into Osteoclasts Without Affecting Differentiation Into Antigen Presenting or Phagocytic Cells in Both Males and Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglia, David N; Yang, Xiaochuan; Kalinowski, Judith; Jastrzebski, Sandra; Drissi, Hicham; Lorenzo, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Runt-related transcription factor 1 (Runx1), a master regulator of hematopoiesis, is expressed in preosteoclasts. Previously we evaluated the bone phenotype of CD11b-Cre Runx1(fl/fl) mice and demonstrated enhanced osteoclasts and decreased bone mass in males. However, an assessment of the effects of Runx1 deletion in female osteoclast precursors was impossible with this model. Moreover, the role of Runx1 in myeloid cell differentiation into other lineages is unknown. Therefore, we generated LysM-Cre Runx1(fl/fl) mice, which delete Runx1 equally (∼80% deletion) in myeloid precursor cells from both sexes and examined the capacity of these cells to differentiate into osteoclasts and phagocytic and antigen-presenting cells. Both female and male LysM-Cre Runx1(fl/fl) mice had decreased trabecular bone mass (72% decrease in bone volume fraction) and increased osteoclast number (2-3 times) (P nuclear factor-κB ligand to stimulate osteoclast formation and fusion in female and male mice without affecting other myeloid cell fates. In turn, increased osteoclast activity in LysM-Cre Runx1(fl/fl) mice likely contributed to a decrease in bone mass. These dramatic effects were not due to increased osteoclast precursors in the deleted mutants and argue that inhibition of Runx1 in multipotential myeloid precursor cells is important for osteoclast formation and function. PMID:27267711

  1. Particle-based transcutaneous administration of HIV-1 p24 protein to human skin explants and targeting of epidermal antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancan, Fiorenza; Amselgruber, Sarah; Hadam, Sabrina; Munier, Sevérine; Pavot, Vincent; Verrier, Bernard; Hackbarth, Steffen; Combadiere, Behazine; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Vogt, Annika

    2014-02-28

    Transcutaneous immunization is a promising vaccination strategy for the treatment of infectious diseases and cancer. In this study, we investigate the combination of cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping (CSSS) and particle-based antigen delivery to target the HIV-1 p24 protein to skin antigen presenting cells (APC). The CSSS treatment pre-activates skin APC and opens hair follicles, where protein-loaded particles accumulate and allow for sustained delivery of the loaded antigen to perifollicular APC. We found that poly-lactic acid (PLA) and polystyrene (PS) particles targeted the adsorbed HIV-1 p24 protein to the hair follicles. Small amounts of PS and PLA particles were found to translocate to the epidermis and be internalized by skin cells, whereas most of the particles aggregated in the hair follicle canal, where they released the loaded antigen. The p24 protein diffused to the epidermis and dermis and was detected in skin cells, especially in Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. Furthermore, the combination of CSSS and particle-based delivery resulted in activation and maturation of Langerhans cells (HLA-DR, CD80 and CD83). We conclude that particle-based antigen delivery across partially disrupted skin barrier is a feasible and effective approach to needle-free transcutaneous vaccination. PMID:24384300

  2. Imprinted Zac1 in neural stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guillaume Daniel; Udo Schmidt-Edelkraut; Dietmar Spengler; Anke Hoffmann

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) and imprinted genes playan important role in brain development. On historicalgrounds, these two determinants have been largelystudied independently of each other. Recent evidencesuggests, however, that NSCs can reset select genomicimprints to prevent precocious depletion of the stemcell reservoir. Moreover, imprinted genes like thetranscriptional regulator Zac1 can fine tune neuronalvs astroglial differentiation of NSCs. Zac1 binds ina sequence-specific manner to pro-neuronal andimprinted genes to confer transcriptional regulation andfurthermore coregulates members of the p53-familyin NSCs. At the genome scale, Zac1 is a central hub ofan imprinted gene network comprising genes with animportant role for NSC quiescence, proliferation anddifferentiation. Overall, transcriptional, epigenomic, andgenomic mechanisms seem to coordinate the functionalrelationships of NSCs and imprinted genes fromdevelopment to maturation, and possibly aging.

  3. Mitochondrial H2O2 in Lung Antigen-Presenting Cells Blocks NF-κB Activation to Prevent Unwarranted Immune Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupriya Khare

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Inhalation of environmental antigens such as allergens does not always induce inflammation in the respiratory tract. While antigen-presenting cells (APCs, including dendritic cells and macrophages, take up inhaled antigens, the cell-intrinsic molecular mechanisms that prevent an inflammatory response during this process, such as activation of the transcription factor NF-κB, are not well understood. Here, we show that the nuclear receptor PPARγ plays a critical role in blocking NF-κB activation in response to inhaled antigens to preserve immune tolerance. Tolerance induction promoted mitochondrial respiration, generation of H2O2, and suppression of NF-κB activation in WT, but not PPARγ-deficient, APCs. Forced restoration of H2O2 in PPARγ-deficient cells suppressed IκBα degradation and NF-κB activation. Conversely, scavenging reactive oxygen species from mitochondria promoted IκBα degradation with loss of regulatory and promotion of inflammatory T cell responses in vivo. Thus, communication between PPARγ and the mitochondria maintains immune quiescence in the airways.

  4. Antigen presentation by non-immune B-cell hybridoma clones: presentation of synthetic antigenic sites reveals clones that exhibit no specificity and clones that present only one epitope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohly, H. H.; Morrison, D. R.; Atassi, M. Z.

    1989-01-01

    Recently, we reported the preparation and antigen-presenting properties of hybridoma B-cell clones obtained after fusing non-secreting, non-antigen presenting Balb/c 653-myeloma cells with non-immune SJL spleen cells. It was found that antigen presentation at the clonal level can be specific or non-specific, depending on the particular B-cell clone. In the present work, one specific and one general presenter B-cell clones were tested for their epitope presentation ability to SJL T-cells that were specific to lysozyme or myoglobin. B-cell clone A1G12, a general presenter which presented both lysozyme and myoglobin to their respective T-cell lines, was found to present all five myoglobin epitopes while clone A1L16, a lysozyme specific presenter presented only one of the three epitopes of lysozyme. The latter reveals a hitherto unknown submolecular specificity (to a given epitope within a protein) for antigen presenting cells at the clonal level. Therefore, the specificity of T-cell recognition does not only derive from the T-cell but may also be dependent on the epitope specificity of the antigen-presenting B-cell.

  5. Differential Impact of PD-1 and/or Interleukin-10 Blockade on HIV-1-Specific CD4 T Cell and Antigen-Presenting Cell Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porichis, Filippos; Hart, Meghan G.; Zupkosky, Jennifer; Barblu, Lucie; Kwon, Douglas S.; McMullen, Ashley; Brennan, Thomas; Ahmed, Rafi; Freeman, Gordon J.; Kavanagh, Daniel G.

    2014-01-01

    that a population of white blood cells called CD4 T cells that targets the virus fails to work properly. At least part of this impairment is under the control of inhibitory mechanisms that can be blocked to improve the function of these CD4 T cells. In this report, we show that blocking one or two of the molecules involved, called PD-1 and IL-10, has different effects on the individual functions of these cells and that one is strongly improved. We investigate how these effects are caused by interactions between CD4 T cells and antigen-presenting cells. These observations can have implications for new therapeutic approaches in HIV infection. PMID:24352453

  6. Nanoparticle-based targeting of vaccine compounds to skin antigen-presenting cells by hair follicles and their transport in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahe, Brice; Vogt, Annika; Liard, Christelle; Duffy, Darragh; Abadie, Valérie; Bonduelle, Olivia; Boissonnas, Alexandre; Sterry, Wolfram; Verrier, Bernard; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Combadiere, Behazine

    2009-05-01

    Particle-based drug delivery systems target active compounds to the hair follicle and may result in a better penetration and higher efficiency of compound uptake by skin resident cells. As previously proposed, such delivery systems could be important tools for vaccine delivery. In this study, we investigated the penetration of solid fluorescent 40 or 200 nm polystyrene nanoparticles (NPs) as well as virus particles in murine skin to further investigate the efficacy of transcutaneously (TC) applied particulate vaccine delivery route. We demonstrated that 40 and 200 nm NPs and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) expressing the green-fluorescent protein penetrated deeply into hair follicles and were internalized by perifollicular antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Fibered-based confocal microscopy analyses allowed visualizing in vivo particle penetration along the follicular duct, diffusion into the surrounding tissue, uptake by APCs and transport to the draining lymph nodes. The application of small particles, such as ovalbumin coding DNA or MVA, induced both humoral and cellular immune responses. Furthermore, TC applied MVA induced protection against vaccinia virus challenge. Our results strengthen the concept of TC targeting of cutaneous APCs by hair follicles and will contribute to the development of advanced vaccination protocols using NPs or viral vectors. PMID:19052565

  7. A novel strategy to improve antigen presentation for active immunotherapy in cancer. Fusion of the human papillomavirus type 16 E7 antigen to a cell penetrating peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facilitating the delivery of exogenous antigens to antigen-presenting cells, ensuing processing and presentation via the major histocompatibility complex class I and induction of an effective immune response are fundamental for an effective therapeutic cancer vaccine. In this regard, we propose the use of cell-penetrating peptides fused to a tumor antigen. To demonstrate this concept we designed a fusion protein comprising a novel cell-penetrating and immunostimulatory peptide corresponding to residues 32 to 51 of the Limulus anti-lipopolysaccharide factor protein (LALF32-51) linked to human papillomavirus 16 E7 antigen (LALF32-51-E7). In this work, we demonstrated that the immunization with LALF32-51-E7 using the TC-1 mouse model induces a potent and long-lasting anti-tumor response supported on an effective E7-specific CD8+T-cell response. The finding that therapeutic immunization with LALF32-51 or E7 alone, or an admixture of LALF32-51 and E7, does not induce significant tumor reduction indicates that covalent linkage between LALF32-51 and E7 is required for the anti-tumor effect. These results support the use of this novel cell-penetrating peptide as an efficient means for delivering therapeutic targets into cellular compartments with the induction of a cytotoxic CD8+T lymphocyte immune response. This approach is promissory for the treatment of tumors associated with the human papillomavirus 16, which is responsible for the 50% of cervical cancer cases worldwide and other malignancies. Furthermore, protein-based vaccines can circumvent the major histocompatibility complex specificity limitation associated with peptide vaccines providing a greater extent in their application

  8. Roles of imprinted genes in neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Anke; Daniel, Guillaume; Schmidt-Edelkraut, Udo; Spengler, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Imprinted genes and neural stem cells (NSC) play an important role in the developing and mature brain. A central theme of imprinted gene function in NSCs is cell survival and G1 arrest to control cell division, cell-cycle exit, migration and differentiation. Moreover, genomic imprinting can be epigenetically switched off at some genes to ensure stem cell quiescence and differentiation. At the genome scale, imprinted genes are organized in dynamic networks formed by interchromosomal interactions and transcriptional coregulation of imprinted and nonimprinted genes. Such multilayered networks may synchronize NSC activity with the demand from the niche resembling their roles in adjusting fetal size. PMID:25431944

  9. Increase in a distinct pulmonary macrophage subset possessing an antigen-presenting cell phenotype and in vitro APC activity following silica exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silica inhalation results in chronic lung inflammation and fibrosis. While the role of the alveolar macrophage (AM) is considered key to the effects of silica on lung pathology, the etiology is not completely understood. Evidence suggests an increase in antigen presenting cell (APC) activity as a contributing factor to this process, as well as potential roles for both AM and interstitial macrophages (IM) in silicosis. In order to study the effects of crystalline silica on the APC activity of pulmonary macrophages, mice were exposed intranasally and changes in pulmonary macrophage populations were assessed using flow cytometry. Following intranasal instillation of silica, a significant increase in the APC activity of AM was observed, as well as a significant increase in a subset of IM expressing classic APC markers (MHC class II, CD11c). In addition, an in vitro system using bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) was generated to assess the effects of silica on the APC activity of macrophages in vitro. Data using BMDM in the in vitro APC assay demonstrated a significant increase in APC activity following silica exposure, but not following exposure to saline or a control particle (TiO2). Using a combination of in vivo and in vitro experiments, the current study describes a significant increase in an interstitial macrophage subset with an APC phenotype, as well as an increase in the APC activity of both AM and BMDM, as a direct result of exposure to crystalline silica. These studies suggest a specific mechanism, macrophage subset activation, by which crystalline silica exposure results in chronic pulmonary inflammation and, eventually, fibrosis

  10. Endogenous antigen presentation by autoantigen-transfected Epstein-Barr virus-lymphoblastoid cells. I. Generation of human thyroid peroxidase-reactive T cells and their T cell receptor repertoire.

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, A; Magnusson, R P; Kendler, D. L.; Concepcion, E; Ben-Nun, A; Davies, T. F.

    1993-01-01

    To develop a model for endogenous thyroid autoantigen presentation, we transfected EBV-transformed B lymphoblastoid cell lines (EBV-LCL), established from patients with autoimmune thyroid disease and normal controls, with cDNA for the human thyroid autoantigen thyroid peroxidase (hTPO). hTPO-antigen presentation to patient peripheral blood T cells was demonstrated after stimulation in vitro for 7 d with irradiated hTPO-transfected or untransfected autologous EBV-LCL. Anti-hTPO-reactive T cell...

  11. Soluble CD14 and CD83 from Human Neonatal Antigen-Presenting Cells Are Inducible by Commensal Bacteria and Suppress Allergen-Induced Human Neonatal Th2 Differentiation▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Lundell, Anna-Carin; Andersson, Kerstin; Josefsson, Elisabet; Steinkasserer, Alexander; Rudin, Anna

    2007-01-01

    CD14 is expressed on the cell surface of various antigen-presenting cells, and CD83 is a maturation marker for dendritic cells (DC). CD14 and CD83 are also present as soluble proteins, and both have immunoregulatory functions. We examined whether neonatal cord blood monocytes or DC released soluble CD14 (sCD14) or sCD83 when exposed to the commensal intestinal bacteria Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Escherichia coli, and Bacteroides fragilis. We found...

  12. Antigen-presenting cells exposed to Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, Bifidobacterium bifidum BI-98, and BI-504 reduce regulatory T cell activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Esben Gjerløff Wedebye; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Jensen, Simon Skjøde;

    2010-01-01

    enteroantigen-presenting cells (APC) and CD4(+)CD25(+) T-regulatory cells (Tregs) in splenocyte-T cell proliferation assays. METHODS:: Splenocytes exposed to enteroantigen +/- probiotics were used to stimulate cultured CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells to which titrated numbers of Tregs were added. Cytokine assays were...... performed by use of neutralizing antibodies and ELISA. RESULTS:: Exposure of APCs to enteroantigens and the series of probiotic strains mentioned above did not influence the stimulatory capacity of APCs on proliferative enteroantigen-specific T cells. However, exposure to B. bifidum BI-98, BI-504 and L....... acidophilus NCFM consistently reduced the suppressive activity of Tregs. The suppressive activity was analyzed using fractionated components of the probiotics, and showed that a component of the cell wall is responsible for the decreased Treg activity in the system. The probiotic-induced suppression of Treg...

  13. Skewed Helper T-Cell Responses to IL-12 Family Cytokines Produced by Antigen-Presenting Cells and the Genetic Background in Behcet’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Shimizu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Behcet’s disease (BD is a multisystemic inflammatory disease and is characterized by recurrent attacks on eyes, brain, skin, and gut. There is evidence that skewed T-cell responses contributed to its pathophysiology in patients with BD. Recently, we found that Th17 cells, a new helper T (Th cell subset, were increased in patients with BD, and both Th type 1 (Th1 and Th17 cell differentiation signaling pathways were overactivated. Several researches revealed that genetic polymorphisms in Th1/Th17 cell differentiation signaling pathways were associated with the onset of BD. Here, we summarize current findings on the Th cell subsets, their contribution to the pathogenesis of BD and the genetic backgrounds, especially in view of IL-12 family cytokine production and pattern recognition receptors of macrophages/monocytes.

  14. Enhanced immune stimulation by a therapeutic lymphoma tumor antigen vaccine produced in insect cells involves mannose receptor targeting to antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betting, David J; Mu, Xi Y; Kafi, Kamran; McDonnel, Desmond; Rosas, Francisco; Gold, Daniel P; Timmerman, John M

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccination of lymphoma patients with tumor-specific immunoglobulin (idiotype, Id) coupled to the carrier protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (Id-KLH) is undergoing clinical investigation, and methods to improve the immunogenicity of these and other protein tumor antigen vaccines are being sought. Id proteins can be produced via tumor-myeloma hybridomas or recombinant methods in mammalian, bacteria, or insect cells. We now demonstrate that terminal mannose residues, characteristic of recombinant proteins produced in insect cells, yield Id proteins with significantly enhanced immunostimulatory properties compared to Id proteins derived from mammalian cells. Recombinant baculovirus-infected insect cell-derived Id showed higher binding to and activation of human dendritic cells mediated by mannose receptors. In vivo, insect cell-derived Id elicited higher levels of tumor-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and improved eradication of pre-established murine lymphoma. Insect cell and mammalian Id generated similar levels of tumor-specific antibodies, showing no impairment in antibody responses to native tumor antigen despite the glycoslylation differences in the immunogen. Combining insect cell production and maleimide-based KLH conjugation offered the highest levels of anti-tumor immunity. Our data comparing sources of recombinant Id protein tumor antigens used in therapeutic cancer vaccines demonstrate that insect cell-derived antigens can offer several immunologic advantages over proteins derived from mammalian sources. PMID:19000731

  15. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide-Exposed Endothelial Cells Bias Antigen Presentation to CD4+ T Cells toward a Th17 Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wanhong; Stohl, Lori L; Xu, Linghui; Zhou, Xi K; Manni, Michela; Wagner, John A; Granstein, Richard D

    2016-03-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuropeptide with well-established immunomodulatory functions. CGRP-containing nerves innervate dermal blood vessels and lymph nodes. We examined whether CGRP regulates the outcome of Ag presentation by Langerhans cells (LCs) to T cells through actions on microvascular endothelial cells (ECs). Exposure of primary murine dermal microvascular ECs (pDMECs) to CGRP followed by coculture with LCs, responsive CD4(+) T cells and Ag resulted in increased production of IL-6 and IL-17A accompanied by inhibition of IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-22 compared with wells containing pDMECs treated with medium alone. Physical contact between ECs and LCs or T cells was not required for this effect and, except for IL-4, we demonstrated that IL-6 production by CGRP-treated pDMECs was involved in these effects. CD4(+) cells expressing cytoplasmic IL-17A were increased, whereas cells expressing cytoplasmic IFN-γ or IL-4 were decreased by the presence of CGRP-treated pDMECs. In addition, the level of retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor γt mRNA was significantly increased, whereas T-bet and GATA3 expression was inhibited. Immunization at the site of intradermally administered CGRP led to a similar bias in CD4(+) T cells from draining lymph node cells toward IL-17A and away from IFN-γ. Actions of nerve-derived CGRP on ECs may have important regulatory effects on the outcome of Ag presentation with consequences for the expression of inflammatory skin disorders involving Th17 cells. PMID:26829986

  16. Production of CXC and CC chemokines by human antigen-presenting cells in response to Lassa virus or closely related immunogenic viruses, and in cynomolgus monkeys with lassa fever.

    OpenAIRE

    Delphine Pannetier; Stéphanie Reynard; Marion Russier; Xavier Carnec; Sylvain Baize

    2014-01-01

    International audience The pathogenesis of Lassa fever (LF), a hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa, remains unclear. We previously compared Lassa virus (LASV) with its genetically close, but nonpathogenic homolog Mopeia virus (MOPV) and demonstrated that the strong activation of antigen-presenting cells (APC), including type I IFN production, observed in response to MOPV probably plays a crucial role in controlling infection. We show here that human macrophages (MP) produce large amou...

  17. Distinct Gut-Derived Bacteria Differentially Affect Three Types of Antigen-Presenting Cells and Impact on NK- and T-Cell Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Hansen, Anne Marie Valentin; Frøkiær, Hanne

    previously been examined, but this study revealed that their effect on other kinds of APCs is markedly different. When APCs matured by different bacteria were added to either NK-cells or T-cells, different APCs combined with distinct strains of bacteria caused the production of varying amounts of cytokines...... through these mechanisms. The bacteria examined can potentially be used in tailored probiotic foods exploring their immunomodulatory properties....

  18. Human antigen-presenting cells respond differently to gut-derived probiotic bacteria but mediate similar strain-dependent NK and T cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Zeuthen, Louise Hjerrild; Ferlazzo, Guido;

    2007-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is essential for homeostasis of the local and systemic immune system, and particularly strains of lactic acid bacteria and Escherichia coli have been shown to have balancing effects on inflammatory conditions such as allergy and inflammatory bowel disease. However...... of IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha to bacteria, which elicited mainly IL-10 in monocyte-derived DC. In contrast, comparable IFN-gamma production patterns were found in both natural killer cells and T cells induced by all bacteria-matured APC. An inhibitory effect of certain strains on this IFN...

  19. Shape recognition of microbial cells by colloidal cell imprints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borovicka, J.; Stoyanov, S.D.; Paunov, V.N.

    2013-01-01

    We have engineered a class of colloids which can recognize the shape and size of targeted microbial cells and selectively bind to their surfaces. These imprinted colloid particles, which we called "colloid antibodies", were fabricated by partial fragmentation of silica shells obtained by templating

  20. Turnover of Ia-peptide complexes is facilitated in viable antigen-presenting cells: biosynthetic turnover of Ia vs. peptide exchange.

    OpenAIRE

    Harding, C V; Roof, R W; Unanue, E R

    1989-01-01

    Macrophages and B cells process antigens to produce antigenic peptides that associate with class II major histocompatibility complex molecules (e.g., Ia molecules); these Ia-peptide complexes are recognized by CD4+ T lymphocytes. Processing of the antigen hen egg white lysozyme was inhibited by cycloheximide in peritoneal exudate cells (PECs, largely macrophages), but not in TA3 B-lymphoma cells. The uptake and metabolism of hen egg white lysozyme was largely intact in cycloheximide-treated P...

  1. UV imprinting for thin film solar cell application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UV imprinting is an interesting, low cost technique to produce large area thin film solar cells incorporating nanometric textures. Here, we review and present new results confirming that replicas of the most common textures used in photovoltaics can be obtained by UV imprinting with an excellent fidelity. The use of these replicas as substrates for amorphous and micromorph thin film silicon solar cells is also shown, together with a comparison with devices obtained on the original textures

  2. UV imprinting for thin film solar cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escarré, J.; Battaglia, C.; Söderström, K.; Pahud, C.; Biron, R.; Cubero, O.; Haug, F.-J.; Ballif, C.

    2012-02-01

    UV imprinting is an interesting, low cost technique to produce large area thin film solar cells incorporating nanometric textures. Here, we review and present new results confirming that replicas of the most common textures used in photovoltaics can be obtained by UV imprinting with an excellent fidelity. The use of these replicas as substrates for amorphous and micromorph thin film silicon solar cells is also shown, together with a comparison with devices obtained on the original textures.

  3. UV imprinting for thin film solar cell application

    OpenAIRE

    Escarre, J; Battaglia, C; Soederstroem, K.; Pahud, C.; Biron, R.; Cubero, O.; Haug, F.-J.; Ballif, C.

    2012-01-01

    UV imprinting is an interesting, low cost technique to produce large area thin film solar cells incorporating nanometric textures. Here, we review and present new results confirming that replicas of the most common textures used in photovoltaics can be obtained by UV imprinting with an excellent fidelity. The use of these replicas as substrates for amorphous and micromorph thin film silicon solar cells is also shown, together with a comparison with devices obtained on the original textures.

  4. Interleukin-19: a constituent of the regulome that controls antigen presenting cells in the lungs and airway responses to microbial products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Hoffman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interleukin (IL-19 has been reported to enhance chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma but the in vivo mechanism is incompletely understood. Because IL-19 is produced by and regulates cells of the monocyte lineage, our studies focused on in vivo responses of CD11c positive (CD11c+ alveolar macrophages and lung dendritic cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: IL-19-deficient (IL-19-/- mice were studied at baseline (naïve and following intranasal challenge with microbial products, or recombinant cytokines. Naïve IL-19-/- mixed background mice had a decreased percentage of CD11c+ cells in the bronchoalveolar-lavage (BAL due to the deficiency in IL-19 and a trait inherited from the 129-mouse strain. BAL CD11c+ cells from fully backcrossed IL-19-/- BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice expressed significantly less Major Histocompatibility Complex class II (MHCII in response to intranasal administration of lipopolysaccharide, Aspergillus antigen, or IL-13, a pro-allergic cytokine. Neurogenic-locus-notch-homolog-protein-2 (Notch2 expression by lung monocytes, the precursors of BAL CD11c+ cells, was dysregulated: extracellular Notch2 was significantly decreased, transmembrane/intracellular Notch2 was significantly increased in IL-19-/- mice relative to wild type. Instillation of recombinant IL-19 increased extracellular Notch2 expression and dendritic cells cultured from bone marrow cells in the presence of IL-19 showed upregulated extracellular Notch2. The CD205 positive subset among the CD11c+ cells was 3-5-fold decreased in the airways and lungs of naïve IL-19-/- mice relative to wild type. Airway inflammation and histological changes in the lungs were ameliorated in IL-19-/- mice challenged with Aspergillus antigen that induces T lymphocyte-dependent allergic inflammation but not in IL-19-/- mice challenged with lipopolysaccharide or IL-13. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Because MHCII is the molecular platform that displays peptides to T

  5. Hepatitis B virus induces IL-23 production in antigen presenting cells and causes liver damage via the IL-23/IL-17 axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghong Wang

    Full Text Available IL-23 regulates myriad processes in the innate and adaptive immune systems, and is a critical mediator of the proinflammatory effects exerted by Th17 cells in many diseases. In this study, we investigated whether and how hepatitis B virus (HBV causes liver damage directly through the IL-23 signaling pathway. In biopsied liver tissues from HBV-infected patients, expression of both IL-23 and IL-23R was remarkably elevated. In vivo observations also indicated that the main sources of IL-23 were myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs and macrophages. Analysis of in vitro differentiated immature DCs and macrophages isolated from healthy donors revealed that the HBV surface antigen (HBsAg efficiently induces IL-23 secretion in a mannose receptor (MR-dependent manner. Culture with an endosomal acidification inhibitor and the dynamin inhibitor showed that, upon binding to the MR, the HBsAg is taken up by mDCs and macrophages through an endocytosis mechanism. In contrast, although the HBV core antigen (HBcAg can also stimulate IL-23 secretion from mDCs, the process was MR- and endocytosis-independent. In addition, IL-23 was shown to be indispensible for HBsAg-stimulated differentiation of naïve CD4(+ T cells into Th17 cells, which were determined to be the primary source of IL-17 in HBV-infected livers. The cognate receptor, IL-17R, was found to exist on the hepatic stellate cells and mDCs, both of which might represent the potential target cells of IL-17 in hepatitis B disease. These data provide novel insights into a yet unrecognized mechanism of HBV-induced hepatitis, by which increases in IL-23 expression, through an MR/endocytosis-dependent or -independent manner, produce liver damage through the IL-23/IL-17 axis.

  6. Activation of human antigen-presenting cells by the mycobacterial cord factor and its glycolipid adjuvant analogue trehalose-6,6’-dibehenate

    OpenAIRE

    Ostrop, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    The mycobacterial cord factor trehalose-6,6’-dimycolate (TDM) is an abundant cell wall glycolipid of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other mycobacteria. It causes inflammation and adjuvanticity, but it is also a major virulence factor of M. tuberculosis. Its synthetic analogue trehalose-6,6’-dibehenate (TDB) has robust adjuvant activity and induces a Th1/Th17 T cell response in animal models. The TDB-containing liposomal adjuvant formulation Caf01 has entered phase I clinical studies in humans...

  7. Frequent lack of translation of antigen presentation-associated molecules MHC class I, CD1a and Beta(2)-microglobulin in Reed-Sternberg cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, A.; Visser, L; Eberwine, J; Dadvand, L; Poppema, S

    2000-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is present in Reed-Sternberg (RS) cells of a substantial proportion of Hodgkin's lymphoma cases. Most EBV-positive cases are also MHC class I-positive, whereas the majority of EBV-negative cases lack detectable levels of MHC class I expression. Application of the SAGE techni

  8. A Neoglycoconjugate Containing the Human Milk Sugar LNFPIII Drives Anti-Inflammatory Activation of Antigen Presenting Cells in a CD14 Dependent Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Tundup, Smanla; Srivastava, Leena; Norberg, Thomas; Watford, Wendy; Harn, Donald

    2015-01-01

    The milk pentasaccharide LNFPIII has therapeutic action for metabolic and autoimmune diseases and prolongs transplant survival in mice when presented as a neoglycoconjugate. Within LNFPIII is the Lewis(x) trisaccharide, expressed by many helminth parasites. In humans, LNFPIII is found in human milk and also known as stage-specific embryonic antigen-1. LNFPIII-NGC drives alternative activation of macrophages and dendritic cells via NF kappa B activation in a TLR4 dependent mechanism. However, ...

  9. A Neoglycoconjugate Containing the Human Milk Sugar LNFPIII Drives Anti-Inflammatory Activation of Antigen Presenting Cells in a CD14 Dependent Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smanla Tundup

    Full Text Available The milk pentasaccharide LNFPIII has therapeutic action for metabolic and autoimmune diseases and prolongs transplant survival in mice when presented as a neoglycoconjugate. Within LNFPIII is the Lewisx trisaccharide, expressed by many helminth parasites. In humans, LNFPIII is found in human milk and also known as stage-specific embryonic antigen-1. LNFPIII-NGC drives alternative activation of macrophages and dendritic cells via NFκB activation in a TLR4 dependent mechanism. However, the connection between LNFPIII-NGC activation of APCs, TLR4 signaling and subsequent MAP kinase signaling leading to anti-inflammatory activation of APCs remains unknown. In this study we determined that the innate receptor CD14 was essential for LNFPIII-NGC induction of both ERK and NFkB activation in APCs. Induction of ERK activation by LNFPIII-NGC was completely dependent on CD14/TLR4-Ras-Raf1/TPL2-MEK axis in bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs. In addition, LNFPIII-NGC preferentially induced the production of Th2 "favoring" chemokines CCL22 and matrix metalloprotease protein-9 in a CD14 dependent manner in BMDCs. In contrast, LNFPIII-NGC induces significantly lower levels of Th1 "favoring" chemokines, MIP1α, MIP1β and MIP-2 compared to levels in LPS stimulated cells. Interestingly, NGC of the identical human milk sugar LNnT, minus the alpha 1-3 linked fucose, failed to activate APCs via TLR4/MD2/CD14 receptor complex, suggesting that the alpha 1-3 linked fucose in LNFPIII and not on LNnT, is required for this process. Using specific chemical inhibitors of the MAPK pathway, we found that LNFPIII-NGC induction of CCL22, MMP9 and IL-10 production was dependent on ERK activation. Over all, this study suggests that LNFPIII-NGC utilizes CD14/TLR4-MAPK (ERK axis in modulating APC activation to produce anti-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines in a manner distinct from that seen for the pro-inflammatory PAMP LPS. These pathways may explain the in vivo

  10. Cell Pluripotency Levels Associated with Imprinted Genes in Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyun Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent stem cells are exhibited similarly in the morphology, gene expression, growth properties, and epigenetic modification with embryonic stem cells (ESCs. However, it is still controversial that the pluripotency of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC is much inferior to ESC, and the differentiation capacity of iPSC and ESC can also be separated by transcriptome and epigenetics. miRNAs, which act in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression and are involved in many basic cellular processes, may reveal the answer. In this paper, we focused on identifying the hidden relationship between miRNAs and imprinted genes in cell pluripotency. Total miRNA expression patterns in iPSC and ES cells were comprehensively analysed and linked with human imprinted genes, which show a global picture of their potential function in pluripotent level. A new CPA4-KLF14 region which locates in chromosomal homologous segments (CHSs within mammals and include both imprinted genes and significantly expressed miRNAs was first identified. Molecular network analysis showed genes interacted with imprinted genes closely and enriched in modules such as cancer, cell death and survival, and tumor morphology. This imprinted region may provide a new look for those who are interested in cell pluripotency of hiPSCs and hESCs.

  11. Cell Pluripotency Levels Associated with Imprinted Genes in Human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Liyun; Tang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Binyan; Ding, Guohui

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are exhibited similarly in the morphology, gene expression, growth properties, and epigenetic modification with embryonic stem cells (ESCs). However, it is still controversial that the pluripotency of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) is much inferior to ESC, and the differentiation capacity of iPSC and ESC can also be separated by transcriptome and epigenetics. miRNAs, which act in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression and are involved in many basic cellular processes, may reveal the answer. In this paper, we focused on identifying the hidden relationship between miRNAs and imprinted genes in cell pluripotency. Total miRNA expression patterns in iPSC and ES cells were comprehensively analysed and linked with human imprinted genes, which show a global picture of their potential function in pluripotent level. A new CPA4-KLF14 region which locates in chromosomal homologous segments (CHSs) within mammals and include both imprinted genes and significantly expressed miRNAs was first identified. Molecular network analysis showed genes interacted with imprinted genes closely and enriched in modules such as cancer, cell death and survival, and tumor morphology. This imprinted region may provide a new look for those who are interested in cell pluripotency of hiPSCs and hESCs. PMID:26504487

  12. ONCOLYTIC VIRUS-MEDIATED REVERSAL OF IMPAIRED TUMOR ANTIGEN PRESENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Ashok Gujar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anti-tumor immunity can eliminate existing cancer cells and also maintain a constant surveillance against possible relapse. Such an antigen-specific adaptive response begins when tumor-specific T cells become activated. T cell activation requires two signals on antigen presenting cells (APCs: antigen presentation through MHC molecules and co-stimulation. In the absence of one or both of these signals, T cells remain inactivated or can even become tolerized. Cancer cells and their associated microenvironment strategically hinder the processing and presentation of tumor antigens and consequently prevent the development of anti-tumor immunity. Many studies, however, demonstrate that interventions that overturn tumor-associated immune evasion mechanisms can establish anti-tumor immune responses of therapeutic potential. One such intervention is oncolytic virus (OV-based anti-cancer therapy. Here we discuss how OV-induced immunological events override tumor-associated antigen presentation impairment and promote appropriate T cell:APC interaction. Detailed understanding of this phenomenon is pivotal for devising the strategies that will enhance the efficacy of OV-based anti-cancer therapy by complementing its inherent oncolytic

  13. Genomic imprinting is variably lost during reprogramming of mouse iPS cells

    OpenAIRE

    Takikawa, Sachiko; Ray, Chelsea; Wang, Xin; Shamis, Yulia; Wu, Tien-Yuan; Li, Xiajun

    2013-01-01

    Derivation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells is mainly an epigenetic reprogramming process. It is still quite controversial how genomic imprinting is reprogrammed in iPS cells. Thus, we derived multiple iPS clones from genetically identical mouse somatic cells. We found that parentally inherited imprint was variably lost among these iPS clones. Concurrent with the loss of DNA methylation imprint at the corresponding Snrpn and Peg3 imprinted regions, parental origin-specific expression o...

  14. Production of CXC and CC chemokines by human antigen-presenting cells in response to Lassa virus or closely related immunogenic viruses, and in cynomolgus monkeys with lassa fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Pannetier

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of Lassa fever (LF, a hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa, remains unclear. We previously compared Lassa virus (LASV with its genetically close, but nonpathogenic homolog Mopeia virus (MOPV and demonstrated that the strong activation of antigen-presenting cells (APC, including type I IFN production, observed in response to MOPV probably plays a crucial role in controlling infection. We show here that human macrophages (MP produce large amounts of CC and CXC chemokines in response to MOPV infection, whereas dendritic cells (DC release only moderate amounts of CXC chemokines. However, in the presence of autologous T cells, DCs produced CC and CXC chemokines. Chemokines were produced in response to type I IFN synthesis, as the levels of both mediators were strongly correlated and the neutralization of type I IFN resulted in an inhibition of chemokine production. By contrast, LASV induced only low levels of CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 production. These differences in chemokine production may profoundly affect the generation of virus-specific T-cell responses and may therefore contribute to the difference of pathogenicity between these two viruses. In addition, a recombinant LASV (rLASV harboring the NP-D389A/G392A mutations, which abolish the inhibition of type I IFN response by nucleoprotein (NP, induced the massive synthesis of CC and CXC chemokines in both DC and MP, confirming the crucial role of arenavirus NP in immunosuppression and pathogenicity. Finally, we confirmed, using PBMC samples and lymph nodes obtained from LASV-infected cynomolgus monkeys, that LF was associated with high levels of CXC chemokine mRNA synthesis, suggesting that the very early synthesis of these mediators may be correlated with a favourable outcome.

  15. Production of CXC and CC chemokines by human antigen-presenting cells in response to Lassa virus or closely related immunogenic viruses, and in cynomolgus monkeys with lassa fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannetier, Delphine; Reynard, Stéphanie; Russier, Marion; Carnec, Xavier; Baize, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Lassa fever (LF), a hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa, remains unclear. We previously compared Lassa virus (LASV) with its genetically close, but nonpathogenic homolog Mopeia virus (MOPV) and demonstrated that the strong activation of antigen-presenting cells (APC), including type I IFN production, observed in response to MOPV probably plays a crucial role in controlling infection. We show here that human macrophages (MP) produce large amounts of CC and CXC chemokines in response to MOPV infection, whereas dendritic cells (DC) release only moderate amounts of CXC chemokines. However, in the presence of autologous T cells, DCs produced CC and CXC chemokines. Chemokines were produced in response to type I IFN synthesis, as the levels of both mediators were strongly correlated and the neutralization of type I IFN resulted in an inhibition of chemokine production. By contrast, LASV induced only low levels of CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 production. These differences in chemokine production may profoundly affect the generation of virus-specific T-cell responses and may therefore contribute to the difference of pathogenicity between these two viruses. In addition, a recombinant LASV (rLASV) harboring the NP-D389A/G392A mutations, which abolish the inhibition of type I IFN response by nucleoprotein (NP), induced the massive synthesis of CC and CXC chemokines in both DC and MP, confirming the crucial role of arenavirus NP in immunosuppression and pathogenicity. Finally, we confirmed, using PBMC samples and lymph nodes obtained from LASV-infected cynomolgus monkeys, that LF was associated with high levels of CXC chemokine mRNA synthesis, suggesting that the very early synthesis of these mediators may be correlated with a favourable outcome. PMID:24421914

  16. Production of CXC and CC Chemokines by Human Antigen-Presenting Cells in Response to Lassa Virus or Closely Related Immunogenic Viruses, and in Cynomolgus Monkeys with Lassa Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russier, Marion; Carnec, Xavier; Baize, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Lassa fever (LF), a hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa, remains unclear. We previously compared Lassa virus (LASV) with its genetically close, but nonpathogenic homolog Mopeia virus (MOPV) and demonstrated that the strong activation of antigen-presenting cells (APC), including type I IFN production, observed in response to MOPV probably plays a crucial role in controlling infection. We show here that human macrophages (MP) produce large amounts of CC and CXC chemokines in response to MOPV infection, whereas dendritic cells (DC) release only moderate amounts of CXC chemokines. However, in the presence of autologous T cells, DCs produced CC and CXC chemokines. Chemokines were produced in response to type I IFN synthesis, as the levels of both mediators were strongly correlated and the neutralization of type I IFN resulted in an inhibition of chemokine production. By contrast, LASV induced only low levels of CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 production. These differences in chemokine production may profoundly affect the generation of virus-specific T-cell responses and may therefore contribute to the difference of pathogenicity between these two viruses. In addition, a recombinant LASV (rLASV) harboring the NP-D389A/G392A mutations, which abolish the inhibition of type I IFN response by nucleoprotein (NP), induced the massive synthesis of CC and CXC chemokines in both DC and MP, confirming the crucial role of arenavirus NP in immunosuppression and pathogenicity. Finally, we confirmed, using PBMC samples and lymph nodes obtained from LASV-infected cynomolgus monkeys, that LF was associated with high levels of CXC chemokine mRNA synthesis, suggesting that the very early synthesis of these mediators may be correlated with a favourable outcome. PMID:24421914

  17. MHC Class Ⅰ Antigen Presentation- Recently Trimmed and Well Presented

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Barry Flutter; Bin Gao

    2004-01-01

    Presentation of antigenic peptide to T cells by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class Ⅰ molecules is the key to the cellular immune response. Non-self intracellular proteins are processed into short peptides and transported into endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where they are assembled with class Ⅰ molecules assisted by several chaperone proteins to form trimeric complex. MHC class Ⅰ complex loaded with optimised peptides travels to the cell surface of antigen presentation cells to be recognised by T cells. The cells presenting non-self peptides are cleared by CD8 positive T cells. In order to ensure that T cells detect an infection or mutation within the target cells the process of peptide loading and class Ⅰ expression must be carefully regulated. Many of the cellular components involved in antigen processing and class Ⅰ presentation are known and their various functions are now becoming clearer. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(1):22-30.

  18. MHC Class I Antigen Presentation- Recently Trimmed and Well Presented

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BarryFlutter; BinGao

    2004-01-01

    Presentation of antigenic peptide to T cells by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules is the key to the cellular immune response. Non-self intracellular proteins are processed into short peptides and transported into endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where they are assembled with class I molecules assisted by several chaperone proteins to form trimeric complex. MHC class I complex loaded with optimised peptides travels to the cell surface of antigen presentation cells to be recognised by T cells. The cells presenting non-self peptides are cleared by CD8 positive T cells. In order to ensure that T cells detect an infection or mutation within the target cells the process of peptide loading and class I expression must be carefully regulated. Many of the cellular components involved in antigen processing and class I presentation are known and their various functions are now becoming clearer. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(1):22-30.

  19. Identification of a peptide binding protein that plays a role in antigen presentation.

    OpenAIRE

    Lakey, E K; Margoliash, E.; Pierce, S K

    1987-01-01

    The helper T-cell response to globular proteins appears, in general, to require intracellular processing of the antigen, such that a peptide fragment containing the T-cell antigenic determinant is released and transported to and held on the surface of an Ia-expressing, antigen-presenting cell. However, the molecular details underlying these phenomena are largely unknown. The means by which antigenic peptides are anchored on the antigen-presenting cell surface was investigated. A cell surface ...

  20. Differentiation of Human Parthenogenetic Pluripotent Stem Cells Reveals Multiple Tissue- and Isoform-Specific Imprinted Transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonatan Stelzer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Parental imprinting results in monoallelic parent-of-origin-dependent gene expression. However, many imprinted genes identified by differential methylation do not exhibit complete monoallelic expression. Previous studies demonstrated complex tissue-dependent expression patterns for some imprinted genes. Still, the complete magnitude of this phenomenon remains largely unknown. By differentiating human parthenogenetic induced pluripotent stem cells into different cell types and combining DNA methylation with a 5′ RNA sequencing methodology, we were able to identify tissue- and isoform-dependent imprinted genes in a genome-wide manner. We demonstrate that nearly half of all imprinted genes express both biallelic and monoallelic isoforms that are controlled by tissue-specific alternative promoters. This study provides a global analysis of tissue-specific imprinting in humans and suggests that alternative promoters are central in the regulation of imprinted genes.

  1. Binding of recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTL) to antigen presenting cells prevents upregulation of CD11b and inhibits T cell activation and transfer of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sushmita; Miller, Lisa; Subramanian, Sandhya; McCarty, Owen J T; Proctor, Thomas; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Huan, Jianya; Burrows, Gregory G; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Offner, Halina

    2010-08-25

    Recombinant T cell ligands (RTLs) ameliorate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in an antigen-specific manner. We evaluated effects of RTL401 (I-A(s) alpha1beta1+PLP-139-151) on splenocytes from SJL/J mice with EAE to study RTL-T cell tolerance-inducing mechanisms. RTLs bound to B, macrophages and DCs, through RTL-MHC-alpha1beta1 moiety. RTL binding reduced CD11b expression on splenic macrophages/DC, and RTL401-conditioned macrophages/DC, not B cells, inhibited T cell activation. Reduced ability of RTL- incubated splenocytes to transfer EAE was likely mediated through macrophages/DC, since B cells were unnecessary for RTL treatment of EAE. These results demonstrate a novel pathway of T cell regulation by RTL-bound APCs. PMID:20546940

  2. Activation, Immune Polarization, and Graft-versus-Leukemia Activity of Donor T-cells are Regulated by Specific Subsets of Donor Bone Marrow Antigen-Presenting Cells in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation1

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jian-Ming; Southerland, Lauren T.; Lu, Ying; Darlak, Kataryna A.; Giver, Cynthia R.; McMillin, Douglas W.; Harris, Wayne A.C.; Jaye, David L.; Waller, Edmund K.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the roles of specific subsets of donor APCs purified from bone marrow in donor T cell activation and graft-vs-leukemia (GvL) activity in murine models of hemopoietic stem cell transplantation. Lineage−CD11c+ APC precursors were separated from donor bone marrow based on expression of CD11b. Transplanting lineage−CD11c+CD11b− APC (CD11b− APC) in combination with c-kit+Sca-1+lineage− hemopoietic stem cells (HSC) and congenic donor T cells led to increased donor CD4+ and CD8+ T ce...

  3. Binding of recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTL) to antigen presenting cells prevents upregulation of CD11b and inhibits T cell activation and transfer of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha, Sushmita; Miller, Lisa; Subramanian, Sandhya; McCarty, Owen; Proctor, Thomas; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Burrows, Gregory G.; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Offner, Halina

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant T cell ligands (RTLs) ameliorate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in antigen specific manner. We evaluated effects of RTL401 (I-As α1β1 + PLP-139-151) on splenocytes from mice with EAE to study RTL- T cell-tolerance-inducing mechanisms. RTLs bound to B, macrophages and DCs, through RTL-MHC-α1β1 moiety. RTL binding reduced CD11b expression on splenic macrophages/DC, and RTL401-conditioned macrophages/DC, not B cells, inhibited T cell activation. Reduced ability of RT...

  4. The role of FcRn in antigen presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi eBaker

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulins are unique molecules capable of simultaneously recognizing a diverse array of antigens and themselves being recognized by a broad array of receptors. The abundance specifically of the IgG subclass and the variety of signaling receptors to which it binds render this an important immunomodulatory molecule. In addition to the classical Fcγ receptors (FcγR which bind IgG at the cell surface, the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn is a lifelong resident of the endolysosomal system of most hematopoietic cells where it determines the intracellular fate of both IgG and IgG-containing immune complexes (IgG IC. Crosslinking of FcRn by multivalent IgG IC within antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DC initiates specific mechanisms which result in trafficking of the antigen-bearing IgG IC into compartments from which the antigen can successfully be processed into peptide epitopes compatible with loading onto both MHC class I and II molecules. In turn, this enables the synchronous activation of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses against the cognate antigen, thereby bridging the gap between the humoral and cellular branches of the adaptive immune response. Critically, FcRn-driven T cell priming is efficient at very low doses of antigen due to the exquisite sensitivity of the IgG-mediated antigen delivery system through which it operates. FcRn-mediated antigen presentation has important consequences in tissue compartments replete with IgG and serves not only to determine homeostatic immune activation at a variety of sites but also to induce inflammatory responses upon exposure to antigens perceived as foreign. Therapeutically targeting the pathway by which FcRn enables T cell activation in response to IgG IC is thus a highly attractive prospect not only for the treatment of diseases that are driven by immune complexes but also for manipulating local immune responses against defined antigens such as those present during infections and

  5. Targeting and Imaging of Cancer Cells via Monosaccharide-Imprinted Fluorescent Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuangshou; Yin, Danyang; Wang, Wenjing; Shen, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jun-Jie; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Liu, Zhen

    2016-03-01

    The recognition of cancer cells is a key for cancer diagnosis and therapy, but the specificity highly relies on the use of biorecognition molecules particularly antibodies. Because biorecognition molecules suffer from some apparent disadvantages, such as hard to prepare and poor storage stability, novel alternatives that can overcome these disadvantages are highly important. Here we present monosaccharide-imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) for targeting and imaging of cancer cells. The molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) probe was fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) doped silica NPs with a shell imprinted with sialic acid, fucose or mannose as the template. The monosaccharide-imprinted NPs exhibited high specificity toward the target monosaccharides. As the template monosaccharides used are over-expressed on cancer cells, these monosaccharide-imprinted NPs allowed for specific targeting cancer cells over normal cells. Fluorescence imaging of human hepatoma carcinoma cells (HepG-2) over normal hepatic cells (L-02) and mammary cancer cells (MCF-7) over normal mammary epithelial cells (MCF-10A) by these NPs was demonstrated. As the imprinting approach employed herein is generally applicable and highly efficient, monosaccharide-imprinted NPs can be promising probes for targeting cancer cells.

  6. Evaluation of the ability of N-terminal fragment of lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis for delivery of Mycobacterium T cell antigen ESAT-6 into cytosol of antigen presenting cells to elicit effective cytotoxic T lymphocyte response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the ability of N-terminal fragment of lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis to deliver genetically fused ESAT-6 (early secretory antigen target), a potent T cell antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, into cytosol to elicit Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. In vitro Th1 cytokines data and CTL assay proved that efficient delivery of LFn.ESAT-6 occurs in cytosol, in the presence of protective antigen (PA), and leads to generation of effective CTL response. Since CTL response is essential for protection against intracellular pathogens and, it is well known that only single T cell epitope or single antigenic protein is not sufficient to elicit protective CTL response due to variation or polymorphism in MHC-I alleles among the individuals, we suggest that as a fusion protein LFn can be used to deliver multiepitopes of T cells or multiproteins which can generate effective CTLs against intracellular pathogens like M. tuberculosis. It can be used to enhance the protective efficacy of BCG vaccine

  7. Current status of multiple antigen-presenting peptide vaccine systems: Application of organic and inorganic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taguchi Hiroaki

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many studies are currently investigating the development of safe and effective vaccines to prevent various infectious diseases. Multiple antigen-presenting peptide vaccine systems have been developed to avoid the adverse effects associated with conventional vaccines (i.e., live-attenuated, killed or inactivated pathogens, carrier proteins and cytotoxic adjuvants. Recently, two main approaches have been used to develop multiple antigen-presenting peptide vaccine systems: (1 the addition of functional components, e.g., T-cell epitopes, cell-penetrating peptides, and lipophilic moieties; and (2 synthetic approaches using size-defined nanomaterials, e.g., self-assembling peptides, non-peptidic dendrimers, and gold nanoparticles, as antigen-displaying platforms. This review summarizes the recent experimental studies directed to the development of multiple antigen-presenting peptide vaccine systems.

  8. G9a/GLP Complex Maintains Imprinted DNA Methylation in Embryonic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuo Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation at imprinting control regions (ICRs is established in gametes in a sex-specific manner and has to be stably maintained during development and in somatic cells to ensure the correct monoallelic expression of imprinted genes. In addition to DNA methylation, the ICRs are marked by allele-specific histone modifications. Whether these marks are essential for maintenance of genomic imprinting is largely unclear. Here, we show that the histone H3 lysine 9 methylases G9a and GLP are required for stable maintenance of imprinted DNA methylation in embryonic stem cells; however, their catalytic activity and the G9a/GLP-dependent H3K9me2 mark are completely dispensable for imprinting maintenance despite the genome-wide loss of non-imprinted DNA methylation in H3K9me2-depleted cells. We provide additional evidence that the G9a/GLP complex protects imprinted DNA methylation by recruitment of de novo DNA methyltransferases, which antagonize TET dioxygenass-dependent erosion of DNA methylation at ICRs.

  9. G9a/GLP Complex Maintains Imprinted DNA Methylation in Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tuo; Termanis, Ausma; Özkan, Burak; Bao, Xun X; Culley, Jayne; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Rappsilber, Juri; Ramsahoye, Bernard; Stancheva, Irina

    2016-04-01

    DNA methylation at imprinting control regions (ICRs) is established in gametes in a sex-specific manner and has to be stably maintained during development and in somatic cells to ensure the correct monoallelic expression of imprinted genes. In addition to DNA methylation, the ICRs are marked by allele-specific histone modifications. Whether these marks are essential for maintenance of genomic imprinting is largely unclear. Here, we show that the histone H3 lysine 9 methylases G9a and GLP are required for stable maintenance of imprinted DNA methylation in embryonic stem cells; however, their catalytic activity and the G9a/GLP-dependent H3K9me2 mark are completely dispensable for imprinting maintenance despite the genome-wide loss of non-imprinted DNA methylation in H3K9me2-depleted cells. We provide additional evidence that the G9a/GLP complex protects imprinted DNA methylation by recruitment of de novo DNA methyltransferases, which antagonize TET dioxygenass-dependent erosion of DNA methylation at ICRs. PMID:27052169

  10. Antigen presentation by liposomes bearing class II MHC and membrane IL-1.

    OpenAIRE

    Bakouche, O; LACHMAN, L.B.

    1990-01-01

    Liposomes containing membrane IL-1, Iak, and the antigen conalbumin were evaluated as "synthetic antigen presenting cells." The role of these three molecules in macrophage-T cell interaction was studied by testing their ability to induce the proliferation of a T-cell clone specific to conalbumin (the D10 cell line) or immune spleen cells sensitized three times in vivo with conalbumin. In the latter case, splenic macrophages were eliminated by adherence and a lysomotropic agent. The antigen co...

  11. Tet-mediated imprinting erasure in H19 locus following reprogramming of spermatogonial stem cells to induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selective methylation of CpG islands at imprinting control regions (ICR) determines the monoparental expression of a subset of genes. The imprinting marks are protected from global demethylation taking place during pre-implantation development before being reset in primordial germ cells. However, it...

  12. Effects of Gold Nanorods on Imprinted Genes Expression in TM-4 Sertoli Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Beilei; Gu, Hao; Xu, Bo; Tang, Qiuqin; Wu, Wei; Ji, Xiaoli; Xia, Yankai; Hu, Lingqing; Chen, Daozhen; Wang, Xinru

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanorods (GNRs) are among the most commonly used nanomaterials. However, thus far, little is known about their harmful effects on male reproduction. Studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that GNRs could decrease glycine synthesis, membrane permeability, mitochondrial membrane potential and disrupt blood-testis barrier factors in TM-4 Sertoli cells. Imprinted genes play important roles in male reproduction and have been identified as susceptible loci to environmental insults by chemicals because they are functionally haploid. In this original study, we investigated the extent to which imprinted genes become deregulated in TM-4 Sertoli cells when treated with low dose of GNRs. The expression levels of 44 imprinted genes were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR in TM-4 Sertoli cells after a low dose of (10 nM) GNRs treatment for 24 h. We found significantly diminished expression of Kcnq1, Ntm, Peg10, Slc22a2, Pwcr1, Gtl2, Nap1l5, Peg3 and Slc22a2, while Plagl1 was significantly overexpressed. Additionally, four (Kcnq1, Slc22a18, Pwcr1 and Peg3) of 10 abnormally expressed imprinted genes were found to be located on chromosome 7. However, no significant difference of imprinted miRNA genes was observed between the GNRs treated group and controls. Our study suggested that aberrant expression of imprinted genes might be an underlying mechanism for the GNRs-induced reproductive toxicity in TM-4 Sertoli cells. PMID:26938548

  13. Boosting the MHC class II-restricted tumor antigen presentation to CD4+ T helper cells: a critical issue for triggering protective immunity and re-orienting the tumor microenvironment toward an anti-tumor state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RobertoAccolla

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the existence of an immune response against tumor cells is well documented, the fact that tumors take off in cancer patients indicates that neoplastic cells can circumvent this response. Over the years many investigators have described strategies to rescue the anti-tumor immune response with the aim of creating specific and long lasting protection against the disease. When exported to human clinical settings, these strategies have revealed in most cases a very limited, if any, positive outcome.We believe that the failure is mostly due to the inadequate triggering of the CD4+ T helper cell (TH arm of the adaptive immunity, as TH cells are necessary to trigger all the immune effector mechanisms required to eliminate tumor cells. In this review we focus on novel strategies that by stimulating MHC class II-restricted activation of TH cells generate a specific and persistent adaptive immunity against the tumor.This point is of critical importance for both preventive or therapeutic anti-tumor vaccination protocols, because adaptive immunity with its capacity to produce specific, long lasting protection and memory responses, is indeed the final goal of vaccination. We will discuss data from our as well as other laboratories which strongly suggest that triggering a specific and persistent anti-tumor CD4+ TH cell response stably modify not only the tumor microenvironment but also tumor-dependent extratumor microenvironments eliminating and/or reducing the blood-derived tumor infiltrating cells that may have a pro-tumor growth function such as regulatory CD4+/CD25+ T cells (Tregs and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC. Within this frame therefore, we believe that the establishment of a pro-tumor environment is not the cause but simply the consequence of the tumor strategy to primarily counteract components of the adaptive cellular immunity, particularly TH lymphocytes.

  14. Identification of a peptide binding protein that plays a role in antigen presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The helper T-cell response to globular proteins appears, in general, to require intracellular processing of the antigen, such that a peptide fragment containing the T-cell antigenic determinant is released and transported to and held on the surface of an Ia-expressing, antigen-presenting cell. However, the molecular details underlying these phenomena are largely unknown. The means by which antigenic peptides are anchored on the antigen-presenting cell surface was investigated. A cell surface protein is identified that was isolated by it ability to bind to a 24-amino acid peptide fragment of pigeon cytochrome c, residues 81-104, containing the major antigenic determinant for B10.A mouse T cells. This peptide binding protein, purified from [35S]methionine-labeled cells, appears as two discrete bands of ≅72 and 74 kDa after NaDodSO4/PAGE. The protein can be eluted from the peptide affinity column with equivalent concentrations of either the antigenic pigeon cytochrome c peptide or the corresponding nonantigenic peptide of mouse cytochrome c. However, it does not bind to the native cytochromes c, either of pigeon or mouse, and thus the protein appears to recognize some structure available only in the free peptides. This protein plays a role in antigen presentation. Its expression is not major histocompatibility complex-restricted in that the blocking activity of the antisera can be absorbed on spleen cells from mice of different haplotypes. This peptide binding protein can be isolated from a variety of cell types, including B cells, T cells, and fibroblasts. The anchoring of processed peptides on the cell surface by such a protein may play a role in antigen presentation

  15. MYELIN ANTIGEN LOAD INFLUENCES ANTIGEN PRESENTATION AND SEVERITY OF CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM AUTOIMMUNITY

    OpenAIRE

    Jaini, Ritika; Popescu, Daniela C.; Flask, Chris A.; Macklin, Wendy B.; Tuohy, Vincent K.

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to understand the impact of self-antigen load on manifestation of organ specific autoimmunity. Using a transgenic mouse model characterized by CNS hypermyelination, we show that larger myelin content results in greater severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis attributable to an increased number of microglia within the hypermyelinated brain. We conclude that a larger self-antigen load affects an increase in number of tissue resident antigen presenting cells...

  16. Stability of XIST repression in relation to genomic imprinting following global genome demethylation in a human cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA methylation is essential in X chromosome inactivation and genomic imprinting, maintaining repression of XIST in the active X chromosome and monoallelic repression of imprinted genes. Disruption of the DNA methyltransferase genes DNMT1 and DNMT3B in the HCT116 cell line (DKO cells) leads to global DNA hypomethylation and biallelic expression of the imprinted gene IGF2 but does not lead to reactivation of XIST expression, suggesting that XIST repression is due to a more stable epigenetic mark than imprinting. To test this hypothesis, we induced acute hypomethylation in HCT116 cells by 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) treatment (HCT116-5-aza-CdR) and compared that to DKO cells, evaluating DNA methylation by microarray and monitoring the expression of XIST and imprinted genes IGF2, H19, and PEG10. Whereas imprinted genes showed biallelic expression in HCT116-5-aza-CdR and DKO cells, the XIST locus was hypomethylated and weakly expressed only under acute hypomethylation conditions, indicating the importance of XIST repression in the active X to cell survival. Given that DNMT3A is the only active DNMT in DKO cells, it may be responsible for ensuring the repression of XIST in those cells. Taken together, our data suggest that XIST repression is more tightly controlled than genomic imprinting and, at least in part, is due to DNMT3A

  17. Stability of XIST repression in relation to genomic imprinting following global genome demethylation in a human cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araújo, E.S.S. de [Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Centro Internacional de Pesquisa, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Vasques, L.R. [Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Stabellini, R.; Krepischi, A.C.V. [Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Centro Internacional de Pesquisa, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pereira, L.V. [Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-10-17

    DNA methylation is essential in X chromosome inactivation and genomic imprinting, maintaining repression of XIST in the active X chromosome and monoallelic repression of imprinted genes. Disruption of the DNA methyltransferase genes DNMT1 and DNMT3B in the HCT116 cell line (DKO cells) leads to global DNA hypomethylation and biallelic expression of the imprinted gene IGF2 but does not lead to reactivation of XIST expression, suggesting that XIST repression is due to a more stable epigenetic mark than imprinting. To test this hypothesis, we induced acute hypomethylation in HCT116 cells by 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) treatment (HCT116-5-aza-CdR) and compared that to DKO cells, evaluating DNA methylation by microarray and monitoring the expression of XIST and imprinted genes IGF2, H19, and PEG10. Whereas imprinted genes showed biallelic expression in HCT116-5-aza-CdR and DKO cells, the XIST locus was hypomethylated and weakly expressed only under acute hypomethylation conditions, indicating the importance of XIST repression in the active X to cell survival. Given that DNMT3A is the only active DNMT in DKO cells, it may be responsible for ensuring the repression of XIST in those cells. Taken together, our data suggest that XIST repression is more tightly controlled than genomic imprinting and, at least in part, is due to DNMT3A.

  18. Exposure to ozone enhances antigen-presenting activity concentration dependently in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of ozone (O3) on the symptoms of allergic asthma and the mechanisms underlying have not yet been fully elucidated. Antigen presentation is one of the factors contributing to the allergic reaction. Therefore, we investigated the effects of repeated exposure to O3 on antigen-presenting (AP) activity, on the expression of cell-surface molecules associated with antigen presentation (Ia, B7.1, B7.2 and CD11b/c) in bronchoalveolar lavage cells (BAL cells), and on allergic asthma-like symptoms. Rats were exposed to 0.3, 0.56, 1 ppm O3 or filtered air for a 3-day period every 2 weeks, this was replicated three times. AP activity was assessed by measuring antigen-specific T-cell proliferation; and the expression of cell-surface molecules, by flow cytometry. Rats were also made to inhale aerosolized 1% ovalbumin (OVA) or saline for 10 min post-exposure to O3, and allergic asthma-like symptoms were measured by determining the increase in enhanced pause (Penh), which correlates well with lung resistance. O3 increased both AP activity and expression of Ia and costimulatory molecules in BAL cells concentration dependently. It also increased lung resistance, and the increase in lung resistance after O3 exposure was significantly higher in the OVA-inhaled group than in the saline-inhaled group. The present results show that O3 increased AP activity concentration dependently and suggest that O3 might aggravate allergy symptoms by enhancing AP activity

  19. Imprinted survival genes preclude loss of heterozygosity of chromosome 7 in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, Arnoud; Oosting, Jan; de Miranda, Noel Fcc; Zhang, Yinghui; Corver, Willem E; van de Water, Bob; Morreau, Hans; van Wezel, Tom

    2016-09-01

    The genomes of a wide range of cancers, including colon, breast, and thyroid cancers, frequently show copy number gains of chromosome 7 and rarely show loss of heterozygosity. The molecular basis for this phenomenon is unknown. Strikingly, oncocytic follicular thyroid carcinomas can display an extreme genomic profile, with homozygosity of all chromosomes except for chromosome 7. The observation that homozygosity of chromosome 7 is never observed suggests that retention of heterozygosity is essential for cells. We hypothesized that cell survival genes are genetically imprinted on either of two copies of chromosome 7, which thwarts loss of heterozygosity at this chromosome in cancer cells. By employing a DNA methylation screen and gene expression analysis, we identified six imprinted genes that force retention of heterozygosity on chromosome 7. Subsequent knockdown of gene expression showed that CALCR, COPG2, GRB10, KLF14, MEST, and PEG10 were essential for cancer cell survival, resulting in reduced cell proliferation, G1 -phase arrest, and increased apoptosis. We propose that imprinted cell survival genes provide a genetic basis for retention of chromosome 7 heterozygosity in cancer cells. The monoallelically expressed cell survival genes identified in this study, and the cellular pathways that they are involved in, offer new therapeutic targets for the treatment of tumours showing retention of heterozygosity on chromosome 7. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27265324

  20. 小剂量X射线照射对人树突状细胞抗原递呈及白介素-12分泌的影响%Effects of low dose X-ray irradiation on antigen presentation and IL-12 secretion in human dendritic cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫鹏; 江其生; 李峰生; 何蕊; 王翠兰; 李晓

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of low dose X-ray irradiation on the ability of antigen presentation and IL-12 secretion in human dendritic cells that had been cultured for different time in vitro.Methods The human peripheral blood mononuclear cells ( PBMC ) were collected and differentiated to dendritic cells (DCs) by rhGM-CSF and rhIL-4 treatment in vitro.The DCs were divided into 3 groups,group A:DCs were cultured for 2 d and then irradiated with 0.05,0.1,0.2 and 0.5 Gy X-rays; group B:DCs were cultured for 6 d and then irradiated as above; group C:DCs were cultured without irradiation.At 8 d of cell culture,the DCs were applied to activate T cells and CCK-8 was used to detect MLR ( mixed lymphocyte reaction),and the antigen presentation ability of DCs was evaluated.MTT assay was also used to test the cell-killing effect of the activated T-cells on A549 cells.IL-12 in the culture medium of DCs was detected by ELISA.Results After irradiation with 0.2 and 0.5 Gy X-rays,the antigen presentation ability of DCs was decreased in group A (t =2.79 and 3.71,P < 0.05 ),but significantly increased in group B (t =3.60 and 3.11,P < 0.05).The ability of the T cell activation was detected and the proliferation of A549 cells was slightly inhibited by the DCs in group A (t =2.89 and 2.91,P < 0.05),but was obviously inhibited by the DCs in group B (t =2.91 and 2.82,P <0.05).Meanwhile,the level of IL-12 was dramatically decreased in group A (t =4.44 and 6.93,P < 0.05),but was increased in group B (t =3.51 and 4.12,P <0.05).Conclusions The abilities of antigen presentation and proliferation inhibition of DCs could be down-regulated by low dose( < 0.5 Gy) of X-ray irradiation at the early stage of DCs,but was up-regulated at the late stage of DCs culture.%目的 探讨小剂量x射线照射对体外不同培养时间的人外周血树突状细胞( dendritic cell,DC)抗原递呈及白介素-12(IL-12)分泌的影响.方法 分离人外周血单个核细胞(PBMC),以人

  1. Antigen Presentation Ability of Salmonella Carrying DNA Vaccine Model and MCP-3 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang Winiati Bachtiar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to determine the antigen presentation ability of a DNA vaccine model that is co-delivered with that of recombinant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (STM1 expressing chemokine macrophage chemotactic protein-3 (MCP-3. The DNA vaccine, pVROVA, was constructed by amplification of the ovalbumin coding region from sOVA-C1. Dendritic cells (DCs were obtained from IL-4 and GMCSF stimulated mouse bone marrow stem cell. Cultured DCs were incubated with STM1 carrying a model ovalbumin gene (pVROVA. Furthermore, MHC class I antigen presentation of a dominant OVA peptide was assayed in vitro. The experiments were designed to determine the effect of co-delivering MCP-3 with that of ovalbumin in STM1. Our results show that a plasmid pROVA-carrying ovalbumin gene was succesfully constructed and sequence analysis of the ovalbumin-coding revealed an identity match of 100% with that of the chicken ovalbumin DNA sequences from the GenBank database. We also found that the presence of the MCP-3 encoding plasmid in STM1 or E. coli DH1 could increase the recovery of both STM1 and E. coli DH1 over those that carry the empty plasmids. Antigen presentation assay also indicates that MCP-3 can positively influence the presentation of ovalbumin. Conclusion: the infection of DCs by STM1-carrying DNA vaccine and MCP-3 results in an increase of processing and presentation of ovalbumin in vitro.Keywords : DNA vaccine, MCP-3, APC, Salmonella, Dendritic cells

  2. Inhibition of MHC class I-restricted antigen presentation by γ2-herpesviruses

    OpenAIRE

    Stevenson, Philip G.; Efstathiou, Stacey; Doherty, Peter C.; Lehner, Paul J.

    2000-01-01

    The γ-herpesviruses, in contrast to the α- and β-herpesviruses, are not known to inhibit antigen presentation to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) during lytic cycle replication. However, murine γ-herpesvirus 68 causes a chronic lytic infection in CD4+ T cell-deficient mice despite the persistence of a substantial CTL response, suggesting that CTL evasion occurs. Here we show that, distinct from host protein synthesis shutoff, γ-herpesvirus 68 down-regulates surface MHC class I expression o...

  3. Facile Multiscale Patterning by Creep-Assisted Sequential Imprinting and Fuel Cell Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Segeun; Kim, Minhyoung; Kang, Yun Sik; Choi, Yong Whan; Kim, Sang Moon; Sung, Yung-Eun; Choi, Mansoo

    2016-05-11

    The capability of fabricating multiscale structures with desired morphology and incorporating them into engineering applications is key to realizing technological breakthroughs by employing the benefits from both microscale and nanoscale morphology simultaneously. Here, we developed a facile patterning method to fabricate multiscale hierarchical structures by a novel approach called creep-assisted sequential imprinting. In this work, nanopatterning was first carried out by thermal imprint lithography above the glass transition temperature (Tg) of a polymer film, and then followed by creep-assisted imprinting with micropatterns based on the mechanical deformation of the polymer film under the relatively long-term exposure to mechanical stress at temperatures below the Tg of the polymer. The fabricated multiscale arrays exhibited excellent pattern uniformity over large areas. To demonstrate the usage of multiscale architectures, we incorporated the multiscale Nafion films into polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell, and this device showed more than 10% higher performance than the conventional one. The enhancement was attributed to the decrease in mass transport resistance because of unique cone-shape morphology by creep-recovery effects and the increase in interfacial surface area between Nafion film and electrocatalyst layer. PMID:27116979

  4. Sugar-fiber Imprinting to Generate Microgrooves on Polymeric Film Surfaces for Contact Guidance of Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屈泽华; 丁建东

    2012-01-01

    Anisotropic surface topography is known to induce the contact guidance of cells, and facile and biocompatible approaches of the physical modification of the pertinent matrix surfaces are thus meaningful for biomaterials. Herein, we put forward a sugar-fiber imprinting technique to generate microgrooves on hydrophobic polymers demonstrated by the poly(lactic-eo-glycolic acid) (PLGA) films. Microgrooves were conveniently generated after removing sugar fibers simply by water. The resulting locally anisotropic microgrooves were confirmed to elongate the cells cultured on the surface.

  5. Regulation of antigen presentation by acidic pH

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The effect of pH on functional association of peptide antigens with APC membranes was investigated by using aldehyde-fixed B cells and class II- restricted T cell hybridomas to assess antigen/MHC complex formation. The results indicated that the rate and extent of functional peptide binding was markedly increased at pH 5.0 as compared with pH 7.3. The pH dependence of binding was preserved after pretreatment of fixed APC with pH 5.0 buffer, suggesting that pH had a direct effect on the intera...

  6. Formation of Nano scale Bio imprints of Muscle Cells Using UV-Cured Spin-Coated Polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a nano scale replication method suitable for biological specimens that has potential in single cell studies and in formation of 3D biocompatible scaffolds. Earlier studies using a heat-curable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) or a UV-curable elastomer introduced Bio imprint replication to facilitate cell imaging. However, the replicating conditions for thermal polymerization are known to cause cell dehydration during curing. In this study, a UV-cured methacrylate copolymer was developed for use in creating replicas of living cells and was tested on rat muscle cells. Bio imprints of muscle cells were formed by spin coating under UV irradiation. The polymer replicas were then separated from the muscle cells and were analyzed under an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), in tapping mode, because it has low tip-sample forces and thus will not destroy the fine structures of the imprint. The new polymer is biocompatible with higher replication resolution and has a faster curing process than other types of silicon-based organic polymers such as PDMS. High resolution images of the muscle cell imprints showed the micro-and nano structures of the muscle cells, including cellular fibers and structures within the cell membranes. The AFM is able to image features at nano scale resolution with the potential for recognizing abnormalities on cell membranes at early stages of disease progression.

  7. A role for NADPH oxidase in antigen presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail J Gardiner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase expressed in phagocytes is a multi-subunit enzyme complex that generates superoxide (O2.-. This radical is an important precursor of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and other reactive oxygen species (ROS needed for microbicidal activity during innate immune responses. Inherited defects in NADPH oxidase give rise to chronic granulomatous disease (CGD, a primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent infections and granulomatous inflammation. Interestingly, CGD, CGD carrier status, and oxidase gene polymorphisms have all been associated with autoinflammatory and autoimmune disorders, suggesting a potential role for NADPH oxidase in regulating adaptive immune responses. Here, NADPH oxidase function in antigen processing and presentation is reviewed. NADPH oxidase influences dendritic cell (DC crosspresentation by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (MHC-I through regulation of the phagosomal microenvironment, while in B lymphocytes, NADPH oxidase alters epitope selection by major histocompatibility complex class II molecules (MHC-II.

  8. MHC-restricted antigen presentation and recognition: constraints on gene, recombinant and peptide vaccines in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunha-Neto E.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The target of any immunization is to activate and expand lymphocyte clones with the desired recognition specificity and the necessary effector functions. In gene, recombinant and peptide vaccines, the immunogen is a single protein or a small assembly of epitopes from antigenic proteins. Since most immune responses against protein and peptide antigens are T-cell dependent, the molecular target of such vaccines is to generate at least 50-100 complexes between MHC molecule and the antigenic peptide per antigen-presenting cell, sensitizing a T cell population of appropriate clonal size and effector characteristics. Thus, the immunobiology of antigen recognition by T cells must be taken into account when designing new generation peptide- or gene-based vaccines. Since T cell recognition is MHC-restricted, and given the wide polymorphism of the different MHC molecules, distinct epitopes may be recognized by different individuals in the population. Therefore, the issue of whether immunization will be effective in inducing a protective immune response, covering the entire target population, becomes an important question. Many pathogens have evolved molecular mechanisms to escape recognition by the immune system by variation of antigenic protein sequences. In this short review, we will discuss the several concepts related to selection of amino acid sequences to be included in DNA and peptide vaccines.

  9. Role of antigen presentation in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in obese adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdoubi, Abdelilah; Kishta, Osama A; Thibodeau, Jacques

    2016-06-01

    Type II diabetes regroups different physiological anomalies that ultimately lead to low-grade chronic inflammation, insulin resistance and loss of pancreatic β-cells. Obesity is one of the best examples of such a condition that can develop into Metabolic Syndrome, causing serious health problems of great socio-economic consequences. The pathological outcome of obesity has a genetic basis and depends on the delicate balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory effectors of the immune system. The causal link between obesity and inflammation is well established. While innate immunity plays a key role in the development of a pro-inflammatory state in obese adipose tissues, it has now become clear that adaptive immune cells are also involved and participate in the cascade of events that lead to metabolic perturbations. The efficacy of some immunotherapeutic protocols in reducing the symptoms of obesity-driven metabolic syndrome in mice implicated all arms of the immune response. Recently, the production of pathogenic immunoglobulins and pro-inflammatory cytokines by B and T lymphocytes suggested an auto-immune basis for the establishment of a non-healthy obese state. Understanding the cellular landscape of obese adipose tissues and how immune cells sustain chronic inflammation holds the key to the development of targeted therapies. In this review, we emphasize the role of antigen-presenting cells and MHC molecules in obese adipose tissue and the general contribution of the adaptive arm of the immune system in inflammation-induced insulin resistance. PMID:26854212

  10. Lack of genomic imprinting of DNA primase, polypeptide 2 (PRIM2) in human term placenta and white blood cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Jaewook; Tsai, Shengdar; James, Andra H.; Thames, Betty H.; Shytle, Stephanie; Piedrahita, Jorge A.

    2012-01-01

    PRIM2, encoding a subunit of primase involved in DNA replication and transcription, is expressed in the placenta and is crucial for mammalian development and growth. Its role in placental function is not well understood. Recently, PRIM2 was reported as imprinted in human white blood cells (WBC). We report here our failure to confirm imprinting of the PRIM2 locus in human placenta or WBC. The discordance between our results and those of others are likely due to an incorrectly annotated PRIM2 p...

  11. Highly efficient ultrathin-film amorphous silicon solar cells on top of imprinted periodic nanodot arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Wensheng, E-mail: yws118@gmail.com; Gu, Min, E-mail: mgu@swin.edu.au [Centre for Micro-Photonics, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Tao, Zhikuo [College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210023 (China); Ong, Thiam Min Brian [Plasma Sources and Application Center, NIE, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Nanyang Walk, Singapore 637616 (Singapore); Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore)

    2015-03-02

    The addressing of the light absorption and conversion efficiency is critical to the ultrathin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells. We systematically investigate ultrathin a-Si:H solar cells with a 100 nm absorber on top of imprinted hexagonal nanodot arrays. Experimental evidences are demonstrated for not only notable silver nanodot arrays but also lower-cost ITO and Al:ZnO nanodot arrays. The measured external quantum efficiency is explained by the simulation results. The J{sub sc} values are 12.1, 13.0, and 14.3 mA/cm{sup 2} and efficiencies are 6.6%, 7.5%, and 8.3% for ITO, Al:ZnO, and silver nanodot arrays, respectively. Simulated optical absorption distribution shows high light trapping within amorphous silicon layer.

  12. Highly efficient ultrathin-film amorphous silicon solar cells on top of imprinted periodic nanodot arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The addressing of the light absorption and conversion efficiency is critical to the ultrathin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells. We systematically investigate ultrathin a-Si:H solar cells with a 100 nm absorber on top of imprinted hexagonal nanodot arrays. Experimental evidences are demonstrated for not only notable silver nanodot arrays but also lower-cost ITO and Al:ZnO nanodot arrays. The measured external quantum efficiency is explained by the simulation results. The Jsc values are 12.1, 13.0, and 14.3 mA/cm2 and efficiencies are 6.6%, 7.5%, and 8.3% for ITO, Al:ZnO, and silver nanodot arrays, respectively. Simulated optical absorption distribution shows high light trapping within amorphous silicon layer

  13. No major role for insulin-degrading enzyme in antigen presentation by MHC molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan Culina

    Full Text Available Antigen presentation by MHC class I molecules requires degradation of epitope source proteins in the cytosol. Although the preeminent role of the proteasome is clearly established, evidence suggesting a significant role for proteasome-independent generation of class I ligands has been reported repeatedly. However, an enzyme responsible for such a role has not been identified. Recently insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE was shown to produce an antigenic peptide derived from the tumor antigen MAGE-A3 in an entirely proteasome-independent manner, raising the question of the global impact of IDE in MHC class I antigen processing. Here we report that IDE knockdown in human cell lines, or knockout in two different mouse strains, has no effect on cell surface expression of various MHC class I molecules, including allomorphs such as HLA-A3 and HLA-B27 suggested to be loaded in an at least a partly proteasome-independent manner. Moreover, reduced or absent IDE expression does not affect presentation of five epitopes including epitopes derived from beta amyloid and proinsulin, two preferred IDE substrates. Thus, IDE does not play a major role in MHC class I antigen processing, confirming the dominant and almost exclusive role of the proteasome in cytosolic production of MHC class I ligands.

  14. No major role for insulin-degrading enzyme in antigen presentation by MHC molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culina, Slobodan; Mauvais, François-Xavier; Hsu, Hsiang-Ting; Burgevin, Anne; Guénette, Suzanne; Moser, Anna; van Endert, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Antigen presentation by MHC class I molecules requires degradation of epitope source proteins in the cytosol. Although the preeminent role of the proteasome is clearly established, evidence suggesting a significant role for proteasome-independent generation of class I ligands has been reported repeatedly. However, an enzyme responsible for such a role has not been identified. Recently insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) was shown to produce an antigenic peptide derived from the tumor antigen MAGE-A3 in an entirely proteasome-independent manner, raising the question of the global impact of IDE in MHC class I antigen processing. Here we report that IDE knockdown in human cell lines, or knockout in two different mouse strains, has no effect on cell surface expression of various MHC class I molecules, including allomorphs such as HLA-A3 and HLA-B27 suggested to be loaded in an at least a partly proteasome-independent manner. Moreover, reduced or absent IDE expression does not affect presentation of five epitopes including epitopes derived from beta amyloid and proinsulin, two preferred IDE substrates. Thus, IDE does not play a major role in MHC class I antigen processing, confirming the dominant and almost exclusive role of the proteasome in cytosolic production of MHC class I ligands. PMID:24516642

  15. Emperipolesis in a Case of Adult T Cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma (Mediastinal type-Detected at FNAC and Imprint Cytology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amita K

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Emperipolesis is a condition in which viable hematopoetic cells are seen intact in the cytoplasm of host cell without damage. This phenomenon is seen in many physiologic and pathologic conditions, its presence in Rosai Dorfman disease (RDD is characteristic of the disease. However emperipolesis is an uncommon finding in malignant lymphoma both Hodgkins and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, wherein it has been described in bone marrow aspirate and tissue culture. In contrast there are only two case reports of emperipolesis phenomenon described in non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in tissue sections. We report a case of an adult T cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (mediastinal type with features of emperipolesis demonstrated at fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC and imprint cytology of cervical lymph nodes. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of emperipolesis in a case of adult T cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (mediastinal type-detected at FNAC and imprint cytology.

  16. Peptide imprinted receptors for the determination of the small cell lung cancer associated biomarker progastrin releasing peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qader, A. A.; Urraca, J.; Torsetnes, S. B.;

    2014-01-01

    prior to LCMS based quantification. Peptide imprinted polymers with the best affinity characteristics were first identified from a 96-polymer combinatorial library. The effects of functional monomers, crosslinker, porogen, and template on adsorption capacity and selectivity for NLLGLIEAK were......Peptide imprinted polymers were developed for detection of progastrin releasing peptide (ProGRP); a low abundant blood based biomarker for small cell lung cancer. The polymers targeted the proteotypic nona-peptide sequence NLLGLIEAK and were used for selective enrichment of the proteotypic peptide...... investigated and optimized. Ultimately, a solid phase extraction method was developed for highly selective enrichment of the target peptide from tryptic digests. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  17. Imprint Molding of a Microfluidic Optical Cell on Thermoplastics with Reduced Surface Roughness for the Detection of Copper Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Lee, Nae Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Here, we introduce a simple and facile technique for fabricating microfluidic optical cells by utilizing a micropatterned polymer mold, followed by imprinting on thermoplastic substrates. This process has reduced the surface roughness of the microchannel, making it suitable for microscale optical measurements. The micropatterned polymer mold was fabricated by first micromilling on a poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) substrate, and then transferring the micropattern onto an ultraviolet (UV)-curable optical adhesive. After an anti-adhesion treatment of the polymer mold fabricated using the UV-curable optical adhesive, the polymer mold was used repeatedly for imprinting onto various thermoplastics, such as PMMA, polycarbonate (PC), and poly(ethyleneterephthalate) (PET). The roughness values for the PMMA, PC, and PET microchannels were approximately 11.3, 20.3, and 14.2 nm, respectively, as compared to those obtained by micromilling alone, which were 15.9, 76.8, and 207.5 nm, respectively. Using the imprint-molded thermoplastic optical cell, rhodamine B and copper ions were successfully quantified. The reduced roughness of the microchannel surface resulted in improved sensitivity and reduced noise, paving the way for integration of the detection module so as to realize totally integrated microdevices. PMID:26753711

  18. Molecular Imprint of Exposure to Naturally Occurring Genetic Variants of Human Cytomegalovirus on the T cell Repertoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Corey; Gras, Stephanie; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Bird, Nicola L.; Valkenburg, Sophie A.; Twist, Kelly-Anne; Burrows, Jacqueline M.; Miles, John J.; Chambers, Daniel; Bell, Scott; Campbell, Scott; Kedzierska, Katherine; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Khanna, Rajiv

    2014-02-01

    Exposure to naturally occurring variants of herpesviruses in clinical settings can have a dramatic impact on anti-viral immunity. Here we have evaluated the molecular imprint of variant peptide-MHC complexes on the T-cell repertoire during human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and demonstrate that primary co-infection with genetic variants of CMV was coincident with development of strain-specific T-cell immunity followed by emergence of cross-reactive virus-specific T-cells. Cross-reactive CMV-specific T cells exhibited a highly conserved public T cell repertoire, while T cells directed towards specific genetic variants displayed oligoclonal repertoires, unique to each individual. T cell recognition foot-print and pMHC-I structural analyses revealed that the cross-reactive T cells accommodate alterations in the pMHC complex with a broader foot-print focussing on the core of the peptide epitope. These findings provide novel molecular insight into how infection with naturally occurring genetic variants of persistent human herpesviruses imprints on the evolution of the anti-viral T-cell repertoire.

  19. Salt bridge residues between I-Ak dimer of dimers alpha-chains modulate antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadati, S; Nydam, T; Demian, D; Wade, T K; Gabriel, J L; Barisas, B G; Wade, W F

    1999-03-15

    Class II dimers of dimers are predicted to have functional significance in antigen presentation. The putative contact amino acids of the I-Ak class II dimer of dimers have been identified by molecular modeling based on the DR1 crystal structure (Nydam et al., Int. Immunol. 10, 1237,1998). We have previously reported the role in antigen presentation of dimer of dimers contact amino acids located in the C-terminal domains of the alpha- and beta-chains of class II. Our calculations show that residues Ealpha89 and Ralpha145 in the alpha2-domain form an inter alpha-chain salt bridge between pairs of alphabeta-heterodimers. Other residues, Qalpha92 and Nalpha115, may be involved in close association in that part of the alpha-chain. We investigated the role of these amino acids on class II expression and antigen presentation. Class II composed of an Ealpha89K substituted alpha-chain paired with a wt beta-chain exhibited inhibited antigen presentation and expression of alpha-chain serologic epitopes. In contrast, mutation of Ralpha145E had less affect on antigen presentation and did not affect I-Ak serologic epitopes. Interchanging charges of the salt bridge residues by expressing both Ralpha145E and Ealpha89K on the same chain obviated the large negative effect of the Ealpha89K mutation on antigen presentation but not on the serologic epitopes. Our results are similar for those reported for mutation of DR3's inter-chain salt bridge with the exception that double mutants did not moderate the DR3 defect. Interestingly, the amino acids differences between I-A and DR change the location of the inter-chain salt bridges. In DR1 these residues are located at positions Ealpha88 and Kalpha111; in I-Ak these residues are located at position Ealpha89 and Ralpha145. Inter alpha-chain salt bridges are thus maintained in various class II molecules by amino acids located in different parts of the alpha2-domain. This conservation of structure suggests that considerable functional

  20. No Major Role for Insulin-Degrading Enzyme in Antigen Presentation by MHC Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Culina, Slobodan; Mauvais, François-Xavier; Hsu, Hsiang-Ting; Burgevin, Anne; Guénette, Suzanne; Moser, Anna; van Endert, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Antigen presentation by MHC class I molecules requires degradation of epitope source proteins in the cytosol. Although the preeminent role of the proteasome is clearly established, evidence suggesting a significant role for proteasome-independent generation of class I ligands has been reported repeatedly. However, an enzyme responsible for such a role has not been identified. Recently insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) was shown to produce an antigenic peptide derived from the tumor antigen MAGE-...

  1. Imprinting disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggermann, Thomas; Perez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Maher, Eamonn R;

    2015-01-01

    Congenital imprinting disorders (IDs) are characterised by molecular changes affecting imprinted chromosomal regions and genes, i.e. genes that are expressed in a parent-of-origin specific manner. Recent years have seen a great expansion in the range of alterations in regulation, dosage or DNA...... impacts upon growth, development and metabolism. Thus, detailed and systematic analysis of IDs can not only identify unifying principles of molecular epigenetics in health and disease, but also support personalisation of diagnosis and management for individual patients and families....

  2. Papaya ringspot virus coat protein gene for antigen presentation Escherichia coli

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chatchen, S.; Juříček, Miloslav; Rueda, P.; Kertbundit, Sunee

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 1 (2006), s. 16-21. ISSN 1225-8687 Grant ostatní: Thai Research Fund(TH) BT-B-06-PG-14-4503 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : antigen presentation * canine parvo virus * epitope * papaya ringspot virus Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.465, year: 2006 http://www.jbmb.or.kr/view_article.php3?cont=jbmb&kid=174&mid=3&pid=3

  3. Parasite Manipulation of the Invariant Chain and the Peptide Editor H2-DM Affects Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Antigen Presentation during Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, Louis-Philippe; Nishi, Manami; El-Hage, Sandy; Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J; Dzierszinski, Florence S

    2015-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite. This apicomplexan is the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, a leading cause of central nervous system disease in AIDS. It has long been known that T. gondii interferes with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) antigen presentation to attenuate CD4(+) T cell responses and establish persisting infections. Transcriptional downregulation of MHC-II genes by T. gondii was previously established, but the precise mechanisms inhibiting MHC-II function are currently unknown. Here, we show that, in addition to transcriptional regulation of MHC-II, the parasite modulates the expression of key components of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway, namely, the MHC-II-associated invariant chain (Ii or CD74) and the peptide editor H2-DM, in professional antigen-presenting cells (pAPCs). Genetic deletion of CD74 restored the ability of infected dendritic cells to present a parasite antigen in the context of MHC-II in vitro. CD74 mRNA and protein levels were, surprisingly, elevated in infected cells, whereas MHC-II and H2-DM expression was inhibited. CD74 accumulated mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and this phenotype required live parasites, but not active replication. Finally, we compared the impacts of genetic deletion of CD74 and H2-DM genes on parasite dissemination toward lymphoid organs in mice, as well as activation of CD4(+) T cells and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) levels during acute infection. Cyst burdens and survival during the chronic phase of infection were also evaluated in wild-type and knockout mice. These results highlight the fact that the infection is influenced by multiple levels of parasite manipulation of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway. PMID:26195549

  4. Parasite Manipulation of the Invariant Chain and the Peptide Editor H2-DM Affects Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Antigen Presentation during Toxoplasma gondii Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Leroux, Louis-Philippe; Nishi, Manami; El-Hage, Sandy; Fox, Barbara A.; Bzik, David J.; Dzierszinski, Florence S.

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite. This apicomplexan is the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, a leading cause of central nervous system disease in AIDS. It has long been known that T. gondii interferes with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) antigen presentation to attenuate CD4+ T cell responses and establish persisting infections. Transcriptional downregulation of MHC-II genes by T. gondii was previously established, but the precise mechanisms...

  5. Aberrant gene expression and sexually incompatible genomic imprinting in oocytes derived from XY mouse embryonic stem cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Nitta

    Full Text Available Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs have the potential to differentiate into germ cells (GCs in vivo and in vitro. Interestingly, XY ESCs can give rise to both male and female GCs in culture, irrespective of the genetic sex. Recent studies showed that ESC-derived primordial GCs contributed to functional gametogenesis in vivo; however, in vitro differentiation techniques have never succeeded in generating mature oocytes from ESCs due to cryptogenic growth arrest during the preantral follicle stages of development. To address this issue, a mouse ESC line, capable of producing follicle-like structures (FLSs efficiently, was established to investigate their properties using conventional molecular biological methods. The results revealed that the ESC-derived FLSs were morphologically similar to ovarian primary-to-secondary follicles but never formed an antrum; instead, the FLSs eventually underwent abnormal development or cell death in culture, or formed teratomas when transplanted under the kidney capsule in mice. Gene expression analyses demonstrated that the FLSs lacked transcripts for genes essential to late folliculogenesis, including gonadotropin receptors and steroidogenic enzymes, whereas some other genes were overexpressed in FLSs compared to the adult ovary. The E-Cadherin protein, which is involved in cell-to-cell interactions, was also expressed ectopically. Remarkably, it was seen that oocyte-like cells in the FLSs exhibited androgenetic genomic imprinting, which is ordinarily indicative of male GCs. Although the FLSs did not express male GC marker genes, the DNA methyltransferase, Dnmt3L, was expressed at an abnormally high level. Furthermore, the expression of sex determination factors was ambiguous in FLSs as both male and female determinants were expressed weakly. These data suggest that the developmental dysfunction of the ESC-derived FLSs may be attributable to aberrant gene expression and genomic imprinting, possibly associated with

  6. Designing Imprint Rolls for Fluid Pathway Fabrication

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David A

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses a novel method for designing imprint rolls for the fabrication of fluid pathways. Roller imprint processes have applications in diverse areas including fuel cell manufacturing and microfluidic device fabrication. Robust design methods are required for developing imprint rolls with optimal features. In the method discussed in this paper, the rolls are designed procedurally with the fluid pathway design given as input. The pathways are decomposed into repeating features (or...

  7. Antigen presenting cells in the skin of a patient with hair loss and systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez; Julia G Girard; Michael S. Howard,

    2009-01-01

    Context: Hair loss is one of the most striking clinical features of active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), however, very few studies have investigated the immunological features of this process. Case report: We describe a 33 years old female who presented with scalp hair loss and arthralgias. Physical examination revealed erythematous plaques on the nose and scalp, with bitemporal hair loss. Scalp biopsies revealed epidermal hyperkeratosis, with a mild interface infiltrate of lymphocytes ...

  8. ImmunoChip Study Implicates Antigen Presentation to T Cells in Narcolepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faraco, J.; Lin, L.; Kornum, B.R.; Kenny, E.E.; Trynka, G.; Einen, M.; Rico, T.J.; Lichtner, P.; Dauvilliers, Y.; Arnulf, I.; Lecendreux, M.; Javidi, S.; Geisler, P.; Mayer, G.; Pizza, F.; Poli, F.; Plazzi, G.; Overeem, S.; Lammers, G.J.; Kemlink, D.; Sonka, K.; Nevsimalova, S.; Rouleau, G.; Desautels, A.; Montplaisir, J.; Frauscher, B.; Ehrmann, L.; Hogl, B.; Jennum, P.; Bourgin, P.; Peraita-Adrados, R.; Iranzo, A.; Bassetti, C.; Chen, W.M.; Concannon, P.; Thompson, S.D.; Damotte, V.; Fontaine, B.; Breban, M.; Gieger, C.; Klopp, N.; Deloukas, P.; Wijmenga, C.; Hallmayer, J.; Onengut-Gumuscu, S.; Rich, S.S.; Winkelmann, J.; Mignot, E.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the identification of susceptibility genes and environmental exposures provide broad support for a post-infectious autoimmune basis for narcolepsy/hypocretin (orexin) deficiency. We genotyped loci associated with other autoimmune and inflammatory diseases in 1,886 individuals with

  9. Protective effects of ion-imprinted chitooligosaccharides as uranium-specific chelating agents against the cytotoxicity of depleted uranium in human kidney cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Occupational internal contamination with depleted uranium (DU) compounds can induce radiological and chemical toxicity, and an effective and specific uranium-chelating agent for clinical use is urgently needed. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a series of synthesized water-soluble metal-ion-imprinted chitooligosaccharides can be used as uranium-specific chelating agents, because the chitooligosaccharides have excellent heavy metal ion chelation property and the ion-imprinting technology can improve the selective recognition of template ions. DU-poisoned human renal proximal tubule epithelium cells (human kidney 2 cells, HK-2) were used to assess the detoxification of these chitooligosaccharides. The DU-chelating capacity and selectivity of the chitooligosaccharides were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Cell viability, cellular accumulation of DU, membrane damage, DNA damage, and morphological changes in the cellular ultrastructure were examined to assess the detoxification of these chitooligosaccharides. The results showed that the Cu2+-imprinted chitooligosaccharides, especially the Cu2+-imprinted glutaraldehyde-crosslinked carboxymethyl chitooligosaccharide (Cu-Glu-CMC), chelated DU effectively and specifically, and significantly reduced the loss of cell viability induced by DU and reduced cellular accumulation of DU in a dose-dependent manner, owing to their chelation of DU outside cells and their prevention of DU internalization. The ultrastructure observation clearly showed that Cu-Glu-CMC-chelated-DU precipitates, mostly outside cells, were grouped in significantly larger clusters, and they barely entered the cells by endocytosis or in any other way. Treatment with Cu-Glu-CMC also increased the activity of antioxidant enzymes, and reduced membrane damage and DNA damage induced by DU oxidant injury. Cu-Glu-CMC was more effective than the positive control drug, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), in

  10. Balancing selection maintains a form of ERAP2 that undergoes nonsense-mediated decay and affects antigen presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida M Andrés

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A remarkable characteristic of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC is its extreme genetic diversity, which is maintained by balancing selection. In fact, the MHC complex remains one of the best-known examples of natural selection in humans, with well-established genetic signatures and biological mechanisms for the action of selection. Here, we present genetic and functional evidence that another gene with a fundamental role in MHC class I presentation, endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 2 (ERAP2, has also evolved under balancing selection and contains a variant that affects antigen presentation. Specifically, genetic analyses of six human populations revealed strong and consistent signatures of balancing selection affecting ERAP2. This selection maintains two highly differentiated haplotypes (Haplotype A and Haplotype B, with frequencies 0.44 and 0.56, respectively. We found that ERAP2 expressed from Haplotype B undergoes differential splicing and encodes a truncated protein, leading to nonsense-mediated decay of the mRNA. To investigate the consequences of ERAP2 deficiency on MHC presentation, we correlated surface MHC class I expression with ERAP2 genotypes in primary lymphocytes. Haplotype B homozygotes had lower levels of MHC class I expressed on the surface of B cells, suggesting that naturally occurring ERAP2 deficiency affects MHC presentation and immune response. Interestingly, an ERAP2 paralog, endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1, also shows genetic signatures of balancing selection. Together, our findings link the genetic signatures of selection with an effect on splicing and a cellular phenotype. Although the precise selective pressure that maintains polymorphism is unknown, the demonstrated differences between the ERAP2 splice forms provide important insights into the potential mechanism for the action of selection.

  11. Maintenance of genomic imprinting by G9a/GLP complex of histone methyltransferases in embryonic stem (ES) cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Tuo

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation refers to an addition of a methyl group to the 5 position of the cytosine pyrimidine ring. As the best characterized epigenetic mark, DNA methylation plays an important role in a plethora of biological functions, including gene repression, genomic imprinting, silencing of retro-transposons and X chromosome inactivation. Genomic imprinting refers to the mono-allelic expression of certain genes according to their parent-of-origin. In mammals, the expression of ...

  12. Imprinting and recalling cortical ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Yang, Weijian; Bando, Yuki; Peterka, Darcy S; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-08-12

    Neuronal ensembles are coactive groups of neurons that may represent building blocks of cortical circuits. These ensembles could be formed by Hebbian plasticity, whereby synapses between coactive neurons are strengthened. Here we report that repetitive activation with two-photon optogenetics of neuronal populations from ensembles in the visual cortex of awake mice builds neuronal ensembles that recur spontaneously after being imprinted and do not disrupt preexisting ones. Moreover, imprinted ensembles can be recalled by single- cell stimulation and remain coactive on consecutive days. Our results demonstrate the persistent reconfiguration of cortical circuits by two-photon optogenetics into neuronal ensembles that can perform pattern completion. PMID:27516599

  13. Imprinting in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUTIERREZ-MARCOS Jose

    2009-01-01

    Genomic imprinting leads to the differential expression of parental alleles after fertilization. Imprinting appears to have evolved independently in mammals and flowering plants to regulate the development of nutrient-transfer placental tissues. In addition, the regulation of imprinting in both mammals and flowering plants involves changes in DNA methylation and histone methylation, thus suggesting that the epigenetic signals that regulate imprinting have been co-opted in these distantly related species.

  14. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor alters the growth characteristics and genomic imprinting of mouse multipotent adult germline stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yoon Hee [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center/Animal Resources Research Center, Konkuk University, Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143 701 (Korea, Republic of); Gupta, Mukesh Kumar, E-mail: goops@konkuk.ac.kr [Department of Animal Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center/Animal Resources Research Center, Konkuk University, Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143 701 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Shin Hye [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center/Animal Resources Research Center, Konkuk University, Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143 701 (Korea, Republic of); Uhm, Sang Jun [Department of Animal Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center/Animal Resources Research Center, Konkuk University, Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143 701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hoon Taek, E-mail: htl3675@konkuk.ac.kr [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center/Animal Resources Research Center, Konkuk University, Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143 701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Animal Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center/Animal Resources Research Center, Konkuk University, Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143 701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-10

    This study evaluated the essentiality of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for in vitro culture of established mouse multipotent adult germline stem (maGS) cell lines by culturing them in the presence of GDNF, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) or both. We show that, in the absence of LIF, GDNF slows the proliferation of maGS cells and result in smaller sized colonies without any change in distribution of cells to different cell-cycle stages, expression of pluripotency genes and in vitro differentiation potential. Furthermore, in the absence of LIF, GDNF increased the expression of male germ-line genes and repopulated the empty seminiferous tubule of W/W{sup v} mutant mouse without the formation of teratoma. GDNF also altered the genomic imprinting of Igf2, Peg1, and H19 genes but had no effect on DNA methylation of Oct4, Nanog and Stra8 genes. However, these effects of GDNF were masked in the presence of LIF. GDNF also did not interfere with the multipotency of maGS cells if they are cultured in the presence of LIF. In conclusion, our results suggest that, in the absence of LIF, GDNF alters the growth characteristics of maGS cells and partially impart them some of the germline stem (GS) cell-like characteristics.

  15. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor alters the growth characteristics and genomic imprinting of mouse multipotent adult germline stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the essentiality of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for in vitro culture of established mouse multipotent adult germline stem (maGS) cell lines by culturing them in the presence of GDNF, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) or both. We show that, in the absence of LIF, GDNF slows the proliferation of maGS cells and result in smaller sized colonies without any change in distribution of cells to different cell-cycle stages, expression of pluripotency genes and in vitro differentiation potential. Furthermore, in the absence of LIF, GDNF increased the expression of male germ-line genes and repopulated the empty seminiferous tubule of W/Wv mutant mouse without the formation of teratoma. GDNF also altered the genomic imprinting of Igf2, Peg1, and H19 genes but had no effect on DNA methylation of Oct4, Nanog and Stra8 genes. However, these effects of GDNF were masked in the presence of LIF. GDNF also did not interfere with the multipotency of maGS cells if they are cultured in the presence of LIF. In conclusion, our results suggest that, in the absence of LIF, GDNF alters the growth characteristics of maGS cells and partially impart them some of the germline stem (GS) cell-like characteristics.

  16. Class-switched anti-insulin antibodies originate from unconventional antigen presentation in multiple lymphoid sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiaoxiao; Thomas, James W; Unanue, Emil R

    2016-05-30

    Autoantibodies to insulin are a harbinger of autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes in humans and in non-obese diabetic mice. To understand the genesis of these autoantibodies, we investigated the interactions of insulin-specific T and B lymphocytes using T cell and B cell receptor transgenic mice. We found spontaneous anti-insulin germinal center (GC) formation throughout lymphoid tissues with GC B cells binding insulin. Moreover, because of the nature of the insulin epitope recognized by the T cells, it was evident that GC B cells presented a broader repertoire of insulin epitopes. Such broader recognition was reproduced by activating naive B cells ex vivo with a combination of CD40 ligand and interleukin 4. Thus, insulin immunoreactivity extends beyond the pancreatic lymph node-islets of Langerhans axis and indicates that circulating insulin, despite its very low levels, can have an influence on diabetogenesis. PMID:27139492

  17. A Role for the Immediate Early Gene Product c-fos in Imprinting T Cells with Short-Term Memory for Signal Summation

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Carolyn E.; Hasan, Milena; Bousso, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    T cells often make sequential contacts with multiple DCs in the lymph nodes and are likely to be equipped with mechanisms that allow them to sum up the successive signals received. We found that a period of stimulation as short as two hours could imprint on a T cell a “biochemical memory” of that activation signal that persisted for several hours. This was evidenced by more rapid induction of activation markers and earlier commitment to proliferation upon subsequent stimulation, even when tha...

  18. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein regulates endogenous and exogenous antigen presentation by group 1 CD1 molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Kaser, Arthur; Hava, David L.; Dougan, Stephanie K.; Chen, Zhangguo; Zeissig, Sebastian; Brenner, Michael B.; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2008-01-01

    Lipid antigens are presented to T cells by the non-polymorphic MHC class I-related CD1 molecules. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident chaperone that has been shown to lipidate the group 2 CD1 molecule CD1d and thus to regulate its function. We now report that MTP also regulates the function of group 1 CD1 molecules CD1a, CD1b, and CD1c. Pharmacological inhibition of MTP in monocyte-derived dendritic cells and lymphoblastoid B cell lines tra...

  19. Evaluation of RNA Amplification Methods to Improve DC Immunotherapy Antigen Presentation and Immune Response

    OpenAIRE

    Slagter-Jäger, Jacoba G.; Raney, Alexa; Lewis, Whitney E; DeBenedette, Mark A; Nicolette, Charles A; Tcherepanova, Irina Y

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) transfected with total amplified tumor cell RNA have the potential to induce broad antitumor immune responses. However, analytical methods required for quantitatively assessing the integrity, fidelity, and functionality of the amplified RNA are lacking. We have developed a series of assays including gel electrophoresis, northern blot, capping efficiency, and microarray analysis to determine integrity and fidelity and a model system to assess functionality after transfect...

  20. Contribution of enhanced engagement of antigen presentation machinery to the clinical immunogenicity of a human interleukin (IL)-21 receptor-blocking therapeutic antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, L; Hickling, T; Song, R; Nowak, J; Rup, B

    2016-01-01

    Reliable risk assessment for biotherapeutics requires accurate evaluation of risk factors associated with immunogenicity. Immunogenicity risk assessment tools were developed and applied to investigate the immunogenicity of a fully human therapeutic monoclonal antibody, ATR-107 [anti-interleukin (IL)-21 receptor] that elicited anti-drug antibodies (ADA) in 76% of healthy subjects in a Phase 1 study. Because the ATR-107 target is expressed on dendritic cells (DCs), the immunogenicity risk related to engagement with DC and antigen presentation pathways was studied. Despite the presence of IL-21R on DCs, ATR-107 did not bind to the DCs more extensively than the control therapeutic antibody (PF-1) that had elicited low clinical ADA incidence. However, ATR-107, but not the control therapeutic antibody, was translocated to the DC late endosomes, co-localized with intracellular antigen-D related (HLA-DR) molecules and presented a dominant T cell epitope overlapping the complementarity determining region 2 (CDR2) of the light chain. ATR-107 induced increased DC activation exemplified by up-regulation of DC surface expression of CD86, CD274 (PD-L1) and CD40, increased expansion of activated DC populations expressing CD86(hi), CD40(hi), CD83(hi), programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1)(hi), HLA-DR(hi) or CCR7(hi), as well as elevated secretion of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α by DCs. DCs exposed to ATR-107 stimulated an autologous T cell proliferative response in human donor cells, in concert with the detection of immunoglobulin (Ig)G-type anti-ATR-107 antibody response in clinical samples. Collectively, the enhanced engagement of antigen presentation machinery by ATR-107 was suggested. The approaches and findings described in this study may be relevant to identifying lower immunogenicity risk targets and therapeutic molecules. PMID:26400440

  1. Shedding light on anti-estrogen resistance and antigen presentation through biophysical techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart, Willem Teunis

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is composed of two parts part one: The study on anti-estrogen resistance and defining criteria a cell has to meet in order to become resistant to anti-estrogenic compounds. part two: the study of antigen-loading, vesicle positioning and costimulation.

  2. Emerging roles for antigen presentation in establishing host-microbiome symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessman, Nicholas J; Sonnenberg, Gregory F

    2016-07-01

    Trillions of beneficial bacteria inhabit the intestinal tract of healthy mammals from birth. Accordingly, mammalian hosts have evolved a series of complementary and redundant pathways to limit pathologic immune responses against these bacteria, while simultaneously protecting against enteric pathogen invasion. These pathways can be generically responsive to the presence of any commensal bacteria and innate in nature, as for IL-22-related pathways. Alternatively, specific bacterial antigens can drive a distinct set of adaptive immune cell responses, including IgA affinity maturation and secretion, and a recently described pathway of intestinal selection whereby MHCII(+) ILC3 deletes commensal bacteria-reactive CD4 T cells. These pathways can either promote or inhibit colonization by specific subsets of commensal bacteria, and cooperatively maintain intestinal homeostasis. In this review, we will highlight recent developments in understanding how these diverse pathways complement each other to cooperatively shape the symbiotic relationship between commensal bacteria and mammalian hosts. PMID:27319348

  3. Adjuvant effects of liposomes containing lipid A: enhancement of liposomal antigen presentation and recruitment of macrophages.

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, J N; Rao, M.; Amselem, S; Krzych, U; Alving, C R; Green, S J; Wassef, N M

    1992-01-01

    Liposomes containing lipid A induced potent humoral immune responses in mice against an encapsulated malaria antigen (R32NS1) containing NANP epitopes. The immune response was not enhanced by lipid A alone or by empty liposomes containing lipid A. Experiments to investigate the adjuvant mechanisms of liposomes and lipid A revealed that liposome-encapsulated R32NS1 was actively presented by bone marrow-derived macrophages to NANP-specific cloned T cells. The degree of presentation was related ...

  4. Antigen-presenting genes and genomic copy number variations in the Tasmanian devil MHC

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng Yuanyuan; Stuart Andrew; Morris Katrina; Taylor Robyn; Siddle Hannah; Deakin Janine; Jones Menna; Amemiya Chris T; Belov Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is currently under threat of extinction due to an unusual fatal contagious cancer called Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD). DFTD is caused by a clonal tumour cell line that is transmitted between unrelated individuals as an allograft without triggering immune rejection due to low levels of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) diversity in Tasmanian devils. Results Here we report the characterization of the genomic regions encom...

  5. Congenital imprinting disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggermann, Thomas; Netchine, Irène; Temple, I Karen;

    2015-01-01

    consortium EUCID.net (European network of congenital imprinting disorders) now aims to promote better clinical care and scientific investigation of imprinting disorders by establishing a concerted multidisciplinary alliance of clinicians, researchers, patients and families. By encompassing all IDs and...... specific clinical features, and, as each appeared to be associated with specific imprinting defects, they have been widely regarded as separate entities. However, they share clinical characteristics and can show overlapping molecular alterations. Nevertheless, IDs are usually studied separately despite...

  6. Antigen-presenting genes and genomic copy number variations in the Tasmanian devil MHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Yuanyuan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii is currently under threat of extinction due to an unusual fatal contagious cancer called Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD. DFTD is caused by a clonal tumour cell line that is transmitted between unrelated individuals as an allograft without triggering immune rejection due to low levels of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC diversity in Tasmanian devils. Results Here we report the characterization of the genomic regions encompassing MHC Class I and Class II genes in the Tasmanian devil. Four genomic regions approximately 960 kb in length were assembled and annotated using BAC contigs and physically mapped to devil Chromosome 4q. 34 genes and pseudogenes were identified, including five Class I and four Class II loci. Interestingly, when two haplotypes from two individuals were compared, three genomic copy number variants with sizes ranging from 1.6 to 17 kb were observed within the classical Class I gene region. One deletion is particularly important as it turns a Class Ia gene into a pseudogene in one of the haplotypes. This deletion explains the previously observed variation in the Class I allelic number between individuals. The frequency of this deletion is highest in the northwestern devil population and lowest in southeastern areas. Conclusions The third sequenced marsupial MHC provides insights into the evolution of this dynamic genomic region among the diverse marsupial species. The two sequenced devil MHC haplotypes revealed three copy number variations that are likely to significantly affect immune response and suggest that future work should focus on the role of copy number variations in disease susceptibility in this species.

  7. Orientation-Controllable ZnO Nanorod Array Using Imprinting Method for Maximum Light Utilization in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Huisu; Song, Hui; Lee, Ryeri; Pak, Yusin; Kumaresan, Yogeenth; Lee, Heon; Jung, Gun Young

    2015-12-01

    We present a holey titanium dioxide (TiO2) film combined with a periodically aligned ZnO nanorod layer (ZNL) for maximum light utilization in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Both the holey TiO2 film and the ZNL were simultaneously fabricated by imprint technique with a mold having vertically aligned ZnO nanorod (NR) array, which was transferred to the TiO2 film after imprinting. The orientation of the transferred ZNL such as laid, tilted, and standing ZnO NRs was dependent on the pitch and height of the ZnO NRs of the mold. The photoanode composed of the holey TiO2 film with the ZNL synergistically utilized the sunlight due to enhanced light scattering and absorption. The best power conversion efficiency of 8.5 % was achieved from the DSC with the standing ZNL, which represented a 33 % improvement compared to the reference cell with a planar TiO2. PMID:26068077

  8. Large adipocytes function as antigen-presenting cells to activate CD4+ T cells via upregulating MHCII in obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, L; Yang, X.; Lin, Y.; Li, S.; Jiang, J; Qian, S.(State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing, China); Tang, Q; He, R; Li, X.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Although obesity is associated with low-grade inflammation and metabolic disorders, clinical studies suggested some obese people were metabolically healthy with smaller adipocyte size compared with metabolically abnormal obese (MAO). This indicated adipocyte size may be an important predictor underlay the distinction between MAO and metabolically healthy obese. As recent study has shown that adipocytes expressed class II major histocompatibility complex (MHCII), which f...

  9. Precision Manufacturing of Imprint Rolls for the Roller Imprinting Process

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David A; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2008-01-01

    The roller imprinting process is being developed for the efficient and accurate fabrication of microfluidic devices. As the precision of the imprinted features is dependent on the features of the imprint rolls used in the process, it is critical that the rolls are manufactured very accurately, conforming closely to their design. It is also important that imprint rolls are manufactured rapidly and cost-effectively to control the cost and lead-time of roller imprinting. This paper looks at the ...

  10. High-efficiency p-i-n superstrate amorphous Si solar cells on SiO x periodic arrays of three-dimensional microstructure prepared by soft imprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niikura, Chisato; Chowdhury, Amartya; Janthong, Bancha; Sichanugrist, Porponth; Konagai, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    Efficient amorphous Si thin-film solar cells in a p-i-n superstrate configuration with a high initial conversion efficiency of 10.3% were successfully fabricated on periodically three-dimensional (3D) micropatterned SiO x /glass substrates prepared by soft imprinting. Conformal film deposition on a 3D microstructure was realized owing to the shape of our newly designed 3D pattern and the triode plasma-enhanced CVD technique, which enables the selective transport of favorable film precursors to the substrate surface. The nanoscale surface texture of the front transparent conductive oxide layer was found to be crucial for optical confinement, unexceptionally for amorphous Si solar cells on a 3D microstructure, which results in an improved short-circuit current density.

  11. Analysis of the platypus genome suggests a transposon origin for mammalian imprinting

    OpenAIRE

    Pask, Andrew J; Papenfuss, Anthony T.; Ager, Eleanor I; McColl, Kaighin A.; Speed, Terence P.; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2009-01-01

    Background Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon that results in monoallelic gene expression. Many hypotheses have been advanced to explain why genomic imprinting evolved in mammals, but few have examined how it arose. The host defence hypothesis suggests that imprinting evolved from existing mechanisms within the cell that act to silence foreign DNA elements that insert into the genome. However, the changes to the mammalian genome that accompanied the evolution of imprinting have be...

  12. Selected imprinting of INS in the marsupial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stringer Jessica M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In marsupials, growth and development of the young occur postnatally, regulated by milk that changes in composition throughout the long lactation. To initiate lactation in mammals, there is an absolute requirement for insulin (INS, a gene known to be imprinted in the placenta. We therefore examined whether INS is imprinted in the mammary gland of the marsupial tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii and compared its expression with that of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2. Results INS was expressed in the mammary gland and significantly increased, while IGF2 decreased, during established milk production. Insulin and IGF2 were both detected in the mammary gland macrophage cells during early lactation and in the alveolar cells later in lactation. Surprisingly, INS, which was thought only to be imprinted in the therian yolk sac, was imprinted and paternally expressed in the liver of the developing young, monoallelically expressed in the tammar mammary gland and biallelic in the stomach and intestine. The INS transcription start site used in the liver and mammary gland was differentially methylated. Conclusions This is the first study to identify tissue-specific INS imprinting outside the yolk sac. These data suggest that there may be an advantage of selective monoallelic expression in the mammary gland and that this may influence the growth of the postnatal young. These results are not consistent with the parental conflict hypothesis, but instead provide support for the maternal–infant co-adaptation hypothesis. Thus, imprinting in the mammary gland maybe as critical for postnatal growth and development in mammals as genomic imprinting in the placenta is prenatally.

  13. Igf2-H19, an imprinted tandem gene, is an important regulator of embryonic development, a guardian of proliferation of adult pluripotent stem cells, a regulator of longevity, and a ‘passkey’ to cancerogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Z. Ratajczak

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The insulin-like growth factor-2 (Igf2-H19 locus encodes important paternally imprinted genes that govern normal embryonic development. While Igf-2 encodes IGF2, which is an autocrine/paracrine mitogen,  transcription of H19 gives rise to non-coding mRNA that is a precursor of several microRNAs (miRNAs that negatively affect cell proliferation. The proper imprinting of a differentially methylated region (DMR within this locus, with methylation of the paternal chromosome and a lack of methylation on the maternal chromosome, regulates expression of both of these genes so that Igf2 is transcribed only from the paternal chromosome and H19 only from the maternal chromosome. There is growing evidence that this ‘Yin-Yang’ locus regulates embryonic development. Furthermore, recent evidence indicates that erasure of imprinting (hypomethylation of the Igf2-H19 locus on both chromosomes, which leads to downregulation of Igf2 and upregulation of H19 expression, plays an important role in regulating quiescence of pluripotent stem cells in adult organisms, and may be involved in the regulation of lifespan. In contrast, hypermethylation of this locus on both chromosomes (loss of imprinting results in Igf2 overexpression and is observed in several malignancies. In this review, we will discuss the biological consequences of changes in Igf2-H19 expression.

  14. Fatal Attraction: Interactions between antigen-presenting cells and islets of Langerhans in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G.M. Rosmalen (Judith)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe onset of diabetes mellitus is characterized by various symptoms, all the result of a disturbed glucose metabolism. The main symptoms are thirst and an excessive production of urine. The disturbed glucose metabolism underlying these symptoms is due to an absolute deficiency of insulin

  15. CNS myelin induces regulatory functions of DC-SIGN-expressing, antigen-presenting cells via cognate interaction with MOG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Garcia-Vallejo; J.M. Ilarregui; H. Kalay; S. Chamorro; N. Koning; W.W. Unger; M. Ambrosini; V. Montserrat; R.J. Fernandes; S.C.M. Bruijns; J.R.T. van Weering; N.J. Paauw; T. O'Toole; J. van Horssen; P. van der Valk; K. Nazmi; J.G.M. Bolscher; J. Bajramovic; C.D. Dijkstra; B.A. 't Hart; Y. van Kooyk

    2014-01-01

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), a constituent of central nervous system myelin, is an important autoantigen in the neuroinflammatory disease multiple sclerosis (MS). However, its function remains unknown. Here, we show that, in healthy human myelin, MOG is decorated with fucosylated N-gly

  16. A Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain That Improves Stimulation of Antigen-Presenting Cells Does Not Enhance Vaccine Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, Deanna M; Dawn M O'Dee; Joseph Horzempa; Paul E Carlson; Russo, Brian C.; Bales, Jacqueline M.; Brown, Matthew J.; Nau, Gerard J.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination is a proven strategy to mitigate morbidity and mortality of infectious diseases. The methodology of identifying and testing new vaccine candidates could be improved with rational design and in vitro testing prior to animal experimentation. The tularemia vaccine, Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS), does not elicit complete protection against lethal challenge with a virulent type A Francisella strain. One factor that may contribute to this poor performance is limited s...

  17. White button mushroom enhances maturation of bone marrow derived dendritic cells and their antigen presenting function in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushrooms have been shown to enhance immune response, which contributes to their anti-tumor property. White button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) (WBM) constitute 90 percent of the total mushrooms consumed in the United States; however, the health benefit of this strain in general is not well studied...

  18. An alternative and effective HIV vaccination approach based on inhibition of antigen presentation attenuators in dendritic cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao-Tong Song; Kevin Evel-Kabler; Lisa Rollins; Melissa Aldrich; Feng Gao; Xue F Huang; Si-Yi Chen

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current efforts to develop HIV vaccines that seek to stimulate immune responses have been disappointing, underscoring the inability of natural immune responses to control HIV-1 infection. Here we tested an alternative strategy to induce anti-HIV immune responses by inhibiting a host's natural immune inhibitor. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used small interfering RNA (siRNA) to inhibit suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) 1, a key negative regulator of the JAK/STAT pathway, and inves...

  19. Loss of imprinting and loss of heterozygosity on 11p15.5 in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rainho, C A; Kowalski, L P; Rogatto, S R

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: IGF2 and H19 are reciprocal imprinted genes with paternal and maternal monoallelic expression, respectively. This is interesting, because IGF2 is known as a growth factor, and H19 encodes a RNA with putative tumor suppressor action. Furthermore, IGF2 and H19 are linked genes located on...... heterozygotes and further studied by RT-PCR analysis. RESULTS: We detected the expression of the IGF2 gene in 10 of 10 informative cases. Two cases exhibited LOI of the IGF2 gene as evidenced by biallelic expression, and in another case, LOH was coupled with monoallelic expression of this growth factor. LOI for...... the H19 gene was observed in 1 of 14 informative samples analyzed. In this case, we also detected parallel monoallelic expression of the IGF2 gene. Down-regulation of the H19 gene was observed in 10 of 14 cases. CONCLUSION: These findings support the hypothesis that H19 may be a tumor suppressor gene...

  20. Preparation of micron/submicron hybrid patterns via a two-stage UV-imprint technique and their dimensional effects on cell adhesion and alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J-Y; Ho, Y-C; Chung, Y-C; Lin, F-C; Liao, W-L; Tsai, W-B

    2013-09-01

    Cell adhesion, movement and proliferation on a biomaterial have been broadly explored and known to be induced by the morphology and structure of material surfaces. In order to explore the effects of hybrid structures (combination of micro- and nanofeatures on a pattern) on cell adhesion and alignment, a micro-featured mold was firstly prepared using partial UV-irradiation and the protruding top of the mold was then imprinted with nano-featured templates via successive UV irradiation. An oxygen inhibition effect was utilized in the course of UV curing and a two-step molding process, to form multiscale hybrid structures. The poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) replica of the hybrid mold was manufactured and employed to fabricate hybrid polymeric patterns for cell attachment. The underlying micro-feature was chosen to be a 25-µm-wide pattern and the nanostructures on the protrusions of the micropattern were different ruled nanogrooves, either parallel or perpendicular to the micro-featured pattern. In cell attachment measurement, 3T3 fibroblasts attached to poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) samples seemed to be preferentially located on the recessed area of the hybrid patterns; however, 3T3 fibroblasts were aligned with nano-features, no matter if the nanogrooves were parallel or perpendicular to the micro-featured patterns. The nanogroove size was found to determine the effectiveness of cell alignment. PMID:23714853

  1. Preparation of micron/submicron hybrid patterns via a two-stage UV-imprint technique and their dimensional effects on cell adhesion and alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell adhesion, movement and proliferation on a biomaterial have been broadly explored and known to be induced by the morphology and structure of material surfaces. In order to explore the effects of hybrid structures (combination of micro- and nanofeatures on a pattern) on cell adhesion and alignment, a micro-featured mold was firstly prepared using partial UV-irradiation and the protruding top of the mold was then imprinted with nano-featured templates via successive UV irradiation. An oxygen inhibition effect was utilized in the course of UV curing and a two-step molding process, to form multiscale hybrid structures. The poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) replica of the hybrid mold was manufactured and employed to fabricate hybrid polymeric patterns for cell attachment. The underlying micro-feature was chosen to be a 25-µm-wide pattern and the nanostructures on the protrusions of the micropattern were different ruled nanogrooves, either parallel or perpendicular to the micro-featured pattern. In cell attachment measurement, 3T3 fibroblasts attached to poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) samples seemed to be preferentially located on the recessed area of the hybrid patterns; however, 3T3 fibroblasts were aligned with nano-features, no matter if the nanogrooves were parallel or perpendicular to the micro-featured patterns. The nanogroove size was found to determine the effectiveness of cell alignment. (paper)

  2. Pervasive polymorphic imprinted methylation in the human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Courtney W; Peñaherrera, Maria S; Saadeh, Heba; Andrews, Simon; McFadden, Deborah E; Kelsey, Gavin; Robinson, Wendy P

    2016-06-01

    The maternal and paternal copies of the genome are both required for mammalian development, and this is primarily due to imprinted genes, those that are monoallelically expressed based on parent-of-origin. Typically, this pattern of expression is regulated by differentially methylated regions (DMRs) that are established in the germline and maintained after fertilization. There are a large number of germline DMRs that have not yet been associated with imprinting, and their function in development is unknown. In this study, we developed a genome-wide approach to identify novel imprinted DMRs in the human placenta and investigated the dynamics of these imprinted DMRs during development in somatic and extraembryonic tissues. DNA methylation was evaluated using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 array in 134 human tissue samples, publicly available reduced representation bisulfite sequencing in the human embryo and germ cells, and targeted bisulfite sequencing in term placentas. Forty-three known and 101 novel imprinted DMRs were identified in the human placenta by comparing methylation between diandric and digynic triploid conceptions in addition to female and male gametes. Seventy-two novel DMRs showed a pattern consistent with placental-specific imprinting, and this monoallelic methylation was entirely maternal in origin. Strikingly, these DMRs exhibited polymorphic imprinted methylation between placental samples. These data suggest that imprinting in human development is far more extensive and dynamic than previously reported and that the placenta preferentially maintains maternal germline-derived DNA methylation. PMID:26769960

  3. A role for the immediate early gene product c-fos in imprinting T cells with short-term memory for signal summation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn E Clark

    Full Text Available T cells often make sequential contacts with multiple DCs in the lymph nodes and are likely to be equipped with mechanisms that allow them to sum up the successive signals received. We found that a period of stimulation as short as two hours could imprint on a T cell a "biochemical memory" of that activation signal that persisted for several hours. This was evidenced by more rapid induction of activation markers and earlier commitment to proliferation upon subsequent stimulation, even when that secondary stimulation occurred hours later. Upregulation of the immediate early gene product c-fos, a component of the AP-1 transcription factor, was maximal by 1-2 hours of stimulation, and protein levels remained elevated for several hours after stimulus withdrawal. Moreover, phosphorylated forms of c-fos that are stable and transcriptionally active persisted for a least a day. Upon brief antigenic stimulation in vivo, we also observed a rapid upregulation of c-fos that could be boosted by subsequent stimulation. Accumulation of phosphorylated c-fos may therefore serve as a biochemical fingerprint of previous suboptimal stimulation, leaving the T cell poised to rapidly resume its activation program upon its next encounter with an antigen-bearing DC.

  4. Ultrasensitive and selective assay of glutathione species in arsenic trioxide-treated leukemia HL-60 cell line by molecularly imprinted polymer decorated electrochemical sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Liu, Jie; Ma, Xiaoru; Zuo, Peng; Ye, Bang-Ce; Li, Yingchun

    2016-06-15

    Herein a pair of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) modified electrochemical sensors were reported to detect glutathione (GSH) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) in arsenic trioxide-treated HL-60 cells. MIP film was in situ synthesized onto electrode surface via electro-polymerization in a facile way. The characteristics of the obtained sensors were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Both GSH-MIP and GSSG-MIP sensors exhibit the relatively wide linear detection range and low detection limit of 1.33×10(-10)M (S/N=3). It is found that N-acetylcysteine and DL-homocysteine, the precursors of GSH, show little influence on the detection of glutathione species, nor did the reactants of arsenite and GSH. Such strategies were successfully applied to discriminate GSH and GSSG in cell samples with acceptable recoveries of 92.0-109.1%, and the results are comparable with classic o-phthalaldehyde fluorospectrophotometry. Moreover, the presented sensors allow for easy disclosure of the reversion of malignant phenotype in leukemia cells via glutathione species analysis. PMID:26890824

  5. From Antigen Presenting Cells to Antigen Presenting Vesicles:philosophic thinking on cancer immunotherapy%从抗原提呈细胞到抗原提呈小体

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张红梅; 张利旺; 刘文超

    2006-01-01

    树突状细胞是体内专职抗原提呈细胞,在抗肿瘤免疫治疗中发挥重要作用.而exosome是树突状细胞分泌的一种膜性微囊小体,富含树突状细胞的MHC-Ⅰ/Ⅱ类分子、协同刺激分子等多种生物活性分子,亦在抗肿瘤免疫应答中发挥重要作用.从树突状细胞到exosome,是细胞性瘤苗向非细胞性瘤苗的飞跃,对免疫治疗研究产生极为深远的影响.

  6. Generation of Five Human Lactoferrin Transgenic Cloned Goats Using Fibroblast Cells and Their Methylation Status of Putative Differential Methylation Regions of IGF2R and H19 Imprinted Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Li Meng; Yongjie Wan; Yanyan Sun; Yanli Zhang; Ziyu Wang; Yang Song; Feng Wang

    2013-01-01

    Background - Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a promising technique to produce transgenic cloned mammalian, including transgenic goats which may produce Human Lactoferrin (hLF). However, success percentage of SCNT is low, because of gestational and neonatal failure of transgenic embryos. According to the studies on cattle and mice, DNA methylation of some imprinted genes, which plays a vital role in the reprogramming of embryo in NT maybe an underlying mechanism. Methodology/Principal ...

  7. Epigenetic status of H19/IGF2 and SNRPN imprinted genes in aborted and successfully derived embryonic stem cell lines in non-human primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Wianny

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The imprinted genes of primate embryonic stem cells (ESCs often show altered DNA methylation. It is unknown whether these alterations emerge while deriving the ESCs. Here we studied the methylation patterns of two differentially methylated regions (DMRs, SNRPN and H19/IGF2 DMRs, during the derivation of monkey ESCs. We show that the SNRPN DMR is characteristically methylated at maternal alleles, whereas the H19/IGF2 DMR is globally highly methylated, with unusual methylation on the maternal alleles. These methylation patterns remain stable from the early stages of ESC derivation to late passages of monkey ESCs and following differentiation. Importantly, the methylation status of H19/IGF2 DMR and the expression levels of IGF2, H19, and DNMT3B mRNAs in early embryo-derived cells were correlated with their capacity to generate genuine ESC lines. Thus, we propose that these markers could be useful to predict the outcomes of establishing an ESC line in primates.

  8. The ESAT-6 protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis interacts with beta-2-microglobulin (β2M affecting antigen presentation function of macrophage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalkrishna Sreejit

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available ESAT-6, an abundantly secreted protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis is an important virulence factor, inactivation of which leads to reduced virulence of M. tuberculosis. ESAT-6 alone, or in complex with its chaperone CFP-10 (ESAT-6:CFP-10, is known to modulate host immune responses; however, the detailed mechanisms are not well understood. The structure of ESAT-6 or ESAT-6:CFP-10 complex does not suggest presence of enzymatic or DNA-binding activities. Therefore, we hypothesized that the crucial role played by ESAT-6 in the virulence of mycobacteria could be due to its interaction with some host cellular factors. Using a yeast two-hybrid screening, we identified that ESAT-6 interacts with the host protein beta-2-microglobulin (β2M, which was further confirmed by other assays, like GST pull down, co-immunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance. The C-terminal six amino acid residues (90-95 of ESAT-6 were found to be essential for this interaction. ESAT-6, in complex with CFP-10, also interacts with β2M. We found that ESAT-6/ESAT-6:CFP-10 can enter into the endoplasmic reticulum where it sequesters β2M to inhibit cell surface expression of MHC-I-β2M complexes, resulting in downregulation of class I-mediated antigen presentation. Interestingly, the ESAT-6:β2M complex could be detected in pleural biopsies of individuals suffering from pleural tuberculosis. Our data highlight a novel mechanism by which M. tuberculosis may undermine the host adaptive immune responses to establish a successful infection. Identification of such novel interactions may help us in designing small molecule inhibitors as well as effective vaccine design against tuberculosis.

  9. Two progenitor cells for human oogonia inferred from pedigree data and the X-inactivation imprinting model of the fragile-X syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Laird, C D; Lamb, M M; Thorne, J L

    1990-01-01

    Laird has proposed that the human fragile-X syndrome is caused by abnormal chromosome imprinting. The analysis presented here supports and extends this proposal. Using published pedigrees that include DNA polymorphism (RFLP) data, we establish that the states of the fragile-X mutation termed "imprinted" and "nonimprinted" usually can be distinguished by the level of cytogenetic expression of the fragile-X chromosome. This information is then used to assess the state of the fragile-X allele in...

  10. Imprint of 5-azacytidine on the natural killer cell repertoire during systemic treatment for high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohlberg, Ebba; Pfefferle, Aline; Andersson, Sandra; Baumann, Bettina C; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Malmberg, Karl-Johan

    2015-10-27

    5-azacytidine (5-aza) is a hypomethylating agent approved for the treatment of high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). It is assumed to act by demethylating tumor suppressor genes and via direct cytotoxic effects on malignant cells. In vitro treatment with hypomethylating agents has profound effects on the expression of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like (KIR) receptors on natural killer (NK) cells, as these receptors are epigenetically regulated via methylation of the promoters. Here we investigated the influence of 5-aza on the NK-cell repertoire during cytokine-induced proliferation in vitro and homeostatic proliferation in vivo in patients with high-risk MDS. In vitro treatment of NK cells from both healthy donors and MDS patients with low doses of 5-aza led to a significant increase in expression of multiple KIRs, but only in cells that had undergone several rounds of cell division. Proliferating 5-aza exposed NK cells exhibited increased IFN-γ production and degranulation towards tumor target cells. MDS patients had lower proportions of educated KIR-expressing NK cells than healthy controls but after systemic treatment with 5-aza, an increased proportion of Ki-67+ NK cells expressed multiple KIRs suggesting uptake of 5-aza in cycling cells in vivo. Hence, these results suggest that systemic treatment with 5-aza may shape the NK cell repertoire, in particular during homeostatic proliferation, thereby boosting NK cell-mediated recognition of malignant cells. PMID:26497557

  11. Imprint of 5-azacytidine on the natural killer cell repertoire during systemic treatment for high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohlberg, Ebba; Pfefferle, Aline; Andersson, Sandra; Baumann, Bettina C.; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Malmberg, Karl-Johan

    2015-01-01

    5-azacytidine (5-aza) is a hypomethylating agent approved for the treatment of high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). It is assumed to act by demethylating tumor suppressor genes and via direct cytotoxic effects on malignant cells. In vitro treatment with hypomethylating agents has profound effects on the expression of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like (KIR) receptors on natural killer (NK) cells, as these receptors are epigenetically regulated via methylation of the promoters. Here we investigated the influence of 5-aza on the NK-cell repertoire during cytokine-induced proliferation in vitro and homeostatic proliferation in vivo in patients with high-risk MDS. In vitro treatment of NK cells from both healthy donors and MDS patients with low doses of 5-aza led to a significant increase in expression of multiple KIRs, but only in cells that had undergone several rounds of cell division. Proliferating 5-aza exposed NK cells exhibited increased IFN-γ production and degranulation towards tumor target cells. MDS patients had lower proportions of educated KIR-expressing NK cells than healthy controls but after systemic treatment with 5-aza, an increased proportion of Ki-67+ NK cells expressed multiple KIRs suggesting uptake of 5-aza in cycling cells in vivo. Hence, these results suggest that systemic treatment with 5-aza may shape the NK cell repertoire, in particular during homeostatic proliferation, thereby boosting NK cell-mediated recognition of malignant cells. PMID:26497557

  12. Long noncoding RNAs: Lessons from genomic imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanduri, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    Genomic imprinting has been a great resource for studying transcriptional and post-transcriptional-based gene regulation by long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). In this article, I overview the functional role of intergenic lncRNAs (H19, IPW, and MEG3), antisense lncRNAs (Kcnq1ot1, Airn, Nespas, Ube3a-ATS), and enhancer lncRNAs (IG-DMR eRNAs) to understand the diverse mechanisms being employed by them in cis and/or trans to regulate the parent-of-origin-specific expression of target genes. Recent evidence suggests that some of the lncRNAs regulate imprinting by promoting intra-chromosomal higher-order chromatin compartmentalization, affecting replication timing and subnuclear positioning. Whereas others act via transcriptional occlusion or transcriptional collision-based mechanisms. By establishing genomic imprinting of target genes, the lncRNAs play a critical role in important biological functions, such as placental and embryonic growth, pluripotency maintenance, cell differentiation, and neural-related functions such as synaptic development and plasticity. An emerging consensus from the recent evidence is that the imprinted lncRNAs fine-tune gene expression of the protein-coding genes to maintain their dosage in cell. Hence, lncRNAs from imprinted clusters offer insights into their mode of action, and these mechanisms have been the basis for uncovering the mode of action of lncRNAs in several other biological contexts. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Clues to long noncoding RNA taxonomy, edited by Dr. Tetsuro Hirose and Dr. Shinichi Nakagawa. PMID:26004516

  13. Solvent Immersion Imprint Lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Grate, Jay W.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Konopka, Allan; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Chang, M. T.

    2014-06-21

    The mechanism of polymer disolution was explored for polymer microsystem prototyping, including microfluidics and optofluidics. Polymer films are immersed in a solvent, imprinted and finally brought into contact with a non-modified surface to permanently bond. The underlying polymer-solvent interactions were experimentally and theoretically investigated, and enabled rapid polymer microsystem prototyping. During imprinting, small molecule integration in the molded surfaces was feasible, a principle applied to oxygen sensing. Polystyrene (PS) was employed for microbiological studies at extreme environmental conditions. The thermophile anaerobe Clostridium Thermocellum was grown in PS pore-scale micromodels, revealing a double mean generation lifetime than under ideal culture conditions. Microsystem prototyping through directed polymer dissolution is simple and accessible, while simultaneous patterning, bonding, and surface/volume functionalization are possible in less than one minute.

  14. MOLECULARLY IMPRINTED POLYMERS

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The present invention refers to new classes of polymerisable monomers targeting biotin, a biotin derivative, a biotin analogue or a biotinylated molecule and related structures, as well as molecularly imprinted polymers obtainable by polymerisation of at least one of these monomers and at least one cross-linking monomer in the presence of a suitable template molecule. The obtained polymers may be used for separation of biotin and related small molecules, together with larger biotinylated mole...

  15. Mass spectrometry of human leukocyte antigen class I peptidomes reveals strong effects of protein abundance and turnover on antigen presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassani-Sternberg, Michal; Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Mann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    HLA class I molecules reflect the health state of cells to cytotoxic T cells by presenting a repertoire of endogenously derived peptides. However, the extent to which the proteome shapes the peptidome is still largely unknown. Here we present a high-throughput mass-spectrometry-based workflow that...

  16. Emperipolesis in a Case of Adult T Cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma (Mediastinal type)-Detected at FNAC and Imprint Cytology

    OpenAIRE

    Amita K; Vijay Shankar S,; Abhishekh MG; Geethalakshmi U

    2011-01-01

    Emperipolesis is a condition in which viable hematopoetic cells are seen intact in the cytoplasm of host cell without damage. This phenomenon is seen in many physiologic and pathologic conditions, its presence in Rosai Dorfman disease (RDD) is characteristic of the disease. However emperipolesis is an uncommon finding in malignant lymphoma both Hodgkins and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, wherein it has been described in bone marrow aspirate and tissue culture. In contrast there are only two case rep...

  17. Generation of five human lactoferrin transgenic cloned goats using fibroblast cells and their methylation status of putative differential methylation regions of IGF2R and H19 imprinted genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Meng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT is a promising technique to produce transgenic cloned mammalian, including transgenic goats which may produce Human Lactoferrin (hLF. However, success percentage of SCNT is low, because of gestational and neonatal failure of transgenic embryos. According to the studies on cattle and mice, DNA methylation of some imprinted genes, which plays a vital role in the reprogramming of embryo in NT maybe an underlying mechanism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fibroblast cells were derived from the ear of a two-month-old goat. The vector expressing hLF was constructed and transfected into fibroblasts. G418 selection, EGFP expression, PCR, and cell cycle distribution were applied sequentially to select transgenic cells clones. After NT and embryo transfer, five transgenic cloned goats were obtained from 240 cloned transgenic embryos. These transgenic goats were identified by 8 microsatellites genotyping and southern blot. Of the five transgenic goats, 3 were lived after birth, while 2 were dead during gestation. We compared differential methylation regions (DMR pattern of two paternally imprinted genes (H19 and IGF2R of the ear tissues from the lived transgenic goats, dead transgenic goats, and control goats from natural reproduction. Hyper-methylation pattern appeared in cloned aborted goats, while methylation status was relatively normal in cloned lived goats compared with normal goats. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this study, we generated five hLF transgenic cloned goats by SCNT. This is the first time the DNA methylation of lived and dead transgenic cloned goats was compared. The results demonstrated that the methylation status of DMRs of H19 and IGF2R were different in lived and dead transgenic goats and therefore this may be potentially used to assess the reprogramming status of transgenic cloned goats. Understanding the pattern of gene imprinting may be useful to improve cloning techniques in future.

  18. Categories with envelopes and imprints

    CERN Document Server

    Akbarov, Sergei

    2011-01-01

    An envelope in a category is a construction generalizing operations of "exterior completion", like completion of a locally convex space. Dually, an imprint generalizes operations of "interior enrichment", like saturation of a locally convex space. We give abstract definition for envelopes and imprints, prove existence of these objects in the categories of stereotype spaces and of stereotype algebras, and give some examples.

  19. Molecularly imprinted polymers for mycotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are a class of synthetic receptors capable of selective recognition of analytes. Recent developments in imprinting technology have made it possible to apply this technology in a range of applications, including mycotoxin detection. Structure-activity relations...

  20. Dissecting genetic effects with imprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José MÁlvarez-Castro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Models of genetic effects are mathematical representations of a genotype-to-phenotype (GP map that, rather than accounting for a raw map assigning phenotypes to genotypes, rely on parameters with deliberate evolutionary meaning—additive and interaction effects. In this article, the conceptual particularities of genetic imprinting and their implications on models of genetic effects are analyzed. The molecular mechanisms by which imprinted loci affect the relationship between genotypes and phenotypes are known to be singular. Despite its epigenetic nature, the (parent-of-origin-dependent way in which the alleles of imprinted genes are modified and segregate in each generation is precisely determined, and thus amenable to be represented through conventional models of genetic effects. The Natural and Orthogonal Interactions (NOIA model framework is here extended to account for imprinting as a tool for a more thorough analysis of the evolutionary implications of this phenomenon. The resulting theory improves and generalizes previous proposals for modelling imprinting.

  1. Transcriptome Analysis of CD4+ T Cells in Coeliac Disease Reveals Imprint of BACH2 and IFNγ Regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma M Quinn

    Full Text Available Genetic studies have to date identified 43 genome wide significant coeliac disease susceptibility (CD loci comprising over 70 candidate genes. However, how altered regulation of such disease associated genes contributes to CD pathogenesis remains to be elucidated. Recently there has been considerable emphasis on characterising cell type specific and stimulus dependent genetic variants. Therefore in this study we used RNA sequencing to profile over 70 transcriptomes of CD4+ T cells, a cell type crucial for CD pathogenesis, in both stimulated and resting samples from individuals with CD and unaffected controls. We identified extensive transcriptional changes across all conditions, with the previously established CD gene IFNy the most strongly up-regulated gene (log2 fold change 4.6; P(adjusted = 2.40x10(-11 in CD4+ T cells from CD patients compared to controls. We show a significant correlation of differentially expressed genes with genetic studies of the disease to date (P(adjusted = 0.002, and 21 CD candidate susceptibility genes are differentially expressed under one or more of the conditions used in this study. Pathway analysis revealed significant enrichment of immune related processes. Co-expression network analysis identified several modules of coordinately expressed CD genes. Two modules were particularly highly enriched for differentially expressed genes (P<2.2x10(-16 and highlighted IFNy and the genetically associated transcription factor BACH2 which showed significantly reduced expression in coeliac samples (log2FC -1.75; P(adjusted = 3.6x10(-3 as key regulatory genes in CD. Genes regulated by BACH2 were very significantly over-represented among our differentially expressed genes (P<2.2x10(-16 indicating that reduced expression of this master regulator of T cell differentiation promotes a pro-inflammatory response and strongly corroborates genetic evidence that BACH2 plays an important role in CD pathogenesis.

  2. Chemical Sensors – from Molecules, Complex Mixtures to Cells – Supramolecular Imprinting Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Palfinger

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Methods of modern chemistry are a powerful tool in generating functional materials suitable as chemically sensitive layers to be combined with a variety of transducer principles. Molecular pits in polymers are formed by molecular imprinting, by suitable double-imprinting e.g. PAHs can be detected down to the sub-μg/l level. The resulting selectivity patterns depend both on the polymerization temperature and the template/mononomer composition. Organic contaminants in water can be either directly assessed in liquid phase or separated from the matrix by a porous Teflon membrane. Thus the detection limits can be reduced to the ppm-level due to the a much lower noise level in gaseous phase. Even complex processes such as engine oil degradation can be followed by suitably imprinted polymers. Pits on the nm- to μm scale are reached by surface templating polymers with microorganisms. The resulting layers show reversible, antibody-like interactions and thus are optimal sensor layers. The successful on-line detection of tobacco mosaic viruses (TMV can be achieved by these surface imprinted layers.

  3. DIAGNOSTIC VALIDITY OF CYTOLOGICAL IMPRINT IN THYROID FOLLICULAR NEOPLASM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Pustaka

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preoperative fine needle aspiration biopsy/FNAB examination, imprint cytology and frozen section intraoperative has big implications for diagnosis and surgical strategy of thyroid nodules with follicular neoplasm cytology. FNAB and frozen section has its limitations, it is difficultto detect the presence of capsular and/or vascular invasion of thyroid follicular carcinoma. Whereas imprint cytology can preserve cellular overview (especially the cell nucleus, including the capsular and/or vascular invasion. In addition, imprint cytology is faster than frozen section. Frozen sectionexamination could not indicate the presence of capsular and/or vascular invasion in most cases so that imprint cytology is used to replace frozen section as an alternative.Method: This research is a diagnostic test study using a descriptive design. This is a prospective study to assess the sensitivity, specificity, NPV, and PPV of imprint cytology in patients with thyroid follicular neoplasm cytology. Results: In our study; sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of imprint cytology for follicular neoplasm was found as 84.21%, 95.45%, 94.12%, 87.50% and 90.24% respectively. The outcome was based on likelihood ratio value of 18.21 and the ROC curve, area under the curve obtained at 0.879 and Kappa value of 0.802.Conclusion: Imprint cytology has a value of a gooddiagnostic validity in the diagnosis of follicular neoplasm of thyroid nodules with sensitivity and specifity values of 84.21% and 95.45%. Imprint cytology is a technique that is simple, inexpensive, and has good reliability so that it can be used instead of frozen section.

  4. Comparative anatomy of chromosomal domains with imprinted and non-imprinted allele-specific DNA methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Paliwal

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM is well studied in imprinted domains, but this type of epigenetic asymmetry is actually found more commonly at non-imprinted loci, where the ASM is dictated not by parent-of-origin but instead by the local haplotype. We identified loci with strong ASM in human tissues from methylation-sensitive SNP array data. Two index regions (bisulfite PCR amplicons, one between the C3orf27 and RPN1 genes in chromosome band 3q21 and the other near the VTRNA2-1 vault RNA in band 5q31, proved to be new examples of imprinted DMRs (maternal alleles methylated while a third, between STEAP3 and C2orf76 in chromosome band 2q14, showed non-imprinted haplotype-dependent ASM. Using long-read bisulfite sequencing (bis-seq in 8 human tissues we found that in all 3 domains the ASM is restricted to single differentially methylated regions (DMRs, each less than 2kb. The ASM in the C3orf27-RPN1 intergenic region was placenta-specific and associated with allele-specific expression of a long non-coding RNA. Strikingly, the discrete DMRs in all 3 regions overlap with binding sites for the insulator protein CTCF, which we found selectively bound to the unmethylated allele of the STEAP3-C2orf76 DMR. Methylation mapping in two additional genes with non-imprinted haplotype-dependent ASM, ELK3 and CYP2A7, showed that the CYP2A7 DMR also overlaps a CTCF site. Thus, two features of imprinted domains, highly localized DMRs and allele-specific insulator occupancy by CTCF, can also be found in chromosomal domains with non-imprinted ASM. Arguing for biological importance, our analysis of published whole genome bis-seq data from hES cells revealed multiple genome-wide association study (GWAS peaks near CTCF binding sites with ASM.

  5. Comparative anatomy of chromosomal domains with imprinted and non-imprinted allele-specific DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Anupam; Temkin, Alexis M; Kerkel, Kristi; Yale, Alexander; Yotova, Iveta; Drost, Natalia; Lax, Simon; Nhan-Chang, Chia-Ling; Powell, Charles; Borczuk, Alain; Aviv, Abraham; Wapner, Ronald; Chen, Xiaowei; Nagy, Peter L; Schork, Nicholas; Do, Catherine; Torkamani, Ali; Tycko, Benjamin

    2013-08-01

    Allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM) is well studied in imprinted domains, but this type of epigenetic asymmetry is actually found more commonly at non-imprinted loci, where the ASM is dictated not by parent-of-origin but instead by the local haplotype. We identified loci with strong ASM in human tissues from methylation-sensitive SNP array data. Two index regions (bisulfite PCR amplicons), one between the C3orf27 and RPN1 genes in chromosome band 3q21 and the other near the VTRNA2-1 vault RNA in band 5q31, proved to be new examples of imprinted DMRs (maternal alleles methylated) while a third, between STEAP3 and C2orf76 in chromosome band 2q14, showed non-imprinted haplotype-dependent ASM. Using long-read bisulfite sequencing (bis-seq) in 8 human tissues we found that in all 3 domains the ASM is restricted to single differentially methylated regions (DMRs), each less than 2kb. The ASM in the C3orf27-RPN1 intergenic region was placenta-specific and associated with allele-specific expression of a long non-coding RNA. Strikingly, the discrete DMRs in all 3 regions overlap with binding sites for the insulator protein CTCF, which we found selectively bound to the unmethylated allele of the STEAP3-C2orf76 DMR. Methylation mapping in two additional genes with non-imprinted haplotype-dependent ASM, ELK3 and CYP2A7, showed that the CYP2A7 DMR also overlaps a CTCF site. Thus, two features of imprinted domains, highly localized DMRs and allele-specific insulator occupancy by CTCF, can also be found in chromosomal domains with non-imprinted ASM. Arguing for biological importance, our analysis of published whole genome bis-seq data from hES cells revealed multiple genome-wide association study (GWAS) peaks near CTCF binding sites with ASM. PMID:24009515

  6. New biomedical devices with selective peptide recognition properties. Part 1: Characterization and cytotoxicity of molecularly imprinted polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Rechichi, A; Cristallini, C; Vitale, U; Ciardelli, G; Barbani, N; Vozzi, G; Giusti, P.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Molecular imprinting is a technique for the synthesis of polymers capable to bind target molecules selectively. The imprinting of large proteins, such as cell adhesion proteins or cell receptors, opens the way to important and innovative biomedical applications. However, such molecules can incur into important conformational changes during the preparation of the imprinted polymer impairing the specificity of the recognition cavities. The “epitope approach” can overcome this limit by ...

  7. Step & flash imprint lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas J. Resnick

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The escalating cost of next generation lithography (NGL is driven in part by the need for complex sources and optics. The cost for a single NGL tool could soon exceed $50 million, a prohibitive amount for many companies. As a result, several research groups are looking at alternative, low-cost methods for printing sub-100 nm features. Many of these methods are limited in their ability to do precise overlay. In 1999, Willson and Sreenivasan developed step and flash imprint lithography (S-FIL™. The use of a quartz template opens up the potential for optical alignment of the wafer and template. This paper reviews several key aspects of the S-FIL process, including template, tool, ultraviolet (UV-curable monomer, and pattern transfer. Two applications are also presented: contact holes and surface acoustic wave (SAW filters.

  8. 小鼠胚胎生殖细胞系的建立及其印记状态%Establishment of a mouse embryonic germ cell line and preliminary study of the expression of imprinted genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡静; 赵巧湜; 古艳丽; 白光宇; 吴稀; 雷蕾

    2013-01-01

    Objective To establish a mouse embryonic germ cell (EGCs) line and to detect the expression of imprinted genes in order to provide basic information for further study and application of embryonic germ cells.Methods EGCs were isolate from primordial germ cells collected from the genital ridge of 12.5 days postcoitum (dpc).The pluripotent characteristics of the established EGCs were detected by alkaline phophatase (AKP) staining,immunofluorescent detection of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) surface antigens,and cell differentiations in vivo.The expressions of several patrilineal and matrilineal imprinted genes,such as Ins2,Lgf2,H19,Lgt2r and so forth,were also detected by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in both EGCs and ESCs.Results The EGCs showed positive for alkaline phosphatase.The pluripotency marker Oct4 and the cell surface marker SSEA-1 were also shown in EGCs cells.Karyotype analysis indicted that EGCs had normal 40 chromosomes,and differentiated into the tissues presenting three germinal layers derivations in vivo,suggesting that embryonic germ cells had pluripotent characteristics.Real-time PCR showed that the expression levels of imprinted genes in EGCs were significantly highter compared with those in ESCs.Conclusion The genomic imprinting memories in EGCs generated from primordial germ cells which collected from the genital ridge of 12.5 dpc are completely erased.%目的 成功建立小鼠胚胎生殖细胞(EGCs)系,并初步分析小鼠胚胎生殖细胞的印记状态.方法 建立交配后12.5d(12.5dpc)原始生殖细胞(PGCs)来源的小鼠EGCs,通过碱性磷酸酶(AKP)染色、免疫荧光细胞化学、体内分化及体外分化等方法检测EGCs的多能性,并以小鼠胚胎干细胞(ESCs)为对照,应用Real-time PCR检测EGCs中与发育相关的Ins2、Lgf2、H19、Lgf2r等11个父源与母源印记基因的表达情况.结果 成功建立小鼠EG细胞系,EGCs克隆AKP染色显示有高水平的AKP活性,免

  9. Silencing by imprinted noncoding RNAs: is transcription the answer?

    OpenAIRE

    Pauler, Florian M; Koerner, Martha V.; Barlow, Denise P.

    2007-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) with gene regulatory functions are starting to be seen as a common feature of mammalian gene regulation with the discovery that most of the transcriptome is ncRNA. The prototype has long been the Xist ncRNA, which induces X-chromosome inactivation in female cells. However, a new paradigm is emerging – the silencing of imprinted gene clusters by long ncRNAs. Here, we review models by which imprinted ncRNAs could function. We argue that an Xist-like model is only one of...

  10. Differential Impact of PD-1 and/or Interleukin-10 Blockade on HIV-1-Specific CD4 T Cell and Antigen-Presenting Cell Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Porichis, Filippos; Hart, Meghan G.; Zupkosky, Jennifer; Barblu, Lucie; Kwon, Douglas S; McMullen, Ashley; Brennan, Thomas; Ahmed, Rafi; Freeman, Gordon J.; Kavanagh, Daniel G.; Kaufmann, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    Antigen persistence in chronic infections and cancer upregulates inhibitory networks, such as the PD-1 and interleukin-10 (IL-10) pathways, that impair immunity and lead to disease progression. These pathways are attractive targets for immunotherapy, as demonstrated by recent clinical trials of PD-1/PD-L1 blockade in cancer patients. However, in HIV-1 infection not all subjects respond to inhibition of either pathway and the mechanistic interactions between these two networks remain to be bet...

  11. Direct Imprinting of Liquid Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Takashi; Takagishi, Hideyuki; Yamazaki, Ken; Shimoda, Tatsuya

    2016-04-20

    A polymeric precursor solution for semiconducting silicon called "liquid silicon" was synthesized and directly imprinted to form well-defined and fine amorphous silicon patterns. The spin-coated film was cured and imprinted followed by annealing at 380 °C to complete the polymer-to-silicon conversion. A pattern with dimensions of several hundreds of nanometers or less was obtained on a substrate. We demonstrated that the curing step before imprinting is particularly important in the imprinting process. A curing temperature of 140-180 °C was found to be optimal in terms of the film's deformability and molding properties. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermal analysis clarified that the cross-linking of the polymer due to the 1,2-hydrogen shift reaction was induced exponentially with the release of a large amount of SiH4/H2 gases at temperatures between 140 and 220 °C, leading to the solidification of the film. Consequently, the film completely lost its deformability at higher temperatures. Despite a volume shrinkage as large as 53-56% during the polymer-to-silicon conversion, well-defined angular patterns were preserved. Fine silicon patterns were formed via the direct imprinting of liquid silicon with high resolution and high throughput, demonstrating the usefulness of this technique for the future manufacturing of silicon electronics. PMID:27028558

  12. Lsd1 and Lsd2 Control Programmed Replication Fork Pauses and Imprinting in Fission Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allyson Holmes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, a chromosomal imprinting event controls the asymmetric pattern of mating-type switching. The orientation of DNA replication at the mating-type locus is instrumental in this process. However, the factors leading to imprinting are not fully identified and the mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we show that the replication fork pause at the mat1 locus (MPS1, essential for imprint formation, depends on the lysine-specific demethylase Lsd1. We demonstrate that either Lsd1 or Lsd2 amine oxidase activity is required for these processes, working upstream of the imprinting factors Swi1 and Swi3 (homologs of mammalian Timeless and Tipin, respectively. We also show that the Lsd1/2 complex controls the replication fork terminators, within the rDNA repeats. These findings reveal a role for the Lsd1/2 demethylases in controlling polar replication fork progression, imprint formation, and subsequent asymmetric cell divisions.

  13. Post-natal imprinting: evidence from marsupials

    OpenAIRE

    Stringer, J. M.; Pask, A J; Shaw, G.; Renfree, M. B.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic imprinting has been identified in therian (eutherian and marsupial) mammals but not in prototherian (monotreme) mammals. Imprinting has an important role in optimising pre-natal nutrition and growth, and most imprinted genes are expressed and imprinted in the placenta and developing fetus. In marsupials, however, the placental attachment is short-lived, and most growth and development occurs post-natally, supported by a changing milk composition tailor-made for each stage of developme...

  14. Imprinted photonic crystal chemical sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, A.; Burghoorn, M.M.A.; Saalmink, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present the use of Photonic Crystals as chemical sensors. These 2D nanostructured sensors were prepared by nano-imprint lithography during which a nanostructure is transferred from a nickel template into a responsive polymer, that is be specifically tuned to interact with the chemic

  15. Epigenetic regulations in the IFNγ signalling pathway: IFNγ-mediated MHC class I upregulation on tumour cells is associated with DNA demethylation of antigen-presenting machinery genes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlková, Veronika; Štěpánek, Ivan; Hrušková, Veronika; Šenigl, Filip; Mayerová, Veronika; Šrámek, Martin; Šímová, Jana; Bieblová, Jana; Indrová, Marie; Hejhal, Tomáš; Dérian, N.; Klatzmann, D.; Six, A.; Reiniš, Milan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 16 (2014), s. 6923-35. ISSN 1949-2553 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP301/10/2174; GA MZd NT14461 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 18933 - CLINIGENE Grant ostatní: French state funds within the Investissements d’Avenir program(FR) ANR-11-IDEX-0004-02 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : IFNγ signalling pathway * DNA demethylation * tumour Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.359, year: 2014

  16. Delivery of Large Heterologous Polypeptides across the Cytoplasmic Membrane of Antigen-Presenting Cells by the Bordetella RTX Hemolysin Moiety Lacking the Adenylyl Cyclase Domain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holubová, Jana; Kamanová, Jana; Jelínek, J.; Tomala, Jakub; Mašín, Jiří; Kosová, Martina; Staněk, Ondřej; Bumba, Ladislav; Michálek, J.; Kovář, Marek; Šebo, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 3 (2012), s. 1181-1192. ISSN 0019-9567 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500200914; GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/11/0717; GA ČR GAP301/11/0325; GA MŠk 1M0506; GA MŠk 2B06161 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : MHC CLASS-I * ESCHERICHIA-COLI * PRESENTATION PATHWAY Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.074, year: 2012

  17. Imprinted Genes and the Environment: Links to the Toxic Metals Arsenic, Cadmium and Lead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Smeester

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Imprinted genes defy rules of Mendelian genetics with their expression tied to the parent from whom each allele was inherited. They are known to play a role in various diseases/disorders including fetal growth disruption, lower birth weight, obesity, and cancer. There is increasing interest in understanding their influence on environmentally-induced disease. The environment can be thought of broadly as including chemicals present in air, water and soil, as well as food. According to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR, some of the highest ranking environmental chemicals of concern include metals/metalloids such as arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury. The complex relationships between toxic metal exposure, imprinted gene regulation/expression and health outcomes are understudied. Herein we examine trends in imprinted gene biology, including an assessment of the imprinted genes and their known functional roles in the cell, particularly as they relate to toxic metals exposure and disease. The data highlight that many of the imprinted genes have known associations to developmental diseases and are enriched for their role in the TP53 and AhR pathways. Assessment of the promoter regions of the imprinted genes resulted in the identification of an enrichment of binding sites for two transcription factor families, namely the zinc finger family II and PLAG transcription factors. Taken together these data contribute insight into the complex relationships between toxic metals in the environment and imprinted gene biology.

  18. Methylation Imprinting of H19 and SNRPN Genes in Human Benign Ovarian Teratomas

    OpenAIRE

    Miura, K; Obama, M.; Yun, K.; Masuzaki, H; Ikeda, Y.; Yoshimura, S.; Akashi, T; Niikawa, N; Ishimaru, T; Jinno, Y.

    1999-01-01

    In humans, studies of female germ cells are very limited by ethics. The current study investigated the usefulness of benign ovarian teratomas as a substitute for ova in analyses of imprinted genes. Twenty-five human benign ovarian teratomas were typed with 45 microsatellite DNA markers and classified according to their genotypic features. Two oppositely imprinted genes, H19 and SNRPN, were then chosen for analysis of their methylation states in these tumors. These analyses revealed that benig...

  19. Imprinted polymers: selectivity by design applications in nuclear industry with special reference to cobalt imprinted polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal ion imprinted polymers offer much higher selectivity than the conventional ion exchange resins. This paper details the imprinted polymers having potential for application in nuclear industry. A cobalt imprinted polymer synthesized for use during decontamination, which exhibited sorption for cobaltous ions whilst excluding ferrous ions from complexing medium is discussed in detail. (author)

  20. 三肽基肽酶Ⅱ(TPPⅡ)对抗原的提呈作用机制研究进展%Progress on mechanism of tripeptidyl-peptidase Ⅱ in the antigenic presentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴玢; 吕凤林; 孔祥军; 任勇刚

    2012-01-01

    Ripetidyl peptidase Ⅱ is a multi-purpose macromolecule serine protease existing in the cytoplasm, which can assists proteasome and other extracellular enzyme participating in the protein metabolism cycle. Recent figures showed that TPP Ⅱ plays a vital contradictory role both in the generation and destroy of MHC- Ⅰ antigen ligands. However, the mechanism involved in these processes remains unclear. In this paper, we first explore the cell biology characteristics of TPP Ⅱ , and then focus on the role of TPPⅡ in the process of MHC - Ⅰ antigen presentation. Finally, we presume that TPP Ⅱ has the important meaning in the new vaccine design.%三肽基肽酶Ⅱ (Ripetidyl PeptidaseⅡ,TPPⅡ)是存在于细胞质中的一种多功能丝氨酸蛋白酶,主要协助蛋白酶体和其他的胞外酶并且参与蛋白周期代谢,最近的数据显示,TPPⅡ对MHC-Ⅰ类分子抗原表位的产生与破坏均有重要作用,但是TPPⅡ在MHC- Ⅰ类抗原递呈中的具体作用机制尚有待进一步研究.本文综述TPPⅡ的细胞生物学特征,着重探究TPPⅡ在MHC- Ⅰ类抗原递呈中作用,并且指出TPPⅡ在新型疫苗设计上具有重要的指导意义.

  1. Transcribed single nucleotide polymorphism: Ideal markers for detecting gene imprinting by 5' nuclease assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Guan-shan; WAN Mo-bin; ZHU Zhong-zheng; ZHENG Rui-ying

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To establish a novel approach for quick and highly efficient verification of human gene imprinting. Methods: A pair of dye-labelled probes, 5' nuclease assay was combined with RT-PCR to determine the genotype of a transcribed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs705 (C>T) of a known imprinted gene, small nuclear ribonucleotide protein N (SNRPN), on both genomic DNA and cDNA of human lymphoblast cell lines. Results: Allele discrimination showed a clear monoallelic expression pattern of SNRPN,which was confirmed by RT-PCR based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLPs). Pedigree analysis verified the paternal origin of expressed allele, which was in consistency with previous report. Conclusion: Transcribed SNP is an ideal marker for detecting gene imprinting by 5' nuclease assay. This approach also may be used to discover differential allele expression of non-imprinted genes, finding out gene cis-acting functional polymorphism.

  2. Imprinting disorders after assisted reproductive technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Pinborg, Anja; Andersen, Anders Nyboe

    2006-01-01

    To assess the evidence of an increased risk of imprinting diseases in children born after use of assisted reproductive technologies.......To assess the evidence of an increased risk of imprinting diseases in children born after use of assisted reproductive technologies....

  3. Composite vascular repair grafts via micro-imprinting and electrospinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Xiang, Ke; Chen, Haiping; Li, Yu; Hu, Qingxi

    2015-04-01

    Composite vascular grafts formed by micro-imprinting and electrospinning exhibited improved mechanical properties relative to those formed by electrospinning alone. The three-layered composite grafts mimic the three-layered structure of natural blood vessels. The middle layer is made by micro-imprinting poly-p-dioxanone (PPDO), while the inner and outer layers are electrospun mixtures of chitosan and polyvinyl alcohol. The graft morphology is characterized with scanning electron microscopy. For constant graft thicknesses, the PPDO increases the mechanical strength. Cells cultivated on the vascular grafts adhere and proliferate better because of the natural, biological chitosan in the inner and outer layers. Overall, the composite scaffolds could be good candidates for blood vessel repair.

  4. Composite vascular repair grafts via micro-imprinting and electrospinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yuanyuan, E-mail: yuanyuan-liu@shu.edu.cn; Hu, Qingxi, E-mail: huqingxi@shu.edu.cn [Rapid Manufacturing Engineering Center, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Intelligent Manufacturing and Robotics, Shanghai 200072 (China); Xiang, Ke, E-mail: xiangke@shu.edu.cn; Chen, Haiping, E-mail: 519673062@qq.com; Li, Yu, E-mail: liyu@hpu.edu.cn [Rapid Manufacturing Engineering Center, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Composite vascular grafts formed by micro-imprinting and electrospinning exhibited improved mechanical properties relative to those formed by electrospinning alone. The three-layered composite grafts mimic the three-layered structure of natural blood vessels. The middle layer is made by micro-imprinting poly-p-dioxanone (PPDO), while the inner and outer layers are electrospun mixtures of chitosan and polyvinyl alcohol. The graft morphology is characterized with scanning electron microscopy. For constant graft thicknesses, the PPDO increases the mechanical strength. Cells cultivated on the vascular grafts adhere and proliferate better because of the natural, biological chitosan in the inner and outer layers. Overall, the composite scaffolds could be good candidates for blood vessel repair.

  5. Morphometric Analysis in Breast Lesions A Rapid Conjunct to Intraoperative Imprint Smears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Marwah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast carcinoma is the most common malignant tumor and leading cause of cancer deaths in women. While fine needle aspiration cytology is highly accurate in the diagnosis of breast lesions, it possesses certain drawbacks. In those circumstancesintraoperative imprint cytology assumes importance, however, imprint cytology is subjected to interpretative errors. Computer image analysis has become an important tool in the pathology laboratory for quantitative morphometric analysis. The purpose of this study was to compare the morphometric values of various breast lesions onintraoperative imprint smears with final histopathological sections.Methods: The study group comprised 30 cases of, borderline(suspicious, and malignant lesions. Intraoperative imprint smears were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and toluidine blue. Morphometry was done on these smears and compared with morphometry on the histopathological sections, followed by statistical correlation. We studied the following five parameters: mean nuclear area, mean nuclear diameter, mean nuclear perimeter, feret circle, and nucleo-cytoplasmic ratio.Results: In the current work, all of the studied parameters with the exception of feret circle showed significantly lower values in benign ductal epithelial cells compared to malignant lesions and concentrate on the importance of morphometry as a diagnostictool that could differentiate benign from malignant lesions, especially if it can be employed on imprint smears intraoperatively. Accurate assessment of intraoperative margins by imprint smears using image analysis automation can prevent multiple reexcisionprocedures in breast conservation surgery.

  6. Imprinted polymer sensors for contamination detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, George M.; Arnold, Bradley R.; Kelly, Craig A.; Uy, O. Manuel

    2001-03-01

    Molecular imprinting is a useful technique for making a chemically selective binding site. The method involves building a synthetic polymeric scaffold of molecular complements containing the target molecule with subsequent removal of the target to leave a cavity with a structural "memory" of the target. Molecularly imprinted polymers can be employed as selective adsorbents of specific molecules or molecular functional groups. The imprinted polymers can be fashioned into membranes that can be used to form ion selective electrodes for an imprinted ion. By incorporating molecules or metal ions with useful optical properties in the binding sites of imprinted polymers, spectroscopic sensors for the imprinted molecule may be made. A variety of metal ion selective electrodes and a Pb2+ ion optrode based on imprinted polymers have been fabricated and tested.1-4 Additionally, a sensor for the hydrolysis product of the nerve agent Soman has been developed using a luminescent lanthanide ion, Eu(III), as optical transducer.5 Our research continues to explore other means to employ electrochemical and optical transduction.

  7. The Importance of Imprinting in the Human Placenta

    OpenAIRE

    Frost, J. M.; Moore, G.E.

    2010-01-01

    As a field of study, genomic imprinting has grown rapidly in the last 20 years, with a growing figure of around 100 imprinted genes known in the mouse and approximately 50 in the human. The imprinted expression of genes may be transient and highly tissue-specific, and there are potentially hundreds of other, as yet undiscovered, imprinted transcripts. The placenta is notable amongst mammalian organs for its high and prolific expression of imprinted genes. This review discusses the development...

  8. The importance of imprinting in the human placenta.

    OpenAIRE

    Frost, Jennifer M.; Moore, Gudrun E.

    2010-01-01

    As a field of study, genomic imprinting has grown rapidly in the last 20 years, with a growing figure of around 100 imprinted genes known in the mouse and approximately 50 in the human. The imprinted expression of genes may be transient and highly tissue-specific, and there are potentially hundreds of other, as yet undiscovered, imprinted transcripts. The placenta is notable amongst mammalian organs for its high and prolific expression of imprinted genes. This review discusses the development...

  9. Subdivision Surfaces for Procedural Design of Optimal Imprint Rolls

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the use of subdivision surfaces in the procedural design of imprint rolls for use in the roller imprinting process. Roller imprinting is being developed for the fabrication of microfluidic devices in polymer substrates. Imprint rolls are modeled using Catmull-Clark subdivision surfaces, and are procedurally designed based on feedback from finite-element simulations of the imprinting process. Microfluidic devices exhibit repeating patterns, and can be modeled using a small set of un...

  10. Ferroelectric capacitor with reduced imprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Jr., Joseph T. (13609 Verbena Pl., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87112); Warren, William L. (7716 Wm. Moyers Ave., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Tuttle, Bruce A. (12808 Lillian Pl., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Dimos, Duane B. (6105 Innsbrook Ct., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Pike, Gordon E. (1609 Cedar Ridge, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87112)

    1997-01-01

    An improved ferroelectric capacitor exhibiting reduced imprint effects in comparison to prior art capacitors. A capacitor according to the present invention includes top and bottom electrodes and a ferroelectric layer sandwiched between the top and bottom electrodes, the ferroelectric layer comprising a perovskite structure of the chemical composition ABO.sub.3 wherein the B-site comprises first and second elements and a dopant element that has an oxidation state greater than +4. The concentration of the dopant is sufficient to reduce shifts in the coercive voltage of the capacitor with time. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the ferroelectric element comprises Pb in the A-site, and the first and second elements are Zr and Ti, respectively. The preferred dopant is chosen from the group consisting of Niobium, Tantalum, and Tungsten. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the dopant occupies between 1 and 8% of the B-sites.

  11. Asparagine endopeptidase is not essential for class II MHC antigen presentation but is required for processing of cathepsin L in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maehr, René; Hang, Howard C; Mintern, Justine D; Kim, You-Me; Cuvillier, Armelle; Nishimura, Mikio; Yamada, Kenji; Shirahama-Noda, Kanae; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2005-06-01

    Class II MHC molecules survey the endocytic compartments of APCs and present antigenic peptides to CD4 T cells. In this context, lysosomal proteases are essential not only for the generation of antigenic peptides but also for proteolysis of the invariant chain to allow the maturation of class II MHC molecules. Recent studies with protease inhibitors have implicated the asparagine endopeptidase (AEP) in class II MHC-restricted Ag presentation. We now report that AEP-deficient mice show no differences in processing of the invariant chain or maturation of class II MHC products compared with wild-type mice. In the absence of AEP, presentation to primary T cells of OVA and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein, two Ags that contain asparagine residues within or in proximity to the relevant epitopes was unimpaired. Cathepsin (Cat) L, a lysosomal cysteine protease essential for the development to CD4 and NK T cells, fails to be processed into its mature two-chain form in AEP-deficient cells. Despite this, the numbers of CD4 and NK T cells are normal, showing that the single-chain form of Cat L is sufficient for its function in vivo. We conclude that AEP is essential for processing of Cat L but not for class II MHC-restricted Ag presentation. PMID:15905550

  12. Quantitative analysis of DNA methylation at all human imprinted regions reveals preservation of epigenetic stability in adult somatic tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woodfine Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genes subject to genomic imprinting are mono-allelically expressed in a parent-of-origin dependent manner. Each imprinted locus has at least one differentially methylated region (DMR which has allele specific DNA methylation and contributes to imprinted gene expression. Once DMRs are established, they are potentially able to withstand normal genome reprogramming events that occur during cell differentiation and germ-line DMRs are stably maintained throughout development. These DMRs, in addition to being either maternally or paternally methylated, have differences in whether methylation was acquired in the germ-line or post fertilization and are present in a variety of genomic locations with different Cytosine-phosphate guanine (CpG densities and CTCF binding capacities. We therefore examined the stability of maintenance of DNA methylation imprints and determined the normal baseline DNA methylation levels in several adult tissues for all imprinted genes. In order to do this, we first developed and validated 50 highly specific, quantitative DNA methylation pyrosequencing assays for the known DMRs associated with human imprinted genes. Results Remarkable stability of the DNA methylation imprint was observed in all germ-line DMRs and paternally methylated somatic DMRs (which maintained average methylation levels of between 35% - 65% in all somatic tissues, independent of gene expression. Maternally methylated somatic DMRs were found to have more variation with tissue specific methylation patterns. Most DMRs, however, showed some intra-individual variability for DNA methylation levels in peripheral blood, suggesting that more than one DMR needs to be examined in order to get an overall impression of the epigenetic stability in a tissue. The plasticity of DNA methylation at imprinted genes was examined in a panel of normal and cancer cell lines. All cell lines showed changes in DNA methylation, especially at the paternal germ

  13. Cosmological imprints of pre-inflationary particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fialkov, Anastasia; Itzhaki, Nissan; Kovetz, Ely D., E-mail: anastasia.fialkov@gmail.com, E-mail: nitzhaki@post.tau.ac.il, E-mail: elykovetz@gmail.com [Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv, 69978 (Israel)

    2010-02-01

    We study some of the cosmological imprints of pre-inflationary particles. We show that each such particle provides a seed for a spherically symmetric cosmic defect. The profile of this cosmic defect is fixed and its magnitude is linear in a single parameter that is determined by the mass of the pre-inflationary particle. We study the CMB and peculiar velocity imprints of this cosmic defect and suggest that it could explain some of the large scale cosmological anomalies.

  14. Antigenic presentation of heterologous epitopes engineered into the outer surface-exposed helix 4 loop region of human papillomavirus L1 capsomeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murata Yoshihiko

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV L1 capsid proteins can self-assemble into pentamers (capsomeres that are immunogenic and can elicit neutralizing antibodies. Structural modelling of L1 inter-pentameric interactions predicts that helix 4 (h4 of each of the five L1 monomers project laterally and outwards from the pentamer. We sought to utilize HPV L1 capsomeres as a vaccine platform by engineering heterologous epitopes within L1 derivatives deleted for h4 domain. Results We used baculovirus – infected Trichoplusia ni cells and ultracentrifugation to synthesize and purify three 16L1 derivatives: one bearing a short deletion (amino acids 404–436 encompassing the h4 domain, and two others, each bearing a conserved neutralizing epitope of the human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV fusion (F protein (residues 255–278 and 423–436 that was substituted for the deleted L1 h4 domain residues. Each of the three capsomere derivatives was recognized by anti-L1 antibodies, while two bearing the RSV F-derived moieties were recognized by anti-RSV F antibodies. All three L1 derivatives formed ring-like structures that were similar in morphology and size to those described for native 16L1 capsomeres. When injected into mice, each of the capsomere derivatives was immunogenic with respect to L1 protein, and immunization with chimeric L1-RSV F pentamers resulted in RSV non-neutralizing antisera that recognized purified RSV F protein in immunoblots. Conclusion HPV L1 monomers bearing heterologous epitopes within the L1 h4 region can self-assemble into capsomeres that elicit antibody response against such non-HPV encoded epitopes. Thus, the L1 h4 region can function as a novel antigen display site within the L1 pentamer, which in turn may serve as a potential vaccine template.

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of touch imprint and frozen section analysis in mediastinal lymph node involvement: lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bannazadeh M

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is well known that, at the time of the initial presentation of patients with non-small cell lung cancer, N-status is very important in accurate staging and avoiding inappropriate surgical procedures. Also, if mediastinal lymph node metastasis (N2 of non-small cell lung cancer (stage IIIA is present, neoadjuvant (preoperative chemora-diotherapy is indicated; therefore a quick and accurate N-status determination is critical before thoracotomy. We compared the usefulness and accuracy of touch imprint and frozen section analysis for this purpose.Methods: During 2006, fifty eight mediastinal lymph node specimens from 27 patients with lung cancer were excised. After touch imprint preparation, half of each lymph node was sent for frozen section and finally permanent histology.Results: Frozen section and touch imprint had only one and two false negative results, respectively, but neither had false positive reports. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the frozen section evaluation was 95.5%, 100% and 98.2%, respectively, and those of touch imprint were, 90.9%, 100% and 96.4%. The differences in the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy between the two methods were not significant (p>0.05.Conclusion: Frozen section and touch imprint have similarly high accuracies for detecting mediastinal lymph node metastasis in lung cancer. However, since the touch imprint method is more rapid and simple, it maybe method of choice.

  16. Molecularly imprinted polymers for biomedical and biotechnological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrienko, E. V.; Pyshnaya, I. A.; Martyanov, O. N.; Pyshnyi, D. V.

    2016-05-01

    This survey covers main advances in the preparation and application of molecularly imprinted polymers which are capable of specific recognition of biologically active compounds. The principles underlying the production of highly efficient and template-specific molecularly imprinted polymers are discussed. The focus is on the imprinting of highly structured macromolecular and supramolecular templates. The existing and potential applications of molecularly imprinted polymers in various fields of chemistry and molecular biology are considered. The bibliography includes 261 references.

  17. Recent assembly of an imprinted domain from non-imprinted components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Rapkins

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Genomic imprinting, representing parent-specific expression of alleles at a locus, raises many questions about how--and especially why--epigenetic silencing of mammalian genes evolved. We present the first in-depth study of how a human imprinted domain evolved, analyzing a domain containing several imprinted genes that are involved in human disease. Using comparisons of orthologous genes in humans, marsupials, and the platypus, we discovered that the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region on human Chromosome 15q was assembled only recently (105-180 million years ago. This imprinted domain arose after a region bearing UBE3A (Angelman syndrome fused with an unlinked region bearing SNRPN (Prader-Willi syndrome, which had duplicated from the non-imprinted SNRPB/B'. This region independently acquired several retroposed gene copies and arrays of small nucleolar RNAs from different parts of the genome. In their original configurations, SNRPN and UBE3A are expressed from both alleles, implying that acquisition of imprinting occurred after their rearrangement and required the evolution of a control locus. Thus, the evolution of imprinting in viviparous mammals is ongoing.

  18. Pairing of homologous regions in the mouse genome is associated with transcription but not imprinting status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christel Krueger

    Full Text Available Although somatic homologous pairing is common in Drosophila it is not generally observed in mammalian cells. However, a number of regions have recently been shown to come into close proximity with their homologous allele, and it has been proposed that pairing might be involved in the establishment or maintenance of monoallelic expression. Here, we investigate the pairing properties of various imprinted and non-imprinted regions in mouse tissues and ES cells. We find by allele-specific 4C-Seq and DNA FISH that the Kcnq1 imprinted region displays frequent pairing but that this is not dependent on monoallelic expression. We demonstrate that pairing involves larger chromosomal regions and that the two chromosome territories come close together. Frequent pairing is not associated with imprinted status or DNA repair, but is influenced by chromosomal location and transcription. We propose that homologous pairing is not exclusive to specialised regions or specific functional events, and speculate that it provides the cell with the opportunity of trans-allelic effects on gene regulation.

  19. Specific changes in the expression of imprinted genes in prostate cancer-implications for cancer progression and epigenetic regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teodora Ribarska; Klaus-Marius Bastian; Annemarie Koch; Wolfgang A Schulz

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic dysregulation comprising DNA hypermethylation and hypomethylation,enhancer of zeste homologue 2 (EZH2)overexpression and altered patterns of histone modifications is associated with the progression of prostate cancer.DNA methylation,EZH2 and histone modifications also ensure the parental-specific monoallelic expression of at least 62 imprinted genes.Although it is therefore tempting to speculate that epigenetic dysregulation may extend to imprinted genes,expression changes in cancerous prostates are only well documented for insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2).A literature and database survey on imprinted genes in prostate cancer suggests that the expression of most imprinted genes remains unchanged despite global disturbances in epigenetic mechanisms.Instead,selective genetic and epigenetic changes appear to lead to the inactivation of a sub-network of imprinted genes,which might function in the prostate to limit cell growth induced viathe PI3K/Akt pathway,modulate androgen responses and regulate differentiation.Whereas dysregulation of IG F2 may constitute an early change in prostate carcinogenesis,inactivation of this imprinted gene network is rather associated with cancer progression.

  20. Recent Assembly of an Imprinted Domain from Non-Imprinted Components

    OpenAIRE

    Rapkins, Robert W.; Hore, Tim; Smithwick, Megan; Ager, Eleanor; Pask, Andrew J; Renfree, Marilyn B; Kohn, Matthias; Hameister, Horst; Nicholls, Robert D.; Deakin, Janine E; Graves, Jennifer A. Marshall.

    2006-01-01

    Synopsis Humans and other mammals have two copies of the genome. For most genes, both copies are active. However, some genes are active only when they are inherited from the father, others only when inherited from the mother. These “imprinted” genes are clustered in domains that are controlled coordinately. Only mammals show genomic imprinting. It is not understood how or why genes became imprinted during mammalian evolution. The authors used comparisons between humans and the most distantly ...

  1. Genomic imprinting and genetic effects on muscle traits in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kärst Stefan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic imprinting refers to parent-of-origin dependent gene expression caused by differential DNA methylation of the paternally and maternally derived alleles. Imprinting is increasingly recognized as an important source of variation in complex traits, however, its role in explaining variation in muscle and physiological traits, especially those of commercial value, is largely unknown compared with genetic effects. Results We investigated both genetic and genomic imprinting effects on key muscle traits in mice from the Berlin Muscle Mouse population, a key model system to study muscle traits. Using a genome scan, we first identified loci with either imprinting or genetic effects on phenotypic variation. Next, we established the proportion of phenotypic variation explained by additive, dominance and imprinted QTL and characterized the patterns of effects. In total, we identified nine QTL, two of which show large imprinting effects on glycogen content and potential, and body weight. Surprisingly, all imprinting patterns were of the bipolar type, in which the two heterozygotes are different from each other but the homozygotes are not. Most QTL had pleiotropic effects and explained up to 40% of phenotypic variance, with individual imprinted loci accounting for 4-5% of variation alone. Conclusion Surprisingly, variation in glycogen content and potential was only modulated by imprinting effects. Further, in contrast to general assumptions, our results show that genomic imprinting can impact physiological traits measured at adult stages and that the expression does not have to follow the patterns of paternal or maternal expression commonly ascribed to imprinting effects.

  2. Plastic Antibodies: Molecular Recognition with Imprinted Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Gregory T.; Furmanski, Brian; Shimizu, Ken D.

    2005-01-01

    Synthetic polymers are prepared and tested in a study for their molecular recognition properties of an adenine derivative, ethyl adenine-9-acetate (EA9A), within two laboratory periods. The procedure introduces undergraduate chemistry students to noncovalent molecular imprinting as well as the analytical techniques for assessing their recognition…

  3. High Sensitivity Imprint Measurements on Nike Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasik, Max

    2005-10-01

    Hydrodynamic instability seeded by laser non-uniformity (laser imprint) is an important factor in performance of direct-drive ICF targets. Most of the imprint occurs during the initial low-intensity (``foot'') part of the pulse, necessary to compress the target to achieve high gain. Experiments are carried out on Nike KrF laser with induced spatial incoherence (ISI) smoothing. The amount of imprint is varied by changing the uniformity the foot of the pulse. The resulting Raleigh-Taylor (RT) amplified areal mass non-uniformity is measured by face-on x-ray radiography using Bragg reflection from a curved crystal coupled to an x-ray streak camera. The streak camera was recently retrofitted with a new high sensitivity CCD camera. The sensitivity of the CCD has enabled it to be fiberoptically coupled directly to the streak camera output, without an image intensifier and lens coupling. This gave an increased overall spatial resolution as well as lower noise. Because of the strong short wavelength component of RT amplified imprint, the increased resolution and lower noise resulted in much lower noise floor in the measurement. Experimental results are compared with 2D simulations using FAST hydrocode for a range of foot uniformities and intensities. Work supported by the U. S. DOE/NNSA.

  4. Separation and purification of hyaluronic acid by glucuronic acid imprinted microbeads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akdamar, H.Acelya; Sarioezlue, Nalan Yilmaz [Department of Biology, Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey); Ozcan, Ayca Atilir; Ersoez, Arzu [Department of Chemistry, Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey); Denizli, Adil [Department of Chemistry, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Say, Ridvan, E-mail: rsay@anadolu.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey); BIBAM (Plant, Drug and Scientific Researches Center), Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2009-05-05

    The purification of hyaluronic acid (HA) is relatively significant to use in biomedical applications. The structure of HA is formed by the repetitive units of glucuronic acid and N-acetyl glucosamine. In this study, glucuronic acid-imprinted microbeads have been supplied for the purification of HA from cell culture (Streptococcus equi). Histidine-functional monomer, methacryloylamidohistidine (MAH) was chosen as the metal-complexing monomer. The glucuronic acid-imprinted poly(ethyleneglycoldimethacrylate-MAH-Copper(II)) [p(EDMA-MAH-Cu{sup 2+})] microbeads have been synthesized by typical suspension polymerization procedure. The template glucuronic acid has been removed by employing 5 M methanolic KOH solution. p(EDMA-MAH-Cu{sup 2+}) microbeads have been characterized by elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and swelling studies. Moreover, HA adsorption experiments have been performed in a batch experimental set-up. Purification of HA from cell culture supernatant has been also investigated by determining the hyaluronidase activity using purified HA as substrate. The glucuronic acid imprinted p(EDMA-MAH-Cu{sup 2+}) particles can be used many times with no significant loss in adsorption capacities. Also, the selectivity of prepared molecular imprinted polymers (MIP) has been examined. Results have showed that MIP particles are 19 times more selective for glucuronic acid than N-acetylglucose amine.

  5. Separation and purification of hyaluronic acid by glucuronic acid imprinted microbeads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purification of hyaluronic acid (HA) is relatively significant to use in biomedical applications. The structure of HA is formed by the repetitive units of glucuronic acid and N-acetyl glucosamine. In this study, glucuronic acid-imprinted microbeads have been supplied for the purification of HA from cell culture (Streptococcus equi). Histidine-functional monomer, methacryloylamidohistidine (MAH) was chosen as the metal-complexing monomer. The glucuronic acid-imprinted poly(ethyleneglycoldimethacrylate-MAH-Copper(II)) [p(EDMA-MAH-Cu2+)] microbeads have been synthesized by typical suspension polymerization procedure. The template glucuronic acid has been removed by employing 5 M methanolic KOH solution. p(EDMA-MAH-Cu2+) microbeads have been characterized by elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and swelling studies. Moreover, HA adsorption experiments have been performed in a batch experimental set-up. Purification of HA from cell culture supernatant has been also investigated by determining the hyaluronidase activity using purified HA as substrate. The glucuronic acid imprinted p(EDMA-MAH-Cu2+) particles can be used many times with no significant loss in adsorption capacities. Also, the selectivity of prepared molecular imprinted polymers (MIP) has been examined. Results have showed that MIP particles are 19 times more selective for glucuronic acid than N-acetylglucose amine.

  6. Differential genomic imprinting regulates paracrine and autocrine roles of IGF2 in mouse adult neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrón, S R; Radford, E J; Domingo-Muelas, A; Kleine, I; Ramme, A; Gray, D; Sandovici, I; Constancia, M; Ward, A; Menheniott, T R; Ferguson-Smith, A C

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is implicated in the control of gene dosage in neurogenic niches. Here we address the importance of Igf2 imprinting for murine adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus in vivo. In the SVZ, paracrine IGF2 is a cerebrospinal fluid and endothelial-derived neurogenic factor requiring biallelic expression, with mutants having reduced activation of the stem cell pool and impaired olfactory bulb neurogenesis. In contrast, Igf2 is imprinted in the hippocampus acting as an autocrine factor expressed in neural stem cells (NSCs) solely from the paternal allele. Conditional mutagenesis of Igf2 in blood vessels confirms that endothelial-derived IGF2 contributes to NSC maintenance in SVZ but not in the SGZ, and that this is regulated by the biallelic expression of IGF2 in the vascular compartment. Our findings indicate that a regulatory decision to imprint or not is a functionally important mechanism of transcriptional dosage control in adult neurogenesis. PMID:26369386

  7. Protein-induced changes during the maturation process of human dendritic cells: A 2-D DIGE approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Gb; Overbergh, L; Hansen, Kasper Lage; D'Hertog, W; Hansen, Daniel Aaen; Maris, M; Moreau, Y; Workman, Christopher; Waelkens, E; Mathieu, C

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are unique antigen presenting cells, which upon maturation change from a specialized antigen-capturing cell towards a professional antigen presenting cells. In this study, a 2-D DIGE analysis of immature and mature DCs was performed, to identify proteins changing in expressi...

  8. [Spectroscopic Study of Salbutamol Molecularly Imprinted Polymers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hui-peng; Guan, Yu-yu; Dai, Rong-hua; Liu, Guo-yan; Chai, Chun-yan

    2016-02-01

    In order to solve the problem of on-site rapid detection of salbutamol residues in feed and animal products, and develop a new method of fast detection of salbutamol on the basis of the molecular imprinting technology, this article uses the salbutamol (SAL) working as template molecule, methacrylic acid (MAA) working as functional monomer. On this basis, a new type of core-shell type salbutamol molecularly imprinted polymers were prepared with colloidal gold particles as triggering core. Superficial characteristics of the MIPs and the related compounds were investigated by ultraviolet (UV) spectra and infrared (IR) spectra, Raman spectra, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) respectively. The results indicated that a stable hydrogen bonding complex has been formed between the carboxyl groups of SAL and MA with a matching ratio of 1:1. The complex can be easily eluted by the reagent containing hydrogen bonding. The chemical binding constant K reaches -0.245 x 10⁶ L² · mol⁻². The possible binding sites of the hydrogen bonding was formed between the hydrogen atoms of -COOH in MA and the oxygen atoms of C==O in SAL. IR and Raman spectrum showed that, compared with MA, a significant red shift of -OH absorption peak was manifested in MIPs, which proved that SAL as template molecule occurred a specific bond between MA. Red shift of stretching vibration absorption peak of C==O was also detected in the un-eluted MIPs and obvious energy loss happened, which demonstrated a possible binding sites is SAL intramolecular of C==O atom of oxygen. If the hydrogen atoms of -COOH in MA wanted to generate hydrogen bond. However, the shapes of absorption peak of other functional groups including C==C, C==O, and -OH were very similar both in MIPs and NIPs. Specific cavities were formed after the template molecules in MIPs were removed. It was proved by the adsorption experiment that the specific sites in these cavities highly match with the chemical and space structure of SAL

  9. CTCF-dependent chromatin bias constitutes transient epigenetic memory of the mother at the H19-Igf2 imprinting control region in prospermatogonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hoon Lee

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Genomic imprints-parental allele-specific DNA methylation marks at the differentially methylated regions (DMRs of imprinted genes-are erased and reestablished in germ cells according to the individual's sex. Imprint establishment at paternally methylated germ line DMRs occurs in fetal male germ cells. In prospermatogonia, the two unmethylated alleles exhibit different rates of de novo methylation at the H19/Igf2 imprinting control region (ICR depending on parental origin. We investigated the nature of this epigenetic memory using bisulfite sequencing and allele-specific ChIP-SNuPE assays. We found that the chromatin composition in fetal germ cells was biased at the ICR between the two alleles with the maternally inherited allele exhibiting more H3K4me3 and less H3K9me3 than the paternally inherited allele. We determined genetically that the chromatin bias, and also the delayed methylation establishment in the maternal allele, depended on functional CTCF insulator binding sites in the ICR. Our data suggest that, in primordial germ cells, maternally inherited allele-specific CTCF binding sets up allele-specific chromatin differences at the ICR. The erasure of these allele-specific chromatin marks is not complete before the process of de novo methylation imprint establishment begins. CTCF-dependent allele-specific chromatin composition imposes a maternal allele-specific delay on de novo methylation imprint establishment at the H19/Igf2 ICR in prospermatogonia.

  10. Mycotoxin Analysis Using Imprinted Materials Technology: Recent Developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appell, Michael; Mueller, Anja

    2016-07-01

    Molecular imprinting technology is an attractive, cost-effective, and robust alternative to address the limitations of highly selective natural receptors, such as antibodies and aptamers. The field of molecular imprinting has seen a recent surge in growth, and several commercially available products are of great interest for sample cleanup to improve mycotoxin analysis. Current research trends are in specific applications of imprinting technology for small-molecule sensing and chromatographic cleanup procedures in new commodities. The choice of components and imprinting template are critical factors for mycotoxin recovery or detection optimization. Template mimics offer a means to reduce toxic exposure during polymer synthesis and address issues of leaching template from the imprinted polymer. Recent reports of molecularly imprinted polymers for aflatoxins, ochratoxins, fumonisins, fusaric acid, citrinin, patulin, zearalenone, deoxynivalenol, and T-2 toxin are reviewed. PMID:27214609

  11. 77 FR 25082 - Picture Permit Imprint Indicia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ...The Postal Service will revise Mailing Standards of the United States Postal Service, Domestic Mail Manual (DMM[supreg]) 604.5 to add picture permit imprint indicia standards allowing customers to include business-related color images, such as corporate logos, company brand or trademarks, in the permit indicia area of First-Class Mail[supreg] full-service automation letters and postcards, and......

  12. Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers and method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Bradley R.; Talley, Chad E.

    2008-06-10

    Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) having polymer features wherein the size, shape and position are predetermined can be fabricated using an xy piezo stage mounted on an inverted microscope and a laser. Using an AMF controller, a solution containing polymer precursors and a photo initiator are positioned on the xy piezo and hit with a laser beam. The thickness of the polymeric features can be varied from a few nanometers to over a micron.

  13. Preparation and Property Recognition of Nimodipine Molecularly Imprinted Polymer

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Fei-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the application of molecular imprinting technique in the separation and detection of nimodipine. Methods: Methacrylic acid as functional monomer, pentaerythritol triacrylate as cross-linking agent were used to prepare molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) with the feature of specific recognition performance on imprinting molecule nimodipine under condition of template molecule nimodipine. The preparation conditions, recognition performance of MIP on nimodipine, different p...

  14. Genome-wide prediction of imprinted murine genes

    OpenAIRE

    Luedi, Philippe P.; Hartemink, Alexander J.; Jirtle, Randy L

    2005-01-01

    Imprinted genes are epigenetically modified genes whose expression is determined according to their parent of origin. They are involved in embryonic development, and imprinting dysregulation is linked to cancer, obesity, diabetes, and behavioral disorders such as autism and bipolar disease. Herein, we train a statistical model based on DNA sequence characteristics that not only identifies potentially imprinted genes, but also predicts the parental allele from which they are expressed. Of 23,7...

  15. Retrotransposon Silencing by DNA Methylation Can Drive Mammalian Genomic Imprinting

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Shunsuke; Ono, Ryuichi; Narita, Takanori; Pask, Andrew J; Shaw, Geoffrey; Wang, Changshan; Kohda, Takashi; Alsop, Amber E; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A.; Kohara, Yuji; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Renfree, Marilyn B; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko

    2007-01-01

    Among mammals, only eutherians and marsupials are viviparous and have genomic imprinting that leads to parent-of-origin-specific differential gene expression. We used comparative analysis to investigate the origin of genomic imprinting in mammals. PEG10 (paternally expressed 10) is a retrotransposon-derived imprinted gene that has an essential role for the formation of the placenta of the mouse. Here, we show that an orthologue of PEG10 exists in another therian mammal, the marsupial tammar w...

  16. Molecularly imprinted nanoparticles with recognition properties towards a laminin H-Tyr-Ile-Gly-Ser-Arg-OH sequence for tissue engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanotechnology is an emerging field that promises to revolutionize medicine and is increasingly used in tissue engineering applications. Our research group proposed for the first time molecular imprinting as a new nanotechnology for the creation of advanced synthetic support structures for cell adhesion and proliferation. The aim of this work was the synthesis and characterization of molecularly imprinted polymers with recognition properties towards a laminin peptide sequence and their application as functionalization structures in the development of bioactive materials. Nanoparticles with an average diameter of 200 nm were synthesized by precipitation polymerization of methacrylic acid in the presence of the template molecule and trimethylpropane trimethacrylate as the cross-linking agent. The imprinted nanoparticles showed good performance in terms of recognition capacity and selectivity. The cytotoxicity tests showed normal vitality of C2C12 myoblasts cultured in the medium that was put in contact with the imprinted polymers. After the deposition on the polymeric film surface, the imprinted particles maintained their specific recognition and rebinding behaviour, showing an even higher quantitative binding than free nanoparticles. Preliminary in vitro cell culture tests demonstrated the ability of functionalized materials to promote cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation, suggesting that molecular imprinting can be used as an innovative functionalization technique.

  17. Synthesis of a Molecularly Imprinted Polymer for Dioxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Brattoli

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A molecularly imprinted polymer for recognising selectively 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD was made by a new non-covalent method employing a“dummy” template. The proposed way represents a simplification of a synthetic schemeproposed by Lübke et al.[1] for covalent imprinting. Comparison of extraction yields of thenovel polymer, a non imprinted polymer and an imprinting polymer, prepared by theoriginal procedure demonstrates the binding capacity of the proposed polymer, which is inprinciple applicable to solid phase extraction (SPE of dioxin.

  18. Regulation of imprinted expression by macro non-coding RNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Latos, Paulina A.; Barlow, Denise P.

    2009-01-01

    In mammals, imprinted genes are clustered and at least one gene in each imprinted cluster is a long i.e., macro non-coding (nc) RNA. Most genes in a cluster show concordant parental-specific expression but the ncRNA is the odd one out, and is expressed from the opposite parental chromosome. While reciprocal expression between imprinted macro non-coding RNAs and flanking mRNA genes is indicative of a functional role, only two of three tested macro ncRNAs have been shown to induce imprinted gen...

  19. Affinity based and molecularly imprinted cryogels: Applications in biomacromolecule purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andaç, Müge; Galaev, Igor Yu; Denizli, Adil

    2016-05-15

    The publications in macro-molecularly imprinted polymers have increased drastically in recent years with the development of water-based polymer systems. The macroporous structure of cryogels has allowed the use of these materials within different applications, particularly in affinity purification and molecular imprinting based methods. Due to their high selectivity, specificity, efficient mass transfer and good reproducibility, molecularly imprinted cryogels (MICs) have become attractive for researchers in the separation and purification of proteins. In this review, the recent developments in affinity based cryogels and molecularly imprinted cryogels in protein purification are reviewed comprehensively. PMID:26454622

  20. Germline DNA demethylation dynamics and imprint erasure through 5-hydroxymethylcytosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Jamie A; Sengupta, Roopsha; Zylicz, Jan J; Murakami, Kazuhiro; Lee, Caroline; Down, Thomas A; Surani, M Azim

    2013-01-25

    Mouse primordial germ cells (PGCs) undergo sequential epigenetic changes and genome-wide DNA demethylation to reset the epigenome for totipotency. Here, we demonstrate that erasure of CpG methylation (5mC) in PGCs occurs via conversion to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), driven by high levels of TET1 and TET2. Global conversion to 5hmC initiates asynchronously among PGCs at embryonic day (E) 9.5 to E10.5 and accounts for the unique process of imprint erasure. Mechanistically, 5hmC enrichment is followed by its protracted decline thereafter at a rate consistent with replication-coupled dilution. The conversion to 5hmC is an important component of parallel redundant systems that drive comprehensive reprogramming in PGCs. Nonetheless, we identify rare regulatory elements that escape systematic DNA demethylation in PGCs, providing a potential mechanistic basis for transgenerational epigenetic inheritance. PMID:23223451

  1. Imprint cytology in the diagnosis of ovarian lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma

    2015-12-01

    Results: The 195 cases were classified broadly according to WHO system into 4 groups and the lesions were statistically analyzed. 122 surface epithelial tumors showed 97.5%sensitivity and 94.5%specificity in diagnosis with an overall accuracy of 96.4%. 8 sex cord stromal tumors had 98.5% diagnostic accuracy with a specificity of 99.5%. There was 100 % sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing the 25 germ cell tumors. The tumor like lesions showed a diagnostic accuracy of 97% with a specificity of 100%. Conclusions: Imprint cytology is an inexpensive and a fairly sensitive tool for rapid intra-operative diagnosis. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(12.000: 3770-3774

  2. Potentiometric Sensors Based on Surface Molecular Imprinting: Detection of Cancer Biomarkers and Viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.; Zhang, Z; Jain, V; Yi, J; Mueller, S; Sokolov, J; Liu, Z; Levon, K; Rigas, B; Rafailovich, M

    2010-01-01

    The continuing discovery of cancer biomarkers necessitates improved methods for their detection. Molecular imprinting using artificial materials provides an alternative to the detection of a wide range of substances. We applied surface molecular imprinting using self-assembled monolayers to design sensing elements for the detection of cancer biomarkers and other proteins. These elements consist of a gold-coated silicon chip onto which hydroxyl-terminated alkanethiol molecules and template biomolecule are co-adsorbed, where the thiol molecules are chemically bound to the metal substrate and self-assembled into highly ordered monolayers, the biomolecules can be removed, creating the foot-print cavities in the monolayer matrix for this kind of template molecules. Re-adsorption of the biomolecules to the sensing chip changes its potential, which can be measured potentiometrically. We applied this method to the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in both solutions of purified CEA and in the culture medium of a CEA-producing human colon cancer cell line. The CEA assay, validated also against a standard immunoassay, was both sensitive (detection range 2.5-250 ng/mL) and specific (no cross-reactivity with hemoglobin; no response by a non-imprinted sensor). Similar results were obtained for human amylase. In addition, we detected virions of poliovirus in a specific manner (no cross-reactivity to adenovirus, no response by a non-imprinted sensor). Our findings demonstrate the application of the principles of molecular imprinting to the development of a new method for the detection of protein cancer biomarkers and to protein-based macromolecular structures such as the capsid of a virion. This approach has the potential of generating a general assay methodology that could be highly sensitive, specific, simple and likely inexpensive.

  3. Comparative Anatomy of Chromosomal Domains with Imprinted and Non-Imprinted Allele-Specific DNA Methylation

    OpenAIRE

    Paliwal, Anupam; Temkin, Alexis M.; Kerkel, Kristi; Yale, Alexander; Yotova, Iveta; Drost, Natalia; Lax, Simon; Nhan-Chang, Chia-Ling; Powell, Charles; Borczuk, Alain; Aviv, Abraham; Wapner, Ronald; Chen, Xiaowei; Nagy, Peter L.; Schork, Nicholas,

    2013-01-01

    Allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM) is well studied in imprinted domains, but this type of epigenetic asymmetry is actually found more commonly at non-imprinted loci, where the ASM is dictated not by parent-of-origin but instead by the local haplotype. We identified loci with strong ASM in human tissues from methylation-sensitive SNP array data. Two index regions (bisulfite PCR amplicons), one between the C3orf27 and RPN1 genes in chromosome band 3q21 and the other near the VTRNA2-1 vault R...

  4. Comparative anatomy of chromosomal domains with imprinted and non-imprinted allele-specific DNA methylation.

    OpenAIRE

    Anupam Paliwal; Temkin, Alexis M.; Kristi Kerkel; Alexander Yale; Iveta Yotova; Natalia Drost; Simon Lax; Chia-Ling Nhan-Chang; Charles Powell; Alain Borczuk; Abraham Aviv; Ronald Wapner; Xiaowei Chen; Nagy, Peter L.; Nicholas Schork

    2013-01-01

    Allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM) is well studied in imprinted domains, but this type of epigenetic asymmetry is actually found more commonly at non-imprinted loci, where the ASM is dictated not by parent-of-origin but instead by the local haplotype. We identified loci with strong ASM in human tissues from methylation-sensitive SNP array data. Two index regions (bisulfite PCR amplicons), one between the C3orf27 and RPN1 genes in chromosome band 3q21 and the other near the VTRNA2-1 vault R...

  5. Effectiveness of combined use of imprint cytological and histological examination in CT-guided tissue-core biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamagami, Takuji; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Kajiwara, Kenji; Ishikawa, Masaki; Awai, Kazuo [Hiroshima University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Institute and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Minami-Ku, Hiroshima (Japan); Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Hasebe, Terumitsu [Tokai University Hachioji Hospital, Tokai University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Hachioji, Tokyo (Japan); Kakizawa, Hideaki [Hiroshima University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Institute and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Minami-Ku, Hiroshima (Japan); Hiroshima Red Cross Hospital and Atomic-bomb Survivors Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Naka-Ku, Hiroshima (Japan); Toyoda, Naoyuki [Hiroshima University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Institute and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Minami-Ku, Hiroshima (Japan); National Hospital Organisation Kure Medical Centre, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kure, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2014-05-15

    This study evaluated the efficacy of the combination of imprint cytology and histology in tissue-core percutaneous biopsy under real-time computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopic guidance. Between October 2009 and June 2013, 156 percutaneous needle biopsies were performed in our institution. Those obtained by tissue-core biopsy underwent both imprint cytological and histological examinations routinely after touch imprint cytology was performed on site to evaluate the samples' sufficiency for cytological and pathological examination. Final diagnosis was confirmed by independent surgical pathology, independent culture results or clinical follow-up. Rates of adequate specimens and precise diagnosis, by combined cytological and histological examination were 100 % (156/156) and 96.2 % (150/156), by cytology 94.4 % (152/156) and 83.3 % (130/156) and by histology 99.3 % (155/156) and 92.3 % (144/156). Precise diagnosis was achieved by combined examinations in 94.7 % (89/94) of thoracic lesions, 97.6 % (40/41) of musculoskeletal lesions, and 100 % (21/21) of abdominal, pelvic and retroperitoneal lesions. In all 104 lesions diagnosed as malignant by CT-guided biopsy and in 30 of 52 diagnosed as benign, specific cell types could be proved by combined examinations. Combined imprint cytology and histology performed after on-site touch imprint cytological evaluation improved the diagnostic ability of CT fluoroscopically guided biopsy. (orig.)

  6. A DNMT3A2-HDAC2 Complex Is Essential for Genomic Imprinting and Genome Integrity in Mouse Oocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengpeng Ma

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Maternal genomic imprints are established during oogenesis. Histone deacetylases (HDACs 1 and 2 are required for oocyte development in mouse, but their role in genomic imprinting is unknown. We find that Hdac1:Hdac2−/− double-mutant growing oocytes exhibit global DNA hypomethylation and fail to establish imprinting marks for Igf2r, Peg3, and Srnpn. Global hypomethylation correlates with increased retrotransposon expression and double-strand DNA breaks. Nuclear-associated DNMT3A2 is reduced in double-mutant oocytes, and injecting these oocytes with Hdac2 partially restores DNMT3A2 nuclear staining. DNMT3A2 co-immunoprecipitates with HDAC2 in mouse embryonic stem cells. Partial loss of nuclear DNMT3A2 and HDAC2 occurs in Sin3a−/− oocytes, which exhibit decreased DNA methylation of imprinting control regions for Igf2r and Srnpn, but not Peg3. These results suggest seminal roles of HDAC1/2 in establishing maternal genomic imprints and maintaining genomic integrity in oocytes mediated in part through a SIN3A complex that interacts with DNMT3A2.

  7. Imprinted X chromosome inactivation: evolution of mechanisms in distantly related mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Waters, Shafagh A.; Waters, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    In females, X chromosome inactivation (XCI) ensures transcriptional silencing of one of the two Xs (either in a random or imprinted fashion) in somatic cells. Comparing this silencing between species has offered insight into different mechanisms of X inactivation, providing clues into the evolution of this epigenetic process in mammals. Long-noncoding RNAs have emerged as a common theme in XCI of therian mammals (eutherian and marsupial). Eutherian X inactivation is regulated by the noncoding...

  8. Imprinting diseases and IVF: Danish National IVF cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Ojvind; Pinborg, Anja; Andersen, Anders Nyboe

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the frequency of imprinting diseases in children born after IVF with the incidence in naturally conceived children.......The aim of this study was to compare the frequency of imprinting diseases in children born after IVF with the incidence in naturally conceived children....

  9. Retrotransposon silencing by DNA methylation can drive mammalian genomic imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shunsuke; Ono, Ryuichi; Narita, Takanori; Pask, Andrew J; Shaw, Geoffrey; Wang, Changshan; Kohda, Takashi; Alsop, Amber E; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A; Kohara, Yuji; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Renfree, Marilyn B; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko

    2007-04-13

    Among mammals, only eutherians and marsupials are viviparous and have genomic imprinting that leads to parent-of-origin-specific differential gene expression. We used comparative analysis to investigate the origin of genomic imprinting in mammals. PEG10 (paternally expressed 10) is a retrotransposon-derived imprinted gene that has an essential role for the formation of the placenta of the mouse. Here, we show that an orthologue of PEG10 exists in another therian mammal, the marsupial tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii), but not in a prototherian mammal, the egg-laying platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus), suggesting its close relationship to the origin of placentation in therian mammals. We have discovered a hitherto missing link of the imprinting mechanism between eutherians and marsupials because tammar PEG10 is the first example of a differentially methylated region (DMR) associated with genomic imprinting in marsupials. Surprisingly, the marsupial DMR was strictly limited to the 5' region of PEG10, unlike the eutherian DMR, which covers the promoter regions of both PEG10 and the adjacent imprinted gene SGCE. These results not only demonstrate a common origin of the DMR-associated imprinting mechanism in therian mammals but provide the first demonstration that DMR-associated genomic imprinting in eutherians can originate from the repression of exogenous DNA sequences and/or retrotransposons by DNA methylation. PMID:17432937

  10. Retrotransposon silencing by DNA methylation can drive mammalian genomic imprinting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Suzuki

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Among mammals, only eutherians and marsupials are viviparous and have genomic imprinting that leads to parent-of-origin-specific differential gene expression. We used comparative analysis to investigate the origin of genomic imprinting in mammals. PEG10 (paternally expressed 10 is a retrotransposon-derived imprinted gene that has an essential role for the formation of the placenta of the mouse. Here, we show that an orthologue of PEG10 exists in another therian mammal, the marsupial tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii, but not in a prototherian mammal, the egg-laying platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus, suggesting its close relationship to the origin of placentation in therian mammals. We have discovered a hitherto missing link of the imprinting mechanism between eutherians and marsupials because tammar PEG10 is the first example of a differentially methylated region (DMR associated with genomic imprinting in marsupials. Surprisingly, the marsupial DMR was strictly limited to the 5' region of PEG10, unlike the eutherian DMR, which covers the promoter regions of both PEG10 and the adjacent imprinted gene SGCE. These results not only demonstrate a common origin of the DMR-associated imprinting mechanism in therian mammals but provide the first demonstration that DMR-associated genomic imprinting in eutherians can originate from the repression of exogenous DNA sequences and/or retrotransposons by DNA methylation.

  11. DNA replication: stalling a fork for imprinting and switching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egel, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Mating-type switching in fission yeast has long been known to be directed by a DNA 'imprint'. This imprint has now been firmly characterized as a protected site-specific and strand-specific nick. New work also links the widely conserved Swi1-Swi3 complex to the protection of stalled replication...

  12. AN EVALUATION OF AUDITORY LEARNING IN FILIAL IMPRINTING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOLHUIS, JJ; VANKAMPEN, HS

    1992-01-01

    The characteristics of auditory learning in filial imprinting in precocial birds are reviewed. Numerous studies have demonstrated that the addition of an auditory stimulus improves following of a visual stimulus. This paper evaluates whether there is genuine auditory imprinting, i.e. the formation o

  13. Theory of genomic imprinting conflict in social insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Queller David C

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic imprinting refers to the differential expression of genes inherited from the mother and father (matrigenes and patrigenes. The kinship theory of genomic imprinting treats parent-specific gene expression as products of within-genome conflict. Specifically, matrigenes and patrigenes will be in conflict over treatment of relatives to which they are differently related. Haplodiploid females have many such relatives, and social insects have many contexts in which they affect relatives, so haplodiploid social insects are prime candidates for tests of the kinship theory of imprinting. Results Matrigenic and patrigenic relatednesses are derived for individuals affected in a variety of contexts, including queen competition, sex ratio, worker laying of male eggs and policing, colony fission, and adoption of new queens. Numerous predictions emerge for what contexts should elicit imprinting, which individuals and tissues will show it, and the direction of imprinting effects. The predictions often vary for different genetic structures (varying queen and mate number and often contrast with predictions for diploids. Conclusion Because the contexts differ from the normal imprinting case, and because nothing is currently known about imprinting in social insects, these predictions can serve as a strong a priori test of the kinship theory of imprinting. If the predictions are correct, then social insects, which have long served as exemplars of cooperation between individuals, will also be shown to be extraordinary examples of competition within individual genomes.

  14. Polymorphisms of transporter associated with antigen presentation, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 and their implications for protection and susceptibility to severe forms of dengue fever in patients in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anira N Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: To date, a clear understanding of dengue disease pathogenesis remains elusive. Some infected individuals display no symptoms while others develop severe life-threatening forms of the disease. It is widely believed that host genetic factors influence dengue severity. Aims: This study evaluates the relationship between certain polymorphisms and dengue severity in Sri Lankan patients. Settings and Design: Polymorphism studies are carried out on genes for; transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP, promoter of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and promoter of interleukin-10 (IL-10. In other populations, TAP1 (333, TAP2 (379, TNF-α (−308, and IL-10 (−1082, −819, −592 have been associated with dengue and a number of different diseases. Data have not been collected previously for these polymorphisms for dengue patients in Sri Lanka. Materials and Methods: The polymorphisms were typed by amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction in 107 dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF patients together with 62 healthy controls. Statistical Analysis Used: Pearson′s Chi-square contingency table analysis with Yates′ correction. Results: Neither the TAP nor the IL-10 polymorphisms considered individually can define dengue disease outcome with regard to severity. However, the genotype combination, IL-10 (−592/−819/−1082 CCA/ATA was significantly associated with development of severe dengue in these patients, suggesting a risk factor to developing DHF. Also, identified is the genotype combination IL-10 (−592/−819/−1082 ATA/ATG which suggested a possibility for protection from DHF. The TNF-α (−308 GG genotype was also significantly associated with severe dengue, suggesting a significant risk factor. Conclusions: The results reported here are specific to the Sri Lankan population. Comparisons with previous reports imply that data may vary from population to population.

  15. NKT cells: their development, mechanisms and effects of action 

    OpenAIRE

    Agnieszka Bojarska-Junak; Jacek Tabarkiewicz; Jacek Roliński

    2013-01-01

    NKT cells are a heterogeneous subset of T lymphocytes that share surface markers and functional characteristics with both conventional T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Most NKT cells express a semi-invariant T cell receptor that reacts with glycolipid antigens presented by the CD1d molecule on the surface of antigen-presenting cells. NKT cells can modulate the immune response against infectious agents, autoantigens, tumors, tissue grafts and allergens. NKT cells mediate the activities ...

  16. Imprint of Galactic dynamics on Earth's climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    A connection between climate and the Solar system's motion perpendicular to the Galactic plane during the last 200 Myr years is studied. An imprint of galactic dynamics is found in a long-term record of the Earth's climate that is consistent with variations in the Solar system oscillation around...... the Galactic midplane. From small modulations in the oscillation frequency of Earth's climate the following features of the Galaxy along the Solar circle can be determined: 1) the mass distribution, 2) the timing of two spiral arm crossings (31 Myr and 142 Myr) 3) Spiral arm/interarm density ratio...

  17. Functional mapping imprinted quantitative trait loci underlying developmental characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Gengxin

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic imprinting, a phenomenon referring to nonequivalent expression of alleles depending on their parental origins, has been widely observed in nature. It has been shown recently that the epigenetic modification of an imprinted gene can be detected through a genetic mapping approach. Such an approach is developed based on traditional quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping focusing on single trait analysis. Recent studies have shown that most imprinted genes in mammals play an important role in controlling embryonic growth and post-natal development. For a developmental character such as growth, current approach is less efficient in dissecting the dynamic genetic effect of imprinted genes during individual ontology. Results Functional mapping has been emerging as a powerful framework for mapping quantitative trait loci underlying complex traits showing developmental characteristics. To understand the genetic architecture of dynamic imprinted traits, we propose a mapping strategy by integrating the functional mapping approach with genomic imprinting. We demonstrate the approach through mapping imprinted QTL controlling growth trajectories in an inbred F2 population. The statistical behavior of the approach is shown through simulation studies, in which the parameters can be estimated with reasonable precision under different simulation scenarios. The utility of the approach is illustrated through real data analysis in an F2 family derived from LG/J and SM/J mouse stains. Three maternally imprinted QTLs are identified as regulating the growth trajectory of mouse body weight. Conclusion The functional iQTL mapping approach developed here provides a quantitative and testable framework for assessing the interplay between imprinted genes and a developmental process, and will have important implications for elucidating the genetic architecture of imprinted traits.

  18. The Drosophila homolog of the mammalian imprint regulator, CTCF, maintains the maternal genomic imprint in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasheva Vanya

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CTCF is a versatile zinc finger DNA-binding protein that functions as a highly conserved epigenetic transcriptional regulator. CTCF is known to act as a chromosomal insulator, bind promoter regions, and facilitate long-range chromatin interactions. In mammals, CTCF is active in the regulatory regions of some genes that exhibit genomic imprinting, acting as insulator on only one parental allele to facilitate parent-specific expression. In Drosophila, CTCF acts as a chromatin insulator and is thought to be actively involved in the global organization of the genome. Results To determine whether CTCF regulates imprinting in Drosophila, we generated CTCF mutant alleles and assayed gene expression from the imprinted Dp(1;fLJ9 mini-X chromosome in the presence of reduced CTCF expression. We observed disruption of the maternal imprint when CTCF levels were reduced, but no effect was observed on the paternal imprint. The effect was restricted to maintenance of the imprint and was specific for the Dp(1;fLJ9 mini-X chromosome. Conclusions CTCF in Drosophila functions in maintaining parent-specific expression from an imprinted domain as it does in mammals. We propose that Drosophila CTCF maintains an insulator boundary on the maternal X chromosome, shielding genes from the imprint-induced silencing that occurs on the paternally inherited X chromosome. See commentary: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/104

  19. Determination of infiltrative ductal breast carcinoma differentiation grade in biopsy imprints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukašinović-Bokun Zorana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. In patients with breast carcinoma there are many risk factors for assessment of breast carcinoma maturity and prognosis. Besides histological type of differentiation, cytologic criteria for the evaluation grade of the differentiation of infiltrative ductal breast carcinomas are very important for prognosis. The aim of this study was to define cytologic criteria for grading of infiltrative ductal carcinomas of the breast. Methods. The imprints of intraoperative biopsies from 124 patients were studied. They were air-dried and stained by May-Grünwald Giemsa method. The features assessed were: the degree and type of cell clustering, nuclear diameter and pleomorphism, chromatin structure, number and features of nucleoli, the aspect of cytoplasm, noncellular background and the variability of cells and nuclei. According to these morphologic features the infiltrative ductal carcinomas of the breast could be classified into three grades of differentiation. Results. Cytologic and histologic differentation grade revealed disagreement among 34.6% of the imprints. In 9 of total 23 histologicaly well differentiated carcinomas, cytological differentation grade was moderately differentiated. In 63 carcinomas with histologic differentiation grade II, cytologic differentiation grade was good in 12 and poor in 16 carcinomas. Conclusion. Cytologic and histologic grading were not identical in 34.6% of the imprints what points out the need to further definition of diagnostic criteria, especially for grade II of differentiation.

  20. Econazole imprinted textiles with antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mirza Akram; Lalloz, Augustine; Benhaddou, Aicha; Pagniez, Fabrice; Raymond, Martine; Le Pape, Patrice; Simard, Pierre; Théberge, Karine; Leblond, Jeanne

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we propose pharmaceutical textiles imprinted with lipid microparticles of Econazole nitrate (ECN) as a mean to improve patient compliance while maintaining drug activity. Lipid microparticles were prepared and characterized by laser diffraction (3.5±0.1μm). Using an optimized screen-printing method, microparticles were deposited on textiles, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The drug content of textiles (97±3μg/cm(2)) was reproducible and stable up to 4months storage at 25°C/65% Relative Humidity. Imprinted textiles exhibited a thermosensitive behavior, as witnessed by a fusion temperature of 34.8°C, which enabled a larger drug release at 32°C (temperature of the skin) than at room temperature. In vitro antifungal activity of ECN textiles was compared to commercial 1% (wt/wt) ECN cream Pevaryl®. ECN textiles maintained their antifungal activity against a broad range of Candida species as well as major dermatophyte species. In vivo, ECN textiles also preserved the antifungal efficacy of ECN on cutaneous candidiasis infection in mice. Ex vivo percutaneous absorption studies demonstrated that ECN released from pharmaceutical textiles concentrated more in the upper skin layers, where the fungal infections develop, as compared to dermal absorption of Pevaryl®. Overall, these results showed that this technology is promising to develop pharmaceutical garments textiles for the treatment of superficial fungal infections. PMID:26883854

  1. Oct4/Sox2 binding sites contribute to maintaining hypomethylation of the maternal igf2/h19 imprinting control region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Zimmerman

    Full Text Available A central question in genomic imprinting is how parental-specific DNA methylation of imprinting control regions (ICR is established during gametogenesis and maintained after fertilization. At the imprinted Igf2/H19 locus, CTCF binding maintains the unmethylated state of the maternal ICR after the blastocyst stage. In addition, evidence from Beckwith-Wiedemann patients and cultured mouse cells suggests that two Sox-Oct binding motifs within the Igf2/H19 ICR also participate in maintaining hypomethylation of the maternal allele. We found that the Sox and octamer elements from both Sox-Oct motifs were required to drive hypomethylation of integrated transgenes in mouse embryonic carcinoma cells. Oct4 and Sox2 showed cooperative binding to the Sox-Oct motifs, and both were present at the endogenous ICR. Using a mouse with mutations in the Oct4 binding sites, we found that maternally transmitted mutant ICRs acquired partial methylation in somatic tissues, but there was little effect on imprinted expression of H19 and Igf2. A subset of mature oocytes also showed partial methylation of the mutant ICR, which suggested that the Sox-Oct motifs provide some protection from methylation during oogenesis. The Sox-Oct motifs, however, were not required for erasure of paternal methylation in primordial germ cells, which indicated that the oocyte methylation was acquired post-natally. Maternally inherited mutant ICRs were unmethylated in blastocysts, which suggested that at least a portion of the methylation in somatic tissues occurred after implantation. These findings provide evidence that Sox-Oct motifs contribute to ICR hypomethylation in post-implantation embryos and maturing oocytes and link imprinted DNA methylation with key stem cell/germline transcription factors.

  2. Preparation of molecularly imprinted polymers for heptachlor: An organochlorine pesticide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanchan Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Molecular Imprinting technology is a promising technique for creating recognition elements for selected compounds and has been successfully applied for synthesis of Environmental pollutants such as pesticides. Aim: Synthetic binding polymers were prepared by non-covalent imprinting technique using bulk polymerization method for heptachlor, which is an organochlorine pesticide. Materials and Methods: Three functional monomers and 2 cross-linkers were used for molecular imprinting. The molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs obtained were subsequently characterized in detail with rebinding investigation using batch rebinding. The results indicate that the imprinting was successfully done for heptachlor using methacrylic acid (MAA as functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EDMA as cross-linker. Results: The affinity order from rebinding results for the 3 polymers is heptachlor-co-MAA-co-EDMA > heptachlor-co-4-VP-co-DVB > heptachlor-co-Styrene-co-DVB. UV-visible spectrophotometric study for interaction of heptachlor with MAA in pre-polymerization mixture suggests the formation of H-bonding also contributing to the formation of good imprint. Conclusion: Molecular Imprinted polymers can be used as detection systems and as clean up materials for pesticides.

  3. Transcriptome-wide investigation of genomic imprinting in chicken

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frésard, Laure; Leroux, Sophie; Servin, Bertrand; Gourichon, David; Dehais, Patrice; Cristobal, Magali San; Marsaud, Nathalie; Vignoles, Florence; Bed'hom, Bertrand; Coville, Jean-Luc; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Beaumont, Catherine; Zerjal, Tatiana; Vignal, Alain; Morisson, Mireille; Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Pitel, Frédérique

    2014-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic mechanism by which alleles of some specific genes are expressed in a parent-of-origin manner. It has been observed in mammals and marsupials, but not in birds. Until now, only a few genes orthologous to mammalian imprinted ones have been analyzed in chicken and did not demonstrate any evidence of imprinting in this species. However, several published observations such as imprinted-like QTL in poultry or reciprocal effects keep the question open. Our main objective was thus to screen the entire chicken genome for parental-allele-specific differential expression on whole embryonic transcriptomes, using high-throughput sequencing. To identify the parental origin of each observed haplotype, two chicken experimental populations were used, as inbred and as genetically distant as possible. Two families were produced from two reciprocal crosses. Transcripts from 20 embryos were sequenced using NGS technology, producing ∼200 Gb of sequences. This allowed the detection of 79 potentially imprinted SNPs, through an analysis method that we validated by detecting imprinting from mouse data already published. However, out of 23 candidates tested by pyrosequencing, none could be confirmed. These results come together, without a priori, with previous statements and phylogenetic considerations assessing the absence of genomic imprinting in chicken. PMID:24452801

  4. The cell biology of T-dependent B cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Zeine, R

    1989-01-01

    The requirement that CD4+ helper T cells recognize antigen in association with class II Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) encoded molecules constrains T cells to activation through intercellular interaction. The cell biology of the interactions between CD4+ T cells and antigen-presenting cells...

  5. A framework for detecting and characterizing genetic background-dependent imprinting effects

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Jason B.; Cheverud, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Genomic imprinting, where the effects of alleles depend on their parent-of-origin, can be an important component of the genetic architecture of complex traits. Although there has been a rapidly increasing number of studies of genetic architecture that have examined imprinting effects, none have examined whether imprinting effects depend on genetic background. Such effects are critical for the evolution of genomic imprinting because they allow the imprinting state of a locus to evolve as a fun...

  6. Genomic imprinting of IGF2 in marsupials is methylation dependent

    OpenAIRE

    Imumorin Ikhide; VandeBerg John L; Gondolphi Christina M; Ferreri Gianni C; Obergfell Craig J; Carone Benjamin R; Lawton Betty R; O'Neill Rachel J; O'Neill Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background- Parent-specific methylation of specific CpG residues is critical to imprinting in eutherian mammals, but its importance to imprinting in marsupials and, thus, the evolutionary origins of the imprinting mechanism have been the subject of controversy. This has been particularly true for the imprinted Insulin-like Growth Factor II (IGF2), a key regulator of embryonic growth in vertebrates and a focal point of the selective forces leading to genomic imprinting. The presence o...

  7. Long Range Chiral Imprinting of Cu(110) by Tartaric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawton, T J; Pushkarev, V; Wei, D; Lucci, F R; Sholl, D S; Gellman, A J; Sykes, E C. H.

    2013-10-31

    Restructuring of metals by chiral molecules represents an important route to inducing and controlling enantioselective surface chemistry. Tartaric acid adsorption on Cu(110) has served as a useful system for understanding many aspects of chiral molecule adsorption and ordering on a metal surface, and a number of chiral and achiral unit cells have been reported. Herein, we show that given the appropriate annealing treatment, singly deprotonated tartaric acid monolayers can restructure the Cu metal itself, and that the resulting structure is both highly ordered and chiral. Molecular resolution scanning tunneling microscopy reveals that singly deprotonated tartaric acid extracts Cu atoms from the Cu(110) surface layer and incorporates them into highly ordered, chiral adatom arrays capped by a continuous molecular layer. Further evidence for surface restructuring comes from images of atom-deep trenches formed in the Cu(110) surface during the process. These trenches also run in low symmetry directions and are themselves chiral. Simulated scanning tunneling microscopy images are consistent with the appearance of the added atom rows and etched trenches. The chiral imprinting results in a long-range, highly ordered unit cell covering the whole surface as confirmed by low energy electron diffraction. Details of the restructuring mechanism were further investigated via time-lapse imaging at elevated temperature. This work reveals the stages of nanoscale surface restructuring and offers an interesting method for chiral modification of an achiral metal surface.

  8. Imprintable membranes from incomplete chiral coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhary, Mark J.; Gibaud, Thomas; Nadir Kaplan, C.; Barry, Edward; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Meyer, Robert B.; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2014-01-01

    Coalescence is an essential phenomenon that governs the equilibrium behaviour in a variety of systems from intercellular transport to planetary formation. In this report, we study coalescence pathways of circularly shaped two-dimensional colloidal membranes, which are one rod-length-thick liquid-like monolayers of aligned rods. The chirality of the constituent rods leads to three atypical coalescence pathways that are not found in other simple or complex fluids. In particular, we characterize two pathways that do not proceed to completion but instead produce partially joined membranes connected by line defects—π-wall defects or alternating arrays of twisted bridges and pores. We elucidate the structure and energetics of these defects and ascribe their stability to a geometrical frustration inherently present in chiral colloidal membranes. Furthermore, we induce the coalescence process with optical forces, leading to a robust on-demand method for imprinting networks of channels and pores into colloidal membranes.

  9. Imprinted spiral structures as neutron polarizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron diffraction from magnetic spiral structures is governed by strong selection rules for the polarization of the outgoing beam. When the sample is entirely of one chirality--for instance a right handed spiral--the neutrons diffracted by some Bragg reflections are fully polarized. While the scattering theory has been formulated long ago, attempts to controllably modify the population of left handed and right handed spiral domains in natural magnetic structures (which for instance occur in some rare earth metals) have been largely unsuccessful. In contrast, we have been able to imprint helical magnetic structures in La/Fe multilayers (each layer approximately 30 angstrom thick) simply by rotating the growing sample in a weak external field (30e). A first estimate is given of the efficiency of these multilayers as polarizers of neutron beams

  10. Human plasmacytoid dendritic cells: from molecules to intercellular communication network

    OpenAIRE

    Till Sebastian Manuel Mathan; Carl Gustav Figdor; Sonja Ingrid Buschow

    2013-01-01

    Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells (pDCs) are a specific subset of naturally occurring dendritic cells, that secrete large amounts of Type I interferon and play an important role in the immune response against viral infection. Several studies have highlighted that they are also effective antigen presenting cells (APCs), making them an interesting target for immunotherapy against cancer. However, the modes of action of pDCs are not restricted to antigen presentation and IFN secretion alone. In this ...

  11. Human Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells: From Molecules to Intercellular Communication Network

    OpenAIRE

    Mathan, Till S. M.; Figdor, Carl G.; Buschow, Sonja I.

    2013-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are a specific subset of naturally occurring dendritic cells, that secrete large amounts of Type I interferon and play an important role in the immune response against viral infection. Several studies have highlighted that they are also effective antigen presenting cells, making them an interesting target for immunotherapy against cancer. However, the modes of action of pDCs are not restricted to antigen presentation and IFN secretion alone. In this review ...

  12. The origin of the RB1 imprint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Kanber

    Full Text Available The human RB1 gene is imprinted due to a differentially methylated CpG island in intron 2. This CpG island is part of PPP1R26P1, a truncated retrocopy of PPP1R26, and serves as a promoter for an alternative RB1 transcript. We show here by in silico analyses that the parental PPP1R26 gene is present in the analysed members of Haplorrhini, which comprise Catarrhini (Old World Monkeys, Small apes, Great Apes and Human, Platyrrhini (New World Monkeys and tarsier, and Strepsirrhini (galago. Interestingly, we detected the retrocopy, PPP1R26P1, in all Anthropoidea (Catarrhini and Platyrrhini that we studied but not in tarsier or galago. Additional retrocopies are present in human and chimpanzee on chromosome 22, but their distinct composition indicates that they are the result of independent retrotransposition events. Chimpanzee and marmoset have further retrocopies on chromosome 8 and chromosome 4, respectively. To examine the origin of the RB1 imprint, we compared the methylation patterns of the parental PPP1R26 gene and its retrocopies in different primates (human, chimpanzee, orangutan, rhesus macaque, marmoset and galago. Methylation analysis by deep bisulfite sequencing showed that PPP1R26 is methylated whereas the retrocopy in RB1 intron 2 is differentially methylated in all primates studied. All other retrocopies are fully methylated, except for the additional retrocopy on marmoset chromosome 4, which is also differentially methylated. Using an informative SNP for the methylation analysis in marmoset, we could show that the differential methylation pattern of the retrocopy on chromosome 4 is allele-specific. We conclude that the epigenetic fate of a PPP1R26 retrocopy after integration depends on the DNA sequence and selective forces at the integration site.

  13. Dimensional characterization of biperiodic imprinted structures using optical scatterometry

    KAUST Repository

    Gereige, Issam

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we report on the characterization of biperiodic imprinted structures using a non-destructive optical technique commonly called scatterometry. The nanostructures consist of periodic arrays of square and circular dots which were imprinted in a thermoplastic polymer by thermal nanoimprint lithography. Optical measurements were performed using spectroscopic ellipsometry in the spectral region of 1.5-4 eV. The geometrical profiles of the imprinted structures were reconstructed using the Rigorous Coupled-Wave Analysis (RCWA) to model the diffraction phenomena by periodic gratings. The technique was also adapted for large scale evaluation of the imprint process. Uniqueness of the solution was examined by analyzing the diffraction of the structure at different experimental conditions, for instance at various angles of incidence. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Highly selective determination of methylmercury with methylmercury-imprinted polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yongwen [Department of Chemistry, Shanxi Datong University, Datong 037009 (China)]. E-mail: dtlyw@263.net; Zai Yunhui [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Chang Xijun [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Guo Yong [Department of Chemistry, Shanxi Datong University, Datong 037009 (China); Meng Shuangming [Department of Chemistry, Shanxi Datong University, Datong 037009 (China); Feng Feng [Department of Chemistry, Shanxi Datong University, Datong 037009 (China)

    2006-08-11

    Methylmercury-imprinted and non-imprinted polymers were prepared by formation monomer complex of methylmercury with (4-ethenylphenyl)-4-formate-6-phenyl-2,2'-bipyridine and thermally polymerizing with divinylbenzene (crosslinker) in the presence of 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile as initiator and subsequently leached with the acidic thiourea solution (1.0 mol L{sup -1} of thiourea and 4.0 mol L{sup -1} of HCl). In the same way, non-imprinted copolymers were prepared without methylmercury chloride added. The separation and preconcentration characteristics of the polymers for methylmercury were investigated by batch and column procedures. The results demonstrated that the methylmercury-imprinted polymers had higher adsorption capacity (170 {mu}mol g{sup -1} of dry microbeads) and good selectivity for methylmercury compared to non-imprinted polymers. The distribution ratio (D) values of the methylmercury-imprinted polymers increased for methylmercury with respect to both D values of Hg(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and non-imprinted polymers. The relatively selective factor ({alpha} {sub r}) values of CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +}/Hg(II), CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +}/Cu(II), CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +}/Zn(II), and CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +}/Cd(II) are 24.0, 46.7, 50.7, and 40.2, which are greater than 1. The methylmercury-imprinted polymers can be used at least twenty times with recoveries no less than 95%. Based on the packed columns with methylmercury-imprinted polymers, a highly selective solid-phase extraction (SPE) and preconcentration method for methylmercury was developed. The metal ion imprinted polymer solid-phase extraction (MIIP-SPE) preconcentration procedure showed a linear calibration curve within concentration range from 0.093 to 22 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The detection limit and quantification limit were 0.041 and 0.093 {mu}g L{sup -1} (3{sigma}) for cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). The relative standard deviation of the 10 replicate determinations was 3.5% for the

  15. Highly selective determination of methylmercury with methylmercury-imprinted polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methylmercury-imprinted and non-imprinted polymers were prepared by formation monomer complex of methylmercury with (4-ethenylphenyl)-4-formate-6-phenyl-2,2'-bipyridine and thermally polymerizing with divinylbenzene (crosslinker) in the presence of 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile as initiator and subsequently leached with the acidic thiourea solution (1.0 mol L-1 of thiourea and 4.0 mol L-1 of HCl). In the same way, non-imprinted copolymers were prepared without methylmercury chloride added. The separation and preconcentration characteristics of the polymers for methylmercury were investigated by batch and column procedures. The results demonstrated that the methylmercury-imprinted polymers had higher adsorption capacity (170 μmol g-1 of dry microbeads) and good selectivity for methylmercury compared to non-imprinted polymers. The distribution ratio (D) values of the methylmercury-imprinted polymers increased for methylmercury with respect to both D values of Hg(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and non-imprinted polymers. The relatively selective factor (α r) values of CH3Hg+/Hg(II), CH3Hg+/Cu(II), CH3Hg+/Zn(II), and CH3Hg+/Cd(II) are 24.0, 46.7, 50.7, and 40.2, which are greater than 1. The methylmercury-imprinted polymers can be used at least twenty times with recoveries no less than 95%. Based on the packed columns with methylmercury-imprinted polymers, a highly selective solid-phase extraction (SPE) and preconcentration method for methylmercury was developed. The metal ion imprinted polymer solid-phase extraction (MIIP-SPE) preconcentration procedure showed a linear calibration curve within concentration range from 0.093 to 22 μg L-1. The detection limit and quantification limit were 0.041 and 0.093 μg L-1 (3σ) for cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). The relative standard deviation of the 10 replicate determinations was 3.5% for the determination of methylmercury in human hair sample. Determination of methylmercury in certified human hair sample

  16. Preparation of hydrophilic molecularly imprinted polymers for tetracycline antibiotics recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Wang; Xiao Fang Fu; Jing Li; Jing Luo; Xiao Ya Zhao; Ming Jun Sun; Yin Zhu Shang; Cheng Ye

    2011-01-01

    Hydrophilic molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were prepared using tetracycline as template, methacrylic acid as monomer and glycidilmethacrylate as pro-hydrophilic co-monomer. Compared with common MIPs, the imprinting effect and adsorption amounts of hydrophilic MIPs for tetracycline (TC) were greatly improved in water media. Furthermore, the electrochemical sensor fabricated by modifying hydrophilic MIPs on glassy carbon electrode was developed for the determination of TC in foodstuff samples.

  17. Chitosan in Molecularly-Imprinted Polymers: Current and Future Prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Long Xu; Yun-An Huang; Qiu-Jin Zhu; Chun Ye

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan is widely used in molecular imprinting technology (MIT) as a functional monomer or supporting matrix because of its low cost and high contents of amino and hydroxyl functional groups. The various excellent properties of chitosan, which include nontoxicity, biodegradability, biocompatibility, and attractive physical and mechanical performances, make chitosan a promising alternative to conventional functional monomers. Recently, chitosan molecularly-imprinted polymers have gained consi...

  18. Full-field imprinting of sub-40 nm patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Jeongho; Kim, Hoyeon; Eynon, Ben

    2008-03-01

    Imprint lithography has been included on the ITRS Lithography Roadmap at the 32, 22 and 16 nm nodes. Step and Flash Imprint Lithography (S-FIL (R)) is a unique patterning method that has been designed from the beginning to enable precise overlay to enable multilevel device fabrication. A photocurable low viscosity resist is dispensed dropwise to match the pattern density requirements of the device, thus enabling patterning with a uniform residual layer thickness across a field and across multiple wafers. Further, S-FIL provides sub-50 nm feature resolution without the significant expense of multi-element projection optics or advanced illumination sources. However, since the technology is 1X, it is critical to address the infrastructure associated with the fabrication of imprint masks (templates). For sub-32 nm device manufacturing, one of the major technical challenges remains the fabrication of full-field 1x imprint masks with commercially viable write times. Recent progress in the writing of sub-40 nm patterns using commercial variable shape e-beam tools and non-chemically amplified resists has demonstrated a very promising route to realizing these objectives, and in doing so, has considerably strengthened imprint lithography as a competitive manufacturing technology for the sub-32nm node. Here we report the first imprinting results from sub-40 nm full-field patterns, using Samsung's current flash memory production device design. The fabrication of the imprint mask and the resulting critical dimension control and uniformity are discussed, along with image placement results. The imprinting results are described in terms of CD uniformity, etch results, and overlay.

  19. Development and characterisation of molecularly imprinted suspension polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    A controlled photo-polymerisation procedure for the synthesis of spherical molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) beads through the use of a suspension polymerisation methodology is described. As molecular imprinting moves towards commercialisation, the need to produce packing materials with good flow properties is critical. A comparative study of non-covalent MIPs synthesised by suspension and bulk polymerisation methods using 2-aminopyridine (2-apy) as a template and methacrylic acid (MA...

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of Molecularly Imprinted Polymers for Phenoxyacetic Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Canping Pan; Tiechun Chen; Fulin Zong; Tao Song; Huiting Zhang

    2008-01-01

    2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (2-MPA), 2-methyl-4-chlorophenxyacetic acid (MCPA) and 4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (4-CPA) were imprinted to investigate the cross-selectivities of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). The result indicates that 2-MPA, which is similar in shape, size and functionality with phenoxyacetic herbicides, are suitable to be used as a suitable template to prepare the MIPs for retaining phenoxyacetic herbicides. To study the ion-pair interactions between template molecules a...

  1. Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Based Sensor for the Detection of Theophylline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Guilherme S.; Paterno, Leonardo G.; Fonseca, Fernando J.; del Valle, Manel

    2011-11-01

    A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) impedance-based sensor was employed to detect theophylline in distilled water. To evaluate its sensibility, impedance measurements were carried out in a diluted solution of theophylline (1 mM) and distilled water using MIP and NIP (reference non-imprinted polymer) sensors. MIP showed higher sensitivity to theophylline than the NIP. This feature shows their suitability for developing an electronic tongue system for determination of methylxanthines.

  2. Separation of tryptophan enantiomers with molecularly imprinted polypyrrole electrode column

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this study,we have fabricated molecularly imprinted polypyrrole(PPy) packed electrode columns and investigated their effects on separation of tryptophan(Trp) enantiomers by using potential control.The results indicate that the imprinted PPy electrode columns could efficiently enhance the L-Trp uptake and separate Trp enantiomers effectively,implying the great potential for the enantioselective recognition of other amino acids enantiomers.

  3. Imprint cytology in the diagnosis of ovarian lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Sushma; Sathibhai Panicker

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ovarian neoplasms constitute a major bulk of surgical pathology specimens. Histopathology is the gold standard in diagnosis. Of the many options available for a rapid intra-operative diagnosis imprint cytology has many advantages. This study therefore aimed to study the imprint cytology of ovarian lesions and compare with the histopathology findings and analyze the statistical effectiveness of this study as a rapid intra-operative diagnostic tool. Methods: 200 lesions resected...

  4. Uniformity in Patterns Imprinted Using Photo-Curable Liquid Polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroshima, Hiroshi; Inoue, Seiji; Kasahara, Nobuyuki; Taniguchi, Jun; Miyamoto, Iwao; Komuro, Masanori

    2002-06-01

    Imprint lithography is a candidate for high-resolution, high-throughput lithography using low-cost equipment. In particular, imprinting using photo-induced solidification is very attractive because it eliminates heat-up, cool-down time and avoids thermal expansion problems inherent in conventional thermal imprinting. We demonstrate the replication of uniform 100 nm line and space (L/S) patterns over a 5 mm× 5 mm area at a time, a 60 nm L/S pattern and a 90-nm-wide line with an aspect ratio of 2 by imprinting using photo-induced solidification. We studied the removal of a base layer by O2 reactive ion etching (RIE) and determined the criteria for the base layer and imprinted patterns. Change in line width through O2 RIE is not affected by the base layer thickness but is affected by etching time. We found that granules generated in polymer during O2 RIE are slowly etched and the resulting long removal time of granules degrades the quality of imprinted patterns or prevents patterns from standing. It is necessary to achieve a base layer which is less than 100 nm thick or to change the O2 RIE conditions so that the polymer dose not granulate and/or use granulation-resistant polymers.

  5. Electropolymerized Molecularly Imprinted Polypyrrole Film for Sensing of Clofibric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Schweiger

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric quartz crystals and analogous gold substrates were electrochemically coated with molecularly imprinted polypyrrole films for pulsed amperometric detection (PAD of clofibric acid, a metabolite of clofibrate. Cyclic voltammetry data obtained during polymerization and deposited weight estimations revealed a decrease of the polymerization rate with increasing clofibric acid concentration. XPS measurements indicated that clofibric acid could be removed after imprinting with an aqueous ethanol solution, which was further optimized by using PAD. Zeta potential and contact angle measurements revealed differences between molecularly imprinted (MIP and non-imprinted polymer (NIP layers. Binding experiments with clofibric acid and other substances showed a pronounced selectivity of the MIP for clofibric acid vs. carbamazepine, but the response of MIP and NIP to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid was higher than that for clofibric acid. A smooth surface, revealed by AFM measurements, with roughness of 6–8 nm for imprinted and non-imprinted layers, might be a reason for an excessively low density of specific binding sites for clofibric acid. Furthermore, the decreased polymerization rate in the presence of clofibric acid might not result in well-defined polymer structures, which could be the reason for the lower sensitivity.

  6. Differentially methylated regions of imprinted genes in prenatal, perinatal and postnatal human tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan K Murphy

    Full Text Available Epigenetic plasticity in relation to in utero exposures may mechanistically explain observed differences in the likelihood of developing common complex diseases including hypertension, diabetes and cardiovascular disease through the cumulative effects of subtle alterations in gene expression. Imprinted genes are essential mediators of growth and development and are characterized by differentially methylated regulatory regions (DMRs that carry parental allele-specific methylation profiles. This theoretical 50% level of methylation provides a baseline from which endogenously- or exogenously-induced deviations in methylation can be detected. We quantified DNA methylation at imprinted gene DMRs in a large panel of human conceptal tissues, in matched buccal cell specimens collected at birth and at one year of age, and in the major cell fractions of umbilical cord blood to assess the stability of methylation at these regions. DNA methylation was measured using validated pyrosequencing assays at seven DMRs regulating the IGF2/H19, DLK1/MEG3, MEST, NNAT and SGCE/PEG10 imprinted domains. DMR methylation did not significantly differ for the H19, MEST and SGCE/PEG10 DMRs across all conceptal tissues analyzed (ANOVA p>0.10. Methylation differences at several DMRs were observed in tissues from brain (IGF2 and MEG3-IG DMRs, liver (IGF2 and MEG3 DMRs and placenta (both DLK1/MEG3 DMRs and NNAT DMR. In most infants, methylation profiles in buccal cells at birth and at one year of age were comparable, as was methylation in the major cell fractions of umbilical cord blood. Several infants showed temporal deviations in methylation at multiple DMRs. Similarity of inter-individual and intra-individual methylation at some, but not all of the DMRs analyzed supports the possibility that methylation of these regions can serve as useful biosensors of exposure.

  7. Magnetic Zn (II) ion-imprinted polymer prepared by the surface imprinting technique and its adsorption properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui-xin; Dou, Qian; Jin, Xiu-hong; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Ting-ru; Han, Xu; Wang, Dong-dong

    2015-01-01

    A novel magnetic Zn (II) ion-imprinted polymer was prepared by the surface ion-imprinted technique by using magnetic Fe3O4@SiO2 microspheres as supporter, methacrylic acid and salicylaldoxime as monomers, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the crosslinker. The products were characterized by Fourier transform infrared, X-ray photoelectron spectrometer, vibrating sample magnetometer and scanning electron microscope. The adsorption experiments showed that the imprinted polymer was employed successfully in comparison with non-imprinted polymer. When the temperature was in a range of 291-297 K, the maximum adsorption was about 52.69 mg g(-1) with an optimal pH 6.0 for an equilibrium time of 40 min. The imprinted polymer possessed high selectivity and specific recognition towards Zn (II). The Langmuir adsorption model was more favourable than the Freundlich or the Temkin adsorption model. Thermodynamic experiment showed that the adsorption was a spontaneous and endothermic process for Zn (II). The mechanism for Zn (II) adsorption on the imprinted polymer was investigated. PMID:25919981

  8. Distinguishing epigenetic marks of developmental and imprinting regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McEwen Kirsten R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The field of epigenetics is developing rapidly, however we are only beginning to comprehend the complexity of its influence on gene regulation. Using genomic imprinting as a model we examine epigenetic profiles associated with different forms of gene regulation. Imprinting refers to the expression of a gene from only one of the chromosome homologues in a parental-origin-specific manner. This is dependent on heritable germline epigenetic control at a cis-acting imprinting control region that influences local epigenetic states. Epigenetic modifications associated with imprinting regulation can be compared to those associated with the more canonical developmental regulation, important for processes such as differentiation and tissue specificity. Here we test the hypothesis that these two mechanisms are associated with different histone modification enrichment patterns. Results Using high-throughput data extraction with subsequent analysis, we have found that particular histone modifications are more likely to be associated with either imprinting repression or developmental repression of imprinted genes. H3K9me3 and H4K20me3 are together enriched at imprinted genes with differentially methylated promoters and do not show a correlation with developmental regulation. H3K27me3 and H3K4me3, however, are more often associated with developmental regulation. We find that imprinted genes are subject to developmental regulation through bivalency with H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 enrichment on the same allele. Furthermore, a specific tri-mark signature comprising H3K4me3, H3K9me3 and H4K20me3 has been identified at all imprinting control regions. Conclusion A large amount of data is produced from whole-genome expression and epigenetic profiling studies of cellular material. We have shown that such publicly available data can be mined and analysed in order to generate novel findings for categories of genes or regulatory elements. Comparing two

  9. Immobilization of Carbon Dots in Molecularly Imprinted Microgels for Optical Sensing of Glucose at Physiological pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Yi, Jinhui; Velado, David; Yu, Yanyan; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2015-07-29

    Nanosized carbon dots (CDs) are emerging as superior fluorophores for biosensing and a bioimaging agent with excellent photostability, chemical inertness, and marginal cytotoxicity. This paper reports a facile one-pot strategy to immobilize the biocompatible and fluorescent CDs (∼6 nm) into the glucose-imprinted poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-acrylamide-vinylphenylboronic acid) [poly(NIPAM-AAm-VPBA)] copolymer microgels for continuous optical glucose detection. The CDs designed with surface hydroxyl/carboxyl groups can form complexes with the AAm comonomers via hydrogen bonds and, thus, can be easily immobilized into the gel network during the polymerization reaction. The resultant glucose-imprinted hybrid microgels can reversibly swell and shrink in response to the variation of surrounding glucose concentration and correspondingly quench and recover the fluorescence signals of the embedded CDs, converting biochemical signals to optical signals. The highly imprinted hybrid microgels demonstrate much higher sensitivity and selectivity for glucose detection than the nonimprinted hybrid microgels over a clinically relevant range of 0-30 mM at physiological pH and benefited from the synergistic effects of the glucose molecular contour and the geometrical constraint of the binding sites dictated by the glucose imprinting process. The highly stable immobilization of CDs in the gel networks provides the hybrid microgels with excellent optical signal reproducibility after five repeated cycles of addition and dialysis removal of glucose in the bathing medium. In addition, the hybrid microgels show no effect on the cell viability in the tested concentration range of 25-100 μg/mL. The glucose-imprinted poly(NIPAM-AAm-VPBA)-CDs hybrid microgels demonstrate a great promise for a new glucose sensor that can continuously monitor glucose level change. PMID:26148139

  10. Non-coding RNAs and the acquisition of genomic imprinting in mammals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG YiJun; QU LiangHu

    2009-01-01

    Genomic imprinting, representing parent-specific expression of alleles at a locus, Is mainly evident in flowering plants and placental mammals. Most imprinted genes, including numerous non-coding RNAs, are located in clusters regulated by imprinting control regions (ICRs). The acquisition and evolution of genomic imprinting is among the most fundamental genetic questions. Discoveries about the transition of mammalian imprinted gene domains from their non-imprinted ancestors, especially recent studies undertaken on the most ancient mammalian clades - the marsupials and monotremes from which model species genomes have recently been sequenced, are of high value. By reviewing and analyzing these studies, a close connection between non-coding RNAs and the acquisition of genomic imprinting in mammals is demonstrated. The evidence comes from two observations accompanied with the ac-quisition of the imprinting: (i) many novel non-coding RNA genes emerged in imprinted regions; (ii) the expressions of some conserved non-coding RNAs have changed dramatically. Furthermore, a system-atical analysis of imprinted snoRNA (small nucleolar RNA) genes from 15 vertebrates suggests that the origination of imprinted snoRNAs occurred after the divergence between eutherians and marsupials, followed by a rapid expansion leading to the fixation of major gene families in the eutherian ancestor prior to the radiation of modern placental mammals. Involved in the regulation of imprinted silencing and mediating the ohromatins epigenetic modification may be the major roles that non-coding RNAs play during the acquisition of genomic imprinting in mammals.

  11. Bisphenol a exposure disrupts genomic imprinting in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Susiarjo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to endocrine disruptors is associated with developmental defects. One compound of concern, to which humans are widely exposed, is bisphenol A (BPA. In model organisms, BPA exposure is linked to metabolic disorders, infertility, cancer, and behavior anomalies. Recently, BPA exposure has been linked to DNA methylation changes, indicating that epigenetic mechanisms may be relevant. We investigated effects of exposure on genomic imprinting in the mouse as imprinted genes are regulated by differential DNA methylation and aberrant imprinting disrupts fetal, placental, and postnatal development. Through allele-specific and quantitative real-time PCR analysis, we demonstrated that maternal BPA exposure during late stages of oocyte development and early stages of embryonic development significantly disrupted imprinted gene expression in embryonic day (E 9.5 and 12.5 embryos and placentas. The affected genes included Snrpn, Ube3a, Igf2, Kcnq1ot1, Cdkn1c, and Ascl2; mutations and aberrant regulation of these genes are associated with imprinting disorders in humans. Furthermore, the majority of affected genes were expressed abnormally in the placenta. DNA methylation studies showed that BPA exposure significantly altered the methylation levels of differentially methylated regions (DMRs including the Snrpn imprinting control region (ICR and Igf2 DMR1. Moreover, exposure significantly reduced genome-wide methylation levels in the placenta, but not the embryo. Histological and immunohistochemical examinations revealed that these epigenetic defects were associated with abnormal placental development. In contrast to this early exposure paradigm, exposure outside of the epigenetic reprogramming window did not cause significant imprinting perturbations. Our data suggest that early exposure to common environmental compounds has the potential to disrupt fetal and postnatal health through epigenetic changes in the embryo and abnormal development of the

  12. Parental genome dosage imbalance deregulates imprinting in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline E Jullien

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In mammals and in plants, parental genome dosage imbalance deregulates embryo growth and might be involved in reproductive isolation between emerging new species. Increased dosage of maternal genomes represses growth while an increased dosage of paternal genomes has the opposite effect. These observations led to the discovery of imprinted genes, which are expressed by a single parental allele. It was further proposed in the frame of the parental conflict theory that parental genome imbalances are directly mirrored by antagonistic regulations of imprinted genes encoding maternal growth inhibitors and paternal growth enhancers. However these hypotheses were never tested directly. Here, we investigated the effect of parental genome imbalance on the expression of Arabidopsis imprinted genes FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT SEED2 (FIS2 and FLOWERING WAGENINGEN (FWA controlled by DNA methylation, and MEDEA (MEA and PHERES1 (PHE1 controlled by histone methylation. Genome dosage imbalance deregulated the expression of FIS2 and PHE1 in an antagonistic manner. In addition increased dosage of inactive alleles caused a loss of imprinting of FIS2 and MEA. Although FIS2 controls histone methylation, which represses MEA and PHE1 expression, the changes of PHE1 and MEA expression could not be fully accounted for by the corresponding fluctuations of FIS2 expression. Our results show that parental genome dosage imbalance deregulates imprinting using mechanisms, which are independent from known regulators of imprinting. The complexity of the network of regulations between expressed and silenced alleles of imprinted genes activated in response to parental dosage imbalance does not support simple models derived from the parental conflict hypothesis.

  13. Chemical microsensors with molecularly imprinted sensitive layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickert, Franz L.; Greibl, Wolfgang; Sikorski, Renatus; Tortschanoff, Matthias; Weber, K.; Bulst, W. E.; Fischerauer, G.

    1998-12-01

    The bottleneck in the development of chemical sensors is the design of the coatings for chemical recognition of the analyte. One pronounced method is to tailor supramolecular cavities for different analytes. Polyfunctional linkers or the embedding of these materials in a polymeric matrix can improve stability and response time of the sensor. An even more favorable method to synthesize chemically sensitive layers is realized by molecular imprinting, since a rigid polymer can be generated directly on the transducer of interest and may be included in its production process. The analyte of interest acts as a template during the polymerization process and is evaporated or extracted by suitable solvents. Due to the cavities formed this polymer enriches analyte molecules, which can be detected by mass- sensitive devices such as QMB or SAW resonators or by optical measurements. This procedure allows both the detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with fluorescence or mass sensitive devices. If the print PAHs are varied the polymers are tuned to the desired analyte. The enrichment of solvent vapors or other uncolored specimen by the layer can also be followed by the embedding of carbenium ions used as optical labels.

  14. Isotopic imprints of mountaintop mining contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengosh, Avner; Lindberg, T Ty; Merola, Brittany R; Ruhl, Laura; Warner, Nathaniel R; White, Alissa; Dwyer, Gary S; Di Giulio, Richard T

    2013-09-01

    Mountaintop mining (MTM) is the primary procedure for surface coal exploration within the central Appalachian region of the eastern United States, and it is known to contaminate streams in local watersheds. In this study, we measured the chemical and isotopic compositions of water samples from MTM-impacted tributaries and streams in the Mud River watershed in West Virginia. We systematically document the isotopic compositions of three major constituents: sulfur isotopes in sulfate (δ(34)SSO4), carbon isotopes in dissolved inorganic carbon (δ(13)CDIC), and strontium isotopes ((87)Sr/(86)Sr). The data show that δ(34)SSO4, δ(13)CDIC, Sr/Ca, and (87)Sr/(86)Sr measured in saline- and selenium-rich MTM impacted tributaries are distinguishable from those of the surface water upstream of mining impacts. These tracers can therefore be used to delineate and quantify the impact of MTM in watersheds. High Sr/Ca and low (87)Sr/(86)Sr characterize tributaries that originated from active MTM areas, while tributaries from reclaimed MTM areas had low Sr/Ca and high (87)Sr/(86)Sr. Leaching experiments of rocks from the watershed show that pyrite oxidation and carbonate dissolution control the solute chemistry with distinct (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios characterizing different rock sources. We propose that MTM operations that access the deeper Kanawha Formation generate residual mined rocks in valley fills from which effluents with distinctive (87)Sr/(86)Sr and Sr/Ca imprints affect the quality of the Appalachian watersheds. PMID:23909446

  15. The "silent" imprint of musical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Carina; Liem, Franziskus; Hänggi, Jürgen; Elmer, Stefan; Jäncke, Lutz

    2016-02-01

    Playing a musical instrument at a professional level is a complex multimodal task requiring information integration between different brain regions supporting auditory, somatosensory, motor, and cognitive functions. These kinds of task-specific activations are known to have a profound influence on both the functional and structural architecture of the human brain. However, until now, it is widely unknown whether this specific imprint of musical practice can still be detected during rest when no musical instrument is used. Therefore, we applied high-density electroencephalography and evaluated whole-brain functional connectivity as well as small-world topologies (i.e., node degree) during resting state in a sample of 15 professional musicians and 15 nonmusicians. As expected, musicians demonstrate increased intra- and interhemispheric functional connectivity between those brain regions that are typically involved in music perception and production, such as the auditory, the sensorimotor, and prefrontal cortex as well as Broca's area. In addition, mean connectivity within this specific network was positively related to musical skill and the total number of training hours. Thus, we conclude that musical training distinctively shapes intrinsic functional network characteristics in such a manner that its signature can still be detected during a task-free condition. Hum Brain Mapp 37:536-546, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26538421

  16. Highly Selective Fluorescent Sensing of Proteins Based on a Fluorescent Molecularly Imprinted Nanosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A fluorescent molecularly imprinted nanosensor was obtained by grafting imprinted polymer onto the surface of multi-wall carbon nanotubes and post-imprinting treatment with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC. The fluorescence of lysozyme-imprinted polymer (Lys-MIP was quenched more strongly by Lys than that of nonimprinted polymer (NIP, which indicated that the Lys-MIP could recognize Lys. The resulted imprinted material has the ability to selectively sense a target protein, and an imprinting factor of 3.34 was achieved. The Lys-MIP also showed selective detection for Lys among other proteins such as cytochrome C (Cyt C, hemoglobin (HB and bovine serum albumin (BSA due to the imprinted sites in the Lys-MIP. This approach combines the high selectivity of surface molecular imprinting technology and fluorescence, and converts binding events into detectable signals by monitoring fluorescence spectra. Therefore, it will have further applications for Lys sensing.

  17. Causes and Consequences of Multi-Locus Imprinting Disturbances in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Delgado, Marta; Riccio, Andrea; Eggermann, Thomas; Maher, Eamonn R; Lapunzina, Pablo; Mackay, Deborah; Monk, David

    2016-07-01

    Eight syndromes are associated with the loss of methylation at specific imprinted loci. There has been increasing evidence that these methylation defects in patients are not isolated events occurring at a given disease-associated locus but that some of these patients may have multi-locus imprinting disturbances (MLID) affecting additional imprinted regions. With the recent advances in technology, methylation profiling has revealed that imprinted loci represent only a small fraction of the methylation differences observed between the gametes. To figure out how imprinting anomalies occur at multiple imprinted domains, we have to understand the interplay between DNA methylation and histone modifications in the process of selective imprint protection during pre-implantation reprogramming, which, if disrupted, leads to these complex imprinting disorders (IDs). PMID:27235113

  18. Electrosynthesis of molecularly imprinted polypyrrole for the antibiotic levofloxacin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzotta, Elisabetta, E-mail: elisabetta.mazzotta@unisalento.it [Laboratorio di Chimica Analitica, Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita del Salento, via Monteroni 73100 Lecce (Italy); Malitesta, Cosimino [Laboratorio di Chimica Analitica, Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita del Salento, via Monteroni 73100 Lecce (Italy); Diaz-Alvarez, Myriam; Martin-Esteban, Antonio [Departamento de Medio Ambiente, INIA, Carretera de A Coruna km 7.5, 28240 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-01-01

    The development of an electrosynthesized imprinted polypyrrole (PPY) film onto a platinum sheet as sorbent phase for a fluoroquinolone antibiotic (levofloxacin) is described. Experimental conditions for the electropolymerization of PPY in the presence of the template were optimized. The molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) film was characterized by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) to verify the template entrapment in the polymeric matrix. After being subject to washing procedures, MIP was analyzed by XPS and a very satisfactory template removal was estimated being equal to 83%. The effectiveness of washing protocol was assessed also by UV-vis and High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) analysis of corresponding washing solutions. Rebinding experiments were performed by exposing the imprinted PPY film to levofloxacin solutions, subsequently analyzed by HPLC. The effect of solvent and time of exposure was investigated. The imprinting effect was verified by comparing recognition abilities of both MIP and not imprinted polymer (a polymer prepared in the same conditions but in the absence of the template).

  19. Scalemic and racemic imprinting with a chiral crosslinker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Britney; Meador, Danielle S; Spivak, David A

    2015-08-26

    The development of molecularly imprinted chiral stationary phases has traditionally been limited by the need for a chiral pure template. Paradoxically, availability of a chiral pure template largely defeats the purpose of developing a chiral stationary phase. To solve this paradox, imprinting of scalemic and racemic template mixtures was investigated using both chiral (N-α-bismethacryloyl-L-alanine) and achiral (N,O-bisacrylamide ethanolamine) crosslinkers. Imprinting of scalemic mixtures provided polymers capable of partial separation of Boc-tyrosine enantiomers with virtually the same results when using either the chiral or achiral crosslinker. However, the chiral crosslinker was required for chiral differentiation by the racemic imprinted polymers which were evaluated in both batch rebinding and chromatographic modes. Batch rebinding analysis revealed intersecting binding isotherms for the L- and D-Boc-tyrosine, indicating bias for the D or L enantiomer is concentration dependent. Partial chromatographic separation was achieved by the racemic imprinted polymers providing variable D or L bias in equal probability over multiple replicates of polymer synthesis. Correlation of enantiomer bias with the batch rebinding results and optimization of HPLC parameters are discussed. PMID:26347178

  20. Molecularly Imprinted Polypyrrole Based Impedimentric Sensor for Theophylline Determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Sensor based on polypyrrole imprinted by theophylline (MIP) deposited on oxygen terminated boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond was developed. • This structure was applied as impedimetric sensor sensitive for theophylline. • Optimal polymer formation conditions suitable for MIP formation were elaborated. • Some analytical parameters were determined and evaluated. - Abstract: In this study development of impedimetric sensor based on oxygen terminated boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (B:NCD:O) modified with theophylline imprinted polypyrrole is described. Hydrogen peroxide induced chemical formation of polypyrrole molecularly imprinted by theophylline was applied for the modification of conducting silicon substrate covered by B:NCD:O film. Non-imprinted polypyrrole layer was formed on similar substrate in order to prove efficiency of imprinted polypyrrole. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was applied for the evaluation of analyte-induced changes in electrochemical capacitance/resistance. The impact of polymerization duration on the capacitance of impedimetric sensor was estimated. A different impedance behavior was observed at different ratio of polymerized monomer and template molecule in the polymerization media. The influence of ethanol as additive to polymerization media on registered changes in capacitance/resistance was evaluated. Degradation of sensor stored in buffer solution was evaluated

  1. Bio-Mimetic Sensors Based on Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catia Algieri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An important challenge for scientific research is the production of artificial systems able to mimic the recognition mechanisms occurring at the molecular level in living systems. A valid contribution in this direction resulted from the development of molecular imprinting. By means of this technology, selective molecular recognition sites are introduced in a polymer, thus conferring it bio-mimetic properties. The potential applications of these systems include affinity separations, medical diagnostics, drug delivery, catalysis, etc. Recently, bio-sensing systems using molecularly imprinted membranes, a special form of imprinted polymers, have received the attention of scientists in various fields. In these systems imprinted membranes are used as bio-mimetic recognition elements which are integrated with a transducer component. The direct and rapid determination of an interaction between the recognition element and the target analyte (template was an encouraging factor for the development of such systems as alternatives to traditional bio-assay methods. Due to their high stability, sensitivity and specificity, bio-mimetic sensors-based membranes are used for environmental, food, and clinical uses. This review deals with the development of molecularly imprinted polymers and their different preparation methods. Referring to the last decades, the application of these membranes as bio-mimetic sensor devices will be also reported.

  2. Aberrant epigenetic reprogramming of imprinted microRNA-127 and Rtl1 in cloned mouse embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microRNA (miRNA) genes mir-127 and mir-136 are located near two CpG islands in the imprinted mouse retrotransposon-like gene Rtl1, a key gene involved in placenta formation. These miRNAs appear to be involved in regulating the imprinting of Rtl1. To obtain insights into the epigenetic reprogramming of cloned embryos, we compared the expression levels of mir-127 and mir-136 in fertilized mouse embryos, parthenotes, androgenotes and cloned embryos developing in vitro. We also examined the DNA methylation status of the promoter regions of Rtl1 and mir-127 in these embryos. Our data showed that mir-127 and mir-136 were highly expressed in parthenotes, but rarely expressed in androgenotes. Interestingly, the expression levels of mir-127 and mir-136 in parthenotes were almost twice that seen in the fertilized embryos, but were much lower in the cloned embryos. The Rtl1 promoter region was hyper-methylated in blastocyst stage parthenotes (75.0%), moderately methylated (32.4%) in the fertilized embryos and methylated to a much lower extent (∼10%) in the cloned embryos. Conversely, the promoter region of mir-127 was hypo-methylated in parthenogenetically activated embryos (0.4%), moderately methylated (30.0%) in fertilized embryos and heavily methylated in cloned blastocysts (63-70%). These data support a role for mir-127 and mir-136 in the epigenetic reprogramming of the Rtl1 imprinting process. Analysis of the aberrant epigenetic reprogramming of mir-127 and Rtl1 in cloned embryos may help to explain the nuclear reprogramming procedures that occur in donor cells following somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT).

  3. Dynamic changes in paternal X-chromosome activity during imprinted X-chromosome inactivation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrat, Catherine; Okamoto, Ikuhiro; Diabangouaya, Patricia; Vialon, Vivian; Le Baccon, Patricia; Chow, Jennifer; Heard, Edith

    2009-03-31

    In mammals, X-chromosome dosage compensation is achieved by inactivating one of the two X chromosomes in females. In mice, X inactivation is initially imprinted, with inactivation of the paternal X (Xp) chromosome occurring during preimplantation development. One theory is that the Xp is preinactivated in female embryos, because of its previous silence during meiosis in the male germ line. The extent to which the Xp is active after fertilization and the exact time of onset of X-linked gene silencing have been the subject of debate. We performed a systematic, single-cell transcriptional analysis to examine the activity of the Xp chromosome for a panel of X-linked genes throughout early preimplantation development in the mouse. Rather than being preinactivated, we found the Xp to be fully active at the time of zygotic gene activation, with silencing beginning from the 4-cell stage onward. X-inactivation patterns were, however, surprisingly diverse between genes. Some loci showed early onset (4-8-cell stage) of X inactivation, and some showed extremely late onset (postblastocyst stage), whereas others were never fully inactivated. Thus, we show that silencing of some X-chromosomal regions occurs outside of the usual time window and that escape from X inactivation can be highly lineage specific. These results reveal that imprinted X inactivation in mice is far less concerted than previously thought and highlight the epigenetic diversity underlying the dosage compensation process during early mammalian development. PMID:19273861

  4. SINGLE AND DOUBLE IMPRINTED POLYMER FOR SELECTIVE RECOGNITION OF Cd(II) IONS IN AQUEOUS MEDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Ebru Birlik ÖZKÜTÜK; Elif ÖZALP; Gülgün İŞLER

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we have reported the synthesis of a new single and double-imprinted polymeric material for the separation of Cd(II) ions in aqueous solutions. Chitosan has choosen as the Cd(II) metal complexing big polymer for single and double imprinted polymers. In the synthesis of single imprinted polymer, Cd(II)-complexed chitosan has crosslinked by epichlorohydrin. In the synthesis of double imprinted polymer, Cd(II)-complexed chitosan was reacted with 3-mercaptopropyl-trimethoxysilane. ...

  5. Galactosylated LDL nanoparticles: a novel targeting delivery system to deliver antigen to macrophages and enhance antigen specific T cell responses

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Fang; Wuensch, Sherry A.; Azadniv, Mitra; Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R.; Crispe, I. Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    We aim to define the role of Kupffer cells in intrahepatic antigen presentation, using the selective delivery of antigen to Kupffer cells rather than other populations of liver antigen-presenting cells. To achieve this we developed a novel antigen delivery system that can target antigens to macrophages, based on a galactosylated low-density lipoprotein nano-scale platform. Antigen was delivered via the galactose particle receptor (GPr), internalized, degraded and presented to T cells. The con...

  6. Immunohistochemical analysis of Langerhans cells in chronic gingivitis using anti-CD1a antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Shweta Jaitley; Sriram Gopu; Rajasekharan, Saraswathi T; Balasundaram Sivapathasundaram

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Langerhans cells (LCs) are dendritic cells (DCs) which belong to the group of antigen presenting cells (APCs). Their function is to recognize the antigen, capture it, and present it to the T lymphocytes; thus initiating an early immune response. The antigen presenting functional LCs may play an important part in initiation and development of gingivitis. The aim of this study was to analyze the density, intraepithelial distribution, and morphology of LCs in gingival epithelium ...

  7. An imprinted signature helps isolate ESC-equivalent iPSCs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emesto Lujan; Marius Wernig

    2010-01-01

    @@ Since the demonstration of direct reprogramming of differentiated cells such as fibroblasts, to a malleable, pluri-potent state by defined transcription fac-tors great effort has been given to isolate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) with the same developmental potential as embryonic stem cells (ESCs) derived from blastocysts. Various selection and morphological criteria have led to the isolation of iPSCs with differential pluripotent capacity, but without the addition of small molecules very few lines have been able to undergo the most stringent pluripotent test - generate vi-able "all iPS cell mice" by tetraploid complementation. In a recent elegant study, Stadtfeld and colleagues have proposed that silencing of the imprinted Dlkl-Dio3 gene cluster is responsible for this variability of pluripotency po-tential in iPSCs, and the key to isolating ESC equivalent iPSCs [1].

  8. [Spectroscopic study of diazepam molecularly imprinted polymers and initiative application to conductimetric sensor based on molecularly imprinted films].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-fang; Li, Feng; Yao, Bing; Wang, Li; Liu, Guo-yan; Chai, Chun-yan

    2010-08-01

    The molecularly imprinted polymers were synthesized using diazepam as the template and molecularly imprinted films (MIF) prepared on screen printed electrodes (SPE). The binding mechanism and recognition characteristics of the molecularly imprinted polymers were studied by ultraviolet (UV) spectra and infrared (IR) spectra. In addition, a conductimetric sensor for diazepam was established preliminarily based on diazepam MIF modified SPE. The results of UV spectra indicated that template molecules and functional monomers had formed 1:2 hydrogen bonding complexes; the results of IR spectra showed that there were some functional groups in the molecularly imprinted polymers which could interact with the template molecules. The molecularly imprinted polymers manifested highly recognition to diazepam. The response of the conductimetric sensor to the concentration of diazepam displayed a linear correlation over a range of 0.04 to 0.62 mg x L(-1) with a detection limit of 0.008 mg x L(-1). The sensor is suitable for on-the-spot detection of diazepam. PMID:20939345

  9. THE MEANING OF GENOMIC IMPRINTING IN HUMAN GENETIC AND DEFECTOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastas LAKOSKI

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Several genetic phenomena do not appear to conform the Mendel's low in the sense that they are not inherited in simple way through the generations. Such exceptions to Mendel's laws include new mutations, changes in chromosomes, expanded triplet sequences, and genomic imprinting. Many genetic diseases involve spontaneous mutations that are not inherited from generation to generation. Changes in chromosomes include nondisjunction, which is the most important cause of mental retardation, the trisomy of Dowen syndrome. Expanded triplet repeats are responsible for the next important cause of mental retardation, fragile X, and for Huntington's disease. Genomic imprinting occurs when the expression of a gene depends on whether it is inherited from the mother or from the father. In this paper the phenomenon of genomic imprinting is explained on the occurrence of Angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes. It's essential for the counselor to be able during the genetic counseling to recognize this phenomenon and to make a proper decision.

  10. Modular Polymer Biosensors by Solvent Immersion Imprint Lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Jayven S.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Grate, Jay W.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Gratton, Enrico; Vasdekis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated Solvent Immersion Imprint Lithography (SIIL), a rapid benchtop microsystem prototyping technique, including polymer functionalization, imprinting and bonding. Here, we focus on the realization of planar polymer sensors using SIIL through simple solvent immersion without imprinting. We describe SIIL’s impregnation characteristics, including an inherent mechanism that not only achieves practical doping concentrations, but their unexpected 4-fold enhancement compared to the immersion solution. Subsequently, we developed and characterized optical sensors for detecting molecular O2. To this end, a high dynamic range is reported, including its control through the immersion duration, a manifestation of SIIL’s modularity. Overall, SIIL exhibits the potential of improving the operating characteristics of polymer sensors, while significantly accelerating their prototyping, as it requires a few seconds of processing and no need for substrates or dedicated instrumentation. These are critical for O2 sensing as probed by way of example here, as well as any polymer permeable reactant.

  11. CTLA-4 blockade during dendritic cell based booster vaccination influences dendritic cell survival and CTL expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders E; Ronchese, Franca

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells and critical for the priming of CD8+ T cells. Therefore the use of these cells as adjuvant cells has been tested in a large number of experimental and clinical vaccination studies, in particular cancer vaccine studies. A number of protocols...

  12. 32 nm imprint masks using variable shape beam pattern generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selinidis, Kosta; Thompson, Ecron; Schmid, Gerard; Stacey, Nick; Perez, Joseph; Maltabes, John; Resnick, Douglas J.; Yeo, Jeongho; Kim, Hoyeon; Eynon, Ben

    2008-05-01

    Imprint lithography has been included on the ITRS Lithography Roadmap at the 32, 22 and 16 nm nodes. Step and Flash Imprint Lithography (S-FIL ®) is a unique method that has been designed from the beginning to enable precise overlay for creating multilevel devices. A photocurable low viscosity monomer is dispensed dropwise to meet the pattern density requirements of the device, thus enabling imprint patterning with a uniform residual layer across a field and across entire wafers. Further, S-FIL provides sub-100 nm feature resolution without the significant expense of multi-element, high quality projection optics or advanced illumination sources. However, since the technology is 1X, it is critical to address the infrastructure associated with the fabrication of templates. For sub-32 nm device manufacturing, one of the major technical challenges remains the fabrication of full-field 1x templates with commercially viable write times. Recent progress in the writing of sub-40 nm patterns using commercial variable shape e-beam tools and non-chemically amplified resists has demonstrated a very promising route to realizing these objectives, and in doing so, has considerably strengthened imprint lithography as a competitive manufacturing technology for the sub 32nm node. Here we report the first imprinting results from sub-40 nm full-field patterns, using Samsung's current flash memory production device design. The fabrication of the template is discussed and the resulting critical dimension control and uniformity are discussed, along with image placement results. The imprinting results are described in terms of CD uniformity, etch results, and overlay.

  13. Removal of iron by chelation with molecularly imprinted supermacroporous cryogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çimen, Duygu; Göktürk, Ilgım; Yılmaz, Fatma

    2016-06-01

    Iron chelation therapy can be used for the selective removal of Fe(3+) ions from spiked human plasma by ion imprinting. N-Methacryloyl-(L)-glutamic acid (MAGA) was chosen as the chelating monomer. In the first step, MAGA was complexed with the Fe(3+) ions to prepare the precomplex, and then the ion-imprinted poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-N-methacryloyl-(L)-glutamic acid) [PHEMAGA-Fe(3+)] cryogel column was prepared by cryo-polymerization under a semi-frozen temperature of - 12°C for 24 h. Subsequently, the template, of Fe(3+) ions was removed from the matrix by using 0.1 M EDTA solution. The values for the specific surface area of the imprinted PHEMAGA-Fe(3+) and non-imprinted PHEMAGA cryogel were 45.74 and 7.52 m(2)/g respectively, with a pore size in the range of 50-200 μm in diameter. The maximum Fe(3+) adsorption capacity was 19.8 μmol Fe(3+)/g cryogel from aqueous solutions and 12.28 μmol Fe(3+)/g cryogel from spiked human plasma. The relative selectivity coefficients of ion-imprinted cryogel for Fe(3+)/Ni(2+) and Fe(3+)/Cd(2+) were 1.6 and 4.2-fold greater than the non-imprinted matrix, respectively. It means that the PHEMAGA-Fe(3+) cryogel possesses high selectivity to Fe(3+) ions, and could be used many times without significantly decreasing the adsorption capacity. PMID:25727711

  14. Prader-Willi Syndrome: Obesity due to Genomic Imprinting

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Merlin G.

    2011-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder due to errors in genomic imprinting with loss of imprinted genes that are paternally expressed from the chromosome 15q11-q13 region. Approximately 70% of individuals with PWS have a de novo deletion of the paternally derived 15q11-q13 region in which there are two subtypes (i.e., larger Type I or smaller Type II), maternal disomy 15 (both 15s from the mother) in about 25% of cases, and the remaining subjects have either defe...

  15. Advancements of molecularly imprinted polymers in the food safety field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peilong; Sun, Xiaohua; Su, Xiaoou; Wang, Tie

    2016-06-01

    Molecularly imprinted technology (MIT) has been widely employed to produce stable, robust and cheap molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) materials that possess selective binding sites for recognition of target analytes in food, such as pesticides, veterinary drugs, mycotoxins, illegal drugs and so on. Because of high selectivity and specificity, MIPs have drawn great attention in the food safety field. In this review, the recent developments of MIPs in various applications for food safety, including sample preparation, chromatographic separation, sensing, immunoassay etc., have been summarized. We particularly discuss the advancements and limitations in these applications, as well as attempts carried out for their improvement. PMID:26937495

  16. Synthesis and Characterization of Molecularly Imprinted Polymers for Phenoxyacetic Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canping Pan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available 2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (2-MPA, 2-methyl-4-chlorophenxyacetic acid (MCPA and 4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (4-CPA were imprinted to investigate the cross-selectivities of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs. The result indicates that 2-MPA, which is similar in shape, size and functionality with phenoxyacetic herbicides, are suitable to be used as a suitable template to prepare the MIPs for retaining phenoxyacetic herbicides. To study the ion-pair interactions between template molecules and functional monomer 4-vinylpiridine (4-VP, computational molecular modeling was employed. The data indicate that the cross-selectivities of MIPs for phenoxyacetic acid herbicides depend on the binding energies of complexes.

  17. Silver front electrode grids for ITO-free all printed polymer solar cells with embedded and raised topographies, prepared by thermal imprint, flexographic and inkjet roll-to-roll processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Jong-Su; Kim, Inyoung; Kim, Jung-Su;

    2012-01-01

    Semitransparent front electrodes for polymer solar cells, that are printable and roll-to-roll processable under ambient conditions using different approaches, are explored in this report. The excellent smoothness of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) electrodes has traditionally been believed to be difficult...... the fastest processing and the lowest silver use, whereas the embedded grid presents the maximally achievable optical transparency and conductivity. Polymer solar cells were prepared in the same step, using roll-to-roll slot-die coating of zinc oxide as the electron transport layer, poly-3-hexylthiophene...

  18. ATRX Plays a Key Role in Maintaining Silencing at Interstitial Heterochromatic Loci and Imprinted Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voon, Hsiao P J; Hughes, Jim R; Rode, Christina; De La Rosa-Velázquez, Inti A; Jenuwein, Thomas; Feil, Robert; Higgs, Douglas R; Gibbons, Richard J

    2015-04-21

    Histone H3.3 is a replication-independent histone variant, which replaces histones that are turned over throughout the entire cell cycle. H3.3 deposition at euchromatin is dependent on HIRA, whereas ATRX/Daxx deposits H3.3 at pericentric heterochromatin and telomeres. The role of H3.3 at heterochromatic regions is unknown, but mutations in the ATRX/Daxx/H3.3 pathway are linked to aberrant telomere lengthening in certain cancers. In this study, we show that ATRX-dependent deposition of H3.3 is not limited to pericentric heterochromatin and telomeres but also occurs at heterochromatic sites throughout the genome. Notably, ATRX/H3.3 specifically localizes to silenced imprinted alleles in mouse ESCs. ATRX KO cells failed to deposit H3.3 at these sites, leading to loss of the H3K9me3 heterochromatin modification, loss of repression, and aberrant allelic expression. We propose a model whereby ATRX-dependent deposition of H3.3 into heterochromatin is normally required to maintain the memory of silencing at imprinted loci. PMID:25865896

  19. ATRX Plays a Key Role in Maintaining Silencing at Interstitial Heterochromatic Loci and Imprinted Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao P.J. Voon

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Histone H3.3 is a replication-independent histone variant, which replaces histones that are turned over throughout the entire cell cycle. H3.3 deposition at euchromatin is dependent on HIRA, whereas ATRX/Daxx deposits H3.3 at pericentric heterochromatin and telomeres. The role of H3.3 at heterochromatic regions is unknown, but mutations in the ATRX/Daxx/H3.3 pathway are linked to aberrant telomere lengthening in certain cancers. In this study, we show that ATRX-dependent deposition of H3.3 is not limited to pericentric heterochromatin and telomeres but also occurs at heterochromatic sites throughout the genome. Notably, ATRX/H3.3 specifically localizes to silenced imprinted alleles in mouse ESCs. ATRX KO cells failed to deposit H3.3 at these sites, leading to loss of the H3K9me3 heterochromatin modification, loss of repression, and aberrant allelic expression. We propose a model whereby ATRX-dependent deposition of H3.3 into heterochromatin is normally required to maintain the memory of silencing at imprinted loci.

  20. Generation of Five Human Lactoferrin Transgenic Cloned Goats Using Fibroblast Cells and Their Methylation Status of Putative Differential Methylation Regions of IGF2R and H19 Imprinted Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meng, L.; Wan, Y.; Sun, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, Z.; Song, Y.; Wang, F.

    2013-01-01

    Background - Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a promising technique to produce transgenic cloned mammalian, including transgenic goats which may produce Human Lactoferrin (hLF). However, success percentage of SCNT is low, because of gestational and neonatal failure of transgenic embryos. Acco

  1. New Results on Plasma Activated Bonding of Imprinted Polymer Features for Bio MEMS Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoimprint Lithography is a well-acknowledged low cost, high resolution, large area 3D patterning process for polymers. It includes the most promising methods: high pressure hot embossing (HE) and UV-Nanoimprint Lithography (UV-NIL). Curing of the imprinted structures is either done by cooling down below the glass transition temperature of the thermoplastic polymer in case of HE or by subsequent UV-light exposure and cross-linking in case of UV-NIL. Both techniques allow rapid prototyping for high volume production of fully patterned substrates for a wide range of materials. The advantages of using polymer substrates over common Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) processing materials like glass, silicon or quartz are: bio-compatible surfaces, easy manufacturability, low cost for high volume production, suitable for use in micro- and nano-fabrication, low conductivity, wide range of optical properties just to name a few. We will present experimental results on HE processes with PMMA as well as UV-NIL imprints in selected UV-curable resists. In the second part of the work we will describe the bonding techniques for packaging of the micro or nano structures. Packaging of the imprinted features is a key technology for a wide variety of field of applications: μ-TAS, biochemistry, micro-mixers, micro-reactors, electrophoresis cells, life science, micro-optical and nano-optical applications (switches) nanofluidics, data storage, etc. for features down to sub-100 nm range. Most bonding techniques for polymer use adhesives as intermediate layers. We will demonstrate a promising technique for dense and very strong bonds using plasma activation of polymers and glass. This bonding technology allows for bonding at low temperatures well below the glass transition temperature of the polymers, which will ensure that the structures are not deformed

  2. Mitigation of Laser Imprinting with Diamond Ablator for Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemori, K.; Kato, H.; Nakai, M.; Hosogi, R.; Sakaiya, T.; Terasaki, H.; Fujioka, S.; Sunahara, A.; Azechi, H.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a novel scheme to mitigate the initial perturbation imprinting due to irradiation non-uniformity. Diamond was potential candidate for the ablator material for ICF targets due to its stiffness. The stiffness is very important parameter for imprint mitigation because the laser imprint is primary as a function of pressure perturbation due to lase irradiation non-uniformity. We measured the imprint amplitude of diamond foils and plastic (CH) foils. The experimental data suggest the initial imprinting is drastically mitigated for the diamond foils.

  3. Preparation and characterization of surface imprinted polymer for selective sorption of uranium(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new surface ion-imprinted polymer for the selective sorption of U(VI) from aqueous solution was prepared by copolymerization of a binary complex of U(VI) with methacrylic acid. The adsorption behavior of U(VI) onto the imprinted polymer was investigated by batch experiments and the results demonstrated that the maximum adsorption capacity of U(VI)-imprinted and non-imprinted polymers was found to be 35.92 and 22.58 mg g-1, respectively. The selectivity study revealed that the U(VI)-imprinted polymer exhibited excellent selectivity and affinity toward U(VI) in the presence of competitive metal ions. (author)

  4. Prevention of an additional surgery for regional lymphadenectomy in melanoma: rapid intraoperative immunostaining of sentinel lymph node imprint smears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Bruce H

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sentinel lymph node (SLN biopsy is performed at many institutions and is considered a standard of care in the management of cutaneous melanoma. The discriminatory immunostaining pattern with the 'MCW Melanoma Cocktail' (a mixture of MART-1 {1:500}, Melan- A {1:100}, and Tyrosinase {1:50} monoclonal antibodies allows intraoperative immunocytochemical evaluation of imprint smears of SLNs for melanoma metastases. Cohesive cells of benign capsular melanocytic nevi that were also immunoreactive with the cocktail do not exfoliate easily for imprint smear detection. Methods We prospectively evaluated 73 lymph nodes (70 SLN & 3 non-SLN from 41 cases (mean 1.8, 1 to 4 SLNs/case of cutaneous melanoma using a rapid 17-minute immunostaining previously published protocol. The results were compared with permanent sections also immunostained with 'the cocktail'. Results 19.5%, 8/41 cases (12%, 9/73 lymph nodes were positive for melanoma metastases on permanent sections immunostained with the 'MCW melanoma cocktail'. Melanoma metastases in 87.5% (7/8 of these cases were also detected in rapidly immunostained imprint smears, with 100% specificity and 90% sensitivity. None of the 7 SLNs from 7 cases with capsular nevi showed false positive results. Conclusion Melanoma metastases could be detected in imprint smears immunostained with 'MCW Melanoma Cocktail' utilizing a rapid intraoperative protocol. The cohesive cells of the capsular nevi do not readily exfoliate and do not lead to false positive interpretation. In a majority of positive cases, a regional lymphadenectomy could have been completed during the same surgery for SLN biopsy and wide excision of primary melanoma site, potentially eliminating the need for an additional surgery.

  5. The Wellcome Prize Lecture. Genetic imprinting: the battle of the sexes rages on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reik, W

    1996-03-01

    Genomic imprinting in mammals is an important genetic mechanism by which genes are expressed or repressed depending on which parent they have been inherited from. Some properties of the imprinting mechanism are already established; notably, some of the effects of imprinting on mammalian development can be explained by the phenotypic effects of a number of specific imprinted genes, which include major fetal growth factors. An evolutionary explanation of imprinting has also been suggested. Some of the molecular mechanisms of imprinting are known, and these include the modification of DNA and chromosomes in the form of DNA methylation and possibly heritable chromatin structures. Loss of imprinting or altered imprinting is implicated in a large number of genetic diseases and cancers. Many important issues remain to be resolved; these include the precise molecular mechanisms and, in particular, the nature of the primary imprints that are inherited from the parental gametes, and the genes that control the imprinting process. Isolation of the majority of imprinted genes and the elucidation of their phenotypic effects and physiology are major goals for the future. These studies will provide important insights into human genetics, and will connect evolutionary understanding with physiology, genetic disease and human behaviour. PMID:8845132

  6. Preparation and recognition of surface molecularly imprinted core-shell microbeads for protein in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a surface molecular imprinting technique was reported for preparing core-shell microbeads of protein imprinting, and bovine hemoglobin or bovine serum albumin were used as model proteins for studying the imprinted core-shell microbeads. 3-Aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) was polymerized onto the surface of polystyrene microbead in the presence of the protein templates to create protein-imprinted core-shell microbeads. The various samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) methods. The effect of pH on rebinding of the template hemoglobin, the specific binding and selective recognition were studied for the imprinted microbeads. The results show that the bovine hemoglobin-imprinted core-shell microbeads were successfully created. The shell was a sort of imprinted thin films with porous structure and larger surface areas. The imprinted microbeads have good selectivity for templates and high stability. Due to the recognition sites locating at or closing to the surface, these imprinted microbeads have good property of mass-transport. Unfortunately, the imprint technology was not successfully applied to imprinting bovine serum albumin (BSA).

  7. Synthesis of surface protein-imprinted nanoparticles endowed with reversible physical cross-links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chongchong; Yan, Xianming; Guo, Hao; Fu, Guoqi

    2016-01-15

    Researches on protein molecularly imprinted polymers have been challenged by the difficulties in facilitating biomacromolecular transfer, in particular upon the template removal step, and enhancing their recognition performance. Addressing these issues, herein we report synthesis of core–shell structured surface protein-imprinted nanoparticles with reversible physical cross-links formed in the imprinted nanoshells. The imprinted layers over nanoparticle supports are fabricated via aqueous precipitation polymerization (PP) of di(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (MEO2MA), a thermo-responsive monomer bearing no strong H-bond donor, and other functional and cross-linking monomers. During polymerization, physical cross-links together with chemical cross-links are in site produced within the imprinted shells based on hydrophobic association among the PMEO2MA, favoring formation of high-quality imprints. While cooled appropriately below the polymerization temperature, these physical cross-links can be dissociated rapidly, thus facilitating removal of the embedded template. For proof of this concept, lysozyme-imprinted nanoparticles were synthesized at 37 °C over the nanoparticles functionalized with carboxylic and vinyl groups. The template removal from the imprinted nanoparticles was readily achieved by washing with a dilute acidic detergent solution at 4 °C. As-prepared imprinted nanoparticles showed greatly higher imprinting factor and specific rebinding than obtained with the same recipe but by solution polymerization (SP). Moreover, such imprinted nanomaterials exhibited satisfactory rebinding selectivity, kinetics and reusability. PMID:26313422

  8. Exosomes Derived from M. Bovis BCG Infected Macrophages Activate Antigen-Specific CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Giri, Pramod K.; Schorey, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    Activation of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells is required for an effective immune response to an M. tuberculosis infection. However, infected macrophages are poor antigen presenting cells and may be spatially separated from recruited T cells, thus limiting antigen presentation within a granuloma. Our previous studies showed that infected macrophages release from cells small membrane-bound vesicles called exosomes which contain mycobacterial lipid components and showed that these exosomes could...

  9. Changes in natural Foxp3(+Treg but not mucosally-imprinted CD62L(negCD38(+Foxp3(+Treg in the circulation of celiac disease patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke A van Leeuwen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease (CD is an intestinal inflammation driven by gluten-reactive CD4(+ T cells. Due to lack of selective markers it has not been determined whether defects in inducible regulatory T cell (Treg differentiation are associated with CD. This is of importance as changes in numbers of induced Treg could be indicative of defects in mucosal tolerance development in CD. Recently, we have shown that, after encounter of retinoic acid during differentiation, circulating gut-imprinted T cells express CD62L(negCD38(+. Using this new phenotype, we now determined whether alterations occur in the frequency of natural CD62L(+Foxp3(+ Treg or mucosally-imprinted CD62L(negCD38(+Foxp3(+ Treg in peripheral blood of CD patients. In particular, we compared pediatric CD, aiming to select for disease at onset, with adult CD. METHODS: Cell surface markers, intracellular Foxp3 and Helios were determined by flow cytometry. Foxp3 expression was also detected by immunohistochemistry in duodenal tissue of CD patients. RESULTS: In children, the percentages of peripheral blood CD4(+Foxp3(+ Treg were comparable between CD patients and healthy age-matched controls. Differentiation between natural and mucosally-imprinted Treg on the basis of CD62L and CD38 did not uncover differences in Foxp3. In adult patients on gluten-free diet and in refractory CD increased percentages of circulating natural CD62L(+Foxp3(+ Treg, but normal mucosally-imprinted CD62L(negCD38(+Foxp3(+ Treg frequencies were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Our data exclude that significant numeric deficiency of mucosally-imprinted or natural Foxp3(+ Treg explains exuberant effector responses in CD. Changes in natural Foxp3(+ Treg occur in a subset of adult patients on a gluten-free diet and in refractory CD patients.

  10. Different Imprinting Status of IGF-2 in Epithelial Ovarian Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊雅丽; 孙永玉; 李红发

    2002-01-01

    Summary: To explore whether the imprinting status of IGF-2 in the malignant epithelial ovarian tumors is different from that in benign tumors, the target sequences (DNA and RNA) which contain a polymorphism site for ApaI restriction endonuclease digestion were amplified with PCR and RT-PCR methods. Then the PCR/RT-PCR products were digested by ApaI. The IGF-2 transcriptional pattern came out from the results of endonucleases digestion. Among the 36 cases of benign epithelial ovarian tumors, 20 were heterozygous for ApaI locus and all showed genomic imprinting. While in the malignant group, 22 were heterozygous for ApaI locus but six were found to lose imprinting. Significant differences existed between the two groups (P<0. 05). Loss of imprinting of IGF-2 may serve as a marker for differentiating the malignant ovarian cancers from the benign ones. In a new field of molecular genetics, our research provides an experimental basis for genetic diagnosis and treatment of the ovarian cancers.

  11. Morphological and chromatographic characterization of molecularly imprinted monolithic columns

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Širc, Jakub; Bosáková, Z.; Coufal, P.; Michálek, Jiří; Přádný, Martin; Hobzová, Radka; Hradil, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 117, - (2007), s. 1-15. ISSN 1618-7229 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : molecularly imprinted polymers * monolithic columns * morphology Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.917, year: 2007

  12. Imprinting: When Early Life Memories Make Food Smell Bad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayes, Diego; Alkema, Mark J

    2016-05-01

    A recent study has found that pathogen exposure early in the life of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans leads to a long-lasting aversion that requires distinct sets of neurons for the formation and retrieval of the imprinted memory. PMID:27166694

  13. Polymer Stamps for Imprinting Nanopatterns in Polymer Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiahao; Amirsadeghi, Alborz; Kim, Jinsoo; Park, Sunggook

    2015-01-01

    Using a silicone or metallic stamp for imprinting multiscale patterns comprising micro down to nanoscale patterns into polymer substrates often results in significant deformation in the molded substrate and loss of pattern transfer fidelity for nanopatterns. In the worst case, the expensive stamp can also be damaged. One method to reduce the problem is to use polymer as the stamp material, which will reduce both adhesion and thermal stress generated at the stamp/substrate interface. In this paper, stamps made of three different polymer materials, i.e., polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), PPGDA-based UV resin and TPGDA-based UV-resin, were fabricated from the same master containing nanofluidic structures and the replication fidelity from the master, polymer stamps, to thermal-imprinted poly(methyl methacrylate) substrate (PMMA) was compared. The largest loss of pattern fidelity occurs in the thermal imprinting step. Polymer stamps with higher Young's moduli result in a better fidelity in pattern transfer. With TPGDA-based UV resin stamps, multiscale structures with a nanochannel with minimum width and height of -70 nm can be imprinted onto PMMA substrate together with macro-scale patterns by a single nanoimprinting processes. PMID:26328384

  14. Selective recognition of neodymium (III) using ion imprinted polymer particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neodymium (III) ion imprinted polymer (IIP) materials were prepared by the copolymerization of styrene (monomer), divinyl benzene (crosslinking monomer) and 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile (initiator) in the presence of neodymium (III) - 5,7- dichloroquinoline-8-ol- 4-vinylpyridine ternary complex. The synthesis was carried out in 2-methoxy ethanol (Porogen) medium and the resultant material formed was filtered, washed, dried and powered to form unleached IIP particles. The imprint ion was removed by stirring the above particles with 50 % (v/v) HCl for 6 h. to obtain leached IIP particles which leaves cavities in the polymer particles. Control polymer (CP) particles were similarly prepared without imprint ion i.e. neodymium(III). CP and unleached and leached IIP particles were characterized by IR, microanalysis, XRD and UV-Visible spectrophotometric studies. The imprinting effect of IIP particles was noticed in all preconcentration and selectivity studies when compared with CP particles. Furthermore, the selectivity coefficients of neodymium (III) IIP particles are much higher compared to the reported separation factors for best liquid-liquid extractants viz. di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid and 2-ethylhexyl-ethylhexyl phosphonate. Kinetic and isotherm studies during rebinding of neodymium (III) onto IIP particles were also carried out. (author)

  15. SEXUAL IMPRINTING AND SONG LEARNING - 2 OF ONE KIND

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TENCATE, C; VOS, DR; MANN, N

    1993-01-01

    Imprinting and song learning in birds are usually categorized under the same heading as 'exposure', 'template' or 'programmed' learning. These terms point to several similarities between the processes, but exactly how similar they are and whether the similarity implies a direct causal linkage is not

  16. Convergent and divergent evolution of genomic imprinting in the marsupial Monodelphis domestica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Radhika

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon resulting in parent-of-origin specific monoallelic gene expression. It is postulated to have evolved in placental mammals to modulate intrauterine resource allocation to the offspring. In this study, we determined the imprint status of metatherian orthologues of eutherian imprinted genes. Results L3MBTL and HTR2A were shown to be imprinted in Monodelphis domestica (the gray short-tailed opossum. MEST expressed a monoallelic and a biallelic transcript, as in eutherians. In contrast, IMPACT, COPG2, and PLAGL1 were not imprinted in the opossum. Differentially methylated regions (DMRs involved in regulating imprinting in eutherians were not found at any of the new imprinted loci in the opossum. Interestingly, a novel DMR was identified in intron 11 of the imprinted IGF2R gene, but this was not conserved in eutherians. The promoter regions of the imprinted genes in the opossum were enriched for the activating histone modification H3 Lysine 4 dimethylation. Conclusions The phenomenon of genomic imprinting is conserved in Therians, but the marked difference in the number and location of imprinted genes and DMRs between metatherians and eutherians indicates that imprinting is not fully conserved between the two Therian infra-classes. The identification of a novel DMR at a non-conserved location as well as the first demonstration of histone modifications at imprinted loci in the opossum suggest that genomic imprinting may have evolved in a common ancestor of these two Therian infra-classes with subsequent divergence of regulatory mechanisms in the two lineages.

  17. MTP regulated by an alternate promoter is essential for NKT cell development

    OpenAIRE

    Dougan, Stephanie K.; Rava, Paul; Hussain, M. Mahmood; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2007-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP), an endoplasmic reticulum lipid transfer protein critical for apolipoprotein B (apoB) secretion, regulates CD1d antigen presentation. We identified MTP variant 1 (MTPv1), a novel splice variant of mouse MTP, by polymerase chain reaction and Northern analysis in non–apoB-secreting tissues, including thymocytes and antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Edman degradation of MTPv1 isolated from transfected cells revealed three unique residues; however, re...

  18. Fast generation of dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvistborg, P; Bøgh, Marie; Claesson, M H; Pedersen, A W

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are potent antigen presenting cells capable of inducing immune responses. DC are widely used as vaccine adjuvant in experimental clinical settings. DC-based vaccines are normally generated using a standard 8day DC protocol (SDDC). In attempts to shorten the vaccine production...

  19. Reversible adsorption of calcium ions by imprinted temperature sensitive gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Guney, Orhan; Oya, Taro; Sakai, Yasuzo; Kobayashi, Masatoshi; Enoki, Takashi; Takeoka, Yukikazu; Ishibashi, Toru; Kuroda, Kenichi; Tanaka, Kazunori; Wang, Guoqiang; Grosberg, Alexander Yu.; Masamune, Satoru; Tanaka, Toyoichi

    2001-02-01

    With the aim of developing polymeric gels sensitive to external stimuli and able to reversibly adsorb and release divalent ions, copolymer gels of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) and methacrylic (MAA) monomers were prepared. We chose calcium as a target divalent ion. Two MAAs form a complex with a calcium ion, and the NIPA component allows the polymers to swell and shrink reversibly in response to temperature. The adsorbing site develops an affinity to target ions when the adsorbing molecules come into proximity, but when they are separated, the affinity diminishes. To enhance the affinity to calcium, an imprinting technique was applied using Ca2+ and Pb2+ ions as templates in methylsulfoxide and dioxane media, respectively. The adsorption capacity of the imprinted gels was compared with that of the nonimprinted gels, and the effects of the templates, the solvents, and the amount of methacrylic monomers used in the synthesis and the medium temperature over the Ca2+ adsorption capacity of the gels from aqueous solutions were evaluated. The analysis of the adsorption revealed that (a) the adsorption can be described by the Langmuir isotherms; (b) there is an approximately linear relationship between saturation and methacrylic monomer concentration; (c) the affinity depends on the degree of gel swelling or shrinkage that can be switched on and off by temperature; (d) in the shrunken state, the affinity depends approximately linearly on the MAA concentration in the imprinted gels, whereas in the nonimprinted gels it is proportional to the square of MAA concentration; (e) the imprinted gels adsorb more than the nonimprinted gels when MAA concentration is less than that of permanent cross linkers. The success of imprinting of CaMAA2 and PbMAA2 complex is evidence for memory of such complex onto the weakly cross-linked gel.

  20. Step and flash imprint lithography for sub-100-nm patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colburn, Matthew; Grot, Annette; Amistoso, Marie N.; Choi, Byung J.; Bailey, Todd C.; Ekerdt, John G.; Sreenivasan, S. V.; Hollenhorst, James; Willson, C. Grant

    2000-07-01

    Step and Flash Imprint Lithography (SFIL) is an alternative to photolithography that efficiently generates high aspect-ratio, sub-micron patterns in resist materials. Other imprint lithography techniques based on physical deformation of a polymer to generate surface relief structures have produced features in PMMA as small as 10 nm, but it is very difficult to imprint large depressed features or to imprint a thick films of resist with high aspect-ratio features by these techniques. SFIL overcomes these difficulties by exploiting the selectivity and anisotropy of reactive ion etch (RIE). First, a thick organic 'transfer' layer (0.3 micrometer to 1.1 micrometer) is spin coated to planarize the wafer surface. A low viscosity, liquid organosilicon photopolymer precursor is then applied to the substrate and a quartz template applied at 2 psi. Once the master is in contact with the organosilicon solution, a crosslinking photopolymerization is initiated via backside illumination with broadband UV light. When the layer is cured the template is removed. This process relies on being able to imprint the photopolymer while leaving the minimal residual material in the depressed areas. Any excess material is etched away using a CHF3/He/O2 RIE. The exposed transfer layer is then etched with O2 RIE. The silicon incorporated in the photopolymer allows amplification of the low aspect ratio relief structure in the silylated resist into a high aspect ratio feature in the transfer layer. The aspect ratio is limited only by the mechanical stability of the transfer layer material and the O2 RIE selectivity and anisotropy. This method has produced 60 nm features with 6:1 aspect ratios. This lithography process was also used to fabricate alternating arrays of 100 nm Ti lines on a 200 nm pitch that function as efficient micropolarizers. Several types of optical devices including gratings, polarizers, and sub-wavelength structures can be easily patterned by SFIL.

  1. Rational preparation of dibenzothiophene-imprinted polymers by surface imprinting technique combined with atom transfer radical polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Wenming [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Liu, Lukuan [School of the Environment, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Zhou, Zhiping, E-mail: zhouzp@ujs.edu.cn [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Liu, Hong [Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Xie, Binze; Xu, Wanzhen [School of the Environment, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2013-10-01

    A computational simulation method is introduced to simulate the dibenzothiophene-monomer pre-assembly system of molecular imprinted polymers. The interaction type and intensity between dibenzothiophene and monomer are discussed from the binding energy and spatial position distribution. The simulation and analysis results indicate that the amount of the function monomer is not the more the better in preparing molecular imprinted polymers. Based on the above results, a novel dibenzothiophene-imprinted polymers with the favorable specific adsorption effect was prepared by surface imprinting technique combined with atom transfer radical polymerization. This combined technologies are used for preparing a desulfurization adsorbent for the first time. Various measures were selected to characterize the structure and morphology of the prepared adsorbent. The characterization results show that the adsorbent has suitable features for further adsorption process. A series of static adsorption experiments were conducted to analyze its adsorption performance. The adsorption process follows Elovich model by the kinetic analysis and Sips equation by the isothermal analysis. The approach we described will provide another opportunity in the deep desulfurization field.

  2. Rational preparation of dibenzothiophene-imprinted polymers by surface imprinting technique combined with atom transfer radical polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computational simulation method is introduced to simulate the dibenzothiophene-monomer pre-assembly system of molecular imprinted polymers. The interaction type and intensity between dibenzothiophene and monomer are discussed from the binding energy and spatial position distribution. The simulation and analysis results indicate that the amount of the function monomer is not the more the better in preparing molecular imprinted polymers. Based on the above results, a novel dibenzothiophene-imprinted polymers with the favorable specific adsorption effect was prepared by surface imprinting technique combined with atom transfer radical polymerization. This combined technologies are used for preparing a desulfurization adsorbent for the first time. Various measures were selected to characterize the structure and morphology of the prepared adsorbent. The characterization results show that the adsorbent has suitable features for further adsorption process. A series of static adsorption experiments were conducted to analyze its adsorption performance. The adsorption process follows Elovich model by the kinetic analysis and Sips equation by the isothermal analysis. The approach we described will provide another opportunity in the deep desulfurization field.

  3. Imprinted X chromosome inactivation: evolution of mechanisms in distantly related mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafagh A. Waters

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In females, X chromosome inactivation (XCI ensures transcriptional silencing of one of the two Xs (either in a random or imprinted fashion in somatic cells. Comparing this silencing between species has offered insight into different mechanisms of X inactivation, providing clues into the evolution of this epigenetic process in mammals. Long-noncoding RNAs have emerged as a common theme in XCI of therian mammals (eutherian and marsupial. Eutherian X inactivation is regulated by the noncoding RNA product of XIST, within a cis-acting master control region called the X inactivation center (XIC. Marsupials XCI is XIST independent. Instead, XCI is controlled by the long-noncoding RNA Rsx, which appears to be a functional analog of the eutherian XIST gene, insofar that its transcript coats the inactive X and represses activity of genes in cis. In this review we discuss XCI in eutherians, and contrast imprinted X inactivation in mouse and marsupials. We provide particular focus on the evolution of genomic elements that confer the unique epigenetic features that characterize the inactive X chromosome.

  4. Maternally and Paternally Silenced Imprinted Genes Differ in Their Intron Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Moore

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Imprinted genes exhibit silencing of one of the parental alleles during embryonic development. In a previous study imprinted genes were found to have reduced intron content relative to a non-imprinted control set (Hurst et al., 1996. However, due to the small sample size, it was not possible to analyse the source of this effect. Here, we re-investigate this observation using larger datasets of imprinted and control (non-imprinted genes that allow us to consider mouse and human, and maternally and paternally silenced, imprinted genes separately. We find that, in the human and mouse, there is reduced intron content in the maternally silenced imprinted genes relative to a non-imprinted control set. Among imprinted genes, a strong bias is also observed in the distribution of intronless genes, which are found exclusively in the maternally silenced dataset. The paternally silenced dataset in the human is not different to the control set; however, the mouse paternally silenced dataset has more introns than the control group. A direct comparison of mouse maternally and paternally silenced imprinted gene datasets shows that they differ significantly with respect to a variety of intron-related parameters. We discuss a variety of possible explanations for our observations.

  5. Skin Dendritic Cells in Burn Patients

    OpenAIRE

    D’Arpa, N.; D’Amelio, L.; Accardo-Palumbo, A.; Pileri, D.; Mogavero, R.; Amato, G.; Napoli, B.; Alessandro, G.; Lombardo, C.; F. Conte

    2009-01-01

    The body's immunological response to burn injury has been a subject of great inquiry in recent years. Burn injury disturbs the immune system, resulting in a progressive suppression of the immune response that is thought to contribute to the development of sepsis. Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells that possess the ability to stimulate naïve T cells.

  6. Non-coding RNAs and the acquisition of genomic imprinting in mammals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Genomic imprinting,representing parent-specific expression of alleles at a locus,is mainly evident in flowering plants and placental mammals.Most imprinted genes,including numerous non-coding RNAs,are located in clusters regulated by imprinting control regions(ICRs).The acquisition and evolution of genomic imprinting is among the most fundamental genetic questions.Discoveries about the transition of mammalian imprinted gene domains from their non-imprinted ancestors,especially recent studies undertaken on the most ancient mammalian clades-the marsupials and monotremes from which model species genomes have recently been sequenced,are of high value.By reviewing and analyzing these studies,a close connection between non-coding RNAs and the acquisition of genomic imprinting in mammals is demonstrated.The evidence comes from two observations accompanied with the acquisition of the imprinting:(i) many novel non-coding RNA genes emerged in imprinted regions;(ii) the expressions of some conserved non-coding RNAs have changed dramatically.Furthermore,a systematical analysis of imprinted snoRNA(small nucleolar RNA) genes from 15 vertebrates suggests that the origination of imprinted snoRNAs occurred after the divergence between eutherians and marsupials,followed by a rapid expansion leading to the fixation of major gene families in the eutherian ancestor prior to the radiation of modern placental mammals.Involved in the regulation of imprinted silencing and mediating the chromatins epigenetic modification may be the major roles that non-coding RNAs play during the acquisition of genomic imprinting in mammals.

  7. Regulatory T-cell compartmentalization and trafficking

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Shuang; Kryczek, Ilona; Zou, Weiping

    2006-01-01

    CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (CD4+ Treg cells) are thought to differentiate in the thymus and immigrate from the thymus to the periphery. Treg cells can regulate both acquired and innate immunity through multiple modes of suppression. The cross-talk between Treg cells and targeted cells, such as antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and T cells, is crucial for ensuring suppression by Treg cells in the appropriate microenvironment. Emerging evidence suggests that Treg compartmentalization and ...

  8. Experimental demonstration of laser imprint reduction using underdense foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme, B.; Olazabal-Loumé, M.; Casner, A.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Michel, D. T.; Riazuelo, G.; Borisenko, N.; Breil, J.; Fujioka, S.; Grech, M.; Orekhov, A.; Seka, W.; Sunahara, A.; Froula, D. H.; Goncharov, V.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2016-04-01

    Reducing the detrimental effect of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability on the target performance is a critical challenge. In this purpose, the use of targets coated with low density foams is a promising approach to reduce the laser imprint. This article presents results of ablative RT instability growth measurements, performed on the OMEGA laser facility in direct-drive for plastic foils coated with underdense foams. The laser beam smoothing is explained by the parametric instabilities developing in the foam and reducing the laser imprint on the plastic (CH) foil. The initial perturbation pre-imposed by the means of a specific phase plate was shown to be smoothed using different foam characteristics. Numerical simulations of the laser beam smoothing in the foam and of the RT growth are performed with a suite of paraxial electromagnetic and radiation hydrodynamic codes. They confirmed the foam smoothing effect in the experimental conditions.

  9. Magnetization dynamics of imprinted non-collinear spin textures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the magnetization dynamics of non-collinear spin textures realized via imprint of the magnetic vortex state in soft permalloy into magnetically hard out-of-plane magnetized Co/Pd nanopatterned heterostructures. Tuning the interlayer exchange coupling between soft- and hard-magnetic subsystems provides means to tailor the magnetic state in the Co/Pd stack from being vortex- to donut-like with different core sizes. While the imprinted vortex spin texture leads to the dynamics similar to the one observed for vortices in permalloy disks, the donut-like state causes the appearance of two gyrofrequencies characteristic of the early and later stages of the magnetization dynamics. The dynamics are described using the Thiele equation supported by the full scale micromagnetic simulations by taking into account an enlarged core size of the donut states compared to magnetic vortices

  10. Magnetization dynamics of imprinted non-collinear spin textures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streubel, Robert, E-mail: r.streubel@ifw-dresden.de; Kopte, Martin; Makarov, Denys, E-mail: d.makarov@ifw-dresden.de [Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Fischer, Peter [Center for X-Ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physics Department, UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States); Schmidt, Oliver G. [Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Material Systems for Nanoelectronics, Chemnitz University of Technology, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2015-09-14

    We study the magnetization dynamics of non-collinear spin textures realized via imprint of the magnetic vortex state in soft permalloy into magnetically hard out-of-plane magnetized Co/Pd nanopatterned heterostructures. Tuning the interlayer exchange coupling between soft- and hard-magnetic subsystems provides means to tailor the magnetic state in the Co/Pd stack from being vortex- to donut-like with different core sizes. While the imprinted vortex spin texture leads to the dynamics similar to the one observed for vortices in permalloy disks, the donut-like state causes the appearance of two gyrofrequencies characteristic of the early and later stages of the magnetization dynamics. The dynamics are described using the Thiele equation supported by the full scale micromagnetic simulations by taking into account an enlarged core size of the donut states compared to magnetic vortices.

  11. Synthesis of molecular imprinted beta cyclodextrins oligomers in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Donghong; Nielsen, Anne Louise; Bach, Lone; Woldum, Henriette Sie; Bauw, Guy; Poulsen, Kristian Raaby; Wimmer, Reinhard; Larsen, Kim Lambertsen

    2003-01-01

    hydrophobic molecules in aqueous solution, however, with limited selectivity. Templated synthesis of Cyclodextrin polymers was introduced by Komiyama. By use of simple templates, such as cholesterol, polymers with improved selectivity for the template molecules were achieved. In most of these...... studies the synthesis was performed in non-aqueous solvents. Since water plays a major role in the formation and stabilization of inclusion complexes between cyclodextrins and a large number of guest molecules, the formation and stability of inclusion complexes, biosensor applications aim at detecting...... compounds in aqueous solution and, therefore, molecular imprinting of cyclodextrins polymers in aqueous solution is of great interest. In this paper, molecular imprinting of beta cyclodextrins has been performed in water by use of diiodobenzene as template and epichlorohydrin as a crosslinker. Inclusion...

  12. Biotin-specific synthetic receptors prepared using molecular imprinting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The composition of new molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) specific for biotin was optimised using molecular modelling software. Three functional monomers: methacrylic acid (MAA), 2-(trifluoromethyl)acrylic acid (TFAA) and 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid (AMPSA), which demonstrated the highest binding scores with biotin, were tested on their ability to generate specific binding sites. The imprinted polymers were photografted to the surface of polystyrene microspheres in water. The affinity of the synthetic 'receptor' sites was evaluated in binding experiments using horseradish peroxidase-labelled biotin. Good correlation was found between the modelling results and the performance of the materials in the template re-binding study. The dissociation constants for all MIPs were 1.4-16.8 nM, which is sufficient for most analytical applications where biotin is used as a label

  13. Site-isolated porphyrin catalysts in imprinted polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burri, Estelle; Ohm, Margarita; Daguenet, Corinne; Severin, Kay

    2005-08-19

    A meso-tetraaryl ruthenium porphyrin complex having four polymerizable vinylbenzoxy groups (2) has been synthesized by reaction of pyrrole with 4-(vinylbenzoxy)benzaldehyde and subsequent metalation with [Ru3(CO)12]. The porphyrin complex was immobilized by copolymerization with ethylene glycol dimethacrylate. The resulting polymer P2 was found to catalyze the oxidation of alcohols and alkanes with 2,6-dichloropyridine N-oxide without activation by mineral acids. Under similar conditions, the homogeneous catalyst 2 was completely inefficient. By using diphenylaminomethane and 1-aminoadamantane as coordinatively bound templates during the polymerization procedure, the molecularly imprinted polymers P3 and P4 have been synthesized. Compared with the polymer P2, the imprinted catalysts displayed a significantly increased activity with rate enhancements of up to a factor of 16. PMID:15977282

  14. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for aspirin recognition and controlled release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan Xianwen; Geng Zhirong; Zhao Yao; Wang Zhilin; Zhu Junjie [State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, MOE Key Lab of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China)], E-mail: wangzl@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: jjzhu@nju.edu.cn

    2009-04-22

    Core-shell structural magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic MIPs) with combined properties of molecular recognition and controlled release were prepared and characterized. Magnetic MIPs were synthesized by the co-polymerization of methacrylic acid (MAA) and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TRIM) around aspirin (ASP) at the surface of double-bond-functionalized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in chloroform. The obtained spherical magnetic MIPs with diameters of about 500 nm had obvious superparamagnetism and could be separated quickly by an external magnetic field. Binding experiments were carried out to evaluate the properties of magnetic MIPs and magnetic non-molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic NIPs). The results demonstrated that the magnetic MIPs had high adsorption capacity and selectivity to ASP. Moreover, release profiles and release rate of ASP from the ASP-loaded magnetic MIPs indicated that the magnetic MIPs also had potential applications in drug controlled release.

  15. Unravelling and controlling hidden imprint fields in ferroelectric capacitors

    OpenAIRE

    Fanmao Liu; Ignasi Fina; Riccardo Bertacco; Josep Fontcuberta

    2016-01-01

    Ferroelectric materials have a spontaneous polarization that can point along energetically equivalent, opposite directions. However, when ferroelectric layers are sandwiched between different metallic electrodes, asymmetric electrostatic boundary conditions may induce the appearance of an electric field (imprint field, E imp) that breaks the degeneracy of the polarization directions, favouring one of them. This has dramatic consequences on functionality of ferroelectric-based devices such as ...

  16. Preparation and Characterization of Nonylphenol Magnetic Molecularly Imprinted Polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonylphenol (NP) is a toxic xenobiotic compound classified as an endocrine disrupter, which can interface with the hormonal system of numerous organisms, and then cause a series of pathological changes. It is of great significance to remove nonyl phenol from the environment. In this paper, an effective method for the preparation of molecularly imprinted nanoparticles was reported. Firstly, Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/ at the rate SiO/sub 2/ magnetic carrier material modified by trimethoxysilane was achieved through three-step reaction. After that, the selective magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer sorbent for NP (Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/ at the rate SiO/sub 2/-MIP) was synthesized by surface molecular imprinting technique, using NP as template, 4-vinyl pyridine(4-Vpy) as functional monomers, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as cross linker and azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator. The morphous, composition, structure and performance of polymer adsorbent was characterized by SEM, TEM, FT-IR, XRD, EDS, VSM and nitrogen adsorption-desorption techniques. The results indicated that the polymer adsorbent was successfully prepared. The size of the polymer particle was about 50 nm, the aperture on the surface was 3.71 nm, the BET specific surface area was 61.80 m/sup 2/g and the Langmuir specific surface area was 101.24 m/sup 2/g. The selective adsorption rate for NP of 0.5 mmol/L attained value of 86.5%, and for NP with low concentration (less than 2.0 mg/L), the selective adsorption rate reached more than 90%. The synthesized magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer had higher selective recognition ability towards the template molecule nonylphenol. It has good magnetism and can be rapidly separated after being employed by using adscititious magnetic field. It has potential application value in treatment and enrichment of nonylphenol. (author)

  17. Microcontact imprinted surface plasmon resonance sensor for myoglobin detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman, Bilgen [Uludag University, Department of Chemistry, Bursa (Turkey); Uzun, Lokman [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Ankara (Turkey); Beşirli, Necati [Uludag University, Department of Chemistry, Bursa (Turkey); Denizli, Adil, E-mail: denizli@hacettepe.edu.tr [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Ankara (Turkey)

    2013-10-15

    In this study, we prepared surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor using the molecular imprinting technique for myoglobin detection in human serum. For this purpose, we synthesized myoglobin imprinted poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-N-methacryloyl-L-tryptophan methyl ester) [poly(HEMA-MATrp)] nanofilm on the surface of SPR sensor. We also synthesized non-imprinted poly(HEMA-MATrp) nanofilm without myoglobin for the control experiments. The SPR sensor was characterized with contact angle measurements, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and ellipsometry. We investigated the effectiveness of the sensor using the SPR system. We evaluated the ability of SPR sensor to sense myoglobin with myoglobin solutions (pH 7.4, phosphate buffer) in different concentration range and in the serum taken from a patient with acute myocardial infarction. We found that the Langmuir adsorption model was the most suitable for the sensor system. The detection limit was 87.6 ng/mL. In order to show the selectivity of the SPR sensor, we investigated the competitive detection of myoglobin, lysozyme, cytochrome c and bovine serum albumin. The results showed that the SPR sensor has high selectivity and sensitivity for myoglobin. - Highlights: • Micro-contact imprinted surface plasmon resonance sensor. • Real-time myoglobin detection in the serum taken from a patient with acute myocardial infarction • Reproducible results for consecutive myoglobin solution supplement • LOD and LOQ values of the SPR sensor were determined to be 26.3 and 87.6 ng/mL. • The SPR sensor has potential for myoglobin sensing during acute MI cases.

  18. Influence of salt ions on binding to molecularly imprinted polymers.

    OpenAIRE

    Kempe, Henrik; Kempe, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Salt ions were found to have an influence on template binding to two model molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs), targeted to penicillin G and propranolol, respectively, in water-acetonitrile mixtures. Water was detrimental to rebinding of penicillin G whereas propranolol bound in the entire water-acetonitrile range tested. In 100% aqueous solution, 3-M salt solutions augmented the binding of both templates. The effects followed the Hofmeister series with kosmotropic ions promoting the larges...

  19. Possible role of imprinting in the Turner phenotype.

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, C E; Donaldson, M D; Kelnar, C J; Smail, P. J.; Greene, S A; Paterson, W.F.; Connor, J M

    1994-01-01

    We have attempted to investigate the role of imprinting in the phenotype of Turner's syndrome. Sixty-three patients were investigated for parental origin of the retained normal X chromosome; 43 were found to retain the maternal X (XM) and 20 the paternal (XP). The relationship between a child's pretreatment height centile and parental height centiles was examined in 36 patients. No significant correlation was found between child and parental height centiles for XP or child and paternal height...

  20. Molecular Imprinting Fibrous Membranes of Poly(acrylonitrile-co-acrylic acid) Prepared by Electrospinning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Introduction Over the past few decades, molecular imprinting has been described as a technology for preparing "molecular doors" which can be matched to "template keys". It has been found to be a simple and effective approach to introduce specific recognition sites into synthetic polymers, namely, to create molecular imprinting polymers[1-4]. Remarkable features such as stability,ease of preparation and low cost, have made molecular imprinting polymers particularly attractive in chemical sensors, catalysis, drug delivery, and dedicated separations.

  1. Lsd1 and Lsd2 Control Programmed Replication Fork Pauses and Imprinting in Fission Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Allyson Holmes; Laura Roseaulin; Catherine Schurra; Herve Waxin; Sarah Lambert; Mikel Zaratiegui; Robert A. Martienssen; Benoit Arcangioli

    2012-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe a chromosomal imprinting event controls the asymmetric pattern of mating-type switching. The orientation of DNA replication at the mating-type locus is instrumental in this process. However, the factors leading to imprinting are not fully identified and the mechanism is poorly understood. Here we show that the replication fork pause at the mat1 locus (MPS1), essential for imprint formation, depends on the lysine specific demethylase, Lsd1. We dem...

  2. Autoinflammation and HLA-B27: Beyond Antigen Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Cailin H

    2016-08-01

    HLA-B27 associated disorders comprise a group of inflammatory conditions which have in common an association with the HLA class I molecule, HLA-B27. Given this association, these diseases are classically considered disorders of adaptive immunity. However, mounting data are challenging this assumption and confirming that innate immunity plays a more prominent role in pathogenesis than previously suspected. In this review, the concept of autoinflammation is discussed and evidence is presented from human and animal models to support a key role for innate immunity in HLA-B27 associated disorders. PMID:27229619

  3. Modeling prepolymerization step of a serotonin imprinted polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündeğer, Ersin; Selçuki, Cenk; Okutucu, Burcu

    2016-07-01

    Studies on generating artificial macromolecular receptors by molecular imprinting of synthetic polymers significantly emerged in the literature during last decades. The non-covalent approach, one of the three methods used in MIP synthesis, is more flexible for the choice of functional monomers, possible target molecules, and use of the imprinted materials. This study aims to investigate a serotonin imprinted polymer prepared by non-covalent approach using molecular modeling. The calculations were carried out by using density functional theory at ωB97XD/6-31++G(d,p) level and the polarizable continuum model was used for solvent calculations. Computational results showed that DMSO plays an important role in the MIP formation as it seems to control the size and the shape of the cavity. DMSO performs these tasks through hydrogen bonding and dispersive interactions. Although experimental IR could not verify the specific interaction modes because of broadband structure, computational IR results showed these modes clearly indicating the interactions leading to MIP formation. This model is specific to the studied serotonin-acrylamide-DMSO system but further studies may reveal a general computational protocol for other MIP systems. PMID:27262576

  4. Monolithic molecularly imprinted polymeric capillary columns for isolation of aflatoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szumski, Michał; Grzywiński, Damian; Prus, Wojciech; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2014-10-17

    Monolithic molecularly imprinted polymers extraction columns have been prepared in fused-silica capillaries by UV or thermal polymerization in a two-step process. First, a poly-(trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate) (polyTRIM) core monolith was synthesized either by UV or thermal polymerization. Then it was grafted with the mixture of methacrylic acid (MAA) as a functional monomer, ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA) as a cross-linking agent, 5,7-dimethoxycoumarin (DMC) as an aflatoxin-mimicking template, toluene as a porogen solvent and 2,2-azobis-(2-methylpropionitrile) (AIBN) as an initiator of the polymerization reaction. Different thermal condition of the photografting and different concentrations of the grafting mixture were tested during polymerization. The extraction capillary columns were evaluated in the terms of their hydrodynamic and chromatographic properties. Retention coefficients for aflatoxin B1 and DMC were used for assessment of the selectivity and imprinting factor. The obtained results indicate that the temperature of photografting and concentration of the grafting mixture are key parameters that determine the quality of the prepared MIPs. From the MIP columns characterized by the highest permeability the column of the highest imprinting factor was applied for isolation of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2 from the model aqueous sample followed by on-line chromatographic separation. The process was performed using a micro-MISPE-microLC-LIF system of a novel design, which allowed for detection of the eluates from the sample preparation part as well as from the chromatographic separation. PMID:25218633

  5. Imprinting of opossum Igf2r in the absence of differential methylation and air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidman, Jennifer R; Dolinoy, Dana C; Maloney, Kristin A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Jirtle, Randy L

    2006-01-01

    Phylogenetic comparison of extant mammals with divergent imprint status is a powerful method for identifying critical components of imprint regulation at individual loci. The entire genomic region of Igf2r in the imprinted marsupials, Didelphis virginiana and Monodelphis domestica, and the non-imprinted monotreme, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, was isolated and sequenced. Genetic and epigenetic comparisons of over 160 kb of sequence were then performed in five distinct mammalian species. Surprisingly, opossum Igf2r is imprinted and maternally expressed despite the absence of the intron 2 CpG island (CpG2), antisense Igf2r RNA (Air) and differential methylation of the promoter (CpG1) required for imprinting of this gene in mice. These findings demonstrate that the genomic elements necessary for imprinted Igf2r expression in eutherians are not required for imprinting of this locus in metatherians. Thus, the regulatory mechanisms of Igf2r imprinting did not evolve convergently within the Therian subclass of mammals. PMID:17998818

  6. SINGLE AND DOUBLE IMPRINTED POLYMER FOR SELECTIVE RECOGNITION OF Cd(II IONS IN AQUEOUS MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Birlik ÖZKÜTÜK

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have reported the synthesis of a new single and double-imprinted polymeric material for the separation of Cd(II ions in aqueous solutions. Chitosan has choosen as the Cd(II metal complexing big polymer for single and double imprinted polymers. In the synthesis of single imprinted polymer, Cd(II-complexed chitosan has crosslinked by epichlorohydrin. In the synthesis of double imprinted polymer, Cd(II-complexed chitosan was reacted with 3-mercaptopropyl-trimethoxysilane. Then, the polymeric beads have crosslinked with tetraethoxysilane (TEOS. The imprinted cadmium ions have removed from the polymeric matrix by 0.1M HNO3 (to prepare Cd(II templates. Optimum pH for rebinding of Cd(II on the single and double-imprinted polymers was 7.0. Equilibrium binding time and sorbent capacity have been found as 120 and 60 min, 342 and 172 mg g-1 for single and double imprinted polymers, respectively. In selectivity studies, it has been found that double imprinted results in increased affinity of the material toward Cd(II ion over other competitor metal ions with the same charge. The prepared single and double-imprinted polymers have repeatedly used and regenerated for thirty times without a significant decrease in polymer binding affinities.

  7. Secondary imprinting in the domestic chick: Binocular and lateralized monocular performance

    OpenAIRE

    Vallortigara, Giorgio; Regolin, Lucia; Zucca, Paolo

    2000-01-01

    Newly-hatched chicks were reared with a coloured imprinting object on day 1 of life (primary imprinting) and then with an object of a different colour (secondary imprinting) on day 2. They were then tested on day 3 for preferences between the primary and the secondary imprinting object in binocular and in monocular conditions. The main results were that (1) left-eyed chicks usually showed clearer choice than right-eyed chicks; (2) there were colour preferences that appeared to affect choice d...

  8. Determination of clenbuterol in pork and potable water samples by molecularly imprinted polymer through the use of covalent imprinting method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yiwei; Lan, Jianxing; Gao, Xue; Liu, Xiuying; Zhang, Defu; Wei, Liqiao; Gao, Ziyuan; Li, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    A novel molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for efficient separation and concentration of clenbuterol (CLB) was synthesized by covalent imprinting approach using CLB derivative as functional monomer. The MIPs synthesized were characterized by scanning electron microscope, nitrogen adsorption analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, and thermo-gravimetric analysis. The binding experimental results showed that the MIPs synthesized had fast adsorption kinetic (20 min at 25 mg L(-1)), high adsorption capacity and specific recognition ability for the analyte. In addition, the MIPs synthesized were successfully used as solid-phase sorbent for CLB sample preparation to be analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detector. Under optimized experimental conditions, the linear range of the calibration curve was 5-80 μg L(-1) (R(2) = 0.9938). The proposed method was also applied to the analysis of CLB in pork and potable water samples. PMID:26213061

  9. Activation of tumor suppressor p53 gene expression by magnetic thymine-imprinted chitosan nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mei-Hwa; Thomas, James L; Chen, Jian-Zhou; Jan, Jeng-Shiung; Lin, Hung-Yin

    2016-02-01

    Chitosan is a natural biodegradable polysaccharide that has been used to enhance gene delivery, owing to the ease with which chitosan nanoparticles enter the nucleus of cells. To study the effects of nuclear delivery of telomeric gene sequences, which contain thymine, we formed magnetic thymine-imprinted chitosan nanoparticles (TIPs) by the precipitation of chitosan, mixed with thymine and magnetic nanoparticles (to aid in separations). The mean size of the TIPS was 116 ± 18 nm; the dissociation constant for thymine was 21.8 mg mL(-1). We then treated human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) with TIPs nanoparticles bearing bound thymine or a bound telomeric DNA sequence. The expression of the tumor suppressor p53 gene increased when TIPs were applied and decreased when telomere-bound TIPs were applied. PMID:26693943

  10. Desorption of 3,3′-diindolylmethane from imprinted particles: An impact of cross-linker structure on binding capacity and selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klejn, Dorota; Luliński, Piotr; Maciejewska, Dorota, E-mail: dorota.maciejewska@wum.edu.pl

    2015-11-01

    Here, seven cross-linkers (six polar diacrylates or dimethacrylates of different lengths between double bonds, and one aromatic-divinylbenzene) were used to examine the impact of the cross-linker on binding capacity and selectivity of 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM) imprinted material. DIM participates in the suppression of viability of human ovarian and human breast cancer cell lines, but has low bioavailability. The investigations of novel imprinted polymer matrices for improvement of DIM release could allow to utilize not only a potency of DIM but also similar alkaloids, which are the important compounds with pharmacological activity. The bulk, thermal radical copolymerization of the cross-linkers in the presence of 3,3′-diindolylmethane (the template) and allylamine (the functional monomer) in dimethyl sulfoxide or in carbon tetrachloride (porogens) was carried out. The binding capacities of imprinted and non-imprinted polymers were compared, and two polymers (these were prepared using ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linkers) with the highest selectivity and binding capacity were selected to desorption test. The desorption profile of polymer prepared using polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linker revealed sustained release of 3,3′-diindolylmethane, and this system was selected for further optimization of the cross-linker amounts. The morphology and structure of the selected particles were analyzed using SEM micrographs, {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy, and BET measurements. The desorption of 3,3′-diindolylmethane from poly(allylamine-co-polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate) particles was in accordance with pseudo-second-order kinetics and the simplified Higuchi model indicated the diffusion controlled release of 3,3′-diindolylmethane. - Graphical abstract: Sustained release of 3,3′-diindolylmethane from cavity in imprinted poly(allylamine-co-polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate

  11. Desorption of 3,3′-diindolylmethane from imprinted particles: An impact of cross-linker structure on binding capacity and selectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here, seven cross-linkers (six polar diacrylates or dimethacrylates of different lengths between double bonds, and one aromatic-divinylbenzene) were used to examine the impact of the cross-linker on binding capacity and selectivity of 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM) imprinted material. DIM participates in the suppression of viability of human ovarian and human breast cancer cell lines, but has low bioavailability. The investigations of novel imprinted polymer matrices for improvement of DIM release could allow to utilize not only a potency of DIM but also similar alkaloids, which are the important compounds with pharmacological activity. The bulk, thermal radical copolymerization of the cross-linkers in the presence of 3,3′-diindolylmethane (the template) and allylamine (the functional monomer) in dimethyl sulfoxide or in carbon tetrachloride (porogens) was carried out. The binding capacities of imprinted and non-imprinted polymers were compared, and two polymers (these were prepared using ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linkers) with the highest selectivity and binding capacity were selected to desorption test. The desorption profile of polymer prepared using polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linker revealed sustained release of 3,3′-diindolylmethane, and this system was selected for further optimization of the cross-linker amounts. The morphology and structure of the selected particles were analyzed using SEM micrographs, 13C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy, and BET measurements. The desorption of 3,3′-diindolylmethane from poly(allylamine-co-polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate) particles was in accordance with pseudo-second-order kinetics and the simplified Higuchi model indicated the diffusion controlled release of 3,3′-diindolylmethane. - Graphical abstract: Sustained release of 3,3′-diindolylmethane from cavity in imprinted poly(allylamine-co-polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate). - Highlights:

  12. Innovative approach to uniform imprint of micron and submicron features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hoch

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To develop methods for uniform imprint of micron and submicron-scale features.Design/methodology/approach: The first is gas-assisted imprint technique. In use of gas to exert isotropic pressure in hot embossing, uniform embossing throughout the area is achieved. Another approach is the electromagnetic force-assisted imprinting technology, which employs the electromagnetic force to pull the magnetic stamp with submicron-scale structures into a UV-curable resist on the substrate. The liquid photopolymer is then cured by UV-irradiation at room temperature. Furthermore, the ferromagnetic UV-curable material is made of nano-Fe powder and UV-curable polymer. The micron and submicron-scale magnetic features can be fabricated.Findings: Uniform embossing throughout the area is achieved. Under the condition of 180˚C, 40kgf/cm2 and 90 seconds, high quality and uniformity of micro-optical components can be fabricated. For electromagnetic force-assisted imprinting technology, a large area of sub-micron pattern with a line width of 502nm and a pitch of 1um can be successfully fabricated under the condition of pressure of 1.6kgf/cm2 for 30 seconds and UV curing for 0.5 minute. Using ferromagnetic UV-curable resist, the structures can be successfully fabricated under the pressure of 0.92kgf/cm2 with the same UV-curable time. These results indicate good uniformity and controllability on both the gas-assisted hot embossing and electromagnetic force-assisted imprinting for efficient fabrication of micron- or submicron-scale structures.Practical implications: The facilities have been designed, constructed and tested. The effects of processing parameters including the processing temperature, pressure, and time on the replication quality were investigated.Originality/value: There are advantages of high uniformity, low pressure and low temperature for various applications in micron and sub-micron features and other micro-optical components such as gratings

  13. Predicting the performance of molecularly imprinted polymers: Selective extraction of caffeine by molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrington, Keith [School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Magner, Edmond [Materials and Surface Science Institute, Chemical and Environmental Sciences Department, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Regan, Fiona [School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland)]. E-mail: fiona.regan@dcu.ie

    2006-04-27

    A rational design approach was taken to the planning and synthesis of a molecularly imprinted polymer capable of extracting caffeine (the template molecule) from a standard solution of caffeine and further from a food sample containing caffeine. Data from NMR titration experiments in conjunction with a molecular modelling approach was used in predicting the relative ratios of template to functional monomer and furthermore determined both the choice of solvent (porogen) and the amount used for the study. In addition the molecular modelling program yielded information regarding the thermodynamic stability of the pre-polymerisation complex. Post-polymerisation analysis of the polymer itself by analysis of the pore size distribution by BET yielded significant information regarding the nature of the size and distribution of the pores within the polymer matrix. Here is proposed a stepwise procedure for the development and testing of a molecularly imprinted polymer using a well-studied compound-caffeine as a model system. It is shown that both the physical characteristics of a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) and the analysis of the pre-polymerisation complex can yield vital information, which can predict how well a given MIP will perform.

  14. Predicting the performance of molecularly imprinted polymers: Selective extraction of caffeine by molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rational design approach was taken to the planning and synthesis of a molecularly imprinted polymer capable of extracting caffeine (the template molecule) from a standard solution of caffeine and further from a food sample containing caffeine. Data from NMR titration experiments in conjunction with a molecular modelling approach was used in predicting the relative ratios of template to functional monomer and furthermore determined both the choice of solvent (porogen) and the amount used for the study. In addition the molecular modelling program yielded information regarding the thermodynamic stability of the pre-polymerisation complex. Post-polymerisation analysis of the polymer itself by analysis of the pore size distribution by BET yielded significant information regarding the nature of the size and distribution of the pores within the polymer matrix. Here is proposed a stepwise procedure for the development and testing of a molecularly imprinted polymer using a well-studied compound-caffeine as a model system. It is shown that both the physical characteristics of a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) and the analysis of the pre-polymerisation complex can yield vital information, which can predict how well a given MIP will perform

  15. Autoantibodies in autoimmune thyroid disease promote immune complex formation with self antigens and increase B cell and CD4+ T cell proliferation in response to self antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Leslie, Robert Graham Quinton

    2004-01-01

    B cells are centrally involved as antigen-presenting cells in certain autoimmune diseases. To establish whether autoantibodies form immune complexes (IC) with self-antigens in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and promote B cell uptake of self-antigen, sera from patients with Hashimoto's thyroidi......B cells are centrally involved as antigen-presenting cells in certain autoimmune diseases. To establish whether autoantibodies form immune complexes (IC) with self-antigens in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and promote B cell uptake of self-antigen, sera from patients with Hashimoto...

  16. Human Vδ2+ γδ T cells differentially induce maturation, cytokine production and alloreactive T cell stimulation by dendritic cells and B cells

    OpenAIRE

    Andreea ePetrasca; Doherty, Derek G.

    2014-01-01

    Human γδ T cells expressing the Vγ9Vδ2 T cell receptor can induce maturation of dendritic (DC) into antigen-presenting cells (APC) and B cells into antibody-secreting plasma cells. Since B cells are capable of presenting antigens to T cells, we investigated if Vγ9Vδ2 T cells can influence antigen presentation by these cells. We report that Vδ2 T cells induced expression of CD86, HLA-DR and CD40 by B cells and stimulated the release of IL-4, IL-6, TNF-α, and IgG, IgA and IgM. Vγ9Vδ2 T cells al...

  17. T cell immunity using transgenic B lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerloni, Mara; Rizzi, Marta; Castiglioni, Paola; Zanetti, Maurizio

    2004-03-01

    Adaptive immunity exists in all vertebrates and plays a defense role against microbial pathogens and tumors. T cell responses begin when precursor T cells recognize antigen on specialized antigen-presenting cells and differentiate into effector cells. Currently, dendritic cells are considered the only cells capable of stimulating T lymphocytes. Here, we show that mature naïve B lymphocytes can be genetically programmed by using nonviral DNA and turned into powerful antigen-presenting cells with a dual capacity of synthesis and presentation of antigen to T cells in vivo. A single i.v. injection of transgenic lymphocytes activates T cell responses reproducibly and specifically even at very low cell doses (102). We also demonstrate that T cell priming can occur in the absence of dendritic cells and results in immunological memory with protective effector functions. These findings disclose aspects in the regulation of adaptive immunity and indicate possibilities for vaccination against viruses and cancer in humans.

  18. Cell to Cell Signalling via Exosomes Through esRNA

    OpenAIRE

    Lotvall, Jan; Valadi, Hadi

    2007-01-01

    Exosomes are small vesicles of endosomal origin that can be released by many different cells to the microenvironment. Exosomes have been shown to participate in the immune system, by mediating antigen presentation. We have recently shown the presence of both mRNA and microRNA in exosomes, specifically in exosomes derived from mast cells. This RNA can be transferred between one mast cell to another, most likely through fusion of the exosome to the recipient cell membrane. The delivered RNA is ...

  19. Auto-presentation of Staphylococcal enterotoxin A by mouse CD4+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    The currently accepted model for superantigen (SAg )induced T cell activation suggests that SAg, without being processed, cross links both MHC class II, from Antigen Presenting Cells (APC), and V-beta, from T-cell receptor (TCR), initiating nonspecific T-cell activation. This T-cell proliferation in...

  20. Opposing roles for RhoH GTPase during T-cell migration and activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Christina M; Comrie, William A; Hyun, Young-Min; Chung, Hung-Li; Fedorchuk, Christine A; Lim, Kihong; Brakebusch, Cord; McGrath, James L; Waugh, Richard E; Meier-Schellersheim, Martin; Kim, Minsoo

    2012-01-01

    T cells spend the majority of their time perusing lymphoid organs in search of cognate antigen presented by antigen presenting cells (APCs) and then quickly recirculate through the bloodstream to another lymph node. Therefore, regulation of a T-cell response is dependent upon the ability of cells...... activation as well as prolonged T:APC conjugates. RT-PCR analyses of activated CD4(+) T cells and live images of T-cell migration and immunological synapse (IS) formation revealed that functions of RhoH took place primarily at the levels of transcription and intracellular distribution. Thus, we conclude that...

  1. Protein imprinting and recognition via forming nanofilms on microbeads surfaces in aqueous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Yan, E-mail: yanlu2001@sohu.com [College of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Yan Changling [College of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Wang Xuejing [Chemistry and Chemical Engineer School, Henna Institute of Science and Technology, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Wang Gongke [College of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China)

    2009-12-15

    In this paler, we present a technique of forming nanofilms of poly-3-aminophenylboronic acid (pAPBA) on the surfaces of polystyrene (PS) microbeads for proteins (papain and trypsin) in aqueous. Papain was chosen as a model to study the feasibility of the technique and trypsin as an extension. Obtained core-shell microbeads were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and BET methods. The results show that pAPBA formed nanofilms (60-100 nm in thickness) on the surfaces of PS microbeads. The specific surface area of the papain-imprinted beads was about 180 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} and its pore size was 31 nm. These imprinted microbeads exhibit high recognition specificity and fast mass transfer kinetics. The specificity of these imprinted beads mainly originates from the spatial effect of imprinted sites. Because the protein-imprinted sites were located at, or close to, the surface, the imprinted beads have good site accessibility toward the template molecules. The facility of the imprinting protocol and the high recognition properties of imprinted microbeads make the approach an attractive solution to problems in the field of biotechnology.

  2. New generation ion-imprinted nanocarrier for removal of Cr(VI) from wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uygun, Murat, E-mail: muygun@adu.edu.tr [Adnan Menderes University, Kocarl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I Vocational and Training School (Turkey); Feyzioglu, Esra; Oezcal Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I skan, Emir; Caka, Mueserref; Ergen, Aygen; Akgoel, Sinan [Ege University, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science (Turkey); Denizli, Adil [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science (Turkey)

    2013-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to prepare a novel ion-imprinted nanoparticle to remove Cr(VI) ions from waste water. For this, Cr(VI) ions were complexed with 2-methacryloylamido histidine (MAH) and then Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles were synthesized by surfactant-free emulsion polymerization technique. The templates, Cr(VI) ions, were removed from the nanoparticles using 0.1 M of HNO{sub 3} solution. The specific surface area of the Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles was found to be 1,397.85 m{sup 2}/g, and the particle size was calculated as 155.3 nm. These Cr(VI)-imprinted nanoparticles were used for the adsorption/desorption of Cr(VI) ions from its aqueous solutions. The effects of initial Cr(VI) concentration and medium pH on the Cr(VI) adsorption capacity were also studied. The maximum adsorbed amount of Cr(VI) on the imprinted nanoparticles was found to be 3,830.58 mg/g nanoparticle in pH 4.0. In order to investigate the selectivity of the imprinted nanoparticle, adsorption studies were repeated using Cr(III) ions. The selectivity results demonstrated that Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles showed high affinity for the Cr(VI) ions than Cr(III). The Cr(VI)-imprinted nanoparticles were used several times without decreasing their Cr(VI) adsorption capacities.

  3. Rapid Prototyping of Chemical Microsensors Based on Molecularly Imprinted Polymers Synthesized by Two-Photon Stereolithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Laura Piedad Chia; Spangenberg, Arnaud; Ton, Xuan-Anh; Fuchs, Yannick; Bokeloh, Frank; Malval, Jean-Pierre; Tse Sum Bui, Bernadette; Thuau, Damien; Ayela, Cédric; Haupt, Karsten; Soppera, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Two-photon stereolithography is used for rapid prototyping of submicrometre molecularly imprinted polymer-based 3D structures. The structures are evaluated as chemical sensing elements and their specific recognition properties for target molecules are confirmed. The 3D design capability is exploited and highlighted through the fabrication of an all-organic molecularly imprinted polymeric microelectromechanical sensor. PMID:27145145

  4. Synthesis, characterization and adsorption behavior of molecularly imprinted nanospheres for erythromycin using precipitation polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Xing; Lei, Jiandu; Geng, Liyuan; Deng, Hongquan; Jiang, Qiying; Zhang, Guifeng; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2012-09-01

    Preparation of uniform size molecularly imprinted nanospheres for erythromycin with good selectivity and high binding capacity by precipitation polymerization were presented, in which erythromycin, methacrylic acid and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate are used as template molecule, functional monomer and cross-linker, respectively. The synthesis conditions of molecularly imprinted nanospheres were optimized and the optimal molar ratio of erythromycin to functional monomer is 1:3. The molecularly imprinted polymers were characterized by scanning electron microscope, laser particle size analyzer and BET, respectively. The results suggested that molecularly imprinted nanospheres for erythromycin exhibited spherical shape and good monodispersity. Selectivity analysis indicated that the imprinted nanospheres could specifically recognize erythromycin from its structure analogues. Furthermore, adsorption kinetics and adsorption isotherm of the imprinted nanospheres were employed to investigate the binding characteristics of the imprinted nanospheres. The results showed that the imprinted nanospheres have high adsorption capacity for erythromycin, and the maximum theoretical static binding capacity is up to 267.0188 mg g(-1). PMID:23035481

  5. Removal of toxic mercury from petroleum oil by newly synthesized molecularly-imprinted polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairi, Nor Ain Shahera; Yusof, Nor Azah; Abdullah, Abdul Halim; Mohammad, Faruq

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, molecularly-imprinted polymers (MIPs) have attracted the attention of several researchers due to their capability for molecular recognition, easiness of preparation, stability and cost-effective production. By taking advantage of these facts, Hg(II) imprinted and non-imprinted copolymers were prepared by polymerizing mercury nitrate stock solution (or without it) with methacrylic acid (MAA), 2-hydroxyl ethyl methacrylate (HEMA), methanol and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the monomer, co-monomer solvent (porogen) and cross-linker, respectively. Thus, the formed Hg(II) imprinted polymer was characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The separation and preconcentration characteristics of Hg(II) imprinted polymer were investigated by solid phase extraction (SPE) procedures, and an optimal pH of 7 was investigated as ideal. The specific surface area of the Hg(II) imprinted polymer was found to be 19.45 m2/g with a size range from 100 to 140 µm in diameter. The maximum adsorption capacity was observed to be 1.11 mg/g of Hg(II) imprinted beads with 87.54% removal of Hg(II) ions within the first 5 min. The results of the study therefore confirm that the Hg(II) imprinted polymer can be used multiple times without significantly losing its adsorption capacity. PMID:26006226

  6. Polycarbonate as an Elasto-Plastic Material Model for Simulation of the Microstructure Hot Imprint Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokas Šakalys

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The thermal imprint process of polymer micro-patterning is widely applied in areas such as manufacturing of optical parts, solar energy, bio-mechanical devices and chemical chips. Polycarbonate (PC, as an amorphous polymer, is often used in thermoforming processes because of its good replication characteristics. In order to obtain replicas of the best quality, the imprint parameters (e.g., pressure, temperature, time, etc. must be determined. Therefore finite element model of the hot imprint process of lamellar periodical microstructure into PC has been created using COMSOL Multiphysics. The mathematical model of the hot imprint process includes three steps: heating, imprinting and demolding. The material properties of amorphous PC strongly depend on the imprint temperature and loading pressure. Polycarbonate was modelled as an elasto-plastic material, since it was analyzed below the glass transition temperature. The hot imprint model was solved using the heat transfer and the solid stress-strain application modes with thermal contact problem between the mold and polycarbonate. It was used for the evaluation of temperature and stress distributions in the polycarbonate during the hot imprint process. The quality of the replica, by means of lands filling ratio, was determined as well.

  7. Removal of Toxic Mercury from Petroleum Oil by Newly Synthesized Molecularly-Imprinted Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Ain Shahera Khairi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, molecularly-imprinted polymers (MIPs have attracted the attention of several researchers due to their capability for molecular recognition, easiness of preparation, stability and cost-effective production. By taking advantage of these facts, Hg(II imprinted and non-imprinted copolymers were prepared by polymerizing mercury nitrate stock solution (or without it with methacrylic acid (MAA, 2-hydroxyl ethyl methacrylate (HEMA, methanol and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA as the monomer, co-monomer solvent (porogen and cross-linker, respectively. Thus, the formed Hg(II imprinted polymer was characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA. The separation and preconcentration characteristics of Hg(II imprinted polymer were investigated by solid phase extraction (SPE procedures, and an optimal pH of 7 was investigated as ideal. The specific surface area of the Hg(II imprinted polymer was found to be 19.45 m2/g with a size range from 100 to 140 µm in diameter. The maximum adsorption capacity was observed to be 1.11 mg/g of Hg(II imprinted beads with 87.54% removal of Hg(II ions within the first 5 min. The results of the study therefore confirm that the Hg(II imprinted polymer can be used multiple times without significantly losing its adsorption capacity.

  8. Protein imprinting and recognition via forming nanofilms on microbeads surfaces in aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paler, we present a technique of forming nanofilms of poly-3-aminophenylboronic acid (pAPBA) on the surfaces of polystyrene (PS) microbeads for proteins (papain and trypsin) in aqueous. Papain was chosen as a model to study the feasibility of the technique and trypsin as an extension. Obtained core-shell microbeads were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and BET methods. The results show that pAPBA formed nanofilms (60-100 nm in thickness) on the surfaces of PS microbeads. The specific surface area of the papain-imprinted beads was about 180 m2 g-1 and its pore size was 31 nm. These imprinted microbeads exhibit high recognition specificity and fast mass transfer kinetics. The specificity of these imprinted beads mainly originates from the spatial effect of imprinted sites. Because the protein-imprinted sites were located at, or close to, the surface, the imprinted beads have good site accessibility toward the template molecules. The facility of the imprinting protocol and the high recognition properties of imprinted microbeads make the approach an attractive solution to problems in the field of biotechnology.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of oxytetracycline imprinted magnetic polymer for application in food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Sneha; Rajput, Yudhishthir Singh; Singh, Gulab; Sharma, Rajan

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic imprinted polymer was prepared by polymerization of methacrylate and ethyleneglycoldimethacrylate in the presence of oxytetracycline on the surface of iron magnetite. Selectivity of prepared polymer was calculated from ratio of partition coefficient of oxytetracycline for imprinted and non- imprinted polymer in water, acetonitrile, methanol and at different pH in aqueous buffer. pH of solvent exhibited pronounced effect on selectivity. Selectivity at pH 7.0, 6.0 and 5.0 was 36.0, 2.25 and 1.61 fold higher than at pH 4.0. Imprinted polymer was not selective for oxytetracycline in methanol. However, selectivity in water and acetonitrile was 19.42 and 2.86, respectively. Oxytetracycline did bind to imprinted polymer in water or aqueous buffer (pH 7.0) and could be eluted with methanol. Prepared polymer extracted 75-80 % oxytetracycline from water, honey and egg white.

  10. Selectivity enhancement of phosphate based functional polymeric gels towards Uranium(VI) using ion imprinting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The imprinting of gel containing polymer chains of ethylene glycol methacrylate phosphate (EGMP) for U(VI) ions were carried out. The U(VI) imprinting has been carried out in pure EGMP and in EGMP: poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA) = 1:9 composition. Complexation of the monomer with template (U(VI)) followed by polymerization have been used to imprint the U(VI) onto the polymer chains. The comparison of uptake studies of U(VI) and Pu(IV) at 3 M HNO3 shows increased selectivity of U(VI) relative to Pu(IV) for both the gel compositions. The less uptake of U(VI) for imprinted EGMP:PEGMA gel relative to pure imprinted EGMP gel at tracer level can be possibly due to the requirement of two EGMP units in the vicinity for U(VI) complexation. (author)

  11. Molecularly imprinted plasmonic nanosensor for selective SERS detection of protein biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yongqin; Qin, Yating; Svec, Frantisek; Tan, Tianwei

    2016-06-15

    Molecularly imprinted plasmonic nanosensor has been prepared via the rational design of an ultrathin polymer layer on the surface of gold nanorods imprinted with the target protein. This nanosensor enabled selective fishing-out of the target protein biomarker even from a complex real sample such as human serum. Sensitive SERS detection of the protein biomarkers with a strong Raman enhancement was achieved by formation of protein imprinted gold nanorods aggregates, stacking of protein imprinted gold nanorods onto a glass plate, or self-assembly of protein imprinted gold nanorods into close-packed array. High specificity and sensitivity of this method were demonstrated with a detection limit of at least 10(-8)mol/L for the target protein. This could provide a promising alternative for the currently used immunoassays and fluorescence detection, and offer an ultrasensitive, non-destructive, and label-free technique for clinical diagnosis applications. PMID:26874111

  12. A taste sensor based on surface imprinted TiO2 membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wenxiang; Chen, Zhencheng; Jiang, Xingguo; Zhao, Hongtian; Chu, Fugang; Hou, Hongbin

    2012-03-01

    Surface imprinted TiO2 membranes had been prepared and used as sensing membranes for basic tastes discrimination. Four basic taste molecules (citric acid, D-glucose, quinine hydrochloride and sodium L-glutamate for sour, sweet, bitter and umami respectively) were used as templates for imprinting. The sensor was fabricated in light-addressable potentiometric principle. Experimental results show that membranes imprinted by citric acid and quinine hydrochloride exhibit similar response behaviors towards four taste substances, that is citric acid > quinine hydrochloride > sodium L-glutamate > D-glucose. Membrane imprinted by sodium L-glutamate is sensitive towards quinine hydrochloride. Except for D-glucose imprinting membrane, other three membranes are inert to glucose. Combined with principal component analysis, four basic tastes can be well distinguished.

  13. Imprinting Analysis of the Porcine MEST Gene in 75 and 90 Day Placentas and Prenatal Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chenchang XU; Lijie SU; Quanyong ZHOU; Changchun LI; Shuhong ZHAO

    2007-01-01

    Imprinted genes play important roles in mammalian growth, development and behavior. Mouse mesoderm-specific transcript (MEST) has been identified as an imprinted gene and mapped to an imprinted region of mouse chromosome 6 (MMU6). It plays essential roles in embryonic and placental growth, and it is required for maternal behavior in adult female mouse. Here, we isolated the porcine MEST gene and detected a single nucleotide polymorphism in the 3'-untranslated region. The RsaI polymorphism was used to investigate the allele frequencies in different pig breeds and the imprinting status in prenatal porcine tissues.Allele frequencies were significantly different between the native Chinese and Landrace breeds, except that most of the native Yushan pigs (21/26) are heterozygous at this locus. The results indicate that MEST was imprinted in placentas on days 75 and 90 of gestation as well as in the 75 d fetal heart, muscle, kidney, lung and liver.

  14. Molecularly Imprinted Polymers: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Considerations on the Specific Sorption and Molecular Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kejun Tong

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a work aiming at thermodynamically and kinetically interpreting the specific sorption and recognition by a molecularly imprinted polymer. Using Boc-L-Phe-OH as a template, the imprinted material was prepared. The result indicates that the prepared polymer can well discriminate the imprint species from its analogue (Boc-D-Phe-OH, so as to adsorb more for the former but less for the latter. Kinetic analysis indicates that this specific sorption, in nature, can be a result of a preferential promotion. The imprint within the polymer causes a larger adsorption rate for the template than for the analogue. Thermodynamic study also implies that the molecular induction from the specific imprint to the template is larger than to the analogue, which thus makes the polymer capable of preferentially alluring the template to bind.

  15. Placental overgrowth in mice lacking the imprinted gene Ipl

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Dale; Fortino, Weiwei; Clark, Lorraine; Musalo, Raymond; Wang, Wenxian; Saxena, Anjana; Li, Chi-Ming; Reik, Wolf; Ludwig, Thomas; Tycko, Benjamin

    2002-01-01

    The Ipl (Tssc3) gene lies in an extended imprinted region of distal mouse chromosome 7, which also contains the Igf2 gene. Expression of Ipl is highest in placenta and yolk sac, where its mRNA is derived almost entirely from the maternal allele. Ipl encodes a small cytoplasmic protein with a pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain. We constructed two lines of mice with germ-line deletions of this gene (Iplneo and IplloxP) and another line deleted for the similar but nonimprinted gene Tih1. All three ...

  16. Uniparental embryos in the study of genomic imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yong; Amarnath, Dasari; Latham, Keith E

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear transplantation has been used to study genomic imprinting. Available nuclear transfer methods include pronuclear transfer (PNT), intracytoplasmic sperm injection, and round spermatid injection. By generating uniparental embryos that have exclusively paternal or maternal genomes, it is possible to study the functions of the parental genomes separately. It is possible to compare functions in haploid and diploid states. In addition, nuclear transfer allows the effects of the ooplasm, including mitochondria, to be distinguished from effects of the maternally inherited chromosomes. PNTs can also be used to study epigenetic modifications of the parental genomes by the ooplasm. This chapter reviews the methods employed to generate uniparental embryonic constructs for these purposes. PMID:22907487

  17. Imprinted and injection-molded nano-structured optical surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Alexander Bruun; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil; Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik;

    2013-01-01

    paper, nanostructured polymer surfaces suitable for up-scalable polymer replication methods, such as imprinting/embossing and injection-molding, are discussed. The limiting case of injection-moulding compatible designs is investigated. Anti-reflective polymer surfaces are realized by replication of...... of light from polymer surfaces and their implication for creating structural colors is discussed. In the case of injection-moulding compatible designs, the maximum reflection of nano-scale textured surfaces cannot exceed the Fresnel reflection of a corresponding flat polymer surface, which is approx...

  18. Imprints of Nuclear Symmetry Energy on Properties of Neutron Stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant progress has been made in recent years in constraining the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy using terrestrial nuclear laboratory data. Around and below the nuclear matter saturation density, the experimental constraints start to merge in a relatively narrow region. At supra-saturation densities, there are, however, still large uncertainties. After summarizing the latest experimental constraints on the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy, we highlight a few recent studies examining imprints of nuclear symmetry energy on the binding energy, energy release during hadron-quark phase transitions as well as the ω-mode frequency and damping time of gravitational wave emission of neutron stars.

  19. 3D Simulation of Nano-Imprint Lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Román Marín, José Manuel; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    2010-01-01

    A proof of concept study of the feasibility of fully three-dimensional (3D) time-dependent simulation of nano-imprint lithography of polymer melt, where the polymer is treated as a structured liquid, has been presented. Considering the flow physics of the polymer as a structured liquid, we have...... followed the line initiated by de Gennes, using a Molecular Stress Function model of the Doi and Edwards type. We have used a 3D Lagrangian Galerkin finite element methods implemented on a parallel computer architecture. In a Lagrangian techniques, the node point follows the particle movement, allowing...

  20. Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Coated on Stainless Steel Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu XiaoGang; Dai GuiMei; Huang JiaJing

    2009-01-01

    @@ With characteristics of specific selectivity,good chemical stability and easy preparation,molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) has been used as the recognition materials m various fields ~([1,2]).Recently,the application of MIP in the sample pre-treatment techniques such as SPME was attractive ~([3,4]).For analysis of complicated samples,the interference matrix would be reduced obviously with the MIP-coated SPME fiber~([5-7]).Because MIPs were coated on the surface of silica fiber through chemical bonding,those fibers could be used for over 80 times without obvious losing of surface quality and extraction performance of MIP coatings.

  1. Frugal fat or munificent muscle: genomic imprinting and metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Haig, David

    2014-01-01

    Variation in body composition is a popular obsession. The culturally ‘ideal’ body type is light on fat and heavy on muscle but the human population is collectively laying on fat. A new study finds antagonistic effects of two imprinted genes, Grb10 and Dlk1, on body composition in mice. These findings pose the question whether there is an evolutionary conflict between genes of maternal and paternal origin over the optimal proportions of body fat and lean muscle mass. See research article: http...

  2. Designing and preparation of cytisine alkaloid surface-imprinted material and its molecular recognition characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • An elaborate molecular design was well done for molecule surface-imprinting. • The new method of “pre-graft polymerizing and post-imprinting” was used. • Cytisine molecule surface-imprinted material was prepared. • Cytisine surface-imprinting depends on electrostatic interaction between host–guest. • The imprinted material has special recognition selectivity for template cytisine. - Abstract: Based on molecular design, a cytisine surface-imprinted material was prepared using the new surface-imprinting technique of “pre-graft polymerizing and post-imprinting”. The graft-polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) on the surfaces of micron-sized silica gel particles was first performed with a surface-initiating system, preparing the grafted particles PGMA/SiO2. Subsequently, a polymer reaction, the ring-opening reaction of the epoxy groups of the grafted PGMA, was conducted with sodium 2,4-diaminobenzene sulfonate (SAS) as reagent, resulting in the functional grafted particles SAS-PGMA/SiO2. The adsorption of cytisine on SAS-PGMA/SiO2 particles reached saturation via strong electrostatic interaction between the sulfonate groups of SAS-PGMA/SiO2 particles and the protonated N atoms in cytisine molecule. Finally, cytisine surface-imprinting was successfully carried out with glutaraldehyde as crosslinker, obtaining cytisine surface-imprinted material MIP-SASP/SiO2. The binding and recognition characteristics of MIP-SASP/SiO2 towards cytisine were investigated in depth. The experimental results show that there is strong electrostatic interaction between particles and cytisine molecules, and on this basis, cytisine surface-imprinting can be smoothly performed. The surface-imprinted MIP-SASP/SiO2 has special recognition selectivity and excellent binding affinity for cytisine, and the selectivity coefficients of MIP-SASP/SiO2 particles for cytisine relative to matrine and oxymatrine, which were used as two contrast alkaloids, are 9.5 and

  3. Molecular imprinted polypyrrole modified glassy carbon electrode for the determination of tobramycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Atomic force microscopic images of (A) bare GCE and (B) TOB imprinted PPy/GCE surface. - Highlights: • Glassy carbon electrode based on molecularly imprinted polypyrrole was prepared. • The developed surfaces were characterized by AFM, FTIR, EIS and CV. • The developed nanosensor was applied to egg and milk samples. - Abstract: Over the past two decades, molecular imprinted polymers have attracted a broad interest from scientists in sensor development. In the preparation of molecular imprinted polymers the desired molecule (template) induces the creation of specific recognition sites in the polymer. In this study, the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) based on molecularly imprinted polypyrrole (PPy) was fabricated for the determination of tobramycin (TOB). The developed electrode was prepared by incorporation of a template molecule (TOB) during the electropolymerization of pyrrole on GCE in aqueous solution using cyclic voltammetry (CV) method. The performance of the imprinted and non-imprinted electrodes was evaluated by square wave voltammetry (SWV). The effect of pH, monomer and template concentrations, electropolymerization cycles on the performance of the imprinted and non-imprinted electrodes was investigated and optimized. The non-modified and TOB-imprinted surfaces were characterized by using atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and CV. The linearity range of TOB was 5.0 × 10−10–1.0 × 10−8 M with the detection limit of 1.4 × 10−10 M. The developed nanosensor was applied successfully for the determination of TOB in egg and milk

  4. Regulation of DNA methylation turnover at LTR retrotransposons and imprinted loci by the histone methyltransferase Setdb1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Danny; Du, Tingting; Wagner, Ulrich; Xie, Wei; Lee, Ah Young; Goyal, Preeti; Li, Yujing; Szulwach, Keith E; Jin, Peng; Lorincz, Matthew C; Ren, Bing

    2014-05-01

    During mammalian development, DNA methylation patterns need to be reset in primordial germ cells (PGCs) and preimplantation embryos. However, many LTR retrotransposons and imprinted genes are impervious to such global epigenetic reprogramming via hitherto undefined mechanisms. Here, we report that a subset of such genomic regions are resistant to widespread erasure of DNA methylation in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) lacking the de novo DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts) Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b. Intriguingly, these loci are enriched for H3K9me3 in mESCs, implicating this mark in DNA methylation homeostasis. Indeed, deletion of the H3K9 methyltransferase SET domain bifurcated 1 (Setdb1) results in reduced H3K9me3 and DNA methylation levels at specific loci, concomitant with increased 5-hydroxymethylation (5hmC) and ten-eleven translocation 1 binding. Taken together, these data reveal that Setdb1 promotes the persistence of DNA methylation in mESCs, likely reflecting one mechanism by which DNA methylation is maintained at LTR retrotransposons and imprinted genes during developmental stages when DNA methylation is reprogrammed. PMID:24757056

  5. Pancreatic islet-specific T-cell clones from nonobese diabetic mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Haskins, K; Portas, M; Bergman, B.; Lafferty, K; Bradley, B

    1989-01-01

    We have produced a panel of islet-specific T-cell clones from nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. These clones proliferate and make interleukin 2 in an antigen-specific manner in response to NOD antigen-presenting cells and islet cells. Most of the clones respond to islet-cell antigen from different mouse strains but only in the presence of antigen-presenting cells bearing the class II major histocompatibility complex of the NOD mouse. In vivo, the clones mediate the destruction of islet, but not p...

  6. Dendritic Cells and Liver Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Adeeb H.; Aloman, Costica

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells are a relative rare population of specialized antigen presenting cells that are distributed through most lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues and play a critical role in linking the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. The liver contains a heterogeneous population of dendritic cells that may contribute to liver inflammation and fibrosis through a number of mechanisms. This review summarizes current knowledge on the development and characterization of liver dendritic cel...

  7. Imprinting superconducting vortex footsteps in a magnetic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisbois, Jérémy; Motta, Maycon; Avila, Jonathan I.; Shaw, Gorky; Devillers, Thibaut; Dempsey, Nora M.; Veerapandian, Savita K. P.; Colson, Pierre; Vanderheyden, Benoît; Vanderbemden, Philippe; Ortiz, Wilson A.; Nguyen, Ngoc Duy; Kramer, Roman B. G.; Silhanek, Alejandro V.

    2016-06-01

    Local polarization of a magnetic layer, a well-known method for storing information, has found its place in numerous applications such as the popular magnetic drawing board toy or the widespread credit cards and computer hard drives. Here we experimentally show that a similar principle can be applied for imprinting the trajectory of quantum units of flux (vortices), travelling in a superconducting film (Nb), into a soft magnetic layer of permalloy (Py). In full analogy with the magnetic drawing board, vortices act as tiny magnetic scribers leaving a wake of polarized magnetic media in the Py board. The mutual interaction between superconducting vortices and ferromagnetic domains has been investigated by the magneto-optical imaging technique. For thick Py layers, the stripe magnetic domain pattern guides both the smooth magnetic flux penetration as well as the abrupt vortex avalanches in the Nb film. It is however in thin Py layers without stripe domains where superconducting vortices leave the clearest imprints of locally polarized magnetic moment along their paths. In all cases, we observe that the flux is delayed at the border of the magnetic layer. Our findings open the quest for optimizing magnetic recording of superconducting vortex trajectories.

  8. Fluorescent monomers: "bricks" that make a molecularly imprinted polymer "bright".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Wei; Wagner, Sabine; Rurack, Knut

    2016-03-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are potent and established recognition phases in separation and enrichment applications. Because of their robustness, versatility and format adaptability, they also constitute very promising sensing phases, especially when the active sensing element is directly integrated into the MIP. Fluorescent MIPs incorporating fluorescent monomers are perhaps the best developed and most successful approach here. This article reviews the state of the art in this field, discussing the pros and cons of the use of fluorescent dye and probe derivatives as such monomers, the different molecular interaction forces for template complexation, signalling modes and a variety of related approaches that have been realized over the years, including Förster resonance energy transfer processes, covalent imprinting, postmodification attachment of fluorescent units and conjugated polymers as MIPs; other measurement schemes and sensing chemistries that use MIPs and fluorescence interrogation to solve analytical problems (fluorescent competitive assays, fluorescent analytes, etc.) are not covered here. Throughout the article, photophysical processes are discussed to facilitate understanding of the effects that can occur when one is planning for a fluorescence response to happen in a constrained polymer matrix. The article concludes with a concise assessment of the suitability of the different formats for sensor realization. PMID:26613794

  9. Molecularly imprinted hydrogels as functional active packaging materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito-Peña, Elena; González-Vallejo, Victoria; Rico-Yuste, Alberto; Barbosa-Pereira, Letricia; Cruz, José Manuel; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Moreno-Bondi, María Cruz

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis of novel molecularly imprinted hydrogels (MIHs) for the natural antioxidant ferulic acid (FA), and their application as packaging materials to prevent lipid oxidation of butter. A library of MIHs was synthesized using a synthetic surrogate of FA, 3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)propionic acid (HFA), as template molecule, ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (EDMA) as cross-linker, and 1-allylpiperazine (1-ALPP) or 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), in combination with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) as functional monomers, at different molar concentrations. The DMAEMA/HEMA-based MIHs showed the greatest FA loading capacity, while the 1-ALLP/HEMA-based polymers exhibited the highest imprinting effect. During cold storage, FA-loaded MIHs protected butter from oxidation and led to TBARs values that were approximately half those of butter stored without protection and 25% less than those recorded for butter covered with hydrogels without FA, potentially extending the shelf life of butter. Active packaging is a new field of application for MIHs with great potential in the food industry. PMID:26213001

  10. Selective sorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate on molecularly imprinted polymer adsorbents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shubo DENG; Danmeng SHUAI; Qiang YU; Jun HUANG; Gang YU

    2009-01-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), as a potential persistent organic pollutant, has been widely detected in water environments, and has become a great concern in recent years. PFOS is very stable and difficult to decompose using conventional techniques. Sorption may be an attractive method to remove it from water. In this study, the molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) adsorbents were prepared through the polymerization of 4-vinylpyridine under different preparation conditions in order to remove perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) from water. The MIP adsorbents using perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) as the template had good imprinting effects and could selectively remove PFOS from aqueous solution. The sorption behaviors including sorption kinetics,isotherms, and effect of pH, salt, and competitive anions were investigated. Experimental results showed that the sorption of PFOS On the MIP adsorbents was very fast, pH-dependent, and highly selective. The achieved fast sorption equilibrium within 1 h was attributed to the surface sorption on the fine adsorbents. The sorption isotherms showed that the sorption selectivity of PFOS on the MIP adsorbents decreased at high PFOS concentrations, which may be due to the double-layer sorption and the formation of PFOS micelles on the sorbent surface. The sorption of PFOS on the MIP adsorbents was mainly dominated by the electrostatic interaction between the protonated vinylpyridine on the adsorbent surface and the anionic PFOS. The prepared MIP adsorbents can potentially be applied in water and wastewater treatment for selective removal of PFOS.

  11. Computational and experimental studies on oxalic acid imprinted polymer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kiran Kumar Tadi; R V Motghare

    2013-03-01

    Computational approach plays an important role to pre-evaluate the interactions between template and functional monomer, so that to choose functional monomer having stronger interactions with template during synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). Hence template-monomer interactions in pre-polymerization were mainly focused. In this paper, computational chemistry was applied to screen the number of mol of functional monomer that interacts with one mol of template. Intermolecular interactions between oxalic acid and acrylamide have been investigated. The binding energies Ebind were calculated by DFT (B3LYP) level of theory with the 6−31+G(d,p) basis set. It was found that four mol of acrylamide were sufficient to interact with one mol of oxalic acid in the pre-polymerization mixture. Four possible conformations and frequency calculations were performed to locate minima. Oxalic acid specific bulk polymer was obtained by the thermal initiated free radical co-polymerization of acrylamide and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate with oxalic acid as template and acetonitrile as porogen. The synthesized MIP efficiently adsorbed oxalic acid from aqueous solutions. The binding parameters ofMIP and non-imprinted polymer (NIP) were compared by Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherms.

  12. Molecularly-imprinted polymer sensors: realising their potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Lokman; Turner, Anthony P F

    2016-02-15

    In parallel with recent developments in communications, nanotechnology and materials sciences, there has been extraordinary growth in the area of biosensors, with almost half of the total number of papers ever published (1962-2015) appearing in the last five-years (2010-2015). Molecular imprinting offers a route to the creation of specific and selective cavities in a 3D-polymeric network, which are complementary not only to the size and shape of a target species, but also provide interaction points and a coordination sphere around the template molecule. Given the challenges facing biosensor technologists, it is natural that this approach to create potentially highly stable synthetic ligands as an alternative to, or to compliment natural receptors, should emerge as a key line of interdisciplinary research. Despite the profuse amount of recent literature on molecularly-imprinted polymers (MIPs) and some limited commercial activity, these promising materials still need to overcome some limitations before taking their place in analytical market. In this review, we have focused on the most promising advances in MIP-based biosensors to illustrate how close to market they really are. We present our material under five main sections covering computational design, polymerisation strategies, material combinations, recent sensor designs and manufacturing issues. Each section provides technical details and evaluates the effect on sensor performance. PMID:26189406

  13. Anthropogenic metal contamination and sapropel imprints in deep Mediterranean sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Metal pollution was recorded in deep Mediterranean sediments. → Atmospheric imprint was characterized with radioactive and stable Pb isotopes. → 210Pb data suggests metal pollution from atmospheric deposition. → Pollutant Pb input to the western basin is 20-25% of coastal atmospheric inventories. → Trace element redistribution is associated with sapropel and turbidite events. - Abstract: Sediment cores from the deep Balearic basin and the Cretan Sea provide evidence for the accumulation of Cd, Pd and Zn in the top few centimeters of the abyssal Mediterranean sea-bottom. In both cores, 206Pb/207Pb profiles confirm this anthropogenic impact with less radiogenic imprints toward surface sediments. The similarity between excess 210Pb accumulated in the top core and the 210Pb flux suggests that top core metal inventories reasonably reflect long-term atmospheric deposition to the open Mediterranean. Pb inventory in the western core for the past 100 years represents 20-30% of sediment coastal inventories, suggesting that long-term atmospheric deposition determined from coastal areas has to be used cautiously for mass balance calculations in the open Mediterranean. In the deeper section of both cores, Al normalized trace metal profiles suggest diagenetic remobilization of Fe, Mn, Cu and, to a lesser extent, Pb that likely corresponds to sapropel event S1.

  14. Imprinting superconducting vortex footsteps in a magnetic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisbois, Jérémy; Motta, Maycon; Avila, Jonathan I.; Shaw, Gorky; Devillers, Thibaut; Dempsey, Nora M.; Veerapandian, Savita K. P.; Colson, Pierre; Vanderheyden, Benoît; Vanderbemden, Philippe; Ortiz, Wilson A.; Nguyen, Ngoc Duy; Kramer, Roman B. G.; Silhanek, Alejandro V.

    2016-01-01

    Local polarization of a magnetic layer, a well-known method for storing information, has found its place in numerous applications such as the popular magnetic drawing board toy or the widespread credit cards and computer hard drives. Here we experimentally show that a similar principle can be applied for imprinting the trajectory of quantum units of flux (vortices), travelling in a superconducting film (Nb), into a soft magnetic layer of permalloy (Py). In full analogy with the magnetic drawing board, vortices act as tiny magnetic scribers leaving a wake of polarized magnetic media in the Py board. The mutual interaction between superconducting vortices and ferromagnetic domains has been investigated by the magneto-optical imaging technique. For thick Py layers, the stripe magnetic domain pattern guides both the smooth magnetic flux penetration as well as the abrupt vortex avalanches in the Nb film. It is however in thin Py layers without stripe domains where superconducting vortices leave the clearest imprints of locally polarized magnetic moment along their paths. In all cases, we observe that the flux is delayed at the border of the magnetic layer. Our findings open the quest for optimizing magnetic recording of superconducting vortex trajectories. PMID:27263660

  15. Multivalent glycopeptide dendrimers for the targeted delivery of antigens to dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. García-Vallejo; M. Ambrosini; A. Overbeek; W.E. van Riel; K. Bloem; W.W.J. Unger; F. Chiodo; J.G. Bolscher; K. Nazmi; H. Kalay; Y. van Kooyk

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the most powerful type of antigen presenting cells. Current immunotherapies targeting dendritic cells have shown a relative degree of success but still require further improvement. One of the most important issues to solve is the efficiency of antigen delivery to dendritic cells

  16. Selective transport of internalized antigens to the cytosol for MHC class I presentation in dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez, A; Regnault, A; Kleijmeer, M; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, P; Amigorena, S

    1999-01-01

    In order for cytotoxic T cells to initiate immune responses, peptides derived from internalized antigens must be presented to the cytotoxic T cells on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Here we show that dendritic cells, the only antigen-presenting cells that initiate immune r

  17. Large-area soft-imprinted nanowire networks as light trapping transparent conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Groep, Jorik; Gupta, Dhritiman; Verschuuren, Marc A.; M. Wienk, Martijn; Janssen, Rene A. J.; Polman, Albert

    2015-06-01

    Using soft-imprint nanolithography, we demonstrate large-area application of engineered two-dimensional polarization-independent networks of silver nanowires as transparent conducting electrodes. These networks have high optical transmittance, low electrical sheet resistance, and at the same time function as a photonic light-trapping structure enhancing optical absorption in the absorber layer of thin-film solar cells. We study the influence of nanowire width and pitch on the network transmittance and sheet resistance, and demonstrate improved performance compared to ITO. Next, we use P3HT-PCBM organic solar cells as a model system to show the realization of nanowire network based functional devices. Using angle-resolved external quantum efficiency measurements, we demonstrate engineered light trapping by coupling to guided modes in the thin absorber layer of the solar cell. Concurrent to the direct observation of controlled light trapping we observe a reduction in photocurrent as a result of increased reflection and parasitic absorption losses; such losses can be minimized by re-optimization of the NW network geometry. Together, these results demonstrate how engineered 2D NW networks can serve as multifunctional structures that unify the functions of a transparent conductor and a light trapping structure. These results are generic and can be applied to any type of optoelectronic device.

  18. Preparation of Molecularly Imprinted Composite Membranes for Inducing Bergenin Crystallization in Supercritical CO{sub 2} and Adsorption Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wencheng; Wang, Ruixia; Cui, Yanfang; Hong, Lile [Hefei University of Technology, Hefei (China); Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Xingyuan [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China)

    2012-02-15

    The process of molecular imprinting is composed of three steps: covalent conjugate or noncovalent adduct between a functional monomer and a template molecule, which is the preorganization step; polymerization of this monomer-template conjugate (or adduct) and removal of the template from the polymer. In the above procedures, the molecular memory is strongly dependent on the formation and status of the template-monomer preorganization conjugate (or adduct). Therefore, to study these conjugates/adducts in detail is crucially important for understanding the imprinting mechanism and designing efficient molecular imprinting systems. On the other hand, one of the most important and facile ways to realize the molecular imprinting is using the molecularly imprinted membranes (MIMs), which were first introduced by Piletsky et al. In MIMs systems, the combination of the imprinting technique can provide membranes with specific selectivity for the separation of targeted organic compounds and thus make the MIMs possess the advantages of both molecular imprinting and membrane technology.

  19. Preparation of Molecularly Imprinted Composite Membranes for Inducing Bergenin Crystallization in Supercritical CO2 and Adsorption Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of molecular imprinting is composed of three steps: covalent conjugate or noncovalent adduct between a functional monomer and a template molecule, which is the preorganization step; polymerization of this monomer-template conjugate (or adduct) and removal of the template from the polymer. In the above procedures, the molecular memory is strongly dependent on the formation and status of the template-monomer preorganization conjugate (or adduct). Therefore, to study these conjugates/adducts in detail is crucially important for understanding the imprinting mechanism and designing efficient molecular imprinting systems. On the other hand, one of the most important and facile ways to realize the molecular imprinting is using the molecularly imprinted membranes (MIMs), which were first introduced by Piletsky et al. In MIMs systems, the combination of the imprinting technique can provide membranes with specific selectivity for the separation of targeted organic compounds and thus make the MIMs possess the advantages of both molecular imprinting and membrane technology

  20. Critical evaluation of imprinted gene expression by RNA-Seq: a new perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian DeVeale

    Full Text Available In contrast to existing estimates of approximately 200 murine imprinted genes, recent work based on transcriptome sequencing uncovered parent-of-origin allelic effects at more than 1,300 loci in the developing brain and two adult brain regions, including hundreds present in only males or females. Our independent replication of the embryonic brain stage, where the majority of novel imprinted genes were discovered and the majority of previously known imprinted genes confirmed, resulted in only 12.9% concordance among the novel imprinted loci. Further analysis and pyrosequencing-based validation revealed that the vast majority of the novel reported imprinted loci are false-positives explained by technical and biological variation of the experimental approach. We show that allele-specific expression (ASE measured with RNA-Seq is not accurately modeled with statistical methods that assume random independent sampling and that systematic error must be accounted for to enable accurate identification of imprinted expression. Application of a robust approach that accounts for these effects revealed 50 candidate genes where allelic bias was predicted to be parent-of-origin-dependent. However, 11 independent validation attempts through a range of allelic expression biases confirmed only 6 of these novel cases. The results emphasize the importance of independent validation and suggest that the number of imprinted genes is much closer to the initial estimates.