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Sample records for antigen-induced arthritis model

  1. Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) as a potential therapy for rheumatoid arthritis: boron biodistribution study in a model of antigen-induced arthritis in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivillin, Verónica A; Abramson, David B; Bumaguin, Gaston E; Bruno, Leandro J; Garabalino, Marcela A; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Heber, Elisa M; Feldman, Sara; Schwint, Amanda E

    2014-11-01

    Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) is explored for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study was to perform boron biodistribution studies in a model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in female New Zealand rabbits, with the boron carriers boronophenylalanine (BPA) and sodium decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) to assess the potential feasibility of BNCS for RA. Rabbits in chronic phase of AIA were used for biodistribution studies employing the following protocols: intra-articular (ia) (a) BPA-f 0.14 M (0.7 mg (10)B), (b) GB-10 (5 mg (10)B), (c) GB-10 (50 mg (10)B) and intravenous (iv), (d) BPA-f 0.14 M (15.5 mg (10)B/kg), (e) GB-10 (50 mg (10)B/kg), and (f) BPA-f (15.5 mg (10)B/kg) + GB-10 (50 mg (10)B/kg). At different post-administration times (13-85 min for ia and 3 h for iv), samples of blood, pathological synovium (target tissue), cartilage, tendon, muscle, and skin were taken for boron measurement by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The intra-articular administration protocols at 20 ppm) in the pathological synovium. Dosimetric estimations suggest that BNCS would be able to achieve a therapeutically useful dose in pathological synovium without exceeding the radiotolerance of normal tissues in the treatment volume, employing boron carriers approved for use in humans. Radiobiological in vivo studies will be necessary to determine the actual therapeutic efficacy of BNCS to treat RA in an experimental model. PMID:25156017

  2. Correlative BOLD MR imaging of stages of synovitis in a rabbit model of antigen-induced arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the ability of blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) MRI to assess blood oxygenation changes within the microvasculature, this technique holds potential for evaluating early perisynovial changes in inflammatory arthritis. To evaluate the feasibility of BOLD MRI to detect interval perisynovial changes in knees of rabbits with inflammatory arthritis. Rabbit knees were injected with albumin (n=9) or saline (n=6) intra-articularly, or were not injected (control knees, n=9). Except for two rabbits (albumin-injected, n=2 knees; saline-injected, n=2 knees) that unexpectedly died on days 7 and 21 of the experiment, respectively, all other animals were scanned with BOLD MRI on days 0, 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after induction of arthritis. T2*-weighted gradient-echo MRI was performed during alternate 30 s of normoxia/hyperoxia. BOLD MRI measurements were compared with clinical, laboratory and histological markers. Percentage of activated voxels was significantly greater in albumin-injected knees than in contralateral saline-injected knees (P=0.04). For albumin-injected knees (P < 0.05) and among different categories of knees (P=0.009), the percentage of activated BOLD voxels varied over time. A quadratic curve for on-and-off BOLD difference was delineated for albumin- and saline-injected knees over time (albumin-injected, P=0.047; saline-injected, P=0.009). A trend toward a significant difference in synovial histological scores between albumin-injected and saline-injected knees was noted only for acute scores (P=0.07). As a proof of concept, BOLD MRI can depict perisynovial changes during progression of experimental arthritis. (orig.)

  3. Correlative BOLD MR imaging of stages of synovitis in a rabbit model of antigen-induced arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doria, Andrea S. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Crawley, Adrian [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Toronto Western Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Gahunia, Harpal; Rayner, Tammy; Tassos, Vivian; Zhong, Anguo [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Moineddin, Rahim [Family and Community Medicine, Department of Public Health, Toronto (Canada); Pritzker, Kenneth; Mendes, Maria; Jong, Roland [Mount Sinai Hospital, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Toronto (Canada); Salter, Robert B. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-01-15

    Because of the ability of blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) MRI to assess blood oxygenation changes within the microvasculature, this technique holds potential for evaluating early perisynovial changes in inflammatory arthritis. To evaluate the feasibility of BOLD MRI to detect interval perisynovial changes in knees of rabbits with inflammatory arthritis. Rabbit knees were injected with albumin (n=9) or saline (n=6) intra-articularly, or were not injected (control knees, n=9). Except for two rabbits (albumin-injected, n=2 knees; saline-injected, n=2 knees) that unexpectedly died on days 7 and 21 of the experiment, respectively, all other animals were scanned with BOLD MRI on days 0, 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after induction of arthritis. T2*-weighted gradient-echo MRI was performed during alternate 30 s of normoxia/hyperoxia. BOLD MRI measurements were compared with clinical, laboratory and histological markers. Percentage of activated voxels was significantly greater in albumin-injected knees than in contralateral saline-injected knees (P=0.04). For albumin-injected knees (P < 0.05) and among different categories of knees (P=0.009), the percentage of activated BOLD voxels varied over time. A quadratic curve for on-and-off BOLD difference was delineated for albumin- and saline-injected knees over time (albumin-injected, P=0.047; saline-injected, P=0.009). A trend toward a significant difference in synovial histological scores between albumin-injected and saline-injected knees was noted only for acute scores (P=0.07). As a proof of concept, BOLD MRI can depict perisynovial changes during progression of experimental arthritis. (orig.)

  4. Anti-inflammatory effects of intravenous methotrexate associated with lipid nanoemulsions on antigen-induced arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Mello, Suzana B V; Tavares, Elaine R; Maria Carolina Guido; Eloisa Bonfá; Raul C. Maranhão

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that intravenous use of methotrexate associated with lipid nanoemulsions can achieve superior anti-inflammatory effects in the joints of rabbits with antigen-induced arthritis compared with commercial methotrexate. METHODS: Arthritis was induced in New Zealand rabbits sensitized with methylated bovine serum albumin and subsequently intra-articularly injected with the antigen. A nanoemulsion of methotrexate labeled with 3H-cholesteryl ether (4 mg/kg methotrex...

  5. Intravenously delivered glucocorticoid liposomes inhibit osteoclast activity and bone erosion in murine antigen-induced arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofkens, Wouter; Grevers, Lilyanne C.; Walgreen, Birgitte; de Vries, Teun J.; Leenen, Pieter J. M.; Everts, Vincent; Storm, Gert; van den Berg, Wim B.; van Lent, Peter L.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of systemic delivery of prednisolone phosphate (PLP) encapsulated within long circulating 'stealth' liposomes on bone erosion and osteoclast activity during experimental antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Liposomal PLP strongly suppressed knee jo

  6. Colloidal chromic phosphate 32P synovectomy in antigen-induced arthritis in the rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes have been employed in the therapy of chronic arthritis, in particular, rheumatoid arthritis for many years. A variety of isotopes have been popularized, and in the last ten years a colloidal solution of radioactive chromic phosphate 32P has been in use apparently with equivalent efficacy to others such as 169erbium, 90yttrium, and 165dysprosium. No controlled studies on this modality have been reported and few animal studies were found. The efficacy of therapeutic doses of 32P as a medical synovectomy and its effect on rabbit joints with antigen-induced arthritis were observed in 62 arthritic knee joints in 31 adult rabbits treated on one side with 0.1 microCi of 32P, the opposite serving as control. The animals were observed over a period of 11 months and examined by histologic and biochemical means. The synovium showed no evidence of radiation necrosis in treated joints. Cartilage of treated and control joints showed similar changes consistent with chronic arthritis, persistent synovitis, progressive chondrocyte degeneration, and decreased matrix metachromasia. The radiosynovectomy had neither removed synovium nor protected the cartilage. Its efficacy in humans is therefore questionable

  7. Macrophage specific MRI imaging for antigen induced arthritides. A potential new strategy for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work describes the potential of iron oxides for the detection of macrophages in synovitis in experimental, antigen-induced arthritis. The pivotal role of macrophages in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in humans and in antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in animal models is discussed. The latter appear to be very similar in many aspects to the human RA. We show the potential for iron oxide-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine the macrophage content in the arthritic synovial membranes. The results of our own research, as well as those of other research groups, are presented and discussed. MRI after the intravenous (i.v.) administration of iron oxides enables the depiction of macrophage content in arthritic synovial membranes in AIA through the effects of the intracellular compartmentalisation of iron oxide particles. These effects can be demonstrated in 24-h delayed images after i.v. contrast application, on T2-weighted spin-echo or turbo-spin-echo sequences, and especially on T2*-weighted gradient-echo sequences. The signal effects are not only apparent in high field strength (4.7 Tesla) but also on 1.5 Tesla clinical scanners. The use of iron oxides enables the determination of the macrophage content in synovitis in animals with AIA. This parameter represents a potential marker to determine disease activity, and possibly represents a marker to evaluate the effectiveness of specific therapies in human RA. Current knowledge of iron oxide-enhanced MRI is limited to animal models. The clinical evaluation of this new method in patients with RA has not yet been performed. However, based on the considerations presented here, significant progress in the diagnostic work-up of RA can be expected

  8. Therapeutic effects of TNF-α antagonist etanercept and methotrexate on antigen-induced arthritis of the temporomandibular joint

    OpenAIRE

    Rafayelyan, Smbat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) can cause severe growth disturbances of the craniomandibular system. Antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) of the rabbit TMJ is simulating the inflammatory process of the TMJ in JIA. In the first two studies of the present thesis the effect of a systemic administration of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) antagonist etanercept and methotrexate (MTX) on AIA in young rabbits should be investigate...

  9. 166Ho-chitosan as a radiation synovectomy agent - antigen-induced arthritis in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation synovectomy is a noninvasive therapy that has been investigated as an alternative to surgical synovectomy. It has been successfully employed in the treatment of synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory arthropathies. In this study, we developed experimental animal model for radiation synovectomy. A model system in which a single injection of ovalbumin into the knee joints of previously sensitized rabbits consistently produced a chronic arthritis which was histologically similiar to human rheumatoid arthritis. (author). 8 refs., 8 figs

  10. Targeted gene delivery to the synovial pannus in antigen-induced arthritis by ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xi; Tang, Yuanjiao; Leng, Qianying; Zhang, Lingyan; Qiu, Li

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to optimize an ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) technique to improve the in vivo transfection efficiency of the gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in the synovial pannus in an antigen-induced arthritis rabbit model. A mixture of microbubbles and plasmids was locally injected into the knee joints of an antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) rabbits. The plasmid concentrations and ultrasound conditions were varied in the experiments. We also tested local articular and intravenous injections. The rabbits were divided into five groups: (1) ultrasound+microbubbles+plasmid; (2) ultrasound+plasmid; (3) microbubble+plasmid; (4) plasmid only; (5) untreated controls. EGFP expression was observed by fluorescent microscope and immunohistochemical staining in the synovial pannus of each group. The optimal plasmid dosage and ultrasound parameter were determined based on the results of EGFP expression and the present and absent of tissue damage under light microscopy. The irradiation procedure was performed to observe the duration of the EGFP expression in the synovial pannus and other tissues and organs, as well as the damage to the normal cells. The optimal condition was determined to be a 1-MHz ultrasound pulse applied for 5 min with a power output of 2 W/cm(2) and a 20% duty cycle along with 300 μg of plasmid. Under these conditions, the synovial pannus showed significant EGFP expression without significant damage to the surrounding normal tissue. The EGFP expression induced by the local intra-articular injection was significantly more increased than that induced by the intravenous injection. The EGFP expression in the synovial pannus of the ultrasound+microbubbles+plasmid group was significantly higher than that of the other four groups (P<0.05). The expression peaked on day 5, remained detectable on day 40 and disappeared on day 60. No EGFP expression was detected in the other tissues and organs. The UTMD

  11. Use of technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate and gallium-67 citrate scans after intraarticular injection of Staphylococcus aureus into knee joints of rabbits with chronic antigen-induced arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous clinical studies have questioned the ability of radionuclide scans to differentiate septic from aseptic joint inflammation. A clinical study may not be able to document an underlying disease process or duration of infection and, thus, may make conclusions about the accuracy of scan interpretations open to debate. In this study, the Dumonde-Glynn model of antigen-induced arthritis in rabbits was used as the experimental model to study technetium and gallium scans in Staphylococcus aureus infection of arthritic and normal joints. Gallium scans were negative in normal rabbits, usually negative in antigen-induced arthritis, but positive in septic arthritis. The bone scan was usually negative in early infection but positive in late septic arthritis, a finding reflecting greater penetration of bacteria into subchondral bone because of the underlying inflammatory process

  12. Intra-articular methotrexate associated to lipid nanoemulsions: anti-inflammatory effect upon antigen-induced arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mello SB

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Suzana BV Mello,1 Elaine R Tavares,2 Adriana Bulgarelli,2 Eloisa Bonfá,1 Raul C Maranhão2,31Rheumatology Division, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Lipid Metabolism Laboratory, the Heart Institute (INCOR of the Medical School Hospital, São Paulo, Brazil; 3Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, BrazilObjective: Commercial methotrexate formulations (MTX have poor anti-inflammatory action for intra-articular treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Our aim was to investigate whether an association between methotrexate and lipidic nanoemulsions (LDE could improve MTX intra-articular action.Methods: For its association to LDE, MTX was previously esterified with dodecyl bromide. LDE-MTX was prepared by high pressure homogenization. Antigen-induced arthritis (AIA was achieved in rabbits sensitized with methylated bovine serum albumin, and the rabbits were subsequently intra-articularly injected with the antigen. Twenty-four hours after AIA induction, groups of four to nine rabbits were intra-articularly injected with increasing doses (0.0625–0.5 µmol/kg of LDE-MTX, and were compared to treatment with 0.5 µmol/kg commercial MTX, LDE alone, and saline (controls. Synovial fluid was collected 48 hours after AIA induction for analysis of protein leakage and cell content. Synovial membranes were collected for histopathology. Uptake of LDE labeled with 3H-cholesteryl ether by the synovial tissue was also determined.Results: Uptake of radioactive LDE by arthritic joints was 2.5-fold greater than by normal joints. Treatment with intra-articular LDE-MTX elicited a clear dose response pattern by reducing the synovial leukocyte infiltrate (P = 0.004 and protein leakage (P = 0.032 when compared with arthritic non-treated joints. In contrast, the intra-articular injection of commercial MTX and LDE did not reduce leukocyte infiltrate or protein leakage. Toxicity to treatment was not observed

  13. Loss of phosphoinositide 3-kinase γ decreases migration and activation of phagocytes but not T cell activation in antigen-induced arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wetzker Reinhard

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphoinositide 3-kinase γ (PI3Kγ has been depicted as a major regulator of inflammatory processes, including leukocyte activation and migration towards several chemokines. This study aims to explore the role of PI3Kγ in the murine model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA. Methods Development of AIA was investigated in wildtype and PI3Kγ-deficient mice as well as in mice treated with a specific inhibitor of PI3Kγ (AS-605240 in comparison to untreated animals. Inflammatory reactions of leukocytes, including macrophage and T cell activation, and macrophage migration, were studied in vivo and in vitro. Results Genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of PI3Kγ induced a marked decrease of clinical symptoms in early AIA, together with a considerably diminished macrophage migration and activation (lower production of NO, IL-1β, IL-6. Also, macrophage and neutrophil infiltration into the knee joint were impaired in vivo. However, T cell functions, measured by cytokine production (TNFα, IFNγ, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-17 in vitro and DTH reaction in vivo were not altered, and accordingly, disease developed normally at later timepoints Conclusion PI3Kγ specifically affects phagocyte function in the AIA model but has no impact on T cell activation.

  14. Intra-articular vs. systemic administration of etanercept in antigen-induced arthritis in the temporomandibular point. Part I: histological effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyengaard Jens R

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporomandibular joint (TMJ arthritis in children causes alterations in craniomandibular growth. This abnormal growth may be prevented by an early anti-inflammatory intervention. We have previously shown that intra-articular (IA corticosteroid reduces TMJ inflammation, but causes concurrent mandibular growth inhibition in young rabbits. Blockage of TNF-α has already proven its efficacy in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis not responding to standard therapy. In this paper we evaluate the effect of IA etanercept compared to subcutaneous etanercept in antigen-induced TMJ-arthritis in rabbits on histological changes using histomorphometry and stereology. This article presents the data and discussion on the anti-inflammatory effects of systemic and IA etanercept. In Part II the data on the effects of systemic and IA etanercept on facial growth are presented. Methods Forty-two rabbits (10 weeks old pre-sensitized with ovalbumin and locally induced inflammation in the temporomandibular joints were divided into three groups: a placebo group receiving IA saline injections in both joints one week after arthritis induction (n = 14, an IA etanercept group receiving 0.1 mg/kg etanercept per joint one week after arthritis induction (n = 14 and a systemic etanercept group receiving 0.8 mg/kg etanercept weekly throughout the 12-week study (n = 14. Arthritis was maintained by giving four inductions three weeks apart. Additional IA saline or etanercept injections were also given one week after the re-inductions. Histomorphometric and unbiased stereological methods (optical fractionator were used to assess and estimate the inflammation in the joints. Results The histomorphometry showed synovial proliferation in all groups. The plasma cell count obtained by the optical fractionator was significantly reduced when treating with systemic etanercept but not with IA etanercept. Semi-quantitative assessments of synovial proliferation and

  15. Intra-articular vs. systemic administration of etanercept in antigen-induced arthritis in the temporomandibular joint. Part II: mandibular growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelineck John

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporomandibular joint (TMJ arthritis in children causes alterations in the craniomandibular growth. Resultant abnormalities include; condylar erosions, a posterior mandibular rotation pattern, micrognathia, malocclusion with an anterior open bite, altered joint and muscular function occasionally associated with pain. These alterations may be prevented by early aggressive anti-inflammatory intervention. Previously, we have shown that intra-articular (IA corticosteroid reduces TMJ inflammation but causes additional mandibular growth inhibition in young rabbits. Local blockage of TNF-α may be an alternative treatment approach against TMJ involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. We evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of IA etanercept compared to subcutaneous etanercept in antigen-induced TMJ-arthritis in young rabbits in terms of mandibular growth. This article (Part II presents the data and discussion on the effects on facial growth. In Part I the anti-inflammatory effects of systemic and IA etanercept administration are discussed. Methods Arthritis was induced and maintained in the TMJs of 10-week old pre-sensitized rabbits (n = 42 by four repeated IA TMJ injections with ovalbumin, over a 12-week period. One group was treated weekly with systemic etanercept (0.8 mg/kg (n = 14, another group (n = 14 received IA etanercept (0.1 mg/kg bilaterally one week after induction of arthritis and one group (n = 14 served as an untreated arthritis group receiving IA TMJ saline injections. Head computerized tomographic scans were done before arthritis was induced and at the end of the study. Three small tantalum implants were inserted into the mandible, serving as stable landmarks for the super-impositions. Nineteen variables were evaluated in a mandibular growth analysis for inter-group differences. All data was evaluated blindedly. ANOVA and T-tests were applied for statistical evaluation using p Results Significant larger

  16. Antigen handling in antigen-induced arthritis in mice: an autoradiographic and immunofluorescence study using whole joint sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antigen localization after intraarticular antigen injection was studied in immune and nonimmune mice using autoradiographic and immunofluorescence techniques on whole joint sections. After intraarticular injection of radiolabeled methylated bovine serum albumin (125I-mBSA) in immune mice, labeling in the synovium and synovial exudate diminished rapidly, apart from some deposits in fibrinlike material present in the joint cavity. Long-term antigen retention was found in avascular and hypovascular structures lining the joint cavity, albeit not along the whole surface; eg, labeling remained present at the edges of the femoral condyle hyaline cartilage but not at the central weight-bearing region; long-term retention at ligaments was only found at the insertion sites. Immunofluorescence data in immune animals showed antigen retention together with the presence of immunoglobulins and complement, indicating that antigen is retained at least in part in the form of immune complexes. Nonimmune mice showed even higher long-term antigen retention than immune animals, probably related to physico-chemical properties of the antigen enabling nonimmune binding to articular structures, but also indicating that the presence of joint inflammation in the immune animals enhances antigen clearance. Histologic examination of the ligaments and patellar cartilage of immune mice did reveal that long-term antigen retention was not anatomically related to nearby inflammation or to local tissue damage. The importance of long-term antigen retention for the chronicity of arthritis may lie in the leakage of small amounts of this antigen to joint compartments where it does behave as an inflammatory stimulus; it may further be that it renders the joint a specifically hypersensitive area

  17. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients. PMID:26063174

  18. Intra-articular vs. systemic administration of etanercept in antigen-induced arthritis in the temporomandibular point. Part I: histological effects

    OpenAIRE

    Nyengaard Jens R; Pedersen Thomas K; Küseler Annelise; Stoustrup Peter; Kristensen Kasper D; Hauge Ellen; Herlin Troels

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis in children causes alterations in craniomandibular growth. This abnormal growth may be prevented by an early anti-inflammatory intervention. We have previously shown that intra-articular (IA) corticosteroid reduces TMJ inflammation, but causes concurrent mandibular growth inhibition in young rabbits. Blockage of TNF-α has already proven its efficacy in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis not responding to standard therapy. In...

  19. Intra-articular vs. systemic administration of etanercept in antigen-induced arthritis in the temporomandibular joint. Part II: mandibular growth

    OpenAIRE

    Gelineck John; Pedersen Thomas K; Küseler Annelise; Kristensen Kasper D; Stoustrup Peter; Herlin Troels

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis in children causes alterations in the craniomandibular growth. Resultant abnormalities include; condylar erosions, a posterior mandibular rotation pattern, micrognathia, malocclusion with an anterior open bite, altered joint and muscular function occasionally associated with pain. These alterations may be prevented by early aggressive anti-inflammatory intervention. Previously, we have shown that intra-articular (IA) corticosteroid r...

  20. Evaluation of four radiopharmaceuticals for imaging inflammation in a rabbit model of arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compared the utility of four radiopharmaceuticals; 111In-chloride, 67Ga-citrate, 111In labeled leukocytes (WBCs) and 99mTc-MDP for assessing the inflammatory response in antigen induced arthritis in a rabbit model. A total of 20 rabbits, divided into four equal groups, were included in this study-Each group was studied twice with a single radiotracer: a baseline study and a follow-up study after induction of the arthritis. Knee to knee, knee to whole body, and knee to liver (except for the group studied with 99mTc-MDP) ratios were generated. Knee to knee ratios showed no significant change from baseline to arthritis studies in any of the four groups. Significantly increased knee to total body ratios were seen in all of the groups, except for the group studied with 99mTc-MDP. The greatest increase was seen in the group studied with 111In-chloride. Significantly increased knee to liver ratios were observed in all three groups for which these ratios were generated and again the greatest increase was observed in the group studied with 111In-chloride. Based on the higher uptake observed in this group, of the four radiotracers evaluated, 111In-chloride is probably the most useful for monitoring the inflammatory response in antigen induced arthritis. The symmetry of the response suggests that it may also be useful in monitoring the response to therapy. (author)

  1. Dengue encephalitis-associated immunopathology in the mouse model: Implications for vaccine developers and antigens inducer of cellular immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Ernesto; Lazo, Laura; Gil, Lázaro; Izquierdo, Alienys; Suzarte, Edith; Valdés, Iris; Blanco, Aracelys; Ancizar, Julio; Alba, José Suárez; Pérez, Yusleydis de la C; Cobas, Karen; Romero, Yaremis; Guillén, Gerardo; Guzmán, María G; Hermida, Lisset

    2016-08-01

    Despite the many efforts made by the scientific community in the development of vaccine candidates against dengue virus (DENV), no vaccine has been licensed up to date. Although the immunopathogenesis associated to the disease is a key factor to take into account by vaccine developers, the lack of animal models that reproduce the clinical signs of the disease has hampered the vaccine progress. Non-human primates support viral replication, but they are very expensive and do not show signs of disease. Immunocompromised mice develop viremia and some signs of the disease; however, they are not valuable for vaccine testing. Nowadays, immunocompetent mice are the most used model to evaluate the immunogenicity of vaccine candidates. These animals are resistant to DENV infection; therefore, the intracranial inoculation with neuroadapted virus, which provokes viral encephalitis, represents an alternative to evaluate the protective capacity of vaccine candidates. Previous results have demonstrated the crucial role of cellular immune response in the protection induced by the virus and vaccine candidates in this mouse encephalitis model. However, in the present work we are proposing that the magnitude of the cell-mediated immunity and the inflammatory response generated by the vaccine can modulate the survival rate after viral challenge. We observed that the intracranial challenge of naïve mice with DENV-2 induces the recruitment of immune cells that contribute to the reduction of viral load, but does not increase the survival rate. On the contrary, animals treated with cyclophosphamide, an immunosuppressive drug that affects proliferating lymphocytes, had a higher viral load but a better survival rate than untreated animals. These results suggest that the immune system is playing an immunopathogenic role in this model and the survival rate may not be a suitable endpoint in the evaluation of vaccine candidates based on antigens that induce a strong cellular immune response

  2. RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS: LABORATORY MODELS OF THE DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Orlovskaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The  establishment and  application of animal  models  represent effective  tools  for  research  in rheumatoid arthritis (RA pathogenesis. Animal models that replicate various mechanisms reflecting all aspects of RA, including early RA pathology, have provided important insights into studying etiology and pathogenetic mechanisms of RA in humans. This review article was compiled in order to give an introduction to the current state of RA models.  Application of these  experimental disorders  for testing  potential therapeutic approaches will help to make better predictions for drug efficiency in human RA

  3. RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS: LABORATORY MODELS OF THE DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    I. A. Orlovskaya; D. D. Tsyrendorzhiev; S. N. Shchelkunov

    2015-01-01

    The  establishment and  application of animal  models  represent effective  tools  for  research  in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis. Animal models that replicate various mechanisms reflecting all aspects of RA, including early RA pathology, have provided important insights into studying etiology and pathogenetic mechanisms of RA in humans. This review article was compiled in order to give an introduction to the current state of RA models.  Application of these  experimental disorders ...

  4. Animal Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis (I): Pristane-Induced Arthritis in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncel, Jonatan; Haag, Sabrina; Hoffmann, Markus H.; Yau, Anthony C. Y.; Hultqvist, Malin; Olofsson, Peter; Bäcklund, Johan; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Weidner, Daniela; Fischer, Anita; Leichsenring, Anna; Lange, Franziska; Haase, Claus; Lu, Shemin; Gulko, Percio S.; Steiner, Günter; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2016-01-01

    Background To facilitate the development of therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the Innovative Medicines Initiative BTCure has combined the experience from several laboratories worldwide to establish a series of protocols for different animal models of arthritis that reflect the pathogenesis of RA. Here, we describe chronic pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) model in DA rats, and provide detailed instructions to set up and evaluate the model and for reporting data. Methods We optimized dose of pristane and immunization procedures and determined the effect of age, gender, and housing conditions. We further assessed cage-effects, reproducibility, and frequency of chronic arthritis, disease markers, and efficacy of standard and novel therapies. Results Out of 271 rats, 99.6% developed arthritis after pristane-administration. Mean values for day of onset, day of maximum arthritis severity and maximum clinical scores were 11.8±2.0 days, 20.3±5.1 days and 34.2±11 points on a 60-point scale, respectively. The mean frequency of chronic arthritis was 86% but approached 100% in long-term experiments over 110 days. Pristane was arthritogenic even at 5 microliters dose but needed to be administrated intradermally to induce robust disease with minimal variation. The development of arthritis was age-dependent but independent of gender and whether the rats were housed in conventional or barrier facilities. PIA correlated well with weight loss and acute phase reactants, and was ameliorated by etanercept, dexamethasone, cyclosporine A and fingolimod treatment. Conclusions PIA has high incidence and excellent reproducibility. The chronic relapsing-remitting disease and limited systemic manifestations make it more suitable than adjuvant arthritis for long-term studies of joint-inflammation and screening and validation of new therapeutics. PMID:27227821

  5. Colony variability under the spotlight in animal models of arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, John H.

    2009-01-01

    A recent article by Farkas and colleagues, published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, is from the laboratory of Dr Tibor Glant and his research team in Chicago, who have investigated in considerable depth the immunopathology of experimental arthritis induced by the major cartilage component proteoglycan aggrecan in an animal model that mimics many features of human rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. This present report takes our understanding a significant step forward by questi...

  6. 超声空化效应破坏兔胶原诱导性关节炎滑膜血管翳的实验研究%Destruction of Synovial Pannus of Antigen-induced Arthritis by Ultrasonic Cavitation in Rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张凌燕; 邱逦; 王磊; 林玲; 文晓蓉

    2011-01-01

    Objective To optimize the conditions of ultrasonic irradiation and microbubble of ultrasound cavitation on destruction of synovial pannus of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in rabbits. Methods Antigen-induced arthritis was successfully induced on bilateral knee joints of 85 rabbits. Each 10 AIA rabbits were divided into two groups to compare various peak negative pressures, different ultrasonic pulse durations, various pulse repetition frequencies, different irradiance duration, different dosages of microbubble contrast agents, different ultrasonic irradiance times. With intravenous infusion of Sonovue to the rabbits, ultrasonic irradiance was performed on the right knee joint using the above condition of ultrasound cavitation. At the day 1 after ultrasonic irradiance, MRI and pathological examination were employed to evaluate the optimal conditions. Results The optimal parameters and conditions for ultrasonic irradiance included intermittent ultrasonic application (in 6 s intervals) ,0. 6 mL/kg of microbubble contrast agent, 4. 6 Mpa of ultrasonic peak negative pressure, 100 cycles of pulse duration, 50 Hz of pulse repetition frequency, 5 min of ultrasonic duration, 0. 6 mL/kg of dosages of microbubble contrast agents and multi-sessional ultrasonic irradiance. After the ultrasonic irradiance, the thickness of right knee synovium measured by MRI was thinner than that of left knee and synovial necrosis was confirmed by the pathological finding. Conclusion Under optimal ultrasonic irradiation and microbubble conditions, ultrasonic cavitation could destroy synovial pannus of AIA in rabbits.%目的 探讨超声空化效应破坏兔胶原诱导关节炎滑膜血管翳的最适超声辐照及微泡条件.方法 建立双侧兔膝关节胶原诱导关节炎模型(AIA模型),将85只造模成功兔随机分入不同超声峰值负压、不同脉冲宽度、不同脉冲重复频率、不同超声辐照时间、不同微泡浓度、不同辐照次数组,经兔耳缘静脉

  7. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory potential of ayurvedic formulation Rheumacure in animal model of rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Vinit D. Patel; Namrata A. Desai; Praboth V Shah; Patel, Snehal S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rheumacure (RC) is a herbomineral preparation recommended by Ayurvedic medical practitioners for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of oral treatment with the herbomineral formulation in animal model of Freunds adjuvant induced arthritis to develop scientific evidence to the efficacious claim of the use of ayurvedic proprietary medicine in the management of rheumatoid arthritis in folklore medicine. Methods: Arthritis was in...

  8. Antigen-induced and non-antigen-induced histamine release from rat mast cells sensitized with mouse antiserum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurose,Masao

    1981-10-01

    Full Text Available Marked IgE-mediated histamine release from rat mast cells sensitized in vitro with mouse antiserum occurs in the presence of added Ca++ and phosphatidylserine (PS, although a considerable degree of antigen-induced histamine release which may utilize intracellular or cell-bound calcium is also observed. The decay in the responsiveness to Ca++ of the sensitized cells stimulated by antigen in Ca++-free medium in the presence of PS is relatively slow, and maximum release is produced by Ca++ added 1 min after antigen. Histamine release also occurs when Ca++ is added after PS in the absence of antigen to the sensitized cells suspended in Ca++-free medium. Unlike the antigen-induced release, the intensity of this non-antigen-induced release varies depending on both mast-cell and antiserum pools. A heat-labile factor(s, which is different from antigen-specific IgE antibody and is also contained in normal mouse serum, is involved in this reaction. In the antigen-nondependent (PS + Ca++-induced release, no decay in the responsiveness to Ca++ is observed after PS addition. Both the antigen-induced and non-antigen-induced release are completed fairly rapidly and are dependent of temperature, pH and energy.

  9. Icariin Prevents Cartilage and Bone Degradation in Experimental Models of Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao Wei, Chen; Qi Ping, Dai; Tian You, Fan; Yong Qiang, Chen; Tao, Che

    2016-01-01

    Background. Icariin (ICA) is an active compound extracted from Epimedium brevicornum Maxim. Previous reports have shown that icariin has a clinically significant therapeutic effect on rheumatoid arthritis. However, little is known about the mechanism by which icariin inhibits cartilage and bone degradation. Methods. New Zealand rabbits were immunized with antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) and treated with icariin. Joint tissues from rabbits were studied by histological analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and micro-CT. The expression levels of receptor activator of nuclear factor-B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in joint tissues were determined using immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR analysis. Results. Histological analysis and TEM sections of cartilage in the ICA treated group showed a low level of chondrocyte destruction. Micro-CT analysis showed that the bone mineral density value and bone structural level in ICA treated rabbits were significantly higher compared with those in the AIA group. Immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR analysis showed that icariin treatment reduced RANKL expression and enhanced OPG expression levels, as compared to the AIA group. Conclusion. These data indicate that ICA suppresses articular bone loss and prevents joint destruction. This study also determined that ICA regulated articular bone loss in part by regulating RANKL and OPG expression. PMID:27199510

  10. Arthritis, a complex connective and synovial joint destructive autoimmune disease: animal models of arthritis with varied etiopathology and their significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, S R; Wala, S M

    2014-01-01

    Animal models play a vital role in simplifying the complexity of pathogenesis and understanding the indefinable processes and diverse mechanisms involved in the progression of disease, and in providing new knowledge that may facilitate the drug development program. Selection of the animal models has to be carefully done, so that there is morphologic similarity to human arthritic conditions that may predict as well as augment the effective screening of novel antiarthritic agents. The review describes exclusively animal models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). The development of RA has been vividly described using a wide variety of animal models with diverse insults (viz. collagen, Freund's adjuvant, proteoglycan, pristane, avridine, formaldehyde, etc.) that are able to simulate/trigger the cellular, biochemical, immunological, and histologic alterations, which perhaps mimic, to a great extent, the pathologic conditions of human RA. Similarly, numerous methods of inducing animal models with OA have also been described (such as spontaneous, surgical, chemical, and physical methods including genetically manipulated animals) which may give an insight into the events of alteration in connective tissues and their metabolism (synovial membrane/tissues along with cartilage) and bone erosion. The development of such arthritic animal models may throw light for better understanding of the etiopathogenic mechanisms of human arthritis and give new impetus for the drug development program on arthritis, a crippling disease. PMID:25121375

  11. Arthritis, a complex connective and synovial joint destructive autoimmune disease: Animal models of arthritis with varied etiopathology and their significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S R Naik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal models play a vital role in simplifying the complexity of pathogenesis and understanding the indefinable processes and diverse mechanisms involved in the progression of disease, and in providing new knowledge that may facilitate the drug development program. Selection of the animal models has to be carefully done, so that there is morphologic similarity to human arthritic conditions that may predict as well as augment the effective screening of novel antiarthritic agents. The review describes exclusively animal models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA and osteoarthritis (OA. The development of RA has been vividly described using a wide variety of animal models with diverse insults (viz. collagen, Freund′s adjuvant, proteoglycan, pristane, avridine, formaldehyde, etc. that are able to simulate/trigger the cellular, biochemical, immunological, and histologic alterations, which perhaps mimic, to a great extent, the pathologic conditions of human RA. Similarly, numerous methods of inducing animal models with OA have also been described (such as spontaneous, surgical, chemical, and physical methods including genetically manipulated animals which may give an insight into the events of alteration in connective tissues and their metabolism (synovial membrane/tissues along with cartilage and bone erosion. The development of such arthritic animal models may throw light for better understanding of the etiopathogenic mechanisms of human arthritis and give new impetus for the drug development program on arthritis, a crippling disease.

  12. Anti-arthritic effect of eugenol on collagen-induced arthritis experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grespan, Renata; Paludo, Marcia; Lemos, Henrique de Paula; Barbosa, Carmem Patrícia; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Dalalio, Marcia Machado de Oliveira; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to test the efficacy of eugenol, a compound obtained from the essential oil of cloves (Syzygium aromaticum) in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a well characterized murine model of rheumatoid arthritis. Macroscopic clinical evidence of CIA manifests first as periarticular erythema and edema in the hind paws. Treatment with eugenol starting at the onset of arthritis (day 25) ameliorated these clinical signs of CIA. Furthermore, eugenol inhibited mononuclear cell infiltration into the knee joints of arthritic mice and also lowered the levels of cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor growth factor (TGF)-β) within the ankle joints. Eugenol treatment did not affect the in vitro cell viability as assessed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Therefore, eugenol ameliorates experimental arthritis and could be useful as a beneficial supplement in treating human arthritis. PMID:23037170

  13. Alpha-1 antitrypsin protein and gene therapies decrease autoimmunity and delay arthritis development in mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkinson Mark A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT is a multi-functional protein that has anti-inflammatory and tissue protective properties. We previously reported that human AAT (hAAT gene therapy prevented autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD mice and suppressed arthritis development in combination with doxycycline in mice. In the present study we investigated the feasibility of hAAT monotherapy for the treatment of chronic arthritis in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA, a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Methods DBA/1 mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen (bCII to induce arthritis. These mice were pretreated either with hAAT protein or with recombinant adeno-associated virus vector expressing hAAT (rAAV-hAAT. Control groups received saline injections. Arthritis development was evaluated by prevalence of arthritis and arthritic index. Serum levels of B-cell activating factor of the TNF-α family (BAFF, antibodies against both bovine (bCII and mouse collagen II (mCII were tested by ELISA. Results Human AAT protein therapy as well as recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV8-mediated hAAT gene therapy significantly delayed onset and ameliorated disease development of arthritis in CIA mouse model. Importantly, hAAT therapies significantly reduced serum levels of BAFF and autoantibodies against bCII and mCII, suggesting that the effects are mediated via B-cells, at least partially. Conclusion These results present a new drug for arthritis therapy. Human AAT protein and gene therapies are able to ameliorate and delay arthritis development and reduce autoimmunity, indicating promising potential of these therapies as a new treatment strategy for RA.

  14. Characteristics of evolving models of care for arthritis: A key informant study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veinot Paula

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The burden of arthritis is increasing in the face of diminishing health human resources to deliver care. In response, innovative models of care delivery are developing to facilitate access to quality care. Most models have developed in response to local needs with limited evaluation. The primary objective of this study is to a examine the range of models of care that deliver specialist services using a medical/surgical specialist and at least one other health care provider and b document the strengths and challenges of the identified models. A secondary objective is to identify key elements of best practice models of care for arthritis. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a sample of key informants with expertise in arthritis from jurisdictions with primarily publicly-funded health care systems. Qualitative data were analyzed using a constant comparative approach to identify common types of models of care, strengths and challenges of models, and key components of arthritis care. Results Seventy-four key informants were interviewed from six countries. Five main types of models of care emerged. 1 Specialized arthritis programs deliver comprehensive, multidisciplinary team care for arthritis. Two models were identified using health care providers (e.g. nurses or physiotherapists in expanded clinical roles: 2 triage of patients with musculoskeletal conditions to the appropriate services including specialists; and 3 ongoing management in collaboration with a specialist. Two models promoting rural access were 4 rural consultation support and 5 telemedicine. Key informants described important components of models of care including knowledgeable health professionals and patients. Conclusion A range of models of care for arthritis have been developed. This classification can be used as a framework for discussing care delivery. Areas for development include integration of care across the continuum, including primary

  15. Blockade of LFA-1 augments in vitro differentiation of antigen-induced Foxp3+ Treg cells

    OpenAIRE

    Verhagen, Johan; Wraith, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific, in vitro-induced Foxp3+ Treg (iTreg) cells protects against autoimmune disease. To generate antigen-specific iTreg cells at high purity, however, remains a challenge. Whereas polyclonal T cell stimulation with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibody yields Foxp3+ iTreg cells at a purity of 90–95%, antigen-induced iTreg cells typically do not exceed a purity of 65–75%, even in a TCR-transgenic model. In a similar vein to thymic Treg cell selection, iTreg cell dif...

  16. The Effects of Pterostilbene on Neutrophil Activity in Experimental Model of Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Tomas Perecko; Katarina Drabikova; Antonin Lojek; Milan Ciz; Silvester Ponist; Katarina Bauerova; Radomir Nosal; Juraj Harmatha; Viera Jancinova

    2013-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that pterostilbene inhibits reactive oxygen species production in neutrophils in vitro. However, little is known about its effects on neutrophils during inflammation in vivo. In this study, the effect of pterostilbene on neutrophil activity was investigated in experimental arthritis model. Lewis rats were injected by a single intradermal injection of heat-killed Mycobacterium butyricum in Freund’s adjuvant to develop arthritis. Another group of arthritic animals recei...

  17. Arthritis Advice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Connected Home » Arthritis Advice Heath and Aging Arthritis Advice Common Kinds of Arthritis Warning Signs Treating ... cause damage to your joints. Common Kinds of Arthritis Arthritis is one of the most common diseases ...

  18. Arthritis - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  19. Old and new therapeutics for Rheumatoid Arthritis: in vivo models and drug development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sardar, Samra; Andersson, Åsa

    2016-01-01

    vivo models during development of anti-rheumatic drugs; from Methotrexate to various antibody treatments, to novel drugs that are, or have recently been, in clinical trials. For novel drugs, we have explored websites for clinical trials. Although one Rheumatoid Arthritis in vivo model cannot mirror the......Development of novel drugs for treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases is to a large extent dependent on the availability of good experimental in vivo models in order to perform preclinical tests of new drugs and for the identification of novel drug targets. Here, we review a number of existing...... rodent models for Rheumatoid Arthritis in the context of how these models have been utilized for developing established therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis and, furthermore, the present use of animal models for studies of novel drug candidates. We have studied the literature in the field for the use of in...

  20. Reactive arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keat, A

    1999-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is one of the spondyloarthropathy family of clinical syndromes. The clinical features are those shared by other members of the spondyloarthritis family, though it is distinguished by a clear relationship with a precipitating infection. Susceptibility to reactive arthritis is closely linked with the class 1 HLA allele B27; it is likely that all sub-types pre-dispose to this condition. The link between HLA B27 and infection is mirrored by the development of arthritis in HLA B27-transgenic rats. In this model, arthritis does not develop in animals maintained in a germ-free environment. Infections of the gastrointestinal, genitourinary and respiratory tract appear to provoke reactive arthritis and a wide range of pathogens has now been implicated. Although mechanistic parallels may exist, reactive arthritis is distinguished from Lyme disease, rheumatic fever and Whipple's disease by virtue of the distinct clinical features and the link with HLA B27. As in these conditions both antigens and DNA of several micro-organisms have been detected in joint material from patients with reactive arthritis. The role of such disseminated microbial elements in the provocation or maintenance of arthritis remains unclear. HLA B27-restricted T-cell responses to microbial antigens have been demonstrated and these may be important in disease pathogenesis. The importance of dissemination of bacteria from sites of mucosal infection and their deposition in joints has yet to be fully understood. The role of antibiotic therapy in the treatment of reactive arthritis is being explored; in some circumstances, both the anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial effects of certain antibiotics appear to be valuable. The term reactive arthritis should be seen as a transitory one, reflecting a concept which may itself be on the verge of replacement, as our understanding of the condition develops. Nevertheless it appropriately describes arthritis that is associated with demonstrable

  1. A model of impairment and functional limitation in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    del Rincón Inmaculada

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously proposed a theoretical model for studying physical disability and other outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The purpose of this paper is to test a model of impairment and functional limitation in (RA, using empirical data from a sample of RA patients. We based the model on the disablement process framework. Methods We posited two distinct types of impairment in RA: 1 Joint inflammation, measured by the tender, painful and swollen joint counts; and 2 Joint deformity, measured by the deformed joint count. We hypothesized direct paths from the two impairments to functional limitation, measured by the shirt-button speed, grip strength and walking velocity. We used structural equation modeling to test the hypothetical relationships, using empirical data from a sample of RA patients recruited from six rheumatology clinics. Results The RA sample was comprised of 779 RA patients. In the structural equation model, the joint inflammation impairment displayed a strong significant path toward the measured variables of joint pain, tenderness and swelling (standardized regression coefficients 0.758, 0.872 and 0.512, P ≤ 0.001 for each. The joint deformity impairment likewise displayed significant paths toward the measured upper limb, lower limb, and other deformed joint counts (standardized regression coefficients 0.849, 0.785, 0.308, P ≤ 0.001 for each. Both the joint inflammation and joint deformity impairments displayed strong direct paths toward functional limitation (standardized regression coefficients of -0.576 and -0.564, respectively, P ≤ 0.001 for each, and explained 65% of its variance. Model fit to data was fair to good, as evidenced by a comparative fit index of 0.975, and the root mean square error of approximation = 0.058. Conclusion This evidence supports the occurrence of two distinct impairments in RA, joint inflammation and joint deformity, that together, contribute strongly to functional

  2. Perillyl alcohol suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits the mevalonate pathway. •We examined whether POH suppresses immune responses with a mouse model of asthma. •POH treatment during sensitization suppressed Ag-induced priming of CD4+ T cells. •POH suppressed airway eosinophila and cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes. -- Abstract: Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits farnesyl transferase and geranylgeranyl transferase, key enzymes that induce conformational and functional changes in small G proteins to conduct signal production for cell proliferation. Thus, it has been tried for the treatment of cancers. However, although it affects the proliferation of immunocytes, its influence on immune responses has been examined in only a few studies. Notably, its effect on antigen-induced immune responses has not been studied. In this study, we examined whether POH suppresses Ag-induced immune responses with a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation. POH treatment of sensitized mice suppressed proliferation and cytokine production in Ag-stimulated spleen cells or CD4+ T cells. Further, sensitized mice received aerosolized OVA to induce allergic airway inflammation, and some mice received POH treatment. POH significantly suppressed indicators of allergic airway inflammation such as airway eosinophilia. Cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes was also significantly suppressed. These results demonstrate that POH suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung. Considering that it exists naturally, POH could be a novel preventive or therapeutic option for immunologic lung disorders such as asthma with minimal side effects

  3. Increased vulnerability of postarthritic cartilage to a second arthritic insult: accelerated MMP activity in a flare up of arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    van Meurs, J. B. J.; van Lent, P L E M; Loo, A.A.J. van de; Holthuysen, A; Bayne, E; Singer, I; van den Berg, W B

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Murine antigen induced arthritis (AIA) is a chronic, smouldering inflammation. Flares of arthritis can be induced by antigen rechallenge or exposure to inflammatory mediators like interleukin 1 (IL1). These flares are characterised by a fast and marked proteoglycan (PG) depletion if compared with the initial arthritis. This study investigated the involvement of metalloproteinases in both the initial and the flare phase of arthritis. 
METHODS—Murine AIA was induced and a flare up of ...

  4. Dynamic changes of serum IL-6 levels in rate models with pristane induced arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the dynamic changes of serum IL-6 levels in rat models with pristane induced arthritis. Methods: Rat models of arthritis were prepared with subcutaneous injection of pristane, serum IL-6 levels were determined with RIA in the rat models before pristane injection and 1, 3, 5, 8w later. Results: Serum IL-6 levels in the rat models were significantly higher 1, 3, 8 w after pristane injection than those before injection (P<0.01). The levels dropped significantly 5w after injection (vs 1wk P<0.01), but rose again with a second peak at 8w. Conclusion: IL-6 possibly participated in the initiation progression and relapse of the pristane induced arthritis in rat models. (authors)

  5. Old and new therapeutics for Rheumatoid Arthritis: in vivo models and drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, Samra; Andersson, Åsa

    2016-01-01

    Development of novel drugs for treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases is to a large extent dependent on the availability of good experimental in vivo models in order to perform preclinical tests of new drugs and for the identification of novel drug targets. Here, we review a number of existing rodent models for Rheumatoid Arthritis in the context of how these models have been utilized for developing established therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis and, furthermore, the present use of animal models for studies of novel drug candidates. We have studied the literature in the field for the use of in vivo models during development of anti-rheumatic drugs; from Methotrexate to various antibody treatments, to novel drugs that are, or have recently been, in clinical trials. For novel drugs, we have explored websites for clinical trials. Although a single Rheumatoid Arthritis in vivo model cannot mirror the complexity of disease development, there exist a number of good animal models for Rheumatoid Arthritis, each defining some parts in disease development, which are useful for studies of drug response. We find that many of the established drugs were not tested in in vivo models before being used in the clinic, but rather animal models have been subsequently used to find mechanisms for efficacy. Finally, we report a number of novel drugs, tested in preclinical in vivo models, presently in clinical trials. PMID:26769136

  6. Formoterol decreases muscle wasting as well as inflammation in the rat model of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-SanMiguel, Ana Belén; Gomez-Moreira, Carolina; Nieto-Bona, María Paz; Fernández-Galaz, Carmen; Villanúa, Maria Ángeles; Martín, Ana Isabel; López-Calderón, Asunción

    2016-06-01

    Adjuvant-induced arthritis is an experimental model of rheumatoid arthritis that is associated with body weight loss and muscle wasting. β2-adrenergic receptor agonists are powerful anabolic agents that trigger skeletal muscle hypertrophy and have been proposed as a promising treatment for muscle wasting in human patients. The aim of this work was to determine whether formoterol, a selective β2-adrenoreceptor agonist, is able to ameliorate muscle wasting in arthritic rats. Arthritis was induced in male Wistar rats by intradermal injection of Freund's adjuvant. Control and arthritic rats were injected daily with 50 μg/kg sc formoterol or saline for 12 days. Body weight change, food intake, and arthritis index were analyzed. After euthanasia, in the gastrocnemius mRNA was analyzed by PCR, and proteins were analyzed by Western blotting. Arthritis decreased gastrocnemius weight, cross-sectional area, and myofiber size, whereas formoterol increased those variables in both arthritic and control rats. Formoterol decreased the external signs of arthritis as well as NF-κB(p65) activation, TNFα, and COX-2 levels in the gastrocnemius of arthritic and control rats. Those effects of formoterol were associated with a decreased expression of myostatin, atrogin-1, and MuRF1 and in LC3b lipidation. Arthritis increased the expression of MyoD, myogenin, IGF-I, and IGFBP-3 and -5 in the gastrocnemius. In control and in arthritic rats, treatment with formoterol increased Akt phosphorylation and myogenin levels, whereas it decreased IGFBP-3 expression in the gastrocnemius. These data suggest that formoterol has an anti-inflammatory effect and decreases muscle wasting in arthritic rats through increasing Akt activity and myogenin and decreasing myostatin, the p-NF-κB(p65)/TNF pathway, and IGFBP-3. PMID:27245339

  7. Genetic regulation of autoantibodies in arthritis : lessons from mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Raposo, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or multiple sclerosis (MS) are commonly regarded as complex or multifactorial diseases. This complexity regards to effector mechanisms involved in pathologic manifestations, and also to the diversity of genetic and environmental factors that predispose individuals to such diseases. Identification of genetic traits becomes relevant to better understand the progression of these diseases, enabling the development of new therapi...

  8. Prevention of arthritis by locally synthesized recombinant antibody neutralizing complement component C5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Durigutto

    Full Text Available Treatment of patients suffering from chronic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis with recombinant antibodies is time consuming and fairly expensive and can be associated with side effects due to generalized depletion of the target molecule. We have addressed these issues by developing an alternative approach consisting of the intraarticular injection of a DNA vector encoding for the anti-C5 neutralizing recombinant miniantibody MB12/22. This method allows local production of the antibody in sufficient amount to be effective in preventing joint inflammation in a rat model of antigen-induced arthritis. Injection of the DNA vector in a right knee of normal rats resulted in the production of the minibody detected in the synovial washes by western blot with a strong signal peaking at 3 days after administration. DNA encoding for the minibody was shown for 14 days in the synovial tissue and was undetectable in the controlateral knee and in other organs. The preventive effect of this approach was evaluated in rats receiving a single injection of the vector 3 days before the induction of antigen-induced arthritis and analyzed 3 days later. The treated rats exhibited a lower increase in swelling, associated with a lower number of PMN in the articular washes and reduced deposition of C9 in synovial tissue compared to control rats. These results suggest that treating the inflamed joints with a vector that induces a local production of a neutralizing anti-C5 antibody may represent a useful strategy to inhibit in situ complement activation and to treat patients with monoarthritis. Moreover, this approach may be adopted as a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent monoarthritis as an alternative to local treatment with antibodies commonly used in this form of arthritis, with the advantages of the lower cost and the longer persistence of antibody production.

  9. Enteropathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Info For Teens Message Boards & Forums Donate Enteropathic Arthritis Learn About Spondylitis / Enteropathic Arthritis Overview For The ... Work and Spondylitis Spondylitis Awareness Month Overview: Enteropathic Arthritis Enteropathic (en-ter-o-path-ic) arthritis is ...

  10. Vulnerability and Resilience in Women with Arthritis: Test of a Two-Factor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bruce W.; Zautra, Alex J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test a 2-factor model of affective health in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA; n = 82) or osteoarthritis (OA; n = 88). Positive and negative social interactions and affect were assessed for 11 consecutive weeks. For each participant, Vulnerability and Resilience factors were created from factor analyses of…

  11. Perillyl alcohol suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imamura, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Oh; Okunishi, Katsuhide; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Harada, Hiroaki; Kawahata, Kimito; Tanaka, Ryoichi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko [Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Dohi, Makoto, E-mail: mdohi-tky@umin.ac.jp [Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Institute of Respiratory Immunology, Shibuya Clinic for Respiratory Diseases and Allergology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits the mevalonate pathway. •We examined whether POH suppresses immune responses with a mouse model of asthma. •POH treatment during sensitization suppressed Ag-induced priming of CD4{sup +} T cells. •POH suppressed airway eosinophila and cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes. -- Abstract: Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits farnesyl transferase and geranylgeranyl transferase, key enzymes that induce conformational and functional changes in small G proteins to conduct signal production for cell proliferation. Thus, it has been tried for the treatment of cancers. However, although it affects the proliferation of immunocytes, its influence on immune responses has been examined in only a few studies. Notably, its effect on antigen-induced immune responses has not been studied. In this study, we examined whether POH suppresses Ag-induced immune responses with a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation. POH treatment of sensitized mice suppressed proliferation and cytokine production in Ag-stimulated spleen cells or CD4{sup +} T cells. Further, sensitized mice received aerosolized OVA to induce allergic airway inflammation, and some mice received POH treatment. POH significantly suppressed indicators of allergic airway inflammation such as airway eosinophilia. Cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes was also significantly suppressed. These results demonstrate that POH suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung. Considering that it exists naturally, POH could be a novel preventive or therapeutic option for immunologic lung disorders such as asthma with minimal side effects.

  12. Mathematical modeling of the circadian dynamics of the neuroendocrine-immune network in experimentally induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, R; DuBois, D; Almon, R; Jusko, W J; Androulakis, I P

    2016-08-01

    The circadian dynamics of important neuroendocrine-immune mediators have been implicated in progression of rheumatoid arthritis pathophysiology, both clinically as well as in animal models. We present a mathematical model that describes the circadian interactions between mediators of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the proinflammatory cytokines. Model predictions demonstrate that chronically elevated cytokine expression results in the development of adrenal insufficiency and circadian variability in paw edema. Notably, our model also predicts that an increase in mean secretion of corticosterone (CST) after the induction of the disease is accompanied by a decrease in the amplitude of the CST oscillation. Furthermore, alterations in the phase of circadian oscillation of both cytokines and HPA axis mediators are observed. Therefore, by incorporating the circadian interactions between the neuroendocrine-immune mediators, our model is able to simulate important features of rheumatoid arthritis pathophysiology. PMID:27221115

  13. Viral arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious arthritis - viral ... Arthritis may be a symptom of many virus-related illnesses. It usually disappears on its own without ... the rubella vaccine, only a few people develop arthritis. No risk factors are known.

  14. The Effects of Pterostilbene on Neutrophil Activity in Experimental Model of Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Perecko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that pterostilbene inhibits reactive oxygen species production in neutrophils in vitro. However, little is known about its effects on neutrophils during inflammation in vivo. In this study, the effect of pterostilbene on neutrophil activity was investigated in experimental arthritis model. Lewis rats were injected by a single intradermal injection of heat-killed Mycobacterium butyricum in Freund’s adjuvant to develop arthritis. Another group of arthritic animals received pterostilbene 30 mg/kg, daily, p.o. The number and activity of neutrophils in blood were measured on a weekly basis during the whole experiment. Moreover, the total radical trapping potential in plasma was measured at the end of the experiment. In the pterostilbene treated arthritic group, the treatment significantly lowered the number of neutrophils in blood on days 14 and 21 without significant downregulation of neutrophil oxidative burst. Pterostilbene nonsignificantly increased total radical trapping potential in arthritic animals. These results indicate that the promising effects of pterostilbene on reactive oxygen species operate by different mechanisms in vitro and in the animal model of inflammation. In conclusion, the positive effects of pterostilbene in the model of arthritis may be attributed to regulation of neutrophil number.

  15. Application of Synchrotron Radiation Imaging for Non-destructive Monitoring of Mouse Rheumatoid Arthritis Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to observe microstructures of the rheumatoid arthritis induced mouse feet using a synchrotron radiation beam and to compare findings with histological observations. X-ray refraction images from ex-vivo rheumatoid arthritis induced mouse feet were obtained with an 8KeV white (unmonochromatic) beam and 20 micron thick CsI(Tl) scintillation crystal. The visual image was magnified using a x 10 microscope objective and captured using digital CCD camera. Experiments were performed at 1B2 bending magnet beamline of the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL) in Korea. Obtained images were compared with histopathologic findings from same sample. Cartilage destruction and thickened joint capsule with joint space narrowing were clearly identified at each grade of rheumatoid model with spatial resolution of as much as 1.2 micron and these findings were directly correlated with histopathologic findings. The results suggest that x-ray microscopy study of the rheumatoid arthritis model using synchrotron radiation demonstrates the potential for clinically relevant micro structure of mouse feet without sectioning and fixation

  16. Application of Synchrotron Radiation Imaging for Non-destructive Monitoring of Mouse Rheumatoid Arthritis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chang-Hyuk; Kim, Hong-Tae; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Jong Ki; Youn, Hwa Shik

    2007-01-01

    This study was performed to observe microstructures of the rheumatoid arthritis induced mouse feet using a synchrotron radiation beam and to compare findings with histological observations. X-ray refraction images from ex-vivo rheumatoid arthritis induced mouse feet were obtained with an 8KeV white (unmonochromatic) beam and 20 micron thick CsI(Tl) scintillation crystal. The visual image was magnified using a × 10 microscope objective and captured using digital CCD camera. Experiments were performed at 1B2 bending magnet beamline of the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL) in Korea. Obtained images were compared with histopathologic findings from same sample. Cartilage destruction and thickened joint capsule with joint space narrowing were clearly identified at each grade of rheumatoid model with spatial resolution of as much as 1.2 micron and these findings were directly correlated with histopathologic findings. The results suggest that x-ray microscopy study of the rheumatoid arthritis model using synchrotron radiation demonstrates the potential for clinically relevant micro structure of mouse feet without sectioning and fixation.

  17. Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  18. Psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis

  19. Psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, L.H.; Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis.

  20. The Effects of Pterostilbene on Neutrophil Activity in Experimental Model of Arthritis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Perečko, Tomáš; Drábiková, K.; Lojek, Antonín; Číž, Milan; Poništ, S.; Bauerová, K.; Nosál, R.; Harmatha, Juraj; Jančinová, V.

    -, č. 106041 (2013), 106041/1-106041/7. ISSN 2314-6133 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : protein kinase C * adjuvant arthritis * rheumatoid arthritis * resveratrol Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  1. Anti-inflammatory Effect of Isaria sinclairii Glycosaminoglycan in an Adjuvant-treated Arthritis Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Mi Young; Jee, Sang Duck; Hwang, Jae Sam; Yun, Eun Young; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2013-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) derived from Isaria sinclairii (IS) and of IS extracts were investigated in a complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-treated chronic arthritis rat model. Groups of rats were treated orally with 30 mg/kg one of the following: [1] saline control, extracts of [2] water-IS, [3] methanol-IS, [4] butanol-IS, [5] ethyl acetate-IS, or [6] Indomethacin® as the positive control for a period of two weeks. The anti-paw edema effects of the individual ext...

  2. Establishment of a Rat Adjuvant Arthritis-Interstitial Lung Disease Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu-nan Song

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Development of an animal model of rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD and improved knowledge of the pathogenesis of RA-ILD may facilitate earlier diagnosis and the development of more effective targeted therapies. Methods. Adult male Wistar rats were studied in an adjuvant arthritis (AA model induced by the injection of Freund’s complete adjuvant (FCA. Rats were sacrificed on days 7, 14, 21, and 28 after FCA injection. Lung tissue was obtained for histopathological examination and evaluation of Caveolin-1 (Cav-1 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β1 protein expression levels. Results. Pulmonary inflammation was evident in lung tissue from day 21 after FCA injection. Inflammation and mild fibrosis were observed in lung tissue on day 28 after FCA injection. Cav-1 protein expression was significantly decreased from day 7 through day 28 and TGF-β1 protein expression was significantly increased on day 28 after FCA injection compared to control (P<0.05. Conclusion. We established an AA rat model that exhibited the extra-articular complication of RA-ILD. We identified Cav-1 and TGF-β1 as protein biomarkers of RA-ILD in this model and propose their signaling pathway as a possible target for therapeutic intervention.

  3. CD1d-dependent NKT cells play a protective role in acute and chronic arthritis models by ameliorating antigen-specific Th1 responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teige, Anna; Bockermann, Robert; Hasan, Maruf;

    2010-01-01

    A protective and anti-inflammatory role for CD1d-dependent NKT cells (NKTs) has been reported in experimental and human autoimmune diseases. However, their role in arthritis has been unclear, with conflicting reports of CD1d-dependent NKTs acting both as regulatory and disease-promoting cells...... in arthritis. These differing modes of action might be due to genetic differences of inbred mice and incomplete backcrossing of gene-modified mice. We therefore put special emphasis on controlling the genetic backgrounds of the mice used. Additionally, we used two different murine arthritis models, Ag......-induced arthritis (AIA) and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), to evaluate acute and chronic arthritis in CD1d knockout mice and mice depleted of NK1.1(+) cells. CD1d-deficient mice developed more severe AIA compared with wild-type littermates, with a higher degree of inflammation and proteoglycan depletion. Chronic...

  4. Osteoarticular Expression of Musashi-1 in an Experimental Model of Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco O’Valle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA, a murine experimental disease model induced by immunization with type II collagen (CII, is used to evaluate novel therapeutic strategies for rheumatoid arthritis. Adult stem cell marker Musashi-1 (Msi1 plays an important role in regulating the maintenance and differentiation of stem/precursor cells. The objectives of this investigation were to perform a morphological study of the experimental CIA model, evaluate the effect of TNFα-blocker (etanercept treatment, and determine the immunohistochemical expression of Msi1 protein. Methods. CIA was induced in 50 male DBA1/J mice for analyses of tissue and serum cytokine; clinical and morphological lesions in limbs; and immunohistochemical expression of Msi1. Results. Clinically, TNFα-blocker treatment attenuated CIA on day 32 after immunization (P<0.001. Msi1 protein expression was significantly higher in joints damaged by CIA than in those with no lesions (P<0.0001 and was related to the severity of the lesions (Spearman’s rho = 0.775, P=0.0001. Conclusions. Treatment with etanercept attenuates osteoarticular lesions in the murine CIA model. Osteoarticular expression of Msi1 protein is increased in joints with CIA-induced lesion and absent in nonlesioned joints, suggesting that this protein is expressed when the lesion is produced in order to favor tissue repair.

  5. Fungal arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and irritation (inflammation) of a joint by a fungal infection. It is also called mycotic arthritis. Causes Fungal ... symptoms of fungal arthritis. Prevention Thorough treatment of fungal infections elsewhere in the body may help prevent fungal ...

  6. Infectious Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ...

  7. Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your body. Some people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling of the ... physical exam and imaging tests to diagnose psoriatic arthritis. There is no cure, but medicines can help ...

  8. Thumb Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Thumb Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... A joint is where bones connect and move. Arthritis is thinning of the cartilage, which is the ...

  9. A mouse model of adoptive immunotherapeutic targeting of autoimmune arthritis using allo-tolerogenic dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Tolerogenic dendritic cells (tDCs are immunosuppressive cells with potent tolerogenic ability and are promising immunotherapeutic tools for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, it is currently unknown whether allogeneic tDCs (allo-tDCs induce tolerance in RA, and whether the numbers of adoptively transferred allo-tDCs, or the requirement for pulsing with relevant auto-antigens are important. METHODS: tDCs were derived from bone marrow precursors of C57BL/B6 mice, which were induced in vitro by GM-CSF, IL-10 and TGF-β1. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA was modeled in D1 mice by immunization with type II collagen (CII to test the therapeutic ability of allo-tDCs against CIA. Clinical and histopathologic scores, arthritic incidence, cytokine and anti-CII antibody secretion, and CD4(+Th subsets were analyzed. RESULTS: tDCs were characterized in vitro by a stable immature phonotype and a potent immunosuppressive ability. Following adoptive transfer of low doses (5×10(5 of CII-loaded allo-tDCs, a remarkable anti-arthritic activity, improved clinical scores and histological end-points were found. Serological levels of inflammatory cytokines and anti-CII antibodies were also significantly lower in CIA mice treated with CII-pulsed allo-tDCs as compared with allo-tDCs. Moreover, treatment with allo-tDCs altered the proportion of Treg/Th17 cells. CONCLUSION: These findings suggested that allo-tDCs, especially following antigen loading, reduced the severity of CIA in a dose-dependent manner. The dampening of CIA was associated with modulated cytokine secretion, Treg/Th17 polarization and inhibition of anti-CII secretion. This study highlights the potential therapeutic utility of allo-tDCs in autoimmune arthritis and should facilitate the future design of allo-tDC immunotherapeutic strategies against RA.

  10. An orally bioavailable synthetic analog of an active dehydroepiandrosterone metabolite reduces established disease in rodent models of rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offner, H.; Firestein, G.S.; Boyle, D.L.; Pieters, R.; Frincke, J.; Garsd, A.; White, S.K.; Reading, C.L.; Auci, D.L.

    2009-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) treatment provides diverse anti-inflammatory benefits in rodent models of diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but only limited benefits to patients. In rodents, DHEA is metabolized to (among others) androstene-3beta,7beta,17beta-triol (AET), which retains pot

  11. Effect of local viral transfer of interleukin 10 gene on a rabbit arthritis model induced by interleukin 1β

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ning; CUI Hua-dong; XUE Hong-xia

    2008-01-01

    Backgroud Interleukin 1β(IL-1 β)is the principal mediator in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthdtis.Continuous injection of interleukin 1β(IL-1β)into the knee articular cavities of anamals can induce models that resemble rheumatoid arthritis.The obiective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of local recombinant retrovirus viral intedeukin 10(rRV-vIL-10)gene transfer treatment of a rabbit model of arthritis induced by IL-1β.Methods An hIL-1β-induced rabbit rheumatoid arthdtis model was established using the MFG-hIL-1β-neo-HIG-82 cell line,which is capable of continuous secretion of hIL-1a.After transfecting the rabbit synovial fibroblast cell line (MFG-hIL-1β-neo-HIG-82)with rRV-vIL-10,G418 was then added to identify the positive clone.The rRV-vIL-10 positive clone was injected into the established rabbit rheumatoid arthritis model through intra-articular injection.Successful gene transfer was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR)and immunohistochemistry.The levels of IL-1β before and after treatment were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results Retrovirus vector was an effective vector both to synoviocytes in vitro and synovium tissue in vivo as confirmed by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry.The rabbit arthritis model treated with rRV-vIL-10 showed a dramatic remission of arthritis and a decline in the level of cytokines such as IL-1β.Conclusions Retrovirus-mediated transfection of vIL-10 successfully transferred the gene into rabbit syrnovium ex vivo and was able to suppress intra-articular inflammation response to IL-1β.

  12. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  13. Arthritis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Arthritis Page Content Article Body Arthritis is an inflammation ... with antibiotics, even if arthritis develops. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) has previously been ...

  14. Arthritis and IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IBD Help Center Home > Resources > Arthritis Go Back Arthritis Email Print + Share Arthritis, or inflammation of the ... joints and a reduction in flexibility. TYPES OF ARTHRITIS In IBD, arthritis may appear in three different ...

  15. Reactive Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Erken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is an acute, sterile, non-suppurative and inflammatory arthropaty which has occured as a result of an infectious processes, mostly after gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract infections. Reiter syndrome is a frequent type of reactive arthritis. Both reactive arthritis and Reiter syndrome belong to the group of seronegative spondyloarthropathies, associated with HLA-B27 positivity and characterized by ongoing inflammation after an infectious episode. The classical triad of Reiter syndrome is defined as arthritis, conjuctivitis and urethritis and is seen only in one third of patients with Reiter syndrome. Recently, seronegative asymmetric arthritis and typical extraarticular involvement are thought to be adequate for the diagnosis. However, there is no established criteria for the diagnosis of reactive arthritis and the number of randomized and controlled studies about the therapy is not enough. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 283-299

  16. Psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past 10 years, a number of well-controlled surveys of psoriatic patients selective for the presence of arthritis have been conducted. A Canadian group reported that of 100 patients admitted to the hospital for treatment of psoriasis, 32 had clinical or radiologic evidence of psoriatic arthritis, and 17 had both types of evidence. Eighty patients with radiologic evidence of spinal or sacroiliac involvement were asymptomatic, and seven had clinical evidence of peripheral arthritis but without radiologic evidence. The authors concluded that psoriatic arthritis is a common event in patients with severe psoriasis and that it is associated with more extensive skin disease than is found in patients without arthritis. The information gathered from these epidemiologic studies coupled with clinical, radiologic, and serologic characteristics have provided the basis for the current belief that psoriatic arthritis is indeed a distinct entity

  17. Car safety belts: a study of two models adapted for people with arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arie, E

    1986-05-01

    People with arthritis find car seat belts difficult to use. Sixteen arthritic patients and 19 healthy volunteers completed a comparative study of one standard inertia-reel belt and two adapted inertia-reel belts with reduced retraction forces. Those with arthritis were strong enough to use the standard belt but both adapted belts had features making them easier to use. PMID:3708235

  18. Physiologic characterization of inflammatory arthritis in a rabbit model with BOLD and DCE MRI at 1.5 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our aim was to test the feasibility of blood oxygen level dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD MRI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI to monitor periarticular hypoxic/inflammatory changes over time in a juvenile rabbit model of arthritis. We examined arthritic and contralateral nonarthritic knees of 21 juvenile rabbits at baseline and days 1,14, and 28 after induction of arthritis by unilateral intra-articular injection of carrageenin with BOLD and DCE MRI at 1.5 Tesla (T). Nine noninjected rabbits served as controls. Associations between BOLD and DCE-MRI and corresponding intra-articular oxygen pressure (PO2) and blood flow [blood perfusion units (BPU)] (polarographic probes, reference standards) or clinical-histological data were measured by correlation coefficients. Percentage BOLD MRI change obtained in contralateral knees correlated moderately with BPU on day 0 (r = -0.51, p = 0.02) and excellently on day 28 (r = -0.84, p = 0.03). A moderate correlation was observed between peak enhancement DCE MRI (day 1) and BPU measurements in arthritic knees (r = 0.49, p = 0.04). In acute arthritis, BOLD and DCE MRI highly correlated (r = 0.89, p = 0.04; r = 1.0, p < 0.0001) with histological scores in arthritic knees. The proposed techniques are feasible to perform at 1.5 T, and they hold potential as surrogate measures to monitor hypoxic and inflammatory changes over time in arthritis at higher-strength MRI fields. (orig.)

  19. The effects of multiple dosing with zileuton on antigen-induced responses in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuri, M; Allegra, L; Abraham, W M

    1998-01-01

    In a previous study, a single dose of zileuton (10 mg/kg, po) given 2 h before antigen challenge, had a minimal effect on the antigen-induced early airway response (EAR), although it was effective in blocking the late airway response (LAR). Because our previous data indicated that 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) products contribute to the severity of the antigen-induced EAR in these animals, we hypothesized that the lack of effect of zileuton on the EAR may have had to do with inadequate tissue levels. Therefore, in this study, we determined if multiple dosing with zileuton, which theoretically could improve tissue levels, would provide protection against the antigen-induced EAR as well as the LAR. Each sheep was used in each of the three trials (> or = 15 days apart), the order of which was randomized. For trial 1, the sheep were treated with zileuton (10 mg/kg in 0.1% methylcellulose, p.o.) once a day for 4 days; for trials 2, the sheep were treated with zileuton (10 mg/kg, p.o.) for 2 days; and, for trial 3, the animals were treated with vehicle (0.1% methylcellulose) for 4 days as in trial 1. In all trials, antigen challenge followed 1 h after the last treatment. In the placebo trial, antigen challenge resulted in characteristic EAR (407 +/- 102%, increase over baseline) and LAR (335 +/- 75%, increase over baseline). The antigen-induced effects were completely blocked by the 4-day treatment (EAR = 24 +/- 3%; LAR = 17 +/- 3%, P trial, the immediate increase in R1, after antigen challenge was only partially blocked (EAR = 163 +/- 16%, P trial), but the late response was completely blocked (24 +/- 3%). The protection against the EAR obtained with the 4-day treatment was significantly better (P < 0.05) than that obtained with the 2-day treatment. The results of this study show that multiple dosing with the 5-LO inhibitor, zileuton, provides protection against the antigen-induced EAR as well as LAR. The effect on the EAR is dependent on the treatment time, with dosing 4 days

  20. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Orally Administrated Denatured Naja Naja Atra Venom on Murine Rheumatoid Arthritis Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kou-Zhu Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the denatured Naja Naja atra venom (NNAV in rheumatoid arthritis-associated models, the denatured NNAV (heat treated; 30, 90, 270 μg/kg, the native NNAV (untreated with heat; 90 μg/kg, and Tripterygium wilfordii polyglycoside (TWP, 15 mg/kg were administrated orally either prophylactically or therapeutically. We measured time of licking the affected paw in formaldehyde-induced inflammatory model, paw volume in egg-white-induced inflammation, and granuloma weight in formalin-soaked filter paper-induced granuloma. For adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA rats, paw edema, mechanical withdrawal threshold, serum levels of TNF-α and IL-10, and histopathological changes of the affected paw were assessed. We found that the denatured NNAV (90, 270 μg/kg significantly reduced time of licking paw, paw volume, and granuloma weight in above inflammatory models and also attenuated paw edema, mechanical hyperalgesia, and histopathology changes in AIA rats. Additionally, the increase in serum TNF-α and the decrease in serum IL-10 in AIA rats were reversed by the denatured NNAV. Although the native NNAV and TWP rendered the similar pharmacological actions on the above four models with less potency than that of the denatured NNAV, these findings demonstrate that oral administration of the denatured NNAV produces antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities on rheumatoid arthritis.

  1. Breast cancer-associated metastasis is significantly increased in a model of autoimmune arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Das Roy, Lopamudra; Pathangey, Latha B; Tinder, Teresa L; Schettini, Jorge L; Gruber, Helen E; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Sites of chronic inflammation are often associated with the establishment and growth of various malignancies including breast cancer. A common inflammatory condition in humans is autoimmune arthritis (AA) that causes inflammation and deformity of the joints. Other systemic effects associated with arthritis include increased cellular infiltration and inflammation of the lungs. Several studies have reported statistically significant risk ratios between AA and breast cancer. Despite...

  2. Establishment and evaluation of a transgenic mouse model of arthritis induced by overexpressing human tumor necrosis factor alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα plays a key role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Blockade of TNFα by monoclonal antibody has been widely used for the therapy of RA since the 1990s; however, its mechanism of efficacy, and potential safety concerns of the treatment are still not fully understood. This study sought to establish a transgenic arthritic mouse model by overexpressing human TNFα (hTNFα and to apply this model as a means to evaluate therapeutic consequences of TNFα inhibitors. The transgenic mouse line (TgTC with FVB background was generated by incorporating 3′-modified hTNFα gene sequences. A progressively erosive polyarthritis developed in the TgTC mice, with many characteristics observed in human rheumatoid arthritis, including polyarticular swelling, impairment of movement, synovial hyperplasia, and cartilage and bone erosion. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that hTNFα is not only expressed in hyperplastic synovial membrane, but also in tissues without lesions, including brain, lung and kidney. Treatment of the TgTC mice with anti-hTNFα monoclonal antibodies (mAb significantly decreased the level of hTNFα in the diseased joint and effectively prevented development of arthritis in a dose-dependent response fashion. Our results indicated that the TgTC mice represent a genetic model which can be used to comprehensively investigate the pathogenesis and therapeutics of TNFα-related diseases.

  3. Lethality of patients with rheumatoid arthritis depending on adalimumab administration: imitation modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D V Goryachev

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Lethality of pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA exceeds mortality values in general population. Possibility of disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD influence on RA pts lethality has been widely discussed lately in scientific works. Objective. To determine possible lethality diminishment in Russian population of RA pts with one of biological drugs TNFα antagonist adalimumab. Material and methods. Model construction is based on the fact of lethality dependence on pt functional state assessed by HAQ. Model simulating progression of functional disability in pts with RA visiting medical institutions of Russia was made (RAISER study. 3 model variants for imitation of consecutive change of DMARDs including adalimumab were done. First consecution assessed DMARD change in the next chain: adalimumab-methotrexate-sulfasalazine-leflunomide-azathioprine-cyclosporine-palliative therapy. Second consecution: adalimumab administration after failure of first 3 DMARDs. Third consecution considered only change of synthetic DMARDs without adalimumab inclusion. Model imitated participation of 3000 pts in every consecution. Prognosis horizon was 12 years. Age of pts and initial HAQ distribution were get from results of epidemiological RAISER study. Calculation was done on the base of elevation of standardized lethality level (SLL in population of RA pts in average from 135% to 300%. SLL values from 80 to 320% were used depending on functional disability degree with converting to Russian values of age-specific lethality coefficient for 1999. Results. Lethality in treatment consecutions including adalimumab was significantly lower. To the end of 12th year in group not using adalimumab, using it at once and using it after 376 DMARDs respectively 65,1%, 71,6% and 71,1% of pts were still alive. Conclusion. Significant decrease of lethality with adalimumab inclusion in consecution of DMARD change during treatment of RA pts was demonstrated with imitation modeling

  4. No evidence of pathogenic involvement of cathelicidins in patient cohorts and mouse models of lupus and arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienhöfer, D; Hahn, J; Schubert, I; Reinwald, C; Ipseiz, N; Lang, S C; Borràs, È Bosch; Amann, K; Sjöwall, C; Barron, A E; Hueber, A J; Agerberth, B; Schett, G; Hoffmann, M H

    2014-01-01

    Apart from their role in the immune defence against pathogens evidence of a role of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in autoimmune diseases has accumulated in the past years. The aim of this project was to examine the functional impact of the human cathelicidin LL-37 and the mouse cathelicidin-related AMP (CRAMP) on the pathogenesis of lupus and arthritis. Serum LL-37 and anti-LL-37 levels were measured by ELISA in healthy donors and patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) and Rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Pristane-induced lupus was induced in female wild type (WT) and cathelicidin-deficient (CRAMP-/-) mice. Serum levels of anti-Sm/RNP, anti-dsDNA, and anti-histone were determined via ELISA, cytokines in sera and peritoneal lavages were measured via Multiplex. Expression of Interferon I stimulated genes (ISG) was determined by real-time PCR. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced in male WT and CRAMP-/- mice and arthritis severity was visually scored and analysed histomorphometrically by OsteoMeasure software. Serum levels of anti-LL-37 were higher in SLE-patients compared to healthy donors or patients with RA. However, no correlation to markers of disease activity or organ involvement was observed. No significant differences of autoantibody or cytokine/chemokine levels, or of expression of ISGs were observed between WT and CRAMP-/- mice after pristane-injection. Furthermore, lung and kidney pathology did not differ in the absence of CRAMP. Incidence and severity of CIA and histological parameters (inflammation, cartilage degradation, and bone erosion) were not different in WT and CRAMP-/- mice. Although cathelicidins are upregulated in mouse models of lupus and arthritis, cathelicidin-deficiency did not persistently affect the diseases. Also in patients with SLE, autoantibodies against cathelicidins did not correlate with disease manifestation. Reactivity against cathelicidins in lupus and arthritis could thus be an epiphenomenon caused by extensive

  5. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marina C.; Tavares, Luciana P.; Vago, Juliana P.; Batista, Nathália V.; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M.; Vieira, Angelica T.; Menezes, Gustavo B.; Sousa, Lirlândia P.; van de Loo, Fons A. J.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Amaral, Flávio A.; Ferreira, Adaliene V. M.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines. PMID:26742100

  6. Arthritis and the Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... RSS Home » Learn About Feet » Foot Health Information Arthritis What is Arthritis? Arthritis, in general terms, is inflammation and swelling of ... an increase in the fluid in the joints. Arthritis has multiple causes; just as a sore throat ...

  7. Arthritis Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bone Bash Dinners & Galas Healing Hands for Arthritis Bike Events Volunteer Search Events About Us Mission & Vision Leadership News Partners & Sponsors Careers Annual Report Financials Contact Us Privacy Policy Donate Make a Donation ...

  8. Enteropathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as well. Those who test positive for the HLA-B27 genetic marker are much more likely to have spinal involvement with enteropathic arthritis than those who test negative. Disease Course/Prognosis ...

  9. Gonococcal arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people who have gonorrhea caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae . Gonococcal arthritis affects women more often than men. ... Saunders; 2013:chap 109. Marrazzo JM, Apicella MA. Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonnorrhea). In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, ...

  10. Psoriatic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that often occurs with a skin condition called psoriasis . ... inflammatory condition. About 1 in 20 people with psoriasis may develop arthritis with the skin condition. In most cases, psoriasis ...

  11. Viral arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Michael; Marks, Jonathan L

    2016-04-01

    Acute-onset arthritis is a common clinical problem facing both the general clinician and the rheumatologist. A viral aetiology is though to be responsible for approximately 1% of all cases of acute arthritis with a wide range of causal agents recognised. The epidemiology of acute viral arthritis continues to evolve, with some aetiologies, such as rubella, becoming less common due to vaccination, while some vector-borne viruses have become more widespread. A travel history therefore forms an important part of the assessment of patients presenting with an acute arthritis. Worldwide, parvovirus B19, hepatitis B and C, HIV and the alphaviruses are among the most important causes of virally mediated arthritis. Targeted serological testing may be of value in establishing a diagnosis, and clinicians must also be aware that low-titre autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody, can occur in the context of acute viral arthritis. A careful consideration of epidemiological, clinical and serological features is therefore required to guide clinicians in making diagnostic and treatment decisions. While most virally mediated arthritides are self-limiting some warrant the initiation of specific antiviral therapy. PMID:27037381

  12. Development of a Rheumatoid Arthritis Education Program using the PRECEDE_PROCEED Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Bahmanpour

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In order to help rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients in carrying out and attaining relevant self-care behaviors and adaptation to the physical limitations of this disease and, conse-quently, promoting their level of health status, an education program based on the PRECEDE component of the PRECEDE–PROCEED model targeting patients with RA was developed. This paper describes the planning of a RA Patient Education Program (RAPEP designed to promote their quality of life.Methods: The development of the program began with a comprehensive review of the literature. This included a review of the signs and symptoms of RA, accompanying functional disabilities, previous educational programs and the effect of the disease on the patient’s quality of life. Be-sides, in order to help inform RAPEP program development, and organize the survey according to the factors identified in the PRECEDE model a cross-sectional survey was applied on a non-prob-ability sample of 181 outpatients in Yazd, center of Iran.Results: The quality of life (QOL problem identified was the considerable low role functioning, health perception and physical functioning due to chronic pain. One of the most significant modi-fiable behavioral factors impacting pain and functional limitations was self-care behaviors in RA patients. Higher level of knowledge, attitude, self-efficacy, enabling factors and social support is associated with better self-care behavior.Conclusions: The PRECEDE component of the PRECEDE–PROCEED model provided a com-prehensive conceptual framework for the development of RAPEP aiming at RA patients in Yazd. Further research to evaluate this educational program is suggested.

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients ...

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of ...

  16. Integration of efficacy, pharmacokinetic and safety assessment of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in a preclinical model of arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuurmond, Anne-Marie; Koudijs, Angela; van El, Benno; Doornbos, Robert P; van Manen-Vernooij, Babs C T; Bastiaans, Jacqueline H M W; Penninks, André H; van Bilsen, Jolanda H M; Cnubben, Nicole H P; Degroot, Jeroen

    2011-04-01

    Pharmacokinetic properties and safety profile of a drug are likely influenced by the disease state of a patient. In this study, we investigated the influence of arthritic processes on pharmacokinetics and immunotoxicity of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (Anakinra) in the rat adjuvant arthritis model. Anakinra dose-dependently suppressed joint inflammation and degradation as demonstrated by reduced clinical arthritis score, paw thickness, synovial infiltration and bone degradation. In addition, plasma levels of chemokines MCP-1 and GRO/KC were reduced. Pharmacokinetic behaviour of Anakinra was influenced by disease state of the rats as judged from a decrease in C(max) and an increase of the MRT as the disease progressed at a dose of 24 and 72 mg Anakinra/kg body weight. The pharmacokinetic parameters increased dose-dependently, but non-proportionally with increasing dose. Low level anti-Anakinra antibody formation was observed at prolonged exposure to the biologic. Safety parameters, including haematology, splenic lymphocyte subset analysis, ex vivo stimulation of spleen cells and histopathology of immune system organs were affected by the disease itself to such extent that no additional effects of Anakinra could be observed. In conclusion, we demonstrated that pharmacokinetic behaviour of Anakinra was influenced by the arthritis background of the rats resulting in decreased internal exposure. PMID:21300126

  17. Physiologic characterization of inflammatory arthritis in a rabbit model with BOLD and DCE MRI at 1.5 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasui, Otilia C.; Chan, Michael W.; Nathanael, George; Rayner, Tammy; Weiss, Ruth; Detzler, Garry; Zhong, Anguo [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Crawley, Adrian [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Toronto Western Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Miller, Elka [Children' s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO), Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Belik, Jaques [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Neonatology, Toronto, ON (Canada); Cheng, Hai-Ling; Kassner, Andrea; Doria, Andrea S. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Moineddin, Rahim [Department of Public Health, Family and Community Medicine, Toronto, ON (Canada); Jong, Roland; Rogers, Marianne [Mount Sinai Hospital, Department of Pathology, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-11-15

    Our aim was to test the feasibility of blood oxygen level dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD MRI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI to monitor periarticular hypoxic/inflammatory changes over time in a juvenile rabbit model of arthritis. We examined arthritic and contralateral nonarthritic knees of 21 juvenile rabbits at baseline and days 1,14, and 28 after induction of arthritis by unilateral intra-articular injection of carrageenin with BOLD and DCE MRI at 1.5 Tesla (T). Nine noninjected rabbits served as controls. Associations between BOLD and DCE-MRI and corresponding intra-articular oxygen pressure (PO{sub 2}) and blood flow [blood perfusion units (BPU)] (polarographic probes, reference standards) or clinical-histological data were measured by correlation coefficients. Percentage BOLD MRI change obtained in contralateral knees correlated moderately with BPU on day 0 (r = -0.51, p = 0.02) and excellently on day 28 (r = -0.84, p = 0.03). A moderate correlation was observed between peak enhancement DCE MRI (day 1) and BPU measurements in arthritic knees (r = 0.49, p = 0.04). In acute arthritis, BOLD and DCE MRI highly correlated (r = 0.89, p = 0.04; r = 1.0, p < 0.0001) with histological scores in arthritic knees. The proposed techniques are feasible to perform at 1.5 T, and they hold potential as surrogate measures to monitor hypoxic and inflammatory changes over time in arthritis at higher-strength MRI fields. (orig.)

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  20. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid ...

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and ...

  2. APL-2, an altered peptide ligand derived from heat-shock protein 60, induces interleukin-10 in peripheral blood mononuclear cell derived from juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients and downregulates the inflammatory response in collagen-induced arthritis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Norailys; Cantera, Dolores; Barberá, Ariana; Alonso, Amaris; Chall, Elsy; Franco, Lourdes; Ancizar, Julio; Nuñez, Yanetsy; Altruda, Fiorella; Silengo, Lorenzo; Padrón, Gabriel; Del Carmen Dominguez, Maria

    2015-02-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by autoimmune arthritis of unknown cause with onset before age of 16 years. Methotrexate provides clinical benefits in JIA. For children who do not respond to methotrexate, treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is an option. However, some patients do not respond or are intolerant to anti-TNF therapy. Induction of peripheral tolerance has long been considered a promising approach to the treatment of chronic autoimmune diseases. We aimed to evaluate the potentialities of two altered peptide ligands (APLs) derived from human heat-shock protein 60, an autoantigen involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis, in JIA patients. Interferon (IFN)-γ, TNF-α and interleukin (IL)-10 levels were determined in ex vivo assays using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from these patients. Wild-type peptide and one of these APLs increased IFN-γ and TNF-α levels. Unlike, the other APLs (called APL2) increased the IL-10 level without affecting IFN-γ and TNF-α levels. On the other hand, APL2 induces a marked activation of T cells since it transforms cell cycle phase's distribution of CD4+ T cells from these patients. In addition, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of APL2 in collagen-induced arthritis model. Therapy with APL2 reduced arthritis scores and histological lesions in mice. This effect was associated to a decrease in TNF-α and IL-17 levels. These results indicate a therapeutic potentiality of APL2 for JIA. PMID:24474501

  3. Gene therapy works in animal models of rheumatoid arthritis...so what!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loo, F.A.J. van de; Geurts, J.; Berg, W.B. van den

    2006-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic disease with polyarticular manifestation of chronic inflammation in the knees and small joints of hand and feet. The current systemic anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha therapies with biologics ameliorate disease in 60% to 70% of RA patients. However, biol

  4. Effects of Libby amphibole asbestos exposure on two rat models of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epidemiological data suggests that occupational exposure to the amphibole-containing vermiculite in Libby, MT was associated with increased risk for developing autoimmune diseases and had an odds ratio of 3.23 for developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our goal was to determine wh...

  5. Evaluation of the therapeutic effect of hydroxyapatite particles labeled with Ho sub 1 sub 6 sub 6 in rats with acute and chronic arthritis

    CERN Document Server

    Mendoza-Lopez, P

    2002-01-01

    with significantly statistical values (p<=0,01). This therapeutic effect was evident too when evaluating the measure of the articular perimeter in acute and chronic arthritis groups through the time with significantly statistical values (p<=0,01). In conclusion the hydroxyapatite particles labeled with Holmium-166 are biologically stable in vivo and have a therapeutic effect in the treatment of acute and chronic arthritis in rats. The therapeutic effect of an intraarticular injection of hydroxyapatite particles labeled with Holmium-166 ( Ho sub 1 sub 6 sub 6 HA) was evaluated. For this evaluation 72 antigen-induced arthritis rats; the arthritis was induced by an intraarticular injection of a suspension of ovoalbumin and Freund's adjuvant complete. The 72 rats were divided in three groups: control group, acute arthritis group and chronic arthritis group. The evaluation of the therapeutic effect was achieved by the measuring of the perimeter of the arthritic knee joint in different days after the intraart...

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Institutes Office of the Director 27 Institutes and Centers that make up the NIH About Mission The NIH ... arthritis is an inflammatory disease affecting about 1.3 million adults, and causes pain, swelling, stiffness, and loss of function in the joints. Several ...

  7. In vivo effect of pinosylvin and pterostilbene in the animal model of adjuvant arthritis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mačičková, T.; Drábiková, K.; Nosál, R.; Bauerová, K.; Mihalová, D.; Harmatha, Juraj; Pečivová, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 31, Suppl. 2 (2010), s. 91-95. ISSN 0172-780X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/07/1227 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : adjuvant arthritis * pinosylvin * pterostilbene * generation of reactive oxygen species Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.621, year: 2010 http://node.nel.edu

  8. Adoptive transfer of suppression of arthritis in the mouse model of collagen-induced arthritis. Evidence for a type II collagen-specific suppressor T cell.

    OpenAIRE

    Kresina, T F; Moskowitz, R W

    1985-01-01

    This study details the suppressive mechanism involved in the antigen-specific suppression of collagen-induced arthritis. Intravenous injection of 500 micrograms of soluble native type II collagen 3 d before immunization with native type II collagen emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant resulted in animals with decreased in vitro cellular and humoral immune response to native and denatured type II collagen compared with control groups. Control groups were composed of animals preinoculated w...

  9. Diagnosing Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to find out more! Email * Zipcode Diagnosing Psoriatic Arthritis Psoriatic arthritis can develop slowly with mild symptoms, or it ... severe. Early recognition, diagnosis and treatment of psoriatic arthritis can help prevent or limit extensive joint damage ...

  10. Treating Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to find out more! Email * Zipcode Treating Psoriatic Arthritis Treatment for psoriatic arthritis can relieve pain, reduce swelling, help keep joints ... recommend treatments based on the type of psoriatic arthritis, its severity and your reaction to treatment. Download ...

  11. What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arthritis Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Rheumatoid Arthritis PDF Version Size: 57 KB Audio Version Time: ... 9.7 MB November 2014 What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ...

  12. Arthritis: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to complications from the flu? 1. What is arthritis? The word arthritis actually means joint inflammation, but ... for you. 2. Who is at risk for arthritis? Certain factors are associated with a greater risk ...

  13. Raman spectroscopy detects deterioration in biomechanical properties of bone in a glucocorticoid-treated mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Jason R.; Takahata, Masahiko; Awad, Hani A.; Berger, Andrew J.

    2011-08-01

    Although glucocorticoids are frequently prescribed for the symptomatic management of inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, extended glucocorticoid exposure is the leading cause of physician-induced osteoporosis and leaves patients at a high risk of fracture. To study the biochemical effects of glucocorticoid exposure and how they might affect biomechanical properties of the bone, Raman spectra were acquired from ex vivo tibiae of glucocorticoid- and placebo-treated wild-type mice and a transgenic mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis. Statistically significant spectral differences were observed due to both treatment regimen and mouse genotype. These differences are attributed to changes in the overall bone mineral composition, as well as the degree of phosphate mineralization in tibial cortical bone. In addition, partial least squares regression was used to generate a Raman-based prediction of each tibia's biomechanical strength as quantified by a torsion test. The Raman-based predictions were as accurate as those produced by microcomputed tomography derived parameters, and more accurate than the clinically-used parameter of bone mineral density. These results suggest that Raman spectroscopy could be a valuable tool for monitoring bone biochemistry in studies of bone diseases such as osteoporosis, including tests of drugs being developed to combat these diseases.

  14. A novel selective prostaglandin E2 synthesis inhibitor relieves pyrexia and arthritis in Guinea pigs inflammatory models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, Ryusuke; Kubota, Kazufumi; Sugimoto, Kotaro; Tachida, Yuki; Shibayama, Takahiro; Kiho, Toshihiro; Kawakami, Katsuhiro; Shimada, Kohei

    2016-02-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), one of the terminal products in the cyclooxygenase pathway, plays an important role in various inflammatory responses. To determine whether selective inhibition of PGE2 may relieve these inflammatory symptoms, we synthesized a selective PGE2 synthesis inhibitor, compound A [1-(6-fluoro-5,7-dimethyl-1,3-benzothiazol-2-yl)-N-[(1S,2R)-2-(hydroxymethyl)cyclohexyl]piperidine-4-carboxamide], then investigated the effects on pyrexia, arthritis and inflammatory pain in guinea pigs. In LPS-stimulated guinea pig macrophages, compound A selectively inhibited inducible PGE2 biosynthesis in a dose-dependent manner whereas enhanced the formation of thromboxane B2 (TXB2). Compound A suppressed yeast-evoked PGE2 production selectively and enhanced the production of TXB2 and 6-keto PGF1αin vivo. In addition, compound A relieved yeast-induced pyrexia and also suppressed paw swelling in an adjuvant-induced arthritis model. The effect on gastrointestinal (GI) ulcer formation was also evaluated and compound A showed a lower GI adverse effect than indomethacin. However, compound A failed to relieve yeast-induced thermal hyperalgesia. These results suggest that selective inhibition of PGE2 synthesis may have anti-pyretic and anti-inflammatory properties without GI side effect, but lack the analgesic efficacy. PMID:26906248

  15. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease; CPPD disease; Acute CPPD arthritis; Pseudogout ... Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis is caused by the collection of salt called calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD). The buildup ...

  16. Preventing and curing citrulline-induced autoimmune arthritis in a humanized mouse model using a Th2-polarizing iNKT cell agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kyle M; Rytelewski, Mateusz; Mazzuca, Delfina M; Meilleur, Shannon A; Mannik, Lisa A; Yue, David; Brintnell, William C; Welch, Ian; Cairns, Ewa; Haeryfar, S M Mansour

    2012-07-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are innate lymphocytes with unique reactivity to glycolipid antigens bound to non-polymorphic CD1d molecules. They are capable of rapidly releasing pro- and/or anti-inflammatory cytokines and constitute attractive targets for immunotherapy of a wide range of diseases including autoimmune disorders. In this study, we have explored the beneficial effects of OCH, a Th2-polarizing glycolipid agonist of iNKT cells, in a humanized mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in which citrullinated human proteins are targeted by autoaggressive immune responses in mice expressing an RA susceptibility human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DR4 molecule. We found for the first time that treatment with OCH both prevents and cures citrulline-induced autoimmune arthritis as evidenced by resolved ankle swelling and reversed histopathological changes associated with arthritis. Also importantly, OCH treatment blocked the arthritogenic capacity of citrullinated antigen-experienced splenocytes without compromising their global responsiveness or altering the proportion of splenic naturally occurring CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells. Interestingly, administering the Th1-promoting iNKT cell glycolipid ligand α-C-galactosylceramide into HLA-DR4 transgenic mice increased the incidence of arthritis in these animals and exacerbated their clinical symptoms, strongly suggesting a role for Th1 responses in the pathogenesis of citrulline-induced arthritis. Therefore, our findings indicate a role for Th1-mediated immunopathology in citrulline-induced arthritis and provide the first evidence that iNKT cell manipulation by Th2-skewing glycolipids may be of therapeutic value in this clinically relevant model, a finding that is potentially translatable to human RA. PMID:21912419

  17. Breast cancer-associated metastasis is significantly increased in a model of autoimmune arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Roy, Lopamudra; Pathangey, Latha B; Tinder, Teresa L; Schettini, Jorge L; Gruber, Helen E; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Sites of chronic inflammation are often associated with the establishment and growth of various malignancies including breast cancer. A common inflammatory condition in humans is autoimmune arthritis (AA) that causes inflammation and deformity of the joints. Other systemic effects associated with arthritis include increased cellular infiltration and inflammation of the lungs. Several studies have reported statistically significant risk ratios between AA and breast cancer. Despite this knowledge, available for a decade, it has never been questioned if the site of chronic inflammation linked to AA creates a milieu that attracts tumor cells to home and grow in the inflamed bones and lungs which are frequent sites of breast cancer metastasis. Methods To determine if chronic inflammation induced by autoimmune arthritis contributes to increased breast cancer-associated metastasis, we generated mammary gland tumors in SKG mice that were genetically prone to develop AA. Two breast cancer cell lines, one highly metastatic (4T1) and the other non-metastatic (TUBO) were used to generate the tumors in the mammary fat pad. Lung and bone metastasis and the associated inflammatory milieu were evaluated in the arthritic versus the non-arthritic mice. Results We report a three-fold increase in lung metastasis and a significant increase in the incidence of bone metastasis in the pro-arthritic and arthritic mice compared to non-arthritic control mice. We also report that the metastatic breast cancer cells augment the severity of arthritis resulting in a vicious cycle that increases both bone destruction and metastasis. Enhanced neutrophilic and granulocytic infiltration in lungs and bone of the pro-arthritic and arthritic mice and subsequent increase in circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines, such as macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), interleukin-17 (IL-17), interleukin-6 (IL-6), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and tumor necrosis factor

  18. The role of T cell interleukin-17 in conducting destructive arthritis: lessons from animal models.

    OpenAIRE

    Lubberts, E; Koenders, M.I.; Berg, W.B. van den

    2005-01-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) is a T cell cytokine spontaneously produced by cultures of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial membranes. High levels have been detected in the synovial fluid of patients with RA. The trigger for IL-17 is not fully identified; however, IL-23 promotes the production of IL-17 and a strong correlation between IL-15 and IL-17 levels in synovial fluid has been observed. IL-17 is a potent inducer of various cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, IL-1, and recepto...

  19. In vivo imaging of matrix metalloprotease 12 and matrix metalloprotease 13 activities in the mouse model of collagen-induced arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, Ngee Han; Meinjohanns, Ernst; Bou-Gharios, George;

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To develop enzyme activatable Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) substrate probes to detect MMP-12 and MMP-13 activities in vivo in mouse models of inflammatory arthritis Methods. Peptidic FRET probes activated by MMP-12 and MMP-13 were reverse designed from inhibitors selected f...

  20. Efficacy of quinupristin/dalfopristin versus vancomycin, alone or in combination with rifampicin, against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a rabbit arthritis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Antoine; Caillon, Jocelyne; Jacqueline, Cédric; Batard, Eric; Potel, Gilles

    2008-02-01

    We compared the efficacy of quinupristin/dalfopristin versus vancomycin, alone or in combination with rifampicin, in a rabbit model of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-induced arthritis. Vancomycin, alone or in combination with rifampicin, and quinupristin/dalfopristin+rifampicin were significantly more effective than quinupristin/dalfopristin alone. PMID:18006281

  1. Colchicine suppresses neutrophil superoxide production in a murine model of gouty arthritis: a rationale for use of low-dose colchicine

    OpenAIRE

    Chia, E W; Grainger, R.; Harper, J L

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: When used to treat gouty arthritis, colchicine is believed to work by inhibiting microtubule-dependent cell infiltration. However, in vitro, colchicine also reduces monosodium urate (MSU)-induced superoxide production by neutrophils. Our study aimed to compare the effects of colchicine on neutrophil superoxide production and infiltration in an in vivo model of acute gouty inflammation.

  2. Opisthorchis viverrini-antigen induces expression of MARCKS during inflammation-associated cholangiocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techasen, Anchalee; Loilome, Watcharin; Namwat, Nisana; Duenngai, Kunyarat; Cha'on, Ubon; Thanan, Raynoo; Sithithaworn, Paiboon; Miwa, Masanao; Yongvanit, Puangrat

    2012-03-01

    Myristoylated alanine rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) has been implicated in PKC-mediated membrane-cytoskeleton alterations that underlie lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced macrophage responses. MARCKS is postulated to be involved in inflammation-associated CCA based on its overexpression in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) and inflammatory cells. The aims of this study were to investigate localization patterns of MARCKS in hamster and human tissue during cholangiocarcinogenesis and to examine the involvement of MARCKS in inflammation. MARCKS protein expression was found prominently in inflammatory cells of Opisthorchis viverrini-treated as well as O. viverrini plus N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA)-treated hamsters from week 2 to week 3 of treatment. The positive signal decreased during week 4 to week 12, then increased again at week 26 when CCA developed. At the last time point the expression of MARCKS was observed in both cancer and inflammatory cells. MARCKS protein expression was also found in inflammatory cells, including macrophages in human CCA tissues. O. viverrini excretory/secretory products or worm antigen induced MARCKS mRNA and protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner in the human U937 macrophage cell line. The relative mRNA expression of MARCKS in white blood cells of O. viverrini-infected patients was significantly higher than in healthy subjects (P = 0.02). Thus, MARCKS is significantly expressed in macrophages and plays a role in inflammation-related CCA induced by O. viverrini. PMID:21763456

  3. Septic arthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Ahaideb Abdulaziz

    2008-01-01

    Abstract There is an increasing number of rheumatoid patients who get septic arthritis. Chronic use of steroids is one of the important predisposing factors. The clinical picture of septic arthritis is different in immunocompromised patients like patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The diagnosis and management are discussed in this review article.

  4. Arthritis in cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Schidlow, D V; Goldsmith, D P; Palmer, J; Huang, N N

    1984-01-01

    We have confirmed previous observations of a transient, non-disabling recurrent arthritis in patients with cystic fibrosis. This arthritis differs from classic rheumatoid arthritis, is frequently associated with skin arthritis lesions, and its occurrence is unrelated to the severity of lung disease.

  5. Anti-arthritic effects of magnolol in human interleukin 1β-stimulated fibroblast-like synoviocytes and in a rat arthritis model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh-Horng Wang

    Full Text Available Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS play an important role in the pathologic processes of destructive arthritis by producing a number of catabolic cytokines and metalloproteinases (MMPs. The expression of these mediators is controlled at the transcriptional level. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the anti-arthritic effects of magnolol (5,5'-Diallyl-biphenyl-2,2'-diol, the major bioactive component of the bark of Magnolia officinalis, by examining its inhibitory effects on inflammatory mediator secretion and the NF-κB and AP-1 activation pathways and to investigate its therapeutic effects on the development of arthritis in a rat model. The in vitro anti-arthritic activity of magnolol was tested on interleukin (IL-1β-stimulated FLS by measuring levels of IL-6, cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E(2, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs by ELISA and RT-PCR. Further studies on how magnolol inhibits IL-1β-stimulated cytokine expression were performed using Western blots, reporter gene assay, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and confocal microscope analysis. The in vivo anti-arthritic effects of magnolol were evaluated in a Mycobacterium butyricum-induced arthritis model in rats. Magnolol markedly inhibited IL-1β (10 ng/mL-induced cytokine expression in a concentration-dependent manner (2.5-25 µg/mL. In clarifying the mechanisms involved, magnolol was found to inhibit the IL-1β-induced activation of the IKK/IκB/NF-κB and MAPKs pathways by suppressing the nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity of both transcription factors. In the animal model, magnolol (100 mg/kg significantly inhibited paw swelling and reduced serum cytokine levels. Our results demonstrate that magnolol inhibits the development of arthritis, suggesting that it might provide a new therapeutic approach to inflammatory arthritis diseases.

  6. Preexposure to ozone blocks the antigen-induced late asthmatic response of the canine peripheral airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, C.R.; Kleeberger, S.R.; Spannhake, E.W. (Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The influence of exposure of the airways to ozone on acute allergic responsiveness has been investigated in several species. Little is known, however, about the effect of this environmental pollutant on the late asthmatic response (LAR) in animals in which it is exhibited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate this effect in the canine peripheral airways and to assess the potential role of mast cells in modulating the effect. A series of experiments on seven mongrel dogs demonstrated that the numbers of mast cells at the base of the epithelial region of small subsegmental airways exposed to 1 ppm ozone for 5 min were significantly (p less than .01) increased 3 h following exposure compared to air exposed or nonexposed control airways. In a second series of experiments performed on eight additional mongrel dogs with inherent sensitivity to Ascaris suum antigen, antigen aerosol was administered to the sublobar segment 3 h following ozone preexposure when mast cell numbers were presumed to be increased. These experiments were performed to determine whether ozone preexposure could enhance the late-phase response to antigen by virtue of acutely increasing the number of mast cells available to bind the antigen. Four of the eight dogs tested displayed a late-phase response to antigen following air-sham preexposure. In these four dogs, simultaneous ozone preexposure of a contralateral lobe completely blocked the late-phase response to antigen. These results indicate that the consequences of a single exposure to ozone persist beyond its effects on acute antigen-induced bronchoconstriction and extend to the complex processes involved with the late response. This attenuating effect of ozone is seen under conditions where mast-cell numbers in the airways are increased above baseline levels.

  7. A dynamic real time in vivo and static ex vivo analysis of granulomonocytic cell migration in the collagen-induced arthritis model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Byrne

    Full Text Available Neutrophilic granulocytes and monocytes (granulomonocytic cells; GMC drive the inflammatory process at the earliest stages of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The migratory behavior and functional properties of GMC within the synovial tissue are, however, only incompletely characterized. Here we have analyzed GMC in the murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA model of RA using multi-photon real time in vivo microscopy together with ex vivo analysis of GMC in tissue sections.GMC were abundant as soon as clinical arthritis was apparent. GMC were motile and migrated randomly through the synovial tissue. In addition, we observed the frequent formation of cell clusters consisting of both neutrophilic granulocytes and monocytes that actively contributed to the inflammatory process of arthritis. Treatment of animals with a single dose of prednisolone reduced the mean velocity of cell migration and diminished the overall immigration of GMC.In summary, our study shows that the combined application of real time in vivo microscopy together with elaborate static post-mortem analysis of GMC enables the description of dynamic migratory characteristics of GMC together with their precise location in a complex anatomical environment. Moreover, this approach is sensitive enough to detect subtle therapeutic effects within a very short period of time.

  8. Cost-effectiveness analysis of tocilizumab in combination with methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis: A Markov model based on data from Serbia, country in socioeconomic transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Marina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Recent studies have shown that biological treatments for rheumatoid arthritis can change the course of rheumatoid arthritis and improve functional ability of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In spite of this fact, use of biological therapy is still limited by high prices of these medicines, especially in countries in socioeconomic transition. The aim of our study was to compare costeffectiveness of a combination of tocilizumab and methotrexate with methotrexate alone for rheumatoid arthritis in Serbia, a country in socioeconomic transition. Methods. For the purpose of our study we designed a Markov model using data on therapy efficacy from the available literature, and data on the costs of health states calculated from records of actual patients treated in the Clinical Center Kragujevac, Serbia. The duration of one cycle in our model was set at one month, and the time horizon was 480 months (40 years. The study was done from the social perspective, and all the costs and outcomes were discounted for 3% per year. Results. Treating rheumatoid arthritis with diseasemodifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs alone was more cost-effective in comparison with a combination of biologic treatment with tocilizumab and DMARDs. The total costs for treating a patient with DMARDs for one year were on average 261,945.42 RSD, or 2,497.70 Euro and the total costs for treatment with tocilizimab plus DMARDs were on average 1,959,217.44 RSD, or 18,659.20 Euro. However, these results are susceptible to changes in costs and treatment effects of tocilizumab in patients with more severe forms of rheumatoid arthritis. Conclusion. Our results show that the use of tocilizumab for rheumatoid arthrits in economic environment of Serbia is not cost-effective. Use of tocilizumab for treating rheumatoid arthritis can become affordable, if costs of its use become lower. In order to start using expensive biologic medicines in patients in transitional countries

  9. The assessment of bee venom responses in an experimental model of mono-arthritis using Tc-99m DPD bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several recent studies have shown that bee venom (BV) has an anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effect on arthritis. However, objective methods for evaluation of the therapeutic effect of BV is insufficient in animal studies and clinical trials. Our purpose was to determine the usefulness of bone scintigraphy using Tc-99m DPD (3,3-diphosphono-1,2-propan-dicarbonacid) about effects of BV applied to carrageenan-induced mono-arthritis (CIA) model. Mono-arthritis was induced by an intra-articular injection of carrageenan in Sprague-Dawley rats. Administration of BV (0.8 mg/kg) was performed at 30 min before and at 4 h after the induction of mono-arthritis. We assigned rats to BV-before, BV-after, control-before and control-after groups and compared the results of each group by the weight-loading test and bone scintigraphy. The rats received an intravenous injection of 37 MBq of Tc-99m DPD by the tail vein and then scanning was performed at 4 and 24 h after the injection. Visual assessment and quantitative analysis were performed for both knees. The BV-before and BV-after groups were more improved than the control groups on the weight load test (p<0.05). Bone scintigraphy showed lower activity in the BV-before group than in the control-before group (p<0.05) on the 4 h imaging. However, a significant difference in the BV-before and BV-after groups was not observed on the 24 h imaging. BV had therapeutic effects by anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity in the CIA and bone scintigraphy performed on 4 h imaging provided visual and quantitative information for the assessment of the therapeutic response to BV as an objective method in mono arthritis model. (author)

  10. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibody T1h and variant anti-CD6 murine 10D12 in healthy animals and in experimental arthritis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodistribution and pharmacokinetic of two radio labeled monoclonal antibodies was performed with the help of imaging techniques. Isotopic labeling was carried out by means of standardized methods. Pharmacokinetic evaluation was performed using the population approach and sparse data design. Introduction: Targeted therapy with monoclonal antibodies (MAb) is an efficient option for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Th1 is a MAb anti human CD6 developed for the treatment of autoimmune disease and 10D12 is its counterpart anti murine CD6 developed as a pharmacological tool to get deep into the response mechanisms in animals models of rheumatoid arthritis.To investigate the behavior of both antibodies in the assay system, molecules were labeled with 125I to evaluate pharmacokinetic in healthy animals and with 99mTc to evaluate the antibody uptake in inflamed area of induced arthritis. Materials and methods: Antibodies were supplied by the Center of Molecular immunology. Iodination was performed by the iodogen method and technetium labeling was carried out directly by Schwarz method. Female C57BL6 from CENPALAB were used for experiments. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetic was performed by a sparse data design using the population approach. Uptake in region of inflammation was quantified by gammagraphy at the same time points of blood sampling. A compartmental model was build to quantify uptake kinetic. Pharmacokinetic profiles were analyzed using MONOLIX software version 4.2. Results: Minor pharmacokinetic differences were found between monoclonal antibodies labeled with 125I and 99mTc. As a humanized antibody, T1h shows a faster clearance than 10D12 and a biodistribution pattern reflecting preference for excretion mechanisms. The arthritis accumulation was not consistent with a targeted mediated uptake. On the other hand, radio labeled 10D12 shows an accumulation profile in arthritis with two peaks of maximum concentration representing an initial transit to

  11. A Patient-Specific Foot Model for the Estimate of Ankle Joint Forces in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinold, Joe A I; Mazzà, Claudia; Di Marco, Roberto; Hannah, Iain; Malattia, Clara; Magni-Manzoni, Silvia; Petrarca, Maurizio; Ronchetti, Anna B; Tanturri de Horatio, Laura; van Dijkhuizen, E H Pieter; Wesarg, Stefan; Viceconti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the leading cause of childhood disability from a musculoskeletal disorder. It generally affects large joints such as the knee and the ankle, often causing structural damage. Different factors contribute to the damage onset, including altered joint loading and other mechanical factors, associated with pain and inflammation. The prediction of patients' joint loading can hence be a valuable tool in understanding the disease mechanisms involved in structural damage progression. A number of lower-limb musculoskeletal models have been proposed to analyse the hip and knee joints, but juvenile models of the foot are still lacking. This paper presents a modelling pipeline that allows the creation of juvenile patient-specific models starting from lower limb kinematics and foot and ankle MRI data. This pipeline has been applied to data from three children with JIA and the importance of patient-specific parameters and modelling assumptions has been tested in a sensitivity analysis focused on the variation of the joint reaction forces. This analysis highlighted the criticality of patient-specific definition of the ankle joint axes and location of the Achilles tendon insertions. Patient-specific detection of the Tibialis Anterior, Tibialis Posterior, and Peroneus Longus origins and insertions were also shown to be important. PMID:26374518

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Arthritis Yoga Poses for Arthritis Patients from Johns Hopkins Stategies to Increase your Level of Physical ... Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Johns Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: psoriatic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions psoriatic arthritis psoriatic arthritis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Psoriatic arthritis is a condition involving joint inflammation (arthritis) that ...

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression ...

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression ...

  16. From the model of integral attention to the creation of centers of excellence in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Moreno, Pedro; Castañeda, Oswaldo; Garro, Boris; Flores, Dennis; Sánchez, Guillermo; Castro, Carlos

    2015-03-01

    For the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), the care of patients with chronic diseases currently experiences fragmentation in attention, generating poor performance of health services. Thus, comprehensive health care strategies arise to mitigate these problems; one of them are Centers of Excellence (CoEs), which aim to obtain high quality results in health from the adequate and minimum use of resources. The objective of this study was to describe the history and current context of the CoE in comprehensive care in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A systematic search of the literature terms (MeSH) was performed. The bases used were PubMed, Ebsco Host, Lilacs, Science Direct, Ovid, and Google (gray literature). The source of the information was evaluated to determine its quality. International standards focus the CoEs starting from comprehensive management of patients with RA and patient volume, continuous improvement, and quality of health care, constituting an interdisciplinary team. The REAL-PANLAR group suggested that the inclusion of the strategy "Treat to Target", and patient education improves patient conditions and understanding of the disease. RA is a prevalent and costly disease. The creation of comprehensive care centers of the CoE type is an initiative that improves the prognosis of RA. This document aims to encourage rheumatologists and scientific societies to structure CoE in an interdisciplinary endeavor. PMID:26208443

  17. Nimesulide Improves the Symptomatic and Disease Modifying Effects of Leflunomide in Collagen Induced Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Abd, Ahmed M.; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A.; Nofal, Salwa M.; Khalifa, Amani E.; Williams, Richard O.; El-Eraky, Wafaa I.; Nagy, Ayman A.; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B.

    2014-01-01

    Nimesulide is a COX-2 inhibitor used for symptomatic relief of rheumatoid arthritis. Leflunomide is an anti-pyrimidine used to manage the progression of rheumatoid arthritis. Herein we studied the influence of nimesulide and leflunomide combination in terms of disease symptoms and progression using collagen-induced arthritis model in mice, as a model for rheumatoid arthritis. Collagen induced arthritis was induced by immunization with type II collagen. Assessment of joint stiffness and articu...

  18. REGULAR EXPRESSION OF DISCOIDIN DOMAIN RECEPTOR 2 IN THE IMPROVED ADJUVANT-INDUCED ANIMAL MODEL FOR RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Li; Yuan-qiang Zhang; Xin-ping Liu; Li-bo Yao; Lan Sun

    2005-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) of fibroblast-like synovial cells in improved adjuvant-induced animal (AIA) model for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to provide evidence for DDR2′s antagonist use clinically.Methods AIA was modified by administrating 0.1 mL of complete Freund′s adjuvant (CFA, mixed with 5 mg Bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccine/mL) into rats′ right hind paws and 0.125 mL tumor necrosis factor-α (2 U/mL) into right ankles and subpatellar fatty tissue. The expression of DDR2 in fibroblast-like synovial cells was assessed using immunohistochemistry,immunofluorescence histochemistry, and in situ hybridization methods. Levels of anti-collagen Ⅱ antibody were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results Given the terms mentioned above, we found a more practical rat model, apparently decreasing immunization time (average 3-5 days). DDR2 can be detected upon the 15th day of immunization; expression gradually increased with time going on, and reaching a peak 35 days after immunization before gradually decreasing. Serum anti-collagen Ⅱ antibody showed similar expression patterns as DDR2, but reached peak later than DDR2, about 40 days after immunization.Conclusion Regular expression of DDR2 in animal models infers its important role in the pathological process of RA.

  19. Predicting the Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Its Age of Onset through Modelling Genetic Risk Variants with Smoking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Ian C.; Seegobin, Seth D.; Steer, Sophia; Tan, Rachael; Forabosco, Paola; Hinks, Anne; Eyre, Stephen; Morgan, Ann W.; Wilson, Anthony G.; Hocking, Lynne J.; Wordsworth, Paul; Barton, Anne; Worthington, Jane; Cope, Andrew P.; Lewis, Cathryn M.

    2013-01-01

    The improved characterisation of risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) suggests they could be combined to identify individuals at increased disease risks in whom preventive strategies may be evaluated. We aimed to develop an RA prediction model capable of generating clinically relevant predictive data and to determine if it better predicted younger onset RA (YORA). Our novel modelling approach combined odds ratios for 15 four-digit/10 two-digit HLA-DRB1 alleles, 31 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and ever-smoking status in males to determine risk using computer simulation and confidence interval based risk categorisation. Only males were evaluated in our models incorporating smoking as ever-smoking is a significant risk factor for RA in men but not women. We developed multiple models to evaluate each risk factor's impact on prediction. Each model's ability to discriminate anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA)-positive RA from controls was evaluated in two cohorts: Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC: 1,516 cases; 1,647 controls); UK RA Genetics Group Consortium (UKRAGG: 2,623 cases; 1,500 controls). HLA and smoking provided strongest prediction with good discrimination evidenced by an HLA-smoking model area under the curve (AUC) value of 0.813 in both WTCCC and UKRAGG. SNPs provided minimal prediction (AUC 0.660 WTCCC/0.617 UKRAGG). Whilst high individual risks were identified, with some cases having estimated lifetime risks of 86%, only a minority overall had substantially increased odds for RA. High risks from the HLA model were associated with YORA (P<0.0001); ever-smoking associated with older onset disease. This latter finding suggests smoking's impact on RA risk manifests later in life. Our modelling demonstrates that combining risk factors provides clinically informative RA prediction; additionally HLA and smoking status can be used to predict the risk of younger and older onset RA, respectively. PMID:24068971

  20. Forms of Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Forms of Arthritis Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents Today, ... of Linda Saisselin Osteoarthritis (OA) — the form of arthritis typically occurring during middle or old age, this ...

  1. MP Joint Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon MP Joint Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... in to name and customize your collection. DESCRIPTION Arthritis is the wearing away of the cartilage at ...

  2. Imaging in Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Østergaard, Mikkel; Terslev, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory joint disease characterized by arthritis and often enthesitis in patients with psoriasis, presenting a wide range of manifestations in various patterns. Imaging procedures are primarily conventional radiography, ultrasonography (US), and magnetic...

  3. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ... The cause of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is not known. It ... illness . This means the body attacks and destroys healthy body ...

  4. Photoacoustic tomography to identify inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajian, Justin Rajesh; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2012-09-01

    Identifying neovascularity (angiogenesis) as an early feature of inflammatory arthritis can help in early accurate diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid imaging modality which relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. PAT is used to identify changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis in a rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, on rats revealed that there is a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histology images obtained from both the normal and the arthritis affected rats correlated well with the PAT findings. Results support the fact that the emerging PAT could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory arthritis.

  5. When is arthritis reactive?

    OpenAIRE

    Hamdulay, S. S.; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra‐articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and gen...

  6. Genetic epidemiology: Psoriatic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Barton, Anne C

    2002-01-01

    The existence of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct clinical entity remains a topic of debate; some authors propose that it is simply the co-occurrence of psoriasis and inflammatory arthritis. However, a distinct entity is likely to have distinct susceptibility factors in addition to those that contribute to psoriasis and inflammatory arthritis alone. These aetiological factors may be genetic and/or environmental, and in this review, the evidence for distinct psoriatic arthritis genetic suscep...

  7. Arthritis in psoriasis.

    OpenAIRE

    Green, L.; Meyers, O L; Gordon, W.; Briggs, B

    1981-01-01

    A group of 61 unselected patients with psoriasis attending a dermatology clinic were studied to determine the prevalence of psoriatic arthritis. On defined criteria arthritis was present in 41.6%. Peripheral arthritis was present in 15.5%, and sacroiliitis in 43%. A strong association of distal interphalangeal arthritis with psoriasis and nail dystrophy was confirmed. Tissue typing showed a strong association of B23, 17, in Caucasoid psoriatics, while the haplotype A1/B8 was increased in mixe...

  8. Psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory joint disease which develops in patients with psoriasis. It is characteristic that the rheumatoid factor in serum is absent. Etiology of the disease is still unclear but a number of genetic associations have been identified. Inheritance of the disease is multilevel and the role of environmental factors is emphasized. Immunology of PsA is also complex. Inflammation is caused by immunological reactions leading to release of kinins. Destructive changes in bones usually appear after a few months from the onset of clinical symptoms. Typically PsA involves joints of the axial skeleton with an asymmetrical pattern. The spectrum of symptoms include inflammatory changes in attachments of articular capsules, tendons, and ligaments to bone surface. The disease can have divers clinical course but usually manifests as oligoarthritis. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of PsA. Classical radiography has been used for this purpose for over a hundred years. It allows to identify late stages of the disease, when bone tissue is affected. In the last 20 years many new imaging modalities, such as ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR), have been developed and became important diagnostic tools for evaluation of rheumatoid diseases. They enable the assessment and monitoring of early inflammatory changes. As a result, patients have earlier access to modern treatment and thus formation of destructive changes in joints can be markedly delayed or even avoided

  9. Animal Models of Bone Loss in Inflammatory Arthritis: from Cytokines in the Bench to Novel Treatments for Bone Loss in the Bedside-a Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, C Henrique; Farrell, Eric; Vis, Marijn; Colin, Edgar M; Lubberts, Erik

    2016-08-01

    Throughout life, bone is continuously remodelled. Bone is formed by osteoblasts, from mesenchymal origin, while osteoclasts induce bone resorption. This process is tightly regulated. During inflammation, several growth factors and cytokines are increased inducing osteoclast differentiation and activation, and chronic inflammation is a condition that initiates systemic bone loss. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory auto-immune disease that is characterised by active synovitis and is associated with early peri-articular bone loss. Peri-articular bone loss precedes focal bone erosions, which may progress to bone destruction and disability. The incidence of generalised osteoporosis is associated with the severity of arthritis in RA and increased osteoporotic vertebral and hip fracture risk. In this review, we will give an overview of different animal models of inflammatory arthritis related to RA with focus on bone erosion and involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, a humanised endochondral ossification model will be discussed, which can be used in a translational approach to answer osteoimmunological questions. PMID:26634933

  10. Analysis of Accumulating Clonotypes of T Cell in Joints of a Spontaneous Murine Model of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WenmingZhao; LipingZhang; YukageKobari; YoshikataMisaki; KazuhikoYamamoto

    2004-01-01

    SKG mouse, as a model of spontaneous rheumatoid arthritis (RA) bred recent years, is similar to the patients with RA. We analyzed the clonotypes of T cell infiltrating into joints of SKG mice in initial stage and late stage of RA by using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and subsequent single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). The results indicated that the percentages of clonotypes TCR Vβ2 and Vβ8.2 of T cell clonotypes increased obviously to 72.3% and 60.2%, respectively. Mice number with identical TCR Vβ2 and Vβ8.2 clonotypes also clearly increased in late stage of disease to 100% and 75%, respectively. These results mean that T cells with TCR Vβ2 and Vβ8.2 clonotypes probably play an important role in RA progression of SKG mouse. Sequencing of the extracted DNA verified that common bands on SSCP gel were derived from the same T cell clones among samples from different joints. The results we obtained implied that RT-PCR/SSCP method was a sensitive and credible method for analyzing T cell clonotypes. When the T cells of SKG mouse were adoptively transferred to a nude mouse, it was verified that the T cells infiltrating into joints were related to morbid formation of RA. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  11. Assessment of the Quality of Delivered Care for Iranian patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis by Using Comprehensive Quality Measurement Model in Health Care (CQMH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Karimi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Quality of care has become increasingly critical in the evaluation of healthcare and healthcare services. The aim of this study was to assess quality of delivered care among patients with rheumatoid arthritis using a model of Comprehensive Quality Measurement in Health Care (CQMH. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 172 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA who were received care from private clinics of Isfahan University of medical sciences in 2013. CQMH questionnaires were used for assessing the quality of care. Data were analyzed using SPSS for Windows. Results: The mean scores of Quality Index, Service Quality (SQ, Technical Quality (TQ, and Costumer Quality (CQ were 72.70, 79.09, 68.54 and 70.25 out of 100, respectively. For CQ only 19.8% of participations staying the course of action even under stress and financial constraints, there is a significant gap between what RA care they received with what was recommended in the guideline for TQ. Scores of service quality was low in majority of aspects especially in "availability of support group" section. Conclusion: Study shows paradoxical findings and expresses that quality scores of service delivery for patients with arthritis rheumatoid from patient's perspective is relatively low. Therefore, for fixing this paradoxical problem, improving the participation of patients and their family and empowering them for self-management and decision should be regarded by health systems.

  12. Therapeutic effect of an altered peptide ligand derived from heat-shock protein 60 by suppressing of inflammatory cytokines secretion in two animal models of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, N; Barberá, A; Domínguez, M C; Torres, A M; Hernandez, M V; Hernandez, I; Gil, R; Ancizar, J; Garay, H; Reyes, O; Altruda, F; Silengo, L; Padrón, G

    2012-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic autoimmune disease mediated by T cells. Productive engagement of T cell receptors by major histocompatibility complex-peptide leads to proliferation, differentiation and the definition of effector functions. Altered peptide ligands (APL) generated by amino acid substitutions in the antigenic peptide have diverse effects on T cell response. We predicted a novel T cell epitope from human heat-shock protein 60, an autoantigen involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Three APLs were designed from this epitope and it was demonstrated that these peptides induce the activation of T cells through their ability to modify cell cycle phase's distribution of CD4+T cells from RA patients. Also, IL-17, TNF-α and IL-10 levels were determined in PBMC from these patients. Unlike the wild-type peptide and the other two APLs, APL2 increased the IL-10 level and suppressed IL-17 secretion in these assays. Therapeutic effect of this APL in adjuvant arthritis (AA) and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) models was also evaluated. Clinical score, histopathology, inflammatory and regulatory cytokine concentration were monitored in the animals. APL2 efficiently inhibited the progression of AA and CIA with a significant reduction of the clinical and histopathologic score. Therapeutic effect of APL2 on CIA was similar to that obtained with MTX; the standard treatment for RA. This effect was associated with a decrease of TNF-α and IL-17 levels. These results suggest that the therapeutic effect of APL2 is mediated in part by down-regulation of inflammatory cytokines and support the potential use of APL2 as a therapeutic drug in RA patients. PMID:22686732

  13. Don’t let up: implementing and sustaining change in a new post-licensure education model for developing extended role practitioners involved in arthritis care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundon K

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Katie Lundon,1,3 Rachel Shupak,1–3 Sonya Canzian,4 Ed Ziesmann,5 Rayfel Schneider,6,71Office of Continuing Professional Development, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, 2Division of Rheumatology, St Michael's Hospital, 3Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, 4Trauma/Neurosurgery and Mobility Programs, St Michael's Hospital, 5Programs and Services, The Arthritis Society, 6Division of Rheumatology, The Hospital for Sick Children, 7Department of Paediatrics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CanadaKey message: Across a 9-year period, the Advanced Clinician Practitioner in Arthritis Care program has achieved a set of short-term “wins” giving direction and momentum to the development of new roles for health care practitioners providing arthritis care.Implications: This is a viable model for post-licensure training offered to multiple allied health professionals to support the development of competent extended role practitioners (extended scope practice. Challenges at this critical juncture include: retain focus, drive, and commitment; develop academic and financial partnerships transferring short-term success to long-term sustainability; advanced, context-driven, system-level evaluation including fiscal outcome; health care policy adaptation to new human health resource development.Supporting evidence: Success includes: completed 2-year health services research evaluating 37 graduates; leadership, innovation, educational excellence, and human health resource benefit awards; influential publications/presentations addressing post-licensure education/outcome, interprofessional collaboration, and improved patient care. Keywords: human health resource development, post-licensure education, arthritis, extended role practitioners, allied health professionals

  14. An Important Role for N-Acylethanolamine Acid Amidase in the Complete Freund's Adjuvant Rat Model of Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonezzi, F T; Sasso, O; Pontis, S; Realini, N; Romeo, E; Ponzano, S; Nuzzi, A; Fiasella, A; Bertozzi, F; Piomelli, D

    2016-03-01

    The endogenous lipid amides, palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and oleoylethanolamide (OEA), exert marked antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects in animal models by engaging nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α. PEA and OEA are produced by macrophages and other host-defense cells and are deactivated by the cysteine amidase, N-acylethanolamine acid amidase (NAAA), which is highly expressed in macrophages and B-lymphocytes. In the present study, we examined whether a) NAAA might be involved in the inflammatory reaction triggered by injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into the rat paw and b) administration of 4-cyclohexylbutyl-N-[(S)-2-oxoazetidin-3-yl]-carbamate (ARN726), a novel systemically active NAAA inhibitor, attenuates such reaction. Injection of CFA into the paw produced local edema and heat hyperalgesia, which were accompanied by decreased PEA and OEA content (assessed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry) and increased NAAA levels (assessed by Western blot and ex vivo enzyme activity measurements) in paw tissue. Administration of undec-10-ynyl-N-[(3S)-2-oxoazetidin-3-yl] carbamate (ARN14686), a NAAA-preferring activity-based probe, revealed that NAAA was catalytically active in CFA-treated paws. Administration of ARN726 reduced NAAA activity and restored PEA and OEA levels in inflamed tissues, and significantly decreased CFA-induced inflammatory symptoms, including pus production and myeloperoxidase activity. The results confirm the usefulness of ARN726 as a probe to investigate the functions of NAAA in health and disease and suggest that this enzyme may provide a new molecular target for the treatment of arthritis. PMID:26769918

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic Arthritis 101 ... Patient to an Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of ...

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed to help you learn more about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of ...

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and Alternative Medicine for ... Patient Update Transitioning the JRA Patient to an Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information ...

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Center since 2000, currently serving as the Nurse Manager. She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing ...

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ... Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Johns Hopkins ...

  20. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of RA is made, what happens to your ... Link Below To Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and Diagnosis Rheumatoid Arthritis: What is Happening to the Joints? ...

  1. Arthritis of the hand - Rheumatoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Rheumatoid Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... causes pressure on the nearby nerve. How Rheumatoid Arthritis is Diagnosed The diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis is ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease that causes chronic abnormal inflammation, ...

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed ... Activity Role of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic ...

  4. IDO1 Deficiency Does Not Affect Disease in Mouse Models of Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Secondary Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Put

    Full Text Available Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO1 is an immune-modulatory enzyme that catalyzes the degradation of tryptophan (Trp to kynurenine (Kyn and is strongly induced by interferon (IFN-γ. We previously reported highly increased levels of IFN-γ and corresponding IDO activity in patients with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH, a hyper-inflammatory syndrome. On the other hand, IFN-γ and IDO were low in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA, an autoinflammatory syndrome. As HLH can occur as a complication of sJIA, the opposing levels of both IFN-γ and IDO are remarkable. In animal models for sJIA and HLH, the role of IFN-γ differs from being protective to pathogenic. In this study, we aimed to unravel the role of IDO1 in the pathogenesis of sJIA and HLH.Wild-type and IDO1-knockout (IDO1-KO mice were used in 3 models of sJIA or HLH: complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA-injected mice developed an sJIA-like syndrome and secondary HLH (sHLH was evoked by either repeated injection of unmethylated CpG oligonucleotide or by primary infection with mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV. An anti-CD3-induced cytokine release syndrome was used as a non-sJIA/HLH control model.No differences were found in clinical, laboratory and hematological features of sJIA/HLH between wild-type and IDO1-KO mice. As IDO modulates the immune response via induction of regulatory T cells and inhibition of T cell proliferation, we investigated both features in a T cell-triggered cytokine release syndrome. Again, no differences were observed in serum cytokine levels, percentages of regulatory T cells, nor of proliferating or apoptotic thymocytes and lymph node cells.Our data demonstrate that IDO1 deficiency does not affect inflammation in sJIA, sHLH and a T cell-triggered cytokine release model. We hypothesize that other tryptophan-catabolizing enzymes like IDO2 and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO might compensate for the lack of IDO1.

  5. Treatment with anti-C5aR mAb leads to early-onset clinical and mechanistic effects in the murine delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, Sara Marie; Nansen, Anneline; Usher, Pernille A.;

    2015-01-01

    Blockade of the complement cascade at the C5a/C5a receptor (C5aR)-axis is believed to be an attractive treatment avenue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the effects of such interventions during the early phases of arthritis remain to be clarified. In this study we use the murine delayed-typ...... arthritic disease development in a DTHA model strengthening the rationale of C5aR-blockade as a treatment strategy for RA, especially during the early stages of arthritis flare.......-type hypersensitivity arthritis (DTHA) model to study the very early effects of a blocking, non-depleting anti-C5aR mAb on joint inflammation with treatment synchronised with disease onset, an approach not previously described. The DTHA model is a single-paw inflammatory arthritis model characterised by synchronised...... and rapid disease onset driven by T-cells, immune complexes and neutrophils. We show that a reduction in paw swelling, bone erosion, cartilage destruction, synovitis and new bone formation is apparent as little as 60 h after administration of a single dose of a blocking, non-depleting anti-mouse C5a...

  6. When is arthritis reactive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdulay, S S; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-07-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra-articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and genetic susceptibility is marked by possession of the HLA-B27 gene, although the mechanism remains uncertain. Diagnosis is a two stage process and requires demonstration of a temporal link with a recognised "trigger" infection. The identification and management of "sexually acquired" and "enteric" forms of reactive arthritis are considered. Putative links with HIV infection are also discussed. The clinical features, approach to investigation, diagnosis, and management of reactive arthritis are reviewed. PMID:16822921

  7. Correlation between joint [F-18] FDG PET uptake and synovial TNF-{alpha} concentration: A study with two rabbit models of acute inflammatory arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, P.-W. [Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Hospital, 111 Hsing-Long Road Sec. 3, Taipei 11696, Taiwan (China); Liu, R.-S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, 201 Shih-Pai Road Sec. 2, Taipei 11217, Taiwan (China); Liou, T.-H. [Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Hospital, 111 Hsing-Long Road Sec. 3, Taipei 11696, Taiwan (China); Pan, L.-C. [Department of General Education, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Chen, C.-H. [Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Hospital, 111 Hsing-Long Road Sec. 3, Taipei 11696, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Medical Informatics, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: chihsen.chen@msa.hinet.net

    2007-11-15

    The objective of this study was to verify that the [F-18]FDG PET synovial uptake is correlated with the synovial fluid (SF) TNF-{alpha} concentration. Two rabbit models of acute inflammatory arthritis induced by human interleukin-8 and lipopolysaccharide were used. Modified standard uptake values (MSUVs) obtained from PET images of the animals were compared with results of SF TNF-{alpha} measurements. Statistically significant correlations were found between the MSUVs and the SF TNF-{alpha} ratios. An equation to estimate the TNF-{alpha} ratio from a MSUV was also derived.

  8. Eicosapentaenoic acid and docosapentaenoic acid monoglycerides are more potent than docosahexaenoic acid monoglyceride to resolve inflammation in a rheumatoid arthritis model

    OpenAIRE

    Morin, Caroline; Blier, Pierre U.; Fortin, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease of the joints and bones. Omega-3 (ω3) fatty acid supplementation has been associated with a decreased production of inflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids involved in RA pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine the therapeutic potential of ω3 monoglyceride (MAG-ω3) compounds in an in vivo rat model of RA induced by Complete Freund’s Adjuvant (CFA). Method CFA rats were untreated or treated per os w...

  9. Aspergillus antigen induces robust Th2 cytokine production, inflammation, airway hyperreactivity and fibrosis in the absence of MCP-1 or CCR2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charo Israel F

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma is characterized by type 2 T-helper cell (Th2 inflammation, goblet cell hyperplasia, airway hyperreactivity, and airway fibrosis. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 or CCL2 and its receptor, CCR2, have been shown to play important roles in the development of Th2 inflammation. CCR2-deficient mice have been found to have altered inflammatory and physiologic responses in some models of experimental allergic asthma, but the role of CCR2 in contributing to inflammation and airway hyperreactivity appears to vary considerably between models. Furthermore, MCP-1-deficient mice have not previously been studied in models of experimental allergic asthma. Methods To test whether MCP-1 and CCR2 are each required for the development of experimental allergic asthma, we applied an Aspergillus antigen-induced model of Th2 cytokine-driven allergic asthma associated with airway fibrosis to mice deficient in either MCP-1 or CCR2. Previous studies with live Aspergillus conidia instilled into the lung revealed that MCP-1 and CCR2 play a role in anti-fungal responses; in contrast, we used a non-viable Aspergillus antigen preparation known to induce a robust eosinophilic inflammatory response. Results We found that wild-type C57BL/6 mice developed eosinophilic airway inflammation, goblet cell hyperplasia, airway hyperreactivity, elevations in serum IgE, and airway fibrosis in response to airway challenge with Aspergillus antigen. Surprisingly, mice deficient in either MCP-1 or CCR2 had responses to Aspergillus antigen similar to those seen in wild-type mice, including production of Th2 cytokines. Conclusion We conclude that robust Th2-mediated lung pathology can occur even in the complete absence of MCP-1 or CCR2.

  10. Abnormal bone remodelling in inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoch, Earl R.; Moran, Erica

    1998-01-01

    Osteopenia is responsible for substantial comorbidity in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and is an important factor in the surgical management of joint disease. In animal models of bone loss stimulated by inflammatory arthritis, increased bone remodelling and altered microstructure of bone have been documented. The subchondral bone plate near the joint surface is narrow and perforated by vascular inflammatory invasion, and in the shaft the thin cortices are weakened by giant resorption defects. Biomechanical tests and a mathematical model of bone strength suggest that cortical defects, much larger than those found in normal osteonal remodelling, are principally responsible for the experimentally observed loss of strength. Similarly, these defects may explain the increased femoral fracture risk in rheumatoid arthritis. The osteoclast, the cell resorbing bone, is demonstrated in increased number and activity in rheumatoid arthritis and in animal models. Bisphosphonates, drugs that inhibit osteoclast function, have been shown experimentally to reduce both focal and generalized osteopenia and to prevent loss of bone strength. Bisphosphonates also protect articular cartilage from damage characteristic of inflammatory arthritis. The mechanism of chondroprotection may be prevention of subchondral bone resorption by the osteoclast and also an altered distribution of bone marrow cells. Thus, bisphosphonates, currently in clinical use for other bone metabolic diseases, appear to have potential as prophylaxis and treatment for osteopenia and joint damage in inflammatory arthritis. PMID:9711159

  11. Autoantibody recognition of collagen type II in arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Lindh, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Autoantibodies against collagen type II (CII), a protein localized in the joint cartilage, play a major role in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), one of the most commonly used animal models for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The studies included in this thesis were undertaken to elucidate structural and functional requirements for B and T cells to recognize native CII structures during experimental arthritis as well as in human RA. To reveal in detail how CII-specific autoantibodies recognize CII...

  12. Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Chang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been implicated as one of the most important extrinsic risk factors for its development and severity. Recent developments have shed light on the pathophysiology of RA in smokers, including oxidative stress, inflammation, autoantibody formation and epigenetic changes. The association of smoking and the development of RA have been demonstrated through epidemiologic studies, as well as through in vivo and animal models of RA. With increased use of biological agents in addition to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs, there has been interest in how smoking affects drug response in RA treatment. Recent evidence suggests the response and drug survival in people treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF therapy is poorer in heavy smokers, and possible immunological mechanisms for this effect are presented in the current paper.

  13. Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kathleen; Yang, So Min; Kim, Seong Heon; Han, Kyoung Hee; Park, Se Jin; Shin, Jae Il

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been implicated as one of the most important extrinsic risk factors for its development and severity. Recent developments have shed light on the pathophysiology of RA in smokers, including oxidative stress, inflammation, autoantibody formation and epigenetic changes. The association of smoking and the development of RA have been demonstrated through epidemiologic studies, as well as through in vivo and animal models of RA. With increased use of biological agents in addition to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), there has been interest in how smoking affects drug response in RA treatment. Recent evidence suggests the response and drug survival in people treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy is poorer in heavy smokers, and possible immunological mechanisms for this effect are presented in the current paper. PMID:25479074

  14. Collagen induced arthritis increases secondary metastasis in MMTV-PyV MT mouse model of mammary cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gruber Helen E; Tinder Teresa L; Pathangey Latha B; Ghosh Sriparna; Roy Lopamudra; Mukherjee Pinku

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Several studies have demonstrated that sites of chronic inflammation are often associated with the establishment and growth of various malignancies. A common inflammatory condition in humans is autoimmune arthritis (AA). Although AA and cancer are different diseases, many of the underlying processes that contribute to the disorders of the joints and connective tissue that characterize AA also affect cancer progression and metastasis. Systemically, AA can lead to cellular i...

  15. Causal modeling using network ensemble simulations of genetic and gene expression data predicts genes involved in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Heming; McDonagh, Paul D; Bienkowska, Jadwiga; Cashorali, Tanya; Runge, Karl; Miller, Robert E; Decaprio, Dave; Church, Bruce; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Khalil, Iya G; Carulli, John

    2011-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) is a key regulator of inflammation and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). TNF-α blocker therapies can be very effective for a substantial number of patients, but fail to work in one third of patients who show no or minimal response. It is therefore necessary to discover new molecular intervention points involved in TNF-α blocker treatment of rheumatoid arthritis patients. We describe a data analysis strategy for predicting gene expression measures that are critical for rheumatoid arthritis using a combination of comprehensive genotyping, whole blood gene expression profiles and the component clinical measures of the arthritis Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28) score. Two separate network ensembles, each comprised of 1024 networks, were built from molecular measures from subjects before and 14 weeks after treatment with TNF-α blocker. The network ensemble built from pre-treated data captures TNF-α dependent mechanistic information, while the ensemble built from data collected under TNF-α blocker treatment captures TNF-α independent mechanisms. In silico simulations of targeted, personalized perturbations of gene expression measures from both network ensembles identify transcripts in three broad categories. Firstly, 22 transcripts are identified to have new roles in modulating the DAS28 score; secondly, there are 6 transcripts that could be alternative targets to TNF-α blocker therapies, including CD86--a component of the signaling axis targeted by Abatacept (CTLA4-Ig), and finally, 59 transcripts that are predicted to modulate the count of tender or swollen joints but not sufficiently enough to have a significant impact on DAS28. PMID:21423713

  16. Causal modeling using network ensemble simulations of genetic and gene expression data predicts genes involved in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heming Xing

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α is a key regulator of inflammation and rheumatoid arthritis (RA. TNF-α blocker therapies can be very effective for a substantial number of patients, but fail to work in one third of patients who show no or minimal response. It is therefore necessary to discover new molecular intervention points involved in TNF-α blocker treatment of rheumatoid arthritis patients. We describe a data analysis strategy for predicting gene expression measures that are critical for rheumatoid arthritis using a combination of comprehensive genotyping, whole blood gene expression profiles and the component clinical measures of the arthritis Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28 score. Two separate network ensembles, each comprised of 1024 networks, were built from molecular measures from subjects before and 14 weeks after treatment with TNF-α blocker. The network ensemble built from pre-treated data captures TNF-α dependent mechanistic information, while the ensemble built from data collected under TNF-α blocker treatment captures TNF-α independent mechanisms. In silico simulations of targeted, personalized perturbations of gene expression measures from both network ensembles identify transcripts in three broad categories. Firstly, 22 transcripts are identified to have new roles in modulating the DAS28 score; secondly, there are 6 transcripts that could be alternative targets to TNF-α blocker therapies, including CD86--a component of the signaling axis targeted by Abatacept (CTLA4-Ig, and finally, 59 transcripts that are predicted to modulate the count of tender or swollen joints but not sufficiently enough to have a significant impact on DAS28.

  17. Causal Modeling Using Network Ensemble Simulations of Genetic and Gene Expression Data Predicts Genes Involved in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Heming; McDonagh, Paul D.; Bienkowska, Jadwiga; Cashorali, Tanya; Runge, Karl; Miller, Robert E.; DeCaprio, Dave; Church, Bruce; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Khalil, Iya G.; Carulli, John

    2011-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) is a key regulator of inflammation and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). TNF-α blocker therapies can be very effective for a substantial number of patients, but fail to work in one third of patients who show no or minimal response. It is therefore necessary to discover new molecular intervention points involved in TNF-α blocker treatment of rheumatoid arthritis patients. We describe a data analysis strategy for predicting gene expression measures that are critical for rheumatoid arthritis using a combination of comprehensive genotyping, whole blood gene expression profiles and the component clinical measures of the arthritis Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28) score. Two separate network ensembles, each comprised of 1024 networks, were built from molecular measures from subjects before and 14 weeks after treatment with TNF-α blocker. The network ensemble built from pre-treated data captures TNF-α dependent mechanistic information, while the ensemble built from data collected under TNF-α blocker treatment captures TNF-α independent mechanisms. In silico simulations of targeted, personalized perturbations of gene expression measures from both network ensembles identify transcripts in three broad categories. Firstly, 22 transcripts are identified to have new roles in modulating the DAS28 score; secondly, there are 6 transcripts that could be alternative targets to TNF-α blocker therapies, including CD86 - a component of the signaling axis targeted by Abatacept (CTLA4-Ig), and finally, 59 transcripts that are predicted to modulate the count of tender or swollen joints but not sufficiently enough to have a significant impact on DAS28. PMID:21423713

  18. A Patient-Specific Foot Model for the Estimate of Ankle Joint Forces in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Prinold, J.A.I.; Mazza, C; Di Marco, R.; Hannah, I.; Malattia, C; Magni-Manzoni, S; Petrarca, M.; Ronchetti, A.B.; de Horatio, L.T.; van Dijkhuizen, E.H.P.; Wesarg, S; Viceconti, M.

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the leading cause of childhood disability from a musculoskeletal disorder. It generally affects large joints such as the knee and the ankle, often causing structural damage. Different factors contribute to the damage onset, including altered joint loading and other mechanical factors, associated with pain and inflammation. The prediction of patients’ joint loading can hence be a valuable tool in understanding the disease mechanisms involved in structural...

  19. Arthritis and Veterans

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-09

    One in three veterans has arthritis. This podcast provides information on how veterans can improve their quality of life with physical activity and other arthritis management strategies.  Created: 11/9/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/9/2015.

  20. PEP-1-FK506BP12 inhibits matrix metalloproteinase expression in human articular chondrocytes and in a mouse carrageenan-induced arthritis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Park, In Young; Kim, Dae Won; Choi, Soo Young; Jung, Young Ok; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-07-01

    The 12 kDa FK506-binding protein (FK506BP12), an immunosuppressor, modulates T cell activation via calcineurin inhibition. In this study, we investigated the ability of PEP-1-FK506BP12, consisting of FK506BP12 fused to the protein transduction domain PEP-1 peptide, to suppress catabolic responses in primary human chondrocytes and in a mouse carrageenan-induced paw arthritis model. Western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis showed that PEP-1-FK506BP12 efficiently penetrated chondrocytes and cartilage explants. In interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-treated chondrocytes, PEP-1-FK506BP12 significantly suppressed the expression of catabolic enzymes, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-1, -3, and -13 in addition to cyclooxygenase-2, at both the mRNA and protein levels, whereas FK506BP12 alone did not. In addition, PEP-1-FK506BP12 decreased IL-1β-induced phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) complex (p38, JNK, and ERK) and the inhibitor kappa B alpha. In the mouse model of carrageenan-induced paw arthritis, PEP-1-FK506BP12 suppressed both carrageenan-induced MMP-13 production and paw inflammation. PEP-1-FK506BP12 may have therapeutic potential in the alleviation of OA progression. PMID:25887750

  1. Th2 and eosinophil responses suppress inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhu; Andreev, Darja; Oeser, Katharina; Krljanac, Branislav; Hueber, Axel; Kleyer, Arnd; Voehringer, David; Schett, Georg; Bozec, Aline

    2016-01-01

    Th2-eosinophil immune responses are well known for mediating host defence against helminths. Herein we describe a function of Th2-eosinophil responses in counteracting the development of arthritis. In two independent models of arthritis, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection leads to Th2 and eosinophil accumulation in the joints associated with robust inhibition of arthritis and protection from bone loss. Mechanistically, this protective effect is dependent on IL-4/IL-13-induced STAT6 pathway. Furthermore, we show that eosinophils play a central role in the modulation of arthritis probably through the increase of anti-inflammatory macrophages into arthritic joints. The presence of these pathways in human disease is confirmed by detection of GATA3-positive cells and eosinophils in the joints of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Taken together, these results demonstrate that eosinophils and helminth-induced activation of the Th2 pathway axis effectively mitigate the course of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:27273006

  2. Psoriatic arthritis as a mountain

    OpenAIRE

    Berthelot, J M

    2011-01-01

    There is no doubt that inflammatory arthritis/enthesitis and psoriasis coexist more frequently than would be expected by chance: for instance, in a study of 1285 patients with psoriasis seen in an hospital, 483 (38%) were suffering from arthritis/ enthesitis, including 40 patients classified as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) (3%), 177 (14%) as undifferentiated arthritis (UA), and 266 (21%) as Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) (1). Although lower percentages have been noticed in the general population with...

  3. Epidemiology of psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Salvarani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies on psoriatic arthritis have long been hampered by the absence of widely accepted classification criteria. The development of the CASPAR (ClASsification criteria for Psoriatic ARthritis criteria has recently provided the framework for conducting epidemiological studies in psoriatic arthritis using uniform recruitment criteria. However, so far, only a minority of studies have adopted such criteria. In addition to the lack of shared classification criteria, differences in study settings, designs, and ascertainment methods have contributed to yield substantial disparities in the estimates of the incidence (from 3,02 to 23,1 cases per 100,000 people and prevalence (from 49,1 to 420 cases per 100,000 people of psoriatic arthritis around the globe. Overall, the available data suggests that the prevalence of psoriasis in the general population is approximately 2-3%, with about a third of patients with psoriasis having arthritis. Therefore, psoriatic arthritis may affect 0,3- 1,0% of the population, a frequency not dissimilar from that of rheumatoid arthritis. Future epidemiological studies should be carried out in larger numbers of patients diagnosed using consistent criteria.

  4. Spontaneous inflammatory arthritis in HLA-B27 transgenic mice lacking beta 2-microglobulin: a model of human spondyloarthropathies

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Human class I major histocompatibility complex allele HLA-B27 is associated with a group of human diseases called "spondyloarthropathies." Studies on transgenic rats expressing HLA-B27 and human beta 2-microglobulin have confirmed the role of HLA-B27 in disease pathogenesis. Here we report spontaneous inflammatory arthritis in HLA-B27 transgenic mice lacking beta 2-microglobulin (B27+ beta 2m-/- ). In the absence of beta 2-microglobulin, B27+ beta 2m-/- animals do not express the HLA-B27 tran...

  5. Collagen induced arthritis increases secondary metastasis in MMTV-PyV MT mouse model of mammary cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several studies have demonstrated that sites of chronic inflammation are often associated with the establishment and growth of various malignancies. A common inflammatory condition in humans is autoimmune arthritis (AA). Although AA and cancer are different diseases, many of the underlying processes that contribute to the disorders of the joints and connective tissue that characterize AA also affect cancer progression and metastasis. Systemically, AA can lead to cellular infiltration and inflammation of the lungs. Several studies have reported statistically significant risk ratios between AA and breast cancer. Despite this knowledge being available, there has been minimal research linking breast cancer, arthritis, and metastasis associated with breast cancer. Notably both diseases are extremely prevalent in older post-menopausal women. To establish the novel link between arthritis induced inflammation and secondary metastasis associated with breast cancer, PyV MT mice that spontaneously develop mammary gland carcinoma were injected with Type II collagen (CII) to induce arthritis at 9 and 18 weeks of age for pre-metastatic and metastatic condition. The sites of secondary metastasis and the associated inflammatory microenvironment were evaluated. A significant increase in breast cancer-associated secondary metastasis to the lungs and bones was observed in the arthritic versus the non-arthritic PyV MT mice along with an increase in primary tumor burden. We report significant increases in the levels of interstitial cellular infiltrates and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-17 (IL-17), interleukin-6 (IL-6), Pro- Matrix metallopeptidase 9 (Pro-MMP9), insulin like growth factor-II (GF-II) and macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) in the arthritic lung and bone milieu as well as in the circulation. These pro-inflammatory cytokines along with the inflammatory microenvironment may be the underlying factors facilitating tumor progression and metastasis in

  6. Collagen induced arthritis increases secondary metastasis in MMTV-PyV MT mouse model of mammary cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruber Helen E

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have demonstrated that sites of chronic inflammation are often associated with the establishment and growth of various malignancies. A common inflammatory condition in humans is autoimmune arthritis (AA. Although AA and cancer are different diseases, many of the underlying processes that contribute to the disorders of the joints and connective tissue that characterize AA also affect cancer progression and metastasis. Systemically, AA can lead to cellular infiltration and inflammation of the lungs. Several studies have reported statistically significant risk ratios between AA and breast cancer. Despite this knowledge being available, there has been minimal research linking breast cancer, arthritis, and metastasis associated with breast cancer. Notably both diseases are extremely prevalent in older post-menopausal women. Methods To establish the novel link between arthritis induced inflammation and secondary metastasis associated with breast cancer, PyV MT mice that spontaneously develop mammary gland carcinoma were injected with Type II collagen (CII to induce arthritis at 9 and 18 weeks of age for pre-metastatic and metastatic condition. The sites of secondary metastasis and the associated inflammatory microenvironment were evaluated. Results A significant increase in breast cancer-associated secondary metastasis to the lungs and bones was observed in the arthritic versus the non-arthritic PyV MT mice along with an increase in primary tumor burden. We report significant increases in the levels of interstitial cellular infiltrates and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-17 (IL-17, interleukin-6 (IL-6, Pro- Matrix metallopeptidase 9 (Pro-MMP9, insulin like growth factor-II (GF-II and macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF in the arthritic lung and bone milieu as well as in the circulation. These pro-inflammatory cytokines along with the inflammatory microenvironment may be the underlying factors

  7. Arthritis in the buff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the significance of radiologic perturbations in articular diseases is facilitated by correlation with its representation in intact macerated skeletons (from the collections of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History). Classic skeletal involvement is illustrated grossly and radiographically for the following conditions: rheumatoid arthritis calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease, osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, reactive (Reiter syndrome, psoriatic arthritis) diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, and infectious arthritis. Distribution and lesion character is reviewed. Visualization of the gross bone lesion ''in the buff'' provides clear explanation of its radiologic appearance and facilitates the transition from x-ray image to the pathophysiology proposed in the interpretation

  8. Cost-effectiveness analysis of tocilizumab in combination with methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis: A Markov model based on data from Serbia, country in socioeconomic transition

    OpenAIRE

    Kostić Marina; Jovanović Snežana; Tomović Marina; Popović-Milenković Marija; Janković Slobodan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim. Recent studies have shown that biological treatments for rheumatoid arthritis can change the course of rheumatoid arthritis and improve functional ability of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In spite of this fact, use of biological therapy is still limited by high prices of these medicines, especially in countries in socioeconomic transition. The aim of our study was to compare costeffectiveness of a combination of tocilizumab and methotr...

  9. SH3BP2 gain-of-function mutation exacerbates inflammation and bone loss in a murine collagen-induced arthritis model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Mukai

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: SH3BP2 is a signaling adapter protein which regulates immune and skeletal systems. Gain-of-function mutations in SH3BP2 cause cherubism, characterized by jawbone destruction. This study was aimed to examine the role of SH3BP2 in inflammatory bone loss using a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA model. METHODS: CIA was induced in wild-type (Sh3bp2(+/+ and heterozygous P416R SH3BP2 cherubism mutant knock-in (Sh3bp2(KI/+ mice, an SH3BP2 gain-of-function model. Severity of the arthritis was determined by assessing the paw swelling and histological analyses of the joints. Micro-CT analysis was used to determine the levels of bone loss. Inflammation and osteoclastogenesis in the joints were evaluated by quantitating the gene expression of inflammatory cytokines and osteoclast markers. Furthermore, involvement of the T- and B-cell responses was determined by draining lymph node cell culture and measurement of the serum anti-mouse type II collagen antibody levels, respectively. Finally, roles of the SH3BP2 mutation in macrophage activation and osteoclastogenesis were determined by evaluating the TNF-α production levels and osteoclast formation in bone marrow-derived M-CSF-dependent macrophage (BMM cultures. RESULTS: Sh3bp2(KI/+ mice exhibited more severe inflammation and bone loss, accompanying an increased number of osteoclasts. The mRNA levels for TNF-α and osteoclast marker genes were higher in the joints of Sh3bp2(KI/+ mice. Lymph node cell culture showed that lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-γ and IL-17 production were comparable between Sh3bp2(+/+ and Sh3bp2(KI/+ cells. Serum anti-type II collagen antibody levels were comparable between Sh3bp2(+/+ and Sh3bp2(KI/+ mice. In vitro experiments showed that TNF-α production in Sh3bp2(KI/+ BMMs is elevated compared with Sh3bp2(+/+ BMMs and that RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis is enhanced in Sh3bp2(KI/+ BMMs associated with increased NFATc1 nuclear localization. CONCLUSION: Gain-of-function of

  10. Arthritis Mechanisms May Vary by Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids Become Lifelong Learners Featured Website: GeneEd: Genetics, Education, Discovery Links Rheumatoid Arthritis Osteoarthritis Gout Rheumatoid Arthritis Juvenile Arthritis Feeling Out of Joint: The Aches of Arthritis CONTACT ...

  11. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve five or more large and small joints of the legs and arms, as well as the jaw and neck. Pauciarticular JIA involves 4 or less ...

  12. What Is Juvenile Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit this page to Yahoo! Buzz '); document.write(' Rank this page on Digg '); document.write(' Bookmark this ... her normal activities. What Are Researchers Trying to Learn About Juvenile Arthritis? Scientists are looking for the ...

  13. Arthritis of the Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of hand and wrist arthritis. (Note: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not test dietary supplements. These compounds may cause negative interactions with other medications. Always consult your doctor before taking dietary supplements.) ...

  14. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worsen, it's known as a "flare" or a "flare-up." JIA often causes only minor problems, but in ... was possible a few years ago. For arthritis flare-ups, doctors may also use medicines called corticosteroids (like ...

  15. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... providers, including the primary care physician, rheumatologist, and physical therapist, will work together to develop the best method ... the management of any type of arthritis. A physical therapist will explain the importance of certain activities and ...

  16. Bone pathology inpsoriatic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    V. V. Badokin

    2007-01-01

    Objective. To study different variants of osteolysis in pts with psoriatic arthritis (PA) and to reveal their relationship with other clinico-radiological features of joint damage. Material and methods. 370 pts with definite PA having different variants of joint damage were included. Radiological examination of bones and joints (in some cases large picture frame) was performed. Morphological evaluation of synovial biopsies was done in 34 pts with PA and 10 pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). ...

  17. Deficiency of RAMP1 attenuates antigen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manyu Li

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the lung, characterized by breathing difficulty during an attack following exposure to an environmental trigger. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP is a neuropeptide that may have a pathological role in asthma. The CGRP receptor is comprised of two components, which include the G-protein coupled receptor, calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR, and receptor activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1. RAMPs, including RAMP1, mediate ligand specificity in addition to aiding in the localization of receptors to the cell surface. Since there has been some controversy regarding the effect of CGRP on asthma, we sought to determine the effect of CGRP signaling ablation in an animal model of asthma. Using gene-targeting techniques, we generated mice deficient for RAMP1 by excising exon 3. After determining that these mice are viable and overtly normal, we sensitized the animals to ovalbumin prior to assessing airway resistance and inflammation after methacholine challenge. We found that mice lacking RAMP1 had reduced airway resistance and inflammation compared to wildtype animals. Additionally, we found that a 50% reduction of CLR, the G-protein receptor component of the CGRP receptor, also ameliorated airway resistance and inflammation in this model of allergic asthma. Interestingly, the loss of CLR from the smooth muscle cells did not alter the airway resistance, indicating that CGRP does not act directly on the smooth muscle cells to drive airway hyperresponsiveness. Together, these data indicate that signaling through RAMP1 and CLR plays a role in mediating asthma pathology. Since RAMP1 and CLR interact to form a receptor for CGRP, our data indicate that aberrant CGRP signaling, perhaps on lung endothelial and inflammatory cells, contributes to asthma pathophysiology. Finally, since RAMP-receptor interfaces are pharmacologically tractable, it may be possible to develop compounds targeting the RAMP1/CLR

  18. Anti-inflammatory effects of red pepper (Capsicum baccatum) on carrageenan- and antigen-induced inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiller, Fernando; Alves, Márcia K; Vieira, Sílvio M; Carvalho, Toni A; Leite, Carlos E; Lunardelli, Adroaldo; Poloni, José A; Cunha, Fernando Q; de Oliveira, Jarbas R

    2008-04-01

    Inflammation is a pivotal component of a variety of diseases, such as atherosclerosis and tumour progression. Various naturally occurring phytochemicals exhibit anti-inflammatory activity and are considered to be potential drug candidates against inflammation-related pathological processes. Capsicum baccatum L. var. pendulum (Willd.) Eshbaugh (Solanaceae) is the most consumed species in Brazil, and its compounds, such as capsaicinoids, have been found to inhibit the inflammatory process. However, the anti-inflammatory effects of C. baccatum have not been characterized. Thus, this study was designed to evaluate the effects of C. baccatum juice in animal models of acute inflammation induced by carrageenan and immune inflammation induced by methylated bovine serum albumin. Pretreatment (30 min) of rats with pepper juice (0.25-2.0 g kg(-1)) significantly decreased leucocyte and neutrophil migration, exudate volume and protein and LDH concentration in pleural exudates of a pleurisy model. This juice also inhibited neutrophil migration and reduced the vascular permeability on carrageenan-induced peritonitis in mice. C. baccatum juice also reduced neutrophil recruitment and exudate levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-1beta in mouse inflammatory immune peritonitis. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the main constituent of C. baccatum juice, as extracted with chloroform, is capsaicin. In agreement with this, capsaicin was able to inhibit the neutrophil migration towards the inflammatory focus. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the anti-inflammatory effect of C. baccatum juice and our data suggest that this effect may be induced by capsaicin. Moreover, the anti-inflammatory effect induced by red pepper may be by inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine production at the inflammatory site. PMID:18380920

  19. Effect of sinomenine and MTX on serum levels of IL-10 and TNF-α in rat models with pristane induced arthritis (PIA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the effect of sinomenine and MTX on the serum levels of IL-10 and TNF-α in rat models of PIA. Methods: Thirty-two rat models of PIA were prepared with subcutaneous injection of pristane (0.2ml). These rat models were divided into four groups (n=8 in each group): Group A, on treatment given; Group B, treated with sinomenine (120mg/kg/d), Group C, treated with MTX (3.8mg/kg/d); Group D, treated with sinomenine and MTX combined. Another 8 rats comprised the control group. All the 40 rats were sacrificed after 8 weeks; serum IL-10 levels were determined with RIA and severity of arthritis (with score 1-4) evaluated. Results: Serum levels of both IL-10 and TNF-α in the rat models treated with MTX alone were the lowest among all the animals and were significantly lower than those in the untreated models. Levels of TNF-α in the untreated models were significantly higher than those in the controls and those in the MTX-treated group (P<0.05), but were not significantly differ- ent from those in the models treated with sinomenine alone. Conclusion: MTX demonstrated prominent inhibition over serum expression of IL-10 and TNF-α in rat models with PIA. (authors)

  20. Self-Adjuvanting Bacterial Vectors Expressing Pre-Erythrocytic Antigens Induce Sterile Protection against Malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke eBergmann-Leitner

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Genetically inactivated, Gram-negative bacteria that express malaria vaccine candidates represent a promising novel self-adjuvanting vaccine approach. Antigens expressed on particulate bacterial carriers not only target directly to antigen-presenting cells but also provide a strong danger signal thus circumventing the requirement for potent extraneous adjuvants. E. coli expressing malarial antigens resulted in the induction of either Th1 or Th2 biased responses that were dependent on both antigen and sub-cellular localization. Some of these constructs induced higher quality humoral responses compared to recombinant protein and most importantly they were able to induce sterile protection against sporozoite challenge in a murine model of malaria. In light of these encouraging results, two major Plasmodium falciparum pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccine targets, the Cell-Traversal protein for Ookinetes and Sporozoites (CelTOS fused to the Maltose-binding protein in the periplasmic space and the Circumsporozoite Protein (CSP fused to the Outer membrane protein A in the outer membrane were expressed in a clinically relevant, attenuated Shigella strain (Shigella flexneri 2a. This type of live attenuated vector has previously undergone clinical investigations as a vaccine against shigellosis. Using this novel delivery platform for malaria, we find that vaccination with the whole organism represents an effective vaccination alternative that induces protective efficacy against sporozoite challenge. Shigella GeMI-Vax expressing malaria targets warrant further evaluation to determine their full potential as a dual disease, multivalent, self-adjuvanting vaccine system, against both shigellosis and malaria.

  1. Infection with influenza a virus leads to flu antigen-induced cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunewald, Susanne M; Hahn, Christian; Wohlleben, Gisela; Teufel, Martin; Major, Tamas; Moll, Heidrun; Bröcker, Eva-B; Erb, Klaus J

    2002-04-01

    It is well established, that viral infections may trigger urticaria or allergic asthma; however, as viral infections induce T helper 1 polarized responses, which lead to the inhibition of T helper 2 cell development, the opposite would be plausible. We wanted to investigate how viral infections may mediate allergic symptoms in a mouse model; therefore, we infected BALB/C mice with influenza A virus intranasally. Histologic analyses of lung sections and bronchoalveolar lavages were performed. In addition, cells from the mediastinal lymph nodes were restimulated in vitro to analyze which types of cytokines were induced by the flu infection. Furthermore, flu-specific antibody titers were determined and local anaphylaxis was measured after rechallenge with flu antigen. We found that airways inflammation consisted predominately of macrophages and lymphocytes, whereas only a few eosinophils were observed. interferon-gamma but no interleukin-4 and little interleukin-5 could be detected in the culture supernatants from in vitro restimulated T cells from the draining lymph nodes. The antibody response was characterized by high levels of virus-specific IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG1 and, surprisingly, low levels of virus-specific IgE antibodies. Interestingly, flu-infected mice developed active and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis after rechallenge with flu-antigen. As the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis reaction persisted over 48 h and was significantly lower after passive transfer of the serum, which was IgE depleted, local anaphylaxis seemed to be mediated predominately by specific IgE antibodies. Taken together, our results demonstrate that mice infected with flu virus develop virus-specific mast cell degranulation in the skin. Our results may also have implications for the pathogenesis of urticaria or other atopic disorders in humans. PMID:11918711

  2. Identification of urinary peptide biomarkers associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelique Stalmach

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis are associated with improved outcomes but current diagnostic tools such as rheumatoid factor or anti-citrullinated protein antibodies have shown limited sensitivity. In this pilot study we set out to establish a panel of urinary biomarkers associated with rheumatoid arthritis using capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry. We compared the urinary proteome of 33 participants of the Scottish Early Rheumatoid Arthritis inception cohort study with 30 healthy controls and identified 292 potential rheumatoid arthritis-specific peptides. Amongst them, 39 were used to create a classifier model using support vector machine algorithms. Specific peptidic fragments were differentially excreted between groups; fragments of protein S100-A9 and gelsolin were less abundant in rheumatoid arthritis while fragments of uromodulin, complement C3 and fibrinogen were all increasingly excreted. The model generated was subsequently tested in an independent test-set of 31 samples. The classifier demonstrated a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 93% in diagnosing the condition, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.93 (p<0.0001. These preliminary results suggest that urinary biomarkers could be useful in the early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Further studies are currently being undertaken in larger cohorts of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other athridities to assess the potential of the urinary peptide based classifier in the early detection of rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. In vivo and in vitro effects of dexamethasone on leukocyte migration in the rat adjuvant arthritis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and mononuclear cells were isolated from the blood of dexamethasone-treated normal rats, in vitro mononuclear cell migration was inhibited and PMN migration was stimulated in comparison to controls. Inflammogen-induced PMNs showed inhibited cell migration due to dexamethasone treatment. Gamma camera imaging was then used to detect cells in vivo after labeling with 111In. When the dexamethasone-treated blood cells were injected into adjuvant arthritis diseased rats, mononuclear cells showed depressed migration into the inflamed paws, while PMNs showed stimulated migration into the inflamed paws in comparison to controls. When the recipient adjuvant arthritic animals were treated with dexamethasone, both normal mononuclear cell and normal PMN migration to the inflamed paws were inhibited

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are available, what is happening in the immune system and what other conditions are associated with RA. ... Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. Updated: ...

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of RA is made, what happens to your joints, what treatments are available, what is happening in ... Diagnosis Rheumatoid Arthritis: What is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist ...

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Center since 2000, currently serving as the Nurse Manager. She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain ...

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Johns Hopkins ...

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to take a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take ... She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing ...

  9. Physical Activity and Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out more! Email * Zipcode Physical Activity and Psoriatic Arthritis Physical activity plays an important role in overall well-being. If you have psoriatic arthritis, moderate exercise may offer specific benefits, including improved ...

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... any advice you receive from your rheumatologist. Click A Link Below To Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and ... About Victoria Ruffing, RN Ms. Ruffing has been a member of the Arthritis Center since 2000, currently ...

  11. Occupational therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Steultjens, E.M.J.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L.M.; Schaardenburg, D.J. van; Kuyk, M.A.H. Van; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2004-01-01

    Background: For persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the physical, personal, familial, social and vocational consequences are extensive. Occupational therapy (OT), with the aim to facilitate task performance and to decrease the consequences of rheumatoid arthritis for daily life activities, is considered to be a cornerstone in the management of rheumatoid arthritis. Till now the efficacy of occupational therapy for patients with rheumatoid arthritis on functional performance and social part...

  12. Assessment of arthritis in rats with CIA:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jasemian, Yousef

    computerized digital infrared thermal imaging, and its association with stages of clinical scores in a rat collagen induced arthritis model. Arthritis was induced with collagen immunization in eight Lewis rats.  Four of the animals were treated with dexamethasone as a negative control. Disease progression was...... monitored by paw edema and body weight. On the basis of paw edema a clinical score was given each paw of the animals involved in the study. The mean temperature of a region covering the metatarsal joint was compared with a reference area on the back of the same rat. The temperature ratios were compared with...

  13. Integrated care for patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Verhoef, John

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes an example of optimization of the traditional multidisciplinary team care model and evolving arthritis care models with emphasis on the question how theoretical models of the system theory and communication can be used to analyse, evaluate, and optimize care delivery. With respect to the team care model we used a rehabilitation tool, for which we developed an accompanying computer application. This thesis contributes to the use of theoretical models, measurement instrume...

  14. Ho-166 Hydroxyapatite (Ha) as a potential therapeutic agent in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation synovectomy is a procedure which is aimed at ablation of the inflamed synovium in rheumatoid arthritis through intraarticular injection of a chemical substance labeled with a beta-emitting radioisotope. The objective of this study was to evaluate Ho-166 Hydoxyapatite (Ho-166 HA) particle as potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of acute and chronic arthritis. Ho-166 was obtained by irradiation of 165Ho2O3 in the 5 MW Research Reactors (RECH1) at the Nuclear Centre La Reina (Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission). The HA synthesis, Ho-166 HA labeling and quality control procedures were performed in the laboratories of Chilean Atomic Energy Commission. Two groups of arthritic (acute and chronic) rabbits with antigen-induced arthritis were administered Ho-166 HA intra-articularly following two different protocols; single dose protocol and double dose protocol. The therapeutic efficacy of Ho-166 HA was assessed by clinical follow-up and evaluation, as well as by serial radionuclide imaging of the inflamed joints with Ga-67 Citrate, before and after treatment. The average radionuclide purity of administered Ho-166 HA in our study was 99%. All animals were followed up by clinical examination. Grades of inflammation, general physical conditions as well as the level of appetite were recorded following treatment. The localization and distribution of the Ho-166 HA were studied by gamma camera imaging at 4 and 24 hrs after-injections. The scans were examined meticulously to look for any evidence of leakage of radiopharmaceutical from the joint space. The group of animals with acute arthritis showed evidence of significant clinical improvement following radionuclide therapy. The animals which received higher doses (double dose) demonstrated better therapeutic response. Based on the preliminary reports from this pilot study it was concluded that Ho-166 HA is a useful radiopharmaceutical for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. (author)

  15. Therapeutic Potential of Interferon-γ and Its Antagonists in Autoinflammation: Lessons from Murine Models of Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Macrophage Activation Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneleen Avau

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Interferon-γ (IFN-γ affects immune responses in a complex fashion. Its immunostimulatory actions, such as macrophage activation and induction of T helper 1-type responsiveness, are widely acknowledged, however, as documented by a large body of literature, IFN-γ has also the potential to temper inflammatory processes via other pathways. In autoimmune and autoinflammatory disorders, IFN-γ can either play a disease-enforcing role or act as protective agent, depending on the nature of the disease. In animal models of any particular autoimmune disease, certain changes in the induction procedure can reverse the net outcome of introduction or ablation of IFN-γ. Here, we review the role of endogenous IFN-γ in inflammatory disorders and related murine models, with a focus on systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA and macrophage activation syndrome (MAS. In particular, we discuss our recent findings in a mouse model of sJIA, in which endogenous IFN-γ acts as a regulatory agent, and compare with results from mouse models of MAS. Also, we elaborate on the complexity in the activity of IFN-γ and the resulting difficulty of predicting its value or that of its antagonists as treatment option.

  16. Chemical changes demonstrated in cartilage by synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy in an antibody-induced murine model of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxford, Allyson M.; Selva Nandakumar, Kutty; Holmdahl, Rikard; Tobin, Mark J.; McNaughton, Don; Rowley, Merrill J.

    2011-06-01

    Collagen antibody-induced arthritis develops in mice following passive transfer of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to type II collagen (CII) and is attributed to effects of proinflammatory immune complexes, but transferred mAbs may react directly and damagingly with CII. To determine whether such mAbs cause cartilage damage in vivo in the absence of inflammation, mice lacking complement factor 5 that do not develop joint inflammation were injected intravenously with two arthritogenic mAbs to CII, M2139 and CIIC1. Paws were collected at day 3, decalcified, paraffin embedded, and 5-μm sections were examined using standard histology and synchrotron Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). None of the mice injected with mAb showed visual or histological evidence of inflammation but there were histological changes in the articular cartilage including loss of proteoglycan and altered chondrocyte morphology. Findings using FTIRM at high lateral resolution revealed loss of collagen and the appearance of a new peak at 1635 cm-1 at the surface of the cartilage interpreted as cellular activation. Thus, we demonstrate the utility of synchrotron FTIRM for examining chemical changes in diseased cartilage at the microscopic level and establish that arthritogenic mAbs to CII do cause cartilage damage in vivo in the absence of inflammation.

  17. Evaluation of the Novel Folate Receptor Ligand [18F] Fluoro-PEG-Folate for Macrophage Targeting in a Rat Model of Arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Gent, Yooney YJ; Weijers, Karin; Molthoff, Carla FM; Windhorst, Albert D.; Huisman, Marc C.; Smith, Desirée EC; Kularatne, Sumith A.; Jansen, Gerritt; Low, Philip S.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Conny J. van der Laken

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Detection of (subclinical) synovitis is relevant for both early diagnosis and monitoring of therapy of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Previously, the potential of imaging (sub)clinical arthritis was demonstrated by targeting the translocator protein in activated macrophages using (R)-[11C]PK11195 and positron emission tomography (PET). Images, however, also showed significant peri-articular background activity. The folate receptor (FR)-β is a potential alternative target for imagi...

  18. Classification of Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and psoriatic arthritis. Email * Zipcode The National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) is a non-profit organization with a mission to drive efforts to cure psoriatic disease and improve the lives of those affected. Copyright © 1996-2015 National Psoriasis Foundation/USA Bottom Menu About NPF About Us Annual ...

  19. Arthritis Pain Reliever

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-12-27

    Learn more about the benefits of physical activity and the types and amounts of exercise helpful for people with arthritis.  Created: 12/27/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/27/2011.

  20. Structural features and assessment of zymosan-induced arthritis in rat temporomandibular joint model using sulfated polysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ariévilo Gurgel Rodrigues

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The green seaweed Caulerpa cupressoides var. lycopodium contains three SPs fractions (Cc-SP1, Cc-SP2 and Cc-SP3. Cc-SP1andCc-SP2 had anticoagulant (in vitro, pro- and antithrombotic, antinociceptive and/or anti-inflammatory (in vivo effects. This study analyzed structural features and the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of Cc-SP1 on zymosan-induced acute arthritis of the rat temporomandibular joint (TMJ. Cc-SP1 was investigated by infrared technique. Male Wistar rats (200-240 g received subcutaneously (s.c. Cc-SP1 1h prior to intra-articular (i.art. injection of zymosan (2 mg joint-1 or saline (0.9% into the left TMJ. Mechanical hypernociception was measured by the electronic Von Frey method in the basal and 4h after zymosan injection. Animals were euthanized 6h after zymosan injection and the TMJ cavity was removed for total leukocyte counts from the synovial fluid and myeloperoxidase (MPO activity assessment. Cc-SP1 (1, 3 or 9 mg kg-1 containing sulfate ester, galactose-6-sulfate, uronic acid and glycosidic linkages reduced zymosan-induced hypernociception (78.12, 81.13 and 87.43%, respectively, p < 0.01, and inhibited the total leukocyte influx (85, 88.14 and 89.95%, respectively, p < 0.01, being confirmed by MPO activity (p < 0.05. Therefore, Cc-SP1 reveals a pharmacological tool for treating inflammatory arthropathies.

  1. Liposomal targeting of prednisolone phosphate to synovial lining macrophages during experimental arthritis inhibits M1 activation but does not favor M2 differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter Hofkens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To determine the effects of liposomal targeting of prednisolone phosphate (Lip-PLP to synovial lining macrophages on M1 and M2 polarization in vitro and during experimental arthritis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Experimental arthritis (antigen and immune complex induced was elicited in mice and prednisolone containing liposomes were given systemically. Synovium was investigated using microarray analysis, RT-PCR and histology. Bone-marrow macrophages were stimulated towards M1 using LPS and IFNγ before treatment by PLP-liposomes. M1 and M2 markers were determined using RT-PCR. RESULTS: Microarray analysis of biopsies of inflamed synovium during antigen induced arthritis (AIA showed an increased M1 signature characterized by upregulation of IL-1β, IL-6 and FcγRI starting from day 1 and lasting up until day 7 after arthritis induction. The M2 signature remained low throughout the 7 day course of arthritis. Treatment of AIA with intravenously delivered Lip-PLP strongly suppressed joint swelling and synovial infiltration whereas colloidal gold containing liposomes exclusively targeted the macrophages within the inflamed synovial intima layer. In vitro studies showed that Lip-PLP phagocytosed by M1 macrophages resulted in a suppression of the M1 phenotype and induction of M2 markers (IL-10, TGF-β, IL-1RII, CD163, CD206 and Ym1. In vivo, Lip-PLP treatment strongly suppressed M1 markers (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12p40, iNOS, FcγRI, Ciita and CD86 after local M1 activation of lining macrophages with LPS and IFN-γ and during experimental AIA and immune complex arthritis (ICA. In contrast, M2 markers were not significantly upregulated in antigen-induced arthritis and down regulated in immune complex arthritis. CONCLUSION: This study clearly shows that systemic treatment with PLP-liposomes selectively targets synovial lining macrophages and inhibits M1 activation. In contrast to in vitro findings, PLP-liposomes do not cause a shift of synovial

  2. IMAGING OF PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D'Angelo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Imaging of psoriatic arthritis (PsA is important for two reasons: the differential diagnosis from other arthritides and the assessment of structural damage that can be inhibited by the new drugs such as the anti-TNFα agents. Plain film radiographic findings of peripheral arthritis have been important in elaborating the concept of PsA as a separate disease entity. Characteristic aspects of psoriatic peripheral arthritis help the differentiation from rheumatoid arthritis. High-resolution ultrasonography (US, US combined with power Doppler (PDUS and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can be used to image joint synovitis of PsA. Radiologic features of spondylitis associated with psoriasis are similar to spondylitis associated with reactive arthritis and differ from those of primary ankylosing spondylitis (AS and the spondylitis associated with inflammatory bowel disease. MRI is very sensitive for the early diagnosis of sacroiliitis. There have been no MRI studies on the spine of patients with PsA. In primary AS bone oedema in the vertebral bodies is an indicator of active disease and can ameliorate during anti-TNFα therapy. Historically, plain film radiography have played a pivotal role in defining enthesitis lesions of SpA. However, entheseal bone changes appear late. US and MRI have proved to be a highly sensitive and non invasive tools. Recent US and MRI studies on both finger and toe dactylitis have established that dactylitis is due to flexor tenosynovitis and marked adjacent soft tissue swelling with a variable degree of small joint synovitis. There is no evidence of enthesitis of the insertion of the flexor digitorum tendons and of the attachment of the caspsule of the digit joints. Key words: Enthesitis, dactylitis, spondyloarthritis, ultrasound, magnetic resonance, imaging

  3. Aortic VCAM‐1: an early marker of vascular inflammation in collagen‐induced arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Denys, Anne; Clavel, Gaëlle; Lemeiter, Delphine; Schischmanoff, Olivier; Boissier, Marie‐Christophe; Semerano, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There are limited experimental data on vascular involvement in arthritis models. To study the link between CVD and inflammation in RA, we developed a model of vascular dysfunction and articular inflammation by collagen‐induced arthritis (CIA) in C57Bl/6 (B6) mice. We studied the expression of vascular inflammatory markers in CIA with and without concomitant hyperlipidic diet (HD). C...

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Complementary Health Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... T U V W X Y Z Rheumatoid Arthritis: In Depth Share: On This Page Key Points ... help ensure coordinated and safe care. About Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory autoimmune disease—a ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions juvenile idiopathic arthritis juvenile idiopathic arthritis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Open All Close All Description Juvenile idiopathic arthritis refers to a group of conditions involving joint ...

  6. Reactive arthritis or post-infective arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keat, Andrew

    2002-09-01

    Infective mechanisms probably underlie a wide range of inflammatory arthropathies. There appears to be a spectrum of mechanisms ranging from the frankly septic, through low-grade infection with very small numbers of microorganisms in the joint to arthritides in which no hard evidence for an infective cause exists. In the midst of the spectrum lie 'post-infective' and 'reactive' arthritides, characterized clinically, genetically and by epidemiological links with infection. Identification of bacterial components within joint material from such patients suggested that the causes of the arthritis had been found. It is now clear that many bacteria are present in inflamed joints; establishing their significance will be of crucial importance, but not easy. PMID:12406424

  7. Arthritis Associated with Crohn's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    A controlled prospective study was undertaken to determine the incidence and characteristic features of peripheral arthritis, sacroiliitis, ankylosing spondylitis and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy in a group of patients with Crohn's disease, and to define the relationship of such arthritides with disease site, duration and activity. Peripheral arthritis occurred in 14.5% of the patients; it was not seen in the control group. This arthritis, which tended to be pauciarticular, was more common i...

  8. Staphylococcus aureus triggered reactive arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Siam, A R; M. Hammoudeh

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To report two patients who developed reactive arthritis in association with Staphylococcus aureus infection. METHODS--A review of the case notes of two patients. RESULTS--Two adult female patients have developed sterile arthritis in association with Staph aureus infection. The first patient has had two episodes of arthritis; the first followed olecranon bursitis, the second followed infection of a central venous catheter used for dialysis. The second patient developed sterile arth...

  9. CLINICAL PRESENTATION OF PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    OpenAIRE

    M. Atteno; Peluso, R.; R. Scarpa

    2011-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a spondyloarthropathy, which occurs in patients with skin and/or nail psoriasis. Basing its characterization on morphological purposes, several types of arthritis have been described. Alternatively, we propose a simplified classification into three subsets, focusing on the levels of expression of cutaneous and articular elements which devise this syndrome. The first is established psoriatic arthritis which occurs in patients with evident or remittent skin and/or nail ps...

  10. Looking for arthritis regulating genes on mouse chromosome 6 & 14

    OpenAIRE

    Popovic, Marjan

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease of the joints with a complex aetiology affected by largely unknown genetic and environmental factors. Because ~60% of susceptibility to RA is genetically inherited, one way to progress towards understanding of the disease is to identify the disease regulating genes. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is the most commonly used model of RA in mice. After immunisation by a subcutaneous injection of collagen emulsified ...

  11. Cocoa intake attenuates oxidative stress associated with rat adjuvant arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos Romero, Sara; Pérez-Cano, Francisco J.; Ramiro Puig, Emma; Franch i Masferrer, Àngels; Castell, Margarida

    2012-01-01

    Cocoa contains flavonoids with antioxidant properties. The aim of this study was to ascertain the effect of cocoa intake on oxidative stress associated with a model of chronic inflammation such as adjuvant arthritis. Female Wistar rats were fed with a 5 or 10% cocoa enriched diet or were given p.o. a quercetin suspension every other day for 10 days. Arthritis was induced by a heat killed Mycobacterium butyricum suspension. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by macrophages, and splenic sup...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research ... Center website is intended for educational purposes only. Physicians and other health care professionals ...

  13. [Pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzberger-ten Cate, R; Fiselier, T

    1991-10-01

    On basis of clinical and immunogenetic factors most children with pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis can be included in one of the subtypes: type 1 and type 2 pauciarticular JCA. Type 1 occurs in young children, mainly girls, with involvement of knees, ankles or elbows. In the majority of children antinuclear antibodies can be detected. The presence of these autoantibodies is associated with chronic anterior uveitis. Type 2 or the juvenile spondylarthropathies include morbus Bechterew, the reactive arthritides and arthritis associated with psoriasis and inflammatory bowel diseases. Large joints of the lower extremities are involved, back pain is unusual at onset, but enthesitis is frequently present. There is a strong association with HLA-B27. Treatment of both subsets consists of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, application of intra-articular steroids, physio- and hydrotherapy and splinting. In children with a polyarticular course of type 1, or a prolonged course of type 2 disease modifying drugs are often needed. PMID:1957301

  14. Clotrimazole in rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Wojtulewski, J. A.; Gow, P J; Walter, J; Grahame, R; Gibson, T.; Panayi, G S; Mason, J.

    1980-01-01

    Forty-seven patients with active rheumatoid arthritis took part in an 8-week controlled study in which clotrimazole was compared with a standard nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent, ketoprofen. Although clotrimazole was shown to be effective in the treatment of the disease and superior to ketoprofen in certain measurements, if was also responsible for a high incidence of adverse effects. Improvement with clotrimazole took place more slowly but was more sustained than with ketoprofen. A signi...

  15. Psoriasis and psoriasic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The psoriasis is an skin inflammatory disease characterized by chronic and recurrent red skin covered with silver scales. In their pathogenesis, immunogenetic and environmental factors are conjugated. Psoriatic arthritis. That is a seronegative arthropathy. In the greater part of cases follow to a chronic course of cutaneous psoriasis. In this paper, we analyzed the most frequent forms of presentation of cutaneous psoriasis and we revised the psoriatic arthropathy, with some indications about its treatment

  16. Dual Effects of IL-1 Overactivity on the Immune System in a Mouse Model of Arthritis due to Deficiency of IL-1 Receptor Antagonist

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Yan; Yan Jiao; Hong Chen; Feng Jiao; Karen A.Hasty; John M.Stuart; Weikuan Gu

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed the significance of cytokine interleukin 1 (IL-1) in the onset and progression of meumatoid arthritis (RA).The precise molecular mechanisms related to IL-1 underlying RA is still elusive.We conducted a whole genome-wide transcriptomal comparison of wild-type (WT) and arthritis-prone IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-Irn) deficient BALB/c mice to address this issue.To refine our search efforts,gene expression profiling was also performed on paired wild-type and arthritis-resis nt IL-1m deficient DBA/1 mice as internal controls when identifying causative arthritis candidate genes.Two hundred and fifteen trans dpts were found to be dysregulated greater than or equal to 2-fold in the diseased mice.The altered transcriptome in BALB/c mice revealed increased myeloid cell activities and impaired lymphocyte functionality,suggesting dual regulatory effects of IL-1 hyperactivil on immunological changes associated with arthritis development.Phase-specific gene expression changes were identified,such as early increase and late decrease of heat shock protein coding genes.Moreover,common gene expression changes were also observed,especially the upregulation of paired Ig-like receptor A (Pira) in both early and late phases of arthritis.Real-time PCR was performed to validate the expression of Pira and an intervention experiment with a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I inhibitor (brefeldin A) was carried out to investigate the role of suppressing Pira activity.We conclude that global pattern changes of common and distinct gene expressions may represent novel opportunities for better control of RA through early diagnosis and development of alternative therapeutic strategies.

  17. Molecular targets of natural health products in arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifé, Sarah; Zafarullah, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) consume 'natural health products' (NHPs) whose therapeutic efficacy, toxicity and mechanisms of action are poorly understood. In a previous issue of Arthritis Research and Therapy, Haqqi and colleagues characterized IL-1-activated mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3 (MKK3) and p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) isoforms in human OA chondrocytes. The cartilageprotective mechanisms of pomegranate extract involve diminishing MKK3-activated p38α, JNK, NF-κB and Runx2 pathways, which regulate inflammatory proteins and cartilage-destroying proteases. Epigallocatechin- 3-gallate, resveratrol, curcumin and other NHP active ingredients suppress multiple inflammatory and catabolic molecular mediators of arthritis. Non-toxicity, reduced severity and incidence of arthritis in animal models warrant testing NHP active ingredients for preventing human OA and RA. PMID:21345249

  18. DIAGNOSIS OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS USING AN ENSEMBLE LEARNING APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Shiezadeh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the diseases that its cause is unknown yet; exploring the field of medical data mining can be helpful in early diagnosis and treatment of the disease. In this study, a predictive model is suggested that diagnoses rheumatoid arthritis. The rheumatoid arthritis dataset was collected from 2,564 patients referred to rheumatology clinic. For each patient a record consists of several clinical and demographic features is saved. After data analysis and pre-processing operations, three different methods are combined to choose proper features among all the features. Various data classification algorithms were applied on these features. Among these algorithms Adaboost had the highest precision. In this paper, we proposed a new classification algorithm entitled CS-Boost that employs Cuckoo search algorithm for optimizing the performance of Adaboost algorithm. Experimental results show that the CS-Boost algorithm enhance the accuracy of Adaboost in predicting of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

  19. Analgesic Effect of the Newly Developed S(+)-Flurbiprofen Plaster on Inflammatory Pain in a Rat Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Masanori; Toda, Yoshihisa; Hori, Miyuki; Mitani, Akiko; Ichihara, Takahiro; Sekine, Shingo; Hirose, Takuya; Endo, Hiromi; Futaki, Nobuko; Kaku, Shinsuke; Otsuka, Noboru; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    Preclinical Research This article describes the properties of a novel topical NSAID (Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) patch, SFPP (S(+)-flurbiprofen plaster), containing the potent cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, S(+)-flurbiprofen (SFP). The present studies were conducted to confirm human COX inhibition and absorption of SFP and to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of SFPP in a rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model. COX inhibition by SFP, ketoprofen and loxoprofen was evaluated using human recombinant COX proteins. Absorption of SFPP, ketoprofen and loxoprofen from patches through rat skin was assessed 24 h after application. The AIA model was induced by injecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis followed 20 days later by the evaluation of the prostaglandin PGE2 content of the inflamed paw and the pain threshold. SFP exhibited more potent inhibitory activity against COX-1 (IC50  = 8.97 nM) and COX-2 (IC50  = 2.94 nM) than the other NSAIDs evaluated. Absorption of SFP was 92.9%, greater than that of ketoprofen and loxoprofen from their respective patches. Application of SFPP decreased PGE2 content from 15 min to 6 h and reduced paw hyperalgesia compared with the control, ketoprofen and loxoprofen patches. SFPP showed analgesic efficacy, and was superior to the ketoprofen and loxoprofen patches, which could be through the potent COX inhibitory activity of SFP and greater skin absorption. The results suggested SFPP can be expected to exert analgesic effect clinically. Drug Dev Res 76 : 20-28, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26763139

  20. Analgesic Effect of the Newly Developed S(+)‐Flurbiprofen Plaster on Inflammatory Pain in a Rat Adjuvant‐Induced Arthritis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Yoshihisa; Hori, Miyuki; Mitani, Akiko; Ichihara, Takahiro; Sekine, Shingo; Hirose, Takuya; Endo, Hiromi; Futaki, Nobuko; Kaku, Shinsuke; Otsuka, Noboru; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Preclinical Research This article describes the properties of a novel topical NSAID (Nonsteroidal anti‐inflammatory drug) patch, SFPP (S(+)‐flurbiprofen plaster), containing the potent cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, S(+)‐flurbiprofen (SFP). The present studies were conducted to confirm human COX inhibition and absorption of SFP and to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of SFPP in a rat adjuvant‐induced arthritis (AIA) model. COX inhibition by SFP, ketoprofen and loxoprofen was evaluated using human recombinant COX proteins. Absorption of SFPP, ketoprofen and loxoprofen from patches through rat skin was assessed 24 h after application. The AIA model was induced by injecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis followed 20 days later by the evaluation of the prostaglandin PGE2 content of the inflamed paw and the pain threshold. SFP exhibited more potent inhibitory activity against COX‐1 (IC50 = 8.97 nM) and COX‐2 (IC50 = 2.94 nM) than the other NSAIDs evaluated. Absorption of SFP was 92.9%, greater than that of ketoprofen and loxoprofen from their respective patches. Application of SFPP decreased PGE2 content from 15 min to 6 h and reduced paw hyperalgesia compared with the control, ketoprofen and loxoprofen patches. SFPP showed analgesic efficacy, and was superior to the ketoprofen and loxoprofen patches, which could be through the potent COX inhibitory activity of SFP and greater skin absorption. The results suggested SFPP can be expected to exert analgesic effect clinically. Drug Dev Res 76 : 20–28, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26763139

  1. Porphyromonas gingivalis oral infection exacerbates the development and severity of collagen-induced arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Marchesan, Julie Teresa; Gerow, Elizabeth Ann; Schaff, Riley; Taut, Andrei Dan; Shin, Seung-Yun; Sugai, James; Brand, David; Burberry, Aaron; Jorns, Julie; Lundy, Steven Karl; Nuñez, Gabriel; Fox, David A; Giannobile, William V.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Clinical studies suggest a direct influence of periodontal disease (PD) on serum inflammatory markers and disease assessment of patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the influence of PD on arthritis development remains unclear. This investigation was undertaken to determine the contribution of chronic PD to immune activation and development of joint inflammation using the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. Methods DBA1/J mice orally infected with Porp...

  2. Potential Use of Plectranthus amboinicus in the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Jia-Ming Chang; Chun-Ming Cheng; Le-Mei Hung; Yuh-Shan Chung; Rey-Yuh Wu

    2010-01-01

    Plectranthus amboinicus (P. amboinicus) is a folk herb that is used to treat inflammatory diseases or swelling symptoms in Taiwan. We investigated therapeutic efficacy of P. amboinicus in treating Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) using collagen-induced arthritis animal model. Arthritis was induced in Lewis rats by immunization with bovine type II collagen. Serum anti-collagen IgG, IgM and C-reactive protein (CRP) were analyzed. To understand the inflammation condition of treated animals, production ...

  3. Induction of lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, J.L.; Schell, R.F.; Hejka, A.; England, D.M.; Konick, L.

    1988-09-01

    In studies of experimental Lyme disease, a major obstacle has been the unavailability of a suitable animal model. We found that irradiated LSH/Ss Lak hamsters developed arthritis after injection of Borrelia burgdorferi in the hind paws. When nonirradiated hamsters were injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi, acute transient synovitis was present. A diffuse neutrophilic infiltrate involved the synovia and periarticular structures. The inflammation was associated with edema, hyperemia, and granulation tissue. Numerous spirochetes were seen in the synovial and subsynovial tissues. The histopathologic changes were enhanced in irradiated hamsters. The onset and duration of the induced swelling were dependent on the dose of radiation and the inoculum of spirochetes. Inoculation of irradiated hamsters with Formalin-killed spirochetes or medium in which B. burgdorferi had grown for 7 days failed to induce swelling. This animal model should prove useful for studies of the immune response to B. burgdorferi and the pathogenesis of Lyme arthritis.

  4. Induction of lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In studies of experimental Lyme disease, a major obstacle has been the unavailability of a suitable animal model. We found that irradiated LSH/Ss Lak hamsters developed arthritis after injection of Borrelia burgdorferi in the hind paws. When nonirradiated hamsters were injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi, acute transient synovitis was present. A diffuse neutrophilic infiltrate involved the synovia and periarticular structures. The inflammation was associated with edema, hyperemia, and granulation tissue. Numerous spirochetes were seen in the synovial and subsynovial tissues. The histopathologic changes were enhanced in irradiated hamsters. The onset and duration of the induced swelling were dependent on the dose of radiation and the inoculum of spirochetes. Inoculation of irradiated hamsters with Formalin-killed spirochetes or medium in which B. burgdorferi had grown for 7 days failed to induce swelling. This animal model should prove useful for studies of the immune response to B. burgdorferi and the pathogenesis of Lyme arthritis

  5. Occupational therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, E.M.J.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L.M.; Schaardenburg, D.J. van; Kuyk, M.A.H. van; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2004-01-01

    Background: For persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the physical, personal, familial, social and vocational consequences are extensive. Occupational therapy (OT), with the aim to facilitate task performance and to decrease the consequences of rheumatoid arthritis for daily life activities, is con

  6. Early identification of rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nies, Jessica Annemarie Bernadette van

    2016-01-01

    The first part is focused on early recognition of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). Two large early arthritis recognition clinics were started in Leiden and Groningen. The results showed that this initiative reduces the GP-delay significantly. Secondly, it was investigated whether an association between sh

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    OpenAIRE

    Jiří Kaas; Valérie Tóthová; Lukáš Martinek

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustio...

  8. [Novel immunodiagnostics for inflammatory arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahle, M; Kling, E

    2016-05-01

    Immunodiagnostics play an important role in the differential diagnostics of arthritis but the test results must be interpreted with respect to the clinical context. The detection of antibodies against citrullinated proteins has significantly improved the immunodiagnostics of arthritis, whereas the importance of testing for rheumatoid factor has decreased due to the low specificity. Antibodies against carbamylated or oxidized proteins will expand the immunodiagnostics of arthritis (especially rheumatoid arthritis) in the future. In contrast, the determination of cytokine concentrations in plasma or synovial fluid plays a subordinate role in the differential diagnostics of arthritis. Indirect immunofluorescence continues to be the gold standard in the detection of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and in the case of positive results further testing for antigen specificity should be carried out. The presence of ANA is not necessarily associated with autoimmune diseases. An example of a non-pathogenic ANA is anti-DFS70 antibodies. PMID:27142378

  9. Psoriatic arthritis as a mountain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Berthelot

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available There is no doubt that inflammatory arthritis/enthesitis and psoriasis coexist more frequently than would be expected by chance: for instance, in a study of 1285 patients with psoriasis seen in an hospital, 483 (38% were suffering from arthritis/ enthesitis, including 40 patients classified as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA (3%, 177 (14% as undifferentiated arthritis (UA, and 266 (21% as Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA (1. Although lower percentages have been noticed in the general population with psoriasis (6% of PsA in an extensive study of 1844 patients with psoriasis (2, they were superior to 5% (i.e. at least 5 times greater than the figures found for patients without psoriasis (3-7.

  10. The Association Between Fatigue and Disease Activity in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis : A Latent Growth Curve Model Analysis of Between-Subject Differences and Within-Subject Changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geenen, R.; Overman, C.L.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.; van Laar, J.M.; Marijnissen, A.C.A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The lack of association between fatigue and objective disease activity markers in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is counterintuitive since patients and doctors consider fatigue an indicator of underlying disease activity. We hypothesized that there is hardly any association betwe

  11. Preparation and analysis of active rat model of rheumatoid arthritis with features of TCM toxic heat-stasis painful obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Wang

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: The CIA model established in this study presents both active RA pathologic features and characteristics of the symptoms of toxic heat-stasis painful obstruction 12 weeks after successful establishment of an animal model. In addition, this study may be a valuable reference for development of animal studies with combined Eastern and Western medicines in dialectics and identification of diseases.

  12. Collagenase-3 (MMP-13) deficiency protects C57BL/6 mice from antibody-induced arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Anjana; Rajasekaran, Narendiran; Hartenstein, Bettina; Szabowski, Sibylle; Gajda, Mieczyslaw; Angel, Peter; Bräuer, Rolf; Illges, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are important in tissue remodelling. Here we investigate the role of collagenase-3 (MMP-13) in antibody-induced arthritis. Methods For this study we employed the K/BxN serum-induced arthritis model. Arthritis was induced in C57BL/6 wild type (WT) and MMP-13-deficient (MMP-13 –/– ) mice by intraperitoneal injection of 200 μl of K/BxN serum. Arthritis was assessed by measuring the ankle swelling. During the course of the experiments, mice were sacri...

  13. Autoantibodies in inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conigliaro, P; Chimenti, M S; Triggianese, P; Sunzini, F; Novelli, L; Perricone, C; Perricone, R

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease characterized by extensive synovitis resulting in erosions of articular cartilage and marginal bone with joint destruction. The lack of immunological tolerance in RA represents the first step toward the development of autoimmunity. Susceptible individuals, under the influence of environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, and silica exposure, develop autoimmune phenomena that result in the presence of autoantibodies. HLA and non-HLA haplotypes play a major role in determining the development of specific autoantibodies differentiating anti-citrullinated antibodies (ACPA)-positive and negative RA patients. Rheumatoid factor (RF) and ACPA are the serological markers for RA, and during the preclinical immunological phase, autoantibody titers increase with a progressive spread of ACPA antigens repertoire. The presence of ACPA represents an independent risk factor for developing RA in patients with undifferentiated arthritis or arthralgia. Moreover, anti-CarP antibodies have been identified in patients with RA as well as in individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms of RA. Several autoantibodies mainly targeting post-translational modified proteins have been investigated as possible biomarkers to improve the early diagnosis, prognosis and response to therapy in RA patients. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is distinguished from RA by infrequent positivity for RF and ACPA, together with other distinctive clinical features. Actually, specific autoantibodies have not been described. Recently, anti-CarP antibodies have been reported in sera from PsA patients with active disease. Further investigations on autoantibodies showing high specificity and sensibility as well as relevant correlation with disease severity, progression, and response to therapy are awaited in inflammatory arthritides. PMID:26970491

  14. Bone pathology inpsoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Badokin

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study different variants of osteolysis in pts with psoriatic arthritis (PA and to reveal their relationship with other clinico-radiological features of joint damage. Material and methods. 370 pts with definite PA having different variants of joint damage were included. Radiological examination of bones and joints (in some cases large picture frame was performed. Morphological evaluation of synovial biopsies was done in 34 pts with PA and 10 pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Results. Different types of osteolysis were revealed in 80 (21,6% pts. Osteolytic variant of joint damage was present in 29 pts. 33 pts had acral, 48 — intra-articular osteolysis and 16 - true bone atrophy. Frequency and intensity of bone resorption were associated with severity of PA. Acral osteolysis correlated with arthritis of distal interphalangeal joints and onychodystrophy. Intra-articular osteolysis was most often present in distal interphalangeal joints of hands and metacarpophalangeal joints (39,6% and 41,7% respectively. Characteristic feature of PA was combination of prominent resorption with formation of bone ankylosis and periosteal reaction. Ankylosis was present in 33,3% of pts with intra-articular osteolysis and in 60% of pts with combination of different osteolysis variants. Systemic reaction of microcirculation in synovial biopsies was most prominent in osteolytic variant: marked thickening of capillary and venule basal membrane with high level of acid phosphatase, increased capillary and precapillary blood flow with stasis features, vascular lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration, productive vasculitis with annular wall thickening, thrombovasculitis and villi deep layer sclerosis. Conclusion. Different variants of osteolysis show bone involvement in PA. Acral and intra- articular osteolysis association with bone ankylosis and periostitis proves their common pathogenetic entity.

  15. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging for inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Chamberland, David; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    Arthritis is a leading cause of disability, affecting 46 million of the population in the U.S. Rendering new optical contrast in articular tissues at high spatial and temporal resolution, emerging photoacoustic imaging (PAI) combined with more established ultrasound (US) imaging technologies provides unique opportunities for diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. In addition to capturing peripheral bone and soft tissue images, PAI has the capability to quantify hemodynamic properties including regional blood oxygenation and blood volume, both abnormal in synovial tissues affected by arthritis. Therefore, PAI, especially when performed together with US, should be of considerable help for further understanding the pathophysiology of arthritis as well as assisting in therapeutic decisions, including assessing the efficacy of new pharmacological therapies. In this paper, we will review our recent work on the development of PAI for application to the diagnostic imaging and therapeutic monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. We will present the imaging results from a home-built imaging system and another one based on a commercial US. The performance of PAI in evaluating pharmacological therapy on animal model of arthritis will be shown. Moreover, our resent work on PAI and US dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints in vivo will also be presented.

  16. RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AND PREGNANCY

    OpenAIRE

    N M Kosheleva; E. V. Matyanova

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) generally starts at the age when many women have already become mothers; however, it may occur in childhood or adolescence. Furthermore, there has been recently a women’s tendency to plan pregnacy for a more mature age, which necessitates a discussion about gestation in this disease. Investigation of mechanisms pregnancy can influence the development of RA both in the gestation and long-term periods is of important theoretical and practical value. The results of thes...

  17. Evaluation of the therapeutic effect of hydroxyapatite particles labeled with Ho166 in rats with acute and chronic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The therapeutic effect of an intraarticular injection of hydroxyapatite particles labeled with Holmium-166 ( Ho166HA) was evaluated. For this evaluation 72 antigen-induced arthritis rats; the arthritis was induced by an intraarticular injection of a suspension of ovoalbumin and Freund's adjuvant complete. The 72 rats were divided in three groups: control group, acute arthritis group and chronic arthritis group. The evaluation of the therapeutic effect was achieved by the measuring of the perimeter of the arthritic knee joint in different days after the intraarticular injection of 0,5 μCi of Ho166-HA (day 0, 4, 9, 14, 19, 30). Also a biological distribution study was done at 4, 24 and 48 hours in different organs, through the counting of its radiation. The results of the biological distribution showed that a very high percent of the injected activity remains inside the joint, with minimal activity in other organs, which indicates that the extra articular leakage is very low. The evaluation of the articular perimeter, demonstrated that Ho166-HA has a therapeutic effect , which was shown by comparing the control group (6.42 ±0.43 cm right knee; 6.14 ±0.31 cm left knee) with the acute arthritis group (5.11 ±0.3 cm right knee; 4.95 ±0.39 cm left knee) with significantly statistical values (p≤0,01); also the control group was compared with the chronic arthritis group (5.6 ±0.56 cm right knee; 5.47 ±0.51 cm left knee), with significantly statistical values (p≤0,01). This therapeutic effect was evident too when evaluating the measure of the articular perimeter in acute and chronic arthritis groups through the time with significantly statistical values (p≤0,01). In conclusion the hydroxyapatite particles labeled with Holmium-166 are biologically stable in vivo and have a therapeutic effect in the treatment of acute and chronic arthritis in rats

  18. Pain and microcrystalline arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramonda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microcrystals are responsible for some of the most common and complex arthropathies which are often accompanied by intense, severe pain and inflammatory reactions. The main pathogens are crystals of monosodium urate (MSU, responsible for the gout, calcium pyrophosphate (CPP, which deposits also in various clinical forms of arthopathies, and basic calcium phosphate associated with osteoarthritis. In this context, the microcrystal arthritis is characterized by multiple, acute attacks followed by chronic pain, disability, impaired quality of life, and increased mortality. Given their chronic nature, they represent an ever more urgent public health problem. MSU and CPP crystals are also able to activate nociceptors. The pain in mycrocrystalline arthritis (MCA is an expression of the inflammatory process. In the course of these diseases there is an abundant release of inflammatory molecules, including prostaglandins 2 and kinins. Interleukin-1 represents the most important cytokine released during the crystal-induced inflammatory process. Therefore, clinically, pain is the most important component of MCA, which lead to functional impairment and disability in a large proportion of the population. It is fundamental to diagnose these diseases as early as possible, and to this aim, to identify appropriate and specific targets for a timely therapeutic intervention.

  19. JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I N Sartika

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA is the most common rheumatic condition in children. JRA is defined as persistent arthritis in 1 or more joints for at least 6 weeks, with the onset before age 16 years. The etiology of JRA is unknown. Antigen activated CD4+ T cell stimulate monocytes, macrophages, and synovial fibroblasts to produce the cytokines Interleukin-1 (IL-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-? and to secrete matrix metalloproteinases, which lead to chronic inflammation due to infiltration of inflammatory cell, angiogenesis, destruction of cartilage and bone with pannus formation. The 3 major subtypes of JRA are based on the symptoms at disease onset and are designated systemic onset, pauciarticular onset, and polyarticular onset. For all patients, the goals of therapy are to decrease chronic joint pain and suppress the inflammatory process. Poor prognostic have been observed in patients with polyarticular onset, rheumatoid factor, persistent morning stiffness, tenosynovitis, involvement of the small joints, rapid appearance of erosions, active late onset childhood, subcutaneous nodules, or antinuclear antibody.

  20. Early rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sarzi-Puttini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the synovial joints damage and loss of the function. The ultimate goal in managing RA is to prevent joint damage and to maintain functional ability. Consequently, early diagnosis and treatment is important, but predictive markers for RA are still confined to auto- antibodies and also magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and sonography do not appear to sufficiently distinguish between early RA and non RA. Evidence shows that substantial and irreversible joint damage already occurs within the first 2 years after disease onset. This “window of opportunity” hypothesis for therapeutic intervention in RA is based on the existence of a time frame within which there is a potential for a greater response to therapy, resulting in sustained benefits or, perhaps most important, a chance of cure. There is increasing evidence for beneficial effects of early DMARDs (disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs therapy over delayed treatment in patients who present with arthritis of recent onset. However, no universal consensus exists concerning the choice of initial drug or whether single drug or combination should be given as initial treatments. Most studies demonstrated superiority of aggressive over conventional approaches. Because the tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α inhibitors have proved to stop joint damage progression in severe progressive RA, the achievement of these agents in early RA are currently of great interest.

  1. Acute serum amyloid A induces migration, angiogenesis, and inflammation in synovial cells in vitro and in a human rheumatoid arthritis/SCID mouse chimera model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Connolly, Mary

    2010-06-01

    Serum amyloid A (A-SAA), an acute-phase protein with cytokine-like properties, is expressed at sites of inflammation. This study investigated the effects of A-SAA on chemokine-regulated migration and angiogenesis using rheumatoid arthritis (RA) cells and whole-tissue explants in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo. A-SAA levels were measured by real-time PCR and ELISA. IL-8 and MCP-1 expression was examined in RA synovial fibroblasts, human microvascular endothelial cells, and RA synovial explants by ELISA. Neutrophil transendothelial cell migration, cell adhesion, invasion, and migration were examined using transwell leukocyte\\/monocyte migration assays, invasion assays, and adhesion assays with or without anti-MCP-1\\/anti-IL-8. NF-kappaB was examined using a specific inhibitor and Western blotting. An RA synovial\\/SCID mouse chimera model was used to examine the effects of A-SAA on cell migration, proliferation, and angiogenesis in vivo. High expression of A-SAA was demonstrated in RA patients (p < 0.05). A-SAA induced chemokine expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05). Blockade with anti-scavenger receptor class B member 1 and lipoxin A4 (A-SAA receptors) significantly reduced chemokine expression in RA synovial tissue explants (p < 0.05). A-SAA induced cell invasion, neutrophil-transendothelial cell migration, monocyte migration, and adhesion (all p < 0.05), effects that were blocked by anti-IL-8 or anti-MCP-1. A-SAA-induced chemokine expression was mediated through NF-kappaB in RA explants (p < 0.05). Finally, in the RA synovial\\/SCID mouse chimera model, we demonstrated for the first time in vivo that A-SAA directly induces monocyte migration from the murine circulation into RA synovial grafts, synovial cell proliferation, and angiogenesis (p < 0.05). A-SAA promotes cell migrational mechanisms and angiogenesis critical to RA pathogenesis.

  2. Radiological aspects of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An introductory summary of the imaging-diagnosis will be given. The necessity of acquiring a catalogue of application to particular imaging methods is emphasized. Discussion of step by step diagnosis regarding rheumatologic questions is given on example of the hand. Technically insufficient radiographs and bad habits during diagnostic analysis are pointed out. Radiologic problems in differentiating arthritis/osteoarthrosis will be mentioned. The discussion of these points is followed by outlining the radiology of rheumatoid arthritis and the complexity of this disease. Introduction of a new stage classification. Finally twelve basic radiologic types of rheumatoid arthritis will be presented. (orig.)

  3. MRI-assessed therapeutic effects of locally administered PLGA nanoparticles loaded with anti-inflammatory siRNA in a murine arthritis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Te Boekhorst, Bernard C M; Jensen, Linda B; Colombo, Stefano;

    2012-01-01

    lipopolysaccharide-activated RAW 264.7 cells in vitro. The severity of collagen antibody-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice was assessed by paw scoring and compared to the degree of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-quantified joint effusion and bone marrow edema. Two intra-articular treatments per joint with......Rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by systemic inflammation of synovial joints leading to erosion and cartilage destruction. Although efficacious anti-tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-a) biologic therapies exist, there is an unmet medical need for safe and more efficient treatment regimens for...... nanoparticles loaded with TNF-a siRNA (1µg) resulted in a reduction in disease activity, evident by a significant decrease of the paw scores and joint effusions, as compared to treatment with PLGA nanoparticles loaded with non-specific control siRNA, whereas the degree of bone marrow edema in the tibial and...

  4. Potential Role of Decoy B7-H4 in the Pathogenesis of Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Mouse Model Informed by Clinical Data

    OpenAIRE

    Azuma, Takeshi; Zhu, Gefeng; Xu, Haiying; Rietz, A. Cecilia; Drake, Charles G.; Matteson, Eric L.; Chen, Lieping

    2009-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease caused by abnormal immune responses. In RA, the body's own immune system mainly attacks the joints, causing inflammation in their lining, but can affect other tissues and organs in the body. About 1% of the population in developed countries suffer from RA, and it can result in long-term joint damage, causing significant illness and disability. Sufferers have chronic pain, loss of function of the joint, and loss of mobi...

  5. Curcumin attenuates inflammatory response in IL-1beta-induced human synovial fibroblasts and collagen-induced arthritis in mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Dong-Oh; Kim, Mun-Ok; Choi, Yung Hyun; Park, Yung-Min; Kim, Gi-Young

    2010-05-01

    Curcumin, a major component of turmeric, has been shown to exhibit anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The present study was performed to determine whether curcumin is efficacious against both collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice and IL-1beta-induced activation in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs). DBA/1 mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen (CII) and treated with curcumin every other day for 2weeks after the initial immunization. For arthritis, we evaluated the incidence of disease and used an arthritis index based on paw thickness. In vitro proliferation of CII- or concanavalin A-induced splenic T cells was examined using IFN-gamma production. Pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-1beta were examined in the mouse ankle joint and serum IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes were analyzed. The expression levels of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in human FLSs were also determined. The results showed that compared with untreated CIA mice, curcumin-treated mice downregulated clinical arthritis score, the proliferation of splenic T cells, expression levels of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta in the ankle joint, and expression levels of IgG2a in serum. Additionally, by altering nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB transcription activity in FLSs, curcumin inhibited PGE(2) production, COX-2 expression, and MMP secretion. These results suggest that curcumin can effectively suppress inflammatory response by inhibiting pro-inflammatory mediators and regulating humoral and cellular immune responses. PMID:20188213

  6. MR imaging of tuberculous arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retrospectively, the MR imaging in 6 patients with tuberculous arthritis was reviewed to determine its MR characteristics. Tuberculous arthritis involved the hip (n=4), knee (n=1) and pubic symphysis (n=1). The affected thick synovial tissue was homogeneously hypointense on T1WI and had mixed signal intensity on T2WI. Enhanced T1WI showed irregular contrast enhancement of the abnormal synovium. MRI demonstrated clearly that the thick synovial tissue involved contiguously articular cartilage and subchondral bone. We could see free intraarticular cartilage and subchondral bone. We could see free intraarticular bodies as hypointense nodules on both T1 and T2WI within increased joint effusion. The MR appearances of tuberculous arthritis are not specific. However, MRI is useful in the diagnosis of tuberculous arthritis because it can provide added information about intraarticular abnormalities. (author)

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed to help you learn more ... Patients from Johns Hopkins Stategies to Increase your Level of Physical Activity Role of Body Weight in ...

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take the place of any advice you receive ... Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  9. Handout on Health: Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of, and surgery for, bone and joint diseases. Physical therapists: Health professionals who work with patients to improve ... heart. Pericarditis can be caused by rheumatoid arthritis. Physical therapist. A health professional who works with patients to ...

  10. Nimesulide improves the symptomatic and disease modifying effects of leflunomide in collagen induced arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M Al-Abd

    Full Text Available Nimesulide is a COX-2 inhibitor used for symptomatic relief of rheumatoid arthritis. Leflunomide is an anti-pyrimidine used to manage the progression of rheumatoid arthritis. Herein we studied the influence of nimesulide and leflunomide combination in terms of disease symptoms and progression using collagen-induced arthritis model in mice, as a model for rheumatoid arthritis. Collagen induced arthritis was induced by immunization with type II collagen. Assessment of joint stiffness and articular hyperalgesia were evaluated using a locomotor activity cage and the Hargreaves method, respectively. Disease progression was assessed via arthritic index scoring, X-ray imaging, myeloperoxidase enzyme activity and histopathologic examination. Nimesulide induced only transient symptomatic alleviation on the top of decreased leucocytic infiltration compared to arthritis group. However, nimesulide alone failed to induce any significant improvement in the radiological or pathological disease progression. Leflunomide alone moderately alleviates the symptoms of arthritis and moderately retarded the radiological and pathological disease progression. Combination of nimesulide and leflunomide significantly improved symptomatic (analgesia and joint stiffness and arthritic disease progression (radiological, pathological and Myeloperoxidase enzyme activity in collagen induced arthritis animal model.

  11. Artritis Temprana Early Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Hasta la década de los años ochenta se consideraba a la artritis reumatoide (AR como una enfermedad poco frecuente, de gravedad leve a moderada, que tenía una evolución lentamente, progresiva hacia el daño articular y la incapacidad. El aborde terapéutico convencional hasta ese momento, era el tratamiento clásico de la pirámide.Until the early the eighties was considered rheumatoid arthritis to (RA as a rare disease of mild to moderate severity, which had a slowly evolution towards joint damage and disability. The conventional therapeutic option until then, was the classic treatment of the pyramid.

  12. Complementary medicine in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    F. Atzeni; P Sarzi- Puttini; Lubrano, E

    2011-01-01

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for chronic conditions has increased in recent years. CAM is immensely popular for musculoskeletal conditions and patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) frequently try CAM. This review summarises the trial data for or against CAM as a symptomatic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. Collectively the evidence demonstrates that some CAM modalities show significant promise, e.g. acupuncture, diets, herbal medicine, homoeopathy, massag...

  13. Rheumatoid arthritis and bacterial infections

    OpenAIRE

    N L Prokopjeva; N N Vesikova; I M Marusenko; V A Ryabkov

    2008-01-01

    To study features of bacterial infections course in pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and changes of laboratory measures after focus of infection sanation. Material and methods. 46 pts with definite rheumatoid arthritis were examined at the time of comorbid infection (Cl) detection and after infection focus sanation. Bacteriological test with evaluation of flora sensitivity to antibiotics by disco-diffusion method was performed at baseline and after the course of antibacterial therapy to ass...

  14. Biologic therapies for juvenile arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson, N; Jackson, G.; Gardner-Medwin, J.

    2003-01-01

    A group of therapies with exciting potential has emerged for children and young people with severe juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) uncontrolled by conventional disease modifying drugs. Theoretical understanding from molecular biologic research has identified specific targets within pathophysiological pathways that control rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and JIA. This review identifies the pathways of autoimmunity to begin to show how biologic agents have been produced to replicate, mimic, or bl...

  15. Biologic therapy of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damjanov Nemanja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA and juvenile idiopathic/rheumatoid arthritis (JIA are chronic, inflammatory, systemic, auto-immune diseases characterized by chronic arthritis leading to progressive joint erosions. The individual functional and social impact of rheumatoid arthritis is of great importance. Disability and joint damage occur rapidly and early in the course of the disease. The remarkably improved outcomes have been achieved initiating biologic therapy with close monitoring of disease progression. Biologic agents are drugs, usually proteins, which can influence chronic immune dysregulation resulting in chronic arthritis. According to the mechanism of action these drugs include: 1 anti-TNF drugs (etanercept, infiximab, adalimumab; 2 IL-1 blocking drugs (anakinra; 3 IL-6 blocking drugs (tocilizumab; 4 agents blocking selective co-stimulation modulation (abatacept; 5 CD 20 blocking drugs (rituximab. Biologics targeting TNF-alpha with methotrexate have revolutionized the treatment of RA, producing significant improvement in clinical, radiographic, and functional outcomes not seen previously. The new concept of rheumatoid arthritis treatment defines early diagnosis, early aggressive therapy with optimal doses of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs and, if no improvement has been achieved during six months, early introduction of biologic drugs. The three-year experience of biologic therapy in Serbia has shown a positive effect on disease outcome.

  16. Photoacoustic imaging: a potential new tool for arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueding

    2012-12-01

    The potential application of photoacoustic imaging (PAI) technology to diagnostic imaging and therapeutic monitoring of inflammatory arthritis has been explored. The feasibility of our bench-top joint imaging systems in delineating soft articular tissue structures in a noninvasive manner was validated first on rat models and then on human peripheral joints. Based on the study on commonly used arthritis rat models, the capability of PAI to differentiate arthritic joints from the normal was also examined. With sufficient imaging depth, PAI can realize tomographic imaging of a human peripheral joint or a small-animal joint as a whole organ noninvasively. By presenting additional optical contrast and tissue functional information such as blood volume and blood oxygen saturation, PAI may provide an opportunity for early diagnosis of inflammatory joint disorders, e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, and for monitoring of therapeutic outcomes with improved sensitivity and accuracy.

  17. Experimental Drug for Rheumatoid Arthritis Shows Promise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_158076.html Experimental Drug for Rheumatoid Arthritis Shows Promise Baricitinib helped patients who failed other ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental drug to treat rheumatoid arthritis showed promise in a new six-month trial. ...

  18. [Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Definition and classification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslandre, C

    2016-04-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a group of diseases defined by the presence of arthritis of more than 6weeks duration in patients aged less than 16years and with unknown etiology. The international classification based on clinical and biological criteria define each type of JIA: systemic, oligoarticular, polyarticular with and without rheumatoid factor, enthesitis-related arthritis, and psoriatic arthritis. However, some discussions persist concerning systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, whose clinical symptoms and pathogenic mechanisms are quite similar to those observed in autoinflammatory diseases, arthritis with antinuclear factors (poly- and oligoarticular) that could be considered as a homogenous group, and a family history of psoriasis that frequently led to unclassified arthritis. Better knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms should improve the initial clinical classification with more homogeneous groups of patients and reduce the number of unclassified cases of arthritis. PMID:26968301

  19. New Treatments Helping Kids with Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 159984.html New Treatments Helping Kids With Juvenile Arthritis Several biologics have been approved by the FDA ... 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- New treatments for juvenile arthritis offer hope to children with the chronic autoimmune ...

  20. Arthritis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Arthritis URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/arthritis.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  1. Diagnostic delay in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jan; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Early diagnosis of inflammatory rheumatic diseases is important in order to improve long-term outcome. We studied whether delay in diagnosis (time between onset of symptoms and establishment of diagnosis) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PSA) and...... ankylosing spondylitis (AS) changed from year 2000 to 2011. METHODS: Month and year of initial symptoms and diagnosis, gender, hospital, year of birth and date of first data entry were obtained for 13 721 patients with RA, PSA or AS who had been registered in the DANBIO registry. Time between symptom onset...... and diagnosis was modelled using generalised linear regression to predict the average duration for each calendar year of initial symptoms with adjustments for gender, year of birth and date of DANBIO entry. RESULTS: Patients with valid data (RA: 10 416 (73%); PSA: 1970 (68%); AS: 1335 (65%)) did not...

  2. Proposal for levels of evidence schema for validation of a soluble biomarker reflecting damage endpoints in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis, and recommendations for study design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maksymowych, Walter P; Fitzgerald, Oliver; Wells, George A;

    2009-01-01

    arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We also aimed to generate consensus on minimum standards for the design of longitudinal studies aimed at validating biomarkers. METHODS: Before the meeting, the Soluble Biomarker Working Group prepared a preliminary framework and...... discussed various models for association and prediction related to the statistical strength domain. In addition, 3 Delphi exercises addressing longitudinal study design for RA, PsA, and AS were conducted within the working group and members of the Assessments in SpondyloArthritis International Society (ASAS...

  3. Inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase in inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughton-Smith, N K; Tinker, A C

    1998-07-01

    There is considerable evidence that excessive nitric oxide (NO) synthesized from L-arginine by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) plays an important pathological role in inflammatory arthritis. Since NO synthesized by constitutive isoforms of NOS has a physiological role, a great deal of activity has been directed at identifying inhibitors of NOS that are selective for the induced isoform. The major chemical areas that have been described so far in the search for such selective iNOS inhibitors and the activity of some of these compounds in animal models of arthritis are reviewed. PMID:18465556

  4. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  5. Prostaglandins and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Fattahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, autoimmune, and complex inflammatory disease leading to bone and cartilage destruction, whose cause remains obscure. Accumulation of genetic susceptibility, environmental factors, and dysregulated immune responses are necessary for mounting this self-reacting disease. Inflamed joints are infiltrated by a heterogeneous population of cellular and soluble mediators of the immune system, such as T cells, B cells, macrophages, cytokines, and prostaglandins (PGs. Prostaglandins are lipid inflammatory mediators derived from the arachidonic acid by multienzymatic reactions. They both sustain homeostatic mechanisms and mediate pathogenic processes, including the inflammatory reaction. They play both beneficial and harmful roles during inflammation, according to their site of action and the etiology of the inflammatory response. With respect to the role of PGs in inflammation, they can be effective mediators in the pathophysiology of RA. Thus the use of agonists or antagonists of PG receptors may be considered as a new therapeutic protocol in RA. In this paper, we try to elucidate the role of PGs in the immunopathology of RA.

  6. RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AND PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Kosheleva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA generally starts at the age when many women have already become mothers; however, it may occur in childhood or adolescence. Furthermore, there has been recently a women’s tendency to plan pregnacy for a more mature age, which necessitates a discussion about gestation in this disease. Investigation of mechanisms pregnancy can influence the development of RA both in the gestation and long-term periods is of important theoretical and practical value. The results of these investigations may be used to develop new treatments for RA and management tactics for patients during pregnancy and lactation. The  aper gives the data available in the literature on fertility in RA, impact of pregnancy on its activity and that of RA on the course and outcomes of gestation, as well as current ideas on lactation and use of oral contraceptives in RA. Particular attention is given to drug therapy in pregnant and breastfeeding women with RA: groups of anti-rheumatic drugs are considered in detail in relation to the safety of or a potential risk from their use. A therapeutic algorithm and recommendations for pregnancy planning and a follow-up of patients with RA during gestation are proposed.

  7. Psoriatic arthritis: imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lubrano

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Imaging techniques to assess psoriatic arthritis (PsA include radiography, ultrasonography (US, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, computed tomography (CT and bone scintigraphy. The radiographic hallmark of PsA is the combination of destructive changes (joint erosions, tuft resorption, osteolysis with bone proliferation (including periarticular and shaft periostitis, ankylosis, spur formation and non-marginal syndesmophytes. US has an increasing important role in the evaluation of PsA. In fact, power Doppler US is useful mainly for its ability to assess musculoskeletal (joints, tendons, entheses and cutaneous (skin and nails involvement, to monitor efficacy of therapy and to guide steroid injections at the level of inflamed joints, tendon sheaths and entheses. MRI allows direct visualization of inflammation in peripheral and axial joints, and peripheral and axial entheses, and has dramatically improved the possibilities for early diagnosis and objective monitoring of the disease process in PsA. MRI has allowed explaining the relationships among enthesitis, synovitis and osteitis in PsA, supporting a SpA pattern of inflammation where enthesitis is the primary target of inflammation. CT has little role in assessment of peripheral joints, but it may be useful in assessing elements of spine disease. CT accuracy is similar to MRI in assessment of erosions in sacroiliac joint involvement, but CT is not as effective in detecting synovial inflammation. Bone scintigraphy lacks specificity and is now supplanted with US and MRI techniques.

  8. Overview of the radiology of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plain films remain the basic tool for diagnosis and follow-up evaluation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In this paper, we review the new classification of JIA: systemic arthritis, oligoarthritis (persistent), oligoarthritis (extended), polyarticular arthritis (rheumatoid factor negative), polyarticular arthritis (rheumatoid factor positive), enthesitis related arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and unclassified arthritis. We will also review regional abnormalities of three stages: an early stage, an intermediate stage, a late stage, as well as the differential diagnosis

  9. BIOBEHAVIORAL THERAPY OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Shabanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the study is connected with need to expand the arsenal of treatment methods patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The study examined the efficacy of biobehavioral therapy in a comprehensive program of treatment patients with rheumatoid arthritis (medical therapy in combination with biobehavioral therapy. It has been shown when compared with the control group (isolated drug therapy maintaining  clinical  response  in  short-term  follow-up  study  in  the  intervention  group.  Statistically    significant relationship the volitional control of the alpha rhythm of EEG (increased power of the alpha rhythm with a reduction in pain intensity in the in neurofeedback program and positive dynamics of the main characteristics of the alpha rhythm have been drmonstrated. Inclusion in the treatment program of arthritis biobehavioral approach has reduced the dose of pain medication, so reducing aggression of pharmacotherapy.

  10. Dietetic recommendations in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Rosa Alhambra-Expósito

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic autoimmune disease that has a significant effect on patients’ physical, emotional, and social functioning. For decades, patients have used different diets to try to improve the symptoms of RA. The possible benefits of dietary therapy for rheumatoid arthritis are reviewed in this article. Nutritional objectives for RA, are to halt the loss of bone mass, promote healing of bone fractures and improving bone-associated inflammatory disorders and joints. In general, diets low in saturated fat, rich in polyunsaturated fats: omega 3 and omega 6, rich in complex carbohydrates and fiber are recommended.

  11. Pyogenic infection and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, I. F.; Deans, A. C.; Keat, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    Ten episodes of severe pyogenic infection occurring in nine patients with rheumatoid arthritis are reported. There was a wide range of presenting features including pyoarthrosis in 7 episodes. Three cases presented with meningitis, bacterial endocarditis and probable multiple abscesses respectively. Infection was caused by Staphylococcus aureus in 7 episodes and by Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae and beta-haemolytic Streptococcus in each of one episode. Three infective episodes were fatal. Pyogenic, especially staphylococcal, infection should be considered in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with unexplained illness with or without sudden deterioration in joint symptoms. It is important to recognize and treat infection rapidly. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3671222

  12. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the spectrum of clinical presentation, laboratory parameters and drug therapy in patients with Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA). Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: The Children's Hospital and The Institute of Child Health, Lahore, from October 2008 to October 2011. Methodology: All patients who fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria for JRA were enrolled. Their clinical features, investigations done and treatment received for JRA were noted. Statistical analysis of data was done on SPSS version 16.0 for obtaining descriptive statistics. Results: Out of 185 patients, 50.3% (n = 93) were females; 54% (n = 100) were between 10 - 15 years of age. Polyarthritis was found in 71.9% (n = 133) followed by oligoarthritis (22.7%, n = 42) and systemic onset disease (5.4%, n = 10). Morning stiffness (78%) and fever (68%) were the most common clinical presentations. All patients with systemic onset disease had fever (n = 10) followed by skin rash, hepatosplenomegaly and lymphadenopathy. Uveitis was found in 2 patients, and both belonged to the oligoarticular group. Rheumatoid factor was found in 10.27% (n = 19) of all patients. All patients were given non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Disease modifying agents (methotrexate) were given to 43.8% (n = 81). Steroids were used in 61% (n = 113) of patients either with NSAIDs alone or NSAIDs plus methotrexate. Conclusion: Disease profile of JRA at the study centre showed that polyarthritis is the commonest type. Recognition of subtypes will help in planning the management of these patients. (author)

  13. Treatment of arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, with radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioactive composition is described for the treatment of arthritis comprising, in combination, a ferric hydroxide or aluminum hydroxide aggregate suspension having a particle size of 3 to 20 microns, wherein a radionuclide is entrapped, the radionuclide being /sup 166/Holmium

  14. The effect of X-rays on the experimental arthritis in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the therapeutic efficacy of low doses of X-rays on different in-vivo models of monoarticular arthritis which have been developed for the investigation of anti-inflammatory drugs. Zymosan or heat-inactivated mycobacterium tuberculosis was injected into 1 knee joint of Wistar rats to produce, via different pathogenetic mechanisms, an acute monoarticular arthritis. Five days later, the amount of joint swelling, bone destruction and cartilage catabolism were measured. Immediately after arthritis induction, the knees were irradiated with a single dose of 5 Gy or with 4 daily fractions of 1 Gy. X-irradiation with daily doses of 1 Gy significantly reduced bone loss and cartilage degradation in Zymosan-induced arthritis and joint swelling in mycobacterium tuberculosis induced arthritis. However, a single high radiation dose significantly increased bone loss in mycobacterium tuberculosis induced arthritis. These data confirm the hypothesis of an anti-inflammatory effect of low radiation doses which so far has been based only on clinical experience. By using an established model of monoarticular arthritis we have now the opportunity to study the mechanism of the anti-inflammatory radiation effect in comparison to that of anti-inflammatory drugs. This way, we hope to provide a scientific basis for the use of radiotherapy in various painful degenerative joint disorders. (orig.)

  15. Positional cloning of ncf1- a piece in the puzzle of arthritis genetics.

    OpenAIRE

    Olofsson, Peter; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2003-01-01

    Positional cloning of susceptibility genes in complex diseases like rheumatoid arthritis in humans is hampered by aspects like genetic heterogeneity and environmental variations, while genetic studies in animal models contain several advantages. With animal models, the environment can be controlled, the genetic complexity of the disease is minimized and the disease onset can be predicted, which simplify diagnosis and characterization. We use pristane-induced arthritis in rats to investigate t...

  16. Relationship between angiogenesis and inflammation in experimental arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavel, Gaelle; Valvason, Chiara; Yamaoka, Kunio; Lemeiter, Delphine; Laroche, Liliane; Boissier, Marie-Christophe; Bessis, Natacha

    2006-09-01

    Background. Angiogenesis is involved in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) leading to leucocyte recruitment and inflammation in the synovium. Furthermore, synovial inflammation itself further potentiates endothelial proliferation and angiogenesis. In this study, we aimed at evaluating the reciprocical relationship between synovial inflammation and angiogenesis in a RA model, namely collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Methods. CIA was induced by immunization of DBA/1 mice with collagen type II in adjuvant. Endothelial cells were detected using a GSL-1 lectin-specific immunohistochemical staining on knee joint sections. Angiogenesis, clinical scores and histological signs of arthritis were evaluated from the induction of CIA until the end of the experiment. Angiogenesis was quantified by counting both the isolated endothelial cells and vessels stained on each section. To evaluate the effect of increased angiogenesis on CIA, VEGF gene transfer was performed using an adeno-associated virus encoding VEGF (AAV-VEGF), by intra-muscular or intra-articular injection in mice with CIA. Results. We showed an increase in synovial angiogenesis from day 6 to day 55 after CIA induction, and, moreover, joint vascularization and clinical scores of arthritis were correlated (p < 0.0001, r = 0.61). Vascularization and histological scores were also correlated (p = 0.0006, r = 0.51). Systemic VEGF overexpression in mice with CIA was followed by an aggravation of arthritis as compared to AAV-lacZ control group (p < 0.0001). In contrast, there was no difference in clinical scores between control mice and mice injected within the knee with AAV-VEGF, even if joint vascularization was higher in this group than in all other groups (p = 0,05 versus non-injected group). Intra-articular AAV-VEGF injections induced more severe signs of histological inflammation and bone destruction than AAV-Lac Z or no injection. Conclusion. Angiogenesis and joint inflammation evolve in parallel during collagen

  17. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel; Bijlsma, Johannes W J;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aiming at therapeutic targets has reduced the risk of organ failure in many diseases such as diabetes or hypertension. Such targets have not been defined for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). OBJECTIVE: /st> To develop recommendations for achieving optimal therapeutic outcomes in RA. METHODS...

  18. Diagnostic Delay in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølbaek, Karen; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Primdahl, Jette

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To prevent joint damage among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is a need to minimize delays from the onset of symptoms until the initiation of appropriate therapy. The present study explored the factors that have an impact on the time it takes for Danish patients with RA...

  19. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolen, Josef S; Breedveld, Ferdinand C; Burmester, Gerd R;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reaching the therapeutic target of remission or low-disease activity has improved outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) significantly. The treat-to-target recommendations, formulated in 2010, have provided a basis for implementation of a strategic approach towards this...

  20. Zinc sulphate in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Mattingly, P. C.; Mowat, A G

    1982-01-01

    To assess the antirheumatic activity of zinc sulphate, 27 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis took part in a 6-month, randomised, double-blind, between-group trial of oral zinc sulphate versus placebo. Twelve patients on zinc and 9 on placebo completed the trial, but no significant antirheumatic activity of zinc sulphate was demonstrated.

  1. Preparation and evaluation of functional foods in adjuvant arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Okbi, S. Y.; Mohamed, D. A.

    2012-07-01

    Adjuvant arthritis is an animal model that closely resembles rheumatoid arthritis in humans. It is a successful working model used to study new anti-inflammatory agents. In previous studies (animal and clinical) we have shown that evening primrose oil, fish oil and the methanol extract of date fruits and fenugreek seeds have anti-inflammatory activity and that the methanol extract of dates has an antioxidant effect. Based on these studies, the aim of the present study was to prepare 7 functional foods containing such bioactive fractions separately or in combination and to evaluate them in adjuvant arthritis in rats, study the stability of bioactive ingredients and evaluate their sensory properties. The studied biochemical parameters were erythrocyte sedimentation rate, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and plasma copper, zinc and interlukin 2. Nutritional parameters, including body weight gain, food intake and food efficiency ratio were monitored during the feeding of the functional foods. The bioactive ingredients assessed were total phenolic contents and fatty acids. The results showed improvement in the biochemical parameters, body weight gain and food efficiency ratio of arthritic rats fed on the functional foods with different degrees. All the prepared functional foods were sensory accepted. The active ingredients showed stability during storage. In conclusion, all the tested functional foods showed promising antiinflammatory activity and were determined to be acceptable through sensory evaluation which means that their potential beneficial use as dietary supplements in rheumatoid arthritis patients may be recommended. (Author) 42 refs.

  2. Supplementation of diet with krill oil protects against experimental rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Berge Kjetil; Scales Hannah; Kerr Alison; Ierna Michelle; Griinari Mikko

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Although the efficacy of standard fish oil has been the subject of research in arthritis, the effect of krill oil in this disease has yet to be investigated. The objective of the present study was to evaluate a standardised preparation of krill oil and fish oil in an animal model for arthritis. Methods Collagen-induced arthritis susceptible DBA/1 mice were provided ad libitum access to a control diet or diets supplemented with either krill oil or fish oil throughout the st...

  3. In Vivo Efficacy of Moxifloxacin Compared with Cloxacillin and Vancomycin in a Staphylococcus aureus Rabbit Arthritis Experimental Model▿

    OpenAIRE

    Grossi, Olivier; Caillon, Jocelyne; Arvieux, Cedric; Jacqueline, Cedric; Bugnon, Denis; Potel, Gilles; Hamel, Antoine

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the efficacies of moxifloxacin, cloxacillin, and vancomycin in a rabbit model of Staphylococcus aureus arthritis. No significant difference between therapeutic regimens was observed after a 7-day treatment. Oral moxifloxacin could be a suitable alternative to standard parenteral therapy for S. aureus arthritis.

  4. Interleukin 1 receptor antagonist mediates the beneficial effects of systemic interferon beta in mice: implications for rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Corr; D.L. Boyle; L.M. Ronacher; B.R. Lew; L.G. van Baarsen; P.P. Tak; G.S. Firestein

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Interferon beta (IFN beta) therapy is effective in multiple sclerosis and murine models of arthritis. Surprisingly, systemic IFN beta treatment induces only minimal improvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To explain this paradox, the authors evaluated the mechanism of IFN beta benefit i

  5. Streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis and adjuvant arthritis in F344----Lewis and in Lewis----F344 bone marrow chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis and adjuvant arthritis (AA) are rat models for chronic, erosive polyarthritis. Both models can be induced in susceptible Lewis rats, whereas F344 rats are resistant. In AA as well as in SCW arthritis, antigen-specific T lymphocytes have been demonstrated to be crucial for chronic disease. In this communication the authors describe their studies to probe the cellular mechanism responsible for the difference in susceptibility of Lewis and F344, using bone marrow chimeras. By transplanting bone marrow cells from F344 into lethally irradiated Lewis recipients, Lewis rats were rendered resistant to SCW arthritis induction. F344 rats reconstituted with Lewis bone marrow, i.e., Lewis----F344 chimeras, develop an arthritis upon SCW injection. For AA comparable results were obtained. These data suggest that both resistance and susceptibility to bacterium-induced chronic arthritis are mediated by hemopoietic/immune cells and that the recipiental environment does not influence the susceptibility to chronic joint inflammation

  6. Enhanced activity of hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) in mesenteric but not epididymal fat correlates with higher production of epinephrine in mesenteric adipocytes in rat model of cachectic rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stofkova, Andrea; Krskova, Katarina; Vaculin, Simon; Jurcovicova, Jana

    2016-06-01

    Cachectic rheumatoid arthritis, the less frequent form of the disease, is associated with loss of fat mass and often more severe course of the disease. Its experimental model represents rat adjuvant arthritis (AA) characterized by edema, lack of appetite, sharp body weight and fat loss. As individual fat depots display functional differences, here we studied lipolytic activity and sensitivity to lipolytic stimuli of nodeless epididymal fat (eWAT) and perinodal mesenteric fat (mWAT) depots at the peak of AA. We also examined changes in catecholamine and cytokine levels involved in lipolysis in plasma and/or isolated adipocytes from both WATs to identify the contribution of local, adipocyte-based processes and/or systemic events to adiposity loss in cachectic rheumatoid arthritis. AA was induced to male Lewis rats by complete Freund's adjuvant. Groups of ad libitum-fed and pair-fed controls were used to distinguish the effects of food restriction from inflammation-induced cachexia. Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and its phosphorylated form (pHSL) were analyzed by western blot. CRP and catecholamine levels in plasma or adipocyte lysates were determined using ELISA kits. Cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 (CINC-1/CXCL1), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2), IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and leptin in adipocyte lysate were analyzed by quantitative protein microarray. Plasma glycerol and FFA were measured spectrophotometrically. AA rats developed severe cachexia, with lower adiposity in mWAT compared to normal and pair-fed controls, whereas in eWAT the adiposity was similarly reduced in AA and pair-fed groups. ATGL levels in both WATs were not affected by AA or pair feeding. AA upregulated levels of HSL, pHSL and pHSL/HSL ratio in mWAT, whereas none of these parameters has changed in eWAT of AA rats or in either WATs of pair-fed rats. In AA rats plasma glycerol was elevated, whereas FFA concentration was reduced. Plasma

  7. Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are Biologic Drugs Right for You?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are Biologic Drugs Right for You? What is rheumatoid arthritis (RA)? Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a serious condition. The body’s immune system attacks the lining of ...

  8. Osteoporosis and Arthritis: Two Common but Different Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your browser. Home Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions Osteoporosis and Arthritis: Two Common but Different Conditions Publication available in: PDF (71 KB) Related Resources Alcoholism Anorexia Nervosa Arthritis Artritis (Arthritis) Asthma Bed Rest and Immobilization ...

  9. Genetics of psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rielly, Darren D; Rahman, Proton

    2014-10-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) represents a group of inflammatory rheumatic diseases that cluster within families and possess overlapping clinical features. The pathogenesis of SpA encompasses a complex array of genetic, immunological and environmental factors. In this article, we will briefly review the genetics of PsA, and then focus on the genes that may be potentially linked either directly or indirectly to the immunopathology of the Th-17 pathway. The most consistent and dominant genetic effect of PsV and PsA is located on chromosome 6p21.3 within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, which accounts for approximately one-third of the genetic contribution of PsV and PsA. To date, 36 genes have reached genome-wide significance, accounting for approximately 22% of psoriasis (PsV) heritability. Prominent genes identified via GWAS include HLA-Cw6, IL12B, IL23R, IL23A, TNIP1, TNFAIP3, LCE3B-LCE3C, TRAF3IP2, NFkBIA, FBXL19, TYK2, IFIH1, REL, and ERAP1. Genes identified in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) has largely echoed those in PsV and include HLA-B/C, HLA-B, IL-12B, IL-23R, TNIP1, TRAF3IP2, FBXL19, and REL. The lack of identified genetic susceptibility loci is largely attributed to the much smaller number of PsA patients and the greater clinical heterogeneity of PsA. Searching for different types of genetic variants such as small CNVs and/or insertions/deletions has also led to the identification of several genes with a function relative to PsV in particular including DEFB4, LCE3C_LCE3B, and IL-22 gene (exon 1). The candidate genes identified in PsV/PsA have highlighted pathways of critical importance to psoriatic disease including distinct signaling pathways comprised of barrier integrity, innate immune response and adaptive immune response, mediated primarily by Th-17 and Th-1 signalling. While GWAS studies have yielded great insights into the genes that contribute to the pathogenesis of PsV and PsA, replication in large cohorts, fine-mapping and resequencing

  10. Establishment and assessment of rheumatoid arthritis model induced by pristane in Dark-Agouti rats%降植烷诱导的DA大鼠类风湿性关节炎模型的建立和评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张利文; 文凯; 袁泉

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To establish animal model of rheumatoid arthritis( RA) and measure the indexes for RA,to provide evidence for reseach and clinical treatments of RA. Methods; The present study was performed on the Dark-Agouti (DA) rats. The RA model was induced by intracutaneous injection of pristane (300 fjul) into the root of the tail. The body weight, pathological score for joints, paw volume, motion of joint, mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) , heat withdrawal latency (HWL) were examined before and after the establishment of the RA model. Results; Arthritic manifestations occurred in all the DA rats 7-14 days after injection of pristane,including joint swelling in metacarpophalangeal joints, interphalangeal joint and ankle joint, increase in paw volume, trouble walking, decline in range of motion, decrease in mechanical withdrawal threshold, and so on. All these manifestations reached the peak at 21-28 days. Conclusion; The RA model induced by pristane in DA rats have some characteristics such as high incidence,simple operation,similar to the patients with RA. Thus,it could be conclude that pristane induced arthritis (PIA) model in DA rats is a better model for RA.%目的:建立大鼠类风湿性关节炎(rheumatoid arthritis,RA)模型及检测相关指标,为研究RA的发病机制及其临床治疗提供依据.方法:本研究以Dark-Agouti (DA)大鼠为模型动物,采用尾根部皮内一次性注射降植烷300μl的方法建立RA模型,并检测不同时间点大鼠体重、关节病理评分、爪容积、后爪关节活动度、机械缩爪阈值、热缩爪潜伏期等指标.结果:注射降植烷后7 ~ 14 d DA大鼠100%发病,表现为四肢掌指关节、指间关节以及踝关节红肿,爪容积增加,动物行走障碍,关节活动度下降,机械缩爪阈值明显下降,第21~28天达高峰.结论:降植烷尾根部注射引起的DA大鼠关节炎发病率高,操作简单易行,与临床RA患者表现有高度相似性,是一种较好的RA模型.

  11. Hyperspectral imaging for detection of arthritis: feasibility and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanic, Matija; Paluchowski, Lukasz A.; Randeberg, Lise L.

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a disease that frequently leads to joint destruction. It has a high incidence rate worldwide, and the disease significantly reduces patients' quality of life. Detecting and treating inflammatory arthritis before structural damage to the joint has occurred is known to be essential for preventing patient disability and pain. Existing diagnostic technologies are expensive, time consuming, and require trained personnel to collect and interpret data. Optical techniques might be a fast, noninvasive alternative. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a noncontact optical technique which provides both spectral and spatial information in one measurement. In this study, the feasibility of HSI in arthritis diagnostics was explored by numerical simulations and optimal imaging parameters were identified. Hyperspectral reflectance and transmission images of RA and normal human joint models were simulated using the Monte Carlo method. The spectral range was 600 to 1100 nm. Characteristic spatial patterns for RA joints and two spectral windows with transmission were identified. The study demonstrated that transmittance images of human joints could be used as one parameter for discrimination between arthritic and unaffected joints. The presented work shows that HSI is a promising imaging modality for the diagnostics and follow-up monitoring of arthritis in small joints.

  12. Technetium scintigraphy in experimental hyperergic arthritis and by rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinea pigs showed an increased uptake of 99m-TC-04 in the inflamed joints during the first days of experimental arthritis. Tc-04 was found in the joint fluid and inflamed synovia. The uptake of Tc-04 and Tc-MDP was reduced by therapy in 13 patients with RA. Classical RA showed an increased uptake of Tc-MDP compared with probable RA. Scintigraphy offers the possibility of early diagnosis and study of progression. (orig.)

  13. Periodontal and hematological characteristics associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Westergaard, Jytte; Stoltze, Kaj;

    2006-01-01

    Periodontitis shares several clinical and pathogenic characteristics with chronic arthritis, and there is some degree of coexistence. The aims of this study were to elucidate whether patients with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP), generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP), juvenile...... idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) share periodontal and hematological characteristics distinguishing them from individuals free of diseases....

  14. Improved early identification of arthritis : evaluating the efficacy of Early Arthritis Recognition Clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nies, Jessica A. B.; Brouwer, Elisabeth; van Gaalen, Floris A.; Allaart, Cornelia F.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Posthumus, Marcel D.; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H. M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Only 31% of Dutch rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-patients visit a rheumatologist within 12weeks after symptom onset; this is mainly due to delay at the level of the general practitioner (GP). In order to reduce delay of GPs in identifying early arthritis, we initiated an Early Arthritis Recogni

  15. Rehabilitation in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Evaggelos Giavasopoulos; Paraskevi Gourni

    2008-01-01

    Rehabilitation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis aims to the management of the consequences of disease. It is widely accepted that, no drug therapy at present leads to long‐term orremission f everyone with rheumatoid arthritis (R.A.). Consequently, patients experience physical, psychological, functional, social and role negative effects of the disease. AIM : The am of the present article was to evaluate the role of rehabilitation to patients with rheumatoid arthritis sMethod and material:...

  16. Current Treatments for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    AlbertoMartini

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) differs markedly from adult rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is not a single disease, but an exclusion diagnosis that gather together all forms of arthritis that begin before the age of 16 years, persist for more than 6 weeks, and are of unknown origin. The advent of the new biological treatments has dramatically changed both the observed responses to treatment and the expectations of therapies. The implementation of an adequate legislation as well as the ...

  17. Can the weather influence arthritis symptoms?

    OpenAIRE

    Wai Chin Li; Ye Zhang

    2014-01-01

    By reviewing twelve previous studies on the relationship between the weather and arthritis symptoms, this article summarized the major findings on this controversial topic. It has been supported by most of the studies that arthritis symptoms are associated with weather conditions. Factors such as barometric pressure and temperature were generally believed to be related to arthritis symptoms. However, controversies arose at minor levels. Whether the weather-symptom relationship depends on the ...

  18. Ethanol prevents development of destructive arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Jonsson, Ing-Marie; Verdrengh, Margareta; Brisslert, Mikael; Lindblad, Sofia; Bokarewa, Maria; Islander, Ulrika; Carlsten, Hans; Ohlsson, Claes; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Holmdahl, Rikard; Tarkowski, Andrej

    2006-01-01

    Environmental factors are thought to play a major role in the development of rheumatoid arthritis. Because the use of ethanol is widespread, we assessed the role of ethanol intake on the propensity to develop chronic arthritis. Collagen type II-immunized mice were given water or water containing 10% (vol/vol) ethanol or its metabolite acetaldehyde. Their development of arthritis was assessed, as well as the impact of ethanol on leukocyte migration and activation of intracellular transcription...

  19. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  20. Which Psoriasis Patients Develop Psoriatic Arthritis?

    OpenAIRE

    Busse, Kristine; Liao, Wilson

    2010-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a major comorbidity of psoriasis that significantly impairs quality of life and physical function. Because skin lesions classically precede joint symptoms, dermatologists are in a unique position to identify patients at risk for psoriatic arthritis before irreversible joint damage occurs. Here we review the literature to identify the clinical and genetic factors most highly associated with development of psoriatic arthritis, with the goal of assisting dermatologists in ...

  1. Immunohistochemical markers for arthritis in psoriasis.

    OpenAIRE

    Veale, D J; Barnes, L.; Rogers, S.; FitzGerald, O

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To examine the immunohistological features in the involved skin of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PA) (n = 15), compared with those in involved skin from patients with psoriasis but no arthritis (n = 5), and with a group with normal skin (n = 4), to identify markers for arthritis in psoriasis. METHODS--Skin was obtained from patients by 6 mm punch biopsy and normal skin was provided by the department of plastic surgery. Samples were stained with monoclonal antibodies against T...

  2. Childhood psychosocial stressors and adult onset arthritis: Broad spectrum risk factors and allostatic load

    OpenAIRE

    Von Korff, Michael; Alonso, Jordi; Ormel, Johan; Angermeyer, Matthais; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Fleiz, Clara; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Ronald C. Kessler; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Posada-Villa, Jose; Scott, Kate M.; Uda, Hidenori

    2009-01-01

    Neural, endocrine, and immune stress mediators are hypothesized to increase risks of diverse chronic diseases, including arthritis. Retrospective data from the World Mental Health Surveys (N = 18,309) were employed to assess whether adult onset of arthritis was associated with childhood adversities and early onset psychological disorder. Cox proportional hazard models assessed the association of number of childhood adversities and the presence of early onset psychological disorder with arthri...

  3. Tyrosine kinases in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Akiko

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an inflammatory, polyarticular joint disease. A number of cellular responses are involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, including activation of inflammatory cells and cytokine expression. The cellular responses involved in each of these processes depends on the specific signaling pathways that are activated; many of which include protein tyrosine kinases. These pathways include the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, Janus kinases/signal transducers and activators transcription pathway, spleen tyrosine kinase signaling, and the nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells pathway. Many drugs are in development to target tyrosine kinases for the treatment of RA. Based on the number of recently published studies, this manuscript reviews the role of tyrosine kinases in the pathogenesis of RA and the potential role of kinase inhibitors as new therapeutic strategies of RA.

  4. Clinimetric criteria of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Galasso

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic autoimmune disease, mainly poli-artycular, among wide-spread chronic inflammatory diseases, that cause pain, functional limitation, damage and joints deformations, and disability. It is characterized by turns of active inflammation and remission phases. Inflammation degree and persistence are associated to a bad functional prognosis and progressive joint disability. These patients management require a continuous valuation of inflammatory activity index of disease both therapeutic management and to prevent disablement process. We focus on many valuation index of joint disability and functional damage. Very important are both the scales of auto-values concerning the pain and the joint swelling and clinical data get by physician to valuate activity index of disease as defined by DAS28. Significant data come by health-related quality of life, disability and by AIMS2 (Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale.

  5. 咪喹莫特对哮喘小鼠气道炎症和调节性T细胞的影响%Effects of aerosol imiquimod on the antigen-induced airway inflammation and Foxp3+ regulatory T cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王珊琳

    2011-01-01

    目的:观察咪喹莫特对小鼠哮喘模型气道炎症和调节性T细胞Foxp3表达的影响.方法:建立哮喘模型,第0,7,14天分别腹腔注射卵白蛋白(OVA)及其佐剂,自21 d时开始雾化吸入OVA一次,连续7d,吸入OVA前0.5 h,咪喹莫特组雾化吸入咪喹莫特30 min(1.5 g/L),地塞米松组腹腔注射地塞米松(4 mg/kg).最后一次OVA雾化吸入后48 h取左下肺组织做HE染色观察肺组织炎症改变;收集支气管肺泡灌洗液(BALF)进行细胞计数、分类和ELISA检测.结果:(1)HE染色显示咪喹莫特组小鼠肺组织炎症程度较哮喘小鼠轻.(2)哮喘组小鼠BALF中嗜酸性粒细胞较正常组显著增加(P<0.01),咪喹莫特组嗜酸性粒细胞比哮喘组显著减少(P<0.01),(3)哮喘组BALF中IL-5水平较正常组显著升高(P<0.01),咪喹莫特治疗组比哮喘组显著降低(P<0.01).哮喘组BALF中IL-10水平较正常组显著降低(P<0.01),咪喹莫特治疗组比哮喘组显著升高(P<0.05),(4)哮喘组脾脏组织Foxp3+细胞数量较正常组减少,咪喹莫特组与地塞米松组较哮喘组增加(P<0.01).结论:雾化吸入味喹莫特可在一定程度上增加Foxp3+细胞数量,减轻哮喘小鼠的气道炎症.%AIM: To observe the effects of aerosol imiquimod on the antigen-induced airway inflammation and Foxp3+ regulatory T cells.METHODS: Thirty-two female BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups: control, asthma model, imiquimod and glucocorticoid treatment groups. Asthma was induced by OVA administration in the asthma model, imiquimod and glucocorticoid treatment groups.Imiquimod and dexamethasone were administered to immunized mice before antigen challenge. After 48 hrs of the last challenge, the mice were killed and bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected to count the number of eosinophil and to measure the levels of IL-5 and IL-10. The lung tissues of inferior lobe of the left lung were obtained for the observation of lung pathological change. The spleen

  6. Dietary intervention in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Jamison, Jennifer R.

    1987-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a disabling disease prevalent in modern society. Dietary prevention may be possible in a subgroup of individuals who appear to suffer food intolerance; dietary intervention, as an adjunct to other management strategies, may be useful in modifying the inflammatory response. The former suggestion is supported by anecdotal evidence; the latter by some in vitro experimentation which implicates arachidonic acid metabolism in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid tissue inflammatio...

  7. Pyogenic infection and rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Rowe, I F; Deans, A. C.; Keat, A C

    1987-01-01

    Ten episodes of severe pyogenic infection occurring in nine patients with rheumatoid arthritis are reported. There was a wide range of presenting features including pyoarthrosis in 7 episodes. Three cases presented with meningitis, bacterial endocarditis and probable multiple abscesses respectively. Infection was caused by Staphylococcus aureus in 7 episodes and by Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae and beta-haemolytic Streptococcus in each of one episode. Three infective ep...

  8. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kaas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustion to the patient. The patients often must give up their hobbies and in some cases even their jobs. In most serious cases, even common daily activities including self-servicing actions become an obstacle to the patient. It is therefore logical that the psyche of a patient with such disease is considerably strained. One of the partial goals of the study consisted in mapping the subjectively perceived quality of life of rheumatoid arthritis patients in facet 8, "negative feelings", and in ascertaining whether there is statistically significant relation to facets 1, "pain and discomfort", and 2, "energy and fatigue". Another goal consisted in comparing the subjectively perceived quality of life between men and women with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as between population of rheumatoid arthritis patients and control healthy population. The study was implemented within the research project of the Grant Agency of the University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice number 120/2012/S, "Reflection of quality of life in nursing", under use of two standardized questionnaires, WHOQOL-100 and HAQ. This article presents exclusively the data acquired based on the WHOQOL-100 questionnaire. The research set consisted of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis from all over the Czech Republic. The size of the set was determined by a statistician at 200 individuals suffering from the disease, in a ratio of 150 women and 50 men. The selection set was derived from the basic set of rheumatoid arthritis patients and can

  9. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kaas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustion to the patient. The patients often must give up their hobbies and in some cases even their jobs. In most serious cases, even common daily activities including self–servicing actions become an obstacle to the patient. It is therefore logical that the psyche of a patient with such disease is considerably strained. One of the partial goals of the study consisted in mapping the subjectively perceived quality of life of rheumatoid arthritis patients in facet 8, "negative feelings", and in ascertaining whether there is statistically significant relation to facets 1, "pain and discomfort", and 2, "energy and fatigue". Another goal consisted in comparing the subjectively perceived quality of life between men and women with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as between population of rheumatoid arthritis patients and control healthy population. The study was implemented within the research project of the Grant Agency of the University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice number 120/2012/S, „Reflection of quality of life in nursing", under use of two standardized questionnaires, WHOQOL–100 and HAQ. This article presents exclusively the data acquired based on the WHOQOL–100 questionnaire. The research set consisted of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis from all over the Czech Republic. The size of the set was determined by a statistician at 200 individuals suffering from the disease, in a ratio of 150 women and 50 men. The selection set was derived from the basic set of rheumatoid arthritis patients and

  10. Role of endogenous and exogenous female sex hormones in arthritis and osteoporosis development in B10.Q-ncf1*/* mice with collagen-induced chronic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gjertsson Inger

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA is an often-used murine model for human rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Earlier studies have shown potent anti-arthritic effects with the female sex hormone estradiol and the selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM raloxifene in CIA in DBA/1-mice. B10.Q-ncf1*/*mice are B10.Q mice with a mutated Ncf1 gene. In B10.Q-ncf1*/*mice, CIA develops as a chronic relapsing disease, which more accurately mimics human RA. We investigated the role of endogenous and exogenous sex steroids and raloxifene in the course of this model of chronic arthritis. We also examined whether treatment would prevent the development of inflammation-triggered generalized osteoporosis. Methods Female B10.Q-ncf1*/*mice were sham-operated or ovariectomized, and CIA was induced. 22 days later, when 30% of the mice had developed arthritis, treatment with raloxifene, estradiol or vehicle was started, and the clinical disease was evaluated continuously. Treatment was continued until day 56 after immunization. At termination of the experiment (day 73, bone mineral density (BMD was analyzed, paws were collected for histological examination, and sera were analyzed for markers of cartilage turnover and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Results Raloxifene and estradiol treatment, as well as endogenous estrogen, decreased the frequency of arthritis, prevented joint destruction and countered generalized osteoporosis. These effects were associated with lower serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. Conclusions This is the first study to show that raloxifene and estradiol can ameliorate established erosive arthritis and inflammation-triggered osteoporosis in this chronic arthritis model. We propose that treatment with raloxifene could be a beneficial addition to the treatment of postmenopausal RA.

  11. Systematic protocol for assessment of the validity of BOLD MRI in a rabbit model of inflammatory arthritis at 1.5 tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Michael W.; Nathanael, George; Kis, Antonella; Amirabadi, Afsaneh; Zhong, Anguo; Rayner, Tammy; Weiss, Ruth; Detzler, Garry; Gahunia, Harpal [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Jong, Roland [Mount Sinai Hospital, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Toronto (Canada); Moineddin, Rahim [Family and Community Medicine, Department of Public Health, Toronto (Canada); Crawley, Adrian [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Toronto Western Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Doria, Andrea S. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    Blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) MRI has the potential to identify regions of early hypoxic and vascular joint changes in inflammatory arthritis. There is no standard protocol for analysis of BOLD MRI measurements in musculoskeletal disorders. To optimize the following BOLD MRI reading parameters: (1) statistical threshold values (low, r > 0.01 versus high, r > 0.2); (2) summary measures of BOLD contrast (percentage of activated voxels [PT%] versus percentage signal difference between on-and-off signal intensities [diff{sub o}n{sub o}ff]); and (3) direction of BOLD response (positive, negative and positive + negative). Using BOLD MRI protocols at 1.5 T, arthritic (n = 21) and contralateral (n = 21) knees of 21 juvenile rabbits were imaged at baseline and on days 1, 14 and 28 after a unilateral intra-articular injection of carrageenan. Nine non-injected rabbits served as external control knees (n = 18). By comparing arthritic to contralateral knees, receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine diagnostic accuracy. Using diff{sub o}n{sub o}ff and positive + negative responses, a threshold of r > 0.01 was more accurate than r > 0.2 (P = 0.03 at day 28). Comparison of summary measures yielded no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). Although positive + negative (AUC = 0.86 at day 28) and negative responses (AUC = 0.90 at day 28) for PT% were the most diagnostically accurate, positive + negative responses for diff{sub o}n{sub o}ff (AUC = 0.78 at day 28) also had acceptable accuracy. The most clinically relevant reading parameters included a lower threshold of r > 0.01 and a positive + negative BOLD response. We propose that diff{sub o}n{sub o}ff is a more clinically relevant summary measure of BOLD MRI, while PT% can be used as an ancillary measure. (orig.)

  12. Systematic protocol for assessment of the validity of BOLD MRI in a rabbit model of inflammatory arthritis at 1.5 tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) MRI has the potential to identify regions of early hypoxic and vascular joint changes in inflammatory arthritis. There is no standard protocol for analysis of BOLD MRI measurements in musculoskeletal disorders. To optimize the following BOLD MRI reading parameters: (1) statistical threshold values (low, r > 0.01 versus high, r > 0.2); (2) summary measures of BOLD contrast (percentage of activated voxels [PT%] versus percentage signal difference between on-and-off signal intensities [diffonoff]); and (3) direction of BOLD response (positive, negative and positive + negative). Using BOLD MRI protocols at 1.5 T, arthritic (n = 21) and contralateral (n = 21) knees of 21 juvenile rabbits were imaged at baseline and on days 1, 14 and 28 after a unilateral intra-articular injection of carrageenan. Nine non-injected rabbits served as external control knees (n = 18). By comparing arthritic to contralateral knees, receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine diagnostic accuracy. Using diffonoff and positive + negative responses, a threshold of r > 0.01 was more accurate than r > 0.2 (P = 0.03 at day 28). Comparison of summary measures yielded no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). Although positive + negative (AUC = 0.86 at day 28) and negative responses (AUC = 0.90 at day 28) for PT% were the most diagnostically accurate, positive + negative responses for diffonoff (AUC = 0.78 at day 28) also had acceptable accuracy. The most clinically relevant reading parameters included a lower threshold of r > 0.01 and a positive + negative BOLD response. We propose that diffonoff is a more clinically relevant summary measure of BOLD MRI, while PT% can be used as an ancillary measure. (orig.)

  13. Decreased activity of hepatic P-glycoprotein in the isolated perfused liver of the adjuvant arthritis rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achira, M; Totsuka, R; Kume, T

    2002-11-01

    1. We investigated the hepatobiliary transport of doxorubicin in the isolated perfused liver prepared from the adjuvant arthritis rat, an animal model for rheumatoid arthritis, to examine the hepatic P-glycoprotein activity in the adjuvant arthritis rat. 2. Liver was isolated from the normal and the adjuvant arthritis rat and perfused for 60 min with recirculating buffer and the perfusate and bile samples were collected at timed interval. 3. The elimination of doxorubicin in the adjuvant arthritis rat tended to be reduced, but it was not significantly different from the normal rat. Biliary clearance (CL(bile)) in the normal rat was 1.93 +/- 0.48 ml min(-1), whereas, CL(bile) in the adjuvant arthritis rat was significantly decreased to 0.40 +/- 0.13 ml min(-1). 4. CL(bile) was markedly decreased to about 0.15 ml min(-1) in the presence of 100 microM verapamil in both types of rat. Methotrexate treatment had no effect on CL(bile) in both the normal and adjuvant arthritis rat (2.18 +/- 0.22 and 0.47 +/- 0.22 ml min(-1), respectively). 5. The results suggest that the hepatic P-glycoprotein activity was markedly decreased in the adjuvant arthritis rat and the effect of methotrexate on the hepatic P-glycoprotein activity did not corresponded to its anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:12487726

  14. Socioeconomic status and risk of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line Merete Blak; Jacobsen, Søren; Klarlund, Mette;

    2006-01-01

    To examine whether markers of socioeconomic status (SES) are associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and if so, whether selected lifestyle-related factors could explain this association.......To examine whether markers of socioeconomic status (SES) are associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and if so, whether selected lifestyle-related factors could explain this association....

  15. Positive psychological qualities and adjustment to arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Sirois, F.M.

    2014-01-01

    Bisopsychosocial approaches to arthritis emphasize the importance of psychological and individual difference factors as predisposing, precipitating or perpetuating factor in arthritis through their interface with pain-related, inflammatory, and immunological responses. Rather than just focusing on understanding how loss is experienced, positive psychological approaches emphasize the importance of promoting and understanding how adjustment is experienced. In this narrative review, four positiv...

  16. Immune modulation by vaccination in chronic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonneveld - Huijssoon, E.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination in autoimmunity can have beneficial, but also detrimental effects. In this thesis, we tried to identify factors that contribute to a favourable or an unfavourable outcome of vaccination in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) and experimental arthritis. In the first part, we focused on th

  17. A comparison of disease burden in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and axial spondyloarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Michelsen

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to compare disease burden in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, psoriatic arthritis (PsA and axial spondyloarthritis (ax-SpA.In this cross-sectional study, all the RA (1093, PsA (365 and ax-SpA (333 patients who visited the out-patient clinic of the Hospital of Southern Norway Trust during the year 2013 were included; the RA patients all had a RA diagnosis verified by the treating rheumatologist, the PsA patients all fulfilled the ClASsification for Psoriatic ARthritis (CASPAR criteria and the ax-SpA patients all fulfilled the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS classification criteria for ax-SpA. Patient-reported health status, demographic variables, medications, and composite scores of disease activity were assessed. The main analyses were performed using General Linear Models adjusted for age, sex and multiple comparisons. Correlation analyses were performed using Spearman's rho.The reported pain, joint pain, patient's global assessment and fatigue were similar in PsA and ax-SpA, but significantly lower in RA. The 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28 (0.3±0.1, p = 0.003, Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI (1.0±0.4, p = 0.028 and Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data 3 (RAPID3 (0.4±0.1, p = 0.004 were all significantly higher in PsA vs. RA. RAPID3 showed moderate to high correlation with DAS28 (rho = 0.521, p<0.001 and CDAI (rho = 0.768, p<0.001 in RA and PsA, and with Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI (rho = 0.902, p<0.001 and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI (0.865, p<0.001 in ax-SpA and PsA.In conclusion, patient- reported outcome measures were similar in our population of PsA and ax-SpA patients, but significantly lower for the RA patients. Composite disease activity measures were lower in RA than in PsA and ax-SpA, but the magnitude of these differences was small and probably not of clinical significance. Our study indicates that

  18. Psoriatic arthritis: from pathogenesis to therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, Oliver

    2012-02-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a multigenic autoimmune disease that involves synovial tissue, entheseal sites and skin, and that may result in significant joint damage. Although there are no diagnostic tests for psoriatic arthritis, research has identified consistent features that help to distinguish the condition from other common rheumatic diseases. Comparison of HLA-B and HLA-C regions in psoriatic arthritis with those in psoriasis without joint involvement demonstrates significant differences, such that psoriatic arthritis cannot be viewed simply as a subset of genetically homogeneous psoriasis. T-cell receptor phenotypic studies have failed to identify antigen-driven clones, and an alternative hypothesis for CD8 stimulation involving innate immune signals is proposed. Finally, imaging studies have highlighted entheseal involvement in psoriatic arthritis, and it is possible that entheseal-derived antigens may trigger an immune response that is critically involved in disease pathogenesis.

  19. The SKG Mutation in ZAP-70 also Confers Arthritis Susceptibility in C57 Black Mouse Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerard, S; Boieri, M; Hultqvist, M; Holmdahl, R; Wing, K

    2016-07-01

    Various rodent models of arthritis are essential to dissect the full complexity of human rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a common autoimmune disease affecting joints. The SKG model of arthritis originates from a spontaneous mutation in ZAP-70 found in a BALB/c colony. This mutation affects T cell selection due to reduced TCR signalling, which allows leakage of self-reactive T cells from the thymus. To further expand the practical applicability of this unique model in arthritis research, we investigated the arthritogenicity of the SKG mutation in two common black mouse strains C57BL/6.Q and C57BL/10.Q and compared to BALB/c.Q. Mice retained the reduced TCR signalling characteristic of SKG.BALB/c mice, which leads to similar alteration in thymic selection. Importantly, mice also retained susceptibility to chronic arthritis after a single injection of mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with comparable prevalence and severity regardless of the genetic background. Further characterization of CD4(+) T cells revealed a similar bias towards IL-17 production and activated T cell phenotype in all SKG strains compared to respective wild type controls. Finally, transfer of SKG thymocytes conferred susceptibility to recipients, which confirm the intrinsic defect and pathogenicity of T cells. Overall, these results underline the strong impact that the W163C ZAP-70 mutation has on T cell-driven arthritis, and they support the use of the SKG model in black mice, which is useful for further investigations of this distinctive arthritis model to better understand autoimmunity. PMID:27040161

  20. Enhanced therapeutic anti-inflammatory effect of betamethasone on topical administration with low-frequency, low-intensity (20 kHz, 100 mW/cm(2)) ultrasound exposure on carrageenan-induced arthritis in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Gadi; Natsheh, Hiba; Sunny, Youhan; Bawiec, Christopher R; Touitou, Elka; Lerman, Melissa A; Lazarovici, Philip; Lewin, Peter A

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether low-frequency, low-intensity (20 kHz, <100 mW/cm(2), spatial-peak, temporal-peak intensity) ultrasound, delivered with a lightweight (<100 g), tether-free, fully wearable, battery-powered applicator, is capable of reducing inflammation in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis. The therapeutic, acute, anti-inflammatory effect was estimated from the relative swelling induced in mice hindlimb paws. In an independent, indirect approach, the inflammation was bio-imaged by measuring glycolytic activity with near-infrared labeled 2-deoxyglucose. The outcome of the experiments indicated that the combination of ultrasound exposure and topical application of 0.1% (w/w) betamethasone gel resulted in statistically significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced anti-inflammatory activity in comparison with drug or ultrasound treatment alone. The present study underscores the potential benefits of low-frequency, low-intensity ultrasound-assisted drug delivery. However, the proof of concept presented indicates the need for additional experiments to systematically evaluate and optimize the potential of, and the conditions for, tolerable low-frequency, low-intensity ultrasound-promoted non-invasive drug delivery. PMID:26003010

  1. Supplementation of diet with krill oil protects against experimental rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berge Kjetil

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the efficacy of standard fish oil has been the subject of research in arthritis, the effect of krill oil in this disease has yet to be investigated. The objective of the present study was to evaluate a standardised preparation of krill oil and fish oil in an animal model for arthritis. Methods Collagen-induced arthritis susceptible DBA/1 mice were provided ad libitum access to a control diet or diets supplemented with either krill oil or fish oil throughout the study. There were 14 mice in each of the 3 treatment groups. The level of EPA + DHA was 0.44 g/100 g in the krill oil diet and 0.47 g/100 g in the fish oil diet. Severity of arthritis was determined using a clinical scoring system. Arthritis joints were analysed by histopathology and graded. Serum samples were obtained at the end of the study and the levels of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-7, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-15, IL-17 and TGF-β were determined by a Luminex™ assay system. Results Consumption of krill oil and supplemented diet significantly reduced the arthritis scores and hind paw swelling when compared to a control diet not supplemented with EPA and DHA. However, the arthritis score during the late phase of the study was only significantly reduced after krill oil administration. Furthermore, mice fed the krill oil diet demonstrated lower infiltration of inflammatory cells into the joint and synovial layer hyperplasia, when compared to control. Inclusion of fish oil and krill oil in the diets led to a significant reduction in hyperplasia and total histology score. Krill oil did not modulate the levels of serum cytokines whereas consumption of fish oil increased the levels of IL-1α and IL-13. Conclusions The study suggests that krill oil may be a useful intervention strategy against the clinical and histopathological signs of inflammatory arthritis.

  2. IL-4 Deficiency Decreases Mortality but Increases Severity of Arthritis in Experimental Group B Streptococcus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Tissi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available IL-4 is an anti-inflammatory cytokine that inhibits the onset and severity in different experimental arthritis models. Group B streptococci (GBS have been recognized as an ever-growing cause of serious invasive infections in nonpregnant adults. Septic arthritis is a clinical manifestation of GBS infection. To investigate the role of IL-4 in experimental GBS infection, IL-4 deficient or competent mice were inoculated with 1×107 GBS/mouse. Mortality, appearance of arthritis, GBS growth in the organs, and local and systemic cytokine and chemokine production were examined. IL-4–/– mice showed lower mortality rates but increased severity of arthritis and exhibited a lower microbial load in blood, kidneys, and joints than wt mice. Increased local levels of IL-1 β, IL-6, TNF-α, MIP-1α, and MIP-2 accompanied the more severe arthritis in IL-4–/– mice. Our results suggest a detrimental role of IL-4 in GBS sepsis, whereas it plays a beneficial effect on GBS-induced arthritis.

  3. Food-induced (allergic) arthritis. Inflammatory arthritis exacerbated by milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panush, R S; Stroud, R M; Webster, E M

    1986-02-01

    Suggestive, but largely unproven, observations have associated arthritis with environmental antigens, including foods. We studied a patient with inflammatory arthritis in a prospective, "blinded," controlled fashion to determine whether her symptoms were associated with food sensitivities. This 52-year-old white woman with 11 years of class I, stage I, active disease, had symptomatic exacerbations allegedly associated with meat, milk, and beans. We observed an increase in symptoms following an unblinded food challenge and then studied her in our clinical research unit. On her normal diet for 6 days, she averaged 30 minutes of morning stiffness, 9 tender joints, 3 swollen joints, 87% subjective assessment (100% = best possible), and 89% examiner assessment. While she was fasting (3 days) or taking Vivonex (2 days), we noted no morning stiffness, tender joint score of 1, swollen joint score of 0, and assessments of 100% (P less than 0.05 versus normal diet). She was then nourished with Vivonex for 33 days without difficulty and challenged in a blinded fashion at mealtimes with lyophilized foods placed into opaque capsules. Four milk challenges (equivalent to greater than or equal to 8 ounces per meal) produced up to 30 minutes of morning stiffness, 14 tender joints, 4 swollen joints, subjective assessment of 85%, and objective assessment of 80% (P less than 0.05 versus fasting-Vivonex), peaking 24-48 hours postchallenge. Placebo and other foods (lettuce and carrots) were without effect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3513771

  4. Two forms of reactive arthritis?

    OpenAIRE

    Toivanen, P; Toivanen, A

    1999-01-01

    Inflammatory arthritides developing after a distant infection have so far been called reactive or postinfectious, quite often depending on the microbial trigger and/or HLA-B27 status of the patient. For clarity, it is proposed that they all should be called reactive arthritis, which, according to the trigger, occurs as an HLA-B27 associated or non-associated form. In addition to the causative agents and HLA-B27, these two categories are also distinguished by other characteristics. Most import...

  5. Natural history of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In quantitative studies the authors found significant correlations between radiographic scores and physical and functional status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The authors review data as it applies to the natural history of RA, with attention to the pathophysiology of specific radiographic features. Cross-sectional analysis in 200 patients demonstrated significant correlations between radiographic scores and duration of disease; longitudinal studies of serial films in 52 patients revealed progression of disease in 92%. The findings of substantial radiographic abnormality and rapid progression early in the disease may provide a rationale for early aggressive therapy of RA

  6. Shoulder arthography in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoulder arthrography in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis is performed to differentiate between a rheumatoid flare and limitation of motion secondary to tear in the rotator cuff. Accurate diagnosis is important because of the therapeutic implications. The arthrographic findings characteristic of rheumatoid involvement of the shoulder joint are nodular filling defects of the joint, the subacromial and subdeltoideal bursa in case of rotator cuff tear, irregular capsular attachment, contracted joint space and visualized lymphatic drainage. A dilatation of the biceps tendon sheath has not been shown. (orig.)

  7. Identifying flares in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bykerk, Vivian P; Bingham, Clifton O; Choy, Ernest H;

    2016-01-01

    ). RESULTS: The 849 patients were 75% female, 81% white, 42% were in remission/low disease activity (R/LDA), and 16-32% were flaring at the second visit. Agreement of flare status was low-strong (κ's 0.17-0.88) and inversely related to RA disease activity level. Flare domains correlated highly (r's≥0...... prior to flare, with escalation planned in 61%. CONCLUSIONS: Flares are common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and are often preceded by treatment reductions. Patient/MD/DAS agreement of flare status is highest in patients worsening from R/LDA. OMERACT RA flare questions can discriminate between patients...

  8. Bone edema on magnetic resonance imaging is an independent predictor of rheumatoid arthritis development in patients with early undifferentiated arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer-Jensen, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Hetland, Merete Lund;

    2011-01-01

    To study magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in patients with early undifferentiated arthritis (UA).......To study magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in patients with early undifferentiated arthritis (UA)....

  9. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor antagonism and its role in rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nam Trung; Nakahama, Taisuke; Nguyen, Chi Hung; Tran, Trang Thu; Le, Van Son; Chu, Hoang Ha; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu

    2015-01-01

    Although rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common autoimmune disease, affecting approximately 1% of the population worldwide, its pathogenic mechanisms are poorly understood. Tobacco smoke, an environmental risk factor for RA, contains several ligands of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr), also known as dioxin receptor. Ahr plays critical roles in the immune system. We previously demonstrated that Ahr in helper T-cells contributes to development of collagen-induced arthritis, a mouse model of RA. Other studies have shown that cigarette smoke condensate and pure Ahr ligands exacerbate RA by altering bone metabolism and inducing proinflammatory responses in fibroblast-like synoviocytes. Consistent with these findings, several Ahr antagonists such as α-naphthoflavone, resveratrol, and GNF351 reverse the effect of Ahr ligands in RA pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of Ahr function in the immune system and the potential clinical benefits of Ahr antagonism in treating RA.

  10. Diagnosing Psoriatic Arthritis from the Dermatologist’s View

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Hyun-Ho; Kim, Byung-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic inflammatory arthropathy associated with skin psoriasis. It is considered a unique arthropathy with distinct clinical and radiologic features. Up to 40% of patients with psoriasis may develop psoriatic arthritis. Psoriasis usually precedes psoriatic arthritis, so dermatologists are in a critical position for screening patients of psoriatic arthritis early in the disease course. Psoriatic arthritis may be challenging to diagnose, especially for dermatologists, ...

  11. MicroRNA-21 Promotes Proliferation of Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes through Mediation of NF-κB Nuclear Translocation in a Rat Model of Collagen-Induced Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Pei-Feng; Yang, Lu; Wang, Sheng-Xu

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) is overexpressed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study was designed to investigate the effect and mechanism of miR-21 on cell proliferation in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) of RA. FLS were primary-cultured from a rat RA model. RA-FLS and normal FLS were infected with lentivirus (anti-miR-21 or pro-miR-21) for overexpression or downregulation of miR-21, respectively. The effects of miR-21 overexpression or inhibition on nucleoprotein NF-κB levels and FLS cell proliferation were evaluated by western blotting and MTT assays. The effects of an inhibitor of NF-κB nuclear translocation (BAY 11-7082) were also evaluated. The results showed that the levels of miR-21 and nucleoprotein NF-κB were increased in FLS of RA model rats compared to the control group. Downregulation of miR-21 in RA FLS led to a significant decrease in nucleoprotein NF-κB levels and cell proliferation rates compared to the antinegative control (NC) group. However, miR-21 overexpression in normal FLS resulted in a significant increase of nucleoprotein NF-κB levels and cell proliferation rates compared to the pro-NC group. The effects of miR-21 overexpression were reversed by BAY 11-7082. We concluded that upregulated miR-21 in FLS in RA model rats may promote cell proliferation by facilitating NF-κB nuclear translocation, thus affecting the NF-κB pathway. PMID:27429986

  12. Complementary medicine in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Atzeni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM for chronic conditions has increased in recent years. CAM is immensely popular for musculoskeletal conditions and patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA frequently try CAM. This review summarises the trial data for or against CAM as a symptomatic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. Collectively the evidence demonstrates that some CAM modalities show significant promise, e.g. acupuncture, diets, herbal medicine, homoeopathy, massage, supplements. However, for the great majority of these therapies no evidencebased (clinical randomized trials results are available. CAM is usually used in addition to, and not as a substitute for conventional therapies. The motivation of patients to try CAM is complex; the willingness to take control of their healthcare, the desire to try everything available, the mass-media pressure and the erroneous notion that CAM is without risks. In fact, none of these treatments is totally devoid of risks. While the use of complementary and alternative modalities for the treatment of RA continues to increase, rigorous clinical trials examining their efficacy are needed before definitive recommendations regarding the application of these modalities can be made.

  13. [Imaging modalities in psoriatic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, K-G A; Ohrndorf, S; Werner, S G; Finzel, S; Backhaus, M

    2013-10-01

    This review presents an overview of the range of imaging modalities used in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Conventional radiography is used to detect structural changes of the joints and tendon attachments. These changes occur late in the course of PsA hence conventional radiography contributes little to the early detection of PsA; however, the detection of periosteal proliferations on radiographs allows a relatively specific diagnosis of PsA. Skeletal scintigraphy and computed tomography are rarely used in PsA. Arthrosonography (ultrasound of the joints) is gaining increasing importance in the early identification of inflammatory soft tissue signs of PsA in the peripheral joints. Sonography enables early detection of synovitis and tenosynovitis as well as superficial erosions and also inflammatory processes of the tendon attachments. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is indispensable for identifying possible involvement of the axial skeleton. Moreover, it allows good visualization of periostitis and arthritis. High resolution microcomputed tomography is an interesting novel diagnostic tool which allows highly sensitive evaluation of the bone structure and can detect very tiny bone lesions where typical signs of PsA are omega-shaped erosions and small corona-like spikes. Another interesting new diagnostic technique is fluorescence optical imaging (FOI) with the Xiralite system which is highly sensitive for detecting inflammatory processes of the hands. PMID:24085530

  14. Rheumatoid arthritis and bacterial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N L Prokopjeva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To study features of bacterial infections course in pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and changes of laboratory measures after focus of infection sanation. Material and methods. 46 pts with definite rheumatoid arthritis were examined at the time of comorbid infection (Cl detection and after infection focus sanation. Bacteriological test with evaluation of flora sensitivity to antibiotics by disco-diffusion method was performed at baseline and after the course of antibacterial therapy to assess its efficacy. Hemogram, serum fibrinogen, rheumatoid factor, circulating immune complexes (CIC, C-reactive protein levels were assessed. Serum interleukin (IL 1(3, IL6 and neopterin concentrations were examined by immune-enzyme assay in a part of pts. Typical clinical features of Cl were present in only 28 (60,9% pts. 13 (28,3% pts had fever, 12 (26,0% — leukocytosis, 15 (32,6% — changes of leucocyte populations. Some laboratory measures (thrombocytes, fibrinogen, CIC, neopterin levels significantly decreased (p<0,05 after infection focus sanation without correction of disease modifying therapy. Cl quite often develop as asymptomatic processes most often in pts with high activity and can induce disturbances promoting appearance of endothelial dysfunction, atherothrombosis and reduction of life duration. So timely detection and proper sanation of infection focuses should be performed in pts with RA

  15. Radiographic manifestations of arthritis in AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to familiarize the radiologist with a newly discovered association between arthritis and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiographic findings in 31 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection referred to their rheumatology clinic with musculoskeletal complaints. The patients carried a wide range of clinical diagnosis including Reiter syndrome, psoriatic arthritis, undifferentiated seronegative arthritis, isolated enthesopathies, rheumatoid arthritis and osteonecrosis. Radiographs were available in 24 of the 31 patients, and in 20 they showed radiographic features of arthritis, which included soft-tissue swelling periarticular osteoporosis, synovial effusions, sacroiliitis, periosteal reaction, joint space narrowing, marginal erosions, and osteonecrosis. Although the radiographic abnormalities were frequently mild, they were significant, given the short duration of disease in many of their patients (weeks to months) at the time radiographs were obtained. The range of radiographic findings in their series was varied and paralleled the wide range of clinical diagnoses. No findings were pathognomonic for HIV-associated arthritis. Nevertheless, HIV infection needs to be considered in any patient belonging to a recognized risk group who presents with musculoskeletal disease. This is particularly important since immunosupressive drugs used for the treatment of arthritis can be detrimental to patients with HIV infection

  16. Inhibition of inflammatory arthritis using fullerene nanomaterials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony L Dellinger

    Full Text Available Inflammatory arthritis (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis; RA is a complex disease driven by the interplay of multiple cellular lineages. Fullerene derivatives have previously been shown to have anti-inflammatory capabilities mediated, in part, by their ability to prevent inflammatory mediator release by mast cells (MC. Recognizing that MC can serve as a cellular link between autoantibodies, soluble mediators, and other effector populations in inflammatory arthritis, it was hypothesized that fullerene derivatives might be used to target this inflammatory disease. A panel of fullerene derivatives was tested for their ability to affect the function of human skin-derived MC as well as other lineages implicated in arthritis, synovial fibroblasts and osteoclasts. It is shown that certain fullerene derivatives blocked FcγR- and TNF-α-induced mediator release from MC; TNF-α-induced mediator release from RA synovial fibroblasts; and maturation of human osteoclasts. MC inhibition by fullerene derivatives was mediated through the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and FcγR-mediated increases in cellular reactive oxygen species and NF-κB activation. Based on these in vitro data, two fullerene derivatives (ALM and TGA were selected for in vivo studies using K/BxN serum transfer arthritis in C57BL/6 mice and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA in DBA/1 mice. Dye-conjugated fullerenes confirmed localization to affected joints in arthritic animals but not in healthy controls. In the K/BxN moldel, fullerenes attenuated arthritis, an effect accompanied by reduced histologic inflammation, cartilage/bone erosion, and serum levels of TNF-α. Fullerenes remained capable of attenuating K/BxN arthritis in mast cell-deficient mice Cre-Master mice, suggesting that lineages beyond the MC represent relevant targets in this system. These studies suggest that fullerene derivatives may hold promise both as an assessment tool and as anti-inflammatory therapy of arthritis.

  17. Synergy between adjuvant arthritis and collagen-induced arthritis in rats

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Adjuvant arthritis (AA) in rats is susceptible to cell-mediated passive transfer. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats is susceptible to passive transfer with antibody to type II collagen. We report here the development of strikingly severe arthritis in Lewis rats as the result of synergy between passively transferred antibody to type II collagen from rats with CIA and concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated lymph node or spleen cells from syngeneic rats with AA. Similar synergy was seen in rat...

  18. Screening for uveitis in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Kanski, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Three hundred and fifteen patients with anterior uveitis associated with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) were studied in order to identify the various risk factors for uveitis. Girls were more susceptible to uveitis than boys by a ratio of 3:1. In 94% of cases the uveitis was diagnosed after the development of arthritis. The risk of uveitis was small after seven or more years had elapsed from the onset of arthritis. Patients with pauciarticular onset JCA had the highest risk of uveitis and s...

  19. Arthritis: Conventional and Advanced Radiological Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adviye Ergun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Arthritides are acute or chronic inflammation of one or more joints. The most common types of arthritis are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, but there are more than 100 different forms. Right and early diagnosis is extremely important for the prevention of eventual structural and functional disability of the affected joint. Imaging findings, especially those of advanced level imaging, play a major role in diagnosis and monitor the progression of arthritis or its response to therapy. The objective of the review is to discuss the findings of conventional and advanced radiological imaging of most common arthritides and to present a simplified approach for their radiological evaluation.

  20. Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sathish

    2016-04-01

    Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is an inflammatory condition characterized by fever, lymphadenopathy, arthritis, rash and serositis. In sJIA, systemic inflammation has been associated with dysregulation of the innate immune system, suggesting that it is an autoinflammatory disorder. IL-1 and IL-6 play a major role in the pathogenesis of sJIA and treatment with IL-1 and IL-6 inhibitors has shown to be highly effective. Recent data suggests that early cytokine blockage might abrogate chronic, destructive, therapy resistant arthritis phase, reflecting a potential "window of opportunity" in the care of children with sJIA. PMID:26916892

  1. Septic and aseptic arthritis: a continuum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Robinson, D; Keat, A

    1999-03-01

    This chapter considers the likelihood that a wide spectrum of infection-provoked arthritis exists, ranging from overt sepsis to apparently aseptic chronic arthritis in which very small numbers of causal bacteria can be detected only by using highly sensitive techniques. It asks whether joints are, as conventionally held, normally devoid of micro-organisms and how to judge the significance of bacteria detected within apparently sterile joints. Through a consideration of known septic, probably infective and apparently aseptic forms of arthritis, a set of criteria for attributing causality to putative arthritogenic micro-organisms is proposed. PMID:10952856

  2. HLA antigens in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Woodrow, J. C.; Ilchysyn, A

    1985-01-01

    HLA phenotypes were determined in 50 patients with psoriasis alone and in 50 patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Positive associations were found in both groups with B13, B17, B37, Cw6, and DR7, and in addition with C4A6. Higher relative risks were found in respect to the patients with psoriasis alone compared with those with arthritis, and this suggests the involvement of additional genetic factors predisposing to peripheral arthritis. In patients with psoriasis only, the presen...

  3. A Comparative Metabolomic Evaluation of Behcet's Disease with Arthritis and Seronegative Arthritis Using Synovial Fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joong Kyong Ahn

    Full Text Available Behcet's disease (BD with arthritis is often confused with seronegative arthritis (SNA because of shared clinical symptoms and the lack of definitive biomarkers for BD. To investigate possible metabolic patterns and potential biomarkers of BD with arthritis, metabolomic profiling of synovial fluid (SF from 6 patients with BD with arthritis and 18 patients with SNA was performed using gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry in conjunction with univariate and multivariate statistical analyses. A total of 123 metabolites were identified from samples. Orthogonal partial least square-discriminant analysis showed clear discrimination between BD with arthritis and SNA. A set of 11 metabolites were identified as potential biomarkers for BD using variable importance for projection values and the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Compared with SNA, BD with arthritis exhibited relatively high levels of glutamate, valine, citramalate, leucine, methionine sulfoxide, glycerate, phosphate, lysine, isoleucine, urea, and citrulline. There were two markers identified, elevated methionine sulfoxide and citrulline, that were associated with increased oxidative stress, providing a potential link to BD-associated neutrophil hyperactivity. Glutamate, citramalate, and valine were selected and validated as putative biomarkers for BD with arthritis (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 61.1%. This is the first report to present potential biomarkers from SF for discriminating BD with arthritis from SNA. The metabolomics of SF may be helpful in searching for potential biomarkers and elucidating the clinicopathogenesis of BD with arthritis.

  4. Stem cells in the treatment of inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndall, Alan; van Laar, Jacob M

    2010-08-01

    Autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) resulted in a positive short-term outcome clinically with low treatment-related toxicity. However, early conditioning regimens were of low immunoablative intensity and most patients relapsed. Mechanistic studies suggest that residual lesional effector cells may have been responsible for the relapses. The introduction of biopharmaceuticals has, for the moment, reduced the need for further experimental studies. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients, mostly of the systemic subgroup, have shown nearly 33% durable drug-free remission, but with significant toxicity, including fatal macrophage-activation syndrome early in the programme. Later modifications to the protocol have reduced this toxicity. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), derived from several sources including bone marrow and adipose tissue, are being tested as tissue-regenerative and immunomodulating agents in many autoimmune diseases and animal models of inflammatory arthritis have been positive. MSCs and other stromal cells derived from actively inflamed synovium and peripheral blood of RA patients do not always demonstrate a full range of differentiation potential compared with healthy MSCs, although their immunomodulalatory capacity is unimpaired. PMID:20732653

  5. Altered composition of gut microbiota in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yuichi; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

      Manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can be attributed to both genetic and environmental factors. Some researchers have been focusing on intestinal microbiota which is thought to be one of the environmental factors that may enhance the development of RA. The advancement of culture-independent, high throughput microbial DNA sequencing had enabled us to understand the interplay between intestinal microbiota and host immune systems. In this study, we have reviewed the previous findings in animal and human studies with respect to the role of intestinal microbiota in RA. Mouse models of arthritis have demonstrated that gut microbiota plays a critical role in the disease development. K/BxN and IL-1 receptor-antagonist knock-out mice did not develop disease in germ free condition, however, colonization of particular intestinal bacteria was sufficient to induce arthritis. Moreover, the dysbiosis was observed in the human RA patients from United States, China and Finland. Thus, we believe that endeavors to improve the dysbiosis would serve as a novel therapeutic or preventive strategy in RA patients. PMID:27181236

  6. Recombinant adenovirus-mediated gene transfer suppresses experimental arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Quattrocchi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Collagen Induced Arthritis (CIA is a widely studied animal model to develop and test novel therapeutic approaches for treating Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA in humans. Soluble Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA4-Ig, which binds B7 molecule on antigen presenting cells and blocks CD28 mediated T-lymphocyte activation, has been shown to ameliorate experimental autoimmune diseases such as lupus, diabetes and CIA. Objective of our research was to investigate in vivo the effectiveness of blocking the B7/CD28 T-lymphocyte co-stimulatory pathway, utilizing a gene transfer technology, as a therapeutic strategy against CIA. Replication-deficient adenoviruses encoding a chimeric CTLA4-Ig fusion protein, or β-galactosidase as control, have been injected intravenously once at arthritis onset. Disease activity has been monitored by the assessment of clinical score, paw thickness and type II collagen (CII specific cellular and humoral immune responses for 21 days. The adenovirally delivered CTLA4-Ig fusion protein at a dose of 2×108 pfu suppressed established CIA, whereas the control β-galactosidase did not significantly affect the disease course. CII-specific lymphocyte proliferation, IFNg production and anti-CII antibodies were significantly reduced by CTLA4-Ig treatment. Our results demonstrate that blockade of the B7/CD28 co-stimulatory pathway by adenovirus-mediated CTLA4-Ig gene transfer is effective in treating established CIA suggesting its potential in treating RA.

  7. Arthritis mutilans: a report from the GRAPPA 2012 annual meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Vinod; Gladman, Dafna D; Helliwell, Philip S; Gudbjörnsson, Björn

    2013-08-01

    Arthritis mutilans is often described as the most severe form of psoriatic arthritis. However, a widely agreed on definition of the disease has not been developed. At the 2012 annual meeting of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA), members hoped to agree on a definition of arthritis mutilans and thus facilitate clinical and molecular epidemiological research into the disease. Members discussed the clinical features of arthritis mutilans and definitions used by researchers to date; reviewed data from the ClASsification for Psoriatic ARthritis study, the Nordic psoriatic arthritis mutilans study, and the results of a premeeting survey; and participated in breakout group discussions. Through this exercise, GRAPPA members developed a broad consensus on the features of arthritis mutilans, which will help us develop a GRAPPA-endorsed definition of arthritis mutilans. PMID:23908536

  8. Subtype specific genetic associations for juvenile idiopathic arthritis: ERAP1 with the enthesitis related arthritis subtype and IL23R with juvenile psoriatic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Hinks, Anne; Martin, Paul; Flynn, Edward; Eyre, Steve; Packham, Jon; Barton, Anne; Worthington, Jane; Thomson, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is an umbrella term for all chronic childhood arthropathies and can be divided into seven subtypes. It includes the enthesitis related arthritis (ERA) subtype which displays symptoms similar to ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and juvenile-onset psoriatic arthritis which has similarities to psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and psoriasis (Ps). We, therefore, hypothesized that two well-established susceptibility loci for AS and Ps, ERAP1 and IL23R, could als...

  9. Muramyl dipeptide-induced adjuvant arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Nagao, S.; Tanaka, A.

    1980-01-01

    Muramyl dipeptide, N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine, induced adjuvant arthritis in WKA rats when injected in a water-in-oil emulsion prepared with Freund incomplete adjuvant (Difco), but not when emulsified with Drackeol and Arlacel A.

  10. Can the weather influence arthritis symptoms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai Chin Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available By reviewing twelve previous studies on the relationship between the weather and arthritis symptoms, this article summarized the major findings on this controversial topic. It has been supported by most of the studies that arthritis symptoms are associated with weather conditions. Factors such as barometric pressure and temperature were generally believed to be related to arthritis symptoms. However, controversies arose at minor levels. Whether the weather-symptom relationship depends on the specific type of arthritis, weather variables, demographic and pathological heterogeneity of the patients is still a matter of debate. This article calls for standardization in future research design, and hope the mechanism underlying the weather-symptom association will be found.

  11. Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Matters NIH Research Matters January 13, 2014 Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery An international research team ... may play a role in triggering the disease. Genetic factors are also thought to play a role. ...

  12. Tracheomegaly in association with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herein we present a case of tracheomegaly seen in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis. To the authors' knowledge, and from a review of the literature, this combination has not been previously described. (orig.)

  13. Golimumab for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H; Epstein, D; Bojke, L; Craig, D; Light, K; Bruce, I; Sculpher, M; Woolacott, N

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents a summary of the evidence review group (ERG) report into the use of golimumab for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The main clinical effectiveness data were derived from a single phase III randomised controlled trial (RCT: GO-REVEAL) that compared golimumab with placebo for treating patients with active and progressive PsA who were symptomatic despite the use of previous disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The 14-week data showed that, compared with placebo, golimumab 50 mg significantly improved joint disease response as measured by American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 20 [relative risk (RR) 5.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.24 to 10.56] and Psoriatic Arthritis Response Criteria (PsARC) (RR 3.45, 95% CI 2.49 to 4.87), and skin disease response as measured by the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) 75 (RR 15.95, 95% CI 4.62 to 59.11). The 24-week absolute data showed that these treatment benefits were maintained. There was a significant improvement in patients' functional status as measured by the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) change from baseline at 24 weeks (-0.33, p patient crossover at week 16. The manufacturer conducted a mixed treatment comparison (MTC) analysis. The ERG considered the assumption of exchangeability between the trials for the purpose of the MTC analysis to be acceptable, and the statistical approach in the MTC analysis to be reliable. Regarding the safety evaluation of golimumab, the manufacturer failed to provide longer-term data or to consider adverse event data of golimumab from controlled studies in other conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. Although the adverse effect profile of golimumab appears similar to other anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) agents, the longer-term safety profile of golimumab remains uncertain. The manufacturer's submission presented a decision model to compare etanercept, infliximab, golimumab

  14. Radiological manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rheumatoid arthritis preferrably becomes manifest at the synovial joints of the limbs, especially at the small joints of the hands and feet, at bursae and synovial sheathes. The pathologic lesions are less frequently found at cartilaginous joints or entheses. The lesions very often are symmetrically distributed and are characterized by the following: 1. A periarticular, spindle-shaped opacity with a density similar to soft-tissue, induced by an inflammatory hypertrophy of the synovia, a serosynovitis, or an edematous impregnation of the periarticular tissue. 2. A juxta-articular osteoporosis, most probably caused by a neighbouring synovialitis accompanied by hyperemia. 3. A diffuse joint cavity narrowing due to a destruction of the articular cartilage by the pannus, a fibrovascular resorptive tissue. 4. Central as well as marginal erosions, caused by destruction of ossous material by the pannus. 5. Subchondral signal cysts, likewise unduced by the pannus. (Orig./AJ)

  15. Rheumatoid arthritis affecting temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandeep Sodhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder that is characterized by joint inflammation, erosive properties and symmetric multiple joint involvement. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ is very rare to be affected in the early phase of the disease, thus posing diagnostic challenges for the dentist. Conventional radiographs fail to show the early lesions due to its limitations. More recently cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT has been found to diagnose the early degenerative changes of TMJ and hence aid in the diagnosis of the lesions more accurately. Our case highlights the involvement of TMJ in RA and the role of advanced imaging (CBCT in diagnosing the bony changes in the early phase of the disease.

  16. Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menter, Alan

    2016-06-01

    Over the past several years, an increased understanding of the pathophysiology of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) has led to the development of several new biologic therapies. Appropriate treatment selection and timing may slow, and even halt, the progression of psoriasis and PsA; as a result, it can decrease the economic burden. As treatment options vary based on individual disease characteristics and patient preferences, reviewing the patient's complete clinical picture is imperative. An updated treatment algorithm, based on patients' most severe disease domain, is now available to guide the selection of optimal therapy. Special care should be given to patients with both psoriasis and PsA who experience multiple disease domains, a heavy symptom burden, and an increased risk of comorbidities. PMID:27356194

  17. Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menter, Alan

    2016-06-01

    Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are chronic immune-mediated diseases that primarily affect the skin and joints, respectively; these diseases are also associated with high rates of cardiovascular and other comorbidities. Despite over 40 genes proven to be related to the disease, the exact causes of psoriasis and PsA are still to be determined. Recent insights into the underlying pathophysiology of these diseases have revealed novel therapeutic targets. Effective management requires timely diagnosis and initiation of treatment. Yet, both psoriasis and PsA remain underrecognized and undertreated in current clinical practice. Recognizing the true physical, social, and emotional burden of psoriasis and PsA, as well as their associated comorbidities, is the first step to improving the prognosis for affected patients. PMID:27356193

  18. GANGGUAN PERTUMBUHAN MANDIBULA PADA JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    OpenAIRE

    Ria Puspitawati

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) is a systemic disease on childhood, which has chronic arthritis as its most prominent manifestation. One very common complication of JRA is growth disturbance. JRA involving temporomandibular joint usually result in mandibular growth retardation which eventually can lead to micrognathia, retrognathia, malocclusion and other mandibulofacial developmental aberrations. Factors considered to be the cause of these growth and developmental disturbances are: conge...

  19. Septic arthritis of a lumbar facet joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Septic arthritis of the posterior lumbar joints is extremely rare. The clinical picture of the unusual site of infection can easily lead to confusion with spondylo-discitis which is more common. We report a case of a 50-year-old women with Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis of the left L5-S1 lumbar facet joint. CT scan was helpful to establish the diagnosis and to guide the percutaneous needle biopsy. (authors)

  20. Seronegative pauciarticular arthritis and HLA B27.

    OpenAIRE

    Eastmond, C J; Rajah, S M; D. Tovey; Wright, V.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty-six patients with a pauciarticular arthritis have been studied clinically, radiologically and with histocompatibility typing. An increased frequency of HLA B27 was found (p = 1.87 x 10(-12)). Low back and buttock pain, Achilles tendinitis and dactylitis of the toes were more frequent in HLA-B27 positive patients. It is suggested that histocompatibility testing may be of some value in diagnosis and in the investigation of the possible 'reactive' nature of this type of arthritis.

  1. Long term prognosis of reactive salmonella arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Leirisalo-Repo, M; Helenius, P; Hannu, T; Lehtinen, A; Kreula, J; Taavitsainen, M; Koskimies, S

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Reactive joint complications triggered by salmonella gastroenteritis are increasingly reported, but the outcome and long term prognosis of the patients is incompletely known. This study looked at the prognosis of salmonella arthritis in patients hospitalised in 1970-1986.
METHODS—Hospital records from two hospitals in southern Finland were screened for patients with the discharge diagnosis of salmonellosis or reactive, postinfectious arthritis or Reiter's disease. For the patients ...

  2. Yoga for Arthritis: A Scoping Review

    OpenAIRE

    Haaz, Steffany; Bartlett, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article was to systematically review the existing literature on the use of yoga for persons with arthritis. We included peer-reviewed research from clinical trials (published from 1980-2010) that used yoga as an intervention for arthritis patients and reported quantitative findings. Eleven studies were identified, including four RCTs and four NRCTs. All trials were small and control groups varied. No adverse events were reported and attrition was comparable or better than typi...

  3. Innovative medicines for treatment of psoriatic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Levitan A.l.; Reshetko O.V.

    2015-01-01

    The problem of effective treatment of psoriatic arthritis has not been solved yet. The search for new therapeutic options is very active in many directions. At the stage of clinical trials are drugs that block interleukin-17-a (secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab), drugs that suppress interleukin-12 and interleukin-23 (ustekinumab). To modern means to ensure psoriatic arthritis include drugs that are inhibitors of small molecules orkinase pathways (apremilast, tofacitinib).

  4. Innovative medicines for treatment of psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levitan A.l.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The problem of effective treatment of psoriatic arthritis has not been solved yet. The search for new therapeutic options is very active in many directions. At the stage of clinical trials are drugs that block interleukin-17-a (secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab, drugs that suppress interleukin-12 and interleukin-23 (ustekinumab. To modern means to ensure psoriatic arthritis include drugs that are inhibitors of small molecules orkinase pathways (apremilast, tofacitinib.

  5. Update on Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, A. Caroline

    1987-01-01

    Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis consists of use of drugs, physical measures, social work interventions, education and reconstructive surgery. The physician plays a co-ordinating role, since most patients with significant rheumatoid arthritis will require treatment by more than one member of the health-care team. Our drug armamentarium, including anti-inflammatory agents, disease suppressants, analgesics, rarely steroids, and even more rarely immunosuppressants, can be used to good effect in...

  6. Monocyte activation in early onset rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, I.; Shingu, M; Nobunaga, M.

    1990-01-01

    Monocytes from peripheral blood and synovial fluid of patients with definite and classic rheumatoid arthritis spontaneously produced significantly greater amounts of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), leukotriene B4 (LTB4), and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) than samples of peripheral blood from normal controls. Peripheral blood monocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis produced significantly greater amounts of PGE2 than control samples when stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. There were no sig...

  7. Group Education for patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Taal, Erik; Riemsma, Rob P.; Brus, Herman L.M.; Seydel, Erwin R; Rasker, Johannes J.; Wiegman, Oene

    1993-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis must learn to adjust their exercise, rest and medication to the varying activity of the disease. Patient education can help patients in making the right decisions about adjustments in their treatment regimen and in attaining ¿self-management¿ behaviors. We developed a group education program based on social learning theory and the `Arthritis Self Management Course¿ developed in the USA by Lorig. Goal of the program is the strengthening of self-efficacy, outc...

  8. GENETICS OF PSORIASIS AND PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ibba

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are linked diseases characterised by (distinct ? immune-mediated pathogenetic mechanisms and by a genetic background interacting with environmental factors. Some candidate susceptibility genes have been studied extensively; they include HLA genes, genes within the HLA region and genes outside the HLA region; among them corneodesmosin and other genes of PSORS1 region, MICA and TNF-a polymorphisms. The main findings in the literature are discussed. Key words: Genetics, psosriasis, psoriatic arthritis

  9. Septic Arthritis in the Temporomandibular Joint

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare event that has only been reported a few dozen times worldwide. This case is remarkable for septic arthritis of the TMJ joint in an otherwise healthy male. Case Report: A 24-year-old male presented to the emergency department with periauricular swelling, erythema, fever, myalgia's and generalized joint pain. He had previously sought medical attention and was placed on ciprofloxacin. However, he developed facial swelling and a rash...

  10. Morin, a dietary bioflavonol suppresses monosodium urate crystal-induced inflammation in an animal model of acute gouty arthritis with reference to NLRP3 inflammasome, hypo-xanthine phospho-ribosyl transferase, and inflammatory mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanasekar, Chitra; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2016-09-01

    The anti-inflammatory effect of morin, a dietary bioflavanol was explored on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced inflammation in rats, an experimental model for acute gouty arthritis. Morin treatment (30mg/kg b.wt) significantly attenuated the ankle swelling and the levels of lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide, serum pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF) -α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and articular elastase along with an increased anti-oxidant status (catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) in the joint homogenate of MSU crystal-induced rats. Histological assessment revealed that morin limited the diffusion of joint space, synovial hyperplasia, and inflammatory cell infiltrations. The mRNA expression of NLRP3 (nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3) inflammasome, caspase-1, pro-inflammatory cytokines, MCP-1, inflammatory enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)), and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65 was found downregulated and HPRT (hypo-xanthine phospho-ribosyl transferase) mRNA expression was upregulated in morin treated MSU crystal-induced rats. In addition, morin treatment reduced the protein expression of NF-κB p65, p-NF-κB p65, iNOS, COX-2, and TNF-α. The results clearly demonstrated that morin exert a potent anti-inflammatory effect on MSU crystal-induced inflammation in rats. PMID:27268719

  11. Rehabilitation in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evaggelos Giavasopoulos

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis aims to the management of the consequences of disease. It is widely accepted that, no drug therapy at present leads to long‐term orremission f everyone with rheumatoid arthritis (R.A.. Consequently, patients experience physical, psychological, functional, social and role negative effects of the disease. AIM : The am of the present article was to evaluate the role of rehabilitation to patients with rheumatoid arthritis sMethod and material: The methodology followed included reviewof tudies which were related to rehabilitation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis Results :The majority of the studies claims that rehabilitation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, is a matter of primary importance. The importance of early provision of specialist rheumatologycare, patient education and promotion of self‐ management; and the evidence for the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions and multidisciplinary care. Conclusions : Individuals who suffer from rheumatoid arthritis can derive significant benefits from rehabilitation programmes. To provide best care, rehabilitation standards and services should be based on the best available evidence.

  12. Burden of childhood-onset arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassett Afton L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Juvenile arthritis comprises a variety of chronic inflammatory diseases causing erosive arthritis in children, often progressing to disability. These children experience functional impairment due to joint and back pain, heel pain, swelling of joints and morning stiffness, contractures, pain, and anterior uveitis leading to blindness. As children who have juvenile arthritis reach adulthood, they face possible continuing disease activity, medication-associated morbidity, and life-long disability and risk for emotional and social dysfunction. In this article we will review the burden of juvenile arthritis for the patient and society and focus on the following areas: patient disability; visual outcome; other medical complications; physical activity; impact on HRQOL; emotional impact; pain and coping; ambulatory visits, hospitalizations and mortality; economic impact; burden on caregivers; transition issues; educational occupational outcomes, and sexuality. The extent of impact on the various aspects of the patients', families' and society's functioning is clear from the existing literature. Juvenile arthritis imposes a significant burden on different spheres of the patients', caregivers' and family's life. In addition, it imposes a societal burden of significant health care costs and utilization. Juvenile arthritis affects health-related quality of life, physical function and visual outcome of children and impacts functioning in school and home. Effective, well-designed and appropriately tailored interventions are required to improve transitioning to adult care, encourage future vocation/occupation, enhance school function and minimize burden on costs.

  13. Factors secreted from dental pulp stem cells show multifaceted benefits for treating experimental rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Jun; Takahashi, Nobunori; Matsumoto, Takuya; Yoshioka, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Nishikawa, Masaya; Hibi, Hideharu; Ishigro, Naoki; Ueda, Minoru; Furukawa, Koichi; Yamamoto, Akihito

    2016-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by synovial hyperplasia and chronic inflammation, which lead to the progressive destruction of cartilage and bone in the joints. Numerous studies have reported that administrations of various types of MSCs improve arthritis symptoms in animal models, by paracrine mechanisms. However, the therapeutic effects of the secreted factors alone, without the cell graft, have been uncertain. Here, we show that a single intravenous administration of serum-free conditioned medium (CM) from human deciduous dental pulp stem cells (SHED-CM) into anti-collagen type II antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA), a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), markedly improved the arthritis symptoms and joint destruction. The therapeutic efficacy of SHED-CM was associated with an induction of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages in the CAIA joints and the abrogation of RANKL expression. SHED-CM specifically depleted of an M2 macrophage inducer, the secreted ectodomain of sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectin-9 (ED-Siglec-9), exhibited a reduced ability to induce M2-related gene expression and attenuate CAIA. SHED-CM also inhibited the RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Collectively, our findings suggest that SHED-CM provides multifaceted therapeutic effects for treating CAIA, including the ED-Siglec-9-dependent induction of M2 macrophage polarization and inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. Thus, SHED-CM may represent a novel anti-inflammatory and reparative therapy for RA. PMID:26603475

  14. Why golimumab in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rossini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Golimumab is an anti-TNF monoclonal antibody administred subcutaneously once a month and produced with an innovative technology that minimizes immunogenicity. This paper reviews and updates the main studies on the efficacy, safety and pharmacoeconomic aspects of treatment with golimumab of psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis.

  15. Comprehensive assessment of rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci in a large psoriatic arthritis cohort.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bowes, John

    2012-08-01

    A number of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) susceptibility genes have been identified in recent years. Given the overlap in phenotypic expression of synovial joint inflammation between RA and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), the authors explored whether RA susceptibility genes are also associated with PsA.

  16. JUVENILE CHRONIC ARTHRITIS WITH EYE LESION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S O Salugina

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A bstract. Objective, to describe a series of pts with JRA/JCA and uveitis. Material and methods. The study included 81 pts with JRA and uveitis. There were 68 girls-84%, 13 boys-16%. We studied the clinical manifestations, the antinuclear antibodies (ANA using HEP-2 cells for the 33 pts with uveitis and 46 pts without uveitis, HLA status was determined for 36 pts. Results. 85,2% of the children had arthritis before uveitis. The mean age at onset of arthritis was 3,5 year (range: 1-10 yrs, the mean age at onset of uveitis was 6 year (range: 2-15 yrs. The mean interval between the onset of arthritis and uveitis was 3,02 years (range: 3,5 yrs before arthritis onset to 12,5 yrs after. In 68,1% pts the diagnosis of uveitis was made within 5 yrs after onset of arthritis. 93% of pts had mono-oligoarticular onset, but 50% had poliarticular course. 23,5% of pts had functional disability 3-4 classes. Ocular complications were developed in 53.1%: cataracts-38,3%, band keratopathy-11,1%, glaucoma-2,5%. 93,9% of 33 studied children with arthritis and uveitis were ANA positive, 9,1% were RF positive. 18,1 % had HLA-DR8 (p<0,001, 83,3% - HLA-A2 (p<0,00l, HLA-B27 - 30,6 % (p<0,00l. Conclusion. Clinical and laboratory data of our pts suggest that: lthe combination of arthritis and uveitis would be named JCA with uveitis; 2 according our opinion JCA with uveitis is separate nosological form among the juvenile arthritides.

  17. A review of current knowledge of the complement system and the therapeutic opportunities in inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, M

    2006-01-01

    The complement activation system, a key component of the innate immune system, protects the host from microorganisms such as bacteria, and other foreign threats including abnormal cells. However, it is also double-edged in that it can have negative effects in the host; excessive complement activation damages the host and can even kill in anaphylactic shock and septic shock. Regulation of the complement system is a useful strategy to control inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis is a common inflammatory disease worldwide. Many medicines are developed to control inflammation, including recently developed biological response modifiers such as anti-TNF and IL-6 agents. Nevertheless, in some patients disease remains difficult to control because of complications, side effects and tolerance of medicines. In inflammatory arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, there is abundant evidence implicating complement activation in humans and animal models. Therefore, anti-complement agents might be beneficial as part of clinical treatment. However, at present, there are still no applicable agents for therapeutic regulation of excessive complement activation in chronic disease. Novel agents in development might be useful as a strategy to control complement activation. Here I describe recent knowledge of the complement system in inflammatory arthritis, the recent developments in anti-complement agents and their considerable potential for the future. PMID:16787214

  18. Effect of Cornus officinalis glycoside on adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI PING ZHAO; JIAN MIN LI; GUI XIANG FU; YONG ZHOU

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effect of Cornus officinalis glucosides (COG) on adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats and its mechanism. Seventy-two rats were divided into six groups of normal, model, Dexasone (0. 125 mg/kg), high-dose COG (240 mg/kg), mid-dose COG (120 mg/kg),and low-dose COG (60 mg/kg). Rat arthritis was induced by injection of Freund's complete adjuvant in the hind paws. All treatment started from the day the arthritis was induced. The edema degree of the adjuvant injection location was determined on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 20, 23 and the opposite side was observed on days 11, 13, 15, 17, 20, 23 after the injection of adjuvant. All rats were sacrificed on day 24 after the injection of adjuvant for microscopic examination of the ankle, and for the study of the immunological molecular mechanism. The results showed that the COG significantly suppressed both the primary and secondary edema, improved pathological injuries of adjuvant arthritis (AA)rat ankles, significantly suppressed the proliferation of T lymphocytes and DTH reaction. It significantly suppressed IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α production from peritoneal macrophages and PGE2 in plasma. In conclusion, the Cornus officinalis glucosides (COG) is able to prevent and cure the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis, and can suppress the production of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α and PGE2.

  19. Fragility Fractures in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Puente, Antonio; Esposito, Antonella; Costa, Luisa; Benigno, Carla; Del Puente, Aurora; Foglia, Francesca; Oriente, Alfonso; Bottiglieri, Paolo; Caso, Francesco; Scarpa, Raffaele

    2015-11-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) can have peculiar effects on bone, including mechanisms of bone loss such as erosions, but also of bone formation, such as ankylosis or periostitis. The aim of the present study was to describe the prevalence of fractures in patients with PsA as compared to healthy controls and to investigate determinants of fractures among cases. For both cases and controls, radiographs were read to identify vertebral fractures (VF), and the presence of femoral neck or other nonvertebral fractures was obtained from patients' medical history. The prevalence of fragility fractures on radiographic readings did not differ between cases and controls. The number of subjects showing a VF was 33 (36%) among PsA patients and 36 (36%) among controls, with a prevalence of severe VF of 8% among cases and 4% among controls. Controlling for covariates in a logistic model, the only variables showing a significant correlation with the presence of nonvertebral fractures (NVF) were disease duration (p=0.02), age (p=0.03), and bone mineral density at femoral neck (inverse correlation, p=0.04). Fractures should be carefully considered when evaluating the global picture of the patient with PsA for their contribution to the "fragility" profile. PMID:26523054

  20. Prevention of Stroke in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Alicia M; Di Napoli, Mario; Behrouz, Réza

    2015-12-01

    The risk of cerebrovascular disease is increased among rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and remains an underserved area of medical need. Only a minor proportion of RA patients achieve suitable stroke prevention. Classical cardiovascular risk factors appear to be under-diagnosed and undertreated among patients with RA. Reducing the inflammatory burden is also necessary to lower the cardiovascular risk. An adequate control of disease activity and cerebrovascular risk assessment using national guidelines should be recommended for all patients with RA. For patients with a documented history of cerebrovascular or cardiovascular risk factors, smoking cessation and corticosteroids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs at the lowest dose possible are crucial. Risk score models should be adapted for patients with RA by introducing a 1.5 multiplication factor, and their results interpreted to appropriately direct clinical care. Statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and angiotensin-II receptor blockers are preferred treatment options. Biologic and non-biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs should be initiated early to mitigate the necessity of symptom control drugs and to achieve early alleviation of the inflammatory state. Early control can improve vascular compliance, decrease atherosclerosis, improve overall lipid and metabolic profiles, and reduce the incidence of heart disease that may lead to atrial fibrillation. In patients with significant cervical spine involvement, early intervention and improved disease control are necessary and may prevent further mechanical vascular injury. PMID:26486791

  1. Antibodies Act Jointly to Promote Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Antibodies Act Jointly to Promote Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis Two types of antibody molecules act in concert to stimulate inflammation in people with rheumatoid arthritis, according to research funded in part by the ...

  2. Elevated rheumatoid factor and long term risk of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sune F; Bojesen, Stig E; Schnohr, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    To test whether elevated concentration of rheumatoid factor is associated with long term development of rheumatoid arthritis.......To test whether elevated concentration of rheumatoid factor is associated with long term development of rheumatoid arthritis....

  3. Risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardsen, Jesper; Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar;

    2012-01-01

    To determine if patients with rheumatoid arthritis have increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke.......To determine if patients with rheumatoid arthritis have increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke....

  4. Common Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis Reduces Risk of Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis Reduces Risk of Death Taking methotrexate—a commonly prescribed anti-inflammatory medication—may reduce the risk of death among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to ...

  5. Pain Treatment in Arthritis-Related Pain: Beyond NSAIDs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, van de Mart A.F.J.; Pergolizzi Jr., Joseph V.; Mellinghoff, Hans-Ulrich; Merchante, Ignacio Morón; Nalamachu, Srinivas; O'Brien, Joanne; Perrot, Serge; Raffa, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Managing pain from chronic conditions, such as, but not limited to, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, requires the clinician to balance the need for effective analgesia against safety risks associated with analgesic agents. Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis pain is incompletely understo

  6. Arthritis Possible Side Effect of Certain Cancer Drugs: Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159602.html Arthritis Possible Side Effect of Certain Cancer Drugs: Study ... increase risk for joint and tissue disease, including arthritis, new research suggests. "We keep having referrals coming ...

  7. Aortic VCAM-1: an early marker of vascular inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denys, Anne; Clavel, Gaëlle; Lemeiter, Delphine; Schischmanoff, Olivier; Boissier, Marie-Christophe; Semerano, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There are limited experimental data on vascular involvement in arthritis models. To study the link between CVD and inflammation in RA, we developed a model of vascular dysfunction and articular inflammation by collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in C57Bl/6 (B6) mice. We studied the expression of vascular inflammatory markers in CIA with and without concomitant hyperlipidic diet (HD). Collagen-induced arthritis was induced with intradermal injection of chicken type-II collagen followed by a boost 21 days later. Mice with and without CIA were fed a standard diet or an HD for 12 weeks starting from the day of the boost. Arthritis severity was evaluated with a validated clinical score. Aortic mRNA levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and interleukin-17 were analysed by quantitative RT-PCR. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 localization in the aortic sinus was determined by immunohistochemistry. Atherosclerotic plaque presence was assessed in aortas. Collagen-induced arthritis was associated with increased expression of VCAM-1, independent of diet. VCAM-1 overexpression was detectable as early as 4 weeks after collagen immunization and persisted after 15 weeks. The HD induced atheroma plaque formation and aortic iNOS expression regardless of CIA. Concomitant CIA and HD had no additive effect on atheroma or VCAM-1 or iNOS expression. CIA and an HD diet induced a distinct and independent expression of large-vessel inflammation markers in B6 mice. This model may be relevant for the study of CVD in RA. PMID:26859834

  8. Association between human parvovirus B19 infection and arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Cassinotti, P; Bas, S; Siegl, G; Vischer, T L

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To gain information concerning the association between parvovirus B19 infection and arthritis. METHODS--Blood or synovial fluid, or both, from a total of 77 adult patients with various arthropathies (rheumatoid arthritis 13; mechanical arthropathies 11; crystal induced arthritis 13; idiopathic mono/oligoarthritis 25; suspicion of viral arthritis 15) were tested for the presence of the viral genome and anti-B19 antibodies. B19 DNA in blood and synovial fluid was investigated by nest...

  9. Aortic incompetence in HLA B27-positive juvenile arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Kean, W F; Anastassiades, T. P.; Ford, P M

    1980-01-01

    The early onset of isolated aortic incompetence in a male child with HLA B27 and peripheral arthritis is reported. Acute anterior uveitis and lone aortic incompetence occurred at 1 and 9 months respectively after the development of the acute inflammatory arthritis. The uveitis resolved with local therapy and the arthritis remitted 10 months after the onset. There has been no recurrence of the arthritis after 10 years of close follow-up but the aortic incompetence has persisted, though it rema...

  10. Peripheral arthritis in the elderly: a hospital study.

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkinson, M L; Bliss, M R; Brain, A T; Scott, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    One hundred consecutive patients admitted to an acute geriatric unit were examined for evidence of peripheral arthritis with recognised criteria used to define osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, pyrophosphate arthropathy, gout, and disorders of the shoulder joint. The presence of arthritis and its severity were related both to functional independence and to a recognition by the patient that joint problems were impairing independence. Seventy six patients had clinical peripheral arthritis; ...

  11. Pseudoseptic Arthritis: A Case Series and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Harrington; Cote, Jonida K.; Stephanie J. Morris; Oppermann, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Pseudoseptic arthritis is an acute inflammatory monoarthritis with a sterile synovial gram stain and culture. Pseudoseptic arthritis has been previously described in the literature in a variety of settings including rheumatoid arthritis and microcrystalline disease. Despite pseudoseptic arthritis being a described entity, there is little published data on this topic with no published reports since 1992. Methods. This paper was a retrospective chart review over a 20-year period that i...

  12. Novel multimeric IL-1 receptor antagonist for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasi, Shweta; Kant, Ravi; Gupta, Sarika; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2015-02-01

    Protein therapeutics targeting inflammatory mediators have shown great promise for the treatment of autoimmunities such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, a significant challenge in this area has been their low in vivo stability and consequently their severely compromised therapeutic efficacy. One such therapeutic molecule IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, has displayed only modest efficacy in human clinical trials owing to its short biological half-life. Herein, we report a novel approach to conglomerate individual protein entities into a drug depot by incorporation of an amyloidogenic motif Lys-Phe-Phe-Glu (KFFE) thereby dramatically improving their systemic persistence and in turn their therapeutic efficacy in a mice model of autoimmune arthritis. PMID:25542800

  13. A SynoviocyteModel for Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis: Response to Ibuprofen, Betamethasone, and Ginger Extract—A Cross-Sectional In Vitro Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribel-Madsen, Søren; Bartels, Else Marie; Stockmarr, Anders;

    2012-01-01

    synovial membrane or joint fluid. Cells were cultivated and exposed to no or TNF-α stimulation without, or in the presence of, betamethasone, ibuprofen, or a standardized ginger extract. Concentrations of a panel of cytokines, growth factors, and chemokines were mapped for each culture and condition. Our......, and IL-8 release in all groups. Ibuprofen showed no effect on cytokine production, while ginger extract was similar to betamethasone. Ginger extract was as effective an anti-inflammatory agent as betamethasone in this in vitro model. Cultured fibroblast-like synoviocytes from OA and RA subjects...

  14. Cytokine profiles in peripheral blood and whole blood cell cultures associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Sørensen, Lars Korsbaek; Stoltze, Kaj; Bendtzen, Klaus; Holmstrup, Palle

    2005-01-01

    Cytokines play a key role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. An obvious question is whether patients with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, or rheumatoid arthritis share blood cytokine profiles distinguishing them from individuals free of disease....

  15. Osteoscintigraphy in the diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors presented the results of clinical, X-ray and osteoscintigraphic investigations of 133 psoriasic arthritis patients and 72 patients with common psoriasis. Osteoscintigraphy was performed using a routine method with 99mTc-pyrophos (USSR) and 99mTc-phosphone (Hungary) on gamma-camera LFOV (Nuclear-Chicago, USA). X-ray signs of the involvement of the osteoarticular system were noted in 69 (51%) patients with psoriasic arthritis and in 16 (22%) patients with common psoriasis. The method permitted the detection of the foci of RP hyperfixation in 129 (97%) potients with psoriasic arthritis and in 51 (70.8%) patients with common psoriasis. They were observed mostly in large and small limb joints, less frequently-in the vertebral column, cranial bones, thorax, and ribs. Thus, osteoscintigraphy is a highly sensitive method for the detection of active inflammatory foci of the osteoarticular system in psoriasis at all stages of arthritis development. It makes it possible to detect the spreading of arthritis and its preclinical forms

  16. Pleural and pulmonary alterations caused by rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary complications caused by rheumatoid arthritis are a clinically relevant aspect of this chronic arthropathy. This article reviews pulmonary abnormalities induced by rheumatoid arthritis and their clinical and radiological findings. In addition, the role of different imaging modalities in the diagnostic work-up of pulmonary complications caused by rheumatoid arthritis is discussed. (orig./MG)

  17. A Comparative Metabolomic Evaluation of Behcet’s Disease with Arthritis and Seronegative Arthritis Using Synovial Fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Joong Kyong Ahn; Sooah Kim; Jungyeon Kim; Jiwon Hwang; Kyoung Heon Kim; Hoon-Suk Cha

    2015-01-01

    Behcet's disease (BD) with arthritis is often confused with seronegative arthritis (SNA) because of shared clinical symptoms and the lack of definitive biomarkers for BD. To investigate possible metabolic patterns and potential biomarkers of BD with arthritis, metabolomic profiling of synovial fluid (SF) from 6 patients with BD with arthritis and 18 patients with SNA was performed using gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry in conjunction with univariate and multivariate statist...

  18. Arthritis and pain. Psychosocial aspects in the management of arthritis pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backman, Catherine L

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize psychosocial factors associated with arthritis pain and highlight recent evidence for psychosocial approaches to managing arthritis pain. By definition, psychosocial factors refer to two dimensions of experience: the psychological (cognitive, affective) and social (interacting with others, engaging in life activities). Psychosocial factors influence the perception of pain and the presence of pain influences psychological well-being and social participation. After discussing the impact of arthritis pain on participation in work, family life, and leisure, evidence for psychosocial interventions is summarized, emphasizing reviews and studies published from January 2000 to August 2006. PMID:17169138

  19. Biologic interventions for fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeida, Celia; Choy, Ernest H S; Hewlett, Sarah;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fatigue is a common and potentially distressing symptom for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with no accepted evidence-based management guidelines. Evidence suggests that biologic interventions improve symptoms and signs in RA as well as reducing joint damage. OBJECTIVES: To...... evaluate the effect of biologic interventions on fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the following electronic databases up to 1 April 2014: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Current Controlled Trials...... contacted key authors. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials if they evaluated a biologic intervention in people with rheumatoid arthritis and had self reported fatigue as an outcome measure. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two reviewers selected relevant trials, assessed methodological...

  20. Glucocorticoids in nano-liposomes administered intravenously and subcutaneously to adjuvant arthritis rats are superior to the free drugs in suppressing arthritis and inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmansky, Rina; Turjeman, Keren; Baru, Moshe; Katzavian, Galia; Harel, Michal; Sigal, Alex; Naparstek, Yaakov; Barenholz, Yechezkel

    2012-06-10

    We have previously shown that intravenous (i.v.) treatment with sterically stabilized nano-liposomes (NSSL) actively remote-loaded with the glucocorticoid (GC) methylprednisolone hemisuccinate (NSSL-MPS) or betamethasone hemisuccinate (NSSL-BMS) significantly decreased severity of adjuvant arthritis in Lewis rats (a model of human rheumatoid arthritis) throughout all disease stages. Here, we compared i.v. or subcutaneous (s.c.) weekly treatment with each of the two NSSL-GC to weekly or daily treatment with the free drugs or with the TNF-α antagonists Infliximab and Etanercept. Therapeutic efficacy and effects on the profile of pro-inflammatory (IL-6, TNF-α, and INF-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10 and TGF-β) cytokines in rat sera and splenocyte tissue culture supernatants were compared to those of the liposomal and free drugs. Both s.c. and i.v. NSSL-GC suppressed arthritis significantly, compared to higher doses of the free drugs or to TNF-α antagonists. NSSL-GC also suppressed the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, but did not change the levels of TGF- β. The highly efficacious anti-inflammatory therapeutic feature of these nano-drugs makes them candidates for treatment of human rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:22226777

  1. Therapy of rheumatoid arthritis by radiosynovectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiosynovectomy is a therapeutic modality for local treatment of inflammatory point diseases. It is performed by intraarticular instillation of beta-emitting radionuclides. Its effectiveness is based upon the anti-inflammatory action of beta-radiation. Accordingly, the indication of radiosynovectomy is based upon the evidence of the inflammatory etiology of disease. The principle of its therapeutic action makes radiosynovectomy a valuable device for successful treatment of florid rheumatoid arthritis. It can be performed as an alternative to surgical synovectomy or in combination with it. The following article describes the therapeutic management of rheumatoid arthritis by radiosynovectomy including patient preparation, performance, and follow-up. (orig.)

  2. Is Hearing Impairment Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emamifar, Amir; Bjoerndal, Kristine; Jensen Hansen, Inger Marie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic, inflammatory disease that affects 1% of the population. The auditory system may be involved during the course of disease; however the association of RA and hearing impairment has not been clearly defined. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review......, hearing test, audiometry, auditory dysfunction and rheumatoid arthritis. CONCLUSION: Based on our review it can be postulated that patients with RA are at higher risk of hearing impairment compared to healthy subjects in their course of the disease. The hearing impairment in RA seems to be a...

  3. Sedentary behaviour in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Tanja; Beyer, Nina; Aadahl, Mette;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite increasing interest in investigating sedentary behaviour (SB) in the general population and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is little documentation of the subjective experiences of SB in patients with RA. This study aimed to examine how patients with RA...... modification of physical activity level causing increase in SB, especially during periods of disease flare. Prioritizing and planning of SB also functioned as part of self-management strategies. 3) It has nothing to do with my arthritis; for some patients, SB was not related to RA, but simply reflected a way...

  4. Connective tissue markers of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, H J

    1998-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common systemic autoimmune disorder of unknown aetiology. The most common outcome of RA is a progressive development of joint destruction and deformity. Early introduction of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs seems important for prevention of the long term...... rheumatoid factor contributes to the classification of arthritis as RA, and acute phase reactants are useful for quantifying and comparing the level of inflammatory activity in the course of a given patient. There is, however, a lack of sensitive and specific biochemical markers for RA, and frontline...

  5. Main Ocular Manifestations in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Saray Quignon Santana

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is considered an autoimmune disease in which articular and extra articular manifestations are produced and contribute to alter the functional capacity of the individual. This study consists on performing a bibliographical review showing the main ocular manifestations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. It is our purpose to give you our experiences to the students as well as the internal medicine, ophthalmology and rheumatologist residents about this topic. The ophthalmological consultation of sick patients contributes to the prevention of ocular illnesses which are characteristic of the base disease and improve the ocular health.

  6. The radiographic features of psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Psoriatic arthritis is a separate and distinct articular disorder with specific radiographic manifestations occurring in a specific distribution. It manifests a severe erosive element, as well as a bone productive element. The erosive changes help to distinguish it from ankylosing spondylitis, and the bone productive changes, from rheumatoid arthritis. The distribution of the changes, that is, preferential involvement of the hands, will help to distinguish it from Reiter's syndrome. In some patients, it is knowledge of the radiographic changes and distribution of these changes that establishes the correct diagnosis of psoriasis

  7. SECONDARY OSTEOARTHRITIS IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Starodubtseva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the problems of comorbidities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Two or more RA-related conditions were diagnosed according to the results of the QUEST-RA program implemented in 34 countries. Osteoarthritis along with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and osteoporosis was detected among the most commonly diseases. Owing to expanded diagnostic capabilities, the recognition and treatment of the comorbidities have recently received much attention, as embodied in the draft Association of Rheumatologists of Russia Guidelines for RA management (2014; Part 1. The concept and major characteristics of secondary osteoarthritis in RA are analyzed. It is precisely the inflammatory process and underlying disease-related risk factors, including treatment, that have impact on the development of secondary osteoarthritis and patients’ quality of life as a whole. All this allows an inference about the mechanisms closely intertwined with the underlying disease for the development of secondary osteoarthritis, which initiates cartilage damage and further remodeling. Primary and secondary osteoarthritis was comparatively analyzed. Particular emphasis is placed on current cartilage biomarkers, their diagnostic value and role in monitoring the efficiency of treatment in clinical trials. The paper provides a comparative analysis of detectable serum and urine biomarkers according to the results of the complex analysis made by the National Institutes of Health. Particular attention is given to cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP. Foreign authors’ investigations suggest that there is a relationship between serum COMP levels and disease severity and joint X-ray changes. There is evidence for the efficacy of hyaluronic acid used in the treatment of secondary osteoarthritis in patients with RA. 

  8. Imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, Fiona M

    2013-08-01

    Imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has undergone extraordinary change in recent years and new techniques are now available to help the clinician diagnose and manage patients much more effectively than previously. While established modalities such as plain radiography (X-Ray) remain important, especially for detection of erosions and determining the progression of joint damage, there are many instances where ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scanning provide added information. MRI and US are now used regularly by clinicians to help diagnose RA in the pre-radiographic stage as they offer improved visualisation of joint erosions. They also have the potential to provide prognostic information as MRI bone oedema/osteitis is linked to the later development of erosions and power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS) joint positivity is also a predictor of joint damage. Nuclear imaging techniques such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are also highly sensitive for detecting joint change in early RA and pre-RA but not yet used clinically mainly because of accessibility and radiation exposure. MRI, US, scintigraphy, SPECT and PET have all been shown to detect sub-clinical joint inflammation in patients in clinical remission, a state that is now the goal of most treat-to-target management strategies. Thus, imaging may be used to direct therapeutic decision making and MRI is also now being used in clinical trials to determine the impact of disease-suppressing therapy on the course of synovitis and osteitis. As is the case for all tests, it would be unwise to rely completely on any one imaging result, as false positives and negatives can occur for all modalities. Thus, the clinician needs to choose the most relevant and reliable imaging test, while also striving to minimise patient discomfort, radiation burden and economic impact. PMID:24315051

  9. Immunological markers of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Matuszewska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is the most common connective tissue disease of autoimmune origin. The disease is characterized by chronic inflammation leading to bone erosions and organ involvement. RA is a progressive disease. It affects the quality of life, leading to disability and death mainly due to premature cardiovascular disease. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential for prognosis and quality of life improvement. In 2010 the American College of Rheumatology (ACR and The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR established new RA classification criteria. Besides clinical symptoms it includes two immunologic criteria: rheumatoid factor (RF and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (anti-CCP antibodies. RF is the first well-known RA immunologic marker. It is observed in 80-85% of patients with RA. Elevated serum level of RF has been associated with increased disease activity, radiographic progression, and the presence of extraarticular manifestations. The sensitivity of RF is 50-90%, and specificity is 50-95%. Anti-CCP antibodies appear to be a more specific marker than RF. They are often present at the very beginning of the disease, or even years before the first symptoms. The prognostic value of anti-CCP antibodies is well established. High serum level of anti-CCP correlates with poor prognosis and early erosions of the joints. The sensitivity of anti-CCP2 is 48-80%, and specificity is 96-98%. New immunologic markers include anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP and antibodies against heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (anti-hnRNP A2/B1, RA33. Scientists aim to identify a highly sensitive and specific biomarker of the disease that not only has diagnostic and prognostic value but also may predict the response to treatment.

  10. Kidney involvement in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lazzarini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA is a widespread disease and its renal involvement, relatively common, is clinically significant because worsens course and mortality of the primary disease. There is still no agreement on the prevalence of renal disorders in RA: data analysis originates from different sources, as death certificates, autopsies, clinical and laboratory findings and kidney biopsies, each with its limitations. Histoimmunological studies on bioptical specimens of patients with RA and kidney damage, led to clarify prevalent pathologies. In order of frequency: glomerulonephritis and amyloidosis (60-65% and 20-30% respectively, followed by acute or chronic interstitial nephritis. Kidney injury during RA includes secondary renal amyloidosis, nephrotoxic effects of antirheumatic drugs and nephropathies as extra-articular manifestations (rheumatoid nephropathy. Amyloidosis affects survival, increases morbidity and is the main cause of end stage renal disease in patients with RA and nephropathy. Strong association between RA activity and amyloidosis needs the use of immunosuppressive and combined therapies, to prevent this complication and reduce risk of dialysis. Long-lasting and combined RA pharmacotherapy involves various renal side effects. In this review we describe NSAIDs and DMARDs (Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs nephrotoxicity, particularly by gold compounds, D-penicillamine, cyclosporine A and methotrexate. Rare cases of IgA glomerulonephritis during immunomodulating therapy with leflunomide and TNF blocking receptor (etanercept are reported; real clinical significance of this drug-related nephropathy will be established by development of RA treatment. In RA nephropathies, mesangial glomerulonephritis is the most frequent histological lesion (35-60 % out of biopsies from patients with urinary abnormalities and/or kidney impairment, followed by minimal change glomerulopathy (3-14% and p-ANCA positive necrotizing crescentic

  11. Cervical myelopathy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijers, K A; Cats, A; Kremer, H P; Luyendijk, W; Onvlee, G J; Thomeer, R T

    1984-01-01

    Results obtained in 43 Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with cervical myelopathy are described; all patients showed several alarm signs together with neurological disturbances. Thirty-four cases were operable; nine patients were not operated upon for various reasons (refusal, and general condition). In the surgically treated patients, the changes were localized in the C1-C2 area (n = 20), in the area below C2 (n = 5), or in both (n = 9). The patients were put on skull traction pre- and post-operatively and nursed on a circo-electric bed. Pre-operatively, the duration of traction varied from a few days to weeks (mean 3 weeks). Post-operatively, the patients were given continuous skull traction for 2 1/2-3 months. This procedure yielded neurological improvement and a stable graft in all but two patients. On follow-up, recurrence of neurological complaints was seen in nine patients, in four due to a new slip at a lower level. Three of these cases were reoperated with good results. Twenty-three patients have died: four 'early' (one pre-operatively and three within 6 weeks post-operatively) and 19 'late'. The mean duration of follow-up was 4.5 years. In those who died 'late', the cause of death was due to the effects of an unstable graft in two cases and in the others the causes were not related to changes in the cervical spine. In the 10 patients who are still alive the mean duration of follow-up is 5 years. The nine patients who were not operated upon all died within a year, 4 of them due to consequences of cord compression. If cervical spondylodesis is feasible in an RA patient with myelopathy, the procedure is advocated. PMID:6529877

  12. Suppression of Experimental Arthritis and Associated Bone Loss by a Tissue-Selective Estrogen Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Annica; Bernardi, Angelina I; Nurkkala-Karlsson, Merja; Stubelius, Alexandra; Grahnemo, Louise; Ohlsson, Claes; Carlsten, Hans; Islander, Ulrika

    2016-03-01

    In addition to the systemic inflammation present in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), decreased estradiol levels in postmenopausal RA patients further accelerate bone loss in these patients. The tissue-selective estrogen complex (TSEC), an estrogen combined with a selective estrogen receptor modulator, is a new hormone replacement therapy option. The first approved TSEC, containing conjugated estrogens and bazedoxifene (BZA), reduces menopausal symptoms and prevents osteoporosis with an improved safety profile compared with conventional hormone replacement therapy. Previous studies have shown that estrogens strongly inhibit experimental arthritis whereas BZA is mildly suppressive. In this study the antiarthritic potential of combined BZA and estradiol is explored for the first time. Female ovariectomized DBA/1 mice were subjected to collagen-induced arthritis, an experimental postmenopausal RA model, and treated with BZA, 17β-estradiol (E2), combined BZA and E2 (BZA/E2), or vehicle. BZA/E2 suppressed arthritis severity and frequency, synovitis, and joint destruction, equally efficient as E2 alone. Unwanted estrogenic proliferative effects on the endometrium were blocked by the addition of BZA, determined by collecting uterine weights. Bone mineral density was measured by peripheral quantitative computed tomography, and all treatments protected collagen-induced arthritis mice from both trabecular and cortical bone loss. Moreover, BZA/E2, but not E2 alone, inhibited preosteoclast formation and reduced serum anticollagen type II antibodies. In conclusion, a TSEC, herein combined BZA/E2, suppresses experimental arthritis and prevents associated bone loss as efficiently as E2 alone but with minimal uterine effects, highlighting the need for clinical trials that evaluate the addition of a TSEC to conventional postmenopausal RA treatment. PMID:26745543

  13. Orofacial pain, jaw function, and temporomandibular disorders in adult women with a history of juvenile chronic arthritis or persistent juvenile chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, M.; Zak, M.; Jensen, B.L.;

    2001-01-01

    Orofacial pain, jaw function, temporomandibular disorders, adult women persistent juvenil chronic arthritis......Orofacial pain, jaw function, temporomandibular disorders, adult women persistent juvenil chronic arthritis...

  14. Radiosynovectomy in the treatment of arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radiosynovectomy is a useful therapeutic option that involves radiopharmaceutical injections into joints, especially to treat rheumatoid arthritis. The indications included different kinds of arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, Bechterew's disease, hemophiliac arthritis, osteoarthritis, but also patients with joint prosthesis and synovial effusion. There are three commercial available radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment: yttrium-90 for the knee (185 to 250 MBq), rhenium-186 for larger joints (shoulder and hip with 111 MBq; elbow, wrist, ankle joint with can also rederbium-169 for smaller joints (acromioclavicular joint with 37 MBq, thumb base and MTP I with 30 MBq, MCP and MTP II-V with 22 MBq, PIP with 18.5 MBq, and DIP with 15 MBq, respectively). Decisive for the treatment is a positive sign for arthritis in the two-phase bone scan with 99mTc-HMDP (high uptake in the blood pool phase). Only for radiosynovecotmy in the knee an ultrasound with an evidence of effusion is sufficient. Side effects by the treatment are rare, such as temporary radiation or crystal synovitis, tissue necrosis (extra articular fraction or intra-articular), joint infection (1 of 35,000 joints) or effects due to the immobilisation (thrombosis, pulmonary embolism (immobilization of the knee), lymphoedema or loss of motion. In the treatment of the knee a prophylaxis with heparin is necessary to protect the patients for a pulmonary embolism. The clinical outcome is depending from the primary disease and the stage of arthrosis. Kresnik at al reported in 2190 treated joints an overall response rate of 73 ± 17%. A higher response rate was observed in patients with early stage of arthrosis (73 ± 12%) to patients with advance stage (52 ± 24%). The best results had patients with hemophiliac arthritis (91 ± 4%). In our hospital were treated up to 10.000 joints with a mean response rate of 70-80%. There was a higher response rate in larger joints with 81 ± 5

  15. Cost effectiveness of etanercept (Enbrel) in combination with methotrexate in the treatment of active rheumatoid arthritis based on the TEMPO trial

    OpenAIRE

    Kobelt, G; Lindgren, P.; Singh, A.; Klareskog, L

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the cost effectiveness of combination treatment with etanercept plus methotrexate in comparison with monotherapies in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using a new model that incorporates both functional status and disease activity.

  16. Arthritis and pain. Psychosocial aspects in the management of arthritis pain

    OpenAIRE

    Backman, Catherine L

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize psychosocial factors associated with arthritis pain and highlight recent evidence for psychosocial approaches to managing arthritis pain. By definition, psychosocial factors refer to two dimensions of experience: the psychological (cognitive, affective) and social (interacting with others, engaging in life activities). Psychosocial factors influence the perception of pain and the presence of pain influences psychological well-being and social partici...

  17. Detection of Arthritis by Joint Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detection and identification of early arthritis is frequently difficult with routine methods. Several tracers, 131I human serum albumin (25 μCi/10 lb), 99mTc human serum albumin (1-3 mCi), 131I iodipamide (40 μCi/10 lb), and 99mTc pertechnetate (10 mCi), have been employed for joint scanning to detect synovitis produced by arthritis in joints of the extremities. When administered intravenously, the 25% increase in localization of these tracers in the synovial membrane, if there is active synovitis, can be demonstrated by scintillation scanning. This ability to detect synovitis at an early stage enables the joint scan to show areas of active synovitis not demonstrated on roentgenograms. The scan may objectively confirm or disprove questionable physical findings. From this standpoint the technique has been useful in determining whether joint pain is functional or due to arthritis as a negative localization tends to rule out active synovitis as the cause of the pain. The scan demonstration of a positive localization of the tracer in several joints when only one area is symptomatic is evidence that joint pain is due to systemic disease. The short half-life tracera permit serial studies to follow the course of an arthritis process. Use of 99mTc pertechnetate and an Anger camera have made joint scanning a practical technique for clinical use. A review of the accuracy of joint scanning in 130 cases as compared to roentgenograms is presented. (author)

  18. New agents for scintigraphy in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiopharmaceuticals have been used as investigative tools for the detection and treatment of arthritis activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) since the 1950s. Against the background of the pathophysiology of RA, the current status of joint scintigraphy and possible future developments are reviewed. Both non-specific (radiolabelled leucocytes and technetium-99m labelled human immunoglobulin) and specific targeting radiopharmaceuticals (including radiolabelled antibodies) are considered. The use of radiopharmaceuticals in the detection of arthritis activity has the advantages of allowing direct imaging of joints by means of whole-body scintigraphy and of joints that are difficult to assess clinically or radiographically. Promising results have been obtained with radiolabelled anti-CD4 and anti-E-selectin antibodies and with somatostatin receptor imaging, but more data are available regarding 99mTc-IgG scintigraphy, which differentiates between the various degrees of arthritis activity and thus facilitates the choice of antirheumatic drug. Newer promising approaches to the imaging of RA include the use of radiolabelled J001 and cytokines, though studies on these are limited at present. (orig.)

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging in coccidioidal arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. The authors assessed the MRI findings of appendicular coccidioidal arthritis. Design. T1- and T2-weighted MR images of affected joints, both with and without intravenous gadopentetate dimeglumine, were performed in nine adult patients (ten studies) and evaluated by three masted readers, using a four-point certainty scale for: synovial abnormality, articular cartilage loss, subarticular bone loss, abnormal marrow signal, enhancement of osseous and articular structures, and assessment of disease activity. Findings were correlated with biopsy results or clinical course. Results. Eight patients had active and one had inactive arthritis, involving the knee (five patients), ankle (two patients), and elbow (one patient). Synovial complex was the most common finding in active arthritis (P<0.025). Cartilage and subarticular bone loss were seen 56% and 89% of patients with active disease, respectively. Abnormal marrow signal was uncommon (two patients). All cases showed synovial and/or osseus enhancement. Conclusions. MRI findings in coccidiodal arthritis are described. Enhancement of thickened synovium and erosions was seen after intravenous gadopentetate. (orig.). With 4 figs

  20. Retrocalcaneal bursitis in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldenstein-Schainberg, C; Homsi, C; Rodrigues Pereira, R M; Cossermelli, W

    1992-01-01

    Retrocalcaneal bursitis has been described in various adult rheumatic diseases and septic bursitis unrelated to previous bursal disease has been reported in children. The case is reported here of a girl with juvenile chronic arthritis who developed non-septic retrocalcaneal bursitis; the diagnosis was suggested by a combination of clinical and radiographic studies and was confirmed by ultrasonography.

  1. Pancytopenia related to azathioprine in rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Jeurissen, M E; Boerbooms, A M; van de Putte, L B

    1988-01-01

    Two patients with rheumatoid arthritis developed pancytopenia during treatment with azathioprine 100 mg daily. In one patient this side effect occurred after three weeks, in the other after eight weeks of treatment. Rapid fall of platelets in one patient necessitated platelet transfusion. In the other patient additional treatment with allopurinol was probably responsible for the toxic effect. Haematological side effects of azathioprine are discussed.

  2. Adherence to methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Henning; Eriksen, Stine A; Christensen, Robin;

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To study adherence to methotrexate (MTX) and factors of importance thereof in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Patients with a hospital diagnosis of RA (ICD10 codes M05.X or M06.X) after January 1, 1997, and aged ≥18 years at the date of first diagnosis/contact, with at...

  3. On the origin of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Anders J; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Houen, Gunnar;

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease with a complex origin. Previous studies have reported heritability estimates on RA at about 60%. Only 16% of the genetic background of the disease has been disclosed so far. The purpose of the present investigation was to provide an optimized...

  4. Penicillamin-induced neuropathy in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P B; Hogenhaven, H

    1990-01-01

    A case of penicillamin-induced severe polyradiculopathy in rheumatoid arthritis is presented. The neuropathy was of demyelinating type, purely motor, proximal and clinically fully reversible when the drug ceased. In case of a progressive neuropathy, during penicillamin treatment, this adverse...

  5. [Biopharmaceuticals in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baslund, B.; Bendtzen, K.

    2008-01-01

    The current status on the use of biopharmaceuticals in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is reviewed. Blocking of TNF-alpha, co-stimulation of CD28+ T-cells and depletion of CD20+ B-cells are all effective ways to diminish inflammation and joint damage. However, not all patients react to these...

  6. Septic arthritis in the newborn and infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajdobranski Đorđe R.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Septic arthritis represents an intra-articular infection caused by pyogenic bacteria. During the earliest childhood it is considered to be a systemic septic condition and demands early diagnosis and prompt surgical treatment. Material and methods This is a retrospective analysis of patients with septic arthritis treated at the Department of Orthopedics of the Pediatric Surgery Clinic in Novi Sad, over a 10-year period. We are also presenting a case of a 12-day-old newborn baby, with clear radiological signs of osteoarthritis of the right knee. Results A retrospective study included the period 1991-2000, and showed that 15 patients, aged 10 days - 12 months were treated for osteoarthritis. The most common localization was the hip, in 60% of cases. In 11 patients the causative agent was Staphylococcus aureus while in the 4 remaining patients the bacteriologic finding was negative. One patient died of generalized sepsis. Discussion In neonates and infants septic arthritis is characterized by atypical clinical picture, often causing delayed diagnosis. In the initial phases of the disease ultrasonographic findings were of greater use compared to radiological imaging, due to relatively late appearance of radiological signs of disease. Conclusions Due to possible development of serious and irreversible damage, even lethal outcome, septic arthritis requires early diagnosis, prompt administration of antibiotics and early surgical treatment. It is a quite unique area in Pediatric Orthopedics where missed or delayed diagnosis may have serious consequences.

  7. Mineral Oil Aspiration Related Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Andrew D; Fischer, Philip R; Reed, Ann M; Wylam, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of rheumatoid factor-positive migratory polyarthritis in a 5-year-old male who had been administered bidaily oral mineral oil as a laxative since birth. Minor respiratory symptoms, radiographic and bronchoscopic findings were consistent with chronic lipoid pneumonia. We speculate that immune sensitization to mineral oil promoted the clinical syndrome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. PMID:26171269

  8. Mineral Oil Aspiration Related Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Andrew D.; Fischer, Philip R.; Reed, Ann M.; Wylam, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of rheumatoid factor-positive migratory polyarthritis in a 5-year-old male who had been administered bidaily oral mineral oil as a laxative since birth. Minor respiratory symptoms, radiographic and bronchoscopic findings were consistent with chronic lipoid pneumonia. We speculate that immune sensitization to mineral oil promoted the clinical syndrome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  9. Mineral Oil Aspiration Related Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the development of rheumatoid factor-positive migratory polyarthritis in a 5-year-old male who had been administered bidaily oral mineral oil as a laxative since birth. Minor respiratory symptoms, radiographic and bronchoscopic findings were consistent with chronic lipoid pneumonia. We speculate that immune sensitization to mineral oil promoted the clinical syndrome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  10. Relation Between Rheumatoid Arthritis and Hearing Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Doosti

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some of the studies have shown that RA (Rheumatoid Arthritis may cause hearing disorders. These disorders can result in problems later in life, so survey of correlation between rheumatoid arthritis and hearing disorders is important . Methods: This was a case-control study which has done from December 2004 to August 2006 at Shaheed Sadoughi hospital in Yazd. In this study, 50 Rheumatoid arthritis patients as case group (100 ears with 50 persons as control group who were of the same age, sex and job (100 ears were compared. Results: Patients were 21-67 years old and the mean age was 47.58 years(It was the same as the control group.From 50 cases (controls 42 were women and 8 were men . Audiometric tests in different frequencies showed that hearing loss in high frequencies, especially in 8000 Hz was significantly different in the two groups. Also, acoustic reflex was absent in case group and this too was significantly different.The evaluation of sensory neural hearing loss showed that this hearing loss was sensory, not neural . Conclusion: In Rheumatoid arthritis, middle and inner ear disorders have been shown. But some patients aren't aware of their hearing loss and they have no clinical complains, so frequent evaluation of audiometric tests is recommended. Hearing disorders can be controlled by therapeutic and rehabilitation procedures in these patients.

  11. The occurrence of psoriatic arthritis in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Birger Vesterager; Svendsen, Anders Jørgen; Ejstrup, Leif;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To apply and compare different classification criteria on a representative nationwide sample of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) twins and to estimate the prevalence and incidence of PsA. METHODS: The study comprised three Danish nationwide twin cohorts. In 1994 37,388 Danish twin individuals...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis, infiltrated pulmonary, and sharp dyspnoea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of a patient (50 year-old) feminine sex, is made with antecedents of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the last 10 years in treatment with steroids, hypothyroidism and arterial hypertension who consults for square of dyspnoea of small efforts, dry cough and fever. An evolution of the illness is made and the topic is analyzed

  13. Novel curcumin diclofenac conjugate enhanced curcumin bioavailability and efficacy in streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Jain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin-diclofenac conjugate as been synthesized by esterification of phenolic group of curcumin with the acid moiety of diclofenac, and characterized by mass spectrometry, NMR, FTIR, DSC, thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis. The relative solubility of curcumin-diclofenac conjugate, curcumin and diclofenac; stability of curcumin-diclofenac conjugate in intestinal extract; permeability study of curcumin-diclofenac conjugate using the everted rat intestinal sac method; stability of curcumin-diclofenac conjugate in gastrointestinal fluids and in vitro efficacy have been evaluated. In vivo bioavailability of curcumin-diclofenac conjugate and curcumin in Sprague-Dawley rats, and antiarthritic activity of curcumin-diclofenac conjugate, curcumin and diclofenac in modified streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis model in Balb/c mice to mimic rheumatoid arthritis in humans have also been studied. In all of the above studies, curcumin-diclofenac conjugate exhibited enhanced stability as compared to curcumin; its activity was twice that of diclofenac in inhibiting thermal protein denaturation taken as a measure of in vitro antiinflammatory activity; it enhanced the bioavailability of curcumin by more than five folds, and significantly (P<0.01 alleviated the symptoms of arthritis in streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis model as compared to both diclofenac and curcumin.

  14. HOW TO LIVE WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS???

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parle Milind

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA is a chronic auto-immune disease characterized by painful inflammation of the joints and surrounding tissues, leading to long term disability. Rheumatoid arthritis can begin at any age but has its peak between 35 to 55 years of age. RA shows hereditary linkage. Women and smokers are most often affected. The patient doesn’t feel any symptoms during inactive state of the disease. RA progresses in a symmetrical pattern involving both the sides of the body. Once rheumatoid arthritis is confirmed by diagnosis, treatment should start as early as possible. The treatment for rheumatoid arthritis focuses initially on reducing the joint inflammation and pain with the use of analgesics and anti-inflammatory agents. In the next stage, joint function is restored by administering Disease Modifying Anti-rheumatic Drugs (DMARDs thus preventing joint deformity. Treatment is generally based on the degree of severity of RA. Patients with mild RA are advised to take rest and are prescribed analgesics and anti-inflammatory medicines, which include fast acting drugs like NSAIDs. Slow acting drugs like (DMARDs such as methotrexate, sulfasalazine, lelflunomide etc., and Body’s reaction modifiers (BRMs such as rituximab, anankinra, infliximab etc., are reserved for patients suffering from moderate to severe RA. The patient is advised to undertake regular exercises like walking, stretching, swimming or cycling, which are aimed at reducing body weight. The patient suffering from arthritis can carry out his normal day-to-day activities with the help of proper medication and regular exercise.

  15. EGCG attenuates autoimmune arthritis by inhibition of STAT3 and HIF-1α with Th17/Treg control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Ji Yang

    Full Text Available Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG is a green tea polyphenol exerting potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting signaling and gene expression. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of EGCG on interleukin (IL-1 receptor antagonist knockout (IL-1RaKO autoimmune arthritis models. IL-1RaKO arthritis models were injected intraperitoneally with EGCG three times per week after the first immunization. EGCG decreased the arthritis index and showed protective effects against joint destruction in the IL-1RaKO arthritis models. The expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, oxidative stress proteins, and p-STAT3 (Y705 and p-STAT3 (S727, mTOR and HIF-1α were significantly lower in mice treated with EGCG. EGCG reduced osteoclast markers in vivo and in vitro along with anti-osteoclastic activity was observed in EGCG-treated IL-1RaKO mice. The proportion of Foxp3(+ Treg cells increased in the spleens of mice treated with EGCG, whereas the proportion of Th17 cells reduced. In vitro, p-STAT3 (Y705 and p-STAT3 (S727, HIF1α and glycolytic pathway molecules were decreased by EGCG. EGCG suppressed the activation of mTOR and subsequently HIF-1α, which is considered as a metabolic check point of Th17/Treg differentiation supporting the therapeutic potential of EGCG in autoimmune arthritis.

  16. Bile salt-stimulated lipase plays an unexpected role in arthritis development in rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Lindquist

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The present study aimed to explore the hypothesis that bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL, in addition to being a key enzyme in dietary fat digestion during early infancy, plays an important role in inflammation, notably arthritis. METHODS: Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA and pristane-induced arthritis (PIA in rodents are commonly used experimental models that reproduce many of the pathogenic mechanisms of human rheumatoid arthritis, i.e. increased cellular infiltration, synovial hyperplasia, pannus formation, and erosion of cartilage and bone in the distal joints. We used the CIA model to compare the response in BSSL wild type (BSSL-WT mice with BSSL-deficient 'knock-out' (BSSL-KO and BSSL-heterozygous (BSSL-HET littermates. We also investigated if intraperitoneal injection of BSSL-neutralizing antibodies affected the development or severity of CIA and PIA in mice and rats, respectively. RESULTS: In two consecutive studies, we found that BSSL-KO male mice, in contrast to BSSL-WT littermates, were significantly protected from developing arthritis. We also found that BSSL-HET mice were less prone to develop disease compared to BSSL-WT mice, but not as resistant as BSSL-KO mice, suggesting a gene-dose effect. Moreover, we found that BSSL-neutralizing antibody injection reduced both the incidence and severity of CIA and PIA in rodents. CONCLUSION: Our data strongly support BSSL as a key player in the inflammatory process, at least in rodents. It also suggests the possibility that BSSL-neutralizing agents could serve as a therapeutic model to reduce the inflammatory response in humans.

  17. Prolactin promotes cartilage survival and attenuates inflammation in inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adán, Norma; Guzmán-Morales, Jessica; Ledesma-Colunga, Maria G.; Perales-Canales, Sonia I.; Quintanar-Stéphano, Andrés; López-Barrera, Fernando; Méndez, Isabel; Moreno-Carranza, Bibiana; Triebel, Jakob; Binart, Nadine; Martínez de la Escalera, Gonzalo; Thebault, Stéphanie; Clapp, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Chondrocytes are the only cells in cartilage, and their death by apoptosis contributes to cartilage loss in inflammatory joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A putative therapeutic intervention for RA is the inhibition of apoptosis-mediated cartilage degradation. The hormone prolactin (PRL) frequently increases in the circulation of patients with RA, but the role of hyperprolactinemia in disease activity is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that PRL inhibits the apoptosis of cultured chondrocytes in response to a mixture of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IFN-γ) by preventing the induction of p53 and decreasing the BAX/BCL-2 ratio through a NO-independent, JAK2/STAT3–dependent pathway. Local treatment with PRL or increasing PRL circulating levels also prevented chondrocyte apoptosis evoked by injecting cytokines into the knee joints of rats, whereas the proapoptotic effect of cytokines was enhanced in PRL receptor–null (Prlr–/–) mice. Moreover, eliciting hyperprolactinemia in rats before or after inducing the adjuvant model of inflammatory arthritis reduced chondrocyte apoptosis, proinflammatory cytokine expression, pannus formation, bone erosion, joint swelling, and pain. These results reveal the protective effect of PRL against inflammation-induced chondrocyte apoptosis and the therapeutic potential of hyperprolactinemia to reduce permanent joint damage and inflammation in RA. PMID:23908112

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table ... disease, which means the arthritis results from your immune system attacking your body's own tissues. The course of ...

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body Past ... prone to fracture). Source: NIAMS Who Gets Rheumatoid Arthritis? The disease occurs in all racial and ethnic ...

  20. Fasciola hepatica tegumental antigens induce anergic-like T cells via dendritic cells in a mannose receptor-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Allison; O'Neill, Sandra M

    2016-05-01

    FoxP3(+) Treg cells and anergic T cells are the two regulatory phenotypes of T-cell responses associated with helminth infection. Here, we examine the T-cell responses in mice during Fasciola hepatica infection, and to its tegumental coat antigens (FhTeg) that are shed from the fluke every 2-3 h. FhTeg comprises a rich source of glycoproteins, mainly oligomannose N-glycans that bind to mannose receptor. This study demonstrated a novel mechanism for the T-cell unresponsiveness observed during F. hepatica infection and after injection with FhTeg. Markers of T-cell anergy, such as GRAIL, EGR2, ICOS, and ITCH, are enhanced amongst CD4(+) T-cell populations during infection and following FhTeg injection. This is characterized by a lack of cytokine responses and reduced proliferative activity, which can be reversed with the addition of IL-2. FhTeg-activated dendritic cells (DCs) suppress T cells in vitro as measured by enhanced GRAIL and CTLA4 by RNA and suppressed cytokine expression in anti-CD3 stimulated CD4(+) T cells. FhTeg-treated DCs have enhanced MR expression, which is critical for DC-CD4(+) T-cell communication. Taken together, this study presents markers of anergy in a mouse model of F. hepatica infection, and improves our understanding of host-pathogen interactions and how helminths modulate host immunity. PMID:26931640

  1. Influence of various forms of dialyzable leukocyte extracts on rat adjuvant arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats is a chronic inflammatory disease, widely as an animal model for rheumatoid arthritis. In our study the effect of various fractions of dialyzable leukocyte extract (DLE): DLE I-molecular weight below 10 kDa (commercial preparation), DLE II-molecular weight below 5 kDa (suppressor fraction), DLE III-molecular weight 5-10 kDa on rat adjuvant-induced arthritis was studied. The adjuvant arthritic (AA) rats were treated with DLE fractions i.p. in solutions containing an active substance isolated from 12.5 x 106 and 6.25 x 106 leukocytes from day 1 (adjuvant injected) through day 18, every second day (total 9 times). Various markers in inflammation, immune function and joint destruction were evaluated: hind paw volume, serum hyaluronic acid, serum albumin and biopterin in urine. All these markers showed a significant improvement after using fraction DLE II in comparison with AA controls. Fractions DLE I and DLE III influenced only some markers of inflammation and immune function. Our results demonstrated a therapeutical effect of fraction DLE II on rat adjuvant-induced arthritis. (author). 22 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  2. Spouse Confidence in Self-Efficacy for Arthritis Management Predicts Improved Patient Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martire, Lynn M.; Keefe, Francis J.; Stephens, Mary Ann Parris; Schulz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Background In addition to patient self-efficacy, spouse confidence in patient efficacy may also independently predict patient health outcomes. However, the potential influence of spouse confidence has received little research attention. Purpose The current study examined the influence of patient and spouse efficacy beliefs for arthritis management on patient health. Methods Patient health (i.e., arthritis severity, perceived health, depressive symptoms, lower extremity function), patient self-efficacy, and spouse confidence in patients’ efficacy were assessed in a sample of knee osteoarthritis patients (N = 152) and their spouses at three time points across an 18-month period. Data were analyzed using structural equation models. Results Consistent with predictions, spouse confidence in patient efficacy for arthritis management predicted improvements in patient depressive symptoms, perceived health, and lower extremity function over 6 months and in arthritis severity over 1 year. Conclusions Our findings add to a growing literature that highlights the important role of spouse perceptions in patients’ long-term health. PMID:24604529

  3. The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Immunopathogenesis of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirshafiey Abbas

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease associated with painful joints that affects approximately 1% of the population worldwide, and for which no effective cure is available. It is characterized by chronic joint inflammation and variable degrees of bone and cartilage erosion. Oxygen metabolism has an important role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are produced in many normal and abnormal processes in humans, including atheroma, asthma, joint diseases, aging, and cancer. TNF-α overproduction is thought to be the main contributor to increased ROS release in patients with RA. Increased ROS production leads to tissue damage associated with inflammation. The prevailing hypothesis that ROS promote inflammation was recently challenged when polymorphisms in Neutrophil cytosolic factor 1(Ncf1, that decrease oxidative burst, were shown to increase disease severity in mouse and rat arthritis models. It has been shown that oxygen radicals might also be important in controlling disease severity and reducing joint inflammation and connective tissue damage. In this review article, our aim is to clarify the role of ROS in immunopathogenesis of Rheumatoid arthritis.

  4. Gene Therapy Induces Antigen-Specific Tolerance in Experimental Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirholt, Pernilla; Turesson, Olof; Wing, Kajsa; Holmdahl, Rikard; Kihlberg, Jan; Stern, Anna; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill; Henningsson, Louise; Gustafsson, Kenth; Gjertsson, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Here, we investigate induction of immunological tolerance by lentiviral based gene therapy in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, collagen II-induced arthritis (CIA). Targeting the expression of the collagen type II (CII) to antigen presenting cells (APCs) induced antigen-specific tolerance, where only 5% of the mice developed arthritis as compared with 95% of the control mice. In the CII-tolerized mice, the proportion of Tregs as well as mRNA expression of SOCS1 (suppressors of cytokine signaling 1) increased at day 3 after CII immunization. Transfer of B cells or non-B cell APC, as well as T cells, from tolerized to naïve mice all mediated a certain degree of tolerance. Thus, sustainable tolerance is established very early during the course of arthritis and is mediated by both B and non-B cells as APCs. This novel approach for inducing tolerance to disease specific antigens can be used for studying tolerance mechanisms, not only in CIA but also in other autoimmune diseases. PMID:27159398

  5. Inhibition of CDK9 as a therapeutic strategy for inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellvard, Annelie; Zeitlmann, Lutz; Heiser, Ulrich; Kehlen, Astrid; Niestroj, André; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Koziel, Joanna; Delaleu, Nicolas; Jan Potempa; Mydel, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by synovial inflammation and proliferation of fibroblast-like synoviocytes. The induction of apoptosis has long been proposed as a target for proliferative autoimmune diseases, and has further been shown to act as a successful treatment of experimental models of arthritis, such as collagen-induced arthritis. Here we examined the effects of specific oral small-molecule inhibitors of the transcription regulating cyclin-dependent kinase 9 on the development and progression of collagen-induced arthritis. DBA/1 mice were immunised with bovine collagen type II and treated orally with specific CDK9 inhibitors. The effects of CDK9 inhibition on RNA levels and protein expression, apoptosis induction, caspase activation and lymphocyte phenotype were further analysed. Mice showed a significant delay in disease onset and a reduction in disease severity following treatment with CDK9 inhibitors. Inhibiting CDK9 activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells resulted in the loss of Mcl-1 expression at both the protein and RNA levels, along with a subsequent increase in apoptosis. CDK9 specific inhibitors may be a potential alternative treatment not only of cancer, but also for autoimmune- and inflammatory diseases. Taken together, these results show that transient inhibition of CDK9 induces apoptosis in leukocyte subsets and modulates the immune response. PMID:27511630

  6. Influence of various forms of dialyzable leukocyte extracts on rat adjuvant arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancikova, Maria; Rovensky, Jozef; Blazickova, Stanislava [Research Institute of Rheumatic Diseases, Piestany (Slovakia); Pekarek, J.; Cech, Karel [Institute of Sera and Vaccines, Prague (Czech Republic)

    1994-12-31

    Adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats is a chronic inflammatory disease, widely as an animal model for rheumatoid arthritis. In our study the effect of various fractions of dialyzable leukocyte extract (DLE): DLE I-molecular weight below 10 kDa (commercial preparation), DLE II-molecular weight below 5 kDa (suppressor fraction), DLE III-molecular weight 5-10 kDa on rat adjuvant-induced arthritis was studied. The adjuvant arthritic (AA) rats were treated with DLE fractions i.p. in solutions containing an active substance isolated from 12.5 x 10{sup 6} and 6.25 x 10{sup 6} leukocytes from day 1 (adjuvant injected) through day 18, every second day (total 9 times). Various markers in inflammation, immune function and joint destruction were evaluated: hind paw volume, serum hyaluronic acid, serum albumin and biopterin in urine. All these markers showed a significant improvement after using fraction DLE II in comparison with AA controls. Fractions DLE I and DLE III influenced only some markers of inflammation and immune function. Our results demonstrated a therapeutical effect of fraction DLE II on rat adjuvant-induced arthritis. (author). 22 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs.

  7. Radiosynovectomy in the treatment of arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radiosynovectomy is a useful therapeutic option that involves radiopharmaceutical injections into joints, especially to treat rheumatoid arthritis. The indications included different kinds of arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, Bechterew's disease, hemophiliac arthritis, osteoarthritis, but also patients with joint prosthesis and synovial effusion. There are three commercial available radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment: yttrium-90 for the knee (185 to 250 MBq), rhenium-186 for larger joints (shoulder and hip with 111 MBq; elbow, wrist, ankle joint with 74 MBq) and erbium- 169 for smaller joints (acromioclavicular joint with 37 MBq, thumb base and MTP I with 30 MBq, MCP and MTP II-V with 22 MBq, PIP with 18.5 MBq, and DIP with 15 MBq, respectively). Decisive for the treatment is a positive sign for arthritis in the two-phase bone scan with 99mTc- HMDP (high uptake in the blood pool phase). Only for radiosynovectomy in the knee an ultrasound with an evidence of effusion is sufficient. Side effects by the treatment are rare, such as temporary radiation or crystal synovitis, tissue necrosis (extra-articular fraction or intraarticular), joint infection (1 of 35,000 joints) or effects due to the immobilization (thrombosis, pulmonary embolism (immobilization of the knee), lymph edema or loss of motion. In the treatment of the knee, a prophylaxis with heparin is necessary to protect the patients for pulmonary embolism. The radiation absorbed dose to the patients are low because a low leakage rate from the treated joint (lymphogenic uptake of 1.8%ID (0.45 to 4.78). These leads to a radiation exposure to the testis of 0.1mSv (0.05 to 0.18) and to the ovary of 0.2 mSv (0.1 to 0.38). Significantly is the radiation exposure of the physician, here especially at the finger pulp. A high beta dose of 22.1 μSv/MBq for the forefinger was observed using only a syringe protection in treatments of knees (90Y), this resulted in a annual radiation

  8. Hand and wrist arthritis of Behcet disease: Imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Reports on arthritis in Behcet disease are relatively scarce, and imaging features vary. Purpose: To document the various imaging features of articular disorders of the hand and wrist in Behcet disease. Material and Methods: Four patients, four women aged 26 to 65 years, fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of Behcet disease, with imaging findings of hand and wrist arthritis, were seen in two institutions. Radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were studied to elucidate the pattern and distribution. Results: Both non-erosive arthritis and erosive arthritis of different features were noted: one with non-erosive synovitis of the wrist, one with wrist synovitis with minimal erosion, and two with erosive arthritis of the distal interphalangeal joint. Conclusion: Imaging manifestations of arthritis of Behcet disease vary, and may be similar to other seronegative arthritides

  9. Value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this review is to describe the spectrum of sonographic findings in rheumatic diseases with respect to the diagnostic potential using US contrast media which prove activity or inactivity in synovial tissue where new treatment regimes target. Synovial activity can be found in non-erosive and erosive forms of primary and secondary osteoarthritis, and in inflammatory forms of joint diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and peripheral manifestations of spondyloarthritis including, ankylosing spondylitis, Reiter's syndrome, psoriatic arthritis and enteropathic arthritis. It can also be present in metabolic and endocrine forms of arthritis, in connective tissue arthropathies like systemic lupus erythematosus or scleroderma and in infectious arthritis. Ultrasound should be used as first-line imaging modality in suspected early cases of RA and other forms of arthritis, whereas contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can further enable for sensitive assessment of vascularity which correlates with disease activity

  10. Clinical evaluation of joint scintigraphy in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertechnetate (sup(99m)TcO4-) joint scintigraphy was performed on 45 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 3 with nonspecific arthritis and 6 normal subjects. 1) The sites of radioisotopic accumulation were generally in agreement with those of clinical involvement in rheumatoid arthritis. 2) By analysis of build-up curves in the wrist joint, tracer was found to be concentrated more rapidly in rheumatoid arthritis (T 1/2 = 0.67 min.) than in nonspecific arthritis (T 1/2 = 2.66 min.) 3) The degree of radioisotopic accumulation correlated well with the value of CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. It could be cosidered that pertechnetate joint scintigraphy is useful for clinical evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis. (author)

  11. Value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zordo, Tobias de; Mlekusch, Sabine P.; Feuchtner, Gudrun M. [Department of Radiology II, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Mur, Erich [Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Schirmer, Michael [Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital of the Elisabethines Klagenfurt, Voelkermarkter Strasse 15-19, 9020 Klagenfurt (Austria); Klauser, Andrea S. [Department of Radiology II, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)], E-mail: andrea.klauser@i-med.ac.at

    2007-11-15

    The purpose of this review is to describe the spectrum of sonographic findings in rheumatic diseases with respect to the diagnostic potential using US contrast media which prove activity or inactivity in synovial tissue where new treatment regimes target. Synovial activity can be found in non-erosive and erosive forms of primary and secondary osteoarthritis, and in inflammatory forms of joint diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and peripheral manifestations of spondyloarthritis including, ankylosing spondylitis, Reiter's syndrome, psoriatic arthritis and enteropathic arthritis. It can also be present in metabolic and endocrine forms of arthritis, in connective tissue arthropathies like systemic lupus erythematosus or scleroderma and in infectious arthritis. Ultrasound should be used as first-line imaging modality in suspected early cases of RA and other forms of arthritis, whereas contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can further enable for sensitive assessment of vascularity which correlates with disease activity.

  12. Interplay between environmental factors, articular involvement, and HLA-B27 in patients with psoriatic arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Scarpa, R.; DEL PUENTE A; di Girolamo, C; Della Valle, G.; E. Lubrano; Oriente, P

    1992-01-01

    Medical records of 138 patients with psoriatic arthritis and 138 with rheumatoid arthritis were reviewed for the occurrence of an environmental factor triggering arthritis. Twelve (9%) of the patients with psoriatic arthritis had had an acute disorder immediately preceding onset of arthritis (an operation in four cases, articular trauma in three, abortion in two, myocardial infarction, thrombophlebitis, and phosphoric ester intoxication in one case each). Peripheral arthritis occurred in all ...

  13. Is yoga a suitable treatment for rheumatoid arthritis: current opinion

    OpenAIRE

    Telles S; Singh N

    2012-01-01

    Shirley Telles, Nilkamal SinghPatanjali Research Foundation, Haridwar, IndiaAbstract: We reviewed published literature regarding the use of yoga for managing rheumatoid arthritis to determine whether adequate evidence exists to suggest its usefulness as a therapy. A search for previous studies involving yoga and rheumatoid arthritis in PubMed yielded eight reports. These studies reported the benefits of yoga in the physical and mental health of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), suggest...

  14. Identification of Urinary Peptide Biomarkers Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Stalmach, Angelique; Johnsson, Hanna; McInnes, Iain B.; Husi, Holger; Klein, Julie; Dakna, Mohammed; Mullen, William; Mischak, Harald; Porter, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis are associated with improved outcomes but current diagnostic tools such as rheumatoid factor or anti-citrullinated protein antibodies have shown limited sensitivity. In this pilot study we set out to establish a panel of urinary biomarkers associated with rheumatoid arthritis using capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry. We compared the urinary proteome of 33 participants of the Scottish Early Rheumatoid Arthritis inception...

  15. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Assayag

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a common inflammatory disease affecting about 1% of the population. Interstitial lung disease is a serious and frequent complication of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD is characterized by several histopathologic subtypes. This article reviews the proposed pathogenesis and risk factors for RA-ILD. We also outline the important steps involved in the work-up of RA-ILD and review the evidence for treatment and prognosis.

  16. Lumbar radiculopathy caused by foraminal stenosis in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Koakutsu, Tomoaki; Morozumi, Naoki; Koizumi, Yutaka; Ishii, Yushin

    2011-01-01

    Study design Case-series study. Objective To describe the clinical presentation, characteristic findings of imaging studies, and treatment of lumbar radiculopathy caused by foraminal stenosis in rheumatoid arthritis. Background Lumbar lesions in rheumatoid arthritis are relatively rare, with a limited number of systemic reports. Methods Six patients with lumbar radiculopathy caused by foraminal stenosis in rheumatoid arthritis were treated. The patients were all women with a mean age of 69 ye...

  17. Pulsed radio frequency therapy of experimentally induced arthritis in ponies.

    OpenAIRE

    Crawford, W. H.; Houge, J C; Neirby, D T; Di Mino, A; Di Mino, A A

    1991-01-01

    The effect of pulsed radio frequency therapy (PRFT) was evaluated on seven ponies with no arthritis and in 28 ponies in which arthritis was created using intra-articular amphotericin B to induce synovitis in the right middle carpal joint. The ponies were divided into five treatment and two control groups. Two levels of arthritis were created and two dosage levels of PRFT were evaluated. The effect of PRFT on arthritic and nonarthritic joints was measured by comparing synovial fluid parameters...

  18. The first national clinical audit for rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Firth, J.; Snowden, N.; Ledingham, J; Rivett, A.; Galloway, J; Dennison, E. M.; MacPhie, E.; Ide, Z.; Rowe, I.; Kandala, N.; Jameson, K

    2016-01-01

    The first national audit for rheumatoid and early inflammatory arthritis has benchmarked care for the first 3 months of follow-up activity from first presentation to a rheumatology service. Access to care, management of early rheumatoid arthritis and support for self care were measured against National Institute for Health and Care Excellence quality standards; impact of early arthritis and experience of care were measured using patient-reported outcome and experience measures. The results de...

  19. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia presenting with arthritis in an adult patient

    OpenAIRE

    Usalan, C.; Ozarslan, E; Zengin, N.; Buyukayk, Y.; Gullu, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The earliest manifestations of leukaemia often include rheumatic signs and symptoms. Arthritis is a well recognised complication of leukaemia in children, but acute and chronic leukaemia may also cause arthritis in adults. Leukaemic arthritis may occur at any time during the course of leukaemia and may be the presenting manifestation. It should therefore be considered in the differential diagnosis of both childhood and adult rheumatic disease. We present an adult patient presenting with arthr...

  20. Reactive arthritis induced by recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Marr

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile colitis is a common infection that can be difficult to resolve and may result in recurrent infections. Reactive arthritis is a rare presentation of this disease and its treatment is not well differentiated in the literature. We describe a case of reactive arthritis occurring in a patient with a history of recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis while currently receiving a taper of oral vancomycin. His arthritis symptoms resolved with corticosteroids and continued treatment with anticlostridial antibiotics.

  1. Microcirculation of the juvenile knee in chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bünger, Cody; Bülow, J; Tøndevold, E;

    1986-01-01

    In order to investigate pathogenetic factors in growth abnormalities of the knee in hemophilic arthropathy and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, the hemodynamic changes of the knee following chronic synovial inflammation and elevated joint pressure were studied in puppies. Unilateral arthritis was....... The growth plates formed borders for the extension of these changes. The increased permeability and surface area between blood and bone in arthritis may accelerate the resorption and subsequent destruction of subchondral bone in chronic arthropathies of the juvenile knee....

  2. How effective is ustekinumab in controlling psoriatic arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifati, Claudio; Graceffa, Dario

    2016-05-01

    Recently ustekinumab has been approved for the therapy of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Some case series have been published reporting new onset of inflammatory arthritis in psoriasis patients treated with ustekinumab. In addition, flare of joint inflammation in PsA patients has also been reported. We describe a case series of seven patients affected by PsA who experienced either a worsening or a flare of inflammatory arthritis during treatment with ustekinumab. PMID:26626908

  3. Suppression of type II collagen-induced arthritis by intragastric administration of soluble type II collagen.

    OpenAIRE

    NAGLER-ANDERSON, C; Bober, L A; Robinson, M E; Siskind, G W; Thorbecke, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    Although oral administration of protein antigens may lead to specific immunologic unresponsiveness, this method of immunoregulation has not been applied to models of autoimmune disease. Type II collagen-induced arthritis is an animal model of polyarthritis induced in susceptible mice and rats by immunization with type II collagen, a major component of cartilage. Intragastric administration of soluble type II collagen, prior to immunization with type II collagen in adjuvant, suppresses the inc...

  4. Posttranslational Modification of Collagen Type II : Effects on Antigen-Specific T-cell Tolerance and Autoreactivity in Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Merky, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common chronic inflammatory disease affecting peripheral joints in approximately 1% of the world population. Immunization of susceptible strains with CII, leads to development of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), an animal model for RA. The aim of this thesis was to investigate mechanisms involved in regulation of immunological T-cell tolerance in CIA by studying availability of joint-specific CII for presentation to autoreactive T cell...

  5. Early rheumatoid arthritis and its differentiation from other joint abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The introduction of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs has created new demands on imaging to early identify patients with rheumatoid arthritis and opened new prospects in therapeutic management of patients with aggressive disease. Therefore, new imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound have developed during the past few years in this field. In some cases, both magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound may be also useful in making the distinction between early rheumatoid arthritis and other joints abnormalities, including early psoriatic arthritis. This article will review key aspects of important advances in imaging in rheumatoid arthritis, particularly focusing on magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound.

  6. Radiosynoviorthese in the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiosynoviorthese, a new method for the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, was developed. Altogether 260 patients with rheumatoid arthritis were treated. The therapeutic activity of radioactive colloid Au was administered intraarticularly to all the patients. Indications and contraindications for radiation therapy of rheumatoid arthritis were developed. Good short- and long-term results were noted in most of the patients after radiation therapy. Radiosynoviorthese as a method of local active therapy of affected joints with colloid Au in the multiple modality treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is effective; its prolonged stable therapeutic effect in patients is observed

  7. GANGGUAN PERTUMBUHAN MANDIBULA PADA JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ria Puspitawati

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA is a systemic disease on childhood, which has chronic arthritis as its most prominent manifestation. One very common complication of JRA is growth disturbance. JRA involving temporomandibular joint usually result in mandibular growth retardation which eventually can lead to micrognathia, retrognathia, malocclusion and other mandibulofacial developmental aberrations. Factors considered to be the cause of these growth and developmental disturbances are: congenital, the disease's direct effect on the condyle, functional deficiency of the temporomandibular joint, duration, age of disease onset and type of the JRA and corticosteroid therapy. However, the mechanism for the mandibulofacial growth and developmental aberrations due to JRA are not fully understood. This literature review will discuss the hypotheses concerning mechanisms of those growth and developmental disturbances, especially based on clinical and radiographic studies on JRA cases.

  8. The cystic form of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nonerosive form of rheumatoid arthritis (R.A.) was found in 62 patients out of 660 patients with R.A.. These 62 patients exhibit slowly progressive cystic changes in about the same joints in which usually erosions develop in classic R.A.. The E.S.R. is often low, half of the patients remained seronegative and there are 35 males and 27 females in the group. A smaller group of 15 out of these patients could be followed from a stage wherein the radiographs were normal to a stage of extensive cystic changes, over a period of at least 6 years. An attempt is made to delineate this group within the rheumatoid arthritis disease entity. (orig.)

  9. Reactive arthritis: advances in diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Petricca

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Reactive Arthritis (ReA is an aseptic synovitis developing after a primary infection distant from the joint, mainly localized in the gastrointestinal (Enteroarthritis or genitourinary tract (Uroarthritis. Because of either the asymmetric joint involvement, the possibility of involvement of the spine and enthesis, and the HLA-B27 association ReA is considered one of the spondylarthropathies. Recently, bacterial components or viable bacteria were found in joints during ReA. For this reason, the limits between ReA itself and infectious arthritis are now less definite. Generally accepted diagnostic and classification criteria are still lacking but the improvement in techniques for detection of bacteria increase the possibility to identify the triggering agents. Several studies have examined the role of antimicrobial drugs in ameliorating the natural course of ReA, with some positive results for Uroarthritis only. However, more conventional treatments based on NSAIDs, Sulfasalazine and steroids are effective in many cases.

  10. Analysis of Rheumatoid Arthritis through Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita Mittal

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is the most common inflammatory arthropathy worldwide, but may be less prevalent in Asian populations causing pain, swelling, stiffness, and loss of function in joints. The spectrum of magnetic resonance imaging findings encountered in the musculoskeletal system in this disease but these images often found non-productive due to noise present in the image and creates troublesome situation for analysis point of view. The role of image processing in rheumatoid arthritis lies, not in diagnosis, but in evaluation of the integrity of structures affected by the disease process. Since Magnetic resonance imaging is more sensitive to synovial changes than any radiography tech, and may permit quantification of changes in disease activity, as well as evaluation of the effects of drug therapy, and of complications of the disease and its treatment. So analyzing the Magnetic resonance images through image processing tool of Matlab provides easy going approach for diagnosis of the disease.

  11. Histopathology of Lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hejka, A.; Schmitz, J.L.; England, D.M.; Callister, S.M.; Schell, R.F.

    1989-05-01

    The authors studied the histopathologic evolution of arthritis in nonirradiated and irradiated hamsters infected with Borrelia burgdorferi. Nonirradiated hamsters injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi developed an acute inflammatory reaction involving the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and dermis. This acute inflammatory reaction was short-lived and was replaced by a mild chronic synovitis as the number of detectable spirochetes in the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and perineurovascular areas diminished. Exposing hamsters to radiation before inoculation with B. burgdorferi exacerbated and prolonged the acute inflammatory phase. Spirochetes also persisted longer in the periarticular soft tissues. A major histopathologic finding was destructive and erosive bone changes of the hind paws, which resulted in deformation of the joints. These studies should be helpful in defining the immune mechanism participating in the onset, progression, and resolution of Lyme arthritis.

  12. Histopathology of Lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors studied the histopathologic evolution of arthritis in nonirradiated and irradiated hamsters infected with Borrelia burgdorferi. Nonirradiated hamsters injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi developed an acute inflammatory reaction involving the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and dermis. This acute inflammatory reaction was short-lived and was replaced by a mild chronic synovitis as the number of detectable spirochetes in the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and perineurovascular areas diminished. Exposing hamsters to radiation before inoculation with B. burgdorferi exacerbated and prolonged the acute inflammatory phase. Spirochetes also persisted longer in the periarticular soft tissues. A major histopathologic finding was destructive and erosive bone changes of the hind paws, which resulted in deformation of the joints. These studies should be helpful in defining the immune mechanism participating in the onset, progression, and resolution of Lyme arthritis

  13. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akter, Ripa; Boland, Paul; Daley, Peter; Rahman, Proton; Al Ghanim, Nayef

    2016-01-01

    Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated. PMID:27366177

  14. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ripa Akter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated.

  15. Cardiovascular Risk in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Y. Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is an inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis. In addition to skin and joint involvement, there is increasing evidence suggesting that patients with PsA also have an increase in risk of clinical and subclinical cardiovascular diseases, mostly due to accelerating atherosclerosis. Both conventional and nonconventional cardiovascular risk factors contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk in PsA. Chronic inflammation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in PsA, acting independently and/or synergistically with the conventional risk factors. In this paper, we discuss the current literature indicating that patients with PsA are at risk of cardiovascular diseases.

  16. Therapeutic effect of Captopril on rheumatoid arthritis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Mei Liu; Kai-Jie Wang

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the therapeutic effect of the intervention treatment with different doses ofCaptopril onTNF-αcontents in serum of rheumatoid arthritis(RA) rats, and to provide the theoretical proofs for clinical application ofCaptopril in treatments of rheumatoid diseases. Methods:FiftyWistar rats were randomly divided into5 groups, namely,GroupA,GroupB, GroupC,GroupD,GroupE with10 ratsin each group.Injection ofFreund’s complete adjuvant was employed to establish adjuvant-induced arthritis model in rats.GroupA was model group; after model establishment, rats were treated with20 mL normal saline as placebo(ip.).Rats inGroupB were treated with8 mg/kg cyclophosphamide(ip.).Rats inGroupC,D andE were intraperitoneally injected with30 mg/kg,100 mg/kg and300 mg/kgCaptopril respectively.Rats in each group were subjected to continuous treatment for3 weeks, and then sacrificed.Eyeballs of rats were excised and blood was collected.TNF-αcontent in serum were detected usingELISA; each group rats were compared for the hind legs arthrocele.Right ankle tissues of rats were collected to prepare section, and microscopic observation of pathological changes was performed. Results:TNF-αcontent in serum ofGroupA rats was significantly higher than that of rats in other4 groups(P0.05).FromDay8, ankle arthrocele of rats inGroupsB,C,D andE was obviously relieved compared with that ofGroupA rats; the anti-inflammatory effects were gradually enhanced with the extension of medication time.Treatments ofGroupsC,D andE showed significant activities against tardive arthrocele; the degree of ankle arthrocele in rats of these three groups was lower than that ofGroupA rats(P<0.01).Histological observation showed that large amount of inflammatory cells and plasmocyte infiltration was found in ankle synovial tissues ofGroupA rats.Relief of hyperaemia and edema of right ankle synovial tissues as well as significant decrease in synoviocyte layer hyperplasia, intra-articular inflammatory

  17. Patient advocacy and arthritis: moving forward.

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Patient advocacy is based on the premise that people have the right to make their own choices about their health care. Personal advocacy is centred on the experiential expertise of the individual affected by the condition, whereas group advocacy is grounded on patient-centred strategies and actions. The first patient advocacy groups for arthritis were set up over 20 years ago in the USA and have subsequently spread to many other countries. This paper discusses the growth and impact of persona...

  18. Rheumatoid arthritis as a modifier of periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda, Letícia Algarves

    2007-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic tissue-destructive condition in which the tooth-supporting collagen fibers of ligament and bone are broken down mainly by the host s overreactive immune inflammatory response. The relation between periodontitis and other chronic inflammatory destructive diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), has been dealt with in some studies because, in spite of their different etiologies, similar mechanisms of tissue destruction have been described in thes...

  19. Genetics of rheumatoid arthritis: GWAS and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    McAllister KM; Eyre S; Orozco G

    2011-01-01

    Kate McAllister, Stephen Eyre, Gisela OrozcoArthritis Research United Kingdom Epidemiology Unit, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, UKAbstract: The study of complex genetics in autoimmune diseases has progressed at a tremendous pace over the last 4 years, as a direct result of the enormous gains made by genome wide association studies (GWAS). Novel genetic findings are continuously being reported alongside the rapid development of genetic technologies, sophis...

  20. Arthritis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please enable JavaScript. Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) French (français) Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Russian (Русский) ... Arthrite - français (French) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Hindi (हिन्दी) Arthritis हिन्दी (Hindi) Bilingual PDF ...