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Sample records for antigen-induced arthritis model

  1. Angiotensin-(1-7 Promotes Resolution of Neutrophilic Inflammation in a Model of Antigen-Induced Arthritis in Mice

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    Lívia C. Barroso

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Defective resolution of inflammation may be crucial for the initiation and development of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as arthritis. Therefore, it has been suggested that therapeutic strategies based on molecules that facilitate inflammation resolution present great potential for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects and role of angiotensin-(1-7 [Ang-(1-7] in driving resolution of neutrophilic inflammation in a model of arthritis. For this purpose, male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to antigen-induced arthritis and treated with Ang-(1-7 at the peak of the inflammatory process. Analysis of the number of inflammatory cells, apoptosis, and immunofluorescence for NF-κB was performed in the exudate collected from the knee cavity. Neutrophil accumulation in periarticular tissue was measured by assaying myeloperoxidase activity. Apoptosis of human neutrophil after treatment with Ang-(1-7 was evaluated morphologically and by flow cytometry, and NF-κB phosphorylation by immunofluorescence. Efferocytosis was evaluated in vivo. Therapeutic treatment with Ang-(1-7 at the peak of inflammation promoted resolution, an effect associated with caspase-dependent neutrophils apoptosis and NF-κB inhibition. Importantly, Ang-(1-7 was also able to induce apoptosis of human neutrophils, an effect associated with NF-κB inhibition. The pro-resolving effects of Ang-(1-7 were inhibited by the Mas receptor antagonist A779. Finally, we showed that Ang-(1-7 increased the efferocytic ability of murine macrophages. Our results clearly demonstrate that Ang-(1-7 resolves neutrophilic inflammation in vivo acting in two key step of resolution: apoptosis of neutrophils and their removal by efferocytosis. Ang-(1-7 is a novel mediator of resolution of inflammation.

  2. Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) as a potential therapy for rheumatoid arthritis: boron biodistribution study in a model of antigen-induced arthritis in rabbits.

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    Trivillin, Verónica A; Abramson, David B; Bumaguin, Gaston E; Bruno, Leandro J; Garabalino, Marcela A; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Heber, Elisa M; Feldman, Sara; Schwint, Amanda E

    2014-11-01

    Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) is explored for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study was to perform boron biodistribution studies in a model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in female New Zealand rabbits, with the boron carriers boronophenylalanine (BPA) and sodium decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) to assess the potential feasibility of BNCS for RA. Rabbits in chronic phase of AIA were used for biodistribution studies employing the following protocols: intra-articular (ia) (a) BPA-f 0.14 M (0.7 mg (10)B), (b) GB-10 (5 mg (10)B), (c) GB-10 (50 mg (10)B) and intravenous (iv), (d) BPA-f 0.14 M (15.5 mg (10)B/kg), (e) GB-10 (50 mg (10)B/kg), and (f) BPA-f (15.5 mg (10)B/kg) + GB-10 (50 mg (10)B/kg). At different post-administration times (13-85 min for ia and 3 h for iv), samples of blood, pathological synovium (target tissue), cartilage, tendon, muscle, and skin were taken for boron measurement by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The intra-articular administration protocols at boron concentrations (>20 ppm) in the pathological synovium. Dosimetric estimations suggest that BNCS would be able to achieve a therapeutically useful dose in pathological synovium without exceeding the radiotolerance of normal tissues in the treatment volume, employing boron carriers approved for use in humans. Radiobiological in vivo studies will be necessary to determine the actual therapeutic efficacy of BNCS to treat RA in an experimental model.

  3. Correlative BOLD MR imaging of stages of synovitis in a rabbit model of antigen-induced arthritis

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    Doria, Andrea S. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Crawley, Adrian [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Toronto Western Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Gahunia, Harpal; Rayner, Tammy; Tassos, Vivian; Zhong, Anguo [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Moineddin, Rahim [Family and Community Medicine, Department of Public Health, Toronto (Canada); Pritzker, Kenneth; Mendes, Maria; Jong, Roland [Mount Sinai Hospital, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Toronto (Canada); Salter, Robert B. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-01-15

    Because of the ability of blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) MRI to assess blood oxygenation changes within the microvasculature, this technique holds potential for evaluating early perisynovial changes in inflammatory arthritis. To evaluate the feasibility of BOLD MRI to detect interval perisynovial changes in knees of rabbits with inflammatory arthritis. Rabbit knees were injected with albumin (n=9) or saline (n=6) intra-articularly, or were not injected (control knees, n=9). Except for two rabbits (albumin-injected, n=2 knees; saline-injected, n=2 knees) that unexpectedly died on days 7 and 21 of the experiment, respectively, all other animals were scanned with BOLD MRI on days 0, 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after induction of arthritis. T2*-weighted gradient-echo MRI was performed during alternate 30 s of normoxia/hyperoxia. BOLD MRI measurements were compared with clinical, laboratory and histological markers. Percentage of activated voxels was significantly greater in albumin-injected knees than in contralateral saline-injected knees (P=0.04). For albumin-injected knees (P < 0.05) and among different categories of knees (P=0.009), the percentage of activated BOLD voxels varied over time. A quadratic curve for on-and-off BOLD difference was delineated for albumin- and saline-injected knees over time (albumin-injected, P=0.047; saline-injected, P=0.009). A trend toward a significant difference in synovial histological scores between albumin-injected and saline-injected knees was noted only for acute scores (P=0.07). As a proof of concept, BOLD MRI can depict perisynovial changes during progression of experimental arthritis. (orig.)

  4. Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) as a potential therapy for rheumatoid arthritis: radiobiological studies at RA-1 Nuclear Reactor in a model of antigen-induced arthritis in rabbits

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    Trivillin, Veronica A.; Schwint, Amanda E. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Department of Radiobiology, San Martin, Provincia Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bruno, Leandro J.; Gatti, David A. [Universidad Nacional de Rosario, LABOATEM (Laboratorio de Biologia Osteoarticular, Ingenieria Tisular y Terapias Emergentes), Facultad de Ciencias Medicas, Rosario (Argentina); Stur, Mariela [Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Catedra de Diagnostico por Imagenes, Facultad de Ciencias Medicas, Rosario (Argentina); Garabalino, Marcela A.; Hughes, Andrea Monti [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Department of Radiobiology, San Martin, Provincia Buenos Aires (Argentina); Castillo, Jorge; Wentzeis, Luis; Scolari, Hugo [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Department of Reactors, San Martin, Provincia Buenos Aires (Argentina); Pozzi, Emiliano C.C. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Department of Research and Production Reactors, Ezeiza, Province Buenos Aires (Argentina); Feldman, Sara [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de Rosario, LABOATEM (Laboratorio de Biologia Osteoarticular, Ingenieria Tisular y Terapias Emergentes), Facultad de Ciencias Medicas, Rosario (Argentina)

    2016-11-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune pathology characterized by the proliferation and inflammation of the synovium. Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS), a binary treatment modality that combines the preferential incorporation of boron carriers to target tissue and neutron irradiation, was proposed to treat the pathological synovium in arthritis. In a previous biodistribution study, we showed the incorporation of therapeutically useful boron concentrations to the pathological synovium in a model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in rabbits, employing two boron compounds approved for their use in humans, i.e., decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) and boronophenylalanine (BPA). The aim of the present study was to perform low-dose BNCS studies at the RA-1 Nuclear Reactor in the same model. Neutron irradiation was performed post intra-articular administration of BPA or GB-10 to deliver 2.4 or 3.9 Gy, respectively, to synovium (BNCS-AIA). AIA and healthy animals (no AIA) were used as controls. The animals were followed clinically for 2 months. At that time, biochemical, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological studies were performed. BNCS-AIA animals did not show any toxic effects, swelling or pain on palpation. In BNCS-AIA, the post-treatment levels of TNF-α decreased in four of six rabbits and IFN-γ levels decreased in five of six rabbits. In all cases, MRI images of the knee joint in BNCS-AIA resembled those of no AIA, with no necrosis or periarticular effusion. Synovial membranes of BNCS-AIA were histologically similar to no AIA. BPA-BNCS and GB-10-BNCS, even at low doses, would be therapeutically useful for the local treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. (orig.)

  5. Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) as a potential therapy for rheumatoid arthritis: radiobiological studies at RA-1 Nuclear Reactor in a model of antigen-induced arthritis in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivillin, Veronica A.; Schwint, Amanda E.; Bruno, Leandro J.; Gatti, David A.; Stur, Mariela; Garabalino, Marcela A.; Hughes, Andrea Monti; Castillo, Jorge; Wentzeis, Luis; Scolari, Hugo; Pozzi, Emiliano C.C.; Feldman, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune pathology characterized by the proliferation and inflammation of the synovium. Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS), a binary treatment modality that combines the preferential incorporation of boron carriers to target tissue and neutron irradiation, was proposed to treat the pathological synovium in arthritis. In a previous biodistribution study, we showed the incorporation of therapeutically useful boron concentrations to the pathological synovium in a model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in rabbits, employing two boron compounds approved for their use in humans, i.e., decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) and boronophenylalanine (BPA). The aim of the present study was to perform low-dose BNCS studies at the RA-1 Nuclear Reactor in the same model. Neutron irradiation was performed post intra-articular administration of BPA or GB-10 to deliver 2.4 or 3.9 Gy, respectively, to synovium (BNCS-AIA). AIA and healthy animals (no AIA) were used as controls. The animals were followed clinically for 2 months. At that time, biochemical, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological studies were performed. BNCS-AIA animals did not show any toxic effects, swelling or pain on palpation. In BNCS-AIA, the post-treatment levels of TNF-α decreased in four of six rabbits and IFN-γ levels decreased in five of six rabbits. In all cases, MRI images of the knee joint in BNCS-AIA resembled those of no AIA, with no necrosis or periarticular effusion. Synovial membranes of BNCS-AIA were histologically similar to no AIA. BPA-BNCS and GB-10-BNCS, even at low doses, would be therapeutically useful for the local treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. (orig.)

  6. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Polyphenolic-Enriched Red Raspberry Extract in an Antigen Induced Arthritis Rat Model†

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    Jean-Gilles, Dinorah; Li, Liya; Ma, Hang; Yuan, Tao; Chichester, Clinton O.; Seeram, Navindra P.

    2011-01-01

    The red raspberry (Rubus idaeus) fruit contains bioactive polyphenols including anthocyanins and ellagitannins with reported anti-inflammatory properties. Here we sought to investigate the cartilage protecting and anti-inflammatory effects of a polyphenolic-enriched red raspberry extract (RRE; standardized to total polyphenol, anthocyanin, and ellagitannin contents) using: 1) an in vitro bovine nasal explant cell culture model and, 2) an in vivo adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model. RRE contained 20% total polyphenols (as gallic acid equivalents), 5% anthocyanins (as cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalents) and 9.25% ellagitannins (as ellagic acid equivalents). In the in vitro studies, bovine nasal explants were stimulated with 10 ng/mL IL-1β to induce the release of proteoglycan and type II collagen. On treatment with RRE (50 μg/mL), there was a decrease in the rate of degradation of both proteoglycan and type II collagen. In the in vivo antigen-induced arthritis rat model, animals were gavaged daily with RRE (at doses of 30 and 120 mg/Kg, respectively) for 30 days after adjuvant injection (750 μg of Mycobacterium tuberculosis suspension in squalene). At the higher dose, animals treated with RRE had a lower incidence and severity of arthritis compared to control animals. Also, histological analyses revealed significant inhibition of inflammation, pannus formation, cartilage damage, and bone resorption by RRE. This study suggests that red raspberry polyphenols may afford cartilage protection and/or modulate the onset and severity of arthritis. PMID:22111586

  7. Macrophage specific MRI imaging for antigen induced arthritides. A potential new strategy for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, G.H.; Rummeny, E.J.; Daldrup-Link, H.E.

    2007-01-01

    The present work describes the potential of iron oxides for the detection of macrophages in synovitis in experimental, antigen-induced arthritis. The pivotal role of macrophages in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in humans and in antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in animal models is discussed. The latter appear to be very similar in many aspects to the human RA. We show the potential for iron oxide-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine the macrophage content in the arthritic synovial membranes. The results of our own research, as well as those of other research groups, are presented and discussed. MRI after the intravenous (i.v.) administration of iron oxides enables the depiction of macrophage content in arthritic synovial membranes in AIA through the effects of the intracellular compartmentalisation of iron oxide particles. These effects can be demonstrated in 24-h delayed images after i.v. contrast application, on T2-weighted spin-echo or turbo-spin-echo sequences, and especially on T2 * -weighted gradient-echo sequences. The signal effects are not only apparent in high field strength (4.7 Tesla) but also on 1.5 Tesla clinical scanners. The use of iron oxides enables the determination of the macrophage content in synovitis in animals with AIA. This parameter represents a potential marker to determine disease activity, and possibly represents a marker to evaluate the effectiveness of specific therapies in human RA. Current knowledge of iron oxide-enhanced MRI is limited to animal models. The clinical evaluation of this new method in patients with RA has not yet been performed. However, based on the considerations presented here, significant progress in the diagnostic work-up of RA can be expected

  8. 166Ho-chitosan as a radiation synovectomy agent - antigen-induced arthritis in rabbits

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    Kim, Sug Jun; Lee, Soo Yong; Jeon, Dae Geun; Lee, Jong Seok

    1998-01-01

    Radiation synovectomy is a noninvasive therapy that has been investigated as an alternative to surgical synovectomy. It has been successfully employed in the treatment of synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory arthropathies. In this study, we developed experimental animal model for radiation synovectomy. A model system in which a single injection of ovalbumin into the knee joints of previously sensitized rabbits consistently produced a chronic arthritis which was histologically similiar to human rheumatoid arthritis. (author). 8 refs., 8 figs

  9. {sup 166}Ho-chitosan as a radiation synovectomy agent - antigen-induced arthritis in rabbits

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    Kim, Sug Jun; Lee, Soo Yong; Jeon, Dae Geun; Lee, Jong Seok [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-01-01

    Radiation synovectomy is a noninvasive therapy that has been investigated as an alternative to surgical synovectomy. It has been successfully employed in the treatment of synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory arthropathies. In this study, we developed experimental animal model for radiation synovectomy. A model system in which a single injection of ovalbumin into the knee joints of previously sensitized rabbits consistently produced a chronic arthritis which was histologically similiar to human rheumatoid arthritis. (author). 8 refs., 8 figs

  10. Sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 15 (Siglec-15) mediates periarticular bone loss, but not joint destruction, in murine antigen-induced arthritis.

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    Shimizu, Tomohiro; Takahata, Masahiko; Kameda, Yusuke; Endo, Tsutomu; Hamano, Hiroki; Hiratsuka, Shigeto; Ota, Masahiro; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2015-10-01

    Osteoclastogenesis requires immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling. Multiple immunoreceptors associated with immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif adaptor proteins, including DNAX-activating protein 12 kDa (DAP12) and Fc receptor common γ (FcRγ), have been identified in osteoclast lineage cells, and some are involved in arthritis-induced bone destruction. Sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 15 (Siglec-15) is an immunoreceptor that regulates osteoclast development and bone resorption in association with DAP12. Whether Siglec-15 is involved in arthritis-induced bone lesions, however, remains unknown. Here we used a murine antigen-induced arthritis model to examine the role of Siglec-15 in the development of bone lesions induced by joint inflammation. Arthritis was unilaterally induced in the knee joints of 8-week-old female wild-type (WT) and Siglec-15(-/-) mice, and the contralateral knees were used as a control. The degree of joint inflammation, and cartilage and subchondral bone destruction in Siglec-15(-/-) mice was comparable to that in WT mice, indicating that Siglec-15 is not involved in the development of arthritis and concomitant cartilage and subchondral bone destruction. On the other hand, the degree of periarticular bone loss in the proximal tibia of the arthritic knee was significantly lower in Siglec-15(-/-) mice compared to WT mice. Although osteoclast formation in the metaphysis was enhanced in both WT and Siglec-15(-/-) mice after arthritis induction, mature multinucleated osteoclast formation was impaired in Siglec-15(-/-) mice, indicating impaired osteoclast bone resorptive function in the periarticular regions of the arthritic joint in Siglec-15(-/-) mice. Confirming this result, Siglec-15(-/-) primary unfractionated bone marrow cells harvested from arthritic femurs and tibiae failed to develop into mature multinuclear osteoclasts. Our findings suggest that Siglec-15 is a therapeutic target for periarticular

  11. Hydrogel is Superior to Fibrin Gel as Matrix of Stem Cells in Alleviating Antigen-Induced Arthritis

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    He Liu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, therapy with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs has been attempted to relieve rheumatoid arthritis (RA and reconstruct cartilage injury. However, treatment has been unsuccessful in complete prevention of persistent cartilage destruction and resulted in inferior outcomes of cartilage regeneration. Scaffolds are an important construct in the field of cartilage tissue engineering, but their role in arthritis treatment has not yet been fully examined. Here, we transplanted two types of scaffold-assisted BMMSCs: fibrin gel- and poly(l-lactide-co-glycolide−poly(ethylene glycol−poly(l-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA−PEG−PLGA hydrogel-assisted BMMSCs referred as FGB and HGB groups, respectively, into subchondral defects for the treatment of antigen-induced arthritis. The administration of exogenous BMMSCs ameliorated joint swelling and decreased both joint surface temperature and inflammatory cytokine levels in both groups. Immune cell composition of the inflammation of surrounding synovium, protection of adjacent cartilage, and improved cartilage repair were also observed. Overall, the HGB group had a better therapeutic efficacy than the FGB group. In conclusion, local transplantation of BMMSCs in subchondral defects presents a novel approach in inducing RA remission and recovery of RA-induced cartilage injury. To induce these changes, the selection of scaffold for cell support is exceedingly important. Further studies are needed regarding the treatment options of subchondral defects in arthritis based on modified scaffold development, application of defined MSCs sources, combination of pharmacotherapeutics, and the addition of factors that inhibit the processes of RA remission, promote the recovery of RA-induced cartilage injury and the relationship between these factors.

  12. Intra-articular vs. systemic administration of etanercept in antigen-induced arthritis in the temporomandibular point. Part I: histological effects

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    Nyengaard Jens R

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporomandibular joint (TMJ arthritis in children causes alterations in craniomandibular growth. This abnormal growth may be prevented by an early anti-inflammatory intervention. We have previously shown that intra-articular (IA corticosteroid reduces TMJ inflammation, but causes concurrent mandibular growth inhibition in young rabbits. Blockage of TNF-α has already proven its efficacy in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis not responding to standard therapy. In this paper we evaluate the effect of IA etanercept compared to subcutaneous etanercept in antigen-induced TMJ-arthritis in rabbits on histological changes using histomorphometry and stereology. This article presents the data and discussion on the anti-inflammatory effects of systemic and IA etanercept. In Part II the data on the effects of systemic and IA etanercept on facial growth are presented. Methods Forty-two rabbits (10 weeks old pre-sensitized with ovalbumin and locally induced inflammation in the temporomandibular joints were divided into three groups: a placebo group receiving IA saline injections in both joints one week after arthritis induction (n = 14, an IA etanercept group receiving 0.1 mg/kg etanercept per joint one week after arthritis induction (n = 14 and a systemic etanercept group receiving 0.8 mg/kg etanercept weekly throughout the 12-week study (n = 14. Arthritis was maintained by giving four inductions three weeks apart. Additional IA saline or etanercept injections were also given one week after the re-inductions. Histomorphometric and unbiased stereological methods (optical fractionator were used to assess and estimate the inflammation in the joints. Results The histomorphometry showed synovial proliferation in all groups. The plasma cell count obtained by the optical fractionator was significantly reduced when treating with systemic etanercept but not with IA etanercept. Semi-quantitative assessments of synovial proliferation and

  13. Intra-articular vs. systemic administration of etanercept in antigen-induced arthritis in the temporomandibular joint. Part II: mandibular growth

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    Gelineck John

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporomandibular joint (TMJ arthritis in children causes alterations in the craniomandibular growth. Resultant abnormalities include; condylar erosions, a posterior mandibular rotation pattern, micrognathia, malocclusion with an anterior open bite, altered joint and muscular function occasionally associated with pain. These alterations may be prevented by early aggressive anti-inflammatory intervention. Previously, we have shown that intra-articular (IA corticosteroid reduces TMJ inflammation but causes additional mandibular growth inhibition in young rabbits. Local blockage of TNF-α may be an alternative treatment approach against TMJ involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. We evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of IA etanercept compared to subcutaneous etanercept in antigen-induced TMJ-arthritis in young rabbits in terms of mandibular growth. This article (Part II presents the data and discussion on the effects on facial growth. In Part I the anti-inflammatory effects of systemic and IA etanercept administration are discussed. Methods Arthritis was induced and maintained in the TMJs of 10-week old pre-sensitized rabbits (n = 42 by four repeated IA TMJ injections with ovalbumin, over a 12-week period. One group was treated weekly with systemic etanercept (0.8 mg/kg (n = 14, another group (n = 14 received IA etanercept (0.1 mg/kg bilaterally one week after induction of arthritis and one group (n = 14 served as an untreated arthritis group receiving IA TMJ saline injections. Head computerized tomographic scans were done before arthritis was induced and at the end of the study. Three small tantalum implants were inserted into the mandible, serving as stable landmarks for the super-impositions. Nineteen variables were evaluated in a mandibular growth analysis for inter-group differences. All data was evaluated blindedly. ANOVA and T-tests were applied for statistical evaluation using p Results Significant larger

  14. A role for CD44 in an antigen-induced murine model of pulmonary eosinophilia

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    Katoh, Shigeki; Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Kawakita, Kumiko; Tominaga, Akira; Kincade, Paul W.; Matsukura, Shigeru

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies established that IL-5–producing CD4+ T cells play a pivotal role in allergic respiratory inflammation. It was also reported that CD4+ T cells express higher levels of CD44 in the airway than in peripheral blood of patients with allergic respiratory diseases. We have used experimental pulmonary eosinophilia induced in mice by Ascaris suum (Asc) extract to investigate the role of CD44 in the development of allergic respiratory inflammation. Intraperitoneal administration of anti-CD44 mAb prevented both lymphocyte and eosinophil accumulation in the lung. Anti-CD44 mAb also blocked antigen-induced elevation of Th2 cytokines as well as chemokines (CCL11, CCL17) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Treatment with anti-CD44 mAb inhibited the increased levels of hyaluronic acid (HA) and leukotriene concentrations in BALF that typically result from antigen challenge. Anti-CD44 mAb also blocked antigen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness. An anti-CD44 mAb (IM7) inhibited the HA-binding ability of splenocytes associated with decreased levels of CD44. Soluble CD44 levels in serum were increased in Asc-challenged IM7–treated mice, but not in KM201-treated mice, compared with Asc-challenged rat IgG–treated mice. Ab’s that block CD44-HA binding reduced allergic respiratory inflammation by preventing lymphocyte and eosinophil accumulation in the lung. Thus, CD44 may be critical for development of allergic respiratory inflammation. PMID:12750406

  15. Suppression of Ongoing Experimental Arthritis by a Chinese Herbal Formula (Huo-Luo-Xiao-Ling Dan Involves Changes in Antigen-Induced Immunological and Biochemical Mediators of Inflammation

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    Ying-Hua Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is one of the major autoimmune diseases of global prevalence. The use of the anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of RA is associated with severe adverse reactions and toxicity. This limitation has necessitated the search for novel therapeutic products. We report here a traditional Chinese medicine-based herbal formula, Huo luo xiao ling dan (HLXL, which has potent antiarthritic activity as validated in the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA model. HLXL (2.3 g/Kg was fed to Lewis (RT.11 rats daily by gavage beginning at the onset of arthritis and then continued through the observation period. HLXL inhibited the severity of ongoing AA. This suppression of arthritis was associated with significant alterations in the T cell proliferative and cytokine responses as well as the antibody response against the disease-related antigen, mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65 (Bhsp65. There was a reduction in the level of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-17 and IL-1β but enhancement of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 level. In addition, there was inhibition of both the anti-Bhsp65 antibody response and the serum level of nitric oxide. Thus, HLXL is a promising CAM modality for further testing in RA patients.

  16. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

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    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Collagen-Induced Arthritis: A model for Murine Autoimmune Arthritis.

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    Pietrosimone, K M; Jin, M; Poston, B; Liu, P

    2015-10-20

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a common autoimmune animal model used to study rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The development of CIA involves infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils into the joint, as well as T and B cell responses to type II collagen. In murine CIA, genetically susceptible mice (DBA/1J) are immunized with a type II bovine collagen emulsion in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), and receive a boost of type II bovine collagen in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) 21 days after the first injection. These mice typically develop disease 26 to 35 days after the initial injection. C57BL/6J mice are resistant to arthritis induced by type II bovine collagen, but can develop arthritis when immunized with type II chicken collagen in CFA, and receive a boost of type II chicken collagen in IFA 21 days after the first injection. The concentration of heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37RA (MT) in CFA also differs for each strain. DBA/1J mice develop arthritis with 1 mg/ml MT, while C57BL/6J mice require and 3-4 mg/ml MT in order to develop arthritis. CIA develops slowly in C57BL/6J mice and cases of arthritis are mild when compared to DBA/1J mice. This protocol describes immunization of DBA/1J mice with type II bovine collagen and the immunization of C57BL/6J mice with type II chicken collagen.

  18. Dengue encephalitis-associated immunopathology in the mouse model: Implications for vaccine developers and antigens inducer of cellular immune response.

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    Marcos, Ernesto; Lazo, Laura; Gil, Lázaro; Izquierdo, Alienys; Suzarte, Edith; Valdés, Iris; Blanco, Aracelys; Ancizar, Julio; Alba, José Suárez; Pérez, Yusleydis de la C; Cobas, Karen; Romero, Yaremis; Guillén, Gerardo; Guzmán, María G; Hermida, Lisset

    2016-08-01

    Despite the many efforts made by the scientific community in the development of vaccine candidates against dengue virus (DENV), no vaccine has been licensed up to date. Although the immunopathogenesis associated to the disease is a key factor to take into account by vaccine developers, the lack of animal models that reproduce the clinical signs of the disease has hampered the vaccine progress. Non-human primates support viral replication, but they are very expensive and do not show signs of disease. Immunocompromised mice develop viremia and some signs of the disease; however, they are not valuable for vaccine testing. Nowadays, immunocompetent mice are the most used model to evaluate the immunogenicity of vaccine candidates. These animals are resistant to DENV infection; therefore, the intracranial inoculation with neuroadapted virus, which provokes viral encephalitis, represents an alternative to evaluate the protective capacity of vaccine candidates. Previous results have demonstrated the crucial role of cellular immune response in the protection induced by the virus and vaccine candidates in this mouse encephalitis model. However, in the present work we are proposing that the magnitude of the cell-mediated immunity and the inflammatory response generated by the vaccine can modulate the survival rate after viral challenge. We observed that the intracranial challenge of naïve mice with DENV-2 induces the recruitment of immune cells that contribute to the reduction of viral load, but does not increase the survival rate. On the contrary, animals treated with cyclophosphamide, an immunosuppressive drug that affects proliferating lymphocytes, had a higher viral load but a better survival rate than untreated animals. These results suggest that the immune system is playing an immunopathogenic role in this model and the survival rate may not be a suitable endpoint in the evaluation of vaccine candidates based on antigens that induce a strong cellular immune response

  19. Collagen-Induced Arthritis: A model for Murine Autoimmune Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Pietrosimone, K. M.; Jin, M.; Poston, B.; Liu, P.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a common autoimmune animal model used to study rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The development of CIA involves infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils into the joint, as well as T and B cell responses to type II collagen. In murine CIA, genetically susceptible mice (DBA/1J) are immunized with a type II bovine collagen emulsion in complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA), and receive a boost of type II bovine collagen in incomplete Freund’s adjuvant (IFA) 21 days aft...

  20. Early Subchondral Bone Loss at Arthritis Onset Predicted Late Arthritis Severity in a Rat Arthritis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courbon, Guillaume; Cleret, Damien; Linossier, Marie-Thérèse; Vico, Laurence; Marotte, Hubert

    2017-06-01

    Synovitis is usually observed before loss of articular function in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition to the synovium and according to the "Inside-Outside" theory, bone compartment is also involved in RA pathogenesis. Then, we investigated time dependent articular bone loss and prediction of early bone loss to late arthritis severity on the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model. Lewis female rats were longitudinally monitored from arthritis induction (day 0), with early (day 10) and late (day 17) steps. Trabecular and cortical microarchitecture parameters of four ankle bones were assessed by microcomputed tomography. Gene expression was determined at sacrifice. Arthritis occurred at day 10 in AIA rats. At this time, bone erosions were detected on four ankle bones, with cortical porosity increase (+67%) and trabecular alterations including bone volume fraction (BV/TV: -13%), and trabecular thickness decrease. Navicular bone assessment was the most reproducible and sensitive. Furthermore, strong correlations were observed between bone alterations at day 10 and arthritis severity or bone loss at day 17, including predictability of day 10 BV/TV to day 17 articular index (R 2  = 0.76). Finally, gene expression at day 17 confirmed massive osteoclast activation and interestingly provided insights on strong activation of bone formation inhibitor markers at the joint level. In rat AIA, bone loss was already observed at synovitis onset and was predicted late arthritis severity. Our results reinforced the key role of subchondral bone in arthritis pathogenesis, in favour to the "Inside-Outside" theory. Mechanisms of bone loss in rat AIA involved resorption activation and formation inhibition changes. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1318-1325, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. How to diagnose rheumatoid arthritis early: a prediction model for persistent (erosive) arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Henk; le Cessie, Saskia; Vos, Koen; Breedveld, Ferdinand C.; Hazes, Johanna M. W.

    2002-01-01

    To develop a clinical model for the prediction, at the first visit, of 3 forms of arthritis outcome: self-limiting, persistent nonerosive, and persistent erosive arthritis. A standardized diagnostic evaluation was performed on 524 consecutive, newly referred patients with early arthritis.

  2. Inhibitory effect of topical Adelmidrol on antigen-induced skin wheal and mast cell behavior in a canine model of allergic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerrato Santiago

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adelmidrol is a semisynthetic derivative of azelaic acid and analogue of the anti-inflammatory compound palmitoylethanolamide (PEA. Based upon its physicochemical properties, adelmidrol is suitable for topical application. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of a topical adelmidrol emulsion on early and late inflammatory responses in hypersensitive dogs. Repeated intradermal injections of Ascaris suum extract were performed in both lateral thoracic areas of six conscious hypersensitive Beagle dogs, topically treated during 8 consecutive days. Adelmidrol (2% was applied to one side and vehicle to the other. 24 hours after the last antigen challenge, two biopsies (adelmidrol- and vehicle-treated side were obtained for each dog at the antigen injection site. Results A significant reduction in the antigen-induced wheal areas was observed on the 4th and 7th day of adelmidrol treatment. Moreover, cutaneous mast cell numbers were significantly decreased in biopsies obtained after 8 consecutive days of topical adelmidrol treatment. Conclusions The results obtained in the present study show that topical treatment with adelmidrol might represent a new therapeutic tool in controlling the early and late allergic inflammatory skin responses in companion animals.

  3. Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common type of arthritis. It's often related to aging or to an injury. Autoimmune arthritis happens when your body's immune system attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Rheumatoid arthritis is ...

  4. Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prevent joint damage. If you have a family history of arthritis, tell your provider, even if you do not have joint pain. Avoiding ... in hip Rheumatoid arthritis Knee joint replacement - series Hip joint ...

  5. Animal Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis (I: Pristane-Induced Arthritis in the Rat.

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    Jonatan Tuncel

    Full Text Available To facilitate the development of therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA, the Innovative Medicines Initiative BTCure has combined the experience from several laboratories worldwide to establish a series of protocols for different animal models of arthritis that reflect the pathogenesis of RA. Here, we describe chronic pristane-induced arthritis (PIA model in DA rats, and provide detailed instructions to set up and evaluate the model and for reporting data.We optimized dose of pristane and immunization procedures and determined the effect of age, gender, and housing conditions. We further assessed cage-effects, reproducibility, and frequency of chronic arthritis, disease markers, and efficacy of standard and novel therapies.Out of 271 rats, 99.6% developed arthritis after pristane-administration. Mean values for day of onset, day of maximum arthritis severity and maximum clinical scores were 11.8±2.0 days, 20.3±5.1 days and 34.2±11 points on a 60-point scale, respectively. The mean frequency of chronic arthritis was 86% but approached 100% in long-term experiments over 110 days. Pristane was arthritogenic even at 5 microliters dose but needed to be administrated intradermally to induce robust disease with minimal variation. The development of arthritis was age-dependent but independent of gender and whether the rats were housed in conventional or barrier facilities. PIA correlated well with weight loss and acute phase reactants, and was ameliorated by etanercept, dexamethasone, cyclosporine A and fingolimod treatment.PIA has high incidence and excellent reproducibility. The chronic relapsing-remitting disease and limited systemic manifestations make it more suitable than adjuvant arthritis for long-term studies of joint-inflammation and screening and validation of new therapeutics.

  6. Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis can occur in people who have psoriasis (scaly red and white skin patches). It affects ... Cómo vivir con artritis: Información básica de salud para usted y su familia Rheumatoid Arthritis: Handout on ...

  7. Dendritic Cells Genetically Modified with an Adenovirus Vector Encoding the cDNA for a Model Antigen Induce Protective and Therapeutic Antitumor Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenru; Kong, Hwai-Loong; Carpenter, Heather; Torii, Hideshi; Granstein, Richard; Rafii, Shahin; Moore, Malcolm A.S.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    1997-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells that play a critical role in the initiation of antitumor immune responses. In this study, we show that genetic modifications of a murine epidermis-derived DC line and primary bone marrow–derived DCs to express a model antigen β-galactosidase (βgal) can be achieved through the use of a replication-deficient, recombinant adenovirus vector, and that the modified DCs are capable of eliciting antigen-specific, MHC-restricted CTL responses. Importantly, using a murine metastatic lung tumor model with syngeneic colon carcinoma cells expressing βgal, we show that immunization of mice with the genetically modified DC line or bone marrow DCs confers potent protection against a lethal tumor challenge, as well as suppression of preestablished tumors, resulting in a significant survival advantage. We conclude that genetic modification of DCs to express antigens that are also expressed in tumors can lead to antigen-specific, antitumor killer cells, with a concomitant resistance to tumor challenge and a decrease in the size of existing tumors. PMID:9334364

  8. K/BxN serum transfer arthritis as a model for human inflammatory arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Deen Christensen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The K/BxN serum-transfer arthritis (STA model is a murine model in which the immunological mechanisms occurring in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and other arthritides can be studied. To induce K/BxN STA, serum from arthritic transgenic K/BxN mice is transferred to naive mice and manifestations of arthritis occur a few days later. The inflammatory response in the model is driven by autoantibodies against the ubiquitously expressed self-antigen, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (G6PI, leading to the formation of immune complexes that drive the activation of different innate immune cells such as neutrophils, macrophages and possibly mast cells. The pathogenesis further involves a range of immune mediators including cytokines, chemokines, complement factors, Toll-like receptors, Fc receptors, and integrins, as well as factors involved in pain and bone erosion. Hence, even though the K/BxN STA model mimics only the effector phase of RA, it still involves a wide range of relevant disease mediators. Additionally, as a murine model for arthritis, the K/BxN STA model has some obvious advantages. Firstly, it has a rapid and robust onset of arthritis with 100% incidence in genetically identical animals. Secondly, it can be induced in a wide range of strain backgrounds and can therefore also be induced in gene-deficient strains to study the specific importance of disease mediators. Even though G6PI might not be an essential autoantigen, for example, in RA, the K/BxN STA model is a useful tool to understand how autoantibodies in general drive the progression of arthritis by interacting with downstream components of the innate immune system. Finally, the model has also proven useful as a model wherein arthritic pain can be studied. Taken together, these features make the K/BxN STA model a relevant one for RA and it is a potentially valuable tool especially for the pre-clinical screening of new therapeutic targets for RA and perhaps other forms of inflammatory

  9. Hamster and Murine Models of Severe Destructive Lyme Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Munson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthritis is a frequent complication of infection in humans with Borrelia burgdorferi. Weeks to months following the onset of Lyme borreliosis, a histopathological reaction characteristic of synovitis including bone, joint, muscle, or tendon pain may occur. A subpopulation of patients may progress to a chronic, debilitating arthritis months to years after infection which has been classified as severe destructive Lyme arthritis. This arthritis involves focal bone erosion and destruction of articular cartilage. Hamsters and mice are animal models that have been utilized to study articular manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. Infection of immunocompetent LSH hamsters or C3H mice results in a transient synovitis. However, severe destructive Lyme arthritis can be induced by infecting irradiated hamsters or mice and immunocompetent Borrelia-vaccinated hamsters, mice, and interferon-gamma- (IFN-γ- deficient mice with viable B. burgdorferi. The hamster model of severe destructive Lyme arthritis facilitates easy assessment of Lyme borreliosis vaccine preparations for deleterious effects while murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis allow for investigation of mechanisms of immunopathology.

  10. Hamster and Murine Models of Severe Destructive Lyme Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Erik; Nardelli, Dean T.; Du Chateau, Brian K.; Callister, Steven M.; Schell, Ronald F.

    2012-01-01

    Arthritis is a frequent complication of infection in humans with Borrelia burgdorferi. Weeks to months following the onset of Lyme borreliosis, a histopathological reaction characteristic of synovitis including bone, joint, muscle, or tendon pain may occur. A subpopulation of patients may progress to a chronic, debilitating arthritis months to years after infection which has been classified as severe destructive Lyme arthritis. This arthritis involves focal bone erosion and destruction of articular cartilage. Hamsters and mice are animal models that have been utilized to study articular manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. Infection of immunocompetent LSH hamsters or C3H mice results in a transient synovitis. However, severe destructive Lyme arthritis can be induced by infecting irradiated hamsters or mice and immunocompetent Borrelia-vaccinated hamsters, mice, and interferon-gamma- (IFN-γ-) deficient mice with viable B. burgdorferi. The hamster model of severe destructive Lyme arthritis facilitates easy assessment of Lyme borreliosis vaccine preparations for deleterious effects while murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis allow for investigation of mechanisms of immunopathology. PMID:22461836

  11. Septic arthritis: immunopathogenesis, experimental models and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Septic arthritis is an inflammatory disease of the joints that is started by an infection whose most common agent is Staphylococcus aureus. In this review we discuss some of the most arthritogenic bacterial factors and the contribution of innate and specific immune mechanisms to joint destruction. Special emphasis is given to the induction of experimental arthritis by S. aureus in mice. The improvement of therapy by association of antibiotics with down-modulation of immunity is also included. PMID:24822058

  12. The TNF-alpha transgenic mouse model of inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Schwarz, Edward M

    2003-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disorder that affects multiple peripheral joints. It is the most common form of inflammatory arthritis and is characterized by synovial hyperplasia, immune cell infiltration, cartilage destruction, and bone erosion. To gain insight into the etiology of the disease, a variety of animal models have been established. Twelve years ago George Kollias' laboratory generated a transgenic (Tg) mouse that over-expresses human TNF-alpha, and develops an erosive polyarthritis with many characteristics observed in rheumatoid arthritis patients. The phenotype of this mouse model validated the theory that TNF-alpha is at the apex of the pro-inflammatory cascade in rheumatoid arthritis, and foreshadowed the remarkable success of anti-TNF-alpha therapy that has transformed the effective management of this disease. As such, the TNF-Tg mice are very useful tools for dissecting the molecular mechanisms of the pathogenic process and evaluating the efficacy of novel therapeutic strategies for rheumatoid arthritis. In this review we (1) provide a brief summary of TNF-alpha biology and the role of this dominant cytokine in rheumatoid arthritis, (2) describe the various TNF-Tg models and their phenotypes, and (3) give examples of how this model has been used experimentally.

  13. Collagen-induced arthritis in common marmosets: A new nonhuman primate model for chronic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.M. Vierboom (Michel); E. Breedveld (Elly); I. Kondova (Ivanela); B.A. 't Hart (Bert)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: There is an ever-increasing need for animal models to evaluate efficacy and safety of new therapeutics in the field of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Particularly for the early preclinical evaluation of human-specific biologicals targeting the progressive phase of the disease,

  14. Pain Relief in Nonhuman Primate Models of Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierboom, Michel P M; Breedveld, Elia; Keehnen, Merei; Klomp, Rianne; Bakker, Jaco

    2017-01-01

    Animal models of rheumatoid arthritis are important in the elucidation of etiopathogenic mechanisms of the disease and for the development of promising new therapies. Species specificity of new biological compounds and their mode of action preclude safety and efficacy testing in rodent models of disease. Nonhuman primates (NHP) can fill this niche and provide the only relevant model. Over the last two decades models of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) were developed in the rhesus monkey and the common marmoset. However, NHP are higher-order animals and complex sentient beings. So especially in models where pain is an intricate part of the disease, analgesia needs to be addressed because of ethical considerations. In our model, a morphine-based pain relief was used that does not interfere with the normal development of disease allowing us to evaluate important mechanistic aspects of the arthritis.

  15. Th17 in Animal Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motomu Hashimoto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available IL-17-secreting helper CD4 T cells (Th17 cells constitute a newly identified subset of helper CD4 T cells that play a key role in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA in its animal models. Recently, several models of spontaneous RA, which elucidate the mechanism of RA onset, have been discovered. These animal models shed new light on the role of Th17 in the development of autoimmune arthritis. Th17 cells coordinate inflammation and promote joint destruction, acting on various cells, including neutrophils, macrophages, synovial fibroblasts, and osteoclasts. Regulatory T cells cannot control Th17 cells under conditions of inflammation. In this review, the pathogenic role of Th17 cells in arthritis development, which was revealed by the recent animal models of RA, is discussed.

  16. Th17 in Animal Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Motomu

    2017-07-21

    IL-17-secreting helper CD4 T cells (Th17 cells) constitute a newly identified subset of helper CD4 T cells that play a key role in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in its animal models. Recently, several models of spontaneous RA, which elucidate the mechanism of RA onset, have been discovered. These animal models shed new light on the role of Th17 in the development of autoimmune arthritis. Th17 cells coordinate inflammation and promote joint destruction, acting on various cells, including neutrophils, macrophages, synovial fibroblasts, and osteoclasts. Regulatory T cells cannot control Th17 cells under conditions of inflammation. In this review, the pathogenic role of Th17 cells in arthritis development, which was revealed by the recent animal models of RA, is discussed.

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis: identifying and characterising polymorphisms using rat models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disorder characterised by erosive inflammation of the articular cartilage and by destruction of the synovial joints. It is regulated by both genetic and environmental factors, and, currently, there is no preventative treatment or cure for this disease. Genome-wide association studies have identified ∼100 new loci associated with rheumatoid arthritis, in addition to the already known locus within the major histocompatibility complex II region. However, together, these loci account for only a modest fraction of the genetic variance associated with this disease and very little is known about the pathogenic roles of most of the risk loci identified. Here, we discuss how rat models of rheumatoid arthritis are being used to detect quantitative trait loci that regulate different arthritic traits by genetic linkage analysis and to positionally clone the underlying causative genes using congenic strains. By isolating specific loci on a fixed genetic background, congenic strains overcome the challenges of genetic heterogeneity and environmental interactions associated with human studies. Most importantly, congenic strains allow functional experimental studies be performed to investigate the pathological consequences of natural genetic polymorphisms, as illustrated by the discovery of several major disease genes that contribute to arthritis in rats. We discuss how these advances have provided new biological insights into arthritis in humans. PMID:27736747

  18. Animal models for arthritis: innovative tools for prevention and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kollias, G.; Papadaki, P.; Apparailly, F.; Vervoordeldonk, M.J.; Holmdahl, R.; Baumans, V.; Desaintes, C.; Di Santo, J.; Distler, J.; Garside, P.; Hegen, M.; Huizinga, T.W.J.; Jüngel, A.; Klareskog, L.; McInnes, I.; Ragoussis, I.; Schett, G.; Hart, B.t.; Tak, P.P.; Toes, R.; van den Berg, W.; Wurst, W.; Gay, S.

    2011-01-01

    The development of novel treatments for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) requires the interplay between clinical observations and studies in animal models. Given the complex molecular pathogenesis and highly heterogeneous clinical picture of RA, there is an urgent need to dissect its multifactorial nature

  19. Early arthritis induces disturbances at bone nanostructural level reflected in decreased tissue hardness in an animal model of arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Bruno; Cascão, Rita; Finnilä, Mikko A J; Lopes, Inês P; Saarakkala, Simo; Zioupos, Peter; Canhão, Helena; Fonseca, João E

    2018-01-01

    Arthritis induces joint erosions and skeletal bone fragility. The main goal of this work was to analyze the early arthritis induced events at bone architecture and mechanical properties at tissue level. Eighty-eight Wistar rats were randomly housed in experimental groups, as follows: adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA) (N = 47) and a control healthy group (N = 41). Rats were monitored during 22 days for the inflammatory score, ankle perimeter and body weight and sacrificed at different time points (11 and 22 days post disease induction). Bone samples were collected for histology, micro computed tomography (micro-CT), 3-point bending and nanoindentation. Blood samples were also collected for bone turnover markers and systemic cytokine quantification. At bone tissue level, measured by nanoindentation, there was a reduction of hardness in the arthritic group, associated with an increase of the ratio of bone concentric to parallel lamellae and of the area of the osteocyte lacuna. In addition, increased bone turnover and changes in the microstructure and mechanical properties were observed in arthritic animals, since the early phase of arthritis, when compared with healthy controls. We have shown in an AIA rat model that arthritis induces very early changes at bone turnover, structural degradation and mechanical weakness. Bone tissue level is also affected since the early phase of arthritis, characterized by decreased tissue hardness associated with changes in bone lamella organization and osteocyte lacuna surface. These observations highlight the pertinence of immediate control of inflammation in the initial stages of arthritis.

  20. Application of a prediction model for the progression of rheumatoid arthritis in patients with undifferentiated arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana-Guajardo, Ana; Pérez-Barbosa, Lorena; Vega-Morales, David; Riega-Torres, Janett; Esquivel-Valerio, Jorge; Garza-Elizondo, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Different prediction rules have been applied to patients with undifferentiated arthritis (UA) to identify those that progress to rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The Leiden Prediction Rule (LPR) has proven useful in different UA cohorts. To apply the LPR to a cohort of patients with UA of northeastern Mexico. We included 47 patients with UA, LPR was applied at baseline. They were evaluated and then classified after one year of follow-up into two groups: those who progressed to RA (according to ACR 1987) and those who did not. 43% of the AI patients developed RA. In the RA group, 56% of patients obtained a score ≤ 6 and only 15% ≥ 8. 70% who did not progress to RA had a score between 6 and ≤ 8. There was no difference in median score of LPR between groups, p=0.940. Most patients who progressed to RA scored less than 6 points in the LPR. Unlike what was observed in other cohorts, the model in our population did not allow us to predict the progression of the disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis by photoacoustic imaging: a study on adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueding; Rajian, Justin; Shao, Xia; Chamberland, David L.; Girish, Gandikota

    2014-03-01

    Neovascularity also known as angiogenesis is an early feature of inflammatory arthritis disease. Therefore, identifying the development of neovascularity is one way to potentially detect and characterize arthritis. Laser-based photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging biomedical imaging modality which may aid in detection of both early and continued development of neovascularity. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of PAI to measure angiogenesis, for the purpose of evaluating and monitoring inflammatory arthritis after treatment. The imaging results on an arthritis rat model demonstrate that 1) there is noticeable enhancement in image intensity in the arthritic ankle joints when compared to the normal joints, and 2) there is noticeable decrease in image intensity in the arthritic ankle joints after treatment when compared to the untreated arthritic joints. In order to validate the findings from PAI, we performed positron emission tomography (PET) and histology on the same joints. The diameters of the ankle joints, as a clinical score of the arthritis, were also measured at each time point.

  2. Peptidylarginine deiminase type 4 deficiency reduced arthritis severity in a glucose-6-phosphate isomerase-induced arthritis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seri, Yu; Shoda, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Akari; Matsumoto, Isao; Sumida, Takayuki; Fujio, Keishi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-21

    Peptidyl arginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) is an enzyme that is involved in protein citrullination, and is a target for anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPAs) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Genetic polymorphisms in the PADI4 gene encoding PAD4 are associated with RA susceptibility. We herein analyzed the roles of PADI4 in inflammatory arthritis using a glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI)-induced arthritis (GIA) model in Padi4 knockout (KO) mice. Arthritis severity, serum anti-GPI antibody titers, and IL-6 concentrations were significantly reduced in Padi4 KO mice. The frequency of Th17 cells was decreased in GPI-immunized Padi4 KO mice, whereas WT and Padi4-deficient naïve CD4(+) T cells displayed the same efficiencies for Th17 cell differentiation in vitro. In addition, the numbers of myeloid lineage cells were reduced with the increased expression of pro-apoptotic genes in GPI-immunized Padi4 KO mice. Furthermore, the survival of Padi4-deficient neutrophils was impaired in vitro. Our results suggest that PADI4 exacerbates arthritis with diverse immunological modifications.

  3. Inherent and antigen-induced airway hyperreactivity in NC mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuto Kobayashi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to clarify the airway physiology of NC mice, the following experiments were carried out. To investigate inherent airway reactivity, we compared tracheal reactivity to various chemical mediators in NC, BALB/c, C57BL/6 and A/J mice in vitro. NC mice showed significantly greater reactivity to acetylcholine than BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice and a reactivity comparable to that of A/J mice, which are known as high responders. Then, airway reactivity to acetylcholine was investigated in those strains in vivo. NC mice again showed comparable airway reactivity to that seen in A/J mice and a significantly greater reactivity than that seen in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. To investigate the effects of airway inflammation on airway reactivity to acetylcholine in vivo, NC and BALB/c mice were sensitized to and challenged with antigen. Sensitization to and challenge with antigen induced accumulation of inflammatory cells, especially eosinophils, in lung and increased airway reactivity in NC and BALB/c mice. These results indicate that NC mice exhibit inherent and antigen-induced airway hyperreactivity. Therefore, NC mice are a suitable strain to use in investigating the mechanisms underlying airway hyperreactivity and such studies will provide beneficial information for understanding the pathophysiology of asthma.

  4. Perillyl alcohol suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Oh; Okunishi, Katsuhide; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Harada, Hiroaki; Kawahata, Kimito; Tanaka, Ryoichi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Dohi, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits the mevalonate pathway. •We examined whether POH suppresses immune responses with a mouse model of asthma. •POH treatment during sensitization suppressed Ag-induced priming of CD4 + T cells. •POH suppressed airway eosinophila and cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes. -- Abstract: Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits farnesyl transferase and geranylgeranyl transferase, key enzymes that induce conformational and functional changes in small G proteins to conduct signal production for cell proliferation. Thus, it has been tried for the treatment of cancers. However, although it affects the proliferation of immunocytes, its influence on immune responses has been examined in only a few studies. Notably, its effect on antigen-induced immune responses has not been studied. In this study, we examined whether POH suppresses Ag-induced immune responses with a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation. POH treatment of sensitized mice suppressed proliferation and cytokine production in Ag-stimulated spleen cells or CD4 + T cells. Further, sensitized mice received aerosolized OVA to induce allergic airway inflammation, and some mice received POH treatment. POH significantly suppressed indicators of allergic airway inflammation such as airway eosinophilia. Cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes was also significantly suppressed. These results demonstrate that POH suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung. Considering that it exists naturally, POH could be a novel preventive or therapeutic option for immunologic lung disorders such as asthma with minimal side effects

  5. Development of the Digital Arthritis Index, a Novel Metric to Measure Disease Parameters in a Rat Model of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Lim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite a broad spectrum of anti-arthritic drugs currently on the market, there is a constant demand to develop improved therapeutic agents. Efficient compound screening and rapid evaluation of treatment efficacy in animal models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA can accelerate the development of clinical candidates. Compound screening by evaluation of disease phenotypes in animal models facilitates preclinical research by enhancing understanding of human pathophysiology; however, there is still a continuous need to improve methods for evaluating disease. Current clinical assessment methods are challenged by the subjective nature of scoring-based methods, time-consuming longitudinal experiments, and the requirement for better functional readouts with relevance to human disease. To address these needs, we developed a low-touch, digital platform for phenotyping preclinical rodent models of disease. As a proof-of-concept, we utilized the rat collagen-induced arthritis (CIA model of RA and developed the Digital Arthritis Index (DAI, an objective and automated behavioral metric that does not require human-animal interaction during the measurement and calculation of disease parameters. The DAI detected the development of arthritis similar to standard in vivo methods, including ankle joint measurements and arthritis scores, as well as demonstrated a positive correlation to ankle joint histopathology. The DAI also determined responses to multiple standard-of-care (SOC treatments and nine repurposed compounds predicted by the SMarTRTM Engine to have varying degrees of impact on RA. The disease profiles generated by the DAI complemented those generated by standard methods. The DAI is a highly reproducible and automated approach that can be used in-conjunction with standard methods for detecting RA disease progression and conducting phenotypic drug screens.

  6. Effect of sublingual immunotherapy on antigen-induced bronchial and nasal inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminuma, Osamu; Suzuki, Kazuya; Mori, Akio

    2010-01-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is effective in the treatment of a variety of allergic diseases, including bronchial asthma and rhinitis. However, how this local therapy exerts such wide effects is unclear. In this study, we comparatively examined the effect of SLIT on antigen-induced airway inflammation in bronchoalveolar and nasal cavities in mice. Mice were treated sublingually with ovalbumin (OVA) once a day for 2 weeks. Subsequently, they were immunized with the corresponding antigen. Following intratracheal and nasal challenge with OVA, infiltration of inflammatory cells into the bronchoalveolar and nasal cavities was investigated in these mice. Massive infiltration of eosinophils as well as neutrophils into the bronchoalveolar cavity was induced by intratracheal OVA challenge. Eosinophils accumulated in the nasal cavity, but the number of neutrophils did not significantly change in response to nasal antigen challenge. These antigen-induced airway inflammatory responses, including the increases in the numbers of eosinophils and/or neutrophils in the bronchoalveolar and nasal cavities, were clearly suppressed by SLIT. This animal model displaying differential inflammatory responses in the bronchoalveolar and nasal cavities may be useful to elucidate the efficacy and mechanisms of SLIT against various allergic diseases. (c) 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Avastin exhibits therapeutic effects on collagen-induced arthritis in rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Da, Gula; Li, Hongbin; Zheng, Yi

    2013-12-01

    Avastin is the monoclonal antibody for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). This study aimed to investigate therapeutic effect of Avastin on type II collagen-induced arthritis. Type II chicken collagen was injected into the tails of Wistar rats, and 60 modeled female rats were randomly divided into three groups (n = 20): Avastin group, Etanercept group, and control group. Arthritis index and joint pad thickness were scored, and the pathology of back metapedes was analyzed. The results showed that compared to control group, the arthritis index, target-to-non-target ratio, synovial pathological injury index, serum levels of VEGF and tumor necrosis factor alpha, and VEGF staining were decreased significantly 14 days after Avastin or Etanercept treatment, but there were no significant differences between Avastin group and Etanercept group. These data provide evidence that Avastin exhibits similar effects to Etanercept to relieve rheumatoid arthritis in rat model and suggest that Avastin is a promising therapeutic agent for rheumatoid arthritis.

  8. Disability intervention model for older adults with arthritis: an integration of theory of symptom management and disablement process model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, So Young

    2014-12-01

    To evolve a management plan for rheumatoid arthritis, it is necessary to understand the patient's symptom experience and disablement process. This paper aims to introduce and critique two models as a conceptual foundation from which to construct a new model for arthritis care. A Disability Intervention Model for Older Adults with Arthritis includes three interrelated concepts of symptom experience, symptom management strategies, and symptom outcomes that correspond to the Theory of Symptom Management. These main concepts influence or are influenced by contextual factors that are situated within the domains of person, environment, and health/illness. It accepts the bidirectional, complex, dynamic interactions among all components within the model representing the comprehensive aspects of the disablement process and its interventions in older adults with rheumatoid arthritis. In spite of some limitations such as confusion or complexity within the model, the Disability Intervention Model for Older Adults with Arthritis has strengths in that it encompasses the majority of the concepts of the two models, attempts to compensate for the limitations of the two models, and aims to understand the impact of rheumatoid arthritis on a patient's physical, cognitive, and emotional health status, socioeconomic status, and well-being. Therefore, it can be utilized as a guiding theoretical framework for arthritis care and research to improve the functional status of older adults with rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Lapachol, a compound targeting pyrimidine metabolism, ameliorates experimental autoimmune arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, Raphael S; Santos, Gabriela B; Cecilio, Nerry T; Jabor, Valquíria A P; Niehues, Michael; Torres, Bruna G S; Buqui, Gabriela; Silva, Carlos H T P; Costa, Teresa Dalla; Lopes, Norberto P; Nonato, Maria C; Ramalho, Fernando S; Louzada-Júnior, Paulo; Cunha, Thiago M; Cunha, Fernando Q; Emery, Flavio S; Alves-Filho, Jose C

    2017-03-07

    The inhibition of pyrimidine biosynthesis by blocking the dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) activity, the prime target of leflunomide (LEF), has been proven to be an effective strategy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatment. However, a considerable proportion of RA patients are refractory to LEF. Here, we investigated lapachol (LAP), a natural naphthoquinone, as a potential DHODH inhibitor and addressed its immunosuppressive properties. Molecular flexible docking studies and bioactivity assays were performed to determine the ability of LAP to interact and inhibit DHODH. In vitro studies were conducted to assess the antiproliferative effect of LAP using isolated lymphocytes. Finally, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) models were employed to address the anti-arthritic effects of LAP. We found that LAP is a potent DHODH inhibitor which had a remarkable ability to inhibit both human and murine lymphocyte proliferation in vitro. Importantly, uridine supplementation abrogated the antiproliferative effect of LAP, supporting that the pyrimidine metabolic pathway is the target of LAP. In vivo, LAP treatment markedly reduced CIA and AIA progression as evidenced by the reduction in clinical score, articular tissue damage, and inflammation. Our findings propose a binding model of interaction and support the ability of LAP to inhibit DHODH, decreasing lymphocyte proliferation and attenuating the severity of experimental autoimmune arthritis. Therefore, LAP could be considered as a potential immunosuppressive lead candidate with potential therapeutic implications for RA.

  10. Alpha-1 antitrypsin protein and gene therapies decrease autoimmunity and delay arthritis development in mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkinson Mark A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT is a multi-functional protein that has anti-inflammatory and tissue protective properties. We previously reported that human AAT (hAAT gene therapy prevented autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD mice and suppressed arthritis development in combination with doxycycline in mice. In the present study we investigated the feasibility of hAAT monotherapy for the treatment of chronic arthritis in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA, a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Methods DBA/1 mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen (bCII to induce arthritis. These mice were pretreated either with hAAT protein or with recombinant adeno-associated virus vector expressing hAAT (rAAV-hAAT. Control groups received saline injections. Arthritis development was evaluated by prevalence of arthritis and arthritic index. Serum levels of B-cell activating factor of the TNF-α family (BAFF, antibodies against both bovine (bCII and mouse collagen II (mCII were tested by ELISA. Results Human AAT protein therapy as well as recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV8-mediated hAAT gene therapy significantly delayed onset and ameliorated disease development of arthritis in CIA mouse model. Importantly, hAAT therapies significantly reduced serum levels of BAFF and autoantibodies against bCII and mCII, suggesting that the effects are mediated via B-cells, at least partially. Conclusion These results present a new drug for arthritis therapy. Human AAT protein and gene therapies are able to ameliorate and delay arthritis development and reduce autoimmunity, indicating promising potential of these therapies as a new treatment strategy for RA.

  11. Diagnosing hypoxia in murine models of rheumatoid arthritis from reflectance multispectral images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinton, Sophie; Naylor, Amy J.; Claridge, Ela

    2017-07-01

    Spectra computed from multispectral images of murine models of Rheumatoid Arthritis show a characteristic decrease in reflectance within the 600-800nm region which is indicative of the reduction in blood oxygenation and is consistent with hypoxia.

  12. Divergent effects of endogenous and exogenous glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper in animal models of inflammation and arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Devi; Beaulieu, Elaine; Gu, Ran; Leaney, Alexandra; Santos, Leilani; Fan, Huapeng; Yang, Yuanhang; Kao, Wenping; Xu, Jiake; Escriou, Virginie; Loiler, Scott; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J; Morand, Eric F

    2013-05-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) has effects on inflammatory pathways that suggest it to be a key inhibitory regulator of the immune system, and its expression is exquisitely sensitive to induction by glucocorticoids. We undertook this study to test our hypothesis that GILZ deficiency would exacerbate experimental immune-mediated inflammation and impair the effects of glucocorticoids on inflammation and, correspondingly, that exogenous GILZ would inhibit these events. GILZ(-/-) mice were generated using the Cre/loxP system, and responses were studied in delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), antigen-induced arthritis (AIA), K/BxN serum-transfer arthritis, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokinemia. Therapeutic expression of GILZ via administration of recombinant adeno-associated virus expressing the GILZ gene (GILZ-rAAV) was compared to the effects of glucocorticoid in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Increased T cell proliferation and DTH were observed in GILZ(-/-) mice, but neither AIA nor K/BxN serum-transfer arthritis was affected, and GILZ deficiency did not affect LPS-induced cytokinemia. Deletion of GILZ did not impair the effects of exogenous glucocorticoids on CIA or cytokinemia. In contrast, overexpression of GILZ in joints significantly inhibited CIA, with an effect similar to that of dexamethasone. Despite effects on T cell activation, GILZ deficiency had no effect on effector pathways of arthritis and was unexpectedly redundant with effects of glucocorticoids. These findings do not support the hypothesis that GILZ is central to the actions of glucocorticoids, but the efficacy of exogenous GILZ in CIA suggests that further evaluation of GILZ in inflammatory disease is required. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  13. Perillyl alcohol suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imamura, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Oh; Okunishi, Katsuhide; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Harada, Hiroaki; Kawahata, Kimito; Tanaka, Ryoichi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko [Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Dohi, Makoto, E-mail: mdohi-tky@umin.ac.jp [Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Institute of Respiratory Immunology, Shibuya Clinic for Respiratory Diseases and Allergology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits the mevalonate pathway. •We examined whether POH suppresses immune responses with a mouse model of asthma. •POH treatment during sensitization suppressed Ag-induced priming of CD4{sup +} T cells. •POH suppressed airway eosinophila and cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes. -- Abstract: Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits farnesyl transferase and geranylgeranyl transferase, key enzymes that induce conformational and functional changes in small G proteins to conduct signal production for cell proliferation. Thus, it has been tried for the treatment of cancers. However, although it affects the proliferation of immunocytes, its influence on immune responses has been examined in only a few studies. Notably, its effect on antigen-induced immune responses has not been studied. In this study, we examined whether POH suppresses Ag-induced immune responses with a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation. POH treatment of sensitized mice suppressed proliferation and cytokine production in Ag-stimulated spleen cells or CD4{sup +} T cells. Further, sensitized mice received aerosolized OVA to induce allergic airway inflammation, and some mice received POH treatment. POH significantly suppressed indicators of allergic airway inflammation such as airway eosinophilia. Cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes was also significantly suppressed. These results demonstrate that POH suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung. Considering that it exists naturally, POH could be a novel preventive or therapeutic option for immunologic lung disorders such as asthma with minimal side effects.

  14. Characteristics of evolving models of care for arthritis: A key informant study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veinot Paula

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The burden of arthritis is increasing in the face of diminishing health human resources to deliver care. In response, innovative models of care delivery are developing to facilitate access to quality care. Most models have developed in response to local needs with limited evaluation. The primary objective of this study is to a examine the range of models of care that deliver specialist services using a medical/surgical specialist and at least one other health care provider and b document the strengths and challenges of the identified models. A secondary objective is to identify key elements of best practice models of care for arthritis. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a sample of key informants with expertise in arthritis from jurisdictions with primarily publicly-funded health care systems. Qualitative data were analyzed using a constant comparative approach to identify common types of models of care, strengths and challenges of models, and key components of arthritis care. Results Seventy-four key informants were interviewed from six countries. Five main types of models of care emerged. 1 Specialized arthritis programs deliver comprehensive, multidisciplinary team care for arthritis. Two models were identified using health care providers (e.g. nurses or physiotherapists in expanded clinical roles: 2 triage of patients with musculoskeletal conditions to the appropriate services including specialists; and 3 ongoing management in collaboration with a specialist. Two models promoting rural access were 4 rural consultation support and 5 telemedicine. Key informants described important components of models of care including knowledgeable health professionals and patients. Conclusion A range of models of care for arthritis have been developed. This classification can be used as a framework for discussing care delivery. Areas for development include integration of care across the continuum, including primary

  15. Facilitated access to an integrated model of care for arthritis in an urban Aboriginal population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnabe, Cheryl; Lockerbie, Stacy; Erasmus, Elizabeth; Crowshoe, Lynden

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate a model of care to improve arthritis detection and treatment in an urban Aboriginal population. Cohort study. The Elbow River Healing Lodge in Calgary, Alta. A total of 26 participants with noninflammatory arthritis and 12 with inflammatory arthritis. A monthly rheumatology clinic was embedded in the primary health care service and received referrals from primary care providers and allied health care professionals, or self-referrals. All participants had a standardized assessment to determine their diagnosis. Those with noninflammatory musculoskeletal conditions were returned to primary care management and those with inflammatory arthritis conditions were followed by the rheumatologist. Accessibility, acceptability, effectiveness, and cultural safety were evaluated as measures of quality for the model of care. Nearly all participants (87%) thought the services were very easy or easy to obtain, and overall satisfaction with the model of care was high (89% were very satisfied or satisfied). For inflammatory arthritis patients, the swollen and tender joint counts improved over time (both P care facilitated access for diagnosis and return to care of inflammatory arthritis conditions, and was acceptable to participants. This model of care removes the complexities of access to non-family physician specialty care while providing health care in a setting valued by Aboriginal patients. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  16. Serum and Synovial Fluid Serum Amyloid A Response in Equine Models of Synovitis and Septic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Elsa K; Brandon Wiese, R; Graham, Megan R; Tyler, Amelia J; Settlage, Julie M; Werre, Stephen R; Petersson-Wolfe, Christina S; Kanevsky-Mullarky, Isis; Dahlgren, Linda A

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the serum and synovial fluid serum amyloid A (SAA) response in equine models of synovitis and septic arthritis and to compare handheld and validated immunoturbidometric assays for SAA quantification. Controlled, experimental study. Healthy adult horses (n = 9). Synovitis (n = 4) and septic arthritis (n = 5) were induced using lipopolysaccharide and Staphylococcus aureus, respectively, and serial serum and synovial fluid samples were collected. Serial synovial fluid cytology was performed for both models and synovial fluid from the septic arthritis model was submitted for bacterial culture. Serum and synovial fluid SAA were quantified by handheld test and immunoturbidometric assay. Cytologic and SAA data were compared within and between models (mixed model ANOVA) and results of SAA assays were compared using category-by-category analysis (weighted kappa coefficient). Synovial fluid total nucleated cell counts and total protein increased significantly following induction of both models. Serum and synovial fluid SAA remained normal in synovitis horses and increased significantly in septic arthritis horses. Serum SAA increased more rapidly than synovial fluid SAA. Agreement was 98% when SAA concentrations were low (septic arthritis in horses. SAA concentrations for the assays diverged and examination using a larger sample size is needed before direct numeric comparisons between the assays can be made. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  17. Arthritis - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  18. Refinement of the Collagen Induced Arthritis Model in Rats by Infrared Thermography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jasemian, Yousef; Deleuran, Bent Winding; Svendsen, Pia

    2011-01-01

    Aims: Collagen induced arthritis in rats is an important model for human rheumatoid arthritis. This study was designed to improve and refine this model by use of infrared thermography by measuring surface temperature of hind feet. Our hypothesis is that the local temperature on the feet correlates...... correlation between temperature and clinical scores. Conclusion: The thermographic response appeared prior to the clinical signs, suggesting that thermography may be used as a predictive sign for the development of disease. This technique could be a non-invasive, objective, rapid, and reproducible method...

  19. Electroacupuncture Alleviates Pain Responses and Inflammation in a Rat Model of Acute Gout Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxin Chai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute gout arthritis is one of the most painful inflammatory conditions. Treatments for gout pain are limited to colchicine, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and corticosteroids, which oftentimes result in severe adverse effects. Electroacupuncture (EA has been proved to be effective in relieving many inflammatory pain conditions with few side effects. Here, we aim to investigate the therapeutic potentials of EA on pain and inflammation of a rat model of acute gout arthritis and underlying mechanisms. We found that 2/100 Hz EA produced the most robust analgesic effect on mechanical hyperalgesia of acute gout arthritis rat model compared with 2 and 100 Hz. EA produced similar analgesic effect compared with indomethacin. 2/100 Hz EA also significantly alleviates the ongoing pain behavior, thermal hyperalgesia, and ankle edema. Locally applied μ and κ-opioid receptor antagonists but not adenosine A1 receptor antagonist significantly abolished the analgesic effect of EA. Locally applied μ and κ-opioid receptor agonists produced significant antiallodynia on acute gout arthritis rats, mimicking EA. Furthermore, 2/100 Hz EA upregulated β-endorphin expression in inflamed ankle skin tissue. Our results demonstrated, for the first time, that EA can be used for relieving acute gout arthritis with effect dependent on peripheral opioid system and comparable with the one obtained with indomethacin.

  20. Old and new therapeutics for Rheumatoid Arthritis: in vivo models and drug development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sardar, Samra; Andersson, Åsa

    2016-01-01

    of in vivo models during development of anti-rheumatic drugs; from Methotrexate to various antibody treatments, to novel drugs that are, or have recently been, in clinical trials. For novel drugs, we have explored websites for clinical trials. Although one Rheumatoid Arthritis in vivo model cannot mirror...

  1. Development of a new humanized mouse model to study acute inflammatory arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misharin Alexander V

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Substantial advances have been generated in understanding the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Current murine models of RA-like disease have provided great insights into the molecular mechanism of inflammatory arthritis due to the use of genetically deficient or transgenic mice. However, these studies are limited by differences that exist between human and murine immune systems. Thus, the development of an animal model that utilizes human immune cells, will afford the opportunity to study their function in the initiation and propagation of inflammatory arthritis. Methods One to two-day old irradiated NOD-scid IL2rγnull (NSG mice were reconstituted with human CD34+ cord blood stem cells. Leukocytes were analyzed by flow cytometry and circulating antibodies were determined by ELISA. Arthritis was induced by injecting complete Freund’s adjuvant into knee or ankle joints. Mice were also treated with the TNF inhibitor, Etanercept, or PBS and joints were analyzed histologically. Results Humanized mice were established with high reconstitution rates and were able to spontaneously produce human immunoglobulins as well as specific IgG in response to immunization. Intraperitoneal injection of thioglycolate or injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant into joints resulted in migration of human immune cells to the injected sites. Arthritic humanized mice treated with Etanercept had markedly less inflammation, which was associated with decreased total numbers of human CD45+ cells, including human lymphocytes and neutrophils. Conclusions The humanized mouse model is a new model to study inflammatory arthritis disease using human leukocytes without rejection of engrafted tissue. Future studies may adapt this system to incorporate RA patient cord blood and develop a chimeric animal model of inflammatory arthritis using genetically predisposed immune cells.

  2. Autotaxin expression from synovial fibroblasts is essential for the pathogenesis of modeled arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitopoulou, Ioanna; Oikonomou, Nikos; Karouzakis, Emmanuel; Sevastou, Ioanna; Nikolaidou-Katsaridou, Nefeli; Zhao, Zhenwen; Mersinias, Vassilis; Armaka, Maria; Xu, Yan; Masu, Masayuki; Mills, Gordon B.; Gay, Steffen; Kollias, George

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a destructive arthropathy characterized by chronic synovial inflammation that imposes a substantial socioeconomic burden. Under the influence of the proinflammatory milieu, synovial fibroblasts (SFs), the main effector cells in disease pathogenesis, become activated and hyperplastic, releasing proinflammatory factors and tissue-remodeling enzymes. This study shows that activated arthritic SFs from human patients and animal models express significant quantities of autotaxin (ATX; ENPP2), a lysophospholipase D that catalyzes the conversion of lysophosphatidylcholine to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). ATX expression from SFs was induced by TNF, and LPA induced SF activation and effector functions in synergy with TNF. Conditional genetic ablation of ATX in mesenchymal cells, including SFs, resulted in disease attenuation in animal models of arthritis, establishing the ATX/LPA axis as a novel player in chronic inflammation and the pathogenesis of arthritis and a promising therapeutic target. PMID:22493518

  3. Studying the Immunomodulatory Effects of Small Molecule Ras Inhibitors in Animal Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    rat adjuvant- induced arthritis (AIA) model by all outcome parameters(Clinical assessment and relevant laboratory/ immunological /Molecular analyses...treatment alone or combined with MTX was coupled with significant "positive" attenuation of multiple relevant immunological and laboratory markers - all...molecule does not belong to the class of farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) that failed in clinical trials . It interferes with the interactions

  4. A multidimensional 'path analysis' model of factors explaining fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dartel, S.A.A. van; Repping-Wuts, H.; Donders, R.; Hoogmoed, D. van; Knoop, H.; Bleijenberg, G.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Fransen, J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Fatigue is one of the most commonly reported symptoms in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Many factors may play a causal role on fatigue in RA patients, but their contribution and interplay is barely understood. The objective was to develop a multidimensional model of factors that explain

  5. A multidimensional 'path analysis' model of factors explaining fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rongen-van Dartel, Sanne A. A.; Repping-Wuts, Han; Donders, Rogier; van Hoogmoed, Dewy; Knoop, Hans; Bleijenberg, Gijs; van Riel, Piet L. C. M.; Fransen, Jaap

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue is one of the most commonly reported symptoms in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Many factors may play a causal role on fatigue in RA patients, but their contribution and interplay is barely understood. The objective was to develop a multidimensional model of factors that explain fatigue severity

  6. Thumb Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Figure 4 - Treatment Diagram PDF Arthritis - Base of the Thumb Related Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Osteoarthritis MP Joint Arthritis de Quervain's Tenosynovitis Other Links CME Mission Statement and Disclaimer Policies ...

  7. Overview of the arthritis Cost Consequence Evaluation System (ACCES): a pharmacoeconomic model for celecoxib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettitt, D; Goldstein, J L; McGuire, A; Schwartz, J S; Burke, T; Maniadakis, N

    2000-12-01

    Pharmacoeconomic analyses have become useful and essential tools for health care decision makers who increasingly require such analyses prior to placing a drug on a national, regional or hospital formulary. Previous health economic models of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been restricted to evaluating a narrow range of agents within specific health care delivery systems using medical information derived from homogeneous clinical trial data. This paper summarizes the Arthritis Cost Consequence Evaluation System (ACCES)--a pharmacoeconomic model that has been developed to predict and evaluate the costs and consequences associated with the use of celecoxib in patients with arthritis, compared with other NSAIDs and NSAIDs plus gastroprotective agents. The advantage of this model is that it can be customized to reflect local practice patterns, resource utilization and costs, as well as provide context-specific health economic information to a variety of providers and/or decision makers.

  8. Cytoskeletal rearrangements in synovial fibroblasts as a novel pathophysiological determinant of modeled rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilis Aidinis

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a high prevalence and substantial socioeconomic burden. Despite intense research efforts, its aetiology and pathogenesis remain poorly understood. To identify novel genes and/or cellular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of the disease, we utilized a well-recognized tumour necrosis factor-driven animal model of this disease and performed high-throughput expression profiling with subtractive cDNA libraries and oligonucleotide microarray hybridizations, coupled with independent statistical analysis. This twin approach was validated by a number of different methods in other animal models of arthritis as well as in human patient samples, thus creating a unique list of disease modifiers of potential therapeutic value. Importantly, and through the integration of genetic linkage analysis and Gene Ontology-assisted functional discovery, we identified the gelsolin-driven synovial fibroblast cytoskeletal rearrangements as a novel pathophysiological determinant of the disease.

  9. Studying the Immunomodulatory Effects of Small Molecule Ras-Inhibitors in Animal Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    arthritis (AIA) model by all outcome parameters(Clinical assessment and relevant laboratory/ immunological /Molecular analyses). (II) Prophylactic dosing of...with MTX was coupled with significant "positive" attenuation of multiple relevant immunological and laboratory markers - all strongly implying that the...Farnesylthiosalicylic acid (FTS). This small molecule does not belong to the class of farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) that failed in clinical trials . It

  10. Antibody-Mediated Neutralization of uPA Proteolytic Function Reduces Disease Progression in Mouse Arthritis Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almholt, Kasper; Hebsgaard, Josephine B; Nansen, Anneline

    2018-01-01

    Genetic absence of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) reduces arthritis progression in the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model to an extent just shy of disease abrogation, but this remarkable observation has not been translated into therapeutic intervention. Our aim was to test...... the potential in mice of an Ab that blocks the proteolytic capacity of uPA in the CIA model and the delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis model. A second aim was to determine the cellular origins of uPA and the uPA receptor (uPAR) in joint tissue from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. A mAb that neutralizes...... mouse uPA significantly reduced arthritis progression in the CIA and delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis models. In the CIA model, the impact of anti-uPA treatment was on par with the effect of blocking TNF-α by etanercept. A pharmacokinetics evaluation of the therapeutic Ab revealed target...

  11. Total glucosides of paeony prevents juxta-articular bone loss in experimental arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Chen Chao; You, Fan Tian; Mei, Li Yu; Jian, Sun; Qiang, Chen Yong

    2013-01-01

    Background Total glucosides of paeony (TGP) is a biologically active compound extracted from Paeony root. TGP has been used in rheumatoid arthritis therapy for many years. However, the mechanism by which TGP prevents bone loss has been less explored. Methods TGP was orally administered for 3?months to New Zealand rabbits with antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Digital x-ray knee images and bone mineral density (BMD) measurements of the subchondral knee bone were performed before sacrifice. Chon...

  12. Efficacy of Bioactive Cyclic Peptides in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Translation from In Vitro to In Vivo Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger New

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Using a novel drug discovery technology reported in previous issues of this journal cyclic peptides have been created which are able to down-regulate secretion of inflammatory cytokines, in vitro, by stimulated cells of the macrophage cell line J774. The cytokines in question, TNF-alpha and IL-6, are strongly implicated in etiology of diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Studies are reported here using the CAIA animal model for rheumatoid arthritis, which show that the peptides identified are indeed able to impact on inflammation of joints, induced in vivo. The results suggest that these peptides are effective at a dose which could be viable in man, and at which no adverse side effects are evident in the short term.

  13. Genetic deficiency of Wnt5a diminishes disease severity in a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLauchlan, Susan; Zuriaga, Maria A; Fuster, José J; Cuda, Carla M; Jonason, Jennifer; Behzadi, Fernanda; Duffen, Jennifer Parker; Haines, G Kenneth; Aprahamian, Tamar; Perlman, Harris; Walsh, Kenneth

    2017-07-19

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the joints, leading to bone erosion and joint dysfunction. Despite the recent successes of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), there is still clinical need for understanding the development and molecular etiology of RA. Wnts are developmental morphogens whose roles in adult pathology are poorly characterized. Wnt5a is a member of the non-canonical family of Wnts that modulates a wide range of cell processes, including differentiation, migration, and inflammation. Wnt5a has been implicated as a possible contributor to arthritis and it is upregulated in synovial fibroblasts from RA patients. We investigated the role of endogenous Wnt5a in RA. Tamoxifen-inducible, Wnt5a knockout (Wnt5a cKO) mice and littermate controls were monitored for arthritis development and joint pathology using the K/BxN serum transfer-induced arthritis (STIA) model. To explore a role of Wnt5a in osteoclast fusion, bone marrow-derived monocytes (BMDMs) were differentiated in vitro. Wnt5a cKO mice were resistant to arthritis development compared to control littermates as assessed by ankle thickness and histologic measurements. Some parameters of inflammation were reduced in the Wnt5a cKO mice, including the extent of polymononuclear cell infiltration and extra-articular inflammation. Wnt5a cKO mice also exhibited less cartilage destruction and a reduction in osteoclast activity with concomitant reduction in tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), cathepsin K (CTSK), macrophage colony-stimulating factor (MCSF), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)2 and MMP9 in the arthritic joints. Treatment of BMDMs with Wnt5a enhanced osteoclast fusion and increased the expression of dendrocyte-expressed seven transmembrane protein (DCSTAMP) and MMP9, that are necessary for osteoclast formation and activity. These data suggest that Wnt5a modulates the development of arthritis by promoting

  14. Defining immunological impact and therapeutic benefit of mild heating in a murine model of arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Ting Lee

    Full Text Available Traditional treatments, including a variety of thermal therapies have been known since ancient times to provide relief from rheumatoid arthritis (RA symptoms. However, a general absence of information on how heating affects molecular or immunological targets relevant to RA has limited heat treatment (HT to the category of treatments known as "alternative therapies". In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of mild HT in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA model which has been used in many previous studies to evaluate newer pharmacological approaches for the treatment of RA, and tested whether inflammatory immune activity was altered. We also compared the effect of HT to methotrexate, a well characterized pharmacological treatment for RA. CIA mice were treated with either a single HT for several hours or daily 30 minute HT. Disease progression and macrophage infiltration were evaluated. We found that both HT regimens significantly reduced arthritis disease severity and macrophage infiltration into inflamed joints. Surprisingly, HT was as efficient as methotrexate in controlling disease progression. At the molecular level, HT suppressed TNF-α while increasing production of IL-10. We also observed an induction of HSP70 and a reduction in both NF-κB and HIF-1α in inflamed tissues. Additionally, using activated macrophages in vitro, we found that HT reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, an effect which is correlated to induction of HSF-1 and HSP70 and inhibition of NF-κB and STAT activation. Our findings demonstrate a significant therapeutic benefit of HT in controlling arthritis progression in a clinically relevant mouse model, with an efficacy similar to methotrexate. Mechanistically, HT targets highly relevant anti-inflammatory pathways which strongly support its increased study for use in clinical trials for RA.

  15. Acrolein exposure suppresses antigen-induced pulmonary inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Adverse health effects of tobacco smoke arise partly from its influence on innate and adaptive immune responses, leading to impaired innate immunity and host defense. The impact of smoking on allergic asthma remains unclear, with various reports demonstrating that cigarette smoke enhances asthma development but can also suppress allergic airway inflammation. Based on our previous findings that immunosuppressive effects of smoking may be largely attributed to one of its main reactive electrophiles, acrolein, we explored the impact of acrolein exposure in a mouse model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic asthma. Methods C57BL/6 mice were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) by intraperitoneal injection with the adjuvant aluminum hydroxide on days 0 and 7, and challenged with aerosolized OVA on days 14–16. In some cases, mice were also exposed to 5 ppm acrolein vapor for 6 hrs/day on days 14–17. Lung tissues or brochoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF) were collected either 6 hrs after a single initial OVA challenge and/or acrolein exposure on day 14 or 48 hrs after the last OVA challenge, on day 18. Inflammatory cells and Th1/Th2 cytokine levels were measured in BALF, and lung tissue samples were collected for analysis of mucus and Th1/Th2 cytokine expression, determination of protein alkylation, cellular thiol status and transcription factor activity. Results Exposure to acrolein following OVA challenge of OVA-sensitized mice resulted in markedly attenuated allergic airway inflammation, demonstrated by decreased inflammatory cell infiltrates, mucus hyperplasia and Th2 cytokines. Acrolein exposure rapidly depleted lung tissue glutathione (GSH) levels, and induced activation of the Nrf2 pathway, indicated by accumulation of Nrf2, increased alkylation of Keap1, and induction of Nrf2-target genes such as HO-1. Additionally, analysis of inflammatory signaling pathways showed suppressed activation of NF-κB and marginally reduced activation of JNK in acrolein

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a form of arthritis that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in ... wrist and fingers. More women than men get rheumatoid arthritis. It often starts in middle age and is ...

  17. Gonococcal arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI); Disseminated gonococcemia; Septic arthritis - gonococcal arthritis ... Gonococcal arthritis is an infection of a joint. It occurs in people who have gonorrhea , which is caused by ...

  18. Arthritis Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our position statement on health care transparency, patient representation and collaboration in finding shared solutions. The Role ... Kids Get Arthritis Too Español Arthritis Today Social Media Newsletters Sign Up for E-Newsletters Arthritis Foundation ...

  19. CD4+ cell-derived interleukin-17 in a model of dysregulated, Borrelia-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Emily S; Johnson, Megan E; Schell, Ronald F; Nardelli, Dean T

    2016-10-01

    Lyme borreliosis, which is caused in the United States by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, may manifest as different arrays of signs, symptoms and severities between infected individuals. Recent studies have indicated that particularly severe forms of Lyme borreliosis in humans are associated with an increased Th17 response. Here, we hypothesized that a murine model combining the dysregulated immune response of an environment lacking interleukin-10 (IL-10) with a robust T-cell-driven inflammatory response would reflect arthritis associated with the production of IL-17 by CD4+ cells. We demonstrate that IL-10 regulates the production of IL-17 by Borrelia-primed CD4+ cells early after interaction with Lyme spirochetes in vitro and that infection of Borrelia-primed mice with B. burgdorferi leads to significant production of IL-17 that contributes to the development of severe arthritis. These results extend our previous findings by demonstrating that a dysregulated adaptive immune response to Lyme spirochetes can contribute to severe, Th17-associated arthritis. These findings may lead to therapeutic measures for individuals with particularly severe symptoms of Lyme borreliosis. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. An epitope-specific DerG-PG70 LEAPS vaccine modulates T cell responses and suppresses arthritis progression in two related murine models of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikecz, Katalin; Glant, Tibor T; Markovics, Adrienn; Rosenthal, Kenneth S; Kurko, Julia; Carambula, Roy E; Cress, Steve; Steiner, Harold L; Zimmerman, Daniel H

    2017-07-13

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune joint disease maintained by aberrant immune responses involving CD4+ T helper (Th)1 and Th17 cells. In this study, we tested the therapeutic efficacy of Ligand Epitope Antigen Presentation System (LEAPS™) vaccines in two Th1 cell-driven mouse models of RA, cartilage proteoglycan (PG)-induced arthritis (PGIA) and PG G1-domain-induced arthritis (GIA). The immunodominant PG peptide PG70 was attached to a DerG or J immune cell binding peptide, and the DerG-PG70 and J-PG70 LEAPS vaccines were administered to the mice after the onset of PGIA or GIA symptoms. As indicated by significant decreases in visual and histopathological scores of arthritis, the DerG-PG70 vaccine inhibited disease progression in both PGIA and GIA, while the J-PG70 vaccine was ineffective. Splenic CD4+ cells from DerG-PG70-treated mice were diminished in Th1 and Th17 populations but enriched in Th2 and regulatory T (Treg) cells. In vitro spleen cell-secreted and serum cytokines from DerG-PG70-treated mice demonstrated a shift from a pro-inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory/regulatory profile. DerG-PG70 peptide tetramers preferentially bound to CD4+ T-cells of GIA spleen cells. We conclude that the DerG-PG70 vaccine (now designated CEL-4000) exerts its therapeutic effect by interacting with CD4+ cells, which results in an antigen-specific down-modulation of pathogenic T-cell responses in both the PGIA and GIA models of RA. Future studies will need to determine the potential of LEAPS vaccination to provide disease suppression in patients with RA. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. The Effects of Pterostilbene on Neutrophil Activity in Experimental Model of Arthritis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Perečko, Tomáš; Drábiková, K.; Lojek, Antonín; Číž, Milan; Poništ, S.; Bauerová, K.; Nosál, R.; Harmatha, Juraj; Jančinová, V.

    -, č. 106041 (2013), 106041/1-106041/7 ISSN 2314-6133 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : protein kinase C * adjuvant arthritis * rheumatoid arthritis * resveratrol Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  2. Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  3. Osteoarticular Expression of Musashi-1 in an Experimental Model of Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco O’Valle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA, a murine experimental disease model induced by immunization with type II collagen (CII, is used to evaluate novel therapeutic strategies for rheumatoid arthritis. Adult stem cell marker Musashi-1 (Msi1 plays an important role in regulating the maintenance and differentiation of stem/precursor cells. The objectives of this investigation were to perform a morphological study of the experimental CIA model, evaluate the effect of TNFα-blocker (etanercept treatment, and determine the immunohistochemical expression of Msi1 protein. Methods. CIA was induced in 50 male DBA1/J mice for analyses of tissue and serum cytokine; clinical and morphological lesions in limbs; and immunohistochemical expression of Msi1. Results. Clinically, TNFα-blocker treatment attenuated CIA on day 32 after immunization (P<0.001. Msi1 protein expression was significantly higher in joints damaged by CIA than in those with no lesions (P<0.0001 and was related to the severity of the lesions (Spearman’s rho = 0.775, P=0.0001. Conclusions. Treatment with etanercept attenuates osteoarticular lesions in the murine CIA model. Osteoarticular expression of Msi1 protein is increased in joints with CIA-induced lesion and absent in nonlesioned joints, suggesting that this protein is expressed when the lesion is produced in order to favor tissue repair.

  4. A mouse model of adoptive immunotherapeutic targeting of autoimmune arthritis using allo-tolerogenic dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Tolerogenic dendritic cells (tDCs are immunosuppressive cells with potent tolerogenic ability and are promising immunotherapeutic tools for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, it is currently unknown whether allogeneic tDCs (allo-tDCs induce tolerance in RA, and whether the numbers of adoptively transferred allo-tDCs, or the requirement for pulsing with relevant auto-antigens are important. METHODS: tDCs were derived from bone marrow precursors of C57BL/B6 mice, which were induced in vitro by GM-CSF, IL-10 and TGF-β1. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA was modeled in D1 mice by immunization with type II collagen (CII to test the therapeutic ability of allo-tDCs against CIA. Clinical and histopathologic scores, arthritic incidence, cytokine and anti-CII antibody secretion, and CD4(+Th subsets were analyzed. RESULTS: tDCs were characterized in vitro by a stable immature phonotype and a potent immunosuppressive ability. Following adoptive transfer of low doses (5×10(5 of CII-loaded allo-tDCs, a remarkable anti-arthritic activity, improved clinical scores and histological end-points were found. Serological levels of inflammatory cytokines and anti-CII antibodies were also significantly lower in CIA mice treated with CII-pulsed allo-tDCs as compared with allo-tDCs. Moreover, treatment with allo-tDCs altered the proportion of Treg/Th17 cells. CONCLUSION: These findings suggested that allo-tDCs, especially following antigen loading, reduced the severity of CIA in a dose-dependent manner. The dampening of CIA was associated with modulated cytokine secretion, Treg/Th17 polarization and inhibition of anti-CII secretion. This study highlights the potential therapeutic utility of allo-tDCs in autoimmune arthritis and should facilitate the future design of allo-tDC immunotherapeutic strategies against RA.

  5. Effect of Uncaria tomentosa extract on purinergic enzyme activities in lymphocytes of rats submitted to experimental adjuvant arthritis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilhos, Lívia G; Rezer, João F P; Ruchel, Jader B; Thorstenberg, Maria Luiza; Jaques, Jeandre A dos S; Schlemmer, Josiane B; Doleski, Pedro H; Rossato, Mateus F; da Silva, Mariane A; Casalli, Emerson André; da Cruz, Ritiel Corrêa; Ferreira, Juliano; Athayde, Margareth L; Gonçalves, Jamile F; Leal, Daniela B R

    2015-06-20

    Considering that adjuvant arthritis is an experimental model of arthritis widely used for preclinical testing of numerous anti-arthritic agents, which were taken by a large number of patients worldwide, it is of great interest to investigate the therapeutic action of compounds with anti-inflammatory properties, such as Uncaria tomentosa extract. Moreover, there are no studies demonstrating the effect of U. tomentosa on the metabolism of adenine nucleotides published so far. Thus, the purpose of the present study is to investigate the effects of U. tomentosa extract on E-NTPDase and E-ADA activities in lymphocytes of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) arthritis induced rats. To evaluate the effect of U. tomentosa extract on the activity of E-NTPDase and ADA in lymphocytes, the rats were submitted to an experimental adjuvant arthritis model. Peripheral lymphocytes were isolated and E-NTPDase and E-ADA activities were determined. Data were analyzed by a one- or two-way ANOVA. Post hoc analyses were carried out by the Student-Newman-Keuls (SNK) Multiple Comparison Test. E-NTPDase activity was increased in arthritic untreated. Arthritic rats which received U. tomentosa extract, presented similar results to the control group. However, results obtained for adenosine hydrolysis by E-ADA were not altered in arthritic rats. U. tomentosa extract did not alter E-NTPDase and E-ADA activity in healthy animals. The present investigation supports the hypothesis that the increased E-NTPDase activity verified in arthritic rats might be an attempt to maintain basal levels of ATP and ADP in the extracellular medium, since the arthritis induction causes tissue damage and, consequently, large amounts of ATP are released into this milieu. Also, it highlights the possibility to use U. tomentosa extract as an adjuvant to treat arthritis.

  6. Immunization of rabbits with nematode Ascaris lumbricoides antigens induces antibodies cross-reactive to house dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Takuya; Khan, Al Fazal; Yasueda, Hiroshi; Saito, Akemi; Fukutomi, Yuma; Takai, Toshiro; Zaman, Khalequz; Yunus, Md; Takeuchi, Haruko; Iwata, Tsutomu; Akiyama, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    There are controversial reports on the relationship between helminthic infection and allergic diseases. Although IgE cross-reactivity between nematode Ascaris antigens and house dust-mite allergens in allergic patients have been reported, whether Ascaris or the mite is the primary sensitizer remains unknown. Here we found that immunization of naïve animals with Ascaris lumbricoides (Al) antigens induced production of antibodies cross-reactive to mite antigens from Dermatophagoides farinae (Df). Sera from Bangladeshi children showed IgE reactivity to Ascaris and mite extracts. IgG from rabbits immunized with Al extract exhibited reactivity to Df antigens. Treatment of the anti-Al antibody with Df antigen-coupled beads eliminated the reactivity to Df antigens. In immunoblot analysis, an approximately 100-kDa Df band was the most reactive to anti-Al IgG. The present study is the first step towards the establishment of animal models to study the relationship between Ascaris infection and mite-induced allergic diseases.

  7. AMPA/kainate glutamate receptors contribute to inflammation, degeneration and pain related behaviour in inflammatory stages of arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Cleo S; Williams, Anwen S; Gilbert, Sophie J; Harvey, Ann K; Evans, Bronwen A; Mason, Deborah J

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fluid glutamate concentrations increase in arthritis. Activation of kainate (KA) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) glutamate receptors (GluRs) increase interleukin-6 (IL-6) release and cause arthritic pain, respectively. We hypothesised that AMPA and KA GluRs are expressed in human arthritis, and that intra-articular NBQX (AMPA/KA GluR antagonist) prevents pain and pathology in antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). GluR immunohistochemistry was related to synovial inflammation and degradation in osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A single intra-articular NBQX injection was given at induction, and knee swelling and gait of AIA and AIA+NBQX rats compared over 21 days, before imaging, RT-qPCR, histology and immunohistochemistry of joints. Effects of NBQX on human primary osteoblast (HOB) activity were determined. AMPAR2 and KA1 immunolocalised to remodelling bone, cartilage and synovial cells in human OA and RA, and rat AIA. All arthritic tissues showed degradation and synovial inflammation. NBQX reduced GluR abundance, knee swelling (pinflammation (pinflammation after NBQX treatment. NBQX reduced HOB number and prevented mineralisation. AMPA/KA GluRs are expressed in human OA and RA, and in AIA, where a single intra-articular injection of NBQX reduced swelling by 33%, and inflammation and degeneration scores by 34% and 27%, respectively, exceeding the efficacy of approved drugs in the same model. AMPA/KA GluR antagonists represent a potential treatment for arthritis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your body. Some people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling of the ... physical exam and imaging tests to diagnose psoriatic arthritis. There is no cure, but medicines can help ...

  9. Infectious Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ...

  10. State selection in Markov models for panel data with application to psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Howard H Z; Jackson, Christopher H; Commenges, Daniel; Sharples, Linda D

    2015-07-20

    Markov multistate models in continuous-time are commonly used to understand the progression over time of disease or the effect of treatments and covariates on patient outcomes. The states in multistate models are related to categorisations of the disease status, but there is often uncertainty about the number of categories to use and how to define them. Many categorisations, and therefore multistate models with different states, may be possible. Different multistate models can show differences in the effects of covariates or in the time to events, such as death, hospitalisation, or disease progression. Furthermore, different categorisations contain different quantities of information, so that the corresponding likelihoods are on different scales, and standard, likelihood-based model comparison is not applicable. We adapt a recently developed modification of Akaike's criterion, and a cross-validatory criterion, to compare the predictive ability of multistate models on the information which they share. All the models we consider are fitted to data consisting of observations of the process at arbitrary times, often called 'panel' data. We develop an implementation of these criteria through Hidden Markov models and apply them to the comparison of multistate models for the Health Assessment Questionnaire score in psoriatic arthritis. This procedure is straightforward to implement in the R package 'msm'. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Locomotion and muscle mass measures in a murine model of collagen-induced arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, A.; Hulsman, J.; Garssen, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by chronic poly-arthritis, synovial hyperplasia, erosive synovitis, progressive cartilage and bone destruction accompanied by a loss of body cell mass. This loss of cell mass, known as rheumatoid cachexia, predominates in the skeletal muscle and

  12. Car safety belts: a study of two models adapted for people with arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arie, E

    1986-05-01

    People with arthritis find car seat belts difficult to use. Sixteen arthritic patients and 19 healthy volunteers completed a comparative study of one standard inertia-reel belt and two adapted inertia-reel belts with reduced retraction forces. Those with arthritis were strong enough to use the standard belt but both adapted belts had features making them easier to use.

  13. Glucose kinetics in the collagen-induced arthritis model: an all-in-one model to assess both efficacy and metabolic side effects of glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toonen, Erik J M; Laskewitz, Anke J; van Dijk, Theo H; Bleeker, Aycha; Grefhorst, Aldo; Schouten, Annelies E; Bastiaanssen, Ellen A J; Ballak, Dov B; Koenders, Marije I; van Doorn, Cindy; van der Vleuten, Monique A J; van Lierop, Marie-Jose C; Groen, Albert K; Dokter, Wim H A

    2014-01-01

    Prednisolone and other glucocorticoids (GCs) are potent anti-inflammatory drugs, but chronic use is hampered by metabolic side effects. Therefore, there is an urgent medical need for improved GCs that are as effective as classical GCs but have a better safety profile. A well-established model to assess anti-inflammatory efficacy is the chronic collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model in mice, a model with features resembling rheumatoid arthritis. Models to quantify undesired effects of glucocorticoids on glucose kinetics are less well-established. Recently, we have described a model to quantify basal blood glucose kinetics using stably-labeled glucose. In the present study, we have integrated this blood glucose kinetic model in the CIA model to enable quantification of both efficacy and adverse effects in one animal model. Arthritis scores were decreased after treatment with prednisolone, confirming the anti-inflammatory properties of GCs. Both inflammation and prednisolone induced insulin resistance as insulin secretion was strongly increased whereas blood glucose concentrations and hepatic glucose production were only slightly decreased. This insulin resistance did not directly resulted in hyperglycemia, indicating a highly adaptive compensatory mechanism in these mice. In conclusion, this 'all-in-one' model allows for studying effects of (novel) GC compounds on the development of arthritis and glucose kinetics in a single animal. This integrative model provides a valuable tool for investigating (drug-induced) metabolic dysregulation in an inflammatory setting.

  14. The genetics of rheumatoid arthritis and the need for animal models to find and understand the underlying genes

    OpenAIRE

    Jirholt, Johan; Lindqvist, Anna-Karin B; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2000-01-01

    The causes of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are largely unknown. However, RA is most probably a multifactorial disease with contributions from genetic and environmental factors. Searches for genes that influence RA have been conducted in both human and experimental model materials. Both types of study have confirmed the polygenic inheritance of the disease. It has become clear that the features of RA complicate the human genetic studies. Animal models are therefore valuable tools for identifying ...

  15. Enhancement of mite antigen-induced histamine release by deuterium oxide from leucocytes of chronic urticarial patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numata, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamura, T.

    1981-09-01

    The mite antigen-induced histamine release from leucocytes of chronic urticarial patients was enhanced in the presence of deuterium oxide, which stabilizes microtubules. This enhancing effect of deuterium oxide on the histamine release from leucocytes may provide a useful means for the detection of allergens in vitro in chronic urticaria.

  16. Model-based methods for case definitions from administrative health data: application to rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeker, Kristine; Widdifield, Jessica; Muthukumarana, Saman; Jiang, Depeng; Lix, Lisa M

    2017-06-23

    This research proposes a model-based method to facilitate the selection of disease case definitions from validation studies for administrative health data. The method is demonstrated for a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) validation study. Data were from 148 definitions to ascertain cases of RA in hospital, physician and prescription medication administrative data. We considered: (A) separate univariate models for sensitivity and specificity, (B) univariate model for Youden's summary index and (C) bivariate (ie, joint) mixed-effects model for sensitivity and specificity. Model covariates included the number of diagnoses in physician, hospital and emergency department records, physician diagnosis observation time, duration of time between physician diagnoses and number of RA-related prescription medication records. The most common case definition attributes were: 1+ hospital diagnosis (65%), 2+ physician diagnoses (43%), 1+ specialist physician diagnosis (51%) and 2+ years of physician diagnosis observation time (27%). Statistically significant improvements in sensitivity and/or specificity for separate univariate models were associated with (all p values model produced similar results. Youden's index was associated with these same case definition criteria, except for the length of the physician diagnosis observation time. A model-based method provides valuable empirical evidence to aid in selecting a definition(s) for ascertaining diagnosed disease cases from administrative health data. The choice between univariate and bivariate models depends on the goals of the validation study and number of case definitions. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Orally Administrated Denatured Naja Naja Atra Venom on Murine Rheumatoid Arthritis Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kou-Zhu Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the denatured Naja Naja atra venom (NNAV in rheumatoid arthritis-associated models, the denatured NNAV (heat treated; 30, 90, 270 μg/kg, the native NNAV (untreated with heat; 90 μg/kg, and Tripterygium wilfordii polyglycoside (TWP, 15 mg/kg were administrated orally either prophylactically or therapeutically. We measured time of licking the affected paw in formaldehyde-induced inflammatory model, paw volume in egg-white-induced inflammation, and granuloma weight in formalin-soaked filter paper-induced granuloma. For adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA rats, paw edema, mechanical withdrawal threshold, serum levels of TNF-α and IL-10, and histopathological changes of the affected paw were assessed. We found that the denatured NNAV (90, 270 μg/kg significantly reduced time of licking paw, paw volume, and granuloma weight in above inflammatory models and also attenuated paw edema, mechanical hyperalgesia, and histopathology changes in AIA rats. Additionally, the increase in serum TNF-α and the decrease in serum IL-10 in AIA rats were reversed by the denatured NNAV. Although the native NNAV and TWP rendered the similar pharmacological actions on the above four models with less potency than that of the denatured NNAV, these findings demonstrate that oral administration of the denatured NNAV produces antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities on rheumatoid arthritis.

  18. The Swedish ACCES model: predicting the health economic impact of celecoxib in patients with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, U; Svarvar, P

    2000-12-01

    The Arthritis Cost Consequence Evaluation System (ACCES) pharmacoeconomic model was used to evaluate the economic and health impact of the recent introduction of celecoxib for treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Sweden. The model demonstrates that use of celecoxib can be expected to reduce the incidence of gastrointestinal adverse events, resource utilization and treatment costs. In a cost-effectiveness analysis, celecoxib demonstrated economic dominance (i.e. improved health at reduced cost) compared with the currently available alternatives for OA, and demonstrated economic dominance against a clinically relevant base-case scenario for RA. In sensitivity analyses, the results were shown to be relatively robust; celecoxib demonstrated economic dominance or favourable cost-effectiveness ratios in all analyses. Based on these data, it can be concluded that the use of celecoxib in Sweden will provide societal benefits by improving health care at reduced cost for patients with OA and RA.

  19. Reactive Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Erken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is an acute, sterile, non-suppurative and inflammatory arthropaty which has occured as a result of an infectious processes, mostly after gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract infections. Reiter syndrome is a frequent type of reactive arthritis. Both reactive arthritis and Reiter syndrome belong to the group of seronegative spondyloarthropathies, associated with HLA-B27 positivity and characterized by ongoing inflammation after an infectious episode. The classical triad of Reiter syndrome is defined as arthritis, conjuctivitis and urethritis and is seen only in one third of patients with Reiter syndrome. Recently, seronegative asymmetric arthritis and typical extraarticular involvement are thought to be adequate for the diagnosis. However, there is no established criteria for the diagnosis of reactive arthritis and the number of randomized and controlled studies about the therapy is not enough. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 283-299

  20. Psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    In the past 10 years, a number of well-controlled surveys of psoriatic patients selective for the presence of arthritis have been conducted. A Canadian group reported that of 100 patients admitted to the hospital for treatment of psoriasis, 32 had clinical or radiologic evidence of psoriatic arthritis, and 17 had both types of evidence. Eighty patients with radiologic evidence of spinal or sacroiliac involvement were asymptomatic, and seven had clinical evidence of peripheral arthritis but without radiologic evidence. The authors concluded that psoriatic arthritis is a common event in patients with severe psoriasis and that it is associated with more extensive skin disease than is found in patients without arthritis. The information gathered from these epidemiologic studies coupled with clinical, radiologic, and serologic characteristics have provided the basis for the current belief that psoriatic arthritis is indeed a distinct entity

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Arthritis Information Disease Information Rheumatoid Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Ankylosing Spondylitis Osteoarthritis Gout Lyme Disease Osteoporosis News Rheumatoid Arthritis News Psoriatic Arthritis ...

  2. Quantification of joint inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis by time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy and tracer kinetic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioussoufovitch, Seva; Morrison, Laura B.; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith; Diop, Mamadou

    2015-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by chronic synovial inflammation, which can cause progressive joint damage and disability. Diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and imaging have the potential to become potent monitoring tools for RA. We devised a method that combined time-resolved DOS and tracer kinetics modeling to rapidly and reliably quantify blood flow in the joint. Preliminary results obtained from two animals show that the technique can detect joint inflammation as early as 5 days after onset.

  3. The effects of pressure on arthritic knees in a rat model of CFA-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Sung Tae; Lee, Chang-Hyung; Choi, Hyeunseok; Shin, Yong Il; Ha, Ki Tae; Ye, Hanna; Shim, Hyun Bo

    2013-01-01

    Pain is influenced by weather changes under certain circumstances, and inflammatory pain in animal models is ameliorated by pressure, but the underlying mechanism of atmospheric pressure has not been clearly elucidated. To examine the effect of pressure on pain in an arthritic animal model. Controlled animal study. Laboratory animal study. Following an injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into one side of a knee joint, 32 rats were assigned randomly to 2 groups and either placed under 1 or 2.5 atmospheres absolute (ATA) in a hyperbaric chamber for 5 hours. The pain levels were assessed daily for up to 2 weeks post-injection to determine the changes in weight bearing (WB) of the affected limbs. In addition, the levels of gelatinase, MMP-2, and MMP-9 expression in the synovial fluids of the knees were analyzed. After arthritis induction, the rats in the 1 ATA group showed reduced WB of the affected limbs (CFA injection in the 1 ATA group. However, repetitive exposure to 2.5 ATA significantly reduced this ratio in the 2.5 ATA group. Although a sufficient number of samples were used to support the hypothesis that high atmospheric pressure improves a painful condition in this study, an additional larger-scale study will be needed to confirm these findings. Exposure to elevated pressures appears to relieve arthritic pain for extended periods by reducing the inflammatory process and should be considered as a possible alternative pain-reducing therapy.

  4. Modeling best practices in chronic disease management: the Arthritis Program at Southlake Regional Health Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Lorna; Mierdel, Sandra; Thorne, Carter

    2012-01-01

    Researchers, hospital administrators and governments are striving to define competencies in interprofessional care and education, as well as to identify effective models in chronic disease management. For more than 25 years The Arthritis Program (TAP) at Southlake Regional Health Centre in Newmarket, Ontario, has actively practiced within these two interrelated priorities, which are now at the top of the healthcare agenda in Ontario and Canada. The approximately 135 different rheumatic conditions are the primary cause of long-term disability in Canada, affecting those from youth to the senior years, with an economic burden estimated at $4.4 billion (CAD$) annually, and growing. For the benefit of healthcare managers and their clients with chronic conditions, this article discusses TAP's history and demonstrable success, predicated on an educational model of patient self-management and self-efficacy. Also outlined are TAP's contributions in supporting evidence-based best practices in interprofessional collaboration and chronic disease management; approaches that are arguably understudied and under-practiced. Next steps for TAP include a larger role in empirical research in chronic-disease management and integration of a formal training program to benefit health professionals launching or expanding their interprofessional programs using TAP as the dynamic clinical example.

  5. Collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bevaart, Lisette; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J.; Tak, Paul P.

    2010-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice is an animal model for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and can be induced in DBA/1 and C57BL/6 mice using different protocols. The CIA model can be used to unravel mechanisms involved in the development of arthritis and is frequently used to study the effect of new

  6. Monoarticular Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Namrata; Vogelgesang, Scott A

    2017-05-01

    Monoarticular arthritis is inflammation characterized by joint pain, swelling, and sometimes periarticular erythema. Although chronic causes are seen, the onset is often acute. An infected joint can quickly lead to permanent damage, making it a medical emergency. However, acute gout presenting as monoarticular arthritis is often so uncomfortable it requires urgent attention. Monoarticular crystalline arthritis is common and a septic joint is a medical emergency so it is no surprise that these diagnoses come to mind with complaint of inflammation in 1 joint. However, there are many causes of monoarticular arthritis that clinicians must consider. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Diagnostic classification based on functional connectivity in chronic pain: model optimization in fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundermann, Benedikt; Burgmer, Markus; Pogatzki-Zahn, Esther; Gaubitz, Markus; Stüber, Christoph; Wessolleck, Erik; Heuft, Gereon; Pfleiderer, Bettina

    2014-03-01

    The combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the brain with multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) has been proposed as a possible diagnostic tool. Goal of this investigation was to identify potential functional connectivity (FC) differences in the salience network (SN) and default mode network (DMN) between fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and controls (HC) and to evaluate the diagnostic applicability of derived pattern classification approaches. The resting period during an fMRI examination was retrospectively analyzed in women with FMS (n = 17), RA (n = 16), and HC (n = 17). FC was calculated for SN and DMN subregions. Classification accuracies of discriminative MVPA models were evaluated with cross-validation: (1) inferential test of a single method, (2) explorative model optimization. No inferentially tested model was able to classify subjects with statistically significant accuracy. However, the diagnostic ability for the differential diagnostic problem exhibited a trend to significance (accuracy: 69.7%, P = .086). Optimized models in the explorative analysis reached accuracies up to 73.5% (FMS vs. HC), 78.8% (RA vs. HC), and 78.8% (FMS vs. RA) whereas other models performed at or below chance level. Comparable support vector machine approaches performed above average for all three problems. Observed accuracies are not sufficient to reliably differentiate between FMS and RA for diagnostic purposes. However, some indirect evidence in support of the feasibility of this approach is provided. This exploratory analysis constitutes a fundamental model optimization effort to be based on in further investigations. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Establishment and evaluation of a transgenic mouse model of arthritis induced by overexpressing human tumor necrosis factor alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα plays a key role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Blockade of TNFα by monoclonal antibody has been widely used for the therapy of RA since the 1990s; however, its mechanism of efficacy, and potential safety concerns of the treatment are still not fully understood. This study sought to establish a transgenic arthritic mouse model by overexpressing human TNFα (hTNFα and to apply this model as a means to evaluate therapeutic consequences of TNFα inhibitors. The transgenic mouse line (TgTC with FVB background was generated by incorporating 3′-modified hTNFα gene sequences. A progressively erosive polyarthritis developed in the TgTC mice, with many characteristics observed in human rheumatoid arthritis, including polyarticular swelling, impairment of movement, synovial hyperplasia, and cartilage and bone erosion. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that hTNFα is not only expressed in hyperplastic synovial membrane, but also in tissues without lesions, including brain, lung and kidney. Treatment of the TgTC mice with anti-hTNFα monoclonal antibodies (mAb significantly decreased the level of hTNFα in the diseased joint and effectively prevented development of arthritis in a dose-dependent response fashion. Our results indicated that the TgTC mice represent a genetic model which can be used to comprehensively investigate the pathogenesis and therapeutics of TNFα-related diseases.

  9. Lethality of patients with rheumatoid arthritis depending on adalimumab administration: imitation modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D V Goryachev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Lethality of pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA exceeds mortality values in general population. Possibility of disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD influence on RA pts lethality has been widely discussed lately in scientific works. Objective. To determine possible lethality diminishment in Russian population of RA pts with one of biological drugs TNFα antagonist adalimumab. Material and methods. Model construction is based on the fact of lethality dependence on pt functional state assessed by HAQ. Model simulating progression of functional disability in pts with RA visiting medical institutions of Russia was made (RAISER study. 3 model variants for imitation of consecutive change of DMARDs including adalimumab were done. First consecution assessed DMARD change in the next chain: adalimumab-methotrexate-sulfasalazine-leflunomide-azathioprine-cyclosporine-palliative therapy. Second consecution: adalimumab administration after failure of first 3 DMARDs. Third consecution considered only change of synthetic DMARDs without adalimumab inclusion. Model imitated participation of 3000 pts in every consecution. Prognosis horizon was 12 years. Age of pts and initial HAQ distribution were get from results of epidemiological RAISER study. Calculation was done on the base of elevation of standardized lethality level (SLL in population of RA pts in average from 135% to 300%. SLL values from 80 to 320% were used depending on functional disability degree with converting to Russian values of age-specific lethality coefficient for 1999. Results. Lethality in treatment consecutions including adalimumab was significantly lower. To the end of 12th year in group not using adalimumab, using it at once and using it after 376 DMARDs respectively 65,1%, 71,6% and 71,1% of pts were still alive. Conclusion. Significant decrease of lethality with adalimumab inclusion in consecution of DMARD change during treatment of RA pts was demonstrated with imitation modeling

  10. Anti-inflammatory activity of two varieties of pumpkin seed oil in an adjuvant arthritis model in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Okbi, S.Y.; Mohamed, D.A.; Kandil, E.; Abo-Zeid, M.A.; Mohammed, S.E.; Ahmed, E.K.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present research was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of pumpkin seed oils (PSOs) of an Egyptian and European variety, in a rat model of adjuvant arthritis. Edema thickness, plasma tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were determined as inflammatory biomarkers while malondialdehyde (MDA) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were assessed as indicative of oxidative stress. Chromosomal aberration, sperm shape abnormalities, and DNA fragmentations are cytogenetic parameters which aid in tracing inflammatory and oxidative activity. Phenolic contents and β-carotene were determined in PSOs. The results showed elevated ESR, plasma TNF-α, plasma MDA, liver cellular DNA fragmentation, bone marrow chromosomal aberration, sperm shape abnormalities with a reduction in plasma TAC and body weight gain in an adjuvant arthritis control compared to a healthy control. Administration of low and high doses of either Egyptian or European PSO improved all the aforementioned parameters with variable degrees. [es

  11. Experimental Model of Zymosan-Induced Arthritis in the Rat Temporomandibular Joint: Role of Nitric Oxide and Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellíada Vasconcelos Chaves

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To establish a new model of zymosan-induced temporomandibular joint (TMJ arthritis in the rat and to investigate the role of nitric oxide. Methods. Inflammation was induced by an intra-articular injection of zymosan into the left TMJ. Mechanical hypernociception, cell influx, vascular permeability, myeloperoxidase activity, nitrite levels, and histological changes were measured in TMJ lavages or tissues at selected time points. These parameters were also evaluated after treatment with the nitric oxide synthase (NOS inhibitors L-NAME or 1400 W. Results. Zymosan-induced TMJ arthritis caused a time-dependent leucocyte migration, plasma extravasation, mechanical hypernociception, and neutrophil accumulation between 4 and 24 h. TMJ immunohistochemical analyses showed increased inducible NOS expression. Treatment with L-NAME or 1400 W inhibited these parameters. Conclusion. Zymosan-induced TMJ arthritis is a reproducible model that may be used to assess both the mechanisms underlying TMJ inflammation and the potential tools for therapies. Nitric oxide may participate in the inflammatory temporomandibular dysfunction mechanisms.

  12. Physiologic characterization of inflammatory arthritis in a rabbit model with BOLD and DCE MRI at 1.5 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasui, Otilia C; Chan, Michael W; Nathanael, George; Crawley, Adrian; Miller, Elka; Belik, Jaques; Cheng, Hai-Ling; Kassner, Andrea; Rayner, Tammy; Weiss, Ruth; Detzler, Garry; Zhong, Anguo; Moineddin, Rahim; Jong, Roland; Rogers, Marianne; Doria, Andrea S

    2014-11-01

    Our aim was to test the feasibility of blood oxygen level dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD MRI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI to monitor periarticular hypoxic/inflammatory changes over time in a juvenile rabbit model of arthritis. We examined arthritic and contralateral nonarthritic knees of 21 juvenile rabbits at baseline and days 1,14, and 28 after induction of arthritis by unilateral intra-articular injection of carrageenin with BOLD and DCE MRI at 1.5 Tesla (T). Nine noninjected rabbits served as controls. Associations between BOLD and DCE-MRI and corresponding intra-articular oxygen pressure (PO2) and blood flow [blood perfusion units (BPU)] (polarographic probes, reference standards) or clinical-histological data were measured by correlation coefficients. Percentage BOLD MRI change obtained in contralateral knees correlated moderately with BPU on day 0 (r = -0.51, p = 0.02) and excellently on day 28 (r = -0.84, p = 0.03). A moderate correlation was observed between peak enhancement DCE MRI (day 1) and BPU measurements in arthritic knees (r = 0.49, p = 0.04). In acute arthritis, BOLD and DCE MRI highly correlated (r = 0.89, p = 0.04; r = 1.0, p < 0.0001) with histological scores in arthritic knees. The proposed techniques are feasible to perform at 1.5 T, and they hold potential as surrogate measures to monitor hypoxic and inflammatory changes over time in arthritis at higher-strength MRI fields. • BOLD and DCE MRI detect interval perisynovial changes in a rabbit knee • BOLD and DCE MRI act as surrogate markers of physiologic changes in arthritis • BOLD MRI signal represents oxygen extraction compared with intra-articular PO 2 • DCE MRI measurements estimate physiologic periarticular vascular properties • In rabbit knees with acute arthritis, BOLD/DCE MRI highly correlated with histological scores.

  13. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Pharmacokinetic Modeling: Initial Experience in Patients With Early Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maijer, Karen I; van der Leij, Christiaan; de Hair, Maria J H; Tas, Sander W; Maas, Mario; Gerlag, Daniëlle M; Tak, Paul P; Lavini, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    Analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) using pharmacokinetic modeling (PKM) provides quantitative measures that mirror microvessel integrity and can be used as an objective marker of the level of synovial inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the PKM parameters K(trans) , kep , and ve in a prospective cohort of disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD)-naive patients with early arthritis, and to validate the results by assessing their correlation with the number of synovial endothelial cells (ECs). Forty-seven patients with early arthritis (arthritis duration arthritis, 22 with unclassified arthritis, 6 with spondyloarthritis [SpA], and 5 with other arthritides) were included. At baseline, DCE-MRI was performed on an inflamed knee joint of each patient. These images were used to calculate the K(trans) (volume transfer constant between the plasma and extracellular extravascular space [EES]), the kep (transfer constant between the EES and plasma), and the ve (fractional volume of the EES). Second, markers of disease activity were collected. Finally, vascularity was evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis of synovial tissue samples obtained from the inflamed knee joints, using antibodies to detect von Willebrand factor (vWF), a marker of ECs. The 3 PKM parameters differed significantly between diagnostic groups at baseline, with the highest K(trans) value being observed in patients with SpA (median 0.050/minute, interquartile range [IQR] 0.041- 0.069). Furthermore, the K(trans) , kep , and ve values correlated significantly with markers of disease activity. Finally, the PKM parameters K(trans) and kep , but not ve , correlated significantly with synovial expression of vWF (r = 0.647, P = 0.004 for K(trans) ; r = 0.614, P = 0.007 for kep ; r = 0.398, P = 0.102 for ve ). These results suggest that the K(trans) , kep , and ve can be used to detect synovial inflammation in patients with

  14. Standards of care and quality indicators for multidisciplinary care models for psoriatic arthritis in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratacós, Jordi; Luelmo, Jesús; Rodríguez, Jesús; Notario, Jaume; Marco, Teresa Navío; de la Cueva, Pablo; Busquets, Manel Pujol; Font, Mercè García; Joven, Beatriz; Rivera, Raquel; Vega, Jose Luis Alvarez; Álvarez, Antonio Javier Chaves; Parera, Ricardo Sánchez; Carrascosa, Jose Carlos Ruiz; Martínez, Fernando José Rodríguez; Sánchez, José Pardo; Olmos, Carlos Feced; Pujol, Conrad; Galindez, Eva; Barrio, Silvia Pérez; Arana, Ana Urruticoechea; Hergueta, Mercedes; Coto, Pablo; Queiro, Rubén

    2018-02-07

    To define and give priority to standards of care and quality indicators of multidisciplinary care for patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). A systematic literature review on PsA standards of care and quality indicators was performed. An expert panel of rheumatologists and dermatologists who provide multidisciplinary care was established. In a consensus meeting group, the experts discussed and developed the standards of care and quality indicators and graded their priority, agreement and also the feasibility (only for quality indicators) following qualitative methodology and a Delphi process. Afterwards, these results were discussed with 2 focus groups, 1 with patients, another with health managers. A descriptive analysis is presented. We obtained 25 standards of care (9 of structure, 9 of process, 7 of results) and 24 quality indicators (2 of structure, 5 of process, 17 of results). Standards of care include relevant aspects in the multidisciplinary care of PsA patients like an appropriate physical infrastructure and technical equipment, the access to nursing care, labs and imaging techniques, other health professionals and treatments, or the development of care plans. Regarding quality indicators, the definition of multidisciplinary care model objectives and referral criteria, the establishment of responsibilities and coordination among professionals and the active evaluation of patients and data collection were given a high priority. Patients considered all of them as important. This set of standards of care and quality indicators for the multidisciplinary care of patients with PsA should help improve quality of care in these patients.

  15. Rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikingsson, Arnor; Graziano, Frank M

    1993-12-01

    Preview Once considered relatively benign, rheumatoid arthritis is now recognized as a disabling systemic disease that causes substantial morbidity and mortality. Early, aggressive therapy may be critical for altering the course of disease. Drs Vikings-son and Graziano describe the causes and clinical course of rheumatoid arthritis and discuss diagnostic considerations and prognostic indicators that support optimum management.

  16. Bacterial antigen induced release of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGFR1 before and after surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Mads N; Lykke, J; Werther, Kim

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The influence of surgery on release of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor (sVEGF) and the soluble inhibitory receptor (sVEGFR1) is unknown. The effect of major and minor surgery on variations in sVEGF and sVEGFR1 concentrations in vivo was studied, and on bacterial antigen...... concentrations in plasma changed during surgery. In vitro stimulation of blood samples with bacteria-derived antigens resulted in a significant increase in sVEGF (p Bacterial antigen-induced release of sVEGF correlated...... significantly with neutrophil cell counts (0.53 Bacterial antigen-induced sVEGFR1 release did not correlate with cell counts. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma sVEGF and sVEGFR1 concentrations did not change during surgery. In vitro bacterial stimulation led to increased release of sVEGF, which...

  17. Development of a Rheumatoid Arthritis Education Program using the PRECEDE_PROCEED Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Bahmanpour

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In order to help rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients in carrying out and attaining relevant self-care behaviors and adaptation to the physical limitations of this disease and, conse-quently, promoting their level of health status, an education program based on the PRECEDE component of the PRECEDE–PROCEED model targeting patients with RA was developed. This paper describes the planning of a RA Patient Education Program (RAPEP designed to promote their quality of life.Methods: The development of the program began with a comprehensive review of the literature. This included a review of the signs and symptoms of RA, accompanying functional disabilities, previous educational programs and the effect of the disease on the patient’s quality of life. Be-sides, in order to help inform RAPEP program development, and organize the survey according to the factors identified in the PRECEDE model a cross-sectional survey was applied on a non-prob-ability sample of 181 outpatients in Yazd, center of Iran.Results: The quality of life (QOL problem identified was the considerable low role functioning, health perception and physical functioning due to chronic pain. One of the most significant modi-fiable behavioral factors impacting pain and functional limitations was self-care behaviors in RA patients. Higher level of knowledge, attitude, self-efficacy, enabling factors and social support is associated with better self-care behavior.Conclusions: The PRECEDE component of the PRECEDE–PROCEED model provided a com-prehensive conceptual framework for the development of RAPEP aiming at RA patients in Yazd. Further research to evaluate this educational program is suggested.

  18. Protective effects of hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oil in animal models of acute inflammation and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, S; Sepodes, B; Rocha, J; Direito, R; Fernandes, A; Brites, D; Freitas, M; Fernandes, E; Bronze, M R; Figueira, M E

    2015-04-01

    Virgin olive oil is the primary source of fat in the Mediterranean diet, and its beneficial health effects have been related with oleic acid and phenolic compounds content. Hydroxytyrosol, a typical virgin olive oil phenolic compound, has beneficial antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties as previously reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oil at 0.5 and 5 mg/kg in a rodent model of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis was induced by intradermic administration, in male Wistar rats, of Freund's adjuvant with collagen type II on days 1 and 21. Hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oils were administrated by gavage from day 23 until day 35. The treatment at 5-mg/kg dose significantly decreased paw edema (P<.01), histological damage, cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, and markedly reduced the degree of bone resorption, soft tissue swelling and osteophyte formation, improving articular function in treated animals. Acute inflammation, induced by carrageenan, was also evaluated for hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oils at 0.5 and 5 mg/kg. Both doses significantly reduced paw edema (P<.001). Our results suggest that the supplementation of refined olive oil with hydroxytyrosol may be advantageous in rheumatoid arthritis with significant impact not only on chronic inflammation but also on acute inflammatory processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Physiologic characterization of inflammatory arthritis in a rabbit model with BOLD and DCE MRI at 1.5 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasui, Otilia C.; Chan, Michael W.; Nathanael, George; Rayner, Tammy; Weiss, Ruth; Detzler, Garry; Zhong, Anguo [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Crawley, Adrian [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Toronto Western Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Miller, Elka [Children' s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO), Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Belik, Jaques [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Neonatology, Toronto, ON (Canada); Cheng, Hai-Ling; Kassner, Andrea; Doria, Andrea S. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Moineddin, Rahim [Department of Public Health, Family and Community Medicine, Toronto, ON (Canada); Jong, Roland; Rogers, Marianne [Mount Sinai Hospital, Department of Pathology, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-11-15

    Our aim was to test the feasibility of blood oxygen level dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD MRI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI to monitor periarticular hypoxic/inflammatory changes over time in a juvenile rabbit model of arthritis. We examined arthritic and contralateral nonarthritic knees of 21 juvenile rabbits at baseline and days 1,14, and 28 after induction of arthritis by unilateral intra-articular injection of carrageenin with BOLD and DCE MRI at 1.5 Tesla (T). Nine noninjected rabbits served as controls. Associations between BOLD and DCE-MRI and corresponding intra-articular oxygen pressure (PO{sub 2}) and blood flow [blood perfusion units (BPU)] (polarographic probes, reference standards) or clinical-histological data were measured by correlation coefficients. Percentage BOLD MRI change obtained in contralateral knees correlated moderately with BPU on day 0 (r = -0.51, p = 0.02) and excellently on day 28 (r = -0.84, p = 0.03). A moderate correlation was observed between peak enhancement DCE MRI (day 1) and BPU measurements in arthritic knees (r = 0.49, p = 0.04). In acute arthritis, BOLD and DCE MRI highly correlated (r = 0.89, p = 0.04; r = 1.0, p < 0.0001) with histological scores in arthritic knees. The proposed techniques are feasible to perform at 1.5 T, and they hold potential as surrogate measures to monitor hypoxic and inflammatory changes over time in arthritis at higher-strength MRI fields. (orig.)

  20. Preexposure to ozone blocks the antigen-induced late asthmatic response of the canine peripheral airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, C.R.; Kleeberger, S.R.; Spannhake, E.W. (Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The influence of exposure of the airways to ozone on acute allergic responsiveness has been investigated in several species. Little is known, however, about the effect of this environmental pollutant on the late asthmatic response (LAR) in animals in which it is exhibited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate this effect in the canine peripheral airways and to assess the potential role of mast cells in modulating the effect. A series of experiments on seven mongrel dogs demonstrated that the numbers of mast cells at the base of the epithelial region of small subsegmental airways exposed to 1 ppm ozone for 5 min were significantly (p less than .01) increased 3 h following exposure compared to air exposed or nonexposed control airways. In a second series of experiments performed on eight additional mongrel dogs with inherent sensitivity to Ascaris suum antigen, antigen aerosol was administered to the sublobar segment 3 h following ozone preexposure when mast cell numbers were presumed to be increased. These experiments were performed to determine whether ozone preexposure could enhance the late-phase response to antigen by virtue of acutely increasing the number of mast cells available to bind the antigen. Four of the eight dogs tested displayed a late-phase response to antigen following air-sham preexposure. In these four dogs, simultaneous ozone preexposure of a contralateral lobe completely blocked the late-phase response to antigen. These results indicate that the consequences of a single exposure to ozone persist beyond its effects on acute antigen-induced bronchoconstriction and extend to the complex processes involved with the late response. This attenuating effect of ozone is seen under conditions where mast-cell numbers in the airways are increased above baseline levels.

  1. The genetics of rheumatoid arthritis and the need for animal models to find and understand the underlying genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirholt, J; Lindqvist, A B; Holmdahl, R

    2001-01-01

    The causes of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are largely unknown. However, RA is most probably a multifactorial disease with contributions from genetic and environmental factors. Searches for genes that influence RA have been conducted in both human and experimental model materials. Both types of study have confirmed the polygenic inheritance of the disease. It has become clear that the features of RA complicate the human genetic studies. Animal models are therefore valuable tools for identifying genes and determining their pathogenic role in the disease. This is probably the fastest route towards unravelling the pathogenesisis of RA and developing new therapies.

  2. High-Methionine Diet Attenuates Severity of Arthritis and Modulates IGF-I Related Gene Expressions in an Adjuvant Arthritis Rats Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxin Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis, a synthesized form of adjuvant arthritis exhibited throughout many animal species, inhibits liver function and circulation of IGF-I and contributes to the degradation of skeletal muscle mass. One of the primary goals of the present study is determining whether a high-Methionine (high-Met diet is capable of reducing the adverse effects of arthritis, namely, loss of body mass. Following adjuvant injection, forty arthritic rats were randomly assigned to either a control group with a basal diet or a high-Met group with the same basal diet + 0.5% Methionine. After 14 days all rats were terminated. The high-Met group exhibited an increase in body weight and food intake in comparison with the control group (P<0.05. High-Met diet debilitated arthritis-induced surges in the gastrocnemius in both atrogin-1 and the MuRF1 expressions; however, it was observed to have little to no effect on atrogin-1 and MuRF1 gene expression in soleus. At the same time, high-Met diet rats experienced a rise in IGF-I, with lowering of IGFBP-3 gene expression in the gastrocnemius and the soleus. These data suggest that arthritis severity can be partly attenuated by high-Met diet.

  3. Oral administration of bovine milk derived extracellular vesicles attenuates arthritis in two mouse models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arntz, O.J.; Pieters, B.C.; Oliveira, M.C.; Broeren, M.G.A.; Bennink, M.B.; Vries, M. de; Lent, P.L.E.M. van; Koenders, M.I.; Berg, W.B. van den; Kraan, P.M. van der; Loo, F.A.J. van de

    2015-01-01

    SCOPE: This study shows the effect of bovine milk derived extracellular vesicles (BMEVs) on spontaneous polyarthritis in IL-1Ra-deficient mice and collagen-induced arthritis. METHODS AND RESULTS: BMEVs were isolated from semi-skimmed milk by ultracentrifugation and the particle size was around 100

  4. Effects of Libby amphibole asbestos exposure on two rat models of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epidemiological data suggests that occupational exposure to the amphibole-containing vermiculite in Libby, MT was associated with increased risk for developing autoimmune diseases and had an odds ratio of 3.23 for developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our goal was to determine wh...

  5. Gene therapy works in animal models of rheumatoid arthritis...so what!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loo, F.A.J. van de; Geurts, J.; Berg, W.B. van den

    2006-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic disease with polyarticular manifestation of chronic inflammation in the knees and small joints of hand and feet. The current systemic anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha therapies with biologics ameliorate disease in 60% to 70% of RA patients. However,

  6. Gene therapy in animal models of rheumatoid arthritis: are we ready for the patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loo, F.A.J. van de; Smeets, R.L.L.; Berg, W.B. van den

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the synovial joints, with progressive destruction of cartilage and bone. Anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha therapies (e.g. soluble tumour necrosis factor receptors) ameliorate disease in 60-70% of patients with RA. However, the need for

  7. Evaluation of the therapeutic effect of hydroxyapatite particles labeled with Ho sub 1 sub 6 sub 6 in rats with acute and chronic arthritis

    CERN Document Server

    Mendoza-Lopez, P

    2002-01-01

    with significantly statistical values (p<=0,01). This therapeutic effect was evident too when evaluating the measure of the articular perimeter in acute and chronic arthritis groups through the time with significantly statistical values (p<=0,01). In conclusion the hydroxyapatite particles labeled with Holmium-166 are biologically stable in vivo and have a therapeutic effect in the treatment of acute and chronic arthritis in rats. The therapeutic effect of an intraarticular injection of hydroxyapatite particles labeled with Holmium-166 ( Ho sub 1 sub 6 sub 6 HA) was evaluated. For this evaluation 72 antigen-induced arthritis rats; the arthritis was induced by an intraarticular injection of a suspension of ovoalbumin and Freund's adjuvant complete. The 72 rats were divided in three groups: control group, acute arthritis group and chronic arthritis group. The evaluation of the therapeutic effect was achieved by the measuring of the perimeter of the arthritic knee joint in different days after the intraart...

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Osteoarthritis News Gout News Osteoporosis News Lupus News Fibromyalgia News Patient Corner Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Managing ... Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis ...

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients ...

  10. Acquiring the optimal time for hyperbaric therapy in the rat model of CFA induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Sung Tae; Lee, Chang-Hyung; Shin, Yong Il; Ko, Hyun Yoon; Lee, Da Gyo; Jeong, Han-Sol

    2014-01-01

    We previously published an article about the pressure effect using a rheumatoid animal model. Hyperbaric therapy appears to be beneficial in treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by reducing the inflammatory process in an animal model. In this sense, acquiring the optimal pressure-treatment time parameter for RA is important and no optimal hyperbaric therapy time has been suggested up to now. The purpose of our study was to acquire the optimal time for hyperbaric therapy in the RA rat model. Controlled animal study. Following injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into one side of the knee joint, 32 rats were randomly assigned to 3 different time groups (1, 3, 5 hours a day) under 1.5 atmospheres absolute (ATA) hyperbaric chamber for 12 days. The pain levels were assessed daily for 2 weeks by weight bearing force (WBF) of the affected limb. In addition, the levels of gelatinase, MMP-2, and MMP-9 expression in the synovial fluids of the knees were analyzed. The reduction of WBF was high at 2 days after injection and then it was spontaneously increased up to 14 days in all 3 groups. There were significant differences of WBF between 5 hours and control during the third through twelfth days, between 3 hours and control during the third through fifth and tenth through twelfth days, and between 3 hours and 5 hours during the third through seventh days (P CFA injection in all groups compared to the initial findings, however, the 3 hour group showed a smaller MMP-9/MMP-2 ratio than the control group. Although enough samples were used for the study to support our hypothesis, more samples will be needed to raise the validity and reliability. The effect of hyperbaric treatment appears to be dependent upon the elevated therapy time under 1.5 ATA pressure for a short period of time; however, the long-term effects were similar in all pressure groups. Further study will be needed to acquire the optimal pressure-treatment parameter relationship in various conditions for

  11. Cost-effectiveness simulation model of biologic strategies for treating to target rheumatoid arthritis in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresniak, Ariel; Baerwald, Christoph; Zeidler, Henning; Krüger, Klaus; Neubauer, Aljoscha S; Dupont, Danielle; Merkesdal, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) usually requires different therapeutic options used sequentially in case of an insufficient response (IR) to previous agents. Since there is a lack of clinical trials comparing biologic treatment sequences, simulation models might add to the understanding of optimal treatment sequences and their cost-effectiveness. The objective of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of different biologic treatment strategies in patients with an IR to anti-TNF agents, based on levels of disease activity from the German public payer's perspective. A cost-effectiveness sequential model was developed in accordance with local RA treatment strategies, using DAS28 scores as dichotomous effectiveness endpoints: achieving remission/no remission (RS/no RS) or a state of low disease activity (LDAS/no LDAS). Costs were estimated using resource utilisation data obtained from a large observational German cohort. Advanced simulations were conducted to assess the cost-effectiveness over 2 years of four sequential biologic strategies composed of up to 3 biologic agents, namely anti-TNF agents, abatacept or rituximab, in patients with moderate-to-severe active RA and an IR to at least one anti-TNF agent. Over two years, the biological sequence including abatacept after an IR to one anti-TNF agent appeared the most effective and cost-effective versus (vs.) use after two anti-TNF agents (€633 vs. €1,067/day in LDAS and €1,222 vs. €3,592/day in remission), and vs a similar sequence using rituximab (€633 vs. €728/day in LDAS and €1,222 vs. €1,812/day in remission). The sequence using a 3rd anti-TNF agent was less effective and cost-effective than the same sequence using abatacept (€2,000 vs. €1,067/day in LDAS and €6,623 vs. €3,592/day in remission). All differences were statistically significant (pcost-effective than similar sequences including rituximab or only cycled anti-TNF agents.

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available Appointments • Support Our Research Arthritis Information Disease Information Rheumatoid Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Ankylosing Spondylitis Osteoarthritis Gout Lyme Disease Osteoporosis News Rheumatoid Arthritis News ...

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Information Disease Information Rheumatoid Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Ankylosing Spondylitis Osteoarthritis Gout Lyme Disease Osteoporosis News Rheumatoid Arthritis ...

  15. Exposure to Candida albicans polarizes a T-cell driven arthritis model towards Th17 responses, resulting in a more destructive arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marijnissen, Renoud J; Koenders, Marije I; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Dulos, John; Netea, Mihai G; Boots, Annemieke M H; Joosten, Leo A B; van den Berg, Wim B

    2012-01-01

    Fungal components have been shown very effective in generating Th17 responses. We investigated whether exposure to a minute amount of C. albicans in the arthritic joint altered the local cytokine environment, leading to enhanced Th17 expansion and resulting in a more destructive arthritis. Chronic SCW arthritis was induced by repeated injection with Streptococcus pyogenes (SCW) cell wall fragments into the knee joint of C57Bl/6 mice, alone or in combination with the yeast of C. albicans or Zymosan A. During the chronic phase of the arthritis, the cytokine levels, mRNA expression and histopathological analysis of the joints were performed. To investigate the phenotype of the IL-17 producing T-cells, synovial cells were isolated and analyzed by flowcytometry. Intra-articular injection of either Zymosan A or C. albicans on top of the SCW injection both resulted in enhanced joint swelling and inflammation compared to the normal SCW group. However, only the addition of C. albicans during SCW arthritis resulted in severe chondrocyte death and enhanced destruction of cartilage and bone. Additionally, exposure to C. albicans led to increased IL-17 in the arthritic joint, which was accompanied by an increased synovial mRNA expression of T-bet and RORγT. Moreover, the C. albicans-injected mice had significantly more Th17 cells in the synovium, of which a large population also produced IFN-γ. This study clearly shows that minute amounts of fungal components, like C. albicans, are very potent in interfering with the local cytokine environment in an arthritic joint, thereby polarizing arthritis towards a more destructive phenotype.

  16. Analysis of the psychometric properties of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Score (AOFAS) in rheumatoid arthritis patients: application of the Rasch model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, Cristiano Sena da; Neto, Mansueto Gomes; Neto, Anolino Costa; Mendes, Selena M D; Baptista, Abrahão Fontes; Sá, Kátia Nunes

    2016-01-01

    To tested the reliability and validity of Aofas in a sample of rheumatoid arthritis patients. The scale was applicable to rheumatoid arthritis patients, twice by the interviewer 1 and once by the interviewer 2. The Aofas was subjected to test-retest reliability analysis (with 20 Rheumatoid arthritis subjects). The psychometric properties were investigated using Rasch analysis on 33 Rheumatoid arthritis patients. Intra-Class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) were (0.90model. Further Rasch modeling suggested revising the original item 8. The results suggest that the Brazilian versions of Aofas exhibit adequate reliability, construct validity, response stability. These findings indicate that Aofas Ankle-Hindfoot scale presents a significant potential for clinical applicability in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis. Other studies in populations with other characteristics are now underway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. In vivo effect of pinosylvin and pterostilbene in the animal model of adjuvant arthritis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mačičková, T.; Drábiková, K.; Nosál, R.; Bauerová, K.; Mihalová, D.; Harmatha, Juraj; Pečivová, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 31, Suppl. 2 (2010), s. 91-95 ISSN 0172-780X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/07/1227 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : adjuvant arthritis * pinosylvin * pterostilbene * generation of reactive oxygen species Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.621, year: 2010 http://node.nel.edu

  18. Total glucosides of paeony prevents juxta-articular bone loss in experimental arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chen Chao; You, Fan Tian; Mei, Li Yu; Jian, Sun; Qiang, Chen Yong

    2013-07-21

    Total glucosides of paeony (TGP) is a biologically active compound extracted from Paeony root. TGP has been used in rheumatoid arthritis therapy for many years. However, the mechanism by which TGP prevents bone loss has been less explored. TGP was orally administered for 3 months to New Zealand rabbits with antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Digital x-ray knee images and bone mineral density (BMD) measurements of the subchondral knee bone were performed before sacrifice. Chondrocytes were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Histological analysis and mRNA expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) were evaluated in joint tissues. The BMD value in TGP rabbits was significantly higher compared with that seen in the AIA model rabbits. In addition, the subchondral bone plate was almost completely preserved by TGP treatment, while there was a decrease in bone plate integrity in AIA rabbits. There was less damage to the chondrocytes of the TGP treated group. Immunohistochemical examination of the TGP group showed that a higher percentage of TGP treated chondrocytes expressed OPG as compared to the chondrocytes isolated from AIA treated animals. In contrast, RANKL expression was significantly decreased in the TGP treated group compared to the AIA group. In support of the immunohistochemistry data, the expression of RANKL mRNA was decreased and OPG mRNA expression was enhanced in the TGP group when compared to that of the AIA model group. These results reveal that TGP suppresses juxta-articular osteoporosis and prevents subchondral bone loss. The decreased RANKL and increased OPG expression seen in TGP treated animals could explain how administration of TGP maintains higher BMD.

  19. Fisiopatología, tratamiento y modelos experimentales de artritis reumatoide Pathophysiology, treatment and experimental models of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Noa Puig

    2011-06-01

    world population, more predominant in women than men and more frequent in those aged 30 and 50 and entails a high level of inability of patient. It is characterized by a symmetrical erosive synovitis with proliferation of conjunctival tissue (pannus, invading and eroding the cartilage and joint bones, and sometimes, by a multisystem affection. In most patients the disease follows a fluctuating chronic course, which it is not treated, provoke a progressive destruction, deformity and inability of involved joints. The disease evolves with high figures of rheumatoid factor and/or anti- citrulline antibodies. These are essential features of an optimal treatment of this entity include: early differential diagnosis, initial treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, the use of disease course modifying drugs, the potential use of oral low-dose glucocorticoid agents or intra-articular injections, and a periodical assessment of treatment fitting (radiological serum and functional monitoring of disease progression and of treatment-associated toxicity and the educational and rehabilitations interventions of patient. To assess the new therapies for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, the more uses models are: that of the arthritis induced by adjuvant drugs in rats and the arthritis induced by collagen in rats and mice. Other new models show limited data. Effectiveness of several compounds reveals that its therapeutic effect is more predictive of the clinical effect in the human being when models of arthritis due to adjuvant drugs and collagen than data from an only one model.

  20. Raman spectroscopy detects deterioration in biomechanical properties of bone in a glucocorticoid-treated mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Jason R.; Takahata, Masahiko; Awad, Hani A.; Berger, Andrew J.

    2011-08-01

    Although glucocorticoids are frequently prescribed for the symptomatic management of inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, extended glucocorticoid exposure is the leading cause of physician-induced osteoporosis and leaves patients at a high risk of fracture. To study the biochemical effects of glucocorticoid exposure and how they might affect biomechanical properties of the bone, Raman spectra were acquired from ex vivo tibiae of glucocorticoid- and placebo-treated wild-type mice and a transgenic mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis. Statistically significant spectral differences were observed due to both treatment regimen and mouse genotype. These differences are attributed to changes in the overall bone mineral composition, as well as the degree of phosphate mineralization in tibial cortical bone. In addition, partial least squares regression was used to generate a Raman-based prediction of each tibia's biomechanical strength as quantified by a torsion test. The Raman-based predictions were as accurate as those produced by microcomputed tomography derived parameters, and more accurate than the clinically-used parameter of bone mineral density. These results suggest that Raman spectroscopy could be a valuable tool for monitoring bone biochemistry in studies of bone diseases such as osteoporosis, including tests of drugs being developed to combat these diseases.

  1. Improvement in latent variable indirect response joint modeling of a continuous and a categorical clinical endpoint in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chuanpu; Zhou, Honghui

    2016-02-01

    Improving the quality of exposure-response modeling is important in clinical drug development. The general joint modeling of multiple endpoints is made possible in part by recent progress on the latent variable indirect response (IDR) modeling for ordered categorical endpoints. This manuscript aims to investigate, when modeling a continuous and a categorical clinical endpoint, the level of improvement achievable by joint modeling in the latent variable IDR modeling framework through the sharing of model parameters for the individual endpoints, guided by the appropriate representation of drug and placebo mechanism. This was illustrated with data from two phase III clinical trials of intravenously administered mAb X for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, with the 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28) and 20, 50, and 70% improvement in the American College of Rheumatology (ACR20, ACR50, and ACR70) disease severity criteria were used as efficacy endpoints. The joint modeling framework led to a parsimonious final model with reasonable performance, evaluated by visual predictive check. The results showed that, compared with the more common approach of separately modeling the endpoints, it is possible for the joint model to be more parsimonious and yet better describe the individual endpoints. In particular, the joint model may better describe one endpoint through subject-specific random effects that would not have been estimable from data of this endpoint alone.

  2. Progressive resistance training (PRT) improves rheumatoid arthritis outcomes: A district general hospital (DGH) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsley, Klara; Berntzen, Berna; Erwood, Lisa; Bellerby, Toby; Williamson, Lyn

    2018-03-01

    Rheumatoid cachexia is common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and develops soon after diagnosis, despite adequate drug therapy. It is associated with multiple adverse effects on body composition, function and mortality. Progressive resistance training (PRT) improves these outcomes but is not widely prescribed outside of a research setting. The aim of the present study was to explore the practicality and effectiveness of providing PRT to patients in a district general hospital within the constraints of existing resources. Patients attending a rheumatology clinic were invited to participate in a weekly PRT class for 6 weeks, supervised by a physiotherapist. Outcome measures included: body composition measures (waist and hip circumference, weight, percentage body fat); functional measures (grip strength, 60-s sit-to-stand test, single leg stance, Health Assessment Questionnaire); mood; fatigue and disease activity measures (sleep scale, hospital anxiety and depression scale, Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy, pain visual analogue scale). These were measured at baseline and at 6 weeks. A total of 83 patients completed the programme (60% female, mean age 51.2 years), of whom 34.9% had early RA. Improvements were seen in multiple measures inpatients with early RA and with established inflammatory arthritis, and were not affected by age or gender. Patients with early and established inflammatory arthritis alike benefited from a 6-week PRT programme provided within a National Health Service setting. Although further work is needed to look at long-term effects, we suggest that this intervention should be more widely available. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Breast cancer-associated metastasis is significantly increased in a model of autoimmune arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Roy, Lopamudra; Pathangey, Latha B; Tinder, Teresa L; Schettini, Jorge L; Gruber, Helen E; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Sites of chronic inflammation are often associated with the establishment and growth of various malignancies including breast cancer. A common inflammatory condition in humans is autoimmune arthritis (AA) that causes inflammation and deformity of the joints. Other systemic effects associated with arthritis include increased cellular infiltration and inflammation of the lungs. Several studies have reported statistically significant risk ratios between AA and breast cancer. Despite this knowledge, available for a decade, it has never been questioned if the site of chronic inflammation linked to AA creates a milieu that attracts tumor cells to home and grow in the inflamed bones and lungs which are frequent sites of breast cancer metastasis. Methods To determine if chronic inflammation induced by autoimmune arthritis contributes to increased breast cancer-associated metastasis, we generated mammary gland tumors in SKG mice that were genetically prone to develop AA. Two breast cancer cell lines, one highly metastatic (4T1) and the other non-metastatic (TUBO) were used to generate the tumors in the mammary fat pad. Lung and bone metastasis and the associated inflammatory milieu were evaluated in the arthritic versus the non-arthritic mice. Results We report a three-fold increase in lung metastasis and a significant increase in the incidence of bone metastasis in the pro-arthritic and arthritic mice compared to non-arthritic control mice. We also report that the metastatic breast cancer cells augment the severity of arthritis resulting in a vicious cycle that increases both bone destruction and metastasis. Enhanced neutrophilic and granulocytic infiltration in lungs and bone of the pro-arthritic and arthritic mice and subsequent increase in circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines, such as macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), interleukin-17 (IL-17), interleukin-6 (IL-6), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and tumor necrosis factor

  4. Breast-cancer-associated metastasis is significantly increased in a model of autoimmune arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Roy, Lopamudra; Pathangey, Latha B; Tinder, Teresa L; Schettini, Jorge L; Gruber, Helen E; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2009-01-01

    Sites of chronic inflammation are often associated with the establishment and growth of various malignancies including breast cancer. A common inflammatory condition in humans is autoimmune arthritis (AA) that causes inflammation and deformity of the joints. Other systemic effects associated with arthritis include increased cellular infiltration and inflammation of the lungs. Several studies have reported statistically significant risk ratios between AA and breast cancer. Despite this knowledge, available for a decade, it has never been questioned if the site of chronic inflammation linked to AA creates a milieu that attracts tumor cells to home and grow in the inflamed bones and lungs which are frequent sites of breast cancer metastasis. To determine if chronic inflammation induced by autoimmune arthritis contributes to increased breast cancer-associated metastasis, we generated mammary gland tumors in SKG mice that were genetically prone to develop AA. Two breast cancer cell lines, one highly metastatic (4T1) and the other non-metastatic (TUBO) were used to generate the tumors in the mammary fat pad. Lung and bone metastasis and the associated inflammatory milieu were evaluated in the arthritic versus the non-arthritic mice. We report a three-fold increase in lung metastasis and a significant increase in the incidence of bone metastasis in the pro-arthritic and arthritic mice compared to non-arthritic control mice. We also report that the metastatic breast cancer cells augment the severity of arthritis resulting in a vicious cycle that increases both bone destruction and metastasis. Enhanced neutrophilic and granulocytic infiltration in lungs and bone of the pro-arthritic and arthritic mice and subsequent increase in circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines, such as macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), interleukin-17 (IL-17), interleukin-6 (IL-6), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) may contribute

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of ... Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center Scleroderma Center Sjogren’s Syndrome Center ...

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available Appointments • Support Our Research Arthritis Information Disease Information Rheumatoid Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Ankylosing Spondylitis Osteoarthritis Gout Lyme Disease Osteoporosis News Rheumatoid Arthritis News Psoriatic Arthritis News Ankylosing Spondylitis News ...

  7. Juvenil idiopatisk arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlin, Troels

    2002-01-01

    The new classification of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is described in this review. Clinical characteristics divide JIA in to subtypes: systemic, oligoarticular (persistent and extended type), RF-positive and--negative polyarticular, enthesitis-related arthritis and psoriatic arthritis...

  8. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Initiative Breadcrumb Home Health Topics English Español Reactive Arthritis Basics In-Depth Download Download EPUB Download PDF What is it? Points To Remember About Reactive Arthritis Reactive arthritis is pain or swelling in a ...

  9. Photobiomodulation therapy associated with treadmill training in the oxidative stress in a collagen-induced arthritis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Solange Almeida; Dos Santos Vieira, Marcia Ataize; Simões, Maira Cécilia Brandão; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo

    2017-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by chronic and systemic inflammation, which leads to the destruction of the cartilage and bone and affects tissues in multiple joints. Oxidative stress has been implicated with regards to involvement in various disease conditions, such as diabetes mellitus and neurodegenerative, respiratory, cardiovascular, and RA diseases. In vivo experimental studies using photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) have shown positive effects in reducing lipid peroxidation and in increasing antioxidant activity. The regular practice of physical exercise has also been reported to be a beneficial treatment capable of reducing oxidative damage. Thus, the aim of this study was to analyze the effects of photobiomodulation therapy at 2- and 4-J doses associated with physical exercise on oxidative stress in an experimental model of RA in protein expression involving superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and/or catalase (CAT) on thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). In this study, 24 male Wistar rats divided into four groups were submitted to an RA model (i.e., collagen-induced arthritis, CIA), with the first immunization performed at the base of the tail on days 0 and 7 were included. After 28 days, a third intraarticular dose was administered in both knees of the animals. After the last induction, PBMT was started immediately, transcutaneously at two points (i.e., the medial and lateral), with a total of 15 applications. Treadmill exercise was also started the day after the last induction, and lasted for 5 weeks. With respect to results, we obtained the decreases in the lipid peroxidation and the increases of the antioxidant activities of SOD, GPX and CAT, with physical exercise associated to PBMT in doses of 2 and 4 J. In conclusion, physical exercise associated with PBMT decreases lipid peroxidation and increases antioxidant activity.

  10. A simplified baseline prediction model for joint damage progression in rheumatoid arthritis: a step toward personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Punder, Yvonne M R; van Riel, Piet L C M; Fransen, Jaap

    2015-03-01

    To compare the performance of an extended model and a simplified prognostic model for joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) based on 3 baseline risk factors: anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP), erosions, and acute-phase reaction. Data were used from the Nijmegen early RA cohort. An extended model and a simplified baseline prediction model were developed to predict joint damage progression between 0 and 3 years. Joint damage progression was assessed using the Ratingen score. In the extended model, prediction factors were positivity for anti-CCP and/or rheumatoid factor, the level of erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and the quantity of erosions. The prediction score was calculated as the sum of the regression coefficients. In the simplified model, the prediction factors were dichotomized and the number of risk factors was counted. Performances of both models were compared using discrimination and calibration. The models were internally validated using bootstrapping. The extended model resulted in a prediction score between 0 and 5.6 with an area under the receiver-operation characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.77 (95% CI 0.72-0.81). The simplified model resulted in a prediction score between 0 and 3. This model had an area under the ROC curve of 0.75 (95% CI 0.70-0.80). In internal validation, the 2 models showed reasonably well the agreement between observed and predicted probabilities for joint damage progression (Hosmer-Lemeshow test p > 0.05 and calibration slope near 1.0). A simple prediction model for joint damage progression in early RA, by only counting the number of risk factors, has adequate performance. This facilitates the translation of the theoretical prognostic models to daily clinical practice.

  11. Anti-arthritic effects of magnolol in human interleukin 1β-stimulated fibroblast-like synoviocytes and in a rat arthritis model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh-Horng Wang

    Full Text Available Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS play an important role in the pathologic processes of destructive arthritis by producing a number of catabolic cytokines and metalloproteinases (MMPs. The expression of these mediators is controlled at the transcriptional level. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the anti-arthritic effects of magnolol (5,5'-Diallyl-biphenyl-2,2'-diol, the major bioactive component of the bark of Magnolia officinalis, by examining its inhibitory effects on inflammatory mediator secretion and the NF-κB and AP-1 activation pathways and to investigate its therapeutic effects on the development of arthritis in a rat model. The in vitro anti-arthritic activity of magnolol was tested on interleukin (IL-1β-stimulated FLS by measuring levels of IL-6, cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E(2, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs by ELISA and RT-PCR. Further studies on how magnolol inhibits IL-1β-stimulated cytokine expression were performed using Western blots, reporter gene assay, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and confocal microscope analysis. The in vivo anti-arthritic effects of magnolol were evaluated in a Mycobacterium butyricum-induced arthritis model in rats. Magnolol markedly inhibited IL-1β (10 ng/mL-induced cytokine expression in a concentration-dependent manner (2.5-25 µg/mL. In clarifying the mechanisms involved, magnolol was found to inhibit the IL-1β-induced activation of the IKK/IκB/NF-κB and MAPKs pathways by suppressing the nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity of both transcription factors. In the animal model, magnolol (100 mg/kg significantly inhibited paw swelling and reduced serum cytokine levels. Our results demonstrate that magnolol inhibits the development of arthritis, suggesting that it might provide a new therapeutic approach to inflammatory arthritis diseases.

  12. Modulation of Th1 cytokines and inflammatory mediators by Euphorbia hirta in animal model of adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayaz Ahmad, Sheikh; Sultan, Phalisteen; Ashour, Abdelkader E; Khan, Tajdar Husain; Attia, Sabry M; Bakheet, Saleh A; Abd-Allah, Adel R A

    2013-10-01

    Euphorbia hirta L. (Euphorbiaceae) (E. hirta) is a tree locally used as a traditional medicine in Africa and Australia to treat numerous diseases such as hypertension, respiratory ailments, tumors, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory activities. In the present study, we investigated the anti-arthritic activity of fresh leaves of E. hirta ethanol extract that was found to inhibit the production of inflammatory mediators and cytokines of adjuvant arthritis in rats. Adjuvant arthritis was induced in rats (Wistar) by the subplantar injection of 0.05 ml freshly prepared suspension (5.0 mg/ml) of steam killed Mycobacterium tuberculli in liquid paraffin. Animals were treated with graded doses of 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg of E. hirta ethanol extract, p.o. E. hirta significantly inhibited the swelling of the adjuvant-induced arthritis. Moreover, E. hirta at higher dose (200 mg/kg) showed 40.54 ± 1.09 % of CD3+, 15.1 ± 0.76 % of CD4+, 12.2 ± 1.18 % of CD8+ T cell receptor and 17.6 ± 1.11 % gated of CD19+ B cell receptor revealing a down regulation of adjuvant-induced arthritis as compared to the corresponding valves of the arthritic control rats. According to the results shown in Tables 1, 2, the production of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-2 and IFN-γ were increased in splenocytes of arthritic rats and this increased level was reduced by E. hirta. Also, E. hirta significantly down regulated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of nitric oxide production in peritoneal macrophages. These results suggest that E. hirta exhibits an improvement in adjuvant-induced arthritis through down regulation of activated macrophages and T lymphocytes functions. Such unique effects of E. hirta shown on adjuvant arthritis rat model may be advantageous to the long-term treatment of clinical rheumatoid arthritis. Table 1 Effect of E. hirta and prednisolone (Pred) on LPS-induced IL-1β and TNF-α productions from splenocytes in Mycobacterium tuberculli-induced inflammatory arthritic rats Treatment

  13. Temporal Role for MyD88 in a Model of Brucella-Induced Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Carolyn A; Mitchell, William J; Brown, Charles R; Skyberg, Jerod A

    2017-03-01

    Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular Gram-negative bacteria that cause the zoonotic disease brucellosis, one of the most common global zoonoses. Osteomyelitis, arthritis, and musculoskeletal inflammation are common focal complications of brucellosis in humans; however, wild-type (WT) mice infected systemically with conventional doses of Brucella do not develop these complications. Here we report C57BL/6 WT mice infected via the footpad with 10 3 to 10 6 CFU of Brucella spp. display neutrophil and monocyte infiltration of the joint space and surrounding musculoskeletal tissue. Joint inflammation is detectable as early as 1 day postinfection and peaks 1 to 2 weeks later, after which WT mice are able to slowly resolve inflammation. B and T cells were dispensable for the onset of swelling but required for resolution of joint inflammation and infection. At early time points, MyD88 -/- mice display decreased joint inflammation, swelling, and proinflammatory cytokine levels relative to WT mice. Subsequently, swelling of MyD88 -/- joints surpassed WT joint swelling, and resolution of joint inflammation was prolonged. Joint bacterial loads in MyD88 -/- mice were significantly greater than those in WT mice by day 3 postinfection and at all time points thereafter. In addition, MyD88 -/- joint inflammatory cytokine levels on day 3 and beyond were similar to WT levels. Collectively these data demonstrate MyD88 signaling mediates early inflammatory responses in the joint but also contributes to subsequent clearance of Brucella and resolution of inflammation. This work also establishes a mouse model for studying Brucella -induced arthritis, musculoskeletal complications, and systemic responses, which will lead to a better understanding of focal complications of brucellosis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. A dynamic real time in vivo and static ex vivo analysis of granulomonocytic cell migration in the collagen-induced arthritis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Ruth; Rath, Eva; Hladik, Anastasiya; Niederreiter, Birgit; Bonelli, Michael; Frantal, Sophie; Smolen, Josef S; Scheinecker, Clemens

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophilic granulocytes and monocytes (granulomonocytic cells; GMC) drive the inflammatory process at the earliest stages of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The migratory behavior and functional properties of GMC within the synovial tissue are, however, only incompletely characterized. Here we have analyzed GMC in the murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model of RA using multi-photon real time in vivo microscopy together with ex vivo analysis of GMC in tissue sections.GMC were abundant as soon as clinical arthritis was apparent. GMC were motile and migrated randomly through the synovial tissue. In addition, we observed the frequent formation of cell clusters consisting of both neutrophilic granulocytes and monocytes that actively contributed to the inflammatory process of arthritis. Treatment of animals with a single dose of prednisolone reduced the mean velocity of cell migration and diminished the overall immigration of GMC.In summary, our study shows that the combined application of real time in vivo microscopy together with elaborate static post-mortem analysis of GMC enables the description of dynamic migratory characteristics of GMC together with their precise location in a complex anatomical environment. Moreover, this approach is sensitive enough to detect subtle therapeutic effects within a very short period of time.

  15. A dynamic real time in vivo and static ex vivo analysis of granulomonocytic cell migration in the collagen-induced arthritis model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Byrne

    Full Text Available Neutrophilic granulocytes and monocytes (granulomonocytic cells; GMC drive the inflammatory process at the earliest stages of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The migratory behavior and functional properties of GMC within the synovial tissue are, however, only incompletely characterized. Here we have analyzed GMC in the murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA model of RA using multi-photon real time in vivo microscopy together with ex vivo analysis of GMC in tissue sections.GMC were abundant as soon as clinical arthritis was apparent. GMC were motile and migrated randomly through the synovial tissue. In addition, we observed the frequent formation of cell clusters consisting of both neutrophilic granulocytes and monocytes that actively contributed to the inflammatory process of arthritis. Treatment of animals with a single dose of prednisolone reduced the mean velocity of cell migration and diminished the overall immigration of GMC.In summary, our study shows that the combined application of real time in vivo microscopy together with elaborate static post-mortem analysis of GMC enables the description of dynamic migratory characteristics of GMC together with their precise location in a complex anatomical environment. Moreover, this approach is sensitive enough to detect subtle therapeutic effects within a very short period of time.

  16. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibody T1h and variant anti-CD6 murine 10D12 in healthy animals and in experimental arthritis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    León, M; Hernández, I; Aldana, L; Ayra, F; Castro, Y; Leyva, R; García, L; Pérez, S.; Casaco, A.

    2016-01-01

    Biodistribution and pharmacokinetic of two radio labeled monoclonal antibodies was performed with the help of imaging techniques. Isotopic labeling was carried out by means of standardized methods. Pharmacokinetic evaluation was performed using the population approach and sparse data design. Introduction: Targeted therapy with monoclonal antibodies (MAb) is an efficient option for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Th1 is a MAb anti human CD6 developed for the treatment of autoimmune disease and 10D12 is its counterpart anti murine CD6 developed as a pharmacological tool to get deep into the response mechanisms in animals models of rheumatoid arthritis.To investigate the behavior of both antibodies in the assay system, molecules were labeled with 125I to evaluate pharmacokinetic in healthy animals and with 99mTc to evaluate the antibody uptake in inflamed area of induced arthritis. Materials and methods: Antibodies were supplied by the Center of Molecular immunology. Iodination was performed by the iodogen method and technetium labeling was carried out directly by Schwarz method. Female C57BL6 from CENPALAB were used for experiments. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetic was performed by a sparse data design using the population approach. Uptake in region of inflammation was quantified by gammagraphy at the same time points of blood sampling. A compartmental model was build to quantify uptake kinetic. Pharmacokinetic profiles were analyzed using MONOLIX software version 4.2. Results: Minor pharmacokinetic differences were found between monoclonal antibodies labeled with 125I and 99mTc. As a humanized antibody, T1h shows a faster clearance than 10D12 and a biodistribution pattern reflecting preference for excretion mechanisms. The arthritis accumulation was not consistent with a targeted mediated uptake. On the other hand, radio labeled 10D12 shows an accumulation profile in arthritis with two peaks of maximum concentration representing an initial transit to

  17. The assessment of bee venom responses in an experimental model of mono-arthritis using Tc-99m DPD bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chung-Yong; Park, Soon-Ah; Oh, Kyung-Jae; Yang, Yun-Sik

    2010-01-01

    Several recent studies have shown that bee venom (BV) has an anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effect on arthritis. However, objective methods for evaluation of the therapeutic effect of BV is insufficient in animal studies and clinical trials. Our purpose was to determine the usefulness of bone scintigraphy using Tc-99m DPD (3,3-diphosphono-1,2-propan-dicarbonacid) about effects of BV applied to carrageenan-induced mono-arthritis (CIA) model. Mono-arthritis was induced by an intra-articular injection of carrageenan in Sprague-Dawley rats. Administration of BV (0.8 mg/kg) was performed at 30 min before and at 4 h after the induction of mono-arthritis. We assigned rats to BV-before, BV-after, control-before and control-after groups and compared the results of each group by the weight-loading test and bone scintigraphy. The rats received an intravenous injection of 37 MBq of Tc-99m DPD by the tail vein and then scanning was performed at 4 and 24 h after the injection. Visual assessment and quantitative analysis were performed for both knees. The BV-before and BV-after groups were more improved than the control groups on the weight load test (p<0.05). Bone scintigraphy showed lower activity in the BV-before group than in the control-before group (p<0.05) on the 4 h imaging. However, a significant difference in the BV-before and BV-after groups was not observed on the 24 h imaging. BV had therapeutic effects by anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity in the CIA and bone scintigraphy performed on 4 h imaging provided visual and quantitative information for the assessment of the therapeutic response to BV as an objective method in mono arthritis model. (author)

  18. Genome Engineering for Personalized Arthritis Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkar, Shaunak S; Brunger, Jonathan M; Willard, Vincent P; Wu, Chia-Lung; Gersbach, Charles A; Guilak, Farshid

    2017-10-01

    Arthritis represents a family of complex joint pathologies responsible for the majority of musculoskeletal conditions. Nearly all diseases within this family, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis, are chronic conditions with few or no disease-modifying therapeutics available. Advances in genome engineering technology, most recently with CRISPR-Cas9, have revolutionized our ability to interrogate and validate genetic and epigenetic elements associated with chronic diseases such as arthritis. These technologies, together with cell reprogramming methods, including the use of induced pluripotent stem cells, provide a platform for human disease modeling. We summarize new evidence from genome-wide association studies and genomics that substantiates a genetic basis for arthritis pathogenesis. We also review the potential contributions of genome engineering in the development of new arthritis therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary ...

  20. From the model of integral attention to the creation of centers of excellence in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Moreno, Pedro; Castañeda, Oswaldo; Garro, Boris; Flores, Dennis; Sánchez, Guillermo; Castro, Carlos

    2015-03-01

    For the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), the care of patients with chronic diseases currently experiences fragmentation in attention, generating poor performance of health services. Thus, comprehensive health care strategies arise to mitigate these problems; one of them are Centers of Excellence (CoEs), which aim to obtain high quality results in health from the adequate and minimum use of resources. The objective of this study was to describe the history and current context of the CoE in comprehensive care in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A systematic search of the literature terms (MeSH) was performed. The bases used were PubMed, Ebsco Host, Lilacs, Science Direct, Ovid, and Google (gray literature). The source of the information was evaluated to determine its quality. International standards focus the CoEs starting from comprehensive management of patients with RA and patient volume, continuous improvement, and quality of health care, constituting an interdisciplinary team. The REAL-PANLAR group suggested that the inclusion of the strategy "Treat to Target", and patient education improves patient conditions and understanding of the disease. RA is a prevalent and costly disease. The creation of comprehensive care centers of the CoE type is an initiative that improves the prognosis of RA. This document aims to encourage rheumatologists and scientific societies to structure CoE in an interdisciplinary endeavor.

  1. Formulation and evaluation of topical herbal gel for the treatment of arthritis in animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajasekaran Aiyalu

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of the study is to formulate and evaluate a topical herbal gel containing Cardiospermum halicacabum and Vitex negundo leaf extracts for their anti-arthritic activity in rats. Twelve herbal gel formulations were prepared using 1.5% of gelling agents carbopol 934 (F1-F6 and carbopol 940 (F6-F12 and they were evaluated for physical appearance, net content, viscosity, extrudability, pH, spreadability, in vitro diffusion profile and primary skin irritation tests. The stability study for the topical herbal gel formulation was done as per ICH guidelines and anti-arthritic activity was evaluated by Freund's Complete Adjuvant (FCA induced arthritis method. Assessment of body weight, paw volume, hematological and biochemical parameters, histopathological examination and In vitro determination of serum biomarkers were also carried out. Formulated gels were homogenous, stable and complied with the guidelines. Among the formulations, F4 showed better release (98.4 % characteristics than other formulations. No erythema or edema was observed in the skin irritation test confirming the gel was non-toxic and safe. Topical application of the herbal gel F4 containing carbopol 934 displayed significant (p < 0.001 anti-arthritic activity compared to diseased rats. Reduction in paw volume, no agglutination in C - reactive protein and rheumatic factor, reduction in TNF level, regaining of normal hematological, and biochemical parameters, reduction in spleen and thymus weight and histopathological examination supported the anti-arthritic activity of the gel formulation.

  2. Refine, reduce, replace: Imaging of fibrosis and arthritis in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenzana, M; Vande Velde, G

    2015-12-01

    Non-invasive imaging has great potential to contribute to the 'Three R's' principles for more ethical use of experimental animals. It enables repetitive monitoring of disease progression and measurement of quantitative biomarkers that report on disease progression and therapy efficacy in the same animal, thereby reducing manifold the number of animals needed for in vivo studies whilst advancing our knowledge into the pathophysiology of these diseases. This article reviews applications of non-invasive imaging in the field of fibrosis and arthritis research. It provides evidence for the viability of this approach not only for ethical reasons (reducing numbers and suffering in research animals, according to the 3R principles) but also for accelerating experimental output and making it more translational. The emphasis is on promising developments which will help improving throughput by reducing experiment length and size as well as human resources for data analysis, therefore encouraging a wider spreading of novel imaging technologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Predicting the risk of rheumatoid arthritis and its age of onset through modelling genetic risk variants with smoking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian C Scott

    Full Text Available The improved characterisation of risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis (RA suggests they could be combined to identify individuals at increased disease risks in whom preventive strategies may be evaluated. We aimed to develop an RA prediction model capable of generating clinically relevant predictive data and to determine if it better predicted younger onset RA (YORA. Our novel modelling approach combined odds ratios for 15 four-digit/10 two-digit HLA-DRB1 alleles, 31 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and ever-smoking status in males to determine risk using computer simulation and confidence interval based risk categorisation. Only males were evaluated in our models incorporating smoking as ever-smoking is a significant risk factor for RA in men but not women. We developed multiple models to evaluate each risk factor's impact on prediction. Each model's ability to discriminate anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA-positive RA from controls was evaluated in two cohorts: Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC: 1,516 cases; 1,647 controls; UK RA Genetics Group Consortium (UKRAGG: 2,623 cases; 1,500 controls. HLA and smoking provided strongest prediction with good discrimination evidenced by an HLA-smoking model area under the curve (AUC value of 0.813 in both WTCCC and UKRAGG. SNPs provided minimal prediction (AUC 0.660 WTCCC/0.617 UKRAGG. Whilst high individual risks were identified, with some cases having estimated lifetime risks of 86%, only a minority overall had substantially increased odds for RA. High risks from the HLA model were associated with YORA (P<0.0001; ever-smoking associated with older onset disease. This latter finding suggests smoking's impact on RA risk manifests later in life. Our modelling demonstrates that combining risk factors provides clinically informative RA prediction; additionally HLA and smoking status can be used to predict the risk of younger and older onset RA, respectively.

  4. Clinical and histopathological evaluation of MDP/collagen induced arthritis rat model (MCIA) after treatment with Urtica dioica, plantago major and Hypericum perforatum L herbal mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifeh, Mohammad S; Hananeh, Wael; Al-Rukibat, Raida; Okour, Omar; Boumezrag, Assia

    2008-04-01

    This study was done to assess the effects of Urtica dioica, Plantago major and Hypericum perforatum L herbal mixture in the MCIA rat model. In addition, a new pathological and clinical arthritis lesion assessment was developed. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were immunized with bovine type II collagen and muramyl dipeptide (MDP). Commercial herbal extracts were administered daily to the rats after the immunization for the course of experiment (90 days). Rats were boosted with a second collagen-MDP emulsion 60 days after the first immunization. Paws were daily evaluated macroscopically for redness, swelling, distortion, or ankylosis of the joints. On the day of sacrifice, rat paws were assessed for histopathologic changes. Herbal mixture administration decreased the clinical lesion manifestation in the MCIA rat model and led to development of similar or slightly more severe histopathological lesions compared to rats that did not receive the treatment. The clinical arthritis signs appeared as early as 13 days after the first MDP/collagen injection and with peak incidence at 20 days post-immunization. Histopathologically, animals showed changes ranging from mild to very severe. Administration of the herbal mixture used in this study had a clinical therapeutic effect on the course of the clinical manifestations in the MCIA model, but the herbal treatment had no such effect on the histopathological lesion development and even led to slightly more severe lesions. Rats in the MCIA model developed prominent clinical and histopathological changes that were comparable to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) lesions in humans.

  5. Treatment with anti-C5aR mAb leads to early-onset clinical and mechanistic effects in the murine delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, Sara Marie; Nansen, Anneline; Usher, Pernille A.

    2015-01-01

    Blockade of the complement cascade at the C5a/C5a receptor (C5aR)-axis is believed to be an attractive treatment avenue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the effects of such interventions during the early phases of arthritis remain to be clarified. In this study we use the murine delayed...... development in a DTHA model strengthening the rationale of C5aR-blockade as a treatment strategy for RA, especially during the early stages of arthritis flare....

  6. Logistic regression models for predicting physical and mental health-related quality of life in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alishiri, Gholam Hossein; Bayat, Noushin; Fathi Ashtiani, Ali; Tavallaii, Seyed Abbas; Assari, Shervin; Moharamzad, Yashar

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop two logistic regression models capable of predicting physical and mental health related quality of life (HRQOL) among rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. In this cross-sectional study which was conducted during 2006 in the outpatient rheumatology clinic of our university hospital, Short Form 36 (SF-36) was used for HRQOL measurements in 411 RA patients. A cutoff point to define poor versus good HRQOL was calculated using the first quartiles of SF-36 physical and mental component scores (33.4 and 36.8, respectively). Two distinct logistic regression models were used to derive predictive variables including demographic, clinical, and psychological factors. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each model were calculated. Poor physical HRQOL was positively associated with pain score, disease duration, monthly family income below 300 US$, comorbidity, patient global assessment of disease activity or PGA, and depression (odds ratios: 1.1; 1.004; 15.5; 1.1; 1.02; 2.08, respectively). The variables that entered into the poor mental HRQOL prediction model were monthly family income below 300 US$, comorbidity, PGA, and bodily pain (odds ratios: 6.7; 1.1; 1.01; 1.01, respectively). Optimal sensitivity and specificity were achieved at a cutoff point of 0.39 for the estimated probability of poor physical HRQOL and 0.18 for mental HRQOL. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the physical and mental models were 73.8, 87, 83.7% and 90.38, 70.36, 75.43%, respectively. The results show that the suggested models can be used to predict poor physical and mental HRQOL separately among RA patients using simple variables with acceptable accuracy. These models can be of use in the clinical decision-making of RA patients and to recognize patients with poor physical or mental HRQOL in advance, for better management.

  7. Local fibroblast proliferation but not influx is responsible for synovial hyperplasia in a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, Yusuke; Mizoguchi, Fumitaka; Saito, Tetsuya [Department of Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8519 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST) Program, Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 102-0075 (Japan); Kawahata, Kimito [Department of Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8519 (Japan); Ueha, Satoshi; Matsushima, Kouji [Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST) Program, Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 102-0075 (Japan); Department of Molecular Preventive Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan); Inagaki, Yutaka [Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST) Program, Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 102-0075 (Japan); Center for Matrix Biology and Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and the Institute of Medical Sciences, Tokai University, 143 Shimo-kasuya, Isehara, Kanagawa, 259-1193 (Japan); Miyasaka, Nobuyuki [Department of Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8519 (Japan); Kohsaka, Hitoshi, E-mail: kohsaka.rheu@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8519 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST) Program, Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 102-0075 (Japan)

    2016-02-12

    Synovial fibroblasts play crucial roles in inflammation and joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). How they accumulate in the RA joints remains unclear. This study was conducted to discern whether cellular influx from the outside of the joints and local proliferation are responsible for synovial fibroblast accumulation in an animal model of RA. We found that synovial fibroblasts were identified as GFP+ cells using collagen type I alpha 2 (Col1a2)-GFP transgenic reporter mice. Then, bone marrow transplantation and parabiosis techniques were utilized to study the cellular influx. Irradiated wild-type mice were transplanted with bone marrow from Col1a2-GFP mice. Col1a2-GFP and wild-type mice were conjoined for parabiosis. The transplanted mice and the parabionts were subjected to collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA). We found no GFP+ cells in the hyperplastic synovial tissues from the transplanted mice with CAIA and from the wild-type parabionts with CAIA. Furthermore, normal and CAIA synovial tissues from Col1a2-GFP mice and from fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci) transgenic mice, in which cells in S/G{sub 2}/M phases of the cell cycle express Azami-Green, were studied for Ki67, a cellular proliferation marker, and vimentin, a fibroblast marker, expression. The percentages of Ki67+/GFP+ and Azami-Green+/vimentin+ cells in the CAIA synovial tissues were higher than those in the untreated synovial tissues (34% vs. 0.40% and 19% vs. 0.26%, respectively). These findings indicate that local fibroblast proliferation but not cellular influx is responsible for the synovial hyperplasia in CAIA. Suppression of proliferation of the local synovial fibroblasts should be a promising treatment for RA. - Highlights: • We studied how synovial fibroblasts accumulate in joints in a murine model of RA. • Bone marrow-derived cells did not accumulate in arthritic joints. • Synovial fibroblasts did not accumulate in arthritic joints via

  8. Mathematical modeling of the circadian rhythm of key neuroendocrine-immune system players in rheumatoid arthritis: a systems biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Figge, Marc Thilo; Straub, Rainer H

    2009-09-01

    Healthy subjects and patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) exhibit circadian rhythms of the neuroendocrine-immune system. Understanding circadian dynamics is complex due to the nonlinear behavior of the neuroendocrine-immune network. This study was undertaken to seek and test a mathematical model for studying this network. We established a quantitative computational model to simulate nonlinear interactions between key factors in the neuroendocrine-immune system, such as plasma tumor necrosis factor (TNF), plasma cortisol (and adrenal cholesterol store), and plasma noradrenaline (NA) (and presynaptic NA store). The model was nicely fitted with measured reference data on healthy subjects and RA patients. Although the individual circadian pacemakers of cortisol, NA, and TNF were installed without a phase shift, the relative phase shift between these factors evolved as a consequence of the modeled network interactions. Combined long-term and short-term TNF increase (the "RA model") increased cortisol plasma levels for only a few days, and cholesterol stores started to become markedly depleted. This nicely demonstrated the phenomenon of inadequate cortisol secretion relative to plasma TNF levels, as a consequence of adrenal deficiency. Using the RA model, treatment with glucocorticoids between midnight and 2:00 AM was found to have the strongest inhibitory effect on TNF secretion, which supports recent studies on RA therapy. Long-term reduction of TNF levels by simulation of anti-TNF therapy normalized cholesterol stores under "RA" conditions. These first in silico studies of the neuroendocrine-immune system in rheumatology demonstrate that computational biology in medicine, making use of large collections of experimental data, supports understanding of the pathophysiology of complex nonlinear systems.

  9. Multi-response model for rheumatoid arthritis based on delay differential equations in collagen-induced arthritic mice treated with an anti-GM-CSF antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Gilbert; Wagner, Thomas; Plater-Zyberk, Christine; Lahu, Gezim; Schropp, Johannes

    2012-02-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice is an experimental model for rheumatoid arthritis, a human chronic inflammatory destructive disease. The therapeutic effect of neutralizing the cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) by an antibody was examined in the mouse disease in a view of deriving a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PKPD) model. In CIA mice the development of disease is measured by a total arthritic score (TAS) and an ankylosis score (AKS). We present a multi-response PKPD model which describes the time course of the unperturbed and perturbed TAS and AKS. The antibody acts directly on GM-CSF by binding to it. Therefore, a compartment for the cytokine GM-CSF is an essential component of the mathematical model. This compartment drives the disease development in the PKPD model. Different known properties of arthritis development in the CIA model are included in the PKPD model. Firstly, the inflammation, driven by GM-CSF, dominates at the beginning of the disease and decreases after some time. Secondly, a destructive (ankylosis) part evolves in the TAS that is delayed in time. In order to model these two properties a delay differential equation was used. The PKPD model was applied to different experiments with doses ranging from 0.1 to 100 mg/kg. The influence of the drug was modeled by a non-linear approach. The final mathematical model consists of three differential equations representing the compartments for GM-CSF, inflammation and destruction. Our mathematical model described well all available dosing schedules by a simultaneous fit. We also present an equivalent and easy reformulation as ordinary differential equation which grants the use of standard PKPD software.

  10. Non-invasive in vivo imaging of arthritis in a collagen-induced murine model with phosphatidylserine-binding near-infrared (NIR) dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Marion M; Gray, Brian D; Pak, Koon Y; Fong, Dunne

    2015-03-09

    Development of non-invasive molecular imaging techniques that are based on cellular changes in inflammation has been of active interest for arthritis diagnosis. This technology will allow real-time detection of tissue damage and facilitate earlier treatment of the disease, thus representing an improvement over X-rays, which detect bone damage at the advanced stage. Tracing apoptosis, an event occurring in inflammation, has been a strategy used. PSVue 794 is a low-molecular-weight, near-infrared (NIR)-emitting complex of bis(zinc2+-dipicolylamine) (Zn-DPA) that binds to phosphatidylserine (PS), a plasma membrane anionic phospholipid that becomes flipped externally upon cell death by apoptosis. In this study, we evaluated the capacity of PSVue 794 to act as an in vivo probe for non-invasive molecular imaging assessment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) via metabolic function in murine collagen-induced arthritis, a widely adopted animal model for RA. Male DBA/1 strain mice were treated twice with chicken collagen type II in Freund's adjuvant. Their arthritis development was determined by measuring footpad thickness and confirmed with X-ray analysis and histology. In vivo imaging was performed with the NIR dye and the LI-COR Odyssey Image System. The level of emission was compared among mice with different disease severity, non-arthritic mice and arthritic mice injected with a control dye without the Zn-DPA targeting moiety. Fluorescent emission correlated reliably with the degree of footpad swelling and the manifestation of arthritis. Ex vivo examination showed emission was from the joint. Specificity of binding was confirmed by the lack of emission when arthritic mice were given the control dye. Furthermore, the PS-binding protein annexin V displaced the NIR dye from binding, and the difference in emission was numerically measurable on a scale. This report introduces an economical alternative method for assessing arthritis non-invasively in murine models. Inflammation in

  11. Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor BMS-986142 in experimental models of rheumatoid arthritis enhances efficacy of agents representing clinical standard-of-care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen M Gillooly

    Full Text Available Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK regulates critical signal transduction pathways involved in the pathobiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA and other autoimmune disorders. BMS-986142 is a potent and highly selective reversible small molecule inhibitor of BTK currently being investigated in clinical trials for the treatment of both RA and primary Sjögren's syndrome. In the present report, we detail the in vitro and in vivo pharmacology of BMS-986142 and show this agent provides potent and selective inhibition of BTK (IC50 = 0.5 nM, blocks antigen receptor-dependent signaling and functional endpoints (cytokine production, co-stimulatory molecule expression, and proliferation in human B cells (IC50 ≤ 5 nM, inhibits Fcγ receptor-dependent cytokine production from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and blocks RANK-L-induced osteoclastogenesis. Through the benefits of impacting these important drivers of autoimmunity, BMS-986142 demonstrated robust efficacy in murine models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, including collagen-induced arthritis (CIA and collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA. In both models, robust efficacy was observed without continuous, complete inhibition of BTK. When a suboptimal dose of BMS-986142 was combined with other agents representing the current standard of care for RA (e.g., methotrexate, the TNFα antagonist etanercept, or the murine form of CTLA4-Ig in the CIA model, improved efficacy compared to either agent alone was observed. The results suggest BMS-986142 represents a potential therapeutic for clinical investigation in RA, as monotherapy or co-administered with agents with complementary mechanisms of action.

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give ...

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression ...

  14. Treatment with anti-NAP monoclonal antibody reduces disease severity in murine model of novel angiogenic protein-induced or ovalbumin-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataraj, N B; Krishnamurthy, J; Salimath, B P

    2013-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a polyarticular inflammatory, angiogenic disease. Synovial angiogenesis contributes to inflammation in RA. In this study we have developed an arthritic model in rats using a novel angiogenic protein (NAP), isolated from human synovial fluid of RA patients. We produced anti-NAP monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and investigated the therapeutic efficacy of the same in adjuvant-induced or NAP-induced arthritis as a model of human RA. The treatment of arthritic rats with anti-NAP mAbs resulted in effective amelioration of paw oedema, radiological arthritic characteristics, serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and NAP, compared to that of untreated arthritic animals. Further, profiling of angiogenic markers such as synovial microvessel density, angiogenesis, CD31, VEGF and fms-like tyrosine kinase (Flt1) by immunohistochemistry both in arthritic and anti-NAP mAb-treated animals revealed the efficacy of mAb as an anti-angiogenic functional antibody. Therefore, NAP may be an attractive target to design anti-angiogenic and anti-arthritic therapies to control the pathogenesis of arthritis. © 2012 British Society for Immunology.

  15. B-1 cell heterogeneity and the regulation of natural and antigen-induced IgM production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Baumgarth

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A small subset of B cells, termed B-1 cells, with developmental origins, phenotype and functions that are distinct from those of conventional B cells exist in mice, which contributes the vast majority of spontaneously produced natural IgM. Natural IgM is constitutively produced, even in the absence of microbiota, and fulfills many distinct functions in tissue-homeostasis and host-defense. B-1 cells also respond with IgM production to innate signals and pathogen exposure, while maintaining steady state levels natural IgM. Thus, within the B-1 cell pool, cells of distinct and heterogeneous functionality must exist to facilitate these different functions. This review considers three factors that may contribute to this heterogeneity: First, developmental differences regarding the origins of the precursors, second, tissue-specific signals that may differentially affect B-1 cells in the tissue compartments, and last responsiveness to self antigens as well as innate and antigen-specific signals. All three are likely to shape the repertoire and responsiveness of B-1 cells to homeostatic and antigen-induced signals and thus to contribute to the functional heterogeneity among these innate-like B cells.

  16. The effects of cannabidiol on the antigen-induced contraction of airways smooth muscle in the guinea-pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudášová, A; Keir, S D; Parsons, M E; Molleman, A; Page, C P

    2013-06-01

    (-)-Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol has been demonstrated to have beneficial effects in the airways, but its psychoactive effects preclude its therapeutic use for the treatment of airways diseases. In the present study we have investigated the effects of (-)-cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive component of cannabis for its actions on bronchial smooth muscle in vitro and in vivo. Guinea-pig bronchial smooth muscle contractions induced by exogenously applied spasmogens were measured isometrically. In addition, contractile responses of bronchial smooth muscle from ovalbumin-sensitized guinea-pigs were investigated in the absence or presence of (-)-cannabidiol. Furthermore, the effect of (-)-cannabidiol against ovalbumin-induced airway obstruction was investigated in vivo in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea-pigs. (-)-Cannabidiol did not influence the bronchial smooth muscle contraction induced by carbachol, histamine or neurokinin A. In contrast, (-)-cannabidiol inhibited anandamide- and virodhamine-induced responses of isolated bronchi. A fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride reversed the inhibitory effect of (-)-cannabidiol on anandamide-induced contractions. In addition, (-)-cannabidiol inhibited the contractile response of bronchi obtained from allergic guinea-pigs induced by ovalbumin. In vivo, (-)-cannabidiol reduced ovalbumin-induced airway obstruction. In conclusion, our results suggest that cannabidiol can influence antigen-induced airway smooth muscle tone suggesting that this molecule may have beneficial effects in the treatment of obstructive airway disorders. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Bone fragility beyond strength and mineral density: Raman spectroscopy predicts femoral fracture toughness in a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzana, Jason A; Maher, Jason R; Takahata, Masahiko; Schwarz, Edward M; Berger, Andrew J; Awad, Hani A

    2013-02-22

    Clinical prediction of bone fracture risk primarily relies on measures of bone mineral density (BMD). BMD is strongly correlated with bone strength, but strength is independent of fracture toughness, which refers to the bone's resistance to crack initiation and propagation. In that sense, fracture toughness is more relevant to assessing fragility-related fracture risk, independent of trauma. We hypothesized that bone biochemistry, determined by Raman spectroscopy, predicts bone fracture toughness better than BMD. This hypothesis was tested in tumor necrosis factor-transgenic mice (TNF-tg), which develop inflammatory-erosive arthritis and osteoporosis. The left femurs of TNF-tg and wild type (WT) littermates were measured with Raman spectroscopy and micro-computed tomography. Fracture toughness was assessed by cutting a sharp notch into the anterior surface of the femoral mid-diaphysis and propagating the crack under 3 point bending. Femoral fracture toughness of TNF-tg mice was significantly reduced compared to WT controls (p=0.04). A Raman spectrum-based prediction model of fracture toughness was generated by partial least squares regression (PLSR). Raman spectrum PLSR analysis produced strong predictions of fracture toughness, while BMD was not significantly correlated and produced very weak predictions. Raman spectral components associated with mineralization quality and bone collagen were strongly leveraged in predicting fracture toughness, reiterating the limitations of mineralization density alone. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Kampo Medicines for Mite Antigen-Induced Allergic Dermatitis in NC/Nga Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu Kun Gao

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We have established an allergic dermatitis model in NC/Nga mice by repeated local exposure of mite antigen for analyzing atopic dermatitis. We examined how four Kampo medicines, Juzen-taiho-to, Hochu-ekki-to, Shofu-san and Oren-gedoku-to, on the dermatitis model to obtain basic information on their usefulness for treating atopic dermatitis. Mite antigen (Dermatophagoides farinae crude extract solution at a concentration of 10 mg/ml was painted on the ear of NC/Nga mice after tape stripping. The procedure was repeated five times, at 7 day intervals. An apparent biphasic ear swelling was caused after the fourth and fifth antigen exposures with elevated serum IgE levels and accumulation of inflammatory cells. In the cervical lymph nodes and ear lobes, the five procedures of antigen exposure induced interleukin-4 mRNA expression but reduced interferon-γ mRNA expression. Oral administration of all four Kampo medicines inhibited the formation of ear swelling and inflammatory cell accumulation. Juzen-taiho-to and Hochu-ekki-to apparently prevented the elevation of serum IgE level. Furthermore, the four Kampo medicines showed a tendency to prevent not only the increase in interleukin-4 mRNA expression but also the decrease in interferon-γ mRNA expression. The present results indicate that Juzen-taiho-to, Hochu-ekki-to, Shofu-san and Oren-gedoku-to may correct the Th1/Th2 balance skewed to Th2, and this activity helps inhibit dermatitis in NC/Nga mice. The ability of the Kampo medicines to correct the Th1/Th2 balance seems to underlie their effectiveness in treating of atopic dermatitis.

  19. Deficiency of RAMP1 attenuates antigen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manyu Li

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the lung, characterized by breathing difficulty during an attack following exposure to an environmental trigger. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP is a neuropeptide that may have a pathological role in asthma. The CGRP receptor is comprised of two components, which include the G-protein coupled receptor, calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR, and receptor activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1. RAMPs, including RAMP1, mediate ligand specificity in addition to aiding in the localization of receptors to the cell surface. Since there has been some controversy regarding the effect of CGRP on asthma, we sought to determine the effect of CGRP signaling ablation in an animal model of asthma. Using gene-targeting techniques, we generated mice deficient for RAMP1 by excising exon 3. After determining that these mice are viable and overtly normal, we sensitized the animals to ovalbumin prior to assessing airway resistance and inflammation after methacholine challenge. We found that mice lacking RAMP1 had reduced airway resistance and inflammation compared to wildtype animals. Additionally, we found that a 50% reduction of CLR, the G-protein receptor component of the CGRP receptor, also ameliorated airway resistance and inflammation in this model of allergic asthma. Interestingly, the loss of CLR from the smooth muscle cells did not alter the airway resistance, indicating that CGRP does not act directly on the smooth muscle cells to drive airway hyperresponsiveness. Together, these data indicate that signaling through RAMP1 and CLR plays a role in mediating asthma pathology. Since RAMP1 and CLR interact to form a receptor for CGRP, our data indicate that aberrant CGRP signaling, perhaps on lung endothelial and inflammatory cells, contributes to asthma pathophysiology. Finally, since RAMP-receptor interfaces are pharmacologically tractable, it may be possible to develop compounds targeting the RAMP1/CLR

  20. Early, middle, or late administration of zoledronate alleviates spontaneous nociceptive behavior and restores functional outcomes in a mouse model of CFA-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morado-Urbina, Carlos Eduardo; Alvarado-Vázquez, Perla Abigail; Montiel-Ruiz, Rosa Mariana; Acosta-González, Rosa Issel; Castañeda-Corral, Gabriela; Jiménez-Andrade, Juan Miguel

    2014-11-01

    This study was performed to evaluate whether early, middle, or late treatment of zoledronate, an approved bisphosphonate that blocks bone resorption, can reduce nociceptive behaviors in a mouse arthritis model. Arthritis was produced by repeated intra-articular knee injections of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). A dose-response curve with zoledronate (3, 30, 100, and 300 μg/kg, i.p., day 4 to day 25, twice weekly for 3 weeks) was performed, and the most effective dose of zoledronate (100 μg/kg, i.p.) was initially administered at different times of disease progression: day 4 (early), day 15 (middle), or day 21 (late) and continued until day 25 after the first CFA injection. Flinching of the injected extremity (spontaneous nociceptive behavior), vertical rearings and horizontal activity (functional outcomes), and knee edema were assessed. Zoledronate improved both functional outcomes and reduced flinching behavior. At day 25, the effect of zoledronate on flinching behavior and vertical rearings was greater in magnitude when it was given early or middle rather than late in the treatment regimen. Chronic zoledronate did not reduce knee edema in CFA-injected mice nor functional outcomes in naïve mice by itself. These results suggest that zoledronate may have a positive effect on arthritis-induced nociception and functional disabilities. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Don’t let up: implementing and sustaining change in a new post-licensure education model for developing extended role practitioners involved in arthritis care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundon K

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Katie Lundon,1,3 Rachel Shupak,1–3 Sonya Canzian,4 Ed Ziesmann,5 Rayfel Schneider,6,71Office of Continuing Professional Development, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, 2Division of Rheumatology, St Michael's Hospital, 3Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, 4Trauma/Neurosurgery and Mobility Programs, St Michael's Hospital, 5Programs and Services, The Arthritis Society, 6Division of Rheumatology, The Hospital for Sick Children, 7Department of Paediatrics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CanadaKey message: Across a 9-year period, the Advanced Clinician Practitioner in Arthritis Care program has achieved a set of short-term “wins” giving direction and momentum to the development of new roles for health care practitioners providing arthritis care.Implications: This is a viable model for post-licensure training offered to multiple allied health professionals to support the development of competent extended role practitioners (extended scope practice. Challenges at this critical juncture include: retain focus, drive, and commitment; develop academic and financial partnerships transferring short-term success to long-term sustainability; advanced, context-driven, system-level evaluation including fiscal outcome; health care policy adaptation to new human health resource development.Supporting evidence: Success includes: completed 2-year health services research evaluating 37 graduates; leadership, innovation, educational excellence, and human health resource benefit awards; influential publications/presentations addressing post-licensure education/outcome, interprofessional collaboration, and improved patient care. Keywords: human health resource development, post-licensure education, arthritis, extended role practitioners, allied health professionals

  2. A microculture system for the measurement of antigen-induced murine lymphocyte proliferation: advantages of 5% horse serum and 5 X 10(-5) M mercaptoethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummer, E; Vris, T W; Lawrence, H S

    1977-01-01

    Short term microculture systems which measure murine lymphocyte proliferative responses to mitogens are well established. We demonstrate here that these microculture methods are not suitable for antigen-induced responses because of the high levels of murine lymphocyte proliferation in control cultures associated with the use of fetal calf serum or human serum. We also show that this problem can be eliminated with the use of a combination of 5% horse serum and 5 X 10(-5) M mercaptoethanol. We describe an antigen-induced murine lymphocyte proliferation microculture system in which good stimulation indices are achieved and the lymphocyte proliferation in control cultures remain at a low level throughout the 7 day culture period.

  3. Photoacoustic tomography to identify inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajian, Justin Rajesh; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2012-09-01

    Identifying neovascularity (angiogenesis) as an early feature of inflammatory arthritis can help in early accurate diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid imaging modality which relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. PAT is used to identify changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis in a rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, on rats revealed that there is a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histology images obtained from both the normal and the arthritis affected rats correlated well with the PAT findings. Results support the fact that the emerging PAT could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory arthritis.

  4. Medicines, injections, and supplements for arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthritis - medications; Arthritis - steroid injections; Arthritis - supplements; Arthritis - hyaluronic acid ... in your joints. These two substances come in supplement form and can be bought over-the-counter. ...

  5. Studying the Immunomodulatory Effects of Small Molecule Ras Inhibitors in Animal Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    2) and in animal models of human autoimmune diseases including autoimmune colitis (3), experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (4), collagen...studied in multiple pre-clinical animal models of autoimmune. For example, FTS can attenuate disease manifestations in experimental autoimmune... experimental animal model of polyarthritis, which can be induced in inbred Lewis rats by immunization with Complete Freund’s adjuvant containing

  6. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  7. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... joints. This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve 5 or more large and ... no known prevention for JIA. Alternative Names Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ...

  8. MP Joint Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy MP Joint Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... important for both pinching and gripping. MP joint arthritis is most common in the thumb and index ...

  9. In vivo imaging of matrix metalloprotease 12 and matrix metalloprotease 13 activities in the mouse model of collagen-induced arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, Ngee Han; Meinjohanns, Ernst; Bou-Gharios, George

    2014-01-01

    inhibitor GM6001 and specific synthetic inhibitors of MMP-12 and MMP-13. The probes were used to follow these enzyme activities in the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model in vivo. Results. The MMP-12- and MMP-13-activity probes (MMP12ap and MMP13ap, respectively) discriminated between the two enzymatic...... activities. The in vivo activation of these probes was inhibited by GM6001 and by their respective specific inhibitors. In the CIA model, MMP12ap activation peaked 5 days after disease onset and showed strong correlation with disease severity during this time (r = 0.85; p...

  10. Clustered multistate models with observation level random effects, mover-stayer effects and dynamic covariates: modelling transition intensities and sojourn times in a study of psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiu, Sean; Farewell, Vernon T; Tom, Brian D M

    2018-02-01

    In psoriatic arthritis, it is important to understand the joint activity (represented by swelling and pain) and damage processes because both are related to severe physical disability. The paper aims to provide a comprehensive investigation into both processes occurring over time, in particular their relationship, by specifying a joint multistate model at the individual hand joint level, which also accounts for many of their important features. As there are multiple hand joints, such an analysis will be based on the use of clustered multistate models. Here we consider an observation level random-effects structure with dynamic covariates and allow for the possibility that a subpopulation of patients is at minimal risk of damage. Such an analysis is found to provide further understanding of the activity-damage relationship beyond that provided by previous analyses. Consideration is also given to the modelling of mean sojourn times and jump probabilities. In particular, a novel model parameterization which allows easily interpretable covariate effects to act on these quantities is proposed.

  11. Studying the Immunomodulatory Effects of Small Molecule Ras-Inhibitors in Animal Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    pre-clinical animal models of autoimmune. For example, FTS can attenuate disease manifestations in experimental autoimmune encephalo- myelitis (34...the clinical score of the disease; however, the biology behind the effect of FTS was not comprehensively elucidated. AIA is an experimental animal ...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0609 TITLE: Studying the Immunomodulatory Effects of Small Molecule Ras-Inhibitors in Animal Models of Rheumatoid

  12. Studying the Immunomodulatory Effects of Small Molecule Ras-Inhibitors in Animal Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    objectives are to further test this hypothesis in the AIA model as well as in another established animal model of RA, the collagen type-II induced...onset) and day +16 (disease peak) sera tested regardless of the animal treatment protocol (data not shown). Responsible PI: Yoel Kloog, Tel Aviv...studies are associated with substantial distress to the animals , and given our duty to balance the needs of the study with that of the welfare of

  13. Iodoacetate and allogenous cartilage particles as models for arthritis induction in equine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Elmesiry

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental models of osteoarthritis (OA have been widely developed in different animal species, because of the high incidence of osteoarthritis diseases in humans and animals. To date, no ideal OA animal model has been reported. The present study compare different osteoarthritis models to determine which one is suitable for inducing experimental equine OA. Fifteen donkeys were divided into three equal groups (n = 5. The radio carpal joints of the right forelimb of 15 donkeys were injected with 25 mg monoiodoacetate (MIA (group A, 50 mg allogenous cartilage particles (ACP (group B, or vehicle solution (group C over a period of 70 days. Osteoarthritis induction was evaluated weekly through lameness score, carpal circumference, joint flexion angel, synovial fluid analysis (total protein and WBC count, and radiology. Animal were euthanized and joints histopathology were performed at 70 days. Lameness score and joint circumference was increased in both group A and B however joint flexion angel was decreased compared to group C (p < 0.05. Osteophytes were observed in MIA injected joints only accompanied with subchondral bone sclerosis. Cartilage damage was observed grossly and histologically in Group A together with synovial membrane fibrosis. Group B had on cartilage damage grossly however histological examination revealed some cartilage surface discontinuity with synovial membrane edema. Injection of monoiodoacetate in the donkey is a successful model to create the acute clinical signs of joint disease as well as cartilage damage. However, allogenous cartilage particles injection need more investigation to be applied.

  14. Effect of mesenchymal precursor cells on the systemic inflammatory response and endothelial dysfunction in an ovine model of collagen-induced arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Dooley

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal precursor cells (MPC are reported to possess immunomodulatory properties that may prove beneficial in autoimmune and other inflammatory conditions. However, their mechanism of action is poorly understood. A collagen-induced arthritis model has been previously developed which demonstrates local joint inflammation and systemic inflammatory changes. These include not only increased levels of inflammatory markers, but also vascular endothelial cell dysfunction, characterised by reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation. This study aimed to characterise the changes in systemic inflammatory markers and endothelial function following the intravenous administration of MPC, in the ovine model.Arthritis was induced in sixteen adult sheep by administration of bovine type II collagen into the hock joint following initial sensitisation. After 24h, sheep were administered either 150 million allogeneic ovine MPCs intravenously, or saline only. Fibrinogen and serum amyloid-A were measured in plasma to assess systemic inflammation, along with pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Animals were necropsied two weeks following arthritis induction. Coronary and digital arterial segments were mounted in a Mulvaney-Halpern wire myograph. The relaxant response to endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilators was used to assess endothelial dysfunction.Arthritic sheep treated with MPC demonstrated a marked spike in plasma IL-10, 24h following MPC administration. They also showed significantly reduced plasma levels of the inflammatory markers, fibrinogen and serum amyloid A, and increased HDL. Coronary arteries from RA sheep treated with MPCs demonstrated a significantly greater maximal relaxation to bradykinin when compared to untreated RA sheep (253.6 ± 17.1% of pre-contracted tone vs. 182.3 ± 27.3% in controls, and digital arteries also demonstrated greater endothelium-dependent vasodilation. This study demonstrated that MPCs

  15. Use of the ACCES model to predict the health economic impact of celecoxib in patients with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svarvar, P; Aly, A

    2000-12-01

    A Norwegian customization of the Arthritis Cost Consequence Evaluation System (ACCES) pharmacoeconomic model was used to predict the economic and health impact of the introduction of celecoxib in Norway. The model predicts that use of celecoxib can be expected to result in a reduction in gastrointestinal events with concomitant annual net savings of at least Norwegian krone (NOK) 580 per osteoarthritis (OA) patient and NOK 514 per rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patient. In a cost-effectiveness analysis, celecoxib demonstrated economic dominance (i.e. improved health at reduced cost) compared with the currently available alternatives. In sensitivity analyses, the results of this model have been shown to be relatively robust, with celecoxib demonstrating economic dominance or favourable cost-effectiveness ratios in all analyses. Based on these data, it can be concluded that the introduction of celecoxib into the Norwegian non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug market, and its use as a first-line agent, will provide societal benefits by improving health care at reduced cost in patients with OA and RA.

  16. Bis(phenylimidazoselenazolyl) diselenide elicits antinociceptive effect by modulating myeloperoxidase activity, NOx and NFkB levels in the collagen-induced arthritis mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagas, Pietro M; Fulco, Bruna C W; Sari, Marcel H M; Roehrs, Juliano A; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2017-08-01

    Bis(phenylimidazoselenazolyl) diselenide (BPIS) is an organoselenium with acute antinociceptive and antioxidant properties. The aim of this study was to investigate BPIS effect on a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model in mice. Protocol of exposure consisted in arthritis induction by chicken collagen type II on day 0 with booster injection on day 21. On day 60 after collagen injection, incidence of mechanic allodynia (Von Frey test) or thermal hyperalgesia (hot plate test) was evaluated. During following 5 days, mice were treated with BPIS (0.1-1 mg/kg; p.o.; daily) or vehicle. On day 65, mice were killed, and paws and spinal cord were removed for analyses. Mice submitted to CIA model developed both mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, which were reversed by BPIS at the highest dose. In paw, BPIS reversed the increase in myeloperoxidase activity in the CIA group. In the spinal cord, BPIS decreased NOx and NFkB levels increased in the CIA group. BPIS-treated animals had lower cyclooxygenase-2 levels in the spinal cord. The myeloperoxidase activity in paw and NOx and NFkB levels in spinal cord are related to antinociceptive properties of BPIS in CIA model. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  17. Artesunate influences Th17/Treg lymphocyte balance by modulating Treg apoptosis and Th17 proliferation in a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Hong, Xuezhi; Lin, Dong; Luo, Xiaohong; Zhu, Mengya; Mo, Hanyou

    2017-01-01

    CD4+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and T-helper 17 (Th17) cells have been shown to have important roles in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In our previous study, it was demonstrated that artesunate was able to alter the Treg/Th17 ratio in patients with RA; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The present study established a male Sprague Dawley (SD) rat model of type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). SD rats were divided into normal control, CIA model and artesunate-treated (5, 10 or 20 mg/kg/day) groups. Treg and Th17 cells were detected in the synovium by immunohistochemical analysis of forkhead/winged helix transcription factor (Foxp3) and interleukin (IL)-17 expression. Subsequently, lymphocytes were extracted from the rat spleens, and the proportions of Treg/Th17 cells were detected by flow cytometry. The results demonstrated that the expression levels of Foxp3 were significantly decreased, and those of IL-17 were significantly increased, in the CIA model group, as compared with the normal control group. The results demonstrated that artesunate decreased the frequency of Th17 cells and increased the frequency of Treg cells in CIA rats in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, the present study suggested that artesunate may regulate the Th17/Treg balance by inducing Th17-mediated apoptosis. Therefore, artesunate may be considered a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of patients with RA. PMID:28565837

  18. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Etanercept in Combination with Methotrexate for Rheumatoid Arthritis - Markov Model Based on Data from Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostic Marina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Biological therapeutic strategies have shown positive benefits for chronic and progressive rheumatoid arthritis (RA in clinical and radiological outcomes. Despite these results, the use of biological drugs in the treatment of RA is limited by high costs. The aim of this study was to compare the cost effectiveness of etanercept in combination with methotrexate and methotrexate alone in patients with RA in the socioeconomic environment of a Balkan country.

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ... Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Rheumatology Course ...

  20. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed ... Activity Role of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic ...

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and Alternative Medicine for ... Patient Update Transitioning the JRA Patient to an Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information ...

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. Updated: ...

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed to help you learn more about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of ...

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed to help you learn more about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Rheumatoid arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease that causes chronic abnormal inflammation, ...

  6. Chemical characterization of a red raspberry fruit extract and evaluation of its pharmacological effects in experimental models of acute inflammation and collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, M E; Câmara, M B; Direito, R; Rocha, J; Serra, A T; Duarte, C M M; Fernandes, A; Freitas, M; Fernandes, E; Marques, M C; Bronze, M R; Sepodes, B

    2014-12-01

    Berries are an important dietary source of fibres, vitamins, minerals and some biologically active non-nutrients. A red raspberry fruit extract was characterized in terms of phenolic content and the anti-inflammatory properties and protective effects were evaluated in two experimental models of inflammation. The antioxidant potential of the extract, the cellular antioxidant activity and the effects over neutrophils' oxidative burst were also studied to provide a mechanistic insight for the anti-inflammatory effects observed. The extract was administered in a dose of 15 mg kg(-1), i.p. and significantly inhibited paw oedema formation in the rat. The same dose was administered via i.p. and p.o. routes in the collagen-induced arthritis model in the rat. The extract showed pharmacological activity and was able to significantly reduce the development of clinical signs of arthritis and markedly reduce the degree of bone resorption, soft tissue swelling and osteophyte formation, preventing articular destruction in treated animals.

  7. Efficacy of combination treatment with fingolimod (FTY720) plus pathogenic autoantigen in a glucose-6-phosphate isomerase peptide (GPI325-339)-induced arthritis mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yuya; Tsuji, Takumi; Watanabe, Sayaka; Matsushima, Ayane; Matsushima, Yuki; Banno, Rie; Fujita, Tetsuro; Kohno, Takeyuki

    2013-01-01

    Fingolimod (FTY720) is known to have a significant therapeutic effect in various autoimmune disease models. Here, we examined FTY720 in a model of rheumatoid arthritis, induced by immunizing DBA/1 mice with a peptide consisting of residues 325 through 339 of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI325-339). The efficacy was evaluated in terms of macroscopic findings, inflammatory cell infiltration and autoantibody level. Prophylactic administration of FTY720 from the day of immunization significantly suppressed the development of paw swelling, but therapeutic administration of FTY720 from onset of symptoms on day 8-9 was less effective. Interestingly, however, combination treatment with FTY720 plus GPI325-339 for 5 d after onset of symptoms significantly reduced the severity of symptoms in all mice, and no relapse occurred after booster immunization. Taking into account the reported mechanism of action of FTY720, these results indicate that combination treatment with FTY720 plus pathogenic autoantigen might efficiently induce immune tolerance by sequestering circulating autoantigen-specific lymphocytes from blood and peripheral tissues to the secondary lymphoid tissues. Combination treatment with FTY720 plus pathogenic autoantigen may become a breakthrough treatment for remission-induction in patients with autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis.

  8. [Septic arthritis in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, M D; Ullot, R; Rigol, S; Pinyot, J; Obiols, P

    1989-01-01

    A review was made of 15 cases of septic arthritis in children. 13 of these cases corresponded to purulent arthritis, one to tuberculous arthritis and one to brucellar arthritis. All of them received diagnostic punction. Five joints received arthrotomy, by a washed-aspiration system. The antibiotic treatment was given approximately during for six weeks. We had two complications, die to a delayed diagnosis: one coxa valga and one capital femoral necrosis. It is important the insist on a early diagnosis and decompressive arthrotomy, specially in those cases in which the hip is the joint affected.

  9. Ultrasound in Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Schueller-Weidekamm, Claudia; Plagou, Athena; Teh, James

    2017-09-01

    Ultrasound is currently performed in everyday rheumatologic practice. It is used for early diagnosis, to monitor treatment results, and to diagnose remission. The spectrum of pathologies seen in arthritis with ultrasound includes early inflammatory features and associated complications. This article discusses the spectrum of ultrasound features of arthritides seen in rheumatoid arthritis and other connective tissue diseases in adults, such as Sjögren syndrome, lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Ultrasound findings in spondyloarthritis, osteoarthritis, and crystal-induced diseases are presented. Ultrasound-guided interventions in patients with arthritis are listed, and the advantages and disadvantages of ultrasound are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Chang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been implicated as one of the most important extrinsic risk factors for its development and severity. Recent developments have shed light on the pathophysiology of RA in smokers, including oxidative stress, inflammation, autoantibody formation and epigenetic changes. The association of smoking and the development of RA have been demonstrated through epidemiologic studies, as well as through in vivo and animal models of RA. With increased use of biological agents in addition to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs, there has been interest in how smoking affects drug response in RA treatment. Recent evidence suggests the response and drug survival in people treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF therapy is poorer in heavy smokers, and possible immunological mechanisms for this effect are presented in the current paper.

  11. The role of eicosanoids in experimental Lyme arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Robert Brown

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Experimental Lyme arthritis is an inflammatory arthritis caused by infection of mice with the spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi. It recapitulates many of the disease parameters seen in human patients with Lyme arthritis, and thus serves as a model system for the investigation of disease pathogenesis. While much progress has been made in defining components of the immune response to Borrelia infection, an overall understanding of the host response leading to arthritis resistance or susceptibility remains elusive. In this review, we will focus on recent advancements of our understanding of the roles of eicosanoids as inflammatory mediators in the regulation of experimental Lyme arthritis. Eicosanoids, such as PGE2 and LTB4, are powerful regulators of inflammatory responses and thus may be important mediators of Lyme arthritis.

  12. Collagen induced arthritis increases secondary metastasis in MMTV-PyV MT mouse model of mammary cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Lopamudra Das; Ghosh, Sriparna; Pathangey, Latha B; Tinder, Teresa L; Gruber, Helen E; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that sites of chronic inflammation are often associated with the establishment and growth of various malignancies. A common inflammatory condition in humans is autoimmune arthritis (AA). Although AA and cancer are different diseases, many of the underlying processes that contribute to the disorders of the joints and connective tissue that characterize AA also affect cancer progression and metastasis. Systemically, AA can lead to cellular infiltration and inflammation of the lungs. Several studies have reported statistically significant risk ratios between AA and breast cancer. Despite this knowledge being available, there has been minimal research linking breast cancer, arthritis, and metastasis associated with breast cancer. Notably both diseases are extremely prevalent in older post-menopausal women. To establish the novel link between arthritis induced inflammation and secondary metastasis associated with breast cancer, PyV MT mice that spontaneously develop mammary gland carcinoma were injected with Type II collagen (CII) to induce arthritis at 9 and 18 weeks of age for pre-metastatic and metastatic condition. The sites of secondary metastasis and the associated inflammatory microenvironment were evaluated. A significant increase in breast cancer-associated secondary metastasis to the lungs and bones was observed in the arthritic versus the non-arthritic PyV MT mice along with an increase in primary tumor burden. We report significant increases in the levels of interstitial cellular infiltrates and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-17 (IL-17), interleukin-6 (IL-6), Pro- Matrix metallopeptidase 9 (Pro-MMP9), insulin like growth factor-II (GF-II) and macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) in the arthritic lung and bone milieu as well as in the circulation. These pro-inflammatory cytokines along with the inflammatory microenvironment may be the underlying factors facilitating tumor progression and metastasis in

  13. Collagen induced arthritis increases secondary metastasis in MMTV-PyV MT mouse model of mammary cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruber Helen E

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have demonstrated that sites of chronic inflammation are often associated with the establishment and growth of various malignancies. A common inflammatory condition in humans is autoimmune arthritis (AA. Although AA and cancer are different diseases, many of the underlying processes that contribute to the disorders of the joints and connective tissue that characterize AA also affect cancer progression and metastasis. Systemically, AA can lead to cellular infiltration and inflammation of the lungs. Several studies have reported statistically significant risk ratios between AA and breast cancer. Despite this knowledge being available, there has been minimal research linking breast cancer, arthritis, and metastasis associated with breast cancer. Notably both diseases are extremely prevalent in older post-menopausal women. Methods To establish the novel link between arthritis induced inflammation and secondary metastasis associated with breast cancer, PyV MT mice that spontaneously develop mammary gland carcinoma were injected with Type II collagen (CII to induce arthritis at 9 and 18 weeks of age for pre-metastatic and metastatic condition. The sites of secondary metastasis and the associated inflammatory microenvironment were evaluated. Results A significant increase in breast cancer-associated secondary metastasis to the lungs and bones was observed in the arthritic versus the non-arthritic PyV MT mice along with an increase in primary tumor burden. We report significant increases in the levels of interstitial cellular infiltrates and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-17 (IL-17, interleukin-6 (IL-6, Pro- Matrix metallopeptidase 9 (Pro-MMP9, insulin like growth factor-II (GF-II and macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF in the arthritic lung and bone milieu as well as in the circulation. These pro-inflammatory cytokines along with the inflammatory microenvironment may be the underlying factors

  14. Collagen induced arthritis increases secondary metastasis in MMTV-PyV MT mouse model of mammary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Lopamudra Das; Ghosh, Sriparna; Pathangey, Latha B; Tinder, Teresa L; Gruber, Helen E; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2011-08-22

    Several studies have demonstrated that sites of chronic inflammation are often associated with the establishment and growth of various malignancies. A common inflammatory condition in humans is autoimmune arthritis (AA). Although AA and cancer are different diseases, many of the underlying processes that contribute to the disorders of the joints and connective tissue that characterize AA also affect cancer progression and metastasis. Systemically, AA can lead to cellular infiltration and inflammation of the lungs. Several studies have reported statistically significant risk ratios between AA and breast cancer. Despite this knowledge being available, there has been minimal research linking breast cancer, arthritis, and metastasis associated with breast cancer. Notably both diseases are extremely prevalent in older post-menopausal women. To establish the novel link between arthritis induced inflammation and secondary metastasis associated with breast cancer, PyV MT mice that spontaneously develop mammary gland carcinoma were injected with Type II collagen (CII) to induce arthritis at 9 and 18 weeks of age for pre-metastatic and metastatic condition. The sites of secondary metastasis and the associated inflammatory microenvironment were evaluated. A significant increase in breast cancer-associated secondary metastasis to the lungs and bones was observed in the arthritic versus the non-arthritic PyV MT mice along with an increase in primary tumor burden. We report significant increases in the levels of interstitial cellular infiltrates and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-17 (IL-17), interleukin-6 (IL-6), Pro- Matrix metallopeptidase 9 (Pro-MMP9), insulin like growth factor-II (GF-II) and macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) in the arthritic lung and bone milieu as well as in the circulation. These pro-inflammatory cytokines along with the inflammatory microenvironment may be the underlying factors facilitating tumor progression and metastasis in

  15. Intra-articular (IA) ropivacaine microparticle suspensions reduce pain, inflammation, cytokine, and substance p levels significantly more than oral or IA celecoxib in a rat model of arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinow, Barrett; Werling, Jane; Bendele, Alison; Gass, Jerome; Bogseth, Roy; Balla, Kelly; Valaitis, Paul; Hutchcraft, Audrey; Graham, Sabine

    2015-02-01

    Current therapeutic treatment options for osteoarthritis entail significant safety concerns. A novel ropivacaine crystalline microsuspension for bolus intra-articular (IA) delivery was thus developed and studied in a peptidoglycan polysaccharide (PGPS)-induced ankle swelling rat model. Compared with celecoxib controls, both oral and IA, ropivacaine IA treatment resulted in a significant reduction of pain upon successive PGPS reactivation, as demonstrated in two different pain models, gait analysis and incapacitance testing. The reduction in pain was attended by a significant reduction in histological inflammation, which in turn was accompanied by significant reductions in the cytokines IL-18 and IL-1β. This may have been due to inhibition of substance P, which was also significantly reduced. Pharmacokinetic analysis indicated that the analgesic effects outlasted measurable ropivacaine levels in either blood or tissue. The results are discussed in the context of pharmacologic mechanisms both of local anesthetics as well as inflammatory arthritis.

  16. A SynoviocyteModel for Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis: Response to Ibuprofen, Betamethasone, and Ginger Extract—A Cross-Sectional In Vitro Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribel-Madsen, Søren; Bartels, Else Marie; Stockmarr, Anders

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at determining if synovial cell cultures from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA), and healthy controls (HC) differ and are suitable disease models in pharmacological studies, and tested their response to some anti-inflammatory drugs. Synovial cells were isolated from...... synovial membrane or joint fluid. Cells were cultivated and exposed to no or TNF-α stimulation without, or in the presence of, betamethasone, ibuprofen, or a standardized ginger extract. Concentrations of a panel of cytokines, growth factors, and chemokines were mapped for each culture and condition. Our......, and IL-8 release in all groups. Ibuprofen showed no effect on cytokine production, while ginger extract was similar to betamethasone. Ginger extract was as effective an anti-inflammatory agent as betamethasone in this in vitro model. Cultured fibroblast-like synoviocytes from OA and RA subjects promise...

  17. Model of septic arthritis by intravenous inoculation of Staphylococcus aureus in Wistar rats Modelo de artrite séptica por inoculação de Staphylococcus aureus em ratos Wistar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flamarion dos Santos Batista

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental model of septic arthritis by monobacterial inoculation of Staphylococcus aureus 10.9 in Wistar rats dorsal penis vein is describred.Descrição de um modelo experimental de artrite séptica por inoculação monobacteriana de Staphylococcus aureus na veia dorsal do pênis de ratos Wistar.

  18. Exacerbation of collagen antibody-induced arthritis in transgenic mice overexpressing peroxiredoxin 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Hwan; Lee, Dong Hun; Jo, Mi Ran; Son, Dong Ju; Park, Mi Hee; Hwang, Chul Ju; Park, Ju Ho; Yuk, Dong Yeon; Yoon, Do Young; Jung, Young-Suk; Kim, Youngsoo; Jeong, Jae Hwang; Han, Sang Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-11-01

    Peroxiredoxin 6 plays important and complex roles in the process of inflammation, but its role in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains unclear. We undertook this study to investigate the roles and mechanisms of peroxiredoxin 6 in the development of collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) and antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in peroxiredoxin 6-overexpressing transgenic mice, in peroxiredoxin 6-transfected RAW 264.7 cells, in macrophages isolated from peroxiredoxin 6-overexpressing transgenic mice, and in synoviocytes from arthritis patients. CAIA and AIA were induced using standard methods. Peroxiredoxin 6-transfected RAW 264.7 cells, macrophages isolated from peroxiredoxin 6-overexpressing transgenic mice, and synoviocytes from arthritis patients were used to study proinflammatory responses and mechanisms. Clinical scores and histopathologic changes were determined in peroxiredoxin 6-overexpressing transgenic mice and wild-type (WT) mice with CAIA or AIA. Generation of nitric oxide (NO), expression of inducible NO synthase and cyclooxygenase 2, and activity of NF-κB and activator protein 1 (AP-1) were determined in cultured macrophages and synoviocytes as well as in joint tissue from mice by Western blotting, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and immunohistochemical analysis. Development of CAIA and AIA and proinflammatory responses were more exacerbated in peroxiredoxin 6-overexpressing transgenic mice than in WT mice. Overexpression of peroxiredoxin 6 increased lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in RAW 264.7 cells, in macrophages isolated from peroxiredoxin 6-overexpressing transgenic mice, and in synoviocytes from arthritis patients, and this was accompanied by up-regulation of the JNK pathway. Moreover, a JNK inhibitor completely blocked RA development and proinflammatory responses. Our findings suggest that overexpression of peroxiredoxin 6 might promote development of RA through NF-κB and AP-1 activity via the JNK

  19. Arthritis and Veterans

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-09

    One in three veterans has arthritis. This podcast provides information on how veterans can improve their quality of life with physical activity and other arthritis management strategies.  Created: 11/9/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/9/2015.

  20. Comparison of drug and cell-based delivery: engineered adult mesenchymal stem cells expressing soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor II prevent arthritis in mouse and rat animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Linda N; Wang, Gang; Hendricks, Kyle; Lee, Keunmyoung; Bohnlein, Ernst; Junker, Uwe; Mosca, Joseph D

    2013-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease with unknown etiology where tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) plays a critical role. Etanercept, a recombinant fusion protein of human soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor II (hsTNFR) linked to the Fc portion of human IgG1, is used to treat RA based on the rationale that sTNFR binds TNFα and blocks TNFα-mediated inflammation. We compared hsTNFR protein delivery from genetically engineered human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with etanercept. Blocking TNFα-dependent intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression on transduced hMSCs and inhibition of nitric oxide production from TNFα-treated bovine chondrocytes by conditioned culture media from transduced hMSCs demonstrated the functionality of the hsTNFR construction. Implanted hsTNFR-transduced mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) reduced mouse serum circulating TNFα generated from either implanted TNFα-expressing cells or lipopolysaccharide induction more effectively than etanercept (TNFα, 100%; interleukin [IL]-1α, 90%; and IL-6, 60% within 6 hours), suggesting faster clearance of the soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor (sTNFR)-TNFα complex from the animals. In vivo efficacy of sTNFR-transduced MSCs was illustrated in two (immune-deficient and immune-competent) arthritic rodent models. In the antibody-induced arthritis BalbC/SCID mouse model, intramuscular injection of hsTNFR-transduced hMSCs reduced joint inflammation by 90% compared with untransduced hMSCs; in the collagen-induced arthritis Fischer rat model, both sTNFR-transduced rat MSCs and etanercept inhibited joint inflammation by 30%. In vitro chondrogenesis assays showed the ability of TNFα and IL1α, but not interferon γ, to inhibit hMSC differentiation to chondrocytes, illustrating an additional negative role for inflammatory cytokines in joint repair. The data support the utility of hMSCs as therapeutic gene delivery vehicles and their potential to be used in alleviating inflammation

  1. [Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbiti, Mohammed; Bouhamidi, Bahia; Louzi, Lhoussaine

    2017-01-01

    Acute septic arthritis is rare. It is associated with poor prognosis in terms of mortality and morbidity. We report the case of a 61-year old patient with spontaneous Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis. He suffered from complicated diabetes associated with positive blood cultures and synovial fluid cultures. Patient's evolution was favorable thanks to early diagnosis and initiation of adequate antibiotic therapy. Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis is rare. On that basis we conducted a literature review of cases of Proteus mirabilis pyogenic arthritis to highlight the risk factors, pathogenesis, treatment and evolution of these diseases. Diagnosis is commonly based on microbiological analysis, early articular puncture biopsy is performed before the initiation of antibiotic treatment, direct examination, culture and antibiogram which are useful as guidance for antibiotic therapy. Septic arthritis is a diagnostic and therapeutic emergency; early management of this disease allows total healing without after-effects.

  2. Midcarpal and Scaphotrapeziotrapezoid Arthritis in Patients with Carpometacarpal Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzel, Evan B; Bielicka, Dierde; Shakir, Sameer; Fowler, John; Buterbaugh, Glenn A; Imbriglia, Joseph E

    2016-06-01

    Carpometacarpal arthroplasty provides well-documented pain relief with preservation of thenar function in basal joint arthritis treatment. Nevertheless, some patients continue to have pain following surgery. The authors hypothesize that unrecognized midcarpal (capitolunate) arthritis is a contributor to persistent pain after carpometacarpal arthroplasty. The prevalence of midcarpal arthritis in patients with basal joint arthritis is unknown. This article establishes the radiographic prevalence of midcarpal arthritis in patients with carpometacarpal arthritis. Patients with basal joint arthritis were identified from a search using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code 716.94. Hand radiographs were reviewed and graded using the Eaton classification and Sodha classification for carpometacarpal arthritis. Scaphotrapeziotrapezoid arthritis and midcarpal arthritis were graded using the Sodha classification for arthritis as follows: grade 1, no or nearly no arthrosis; grade 2, definite arthrosis but not severe; and grade 3, severe arthrosis. Eight hundred ninety-six radiographs were reviewed. The prevalence of scaphotrapeziotrapezoid arthritis in this population was 64 percent. The prevalence of midcarpal arthritis in this population was 23.5 percent. The prevalence of midcarpal arthritis in patients with radiologic evidence of carpometacarpal arthritis was 25.4 percent. The prevalence of severe midcarpal arthritis was 7 percent. The prevalence of midcarpal arthritis in patients with basal joint arthritis is 24 percent. The presence of two locations of arthritis may explain persistent hand and wrist pain in this population despite carpometacarpal arthroplasty. Clinically, these data will allow hand surgeons to better educate patients with basal joint arthritis regarding the possibility of incomplete pain relief following carpometacarpal arthroplasty.

  3. Intraarticularly-Injected Mesenchymal Stem Cells Stimulate Anti-Inflammatory Molecules and Inhibit Pain Related Protein and Chondrolytic Enzymes in a Monoiodoacetate-Induced Rat Arthritis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Ichiseki

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent inflammation is well known to promote the progression of arthropathy. mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been shown to possess anti-inflammatory properties and tissue differentiation potency. Although the experience so far with the intraarticular administration of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC to induce cartilage regeneration has been disappointing, MSC implantation is now being attempted using various surgical techniques. Meanwhile, prevention of osteoarthritis (OA progression and pain control remain important components of the treatment of early-stage OA. We prepared a shoulder arthritis model by injecting monoiodoacetate (MIA into a rat shoulder, and then investigated the intraarticular administration of MSC from the aspects of the cartilage protective effect associated with their anti-inflammatory property and inhibitory effect on central sensitization of pain. When MIA was administered in this rat shoulder arthritis model, anti-Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide (CGRP was expressed in the joint and C5 spinal dorsal horn. Moreover, expression of A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 5 (ADAMTS5, a marker of joint cartilage injury, was similarly elevated following MIA administration. When MSC were injected intraarticularly after MIA, the expression of CGRP in the spinal dorsal horn was significantly deceased, indicating suppression of the central sensitization of pain. The expression of ADAMTS 5 in joint cartilage was also significantly inhibited by MSC administration. In contrast, a significant increase in the expression of TNF-α stimulated gene/protein 6 (TSG-6, an anti-inflammatory and cartilage protective factor shown to be produced and secreted by MSC intraarticularly, was found to extend to the cartilage tissue following MSC administration. In this way, the intraarticular injection of MSC inhibited the central sensitization of pain and increased the expression of the anti-inflammatory and cartilage

  4. Dissection of a locus on mouse chromosome 5 reveals arthritis promoting and inhibitory genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvall, Therese; Karlsson, Jenny; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2009-01-01

    in different experimental arthritis models were mapped to this region. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether genes within Eae39, in addition to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis , control development of collagen induced arthritis (CIA). METHODS: Collagen induced arthritis, induced...

  5. Integrated care for patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, John

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes an example of optimization of the traditional multidisciplinary team care model and evolving arthritis care models with emphasis on the question how theoretical models of the system theory and communication can be used to analyse, evaluate, and optimize care delivery. With

  6. Techniques for assessing knee joint pain in arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Yu

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The assessment of pain is of critical importance for mechanistic studies as well as for the validation of drug targets. This review will focus on knee joint pain associated with arthritis. Different animal models have been developed for the study of knee joint arthritis. Behavioral tests in animal models of knee joint arthritis typically measure knee joint pain rather indirectly. In recent years, however, progress has been made in the development of tests that actually evaluate the sensitivity of the knee joint in arthritis models. They include measurements of the knee extension angle struggle threshold, hind limb withdrawal reflex threshold of knee compression force, and vocalizations in response to stimulation of the knee. A discussion of pain assessment in humans with arthritis pain conditions concludes this review.

  7. Repeated administration of mazindol reduces spontaneous pain-related behaviors without modifying bone density and microarchitecture in a mouse model of complete Freund's adjuvant-induced knee arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo-González, L E; Martínez-Martínez, A; Vargas-Muñoz, V M; Acosta-González, R I; Plancarte-Sánchez, R; Anaya-Reyes, M; Fernández Del Valle-Laisequilla, C; Reyes-García, J G; Jiménez-Andrade, J M

    2017-01-01

    The role of dopaminergic system in the development of rheumatoid arthritis-related pain, a major symptom in this disease, has not been explored. Therefore, the anti-nociceptive effect of mazindol, a dopamine uptake inhibitor, was evaluated in a model of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritis. Furthermore, as studies have shown that the dopaminergic system regulates bone metabolism, the effect of mazindol on bone mass and microarchitecture was determined. Adult ICR male mice received intra-articular injections of either CFA or saline into the right knee joint every week. Spontaneous pain-like behaviors (flinching and guarding) and locomotor activity were assessed at day 26 post-first CFA, following which, a single intraperitoneally (i.p.) administered dose of mazindol was given (1, 3 and 10 mg/kg). Then, the antinociceptive effect of a repeated administration of 3 mg/kg mazindol (daily, i.p.; day 15-day 26) was evaluated. Additionally, at day 26, the participation of D1-like, D2-like or opioid receptors in the antinociceptive effect of mazindol was evaluated. The effect of mazindol on bone density and microarchitecture was evaluated by micro-computed tomography. Acute administration of mazindol decreased the spontaneous pain-like behaviors in a dose-dependent manner without reducing the knee edema. However, mazindol at 10 mg/kg significantly increased the locomotor activity; therefore, 3 mg/kg mazindol was used for further studies. Repeated administration of 3 mg/kg mazindol significantly decreased the pain-like behaviors without modifying locomotor activity. The antinociceptive effect of mazindol was blocked by administration of a D2-like receptor antagonist (haloperidol), but not by administration of D1-like receptor antagonist (SCH 23390) or an opioid receptor antagonist (naloxone). Repeated administration of mazindol did not significantly modify the density and microarchitecture of periarticular bone of the arthritic and nonarthritic knee joints

  8. The CO-releasing molecule CORM-3 protects against articular degradation in the K/BxN serum transfer arthritis model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maicas, N.; Ferrandiz, M.L.; Devesa, I.; Motterlini, R.; Koenders, M.I.; Berg, W.B. van den; Alcaraz, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-releasing molecules can counteract inflammatory responses. The aim of this study was to investigate whether tricarbonylchloro(glycinate)ruthenium (II) (CORM-3) is able to control the effector phase of experimental arthritis. Arthritis was induced in C57Black-6 mice by an

  9. Augmented acetylcholine-induced, Rho-mediated Ca2+ sensitization of bronchial smooth muscle contraction in antigen-induced airway hyperresponsive rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Yoshihiko; Takada, Yuka; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Mitsui-Saito, Minori; Karaki, Hideaki; Misawa, Miwa

    1999-01-01

    Treatment with acetylcholine (ACh) of a β-escin-permeabilized intrapulmonary bronchial smooth muscle of the rat induced force when the Ca2+ concentration was clamped at 1 μM. The ACh-induced Ca2+ sensitization of myofilaments was significantly greater in antigen-induced airway hyperresponsive rats than in control rats. The ACh-induced Ca2+ sensitization was completely blocked by treatment with Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme, an inactivator of Rho family of proteins. Moreover, the protein level of RhoA in the intrapulmonary bronchi was significantly increased in the airway hyperresponsive rats. Thus, increased airway smooth muscle contractility observed in asthmatics may be related to augmented agonist-induced, Rho-mediated Ca2+ sensitization of myofilaments. PMID:10401547

  10. Association between condylar morphology and inflammation in experimental temporomandibular joint TMJ arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper Dahl; Stoustrup, Peter bangsgaard; Küseler, Annelise

    not previously been investigated. Aim: We studied the effects of antigen-induced arthritis on the bony structures in rabbit mandibular condylar development, in particular the morphological changes and the bone micro-architecture. Materials and Methods: Included were juvenile rabbits with ovalbumin-induced TMJ...... blindly by two independent observers as normal or abnormal. TMJs were stratified for condylar morphology and evaluated against data on inflammation, trabecular structural parameters, and overall mandibular growth. Mineral apposition rate was measured using fluorochrome labelling. Results and discussion......: Abnormal morphology was seen in 15 of 32 animals available for data analysis and was strongly related to the degree of inflammation. However, no differences in trabecular structural parameters or mineral apposition rate were seen according to treatment. Erosions were an uncommon finding. Abnormal condylar...

  11. Arthritis-induced alveolar bone loss is associated with changes in the composition of oral microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Jôice Dias; Saraiva, Adriana Machado; Queiroz-Junior, Celso Martins; Madeira, Mila Fernandes Moreira; Duarte, Poliana Mendes; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Souza, Danielle Glória; da Silva, Tarcília Aparecida

    2016-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis (PD) are chronic inflammatory disorders that cause bone loss. PD tends to be more prevalent and severe in RA patients. Previous experimental studies demonstrated that RA triggers alveolar bone loss similarly to PD. The aim of this study was to investigate if arthritis-induced alveolar bone loss is associated with modification in the oral microbiota. Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization was employed to analyze forty oral bacterial species in 3 groups of C57BL/6 mice: control (n = 12; without any challenge); Y4 (n = 8; received oral inoculation of Aggregatibacter Actinomycetemcomitans strain FDC Y4) and AIA group (n = 12; chronic antigen-induced arthritis). The results showed that AIA and Y4 group exhibited similar patterns of bone loss. The AIA group exhibited higher counts of most bacterial species analyzed with predominance of Gram-negative species similarly to infection-induced PD. Prevotella nigrescens and Treponema denticola were detected only in the Y4 group whereas Campylobacter showae, Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus oralis were only found in the AIA group. Counts of Parvimonas micra, Selenomonas Noxia and Veillonella parvula were greater in the AIA group whereas Actinomyces viscosus and Neisseira mucosa were in large proportion in Y4 group. In conclusion, AIA is associated with changes in the composition of the oral microbiota, which might account for the alveolar bone loss observed in AIA mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Forms of Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Today, Linda Saisselin takes joy in holding her new grandson—pain free. Photo courtesy of Linda Saisselin Osteoarthritis (OA) — the form of arthritis typically occurring during middle or old age, this is a joint disease that mostly affects ...

  13. Arthritis: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SME Issue Briefs Compendium of Interventions ASMP/CDSMP Meta-Analysis Executive Summary Communication Campaigns Physical Activity. The Arthritis Pain Reliever. FAQs Campaign Materials Download General Campaign Materials Buenos días, artritis FAQs ...

  14. Ho-166 Hydroxyapatite (Ha) as a potential therapeutic agent in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandia, M.; Errazu, X.; Pinto, L.; Troncoso, F.; Mendoza, P.; Jofre, J.

    2004-01-01

    Radiation synovectomy is a procedure which is aimed at ablation of the inflamed synovium in rheumatoid arthritis through intraarticular injection of a chemical substance labeled with a beta-emitting radioisotope. The objective of this study was to evaluate Ho-166 Hydoxyapatite (Ho-166 HA) particle as potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of acute and chronic arthritis. Ho-166 was obtained by irradiation of 165 Ho 2 O 3 in the 5 MW Research Reactors (RECH1) at the Nuclear Centre La Reina (Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission). The HA synthesis, Ho-166 HA labeling and quality control procedures were performed in the laboratories of Chilean Atomic Energy Commission. Two groups of arthritic (acute and chronic) rabbits with antigen-induced arthritis were administered Ho-166 HA intra-articularly following two different protocols; single dose protocol and double dose protocol. The therapeutic efficacy of Ho-166 HA was assessed by clinical follow-up and evaluation, as well as by serial radionuclide imaging of the inflamed joints with Ga-67 Citrate, before and after treatment. The average radionuclide purity of administered Ho-166 HA in our study was 99%. All animals were followed up by clinical examination. Grades of inflammation, general physical conditions as well as the level of appetite were recorded following treatment. The localization and distribution of the Ho-166 HA were studied by gamma camera imaging at 4 and 24 hrs after-injections. The scans were examined meticulously to look for any evidence of leakage of radiopharmaceutical from the joint space. The group of animals with acute arthritis showed evidence of significant clinical improvement following radionuclide therapy. The animals which received higher doses (double dose) demonstrated better therapeutic response. Based on the preliminary reports from this pilot study it was concluded that Ho-166 HA is a useful radiopharmaceutical for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. (author)

  15. Therapeutic Potential of Interferon-γ and Its Antagonists in Autoinflammation: Lessons from Murine Models of Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Macrophage Activation Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneleen Avau

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Interferon-γ (IFN-γ affects immune responses in a complex fashion. Its immunostimulatory actions, such as macrophage activation and induction of T helper 1-type responsiveness, are widely acknowledged, however, as documented by a large body of literature, IFN-γ has also the potential to temper inflammatory processes via other pathways. In autoimmune and autoinflammatory disorders, IFN-γ can either play a disease-enforcing role or act as protective agent, depending on the nature of the disease. In animal models of any particular autoimmune disease, certain changes in the induction procedure can reverse the net outcome of introduction or ablation of IFN-γ. Here, we review the role of endogenous IFN-γ in inflammatory disorders and related murine models, with a focus on systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA and macrophage activation syndrome (MAS. In particular, we discuss our recent findings in a mouse model of sJIA, in which endogenous IFN-γ acts as a regulatory agent, and compare with results from mouse models of MAS. Also, we elaborate on the complexity in the activity of IFN-γ and the resulting difficulty of predicting its value or that of its antagonists as treatment option.

  16. Exploring the existence of a stayer population with mover-stayer counting process models: application to joint damage in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiu, Sean; Farewell, Vernon T; Tom, Brian D M

    2017-08-01

    Many psoriatic arthritis patients do not progress to permanent joint damage in any of the 28 hand joints, even under prolonged follow-up. This has led several researchers to fit models that estimate the proportion of stayers (those who do not have the propensity to experience the event of interest) and to characterize the rate of developing damaged joints in the movers (those who have the propensity to experience the event of interest). However, when fitted to the same data, the paper demonstrates that the choice of model for the movers can lead to widely varying conclusions on a stayer population, thus implying that, if interest lies in a stayer population, a single analysis should not generally be adopted. The aim of the paper is to provide greater understanding regarding estimation of a stayer population by comparing the inferences, performance and features of multiple fitted models to real and simulated data sets. The models for the movers are based on Poisson processes with patient level random effects and/or dynamic covariates, which are used to induce within-patient correlation, and observation level random effects are used to account for time varying unobserved heterogeneity. The gamma, inverse Gaussian and compound Poisson distributions are considered for the random effects.

  17. AMPA/kainate glutamate receptors contribute to inflammation, degeneration and pain related behaviour in inflammatory stages of arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Cleo S; Williams, Anwen S; Gilbert, Sophie J; Harvey, Ann K; Evans, Bronwen A; Mason, Deborah J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Synovial fluid glutamate concentrations increase in arthritis. Activation of kainate (KA) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) glutamate receptors (GluRs) increase interleukin-6 (IL-6) release and cause arthritic pain, respectively. We hypothesised that AMPA and KA GluRs are expressed in human arthritis, and that intra-articular NBQX (AMPA/KA GluR antagonist) prevents pain and pathology in antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Methods GluR immunohistochemistry was related to synovial inflammation and degradation in osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A single intra-articular NBQX injection was given at induction, and knee swelling and gait of AIA and AIA+NBQX rats compared over 21 days, before imaging, RT-qPCR, histology and immunohistochemistry of joints. Effects of NBQX on human primary osteoblast (HOB) activity were determined. Results AMPAR2 and KA1 immunolocalised to remodelling bone, cartilage and synovial cells in human OA and RA, and rat AIA. All arthritic tissues showed degradation and synovial inflammation. NBQX reduced GluR abundance, knee swelling (parthritis. PMID:24130267

  18. Altered cardiac gene expression of noradrenaline enzymes, transporter and β-adrenoceptors in rat model of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dronjak, Sladjana; Stefanovic, Bojana; Jovanovic, Predrag; Spasojevic, Natasa; Jankovic, Milica; Jeremic, Ivica; Hoffmann, Markus

    2017-12-01

    Baseline sympathetic activity was found to be elevated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and it is related to increased cardiovascular risk in these patients. Although many studies have highlighted the association between RA and increased cardiac sympathetic activity, the underlying mechanistic links remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to understand how diseases-triggered changes in gene expression may result in maladaptive physiological changes. Our results suggest that the equilibrium between noradrenaline synthesis, release and reuptake was disrupted in the ventricles of arthritic rats. In the acute phase of the arthritic process, decreased gene expression of MAO-A might lead to accumulation of noradrenaline in myocardial interstitial space, whereas increased gene expression of NET protected cardiomyocytes from the deleterious effects of enhanced noradrenaline. During the chronic phase, reduced expression of β 1 -adrenoceptor and decreased efficiency of noradrenaline reuptake contribute to progressive damage of the myocardium and limits heart efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Chemical changes demonstrated in cartilage by synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy in an antibody-induced murine model of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxford, Allyson M.; Selva Nandakumar, Kutty; Holmdahl, Rikard; Tobin, Mark J.; McNaughton, Don; Rowley, Merrill J.

    2011-06-01

    Collagen antibody-induced arthritis develops in mice following passive transfer of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to type II collagen (CII) and is attributed to effects of proinflammatory immune complexes, but transferred mAbs may react directly and damagingly with CII. To determine whether such mAbs cause cartilage damage in vivo in the absence of inflammation, mice lacking complement factor 5 that do not develop joint inflammation were injected intravenously with two arthritogenic mAbs to CII, M2139 and CIIC1. Paws were collected at day 3, decalcified, paraffin embedded, and 5-μm sections were examined using standard histology and synchrotron Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). None of the mice injected with mAb showed visual or histological evidence of inflammation but there were histological changes in the articular cartilage including loss of proteoglycan and altered chondrocyte morphology. Findings using FTIRM at high lateral resolution revealed loss of collagen and the appearance of a new peak at 1635 cm-1 at the surface of the cartilage interpreted as cellular activation. Thus, we demonstrate the utility of synchrotron FTIRM for examining chemical changes in diseased cartilage at the microscopic level and establish that arthritogenic mAbs to CII do cause cartilage damage in vivo in the absence of inflammation.

  20. Pemetrexed ameliorates experimental arthritis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Ahmet; Koca, Suleyman Serdar; Ozgen, Metin; Dagli, Adile Ferda; Erman, Fazilet; Sahin, Nuran; Sahin, Kazim; Isik, Ahmet

    2015-02-01

    Pemetrexed (PMTX) is an anti-folate drug as methotrexate. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of PMTX on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Forty Wistar albino rats were randomized into four groups. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of chicken type II collagen combined with incomplete Freund's adjuvant. Animals were sacrificed at the 15th day after the onset of arthritis. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-17, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were increased, and superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities and the expressions of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were decreased in the arthritis group. In the PMTX-treated (0.2 and 1 mg/kg/week i.p.) groups, the levels of TNF-α, IL-17, and MDA were decreased; the activities of SOD, CAT, and GPx and the expressions of Nrf2 and HO-1 were restored, and perisynovial inflammation and cartilage-bone destruction were decreased. PMTX has anti-arthritic potential in the CIA model and may be a therapeutic agent for rheumatoid arthritis.

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are available, what is happening in the immune system and what other conditions are associated with RA. ... Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. Updated: ...

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to take a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take ... She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing ...

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education Fund About Us Appointment Information Contact Us Our Faculty Our Staff Rheumatology Specialty Centers You are here: Home / Patient Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video ...

  4. Occupational therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, E. M.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L. M.; van Schaardenburg, D.; van Kuyk, M. A.; van den Ende, C. H.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the physical, personal, familial, social and vocational consequences are extensive. Occupational therapy (OT), with the aim to facilitate task performance and to decrease the consequences of rheumatoid arthritis for daily life activities, is

  5. Occupational therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, E.M.J.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L.M.; Schaardenburg, D.J. van; Kuyk, M.A.H. van; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2004-01-01

    Background: For persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the physical, personal, familial, social and vocational consequences are extensive. Occupational therapy (OT), with the aim to facilitate task performance and to decrease the consequences of rheumatoid arthritis for daily life activities, is

  6. Arthritis of the hand - Rheumatoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Rheumatoid Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... debilitating when it affects the hands and fingers. Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common forms of ...

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of RA is made, what happens ... Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Rheumatology Course Connect ...

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... any advice you receive from your rheumatologist. Click A Link Below To Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and ... About Victoria Ruffing, RN Ms. Ruffing has been a member of the Arthritis Center since 2000, currently ...

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Osteoarthritis News Gout News Osteoporosis News Lupus News Fibromyalgia News Patient Corner Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Managing ... Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of RA is made, what happens to your ...

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Rheumatology Course ...

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. Updated: July 9, 2012 ... in seeking it because of something they may have read on this website. Copyright Johns Hopkins Arthritis ...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spondylitis News Osteoarthritis News Gout News Osteoporosis News Lupus News Fibromyalgia News Patient Corner Arthritis Drug Information ... Connect With Us Johns Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center ...

  13. The Association Between Fatigue and Disease Activity in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis : A Latent Growth Curve Model Analysis of Between-Subject Differences and Within-Subject Changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geenen, R.; Overman, C.L.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.; van Laar, J.M.; Marijnissen, A.C.A

    BACKGROUND The lack of association between fatigue and objective disease activity markers in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is counterintuitive since patients and doctors consider fatigue an indicator of underlying disease activity. We hypothesized that there is hardly any association

  14. CD1d-dependent NKT cells play a protective role in acute and chronic arthritis models by ameliorating antigen-specific Th1 responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teige, Anna; Bockermann, Robert; Hasan, Maruf

    2010-01-01

    -induced arthritis (AIA) and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), to evaluate acute and chronic arthritis in CD1d knockout mice and mice depleted of NK1.1(+) cells. CD1d-deficient mice developed more severe AIA compared with wild-type littermates, with a higher degree of inflammation and proteoglycan depletion. Chronic...... arthritis in CIA was also worse in the absence of CD1d-dependent NKTs. Elevated levels of Ag-specific IFN-gamma production accompanied these findings rather than changes in IL-17alpha. Depletion of NK1.1(+) cells supported these findings in AIA and CIA. This report provides support for CD1d-dependent NKTs...

  15. Interleukin-21 receptor deficiency increases the initial toll-like receptor 2 response but protects against joint pathology by reducing Th1 and Th17 cells during streptococcal cell wall arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marijnissen, Renoud J; Roeleveld, Debbie M; Young, Deborah; Nickerson-Nutter, Cheryl; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, Shahla; Garcia de Aquino, Sabrina; van de Loo, Fons A J; van Spriel, Annemiek B; Boots, Annemieke M H; van den Berg, Wim B; Koenders, Marije I

    2014-04-01

    The cytokine interleukin-21 (IL-21) can have both proinflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential dual role of IL-21 in experimental arthritis in relation to Th17 cells. Antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) and chronic streptococcal cell wall (SCW) arthritis were induced in IL-21 receptor-deficient (IL-21R(-/-) ) and wild-type mice. Knee joints, synovial tissue, and serum were analyzed for arthritis pathology and inflammatory markers. During AIA and chronic SCW arthritis, IL-21R deficiency protected against severe inflammation and joint destruction. This was accompanied by suppressed serum IgG1 levels and antigen-specific T cell responses. Levels of IL-17 were reduced during AIA, and synovial lymphocytes isolated during SCW arthritis for flow cytometry demonstrated that mainly IL-17+ interferon-γ (IFNγ)-positive T cells were reduced in IL-21R(-/-) mice. However, during the acute phases of SCW arthritis, significantly higher joint swelling scores were observed, consistent with enhanced tumor necrosis factor and IL-6 expression. Interestingly, IL-21R(-/-) mice were significantly less capable of up-regulating suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS-1) and SOCS-3 messenger RNA. IL-21 stimulation also affected the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2)/caspase recruitment domain 15 response to SCW fragments in vitro, indicating that impaired SOCS regulation in the absence of IL-21 signaling might contribute to the increased local activation during SCW arthritis. In contrast to the proinflammatory role of IL-21 in adaptive immunity, which drives IL-17+IFN+ cells and joint pathology during chronic experimental arthritis, IL-21 also has an important immunosuppressive role, presumably by inhibiting TLR signaling via SOCS-1 and SOCS-3. If this dual role of IL-21 in various immune processes is present in human disease, it could make IL-21 a difficult therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2014 by the American

  16. Qigong Exercise and Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Marks

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Arthritis is a chronic condition resulting in considerable disability, particularly in later life. Aims: The first aim of this review was to summarize and synthesize the research base concerning the use of Qigong exercises as a possible adjunctive strategy for promoting well-being among adults with arthritis. A second was to provide related intervention directives for health professionals working or who are likely to work with this population in the future. Methods: Material specifically focusing on examining the nature of Qigong for minimizing arthritis disability, pain and dependence and for improving life quality was sought. Results: Collectively, despite almost no attention to this topic, available data reveal that while more research is indicated, Qigong exercises—practiced widely in China for many centuries as an exercise form, mind-body and relaxation technique—may be very useful as an intervention strategy for adults with different forms of painful disabling arthritis. Conclusion: Health professionals working with people who have chronic arthritis can safely recommend these exercises to most adults with this condition with the expectation they will heighten the life quality of the individual, while reducing pain and depression in adults with this condition.

  17. Qigong Exercise and Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Ray

    2017-09-27

    Background: Arthritis is a chronic condition resulting in considerable disability, particularly in later life. Aims: The first aim of this review was to summarize and synthesize the research base concerning the use of Qigong exercises as a possible adjunctive strategy for promoting well-being among adults with arthritis. A second was to provide related intervention directives for health professionals working or who are likely to work with this population in the future. Methods: Material specifically focusing on examining the nature of Qigong for minimizing arthritis disability, pain and dependence and for improving life quality was sought. Results: Collectively, despite almost no attention to this topic, available data reveal that while more research is indicated, Qigong exercises-practiced widely in China for many centuries as an exercise form, mind-body and relaxation technique-may be very useful as an intervention strategy for adults with different forms of painful disabling arthritis. Conclusion: Health professionals working with people who have chronic arthritis can safely recommend these exercises to most adults with this condition with the expectation they will heighten the life quality of the individual, while reducing pain and depression in adults with this condition.

  18. Pasteurella multocida infectious arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnuolo, P J

    1978-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida, a small gram-negative rod, is a domestic animal saprophyte that occasionally causes disease in humans. Infectious arthritis may develop from a superficial animal bite or scratch. Nine previous cases of infectious arthritis due to this organism have been documented in the literature, and a tenth case is reported here. Most patients had recent animal exposure, and half the patients had underlying chronic rheumatoid arthritis. Clinical signs of inflammation were consistently present; however, systemic infection was infrequent. The lack of positive synovial fluid gram-stain smears may make differentiation from other forms of infectious arthritis difficult. Penicillin in moderate doses is effective therapy, with osteomyelitis developing in only two patients. The tendency for this syndrome to affect patients with rheumatoid arthritis may reflect deficient local defense mechanisms, chronic steroid therapy, or increased ownership of pets. The mechanism of spread of infection to the joint space appears to be through contiguous spread from a skin site rather than by the hematogenous route in most cases.

  19. Is air pollution a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essouma, Mickael; Noubiap, Jean Jacques N

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory debilitating disease triggered by a complex interaction involving genetic and environmental factors. Active smoking and occupational exposures such as silica increase its risk, suggesting that initial inflammation and generation of rheumatoid arthritis-related autoantibodies in the lungs may precede the clinical disease. This hypothesis paved the way to epidemiological studies investigating air pollution as a potential determinant of rheumatoid arthritis. Studies designed for epidemiology of rheumatoid arthritis found a link between traffic, a surrogate of air pollution, and this disease. Furthermore, a small case-control study recently found an association between wood smoke exposure and anticyclic citrullinated protein/peptide antibody in sera of patients presenting wood-smoke-related chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, reports addressing impact of specific pollutants on rheumatoid arthritis incidence and severity across populations are somewhat conflicting. In addition to the link reported between other systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases and particulate matters/gaseous pollutants, experimental observation of exacerbated rheumatoid arthritis incidence and severity in mice models of collagen-induced arthritis after diesel exhaust particles exposure as well as hypovitaminosis D-related autoimmunity can help understand the role of air pollution in rheumatoid arthritis. All these considerations highlight the necessity to extend high quality epidemiological researches investigating different sources of atmospheric pollution across populations and particularly in low-and-middle countries, in order to further explore the biological plausibility of air pollution's effect in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. This should be attempted to better inform policies aiming to reduce the burden of rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. Functional Mechanism(s) of the Inhibition of Disease Progression by Combination Treatment with Fingolimod Plus Pathogenic Antigen in a Glucose-6-phosphate Isomerase Peptide-Induced Arthritis Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yuya; Mikami, Norihisa; Matsushima, Yuki; Otani, Fumiya; Miyawaki, Mai; Takatsuji, Miku; Banno, Rie; Tsuji, Takumi; Fujita, Tetsuro; Tsujikawa, Kazutake; Kohno, Takeyuki

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that combination treatment with fingolimod (FTY720) plus antigenic peptide of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (residues 325-339) (GPI325-339) from the onset of symptoms significantly inhibited disease progression in a mouse model of GPI325-339-induced arthritis. In this study, we investigated the mechanism(s) involved. The model mice were treated from arthritis onset with FTY720 alone, GPI325-339 alone, or the combination of FTY720 plus GPI325-339. At the end of treatment, inguinal lymph nodes (LNs) were excised and examined histologically and in flow cytometry. Levels of apoptotic cells, programmed death-1-expressing CD4(+)forkhead box P3(-) nonregulatory T cells (non-Tregs), and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4-expressing non-Tregs in inguinal LNs were markedly increased in the combination treatment group mice. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) were also increased. These results indicate that combination treatment with FTY720 plus GPI325-339 inhibits the progression of arthritis by inducing clonal deletion and anergy of pathogenic T cells and also by immune suppression via Tregs.

  1. Pediatric Septic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Nicole I; Epps, Howard R

    2017-04-01

    Acute septic arthritis is a condition with the potential for joint destruction, physeal damage, and osteonecrosis, which warrants urgent identification and treatment. The organism most frequently responsible is Staphylococcus aureus; however, our understanding of pathogens continues to evolve as detection methods continue to improve. MRI has improved our ability to detect concurrent infections and is a useful clinical tool where available. The treatment course involves intravenous antibiotics followed by transition to oral antibiotics when clinically appropriate. The recommended surgical treatment of septic arthritis is open arthrotomy with decompression of the joint, irrigation, and debridement and treatment of concurrent infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Sarcopaenia and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targowski, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    In October 2016 a new independent disease called sarcopaenia (according to ICD-10 classification) appeared. According to the recommendation of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP), sarcopaenia is defined as abnormally low muscle mass plus low skeletal muscle strength or low physical performance. Sarcopaenia, as a primary disease, is mainly observed in older people, but it can also appear in younger adults in the course of many clinical chronic conditions. One of the most frequent chronic diseases associated with chronic inflammation and functional limitation of skeletal system is rheumatoid arthritis. In the present article, current knowledge on the epidemiology of sarcopaenia and its association with rheumatoid arthritis is presented.

  3. Vasculitis and inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Richard A; Scott, David G I

    2016-10-01

    Vasculitis has been described in most types of inflammatory arthritis. The best described and most widely recognised form is rheumatoid vasculitis. The incidence of systemic rheumatoid vasculitis has declined significantly following the general early use of methotrexate in the 1990s, and it is now a rare form of vasculitis. Treatment of rheumatoid vasculitis is conventionally with glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide, but there is an increasing role for rituximab similar to that in other types of vasculitis. Despite these developments the mortality of rheumatoid vasculitis remains high. Vasculitis in other types of inflammatory arthritis is less well described and the treatment remains empirical. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Imaging in Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Østergaard, Mikkel; Terslev, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory joint disease characterized by arthritis and often enthesitis in patients with psoriasis, presenting a wide range of manifestations in various patterns. Imaging procedures are primarily conventional radiography, ultrasonography (US), and magnetic...... resonance imaging (MRI); other modalities such as computed tomography are not used routinely. Imaging is an integral part of management of PsA. In this article, we provide an overview of the status, virtues, and limitations of imaging modalities in PsA, focusing on radiography, US, and MRI....

  5. Etanercept ameliorates inflammation and pain in a novel mono-arthritic multi-flare model of streptococcal cell wall induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, Kalyan; Faltus, Robert; Robinson, Gain; Sevilla, Raquel; Shin, John; Zielstorff, Mark; Byford, Alan; Leccese, Erica; Caniga, Michael J; Hseih, SuChun; Zhang, Shuli; Chiu, Chi-Sung; Zhang-Hoover, Jie; Moy, Lily Y; McLeod, Robbie L; Stoffregen, Dana; Zhang, Weisheng; Murtaza, Anwar; Cicmil, Milenko

    2014-12-04

    The impact of anti-TNF, corticosteroid and analgesic therapy on inflammation and pain was evaluated in a novel mono-arthritic multi-flare rat Streptococcal Cell Wall (SCW) model using Etanercept, Dexamethasone and Buprenorphine. Multiple flares of arthritis were induced with an intra-articular injection of SCW in the hind ankle on day 1, followed by intravenous challenges on days 21 and 42. Inflammation and pain were monitored in the hind paws. Cytokine profiling, cell phenotyping, bioluminescence imaging and histopathological evaluation were also performed. Local injection of SCW caused a rapid onset of inflammation and pain in the injected ankle which resolved within 4 days (Flare 1). Intravenous injection 20 days after sensitization resulted in an increase in ankle diameter and pain, which partially resolved in 8 days (Flare 2). The subsequent intra-venous injection in the same animals 14 days after resulted in a more chronic disease with inflammation and pain persisting over a period of 10 days (Flare 3). In Flare 2, therapeutic administration of Dexamethasone inhibited paw swelling (95%; Ppain (55%; Ppain (80%; Ppain by ≥30%. Expression of IL-1β, IL-6, MCP-1 and CINC was reduced by >50% (Ppain by 25%. Prior treatment with Etanercept in Flare 2 followed by re-administration in Flare 3 led to a complete loss in the efficacy of Etanercept. Systemic exposure of Etanercept corroborated with lack of efficacy. Dexamethasone inhibited inflammation and pain in both Flares 2 and 3 (Pinflammation and pain simultaneously in this model. Etanercept and Dexamethasone inhibited inflammation, pain and proinflammatory cytokines in this model. Taken together, this model facilitates the assessment of anti-rheumatic agents targeting inflammation and pain in the multiple flare paradigm and offers a powerful tool for drug discovery.

  6. IL33 in rheumatoid arthritis: potential contribution to pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Rafaela Bicalho Viana; Kakehasi, Adriana Maria; Melo de Andrade, Marcus Vinicius

    A better understanding of the inflammatory mechanisms of rheumatoid arthritis and the development of biological therapy revolutionized its treatment, enabling an interference in the synovitis - structural damage - functional disability cycle. Interleukin 33 was recently described as a new member of the interleukin-1 family, whose common feature is its pro-inflammatory activity. Its involvement in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases, including autoimmune diseases, raises the interest in the possible relationship with rheumatoid arthritis. Its action has been evaluated in experimental models of arthritis as well as in serum, synovial fluid and membrane of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. It has been shown that the administration of interleukin-33 exacerbates collagen-induced arthritis in experimental models, and a positive correlation between cytokine concentrations in serum and synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and disease activity was found. This review discusses evidence for the role of interleukin-33 with a focus on rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. In Vivo Quantitative Measurement of Arthritis Activity Based on Hydrophobically Modified Glycol Chitosan in Inflammatory Arthritis: More Active than Passive Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyeong Soon Park

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated that arthritis could be visualized noninvasively using hydrophobically modified glycol chitosan nanoparticles labeled with Cy5.5 (HGC-Cy5.5 and an optical imaging system. Activated macrophages expressing Mac-1 molecules effectively phagocytosed HGC-Cy5.5, which formed spherical nanoparticles under physiologic conditions. We estimated the applicability of HGC-Cy5.5 to quantitative analysis of arthritis development and progression. Near-infrared fluorescence images, captured after HGC-Cy5.5 injection in mice with collagen-induced arthritis, showed stronger fluorescence intensity in the active arthritis group than in the nonarthritis group. According to the progression of arthritis in both collagen-induced arthritis and collagen antibody-induced arthritis models, total photon counts (TPCs increased in parallel with the clinical arthritis index. Quantitative analysis of fluorescence after treatment with methotrexate showed a significant decrease in TPC in a dose-dependent manner. Histologic evaluation confirmed that the mechanism underlying selective accumulation of HGC-Cy5.5 within synovitis tissues included enhanced phagocytosis of the probe by Mac-1-expressing macrophages as well as enhanced permeability through leaky vessels. These results suggest that optical imaging of arthritis using HGC-Cy5.5 can provide an objective measurement of disease activity and, at the same time, therapeutic responses in rheumatoid arthritis.

  8. Modeled Health Economic Impact of a Hypothetical Certolizumab Pegol Risk-Sharing Scheme for Patients with Moderate-to-Severe Rheumatoid Arthritis in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soini, Erkki; Asseburg, Christian; Taiha, Maarit; Puolakka, Kari; Purcaru, Oana; Luosujärvi, Riitta

    2017-10-01

    To model the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) outcomes, cost-effectiveness, and budget impact of certolizumab pegol (CZP) (with and without a hypothetical risk-sharing scheme at treatment initiation for biologic-naïve patients) versus the current mix of reimbursed biologics for treatment of moderate-to-severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Finland. A probabilistic model with 12-week cycles and a societal approach was developed for the years 2015-2019, accounting for differences in ACR responses (meta-analysis), mortality, and persistence. The risk-sharing scheme included a treatment switch and refund of the costs associated with CZP acquisition if patients failed to achieve ACR20 response at week 12. For the current treatment mix, ACR20 at week 24 determined treatment continuation. Quality-adjusted life years were derived on the basis of the Health Utilities Index. In the Finnish target population, CZP treatment with a risk-sharing scheme led to a estimated annual net expenditure decrease ranging from 1.7% in 2015 to 5.6% in 2019 compared with the current treatment mix. Per patient over the 5 years, CZP risk sharing was estimated to decrease the time without ACR response by 5%-units, decrease work absenteeism by 24 days, and increase the time with ACR20, ACR50, and ACR70 responses by 5%-, 6%-, and 1%-units, respectively, with a gain of 0.03 quality-adjusted life years. The modeled risk-sharing scheme showed reduced costs of €7866 per patient, with a more than 95% probability of cost-effectiveness when compared with the current treatment mix. The present analysis estimated that CZP, with or without the risk-sharing scheme, is a cost-effective alternative treatment for RA patients in Finland. The surplus provided by the CZP risk-sharing scheme could fund treatment for 6% more Finnish RA patients. UCB Pharma.

  9. Arthritis Pain Reliever

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-12-27

    Learn more about the benefits of physical activity and the types and amounts of exercise helpful for people with arthritis.  Created: 12/27/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/27/2011.

  10. Monitoring rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gvozdenovic, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we focussed on so-called ‘treat to target’ therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Treat to target relies on repetitive measurements of disease activity using a composite score that incorporates signs of disease activity such as laboratory results, findings of physical joint

  11. Rheumatoid arthritis. Radiological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo Suarez, Jose Felix; Pena Cortes, Mario; Rondon Herrera, Federico; Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio

    2000-01-01

    We reviewed in this paper the radiographic characteristics of rheumatoid arthritis, making emphasis in the more common involved joints. We present a select but complete set of film as a result of our practice for many years in the Universidad Nacional de Colombia, HSJD, Bogota

  12. rheumatoid arthritis health outcome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2004-12-04

    Dec 4, 2004 ... School of Psychology, University of KwaZulu-Natal,. Pietermaritzburg. Girish M Mody, MB ChB, MRCP, FCP, MD, FRCP. Department of Rheumatology, Nelson R Mandela School of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disorder.

  13. Changes in Soluble CD18 in Murine Autoimmune Arthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis Reflect Disease Establishment and Treatment Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Jalilian, Babak; Keller, Kresten Krarup

    2016-01-01

    in murine models of rheumatoid arthritis. Methods The level of sCD18 was analyzed with a time-resolved immunoflourometric assay in 1) plasma from early treatment naïve RA patients during a treat-to-target strategy (the OPERA cohort), 2) plasma from chronic RA patients, 3) serum from SKG and CIA mice...... associated with radiographic progression. Correspondingly, the serum level of sCD18 was decreased in SKG mice 6 weeks after arthritis induction compared with healthy littermates. The sCD18 levels in both SKG and CIA mice exhibited a biphasic course after arthritis induction with an initial increase above...

  14. IMAGING OF PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D'Angelo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Imaging of psoriatic arthritis (PsA is important for two reasons: the differential diagnosis from other arthritides and the assessment of structural damage that can be inhibited by the new drugs such as the anti-TNFα agents. Plain film radiographic findings of peripheral arthritis have been important in elaborating the concept of PsA as a separate disease entity. Characteristic aspects of psoriatic peripheral arthritis help the differentiation from rheumatoid arthritis. High-resolution ultrasonography (US, US combined with power Doppler (PDUS and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can be used to image joint synovitis of PsA. Radiologic features of spondylitis associated with psoriasis are similar to spondylitis associated with reactive arthritis and differ from those of primary ankylosing spondylitis (AS and the spondylitis associated with inflammatory bowel disease. MRI is very sensitive for the early diagnosis of sacroiliitis. There have been no MRI studies on the spine of patients with PsA. In primary AS bone oedema in the vertebral bodies is an indicator of active disease and can ameliorate during anti-TNFα therapy. Historically, plain film radiography have played a pivotal role in defining enthesitis lesions of SpA. However, entheseal bone changes appear late. US and MRI have proved to be a highly sensitive and non invasive tools. Recent US and MRI studies on both finger and toe dactylitis have established that dactylitis is due to flexor tenosynovitis and marked adjacent soft tissue swelling with a variable degree of small joint synovitis. There is no evidence of enthesitis of the insertion of the flexor digitorum tendons and of the attachment of the caspsule of the digit joints. Key words: Enthesitis, dactylitis, spondyloarthritis, ultrasound, magnetic resonance, imaging

  15. Essential Contribution of CD4+ T Cells to Antigen-Induced Nasal Hyperresponsiveness in Experimental Allergic Rhinitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoe Nishimura

    Full Text Available Nasal hyperresponsiveness (NHR is a characteristic feature of allergic rhinitis (AR; however, the pathogenesis of NHR is not fully understood. In this study, during the establishment of an experimental AR model using ovalbumin-immunized and -challenged mice, augmentation of the sneezing reaction in response to nonspecific proteins as well as a chemical stimulant was detected. Whether NHR is independent of mast cells and eosinophils was determined by using mast cell- and eosinophil-deficient mice. NHR was suppressed by treatment with anti-CD4 antibody, suggesting the pivotal contribution of CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, antigen challenge to mice to which in vitro-differentiated Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells but not naïve CD4+ T cells had been adoptively transferred led to the development of equivalent NHR. Since antigen-specific IgE and IgG were not produced in these mice and since antigen-specific IgE-transgenic mice did not develop NHR even upon antigen challenge, humoral immunity would be dispensable for NHR. CD4+ T cells play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of AR via induction of NHR, independent of IgE-, mast cell-, and eosinophil-mediated responses.

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Eyes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the eyes? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect the eyes? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that primarily affects ...

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Lungs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the lungs? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect your lungs? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Although rheumatoid arthritis primarily affects joints, it sometimes causes lung disease ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Juvenile idiopathic arthritis Juvenile idiopathic arthritis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Juvenile idiopathic arthritis refers to a group of conditions involving joint ...

  19. Efficient and nontoxic biological response carrier delivering TNF-α shRNA for gene silencing in a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialin Song

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Small interfering RNA (siRNA is an effective and specific method for silencing genes. However, an efficient and nontoxic carrier is needed to deliver the siRNA into the target cells. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α plays a central role in the occurrence and progression of rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, we pre-synthetized a degradable cationic polymer (PDAPEI from 2,6-pyridinedicarboxaldehyde and low molecular weight polyethyleneimine (PEI, Mw=1.8 kDa as a gene vector for the delivery of TNF-α shRNA. The PDAPEI/pDNA complex showed a suitable particle size and stable zeta potential for transfection. In vitro study of the PDAPEI/pDNA complex revealed a lower cytotoxicity and higher transfection efficiency when transfecting TNF-α shRNA to macrophages by significantly down-regulating the expression of TNF-α. Moreover, the complex was extremely efficient in decreasing the severity of arthritis in mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA. PDAPEI delivered TNF-α shRNA has great potential in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. MRI-assessed therapeutic effects of locally administered PLGA nanoparticles loaded with anti-inflammatory siRNA in a murine arthritis model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Boekhorst, B.C.; Jensen, L.B.; Colombo, S.; Varkouhi, A.K.; Schiffelers, R.M.; Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria; Storm, Gerrit; Nielsen, H.M.; Strijkers, G.J.; Foged, C.; Nicolay, K.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by systemic inflammation of synovial joints leading to erosion and cartilage destruction. Although efficacious anti-tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) biologic therapies exist, there is an unmet medical need for safe and more efficient treatment regimens

  1. Arthritis and the Risk of Falling Into Poverty: A Survival Analysis Using Australian Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callander, Emily J; Schofield, Deborah J

    2016-01-01

    Low income is known to be associated with having arthritis. However, no longitudinal studies have documented the relationship between developing arthritis and falling into poverty. The purpose of this study was to evaluate Australians who developed arthritis to determine if they had an elevated risk of falling into poverty. Survival analysis using Cox regression models was applied to nationally representative, longitudinal survey data obtained between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 from Australian adults who were ages 21 years and older in 2007. The hazard ratio for falling into income poverty was 1.08 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.06-1.09) in women who were diagnosed as having arthritis and 1.15 (95% CI 1.13-1.16) in men who were diagnosed as having arthritis, as compared to those who were never diagnosed as having arthritis. The hazard ratio for falling into multidimensional poverty was 1.15 (95% CI 1.14-1.17) in women who were diagnosed as having arthritis and 1.88 (95% CI 1.85-1.91) in men who were diagnosed as having arthritis. Developing arthritis increases the risk of falling into income poverty and multidimensional poverty. The risk of multidimensional poverty is greater than the risk of income poverty. Given the high prevalence of arthritis, the condition is likely an overlooked driver of poverty. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  2. Potential Use of Plectranthus amboinicus in the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Jia-Ming Chang; Chun-Ming Cheng; Le-Mei Hung; Yuh-Shan Chung; Rey-Yuh Wu

    2010-01-01

    Plectranthus amboinicus (P. amboinicus) is a folk herb that is used to treat inflammatory diseases or swelling symptoms in Taiwan. We investigated therapeutic efficacy of P. amboinicus in treating Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) using collagen-induced arthritis animal model. Arthritis was induced in Lewis rats by immunization with bovine type II collagen. Serum anti-collagen IgG, IgM and C-reactive protein (CRP) were analyzed. To understand the inflammation condition of treated animals, production ...

  3. Rheumatoid arthritis: vocational rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, G M

    1982-01-01

    The consequences of inflation and accelerating introduction of automation and microprocessors into industry are a shift from unskilled to skilled work, the lessening of opportunities for the unskilled worker, and growing unemployment. If disabled people are competing for employment they must take every opportunity to extend education and acquire skills. Juvenile chronic arthritis presents one set of problems in vocational rehabilitation at the beginning of a working career and adult rheumatoid arthritis another, commonly in those over 45 years old and previously established in work. The prevalence of severe disability in juvenile chronic arthritis is about 1 in 20 000 of the population, females are affected twice as often as males and 1 in 10 has defective vision or blindness due to chronic iridocyclitis. At school, besides education, there must be emphasis on encouraging independence, self-confidence, mobility and determination. A School Leavers' Conference early in the last year at school gives the adolescent the best chance of choosing a career. Rheumatoid arthritis is three times more common in women and increasingly, over the last 40 years, women are working besides home-making. Morning stiffness, fatigue, immobility and pain are the common symptoms of widespread involvement of joints and systemic disturbance. The principal determinant in the success of vocational rehabilitation is personality, and the social and environmental factors are more significant than the degree of disability. The Disablement Resettlement Officer can assure continuity of rehabilitation between the health and employment services: a favourable outcome is work, self-derived income independence and freedom of movement using whatever technical aids are required to achieve this.

  4. Psoriasis and psoriasic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes Vera, Sandra Liliana; Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio; Restrepo Suarez, Jose Felix

    2003-01-01

    The psoriasis is an skin inflammatory disease characterized by chronic and recurrent red skin covered with silver scales. In their pathogenesis, immunogenetic and environmental factors are conjugated. Psoriatic arthritis. That is a seronegative arthropathy. In the greater part of cases follow to a chronic course of cutaneous psoriasis. In this paper, we analyzed the most frequent forms of presentation of cutaneous psoriasis and we revised the psoriatic arthropathy, with some indications about its treatment

  5. [Sport and rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proschek, D; Rehart, S

    2014-06-01

    Sport is becoming increasingly more important in our society. Due to the changing age spectrum with a greater number of elderly and substantially more active people, an increasing number of people with underlying orthopedic diseases are becoming interested in participating in sport. This article deals with the possibilities and effects of sporting activities for people with rheumatoid arthritis within the framework of a conservative therapy. A literature search was carried out using medical search engines, in particular PubMed, and also via the recommendations of specialist societies and patient help groups. The quality of life of patients with rheumatoid arthritis consists of physical, mental and social components. Sport as a means of rehabilitation influences all of these components. Sport should be comprehended as a form of therapy and be adapted to the needs of the individual patient. The willingness to actively participate in sport should always be highly rated and encouraged. Sport is therefore an important pillar of therapy in a conservative total concept. The main aspects of sport therapeutic activities are functional, pedagogical and experience-oriented aspects. The clinical symptoms, extent of damage and physical impairment must, however, be evaluated and taken into consideration for the therapeutic concept. The amount of data on the complex topic of sport and rheumatoid arthritis is low and is mainly dealt with as retrospective reviews. A prospective randomized study basis is lacking. The aim must therefore be to confirm the currently available recommendations for various types of sport in controlled studies.

  6. Evaluation of the therapeutic effect of hydroxyapatite particles labeled with Ho166 in rats with acute and chronic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza Lopez, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of an intraarticular injection of hydroxyapatite particles labeled with Holmium-166 ( Ho 166 HA) was evaluated. For this evaluation 72 antigen-induced arthritis rats; the arthritis was induced by an intraarticular injection of a suspension of ovoalbumin and Freund's adjuvant complete. The 72 rats were divided in three groups: control group, acute arthritis group and chronic arthritis group. The evaluation of the therapeutic effect was achieved by the measuring of the perimeter of the arthritic knee joint in different days after the intraarticular injection of 0,5 μCi of Ho 166 -HA (day 0, 4, 9, 14, 19, 30). Also a biological distribution study was done at 4, 24 and 48 hours in different organs, through the counting of its radiation. The results of the biological distribution showed that a very high percent of the injected activity remains inside the joint, with minimal activity in other organs, which indicates that the extra articular leakage is very low. The evaluation of the articular perimeter, demonstrated that Ho 166 -HA has a therapeutic effect , which was shown by comparing the control group (6.42 ±0.43 cm right knee; 6.14 ±0.31 cm left knee) with the acute arthritis group (5.11 ±0.3 cm right knee; 4.95 ±0.39 cm left knee) with significantly statistical values (p≤0,01); also the control group was compared with the chronic arthritis group (5.6 ±0.56 cm right knee; 5.47 ±0.51 cm left knee), with significantly statistical values (p≤0,01). This therapeutic effect was evident too when evaluating the measure of the articular perimeter in acute and chronic arthritis groups through the time with significantly statistical values (p≤0,01). In conclusion the hydroxyapatite particles labeled with Holmium-166 are biologically stable in vivo and have a therapeutic effect in the treatment of acute and chronic arthritis in rats [es

  7. Imaging of Posttraumatic Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Septic Arthritis, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, and Cancer Mimicking Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupasov, Andrey; Cain, Usa; Montoya, Simone; Blickman, Johan G

    2017-09-01

    This article focuses on the imaging of 5 discrete entities with a common end result of disability: posttraumatic arthritis, a common form of secondary osteoarthritis that results from a prior insult to the joint; avascular necrosis, a disease of impaired osseous blood flow, leading to cellular death and subsequent osseous collapse; septic arthritis, an infectious process leading to destructive changes within the joint; complex regional pain syndrome, a chronic limb-confined painful condition arising after injury; and cases of cancer mimicking arthritis, in which the initial findings seem to represent arthritis, despite a more insidious cause. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of a mixture of fatty acids from sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum L.) wax oil in two models of inflammation: zymosan-induced arthritis and mice tail test of psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledón, N; Casacó, A; Remirez, D; González, A; Cruz, J; González, R; Capote, A; Tolón, Z; Rojas, E; Rodríguez, V J; Merino, N; Rodríguez, S; Ancheta, O; Cano, M C

    2007-10-01

    A mixture of fatty acids obtained from sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum L.) wax oil (FAM), in which the main constituents are palmitic, oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids, was evaluated in two models of inflammation: zymosan-induced arthritis and in the tail test for psoriasis, both on mice. In the first model, FAM significantly reduced zymozan-induced increase of beta glucuronidase (DE(50) 90+/-7 mg/kg). Histopathological studies showed inhibition in cellular infiltration and reduction of synovial hyperplasia and synovitis, whereas in the second test, histopathological and ultrastructural studies showed that topical application of FAM induced orthokeratosis with the presence of keratohyalin granules in the previously parakeratotic adult mouse tail, and without effects on epidermal thickness. The ED(50) of FAM in this model was 155+/-10 mg. The results of our studies showed that topical application of FAM exerts an important anti-inflammatory activity in both tests without evidence of irritant effects. The anti-inflamatory effects exerted by FAM may be due to its inhibitory effects on arachidonic acid metabolism. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the anti-inflammatory effect of sugar cane by-products in experimental models of arthritis and psoriasis.

  9. Induction of lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, J.L.; Schell, R.F.; Hejka, A.; England, D.M.; Konick, L.

    1988-09-01

    In studies of experimental Lyme disease, a major obstacle has been the unavailability of a suitable animal model. We found that irradiated LSH/Ss Lak hamsters developed arthritis after injection of Borrelia burgdorferi in the hind paws. When nonirradiated hamsters were injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi, acute transient synovitis was present. A diffuse neutrophilic infiltrate involved the synovia and periarticular structures. The inflammation was associated with edema, hyperemia, and granulation tissue. Numerous spirochetes were seen in the synovial and subsynovial tissues. The histopathologic changes were enhanced in irradiated hamsters. The onset and duration of the induced swelling were dependent on the dose of radiation and the inoculum of spirochetes. Inoculation of irradiated hamsters with Formalin-killed spirochetes or medium in which B. burgdorferi had grown for 7 days failed to induce swelling. This animal model should prove useful for studies of the immune response to B. burgdorferi and the pathogenesis of Lyme arthritis.

  10. Acute serum amyloid A induces migration, angiogenesis, and inflammation in synovial cells in vitro and in a human rheumatoid arthritis/SCID mouse chimera model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Connolly, Mary

    2010-06-01

    Serum amyloid A (A-SAA), an acute-phase protein with cytokine-like properties, is expressed at sites of inflammation. This study investigated the effects of A-SAA on chemokine-regulated migration and angiogenesis using rheumatoid arthritis (RA) cells and whole-tissue explants in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo. A-SAA levels were measured by real-time PCR and ELISA. IL-8 and MCP-1 expression was examined in RA synovial fibroblasts, human microvascular endothelial cells, and RA synovial explants by ELISA. Neutrophil transendothelial cell migration, cell adhesion, invasion, and migration were examined using transwell leukocyte\\/monocyte migration assays, invasion assays, and adhesion assays with or without anti-MCP-1\\/anti-IL-8. NF-kappaB was examined using a specific inhibitor and Western blotting. An RA synovial\\/SCID mouse chimera model was used to examine the effects of A-SAA on cell migration, proliferation, and angiogenesis in vivo. High expression of A-SAA was demonstrated in RA patients (p < 0.05). A-SAA induced chemokine expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05). Blockade with anti-scavenger receptor class B member 1 and lipoxin A4 (A-SAA receptors) significantly reduced chemokine expression in RA synovial tissue explants (p < 0.05). A-SAA induced cell invasion, neutrophil-transendothelial cell migration, monocyte migration, and adhesion (all p < 0.05), effects that were blocked by anti-IL-8 or anti-MCP-1. A-SAA-induced chemokine expression was mediated through NF-kappaB in RA explants (p < 0.05). Finally, in the RA synovial\\/SCID mouse chimera model, we demonstrated for the first time in vivo that A-SAA directly induces monocyte migration from the murine circulation into RA synovial grafts, synovial cell proliferation, and angiogenesis (p < 0.05). A-SAA promotes cell migrational mechanisms and angiogenesis critical to RA pathogenesis.

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatments are available, what is happening in the immune system and what other conditions are associated with RA. ... Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. Updated: ...

  12. Living with persistent rheumatoid arthritis: a BARFOT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Sidona-Valentina; Samuelson, Karin; Hagell, Peter; Fridlund, Bengt; Forslind, Kristina; Svensson, Björn; Thomé, Bibbi

    2017-09-01

    To describe and understand the meaning of living with persistent rheumatoid arthritis. A considerable number of patients with rheumatoid arthritis live with an ongoing active and symptomatic illness despite access to potent antirheumatic treatment. There is, however, a lack of knowledge about the meaning of living with this severe long-term illness, defined as persistent rheumatoid arthritis. A descriptive design based on a hermeneutic phenomenological method was used. Ten adults with persistent rheumatoid arthritis and at least five years disease duration were interviewed. The interviews were analysed according to van Manen's method. Living with persistent rheumatoid arthritis revealed four overall themes: an existence dominated by painful symptoms and treatment, radical changes and limitations in one's life, a continual struggle to cope with one's life and to master the illness, and a dependency on those who are close by and the world around. The lifeworld was affected to a varying extent and in various ways by the illness but also by the dependence on its treatment and care that was not experienced as sufficiently meeting needs in terms of security, access to and coordination of care as well as team and rehabilitation services. Persistent rheumatoid arthritis and its treatment entail a radical effect on the person's life and quality of life. Current ordinary rheumatology care does not seem to meet the individual needs of the person with persistent rheumatoid arthritis in an optimal way. A greater knowledge about and understanding of the person who lives with persistent rheumatoid arthritis is important for facilitating the development of care and the relief of suffering. A holistic alternative to conventional clinical practice, such as person-centred care, could be tested as an innovative model of care. Our findings might serve as material for educational and counselling purposes for healthcare professionals. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging for inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Chamberland, David; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    Arthritis is a leading cause of disability, affecting 46 million of the population in the U.S. Rendering new optical contrast in articular tissues at high spatial and temporal resolution, emerging photoacoustic imaging (PAI) combined with more established ultrasound (US) imaging technologies provides unique opportunities for diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. In addition to capturing peripheral bone and soft tissue images, PAI has the capability to quantify hemodynamic properties including regional blood oxygenation and blood volume, both abnormal in synovial tissues affected by arthritis. Therefore, PAI, especially when performed together with US, should be of considerable help for further understanding the pathophysiology of arthritis as well as assisting in therapeutic decisions, including assessing the efficacy of new pharmacological therapies. In this paper, we will review our recent work on the development of PAI for application to the diagnostic imaging and therapeutic monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. We will present the imaging results from a home-built imaging system and another one based on a commercial US. The performance of PAI in evaluating pharmacological therapy on animal model of arthritis will be shown. Moreover, our resent work on PAI and US dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints in vivo will also be presented.

  14. Psoriatic arthritis as a mountain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Berthelot

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available There is no doubt that inflammatory arthritis/enthesitis and psoriasis coexist more frequently than would be expected by chance: for instance, in a study of 1285 patients with psoriasis seen in an hospital, 483 (38% were suffering from arthritis/ enthesitis, including 40 patients classified as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA (3%, 177 (14% as undifferentiated arthritis (UA, and 266 (21% as Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA (1. Although lower percentages have been noticed in the general population with psoriasis (6% of PsA in an extensive study of 1844 patients with psoriasis (2, they were superior to 5% (i.e. at least 5 times greater than the figures found for patients without psoriasis (3-7.

  15. Anti-RANKL treatment inhibits erosive joint destruction and lowers inflammation but has no effect on bone formation in the delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis (DTHA) model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, Sara Marie; Bleil, Janine; Maier, Rene

    2016-01-01

    . Periarticular bone formation was observed from day 10. Induction of new bone formation indicated by enhanced Runx2, collagen X, osteocalcin, MMP2, MMP9, and MMP13 mRNA expression was observed only between days 8 and 11. Anti-RANKL treatment resulted in a modest reduction in paw and ankle swelling...... and bone formation were analyzed by mRNA deep sequencing. Serum concentrations of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b, carboxy-terminal telopeptide I (CTX-I), matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3), and serum amyloid P component (SAP) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Anti......-RANKL monoclonal antibody treatment was initiated at the time of immunization. Results: Bone destruction (MMP3 serum levels, cathepsin B activity, and RANKL mRNA) peaked at day 3 after arthritis induction, followed by a peak in cartilage destruction and bone erosion on day 5 after arthritis induction...

  16. Skin Manifestations of Rheumatoid Arthritis, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, and Spondyloarthritides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua-Aguilera, Carolyn Jean; Möller, Burkhard; Yawalkar, Nikhil

    2017-12-01

    Extra-articular manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and various spondyloarthritides including psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease-associated spondyloarthritis often involve the skin and may occur before or after diagnosis of these rheumatic diseases. Cutaneous manifestations encompass a wide range of reactions that may have a notable negative impact not only on the physical but especially on the emotional and psychosocial well-being of these patients. Several cutaneous manifestations have been related to rheumatoid arthritis such as subcutaneous nodules including classical rheumatoid nodules, accelerated rheumatoid nodulosis, and rheumatoid nodulosis; vascular disorders like rheumatoid vasculitis, livedo racemosa, and Raynaud's phenomenon; and neutrophilic and/or granulomatous diseases like pyoderma gangrenosum, Sweet's syndrome, rheumatoid neutrophilic dermatitis, interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis, as well as palisaded neutrophilic and granulomatous dermatitis. In juvenile idiopathic arthritis, the main cutaneous manifestations include an evanescent rash, rheumatoid nodules, as well as plaque and guttate psoriasis. Plaque psoriasis is also the main skin disease involved in spondyloarthritides. Furthermore, other forms of psoriasis including guttate, inverse, erythrodermic, pustular, and particularly nail psoriasis may also occur. In addition, a variety of drug-induced skin reactions may also appear in these diseases. Early recognition and understanding of these different dermatologic manifestations together with an interdisciplinary approach are often needed to optimize management of these diseases.

  17. Bone pathology inpsoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Badokin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study different variants of osteolysis in pts with psoriatic arthritis (PA and to reveal their relationship with other clinico-radiological features of joint damage. Material and methods. 370 pts with definite PA having different variants of joint damage were included. Radiological examination of bones and joints (in some cases large picture frame was performed. Morphological evaluation of synovial biopsies was done in 34 pts with PA and 10 pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Results. Different types of osteolysis were revealed in 80 (21,6% pts. Osteolytic variant of joint damage was present in 29 pts. 33 pts had acral, 48 — intra-articular osteolysis and 16 - true bone atrophy. Frequency and intensity of bone resorption were associated with severity of PA. Acral osteolysis correlated with arthritis of distal interphalangeal joints and onychodystrophy. Intra-articular osteolysis was most often present in distal interphalangeal joints of hands and metacarpophalangeal joints (39,6% and 41,7% respectively. Characteristic feature of PA was combination of prominent resorption with formation of bone ankylosis and periosteal reaction. Ankylosis was present in 33,3% of pts with intra-articular osteolysis and in 60% of pts with combination of different osteolysis variants. Systemic reaction of microcirculation in synovial biopsies was most prominent in osteolytic variant: marked thickening of capillary and venule basal membrane with high level of acid phosphatase, increased capillary and precapillary blood flow with stasis features, vascular lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration, productive vasculitis with annular wall thickening, thrombovasculitis and villi deep layer sclerosis. Conclusion. Different variants of osteolysis show bone involvement in PA. Acral and intra- articular osteolysis association with bone ankylosis and periostitis proves their common pathogenetic entity.

  18. Development and optimization of a high-throughput micro-computed tomography imaging method incorporating a novel analysis technique to evaluate bone mineral density of arthritic joints in a rodent model of collagen induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla, Raquel S; Cruz, Francisco; Chiu, Chi-Sung; Xue, Dahai; Bettano, Kimberly A; Zhu, Joe; Chakravarthy, Kalyan; Faltus, Robert; Wang, Shubing; Vanko, Amy; Robinson, Gain; Zielstorff, Mark; Miao, John; Leccese, Erica; Conway, Donald; Moy, Lily Y; Dogdas, Belma; Cicmil, Milenko; Zhang, Weisheng

    2015-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease resulting in joint inflammation, pain, and eventual bone loss. Bone loss and remodeling caused by symmetric polyarthritis, the hallmark of RA, is readily detectable by bone mineral density (BMD) measurement using micro-CT. Abnormalities in these measurements over time reflect the underlying pathophysiology of the bone. To evaluate the efficacy of anti-rheumatic agents in animal models of arthritis, we developed a high throughput knee and ankle joint imaging assay to measure BMD as a translational biomarker. A bone sample holder was custom designed for micro-CT scanning, which significantly increased assay throughput. Batch processing 3-dimensional image reconstruction, followed by automated image cropping, significantly reduced image processing time. In addition, we developed a novel, automated image analysis method to measure BMD and bone volume of knee and ankle joints. These improvements significantly increased the throughput of ex vivo bone sample analysis, reducing data turnaround from 5 days to 24 hours for a study with 200 rat hind limbs. Taken together, our data demonstrate that BMD, as quantified by micro-CT, is a robust efficacy biomarker with a high degree of sensitivity. Our innovative approach toward evaluation of BMD using optimized image acquisition and novel image processing techniques in preclinical models of RA enables high throughput assessment of anti-rheumatic agents offering a powerful tool for drug discovery. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Wnt/β-catenin Signaling in Osteoarthritis and in Other Forms of Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yachuan; Wang, Tingyu; Hamilton, John L; Chen, Di

    2017-09-01

    Arthritis defines a large group of diseases primarily affecting the joint. It is the leading cause of pain and disability in adults. Osteoarthritis (OA) affecting the knee or hip is the most common form among over 100 types of arthritis. Other types of arthritis include erosive hand OA, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) OA, facet joint OA, diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH), and spondyloarthritis (SpA). However, the specific molecular signals involved in the development and progression of OA and related forms of arthritis remain largely unknown. The canonical wingless/integrated (Wnt)/β-catenin signaling pathway could play a unique role in the pathogenesis of arthritis. In this review article, we will focus on the molecular mechanisms of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the pathogenesis of OA and other types of arthritis. Emerging evidence demonstrates that Wnts and Wnt-related molecules are involved in arthritis development and progression in human genetic studies and in vitro studies. Also, mouse models have been generated to determine the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the pathogenesis of arthritis. Wnt/β-catenin signaling represents a unique signaling pathway regulating arthritis development and progression, and the molecules in this particular pathway may serve as targets for the therapeutic intervention of arthritis. Mediators and downstream effectors of Wnt/β-catenin signaling are increased in OA as well other forms of arthritis, including DISH and SpA. Through extensive investigations, including pre-clinical studies in transgenic mice and translational and human studies, the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway has been proven to play roles in bone and joint pathology by directly affecting bone, cartilage, and synovial tissue; further, these pathologies can be reduced through targeting this pathway. Continued investigation into the distinct molecular signaling of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway will provide additional insights toward the therapeutic

  20. MicroRNA-146a governs fibroblast activation and joint pathology in arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saferding, V.; Puchner, A.; Goncalves-Alves, E.; Hofmann, M.; Bonelli, M.; Brunner, J.S.; Sahin, E.; Niederreiter, B.; Hayer, S.; Kiener, H.P.; Einwallner, E.; Nehmar, R.; Carapito, R.; Georgel, P.; Koenders, M.I.; Boldin, M.; Schabbauer, G.; Kurowska-Stolarska, M.; Steiner, G.; Smolen, J.S.; Redlich, K.; Bluml, S.

    2017-01-01

    Synovial fibroblasts are key cells orchestrating the inflammatory response in arthritis. Here we demonstrate that loss of miR-146a, a key epigenetic regulator of the innate immune response, leads to increased joint destruction in a TNF-driven model of arthritis by specifically regulating the

  1. JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I N Sartika

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA is the most common rheumatic condition in children. JRA is defined as persistent arthritis in 1 or more joints for at least 6 weeks, with the onset before age 16 years. The etiology of JRA is unknown. Antigen activated CD4+ T cell stimulate monocytes, macrophages, and synovial fibroblasts to produce the cytokines Interleukin-1 (IL-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-? and to secrete matrix metalloproteinases, which lead to chronic inflammation due to infiltration of inflammatory cell, angiogenesis, destruction of cartilage and bone with pannus formation. The 3 major subtypes of JRA are based on the symptoms at disease onset and are designated systemic onset, pauciarticular onset, and polyarticular onset. For all patients, the goals of therapy are to decrease chronic joint pain and suppress the inflammatory process. Poor prognostic have been observed in patients with polyarticular onset, rheumatoid factor, persistent morning stiffness, tenosynovitis, involvement of the small joints, rapid appearance of erosions, active late onset childhood, subcutaneous nodules, or antinuclear antibody.

  2. Pain and microcrystalline arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramonda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microcrystals are responsible for some of the most common and complex arthropathies which are often accompanied by intense, severe pain and inflammatory reactions. The main pathogens are crystals of monosodium urate (MSU, responsible for the gout, calcium pyrophosphate (CPP, which deposits also in various clinical forms of arthopathies, and basic calcium phosphate associated with osteoarthritis. In this context, the microcrystal arthritis is characterized by multiple, acute attacks followed by chronic pain, disability, impaired quality of life, and increased mortality. Given their chronic nature, they represent an ever more urgent public health problem. MSU and CPP crystals are also able to activate nociceptors. The pain in mycrocrystalline arthritis (MCA is an expression of the inflammatory process. In the course of these diseases there is an abundant release of inflammatory molecules, including prostaglandins 2 and kinins. Interleukin-1 represents the most important cytokine released during the crystal-induced inflammatory process. Therefore, clinically, pain is the most important component of MCA, which lead to functional impairment and disability in a large proportion of the population. It is fundamental to diagnose these diseases as early as possible, and to this aim, to identify appropriate and specific targets for a timely therapeutic intervention.

  3. Crocin reduces the inflammation response in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Jiang, Chao; Zhu, Wenyong

    2017-05-01

    This study is to determine the role and mechanism of crocin in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Totally 60 Wistar SD rats were randomly divided into control group, RA model group, methotrexate group, crocin high dose, middle dose, and low dose groups. The paw swelling degree, arthritis score, thymus and spleen index, the mRNA and protein levels of iNOS, and the serum content of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were evaluated. Crocin treatment significantly alleviated the paw swelling of RA rats. The arthritis score in crocin treatment groups was significantly lower than that in RA model group. Additionally, the thymus index, but not the spleen index, declined remarkably in crocin treatment groups than in RA model group. Besides, crocin administration significantly reduced the iNOS production and the serum content of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6. Crocin may exert potent anti-RA effects through inhibiting cytokine.

  4. Education and Employment Participation in Young Adulthood: What Role Does Arthritis Play?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetha, Arif; Theis, Kristina A; Boring, Michael A; Barbour, Kamil E

    2017-10-01

    To examine the association between arthritis diagnosis and education and employment participation among young adults, and to determine whether findings differ by self-rated health and age. Data from the National Health Interview Survey, in the years 2009-2015, were combined and analyzed. The study sample was restricted to those ages 18-29 years, either diagnosed with arthritis (n = 1,393) or not (n = 40,537). The prevalence and correlates of employment and education participation were compared by arthritis status. Demographic characteristics, social role participation restrictions, health factors, and health system use variables were included as covariates. Models were stratified for age (18-23 versus 24-29 years) and self-rated health. Weighted proportions and univariate and multivariate associations were calculated to examine the association between arthritis and education and employment participation. Respondents with arthritis were more likely to be female, married, and report having more social participation restrictions, fair/poor health, and more functional limitations than those without arthritis. In multivariate models, arthritis was significantly associated with lower education (prevalence ratio [PR] 0.75 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.57-0.98]) and higher employment participation (PR 1.07 [95% CI 1.03-1.13]). Additional stratified analyses indicated an association between arthritis diagnosis and greater employment participation in those ages 18-23 years and reporting higher self-rated health. Young adults with arthritis may be transitioning into employment at an earlier age than their peers without arthritis. To inform the design of interventions that promote employment participation, future research on the education and employment experiences of young adults with arthritis is needed. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education Fund About Us Appointment Information Contact Us Our Faculty Our Staff Rheumatology Specialty Centers You are here: Home / Patient ...

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Our Staff Rheumatology Specialty Centers You are here: Home / Patient Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video ... to take a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take ...

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a Question Physician Corner Rheumatology Conference Rheumatology Rounds Case Rounds Radiology Rounds Pathophysiology of the Rheumatic Diseases Our Research Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Research Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education ...

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take the place of any advice you ... Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: psoriatic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 links) American Society for Surgery of the Hand Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery and Rehabilitation Related Information How are genetic conditions diagnosed? How ...

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rounds Pathophysiology of the Rheumatic Diseases Our Research Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Research Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education Fund About Us Appointment Information Contact Us Our ...

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact Us Our Faculty Our Staff Rheumatology Specialty Centers You are here: Home / Patient Corner / Patient Webcasts / ... Ruffing has been a member of the Arthritis Center since 2000, currently serving as the Nurse Manager. ...

  12. Rheumatoid arthritis and hand surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peretz, Anne Sofie Rosenborg; Madsen, Ole Rintek; Brogren, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis results in characteristic deformities of the hand. Medical treatment has undergone a remarkable development. However, not all patients achieve remission or tolerate the treatment. Patients who suffer from deformities and persistent synovitis may be candidates for hand surgery...

  13. Treatment of severe rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, V.

    1986-01-01

    Current practices in treating severe rheumatoid arthritis are reviewed, including remarks on controlled trials of methotrexate, total lymphatic irradiation trials at Stanford and Harvard, and total body irradiation trials. U.K

  14. Fetal Programming in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.D.O. de Steenwinkel (Florentien)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic, inflammatory, autoimmune disease mainly affecting synovial tissues, which can lead to severe morbidity and progressive joint destruction resulting in deformations and disability. Other important outcomes include

  15. Arthritis in America PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-03-07

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the March 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Many adults in the United States have arthritis. Learn how to reduce the pain of arthritis, as well as manage the condition.  Created: 3/7/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 3/7/2017.

  16. Hepatitis C-associated arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskila, D

    2000-07-01

    Rheumatologic complications of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are common and include mixed cryoglobulinemia, vasculitis, sicca symptoms, myalgia, arthritis, and fibromyalgia. The prevalence of cryoglobulinemia in Sweden and Germany is much lower compared with data from southern Europe. Viral, genetic, or environmental factors may be responsible for such a difference in prevalence. There is no single clinical picture of arthritis in patients with HCV infection. There is a well-defined picture of arthritis associated with the presence of mixed cryoglobulinemia that consists of an intermittent mono- or oligoarticular, nondestructive arthritis affecting large and medium-size joints. Involvement of salivary and lacrimal glands is common in HCV-infected subjects, but HCV antigens are not detected in affected glands. HCV-infected subjects express a high prevalence of a variety of autoantibodies, usually in low titers. The clinical significance of most of these autoantibodies is not clear. The prevalence and titer of these autoantibodies are unaffected by interferon-alpha therapy. Several studies have attempted to assess whether HCV infection may be involved in the etiopathogenesis of rheumatic and autoimmune diseases. The results of most of these studies do not support the idea that HCV infection may play a pathogenic role in the development of systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome, or leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Experience treating patients with HCV-associated arthritis is limited and treatment remains controversial. No major therapeutic trials in HCV-associated arthritis were reported in the past 2 years.

  17. Biologic therapy of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damjanov Nemanja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA and juvenile idiopathic/rheumatoid arthritis (JIA are chronic, inflammatory, systemic, auto-immune diseases characterized by chronic arthritis leading to progressive joint erosions. The individual functional and social impact of rheumatoid arthritis is of great importance. Disability and joint damage occur rapidly and early in the course of the disease. The remarkably improved outcomes have been achieved initiating biologic therapy with close monitoring of disease progression. Biologic agents are drugs, usually proteins, which can influence chronic immune dysregulation resulting in chronic arthritis. According to the mechanism of action these drugs include: 1 anti-TNF drugs (etanercept, infiximab, adalimumab; 2 IL-1 blocking drugs (anakinra; 3 IL-6 blocking drugs (tocilizumab; 4 agents blocking selective co-stimulation modulation (abatacept; 5 CD 20 blocking drugs (rituximab. Biologics targeting TNF-alpha with methotrexate have revolutionized the treatment of RA, producing significant improvement in clinical, radiographic, and functional outcomes not seen previously. The new concept of rheumatoid arthritis treatment defines early diagnosis, early aggressive therapy with optimal doses of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs and, if no improvement has been achieved during six months, early introduction of biologic drugs. The three-year experience of biologic therapy in Serbia has shown a positive effect on disease outcome.

  18. Obesity is the main determinant of insulin resistance more than the circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines levels in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Castillo-Hernandez

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Systemic blockade of TNF-α in Rheumatoid arthritis with insulin resistance seems to produce more improvement in insulin sensitivity in normal weight patients with Rheumatoid arthritis than in obese patients with Rheumatoid arthritis, suggesting that systemic-inflammation and obesity are independent risk factors for insulin resistance in Rheumatoid arthritis patients. Objectives: To evaluate the insulin resistance in: normal weight patients with Rheumatoid arthritis, overweight patients with Rheumatoid arthritis, obese Rheumatoid arthritis patients, and matched control subjects with normal weight and obesity; and its association with major cytokines involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Methods: Assessments included: body mass index, insulin resistance by Homeostasis Model Assessment, ELISA method, and enzymatic colorimetric assay. Results: Outstanding results from these studies include: (1 In Rheumatoid arthritis patients, insulin resistance was well correlated with body mass index, but not with levels of serum cytokines. In fact, levels of cytokines were similar in all Rheumatoid arthritis patients, regardless of being obese, overweight or normal weight (2 Insulin resistance was significantly higher in Rheumatoid arthritis with normal weight than in normal weight (3 No significant difference was observed between insulin resistances of Rheumatoid arthritis with obesity and obesity (4 As expected, levels of circulating cytokines were significantly higher in Rheumatoid arthritis patients than in obesity. Conclusions: Obesity appears to be a dominant condition above inflammation to produce IR in RA patients. The dissociation of the inflammation and obesity components to produce IR suggests the need of an independent therapeutic strategy in obese patients with RA.

  19. Obesity is the main determinant of insulin resistance more than the circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines levels in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Hernandez, Jesus; Maldonado-Cervantes, Martha Imelda; Reyes, Juan Pablo; Patiño-Marin, Nuria; Maldonado-Cervantes, Enrique; Solorzano-Rodriguez, Claudia; de la Cruz Mendoza, Esperanza; Alvarado-Sanchez, Brenda

    Systemic blockade of TNF-α in Rheumatoid arthritis with insulin resistance seems to produce more improvement in insulin sensitivity in normal weight patients with Rheumatoid arthritis than in obese patients with Rheumatoid arthritis, suggesting that systemic-inflammation and obesity are independent risk factors for insulin resistance in Rheumatoid arthritis patients. To evaluate the insulin resistance in: normal weight patients with Rheumatoid arthritis, overweight patients with Rheumatoid arthritis, obese Rheumatoid arthritis patients, and matched control subjects with normal weight and obesity; and its association with major cytokines involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Assessments included: body mass index, insulin resistance by Homeostasis Model Assessment, ELISA method, and enzymatic colorimetric assay. Outstanding results from these studies include: (1) In Rheumatoid arthritis patients, insulin resistance was well correlated with body mass index, but not with levels of serum cytokines. In fact, levels of cytokines were similar in all Rheumatoid arthritis patients, regardless of being obese, overweight or normal weight (2) Insulin resistance was significantly higher in Rheumatoid arthritis with normal weight than in normal weight (3) No significant difference was observed between insulin resistances of Rheumatoid arthritis with obesity and obesity (4) As expected, levels of circulating cytokines were significantly higher in Rheumatoid arthritis patients than in obesity. Obesity appears to be a dominant condition above inflammation to produce IR in RA patients. The dissociation of the inflammation and obesity components to produce IR suggests the need of an independent therapeutic strategy in obese patients with RA. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  20. S100-alarmins: potential therapeutic targets for arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austermann, Judith; Zenker, Stefanie; Roth, Johannes

    2017-07-01

    In arthritis, inflammatory processes are triggered by numerous factors that are released from joint tissues, promoting joint destruction and pathological progression. During inflammation, a novel family of pro-inflammatory molecules called alarmins is released, amplifying inflammation and joint damage. Areas covered: With regard to the role of the alarmins S100A8 and S100A9 in the pathogenesis of arthritis, recent advances and the future prospects in terms of therapeutic implications are considered. Expert opinion: There is still an urgent need for novel treatment strategies addressing the local mechanisms of joint inflammation and tissue destruction, offering promising therapeutic alternatives. S100A8 and S100A9, which are the most up-regulated alarmins during arthritis, are endogenous triggers of inflammation, defining these proteins as promising targets for local suppression of arthritis. In murine models, the blockade of S100A8/S100A9 ameliorates inflammatory processes, including arthritis, and there are several lines of evidence that S100-alarmins may already be targeted in therapeutic approaches in man.

  1. Anti-inflammatory effects of polyphenols in arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliviero, Francesca; Scanu, Anna; Zamudio-Cuevas, Yessica; Punzi, Leonardo; Spinella, Paolo

    2018-03-01

    Polyphenols have been extensively investigated with regard to their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulant properties in many inflammatory chronic conditions. The aim of this review is to summarise how these compounds can modulate the inflammatory pathways which characterise the most prevalent arthropathies including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and crystal-induced arthritis. Among polyphenols, epigallocatechin gallate, carnosol, hydroxytyrosol, curcumin, resveratrol, kaempferol and genistein have been the most widely investigated in arthritis. The most important results of the studies outlined in this article show how polyphenolic compounds are able to inhibit the expression and the release of a number of pro-inflammatory mediators and proteolytic enzymes, the activity of different transcriptional factors and the production of reactive oxygen species in vitro. Studies on animal models of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and gout show interesting results in terms of reduced tissue damage, restored cartilage homeostasis, and decreased levels of uric acid, respectively. Despite the multiple protective effects of polyphenols, there are no dietary recommendations for patients affected by rheumatic diseases. Future studies, including intervention trials, should be conducted to determine the relevance of polyphenols consumption or supplementation in arthritis. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Collagen-induced arthritis in C57BL/6 mice is associated with a robust and sustained T-cell response to type II collagen

    OpenAIRE

    Inglis, Julia J; Criado, Gabriel; Medghalchi, Mino; Andrews, Melanie; Sandison, Ann; Feldmann, Marc; Williams, Richard O

    2007-01-01

    Many genetically modified mouse strains are now available on a C57BL/6 (H-2b) background, a strain that is relatively resistant to collagen-induced arthritis. To facilitate the molecular understanding of autoimmune arthritis, we characterised the induction of arthritis in C57BL/6 mice and then validated the disease as a relevant pre-clinical model for rheumatoid arthritis. C57BL/6 mice were immunised with type II collagen using different protocols, and arthritis incidence, severity, and respo...

  3. Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIH Research Matters January 13, 2014 Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery An international research team identified 42 new ... Edition Distracted Driving Raises Crash Risk Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery Oxytocin Affects Facial Recognition Connect with Us ...

  4. Gut Microbes Linked to Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Matters November 25, 2013 Gut Microbes Linked to Rheumatoid Arthritis The presence of a specific type of gut bacteria correlates with rheumatoid arthritis in newly diagnosed, untreated people. The finding suggests ...

  5. Arthritis Mechanisms May Vary by Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Subscribe August 2016 Print this issue Arthritis Mechanisms May Vary by Joint En español Send us ... joints have unique patterns of chemical tags—called epigenetic markers—that differ between rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. ...

  6. Arthritis Pain: Do's and Don'ts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... depression symptoms but also arthritis pain. It's no surprise that arthritis pain has a negative effect on ... Clinic does not endorse any of the third party products and services advertised. Advertising and sponsorship policy ...

  7. Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinic identifies the following risk factors: family history, age, sex, previous join injury, and obesity (Mayo Clinic, 2011). How is arthritis treated? Treatments for arthritis vary; exercising, medication, natural remedies, nutrition, ...

  8. The therapeutic potential of plant flavonoids on rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Samuel D; Ketheesan, Natkunam; Haleagrahara, Nagaraja

    2017-11-22

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune condition that mainly affects peripheral joints. Although immunosuppressive drugs and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used to treat this condition, these drugs have severe side effects. Flavonoids are the most abundant phenolic compounds which exhibit anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. Many bioactive flavonoids have powerful anti-inflammatory effects. However, a very few have reached clinical use. Dietary flavonoids have been reported to control joint inflammation and alleviate arthritis symptoms in both human RA and animal models of arthritis. There is little scientific evidence about their mechanism of actions in RA. We review the therapeutic effects of different groups of flavonoids belonging to the most common and abundant groups on RA. In particular, the probable mechanisms of major flavonoids on cells and chemical messengers involved in the inflammatory signaling components of RA are discussed in detail.

  9. Haemodynamics in acute arthritis of the knee in puppies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bünger, C; Hjermind, J; Harving, S

    1984-01-01

    In order to study the haemodynamic changes of the juvenile knee in acute arthritis, an experimental model was developed in puppies by unilateral intra-articular injections of Carragheenin solution into the knee. Tissue blood flow was studied by the tracer microsphere technique in eight dogs...... and simultaneous intra-articular and intraosseous pressure recordings were performed in seven other dogs. The intra-articular pressure was elevated in all arthritic knees. Hyperaemia was found in the knee-joint capsule and distal femoral metaphysis, whereas juxta-articular epiphyseal blood flow rates were...... not significantly changed. A decrease of femoral muscle blood flow was encountered. Intraosseous pressure recordings during venous tamponade of the knee-joint capsules suggested a qualitative change of bone vasculature in acute arthritis. The juxta-articular bone blood flow in arthritis appears to be influenced...

  10. Heterogeneous stock mice are susceptible to encephalomyelitis and antibody-initiated arthritis but not to collagen- and G6PI-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaczkowska, D; Raposo, B; Nandakumar, K S

    2011-01-01

    The strategy of using heterogeneous stock (HS) mice has proven to be successful in fine mapping of quantitative trait loci in complex diseases. However, whether these mice can be used for arthritis, encephalomyelitis and autoimmune phenotypes has not been addressed. Here, we screened the Northport HS mice for arthritis phenotypes using three different models: collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), using rat, bovine or chicken collagen type II (CII); recombinant human glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (G6PI)-induced arthritis; and collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA). Irrespective of the origin of collagen, we found HS mice to be fairly resistant to CIA and G6PI-induced arthritis, despite the development of antibodies against the respective antigens. On the other hand, HS mice were found to be susceptible for CAIA. Similarly, these mice developed encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced either with mouse or rat spinal cord homogenate (SCH), or with recombinant rat myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein, with elevated antibody levels against CNS proteins. Accordingly, we conclude that the use of HS mice for fine mapping and positional cloning of gene(s) involved in CAIA and EAE is possible, but not for collagen- and G6PI-induced arthritis. © 2011 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Repeated administration of mazindol reduces spontaneous pain-related behaviors without modifying bone density and microarchitecture in a mouse model of complete Freund’s adjuvant-induced knee arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo-González, LE; Martínez-Martínez, A; Vargas-Muñoz, VM; Acosta-González, RI; Plancarte-Sánchez, R; Anaya-Reyes, M; Fernández del Valle-Laisequilla, C; Reyes-García, JG; Jiménez-Andrade, JM

    2017-01-01

    Background The role of dopaminergic system in the development of rheumatoid arthritis-related pain, a major symptom in this disease, has not been explored. Therefore, the anti-nociceptive effect of mazindol, a dopamine uptake inhibitor, was evaluated in a model of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritis. Furthermore, as studies have shown that the dopaminergic system regulates bone metabolism, the effect of mazindol on bone mass and microarchitecture was determined. Methods Adult ICR male mice received intra-articular injections of either CFA or saline into the right knee joint every week. Spontaneous pain-like behaviors (flinching and guarding) and locomotor activity were assessed at day 26 post-first CFA, following which, a single intraperitoneally (i.p.) administered dose of mazindol was given (1, 3 and 10 mg/kg). Then, the antinociceptive effect of a repeated administration of 3 mg/kg mazindol (daily, i.p.; day 15–day 26) was evaluated. Additionally, at day 26, the participation of D1-like, D2-like or opioid receptors in the antinociceptive effect of mazindol was evaluated. The effect of mazindol on bone density and microarchitecture was evaluated by micro-computed tomography. Results Acute administration of mazindol decreased the spontaneous pain-like behaviors in a dose-dependent manner without reducing the knee edema. However, mazindol at 10 mg/kg significantly increased the locomotor activity; therefore, 3 mg/kg mazindol was used for further studies. Repeated administration of 3 mg/kg mazindol significantly decreased the pain-like behaviors without modifying locomotor activity. The antinociceptive effect of mazindol was blocked by administration of a D2-like receptor antagonist (haloperidol), but not by administration of D1-like receptor antagonist (SCH 23390) or an opioid receptor antagonist (naloxone). Repeated administration of mazindol did not significantly modify the density and microarchitecture of periarticular bone of the arthritic

  12. MRI-assessed therapeutic effects of locally administered PLGA nanoparticles loaded with anti-inflammatory siRNA in a murine arthritis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Te Boekhorst, Bernard C M; Jensen, Linda B; Colombo, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by systemic inflammation of synovial joints leading to erosion and cartilage destruction. Although efficacious anti-tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-a) biologic therapies exist, there is an unmet medical need for safe and more efficient treatment regimens...... for disease remission. We evaluated the anti-inflammatory effects of poly(dl-lactide-co-glycolide acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles loaded with small interfering RNA (siRNA) directed against TNF-a in vitro and in vivo. The siRNA-loaded PLGA nanoparticles mediated a dose-dependent TNF-a silencing...... with nanoparticles loaded with TNF-a siRNA (1µg) resulted in a reduction in disease activity, evident by a significant decrease of the paw scores and joint effusions, as compared to treatment with PLGA nanoparticles loaded with non-specific control siRNA, whereas the degree of bone marrow edema in the tibial...

  13. Immunomodulation in human and experimental arthritis: including vitamin D, helminths and heat-shock proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, L L W; Shoenfeld, Y; Sartori, A

    2014-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that is mainly directed to the joints, affecting the synovial membrane, the cartilage and also the bone. This disease affects 1% to 2% of the world population and is associated with significant morbidity and increased mortality. RA experimental models have allowed a great deal of information to be translated to the corresponding human disease. This review summarizes some of the most relevant findings targeting immunomodulation in arthritis. Some general guidelines to choose an adequate experimental model and also our experience with arthritis are supplied.

  14. Exercise therapy in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takken, T.; van Brussel, M.; Engelbert, R. H. H.; van der Net, J.; Kuis, W.; Helders, P. J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Exercise therapy is considered an important component of the treatment of arthritis. The efficacy of exercise therapy has been reviewed in adults with rheumatoid arthritis but not in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). To assess the effects of exercise therapy on functional ability,

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis: "You Are Not Alone."

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis: "You Are Not Alone." Past Issues / Summer 2014 ... Contents Members of the America 2 Anywhere 4 Arthritis (A2A4A) running group after finishing a marathon. Through ...

  16. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for human...

  17. Native joinPropionibacteriumseptic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Thomas; Coe, Marcus; Mata-Fink, Ana; Zuckerman, Richard

    2017-10-02

    Propionibacterium species are associated with normal skin flora and cultures may be dismissed as contaminants. They are increasingly recognized as a cause of septic arthritis following shoulder arthroplasty and arthrotomy. We identified three cases of Propionibacterium septic arthritis in native joints mimicking atypical osteoarthritis and review the literature, clinical course, and treatment of 18 cases. Two cases of Propionibacterium acne in native knee joints and one in a sternoclavicular joint are described. A literature search for Propionibacterium septic arthritis was performed. Clinical course, treatment, and outcome are reviewed for all cases. Our three cases were combined with 15 cases from the literature. Fourteen cases showed few signs of acute infection, slow culture growth, and delayed diagnosis. In 3 cases an early culture was dismissed as a contaminant. Six cases were reported as caused by recent arthrocentesis. Fifteen cases were cured with antibiotics, although 5 of these 15 also required surgical intervention. Two patients were diagnosed while undergoing surgery for osteoarthritis. Four patients required arthroplasty and two of our patients will require arthroplasty for good functional results. Propionibacterium as a cause of septic arthritis in native joints demonstrates few signs of acute infection, presents with prolonged course, and is often misdiagnosed or unsuspected. Anaerobic growth may be delayed or missed altogether, and outcomes are consequently poor. Consider Propionibacterium septic arthritis in atypical osteoarthritis prior to arthroplasty.

  18. Towards adoptive cellular therapy of chronic autoimmune arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flierman, Roelof

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a relatively common disease that is characterized by chronic inflammation of joints. The research as described in this thesis focused on the question of whether adoptive cellular therapy is effective in a mouse model of RA. The most generally known type of adoptive

  19. The Impact of Arthritis on Life Satisfaction of Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burckhardt, Carol S.

    Poor health has been implicated as a suppressor of the life satisfaction of older adults. To clarify the contribution of arthritis to this process, functional disability, negative affect, pain, current severity of the disease, self-esteem, perception of general health, and internal health locus of control, were placed within a causal model as…

  20. Perceived injustice in fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Robert; Russell, Anthony Science

    2014-01-01

    This is a pilot study to compare levels of perceived injustice via the Injustice Experience Questionnaire in patients with fibromyalgia or rheumatoid arthritis. Two cohorts of patients, one with fibromyalgia (FM), one with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), completed the Injustice Experience Questionnaire, a visual analogue pain scale, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Inferential statistics were then used to determine whether participants in the two diagnostic groups had significantly different scores on the Perceived Injustice Questionnaire. This was done univariately using t tests and after adjusting for potential confounders using ANCOVA. We also examined crude associations between the variables using Pearson correlation coefficients, then examined the adjusted association between diagnostic group and perceived injustice using multivariable linear regression. Our final models were built in a blocked fashion by initially entering diagnostic category into the model, then entering other variables simultaneously using a stepwise strategy (p-to-enter ≤.05, p-to-remove ≥.10). A total of 126 participants (64 FM, 62 RA) completed all questionnaires. The FM group had a greater percentage of female participants, more severe pain, more severe anxiety and more severe depression. In unadjusted analysis, the FM group had higher Injustice Experience Questionnaire scores. When the RA and FM group scores for the Injustice Experience Questionnaire are adjusted for pain levels, there is no statistically significant difference between groups. Adjustment for HADS anxiety and HADS depression does not significantly affect the Injustice Experience Questionnaire scores after adjustment for pain. Fibromyalgia is associated with a higher level of perceived injustice than is seen with rheumatoid arthritis. This difference appears to be associated with higher levels of pain reported by fibromyalgia patients, and therefore may not be specific to the diagnosis. Prospective

  1. Genetics of rheumatoid arthritis - a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkó, Júlia; Besenyei, Timea; Laki, Judit; Glant, Tibor T; Mikecz, Katalin; Szekanecz, Zoltán

    2013-10-01

    The "Bermuda triangle" of genetics, environment and autoimmunity is involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Various aspects of genetic contribution to the etiology, pathogenesis and outcome of RA are discussed in this review. The heritability of RA has been estimated to be about 60 %, while the contribution of HLA to heritability has been estimated to be 11-37 %. Apart from known shared epitope (SE) alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*01 and DRB1*04, other HLA alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*13 and DRB1*15 have been linked to RA susceptibility. A novel SE classification divides SE alleles into S1, S2, S3P and S3D groups, where primarily S2 and S3P groups have been associated with predisposition to seropositive RA. The most relevant non-HLA gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with RA include PTPN22, IL23R, TRAF1, CTLA4, IRF5, STAT4, CCR6, PADI4. Large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 30 loci involved in RA pathogenesis. HLA and some non-HLA genes may differentiate between anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) seropositive and seronegative RA. Genetic susceptibility has also been associated with environmental factors, primarily smoking. Some GWAS studies carried out in rodent models of arthritis have confirmed the role of human genes. For example, in the collagen-induced (CIA) and proteoglycan-induced arthritis (PgIA) models, two important loci - Pgia26/Cia5 and Pgia2/Cia2/Cia3, corresponding the human PTPN22/CD2 and TRAF1/C5 loci, respectively - have been identified. Finally, pharmacogenomics identified SNPs or multiple genetic signatures that may be associated with responses to traditional disease-modifying drugs and biologics.

  2. Temporomandibular Joint Septic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Frojo, MD

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Infection of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ is a rare pediatric condition resulting from the introduction of pathogens into the joint by hematogenous seeding, local extension, or trauma. Early recognition of the typical signs and symptoms including fever, trismus, preauricular swelling, and TMJ region tenderness are critical in order to initiate further evaluation and prevent feared complications of fibrosis, ankylosis, abnormal facial structure, or persistence of symptoms. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography with ancillary laboratory analysis including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and white blood cell count are beneficial in confirming the suspected diagnosis and monitoring response to therapy. Initial intervention should include empiric parenteral antibiotics, early mandibular mobilization, and joint decompression to provide synovial fluid for analysis including cultures. This report describes a case of TMJ bacterial arthritis in a healthy 6-year-old male who was promptly treated nonsurgically with intravenous antibiotics and localized needle joint decompression with return to normal function after completion of oral antibiotics and physical therapy.

  3. Septic Arthritis of Native Joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, John J

    2017-06-01

    Septic arthritis is a rheumatologic emergency that may lead to disability or death. Prompt evacuation of the joint, either by arthrocentesis at the bedside, open or arthroscopic drainage in the operating room, or imaging-guided drainage in the radiology suite, is mandatory. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become a major cause of septic arthritis in the United States. MRSA joint infection seems to be associated with worse outcomes. Antibiotic courses of 3 to 4 weeks in duration are usually adequate for uncomplicated bacterial arthritis. Treatment duration should be extended to 6 weeks if there is imaging evidence of accompanying osteomyelitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Correlates of rheumatoid arthritis among women in Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Kollcaku

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Our aim was to assess the association of rheumatoid arthritis with socio-demographic characteristics and lifestyle factors among women in transitional Albania.      Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in 2012-2013 including a sample of 2198 women aged 30 years and above who attended the Rheumatology services at primary health care clinics in Tirana municipality (mean age: 60.2±9.7 years; overall response rate: 95%. The diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis was based on the American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism (ACR/EULAR 2010 criteria. In addition, a structured questionnaire was administered to all study participants including information on demographic and socioeconomic characteristics and behavioral factors. Binary logistic regression was used to assess the association of rheumatoid arthritis with covariates. Results: Overall, 437 (19.9% women were diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (both incident and prevalent cases. In multivariable-adjusted models, rheumatoid arthritis was positively and significantly related to older age (OR=1.8, 95%CI=1.3-2.6, a lower educational attainment (OR=1.4, 95%CI=1.1-1.9, smoking (OR=1.5, 95%CI=1.1-2.0, alcohol intake (OR=1.9, 95%CI=1.2-3.1 and overweight and obesity (OR=1.5, 95%CI=1.2-2.0 and OR=1.6, 95%CI=1.2-2.0, respectively.    Conclusion: This study provides useful evidence about selected correlates of rheumatoid arthritis among women attending specialized primary health care services in Albania. Health professionals and policymakers in Albania should be aware of the magnitude and consequences of this chronic condition in the adult population.

  5. Dietetic recommendations in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Rosa Alhambra-Expósito

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic autoimmune disease that has a significant effect on patients’ physical, emotional, and social functioning. For decades, patients have used different diets to try to improve the symptoms of RA. The possible benefits of dietary therapy for rheumatoid arthritis are reviewed in this article. Nutritional objectives for RA, are to halt the loss of bone mass, promote healing of bone fractures and improving bone-associated inflammatory disorders and joints. In general, diets low in saturated fat, rich in polyunsaturated fats: omega 3 and omega 6, rich in complex carbohydrates and fiber are recommended.

  6. Insufficiency fractures in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, L.; Ausejo de Pomar, E.; Cruzalegui, L.; Cano, R.; Morales, R.; Ara, P.

    1992-01-01

    The occurrence of insufficiency fractures in patients with long-standing rheumatoid arthritis has not been sufficiently emphasized. Osteoporosis due to rheumatoid arthritis, corticosteroid therapy, contracture and angular deformity of the extremity, combine to predispose to the occurrence of the insufficiency fractures in these patients. Additionally, the pain and disability caused by the fracture is often attributed to rheumatoid joint involvement, masking the diagnosis of insufficiency fracture. The fracture may not be visible on radiographs near the onset of symptoms and the bone scanning can help in making an early diagnosis. (Author). 18 refs., 2 fig

  7. Identifying flares in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bykerk, Vivian P; Bingham, Clifton O; Choy, Ernest H

    2016-01-01

    to flare, with escalation planned in 61%. CONCLUSIONS: Flares are common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and are often preceded by treatment reductions. Patient/MD/DAS agreement of flare status is highest in patients worsening from R/LDA. OMERACT RA flare questions can discriminate between patients with...... Set. METHODS: Candidate flare questions and legacy measures were administered at consecutive visits to Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort (CATCH) patients between November 2011 and November 2014. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) core set indicators were recorded. Concordance to identify flares...

  8. Radiological features of experimental staphylococcal septic arthritis by micro computed tomography scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Farah; Fei, Ying; Ali, Abukar; Mohammad, Majd; Erlandsson, Malin C; Bokarewa, Maria I; Nawaz, Muhammad; Valadi, Hadi; Na, Manli; Jin, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Permanent joint dysfunction due to bone destruction occurs in up to 50% of patients with septic arthritis. Recently, imaging technologies such as micro computed tomography (μCT) scan have been widely used for preclinical models of autoimmune joint disorders. However, the radiological features of septic arthritis in mice are still largely unknown. NMRI mice were intravenously or intra-articularly inoculated with S. aureus Newman or LS-1 strain. The radiological and clinical signs of septic arthritis were followed for 10 days using μCT. We assessed the correlations between joint radiological changes and clinical signs, histological changes, and serum levels of cytokines. On days 5-7 after intravenous infection, bone destruction verified by μCT became evident in most of the infected joints. Radiological signs of bone destruction were dependent on the bacterial dose. The site most commonly affected by septic arthritis was the distal femur in knees. The bone destruction detected by μCT was positively correlated with histological changes in both local and hematogenous septic arthritis. The serum levels of IL-6 were significantly correlated with the severity of joint destruction. μCT is a sensitive method for monitoring disease progression and determining the severity of bone destruction in a mouse model of septic arthritis. IL-6 may be used as a biomarker for bone destruction in septic arthritis.

  9. The effect of X-rays on the experimental arthritis in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trott, K.R.; Parker, R.; Seed, M.P.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the therapeutic efficacy of low doses of X-rays on different in-vivo models of monoarticular arthritis which have been developed for the investigation of anti-inflammatory drugs. Zymosan or heat-inactivated mycobacterium tuberculosis was injected into 1 knee joint of Wistar rats to produce, via different pathogenetic mechanisms, an acute monoarticular arthritis. Five days later, the amount of joint swelling, bone destruction and cartilage catabolism were measured. Immediately after arthritis induction, the knees were irradiated with a single dose of 5 Gy or with 4 daily fractions of 1 Gy. X-irradiation with daily doses of 1 Gy significantly reduced bone loss and cartilage degradation in Zymosan-induced arthritis and joint swelling in mycobacterium tuberculosis induced arthritis. However, a single high radiation dose significantly increased bone loss in mycobacterium tuberculosis induced arthritis. These data confirm the hypothesis of an anti-inflammatory effect of low radiation doses which so far has been based only on clinical experience. By using an established model of monoarticular arthritis we have now the opportunity to study the mechanism of the anti-inflammatory radiation effect in comparison to that of anti-inflammatory drugs. This way, we hope to provide a scientific basis for the use of radiotherapy in various painful degenerative joint disorders. (orig.) [de

  10. Role of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF) beta in the physiopathology of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo-Gil, Elena; Galindo-Izquierdo, María

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a cytokine with pleiotropic functions in hematopoiesis, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. Although its role in rheumatoid arthritis is not well defined, TGF-β activation leads to functional immunomodulatory effects according to environmental conditions. The function of TGF-β in the development of arthritis in murine models has been extensively studied with controversial results. Recent findings point to a non-relevant role for TGF-β in a mice model of collagen-induced arthritis. The study of TGF-β on T-cell responses has shown controversial results as an inhibitor or promoter of the inflammatory response. This paper presents a review of the role of TGF-β in animal models of arthritis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Exploring the Public Health Impact of an Intensive Exercise Program for Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Dissemination and Implementation Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Der Giesen, F.J. van der; Lankveld, W. van; Hopman-Rock, M.; Jong, Z. de; Munneke, M.; Hazes, J.M.W.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Peeters, A.J.; Ronday, H.K.; Vliet Vlieland, T.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the implementation of an intensive group exercise program in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. In 4 regions in The Netherlands, the Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients In Training exercise program was implemented on a limited scale. Evaluation using the RE-AIM model

  12. Evidence-based Diagnostics: Adult Septic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Christopher R.; Schuur, Jeremiah D.; Everett, Worth W.; Pines, Jesse M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Acutely swollen or painful joints are common complaints in the emergency department (ED). Septic arthritis in adults is a challenging diagnosis, but prompt differentiation of a bacterial etiology is crucial to minimize morbidity and mortality. Objectives The objective was to perform a systematic review describing the diagnostic characteristics of history, physical examination, and bedside laboratory tests for nongonococcal septic arthritis. A secondary objective was to quantify test and treatment thresholds using derived estimates of sensitivity and specificity, as well as best-evidence diagnostic and treatment risks and anticipated benefits from appropriate therapy. Methods Two electronic search engines (PUBMED and EMBASE) were used in conjunction with a selected bibliography and scientific abstract hand search. Inclusion criteria included adult trials of patients presenting with monoarticular complaints if they reported sufficient detail to reconstruct partial or complete 2 × 2 contingency tables for experimental diagnostic test characteristics using an acceptable criterion standard. Evidence was rated by two investigators using the Quality Assessment Tool for Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS). When more than one similarly designed trial existed for a diagnostic test, meta-analysis was conducted using a random effects model. Interval likelihood ratios (LRs) were computed when possible. To illustrate one method to quantify theoretical points in the probability of disease whereby clinicians might cease testing altogether and either withhold treatment (test threshold) or initiate definitive therapy in lieu of further diagnostics (treatment threshold), an interactive spreadsheet was designed and sample calculations were provided based on research estimates of diagnostic accuracy, diagnostic risk, and therapeutic risk/benefits. Results The prevalence of nongonococcal septic arthritis in ED patients with a single acutely painful joint is approximately 27

  13. Preparation and evaluation of functional foods in adjuvant arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Okbi, S. Y.; Mohamed, D. A.

    2012-07-01

    Adjuvant arthritis is an animal model that closely resembles rheumatoid arthritis in humans. It is a successful working model used to study new anti-inflammatory agents. In previous studies (animal and clinical) we have shown that evening primrose oil, fish oil and the methanol extract of date fruits and fenugreek seeds have anti-inflammatory activity and that the methanol extract of dates has an antioxidant effect. Based on these studies, the aim of the present study was to prepare 7 functional foods containing such bioactive fractions separately or in combination and to evaluate them in adjuvant arthritis in rats, study the stability of bioactive ingredients and evaluate their sensory properties. The studied biochemical parameters were erythrocyte sedimentation rate, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and plasma copper, zinc and interlukin 2. Nutritional parameters, including body weight gain, food intake and food efficiency ratio were monitored during the feeding of the functional foods. The bioactive ingredients assessed were total phenolic contents and fatty acids. The results showed improvement in the biochemical parameters, body weight gain and food efficiency ratio of arthritic rats fed on the functional foods with different degrees. All the prepared functional foods were sensory accepted. The active ingredients showed stability during storage. In conclusion, all the tested functional foods showed promising antiinflammatory activity and were determined to be acceptable through sensory evaluation which means that their potential beneficial use as dietary supplements in rheumatoid arthritis patients may be recommended. (Author) 42 refs.

  14. In Vitro TNF-α Inhibitory Activity of Brazilian Plants and Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Stryphnodendron adstringens in an Acute Arthritis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara O. Henriques

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stryphnodendron species, popularly named “barbatimão,” are traditionally used in Brazil as anti-inflammatory agents. This study aimed to investigate the effect of barbatimão and 11 other species on the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- stimulated THP-1 cells, as well as their anti-arthritis activity. The extracts of Stryphnodendron adstringens, Stryphnodendron obovatum, Campomanesia lineatifolia, and Terminalia glabrescens promoted a concentration-dependent inhibition of TNF-α. Mice injected with LPS in the knee joint were treated per os with fractions from the selected extracts. Both the organic (SAO and the aqueous (SAA fractions of S. adstringens promoted a dose-dependent reduction of leukocyte migration and neutrophil accumulation into the joint, but none of them reduced CXCL1 concentration in the periarticular tissue. In contrast, treatment with C. lineatifolia and T. glabrescens fractions did not ameliorate the inflammatory parameters. Analyses of SAO by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS led to the identification of gallic acid along with 11 prodelphinidins, characterized as monomers and dimers of the B-type. Our findings contribute to some extent to corroborating the traditional use of S. adstringens as an anti-inflammatory agent. This activity is probably related to a decrease of leukocyte migration into the inflammatory site. Polyphenols like gallic acid and prodelphinidins, identified in the active fraction, may contribute to the observed activity.

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of five videos was designed to help you learn more about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of RA is made, what ... and what other conditions are associated with RA. Learning more about your condition will allow you to ...

  16. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolen, Josef S; Breedveld, Ferdinand C; Burmester, Gerd R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reaching the therapeutic target of remission or low-disease activity has improved outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) significantly. The treat-to-target recommendations, formulated in 2010, have provided a basis for implementation of a strategic approach towards this t...

  17. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel; Bijlsma, Johannes W J

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aiming at therapeutic targets has reduced the risk of organ failure in many diseases such as diabetes or hypertension. Such targets have not been defined for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). OBJECTIVE: /st> To develop recommendations for achieving optimal therapeutic outcomes in RA. METHODS...

  18. COMORBIDITY IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Panafidina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The peak onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA is at 30-55 years of age. At this age, the patients have also other concomi- tant diseases (comorbidities that affect the course and prognosis of RA, the choice of its treatment policy, quality of life of the patients. Objective: to identify the most important and common comorbidities in patients with RA. Subjects and methods. Two hundred patients (median age 55 [46; 61] years were enrolled; there was a preponderance of women (82.5% with median disease duration 5 [1; 10] years, seropositive for IgM rheumatoid factor (83.0% and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (81.6% with moderate and high disease activity (median DAS28 value 3.9 [3.1; 4.9]. Varying degrees of destructive changes in hand and foot joints were radiologically detected in 71.2% of the patients; 64.5% of the patients had Functional Class II. Methotrexate was given to 69.5% of the patients; therapy with biological agents was used in 21.0% of the cases. 15.5% of the patients did not receive DMARD or biologics. 43.0% of the patients with RA received glucocorticoids. Results. Comorbidities were present in 72.0% of the patients with RA. The most common diseases were hypertension (60.0%, dyslipidemia (45.0%, fractures at various sites (29.5%, and coronary heart disease (21.0%. Myocardial infarction and stroke were observed in 1.5 and 1.0% of cases, respectively. There was diabetes mellitus (DM in 7.5% of the cases and osteoporosis in 15.5% of the patients. 81.7% of the patients with RA and hypertension and 80.0% of those with RA and DM received antihypertensive and sugar-lowering therapy, respectively. At the same time the RA patients with dyslipidemia and osteoporosis received specific drugs far less frequently (30.0 and 29.0%, respectively. Conclusion. Comorbidities are frequently encountered in RA. By taking into account the fact that cardiovascular dis- eases are a main cause of death in RA; it is necessary to adequately and timely

  19. CD44 antibodies and immune thrombocytopenia in the amelioration of murine inflammatory arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J Mott

    Full Text Available Antibodies to CD44 have been used to successfully ameliorate murine models of autoimmune disease. The most often studied disease model has been murine inflammatory arthritis, where a clear mechanism for the efficacy of CD44 antibodies has not been established. We have recently shown in a murine passive-model of the autoimmune disease immune thrombocytopenia (ITP that some CD44 antibodies themselves can induce thrombocytopenia in mice, and the CD44 antibody causing the most severe thrombocytopenia (IM7, also is known to be highly effective in ameliorating murine models of arthritis. Recent work in the K/BxN serum-induced model of arthritis demonstrated that antibody-induced thrombocytopenia reduced arthritis, causing us to question whether CD44 antibodies might primarily ameliorate arthritis through their thrombocytopenic effect. We evaluated IM7, IRAWB14.4, 5035-41.1D, KM201, KM114, and KM81, and found that while all could induce thrombocytopenia, the degree of protection against serum-induced arthritis was not closely related to the length or severity of the thrombocytopenia. CD44 antibody treatment was also able to reverse established inflammation, while thrombocytopenia induced by an anti-platelet antibody targeting the GPIIbIIIa platelet antigen, could not mediate this effect. While CD44 antibody-induced thrombocytopenia may contribute to some of its therapeutic effect against the initiation of arthritis, for established disease there are likely other mechanisms contributing to its efficacy. Humans are not known to express CD44 on platelets, and are therefore unlikely to develop thrombocytopenia after CD44 antibody treatment. An understanding of the relationship between arthritis, thrombocytopenia, and CD44 antibody treatment remains critical for continued development of CD44 antibody therapeutics.

  20. Arthritis and cognitive impairment in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Nancy A; Barbour, Kamil E; Helmick, Charles G; Zack, Matthew; Al Snih, Soham

    2017-06-01

    Adults aged 65 or older with arthritis may be at increased risk for cognitive impairment [cognitive impairment but not dementia (CIND) or dementia]. Studies have found associations between arthritis and cognition impairments; however, none have examined whether persons with arthritis develop cognitive impairments at higher rates than those without arthritis. Using data from the Health and Retirement Study, we estimated the prevalence of cognitive impairments in older adults with and without arthritis, and examined associations between arthritis status and cognitive impairments. We calculated incidence density ratios (IDRs) using generalized estimating equations to estimate associations between arthritis and cognitive impairments adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, marital status, education, income, depression, obesity, smoking, the number of chronic conditions, physical activity, and birth cohort. The prevalence of CIND and dementia did not significantly differ between those with and without arthritis (CIND: 20.8%, 95% CI 19.7-21.9 vs. 18.3%, 95% CI 16.8-19.8; dementia: 5.2% 95% CI 4.6-5.8 vs. 5.1% 95% CI 4.3-5.9). After covariate control, older adults with arthritis did not differ significantly from those without arthritis for either cognitive outcome (CIND IDR: 1.6, 95% CI = 0.9-2.9; dementia IDR: 1.1, 95% CI = 0.4-3.3) and developed cognitive impairments at a similar rate to those without arthritis. Older adults with arthritis were not significantly more at risk to develop cognitive impairments and developed cognitive impairments at a similar rate as older adults without arthritis over 6 years.

  1. Effects of Oral Administration of Type II Collagen on Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentham, David E.; Dynesius-Trentham, Roselynn A.; Orav, E. John; Combitchi, Daniel; Lorenzo, Carlos; Sewell, Kathryn Lea; Hafler, David A.; Weiner, Howard L.

    1993-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory synovial disease thought to involve T cells reacting to an antigen within the joint. Type II collagen is the major protein in articular cartilage and is a potential autoantigen in this disease. Oral tolerization to autoantigens suppresses animal models of T cell-mediated autoimmune disease, including two models of rheumatoid arthritis. In this randomized, double-blind trial involving 60 patients with severe, active rheumatoid arthritis, a decrease in the number of swollen joints and tender joints occurred in subjects fed chicken type II collagen for 3 months but not in those that received a placebo. Four patients in the collagen group had complete remission of the disease. No side effects were evident. These data demonstrate clinical efficacy of an oral tolerization approach for rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. Collagen-induced arthritis in C57BL/6 mice is associated with a robust and sustained T-cell response to type II collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Julia J; Criado, Gabriel; Medghalchi, Mino; Andrews, Melanie; Sandison, Ann; Feldmann, Marc; Williams, Richard O

    2007-01-01

    Many genetically modified mouse strains are now available on a C57BL/6 (H-2b) background, a strain that is relatively resistant to collagen-induced arthritis. To facilitate the molecular understanding of autoimmune arthritis, we characterised the induction of arthritis in C57BL/6 mice and then validated the disease as a relevant pre-clinical model for rheumatoid arthritis. C57BL/6 mice were immunised with type II collagen using different protocols, and arthritis incidence, severity, and response to commonly used anti-arthritic drugs were assessed and compared with DBA/1 mice. We confirmed that C57BL/6 mice are susceptible to arthritis induced by immunisation with chicken type II collagen and develop strong and sustained T-cell responses to type II collagen. Arthritis was milder in C57BL/6 mice than DBA/1 mice and more closely resembled rheumatoid arthritis in its response to therapeutic intervention. Our findings show that C57BL/6 mice are susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis, providing a valuable model for assessing the role of specific genes involved in the induction and/or maintenance of arthritis and for evaluating the efficacy of novel drugs, particularly those targeted at T cells.

  3. [Identification of Zaocys type II collagen and its effect on arthritis in mice with collagen-induced arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Feng, Zhi-tao; Zhu, Jun-qing; Wu, Xiang-hui; Li, Juan

    2014-06-01

    To analyze the homology of Zaocys type 1I collagen ( ZC II ) with the C II collagen from other species, and to investigate the effect of ZC II on arthritis in mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). ZC II was purified with restriction pepsin digestion. Then SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis and UV spectrophotometry were used to identify the protein,the homology of the ZC II peptide was analyzed with Mass Spectrometry. The model of CIA mice were induced by subcutaneous injection of Chicken C II into male C57BL/6 mice from the base of the tails. After immunization,ZC II [H,M,L:40,20 and 10 μg/(kgd) ]was administered orally to mice from day 21 to 28 accordingly. The severity of the arthritis in each limb was evaluated using a macroscopic scoring system, and his- topathological change of joint was observed by light microscope with HE staining. The molecular weight of ZC II protein deter- mined by SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis was between 110 kD and 140 kD, and UV absorption peak appeared at around 230 nm in wave- length. The peptide mass fingerprinting(PMF) of the purified protein by Mass Spectrometry analysis showed that it had at least 4 peptides matched with other species,and the protein score was greater than 95%. Compared with normal group,the CIA model group had significantly higher scores for arthritis and histopathological changes (P II peptide-treated mice with CIA were significantly lower than the mice from CIA model group(P II has high homology with the C II from other species. Oral administration of ZC II can suppress arthritis in mice with CIA and ameliorate the histopathological changes of the joint.

  4. Predicting the Presence of Adjacent Infections in Septic Arthritis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Scott; Bernstein, Derek T; Daram, Shiva; Dawson, John; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The gold standard for treatment of septic arthritis is urgent surgical debridement. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may identify osteomyelitis, subperiosteal abscesses, and intramuscular abscesses, which frequently occur with septic arthritis. If these adjacent infections are not recognized, initial treatment may be inadequate. The purpose of this study is to develop a prediction algorithm to distinguish septic arthritis with adjacent infections from isolated septic arthritis to determine which patients should undergo preoperative MRI. An IRB-approved retrospective review of 87 children treated for septic arthritis was performed. All patients underwent MRI. Sixteen variables (age, sex, temperature, WBC, CRP, ESR, ANC, hematocrit, platelet count, heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, symptom duration, weight-bearing status, prior antibiotic therapy, and prior hospitalization) from admission were reviewed. Graphical and logistical regression analysis was used to determine variables independently predictive of adjacent infection. Optimal cutoff values were determined for each variable and a prediction algorithm was created. Finally, the model was applied to our patient database and each patient with isolated septic arthritis or adjacent infection was stratified based upon the number of positive predictive factors. A total of 36 (41%) patients had isolated septic arthritis and 51 (59%) had septic arthritis with adjacent foci. Five variables (age above 3.6 y, CRP>13.8 mg/L, duration of symptoms >3 d, platelets 8.6×10 cells/μL) were found to be predictive of adjacent infection and were included in the algorithm. Patients with ≥3 risk factors were classified as high risk for septic arthritis with adjacent infection (sensitivity: 90%, specificity: 67%, positive predictive value: 80%, negative predictive value: 83%). Age, CRP, duration of symptoms, platelet count, and ANC were predictive of adjacent infections. Patients who met

  5. Systematic protocol for assessment of the validity of BOLD MRI in a rabbit model of inflammatory arthritis at 1.5 tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Michael W.; Nathanael, George; Kis, Antonella; Amirabadi, Afsaneh; Zhong, Anguo; Rayner, Tammy; Weiss, Ruth; Detzler, Garry; Gahunia, Harpal [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Jong, Roland [Mount Sinai Hospital, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Toronto (Canada); Moineddin, Rahim [Family and Community Medicine, Department of Public Health, Toronto (Canada); Crawley, Adrian [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Toronto Western Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Doria, Andrea S. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    Blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) MRI has the potential to identify regions of early hypoxic and vascular joint changes in inflammatory arthritis. There is no standard protocol for analysis of BOLD MRI measurements in musculoskeletal disorders. To optimize the following BOLD MRI reading parameters: (1) statistical threshold values (low, r > 0.01 versus high, r > 0.2); (2) summary measures of BOLD contrast (percentage of activated voxels [PT%] versus percentage signal difference between on-and-off signal intensities [diff{sub o}n{sub o}ff]); and (3) direction of BOLD response (positive, negative and positive + negative). Using BOLD MRI protocols at 1.5 T, arthritic (n = 21) and contralateral (n = 21) knees of 21 juvenile rabbits were imaged at baseline and on days 1, 14 and 28 after a unilateral intra-articular injection of carrageenan. Nine non-injected rabbits served as external control knees (n = 18). By comparing arthritic to contralateral knees, receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine diagnostic accuracy. Using diff{sub o}n{sub o}ff and positive + negative responses, a threshold of r > 0.01 was more accurate than r > 0.2 (P = 0.03 at day 28). Comparison of summary measures yielded no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). Although positive + negative (AUC = 0.86 at day 28) and negative responses (AUC = 0.90 at day 28) for PT% were the most diagnostically accurate, positive + negative responses for diff{sub o}n{sub o}ff (AUC = 0.78 at day 28) also had acceptable accuracy. The most clinically relevant reading parameters included a lower threshold of r > 0.01 and a positive + negative BOLD response. We propose that diff{sub o}n{sub o}ff is a more clinically relevant summary measure of BOLD MRI, while PT% can be used as an ancillary measure. (orig.)

  6. Technetium scintigraphy in experimental hyperergic arthritis and by rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanheide, M.; Dreher, R.; Grebe, S.F.; Virian, M.; Federlin, K.; Sattler, E.L.; Altaras, J.; Mueller, H.; Giessen Univ.; Giessen Univ.; Giessen Univ.

    1980-01-01

    Guinea pigs showed an increased uptake of 99m-TC-04 in the inflamed joints during the first days of experimental arthritis. Tc-04 was found in the joint fluid and inflamed synovia. The uptake of Tc-04 and Tc-MDP was reduced by therapy in 13 patients with RA. Classical RA showed an increased uptake of Tc-MDP compared with probable RA. Scintigraphy offers the possibility of early diagnosis and study of progression. (orig.) [de

  7. Periodontal and hematological characteristics associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Westergaard, Jytte; Stoltze, Kaj

    2006-01-01

    Periodontitis shares several clinical and pathogenic characteristics with chronic arthritis, and there is some degree of coexistence. The aims of this study were to elucidate whether patients with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP), generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP), juvenile idi...... idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) share periodontal and hematological characteristics distinguishing them from individuals free of diseases....

  8. Genetic control of spontaneous arthritis in a four-way advanced intercross line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Mellado Ranea

    Full Text Available Identifying the genetic basis of complex diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, remains a challenge that requires experimental models to reduce the genetic and environmental variability. Numerous loci for arthritis have been identified in induced animal models; however, few spontaneous models have been genetically studied. Therefore, we generated a four-way advanced intercross line (AIL from four inbred strains, including BXD2/TyJ which spontaneously develops autoimmune arthritis. A genome-wide scan for spontaneous arthritis was performed in a cohort of 366 mice of the fourth generation (G4 of this cross. Five loci contributing to clinical phenotypes were identified in chromosomes 3, 7, 13, 18, and X. Three of the loci found in this study, confirm previously identified loci; whereas two of them are novel loci. Interesting candidate genes for the loci are highlighted. This study provides a genetic overview of spontaneous arthritis in mice and aids to solve the genetic etiology of rheumatoid arthritis and to gain a better understanding of the disease.

  9. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  10. Rehabilitation in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Evaggelos Giavasopoulos; Paraskevi Gourni

    2008-01-01

    Rehabilitation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis aims to the management of the consequences of disease. It is widely accepted that, no drug therapy at present leads to long‐term orremission f everyone with rheumatoid arthritis (R.A.). Consequently, patients experience physical, psychological, functional, social and role negative effects of the disease. AIM : The am of the present article was to evaluate the role of rehabilitation to patients with rheumatoid arthritis sMethod and material:...

  11. Repeated administration of mazindol reduces spontaneous pain-related behaviors without modifying bone density and microarchitecture in a mouse model of complete Freund’s adjuvant-induced knee arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robledo-González LE

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available LE Robledo-González,1 A Martínez-Martínez,1 VM Vargas-Muñoz,1 RI Acosta-González,2 R Plancarte-Sánchez,3 M Anaya-Reyes,4 C Fernández del Valle-Laisequilla,5 JG Reyes-García,6 JM Jiménez-Andrade1 1Laboratorio de Farmacología, 2Departamento de Análisis Clínicos, Unidad Académica Multidisciplinaria Reynosa-Aztlán, UAT, Reynosa, Tamaulipas, Mexico; 3Departamento de Anestesiología, Terapia Intensiva y Clínica del Dolor, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, Mexico City, Mexico; 4Investigación Clínica y Farmacovigilancia, 5Investigación Clínica y Farmacovigilancia, Productos Medix, S.A. de C.V., Mexico City, Mexico; 6Sección de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigación, Escuela Superior de Medicina, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Mexico City, Mexico Background: The role of dopaminergic system in the development of rheumatoid arthritis-related pain, a major symptom in this disease, has not been explored. Therefore, the antinociceptive effect of mazindol, a dopamine uptake inhibitor, was evaluated in a model of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA-induced arthritis. Furthermore, as studies have shown that the dopaminergic system regulates bone metabolism, the effect of mazindol on bone mass and microarchitecture was determined.Methods: Adult ICR male mice received intra-articular injections of either CFA or saline into the right knee joint every week. Spontaneous pain-like behaviors (flinching and guarding and locomotor activity were assessed at day 26 post-first CFA, following which, a single intraperitoneally (i.p. administered dose of mazindol was given (1, 3 and 10 mg/kg. Then, the antinociceptive effect of a repeated administration of 3 mg/kg mazindol (daily, i.p.; day 15–day 26 was evaluated. Additionally, at day 26, the participation of D1-like, D2-like or opioid receptors in the antinociceptive effect of mazindol was evaluated. The effect of mazindol on bone density and microarchitecture was evaluated by micro

  12. Modeling of the clinical and economic impact of a risk-sharing agreement supporting a treat-to-target strategy in the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagnani, Francis; Pham, Thao; Claudepierre, Pascal; Berenbaum, Francis; De Chalus, Thibault; Saadoun, Carine; Joubert, Jean-Michel; Fautrel, Bruno

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a Treat-to-Target strategy with certolizumab pegol in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in the context of a pay-for-performance agreement in which medication costs are refunded in case of discontinuation during the first 3 months of treatment. The Treat-to-Target strategy consisted of a systematic switch to second-line tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α inhibitor in case of an unmet ACR50 response at 3 months compared to current routine clinical practice. A reference cohort treated first-line with certolizumab pegol according to current practice without systematic switching was considered as the comparator. A decision-tree model was constructed to estimate clinical outcome (health assessment questionnaire-disability index or HAQ-DI score), time spent in ACR50 response (ACR 50), and direct costs of treatment over a 2-year period. HAQ scores were derived from American College of Rheumatology 50 (ACR50) responses. All TNFα inhibitors were assumed to have equivalent efficacy and tolerability. Costs were estimated at 2013 French retail prices (date of the pay-for-performance agreement). The mean duration of an ACR50 response was 1.23 years in the Treat-to-Target strategy certolizumab pegol cohort vs 0.98 years in the reference cohort, resulting in a mean gain in HAQ at 24 months of 0.117. The Treat-to-Target strategy with a mix of TNFα inhibitors as second-line therapy was more expensive than the reference strategy in absolute terms, but this difference was entirely offset by the pay-for-performance agreement. The Treat-to-Target strategy was, thus, cost-neutral over a 2-year period after the payback of CZP cost for patients not achieving the target at 3 months. In the context of a pay-for-performance agreement, the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis using a Treat-to-Target strategy with certolizumab pegol in first line is dominant compared to standard use of this drug in the French setting in 2013.

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of Lyme arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvikar, Sheila L; Steere, Allen C

    2015-06-01

    In the United States, Lyme arthritis is the most common feature of late-stage Borrelia burgdorferi infection, usually beginning months after the initial bite. In some, earlier phases are asymptomatic and arthritis is the presenting manifestation. Patients with Lyme arthritis have intermittent or persistent attacks of joint swelling and pain in 1 or a few large joints. Serologic testing is the mainstay of diagnosis. Synovial fluid polymerase chain reaction for B burgdorferi DNA is often positive before treatment, but is not a reliable marker of spirochetal eradication after therapy. This article reviews the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of Lyme arthritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Cutaneous panarteritis nodosa with destructive arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso Ruiz, A; Calabozo Raluy, M; Manrique Martínez, P; Rossell Cerro, M; Múgica Sanperio, C; Goicoechea Marcaida, A

    1990-01-27

    The existence of arthritis in cutaneous panarteritis nodosa (CPAN) is controversial. We report a 52-year-old male with chronic destructive arthritis of both knees and palpable purpura in the feet, where the underlying histological finding was necrotizing arteritis. Systemic involvement was not demonstrated. AntiHBc and antiHBs antibodies were positive. Four of the 11 cases of CPAN with arthritis that we have found reported in the literature were well documented, and only one developed erosions of the joints. Our patient is the first reported case of CPAN with destructive arthritis and evidence of previous hepatitis B virus infection.

  15. Tyrosine kinases in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Akiko

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an inflammatory, polyarticular joint disease. A number of cellular responses are involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, including activation of inflammatory cells and cytokine expression. The cellular responses involved in each of these processes depends on the specific signaling pathways that are activated; many of which include protein tyrosine kinases. These pathways include the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, Janus kinases/signal transducers and activators transcription pathway, spleen tyrosine kinase signaling, and the nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells pathway. Many drugs are in development to target tyrosine kinases for the treatment of RA. Based on the number of recently published studies, this manuscript reviews the role of tyrosine kinases in the pathogenesis of RA and the potential role of kinase inhibitors as new therapeutic strategies of RA.

  16. Clinimetric criteria of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Galasso

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic autoimmune disease, mainly poli-artycular, among wide-spread chronic inflammatory diseases, that cause pain, functional limitation, damage and joints deformations, and disability. It is characterized by turns of active inflammation and remission phases. Inflammation degree and persistence are associated to a bad functional prognosis and progressive joint disability. These patients management require a continuous valuation of inflammatory activity index of disease both therapeutic management and to prevent disablement process. We focus on many valuation index of joint disability and functional damage. Very important are both the scales of auto-values concerning the pain and the joint swelling and clinical data get by physician to valuate activity index of disease as defined by DAS28. Significant data come by health-related quality of life, disability and by AIMS2 (Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale.

  17. Arthritis dermatitis syndrome in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasquez Mendez, Monica Patricia; Ramirez Gomez, Luis Alberto

    2004-01-01

    The pediatric rheumatology is a medical specialization with many areas under developed. The prevalence, pathophysiology and form of presentation of the pediatric rheumatic disease are different of adults. The skin compromise in many pediatric rheumatic diseases is a helping sing for diagnosis. The arthritis-dermatitis syndrome can be the first manifestation of many diseases as infections, tumors and endocrine diseases, but in pediatric age the immunologic and infections diseases are really important. Among infections diseases, virus (parvovirus, rubella, HIV) and bacteria (gonococcus, meningoccus) are the most Important. Within the group of autoimmune diseases the vasculitis such as Henoch-Schonlein purpura and Kawasaki disease are among the more prevalent autoimmune disease. This is a general review about arthritis-dermatitis syndrome in pediatric age

  18. The potential of stem cell therapy for osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keerthi, Naveen; Chimutengwende-Gordon, Mukai; Sanghani, Anita; Khan, Wasim

    2013-11-01

    Joint diseases are a major cause of disability and are a significant financial burden on health care systems. Regenerative medicine offers exciting possibilities for treating osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. As well as possessing the ability to differentiate into other tissue lineages, some stem cells such as mesenchymal stem cells possess immmunomodulatory properties that make them useful in the search for alternative treatments for rheumatoid arthritis specifically. Various studies have been carried out using animal models to evaluate the role of stem cells in the treatment of arthritis, with some research being translated into clinical studies. However, the number of patients used in some studies has left questions on the ability of stem cell therapy to treat arthritic conditions unanswered. This article reviews the innovative studies that have been carried out to treat arthritis using stem cells and also highlights the key challenges associated with these techniques.

  19. Econometric modelling of multiple self-reports of health states: The switch from EQ-5D-3L to EQ-5D-5L in evaluating drug therapies for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Alava, Mónica; Pudney, Stephen

    2017-09-01

    EQ-5D is used in cost-effectiveness studies underlying many important health policy decisions. It comprises a survey instrument describing health states across five domains, and a system of utility values for each state. The original 3-level version of EQ-5D is being replaced with a more sensitive 5-level version but the consequences of this change are uncertain. We develop a multi-equation ordinal response model incorporating a copula specification with normal mixture marginals to analyse joint responses to EQ-5D-3L and EQ-5D-5L in a survey of people with rheumatic disease, and use it to generate mappings between the alternative descriptive systems. We revisit a major cost-effectiveness study of drug therapies for rheumatoid arthritis, mapping the original EQ-5D-3L measure onto a 5L valuation basis. Working within a comprehensive, flexible econometric framework, we find that use of simpler restricted specifications can make very large changes to cost-effectiveness estimates with serious implications for decision-making. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Emerging immunotherapies for rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Gary; Cooles, Faye AH; Isaacs, John D; Hilkens, Catharien MU

    2014-01-01

    Novel treatments in development for rheumatoid arthritis target 3 broad areas: cytokines, cells, and signaling pathways. Therapies from each domain share common advantages (for example previously demonstrated efficacy, potential long-term immunomodulation, and oral administration respectively) that have stimulated research in each area but also common obstacles to their development. In this review recent progress in each area will be discussed alongside the factors that have impeded their path to clinical use. PMID:24535556

  1. Rheumatoid arthritis of the wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naegele, M.; Kunze, V.; Koch, W.; Bruening, R.; Seelos, K.; Stroehmann, I.; Woell, B.; Reiser, M.

    1993-01-01

    21 patients with rheumatoid arthritis of the wrist diagnosed according to the criteria of the American Rheumatism Association were examined by dynamic MRT before and after the i.v. injection of Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg). The results were correlated with the clinical and radiological findings. The increased signal intensity of the pannus was 1.17±0.45%/sec and this differed significantly (p [de

  2. Nail involvement in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolewski, Piotr; Walecka, Irena; Dopytalska, Klaudia

    2017-01-01

    Nail psoriasis is considered a significant psychological and social problem causing functional impairment in affected patients. Nail changes hamper their daily and occupational activities and contribute to a worse quality of life. Almost 50% of patients with psoriasis vulgaris and up to 80% of patients with psoriatic arthritis are afflicted with nail lesions. The important correlation between psoriatic arthritis and nail changes is well established - the presence of the latter is a strong predictor of the development of arthritis. There is a broad spectrum of nail dystrophies associated with psoriasis, ranging from the common pitting, subungual hyperkeratosis and loosening of the nail plate to less frequent discolouration and splinter haemorrhages. Some of these symptoms are also observed in other nail diseases, and further diagnostics should be performed. The assessment tools NAPSI (Nail Psoriasis Severity Index), mNAPSI (Modified Nail Psoriasis Severity Index), and PNSS (Psoriasis Nail Severity Score) are most commonly used to grade the severity of nail involvement in psoriasis and enable the evaluation of therapy effectiveness. The treatment of nail psoriasis is a major clinical challenge. It should be adjusted to the extent of dermal, articular and ungual lesions. Systemic therapies of psoriasis, especially biological agents, are most likely to be effective in treating nail psoriasis. However, as their use is limited in scope and safety, topical therapy remains a mainstay, and the combination of corticosteroids and vitamin D 3 analogues is considered to be most helpful.

  3. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kaas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustion to the patient. The patients often must give up their hobbies and in some cases even their jobs. In most serious cases, even common daily activities including self-servicing actions become an obstacle to the patient. It is therefore logical that the psyche of a patient with such disease is considerably strained. One of the partial goals of the study consisted in mapping the subjectively perceived quality of life of rheumatoid arthritis patients in facet 8, "negative feelings", and in ascertaining whether there is statistically significant relation to facets 1, "pain and discomfort", and 2, "energy and fatigue". Another goal consisted in comparing the subjectively perceived quality of life between men and women with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as between population of rheumatoid arthritis patients and control healthy population. The study was implemented within the research project of the Grant Agency of the University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice number 120/2012/S, "Reflection of quality of life in nursing", under use of two standardized questionnaires, WHOQOL-100 and HAQ. This article presents exclusively the data acquired based on the WHOQOL-100 questionnaire. The research set consisted of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis from all over the Czech Republic. The size of the set was determined by a statistician at 200 individuals suffering from the disease, in a ratio of 150 women and 50 men. The selection set was derived from the basic set of rheumatoid arthritis patients and can

  4. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kaas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustion to the patient. The patients often must give up their hobbies and in some cases even their jobs. In most serious cases, even common daily activities including self–servicing actions become an obstacle to the patient. It is therefore logical that the psyche of a patient with such disease is considerably strained. One of the partial goals of the study consisted in mapping the subjectively perceived quality of life of rheumatoid arthritis patients in facet 8, "negative feelings", and in ascertaining whether there is statistically significant relation to facets 1, "pain and discomfort", and 2, "energy and fatigue". Another goal consisted in comparing the subjectively perceived quality of life between men and women with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as between population of rheumatoid arthritis patients and control healthy population. The study was implemented within the research project of the Grant Agency of the University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice number 120/2012/S, „Reflection of quality of life in nursing", under use of two standardized questionnaires, WHOQOL–100 and HAQ. This article presents exclusively the data acquired based on the WHOQOL–100 questionnaire. The research set consisted of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis from all over the Czech Republic. The size of the set was determined by a statistician at 200 individuals suffering from the disease, in a ratio of 150 women and 50 men. The selection set was derived from the basic set of rheumatoid arthritis patients and

  5. Changes in Soluble CD18 in Murine Autoimmune Arthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis Reflect Disease Establishment and Treatment Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tue Wenzel Kragstrup

    Full Text Available In rheumatoid arthritis (RA immune activation and presence of autoantibodies may precede clinical onset of disease, and joint destruction can progress despite remission. However, the underlying temporal changes of such immune system abnormalities in the inflammatory response during treat-to-target strategies remain poorly understood. We have previously reported low levels of the soluble form of CD18 (sCD18 in plasma from patients with chronic RA and spondyloarthritis. Here, we study the changes of sCD18 before and during treatment of early RA and following arthritis induction in murine models of rheumatoid arthritis.The level of sCD18 was analyzed with a time-resolved immunoflourometric assay in 1 plasma from early treatment naïve RA patients during a treat-to-target strategy (the OPERA cohort, 2 plasma from chronic RA patients, 3 serum from SKG and CIA mice following arthritis induction, and 4 supernatants from synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from 6 RA patients cultured with TNFα or adalimumab.Plasma levels of sCD18 were decreased in chronic RA patients compared with early RA patients and in early RA patients compared with healthy controls. After 12 months of treatment the levels in early RA patients were similar to healthy controls. This normalization of plasma sCD18 levels was more pronounced in patients with very early disease who achieved an early ACR response. Plasma sCD18 levels were associated with radiographic progression. Correspondingly, the serum level of sCD18 was decreased in SKG mice 6 weeks after arthritis induction compared with healthy littermates. The sCD18 levels in both SKG and CIA mice exhibited a biphasic course after arthritis induction with an initial increase above baseline followed by a decline. Shedding of CD18 from RA SFMC and RA PBMC cultures was increased by TNFα and decreased by adalimumab.The plasma sCD18 levels were altered in patients with RA, in mice

  6. Changes in Soluble CD18 in Murine Autoimmune Arthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis Reflect Disease Establishment and Treatment Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Jalilian, Babak; Keller, Kresten Krarup; Zhang, Xianwei; Laustsen, Julie Kristine; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Hetland, Merete Lund; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Junker, Peter; Østergaard, Mikkel; Hauge, Ellen-Margrethe; Hvid, Malene; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas; Deleuran, Bent

    2016-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) immune activation and presence of autoantibodies may precede clinical onset of disease, and joint destruction can progress despite remission. However, the underlying temporal changes of such immune system abnormalities in the inflammatory response during treat-to-target strategies remain poorly understood. We have previously reported low levels of the soluble form of CD18 (sCD18) in plasma from patients with chronic RA and spondyloarthritis. Here, we study the changes of sCD18 before and during treatment of early RA and following arthritis induction in murine models of rheumatoid arthritis. The level of sCD18 was analyzed with a time-resolved immunoflourometric assay in 1) plasma from early treatment naïve RA patients during a treat-to-target strategy (the OPERA cohort), 2) plasma from chronic RA patients, 3) serum from SKG and CIA mice following arthritis induction, and 4) supernatants from synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 6 RA patients cultured with TNFα or adalimumab. Plasma levels of sCD18 were decreased in chronic RA patients compared with early RA patients and in early RA patients compared with healthy controls. After 12 months of treatment the levels in early RA patients were similar to healthy controls. This normalization of plasma sCD18 levels was more pronounced in patients with very early disease who achieved an early ACR response. Plasma sCD18 levels were associated with radiographic progression. Correspondingly, the serum level of sCD18 was decreased in SKG mice 6 weeks after arthritis induction compared with healthy littermates. The sCD18 levels in both SKG and CIA mice exhibited a biphasic course after arthritis induction with an initial increase above baseline followed by a decline. Shedding of CD18 from RA SFMC and RA PBMC cultures was increased by TNFα and decreased by adalimumab. The plasma sCD18 levels were altered in patients with RA, in mice with

  7. Social support and cognitive functioning as resources for elderly persons with chronic arthritis pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Eun; Kahana, Boaz; Kahana, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Arthritis pain and depression are prevalent physical and psychological disorders in late life and co-occur frequently. We explored the stability and covariation of arthritis pain and depressive symptoms. We also addressed the influence of cognitive functioning and social support on the relationship between pain and depressive symptoms among community-dwelling older individuals. This longitudinal study utilized a sample of 299 residents of Florida retirement communities who participated in a long-term panel study using yearly assessments across 4 years. Using multilevel modeling, we modeled the individual differences as well as stability in arthritis pain and depressive symptoms simultaneously. Further, we tested the role of cognitive functioning and social support in the association between arthritis pain and depressive symptoms. We found substantial within-person variation in both pain and depressive symptoms (between 58% and 65%) across 4 years even after controlling for a time effect. After controlling for arthritis pain, persons with higher social support and higher cognitive functioning reported lower levels of depressive symptoms. Findings suggest that fluctuations in pain and depressive symptoms are common for older adults. Furthermore, social support and intact cognitive functioning may serve as useful resources, as they buffer the negative impact of arthritis pain on depressive symptoms.

  8. A critical role for plasma kallikrein in the pathogenesis of autoantibody-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Aizhen; Zhou, Junsong; Wang, Bo; Dai, Jihong; Colman, Robert W; Song, Wenchao; Wu, Yi

    2017-12-01

    The plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) consists of serine proteases, prekallikrein (pKal) and factor XII (FXII), and a cofactor, high-MW kininogen (HK). Upon activation, activated pKal and FXII cleave HK to release bradykinin. Activation of this system has been noted in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and its pathogenic role has been characterized in animal arthritic models. In this study, we generated 2 knockout mouse strains that lacked pKal and HK and determined the role of KKS in autoantibody-induced arthritis. In a K/BxN serum transfer-induced arthritis (STIA) model, mice that lacked HK, pKal, or bradykinin receptors displayed protective phenotypes in joint swelling, histologic changes in inflammation, and cytokine production; however, FXII-deficient mice developed normal arthritis. Inhibition of Kal ameliorated arthritis severity and incidence at early stage STIA and reduced the levels of major cytokines in joints. In addition to releasing bradykinin from HK, Kal directly activated monocytes to produce proinflammatory cytokines, up-regulated their C5aR and FcRIII expression, and released C5a. Immune complex increased pKal activity, which led to HK cleavage. The absence of HK is associated with a decrease in joint vasopermeability. Thus, we identify a critical role for Kal in autoantibody-induced arthritis with pleiotropic effects, which suggests that it is a new target for the inhibition of arthritis.-Yang, A., Zhou, J., Wang, B., Dai, J., Colman, R. W., Song, W., Wu, Y. A critical role for plasma kallikrein in the pathogenesis of autoantibody-induced arthritis. © FASEB.

  9. Cardiovascular disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naranjo, Antonio; Sokka, Tuulikki; Descalzo, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, smoking, physical inactivity, and body mass index. Unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) (95% confidence interval [CI]) for CV morbidity were calculated using Cox proportional hazard regression models. RESULTS: Between January 2005 and October 2006......ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: We analyzed the prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its association with traditional CV risk factors, clinical features of RA, and the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in a multinational cross......, the QUEST-RA project included 4,363 patients from 48 sites in 15 countries; 78% were female, more than 90% were Caucasian, and the mean age was 57 years. The prevalence for lifetime CV events in the entire sample was 3.2% for myocardial infarction, 1.9% for stroke, and 9.3% for any CV event. The prevalence...

  10. Septic arthritis due to Clostridium ramosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Jiménez, Antonio; Prim, Núria; Crusi, Xavier; Benito, Natividad

    2016-04-01

    Clostridium species are anaerobic bacilli that are rarely reported as etiologic agents of infectious arthritis. Previous cases of arthritis caused by Clostridium ramosum have not been reported. We describe the first 2 cases of C. ramosum arthritis. We reviewed the etiology of arthritis in our hospital during the previous 15 years. Both patients had underlying immunocompromising conditions and their infections involved a joint with preexisting disease: patient 1 had rheumatic arthritis and a prosthetic joint; patient 2, chronic renal failure on dialysis and hip osteoarthritis. The infection was hematogenously acquired and the course was indolent but destructive in both the cases. Management included open arthrotomy and resection arthroplasty. The infection had a persisting and relapsing course, and prolonged antibiotic treatment was required. In the literature review, we found 55 previous cases of arthritis caused by Clostridium species between 1966 and 2014; Clostridium perfringens was the most common infecting species; the infection was traumatically acquired in most of the cases. A total of 15 patients have been described with infections caused by C. ramosum; none had septic arthritis. The majority were elderly or immunocompromised adults. Proper collection, transportation and processing of clinical specimens is essential for diagnosing clostridial infections. More information about the best management of clostridial arthritis are needed. We describe the first 2 cases of septic arthritis caused by C. ramosum. They shared several pathogenic and clinical features. The possibility of anaerobic arthritis should always be considered when collecting diagnostic specimens. An increasing number of clostridial arthritis cases are likely to be diagnosed in future years. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The potential use of microcalorimetry in rapid differentiation between septic arthritis and other causes of arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, E; Hügle, T; Daikeler, T; Voide, C; Borens, O; Trampuz, A

    2015-03-01

    Current diagnostic methods in differentiating septic from non-septic arthritis are time-consuming (culture) or have limited sensitivity (Gram stain). Microcalorimetry is a novel method that can rapidly detect microorganisms by their heat production. We investigated the accuracy and time to detection of septic arthritis by using microcalorimetry. Patients older than 18 years of age with acute arthritis of native joints were prospectively included. Synovial fluid was aspirated and investigated by Gram stain, culture and microcalorimetry. The diagnosis of septic arthritis and non-septic arthritis were made by experienced rheumatologists or orthopaedic surgeons. Septic arthritis was diagnosed by considering the finding of acute arthritis together with findings such as positive Gram stain or positive culture of synovial fluid or positive blood culture. The sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing septic arthritis and the time to positivity of microcalorimetry were determined. Of 90 patients (mean age 64 years), nine had septic arthritis, of whom four (44 %) had positive Gram stain, six (67 %) positive synovial fluid culture and four (44 %) had positive blood culture. The sensitivity of microcalorimetry was 89 %, the specificity was 99 % and the mean detection time was 5.0 h (range, 2.2-8.0 h). Microcalorimetry is an accurate and rapid method for the diagnosis of septic arthritis. It has potential to be used in clinical practice in diagnosing septic arthritis.

  12. A comparison of disease burden in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and axial spondyloarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Michelsen

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to compare disease burden in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, psoriatic arthritis (PsA and axial spondyloarthritis (ax-SpA.In this cross-sectional study, all the RA (1093, PsA (365 and ax-SpA (333 patients who visited the out-patient clinic of the Hospital of Southern Norway Trust during the year 2013 were included; the RA patients all had a RA diagnosis verified by the treating rheumatologist, the PsA patients all fulfilled the ClASsification for Psoriatic ARthritis (CASPAR criteria and the ax-SpA patients all fulfilled the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS classification criteria for ax-SpA. Patient-reported health status, demographic variables, medications, and composite scores of disease activity were assessed. The main analyses were performed using General Linear Models adjusted for age, sex and multiple comparisons. Correlation analyses were performed using Spearman's rho.The reported pain, joint pain, patient's global assessment and fatigue were similar in PsA and ax-SpA, but significantly lower in RA. The 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28 (0.3±0.1, p = 0.003, Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI (1.0±0.4, p = 0.028 and Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data 3 (RAPID3 (0.4±0.1, p = 0.004 were all significantly higher in PsA vs. RA. RAPID3 showed moderate to high correlation with DAS28 (rho = 0.521, p<0.001 and CDAI (rho = 0.768, p<0.001 in RA and PsA, and with Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI (rho = 0.902, p<0.001 and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI (0.865, p<0.001 in ax-SpA and PsA.In conclusion, patient- reported outcome measures were similar in our population of PsA and ax-SpA patients, but significantly lower for the RA patients. Composite disease activity measures were lower in RA than in PsA and ax-SpA, but the magnitude of these differences was small and probably not of clinical significance. Our study indicates that

  13. Reactive arthritis associated with Mycoplasma genitalium urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrisment, D; Machelart, I; Wirth, G; Lazaro, E; Greib, C; Pellegrin, J-L; Bébéar, C; Peuchant, O

    2013-11-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is an important cause of sexually transmitted infections that is gaining recognition and is an independent cause of acute and chronic nongonococcal urethritis in men. M. genitalium has been implicated as a possible causative factor in reactive arthritis. We report a case of reactive arthritis complicating M. genitalium urethritis in an HLA-B27-positive patient. © 2013.

  14. Socioeconomic status and risk of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line Merete Blak; Jacobsen, Søren; Klarlund, Mette

    2006-01-01

    To examine whether markers of socioeconomic status (SES) are associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and if so, whether selected lifestyle-related factors could explain this association.......To examine whether markers of socioeconomic status (SES) are associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and if so, whether selected lifestyle-related factors could explain this association....

  15. Pseudomonas Septic Arthritis | Thanni | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Septic arthritis due to pseudomonas species is unusual and when it occurs, there is often an underlying cause like immune depression, intravenous drug abuse or a penetrating injury. PATIENT AND METHOD: We report a case of pseudomonas septic arthritis complicating cannulation of a leg vein following ...

  16. Arthritis and X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Pedro; Santos, Alexandra; Faria, Emília; Silva, Jorge; Malcata, Armando; Chieira, Celso

    2008-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies are defined as genetically determined functional and/or quantitative abnormalities in one or more of the components of the immune system. Immunodeficiency and arthritis can be related, although the mechanisms are not always clear. Different causes for immunodeficiency can secondarily be found in patients with arthritis; on the other hand, arthritis can be a manifestation of primary immunodeficiency. Arthritis occurs chiefly in humoral primary immunodeficiencies, namely in X-linked agammaglobulinemia and common variable immunodeficiency, and may be one of the warning signs for primary immunodeficiency. We report a case of arthritis as the presenting feature of X-linked agammaglobulinemia. In X-linked agammaglobulinemia, arthritis may be a consequence of infection, most notably by Mycoplasma, or of immune dysfunction itself. In children, and occasionally in young adults, a combination of arthritis and hypogammaglobulinemia should suggest primary immunodeficiency, although other causes of hypogammaglobulinemia must be excluded. Physicians evaluating patients with arthritis should be aware of this fact so that an early diagnosis can be pursued as it is of extreme importance in the optimal management and prognosis of these patients.

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis in the hand. Chapter 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weston, W.J.

    1979-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is primarily a disease of the synovial membrane. To demonstrate synovial changes it is necessary to show adequate detail of the soft tissue. This is best obtained by using industrial film and by hand-processing. The anatomy of the hand and the radiological appearance of rheumatoid arthritis are described. (author)

  18. Microbiota and arthritis: correlations or cause?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Blas, Alberto; Wessel, Hannah; Milling, Simon

    2016-03-01

    The microorganisms that colonise our bodies, the commensal 'microbiota', respond to changes in our behaviour and environment, and can also profoundly affect our health. We can now investigate these organisms with unprecedented depth and precision, revealing that they may contribute to the pathogenesis of diseases including arthritis. Here we discuss the changes occurring in the microbiota in people with arthritis, and how manipulation of the microbiota may provide an additional pathway for therapy. We highlight two important aspects of the recent literature. First we describe changes in the microbiota identified in people with arthritis; these correlations give insights into the microbial changes that may contribute to symptoms of arthritis. We then discuss attempts to ameliorate arthritis by manipulating the microbiota. This is a rapidly developing area of research. There are tantalising hints that interventions targeting the microbiota may become therapeutically viable for some types of inflammatory arthritis. Our commensal microbial communities respond to changes in our health, and are altered in people with arthritis. Understanding the complex relationships between the microbiota and the body may enable us to deliberately manipulate these organisms and provide additional therapeutic options for people with arthritis.

  19. Immune modulation by vaccination in chronic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonneveld - Huijssoon, E.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination in autoimmunity can have beneficial, but also detrimental effects. In this thesis, we tried to identify factors that contribute to a favourable or an unfavourable outcome of vaccination in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) and experimental arthritis. In the first part, we focused on

  20. Septic arthritis in gout patients: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sian Yik; Lu, Na; Choi, Hyon K

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the association of incident gout with the risk of incident septic arthritis in a general population context. We investigated the association of incident gout with the risk of incident septic arthritis using the Health Improvement Network, a computerized medical record database from general practices in the UK. We conducted a cohort analysis of the risk of an incident septic arthritis diagnosis among adults with incident gout compared with up to five non-gout individuals matched by age, sex, date of study entry and enrolment year. We performed Cox proportional hazard regression models to adjust for lifestyle variables, physician visits, comorbidities and medication use. We identified 72 073 incident gout patients and 358 342 matched non-gout patients. The incidence rates of a septic arthritis diagnosis were 0.24 cases and 0.09 cases per 1000 person-years in the gout and comparison cohorts, respectively. Matched univariate and multivariate hazard ratios of a septic arthritis diagnosis were 2.82 (95% CI 2.15, 3.71) and 2.60 (95% CI 1.93, 3.51), respectively. The association persisted among subgroups stratified by sex, age group (septic arthritis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. A novel method for a fast diagnosis of septic arthritis using mid infrared and deported spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Jean-David; Monbet, Valérie; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Fatih, Nadia; Le Corvec, Maëna; Seck, Malik; Charpentier, Frédéric; Coiffier, Guillaume; Boussard-Pledel, Catherine; Bureau, Bruno; Guggenbuhl, Pascal; Loréal, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    To assess the ability of mid infrared deported spectroscopy to discriminate synovial fluids samples of septic arthritis patients from other causes of joint effusion. Synovial fluids obtained from patients with clinically suspected arthritis were collected, analysed and classified according to standard diagnostic procedures as septic or non-septic. A spectroscopic analysis on synovial fluid samples was then performed using a coiled optical fiber made with chalcogenide glass. After a factorial analysis of the normalized spectra and the computation of a Fisher test used to select the most relevant components, a logistic regression model was fitted, allowing to attribute a score between 0 - non-septic -, and 1 - septic. In a first phase, we analysed the synovial fluids from 122 different synovial fluids including 6 septic arthritis among arthritis of various origins. Septic synovial fluids were identified with a sensitivity of 95.8% and a specificity of 93.9% and an AUROC of 0.977. The analysis of an independent set of samples (n=42, including two septic arthritis) gave similar values. Our data strongly supports the interest of mid infrared deported spectroscopy, which could be used potentially at point of care, for a rapid and easy diagnosis of septic arthritis. Now, the precision of the diagnosis must be evaluated through a multicentric study on a larger panel of patients. Copyright © 2015 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Modulation of IL-17 and Foxp3 expression in the prevention of autoimmune arthritis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Duarte

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA is a chronic immune mediated disease associated with deregulation of many cell types. It has been reported that different T cell subsets have opposite effects in disease pathogenesis, in particular Th17 and Treg cells.We investigated whether non-depleting anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies, which have been reported as pro-tolerogenic, can lead to protection from chronic autoimmune arthritis in SKG mice--a recently described animal model of RA--by influencing the Th17/Treg balance. We found that non-depleting anti-CD4 prevented the onset of chronic autoimmune arthritis in SKG mice. Moreover, treated mice were protected from the induction of arthritis up to 60 days following anti-CD4 treatment, while remaining able to mount CD4-dependent immune responses to unrelated antigens. The antibody treatment also prevented disease progression in arthritic mice, although without leading to remission. Protection from arthritis was associated with an increased ratio of Foxp3, and decreased IL-17 producing T cells in the synovia. In vitro assays under Th17-polarizing conditions showed CD4-blockade prevents Th17 polarization, while favoring Foxp3 induction.Non-depleting anti-CD4 can therefore induce long-term protection from chronic autoimmune arthritis in SKG mice through reciprocal changes in the frequency of Treg and Th17 cells in peripheral tissues, thus shifting the balance towards immune tolerance.

  3. Design and acceptance of Rheumates@Work, a combined internet-based and in person instruction model, an interactive, educational, and cognitive behavioral program for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbrust, Wineke; Bos, Joyce J F J; Cappon, Jeannette; van Rossum, Marion A J J; Sauer, Pieter J J; Wulffraat, Nico; van Wijnen, Veera K; Lelieveld, Otto T H M

    2015-07-23

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a chronic rheumatic disease. Patients suffer daily discomforts such as pain, fatigue, stiffness, and mood disturbances. Their exercise capacity is decreased to a variable degree and physical activity levels may be impaired. To prevent long-term cardiovascular risks associated with JIA and medication, it is important to encourage physical activity. To achieve this we developed Rheumates@Work (R@W), a combined internet-based and in person instruction model, an interactive, educational, and cognitive behavioral program. The aim of this study is twofold: to describe the theoretical background and design of R@W based on Pender's Health Promotion Model, and to assess its acceptance. We enrolled 8 to 13-year-old JIA patients, from 3 outpatients clinics in The Netherlands, in R@W. Inclusion criteria were a low disease activity (VAS physician anonymous questionnaire concerning f.e. time investment and perceived benefits. Costs were monitored. Of the 64 patients we enrolled, 23 boys and 41 girls, 93.8 % completed the program. Participant-initiated interaction was seen in 10.7 %, 24.7 % send a mail because of technical problems. Eighty-two percent of the participants and 99 % of the parents liked the program, and 85 % of the participants indicated that they had learnt something, or quite a lot. Development costs of the program were low. The HPM is suitable for a behavioral intervention program such as R@W. Acceptance and satisfaction of R@W were high and the costs of the program were low. ISRCTN92733069.

  4. LIPID PROFILE IN CHILDREN WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Yu. Gudkova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid composition in children with different types of juvenile arthritis was investigated in this trial. Significant decrease of plasma concentration of cholesterol in high density lipoproteins in patients with high activity of rheumatoid arthritis was discovered. «Atherogenic» shift of lipid composition and increase of atherogenity index was shown in most of pediatric patients with different types of juvenile arthritis. The number of children with increased atherogenity index grows according to the increase of disease activity. pediatric patients with high activity of juvenile arthritis and juvenile ankylosing spondylitis are the risk group of early atherosclerosis development.Key words: juvenile arthritis, atherosclerosis, high density lipoproteins, triglyceride, atherogenity index.

  5. Hearing status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadzadeh, A; Daraei, M; Jalessi, M; Peyvandi, A A; Amini, E; Ranjbar, L A; Daneshi, A

    2017-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is thought to induce conductive hearing loss and/or sensorineural hearing loss. This study evaluated the function of the middle ear and cochlea, and the related factors. Pure tone audiometry, speech reception thresholds, speech discrimination scores, tympanometry, acoustic reflexes, and distortion product otoacoustic emissions were assessed in rheumatoid arthritis patients and healthy volunteers. Pure tone audiometry results revealed a higher bone conduction threshold in the rheumatoid arthritis group, but there was no significant difference when evaluated according to the sensorineural hearing loss definition. Distortion product otoacoustic emissions related prevalence of conductive or mixed hearing loss, tympanometry values, acoustic reflexes, and speech discrimination scores were not significantly different between the two groups. Sensorineural hearing loss was significantly more prevalent in patients who used azathioprine, cyclosporine and etanercept. Higher bone conduction thresholds in some frequencies were detected in rheumatoid arthritis patients that were not clinically significant. Sensorineural hearing loss is significantly more prevalent in refractory rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  6. Psoriatic arthritis: from pathogenesis to therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, Oliver

    2012-02-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a multigenic autoimmune disease that involves synovial tissue, entheseal sites and skin, and that may result in significant joint damage. Although there are no diagnostic tests for psoriatic arthritis, research has identified consistent features that help to distinguish the condition from other common rheumatic diseases. Comparison of HLA-B and HLA-C regions in psoriatic arthritis with those in psoriasis without joint involvement demonstrates significant differences, such that psoriatic arthritis cannot be viewed simply as a subset of genetically homogeneous psoriasis. T-cell receptor phenotypic studies have failed to identify antigen-driven clones, and an alternative hypothesis for CD8 stimulation involving innate immune signals is proposed. Finally, imaging studies have highlighted entheseal involvement in psoriatic arthritis, and it is possible that entheseal-derived antigens may trigger an immune response that is critically involved in disease pathogenesis.

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease caused by periodontal pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogrendik M

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mesut OgrendikDivision of Physical Therapy and Rheumatology, Nazilli State Hospital, Nazilli, TurkeyAbstract: A statistically significant association between periodontal disease (PD and systemic diseases has been identified. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA, which is a chronic inflammatory joint disease, exhibits similar characteristics and pathogenesis to PD. The association between RA and PD has been investigated, and numerous publications on this subject exist. Approximately 20 bacterial species have been identified as periodontal pathogens, and these organisms are linked to various types of PD. The most analyzed species of periodontopathic bacteria are Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Antibodies and DNA from these oral pathogens have been isolated from the sera and synovial fluids of RA patients. This rapid communication describes the role of periodontal pathogens in the etiopathogenesis of RA.Keywords: etiopathogenesis, chronic arthritis, periodontitis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, systemic disease, animal models, antibiotics

  8. [Comparison of the Disease Activity Score-28 and Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score in the juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capela, Renata Campos; Corrente, José Eduardo; Magalhães, Claudia Saad

    2015-01-01

    the assessment of the activity of rheumatoid arthritis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis is made by means of different tools, respectively DAS-28 and JADAS. To compare DAS-28 and JADAS with scores of 71, 27 and 10 joint counts in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. A secondary analysis of a phase III placebo-controlled trial, testing safety and efficacy of abatacept was conducted in 8 patients with 178 assessment visits. Joint count scores for active and limited joints, physician's and parents' global assessment by 0-10cm Visual Analog Scale, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate normalized to 0-10 scale, in all visits. The comparison among the activity indices in different observations was made through Anova or adjusted gamma model. The paired observations between DAS-28 and JADAS 71, 27 and 10, respectively, were analyzed by linear regression. There were significant differences among individual measures, except for ESR, in the first four months of biological treatment, when five of the eight patients reached ACR-Pedi 30, with improvement. The indices of DAS-28, JADAS 71, 27 and 10 also showed significant difference during follow-up. Linear regression adjusted model between DAS-28 and JADAS resulted in mathematical formulas for conversion: [DAS-28=0.0709 (JADAS 71)+1.267] (R(2)=0.49); [DAS-28=0.084 (JADAS 27) +1.7404] (R(2)=0.47) and [DAS-28=0.1129 (JADAS-10) +1.5748] (R(2)=0.50). The conversion of scores of DAS-28 and JADAS 71, 27 and 10 for this mathematical model would allow equivalent application of both in adolescents with arthritis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Bone edema on magnetic resonance imaging is an independent predictor of rheumatoid arthritis development in patients with early undifferentiated arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer-Jensen, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2011-01-01

    To study magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in patients with early undifferentiated arthritis (UA).......To study magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in patients with early undifferentiated arthritis (UA)....

  10. Therapeutical approach to rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Paraskevi Gourni; Evaggelos Giavasopoulos

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease characterized by inflammation of the synovial joints, and loss of the function leading to disability. The ultimate goal in managing RA is to prevent joint damage and to maintain functional ability. Although, οver the past decade, major advances have been made in our understanding of the factors that are crucial in regulating this disease, still the managment of the disease remains difficult.Aim : Τhe aim of the present study was the evaluation ...

  11. Shoulder arthography in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinbold, W.D.; Hehne, H.J.; Rau, W.S.; Freiburg Univ.

    1983-01-01

    Shoulder arthrography in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis is performed to differentiate between a rheumatoid flare and limitation of motion secondary to tear in the rotator cuff. Accurate diagnosis is important because of the therapeutic implications. The arthrographic findings characteristic of rheumatoid involvement of the shoulder joint are nodular filling defects of the joint, the subacromial and subdeltoideal bursa in case of rotator cuff tear, irregular capsular attachment, contracted joint space and visualized lymphatic drainage. A dilatation of the biceps tendon sheath has not been shown. (orig.) [de

  12. Impact of cell wall peptidoglycan O-acetylation on the pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus in septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranwal, Gaurav; Mohammad, Majd; Jarneborn, Anders; Reddy, Bommana Raghunath; Golla, Archana; Chakravarty, Sumana; Biswas, Lalitha; Götz, Friedrich; Shankarappa, Sahadev; Jin, Tao; Biswas, Raja

    2017-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of the most common pathogen causing septic arthritis. To colonize the joints and establish septic arthritis this bacterium needs to resist the host innate immune responses. Lysozyme secreted by neutrophils and macrophages is an important defense protein present in the joint synovial fluids. S. aureus is known to be resistant to lysozyme due to its peptidoglycan modification by O-acetylation of N-acetyl muramic acid. In this study we have investigated the role of O-acetylated peptidoglycan in septic arthritis. Using mouse models for both local and hematogenous S. aureus arthritis we compared the onset and progress of the disease induced by O-acetyl transferase mutant and the parenteral wild type SA113 strain. The disease progression was assessed by observing the clinical parameters including body weight, arthritis, and functionality of the affected limbs. Further X-ray and histopathological examinations were performed to monitor the synovitis and bone damage. In local S. aureus arthritis model, mice inoculated with the ΔoatA strain developed milder disease (in terms of knee swelling, motor and movement functionality) compared to mice inoculated with the wild type SA113 strain. X-ray and histopathological data revealed that ΔoatA infected mice knee joints had significantly lesser joint destruction, which was accompanied by reduced bacterial load in knee joints. Similarly, in hematogenous S. aureus arthritis model, ΔoatA mutant strain induced significantly less severe clinical septic arthritis compared to its parental strain, which is in accordance with radiological findings. Our data indicate that peptidoglycan O-acetylation plays an important role in S. aureus mediated septic arthritis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Treatment persistence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Amaral de Ávila Machado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To evaluate treatment persistence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis who started therapies with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD and tumor necrosis factor blockers (anti-TNF drugs. METHODS This retrospective cohort study from July 2008 to September 2013 evaluated therapy persistence, which is defined as the period between the start of treatment until it is discontinued, allowing for an interval of up to 30 days between the prescription end and the start of the next prescription. Odds ratio (OR with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI were calculated by logistic regression models to estimate the patients’ chances of persisting in their therapies after the first and after the two first years of follow-up. RESULTS The study included 11,642 patients with rheumatoid arthritis – 2,241 of these started on anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD and 9,401 patients started on DMARD – and 1,251 patients with ankylosing spondylitis – 976 of them were started on anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD and 275 were started on DMARD. In the first year of follow-up, 63.5% of the patients persisted in their therapies with anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD and 54.1% remained using DMARD in the group with rheumatoid arthritis. In regards to ankylosing spondylitis, 79.0% of the subjects in anti-TNF (+/-DMARD group and 41.1% of the subjects in the DMARD group persisted with their treatments. The OR (95%CI for therapy persistence was 1.50 (1.34-1.67 for the anti-TNF (+/-DMARD group as compared with the DMARD group in the first year for the patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and 2.33 (1.74-3.11 for the patients with ankylosing spondylitis. A similar trend was observed at the end of the second year. CONCLUSIONS A general trend of higher rates of therapy persistence with anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD was observed as compared to DMARD in the study period. We observed higher persistence rates for anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD in patients with ankylosing

  14. Observations on Arthritis in Broiler Breeder Chickens Experimentally Infected with Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Qin Gu§, Xue-Ying Hu§, Chang-Qing Xie1, Wan-Po Zhang, De-Hai Wang, Quan Zhou and Guo-Fu Cheng1*

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of bacterial arthritis in broiler breeder chickens. In this study, we established a model of broiler breeder chicken arthritis inoculated with Staph. aureus isolated from a spontaneously occurring bacterial arthritis in chickens. We evaluated the model by bacteriology, serology, pathology, and immunology. The results showed that 2.5 × 109 cfu Staph. aureus injected into the right joint cavity can successfully induce a chicken arthritis model. The majority of the infected chickens suffered lameness and joint swelling at 3 days post-inoculation (DPI. The death peak time was on 7 DPI and the mortality rate was 51.1%. Staph. aureus can be continuously isolated from the blood and left joint synovial fluid of the infected chickens. Lesions found on the infected chickens consisted of swollen joints full of caseous exudates, cartilage injury, and synovial membrane thickening with infiltration of inflammatory cells. The center of the lesion contained many round bacterial cocci. With joint injury aggravation, intra-articular hyaluronic acid gradually decreased, and serum interleukin-6 became significantly higher compared with the control (P<0.01 from 3 DPI. The results indicated that the chicken models of Staph. aureus-mediated arthritis were successful, and can be used to gain a better understanding of the host-bacterium relationship.

  15. Active immunization against IL-23p19 improves experimental arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratsimandresy, Rojo Anthony; Duvallet, Emilie; Assier, Eric; Semerano, Luca; Delavallée, Laure; Bessis, Natacha; Zagury, Jean-François; Boissier, Marie-Christophe

    2011-11-21

    IL-23 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine essential for the differentiation of Th17 lymphocytes, a subtype of T lymphocyte implied in auto-immunity. IL-23 shares a subunit with IL-12, IL-12/23p40, and comprises a specific subunit, IL-23p19. We previously demonstrated that active immunization against entire TNF-α and against peptides of IL-1β was protective in animal models of rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of peptide-based vaccines targeting the IL-23p19 subunit in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Using bioinformatics, the murine IL-23p19 subunit was modeled and two peptides were defined in the receptor interacting domain. Each peptide was coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) to obtain two vaccines IL23-K1 and IL23-K2. Both vaccines were used for immunizations in incomplete Freund adjuvant (IFA) in groups of DBA/1 mice. Control groups received KLH or PBS at the same dates. CIA was induced by two subcutaneous injections of bovine type II collagen (CIIb), and the development of disease assessed during the next two months. Anti-CIIb and anti-IL-23 antibody levels were assessed by ELISA. Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines mRNA were quantified by qRT-PCR in the spleen and the synovium. T-cell populations in the spleen were evaluated by FACS analysis. The clinical scores showed that mice treated with IL23-K1 developed less arthritis than negative controls (panti-IL-23 antibodies than those immunized with IL23-K2 (peffect on IL-17 level. Histological examination showed that IL23-K1 strongly protected against joint destruction and inflammation (pvaccination strategy is protective in CIA. This specific targeting of IL-23 might constitute a promising therapeutic approach to explore in rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Radiographic manifestations of arthritis in AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, Z.S.; Norman, A.; Solomon, G.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to familiarize the radiologist with a newly discovered association between arthritis and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiographic findings in 31 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection referred to their rheumatology clinic with musculoskeletal complaints. The patients carried a wide range of clinical diagnosis including Reiter syndrome, psoriatic arthritis, undifferentiated seronegative arthritis, isolated enthesopathies, rheumatoid arthritis and osteonecrosis. Radiographs were available in 24 of the 31 patients, and in 20 they showed radiographic features of arthritis, which included soft-tissue swelling periarticular osteoporosis, synovial effusions, sacroiliitis, periosteal reaction, joint space narrowing, marginal erosions, and osteonecrosis. Although the radiographic abnormalities were frequently mild, they were significant, given the short duration of disease in many of their patients (weeks to months) at the time radiographs were obtained. The range of radiographic findings in their series was varied and paralleled the wide range of clinical diagnoses. No findings were pathognomonic for HIV-associated arthritis. Nevertheless, HIV infection needs to be considered in any patient belonging to a recognized risk group who presents with musculoskeletal disease. This is particularly important since immunosupressive drugs used for the treatment of arthritis can be detrimental to patients with HIV infection

  17. Ankle arthritis predicts polyarticular disease course and unfavourable outcome in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjörnsson, Anna-Clara; Aalto, Kristiina; Broström, Eva W

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the occurrence, clinical characteristics and prognostic factors associated with ankle arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). METHODS: 440 children with JIA were followed for eight years in a prospective Nordic population-based cohort study. Data...... on remission was available for 427 of these children. Occurrence of clinically assessed ankle arthritis was analysed in relation to JIA category, clinical characteristics and remission data eight years after disease onset. RESULTS: In 440 children with JIA, 251 (57%) experienced ankle arthritis during...... the first eight years of disease. Ankle arthritis was least common in the persistent oligoarticular category (25%) and most common in children with extended oligoarticular (83%) and polyarticular RF-negative (85%) JIA. Children who developed ankle arthritis during the first year of disease were younger...

  18. Design and acceptance of Rheumates@Work, a combined internet-based and in person instruction model, an interactive, educational, and cognitive behavioral program for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armbrust, Wineke; Bos, Joyce J. F. J.; Cappon, Jeannette; van Rossum, Marion A. J. J.; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Wulffraat, Nico; van Wijnen, Veera K.; Lelieveld, Otto T. H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a chronic rheumatic disease. Patients suffer daily discomforts such as pain, fatigue, stiffness, and mood disturbances. Their exercise capacity is decreased to a variable degree and physical activity levels may be impaired. To prevent long-term

  19. Design and acceptance of Rheumates@Work, a combined internet-based and in person instruction model, an interactive, educational, and cognitive behavioral program for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armbrust, Wineke; Bos, Joyce J. F. J.; Cappon, Jeannette; van Rossum, Marion A. J. J.; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Wulffraat, Nico; van Wijnen, Veera K.; Lelieveld, Otto T. H. M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a chronic rheumatic disease. Patients suffer daily discomforts such as pain, fatigue, stiffness, and mood disturbances. Their exercise capacity is decreased to a variable degree and physical activity levels may be impaired. To prevent long-term

  20. Thumb troubles in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Garofalo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Thumb involvement may play a relevant role in inducing a severe functional impairment in rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this sonographic vignette is to show the value of sonography in detailing anatomic changes involving the thumb during a phase of active synovitis. The patient was a 50-year old man who presented with a 3-year history of rheumatoid arthritis. He complained of a 4-week history of a marked recrudescence inflammatory thumb involvement associated with clinical signs of carpal tunnel syndrome. Sonographic images were obtained with a real-time ultrasound system equipped with a 13 MHz linear transducer. Sonographic examination on longitudinal dorsal scan of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb showed a moderate joint cavity widening with two evident bone erosions, one at the metacarpal head and the other one at the basis of the proximal phalanx. The longitudinal volar scan of the first metacarpophalangeal joint confirmed the presence of synovitis detecting a marked joint cavity widening, with aspect of synovial proliferation. The flexor pollicis longus tendon was severely involved (marked tendon sheath widening, synovial proliferation, loss of the normal homogeneous fibrillar echotexture, and a large intratendinous tear. Sonography allowed the depiction of a wide range of otherwise undetectable pathologic changes in the standard clinical setting.

  1. [Reiter disease or reactive arthritis?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppinger, S; Schmitt, J; Meurer, M

    2006-04-01

    There is an ongoing international discussion on whether the condition reactive arthritis should be named after a former Nazi functionary. The German dermatological community should participate in this debate. In 1916, Hans Reiter described a disease with the symptoms urethritis, conjunctivitis, and arthritis, which was later named after him. After becoming titular professor in May 1918, Reiter was appointed director of the regional public health department Mecklenburg-Schwerin in 1926. At the same time he taught social hygiene at the University of Rostock, where he was appointed full professor in 1928. In 1931, Hans Reiter became a member of the National Socialist German Workers Party (NSDAP). In July 1932 he was elected representative of the NSDAP to the seventh assembly of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. After becoming its acting director in July 1933, Reiter was appointed president of the Reich public health department in Berlin on October 1, 1933. Both his excellent professional qualifications, as well as his National Socialist attitudes, were considered key criteria for taking over this important position. As the president of the Reich public health department, Reiter was said to have known about the conduct of experiments with typhus-fever at the concentration camp Buchenwald in which 250 humans died. From the end of the Second World War until 1947, Reiter was imprisoned in the Nuremberg Prison for War Criminals, but never convicted of a crime.

  2. Complementary medicine in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Atzeni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM for chronic conditions has increased in recent years. CAM is immensely popular for musculoskeletal conditions and patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA frequently try CAM. This review summarises the trial data for or against CAM as a symptomatic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. Collectively the evidence demonstrates that some CAM modalities show significant promise, e.g. acupuncture, diets, herbal medicine, homoeopathy, massage, supplements. However, for the great majority of these therapies no evidencebased (clinical randomized trials results are available. CAM is usually used in addition to, and not as a substitute for conventional therapies. The motivation of patients to try CAM is complex; the willingness to take control of their healthcare, the desire to try everything available, the mass-media pressure and the erroneous notion that CAM is without risks. In fact, none of these treatments is totally devoid of risks. While the use of complementary and alternative modalities for the treatment of RA continues to increase, rigorous clinical trials examining their efficacy are needed before definitive recommendations regarding the application of these modalities can be made.

  3. Proposal for levels of evidence schema for validation of a soluble biomarker reflecting damage endpoints in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis, and recommendations for study design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maksymowych, Walter P; Fitzgerald, Oliver; Wells, George A

    2009-01-01

    and discussed various models for association and prediction related to the statistical strength domain. In addition, 3 Delphi exercises addressing longitudinal study design for RA, PsA, and AS were conducted within the working group and members of the Assessments in SpondyloArthritis International Society (ASAS...... Biomarker Group has successfully formulated a levels of evidence scheme and a study design template that will provide guidance to conduct validation studies in the setting of soluble biomarkers proposed to replace the measurement of damage endpoints in RA, PsA, and AS....... arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We also aimed to generate consensus on minimum standards for the design of longitudinal studies aimed at validating biomarkers. METHODS: Before the meeting, the Soluble Biomarker Working Group prepared a preliminary framework...

  4. Proposal for levels of evidence schema for validation of a soluble biomarker reflecting damage endpoints in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis, and recommendations for study design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maksymowych, W.P.; Fitzgerald, O.; Wells, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    and discussed various models for association and prediction related to the statistical strength domain. In addition, 3 Delphi exercises addressing longitudinal study design for RA, PsA, and AS were conducted within the working group and members of the Assessments in SpondyloArthritis International Society (ASAS...... Biomarker Group has successfully formulated a levels of evidence scheme and a study design template that will provide guidance to conduct validation studies in the setting of soluble biomarkers proposed to replace the measurement of damage endpoints in RA, PsA, and AS Udgivelsesdato: 2009/8...... arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We also aimed to generate consensus on minimum standards for the design of longitudinal studies aimed at validating biomarkers. METHODS: Before the meeting, the Soluble Biomarker Working Group prepared a preliminary framework...

  5. Arthritis: Conventional and Advanced Radiological Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adviye Ergun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Arthritides are acute or chronic inflammation of one or more joints. The most common types of arthritis are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, but there are more than 100 different forms. Right and early diagnosis is extremely important for the prevention of eventual structural and functional disability of the affected joint. Imaging findings, especially those of advanced level imaging, play a major role in diagnosis and monitor the progression of arthritis or its response to therapy. The objective of the review is to discuss the findings of conventional and advanced radiological imaging of most common arthritides and to present a simplified approach for their radiological evaluation.

  6. Temporomandibular joint abnormalities in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larheim, T.A.; Tveito, L.; Dale, K.; Ruud, A.F.

    1981-01-01

    Transantral (infraorbital, transmaxillary) examination of the temporomandibular joint was compared with conventional transcranial examination and lateral tomography of patients with rheumatoid arthritis aged 23 to 83. Abnormalities were most frequently found at tomography, and equally frequent at transantral and transcranial examinations. The various examinations appeared to be rather supplementary. Bone erosion was frequently observed at transantral examination, which appeared to be the preferable radiographic method for detecting arthritis of this joint. Combined with transcranial examination, the method is recommended for the evaluation of temporomandibular joint abnormalities in rheumatoid arthritis if tomographic equipment is not available. (Auth.)

  7. Recombinant adenovirus-mediated gene transfer suppresses experimental arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Quattrocchi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Collagen Induced Arthritis (CIA is a widely studied animal model to develop and test novel therapeutic approaches for treating Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA in humans. Soluble Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA4-Ig, which binds B7 molecule on antigen presenting cells and blocks CD28 mediated T-lymphocyte activation, has been shown to ameliorate experimental autoimmune diseases such as lupus, diabetes and CIA. Objective of our research was to investigate in vivo the effectiveness of blocking the B7/CD28 T-lymphocyte co-stimulatory pathway, utilizing a gene transfer technology, as a therapeutic strategy against CIA. Replication-deficient adenoviruses encoding a chimeric CTLA4-Ig fusion protein, or β-galactosidase as control, have been injected intravenously once at arthritis onset. Disease activity has been monitored by the assessment of clinical score, paw thickness and type II collagen (CII specific cellular and humoral immune responses for 21 days. The adenovirally delivered CTLA4-Ig fusion protein at a dose of 2×108 pfu suppressed established CIA, whereas the control β-galactosidase did not significantly affect the disease course. CII-specific lymphocyte proliferation, IFNg production and anti-CII antibodies were significantly reduced by CTLA4-Ig treatment. Our results demonstrate that blockade of the B7/CD28 co-stimulatory pathway by adenovirus-mediated CTLA4-Ig gene transfer is effective in treating established CIA suggesting its potential in treating RA.

  8. Air Pollution as a Determinant of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigaux, Johanna; Biton, Jérôme; André, Emma; Semerano, Luca; Boissier, Marie-Christophe

    2018-03-07

    Pollution has long been incriminated in many cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. More recently, studies evaluated the potential role for particulate pollutants in autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The incidence of RA was found to be higher in urban areas. Living near air pollution emitters was associated with higher risks of developing RA and of producing RA-specific autoantibodies. Nevertheless, no strong epidemiological evidence exists to link one or more specific air pollution particles to RA. The presence in the bronchi of lymphoid satellite islands (inducible bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue, iBALT) is strongly associated with both inflammatory lung disease and RA-associated lung disease. Diesel exhaust particles can stimulate iBALT formation. The induction by air pollution of an inflammatory environment with high citrullination levels in the lung may induce iBALT formation, thereby causing a transition toward a more specific immune response via the production of anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies. Air pollution not only triggers innate immune responses at the molecular level, increasing the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species, but is also involved in adaptive immune responses. Thus, via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), diesel exhaust particles can trigger a T-cell switch to the Th17 profile. Finally, in the murine collagen-induced arthritis model, animals whose lymphocytes lack the AHR develop milder arthritis. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  9. Anti-rheumatoid arthritis effects of traditional Chinese herb couple in adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ting; Cheng, Tao-Fang; Jia, Yu-Ran; Li, Ping; Li, Fei

    2017-06-09

    Clematis chinensis Osbeck / Notopterygium incisum Ting ex H, T-Chang (CN) is a traditional Chinese herb couple with prominent efficacy. The herb couple has been commonly used for clinical treatment of arthralgia syndrome ("Bi Zheng" in Chinese) for centuries in China, including rheumatic arthritis, osteoarthritis and gout in modern medicine. To evaluate the anti-arthritic effect of CN herb couple in a rat model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Rats were divided randomly into six groups with eight each. Adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model was established by intradermal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Rats were treated orally with different dosages of CN (0.7g/kg, 2.1g/kg, 6.3g/kg) from day 16 till day 40. Ibuprofen (50.4mg/kg) served as a positive control. Spontaneous activity, body weight, paw swelling, and arthritis index (AI) were monitored throughout drug treatment. Then serum levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. In addition, histopathological examination and immunohistochemistry were used to assess the severity of arthritis. Three dosage of CN significantly ameliorated symptoms of RA via increasing body weight as well as reducing paw swelling (at dose of 6.3g/kg, p<0.01) in AIA rats. An extremely significant reduction of AI (p<0.001) was also observed with treatment of CN (6.3g/kg) compared with model group. In parallel, treatment of CN significantly down-regulated levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and VEGF both in serum (p<0.01) and in joint synovial compared with model rats. And histopathology revealed noticeable reduction in synovial hyperplasia, cartilage damage, and inflammatory infiltration by CN treatment, especially at dose of 6.3g/kg. To conclude, all results suggest that CN possesses evident anti-arthritic effects in AIA rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Predictive Factors for Differentiating Between Septic Arthritis and Lyme Disease of the Knee in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Keith D; Brusalis, Christopher M; Nduaguba, Afamefuna M; Sankar, Wudbhav N

    2016-05-04

    Differentiating between septic arthritis and Lyme disease of the knee in endemic areas can be challenging and has major implications for patient management. The purpose of this study was to identify a prediction rule to differentiate septic arthritis from Lyme disease in children presenting with knee pain and effusion. We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients younger than 18 years of age with knee effusions who underwent arthrocentesis at our institution from 2005 to 2013. Patients with either septic arthritis (positive joint fluid culture or synovial white blood-cell count of >60,000 white blood cells/mm(3) with negative Lyme titer) or Lyme disease (positive Lyme immunoglobulin G on Western blot analysis) were included. To avoid misclassification bias, undiagnosed knee effusions and joints with both a positive culture and positive Lyme titers were excluded. Historical, clinical, and laboratory data were compared between groups to identify variables for comparison. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent predictive variables. One hundred and eighty-nine patients were studied: 23 with culture-positive septic arthritis, 26 with culture-negative septic arthritis, and 140 with Lyme disease. Multivariate binary logistic regression identified pain with short arc motion, history of fever reported by the patient or a family member, C-reactive protein of >4 mg/L, and age younger than 2 years as independent predictive factors for septic arthritis. A simpler model was developed that showed that the risk of septic arthritis with none of these factors was 2%, with 1 of these factors was 18%, with 2 of these factors was 45%, with 3 of these factors was 84%, or with all 4 of these factors was 100%. Although septic arthritis of the knee and Lyme monoarthritis share common features that can make them difficult to distinguish clinically, the presence of pain with short arc motion, C-reactive protein of >4.0 mg/L, patient-reported history of

  11. Esculetin reduces leukotriene B4 level in plasma of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław Rzodkiewicz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Esculetin (6,7-dihydroxycoumarin is a natural coumarin with anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activity. It acts as a potent inhibitor of lipoxygenases (5-LOX and 12-LOX and decreases the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-1, MMP-3 and MMP-9. Because both inhibition of lipoxygenases and inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases are effective strategies in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, we investigated whether esculetin may be effective in adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. Material and methods : The study was performed on male Lewis rats, in the adjuvant-induced arthritis model. Rats were divided into two groups: control (treated with 1% methylcellulose and experimental (treated with esculetin – 10 mg/kg ip.. The tested compound was administered for 5 consecutive days starting on the 21st day after induction of arthritis. Each group consisted of 7 animals. After 5 days of treatment, rats were anesthetized. The concentration of leukotriene B4 (LTB4 in plasma was determined by a competitive enzyme immunoassay. Results : The LTB4 level in plasma of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis is increased in comparison to rats without inflammation (362 ±34 vs. 274 ±15 pg/ml, p < 0.01, respectively. Five-day treatment with esculetin in adjuvant-induced arthritis rats decreases the LTB4 level to a level comparable with rats without inflammation (284 ±23 pg/ml, p < 0.01. Conclusions : LTB4 is the most potent chemotactic agent influencing neutrophil migration into the joint. It is known that its level in serum of patients with active rheumatoid arthritis is increased and correlates with disease severity. Some other lipoxygenase inhibitors have already been tested as potential drug candidates in clinical and preclinical trials for rheumatoid arthritis (Zileuton, PF-4191834. Because esculetin decreases the LTB4 level in plasma of rats in adjuvant-induced arthritis, it may also be considered as an attractive

  12. Association of regional racial/cultural context and socioeconomic status with arthritis in the population: a multilevel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañizares, Mayilee; Power, J Denise; Perruccio, Anthony V; Badley, Elizabeth M

    2008-03-15

    To examine the extent to which differences in individual- and regional-level socioeconomic status and racial/cultural origin account for geographic variations in the prevalence of self-reported arthritis, and to determine whether regional characteristics modify the effect of individual characteristics associated with reporting arthritis. Analyses were based on the 2000-2001 Canadian Community Health Survey (>15 years, n = 127,513). Arthritis was self-reported as a long-term condition diagnosed by a health professional. A 2-level logistic regression model was used to identify predictors of reporting arthritis. Individual-level variables included age, sex, income, education, immigration status, racial/cultural origin, smoking, physical activity, and body mass index. Regional-level variables included the proportion of low-income families, low education, unemployment, recent immigrants, Aboriginals, and Asians. At the individual level, age, sex, low income, low education, Aboriginal origin, current smoking, and overweight/obesity were positively associated with reporting arthritis; recent immigration and Asian origin were negatively associated with reporting arthritis. At the regional level, percentages of low-income families and the Aboriginal population were independently associated with reporting arthritis. Regional income and racial/cultural origin moderated the effects of individual income and racial/cultural origin; low-income individuals residing in regions with a higher proportion of low-income families reported arthritis more than low-income individuals living in better-income regions. Both individual and regional factors were found to contribute to variations in the prevalence of arthritis, although significant unexplained variation remained. Further research is required to better understand the mechanisms that underlie these regional effects and to identify other contributing factors to the remaining variation.

  13. Exercise Helps Ease Arthritis Pain and Stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mowing the lawn, raking leaves and walking the dog count. Body awareness exercises, such as gentle forms ... www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. 16, 2015. Benefits of exercise for osteoarthritis. Arthritis Foundation. http://www. ...

  14. Role of Gut Microbiota in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yuichi; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2017-06-09

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease, caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Recently, investigators have focused on the gut microbiota, which is thought to be an environmental agent affecting the development of RA. Here we review the evidence from animal and human studies that supports the role of the gut microbiota in RA. We and others have demonstrated that the abundance of Prevotella copri is increased in some early RA. We have also used gnotobiotic experiments to show that dysbiosis in RA patients contributed to the development of Th17 cell-dependent arthritis in intestinal microbiota-humanized SKG mice. On the other hand, Prevotella histicola from human gut microbiota suppressed the development of arthritis. In summary, Prevotella species are involved in the pathogenesis of arthritis.

  15. Role of Gut Microbiota in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Maeda

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic autoimmune disease, caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Recently, investigators have focused on the gut microbiota, which is thought to be an environmental agent affecting the development of RA. Here we review the evidence from animal and human studies that supports the role of the gut microbiota in RA. We and others have demonstrated that the abundance of Prevotella copri is increased in some early RA. We have also used gnotobiotic experiments to show that dysbiosis in RA patients contributed to the development of Th17 cell-dependent arthritis in intestinal microbiota-humanized SKG mice. On the other hand, Prevotella histicola from human gut microbiota suppressed the development of arthritis. In summary, Prevotella species are involved in the pathogenesis of arthritis.

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis | Ally | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Immune-mediated inflammatory disorders include a clinically diverse group of conditions sharing similar pathogenic mechanisms. Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, spondyloarthropathy, inflammatory bowel disease and connective tissue diseases are characterised by immune dysregulation and chronic ...

  17. Marine oil supplements for arthritis pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senftleber, Ninna K.; Nielsen, Sabrina M.; Andersen, Jens Rikardt

    2017-01-01

    Arthritis patients often take fish oil supplements to alleviate symptoms, but limited evidence exists regarding their efficacy. The objective was to evaluate whether marine oil supplements reduce pain and/or improve other clinical outcomes in patients with arthritis. Six databases were searched......-regression analysis. Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) was used to rate the overall quality of the evidence. Forty-two trials were included; 30 trials reported complete data on pain. The standardized mean difference (SMD) suggested a favorable effect (-0.24; 95% confidence.......57–0.24). The evidence for using marine oil to alleviate pain in arthritis patients was overall of low quality, but of moderate quality in rheumatoid arthritis patients....

  18. Atlantooccipital septic arthritis complicating recurrent otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Zoe; Cranswick, Noel; Rao, Padma; Steer, Andrew C

    2013-01-01

    Otitis media is known to have a number of complications. We present the first reported case of atlantooccipital septic arthritis as a complication of Streptococcus pneumoniae otitis media in an 8-month-old boy.

  19. Effect of 1,25-(OH2D3 on Proliferation of Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes and Expressions of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines through Regulating MicroRNA-22 in a Rat Model of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Fan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aims to investigate the regulatory mechanism of 1,25-(OH2D3 on the proliferation of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS and expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines in rheumatoid arthritis (RA rats via microRNA-22 (miR-22. Methods: A rat model of RA was established with a subcutaneous injection of type II collagen. After treated with different concentrations of 1,25-(OH2D3 the proliferation of FLS was estimated by the MTT method, and the optimal concentration of 1,25-(OH2D3 was selected for further experiments. Cell proliferation was detected by MTT. Cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by FCM. The IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and PGE2 protein expressions were determined by ELISA, and MMP-3, INOS, and Cox-2 mRNA expressions were measured by qRT-PCR. Results: The rat model of RA was successfully established. Compared with the blank group, the 1,25-(OH2D3 and miR-22 inhibitors groups exhibited higher proliferation inhibition and apoptosis rates, lower levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and PGE2, and decreased mRNA expressions of MMP-3, INOS, and Cox-2. The miR-22 mimics group had lower proliferation inhibition and apoptosis rates, elevated expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines and MMP-3, INOS, and Cox-2 than the blank group. In contrast to the 1,25-(OH2D3 group, the proliferation inhibition and apoptosis rates were down-regulated, and the expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines and MMP-3, INOS, and Cox-2 were up-regulated in the 1,25-(OH2D3 + miR-22 mimics group. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that 1,25-(OH2D3 inhibits the proliferation of FLS and alleviates inflammatory response in RA rats by down-regulating miR-22.

  20. Oral buprenorphine is anti-inflammatory and modulates the pathogenesis of streptococcal cell wall polymer-induced arthritis in the Lew/SSN rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volker, D; Bate, M; Gentle, R; Garg, M

    2000-10-01

    This study was carried out to determine an effective regimen for pain management in streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis in female Lew/SSN rats. Forty weanling rats lin 2 groups) were trained to accept disks of jelly as part of their dietary regimen. At 8 weeks of age weighing 150 g, SCW arthritis was induced and sublingual buprenorphine tablets were incorporated into the jelly disks to alleviate the pain of acute arthritis, which developed 24 h post-induction. Group A rats received buprenorphine at a rate of 1 mg/kg 12 hourly. Group B rats received buprenorphine at a rate of 2 mg/kg 12 hourly. Both groups of rats were monitored for symptoms of distress using an adaptation of the Morton and Griffin scale of adverse reactions. Group A rats with severe arthritis required additional subcutaneous (s.c.) injections of buprenorphine to alleviate the adverse effects of arthritis. Group B rats, with twice the dose of buprenorphine did not require additional s.c. injections of buprenorphine. Histological sections of rat hocks indicated that the inflammation was suppressed in Group B rats. We concluded that oral administration of buprenorphine is an effective method of pain management in the pathogenesis of SCW-induced arthritis in Lew/SSN rats. In this model of arthritis, oral buprenorphine has a significant anti-inflammatory effect and appears to modulate the destructive arthritic phase in joints in this animal model of arthritis.

  1. Asymptomatic atlantoaxial subluxation in rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadali Nazarinia; Reza Jalli; Eskandar Kamali Sarvestani; Siamak Farahangiz; Maryam Ataollahi

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional study is conducted to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic cervical spine subluxation in rheumatoid arthritis patients by plain radiographs and its relation to demographic and clinical characteristics, disease activity measures and medications. 100 rheumatoid arthritis patients (18 male and 82 female) were selected randomly, according to the American college of Rheumatology Criteria, who were under follow up in the rheumatology clinic. A complete history was taken, an...

  2. Periodontal Disease as a Risk Factor for Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Sushil; White, Sarahlouise; Bartold, Mark

    2012-01-01

    of periodontal disease might have a significant impact on rheumatoid arthritis severity. Similarly, subjects with rheumatoid arthritis have significantly increased periodontal attachment loss.In a recent research article, Ogrendik et al. in 2009 concluded that antibodies formed against these oral bacteria could be important to the aetiopathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. They recommended that gingival tissue infections should be considered in rheumatoid arthritis pathogenesis and that periodontal infections should be treated and prevented from becoming chronic. If successful results are observed against periodontal infections in clinical, radiologic, and laboratory data of the rheumatoid arthritis patients, the essential role of these bacteria in the aetiology of rheumatoid arthritis can be proven. One hypothesis that links rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis is the recently published "two-hit" model that attempts to link experimental evidence from animal models and is supported by evidence from human clinical studies. In this theory, the first "hit" involves the periodontopathic subgingival biofilm and its microbial products, such as endotoxin. The second "hit" involves a medical systemic disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis, which increases biomarkers of systemic inflammation in the circulation, including C reactive protein (CRP), cytokines (e.g. IL-6), prostanoids (e.g. PGE2), and matrix metalloproteinases (e.g. MMP-9), and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF- α). These cytokines are thought to stimulate resident cells in the synovium and the periodontium to produce MMPs mediating connective tissue destruction, and induce the differentiation and activity of osteoclasts to destroy bone In particular, TNF-α, also promotes bone resorption: (i) by up-regulating inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the production of nitric oxide (NO); and (ii) by modulating the receptor activator of nuclear factor _B (NF_B) ligand (RANKL) in osteoblasts, and its antagonist

  3. [Cartilage degradation in rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Naoki

    2009-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a polyarticular joint disease. The inflammatory process is characterized by infiltration of inflammatory cells into the joints, leading to proliferation of synoviocytes and destruction of cartilage and bone. The Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc-dependent proteinases. It had been well recognized that MMP play major roles in the cartilage breakdown in RA and OA. Moreover ADAM-TS-1, -4, -5 have aggrecanase activity, and also involve the cartilage degradation in RA and OA. Of course they contribute the cartilage homeostasis in healthy subjects. Failure to regulate the synthesis, activation and inhibition of the proteinases finally leads to cartilage destruction. Aggrecan and type II collagen are major components in cartilage matrix. Cleavage of aggrecan by aggrecanase and that of collagen by collagenase are critical steps for degradation of articular cartilage in RA. To prevent the cartilage damage, inflammatory synovitis should be suppressed in early stage.

  4. [New therapies for rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Eva; Maneiro, José Ramón

    2014-11-18

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease characterized by inflammation of the synovial membrane and progressive destruction of the articular cartilage and bone. Advances in the knowledge of disease pathogenesis allowed the identification of novel therapeutic targets such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 or the system JAK/STAT phosphorylation. At present there are 5 TNF antagonists approved for RA. Tocilizumab blocks the pathway of IL-6 and is the only biological with proven efficacy in monotherapy. Rituximab modulates B cell response in RA. Abatacept provided new data on T cell involvement in the pathogenesis of RA. Tofacitinib is the first kinase inhibitor approved for this disease. Biologic drugs have proven efficacy, almost always in combination with methotrexate, and even halt radiographic progression. Monitoring infection is the main precaution in handling these patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syrjaenen, S.M.

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was investigated clinically and by orthopantomography in 110 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in 73 control subjects. Clinical symptoms in the TMJ were established in 34% of the RA patients and in 18% of the controls. Radiographic abnormalities were found in 60% of the RA patients compared with 15% in the controls. No single radiographic abnormality was characteristic of joint involvement by RA. The most common radiologic features in RA patients were changes in the morphology of the condylar head and articular eminentia, marginal irregularities, reduced mobility, and an anterior position of the condylar head. No abnormalities were encountered in the early stage of the disease, which at least in part could be attributed to the inherent limitations of orthopantomography. The incidence of joint lesions increased with duration of the RA. (orig.).

  6. Rheumatoid arthritis affecting temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandeep Sodhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder that is characterized by joint inflammation, erosive properties and symmetric multiple joint involvement. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ is very rare to be affected in the early phase of the disease, thus posing diagnostic challenges for the dentist. Conventional radiographs fail to show the early lesions due to its limitations. More recently cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT has been found to diagnose the early degenerative changes of TMJ and hence aid in the diagnosis of the lesions more accurately. Our case highlights the involvement of TMJ in RA and the role of advanced imaging (CBCT in diagnosing the bony changes in the early phase of the disease.

  7. Link between rheumatoid arthritis and chronic periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Kaczyński

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic periodontitis is an infectious disease associated with the progressive destruction of periodontal tissues. In recent years, more and more data indicate an existing relationship between periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis. The link between both diseases has been confirmed in multiple studies. Despite the fact that this association might be based on shared environmental and genetic risk factors, a possible causal relation was advocated by experimental, epidemiological and interventional studies, with the leading role of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Individuals with chronic periodontitis are at an increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis, as well as rheumatoid arthritis patients are at an increased risk of chronic periodontitis and more severe forms of periodontitis. Furthermore, there is a correlation between the activity in both diseases – patients with more severe periodontitis suffer from more active rheumatoid arthritis. Intervention attempts were also performed, which demonstrated that eliminating periodontal infection and inflammation can affect the severity of rheumatoid arthritis. In this paper, we review the current knowledge about the link between both diseases, focusing on its clinical implications. Will periodontal treatment become a part of standard therapy for rheumatoid arthritis?

  8. Burden of childhood-onset arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassett Afton L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Juvenile arthritis comprises a variety of chronic inflammatory diseases causing erosive arthritis in children, often progressing to disability. These children experience functional impairment due to joint and back pain, heel pain, swelling of joints and morning stiffness, contractures, pain, and anterior uveitis leading to blindness. As children who have juvenile arthritis reach adulthood, they face possible continuing disease activity, medication-associated morbidity, and life-long disability and risk for emotional and social dysfunction. In this article we will review the burden of juvenile arthritis for the patient and society and focus on the following areas: patient disability; visual outcome; other medical complications; physical activity; impact on HRQOL; emotional impact; pain and coping; ambulatory visits, hospitalizations and mortality; economic impact; burden on caregivers; transition issues; educational occupational outcomes, and sexuality. The extent of impact on the various aspects of the patients', families' and society's functioning is clear from the existing literature. Juvenile arthritis imposes a significant burden on different spheres of the patients', caregivers' and family's life. In addition, it imposes a societal burden of significant health care costs and utilization. Juvenile arthritis affects health-related quality of life, physical function and visual outcome of children and impacts functioning in school and home. Effective, well-designed and appropriately tailored interventions are required to improve transitioning to adult care, encourage future vocation/occupation, enhance school function and minimize burden on costs.

  9. Collagen-induced arthritis in nonhuman primates: multiple epitopes of type II collagen can induce autoimmune-mediated arthritis in outbred cynomolgus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimozuru, Y; Yamane, S; Fujimoto, K; Terao, K; Honjo, S; Nagai, Y; Sawitzke, A D; Terato, K

    1998-03-01

    To define which regions of the type II collagen (CII) molecule result in anticollagen antibody production and the subsequent development of autoantibodies in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) nonhuman primate model. Male and female cynomolgus monkeys (2-6 of each sex per group) were immunized with either chicken (Ch), human, or monkey (Mk) CII, or with cyanogen bromide (CB)-generated peptide fragments of ChCII emulsified in Freund's complete adjuvant. Monkeys were observed for the development of arthritis, and sera were collected and analyzed for anticollagen antibody specificity by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Overt arthritis developed in all groups of monkeys immunized with intact CII and with all major CB peptide fragments of ChCII except CB8. Onset and severity of arthritis correlated best with serum anti-MkCII antibody levels. The levels of IgG autoantibody to MkCII were a result of the cross-reactivity rate of anti-heterologous CII antibodies with MkCII, which was based on the genetic background of individual monkeys rather than on sex differences. CII from several species and disparate regions of the CII molecule were able to induce autoantibody-mediated arthritis in outbred cynomolgus monkeys. The strong anti-MkCII response suggests that epitope spreading or induction of broad-based CII cross-reactivity occurred in these animals. Autoantibody levels to MkCII were higher in CIA-susceptible monkeys than in resistant monkeys, despite comparable antibody levels in response to the various immunizations of CII. These results closely parallel the type of anticollagen responses found in sera from rheumatoid arthritis patients. Perhaps this can be accounted for by similar major histocompatibility complex heterogenicity associated with an outbred population, or maybe this is a primate-specific pattern of reactivity to CII.

  10. Why golimumab in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rossini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Golimumab is an anti-TNF monoclonal antibody administred subcutaneously once a month and produced with an innovative technology that minimizes immunogenicity. This paper reviews and updates the main studies on the efficacy, safety and pharmacoeconomic aspects of treatment with golimumab of psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis.

  11. Comprehensive assessment of rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci in a large psoriatic arthritis cohort.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bowes, John

    2012-08-01

    A number of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) susceptibility genes have been identified in recent years. Given the overlap in phenotypic expression of synovial joint inflammation between RA and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), the authors explored whether RA susceptibility genes are also associated with PsA.

  12. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein deficiency promotes early onset and the chronic development of collagen-induced arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Hui; Carlsen, Stefan; Nandakumar, Kutty

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a homopentameric protein in cartilage. The development of arthritis, like collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), involves cartilage as a target tissue. We have investigated the development of CIA in COMP-deficient mice. METHODS: COMP......-deficient mice in the 129/Sv background were backcrossed for 10 generations against B10.Q mice, which are susceptible to chronic CIA. COMP-deficient and wild-type mice were tested for onset, incidence, and severity of arthritis in both the collagen and collagen antibody-induced arthritis models. Serum anti......-collagen II and anti-COMP antibodies as well as serum COMP levels in arthritic and wild-type mice were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: COMP-deficient mice showed a significant early onset and increase in the severity of CIA in the chronic phase, whereas collagen II-antibody titers were...

  13. BAFF and its receptors involved in the inflammation progress in adjuvant induced arthritis rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fang; Xu, Shu; Jia, Xiaoyi; Sun, Xiaojing; Yang, Xuezhi; Wei, Wei; Chang, Yan

    2016-02-01

    This study is in order to clear the roles of BAFF and its receptors in the inflammation course of autoimmune arthritis. We used a T cell-mediated experimental autoimmune model adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) rat to study the profiles of BAFF and its receptors in spleen during the inflammation arthritis induction and the effects of BAFF on DCs functions. In vivo, the levels of BAFF and the expression of BAFF-R, TACI were increased in spleen from very early stage of AA. The lesions of spleen were definite correlated with increased levels of BAFF in homogenization. The mature of DCs and increased number in spleen were mainly at early stage of arthritis. In addition, the levels of Interleukin (IL)-12 were found highest and IL-10 were found lowest at this time too. In vitro recombinant BAFF promoted maturation of DCs and inhibited the phagocytosis of DCs. Under stimulation of BAFF on DCs, the levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-6, IL-12 were increased, IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 were decreased. Moreover, BAFF-treated DCs induced proliferation of CD4(+) T cell. These findings support the crucial pathogenic role of DCs, BAFF, and its receptors in the development of experimental arthritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Aortic VCAM-1: an early marker of vascular inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denys, Anne; Clavel, Gaëlle; Lemeiter, Delphine; Schischmanoff, Olivier; Boissier, Marie-Christophe; Semerano, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There are limited experimental data on vascular involvement in arthritis models. To study the link between CVD and inflammation in RA, we developed a model of vascular dysfunction and articular inflammation by collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in C57Bl/6 (B6) mice. We studied the expression of vascular inflammatory markers in CIA with and without concomitant hyperlipidic diet (HD). Collagen-induced arthritis was induced with intradermal injection of chicken type-II collagen followed by a boost 21 days later. Mice with and without CIA were fed a standard diet or an HD for 12 weeks starting from the day of the boost. Arthritis severity was evaluated with a validated clinical score. Aortic mRNA levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and interleukin-17 were analysed by quantitative RT-PCR. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 localization in the aortic sinus was determined by immunohistochemistry. Atherosclerotic plaque presence was assessed in aortas. Collagen-induced arthritis was associated with increased expression of VCAM-1, independent of diet. VCAM-1 overexpression was detectable as early as 4 weeks after collagen immunization and persisted after 15 weeks. The HD induced atheroma plaque formation and aortic iNOS expression regardless of CIA. Concomitant CIA and HD had no additive effect on atheroma or VCAM-1 or iNOS expression. CIA and an HD diet induced a distinct and independent expression of large-vessel inflammation markers in B6 mice. This model may be relevant for the study of CVD in RA. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  15. A retrospective study of septic arthritis in a tertiary hospital in West Texas with high rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sian Yik; Pannikath, Deepa; Nugent, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    Septic arthritis is an important concern for rheumatologists in the evaluation of joint disease. Very few studies have addressed the microbiologic epidemiology and outcomes of septic arthritis in the USA since the year 2000. We performed a retrospective study of septic arthritis in a tertiary hospital in West Texas from the year 2000 to 2013. We recorded data on patient demographics, microbiologic etiology, treatment patterns, and outcomes. The most common causative organisms were Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus spp. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) caused septic arthritis in 22.6 % of the cases. MRSA septic arthritis was associated with low rates of adequate empiric antimicrobial therapy. The mortality due to sepsis in our study was 5.5 %. Patients with septic arthritis had a mean length of stay of 13.5 ± 12.1 days and required 2.1 ± 1.4 joint operations. Many patients (29.2 %) had readmissions due to complications, and these patients had high rates of home health utilization and transfers to other facilities post hospital discharge. In our logistic regression analysis model, factors associated with poor outcomes in septic arthritis were MRSA, older age, and prosthetic joint infection. Septic arthritis is associated with significant mortality, morbidity, and health care costs, and more studies are needed to improve outcomes, especially considering the increasing rates of MRSA as the pathogen.

  16. Mast cell depletion in the preclinical phase of collagen-induced arthritis reduces clinical outcome by lowering the inflammatory cytokine profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velden, Daniël; Lagraauw, H Maxime; Wezel, Anouk; Launay, Pierre; Kuiper, Johan; Huizinga, Tom W J; Toes, René E M; Bot, Ilze; Stoop, Jeroen N

    2016-06-13

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease, which is characterized by inflammation of synovial joints leading to the destruction of cartilage and bone. Infiltrating mast cells can be found within the inflamed synovial tissue, however their role in disease pathogenesis is unclear. Therefore we have studied the role of mast cells during different phases of experimental arthritis. We induced collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), the most frequently used animal model of arthritis, in an inducible mast cell knock-out mouse and determined the effect of mast cell depletion on the development and severity of arthritis. Depletion of mast cells in established arthritis did not affect clinical outcome. However, depletion of mast cells during the preclinical phase resulted in a significant reduction in arthritis. This reduction coincided with a decrease in circulating CD4(+) T cells and inflammatory monocytes but not in the collagen-specific antibody levels. Mast cell depletion resulted in reduced levels of IL-6 and IL-17 in serum. Furthermore, stimulation of splenocytes from mast cell-depleted mice with collagen type II resulted in reduced levels of IL-17 and enhanced production of IL-10. Here we show that mast cells contribute to the preclinical phase of CIA. Depletion of mast cells before disease onset resulted in an altered collagen-specific T cell and cytokine response. These data may suggest that mast cells play a role in the regulation of the adaptive immune response during the development of arthritis.

  17. A systems approach to rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungyong You

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic autoimmune disease that primarily attacks synovial joints. Despite the advances in diagnosis and treatment of RA, novel molecular targets are still needed to improve the accuracy of diagnosis and the therapeutic outcomes. Here, we present a systems approach that can effectively 1 identify core RA-associated genes (RAGs, 2 reconstruct RA-perturbed networks, and 3 select potential targets for diagnosis and treatments of RA. By integrating multiple gene expression datasets previously reported, we first identified 983 core RAGs that show RA dominant differential expression, compared to osteoarthritis (OA, in the multiple datasets. Using the core RAGs, we then reconstructed RA-perturbed networks that delineate key RA associated cellular processes and transcriptional regulation. The networks revealed that synovial fibroblasts play major roles in defining RA-perturbed processes, anti-TNF-α therapy restored many RA-perturbed processes, and 19 transcription factors (TFs have major contribution to deregulation of the core RAGs in the RA-perturbed networks. Finally, we selected a list of potential molecular targets that can act as metrics or modulators of the RA-perturbed networks. Therefore, these network models identify a panel of potential targets that will serve as an important resource for the discovery of therapeutic targets and diagnostic markers, as well as providing novel insights into RA pathogenesis.

  18. Septic arthritis in the central part of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen Andreasen, Rikke; Andersen, Nanna Skaarup; Just, Søren Andreas

    Septic arthritis in the central part of Denmark, Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, volume 73, supplement 2, p. 287......Septic arthritis in the central part of Denmark, Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, volume 73, supplement 2, p. 287...

  19. Aiming for a simpler early arthritis MRI protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stomp, Wouter; Krabben, Annemarie; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate whether intravenous gadolinium (Gd) contrast administration can be eliminated when evaluating synovitis and tenosynovitis in early arthritis patients, thereby decreasing imaging time, cost, and invasiveness. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Wrist MRIs of 93 early arthritis patients wer...

  20. What Are Osteoporosis and Arthritis and How Are They Different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Osteoporosis and Arthritis and How Are They Different? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ... swelling, and stiffness. How Are Osteoporosis and Arthritis Different? Osteoporosis and osteoarthritis are sometimes confused because their ...

  1. Psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudbjornsson, B; Ejstrup, L; Gran, J T

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries.......To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries....

  2. Elevated rheumatoid factor and long term risk of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sune F; Bojesen, Stig E; Schnohr, Peter

    2012-01-01

    To test whether elevated concentration of rheumatoid factor is associated with long term development of rheumatoid arthritis.......To test whether elevated concentration of rheumatoid factor is associated with long term development of rheumatoid arthritis....

  3. Risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardsen, Jesper; Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2012-01-01

    To determine if patients with rheumatoid arthritis have increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke.......To determine if patients with rheumatoid arthritis have increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke....

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis Pain: Tips for Protecting Your Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis pain: Tips for protecting your joints Use these joint protection techniques to help you stay in control of your rheumatoid arthritis pain. By Mayo Clinic Staff Joint protection is ...

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis Diet: Can Certain Foods Reduce Symptoms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... saturated fats, sodium and processed foods might help reduce symptoms associated with rheumatoid arthritis. But the research ... often results in weight loss, which can independently reduce stress on joints and improve arthritis symptoms. Some ...

  6. Degenerative Changes in the Spine: Is This Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in my spine. Does this mean I have arthritis? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Yes. ... spine. Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. Doctors may also refer to it as degenerative ...

  7. Cytokine profiles in peripheral blood and whole blood cell cultures associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Sørensen, Lars Korsbaek; Stoltze, Kaj

    2005-01-01

    Cytokines play a key role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. An obvious question is whether patients with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, or rheumatoid arthritis share blood cytokine profiles distinguishing them from individuals free of disease....

  8. Septic arthritis associated with systemic sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sung-Weon; Kim, Dong-Hee; Shin, Sung-Jin; Kang, Byoung-Youl; Eho, Yil-Ju; Yang, Seong-Wook

    2018-01-01

    Septic arthritis presents with good joint function, but sometimes leads to poor outcomes. Concurrent systemic sepsis has been regarded as the poor outcome, and the exact cause remains unclear. This paper was performed to identify factors associated with concurrent systemic sepsis and to research results to predict poor outcomes in patients with septic arthritis. Laboratory and medical data were reviewed for 137 adults with acute septic arthritis who underwent open or arthroscopic surgical debridement at our institution between January 2005 and December 2014. The patients were divided according to whether they had septic arthritis alone (Group A) or in combination with systemic sepsis (Group B). Systemic sepsis was defined as two more systemic inflammatory signs in response to an infectious process. Patient characteristics, laboratory findings, synovial fluid findings and cultures, and surgical results were compared between two groups. Of the 137 patients, 41 (29.9%) had initial systemic sepsis at the diagnosis of septic arthritis. Independent t test revealed that duration of prodromal symptom (p = 0.012), serum neutrophil percent (p = 0.008), C-reactive protein (p = 0.001), Charlson comorbidity index (p = 0.001), positive culture in synovial fluid (p = 0.001), and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) isolate in synovial fluid (p = 0.001) had significant correlations with the group B. Repeated debridement was performed for those who had recurrence of infection, and this procedure was more often in group B (23 versus 21 joints, 23.9 versus 51.2%, p = 0.012). Progression of arthritis occurred more often in group B (16 versus 17 joints, 16.7 versus 41.5%, p = 0.001). Septic arthritis combined with systemic sepsis was related to duration of prodromal symptom, serum neutrophil percent, C-reactive protein, Charlson comorbidity index, positive culture in synovial fluid, and a MSSA isolate in synovial fluid. Concurrent systemic sepsis led to

  9. Managing Arthritis (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-10-19

    Arthritis is a common chronic condition among Americans. Early diagnosis and management of arthritis is critical for maintaining quality of life. This podcast discusses importance of early diagnosis and management of arthritis.  Created: 10/19/2017 by MMWR.   Date Released: 10/19/2017.

  10. Cardio-pulmonary manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease, characterized by polyarthritis and extraarticular manifestations. The cardiopulmonary manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis were studied retrospectively in a cohort of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Methods: This was a retrospective study of all ...

  11. Arthritis mutilans due to chronic tophaceous gout | Akintayo | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Arthritis mutilans is a form of destructive arthritis which is often characterized with severe osteolysis. It is more commonly described in association with the most severe forms of psoriatic and rheumatoid arthritis. Case presentation: A 69-year old man presented with a fifteen-year history of recurrent inflammatory ...

  12. Pleural and pulmonary alterations caused by rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankier, A.A.; Fleischmann, D.; Kiener, H.P.; Wiesmayr, M.N.; Herold, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    Pulmonary complications caused by rheumatoid arthritis are a clinically relevant aspect of this chronic arthropathy. This article reviews pulmonary abnormalities induced by rheumatoid arthritis and their clinical and radiological findings. In addition, the role of different imaging modalities in the diagnostic work-up of pulmonary complications caused by rheumatoid arthritis is discussed. (orig./MG) [de

  13. Exercise therapy in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a Cochrane Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takken, T.; van Brussel, M.; Engelbert, R. H. H.; van der Net, J.; Kuis, W.; Helders, P. J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Exercise therapy is considered an important component of the treatment of arthritis. The efficacy of exercise therapy has been reviewed in adults with rheumatoid arthritis but not in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). To assess the effects of exercise therapy on functional ability,

  14. 76 FR 29767 - Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food... of Committee: Arthritis Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... arthritis attacks. ILARIS has also been shown to extend the time to the next attack and reduce the frequency...

  15. 77 FR 14529 - Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food... of Committee: Arthritis Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis who have had an inadequate response to one or more disease...

  16. 78 FR 32403 - Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food... of Committee: Arthritis Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... meeting. Agenda: On July 22, 2013, the committee will discuss the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis...

  17. Management of Children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Vijay; Murray, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) comprises a group of heterogeneous disorders of chronic arthritis in childhood and remains the commonest pediatric rheumatic disease associated with significant long-term morbidity. Advances in understanding of the pathogenesis, better definition of disease control/remission measures, and the arrival of biological agents have improved the outcomes remarkably. Methotrexate (Mtx) remains the first-line disease modifying (DMARD) therapy for most children with JIA due to its proven efficacy and safety. Sulphosalazine (SSz) (especially for enthesitis) and leflunomide may also have a secondary role. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNF-I), alone or in combination with Mtx have shown tremendous benefit in children with polyarticular JIA, enthesitis related arthritis (ERA) and psoriatic arthritis. Tocilizumab appears very efficacious in systemic arthritis and abatacept and tocilizumab also appear to benefit polyarticular JIA; the role of rituximab remains unclear, though clearly beneficial in adult RA. TNF-I with Mtx is also effective in uveitis associated with JIA. Biologicals have demonstrated an impressive safety record in children with JIA, although close monitoring for rare but potentially dangerous adverse events, such as tuberculosis and other infections; paradoxical development of additional autoimmune diseases; and possibly an increased risk of cancers is warranted.

  18. INFLIXIMAB IN TREATMENT OF REFRACTORY JUVENILE ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.P. Nikishina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Inclusion to the clinical practice of genetically engineered biological medications opens new opportunities in treatment of juvenile arthritis. The article summarizes an experience of treatment of juvenile arthritis with infliximab in children’s department of Scientific Center of Rheumatology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences. The analysis included 55 patients (16 children had systemic type, 23 — polyarticular type of juvenile arthritis, and 16 patients had juvenile spondylarthritis, treated with infliximab in 2002–2009 years. Infliximab was administrated in patients with high activity of the disease refractory to the modern basic therapy. Patients received intravenous infliximab 3–5 mg/kg daily according to the standard scheme (on 0, 2, 6 weeks and further every 8 weeks. Therapy with this drug was estimated as effective (improvement on 30% and more according ACRpedi in 80% of patients: 16% achieved ACR30, 29% — ACR50, 26% — ACR70, and 9% — ACR90. Unfavorable effects (infusion reactions were detected in 16% of cases. Infections, including one case of disseminated tuberculosis, developed in 20% of patients. Thus, treatment with infliximab is effective and has good «risk–benefit» ratio in treatment of patients with refractory juvenile arthritis. Key words: children, juvenile arthritis, infliximab, treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(1:142-149

  19. Challenges of developing a cardiovascular risk calculator for patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crowson, C.S.; Rollefstad, S.; Kitas, G.D.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Gabriel, S.E.; Semb, A.G.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk calculators designed for use in the general population do not accurately predict the risk of CVD among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), who are at increased risk of CVD. The process of developing risk prediction models involves numerous issues.

  20. Genetics of Rheumatoid Arthritis — A Comprehensive Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkó, Júlia; Besenyei, Timea; Laki, Judit; Glant, Tibor T.; Mikecz, Katalin

    2013-01-01

    The “Bermuda triangle” of genetics, environment and autoimmunity is involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Various aspects of genetic contribution to the etiology, pathogenesis and outcome of RA are discussed in this review. The heritability of RA has been estimated to be about 60 %, while the contribution of HLA to heritability has been estimated to be 11–37 %. Apart from known shared epitope (SE) alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*01 and DRB1*04, other HLA alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*13 and DRB1*15 have been linked to RA susceptibility. A novel SE classification divides SE alleles into S1, S2, S3P and S3D groups, where primarily S2 and S3P groups have been associated with predisposition to seropositive RA. The most relevant non-HLA gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with RA include PTPN22, IL23R, TRAF1, CTLA4, IRF5, STAT4, CCR6, PADI4. Large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 30 loci involved in RA pathogenesis. HLA and some non-HLA genes may differentiate between anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) seropositive and seronegative RA. Genetic susceptibility has also been associated with environmental factors, primarily smoking. Some GWAS studies carried out in rodent models of arthritis have confirmed the role of human genes. For example, in the collagen-induced (CIA) and proteoglycan-induced arthritis (PgIA) models, two important loci — Pgia26/Cia5 and Pgia2/Cia2/Cia3, corresponding the human PTPN22/CD2 and TRAF1/C5 loci, respectively — have been identified. Finally, pharmacogenomics identified SNPs or multiple genetic signatures that may be associated with responses to traditional disease-modifying drugs and biologics. PMID:23288628

  1. Cardiovascular risk in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubrier, Martin; Barber Chamoux, Nicolas; Tatar, Zuzana; Couderc, Marion; Dubost, Jean-Jacques; Mathieu, Sylvain

    2014-07-01

    The objectives of this review are to discuss data on the cardiovascular risk increase associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the effects of RA treatments on the cardiovascular risk level, and the management of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with RA. Overall, the risk of cardiovascular disease is increased 2-fold in RA patients compared to the general population, due to the combined effects of RA and conventional risk factors. There is some evidence that the cardiovascular risk increase associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy may be smaller in RA patients than in the general population. Glucocorticoid therapy increases the cardiovascular risk in proportion to both the current dose and the cumulative dose. Methotrexate and TNFα antagonists diminish cardiovascular morbidity and mortality rates. The management of dyslipidemia remains suboptimal. Risk equations may perform poorly in RA patients even when corrected using the multiplication factors suggested by the EUropean League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) (multiply the score by 1.5 when two of the following three criteria are met: disease duration longer than 10 years, presence of rheumatoid factor or anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies, and extraarticular manifestations). Doppler ultrasonography of the carotid arteries in patients at moderate cardiovascular risk may allow a more aggressive approach to dyslipidemia management via reclassification into the high-risk category of patients with an intima-media thickness greater than 0.9 mm or atheroma plaque. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  2. Rheumatoid arthritis and sleep quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goes, Ana Claudia Janiszewski; Reis, Larissa Aparecida Busatto; Silva, Marilia Barreto G; Kahlow, Barbara Stadler; Skare, Thelma L

    Sleep disturbances are common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and contribute to loss of life quality. To study associations of sleep quality with pain, depression and disease activity in RA. This is a transversal observational study of 112 RA patients submitted to measurement of DAS-28, Epworth scale for daily sleepiness, index of sleep quality by Pittsburg index, risk of sleep apnea by the Berlin questionnaire and degree of depression by the CES-D (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale) questionnaire. We also collected epidemiological, clinical, serological and treatment data. Only 18.5% of RA patients had sleep of good quality. In univariate analysis a bad sleep measured by Pittsburg index was associated with daily doses of prednisone (p=0.03), DAS-28 (p=0.01), CES-D (p=0.0005) and showed a tendency to be associated with Berlin sleep apnea questionnaire (p=0.06). In multivariate analysis only depression (p=0.008) and Berlin sleep apnea questionnaire (p=0.004) kept this association. Most of RA patients do not have a good sleep quality. Depression and risk of sleep apnea are independently associated with sleep impairment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Glucocorticoids in nano-liposomes administered intravenously and subcutaneously to adjuvant arthritis rats are superior to the free drugs in suppressing arthritis and inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmansky, Rina; Turjeman, Keren; Baru, Moshe; Katzavian, Galia; Harel, Michal; Sigal, Alex; Naparstek, Yaakov; Barenholz, Yechezkel

    2012-06-10

    We have previously shown that intravenous (i.v.) treatment with sterically stabilized nano-liposomes (NSSL) actively remote-loaded with the glucocorticoid (GC) methylprednisolone hemisuccinate (NSSL-MPS) or betamethasone hemisuccinate (NSSL-BMS) significantly decreased severity of adjuvant arthritis in Lewis rats (a model of human rheumatoid arthritis) throughout all disease stages. Here, we compared i.v. or subcutaneous (s.c.) weekly treatment with each of the two NSSL-GC to weekly or daily treatment with the free drugs or with the TNF-α antagonists Infliximab and Etanercept. Therapeutic efficacy and effects on the profile of pro-inflammatory (IL-6, TNF-α, and INF-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10 and TGF-β) cytokines in rat sera and splenocyte tissue culture supernatants were compared to those of the liposomal and free drugs. Both s.c. and i.v. NSSL-GC suppressed arthritis significantly, compared to higher doses of the free drugs or to TNF-α antagonists. NSSL-GC also suppressed the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, but did not change the levels of TGF- β. The highly efficacious anti-inflammatory therapeutic feature of these nano-drugs makes them candidates for treatment of human rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of symptoms and self-efficacy in predicting physical activity change among older adults with arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperber, Nina; Hall, Katherine S; Allen, Kelli; DeVellis, Brenda M; Lewis, Megan; Callahan, Leigh F

    2014-03-01

    Physical and psychological symptoms limit physical activity for people with arthritis. This study examined if self-efficacy mediated a relationship between symptom and physical activity (PA) frequency change. This was a secondary analysis of older adults with arthritis and joint pain in a trial of a lifestyle PA program (n = 339). Measures were depressive symptoms, pain, fatigue, arthritis self-efficacy, PA self-efficacy, and PA frequency. A panel model was used to analyze relationships at baseline and changes at 20 weeks. The mean age was 68.8 years. At baseline, depression and fatigue were associated with arthritis self-efficacy (β = -.34 and -.24) and, in turn, PA self-efficacy (β = .63); PA self-efficacy was associated with PA (β = .15). Pain and depression changes were associated with arthritis self-efficacy change (β = -.20 and -.21) and, in turn, PA self-efficacy (β = .32) change; PA self-efficacy change was associated with PA change (β = .36). Change in symptom severity affected change in PA frequency. These relationships appeared to operate through self-efficacy. Over time, pain appeared to have a stronger relationship than fatigue with self-efficacy and PA. These findings support strategies to help people with arthritis strengthen their confidence for symptom coping and PA participation.

  5. Fatigue - an underestimated symptom in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewska-Włodarczyk, Magdalena; Owczarczyk-Saczonek, Agnieszka; Placek, Waldemar

    2017-01-01

    The nature of fatigue is very complex and involves physiological, psychological and social phenomena at the same time, and the mechanisms leading to occurrence and severity of fatigue are still poorly understood. The condition of chronic inflammation associated with psoriatic arthritis can be regarded as a potential factor affecting development of fatigue. Only a few studies so far have focused on the occurrence of fatigue in psoriatic arthritis. The problem of chronic fatigue is underestimated in everyday clinical practice. Identification and analysis of subjective fatigue components in each patient can provide an objective basis for optimal fatigue treatment in daily practice. This review presents a definition of chronic fatigue and describes mechanisms that may be associated with development of fatigue, highlighting the role of chronic inflammation, selected fatigue measurement methods and relations of fatigue occurrence with clinical aspects of psoriatic arthritis.

  6. Increased chemotaxis and activity of circulatory myeloid progenitor cells may contribute to enhanced osteoclastogenesis and bone loss in the C57BL/6 mouse model of collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikić Matijašević, M; Flegar, D; Kovačić, N; Katavić, V; Kelava, T; Šućur, A; Ivčević, S; Cvija, H; Lazić Mosler, E; Kalajzić, I; Marušić, A; Grčević, D

    2016-12-01

    Our study aimed to determine the functional activity of different osteoclast progenitor (OCP) subpopulations and signals important for their migration to bone lesions, causing local and systemic bone resorption during the course of collagen-induced arthritis in C57BL/6 mice. Arthritis was induced with chicken type II collagen (CII), and assessed by clinical scoring and detection of anti-CII antibodies. We observed decreased trabecular bone volume of axial and appendicular skeleton by histomorphometry and micro-computed tomography as well as decreased bone formation and increased bone resorption rate in arthritic mice in vivo. In the affected joints, bone loss was accompanied with severe osteitis and bone marrow hypercellularity, coinciding with the areas of active osteoclasts and bone erosions. Flow cytometry analysis showed increased frequency of putative OCP cells (CD3 - B220 - NK1.1 - CD11b -/lo CD117 + CD115 + for bone marrow and CD3 - B220 - NK1.1 - CD11b + CD115 + Gr-1 + for peripheral haematopoietic tissues), which exhibited enhanced differentiation potential in vitro. Moreover, the total CD11b + population was expanded in arthritic mice as well as CD11b + F4/80 + macrophage, CD11b + NK1.1 + natural killer cell and CD11b + CD11c + myeloid dendritic cell populations in both bone marrow and peripheral blood. In addition, arthritic mice had increased expression of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, CC chemokine ligand-2 (Ccl2) and Ccl5, with increased migration and differentiation of circulatory OCPs in response to CCL2 and, particularly, CCL5 signals. Our study characterized the frequency and functional properties of OCPs under inflammatory conditions associated with arthritis, which may help to clarify crucial molecular signals provided by immune cells to mediate systemically enhanced osteoresorption. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  7. Euglena gracilis Z and its carbohydrate storage substance relieve arthritis symptoms by modulating Th17 immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kengo Suzuki

    Full Text Available Euglena gracilis Z is a microorganism classified as a microalga and is used as a food or nutritional supplement. Paramylon, the carbohydrate storage substance of E. gracilis Z, is reported to affect the immunological system. This study evaluated the symptom-relieving effects of E. gracilis Z and paramylon in rheumatoid arthritis in a collagen-induced arthritis mouse model. The efficacy of both substances was assessed based on clinical arthritis signs, as well as cytokine (interleukin [IL]-17, IL-6, and interferon [IFN]-γ levels in lymphoid tissues. Additionally, the knee joints were harvested and histopathologically examined. The results showed that both substances reduced the transitional changes in the visual assessment score of arthritis symptoms compared with those in the control group, indicating their symptom-relieving effects on rheumatoid arthritis. Furthermore, E. gracilis Z and paramylon significantly reduced the secretion of the cytokines, IL-17, IL-6, and IFN-γ. The histopathological examination of the control group revealed edema, inflammation, cell hyperplasia, granulation tissue formation, fibrosis, and exudate in the synovial membrane, as well as pannus formation and articular cartilage destruction in the femoral trochlear groove. These changes were suppressed in both treatment groups. Particularly, the E. gracilis Z group showed no edema, inflammation, and fibrosis of the synovial membrane, or pannus formation and destruction of articular cartilage in the femoral trochlear groove. Furthermore, E. gracilis Z and paramylon exhibited symptom-relieving effects on rheumatoid arthritis and suppressed the secretion of cytokines IL-17, IL-6, and IFN-γ. These effects were likely mediated by the regulatory activities of E. gracilis Z and paramylon on Th17 immunity. In addition, the symptom-relieving effects of both substances were comparable, which suggests that paramylon is the active component of Euglena gracilis Z.

  8. Euglena gracilis Z and its carbohydrate storage substance relieve arthritis symptoms by modulating Th17 immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kengo; Nakashima, Ayaka; Igarashi, Masaharu; Saito, Keita; Konno, Makoto; Yamazaki, Noriyuki; Takimoto, Hiroaki

    2018-01-01

    Euglena gracilis Z is a microorganism classified as a microalga and is used as a food or nutritional supplement. Paramylon, the carbohydrate storage substance of E. gracilis Z, is reported to affect the immunological system. This study evaluated the symptom-relieving effects of E. gracilis Z and paramylon in rheumatoid arthritis in a collagen-induced arthritis mouse model. The efficacy of both substances was assessed based on clinical arthritis signs, as well as cytokine (interleukin [IL]-17, IL-6, and interferon [IFN]-γ) levels in lymphoid tissues. Additionally, the knee joints were harvested and histopathologically examined. The results showed that both substances reduced the transitional changes in the visual assessment score of arthritis symptoms compared with those in the control group, indicating their symptom-relieving effects on rheumatoid arthritis. Furthermore, E. gracilis Z and paramylon significantly reduced the secretion of the cytokines, IL-17, IL-6, and IFN-γ. The histopathological examination of the control group revealed edema, inflammation, cell hyperplasia, granulation tissue formation, fibrosis, and exudate in the synovial membrane, as well as pannus formation and articular cartilage destruction in the femoral trochlear groove. These changes were suppressed in both treatment groups. Particularly, the E. gracilis Z group showed no edema, inflammation, and fibrosis of the synovial membrane, or pannus formation and destruction of articular cartilage in the femoral trochlear groove. Furthermore, E. gracilis Z and paramylon exhibited symptom-relieving effects on rheumatoid arthritis and suppressed the secretion of cytokines IL-17, IL-6, and IFN-γ. These effects were likely mediated by the regulatory activities of E. gracilis Z and paramylon on Th17 immunity. In addition, the symptom-relieving effects of both substances were comparable, which suggests that paramylon is the active component of Euglena gracilis Z. PMID:29389956

  9. Arthritis increases the risk for fractures--results from the Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Nicole C; Lisse, Jeffrey R; Walitt, Brian T; Eaton, Charles B; Chen, Zhao

    2011-08-01

    To examine the relationship between arthritis and fracture. Women were classified into 3 self-reported groups at baseline: no arthritis (n = 83,295), osteoarthritis (OA; n = 63,402), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA; n = 960). Incident fractures were self-reported throughout followup. Age-adjusted fracture rates by arthritis category were generated, and the Cox proportional hazards model was used to test the association between arthritis and fracture. After an average of 7.80 years, 24,137 total fractures were reported including 2559 self-reported clinical spinal fractures and 1698 adjudicated hip fractures. For each fracture type, age-adjusted fracture rates were highest in the RA group and lowest in the nonarthritic group. After adjustment for several covariates, report of arthritis was associated with increased risk for spine, hip, and any clinical fractures. Compared to the nonarthritis group, the risk of sustaining any clinical fracture in the OA group was HR 1.09 (95% CI 1.05, 1.13; p < 0.001) and HR 1.49 (95% CI 1.26, 1.75; p < 0.001) in the RA group. The risk of sustaining a hip fracture was not statistically increased in the OA group (HR 1.11; 95% CI 0.98, 1.25; p = 0.122) compared to the nonarthritis group; however, the risk of hip fracture increased significantly (HR 3.03; 95% CI 2.03, 4.51; p < 0.001) in the RA group compared to the nonarthritis group. The increase in fracture risk confirms the importance of fracture prevention in patients with RA and OA.

  10. Radiosynovectomy in the Therapeutic Management of Arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knut, Liepe

    2015-01-01

    Radiosynovectomy is a well-established therapy in arthritis and involves an intra-articular injection of small radioactive particles to treat a synovitis. In Europe, frequent indications are rheumatoid and poly-arthritis. Especially in Germany radiosynovectomy is the second common therapy in Nuclear Medicine with about 40,000–60,000 treated joints per year. In Spain, USA, Turkey, Argentines and Philippines the therapy is more use in hemophilic arthritis with excellent results. Especially in developing countries with low availability of clotting factors, the radiosynovectomy represent a cost effective therapeutic option for repeated bleedings in hemophilic arthropathy. The special focus in these countries is maintaining of mobility and work ability. Often only the knee and medium joints (ankle, elbow and shoulder) are treated using yttrium-90, rhenium-186 or phosphorus-32. However, in rheumatoid arthritis most common affected joints are the fingers. For the treatment in these small joints, erbium-169 is necessary. Unfortunately, erbium-169 is only available in Europe. Further indications for radiosynovectomy are osteoarthritis and the articular effusion after joint replacement. The reported response rates in rheumatoid and poly-arthritis range from 60% to 80% depends from the stage of previous arthrosis. The best effectiveness of therapy was observed in hemophilic arthritis with response rate of 90% and significant reducing of bleeding frequency. The therapy is well-tolerated with low rate of side effects. In respect of the specific uptake of particles in the synovia and short range of beta radiation, the radiation exposure outside the joint is very low. The radiosynovectomy has efforts in comparison to surgical synovectomy: it's a minor intervention with low costs; and simultaneous treatments of multiple joints or treatment in short intervals are possible. The presented paper summarized the published papers and reports our own experiences in >15,000 treated

  11. Suppression of Inflammation and Arthritis by Orally Administrated Cardiotoxin from Naja naja atra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao-Xin Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiotoxin (CTX from Naja naja atra venom (NNAV reportedly had analgesic effect in animal models but its role in inflammation and arthritis was unknown. In this study, we investigated the analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antiarthritic actions of orally administered CTX-IV isolated from NNAV on rodent models of inflammation and adjuvant arthritis. CTX had significant anti-inflammatory effects in models of egg white induced nonspecific inflammation, filter paper induced rat granuloma formation, and capillary osmosis tests. CTX significantly reduced the swelling of paw induced by egg white, the inflammatory exudation, and the formation of granulomas. CTX reduced the swelling of paw, the AA clinical scores, and pathological alterations of joint. CTX significantly decreased the number of the CD4 T cells and inhibited the expression of relevant proinflammatory cytokines IL-17 and IL-6. CTX significantly inhibited the secretion of proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 and reduced the level of p-STAT3 in FLS. These results suggest that CTX inhibits inflammation and inflammatory pain and adjuvant-induced arthritis. CTX may be a novel therapeutic drug for treatment of arthritis.

  12. Insulin-Like Growth Factor I Does Not Drive New Bone Formation in Experimental Arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa N van Tok

    Full Text Available Insulin like growth factor (IGF-I can act on a variety of cells involved in cartilage and bone repair, yet IGF-I has not been studied extensively in the context of inflammatory arthritis. The objective of this study was to investigate whether IGF-I overexpression in the osteoblast lineage could lead to increased reparative or pathological bone formation in rheumatoid arthritis and/or spondyloarthritis respectively.Mice overexpressing IGF-I in the osteoblast lineage (Ob-IGF-I+/- line 324-7 were studied during collagen induced arthritis and in the DBA/1 aging model for ankylosing enthesitis. Mice were scored clinically and peripheral joints were analysed histologically for the presence of hypertrophic chondrocytes and osteocalcin positive osteoblasts.90-100% of the mice developed CIA with no differences between the Ob-IGF-I+/- and non-transgenic littermates. Histological analysis revealed similar levels of hypertrophic chondrocytes and osteocalcin positive osteoblasts in the ankle joints. In the DBA/1 aging model for ankylosing enthesitis 60% of the mice in both groups had a clinical score 1<. Severity was similar between both groups. Histological analysis revealed the presence of hypertrophic chondrocytes and osteocalcin positive osteoblasts in the toes in equal levels.Overexpression of IGF-I in the osteoblast lineage does not contribute to an increase in repair of erosions or syndesmophyte formation in mouse models for destructive and remodeling arthritis.

  13. Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha Targeting Can Protect against Arthritis with Low Sensitization to Infection

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    Nadia Belmellat

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α blockade is an effective treatment for rheumatoid arthritis (RA and other inflammatory diseases, but in patients, it is associated with reduced resistance to the infectious agents Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Listeria monocytogenes, among others. Our goal was to model infection and arthritis in mice and to compare etanercept, a currently used anti-TNF-α inhibitor, to an anti-TNF-α vaccine. We developed a murine surrogate of the TNF-α kinoid and produced an anti-murine TNF-α vaccine (TNFKi composed of keyhole limpet hemocyanin conjugated to TNF-α, which resulted in anti-TNF-α antibody production in mice. We also used etanercept (a soluble receptor of TNF commonly used to treat RA as a control of TNF neutralization. In a mouse model of collagen-induced arthritis, TNFKi protected against inflammation similar to etanercept. In a mouse model of acute L. monocytogenes infection, all TNFKi-treated mice showed cleared bacterial infection and survived, whereas etanercept-treated mice showed large liver granulomas and quickly died. Moreover, TNFKi mice infected with the virulent H37Rv M. tuberculosis showed resistance to infection, in contrast with etanercept-treated mice or controls. Depending on the TNF-α blockade strategy, treating arthritis with a TNF-α inhibitor could result in a different profile of infection suceptibility. Our TNFKi vaccine allowed for a better remaining host defense than did etanercept.

  14. Septic arthritis caused by Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus

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    Carlos Costa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Peptostreptococcus spp are commensal organisms, usually involved in periodontal disease. Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus is an anaerobic gram-negative cocci, difficult to isolate due to its slow growth. Septic arthritis by this microorganism is a rare entity, but it can occur by hematogenous dissemination from a distant focus. Colonization and growth are more likely to occur in an already damaged articulation. We report the case of a 57 year-old woman with peripheral spondyloarthritis who developed knee septic arthritis by Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus.

  15. Penicillamin-induced neuropathy in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P B; Hogenhaven, H

    1990-01-01

    A case of penicillamin-induced severe polyradiculopathy in rheumatoid arthritis is presented. The neuropathy was of demyelinating type, purely motor, proximal and clinically fully reversible when the drug ceased. In case of a progressive neuropathy, during penicillamin treatment, this adverse eff...... effect should be born in mind, and discontinuation of the drug considered.......A case of penicillamin-induced severe polyradiculopathy in rheumatoid arthritis is presented. The neuropathy was of demyelinating type, purely motor, proximal and clinically fully reversible when the drug ceased. In case of a progressive neuropathy, during penicillamin treatment, this adverse...

  16. Septic arthritis caused by Enterobacter agglomerans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatauer, F E; Khan, M A

    1978-05-01

    A case of septic arthritis was caused by Enterobacter agglomerans, an association that to our knowledge has not been described previously. The right knee joint of a previously healthy 11-year-old boy became infected when the organism was introduced through the overlying skin by a contaminated wooden splinter. Conservative management with antibiotic therapy and repeated arthrocenteses was successful. Enterobacter agglomerans is a known plant pathogen, and a relationship between human infections caused by this organism and contact with plants is well recognized. The patient described here demonstrates that, when given a suitable set of environmental circumstances, E agglomerans can cause infection in man, including septic arthritis.

  17. Therapy of rheumatoid arthritis by radiosynovectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mruck, S.; Feistel, H.; Kat, S.; Kuwert, T.

    2001-01-01

    Radiosynovectomy is a therapeutic modality for local treatment of inflammatory point diseases. It is performed by intraarticular instillation of beta-emitting radionuclides. Its effectiveness is based upon the anti-inflammatory action of beta-radiation. Accordingly, the indication of radiosynovectomy is based upon the evidence of the inflammatory etiology of disease. The principle of its therapeutic action makes radiosynovectomy a valuable device for successful treatment of florid rheumatoid arthritis. It can be performed as an alternative to surgical synovectomy or in combination with it. The following article describes the therapeutic management of rheumatoid arthritis by radiosynovectomy including patient preparation, performance, and follow-up. (orig.) [de

  18. Connective tissue markers of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, H J

    1998-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common systemic autoimmune disorder of unknown aetiology. The most common outcome of RA is a progressive development of joint destruction and deformity. Early introduction of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs seems important for prevention of the long term...... of rheumatoid factor contributes to the classification of arthritis as RA, and acute phase reactants are useful for quantifying and comparing the level of inflammatory activity in the course of a given patient. There is, however, a lack of sensitive and specific biochemical markers for RA, and frontline...

  19. Protective effects of a blueberry extract in acute inflammation and collagen-induced arthritis in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, Maria-Eduardo; Oliveira, Mónica; Direito, Rosa; Rocha, João; Alves, Paula; Serra, Ana-Teresa; Duarte, Catarina; Bronze, Rosário; Fernandes, Adelaide; Brites, Dora; Freitas, Marisa; Fernandes, Eduarda; Sepodes, Bruno

    2016-10-01

    Here we investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of a blueberry extract in the carrageenan-induced paw edema model and collagen-induced arthritis model, both in rats. Along with the chemical characterization of the phenolic content of the fruits and extract, the antioxidant potential of the extract, the cellular antioxidant activity and the effects over neutrophils' oxidative burst, were studied in order to provide a mechanistic insight for the anti-inflammatory effects observed. The extract significantly inhibited paw edema formation in an acute model the rat. Our results also demonstrate that the standardized extract had pharmacological activity when administered orally in the collagen-induced arthritis model in the rat and was able to significantly reduce the development of clinical signs of arthritis and the degree of bone resorption, soft tissue swelling and osteophyte formation, consequently improving articular function in treated animals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. SECONDARY OSTEOARTHRITIS IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

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    I. A. Starodubtseva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the problems of comorbidities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Two or more RA-related conditions were diagnosed according to the results of the QUEST-RA program implemented in 34 countries. Osteoarthritis along with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and osteoporosis was detected among the most commonly diseases. Owing to expanded diagnostic capabilities, the recognition and treatment of the comorbidities have recently received much attention, as embodied in the draft Association of Rheumatologists of Russia Guidelines for RA management (2014; Part 1. The concept and major characteristics of secondary osteoarthritis in RA are analyzed. It is precisely the inflammatory process and underlying disease-related risk factors, including treatment, that have impact on the development of secondary osteoarthritis and patients’ quality of life as a whole. All this allows an inference about the mechanisms closely intertwined with the underlying disease for the development of secondary osteoarthritis, which initiates cartilage damage and further remodeling. Primary and secondary osteoarthritis was comparatively analyzed. Particular emphasis is placed on current cartilage biomarkers, their diagnostic value and role in monitoring the efficiency of treatment in clinical trials. The paper provides a comparative analysis of detectable serum and urine biomarkers according to the results of the complex analysis made by the National Institutes of Health. Particular attention is given to cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP. Foreign authors’ investigations suggest that there is a relationship between serum COMP levels and disease severity and joint X-ray changes. There is evidence for the efficacy of hyaluronic acid used in the treatment of secondary osteoarthritis in patients with RA.