WorldWideScience

Sample records for antigen-dc-lamp messenger rna-electroporated

  1. Messenger RNA electroporation of human monocytes, followed by rapid in vitro differentiation, leads to highly stimulatory antigen-loaded mature dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsaerts, Peter; Van den Bosch, Glenn; Cools, Nathalie; Van Driessche, Ann; Nijs, Griet; Lenjou, Marc; Lardon, Filip; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Van Bockstaele, Dirk R; Berneman, Zwi N; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F I

    2002-08-15

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional Ag-capturing and -presenting cells of the immune system. Because of their exceptional capability of activating tumor-specific T cells, cancer vaccination research is now shifting toward the formulation of a clinical human DC vaccine. We developed a short term and serum-free culture protocol for rapid generation of fully mature, viable, and highly stimulatory CD83(+) DC. Human monocytes were cultured for 24 h in serum-free AIM-V medium, followed by 24-h maturation by polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (polyI:C). Short term cultured, polyI:C-maturated DC, far more than immature DC, showed typical mature DC markers and high allogeneic stimulatory capacity and had high autologous stimulatory capacity in an influenza model system using peptide-pulsed DC. Electroporation of mRNA as an Ag-loading strategy in these cells was optimized using mRNA encoding the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Monocytes electroporated with EGFP mRNA, followed by short term, serum-free differentiation to mature DC, had a phenotype of DC, and all showed positive EGFP fluorescence. Influenza matrix protein mRNA-electroporated monocytes cultured serum-free and maturated with polyI:C showed high stimulatory capacity in autologous T cell activation experiments. In conclusion, the present short term and serum-free ex vivo DC culture protocol in combination with mRNA electroporation at the monocyte stage imply an important reduction in time and consumables for preparation of Ag-loaded mature DC compared with classical DC culture protocols and might find application in clinical immunotherapy settings.

  2. High-Efficiency Transfection of Primary Human and Mouse T Lymphocytes Using RNA Electroporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yangbing; Zheng, Zhili; Cohen, Cyrille J.; Gattinoni, Luca; Palmer, Douglas C.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Morgan, Richard A.

    2006-01-01

    The use of nonviral gene transfer methods in primary lymphocytes has been hampered by low gene transfer efficiency and high transfection-related toxicity. In this report, high gene transfection efficiency with low transfection-related toxicity was achieved by electroporation using in vitro-transcribed mRNA. Using these methods, >90% transgene expression with >80% viable cells was observed in stimulated primary human and murine T lymphocytes transfected with GFP or mCD62L. Electroporation of unstimulated human PBMCs or murine splenocytes with GFP RNA yielded 95 and 56% GFP+ cells, respectively. Electroporation of mRNA for NY-ESO-1, MART-1, and p53 antigen-specific TCRs into human T lymphocytes redirected these lymphocytes to recognize melanoma cell lines in an MHC-restricted manner. The onset of gene expression was rapid (within 30 min) and durable (up to 7 days postelectroporation) using both GFP and TCR-mediated recognition of target cells. There was no adverse effect observed on the T lymphocytes subjected to RNA electroporation evaluated by cell growth rate, annexin-V staining of apoptotic cells, BrdU incorporation, tumor antigen-specific recognition or antigen-specific TCR affinity. The results of this study indicate that mRNA electroporation provides a powerful tool to introduce genes into both human and murine primary T lymphocytes. PMID:16140584

  3. Studies on mRNA electroporation of immature and mature dendritic cells: Effects on their immunogenic potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Met, O.; Eriksen, J.; Svane, Inge Marie

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that mRNA-electroporated dendritic cells (DCs) are able to process and present tumor-associated antigens, leading to the activation of tumor-specific T cells in vitro and in vivo. However, the optimal maturation state of antigen loading and half-life of the m...

  4. Expression of HTLV-1 Genes in T-Cells Using RNA Electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manicone, Mariangela; Rende, Francesca; Cavallari, Ilaria; Thoma-Kress, Andrea K; Ciminale, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infects about 20 million people world-wide. Around 5% of the infected individuals develop adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) or a neurological disease termed tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP) after a clinical latency of years to decades. Through the use of two promoters and alternative splicing HTLV-1 expresses at least 12 different proteins. HTLV-1 establishes a life-long persistent infection by inducing the clonal expansion of infected cells, a property largely ascribed to the viral genes Tax and HBZ. However, the fact that ATL arises in a minority of infected individuals after a long clinical latency suggests the existence of factors counterbalancing the oncogenic potential of HTLV-1 in the context of natural infection.To study the role of the different HTLV-1 gene products in the HTLV-1 life cycle, we optimized a transfection protocol for primary T-cells using an approach based on the electroporation of in vitro-transcribed RNA. Results showed that the RNA transfection technique combines a high transfection efficiency with low toxicity, not only in Jurkat T-cells but also in primary T-cells. These findings suggest that RNA electroporation is preferable for experiments aimed at investigating the role of HTLV-1 gene products in the context of primary T-cells, which represent the main target of HTLV-1 in vivo.

  5. Whole tumor antigen vaccination using dendritic cells: Comparison of RNA electroporation and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benencia Fabian

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Because of the lack of full characterization of tumor associated antigens for solid tumors, whole antigen use is a convenient approach to tumor vaccination. Tumor RNA and apoptotic tumor cells have been used as a source of whole tumor antigen to prepare dendritic cell (DC based tumor vaccines, but their efficacy has not been directly compared. Here we compare directly RNA electroporation and pulsing of DCs with whole tumor cells killed by ultraviolet (UV B radiation using a convenient tumor model expressing human papilloma virus (HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes. Although both approaches led to DCs presenting tumor antigen, electroporation with tumor cell total RNA induced a significantly higher frequency of tumor-reactive IFN-gamma secreting T cells, and E7-specific CD8+ lymphocytes compared to pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells. DCs electroporated with tumor cell RNA induced a larger tumor infiltration by T cells and produced a significantly stronger delay in tumor growth compared to DCs pulsed with UV-irradiated tumor cells. We conclude that electroporation with whole tumor cell RNA and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells are both effective in eliciting antitumor immune response, but RNA electroporation results in more potent tumor vaccination under the examined experimental conditions.

  6. Clinical-grade manufacturing of autologous mature mRNA-electroporated dendritic cells and safety testing in acute myeloid leukemia patients in a phase I dose-escalation clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessche, A. Van; Velde, A.L. Van de; Nijs, G.; Braeckman, T.; Stein, B.; Vries, I.J.M. de; Berneman, Z.N.; Tendeloo, V.F. Van

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AIMS: RNA-electroporated dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines are rapidly gaining interest as therapeutic cancer vaccines. We report on a phase I dose-escalation trial using clinical-grade manufactured mature RNA-electroporated DC in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. METHODS: CD14(+)

  7. Membrane-attached Cytokines Expressed by mRNA Electroporation Act as Potent T-Cell Adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein-Marom, Hadas; Pato, Aviad; Levin, Noam; Susid, Keren; Itzhaki, Orit; Besser, Michal J; Peretz, Tamar; Margalit, Alon; Lotem, Michal; Gross, Gideon

    2016-01-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines are widely explored in different adoptive cell therapy protocols for enhancing survival and function of the transferred T cells, but their systemic administration is often associated with severe toxicity which limits their clinical use. To confine cytokine availability to the therapeutic T cells, we expressed 3 key cytokines, IL-2, IL-12, and IL-15, as integral T-cell membrane proteins. To prevent permanent activation of growth signaling pathways, we delivered these genes to T cells through mRNA electroporation. The engineered cytokines could be detected on the surface of mRNA-transfected cells and binding to their cell-surface receptors mainly occurred in cis. The 3 human cytokines supported the ex vivo growth of activated human CD8 and CD4 T cells for at least 6 days posttransfection, comparably to high-dose soluble IL-2. Similarly, membrane IL-2, membrane IL-12, and, to a lesser extent, membrane IL-15, were comparable with their soluble counterparts in supporting proliferation of splenic mouse CD8 T cells. Following electroporation of human CD8 T cells and antimelanoma tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, membrane cytokines synergized with constitutively active toll-like receptor 4 in inducing interferon-γ secretion. Efficient cooperation with TLR4 was also evident in the upregulation of the activation molecules CD25, CD69, CD137 (4-1BB), and CD134 (OX40). Taken together, membrane cytokines expressed through mRNA transfection emerge as effective tools for enhancing T-cell proliferation and function and may have potential use in adoptive T-cell therapy.

  8. Transmembrane Signalling: Membrane messengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockroft, Scott L.

    2017-05-01

    Life has evolved elaborate means of communicating essential chemical information across cell membranes. Inspired by biology, two new artificial mechanisms have now been developed that use synthetic messenger molecules to relay chemical signals into or across lipid membranes.

  9. Characterization of CD8+ T-Cell Responses in the Peripheral Blood and Skin Injection Sites of Melanoma Patients Treated with mRNA Electroporated Autologous Dendritic Cells (TriMixDC-MEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphné Benteyn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of melanoma patients with mRNA electroporated dendritic cells (TriMixDC-MEL stimulates T-cell responses against the presented tumor-associated antigens (TAAs. In the current clinical trials, melanoma patients with systemic metastases are treated, requiring priming and/or expansion of preexisting TAA-specific T cells that are able to migrate to both the skin and internal organs. We monitored the presence of TAA-specific CD8+ T cells infiltrating the skin at sites of intradermal TriMixDC-MEL injection (SKILs and within the circulation of melanoma patients treated in two clinical trials. In 10 out of fourteen (71% patients screened, CD8+ T cells recognizing any of the four TAA presented by TriMixDC-MEL cellular vaccine were found in both compartments. In total, 30 TAA-specific T-cell responses were detected among the SKILs and 29 among peripheral blood T cells, of which 24 in common. A detailed characterization of the antigen specificity of CD8+ T-cell populations in four patients indicates that the majority of the epitopes detected were only recognized by CD8+ T cells derived from either skin biopsies or peripheral blood, indicating that some compartmentalization occurs after TriMix-DC therapy. To conclude, functional TAA-specific CD8+ T cells distribute both to the skin and peripheral blood of patients after TriMixDC-MEL therapy.

  10. Messengers of new physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodejohann, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Postfach 103980, D-69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Shiozawa, M. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka-cho, Hida-shi, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    The talks of the parallel session 'Messengers of new physics' of the NOW2010 workshop are summarized. Topics under discussion included models of neutrino mass and mixing, charged lepton flavor violation and neutrinos, neutrinos and the LHC, future large-volume detectors, neutrinos and dark matter, neutrino properties and interactions beyond the Standard Model, leptogenesis, etc.

  11. Dynamical Messengers for Gauge Mediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hook, Anson; Torroba, Gonzalo; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-17

    We construct models of indirect gauge mediation where the dynamics responsible for breaking supersymmetry simultaneously generates a weakly coupled subsector of messengers. This provides a microscopic realization of messenger gauge mediation where the messenger and hidden sector fields are unified into a single sector. The UV theory is SQCD with massless and massive quarks plus singlets, and at low energies it flows to a weakly coupled quiver gauge theory. One node provides the primary source of supersymmetry breaking, which is then transmitted to the node giving rise to the messenger fields. These models break R-symmetry spontaneously, produce realistic gaugino and sfermion masses, and give a heavy gravitino.

  12. MESSENGER: Exploring Mercury's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.

    2008-01-01

    The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet's miniature magnetosphere since Mariner 10's brief fly-bys in 1974-5. Mercury's magnetosphere is unique in many respects. The magnetosphere of Mercury is the smallest in the solar system with its magnetic field typically standing off the solar wind only - 1000 to 2000 km above the surface. For this reason there are no closed dri-fi paths for energetic particles and, hence, no radiation belts; the characteristic time scales for wave propagation and convective transport are short possibly coupling kinetic and fluid modes; magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause may erode the subsolar magnetosphere allowing solar wind ions to directly impact the dayside regolith; inductive currents in Mercury's interior should act to modify the solar In addition, Mercury's magnetosphere is the only one with its defining magnetic flux tubes rooted in a planetary regolith as opposed to an atmosphere with a conductive ionosphere. This lack of an ionosphere is thought to be the underlying reason for the brevity of the very intense, but short lived, approx. 1-2 min, substorm-like energetic particle events observed by Mariner 10 in Mercury's magnetic tail. In this seminar, we review what we think we know about Mercury's magnetosphere and describe the MESSENGER science team's strategy for obtaining answers to the outstanding science questions surrounding the interaction of the solar wind with Mercury and its small, but dynamic magnetosphere.

  13. MESSENGER'S First Flyby of Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.

    2008-01-01

    The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet's miniature magnetosphere since Mariner 10's brief fly-bys in 1974-5. The magnetosphere of Mercury is the smallest in the solar system with its magnetic field typically standing off the solar wind only - 1000 to 2000 km above the surface. An overview of the MESSENGER mission and its January 14th close flyby of Mercury will be provided. Primary science objectives and the science instrumentation will be described. Initial results from MESSENGER'S first flyby on January 14th, 2008 will be discussed with an emphasis on the magnetic field and charged particle measurements.

  14. Translational Influence on Messenger Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Mette

    , on messenger stability was examined. Depending on the translation initiation frequency, the chance of an initial ribosome trailing the RNA polymerase get better for better initiation sites, thus protecting transcription from termination by Rho. A polarity assay in which the activity of the downstream lac......-termination to be a global phenomena in gene regulation. The influence of codon usage in the early coding region on messenger stability was examined, in order to establish how fast or slow the ribosome has to decode the sequence for it to protect the messenger from degradation. The experiments demonstrated that very fast...

  15. Peptide primary messengers in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The peptide primary messengers regulate embryonic development,cell growth and many other activities in animal cells. But recent evidence verified that peptide primary messengers are also involved in plant defense responses, the recognition between pollen and stigma and keep the balance between cell proliferation and differentiations in shoot apical meristems. Those results suggest that plants may actually make wide use of peptide primary messengers, both in embryonic development and late life when they rally their cells to defend against pathogens and insect pests. The recent advance in those aspects is reviewed.

  16. The MESSENGER Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, James C.; Conde, Richard F.; Dakermanji, George; Engelbrecht, Carl S.; Ercol, Carl J.; Fielhauer, Karl B.; Grant, David G.; Hartka, Theodore J.; Hill, Tracy A.; Jaskulek, Stephen E.; Mirantes, Mary A.; Mosher, Larry E.; Paul, Michael V.; Persons, David F.; Rodberg, Elliot H.; Srinivasan, Dipak K.; Vaughan, Robin M.; Wiley, Samuel R.

    2007-08-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft was designed and constructed to withstand the harsh environments associated with achieving and operating in Mercury orbit. The system can be divided into eight subsystems: structures and mechanisms (e.g., the composite core structure, aluminum launch vehicle adapter, and deployables), propulsion (e.g., the state-of-the-art titanium fuel tanks, thruster modules, and associated plumbing), thermal (e.g., the ceramic-cloth sunshade, heaters, and radiators), power (e.g., solar arrays, battery, and controlling electronics), avionics (e.g., the processors, solid-state recorder, and data handling electronics), software (e.g., processor-supported code that performs commanding, data handling, and spacecraft control), guidance and control (e.g., attitude sensors including star cameras and Sun sensors integrated with controllers including reaction wheels), radio frequency telecommunications (e.g., the spacecraft antenna suites and supporting electronics), and payload (e.g., the science instruments and supporting processors). This system architecture went through an extensive (nearly four-year) development and testing effort that provided the team with confidence that all mission goals will be achieved.

  17. The Messenger Mission to Mercury

    CERN Document Server

    Domingue, D. L

    2007-01-01

    NASA’s MESSENGER mission, launched on 3 August, 2004 is the seventh mission in the Discovery series. MESSENGER encounters the planet Mercury four times, culminating with an insertion into orbit on 18 March 2011. It carries a comprehensive package of geophysical, geological, geochemical, and space environment experiments to complete the complex investigations of this solar-system end member, which begun with Mariner 10. The articles in this book, written by the experts in each area of the MESSENGER mission, describe the mission, spacecraft, scientific objectives, and payload. The book is of interest to all potential users of the data returned by the MESSENGER mission, to those studying the nature of the planet Mercury, and by all those interested in the design and implementation of planetary exploration missions.

  18. Translational Influence on Messenger Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Mette

    , on messenger stability was examined. Depending on the translation initiation frequency, the chance of an initial ribosome trailing the RNA polymerase get better for better initiation sites, thus protecting transcription from termination by Rho. A polarity assay in which the activity of the downstream lac......A in the lac operon was measured, demonstrated that Rho dependent transcriptional pre-termination correlated with ribosome translation initiation frequency. It was further shown that Rho terminates RNA polymerases during transcription on messengers normally considered stable, suggesting Rho transcriptional pre...... pulls out the nascent transcript. Finally this thesis also focussed on the cell stress caused by an artificial and very strong RNA psudoknot used in a fusion gene. The technique of ribosomal foot printing and whole transcriptome deep sequencing was employed to facilitate an overview of the changes...

  19. Geodesy at Mercury with MESSENGER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria t.; Peale, Stanley J.; Phillips, Roger J.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2006-01-01

    In 2011 the MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) spacecraft will enter Mercury orbit and begin the mapping phase of the mission. As part of its science objectives the MESSENGER mission will determine the shape and gravity field of Mercury. These observations will enable the topography and the crustal thickness to be derived for the planet and will determine the small libration of the planet about its axis, the latter critical to constraining the state of the core. These measurements require very precise positioning of the MESSENGER spacecraft in its eccentric orbit, which has a periapsis altitude as low as 200 km, an apoapsis altitude near 15,000 km, and a closest approach to the surface varying from latitude 60 to about 70 N. The X-band tracking of MESSENGER and the laser altimetry are the primary data that will be used to measure the planetary shape and gravity field. The laser altimeter, which has an expected range of 1000 to 1200 km, is expected to provide significant data only over the northern hemisphere because of MESSENGER's eccentric orbit. For the southern hemisphere, radio occultation measurements obtained as the spacecraft passes behind the planet as seen from Earth and images obtained with the imaging system will be used to provide the long-wavelength shape of the planet. Gravity, derived from the tracking data, will also have greater resolution in the northern hemisphere, but full global models for both topography and gravity will be obtained at low harmonic order and degree. The limiting factor for both gravity and topography is expected to be knowledge of the spacecraft location. Present estimations are that in a combined tracking, altimetry, and occultation solution the spacecraft position uncertainty is likely to be of order 10 m. This accuracy should be adequate for establishing an initial geodetic coordinate system for Mercury that will enable positioning of imaged features on the surface, determination of

  20. Nuclear Export of Messenger RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katahira, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Transport of messenger RNA (mRNA) from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is an essential step of eukaryotic gene expression. In the cell nucleus, a precursor mRNA undergoes a series of processing steps, including capping at the 5' ends, splicing and cleavage/polyadenylation at the 3' ends. During this process, the mRNA associates with a wide variety of proteins, forming a messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) particle. Association with factors involved in nuclear export also occurs during transcription and processing, and thus nuclear export is fully integrated into mRNA maturation. The coupling between mRNA maturation and nuclear export is an important mechanism for providing only fully functional and competent mRNA to the cytoplasmic translational machinery, thereby ensuring accuracy and swiftness of gene expression. This review describes the molecular mechanism of nuclear mRNA export mediated by the principal transport factors, including Tap-p15 and the TREX complex. PMID:25836925

  1. A REMOTE HEALTH MONITORING MESSENGER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmili Minu.DH

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Health is an important factor of every human being. Remote health monitoring messenger is needed for the people to reduce their inconvenience in travel to hospitals due to ailing health. Ill-patientrequires accurate decision to be taken immediately in critical situations, so that life-protecting and lifesaving therapy can be properly applied. In recent years, sensors are used in each and every fast developing application for designing the miniaturized system which is much easier for people use. A remote health monitoring messenger informs the doctor about the patient condition through wireless media such as Global System for Mobile communication. The system specifically deals with the signal conditioning and data acquisition of heart beat, temperature, and blood pressure of human body. The Heart beat sensor is used to read the patient’s beats per minute (bpm and temperature sensor to measure the body temperature of patient externally and pressure sensor to measure the level of pressure in blood. Signals obtained from sensors are fed into the microcontroller for processing and medicine is prescribed as first aid for patient to control the parameters through visual basic. A message is then sent to the doctor for further actions to be taken for treatment of patient after first aid. The system has a very good response time and it is cost effective.

  2. Astroparticles: Messengers from Outer Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desiati, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Since Galileo pointed a spyglass toward the sky, 400 years ago, observations empowered by man-made instrumentation have provided us with an enormous leap in the knowledge of how the Universe functions. More and more powerful optical telescopes made it possible for us to reach the farthest corners of space. At the same time, the advances in microphysics and the discovery of the electromagnetic spectrum, made it possible to directly look at the Universe in a way that our eyes cannot see. The discoveries of the intimate structure of matter, of subatomic particles and of how they interact with each other, have led astronomers to use the smallest objects in Nature to observe the farthest reaches of the otherwise invisible Universe. Not unlike Galileo, today we observe Outer Space with visible light and beyond, across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, from long wavelength radio waves to short wavelength gamma rays. But also with instruments detecting cosmic rays (the atomic nuclei we know on Earth) neutrinos (neutral subatomic particles that interact very weakly with matter) and gravitational waves (perturbations of spacetime predicted by General Relativity). Each cosmic messenger provides us with a unique piece of information about their source and the history of their journey to us. Modern astrophysics has the challenging goal to collect as much information as possible from all those messengers, to reconstruct the story of the Universe and how it became what it is today. This journey started with the unsettling discovery that we are only one minuscule dot in the immensity of the Universe and yet we are able to observe objects that are far in space and time. This journey is yet to complete its course, and the more we advance our knowledge, the more we need to understand. This interdisciplinary talk provides an overview of this journey and the future perspectives.

  3. MESSENGER: Exploring the Innermost Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    One of Earth's closest planetary neighbors, Mercury remained comparatively unexplored for the more than three decades that followed the three flybys of the innermost planet by the Mariner 10 spacecraft in 1974-75. Mariner 10 imaged 45% of Mercury's surface at about 1 km/pixel average resolution, confirmed Mercury's anomalously high bulk density and implied large fractional core size, discovered Mercury's internal magnetic field, documented that H and He are present in the planet's tenuous exosphere, and made the first exploration of Mercury's magnetosphere and solar wind environment. Ground-based astronomers later reported Na, K, and Ca in Mercury's exosphere; the presence of deposits in the floors of polar craters having radar characteristics best matched by water ice; and strong evidence from the planet's forced libration amplitude that Mercury has a fluid outer core. Spacecraft exploration of Mercury resumed with the selection for flight, under NASA's Discovery Program, of the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission. Launched in 2004, MESSENGER flew by the innermost planet three times in 2008-2009 en route to becoming the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury in March of this year. MESSENGER's first chemical remote sensing measurements of Mercury's surface indicate that the planet's bulk silicate fraction differs from those of the other inner planets, with a low-Fe surface composition intermediate between basalts and ultramafic rocks and best matched among terrestrial rocks by komatiites. Moreover, surface materials are richer in the volatile constituents S and K than predicted by most planetary formation models. Global image mosaics and targeted high-resolution images (to resolutions of 10 m/pixel) reveal that Mercury experienced globally extensive volcanism, including large expanses of plains emplaced as flood lavas and widespread examples of pyroclastic deposits likely emplaced during explosive eruptions of volatile

  4. The Mercury exosphere after MESSENGER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Rosemary; McClintock, William; Vervack, Ronald; Merkel, Aimee; Burger, Matthew; Cassidy, Timothy; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2016-07-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft observed sodium, calcium and magnesium emisison in Mercury's exosphere on a near-daily basis for >16 Mercury years. The MASCS observations showed that calcium in Mercury's exosphere is persistently concentrated in the dawn hemisphere and is of extreme temperature (>50,000 K). The column abundance varies seasonally, and is extremely repeatable each Mercury year. In addition, the calcium exhibits a persistent maximum not at perihelion but 20° after perihelion, an enhancement that was shown to be coincident with the probable intersection of Mercury's orbit with a dust stream originating at Comet Encke. Any mechanism producing the Mercurian Ca exosphere must explain the facts that the Ca is extremely hot, that it is seen almost exclusively on the dawnside of the planet, and that its content varies seasonally, not sporadically. Energization of the Ca atoms was suggested to originate through dissociation of Ca-bearing molecules ejected by meteoritic impacts. Magnesium was also observed on a daily basis throughout the MESSENGER orbital phase. Mg has its own spatial and temporal pattern, peaking at mid-morning instead of early morning like Ca, and exhibiting a warm thermal profile, about 5000 K, unlike the extreme temperature of Ca which is an order of magnitude hotter. Although Mercury's sodium exosphere has been observed from the ground for many decades, the MASCS observations showed that, like calcium, the sodium exosphere is dominated by seasonal variations, not sporadic variations. However a conundrum exists as to why ground-based observations show highly variable high-latitude variations that eluded the MASCS. The origin of a persistent south polar enhancement has not been explained. The more volatile element, Na, is again colder, about 1200 K, but not thermally accommodated to the surface temperature. A

  5. MESSENGER'S First and Second Flybys of Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.

    2009-01-01

    The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet's miniature magnetosphere since Mariner 10's brief fly-bys in 1974-5. The magnetosphere of Mercury is the smallest in the solar system with its magnetic field typically standing off the solar wind only approximately 1000 km above the surface. An overview of the MESSENGER mission and its January 14th and October 6th, 2008 close flybys of Mercury will be provided. Primary science objectives and the science instrumentation will be described. Initial results from MESSENGER will be discussed with an emphasis on the magnetic field and charged particle measurements.

  6. Attenuation of diacylglycerol second messengers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, W.R.; Ganong, B.R.; Bell, R.M.

    1986-05-01

    Diacylglycerol(DAG) derived from phosphatidylinositol activates protein kinase C in agonist-stimulated cells. At least two pathways may contribute to the attenuation of the DAG signal: (1) phosphorylation to phosphatidic acid(PA) by DAG kinase(DGK), and (2) deacylation by DAG and monoacylglycerol lipases. A number of DAG analogs were tested as substrates and inhibitors of partially purified pig brain DGK. Two analogs were potent inhibitors in vitro, 1-monooleoylglycerol(MOG,K/sub I/ = 91 ..mu..M) and diotanoylethyleneglycol (diC/sub 8/EG, K/sub I/ = 58 ..mu..M). These compounds were tested in human platelets. DiC/sub 8/EG inhibited (70 - 100%) (/sup 32/P/sub i/) incorporation into PA in thrombin-stimulated platelets. Under these conditions the DAG signal was somewhat long-lived but was still metabolized, presumably by the lipase pathway. MOG treatment elevated DAG levels up to 4-fold in unstimulated platelets. The DAG formed was in a pool where it did not activate protein kinase C. Thrombin-stimulation of MOG-treated platelets resulted in DAG levels 10-fold higher than control platelets. This appears to be due to the inability of these platelets to metabolize agonist-linked DAG via the lipase pathway. The development of specific inhibitors of DAG kinase and DAG lipase, in conjunction with mass quantification of DAG levels as used here, will provide further insights into the regulation of DAG second messengers.

  7. On messengers and metastability in gauge mediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudas, Emilian, E-mail: emilian.dudas@cpht.polytechnique.f [Centre de Physique Theorique, Ecole Polytechnique and CNRS, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Universite de Paris-Sud, Bat. 210, F-91405 Orsay (France); Lavignac, Stephane [Institut de Physique Theorique, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Parmentier, Jeanne [Centre de Physique Theorique, Ecole Polytechnique and CNRS, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Institut de Physique Theorique, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2011-04-04

    One notoriously difficult problem in perturbative gauge mediation of supersymmetry breaking via messenger fields is the generic presence of a phenomenologically unacceptable vacuum with messenger vevs, with a lower energy than the desired ('MSSM') vacuum. We investigate the possibility that quantum corrections promote the latter to the ground state of the theory, and find that this is indeed feasible. For this to happen, the couplings of the messengers to the goldstino superfield must be small, and this implies an additional suppression of the MSSM soft terms with respect to the supersymmetry breaking scale. This in turn sets a lower limit on the masses of the messengers and of the supersymmetry breaking fields, which makes both sectors inaccessible at colliders. Contrary to other scenarios like direct gauge mediation, gaugino masses are unsuppressed with respect to scalar masses.

  8. Higgs mass from neutrino-messenger mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Byakti, Pritibhajan; Mummidi, V Suryanarayana; Vempati, Sudhir K

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the Higgs particle at 125 GeV has put strong constraints on minimal messenger models of gauge mediation, pushing the stop masses into the multi-TeV regime. Extensions of these models with matter-messenger mixing terms have been proposed to generate a large trilinear parameter, $A_t$, relaxing these constraints. The detailed survey of these models \\cite{Byakti:2013ti,Evans:2013kxa} so far considered messenger mixings with only MSSM superfields. In the present work, we extend the survey to MSSM with inverse-seesaw mechanism. The neutrino-sneutrino corrections to the Higgs mass in the inverse seesaw model are not significant in the minimal gauge mediation model, unless one considers messenger-matter interaction terms. We classify all possible models with messenger-matter interactions and perform thorough numerical analysis to find out the promising models. We found that out of the 17 possible models 15 of them can lead to Higgs mass within the observed value without raising the sfermion masses s...

  9. Messenger RNA surveillance: neutralizing natural nonsense

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischelfeldt, Joachim Lütken; Lykke-Andersen, Jens; Porse, Bo

    2005-01-01

    Messenger RNA transcripts that contain premature stop codons are degraded by a process termed nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Although previously thought of as a pathway that rids the cell of non-functional mRNAs arising from mutations and processing errors, new research suggests a more general...

  10. MESSENGER at Mercury: Early Orbital Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNutt, Ralph L., Jr; Solomon, Sean C.; Bedini, Peter D.; Anderson, Brian J.; Blewett, David T.; Evans, Larry G.; Gold, Robert E.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Murchie, Scott L.; Nittler, Larry R.; Philips, Roger J.; Prockter, Louise M.; Slavin, James A.; Zuber, M. T.; Finnegan, Eric J.; Grant, David G.

    2013-01-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched in August 2004 under NASA's Discovery Program, was inserted into orbit about the planet Mercury in March 2011. MESSENGER's three flybys of Mercury in 2008-2009 marked the first spacecraft visits to the innermost planet since the Mariner 10 flybys in 1974-1975. The unprecedented orbital operations are yielding new insights into the nature and evolution of Mercury. The scientific questions that frame the MESSENGER mission led to the mission measurement objectives to be achieved by the seven payload instruments and the radio science experiment. Interweaving the full set of required orbital observations in a manner that maximizes the opportunity to satisfy all mission objectives and yet meet stringent spacecraft pointing and thermal constraints was a complex optimization problem that was solved with a software tool that simulates science observations and tracks progress toward meeting each objective. The final orbital observation plan, the outcome of that optimization process, meets all mission objectives. MESSENGER's Mercury Dual Imaging System is acquiring a global monochromatic image mosaic at better than 90% coverage and at least 250 m average resolution, a global color image mosaic at better than 90% coverage and at least 1 km average resolution, and global stereo imaging at better than 80% coverage and at least 250 m average resolution. Higher-resolution images are also being acquired of targeted areas. The elemental remote sensing instruments, including the Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer and the X-Ray Spectrometer, are being operated nearly continuously and will establish the average surface abundances of most major elements. The Visible and Infrared Spectrograph channel of MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer is acquiring a global map of spectral reflectance from 300 to 1450 nm wavelength at a range of incidence and emission

  11. MESSENGER at Mercury: Early orbital operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNutt, Ralph L.; Solomon, Sean C.; Bedini, Peter D.; Anderson, Brian J.; Blewett, David T.; Evans, Larry G.; Gold, Robert E.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Murchie, Scott L.; Nittler, Larry R.; Phillips, Roger J.; Prockter, Louise M.; Slavin, James A.; Zuber, Maria T.; Finnegan, Eric J.; Grant, David G.; MESSENGER Team

    2014-01-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched in August 2004 under NASA's Discovery Program, was inserted into orbit about the planet Mercury in March 2011. MESSENGER's three flybys of Mercury in 2008-2009 marked the first spacecraft visits to the innermost planet since the Mariner 10 flybys in 1974-1975. The unprecedented orbital operations are yielding new insights into the nature and evolution of Mercury. The scientific questions that frame the MESSENGER mission led to the mission measurement objectives to be achieved by the seven payload instruments and the radio science experiment. Interweaving the full set of required orbital observations in a manner that maximizes the opportunity to satisfy all mission objectives and yet meet stringent spacecraft pointing and thermal constraints was a complex optimization problem that was solved with a software tool that simulates science observations and tracks progress toward meeting each objective. The final orbital observation plan, the outcome of that optimization process, meets all mission objectives. MESSENGER's Mercury Dual Imaging System is acquiring a global monochromatic image mosaic at better than 90% coverage and at least 250 m average resolution, a global color image mosaic at better than 90% coverage and at least 1 km average resolution, and global stereo imaging at better than 80% coverage and at least 250 m average resolution. Higher-resolution images are also being acquired of targeted areas. The elemental remote sensing instruments, including the Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer and the X-Ray Spectrometer, are being operated nearly continuously and will establish the average surface abundances of most major elements. The Visible and Infrared Spectrograph channel of MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer is acquiring a global map of spectral reflectance from 300 to 1450 nm wavelength at a range of incidence and emission

  12. The Energy Messenger, Number 1, Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancil, J. [ed.

    1995-01-01

    `The Energy Messenger` is a Department of Energy publication on energy activities of interest to American Indians. The first issue of 1995 (in a magazine format) includes articles on: tribes winning grants to develop energy resources, recruiting of internships for DOE, information about Title XXVI-Indian Energy Resources, American Indian Heritage Month, tribal perspective on DOE actions, joint ventures between tribes and the DOE, and brief description of recent DOE activities.

  13. Messenger Plus!2.0——MSN Messenger 5.0的新伴侣

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁宏睿

    2003-01-01

    使用MSN Messenger 的用户,想要实现保存聊天记录等功能肯定都会安装Mesenger Plus!或者Messenger Help!这样的插件程序。由于Microsoft将Windows Messenger升级到MSN Messenger 5以后,编程接口发生了变化,Messenger Plus!的老版本无法使用,让MSN Messenger 5的用户感到很不方便。经过数个月的等待,Messenger Plus!(后文简称Plus!)终于推出了最新版本,完全支持Windows Messenger和MSN Messenger 5。

  14. Mercury's Na Exosphere from MESSENGER Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Rosemary M.; Burger, M. H.; Cassidy, T. A.; Sarantos, M.; Vervack, R. J.; McClintock, W. El; Merkel, A. W.; Sprague, A. L.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-01-01

    MESSENGER entered orbit about Mercury on March 18, 2011. Since then, the Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UWS) channel of MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) has been observing Mercury's exosphere nearly continuously. Daily measurements of Na brightness were fitted with non-uniform exospheric models. With Monte Carlo sampling we traced the trajectories of a representative number of test particles, generally one million per run per source process, until photoionization, escape from the gravitational well, or permanent sticking at the surface removed the atom from the simulation. Atoms were assumed to partially thermally accommodate on each encounter with the surface with accommodation coefficient 0.25. Runs for different assumed source processes are run separately, scaled and co-added. Once these model results were saved onto a 3D grid, we ran lines of sight from the MESSENGER spacecraft :0 infinity using the SPICE kernels and we computed brightness integrals. Note that only particles that contribute to the measurement can be constrained with our method. Atoms and molecules produced on the nightside must escape the shadow in order to scatter light if the excitation process is resonant-light scattering, as assumed here. The aggregate distribution of Na atoms fits a 1200 K gas, with a PSD distribution, along with a hotter component. Our models constrain the hot component, assumed to be impact vaporization, to be emitted with a 2500 K Maxwellian. Most orbits show a dawnside enhancement in the hot component broadly spread over the leading hemisphere. However, on some dates there is no dawn/dusk asymmetry. The portion of the hot/cold source appears to be highly variable.

  15. Mercury's Na Exosphere from MESSENGER Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Rosemary M.; Burger, M. H.; Cassidy, T. A.; Sarantos, M.; Vervack, R. J.; McClintock, W. El; Merkel, A. W.; Sprague, A. L.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-01-01

    MESSENGER entered orbit about Mercury on March 18, 2011. Since then, the Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UWS) channel of MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) has been observing Mercury's exosphere nearly continuously. Daily measurements of Na brightness were fitted with non-uniform exospheric models. With Monte Carlo sampling we traced the trajectories of a representative number of test particles, generally one million per run per source process, until photoionization, escape from the gravitational well, or permanent sticking at the surface removed the atom from the simulation. Atoms were assumed to partially thermally accommodate on each encounter with the surface with accommodation coefficient 0.25. Runs for different assumed source processes are run separately, scaled and co-added. Once these model results were saved onto a 3D grid, we ran lines of sight from the MESSENGER spacecraft :0 infinity using the SPICE kernels and we computed brightness integrals. Note that only particles that contribute to the measurement can be constrained with our method. Atoms and molecules produced on the nightside must escape the shadow in order to scatter light if the excitation process is resonant-light scattering, as assumed here. The aggregate distribution of Na atoms fits a 1200 K gas, with a PSD distribution, along with a hotter component. Our models constrain the hot component, assumed to be impact vaporization, to be emitted with a 2500 K Maxwellian. Most orbits show a dawnside enhancement in the hot component broadly spread over the leading hemisphere. However, on some dates there is no dawn/dusk asymmetry. The portion of the hot/cold source appears to be highly variable.

  16. [Pathophysiological implications of the chemical messengers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blázquez Fernández, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    To maintain a physical organization and a different composition of its surroundings environment, living beings use a great part of the energy that they produce. Vital processes require an elevated number of reactions which are regulated and integrated by chemical messengers. They use autocrine, paracrine, endocrine and synaptic signals through receptors of cell surface, nuclear or associated with ionic chanels, enzymes, trimeric G proteins and to intracellular kinases. Through these mechanisms pheromones play an important role in the relationships between different individuals, and hormones are able to regulate the integrative functions of our organism. In the nervous system, neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, sensors and receptors between other messengers, play functions of great relevance, while growth factors stimulate cell proliferation and cytokines have many effects but the most important is the ones related with the control of the immflamatory process. Alterations of these messengers permit us a better understanding of the diseases and possibly of its treatments in a near future. Modifications of the expression of genes from the nuclear and mitochondrial genomas are responsible of monogenic, polygenic and mitochondrial diseases, while alterations in the activities of dopamine and serotonin neurotransmitters are related with schizophrenia, Parkinson disease and depression, respectively. Other example is the hyperthyroidism of the Graves-Bassedow disease due to the competitive interference of the LATS immunoglobulin with TSH at the level of the folicular cells producing thyroid hormones Twenty five years ago in the reviews on the mechanisms of insulin action, there was presentations in which the insulin receptor was located in the plasma membrane of the target cells while in the cytoplasm only a big interrogative was observed, that at present is replaced by chemical mediators cascades responsible of the multiple effects of insulin. This finding is similar to

  17. The Dawn of Multi-Messenger Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Santander, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The recent discoveries of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos and gravitational waves have opened new windows of exploration to the Universe. Combining neutrino observations with measurements of electromagnetic radiation and cosmic rays promises to unveil the sources responsible for the neutrino emission and to help solve long-standing problems in astrophysics such as the origin of cosmic rays. Neutrino observations may also help localize gravitational-wave sources, and enable the study of their astrophysical progenitors. In this work we review the current status and future plans for multi-messenger searches of neutrino sources.

  18. Gravitational Waves and Multi-Messenger Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan M.

    2010-01-01

    Gravitational waves are produced by a wide variety of sources throughout the cosmos, including the mergers of black hole and neutron star binaries/compact objects spiraling into central black holes in galactic nuclei, close compact binaries/and phase transitions and quantum fluctuations in the early universe. Observing these signals can bring new, and often very precise, information about their sources across vast stretches of cosmic time. In this talk we will focus on thee opening of this gravitational-wave window on the universe, highlighting new opportunities for discovery and multi-messenger astronomy.

  19. MESSENGER observations of Mercury's magnetic field structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Catherine L.; Purucker, Michael E.; Korth, Haje; Anderson, Brian J.; Winslow, Reka M.; Al Asad, Manar M. H.; Slavin, James A.; Alexeev, Igor. I.; Phillips, Roger J.; Zuber, Maria T.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2012-12-01

    We present a baseline, time-averaged model for Mercury's magnetosphere, derived from MESSENGER Magnetometer data from 24 March to 12 December 2011, comprising the spacecraft's first three Mercury years in orbit around the innermost planet. The model, constructed under the approximation that the magnetospheric shape can be represented as a paraboloid of revolution, includes two external (magnetopause and magnetotail) current systems and an internal (dipole) field and allows for reconnection. We take advantage of the geometry of the orbital Magnetometer data to estimate all but one of the model parameters, and their ranges, directly from the observations. These parameters are then used as a priori constraints in the paraboloid magnetospheric model, and the sole remaining parameter, the dipole moment, is estimated as 190 nT RM3 from a grid search. We verify that the best fit dipole moment is insensitive to changes in the other parameters within their determined ranges. The model provides an excellent first-order fit to the MESSENGER observations, with a root-mean-square misfit of less than 20 nT globally. The results show that the magnetopause field strength ranges from 10% to 50% of the dipole field strength at observation locations on the dayside and at nightside latitudes north of 60°N. Globally, the residual signatures observed to date are dominated by the results of magnetospheric processes, confirming the dynamic nature of Mercury's magnetosphere.

  20. A mathematical analysis of second messenger compartmentalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Levine, Herbert; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2008-12-10

    Intracellular compartmentalization of second messengers can lead to microdomains of elevated concentration that are thought to be involved in ensuring signaling specificity. Most experimental evidence for this compartmentalization involves the second messenger adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), which is degraded by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). One possible way of creating these compartments, supported by recent experiments, is to spatially separate the source of cAMP from regions of elevated PDE concentration. To quantify this possibility, we study here a simplified geometry in two dimensions (2D) and in three dimensions (3D), containing a cAMP point source and regions with different degradation constants. Using the symmetry of our geometry, we are able to derive steady state solutions for the cAMP concentration as a function of the system parameters. Furthermore, we show, using analytics as well as direct numerical simulations, that for physiologically relevant time scales the steady state solution has been reached. Our results indicate that elevating the degradation constant throughout the cell, except for a small microdomain surrounding the source, requires an unphysiologically high cellular PDE concentration. On the other hand, a tight spatial relationship of localized PDEs with the cAMP source can result in functional microdomains while maintaining a physiologically plausible cellular PDE concentration.

  1. Theory of high-energy messengers

    CERN Document Server

    Dermer, Charles D

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the distant high-energy universe comes from photons, ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), high-energy neutrinos, and gravitational waves. The theory of high-energy messengers reviewed here focuses on the extragalactic background light at all wavelengths, cosmic rays and magnetic fields in intergalactic space, and neutrinos of extragalactic origin. Comparisons are drawn between the intensities of photons and UHECRs in intergalactic space, and the high-energy neutrinos recently detected with IceCube at about the Waxman-Bahcall flux. Source candidates for UHECRs and high-energy neutrinos are reviewed, focusing on star-forming and radio-loud active galaxies. HAWC and Advanced LIGO are just underway, with much anticipation.

  2. Gauge Mediation Models with Adjoint Messengers

    CERN Document Server

    Gogoladze, Ilia; Shafi, Qaisar; Un, Cem Salih

    2016-01-01

    We present a class of models in the framework of gauge mediation supersymmetry breaking where the messenger fields transform in the adjoint representation of the Standard Model gauge symmetry. To avoid unacceptably light right-handed sleptons in the spectrum we introduce a non-zero U(1)_B-L D-term. This leads to an additional contribution to the soft supersymmetry breaking mass terms which makes the right-handed slepton masses compatible with the current experimental bounds. We show that in this framework the observed 125 GeV Higgs boson mass can be accommodated with the sleptons accessible at the LHC, while the squarks and gluinos lie in the multi-TeV range. We also discuss the issue of the fine-tuning and show that the desired relic dark matter abundance can also be accommodated.

  3. [Irisin: a messenger from the gods?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, María; Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Due to the need to understand the basis of the metabolic benefits of exercise, irisin was discovered a few years ago. This cytokine, secreted by skeletal muscle due to exercise, should have positive effects on energetic metabolism. In particular, it could act as a messenger on white adipose tissue, modifying its phenotype into the beige adipocyte, and increasing its thermogenic capacity. Since it was described, there have been numerous studies led to depict its function, with the aim of determining if irisin could become a therapeutic target in the context of diseases associated with a caloric excess, such as obesity and diabetes. In this review, the irisin discovery is summarized, along with its in vitro and in vivo effects described up until now. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Theory of high-energy messengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermer, Charles D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of the distant high-energy universe comes from photons, ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), high-energy neutrinos, and gravitational waves. The theory of high-energy messengers reviewed here focuses on the extragalactic background light at all wavelengths, cosmic rays and magnetic fields in intergalactic space, and neutrinos of extragalactic origin. Comparisons are drawn between the intensities of photons and UHECRs in intergalactic space, and the high-energy neutrinos recently detected with IceCube at about the Waxman-Bahcall flux. Source candidates for UHECRs and high-energy neutrinos are reviewed, focusing on star-forming and radio-loud active galaxies. HAWC and Advanced LIGO are just underway, with much anticipation.

  5. THE LIFETIME OF BACTERIAL MESSENGER RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, V.; Calvin, M.

    1963-12-01

    Puromycin, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, appears to act as an inhibitor at additional sites during the induction of {beta}-galactosidase synthesis. No inhibition of the reactions proceeding during the first 20 seconds of induction was observed, but puromycin seems to prevent the accumulation of messenger RNA during the period between 20 seconds and the first appearance of enzyme activity after 3 minutes. When cells from a stationary culture are placed in fresh medium containing inducer for {beta}-galactosidase, growth, as represented by increase in turbidity and by total protein synthesis, starts within 30 seconds. By contrast, {beta}-galactosidase synthesis is greatly delayed compared with induction during exponential growth. Two other inducible enzymes show similar lags, but malic dehydrogenase, which requires no external inducer, shows no lag. The lags are not due to catabolite repression phenomena. They cannot be reduced by pretreatment of the culture with inducer, or by supplementing the fresh medium with amino acids or nucleotides. The lag is also demonstrated by an i{sup -} mutant constitutive for {beta}-galactosidase synthesis. An inhibitor of RNA synthesis, 6-azauracil, preferentially inhibits {beta}-galactosidase synthesis compared with growth in both inducible and constitutive strains. It is suggested that these observations, together with many reports in the literature that inducible enzyme synthesis is more sensitive than total growth to some inhibitors and adverse growth conditions, can be explained by supposing that messenger RNA for normally inducible enzymes is biologically more labile than that for normally constitutive proteins. The implications of this hypothesis for the achievement of cell differentiation by genetic regulation of enzyme synthesis are briefly discussed.

  6. Calcium in Mercury's Exosphere: Modeling MESSENGER Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, M. H.; Killen, R. M.; McClintock, W. E.; Merkel, A. W.; Vervack, R. J.; Sarantos, M.; Sprague, A. L.

    2011-12-01

    Mercury is surrounded by a surface-bounded exosphere known to contain hydrogen, sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium. Because the exosphere is collisionless, its composition represents a balance of active source and loss processes. The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has made high-spatial-resolution observations of sodium, calcium, and magnesium near Mercury's surface and in the extended, anti-sunward direction. The most striking feature of these data is the substantial differences among species, which was detected during three close flybys of the planet and has been persistantly present during MESSENGER's orbital phase. Our modeling demonstrates that these differences are not because of post-ejection dynamics such as differences in photo-ionization rate and radiation pressure, but rather result from differences in the source mechanisms and regions on the surface from which each species is ejected. The observations of calcium have revealed a strong dawn/dusk asymmetry, with the abundance over the dawn hemisphere substantially greater than that on the dusk side. To understand this asymmetry, we use a Monte Carlo model of Mercury's exosphere that we developed to track the motions of exospheric neutrals under the influence of gravity and radiation pressure. In this model, Ca atoms can be ejected directly from the surface or produced by ejection of CaO followed by dissociation to produce Ca and O. Particles are removed from the system if they stick to the surface or escape from the model region of interest (within 15 Mercury radii). Photoionization reduces the final weighting given to each particle when simulating the Ca radiance. Data from the flybys are consistent with a high temperature (~1-2 x 104 K) source of atomic Ca concentrated over the dawn hemisphere. Such a high temperature resutls from dissociation of CaO in a near

  7. Mercury: A Synthesis from MESSENGER's Extended Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S. C.; Nittler, L. R.; McNutt, R. L.

    2012-12-01

    Launched in 2004, MESSENGER flew by Mercury three times in 2008-2009 en route to becoming the first spacecraft to orbit the solar system's innermost planet in March 2011. Orbital observations over the subsequent 21 months have provided the first global view of this nearby but heretofore little studied world. MESSENGER's chemical remote sensing measurements of Mercury's surface indicate that the planet's bulk silicate fraction, low in Fe and high in Mg, differs from those of the other inner planets. Moreover, surface materials are richer in the moderately volatile constituents S and K than predicted by most current models for inner planet formation. Global image mosaics and targeted high-resolution images reveal that Mercury experienced globally extensive volcanism, with large expanses of plains emplaced as flood lavas and widespread examples of pyroclastic deposits likely emplaced during explosive eruptions of volatile-bearing magmas. Bright deposits within impact craters host fresh-appearing, rimless depressions or hollows, often with high-reflectance interiors and halos and likely formed through processes involving the geologically recent loss of volatiles. The large-scale deformational history of Mercury, although dominated by near-global contractional deformation as first seen by Mariner 10, is more complex than first appreciated, with numerous examples of extensional deformation that accompanied impact crater and basin modification. Mercury's magnetic field is dominantly dipolar, but the field is axially symmetric and equatorially asymmetric, a geometry that poses challenges to dynamo models for field generation. The interaction between the solar wind and Mercury's magnetosphere, among the most dynamic in the solar system, serves both to replenish the exosphere and space weather the planet's surface. Plasma ions of planetary origin are seen throughout the sampled volume of Mercury's magnetosphere, with maxima in heavy-ion fluxes in the planet's magnetic

  8. Messenger Observations of Mercury's Bow Shock and Magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin J. A.; Acuna, M. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Benna, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Raines, M.; Schriver, D.; Travnicek, P.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2008-01-01

    The MESSENGER spacecraft made the first of three flybys of Mercury on January 14.2008 (1). New observations of solar wind interaction with Mercury were made with MESSENGER'S Magnetometer (MAG) (2.3) and Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) - composed of the Energetic Particle Spectrometer (EPS) and Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) (3,4). These MESSENGER observations show that Mercury's magnetosphere has a large-scale structure that is distinctly Earth-like, but it is immersed in a comet-like cloud of planetary ions [5]. Fig. 1 provides a schematic view of the coupled solar wind - magnetosphere - neutral atmosphere - solid planet system at Mercury.

  9. Mercury's Seasonal Sodium Exosphere: MESSENGER Orbital Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Timothy A.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2014-01-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft now orbiting Mercury provides the first close-up look at the planet's sodium exosphere. UVVS has observed the exosphere from orbit almost daily for over 10 Mercury years. In this paper we describe and analyze a subset of these data: altitude profiles taken above the low-latitude dayside and south pole. The observations show spatial and temporal variations, but there are no obvious year-to-year variations in most of the observations. We do not see the episodic variability reported by some ground-based observers. We used these altitude profiles to make estimates of sodium density and temperature. The bulk of the exosphere, at about 1200 K, is much warmer than Mercury's surface. This value is consistent with some ground-based measurements and suggests that photon-stimulated desorption is the primary ejection process. We also observe a tenuous energetic component but do not see evidence of the predicted thermalized (or partially thermalized) sodium near Mercury's surface temperature. Overall we do not see the variable mixture of temperatures predicted by most Monte Carlo models of the exosphere.

  10. ACTH Action on Messenger RNA Stability Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desroches-Castan, Agnès; Feige, Jean-Jacques; Cherradi, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    The regulation of mRNA stability has emerged as a critical control step in dynamic gene expression. This process occurs in response to modifications of the cellular environment, including hormonal variations, and regulates the expression of subsets of proteins whose levels need to be rapidly adjusted. Modulation of messenger RNA stability is usually mediated by stabilizing or destabilizing RNA-binding proteins (RNA-BP) that bind to the 3′-untranslated region regulatory motifs, such as AU-rich elements (AREs). Destabilizing ARE-binding proteins enhance the decay of their target transcripts by recruiting the mRNA decay machineries. Failure of such mechanisms, in particular misexpression of RNA-BP, has been linked to several human diseases. In the adrenal cortex, the expression and activity of mRNA stability regulatory proteins are still understudied. However, ACTH- or cAMP-elicited changes in the expression/phosphorylation status of the major mRNA-destabilizing protein TIS11b/BRF1 or in the subcellular localization of the stabilizing protein Human antigen R have been reported. They suggest that this level of regulation of gene expression is also important in endocrinology.

  11. MESSENGER Measurements of Mercury's Magnetic Field during the First Flyby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.; Boardsen, S. A.; Acuna, M. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Johnson, C. L.; Korth, H.; Krimigis, S. M.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Purucker, M. E.; Solomon, S. C.

    2008-01-01

    On 14 January 2008 the MESSENGER spacecraft will encounter Mercury for the first time. Depending upon the solar wind conditions, this initial flyby will return Magnetometer measurements of Mercury's magnetic field over a time interval lasting between - 30 md 60 min. Closest approach for MESSENGER is targeted for an altitude of 200 km as compared with the 707 krn and 327 km attained by Mariner 10 on 29 March 1974 and 16 March 1975, respectively. Furthermore, the differences in the MESSENGER and Mariner 10 encounter trajectories, with respect both to magnetospheric and body-fixed coordinates are highly complementary and expected to lead to significant improvements in our knowledge of Mercury's magnetic field. We present an overview of the MESSENGER magnetic field observations, an initial subtraction of the magnetic fields attributable to magnetospheric current systems from the total measured magnetic field, and an improved model of Mercury's intrinsic magnetic field. We also discuss the expected advances afforded by the two additional MESSENGER flybys, which occur in October 2008 and September 2009, as well as the orbital phase that will begin in March 201 1.

  12. Gauge Mediation with Gauge Messengers in SU(5)

    CERN Document Server

    Matos, Luis

    2010-01-01

    The inclusion of gauge messengers in models of gauge mediation allows for more general predictions that those described by the framework of general gauge mediation. Motivated by this, we explore some models of gauge mediation with gauge messengers in SU(5) GUTs. In most previous attempts of building viable models where gauge messengers play a role in determining the soft terms, squark and/or slepton masses turned out to be tachyonic. The objective of this paper is to address this problem and propose two possible solutions, one of which has a natural realization in the solution of the doublet-triplet problem. Another interesting result is that in these models the association of SUSY breaking with the breaking of the GUT group provides a simple mechanism that can explain why $SU(5)\\rightarrow SU(3)\\times SU(2) \\times U(1)$ is preferred over other symmetry breaking patterns.

  13. How MESSENGER Meshes Simulations and Games with Citizen Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshon, B.; Chapman, C. R.; Edmonds, J.; Goldstein, J.; Hallau, K. G.; Solomon, S. C.; Vanhala, H.; Weir, H. M.; Messenger Education; Public Outreach (Epo) Team

    2010-12-01

    How MESSENGER Meshes Simulations and Games with Citizen Science In the film The Last Starfighter, an alien civilization grooms their future champion—a kid on Earth—using a video game. As he gains proficiency in the game, he masters the skills he needs to pilot a starship and save their civilization. The NASA MESSENGER Education and Public Outreach (EPO) Team is using the same tactic to train citizen scientists to help the Science Team explore the planet Mercury. We are building a new series of games that appear to be designed primarily for fun, but that guide players through a knowledge and skill set that they will need for future science missions in support of MESSENGER mission scientists. As players score points, they gain expertise. Once they achieve a sufficiently high score, they will be invited to become participants in Mercury Zoo, a new program being designed by Zooniverse. Zooniverse created Galaxy Zoo and Moon Zoo, programs that allow interested citizens to participate in the exploration and interpretation of galaxy and lunar data. Scientists use the citizen interpretations to further refine their exploration of the same data, thereby narrowing their focus and saving precious time. Mercury Zoo will be designed with input from the MESSENGER Science Team. This project will not only support the MESSENGER mission, but it will also add to the growing cadre of informed members of the public available to help with other citizen science projects—building on the concept that engaged, informed citizens can help scientists make new discoveries. The MESSENGER EPO Team comprises individuals from the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); Carnegie Academy for Science Education (CASE); Center for Educational Resources (CERES) at Montana State University (MSU) - Bozeman; National Center for Earth and Space Science Education (NCESSE); Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL); National Air and Space Museum (NASM); Science

  14. To Be Connected or Not To Be Connected? Mobile Messenger Overload, Fatigue, and Mobile Shunning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jaewook; Shin, Mincheol

    2016-10-01

    With the increased adoption of mobile devices, mobile communication is all around us and we are connected anywhere, anytime. Mobile communication in general and mobile messenger service in particular make interpersonal communication in Korea so frequent and convenient. However, being connected too much anywhere and anytime via mobile messenger service appears to lead an increasing number of people to feel fatigue and to decrease mobile communication under some conditions. Based on a sample of 334 respondents, this study empirically investigated the relationships among commercial, noncommercial mobile messenger overload, mobile messenger fatigue, relational self-concept, and mobile shunning behavior. The findings show that (a) the effect of noncommercial mobile messenger overload is stronger than that of commercial mobile messenger overload in increasing mobile messenger fatigue although both positively affect mobile messenger fatigue, (b) relational self-concept has moderating effects on the relationship between mobile messenger overload and mobile messenger fatigue, and that (c) mobile messenger fatigue triggers mobile communicators' shunning behavior through which the communicators increase their intention to avoid mobile communication, to change their mobile phone numbers, and to subscribe to dual number service on one mobile device. When confronted with mobile messenger fatigue caused by mobile messenger overload, mobile messaging service users are likely to shun their mobile communication. Being constantly and conveniently connected appears to be a blessing in disguise.

  15. Neuronal chemokines : Versatile messengers in central nervous system cell interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, A. H.; van Weering, H. R. J.; de Jong, E. K.; Boddeke, H. W. G. M.; Biber, K. P. H.

    2007-01-01

    Whereas chemokines are well known for their ability to induce cell migration, only recently it became evident that chemokines also control a variety of other cell functions and are versatile messengers in the interaction between a diversity of cell types. In the central nervous system (CNS), chemoki

  16. Mercury's Atmosphere and Magnetosphere: MESSENGER Third Flyby Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Johnson, Catherine L.; Gloeckler, George; Killen, Rosemary M.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McClintock, William; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C.; Sprague, Ann L.; Vevack, Ronald J., Jr.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury en route to orbit insertion about the innermost planet took place on 29 September 2009. The earlier 14 January and 6 October 2008 encounters revealed that Mercury's magnetic field is highly dipolar and stable over the 35 years since its discovery by Mariner 10; that a structured, temporally variable exosphere extends to great altitudes on the dayside and forms a long tail in the anti-sunward direction; a cloud of planetary ions encompasses the magnetosphere from the dayside bow shock to the downstream magnetosheath and magnetotail; and that the magnetosphere undergoes extremely intense magnetic reconnect ion in response to variations in the interplanetary magnetic field. Here we report on new results derived from observations from MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS), Magnetometer (MAG), and Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) taken during the third flyby.

  17. MESSENGER Observations of Large Flux Transfer Events at Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.; Lepping, Ronald P.; Wu, Chin-Chun; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Boardsen, Scott A.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McClintock, William E.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C.; Travnicek, Pavel; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Six flux transfer events (FTEs) were encountered during MESSENGER's first two flybys of Mercury (M1 and M2). For M1 the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) was predominantly northward and four FTEs with durations of 1 to 6 s were observed in the magnetosheath following southward IMF turnings. The IMF was steadily southward during M2, and an FTE 4 s in duration was observed just inside the dawn magnetopause followed approx. 32 s later by a 7 s FTE in the magnetosheath. Flux rope models were fit to the magnetic field data to determine FTE dimensions and flux content. The largest FTE observed by MESSENGER had a diameter of approx. 1 R(sub M) (where R(sub M) is Mercury s radius), and its open magnetic field increased the fraction of the surface exposed to the solar wind by 10 - 20 percent and contributed up to approx. 30 kV to the cross-magnetospheric electric potential.

  18. Brain clock driven by neuropeptides and second messengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miro-Bueno, Jesus; Sosík, Petr

    2014-09-01

    The master circadian pacemaker in mammals is localized in a small portion of the brain called the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). It is unclear how the SCN produces circadian rhythms. A common interpretation is that the SCN produces oscillations through the coupling of genetic oscillators in the neurons. The coupling is effected by a network of neuropeptides and second messengers. This network is crucial for the correct function of the SCN. However, models that study a possible oscillatory behavior of the network itself have received little attention. Here we propose and analyze a model to examine this oscillatory potential. We show that an intercellular oscillator emerges in the SCN as a result of the neuropeptide and second messenger dynamics. We find that this intercellular clock can produce circadian rhythms by itself with and without genetic clocks. We also found that the model is robust to perturbation of parameters and can be entrained by light-dark cycles.

  19. Light third-generation squarks from flavour gauge messengers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, Felix [International School for Advanced Studies, Trieste (Italy); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); McGarrie, Moritz [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Univ. of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). School of Physics and Centre for Theoretical Physics; Weiler, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); CERN - European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Theory Div.

    2014-04-15

    We study models of gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking with a gauged horizontal SU(3){sub F} symmetry acting on the quark superfields. If SU(3){sub F} is broken non-supersymmetrically by F-term vacuum expectation values, the massive gauge bosons and gauginos become messengers for SUSY breaking mediation. These gauge messenger fields induce a flavour-dependent, negative contribution to the soft masses of the squarks at one loop. In combination with the soft terms from standard gauge mediation, one obtains large and degenerate first- and second-generation squark masses, while the stops and sbottoms are light. We discuss the implications of this mechanism for the superparticle spectrum and for flavour precision observables. We also provide an explicit realization in a model with simultaneous SUSY and SU(3){sub F} breaking.

  20. Light third-generation squarks from flavour gauge messengers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brümmer, Felix [SISSA/ISAS,Via Bonomea 265, Trieste I-34136 (Italy); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY,Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); McGarrie, Moritz [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY,Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); National Institute for Theoretical Physics, School of Physics,and Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of the Witwatersrand,Johannesburg, WITS 2050 (South Africa); Weiler, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY,Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); CERN Theory Division,CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2014-04-10

    We study models of gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking with a gauged horizontal SU(3){sub F} symmetry acting on the quark superfields. If SU(3){sub F} is broken non-supersymmetrically by F-term vacuum expectation values, the massive gauge bosons and gauginos become messengers for SUSY breaking mediation. These gauge messenger fields induce a flavour-dependent, negative contribution to the soft masses of the squarks at one loop. In combination with the soft terms from standard gauge mediation, one obtains large and degenerate first- and second-generation squark masses, while the stops and sbottoms are light. We discuss the implications of this mechanism for the superparticle spectrum and for flavour precision observables. We also provide an explicit realization in a model with simultaneous SUSY and SU(3){sub F} breaking.

  1. The models evaluating courier and messenger companies in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chodakowska Ewa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA is a well-established, popular, and often used method for efficiency evaluation of units from all sector, both commercial and non-profit organisations, of any scale of operations. Network DEA models are a relatively recent approach used to examine the efficiency of decision-making units (DMUs having an internal structure of sub-processes. The article presents the concept of DEA network models in estimating the efficiency of courier and messenger companies with relations to their business clients. The considerations are supported by an example of data concerning leaders from the sector of couriers and messengers in Poland and one of the biggest and most popular online stores. The results are compared with the traditional DEA approach. In addition, to measure reliability for DEA scores, the jackknife procedure was performed. The author proves the usefulness of network DEA as a research and management tool.

  2. Mercury's exosphere: observations during MESSENGER's First Mercury flyby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, William E; Bradley, E Todd; Vervack, Ronald J; Killen, Rosemary M; Sprague, Ann L; Izenberg, Noam R; Solomon, Sean C

    2008-07-04

    During MESSENGER's first Mercury flyby, the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer measured Mercury's exospheric emissions, including those from the antisunward sodium tail, calcium and sodium close to the planet, and hydrogen at high altitudes on the dayside. Spatial variations indicate that multiple source and loss processes generate and maintain the exosphere. Energetic processes connected to the solar wind and magnetospheric interaction with the planet likely played an important role in determining the distributions of exospheric species during the flyby.

  3. Chemical and structural effects of base modifications in messenger RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harcourt, Emily M.; Kietrys, Anna M.; Kool, Eric T.

    2017-01-01

    A growing number of nucleobase modifications in messenger RNA have been revealed through advances in detection and RNA sequencing. Although some of the biochemical pathways that involve modified bases have been identified, research into the world of RNA modification -- the epitranscriptome -- is still in an early phase. A variety of chemical tools are being used to characterize base modifications, and the structural effects of known base modifications on RNA pairing, thermodynamics and folding are being determined in relation to their putative biological roles.

  4. The Morphology of Craters on Mercury: Results from MESSENGER Flybys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnouin, Oliver S.; Zuber, Maria T.; Smith, David E.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Herrick, Robert R.; Chappelow, John E.; Murchie, Scott L.; Prockter, Louise M.

    2012-01-01

    Topographic data measured from the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) and the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) aboard the MESSENGER spacecraft were used for investigations of the relationship between depth and diameter for impact craters on Mercury. Results using data from the MESSENGER flybys of the innermost planet indicate that most of the craters measured with MLA are shallower than those previously measured by using Mariner 10 images. MDIS images of these same MLA-measured craters show that they have been modified. The use of shadow measurement techniques, which were found to be accurate relative to the MLA results, indicate that both small bowl-shaped and large complex craters that are fresh possess depth-to-diameter ratios that are in good agreement with those measured from Mariner 10 images. The preliminary data also show that the depths of modified craters are shallower relative to fresh ones, and might provide quantitative estimates of crater in-filling by subsequent volcanic or impact processes. The diameter that defines the transition from simple to complex craters on Mercury based on MESSENGER data is consistent with that reported from Mariner 10 data.

  5. Mercury's Sodium Exosphere: Observations during the MESSENGER Orbital Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Rosemary M.; Cassidy, Timothy A.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Burger, Matthew H.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Sprague, Ann L.; McClintock, William E.; Benna, Mehdi; Solomon, Sean C.

    2012-01-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft entered into orbit about Mercury on March 18,2011. We now have approximately five Mercury years of data from orbit. Prior to the MESSENGER mission, Mercury's surface-bounded exosphere was known to contain H, He, Na. K, and Ca. The Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) began routine orbital observations of both the dayside and nightside exosphere on March 29. 2011, measuring altitude profiles for all previously detected neutral species except for He and K. We focus here on what we have learned about the sodium exosphere: its spatial, seasonal, and sporadic variation. Observations to date permit delineation of the relative roles of photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) and impact vaporization (IV) from seasonal and spatial effects, as well as of the roles of ions both as sputtering agents and in their possible role to enhance the efficiency of PSD. Correlations of Mercury's neutral sodium exosphere with measurements from MESSENGER's Magnetometer (MAG) and Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) provide insight into the roles of ions and electrons. Models incorporating MAG observations provide a basis for identifying the location and area of the surface exposed to solar wind plasma, and EPPS observations reveal episodic populations of energetic electrons in the magnetosphere and the presence of planetary He(+), 0(+), and Na(+),

  6. MESSENGER Observations of Magnetic Reconnection in Mercury's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin. James A.

    2009-01-01

    During MESSENGER'S second flyby of Mercury on October 6,2008, very intense reconnection was observed between the planet's magnetic field and a steady southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The dawn magnetopause was threaded by a strong magnetic field normal to its surface, approx.14 nT, that implies a rate of reconnection approx.10 times the typical rate at Earth and a cross-magnetospheric electric potential drop of approx.30 kV. The highest magnetic field observed during this second flyby, approx.160 nT, was found at the core of a large dayside flux transfer event (FTE). This FTE is estimated to contain magnetic flux equal to approx.5% that of Mercury's magnetic tail or approximately one order of magnitude higher fraction of the tail flux than is typically found for FTEs at Earth. Plasmoid and traveling compression region (TCR) signatures were observed throughout MESSENGER'S traversal of Mercury's magnetotail with a repetition rate comparable to the Dungey cycle time of approx.2 min. The TCR signatures changed from south-north, indicating tailward motion, to north-south, indicating sunward motion, at a distance approx.2.6 RM (where RM is Mercury's radius) behind the terminator indicating that the near-Mercury magnetotail neutral line was crossed at that point. Overall, these new MESSENGER observations suggest that magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause is very intense relative to what is found at Earth and other planets, while reconnection in Mercury's tail is similar to that in other planetary magnetospheres, but with a very short Dungey cycle time.

  7. Intracellular messengers in the generation and degeneration of hippocampal neuroarchitecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, M P; Guthrie, P B; Kater, S B

    1988-01-01

    The actions and interactions of the neurotransmitter glutamate and the intracellular messengers calcium, cyclic AMP, and protein kinase C (PKC) in the regulation of neurite outgrowth and cell survival were examined in hippocampal pyramidal-like neurons in isolated cell culture. Low, subtoxic levels of glutamate (10-100 microM) caused the regression of dendrites but not axons; millimolar levels caused cell death. Calcium ionophore A23187 (50-100 nM) and the PKC activator phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA; 10-50 nM) caused the regression of both axons and dendrites, whereas the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin enhanced outgrowth rates in both axons and dendrites. The effects of glutamate, A23187, PMA, and forskolin on outgrowth were mediated locally at the growth cones; dendrites were more sensitive than axons to each of these agents. High levels of A23187 (1 microM) or PMA (100 nM) significantly reduced cell survival. Co2+ and trifluoperazine each significantly reduced glutamate-induced dendritic regression and neurotoxicity suggesting that calcium influx and/or PKC activation mediated glutamate's actions. Fura-2 measurements showed that glutamate caused a rapid rise in intracellular calcium levels; this rise was prevented by Co2+. PMA and forskolin did not alter intracellular calcium levels, nor did these agents affect glutamate-induced calcium rises. Taken together, the results indicate that parallel intracellular messenger pathways that influence neurite outgrowth and cell survival are operative in hippocampal neurons; these messengers may play roles in the formation and modification of neuronal circuitry.

  8. Constraints on Mercury's surface composition from MESSENGER neutron spectrometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riner, M. A.; Lucey, P. G.; McCubbin, F. M.; Taylor, G. J.

    2011-08-01

    The composition of Mercury's surface is poorly known, but the MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) mission has provided a wealth of new data from three flybys. In particular, MESSENGER Neutron Spectrometer (NS) observations reveal a surface enriched in neutron absorbing elements, consistent with interpretations of color and albedo observations suggesting a surface composition enriched in Fe-Mg-Ti oxides. In this study, we have computed the neutron absorption cross sections for all of the available proposed surface compositions of Mercury and evaluated the plausibility of each surface composition based on the neutron absorption cross section observed by MESSENGER. For identified plausible compositions, the implications for the thermal and magmatic evolution of Mercury are discussed. The measured macroscopic neutron absorption cross section of Mercury is inconsistent with a crust formed from partial melting of plausible bulk mantle compositions, flotation in a magma ocean or adiabatic melting of upwelling cumulates during magma ocean overturn. However, the observed neutron absorption is consistent with model compositions of late-stage magma-ocean cumulates and some proposed compositions from spectral modeling and equilibrium modeling. This suggests that the enrichment of neutron absorbing elements may be indicative of the processes that acted to form Mercury's crust. The enrichment in neutron absorbing elements, in combination with spectral observations that constrain FeO in silicates (neutron absorption cross section. High-Fe oxides are not required and more Mg-rich oxides may even be favored as the Ti-contents can sufficiently account for the observed neutron absorption.

  9. Mercury's Complex Exosphere: Results from MESSENGER's Third Flyby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; McClintock, William E.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Sprague, Ann L.; Anderson, Brian J.; Burger, Matthew H.; Bradley, E. Todd; Mouawad, Nelly; Solomon, Sean C.; Izenberg, Noam R.

    2010-01-01

    During MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury, the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer detected emission from ionized calcium concentrated 1 to 2 Mercury radii tailward of the planet. This measurement provides evidence for tailward magnetospheric convection of photoions produced inside the magnetosphere. Observations of neutral sodium, calcium, and magnesium above the planet's north and south poles reveal attitude distributions that are distinct for each species. A two-component sodium distribution and markedly different magnesium distributions above the two poles are direct indications that multiple processes control the distribution of even single species in Mercury's exosphere,

  10. Laser altimeter observations from MESSENGER's first Mercury flyby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, Maria T; Smith, David E; Solomon, Sean C; Phillips, Roger J; Peale, Stanton J; Head, James W; Hauck, Steven A; McNutt, Ralph L; Oberst, Jürgen; Neumann, Gregory A; Lemoine, Frank G; Sun, Xiaoli; Barnouin-Jha, Olivier; Harmon, John K

    2008-07-04

    A 3200-kilometers-long profile of Mercury by the Mercury Laser Altimeter on the MESSENGER spacecraft spans approximately 20% of the near-equatorial region of the planet. Topography along the profile is characterized by a 5.2-kilometer dynamic range and 930-meter root-mean-square roughness. At long wavelengths, topography slopes eastward by 0.02 degrees , implying a variation of equatorial shape that is at least partially compensated. Sampled craters on Mercury are shallower than their counterparts on the Moon, at least in part the result of Mercury's higher gravity. Crater floors vary in roughness and slope, implying complex modification over a range of length scales.

  11. Mercury's complex exosphere: results from MESSENGER's third flyby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervack, Ronald J; McClintock, William E; Killen, Rosemary M; Sprague, Ann L; Anderson, Brian J; Burger, Matthew H; Bradley, E Todd; Mouawad, Nelly; Solomon, Sean C; Izenberg, Noam R

    2010-08-06

    During MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury, the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer detected emission from ionized calcium concentrated 1 to 2 Mercury radii tailward of the planet. This measurement provides evidence for tailward magnetospheric convection of photoions produced inside the magnetosphere. Observations of neutral sodium, calcium, and magnesium above the planet's north and south poles reveal altitude distributions that are distinct for each species. A two-component sodium distribution and markedly different magnesium distributions above the two poles are direct indications that multiple processes control the distribution of even single species in Mercury's exosphere.

  12. Mercury's Plasma Mantle – a survey of MESSENGER observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinski, Jamie Matthew; Slavin, James A.; Raines, Jim; DiBraccio, Gina

    2016-10-01

    The plasma mantle is a region of solar wind plasma entry into the nightside high-latitude magnetosphere. We present a survey of plasma mantles identified in particle and magnetic field measurements from four years of MESSENGER spacecraft observations of Mercury's magnetosphere. The two common observational signatures of this region are ion energy latitude dispersions as well as diamagnetic depressions. From these observations we estimate the contribution of plasma from the solar wind via the mantle and infer magnitude and variability in the cross-magnetospheric electric fields present at Mercury's dynamic magnetosphere.

  13. Mercury's Complex Exosphere: Results from MESSENGER's Third Flyby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; McClintock, William E.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Sprague, Ann L.; Anderson, Brian J.; Burger, Matthew H.; Bradley, E. Todd; Mouawad, Nelly; Solomon, Sean C.; Izenberg, Noam R.

    2010-01-01

    During MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury, the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer detected emission from ionized calcium concentrated 1 to 2 Mercury radii tailward of the planet. This measurement provides evidence for tailward magnetospheric convection of photoions produced inside the magnetosphere. Observations of neutral sodium, calcium, and magnesium above the planet's north and south poles reveal attitude distributions that are distinct for each species. A two-component sodium distribution and markedly different magnesium distributions above the two poles are direct indications that multiple processes control the distribution of even single species in Mercury's exosphere,

  14. The H.E.S.S. multi-messenger program

    CERN Document Server

    Schüssler, F; Brun, F; Brun, P; Domainko, W; Fuessling, M; Hoischen, C; Pühlhofer, G; Reimer, A; Rowell, G

    2015-01-01

    Based on fundamental particle physics processes like the production and subsequent decay of pions in interactions of high-energy particles, close connections exist between the acceleration sites of high-energy cosmic rays and the emission of high-energy gamma rays and high-energy neutrinos. In most cases these connections provide both spatial and temporal correlations of the different emitted particles. The combination of the complementary information provided by these messengers allows to lift ambiguities in the interpretation of the data and enables novel and highly sensitive analyses. In this contribution the H.E.S.S. multi-messenger program is introduced and described. The current core of this newly installed program is the combination of high-energy neutrinos and high-energy gamma rays. The search for gamma-ray emission following gravitational wave triggers is also discussed. Furthermore, the existing program for following triggers in the electromagnetic regime was extended by the search for gamma-ray em...

  15. Pseudo-messenger RNA: phantoms of the transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin C Frith

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian transcriptome harbours shadowy entities that resist classification and analysis. In analogy with pseudogenes, we define pseudo-messenger RNA to be RNA molecules that resemble protein-coding mRNA, but cannot encode full-length proteins owing to disruptions of the reading frame. Using a rigorous computational pipeline, which rules out sequencing errors, we identify 10,679 pseudo-messenger RNAs (approximately half of which are transposon-associated among the 102,801 FANTOM3 mouse cDNAs: just over 10% of the FANTOM3 transcriptome. These comprise not only transcribed pseudogenes, but also disrupted splice variants of otherwise protein-coding genes. Some may encode truncated proteins, only a minority of which appear subject to nonsense-mediated decay. The presence of an excess of transcripts whose only disruptions are opal stop codons suggests that there are more selenoproteins than currently estimated. We also describe compensatory frameshifts, where a segment of the gene has changed frame but remains translatable. In summary, we survey a large class of non-standard but potentially functional transcripts that are likely to encode genetic information and effect biological processes in novel ways. Many of these transcripts do not correspond cleanly to any identifiable object in the genome, implying fundamental limits to the goal of annotating all functional elements at the genome sequence level.

  16. Multi-Messenger Astronomy: White Dwarf Binaries, LISA and GAIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Michael; Breivik, Katelyn; Larson, Shane L.

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of gravitational waves has ushered in a new era in astronomy. The low-frequency band covered by the future LISA detector provides unprecedented opportunities for multi-messenger astronomy. With the Global Astrometric Interferometer for Astrophysics (GAIA) mission, we expect to discover about 1,000 eclipsing binary systems composed of a WD and a main sequence star - a sizeable increase from the approximately 34 currently known binaries of this type. In advance of the first GAIA data release and the launch of LISA within the next decade, we used the Binary Stellar Evolution (BSE) code simulate the evolution of White Dwarf Binaries (WDB) in a fixed galaxy population of about 196,000 sources. Our goal is to assess the detectability of a WDB by LISA and GAIA using the parameters from our population synthesis, we calculate GW strength h, and apparent GAIA magnitude G. We can then use a scale factor to make a prediction of how many multi- messenger sources we expect to be detectable by both LISA and GAIA in a galaxy the size of the Milky Way. We create binaries 10 times to ensure randomness in distance assignment and average our results. We then determined whether or not astronomical chirp is the difference between the total chirp and the GW chirp. With Astronomical chirp and simulations of mass transfer and tides, we can gather more information about the internal astrophysics of stars in ultra-compact binary systems.

  17. Gravity, Topography, and Magnetic Field of Mercury from Messenger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Gregory A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zuber, Maria T.; Phillips, Roger J.; Barnouin, Olivier; Ernst, Carolyn; Goosens, Sander; Hauck, Steven A., II; Head, James W., III; Johnson, Catherine L.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Margot, Jean-Luc; McNutt, Ralph; Mazarico, Erwan M.; Oberst, Jurgen; Peale, Stanley J.; Perry, Mark; Purucker, Michael E.; Rowlands, David D.; Torrence, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    On 18 March 2011, the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft was inserted into a 12-hour, near-polar orbit around Mercury, with an initial periapsis altitude of 200 km, initial periapse latitude of 60 deg N, and apoapsis at approximately 15,200 km altitude in the southern hemisphere. This orbit has permitted the mapping of regional gravitational structure in the northern hemisphere, and laser altimetry from the MESSENGER spacecraft has yielded a geodetically controlled elevation model for the same hemisphere. The shape of a planet combined with gravity provides fundamental information regarding its internal structure and geologic and thermal evolution. Elevations in the northern hemisphere exhibit a unimodal distribution with a dynamic range of 9.63 km, less than that of the Moon (19.9 km), but consistent with Mercury's higher surface gravitational acceleration. After one Earth-year in orbit, refined models of gravity and topography have revealed several large positive gravity anomalies that coincide with major impact basins. These candidate mascons have anomalies that exceed 100 mGal and indicate substantial crustal thinning and superisostatic uplift of underlying mantle. An additional uncompensated 1000-km-diameter gravity and topographic high at 68 deg N, 33 deg E lies within Mercury's northern volcanic plains. Mercury's northern hemisphere crust is generally thicker at low latitudes than in the polar region. The low-degree gravity field, combined with planetary spin parameters, yields the moment of inertia C/MR2 = 0.353 +/- 0.017, where M=3.30 x 10(exp 23) kg and R=2440 km are Mercury's mass and radius, and a ratio of the moment of inertia of Mercury's solid outer shell to that of the planet of Cm/C = 0.452 +/- 0.035. One proposed model for Mercury's radial density distribution consistent with these results includes silicate crust and mantle layers overlying a dense solid (possibly Fe-S) layer, a liquid Fe

  18. Imaging Mercury's polar deposits during MESSENGER's low-altitude campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabot, Nancy L.; Ernst, Carolyn M.; Paige, David A.; Nair, Hari; Denevi, Brett W.; Blewett, David T.; Murchie, Scott L.; Deutsch, Ariel N.; Head, James W.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-09-01

    Images obtained during the low-altitude campaign in the final year of the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission provide the highest-spatial-resolution views of Mercury's polar deposits. Images for distinct areas of permanent shadow within 35 north polar craters were successfully captured during the campaign. All of these regions of permanent shadow were found to have low-reflectance surfaces with well-defined boundaries. Additionally, brightness variations across the deposits correlate with variations in the biannual maximum surface temperature across the permanently shadowed regions, supporting the conclusion that multiple volatile organic compounds are contained in Mercury's polar deposits, in addition to water ice. A recent large impact event or ongoing bombardment by micrometeoroids could deliver water as well as many volatile organic compounds to Mercury. Either scenario is consistent with the distinctive reflectance properties and well-defined boundaries of Mercury's polar deposits and the presence of volatiles in all available cold traps.

  19. Bicycle messengers: energy expenditure and exposure to air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernmark, Eva; Wiktorin, Christina; Svartengren, Magnus; Lewné, Marie; Aberg, Samuel

    2006-11-15

    The purpose of the study was to determine the level of energy expenditure and exposure to air pollution for bicycle messengers. Relationships between heart rate (HR) and oxygen uptake, and between HR and pulmonary ventilation (VE) for each participant were established in laboratory tests. Air pollution and HR were measured during one working day. The total oxygen uptake was then described as the total energy expenditure in Joule (J) and in multiples of the energy expenditure at rest (MET). The mean energy expenditure during a working day (8 h) was 12 MJ, (4.8 MET). The level of air pollution exposure when cycling seemed to be comparable with the levels of exposure when sitting inside a vehicle. The VE during cycling was four times higher than resting value. Increased VE led to increased exposure to air pollution.

  20. Gravity field and internal structure of Mercury from MESSENGER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David E; Zuber, Maria T; Phillips, Roger J; Solomon, Sean C; Hauck, Steven A; Lemoine, Frank G; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A; Peale, Stanton J; Margot, Jean-Luc; Johnson, Catherine L; Torrence, Mark H; Perry, Mark E; Rowlands, David D; Goossens, Sander; Head, James W; Taylor, Anthony H

    2012-04-13

    Radio tracking of the MESSENGER spacecraft has provided a model of Mercury's gravity field. In the northern hemisphere, several large gravity anomalies, including candidate mass concentrations (mascons), exceed 100 milli-Galileos (mgal). Mercury's northern hemisphere crust is thicker at low latitudes and thinner in the polar region and shows evidence for thinning beneath some impact basins. The low-degree gravity field, combined with planetary spin parameters, yields the moment of inertia C/MR(2) = 0.353 ± 0.017, where M and R are Mercury's mass and radius, and a ratio of the moment of inertia of Mercury's solid outer shell to that of the planet of C(m)/C = 0.452 ± 0.035. A model for Mercury's radial density distribution consistent with these results includes a solid silicate crust and mantle overlying a solid iron-sulfide layer and an iron-rich liquid outer core and perhaps a solid inner core.

  1. MESSENGER observations of magnetic reconnection in Mercury's magnetosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A; Acuña, Mario H; Anderson, Brian J; Baker, Daniel N; Benna, Mehdi; Boardsen, Scott A; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E; Ho, George C; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M; McNutt, Ralph L; Raines, Jim M; Sarantos, Menelaos; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C; Trávnícek, Pavel; Zurbuchen, Thomas H

    2009-05-01

    Solar wind energy transfer to planetary magnetospheres and ionospheres is controlled by magnetic reconnection, a process that determines the degree of connectivity between the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and a planet's magnetic field. During MESSENGER's second flyby of Mercury, a steady southward IMF was observed and the magnetopause was threaded by a strong magnetic field, indicating a reconnection rate ~10 times that typical at Earth. Moreover, a large flux transfer event was observed in the magnetosheath, and a plasmoid and multiple traveling compression regions were observed in Mercury's magnetotail, all products of reconnection. These observations indicate that Mercury's magnetosphere is much more responsive to IMF direction and dominated by the effects of reconnection than that of Earth or the other magnetized planets.

  2. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections observed by MESSENGER and Venus Express

    CERN Document Server

    Good, S W

    2015-01-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) observed by the MESSENGER (MES) and Venus Express (VEX) spacecraft have been catalogued and analysed. The ICMEs were identified by a relatively smooth rotation of the magnetic field direction consistent with a flux rope structure, coinciding with a relatively enhanced magnetic field strength. A total of 35 ICMEs were found in the surveyed MES data (primarily from March 2007 to April 2012), and 84 ICMEs in the surveyed VEX data (from May 2006 to December 2013). The ICME flux rope configurations have been determined. Ropes with northward leading edges were about four times more common than ropes with southward leading edges, in agreement with a previously established solar cycle dependence. Ropes with low inclinations to the solar equatorial plane were about four times more common than ropes with high inclinations, possibly an observational effect. Left and right-handed ropes were observed in almost equal numbers. In addition, data from MES, VEX, STEREO-A, STEREO-B ...

  3. Proteins encoded near the adenovirus late messenger RNA leader segments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, J.B.; Anderson, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    Small fragments of adenovirus 2 DNA cloned into the single-strand phage M13 were used to select adenoviral messenger RNAs transcribed from the R-strand between map positions 16 and 30. Cell-free translation of these mRNAs produced proteins of 13.5K, 13.6K, and 11.5K, respectively encoded between the first and second segments of the tripartite major late leader, within the ''i''-leader segment, and immediately preceding the third leader segment. Partial sequence analysis of the 13.6K protein is consistent with the hypothesis that it is encoded within the i-leader segment.

  4. Tissue distribution of human acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase messenger RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jbilo, O.; Barteles, C.F.; Chatonnet, A.; Toutant, J.P.; Lockridge, O.

    1994-12-31

    Tissue distribution of human acetyicholinesterase and butyryicholinesterase messenger RNA. 1 Cholinesterase inhibitors occur naturally in the calabar bean (eserine), green potatoes (solanine), insect-resistant crab apples, the coca plant (cocaine) and snake venom (fasciculin). There are also synthetic cholinesterase inhibitors, for example man-made insecticides. These inhibitors inactivate acetyicholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase as well as other targets. From a study of the tissue distribution of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase mRNA by Northern blot analysis, we have found the highest levels of butyrylcholinesterase mRNA in the liver and lungs, tissues known as the principal detoxication sites of the human body. These results indicate that butyrylcholinesterase may be a first line of defense against poisons that are eaten or inhaled.

  5. Using an Instant Messenger to Learn a Foreign Language in a Peer-Tutoring Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Joeun; Yoo, Yungtai; Lee, Kyungsuk; Jung, Bokmoon; Baek, Youngkyun

    2017-01-01

    This study explores useful ways of using an instant messenger in a peer-tutoring environment when two students exchange their mother languages. Seven learners of Korean and seven Korean students learning English were paired randomly to conduct language exchange via an instant messenger, KakaoTalk. The pairs (five of male and female pair and two of…

  6. Insights into the Nature of Mercury's Exosphere: Early Results from the MESSENGER Orbital Mission Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, William E.; Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Sprague, Ann L.; Solomon, Sean C.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer aboard the MESSENGER spacecraft has been making routine observations of Mercury's exosphere since March 29, 2011. Correlations of the spatial distributions of Ca, Mg, and Na with MESSENGER magnetic field and energetic particle distribution data provide insight into the processes that populate the neutral exosphere

  7. A comprehensive study of Mercury and MESSENGER orbit determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Antonio; Mazarico, Erwan; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Frank G.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Nicholas, Joseph B.; Rowlands, David D.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-10-01

    The MErcury, Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft orbited the planet Mercury for more than 4 years. The probe started its science mission in orbit around Mercury on 18 March 2011. The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) and radio science system were the instruments dedicated to geodetic observations of the topography, gravity field, orientation, and tides of Mercury. X-band radio-tracking range-rate data collected by the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) allowed the determination of Mercury's gravity field to spherical harmonic degree and order 100, the planet's obliquity, and the Love number k2.The extensive range data acquired in orbit around Mercury during the science mission (from April 2011 to April 2015), and during the three flybys of the planet in 2008 and 2009, provide a powerful dataset for the investigation of Mercury's ephemeris. The proximity of Mercury's orbit to the Sun leads to a significant perihelion precession attributable to the gravitational flattening of the Sun (J2) and the Parameterized Post-Newtonian (PPN) coefficients γ and β, which describe the space curvature produced by a unit rest mass and the nonlinearity in superposition of gravity, respectively. Therefore, the estimation of Mercury's ephemeris can provide crucial information on the interior structure of the Sun and Einstein's general theory of relativity. However, the high correlation among J2, γ, and β complicates the combined recovery of these parameters, so additional assumptions are required, such as the Nordtvedt relationship η = 4β - γ - 3.We have modified our orbit determination software, GEODYN II, to enable the simultaneous integration of the spacecraft and central body trajectories. The combined estimation of the MESSENGER and Mercury orbits allowed us to determine a more accurate gravity field, orientation, and tides of Mercury, and the values of GM and J2 for the Sun, where G is the gravitational constant and M is the solar mass

  8. Mercury's Dynamic Magnetosphere: What Have We Learned from MESSENGER?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.

    2016-04-01

    Mercury's magnetosphere is created by the solar wind interaction with its dipolar, spin-axis aligned, northward offset intrinsic magnetic field. Structurally it resembles that of the Earth in many respects, but the magnetic field intensities and plasma densities are all higher at Mercury due to conditions in the inner solar system. Magnetospheric plasma at Mercury appears to be primarily of solar wind origin, i.e. H+ and He++, but with 10% Na+ derived from the exosphere. Solar wind sputtering and other processes promote neutrals from the regolith into the exosphere where they may be ionized and incorporated into the magnetospheric plasma population. At this point in time, about one year after MESSENGER's impact and one year prior to BepiColombo's launch, we review MESSENGER's observations of magnetospheric dynamics and structure. In doing so we will provide our best answers to the following six questions: Question #1: How do magnetosheath conditions at Mercury differ from what is found at the other planets? Question #2: How do conditions in Mercury's magnetosheath contribute to the dynamic nature of Mercury's magnetosphere? How does magnetopause reconnection at Mercury differ from what is seen at Earth? Are flux transfer events (FTEs) a major driver of magnetospheric convection at Mercury? Question #3: Does reconnection ever erode the dayside magnetosphere to the point where the subsolar region of the surface is exposed to direct solar wind impact? To what extent do induction currents driven in Mercury's interior limit the solar wind flux to the surface? Do FTEs contribute significantly to the solar wind flux reaching the surface? Question #4: What effects do heavy planetary ions have on Mercury's magnetosphere? Question #5: Does Mercury's magnetotail store and dissipate magnetic energy in a manner analogous to substorms at Earth? How is the process affected by the lack of an ionosphere and the expected high electrical resistivity of the crust? Question #6: How

  9. Global Controlled Mosaic of Mercury from MESSENGER Orbital Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, K. J.; Weller, L. A.; Edmundson, K. L.; Becker, T. L.; Robinson, M. S.; Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    The MESSENGER spacecraft entered orbit around Mercury in March 2011. Since then, the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) has been steadily acquiring images from the monochrome, narrow-angle camera (NAC) and the multispectral, wide-angle camera (WAC). With these images, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is constructing a global, controlled monochrome base map of the planet using the Integrated Software for Imagers and Spectrometers (ISIS3) [1]. Although the characterization of MESSENGER spacecraft's navigation and attitude data has proven to be reliable to date, an element of uncertainty in these parameters is unavoidable. This leads to registration offsets between images in the base map. To minimize these errors, images are controlled using a least-squares bundle adjustment that provides refined spacecraft attitude and position parameters plus triangulated ground coordinates of image tie points. As a first effort, 4542 images (2781 NAC, 1761 WAC G filter) have been controlled with a root mean squared error of 0.25 pixels in image space [2]. A preliminary digital elevation model (DEM) is also being produced from the large number of ground points (~ 47,000) triangulated in this adjustment. The region defined by these points ranges from 80°S to 86°N latitude and 158°E to 358°E longitude. A symmetric, unimodal distribution and a dynamic range of 10.5 km characterize the hypsometry of this area. Minimum, maximum, and mean elevations are -5.0, 5.5, and -0.2 km relative to the mean radius of Mercury (2440 km) as defined by the mission. The USGS will use the DEM and base map for the construction of a registered color (WAC) map of high spatial integrity essential for reliable scientific interpretation of the color data. Ongoing improvements to the base map will be made as new images from MDIS become available, providing continuity in resolution, illumination, and viewing conditions. Additional bundle adjustments will further improve spacecraft attitude. The results from

  10. Extracellular ATP and other nucleotides-ubiquitous triggers of intercellular messenger release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Herbert

    2016-03-01

    Extracellular nucleotides, and ATP in particular, are cellular signal substances involved in the control of numerous (patho)physiological mechanisms. They provoke nucleotide receptor-mediated mechanisms in select target cells. But nucleotides can considerably expand their range of action. They function as primary messengers in intercellular communication by stimulating the release of other extracellular messenger substances. These in turn activate additional cellular mechanisms through their own receptors. While this applies also to other extracellular messengers, its omnipresence in the vertebrate organism is an outstanding feature of nucleotide signaling. Intercellular messenger substances released by nucleotides include neurotransmitters, hormones, growth factors, a considerable variety of other proteins including enzymes, numerous cytokines, lipid mediators, nitric oxide, and reactive oxygen species. Moreover, nucleotides activate or co-activate growth factor receptors. In the case of hormone release, the initially paracrine or autocrine nucleotide-mediated signal spreads through to the entire organism. The examples highlighted in this commentary suggest that acting as ubiquitous triggers of intercellular messenger release is one of the major functional roles of extracellular nucleotides. While initiation of messenger release by nucleotides has been unraveled in many contexts, it may have been overlooked in others. It can be anticipated that additional nucleotide-driven messenger functions will be uncovered with relevance for both understanding physiology and development of therapy.

  11. Navigating the MESSENGER Spacecraft through End of Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, C. G.; Williams, B. G.; Williams, K. E.; Taylor, A. H.; Carranza, E.; Page, B. R.; Stanbridge, D. R.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; O'Shaughnessy, D. J.; McAdams, J. V.; Calloway, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft orbited the planet Mercury from March 2011 until the end of April 2015, when it impacted the planetary surface after propellant reserves used to maintain the orbit were depleted. This highly successful mission was led by the principal investigator, Sean C. Solomon, of Columbia University. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) designed and assembled the spacecraft and served as the home for spacecraft operations. Spacecraft navigation for the entirety of the mission was provided by the Space Navigation and Flight Dynamics Practice (SNAFD) of KinetX Aerospace. Orbit determination (OD) solutions were generated through processing of radiometric tracking data provided by NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) using the MIRAGE suite of orbital analysis tools. The MESSENGER orbit was highly eccentric, with periapsis at a high northern latitude and periapsis altitude in the range 200-500 km for most of the orbital mission phase. In a low-altitude "hover campaign" during the final two months of the mission, periapsis altitudes were maintained within a narrow range between about 35 km and 5 km. Navigating a spacecraft so near a planetary surface presented special challenges. Tasks required to meet those challenges included the modeling and estimation of Mercury's gravity field and of solar and planetary radiation pressure, and the design of frequent orbit-correction maneuvers. Superior solar conjunction also presented observational modeling issues. One key to the overall success of the low-altitude hover campaign was a strategy to utilize data from an onboard laser altimeter as a cross-check on the navigation team's reconstructed and predicted estimates of periapsis altitude. Data obtained from the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) on a daily basis provided near-real-time feedback that proved invaluable in evaluating alternative orbit estimation strategies, and

  12. Gravity Field and Internal Structure of Mercury from MESSENGER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Phillips, Roger J.; Solomon, Sean C.; Hauck, Steven A., II; Lemoine, Frank G.; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A.; Peale, Stanton J.; Margot, Jean-Luc; Johnson, Catherine L.; Torrence, Mark H.; Perry, Mark E.; Rowlands, David D.; Goossens, Sander; Head, James W.; Taylor, Anthony H.

    2012-01-01

    Radio tracking of the MESSENGER spacecraft has provided a model of Mercury's gravity field. In the northern hemisphere, several large gravity anomalies, including candidate mass concentrations (mascons), exceed 100 milli-Galileos (mgal). Mercury's northern hemisphere crust is thicker at low latitudes and thinner in the polar region and shows evidence for thinning beneath some impact basins. The low-degree gravity field, combined with planetary spin parameters, yields the moment of inertia C/M(R(exp 2) = 0.353 +/- 0.017, where M and R are Mercury's mass and radius, and a ratio of the moment of inertia of Mercury's solid outer shell to that of the planet of C(sub m)/C = 0.452 +/- 0.035. A model for Mercury s radial density distribution consistent with these results includes a solid silicate crust and mantle overlying a solid iron-sulfide layer and an iron-rich liquid outer core and perhaps a solid inner core.

  13. Purification of Messenger Ribonucleoprotein Particles via a Tagged Nascent Polypeptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana P Inchaustegui Gil

    Full Text Available The cytoplasmic fates of mRNAs are influenced by interactions between RNA-binding proteins and cis regulatory motifs. In the cytoplasm, mRNAs are present as messenger ribonucleoprotein particles, which include not only proteins that bind directly to the mRNA, but also additional proteins that are recruited via protein-protein interactions. Many labs have sought to purify such particles from cells, with limited success. We here describe a simple two-step procedure to purify actively translated mRNAs, with their associated proteins, from polysomes. We use a reporter mRNA that encodes a protein with three streptavidin binding peptides at the N-terminus. The polysomal reporter mRNA, with associated proteins, is purified via binding to a streptavidin matrix. The method takes four days, and can be applied in any cell that can be genetically manipulated. Using Trypanosoma brucei as a model system, we routinely purified 8% of the input reporter mRNA, with roughly 22-fold enrichment relative to un-tagged mRNAs, a final reporter-mRNA:total-mRNA ratio of about 1:10, and a protein purification factor of slightly over 1000-fold. Although the overall reporter mRNP composition is masked by the presence of proteins that are associated with many polysomal mRNAs, our method can be used to detect association of an RNA-binding protein that binds to specifically to a reporter mRNA.

  14. Topicality and impact in social media: diverse messages, focused messengers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Weng

    Full Text Available We have a limited understanding of the factors that make people influential and topics popular in social media. Are users who comment on a variety of matters more likely to achieve high influence than those who stay focused? Do general subjects tend to be more popular than specific ones? Questions like these demand a way to detect the topics hidden behind messages associated with an individual or a keyword, and a gauge of similarity among these topics. Here we develop such an approach to identify clusters of similar hashtags in Twitter by detecting communities in the hashtag co-occurrence network. Then the topical diversity of a user's interests is quantified by the entropy of her hashtags across different topic clusters. A similar measure is applied to hashtags, based on co-occurring tags. We find that high topical diversity of early adopters or co-occurring tags implies high future popularity of hashtags. In contrast, low diversity helps an individual accumulate social influence. In short, diverse messages and focused messengers are more likely to gain impact.

  15. Topicality and impact in social media: diverse messages, focused messengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Lilian; Menczer, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    We have a limited understanding of the factors that make people influential and topics popular in social media. Are users who comment on a variety of matters more likely to achieve high influence than those who stay focused? Do general subjects tend to be more popular than specific ones? Questions like these demand a way to detect the topics hidden behind messages associated with an individual or a keyword, and a gauge of similarity among these topics. Here we develop such an approach to identify clusters of similar hashtags in Twitter by detecting communities in the hashtag co-occurrence network. Then the topical diversity of a user's interests is quantified by the entropy of her hashtags across different topic clusters. A similar measure is applied to hashtags, based on co-occurring tags. We find that high topical diversity of early adopters or co-occurring tags implies high future popularity of hashtags. In contrast, low diversity helps an individual accumulate social influence. In short, diverse messages and focused messengers are more likely to gain impact.

  16. Nonthermal electromagnetic fields: from first messenger to therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilla, Arthur A

    2013-06-01

    Nonthermal pulsed electromagnetic fields, from low frequency to pulse-modulated radio frequency, have been successfully employed as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of delayed and non-union fractures, fresh fractures and chronic wounds. Recent increased understanding of the mechanism of action of electromagnetic fields (EMF) has permitted technologic advances allowing the development of EMF devices which are portable and disposable, can be incorporated into dressings, supports and casts, and can be used over clothing. This broadens the use of non-pharmacological, non-invasive EMF therapy to the treatment of postoperative pain and edema to enhance surgical recovery. EMF therapy is rapidly becoming a standard part of surgical care, and new, more significant, clinical applications for osteoarthritis, brain and cardiac ischemia and traumatic brain injury are in the pipeline. This study reviews recent evidence which suggests that calmodulin (CaM)-dependent nitric oxide signaling is involved in cell and tissue response to weak nonthermal EMF signals. There is abundant evidence that EMF signals can be configured a priori to increase the rate of CaM activation, which, in turn, can modulate the biochemical cascades living cells and tissues employ in response to external insult. Successful applications in pilot clinical trials, coupled with evidence at the cellular and animal levels, provide support that EMF is a first messenger that can modulate the response of challenged biological systems.

  17. Mercury's gravity, tides, and spin from MESSENGER radio science data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ashok Kumar; Margot, Jean-Luc

    2016-09-01

    We analyze radio tracking data obtained during 1311 orbits of the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft in the period March 2011 to April 2014. A least squares minimization of the residuals between observed and computed values of two-way range and Doppler allows us to solve for a model describing Mercury's gravity, tidal response, and spin state. We use a spherical harmonic representation of the gravity field to degree and order 40 and report error bars corresponding to 10 times the formal uncertainties of the fit. Our estimate of the product of Mercury's mass and the gravitational constant, GM = (22031.87404 ± 9×10-4) km3 s-2, is in excellent agreement with published results. Our solution for the geophysically important second-degree coefficients (C¯2,0=-2.25100×10-5±1.3×10-9, C¯2,2=1.24973×10-5±1.2×10-9) confirms previous estimates to better than 0.4% and, therefore, inferences about Mercury's moment of inertia and interior structure. Our estimate of the tidal Love number k2 = 0.464 ± 0.023 indicates that Mercury's mantle may be hotter and weaker than previously thought. Our spin state solution suggests that gravity-based estimates of Mercury's spin axis orientation are marginally consistent with previous measurements of the orientation of the crust.

  18. Internet messenger based smart virtual class learning using ubiquitous computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umam, K.; Mardi, S. N. S.; Hariadi, M.

    2017-06-01

    Internet messenger (IM) has become an important educational technology component in college education, IM makes it possible for students to engage in learning and collaborating at smart virtual class learning (SVCL) using ubiquitous computing. However, the model of IM-based smart virtual class learning using ubiquitous computing and empirical evidence that would favor a broad application to improve engagement and behavior are still limited. In addition, the expectation that IM based SVCL using ubiquitous computing could improve engagement and behavior on smart class cannot be confirmed because the majority of the reviewed studies followed instructions paradigms. This article aims to present the model of IM-based SVCL using ubiquitous computing and showing learners’ experiences in improved engagement and behavior for learner-learner and learner-lecturer interactions. The method applied in this paper includes design process and quantitative analysis techniques, with the purpose of identifying scenarios of ubiquitous computing and realize the impressions of learners and lecturers about engagement and behavior aspect and its contribution to learning

  19. MESSENGER observations of energetic electron acceleration in Mercury's magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, Ryan; Slavin, James A.; Baker, Daniel; Raines, Jim; Lawrence, David

    2016-10-01

    Energetic particle bursts within Mercury's magnetosphere have been a source of curiosity and controversy since Mariner 10's flybys. Unfortunately, instrumental effects prevent an unambiguous determination of species, flux, and energy spectrum for the Mariner 10 events. MESSENGER data taken by the Energetic Particle Spectrometer (EPS) have now shown that these energetic particle bursts are composed entirely of electrons. EPS made directional measurements of these electrons from ~30 to 300 keV at 3 s resolution, and while the energy of these electrons sometimes exceeded 200 keV, the energy distributions usually exhibited a cutoff near 100 keV. The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) has also provided measurements of these electron events, at higher time resolution (10 ms) and energetic threshold (> 50 keV) compared to EPS. We focus on GRS electron events near the plasma sheet in Mercury's magnetotail to identify reconnection-associated acceleration mechanisms. We present observations of acceleration associated with dipolarization events (betratron acceleration), flux ropes (Fermi acceleration), and tail loading/unloading (X-line acceleration). We find that the most common source of energetic electron events in Mercury's magnetosphere are dipolarization events similar to those first observed by Mariner 10. Further, a significant dawn-dusk asymmetry is found with dipolarization-associated energetic particle bursts being more common on the dawn side of the magnetotail.

  20. Mercury's gravity, tides, and spin from MESSENGER radio science data

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, Ashok Kumar

    2016-01-01

    We analyze radio tracking data obtained during 1311 orbits of the MESSENGER spacecraft in the period March 2011 to April 2014. A least-squares minimization of the residuals between observed and computed values of two-way range and Doppler allows us to solve for a model describing Mercury's gravity, tidal response, and spin state. We use a spherical harmonic representation of the gravity field to degree and order 40 and report error bars corresponding to 10 times the formal uncertainties of the fit. Our estimate of the product of Mercury's mass and the gravitational constant, $GM = (22031.87404 \\pm 9 \\times 10^{-4})$ km$^{3}$s$^{-2}$, is in excellent agreement with published results. Our solution for the geophysically important second-degree coefficients ($\\bar{C}_{2,0} = -2.25100 \\times 10^{-5} \\pm 1.3 \\times 10^{-9}$, $\\bar{C}_{2,2} = 1.24973 \\times 10^{-5} \\pm 1.2 \\times 10^{-9}$) confirms previous estimates to better than 0.4\\% and, therefore, inferences about Mercury's moment of inertia and interior struc...

  1. Endogenous Arabidopsis messenger RNAs transported to distant tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Christoph J; Rojas-Triana, Monica; Stecyk, Ewelina; Schudoma, Christian; Zhang, Wenna; Yang, Lei; Miñambres, Miguel; Walther, Dirk; Schulze, Waltraud X; Paz-Ares, Javier; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Kragler, Friedrich

    2015-03-23

    The concept that proteins and small RNAs can move to and function in distant body parts is well established. However, non-cell-autonomy of small RNA molecules raises the question: To what extent are protein-coding messenger RNAs (mRNAs) exchanged between tissues in plants? Here we report the comprehensive identification of 2,006 genes producing mobile RNAs in Arabidopsis thaliana. The analysis of variant ecotype transcripts that were present in heterografted plants allowed the identification of mRNAs moving between various organs under normal or nutrient-limiting conditions. Most of these mobile transcripts seem to follow the phloem-dependent allocation pathway transporting sugars from photosynthetic tissues to roots via the vasculature. Notably, a high number of transcripts also move in the opposite, root-to-shoot direction and are transported to specific tissues including flowers. Proteomic data on grafted plants indicate the presence of proteins from mobile RNAs, allowing the possibility that they may be translated at their destination site. The mobility of a high number of mRNAs suggests that a postulated tissue-specific gene expression profile might not be predictive for the actual plant body part in which a transcript exerts its function.

  2. Planetary ephemeris construction and general relativity tests of PPN-formalism with MESSENGER radioscience data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ashok Kumar; Fienga, A.; Laskar, J.; Manche, H.; Gastineau, M.

    2013-10-01

    Current knowledge of Mercury orbit is mainly brought by the direct radar ranging obtained from the 60s to 1998 and five Mercury flybys made by Mariner 10 in the 70s, and MESSENGER made in 2008 and 2009. On March 18, 2011, MESSENGER became the first spacecraft orbiting Mercury. The radioscience observations acquired during the orbital phase of MESSENGER drastically improved our knowledge of the Mercury orbit. An accurate MESSENGER orbit is obtained by fitting one-and-half years of tracking data using GINS orbit determination software. The systematic error in the Earth-Mercury geometric positions, also called range bias, obtained from GINS are then used to fit the INPOP dynamical modeling of the planet motions. An improved ephemeris of the planets is then obtained, INPOP13a, and used to perform general relativity test of PPN-formalism. Our estimations of PPN parameters (β and γ) are most stringent than previous results.

  3. Use of MESSENGER radioscience data to improve planetary ephemeris and to test general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, Ashok; Laskar, Jacques; Manche, Herve; Gastineau, Mickael

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge of Mercury orbit is mainly brought by the direct radar ranging obtained from the 60s to 1998 and five Mercury flybys made by Mariner 10 in the 70s, and MESSENGER made in 2008 and 2009. On March 18, 2011, MESSENGER became the first spacecraft orbiting Mercury. The radioscience observations acquired during the orbital phase of MESSENGER drastically improved our knowledge of the orbit of Mercury. An accurate MESSENGER orbit is obtained by fitting one-and-half years of tracking data using GINS orbit determination software. The systematic error in the Earth-Mercury geometric positions, also called range bias, obtained from GINS are then used to fit the INPOP dynamical modeling of the planet motions. An improved ephemeris of the planets is then obtained, INPOP13a, and used to perform general relativity test of PPN-formalism. Our estimations of PPN parameters are most stringent than previous results.

  4. Evidence for a Messenger Function of Cyclic GMP During Phosphodiesterase Induction in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Pasveer, Frank J.; Meer, Rob C. van der; Heijden, Paul R. van der; Walsum, Hans van; Konijn, Theo M.

    1982-01-01

    Chemotactic stimulation of vegetative or aggregative Dictyostelium discoideum cells induced a transient elevation of cyclic GMP levels. The addition of chemoattractants to postvegetative cells by pulsing induced phosphodiesterase activity. The following lines of evidence suggest a messenger function

  5. Mechanical forces and their second messengers in stimulating cell growth in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1992-01-01

    Mechanical forces play an important role in modulating the growth of a number of different tissues including skeletal muscle, smooth muscle, cardiac muscle, bone, endothelium, epithelium, and lung. As interest increases in the molecular mechanisms by which mechanical forces are transduced into growth alterations, model systems are being developed to study these processes in tissue culture. This paper reviews the current methods available for mechanically stimulating tissue cultured cells. It then outlines some of the putative 'mechanogenic' second messengers involved in altering cell growth. Not surprisingly, many mechanogenic second messengers are the same as those involved in growth factor-induced cell growth. It is hypothesized that from an evolutionary standpoint, some second messenger systems may have initially evolved for unicellular organisms to respond to physical forces such as gravity and mechanical perturbation in their environment. As multicellular organisms came into existence, they appropriated these mechanogenic second messenger cascades for cellular regulation by growth factors.

  6. Mining functional elements in messenger RNAs: overview, challenges, and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoz eAhmed

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic messenger RNA contains not only protein-coding regions but also a plethora of functional cis-elements that influence or coordinate a number of regulatory aspects of gene expression, such as mRNA stability, splicing forms, and translation rates. Understanding the rules that apply to each of these element types (e.g., whether the element is defined by primary or higher-order structure allows for the discovery of novel mechanisms of gene expression as well as the design of transcripts with controlled expression. Bioinformatics plays a major role in creating databases and finding non-evident patterns governing each type of eukaryotic functional element. Much of what we currently know about mRNA regulatory elements in eukaryotes is derived from microorganism and animal systems, with the particularities of plant systems lagging behind. In this review, we provide a general introduction to the most well-known eukaryotic mRNA regulatory motifs (splicing regulatory elements, internal ribosome entry sites, iron-responsive elements, AU-rich elements, zipcodes, and polyadenylation signals and describe available bioinformatics resources (databases and analysis tools to analyze eukaryotic transcripts in search of functional elements, focusing on recent trends in bioinformatics methods and tool development. We also discuss future directions in the development of better computational tools based upon current knowledge of these functional elements. Improved computational tools would advance our understanding of the processes underlying gene regulations. We encourage plant bioinformaticians to turn their attention to this subject to help identify novel mechanisms of gene expression regulation using RNA motifs that have potentially evolved or diverged in plant species.

  7. MESSENGER observations of flux ropes in Mercury's magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBraccio, Gina A.; Slavin, James A.; Imber, Suzanne M.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Raines, Jim M.; Jackman, Caitriona M.; Boardsen, Scott A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; McNutt, Ralph L.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2015-09-01

    We report an investigation of magnetic reconnection in Mercury's magnetotail conducted with MESSENGER Magnetometer and Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer measurements during seven "hot seasons" when the periapsis of the spacecraft orbit is on Mercury's dayside. Flux ropes are formed in the cross-tail current sheet by reconnection. We have analyzed 49 flux ropes observed between 1.7 RM and 2.8 RM (where RM is Mercury's radius, or 2440 km) down the tail from the center of the planet, for which minimum variance analysis indicates that the spacecraft passed near the central axis of the structure. An average Alfvén speed of 465 km s-1 is measured in the plasma sheet surrounding these flux ropes. Under the assumption that the flux ropes moved at the local Alfvén speed, the mean duration of 0.74±0.15 s determined for these structures implies a typical diameter of ~345 km, or ~0.14 RM, which is comparable to a proton gyroradius in the plasma sheet of ~380 km. We successfully fit the magnetic signatures of 16 flux ropes to a force-free model. The mean radius and core field determined in this manner were ~450 km, or ~0.18 RM, and ~40 nT, respectively. A superposed epoch analysis of the magnetic field during these events shows variations similar to those observed at Earth, including the presence of a post-plasmoid plasma sheet, filled with disconnected magnetic flux, but the timescales are 40 times shorter at Mercury. The results of this flux rope survey indicate that intense magnetic reconnection occurs frequently in the cross-tail current layer of this small but extremely dynamic magnetosphere.

  8. Limits to Mercury's magnesium exosphere from MESSENGER second flyby observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarantos, Menelaos; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Todd Bradley, E.; Vervack, Ronald J.; Benna, Mehdi; Slavin, James A.

    2011-12-01

    The discovery measurements of Mercury's exospheric magnesium, obtained by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) probe during its second Mercury flyby, are modeled to constrain the source and loss processes for this neutral species. Fits to a Chamberlain exosphere reveal that at least two source temperatures are required to reconcile the distribution of magnesium measured far from and near the planet: a hot ejection process at the equivalent temperature of several tens of thousands of degrees K, and a competing, cooler source at temperatures as low as 400 K. For the energetic component, our models indicate that the column abundance that can be attributed to sputtering under constant southward interplanetary magnetic field conditions is at least a factor of five less than the rate dictated by the measurements. Although highly uncertain, this result suggests that another energetic process, such as the rapid dissociation of exospheric MgO, may be the main source of the distant neutral component. If meteoroid and micrometeoroid impacts eject mainly molecules, the total amount of magnesium at altitudes exceeding ˜100 km is found to be consistent with predictions by impact vaporization models for molecule lifetimes of no more than two minutes. Though a sharp increase in emission observed near the dawn terminator region can be reproduced if a single meteoroid enhanced the impact vapor at equatorial dawn, it is much more likely that observations in this region, which probe heights increasingly near the surface, indicate a reservoir of volatile Mg being acted upon by lower-energy source processes.

  9. Reference surfaces of the planet Mercury from MESSENGER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Roohollah; Ardalan, Alireza A.; Farahani, Soheil Vasheghani

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the reference surfaces of the planet Mercury obtained by the MESSENGER mission in order to provide a geodetic reference system (GRS) for the planet. The reference surfaces under consideration are the geoid and the reference ellipsoid. The reference ellipsoid is a triaxial planetocentric equipotential ellipsoid that best fits the geoid. To determine the reference surfaces, two methods are presented. In this line, the shape of the planet is sampled by expanding the global shape model (GSM) GTMES_125V03_SHA only up to the degree strength of the global gravity model (GGM) GGMES_50V06_SHA. The spatial resolution of the sampling points is selected based on the degree strength and the latitude of the location. According to our preferred method, we estimate the values for the semi-major equatorial axis, semi-minor equatorial axis, and polar axis of the reference ellipsoid equal to 2, 439, 422 ± 368m , 2, 439, 304 ± 368m , and 2, 439, 178 ± 368m , respectively. Moreover, we estimate the geoid potential value equal to 9, 032, 044 ± 1361m2 /s2 . The three axes of the reference ellipsoid give the polar and equatorial flattenings equal to (100 ± 213) ×10-6 and (48 ± 213) ×10-6 , respectively. However, we show that the best-fitting ellipsoid gives the polar and equatorial flattenings equal to (896 ± 213) ×10-6 and (426 ± 213) ×10-6 , respectively. The best-fitting ellipsoid is a triaxial ellipsoid that fits the shape of Mercury in a least-squares sense. The significant discrepancy observed between the flattenings of the two ellipsoids is a consequence of Mercury's geophysical characteristics together with its non-hydrostatic equilibrium. The results provided in the present work prove adequate for defining a promised GRS for the planet Mercury.

  10. In-Flight performance of MESSENGER's Mercury dual imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, S.E.; Murchie, S.L.; Becker, K.J.; Selby, C.M.; Turner, F.S.; Noble, M.W.; Chabot, N.L.; Choo, T.H.; Darlington, E.H.; Denevi, B.W.; Domingue, D.L.; Ernst, C.M.; Holsclaw, G.M.; Laslo, N.R.; Mcclintock, W.E.; Prockter, L.M.; Robinson, M.S.; Solomon, S.C.; Sterner, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    The Mercury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched in August 2004 and planned for insertion into orbit around Mercury in 2011, has already completed two flybys of the innermost planet. The Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) acquired nearly 2500 images from the first two flybys and viewed portions of Mercury's surface not viewed by Mariner 10 in 1974-1975. Mercury's proximity to the Sun and its slow rotation present challenges to the thermal design for a camera on an orbital mission around Mercury. In addition, strict limitations on spacecraft pointing and the highly elliptical orbit create challenges in attaining coverage at desired geometries and relatively uniform spatial resolution. The instrument designed to meet these challenges consists of dual imagers, a monochrome narrow-angle camera (NAC) with a 1.5?? field of view (FOV) and a multispectral wide-angle camera (WAC) with a 10.5?? FOV, co-aligned on a pivoting platform. The focal-plane electronics of each camera are identical and use a 1024??1024 charge-coupled device detector. The cameras are passively cooled but use diode heat pipes and phase-change-material thermal reservoirs to maintain the thermal configuration during the hot portions of the orbit. Here we present an overview of the instrument design and how the design meets its technical challenges. We also review results from the first two flybys, discuss the quality of MDIS data from the initial periods of data acquisition and how that compares with requirements, and summarize how in-flight tests are being used to improve the quality of the instrument calibration. ?? 2009 SPIE.

  11. Opioid modulation of immunocompetence: Receptor characterization and second messenger involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmick, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to examine the effects of opioids on several indices of immunocompetence, determined the receptor specificity of these effects, and ascertain whether the actions of opioids on lymphocytes could be correlated with activation of second messenger systems. By measuring {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake into lymphocytes, it was demonstrated that {beta}-endorphin 1-31 ({beta}-END 1-31) enhanced rat thymocyte Ca{sup 2+} uptake in response to concanavalin A (Con A) but not phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Related opioid peptides and alkaloids were unable to mimic the effect, and naloxone did not block it, suggesting that {beta}-END 1-31 acted by binding to specific, non-opioid receptors on the thymocytes. Rat splenocyte Con A-stimulated Ca{sup 2+} uptake was not affected by {beta}-END 1-31. {beta}-END 1-31 did not affect basal Ca{sup 2+} uptake by either cell type. Using ({sup 3}H)thymidine uptake as an index of lymphocyte proliferation, {beta}-END 1-31 and several related opioid peptides reversed prostaglandin E{sub 1} (PGE{sub 1}) suppression of rat lymph node cell Con A- and PHA-stimulated proliferation. Naloxone did not block the reversal. {beta}-END 1-31 was unable to reverse forskolin and cholera toxin suppression of proliferation, indicating that the lowering of cyclic AMP levels was not the mechanism involved. Verapamil inhibition of proliferation was also not reversed by {beta}-END 1-31, suggesting that promotion of Ca{sup 2+} influx was not a major mechanism involved.

  12. Survival Strategies in the Aquatic and Terrestrial World: The Impact of Second Messengers on Cyanobacterial Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Agostoni

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Second messengers are intracellular substances regulated by specific external stimuli globally known as first messengers. Cells rely on second messengers to generate rapid responses to environmental changes and the importance of their roles is becoming increasingly realized in cellular signaling research. Cyanobacteria are photooxygenic bacteria that inhabit most of Earth’s environments. The ability of cyanobacteria to survive in ecologically diverse habitats is due to their capacity to adapt and respond to environmental changes. This article reviews known second messenger-controlled physiological processes in cyanobacteria. Second messengers used in these systems include the element calcium (Ca2+, nucleotide-based guanosine tetraphosphate or pentaphosphate (ppGpp or pppGpp, represented as (pppGpp, cyclic adenosine 3’,5’-monophosphate (cAMP, cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP, cyclic guanosine 3’,5’-monophosphate (cGMP, and cyclic dimeric AMP (c-di-AMP, and the gaseous nitric oxide (NO. The discussion focuses on processes central to cyanobacteria, such as nitrogen fixation, light perception, photosynthesis-related processes, and gliding motility. In addition, we address future research trajectories needed to better understand the signaling networks and cross talk in the signaling pathways of these molecules in cyanobacteria. Second messengers have significant potential to be adapted as technological tools and we highlight possible novel and practical applications based on our understanding of these molecules and the signaling networks that they control.

  13. Mercury's magnetopause and bow shock from MESSENGER observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, R. M.; Anderson, B. J.; Johnson, C. L.; Slavin, J. A.; Korth, H.; Purucker, M. E.; Baker, D. N.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    We establish the time-averaged shape and location of Mercury's magnetopause and bow shock from orbital observations by the MESSENGER Magnetometer. We fit empirical models to the midpoints of boundary crossings as well as to probability density maps of the magnetopause and bow shock positions. The magnetopause is fit by two different surfaces: (1) a paraboloid, and (2) a surface for which the position R from the planetary dipole varies as [1+cos(θ)]-α, where θ is the angle between R and the dipole-Sun line, and α is a flaring parameter that governs whether the magnetotail is closed (α fit simultaneously both the dayside and nightside magnetopause crossings, but the second surface gives the best-fit overall shape to the observations with a subsolar stand-off distance, Rss, of 1.45 RM (where RM is Mercury's radius), and a flaring parameter α = 0.5. The average magnetopause shape and location were determined under a mean solar wind ram pressure, PRam, of 14.3 nPa. The best-fit bow shock shape established under an average Alfvén Mach number (MA ) of 6.6 is described by a hyperboloid having Rss = 1.96 RM and an eccentricity of 1.02. These boundaries move as PRam and MA vary, but their shape remains unchanged. The magnetopause Rss varies from 1.55 RM to 1.35 RM for PRam in the range 8.8 to 21.6 nPa. The bow shock Rss varies from 2.29 RM to 1.89 RM for MA in the range 4.12 to 11.8. To first order, the boundaries are well approximated by figures of revolution. Additional effects of the interplanetary magnetic field are masked by the large dynamic variability of these boundaries. Despite the moderate average magnetic shear conditions at Mercury, the magnetotail surface is nearly cylindrical, with a radius of ~2.7 RM at a distance 3 RM downstream of Mercury. By comparison, Earth's magnetotail flaring continues until a downstream distance of ~10 Rss. This result may indicate that reconnection in Mercury's magnetotail does not take place beyond ~3 RM downstream of the

  14. Exploring the Planet Mercury: One Year of MESSENGER Orbital Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Sean C.

    2012-05-01

    Launched in 2004, MESSENGER flew by Mercury three times in 2008-2009 en route to becoming the first spacecraft to orbit the solar system’s innermost planet in March 2011. MESSENGER’s chemical remote sensing measurements of Mercury’s surface indicate that the planet’s bulk silicate fraction, low in Fe and high in Mg, differs from those of the other inner planets. Moreover, surface materials are richer in the moderately volatile constituents S and K than predicted by most current models for inner planet formation. Global image mosaics and targeted high-resolution images reveal that Mercury experienced globally extensive volcanism, including large expanses of plains emplaced as flood lavas and widespread examples of pyroclastic deposits likely emplaced during explosive eruptions of volatile-bearing magmas. Bright deposits within impact craters host fresh-appearing, rimless depressions or hollows, often with high-reflectance interiors and halos and likely formed through processes involving the geologically recent loss of volatiles. The large-scale deformational history of Mercury, although dominated by near-global contractional deformation as first seen by Mariner 10, is more complex than first appreciated, with numerous examples of extensional deformation that accompanied impact crater and basin modification. Mercury’s magnetic field is dominantly dipolar, but the field is axially symmetric and equatorially asymmetric, a geometry that poses challenges to dynamo models for field generation. The interaction between the solar wind and Mercury’s magnetosphere, among the most dynamic in the solar system, serves both to replenish the exosphere and space weather the planet’s surface. Plasma ions of planetary origin are seen throughout the sampled volume of Mercury’s magnetosphere, with maxima in heavy-ion fluxes in the planet’s magnetic-cusp regions. Bursts of energetic electrons, seen at most local times, point to an efficient acceleration mechanism

  15. Bacterial Signal Transduction by Cyclic Di-GMP and Other Nucleotide Second Messengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengge, Regine; Gründling, Angelika; Jenal, Urs; Ryan, Robert; Yildiz, Fitnat

    2016-01-01

    The first International Symposium on c-Di-GMP Signaling in Bacteria (22 to 25 March 2015, Harnack-Haus, Berlin, Germany)brought together 131 molecular microbiologists from 17 countries to discuss recent progress in our knowledge of bacterial nucleotide second messenger signaling. While the focus was on signal input, synthesis, degradation, and the striking diversity of the modes of action of the current second messenger paradigm, i.e., cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP), “classics” like cAMP and (p)ppGpp were also presented, in novel facets, and more recent “newcomers,” such as c-di-AMP and c-AMP-GMP, made an impressive appearance. A number of clear trends emerged during the 30 talks, on the 71 posters, and in the lively discussions, including (i)c-di-GMP control of the activities of various ATPases and phosphorylation cascades, (ii) extensive cross talk between c-di-GMP and other nucleotide second messenger signaling pathways, and (iii) a stunning number of novel effectors for nucleotide second messengers that surprisingly include some long-known master regulators of developmental pathways. Overall, the conference made it amply clear that second messenger signaling is currently one of the most dynamic fields within molecular microbiology,with major impacts in research fields ranging from human health to microbial ecology.

  16. Isolation and Translation of Hordein Messenger RNA from Wild Type and Mutant Endosperms in Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Anders Bøving; Ingwersen, J.

    1978-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences of four cDNA clones coding for the carboxy-terminal portion of at least two different B1 hordein polypeptides are presented. The open reading frame in the nucleotide sequence of the the largest clone (pc hor2-4, 720 nucleotides) translates into the 181 carboxy-terminal amino...... was found to be a major constituent of the total messenger RNA population of the endosperm cell. Polyadenylated hordein messenger RNA sedimented at 11S in sucrose gradients and electrophoretic analysis reveals the presence of at least three RNA species with apparent molecular weights of 0.45, 0.36 and 0.......30 megadaltons. The 11S messenger RNA was translated in vitro into hordein precursor polypeptides which are 2–4 kilodaltons larger than the native hordein polypeptides. The endosperm cell of mutant No. 1508 contained twice as much RNA as the wild type endosperm cell but the same amount of polyadenylated 11S RNA...

  17. The effect of addiction to mobile messenger software and mental health among physical education students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Bagherianfar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of the present study is to the effect of addiction to mobile messenger software on mental health among physical education university students of Torbat-e-Heydarieh city.  Materials and Methods: The statistical population of this descriptive-correlational study included all physical education university students of Torbat-e-Heydarieh city. 169 students out of 302 were chosen as the sample of study, for which stratified sampling method was applied. In order to collect data, Goldberg general health questionnaire and addiction to mobile messenger software inventory were used. Data were analyzed using descriptive and illative statistics.  Results: The research findings showed that there is a statistically significant relationship between addiction to mobile messenger software's and mental health among the students of physical education (P

  18. Involvement of the second messenger cAMP in gravity-signal transduction in physarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, I.; Rabien, H.; Ivanova, K.

    The aim of the investigation was to clarify, whether cellular signal processing following graviperception involves second messenger pathways. The test object was a most gravisensitive free-living ameboid cell, the myxomycete (acellular slime mold) Physarum polycephalum. It was demonstrated that the motor response is related to acceleration-dependent changes in the levels of the cellular second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Rotating Physarum plasmodia in the gravity field of the Earth about a horizontal axis increased their cAMP concentration. Depriving the cells for a few days of the acceleration stimulus (near weightlessness in a space experiment on STS-69) slightly lowered plasmodial cAMP levels. Thus, the results provide first indications that the acceleration-stimulus signal transduction chain of Physarum uses an ubiquitous second messenger pathway.

  19. MESSENGER and Venus Express Observations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.; Acuna, Mario H.; Anderson, Brian J.; Barabash, Stas; Benna, Mehdi; Boardsen, Scott A.; Fraenz, Markus; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E.; Ho,George C.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Raines, Jim M.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Solomon, Sean C.; Zhang, Tielong; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    At 23:08 UTC on 5 June 2007 the MESSENGER spacecraft reached its closest approach altitude of 338 kin during its final flyby of Venus en route to its 2011 orbit insertion at Mercury. The availability of the simultaneous Venus Express solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field measurements provides a rare opportunity to examine the influence of upstream conditions on this planet's solar wind interaction. We present MESSENGER observations of new features of the Venus - solar wind interaction including hot flow anomalies upstream of the bow shock, a flux rope in the near-tail and a two-point determination of the timescale for magnetic flux transport through this induced magnetosphere. Citation: Stavin, J. A., et al. (2009), MESSENGER and Venus Express observations of the solar wind interaction with Venus,

  20. Coulomb interactions between cytoplasmic electric fields and phosphorylated messenger proteins optimize information flow in cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Gatenby

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Normal cell function requires timely and accurate transmission of information from receptors on the cell membrane (CM to the nucleus. Movement of messenger proteins in the cytoplasm is thought to be dependent on random walk. However, Brownian motion will disperse messenger proteins throughout the cytosol resulting in slow and highly variable transit times. We propose that a critical component of information transfer is an intracellular electric field generated by distribution of charge on the nuclear membrane (NM. While the latter has been demonstrated experimentally for decades, the role of the consequent electric field has been assumed to be minimal due to a Debye length of about 1 nanometer that results from screening by intracellular Cl- and K+. We propose inclusion of these inorganic ions in the Debye-Huckel equation is incorrect because nuclear pores allow transit through the membrane at a rate far faster than the time to thermodynamic equilibrium. In our model, only the charged, mobile messenger proteins contribute to the Debye length. FINDINGS: Using this revised model and published data, we estimate the NM possesses a Debye-Huckel length of a few microns and find this is consistent with recent measurement using intracellular nano-voltmeters. We demonstrate the field will accelerate isolated messenger proteins toward the nucleus through Coulomb interactions with negative charges added by phosphorylation. We calculate transit times as short as 0.01 sec. When large numbers of phosphorylated messenger proteins are generated by increasing concentrations of extracellular ligands, we demonstrate they generate a self-screening environment that regionally attenuates the cytoplasmic field, slowing movement but permitting greater cross talk among pathways. Preliminary experimental results with phosphorylated RAF are consistent with model predictions. CONCLUSION: This work demonstrates that previously unrecognized Coulomb interactions

  1. Linking the Universe to the Community: Students as Starry Messengers for IYA2009---Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoja, C. A.; Lebrón Santos, M. E.

    2008-11-01

    This poster presents a project to establish a working team of undergraduate students (``Starry Messengers'') to promote and experience the wonders of space science and education with all the senses. The students are expected to assist during the activities of the IYA2009. During 2008 the students will receive the appropriate instruction on observational astronomy through two workshops. An innovative model of inclusion will be developed, adapting all materials to include the visually impaired. We will encourage the participation of at least one visually impaired student or teacher on the Starry Messenger team. The workshops will serve as templates for future K--12 teacher workshops.

  2. Mercury's Exosphere During MESSENGER's Second Flyby: Detection of Magnesium and Distinct Distributions of Neutral Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, William E.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Bradley, E. Todd; Killen, Rosemary M.; Mouawad, Nelly; Sprague, Ann L.; Burger, Matthew H.; Solomon, Sean C.; Izenberg, Noam R.

    2009-01-01

    During MESSENGER's second Mercury flyby, the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer observed emission from Mercury's neutral exosphere. These observations include the first detection of emission from magnesium. Differing spatial distributions for sodium, calcium, and magnesium were revealed by observations beginning in Mercury's tail region, approximately 8 Mercury radii anti-sunward of the planet, continuing past the nightside, and ending near the dawn terminator. Analysis of these observations, supplemented by observations during the first Mercury flyby as well as those by other MESSENGER instruments, suggests that the distinct spatial distributions arise from a combination of differences in source, transfer, and loss processes.

  3. Students Engaging the Public in Exciting Discoveries by NASA's MESSENGER Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallau, K. G.; Morison, J.; Schuele, H.

    2012-12-01

    In March 2011, NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft entered into orbit around Mercury, the closest planet to the Sun. As the first mission to orbit and study Mercury in depth, MESSENGER sought to answer six primary scientific questions: why is Mercury so dense; what is the geologic history of Mercury; what is the nature of Mercury's magnetic field; what is the structure of Mercury's core; what are the unusual materials at Mercury's poles; and what volatiles are important at Mercury? In the first year of orbit, MESSENGER answered all of these questions, and also made several surprising discoveries. Student interns working with the MESSENGER Education and Public Outreach (EPO) team are using MESSENGER Mosaic Postcards (MPC) in both print and digital formats to present this new information to a broad audience. These MPCs, in conjunction with the rest of the MESSENGER EPO tools, present a unified and global resource for the public. By creating this resource in a variety of media, from printable cards to interactive features on the EPO website (http://www.messenger-education.org/), the EPO team can reach a larger audience, further the goal of the MPC project to share newly discovered features and phenomena with the general public, and thereby generate increased interest in and excitement about science and planetary exploration. One side of each MPC shows a MESSENGER image of a portion of Mercury's surface, and together the postcards can be arranged to form a complete image of the planet. On the reverse side of some cards is information pertaining to an item of interest in view on the image-side. One of us (physics undergraduate JEM) researches interesting features on the surface of Mercury and creates descriptions for the informational side of the postcards, and another (computer science undergraduate HCS) creates the digital versions of cards and associated resources for the Surface Interactive, an interactive tool on the MESSENGER EPO website. Postcards already in distribution

  4. La escritura simbólica y el lenguaje escrito en los usuarios del Messenger The Symbols and Written Language of Users of Messenger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica García Martínez

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available El presente estudio es el resultado de un trabajo de tesis de comunicación en el que se aborda el tema de la utilización del lenguaje en el Messenger y sus posibles repercusiones en los manuscritos de los estudiantes de nivel medio superior. Es un estudio desarrollado entre adolescentes usuarios del Messenger, que utilizan la gama de símbolos y signos que les proporciona esta herramienta, para sustituir la escritura que comúnmente se usa en los manuscritos. La metodología es del enfoque cualitativo y se trata de un estudio comparativo basado en el modelo de comunicación referencial. El trabajo empírico se realizó entre un total de 16 jóvenes de dos escuelas diferentes de nivel medio superior, cuya edad está entre los 15 y 17 años, los cuales a su vez se integraron en dos grupos de ocho sujetos para el estudio en una primera etapa y otros ocho en una segunda. Básicamente se diferenciaron los que utilizan con mucha frecuencia el Messenger y los que lo utilizan muy poco, o no lo utilizan. Las técnicas de recolección de datos fueron: observación durante sesiones de chat, escritos a máquina (ordenador y manuscritos. La técnica para la interpretación de los datos fue de análisis de contenido. Los resultados sugieren que existe escasa relación entre la utilización de signos y símbolos en el Messenger y la calidad en la redacción de los textos, particularmente en los manuscritos.This work presents the results of a postgraduate thesis on communication, particularly the use of language. Messenger is one of the most popular ways for communicating by signs and symbols. This study was carried out on junior high school students in state education. This research explores the possible impact on junior high school students’ written work due to their use of Messenger. To address this question, the referential communication model with the qualitative approach was used in order to carry out a comparative study. Data were gathered from 16

  5. Messenger RNA patterns in rat liver nuclei before and after treat-ment with growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drews, J; Brawerman, G

    1967-06-09

    Like cortisol, growth hormone enhances RNA synthesis in rat liver nuclei. However, DNA-RNA hybridization experiments show that the application of growth hormone does not stimulate the formation of new species of messenger RNA. The latter phenomenon was observed after treatment with cortisol.

  6. Mobile Immersion: An Experiment Using Mobile Instant Messenger to Support Second-Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Immersion has been an acclaimed approach for second-language acquisition, but is not available to most students. The idea of this study was to create a mobile immersion environment on a smartphone using a mobile instant messenger, WhatsApp™. Forty-five Form-1 (7th grade) students divided into the Mobile Group and Control Group participated in a…

  7. The Gravity Field of Mercury After the Messenger Low-Altitude Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazarico, Erwan; Genova, Antonio; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Frank G.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Neumann, Gary A.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2015-01-01

    The final year of the MESSENGER mission was designed to take advantage of the remaining propellant onboard to provide a series of lowaltitude observation campaigns and acquire novel scientific data about the innermost planet. The lower periapsis altitude greatly enhances the sensitivity to the short-wavelength gravity field, but only when the spacecraft is in view of Earth. After more than 3 years in orbit around Mercury, the MESSENGER spacecraft was tracked for the first time below 200-km altitude on 5 May 2014 by the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN). Between August and October, periapsis passages down to 25-km altitude were routinely tracked. These periods considerably improved the quality of the data coverage. Before the end of its mission, MESSENGER will fly at very low altitudes for extended periods of time. Given the orbital geometry, however the periapses will not be visible from Earth and so no new tracking data will be available for altitudes lower than 75 km. Nevertheless, the continuous tracking of MESSENGER in the northern hemisphere will help improve the uniformity of the spatial coverage at altitudes lower than 150 km, which will further improve the overall quality of the Mercury gravity field.

  8. Use of MESSENGER radioscience data to improve planetary ephemeris and to test general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, A. K.; Fienga, A.; Laskar, J.; Manche, H.; Gastineau, M.

    2014-01-01

    The current knowledge of Mercury's orbit has mainly been gained by direct radar ranging obtained from the 60s to 1998 and by five Mercury flybys made with Mariner 10 in the 70s, and with MESSENGER made in 2008 and 2009. On March 18, 2011, MESSENGER became the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury. The radioscience observations acquired during the orbital phase of MESSENGER drastically improved our knowledge of the orbit of Mercury. An accurate MESSENGER orbit is obtained by fitting one-and-half years of tracking data using GINS orbit determination software. The systematic error in the Earth-Mercury geometric positions, also called range bias, obtained from GINS are then used to fit the INPOP dynamical modeling of the planet motions. An improved ephemeris of the planets is then obtained, INPOP13a, and used to perform general relativity tests of the parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) formalism. Our estimations of PPN parameters (γ and β) are more stringent than previous results.

  9. Realising effective theories of tribrid inflation: are there effects from messenger fields?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antusch, Stefan [Department of Physics, University of Basel,Klingelbergstr. 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut),Föhringer Ring 6, D-80805 München (Germany); Nolde, David [Department of Physics, University of Basel,Klingelbergstr. 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2015-09-22

    Tribrid inflation is a variant of supersymmetric hybrid inflation in which the inflaton is a matter field (which can be charged under gauge symmetries) and inflation ends by a GUT-scale phase transition of a waterfall field. These features make tribrid inflation a promising framework for realising inflation with particularly close connections to particle physics. Superpotentials of tribrid inflation involve effective operators suppressed by some cutoff scale, which is often taken as the Planck scale. However, these operators may also be generated by integrating out messenger superfields with masses below the Planck scale, which is in fact quite common in GUT and/or flavour models. The values of the inflaton field during inflation can then lie above this mass scale, which means that for reliably calculating the model predictions one has to go beyond the effective theory description. We therefore discuss realisations of effective theories of tribrid inflation and specify in which cases effects from the messenger fields are expected, and under which conditions they can safely be neglected. In particular, we point out how to construct realisations where, despite the fact that the inflaton field values are above the messenger mass scale, the predictions for the observables are (to a good approximation) identical to the ones calculated in the effective theory treatment where the messenger mass scale is identified with the (apparent) cutoff scale.

  10. Mobile Immersion: An Experiment Using Mobile Instant Messenger to Support Second-Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Immersion has been an acclaimed approach for second-language acquisition, but is not available to most students. The idea of this study was to create a mobile immersion environment on a smartphone using a mobile instant messenger, WhatsApp™. Forty-five Form-1 (7th grade) students divided into the Mobile Group and Control Group participated in a…

  11. Recognition of the bacterial second messenger cyclic diguanylate by its cognate riboswitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulshina, Nadia; Baird, Nathan J.; Ferré-D' Amaré, Adrian R.; (UWASH); (FHCRC)

    2009-12-03

    The cyclic diguanylate (bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate, c-di-GMP) riboswitch is the first known example of a gene-regulatory RNA that binds a second messenger. c-di-GMP is widely used by bacteria to regulate processes ranging from biofilm formation to the expression of virulence genes. The cocrystal structure of the c-di-GMP responsive GEMM riboswitch upstream of the tfoX gene of Vibrio cholerae reveals the second messenger binding the RNA at a three-helix junction. The two-fold symmetric second messenger is recognized asymmetrically by the monomeric riboswitch using canonical and noncanonical base-pairing as well as intercalation. These interactions explain how the RNA discriminates against cyclic diadenylate (c-di-AMP), a putative bacterial second messenger. Small-angle X-ray scattering and biochemical analyses indicate that the RNA undergoes compaction and large-scale structural rearrangement in response to ligand binding, consistent with organization of the core three-helix junction of the riboswitch concomitant with binding of c-di-GMP.

  12. Comparison of methods of extracting messenger Ribonucleic Acid from ejaculated Porcine (Sus Scrofa) Spermatozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. D. Guthrie, G.R. Welch, and L. A. Blomberg. Comparison of Methods of Extracting Messenger Ribonucleic Acid from Ejaculated Porcine (Sus Scrofa) Spermatozoa. Biotechnology and Germplasm Laboratory, Agricultural Research Service U. S. Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD 20705 The purpos...

  13. A Contemporary, Laboratory-Intensive Course on Messenger RNA Transcription and Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Sue; Miller, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) plays a pivotal role in the central dogma of molecular biology. Importantly, molecular events occurring during and after mRNA synthesis have the potential to create multiple proteins from one gene, leading to some of the remarkable protein diversity that genomes hold. The North Carolina State University…

  14. Return to Mercury: a global perspective on MESSENGER's first Mercury flyby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Sean C; McNutt, Ralph L; Watters, Thomas R; Lawrence, David J; Feldman, William C; Head, James W; Krimigis, Stamatios M; Murchie, Scott L; Phillips, Roger J; Slavin, James A; Zuber, Maria T

    2008-07-04

    In January 2008, the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft became the first probe to fly past the planet Mercury in 33 years. The encounter revealed that Mercury is a dynamic system; its liquid iron-rich outer core is coupled through a dominantly dipolar magnetic field to the surface, exosphere, and magnetosphere, all of which interact with the solar wind. MESSENGER images confirm that lobate scarps are the dominant tectonic landform and record global contraction associated with cooling of the planet. The history of contraction can be related to the history of volcanism and cratering, and the total contractional strain is at least one-third greater than inferred from Mariner 10 images. On the basis of measurements of thermal neutrons made during the flyby, the average abundance of iron in Mercury's surface material is less than 6% by weight.

  15. MESSENGER observations of Mercury's exosphere: detection of magnesium and distribution of constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, William E; Vervack, Ronald J; Bradley, E Todd; Killen, Rosemary M; Mouawad, Nelly; Sprague, Ann L; Burger, Matthew H; Solomon, Sean C; Izenberg, Noam R

    2009-05-01

    Mercury is surrounded by a tenuous exosphere that is supplied primarily by the planet's surface materials and is known to contain sodium, potassium, and calcium. Observations by the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer during MESSENGER's second Mercury flyby revealed the presence of neutral magnesium in the tail (anti-sunward) region of the exosphere, as well as differing spatial distributions of magnesium, calcium, and sodium atoms in both the tail and the nightside, near-planet exosphere. Analysis of these observations, supplemented by observations during the first Mercury flyby, as well as those by other MESSENGER instruments, suggests that the distinct spatial distributions arise from a combination of differences in source, transfer, and loss processes.

  16. Planetary science. Low-altitude magnetic field measurements by MESSENGER reveal Mercury's ancient crustal field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Catherine L; Phillips, Roger J; Purucker, Michael E; Anderson, Brian J; Byrne, Paul K; Denevi, Brett W; Feinberg, Joshua M; Hauck, Steven A; Head, James W; Korth, Haje; James, Peter B; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A; Philpott, Lydia C; Siegler, Matthew A; Tsyganenko, Nikolai A; Solomon, Sean C

    2015-05-22

    Magnetized rocks can record the history of the magnetic field of a planet, a key constraint for understanding its evolution. From orbital vector magnetic field measurements of Mercury taken by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft at altitudes below 150 kilometers, we have detected remanent magnetization in Mercury's crust. We infer a lower bound on the average age of magnetization of 3.7 to 3.9 billion years. Our findings indicate that a global magnetic field driven by dynamo processes in the fluid outer core operated early in Mercury's history. Ancient field strengths that range from those similar to Mercury's present dipole field to Earth-like values are consistent with the magnetic field observations and with the low iron content of Mercury's crust inferred from MESSENGER elemental composition data. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Evidence for young volcanism on Mercury from the third MESSENGER flyby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prockter, Louise M; Ernst, Carolyn M; Denevi, Brett W; Chapman, Clark R; Head, James W; Fassett, Caleb I; Merline, William J; Solomon, Sean C; Watters, Thomas R; Strom, Robert G; Cremonese, Gabriele; Marchi, Simone; Massironi, Matteo

    2010-08-06

    During its first two flybys of Mercury, the MESSENGER spacecraft acquired images confirming that pervasive volcanism occurred early in the planet's history. MESSENGER's third Mercury flyby revealed a 290-kilometer-diameter peak-ring impact basin, among the youngest basins yet seen, having an inner floor filled with spectrally distinct smooth plains. These plains are sparsely cratered, postdate the formation of the basin, apparently formed from material that once flowed across the surface, and are therefore interpreted to be volcanic in origin. An irregular depression surrounded by a halo of bright deposits northeast of the basin marks a candidate explosive volcanic vent larger than any previously identified on Mercury. Volcanism on the planet thus spanned a considerable duration, perhaps extending well into the second half of solar system history.

  18. Astrophysical objects observed by the MESSENGER X-ray spectrometer during Mercury flybys

    CERN Document Server

    Bannister, N P; Lindsay, S T; Martindale, A; Talboys, D L

    2012-01-01

    The MESSENGER spacecraft conducted its first flyby of Mercury on 14th January 2008, followed by two subsequent encounters on 6th October 2008 and 29th September 2009, prior to Mercury orbit insertion on 18th March 2011. We have reviewed MESSENGER flight telemetry and X-ray Spectrometer observations from the first two encounters, and correlate several prominent features in the data with the presence of astrophysical X-ray sources in the instrument field of view. We find that two X-ray peaks attributed in earlier work to the detection of suprathermal electrons from the Mercury magnetosphere, are likely to contain a significant number of events that are of astrophysical origin. The intensities of these two peaks cannot be explained entirely on the basis of astrophysical sources, and we support the previous suprathermal explanation but suggest that the electron fluxes derived in those studies be revised to correct for a significant astrophysical signal.

  19. Realising effective theories of tribrid inflation: Are there effects from messenger fields?

    CERN Document Server

    Antusch, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Tribrid inflation is a variant of supersymmetric hybrid inflation in which the inflaton is a matter field (which can be charged under gauge symmetries) and inflation ends by a GUT-scale phase transition of a waterfall field. These features make tribrid inflation a promising framework for realising inflation with particularly close connections to particle physics. Superpotentials of tribrid inflation involve effective operators suppressed by some cutoff scale, which is often taken as the Planck scale. However, these operators may also be generated by integrating out messenger superfields with masses below the Planck scale, which is in fact quite common in GUT and/or flavour models. The values of the inflaton field during inflation can then lie above this mass scale, which means that for reliably calculating the model predictions one has to go beyond the effective theory description. We therefore discuss realisations of effective theories of tribrid inflation and specify in which cases effects from the messenge...

  20. Multi-messenger signals of long-term core-collapse supernova simulations : synergetic observation strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, Ko; Tanaka, Masaomi; Hayama, Kazuhiro; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei

    2016-01-01

    The next Galactic supernova is expected to bring great opportunities for the direct detection of gravitational waves (GW), full flavor neutrinos, and multi-wavelength photons. To maximize the science return from such a rare event, it is essential to have established classes of possible situations and preparations for appropriate observations. To this end, we use a long-term numerical simulation of the core-collapse supernova (CCSN) of a 17 solar-mass red supergiant progenitor to self-consistently model the multi-messenger signals expected in GW, neutrino, and electromagnetic messengers. This supernova model takes into account the formation and evolution of a protoneutron star, neutrino-matter interaction, and neutrino transport, all within a two-dimensional shock hydrodynamics simulation. With this, we separately discuss three situations: (i) a CCSN at the Galactic Center, (ii) an extremely nearby CCSN within hundreds of parsecs, and (iii) a CCSN in nearby galaxies within several Mpc. These distance regimes n...

  1. Improving naturalness in Gauge Mediation with non-unified messenger sectors

    CERN Document Server

    Calibbi, Lorenzo; Mustafayev, Azar; Raza, Shabbar

    2016-01-01

    We study models of gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking with messengers that do not belong to complete representations of grand-unified gauge groups. We show that certain setups characterized by heavy Wino can greatly improve the fine tuning with respect to models with unified messengers, such as minimal gauge mediation. The typical models with low tuning feature multi-TeV superparticles, with the exception of the Higgsinos and possibly Bino and right-handed sleptons. As a consequence, the absence of signals for supersymmetry at the LHC is trivially accommodated in our framework. On the other hand, testing these models will be challenging at the LHC. We finally show that the gravitino can be a consistent candidate for cold dark matter, provided a rather low reheating temperature, if a standard thermal history of the universe is assumed.

  2. Expected Geochemical and Mineralogical Properties of Meteorites from Mercury: Inferences from Messenger Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, F. M.; McCoy, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    Meteorites from the Moon, Mars, and many types of asteroid bodies have been identified among our global inventory of meteorites, however samples of Mercury and Venus have not been identified. The absence of mercurian and venusian meteorites could be attributed to an inability to recognize them in our collections due to a paucity of geochemical information for Venus and Mercury. In the case of mercurian meteorites, this possibility is further supported by dynamical calculations that suggest mercurian meteorites should be present on Earth at a factor of 2-3 less than meteorites from Mars [1]. In the present study, we focus on the putative mineralogy of mercurian meteorites using data obtained from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, which has provided us with our first quantitative constraints on the geochemistry of planet Mercury. We have used the MESSENGER data to compile a list of mineralogical and geochemical characteristics that a meteorite from Mercury is likely to exhibit.

  3. Radial Evolution of a Magnetic Cloud: MESSENGER, STEREO, and Venus Express Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, S. W.; Forsyth, R. J.; Raines, J. M.; Gershman, D. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2015-07-01

    The Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus missions will provide observations of magnetic clouds closer to the Sun than ever before, and it will be good preparation for these missions to make full use of the most recent in situ data sets from the inner heliosphere—namely, those provided by MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) and Venus Express—for magnetic cloud studies. We present observations of the same magnetic cloud made by MESSENGER at Mercury and later by Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory-B (STEREO-B), while the spacecraft were radially aligned in 2011 November. Few such radial observations of magnetic clouds have been previously reported. Estimates of the solar wind speed at MESSENGER are also presented, calculated through the application of a previously established technique. The cloud's flux rope has been analyzed using force-free fitting; the rope diameter increased from 0.18 to 0.41 AU (corresponding to an {r}{{H}}0.94 dependence on heliocentric distance, rH), and the axial magnetic field strength dropped from 46.0 to 8.7 nT (an {r}{{H}}-1.84 dependence) between the spacecraft, clear indications of an expanding structure. The axial magnetic flux was ˜0.50 nT AU2 at both spacecraft, suggesting that the rope underwent no significant erosion through magnetic reconnection between MESSENGER and STEREO-B. Further, we estimate the change in the cloud's angular width by assuming helicity conservation. It has also been found that the rope axis rotated by 30° between the spacecraft to lie close to the solar equatorial plane at STEREO-B. Such a rotation, if it is a common feature of coronal mass ejection propagation, would have important implications for space weather forecasting.

  4. Comparison of MESSENGER Optical Images with Thermal and Radar Data for the Surface of MERCURY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewett, D. T.; Coman, E. I.; Chabot, N. L.; Izenberg, N. R.; Harmon, J. K.; Neish, C.

    2010-12-01

    Images collected by the MESSENGER spacecraft during its three Mercury flybys cover nearly the entire surface of the planet that was not imaged by Mariner 10. The MESSENGER data now allow us to observe features at optical wavelengths that were previously known only through remote sensing in other portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. For example, the Mariner 10 infrared (IR) radiometer made measurements along a track on the night side of Mercury during the spacecraft's first encounter in 1974. Analysis of the IR radiometer data identified several thermal anomalies that we have correlated to craters with extensive rays or ejecta deposits, including Xiao Zhao and Eminescu. The thermal properties are consistent with a greater exposure of bare rock (exposed in steep walls or as boulders and cobbles) in and around these craters compared with the lower-thermal-inertia, finer-grained regolith of the surrounding older surface. The portion of Mercury not viewed by Mariner 10 has also been imaged by Earth-based radar. The radar backscatter gives information on the wavelength-scale surface roughness. Arecibo S-band (12.6-cm wavelength) radar observations have produced images of Eminescu and also revealed two spectacular rayed craters (Debussy and Hokusai) that have since been imaged by MESSENGER. We are examining radial profiles for these craters, extracted from both the radar images and MESSENGER narrow-angle camera mosaics, that extend from the crater center outwards to a distance of several crater diameters. Comparison of optical and radar profiles for the craters, as well as similar profiles for lunar craters, can provide insight into ejecta deposition, the effect of surface gravity on the cratering process, and space weathering.

  5. PENGARUH EDUKASI MENGGUNAKAN BLACKBERRY MESSENGER TERHADAP PERUBAHAN PENGETAHUAN REMAJA SMPN 30 MAKASSAR

    OpenAIRE

    Maysita; Jafar, Nurhaedar; Salam, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Prevalensi gizi lebih pada remaja di SMPN 30 Makassar cukup tinggi. Pencegahan gizi lebih pada remaja lebih mudah dilakukan daripada menanggulangi gizi lebih pada usia dewasa. Penelitian bertujuan mengetahui pengaruh edukasi gizi menggunakan Blackberry Messenger dalam mengubah pengetahuan konsumsi buah sayur, fast food dan soft drink remaja dengan status gizi lebih di SMPN 30 Makassar. Jenis penelitian yang digunakan adalah pra eksperimen dengan rancangan one-group pretest-posttestdesign. Pop...

  6. Propionic and Methylmalonic Acidemia: Antisense Therapeutics for Intronic Variations Causing Aberrantly Spliced Messenger RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Rincón, A. ; Aguado, C. ; Desviat, L. R. ; Sánchez-Alcudia, R. ; Ugarte, M. ; Pérez, B. 

    2007-01-01

    We describe the use of antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (AMOs) to restore normal splicing caused by intronic molecular defects identified in methylmalonic acidemia (MMA) and propionic acidemia (PA). The three new point mutations described in deep intronic regions increase the splicing scores of pseudoexons or generate consensus binding motifs for splicing factors, such as SRp40, which favor the intronic inclusions in MUT (r.1957ins76), PCCA (r.1284ins84), or PCCB (r.654ins72) messenger R...

  7. Comment on "Length-dependent translation of messenger RNA by ribosomes"

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yunxin

    2011-01-01

    In recent paper [Phys. Rev. E {\\bf 83}, 042903 (2011)], a simple model for the translation of messenger RNA by ribosomes is provided, and the expression of translational ratio of protein is given. In this comments, varied methods to get this ratio are addressed. Depending on a different method, we find that, roughly speaking, this translational ratio decays exponentially with mRNA length in prokaryotic cell, and reciprocally with mRNA length in eukaryotic cells.

  8. Means to an end: mechanisms of alternative polyadenylation of messenger RNA precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Gruber, Andreas R; Martin, Georges; Keller, Walter; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2013-01-01

    Expression of mature messenger RNAs (mRNAs) requires appropriate transcription initiation and termination, as well as pre-mRNA processing by capping, splicing, cleavage, and polyadenylation. A core 3′-end processing complex carries out the cleavage and polyadenylation reactions, but many proteins have been implicated in the selection of polyadenylation sites among the multiple alternatives that eukaryotic genes typically have. In recent years, high-throughput approaches to map both the 3′-end...

  9. Dashboard Monitoring System Berbasis Web Sebagai Pemantau Layanan liteBIG Instant Messenger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gigih Forda Nama

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Saat ini hampir semua pengguna ponsel pintar menggunakan layanan perpesanan instan sebagai media komunikasi dikarenakan layanan perpesanan instan lebih hemat biaya dengan hanya menggunakan jaringan internet dibandingkan layanan pesan singkat (SMS. Layanan yang diberikan harus dapat melayani pengguna dengan baik agar pesan yang dikirim oleh pengirim dapat diterima oleh penerima dengan cepat dan akurat. Layanan ini juga harus dijaga keandalannya untuk menjamin kualitas pelayanan dan untuk menghindari ketidaknyamanan pengguna. Sehingga, diperlukan adanya sistem pemantauan berupa perangkat lunak untuk pengawasan status layanan setiap saat dapat diakses dari manapun dan kapanpun. PT.Sandika Cahaya Mandiri memiliki produk layanan perpesanan instan dengan brand name liteBIG Messenger. Perusahaan ini memerlukan perangkat lunak untuk pemantauan layanan liteBIG Messenger. Dengan adanya perangkat lunak pemantauan layanan, petugas pemantauan dapat melihat secara realtime status layanan utama pada setiap komputer server, pemakaian sumber daya (cpu, memory, dan harddisk, dan statistik pengguna baru liteBIG Messenger  melalui antarmuka web. Petugas pemantauan juga akan mendapat pemberitahuan ketika terjadi masalah pada layanan sehingga masalah dapat lebih dini diketahui dan downtime dapat dikurangi.

  10. Messenger RNA encoding constitutively active Toll-like receptor 4 enhances effector functions of human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pato, A; Eisenberg, G; Machlenkin, A; Margalit, A; Cafri, G; Frankenburg, S; Merims, S; Peretz, T; Lotem, M; Gross, G

    2015-11-01

    Adoptive T cell therapy of cancer employs a large number of ex-vivo-propagated T cells which recognize their targets either by virtue of their endogenous T cell receptor (TCR) or via genetic reprogramming. However, both cell-extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms often diminish the in-vivo potency of these therapeutic T cells, limiting their clinical efficacy and broader use. Direct activation of human T cells by Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands induces T cell survival and proliferation, boosts the production of proinflammatory cytokines and augments resistance to regulatory T cell (Treg) suppression. Removal of the TLR ligand-binding region results in constitutive signalling triggered by the remaining cytosolic Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain. The use of such TIR domains therefore offers an ideal means for equipping anti-tumour T cells with the arsenal of functional attributes required for improving current clinical protocols. Here we show that constitutively active (ca)TLR-4 can be expressed efficiently in human T cells using mRNA electroporation. The mere expression of caTLR-4 mRNA in polyclonal CD8 and CD4 T cells induced the production of interferon (IFN)-γ, triggered the surface expression of CD25, CD69 and 4-1BB and up-regulated a panel of cytokines and chemokines. In tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes prepared from melanoma patients, caTLR-4 induced robust IFN-γ secretion in all samples tested. Furthermore, caTLR-4 enhanced the anti-melanoma cytolytic activity of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes and augmented the secretion of IFN-γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) for at least 4 days post-transfection. Our results demonstrate that caTLR-4 is capable of exerting multiple T cell-enhancing effects and can potentially be used as a genetic adjuvant in adoptive cell therapy. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  11. Pathophysiological implications of the chemical messengers; Implicaciones fisiopatologicas de los mensajeros quimicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazquez Fernandez, E.

    2009-07-01

    To maintain a physical organization and a different composition of its surroundings environment, living beings use a great part of the energy that they produce. Vital processes require an elevated number of reactions which are regulated and integrated by chemical messengers. They use autocrine, paracrine, endocrine and synaptic signals through receptors of cell surface, nuclear or associated with ionic channels, enzymes, trim eric G proteins and to intracellular kinases. Through these mechanisms pheromones play an important role in the relationships between different individuals, and hormones are able to regulate the integrative functions of our organism. In the nervous system, neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, sensors and receptors between other messengers, play functions of great relevance, while growth factors stimulate cell proliferation and cytokines have many effects but the most important is the ones related with the control of the immflamatory process. Alterations of these messengers permit us a better understanding of the diseases and possibly of its treatments in a near future. Modifications of the expression of genes from the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes are responsible of monogenic, polygenic and mitochondrial diseases, while alterations in the activities of dopamine and serotonin neurotransmitters are related with schizophrenia, Parkinson disease and depression, respectively. Other example is the hyperthyroidism of the Graves-Bassedow disease due to the competitive interference of the LATS immunoglobulin with TSH at the level of the follicular cells producing thyroid hormones Twenty five years ago in the reviews on the mechanisms of insulin action, there was presentations in which the insulin receptor was located in the plasma membrane of the target cells while in the cytoplasm only a big interrogative was observed, that at present is replaced by chemical mediators cascades responsible of the multiple effects of insulin. This finding is similar

  12. Messenger molecules of the phospholipase signaling system have dual effects on vascular smooth muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidulescu, Cristina; Mironneau, J.; Mironneau, Chantal; Popescu, L. M.

    2000-01-01

    Background and methods. In order to investigate the role of phospholipases and their immediately derived messengers in agonist-induced contraction of portal vein smooth muscle, we used the addition in the organ bath of exogenous molecules such as: phospholipases C, A(2), and D, diacylglycerol, arachidonic acid, phosphatidic acid, choline. We also used substances modulating activity of downstream molecules like protein kinase C, phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase, or cyclooxygenase. Results. a) Exogenous phospholipases C or A(2), respectively, induced small agonist-like contractions, while exogenous phospholipase D did not. Moreover, phospholipase D inhibited spontaneous contractions. However, when added during noradrenaline-induced plateau, phospholipase D shortly potentiated it. b) The protein kinase C activator, phorbol dibutyrate potentiated both the exogenous phospholipase C-induced contraction and the noradrenaline-induced plateau, while the protein kinase C inhibitor 1-(-5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methyl-piperazine relaxed the plateau. c) When added before noradrenaline, indomethacin inhibited both phasic and tonic contractions, but when added during the tonic contraction shortly potentiated it. Arachidonic acid strongly potentiated both spontaneous and noradrenaline-induced contractions, irrespective of the moment of its addition. d) In contrast, phosphatidic acid inhibited spontaneous contractile activity, nevertheless it was occasionally capable of inducing small contractions, and when repetitively added during the agonist-induced tonic contraction, produced short potentiations of the plateau. Pretreatment with propranolol inhibited noradrenaline-induced contractions and further addition of phosphatidic acid augmented this inhibition. Choline augmented the duration and amplitude of noradrenaline-induced tonic contraction and final contractile oscillations. Conclusions. These data suggest that messengers produced by phospholipase C and phospholipase A(2

  13. Key science issues after MESSENGER and current observation plans of BepiColombo MMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Go; Hayakawa, Hajime; Fujimoto, Masaki

    2017-04-01

    Little had been known about the Hermean magnetosphere until MESSENGER explored the region. The region is formed as the weak planetary magnetic field stands against the intense solar wind in the close proximity of the Sun. Various prediction had been given by noting the difference in the parameters from the well-studied terrestiral magnetosphere of a similar setting and scaling the well-knowns to the Hermean environment. MESSENGER results, however, show a wide varieity of phenomena that are out of the scope of what one could have reasonably argued. The micro-magnetosphere of Mercury is much more dynamic than one had predicted. BepiColombo MMO, the JAXA spacecraft of the BepiColombo Mercury exploration mission which will be launched in 2018 and will arrive at Mercury in 2025, is equipped to study the space environment of the planet Mercury. BepiColombo MMO is mainly designed for plasma observations and is expected to extract essential elements of space plasma physics that become visible in the Hermean environment. MMO has large constraints on science operations, such as thermal issue and limited telemetry rate. Due to the thermal issue each science instrument cannot always be turned on. In addition, due to the low telemetry rate in average, only a part ( 20-30%) of science mission data with high resolution can be downlinked. Therefore, in order to maximize the scientific results and outcomes to be achieved by MMO, we are now working to optimize the science observation and downlink plans in detail. Here we review MESSENGER results and how MMO will contribute to deepen our understanding of space plasmas by addressing the puzzles raised by MESSEGNER.

  14. Exploring the recovery and detection of messenger RNA and DNA from enhanced fingermarks in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, A; Gittos, M; Harbison, S A; Fleming, R; Wivell, R

    2014-05-01

    Often in the examination of bloodstained fingermarks discussion occurs around whether to prioritise the fingerprint evidence or focus on the biological evidence. Collecting a sample for genetic profiling may result in the loss of ridge detail that could have been used for fingerprint comparison. Fingermark enhancement and recovery methods along with sample collection methods could also compromise downstream genetic analysis. Previous forensic casework has highlighted circumstances where, after enhancement had been performed, it would have been extremely valuable to both identify the body fluid and generate a DNA profile from the same sample. We enhanced depletion series of fingermarks made in blood, using single treatments consisting of aqueous amido black, methanol-based amido black, acid yellow and leucocrystal violet, and exposure to long wave UV light. We then extracted the DNA and RNA for profiling, to assess the recovery and detection of genetic material from the enhanced fingermarks. We have shown that genetic profiling of bloodstained fingermarks can be successful after chemical enhancement; however it may still be necessary to prioritise evidence types in certain circumstances. From our results it appears that even with visible bloodstained fingermarks, leucocrystal violet can reduce the effectiveness of subsequent messenger RNA profiling. Aqueous amido black and acid yellow also have adverse effects on messenger RNA profiling of depleted fingermarks with low levels of cellular material. These results help with forensic decision-making by expanding knowledge of the extent of the detrimental effects of blood-enhancement reagents on both DNA profiling and body fluid identification using messenger RNA profiling.

  15. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Fast Transients. Multi-wavelength Observations and Multi-messenger Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willingale, R.; Mészáros, P.

    2017-07-01

    The current status of observations and theoretical models of gamma-ray bursts and some other related transients, including ultra-long bursts and tidal disruption events, is reviewed. We consider the impact of multi-wavelength data on the formulation and development of theoretical models for the prompt and afterglow emission including the standard fireball model utilizing internal shocks and external shocks, photospheric emission, the role of the magnetic field and hadronic processes. In addition, we discuss some of the prospects for non-photonic multi-messenger detection and for future instrumentation, and comment on some of the outstanding issues in the field.

  16. Vector-like fields, messenger mixing and the Higgs mass in gauge mediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischler, Willy; Tangarife, Walter [Department of Physics and Texas Cosmology Center,The University of Texas at Austin,TX 78712 (United States)

    2014-05-30

    In order to generate, in the context of gauge mediation, a Higgs mass around 126 GeV that avoids the little hierarchy problem, we explore a set of models where the messengers are directly coupled to new vector-like fields at the TeV scale in addition to the usual low energy degrees of freedom. We find that in this context, stop masses lighter than 2 TeV and large A-terms are generated, thereby improving issues of fine tuning.

  17. The Role of RNA Binding Proteins in Insulin Messenger Stability and Translation

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Although the reason for insufficient release of insulin in diabetes mellitus may vary depending on the type and stage of the disease, it is of vital importance that an amplified insulin biosynthesis can meet the increased need during periods of hyperglycemia. The insulin mRNA is highly abundant in beta cells and changes in insulin mRNA levels are, at least in part, controlled by altered rates of mRNA degradation. Since the mechanisms behind the control of insulin messenger stability and trans...

  18. The Measurement of 41Ca and Its Application for Cell Messenger

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Ca is an important element in human body. Many diseases relate with Ca in organizations and cells.41Ca (T1/2=1.04×105 a, pure electron capture with emission or Auger electrons and X-rays) is an idealtracer to understand of the mechanism of the disease. The measurement of 41Ca with AMS has been usedfor study of long-term bone resorption, bone resorption in a human, Ca uptake and deposition in heardtissue and skeletal Ca metabolism. Ca2+ in cytoplasm of human cell as a cell messenger plays an important

  19. Vector-like Fields, Messenger Mixing and the Higgs mass in Gauge Mediation

    CERN Document Server

    Fischler, Willy

    2014-01-01

    In order to generate, in the context of gauge mediation, a Higgs mass around 126 GeV that avoids the little hierarchy problem, we explore a set of models where the messengers are directly coupled to new vector-like fields at the TeV scale in addition to the usual low energy degrees of freedom. We find that in this context, stop masses lighter than 2 TeV and large $A$-terms are generated, thereby improving issues of fine tuning.

  20. MESSENGER Observations of the Spatial Distribution of Planetary Ions Near Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Raines, Jim M.; Slavin, James A.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Gilbert, Jason A.; Gloeckler, George; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Schriver, David; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2011-01-01

    Global measurements by MESSENGER of the fluxes of heavy ions at Mercury, particularly sodium (Na(+)) and oxygen (O(+)), exhibit distinct maxima in the northern magnetic-cusp region, indicating that polar regions are important sources of Mercury's ionized exosphere, presumably through solar-wind sputtering near the poles. The observed fluxes of helium (He(+)) are more evenly distributed, indicating a more uniform source such as that expected from evaporation from a helium-saturated surface. In some regions near Mercury, especially the nightside equatorial region, the Na(+) pressure can be a substantial fraction of the proton pressure.

  1. Putative Key Role of Inositol Messengers in Endothelial Cells in Preeclampsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunjara, Sirilaksana; McLean, Patricia; Rademacher, Laurens; Rademacher, Thomas W.; Fascilla, Fabiana; Bettocchi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Immunological alterations, endothelial dysfunction, and insulin resistance characterize preeclampsia. Endothelial cells hold the key role in the pathogenesis of this disease. The signaling pathways mediating these biological abnormalities converge on PKB/Akt, an intracellular kinase regulating cell survival, proliferation, and metabolism. Inositol second messengers are involved in metabolic and cell signaling pathways and are highly expressed during preeclampsia. Intracellular action of these molecules is deeply affected by zinc, manganese, and calcium. To evaluate the pathophysiological significance, we present the response of the intracellular pathways of inositol phosphoglycans involved in cellular metabolism and propose a link with the disease. PMID:27738431

  2. Selective Pyramidal Cell Reduction of GABAA Receptor α1 Subunit Messenger RNA Expression in Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Glausier, Jill R; Lewis, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Levels of messenger RNA (mRNA) for the α1 subunit of the GABAA receptor, which is present in 60% of cortical GABAA receptors, have been reported to be lower in layer 3 of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in subjects with schizophrenia. This subunit is expressed in both pyramidal cells and interneurons, and thus lower α1 subunit levels in each cell population would have opposite effects on net cortical excitation. We used dual-label in situ hybridization to quantify GABAA α1 subunit mRNA expression...

  3. Online De-Radicalization? Countering Violent Extremist Narratives: Message, Messenger and Media Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Ashour

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Is “online de-radicalization” possible? Given the two growing phenomena of “online radicalization” and “behavioral/ideological/organizational de-radicalization,” this article outlines a broad strategy for countering the narratives of violent extremists. It argues that an effective counter-narrative should be built on three pillars. The first is an effective comprehensive message that dismantles and counter-argues against every dimension of the extremist narrative, namely the theological, political, historical, instrumental and socio-psychological dimensions. The second pillar is the messengers. The article argues that for the first time in the history of Jihadism a “critical mass” of former militants, who rebelled not only against the current behaviour of their former colleagues but also against the ideology supporting it, has come into existence. This “critical mass” can constitute the core of credible messengers, especially the few de-radicalized individuals and groups that still maintain influence and respect among vulnerable communities. The third pillar is the dissemination and attraction strategy of the counter-narratives(s which focuses on the role of the media. The author of the article outlines a broad framework, which is a part of a UN-sponsored, comprehensive research project on countering the extremists narrative.

  4. Transfer-messenger RNA controls the translation of cell-cycle and stress proteins in Streptomyces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barends, Sharief; Zehl, Martin; Bialek, Sylwia

    2010-01-01

    , elongation factor Tu3, and the cell-cycle control proteins DasR, SsgA, SsgF and SsgR. Although tmRNA-tagged proteins are degraded swiftly, the translation of dnaK and dasR messenger RNAs (mRNAs) depends fully on tmRNA, whereas transcription is unaffected. The data unveil a surprisingly dedicated......The transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA)-mediated trans-translation mechanism is highly conserved in bacteria and functions primarily as a system for the rescue of stalled ribosomes and the removal of aberrantly produced proteins. Here, we show that in the antibiotic-producing soil bacterium Streptomyces...... coelicolor, trans-translation has a specialized role in stress management. Analysis of proteins that were carboxy-terminally His(8)-tagged by a recombinant tmRNA identified only 10 targets, including the stress proteins: DnaK heat-shock protein 70, thiostrepton-induced protein A, universal stress protein A...

  5. Messenger RNA fluctuations and regulatory RNAs shape the dynamics of a negative feedback loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Martínez, María; Soriano, Jordi; Tlusty, Tsvi; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Furman, Itay

    2010-03-01

    Single-cell experiments of simple regulatory networks can markedly differ from cell population experiments. Such differences arise from stochastic events in individual cells that are averaged out in cell populations. For instance, while individual cells may show sustained oscillations in the concentrations of some proteins, such oscillations may appear damped in the population average. In this paper we investigate the role of RNA stochastic fluctuations as a leading force to produce a sustained excitatory behavior at the single-cell level. As opposed to some previous models, we build a fully stochastic model of a negative feedback loop that explicitly takes into account the RNA stochastic dynamics. We find that messenger RNA random fluctuations can be amplified during translation and produce sustained pulses of protein expression. Motivated by the recent appreciation of the importance of noncoding regulatory RNAs in post-transcription regulation, we also consider the possibility that a regulatory RNA transcript could bind to the messenger RNA and repress translation. Our findings show that the regulatory transcript helps reducing gene expression variability both at the single-cell level and at the cell population level.

  6. Multi-Messenger Time-Domain Astronomy with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Adam; Fermi GBM Team

    2017-01-01

    With exciting new detections of gravitational waves by LIGO and astrophysical neutrinos by IceCube and ANTARES, the era of multi-messenger time-domain astronomy has arrived. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) continuously observes the entire sky that is not occulted by the Earth in gamma-rays from 8 keV - 40 MeV with 2 microsecond temporal resolution, and that continuous data is downlinked every few hours. This wealth of near-real-time all-sky data has lead to the development of continuous data searches for gamma-ray events, such as Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), in coincidence with astrophysical neutrinos and gravitational wave events. Additionally, GBM has the ability to localize triggered and un-triggered transient events to a few-degree accuracy, rapidly disseminate the alerts and localization sky maps, and there have been several successful follow-up attempts by wide-field optical telescopes, such as the Palomar Transient Factory, to catch the fading optical afterglow of GBM-triggered GRBs. We discuss the current applications and importance of Fermi GBM in leading multi-messenger time-domain astronomy in the gamma-ray regime.

  7. Measurement of the radius of Mercury by radio occultation during the MESSENGER flybys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Mark E.; Kahan, Daniel S.; Barnouin, Olivier S.; Ernst, Carolyn M.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zuber, Maria T.; Smith, David E.; Phillips, Roger J.; Srinivasan, Dipak K.; Oberst, Jürgen; Asmar, Sami W.

    2011-12-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft completed three flybys of Mercury in 2008-2009. During the first and third of those flybys, MESSENGER passed behind the planet from the perspective of Earth, occulting the radio-frequency (RF) transmissions. The occultation start and end times, recovered with 0.1 s accuracy or better by fitting edge-diffraction patterns to the RF power history, are used to estimate Mercury's radius at the tangent point of the RF path. To relate the measured radius to the planet shape, we evaluate local topography using images to identify the high-elevation feature that defines the RF path or using altimeter data to quantify surface roughness. Radius measurements are accurate to 150 m, and uncertainty in the average radius of the surrounding terrain, after adjustments are made from the local high at the tangent point of the RF path, is 350 m. The results are consistent with Mercury's equatorial shape as inferred from observations by the Mercury Laser Altimeter and ground-based radar. The three independent estimates of radius from occultation events collectively yield a mean radius for Mercury of 2439.2±0.5 km.

  8. Rotation of a Magnetic Cloud: MESSENGER and STEREO-B Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, S. W.; Forsyth, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic clouds are a magnetically well ordered subset of CMEs observed in interplanetary space. We report observations of the same magnetic cloud made by the MESSENGER spacecraft at Mercury (then at 0.44 AU) and later by STEREO-B at 1.09 AU, while the two spacecraft were radially aligned in November 2011. Observation with two radially aligned spacecraft allows sampling of approximately the same region of a magnetic cloud, and so allows any evolution that may have occurred within that region during propagation between the two spacecraft to be determined. The flux rope within the November 2011 cloud has been analysed using force-free fitting and minimum variance analysis: it has been estimated that the rope axis rotated from an inclination of approximately 25° relative to the solar equatorial plane at MESSENGER to lie within a few degrees of the plane at STEREO-B. We investigate the hypothesis that this rotation and alignment with the solar equatorial plane is driven by interactions of the cloud with the heliospheric current sheet.

  9. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Power Spectrum Variations in the Inner Heliosphere: A Wind and MESSENGER Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Adam; Koval, A.

    2011-01-01

    The newly reprocessed high time resolution (11/22 vectors/sec) Wind mission interplanetary magnetic field data and the similar observations made by the MESSENGER spacecraft in the inner heliosphere affords an opportunity to compare magnetic field power spectral density variations as a function of radial distance from the Sun under different solar wind conditions. In the reprocessed Wind Magnetic Field Investigation (MFI) data, the spin tone and its harmonics are greatly reduced that allows the meaningful fitting of power spectra to the approx.2 Hz limit above which digitization noise becomes apparent. The powe'r spectral density is computed and the spectral index is fitted for the MHD and ion inertial regime separately along with the break point between the two for various solar wind conditions. Wind and MESSENGER magnetic fluctuations are compared for times when the two spacecraft are close to radial and Parker field alignment. The functional dependence of the ion inertial spectral index and break point on solar wind plasma and magnetic field conditions will be discussed.

  10. ALLTALK™- A Windows Phone Messenger With Cross Language Communication For Customer Care Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhil Abraham

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In day to day life, messengers or chatting applications provide facility for instant messaging over the internet. Exchange of messages takes place in universally used languages like English, French, etc. where both the users know how to communicate in a common language. Thus chatting on mobile phones is a luxury when both the parties involved know a common language. When any company wants to provide customer care services to its customer they use mediums like talking to the customers over the telephone which requires employees that are proficient in speaking various languages and set up large numbers of call centers to serve the customers worldwide. Hence we have implemented ALLTALK™ which is a Windows 8 phone based chatting application which makes cross language communication possible using mobile programming and networking technology. This application will enable the communication between two persons irrespective of the language each user wishes to use individually. The various modes of communication available in this messenger are through text and voice. Due to the best processing power provided among the available smartphones and high battery life we choose to work on windows 8 platform. This application provides a facility which enables service providers companies to provide customer care services to their customers in their native languages without the need of employees being skilled in various languages. Thus we have successfully eliminated the language barrier and enabled ease of communication through this application.

  11. Time Domain Astronomy with Fermi GBM in the Multi-messenger Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2017-08-01

    As the Multi-Messenger era begins with detections of gravitational waves with LIGO and neutrinos with IceCube, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor provides context observations of gamma-ray transients between 8 keV and 40 MeV. Fermi GBM has a wide field of view, high uptime, and both in-orbit triggering and high time resolution continuous data enabling offline searches for weaker transients. GBM detects numerous gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), soft gamma-ray repeaters, X-ray bursters, solar flares and terrestrial gamma-ray flashes. Longer timescale transients, predominantly in our galaxy so far, are detected using the Earth occultation technique and epoch-folding for periodic sources. The GBM team has developed two ground-based searches to enhance detections of faint transients, especially short GRBs. The targeted search uses the time and location of an event detected with another instrument to coherently search the GBM data, increasing the sensitivity to a transient. The untargeted search agnostically searches the GBM data for all directions and times to find weaker transients. This search finds about 80 short GRBs per year, in addition to the 40 per year triggered on-orbit. With its large field of view, high duty cycle and increasingly sophisticated detection methods, Fermi GBM is expected to have a major role in the Multi-Messenger era.

  12. Plasma Distribution in Mercury's Magnetosphere Derived from MESSENGER Magnetometer and Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korth, Haje; Anderson, Brian J.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Raines, Jim M.; Slavin, James A.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Solomon, Sean C.; McNutt, Ralph L.

    2014-01-01

    We assess the statistical spatial distribution of plasma in Mercury's magnetosphere from observations of magnetic pressure deficits and plasma characteristics by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. The statistical distributions of proton flux and pressure were derived from 10months of Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) observations obtained during the orbital phase of the MESSENGER mission. The Magnetometer-derived pressure distributions compare favorably with those deduced from the FIPS observations at locations where depressions in the magnetic field associated with the presence of enhanced plasma pressures are discernible in the Magnetometer data. The magnitudes of the magnetic pressure deficit and the plasma pressure agree on average, although the two measures of plasma pressure may deviate for individual events by as much as a factor of approximately 3. The FIPS distributions provide better statistics in regions where the plasma is more tenuous and reveal an enhanced plasma population near the magnetopause flanks resulting from direct entry of magnetosheath plasma into the low-latitude boundary layer of the magnetosphere. The plasma observations also exhibit a pronounced north-south asymmetry on the nightside, with markedly lower fluxes at low altitudes in the northern hemisphere than at higher altitudes in the south on the same field line. This asymmetry is consistent with particle loss to the southern hemisphere surface during bounce motion in Mercury's offset dipole magnetic field.

  13. The rotational state of Mercury after four years of MESSENGER observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Alexander; Oberst, Jürgen; Preusker, Frank; Hussmann, Hauke

    2017-04-01

    We measured the rotational state of Mercury with orbital data from NASA's MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. We use accurate co-registration of digital terrain models from stereo images (stereo DTMs) and laser altimeter data to measure the orientation of the rotation axis, the libration amplitude and the mean rotation rate with improved precision. In contrast to our previous study, we use the full four years of near-continuous Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) observations and stereo DTMs with a higher spatial coverage. We confirm a large libration amplitude and a mean rotation rate which is significantly higher than the assumed resonant rotation rate based on a perfect 3:2 spin orbit resonance. The estimated orientation of the rotation axis is consistent with the assumption that Mercury occupies a Cassini state. We compare our estimates with values based on Earth-based observations and MESSENGER radio science. Our results confirm that Mercury possesses a liquid outer core and we discuss further implications of our estimates on the interior structure of the planet.

  14. Compositional variability across Mercury's surface revealed by MESSENGER measurements of variations in thermal neutron count rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peplowski, P. N.; Lawrence, D. J.; Goldsten, J. O.; Nittler, L. R.; Solomon, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Measurements by MESSENGER's Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer (GRNS) have revealed variations in the flux of thermal neutrons across Mercury's northern hemisphere. These variations are interpreted to originate from spatial variations in surface elemental composition. In particular, the measurements are sensitive to the near-surface abundances of elements that absorb thermal neutrons, including major rock-forming elements such as Fe and Ti, minor elements such as Mn and Cl, and rare-earth elements such as Gd and Sm. We have constructed a map of thermal neutron variability across the surface and compared it with known variations in elemental composition and with the distribution of geologic units. Development of the map included the derivation of the macroscopic thermal neutron absorption cross section across the surface, a quantity whose value and variability provides useful constraints on the formation and geochemical evolution of Mercury's crust. Finally, by combining the thermal neutron measurements with previously reported elemental measurements from the GRNS and MESSENGER's X-Ray Spectrometer, we have derived constraints on the abundances of neutron-absorbing elements, including previously unreported limits for some minor and rare-earth elements.

  15. Expression of P450c17 messenger ribonucleic acid in postmenopausal human ovary tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    José, M; Puche, C; Cabero, A; Cabero, L; Meseguer, A

    1999-03-01

    To investigate the expression of the P450c17 gene in postmenopausal human ovaries compared with normal cycling ovaries. Prospective nonrandomized clinical research study. Servei de Medicina Reproductiva and Centre d'Investigacions en Bioquimica i Biologia Molecular, Hospitals Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain. Six premenopausal women and four postmenopausal women undergoing bilateral oophorectomy for nonovarian gynecologic disease. Extraction of 10 mL of peripheral venous blood for hormone measurements. Extraction of RNA from surgically removed ovaries for Northern blot, ribonuclease protection, and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction Southern blot assays. Definition of the reproductive cycle state of each patient and determination of the level of P450c17 gene expression in all samples with the use of the semiquantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction Southern blot assay. P450c17 messenger RNA levels in postmenopausal ovaries varied considerably between samples. Although the levels were similar to those detected in the early follicular phase, one of the samples had levels as high as those observed in the late follicular phase. Although the degree varied from one sample to another, all the postmenopausal ovaries studied expressed the P450c17 gene at the messenger RNA level. In a sample from a patient with endometrial adenocarcinoma, the level was as high as the levels observed in the late follicular phase.

  16. MESSENGER Orbital Observations of Large-Amplitude Kelvin-Helmholtz Waves at Mercury's Magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Torbjorn; Boardsen, Scott A.; Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Raines, Jim M.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2012-01-01

    We present a survey of Kelvi\\ n-Helmholtz (KH) waves at Mercury's magnetopause during MESSENGER's first Mercury year in orb it. The waves were identified on the basis of the well-established sawtooth wave signatures that are associated with non-linear KH vortices at the magnetopause. MESSENGER frequently observed such KH waves in the dayside region of the magnetosphere where the magnetosheath flow velocity is still sub -sonic, which implies that instability growth rates at Mercury's magnetopau are much larger than at Earth. We attribute these greater rates to the limited wave energy dissipation in Mercury's highly resistive regolith. The wave amplitude was often on the order of ' 00 nT or more, and the wave periods were - 10- 20 s. A clear dawn-dusk asymmetry is present in the data, in that all of the observed wave events occurred in the post-noon and dusk-side sectors of the magnetopause. This asymmetry is like ly related to finite Larmor-radius effects and is in agreement with results from particle-in-cell simulations of the instability. The waves were observed almost exclusively during periods when the north-south component of the magnetosheath magnetic field was northward, a pattern similar to that for most terrestrial KH wave events. Accompanying plasma measurements show that the waves were associated with the transport of magnetosheath plasma into the magnetosphere.

  17. Solar Influence on Nuclear Decay Rates: Constraints from the MESSENGER Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Fischbach, Ephraim; Gold, Robert E; Goldsten, John O; Lawrence, David J; McNutt, Ralph J; Rhodes, Edgar A; Jenkins, Jere H; Longuski, John

    2011-01-01

    We have analyzed Cs-137 decay data, obtained from a small sample onboard the MESSENGER spacecraft en route to Mercury, with the aim of setting limits on a possible correlation between nuclear decay rates and solar activity. Such a correlation has been suggested recently on the basis of data from Mn-54 decay during the solar flare of 13 December 2006, and by indications of an annual and other periodic variations in the decay rates of Si-32, Cl-36, and Ra-226. Data from five measurements of the Cs-137 count rate over a period of approximately 5.4 years have been fit to a formula which accounts for the usual exponential decrease in count rate over time, along with the addition of a theoretical solar contribution varying with MESSENGER-Sun separation. The indication of solar influence is then characterized by a non-zero value of the calculated parameter \\xi, and we find \\xi=(2.8+/-8.1)x10^{-3} for Cs-137. A simulation of the increased data that can hypothetically be expected following Mercury orbit insertion on 1...

  18. Multi-Messenger Time-Domain Astronomy with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaughton, Valerie; Goldstein, Adam; Fermi GBM - LIGO Group

    2017-01-01

    With exciting new detections of gravitational waves by LIGO and astrophysical neutrinos by IceCube and ANTARES, the era of multi-messenger time-domain astronomy has arrived. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) continuously observes the entire sky that is not occulted by the Earth in gamma-rays from 8 keV - 40 MeV with 2 microsecond temporal resolution, with regular data downlinks every few hours. This wealth of near-realtime all-sky data has lead to the development of continuous data searches for gamma-ray events, such as Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), in coincidence with astrophysical neutrinos and gravitational wave events. Additionally, GBM has the ability to localize triggered and untriggered transient events to a few-degree accuracy, rapidly disseminate the alerts and localization sky maps within tens of seconds, and there have been several successful follow-up attempts by wide-field optical telescopes, such as the Palomar Transient Factory, to catch the fading optical afterglow of GBM-triggered GRBs. We discuss the current applications and importance of Fermi GBM in leading multi-messenger time-domain astronomy in the gamma-ray regime.

  19. RG Invariants, Unification and the Role of the Messenger Scale in General Gauge Mediation

    CERN Document Server

    Jaeckel, Joerg; Wymant, Chris

    2011-01-01

    In General Gauge Mediation (GGM) all MSSM soft sfermion masses at a high scale M_mess can be parameterised by three a priori independent scales \\Lambda_{S;1,2,3}(M_mess). (Similarly the gaugino masses are given by \\Lambda_{G;1,2,3}(M_mess).) For the first two generations this parameterisation in terms of a set of running \\Lambda_{S;1,2,3}(\\mu) -- conveniently obtained from appropriate RG invariants -- continues to hold all the way down to the electroweak scale. This is not the case for the third generation because of the large Yukawa couplings. Together these two observations imply that the messenger scale is an additional parameter of GGM models. In models where all messengers are in complete GUT multiplets (without significant mass splittings), all \\Lambda_{S,r} are equal at M_mess. Starting from the observable mass spectrum at the electroweak scale we present a strategy to determine if this unification occurs and at which scale. This approach uses data accessible at colliders to gain insight into high scal...

  20. Exosomes as divine messengers: are they the Hermes of modern molecular oncology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braicu, C; Tomuleasa, C; Monroig, P; Cucuianu, A; Berindan-Neagoe, I; Calin, G A

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are cell-derived vesicles that convey key elements with the potential to modulate intercellular communication. They are known to be secreted from all types of cells, and are crucial messengers that can regulate cellular processes by 'trafficking' molecules from cells of one tissue to another. The exosomal content has been shown to be broad, composed of different types of cytokines, growth factors, proteins, or nucleic acids. Besides messenger RNA (mRNA) they can also contain noncoding transcripts such as microRNAs (miRNAs), which are small endogenous cellular regulators of protein expression. In diseases such as cancer, exosomes can facilitate tumor progression by altering their vesicular content and supplying the tumor niche with molecules that favor the progression of oncogenic processes such as proliferation, invasion and metastasis, or even drug resistance. The packaging of their molecular content is known to be tissue specific, a fact that makes them interesting tools in clinical diagnostics and ideal candidates for biomarkers. In the current report, we describe the main properties of exosomes and explain their involvement in processes such as cell differentiation and cell death. Furthermore, we emphasize the need of developing patient-targeted treatments by applying the conceptualization of exosomal-derived miRNA-based therapeutics.

  1. Mercury's thermo-chemical evolution from numerical models constrained by Messenger observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, N.; Breuer, D.; Plesa, A. C.; Wagner, F.; Laneuville, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Messenger spacecraft, in orbit around Mercury for almost one year, has been delivering a great deal of new information that is changing dramatically our understanding of the solar system's innermost planet. Tracking data of the Radio Science experiment yielded improved estimates of the first coefficients of the gravity field that permit to determine the normalized polar moment of inertia of the planet (C/MR2) and the ratio of the moment of inertia of the mantle to that of the whole planet (Cm/C). These two parameters provide a strong constraint on the internal mass distribution and, in particular, on the core mass fraction. With C/MR2 = 0.353 and Cm/C = 0.452 [1], interior structure models predict a core radius as large as 2000 km [2], leaving room for a silicate mantle shell with a thickness of only ~ 400 km, a value significantly smaller than that of 600 km usually assumed in parametrized [3] as well as in numerical models of Mercury's mantle dynamics and evolution [4]. Furthermore, the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer measured the surface abundance of radioactive elements, revealing, besides uranium and thorium, the presence of potassium. The latter, being moderately volatile, rules out traditional formation scenarios from highly refractory materials, favoring instead a composition not much dissimilar from a chondritic model. Considering a 400 km thick mantle, we carry out a large series of 2D and 3D numerical simulations of the thermo-chemical evolution of Mercury's mantle. We model in a self-consistent way the formation of crust through partial melting using Lagrangian tracers to account for the partitioning of radioactive heat sources between mantle and crust and variations of thermal conductivity. Assuming the relative surface abundance of radiogenic elements observed by Messenger to be representative of the bulk mantle composition, we attempt at constraining the degree to which uranium, thorium and potassium are concentrated in the silicate mantle through a broad

  2. Follow-up of GW150914 and multi-messenger studies of transient astrophysical sources with the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coleiro Alexis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available By constantly monitoring at least one complete hemisphere of the sky, neutrino telescopes are well designed to detect neutrinos emitted by transient astrophysical sources. In particular, the ANTARES telescope is currently the largest high-energy neutrino detector in the Northern Hemisphere. Searches for ANTARES neutrino candidates coincident with multi-wavelength and multi-messenger transient phenomena are performed by triggering optical, X-ray and radio observations immediately after the detection of an interesting ANTARES event and also by looking for neutrino emission spatially and temporally coincident with transient astrophysical events detected across the electromagnetic spectrum or with new messengers as gravitational-wave signals. The latest results of the multi-messenger analyses performed with ANTARES will be presented in this contribution. In particular, we will focus on the neutrino follow-up performed after the detection of the first gravitation-wave event, GW150914.

  3. Messenger Ribonucleic Acid Synthesis and Degradation in Escherichia coli During Inhibition of Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pato, Martin L.; Bennett, Peter M.; Von Meyenburg, Kaspar

    1973-01-01

    Various aspects of the coupling between the movement of ribosomes along messenger ribonucleic acids (mRNA) and the synthesis and degradation of mRNA have been investigated. Decreasing the rate of movement of ribosomes along an mRNA does not affect the rate of movement of some, and possibly most, of the RNA polymerases transcribing the gene coding for that mRNA. Inhibiting translation with antibiotics such as chloramphenicol, tetracycline, or fusidic acid protects extant mRNA from degradation, presumably by immobilizing ribosomes, whereas puromycin exposes mRNA to more rapid degradation than normal. The promoter distal (3′) portion of mRNA, synthesized after ribosomes have been immobilized by chloramphenicol on the promoter proximal (5′) portion of the mRNA, is subsequently degraded. PMID:4583248

  4. Messenger RNA Fluctuations and Regulatory RNAs Shape the Dynamics of Negative Feedback Loop

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez, María Rodríguez; Tlusty, Tsvi; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Furman, Itay; 10.1103/PhysRevE.81.031924

    2010-01-01

    Single cell experiments of simple regulatory networks can markedly differ from cell population experiments. Such differences arise from stochastic events in individual cells that are averaged out in cell populations. For instance, while individual cells may show sustained oscillations in the concentrations of some proteins, such oscillations may appear damped in the population average. In this paper we investigate the role of RNA stochastic fluctuations as a leading force to produce a sustained excitatory behavior at the single cell level. Opposed to some previous models, we build a fully stochastic model of a negative feedback loop that explicitly takes into account the RNA stochastic dynamics. We find that messenger RNA random fluctuations can be amplified during translation and produce sustained pulses of protein expression. Motivated by the recent appreciation of the importance of non--coding regulatory RNAs in post--transcription regulation, we also consider the possibility that a regulatory RNA transcri...

  5. Radioactive elements on Mercury's surface from MESSENGER: implications for the planet's formation and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peplowski, Patrick N; Evans, Larry G; Hauck, Steven A; McCoy, Timothy J; Boynton, William V; Gillis-Davis, Jeffery J; Ebel, Denton S; Goldsten, John O; Hamara, David K; Lawrence, David J; McNutt, Ralph L; Nittler, Larry R; Solomon, Sean C; Rhodes, Edgar A; Sprague, Ann L; Starr, Richard D; Stockstill-Cahill, Karen R

    2011-09-30

    The MESSENGER Gamma-Ray Spectrometer measured the average surface abundances of the radioactive elements potassium (K, 1150 ± 220 parts per million), thorium (Th, 220 ± 60 parts per billion), and uranium (U, 90 ± 20 parts per billion) in Mercury's northern hemisphere. The abundance of the moderately volatile element K, relative to Th and U, is inconsistent with physical models for the formation of Mercury requiring extreme heating of the planet or its precursor materials, and supports formation from volatile-containing material comparable to chondritic meteorites. Abundances of K, Th, and U indicate that internal heat production has declined substantially since Mercury's formation, consistent with widespread volcanism shortly after the end of late heavy bombardment 3.8 billion years ago and limited, isolated volcanic activity since.

  6. MESSENGER observations of the composition of Mercury's ionized exosphere and plasma environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurbuchen, Thomas H; Raines, Jim M; Gloeckler, George; Krimigis, Stamatios M; Slavin, James A; Koehn, Patrick L; Killen, Rosemary M; Sprague, Ann L; McNutt, Ralph L; Solomon, Sean C

    2008-07-04

    The region around Mercury is filled with ions that originate from interactions of the solar wind with Mercury's space environment and through ionization of its exosphere. The MESSENGER spacecraft's observations of Mercury's ionized exosphere during its first flyby yielded Na+, O+, and K+ abundances, consistent with expectations from observations of neutral species. There are increases in ions at a mass per charge (m/q) = 32 to 35, which we interpret to be S+ and H2S+, with (S+ + H2S+)/(Na+ + Mg+) = 0.67 +/- 0.06, and from water-group ions around m/q = 18, at an abundance of 0.20 +/- 0.03 relative to Na+ plus Mg+. The fluxes of Na+, O+, and heavier ions are largest near the planet, but these Mercury-derived ions fill the magnetosphere. Doubly ionized ions originating from Mercury imply that electrons with energies less than 1 kiloelectron volt are substantially energized in Mercury's magnetosphere.

  7. Common observations of solar X-rays from SPHINX/CORONAS-PHOTON and XRS/MESSENGER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepa, Anna; Sylwester, Janusz; Sylwester, Barbara; Siarkowski, Marek; Mrozek, Tomasz; Gryciuk, Magdalena; Phillips, Kenneth

    SphinX was a soft X-ray spectrophotometer constructed in the Space Research Centre of Polish Academy of Sciences. The instrument was launched on 30 January 2009 aboard CORONAS-PHOTON satellite as a part of TESIS instrument package. SphinX measured total solar X-ray flux in the energy range from 1 to 15 keV during the period of very low solar activity from 20 February to 29 November 2009. For these times the solar detector (X-ray Spectrometer - XRS) onboard MESSENGER also observed the solar X-rays from a different vantage point. XRS measured the radiation in similar energy range. We present results of the comparison of observations from both instruments and show the preliminary results of physical analysis of spectra for selected flares.

  8. A Two-Sided Market Model of Optimal Price Structure for Instant Messenger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Instant messenger (IM is one of the most popular Internet applications all over the world. This paper examines the pricing problem of IM based on two-sided market model. IM serves as a two-sided platform, which gets both Internet users and advertisers on board. This paper concludes that IM operator adopts a heavily skewed price structure that favors IM users both under monopolistic case and under horizontal differentiated duopolistic case. When advertising revenue is large enough relatively to marginal cost for serving IM users, IM users can enjoy free service provided by IM operators. The competitive equilibrium of duopolistic case is not necessarily symmetric when advertisers choose singlehoming. Even in the symmetric equilibrium platform would rather deter all advertisers.

  9. NEUTRINOS AS COSMIC MESSENGERS IN THE ERA OF ICECUBE, ANTARES AND KM3NET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uli F. Katz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Using neutrinos as cosmic messengers for observation of non-thermal processes in the Universe is a highly attractive and promising vision, which has been pursued in various neutrino telescope projects for more than two decades. Recent results from ground-based TeV gamma-ray observatories and refinements of model calculations of the expected neutrino fluxes indicate that Gigaton target volumes will be necessary to establish neutrino astronomy. A first neutrino telescope of that size, IceCube, is operational at the South Pole. Based on experience with the smaller first-generation ANTARES telescope in the Mediterranean Sea, the multi-Gigaton KM3NeT device is in preparation. These neutrino telescopes are presented, and some selected results and the expected KM3NeT performance are discussed.

  10. Postage for the messenger: Designating routes for Nuclear mRNA Export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natalizio, Barbara J.; Wente, Susan R.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription of messenger(m) RNA occurs in the nucleus, making the translocation of mRNA across the nuclear envelope (NE) boundary a critical determinant of proper gene expression and cell survival. A major mRNA export route occurs via the NXF1-dependent pathway through the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the NE. However, recent findings have discovered new evidence supporting the existence of multiple mechanisms for crossing the NE, including both NPC-mediated and NE budding-mediated pathways. An analysis of the trans-acting factors and cis components that define these pathways reveals shared elements as well as mechanistic differences. We review here the current understanding of the mechanisms that characterize each pathway and highlight the determinants that influence mRNA transport fate. PMID:23583578

  11. The major-element composition of Mercury's surface from MESSENGER X-ray spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittler, Larry R; Starr, Richard D; Weider, Shoshana Z; McCoy, Timothy J; Boynton, William V; Ebel, Denton S; Ernst, Carolyn M; Evans, Larry G; Goldsten, John O; Hamara, David K; Lawrence, David J; McNutt, Ralph L; Schlemm, Charles E; Solomon, Sean C; Sprague, Ann L

    2011-09-30

    X-ray fluorescence spectra obtained by the MESSENGER spacecraft orbiting Mercury indicate that the planet's surface differs in composition from those of other terrestrial planets. Relatively high Mg/Si and low Al/Si and Ca/Si ratios rule out a lunarlike feldspar-rich crust. The sulfur abundance is at least 10 times higher than that of the silicate portion of Earth or the Moon, and this observation, together with a low surface Fe abundance, supports the view that Mercury formed from highly reduced precursor materials, perhaps akin to enstatite chondrite meteorites or anhydrous cometary dust particles. Low Fe and Ti abundances do not support the proposal that opaque oxides of these elements contribute substantially to Mercury's low and variable surface reflectance.

  12. Signalling at membrane contact sites: two membranes come together to handle second messengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Tim P; Patel, Sandip

    2016-04-01

    It is now clear that many intracellular signals result from multiple membrane-bound compartments acting in concert. Membrane contact sites, regions of close apposition between organelles, have emerged as major points of convergence during signalling, as these are places where material is exchanged. The material exchanged can be either water-insoluble molecules such as membrane lipids that are passed directly between organelles, or ions such as Ca(2+). Here we highlight new insights into the role of contacts in signalling by second messengers, including lipid traffic that underpins re-generation of IP3, the regulation of NAADP and store-operated Ca(2+) signals, and possible involvement in cyclic AMP signalling.

  13. Properties of Hermean plasma belt: Numerical simulations and comparison with MESSENGER data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herčík, David; Trávníček, Pavel M.; Å tverák, Å. těpán.; Hellinger, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Using a global hybrid model and test particle simulations we present a detailed analysis of the Hermean plasma belt structure. We investigate characteristic properties of quasi-trapped particle population characteristics and its behavior under different orientations of the interplanetary magnetic field. The plasma belt region is constantly supplied with solar wind protons via magnetospheric flanks and tail current sheet region. Protons inside the plasma belt region are quasi-trapped in the magnetic field of Mercury and perform westward drift along the planet. This region is well separated by a magnetic shell and has higher average temperatures and lower bulk proton current densities than the surrounding area. On the dayside the population exhibits loss cone distribution function matching the theoretical loss cone angle. The simulation results are in good agreement with in situ observations of MESSENGER's (MErcury Surface Space ENvironment GEochemistry, and Ranging) MAG and FIPS instruments.

  14. Topography of the Northern Hemisphere of Mercury from MESSENGER Laser Altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber,Maria T.; Smith, David E.; Phillips, Roger J.; Solomon, Sean C.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Hauck, Steven A., Jr.; Peale, Stanton J.; Barnouin, Oliver S.; Head, James W.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Mazarico, Erwan; Sun, Xiaoli; Torrence, Mark H.; Freed, Andrew M.; Klimczak, Christian; Margot, Jean-Luc; Oberst, Juergen; Perry, Mark E.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Balcerski, Jeffrey A.; Michel, Nathalie; Talpe, Matthieu J.; Yang, Di

    2012-01-01

    Laser altimetry by the MESSENGER spacecraft has yielded a topographic model of the northern hemisphere of Mercury. The dynamic range of elevations is considerably smaller than those of Mars or the Moon. The most prominent feature is an extensive lowland at high northern latitudes that hosts the volcanic northern plains. Within this lowland is a broad topographic rise that experienced uplift after plains emplacement. The interior of the 1500-km-diameter Caloris impact basin has been modified so that part of the basin floor now stands higher than the rim. The elevated portion of the floor of Caloris appears to be part of a quasi-linear rise that extends for approximately half the planetary circumference at mid-latitudes. Collectively, these features imply that long-wavelength changes to Mercury s topography occurred after the earliest phases of the planet s geological history.

  15. Support of long-wavelength topography on Mercury inferred from MESSENGER measurements of gravity and topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Peter B.; Zuber, Maria T.; Phillips, Roger J.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2015-02-01

    To explore the mechanisms of support of surface topography on Mercury, we have determined the admittances and correlations of topography and gravity in Mercury's northern hemisphere from measurements obtained by NASA's MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. These admittances and correlations can be interpreted in the context of a number of theoretical scenarios, including flexural loading and dynamic flow. We find that long-wavelength (spherical harmonic degree l shallow crustal compensation and are weakly correlated with positive mass anomalies in the mantle. The center of the Caloris basin features some of the thinnest crust on the planet, and the basin is underlain by a large negative mass anomaly. We also explore models of dynamic flow in the presence of compositional stratification above the liquid core. If there is substantial compositional stratification in Mercury's solid outer shell, relaxation of perturbed compositional interfaces may be capable of creating and sustaining long-wavelength topography.

  16. Linking The Universe To The Community: Students As Starry Messengers For IYA2009-Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoja, Carmen; Lebrón, M.

    2008-05-01

    This poster presents a project at Puerto Rico to establish a working team of undergraduate students (Starry Messengers) to promote and experience the wonders of space science and education with all the senses. The students are expected to assist during the activities of the International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009). During 2008 the students will receive the appropriate instruction on observational astronomy through two workshops. These workshops follow the active learning model and therefore prepare students for outreach activities in astronomy. An innovative model of inclusion will be developed, adapting all the activities and material to include blind or visually impaired. We will encourage the participation of at least one visually impaired student or teacher on the Starry Messengers team. The greatest challenge in this project will be to develop adequate accessible activities in astronomy. The workshops will be held at the Arecibo Observatory and "El Parque de las Ciencias" Planetarium. These two centers have the facilities to develop the workshops and have the adequate settings for the participants to gain experience with astronomy research and outreach. This project targets underrepresented groups in science and engineering: hispanic students and students with visual impairments. The inquiry-based learning activities and material designed as part of the program will also be made available to the public to further promote excellence in astronomy. The workshops will serve as templates for future K-12 teacher workshops. This work has been funded by the NASA IDEAS-ER program. We would like to acknowledge the support from the Arecibo Observatory. The Arecibo Observatory is part of the National Astronomy and Ionospheric Center, which is operated by Cornell University under a Cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  17. Precession of Mercury’s Perihelion from Ranging to the MESSENGER Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ryan S.; Folkner, William M.; Konopliv, Alexander S.; Williams, James G.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2017-03-01

    The perihelion of Mercury’s orbit precesses due to perturbations from other solar system bodies, solar quadrupole moment (J 2), and relativistic gravitational effects that are proportional to linear combinations of the parametrized post-Newtonian parameters β and γ. The orbits and masses of the solar system bodies are quite well known, and thus the uncertainty in recovering the precession rate of Mercury’s perihelion is dominated by the uncertainties in the parameters J 2, β, and γ. Separating the effects due to these parameters is challenging since the secular precession rate has a linear dependence on each parameter. Here we use an analysis of radiometric range measurements to the MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) spacecraft in orbit about Mercury to estimate the precession of Mercury’s perihelion. We show that the MESSENGER ranging data allow us to measure not only the secular precession rate of Mercury’s perihelion with substantially improved accuracy, but also the periodic perturbation in the argument of perihelion sensitive to β and γ. When combined with the γ estimate from a Shapiro delay experiment from the Cassini mission, we can decouple the effects due to β and J 2 and estimate both parameters, yielding (β -1)=(-2.7+/- 3.9)× {10}-5 and J 2 = (2.25 ± 0.09) × 10‑7. We also estimate the total precession rate of Mercury’s perihelion as 575.3100 ± 0.0015″/century and provide estimated contributions and uncertainties due to various perturbing effects.

  18. The Geophysics of Mercury: Shape, Interior Structure and Thermal Evolution from MESSENGER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, M. T.; Phillips, R. J.; Smith, D. E.; Solomon, S. C.; Hauck, S. A.; Head, J. W.; Lemoine, F. G.; Neumann, G. A.; Peale, S. J.; Margot, J.; Johnson, C. L.; Oberst, J.; Purucker, M. E.; Mazarico, E.; Perry, M. E.; Barnouin, O. S.; McNutt, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    The surface and interior of Mercury preserve collectively the record of processes that contributed to the planet's thermal evolution: accretion, differentiation, orbital, rotational and internal dynamics, impact cratering, tectonics and volcanism. Reconstructing Mercury's evolution requires relating internal structure and planetary dynamics to topography, chemistry and surface geology. Observations from the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) and Radio Science (RS) experiments from the flyby and orbital phases of the MESSENGER mission are being analyzed in support of that goal. The MLA obtains returns from the surface at slant ranges fit of low-latitude topography confirms the ellipsoidal shape and orientation of the equator and a 0.015o downward to east slope indicative of an offset between the center of mass and center of figure in the equatorial plane. This distinctive feature of the planetary shape reflects an east-west hemispheric difference in internal structure that could potentially arise from crustal thickness or crustal density variations, large-scale mantle density variations, or topography along the Mercury's core-mantle boundary. The floor of the major impact basin Caloris has been significantly modified, with the northern sections rising above the basin rim. The north polar region shows an irregular topographic depression of 2-4 km depth centered on the north pole. The feature may have migrated to the pole due to reorientation of the planet's inertia axes. The depression could represent a non-hydrostatic contribution to the planetary flattening that must be isolated and removed prior to interpreting the flattening in the context of the radial distribution of interior mass. Analysis of X-band Doppler tracking of MESSENGER has resulted in a 20th degree and order global gravity field, with high degree and order coefficients resolved only in the north. Present are mass anomalies that correlate with some impact basins that hold the promise of modeling to

  19. Radiative Transfer Modeling of MESSENGER VIR Spectra of Mercury: Detection and Mapping of Submicroscopic Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trang, D.; Lucey, P. G.; Izenberg, N.

    2015-12-01

    The composition of Mercury is elusive because the planet is optically dark and exhibits a relatively featureless red visible and near-infrared spectrum. Studies have invoked opaque minerals and space weathering to explain these characteristics. In this study we used radiative transfer modeling of MESSENGER VIRS data to show that carbon is required to explain the detailed shape of the spectrum of Mercury from 0.3-1.5 µm. In this model, we assume the regolith comprises a high albedo host mineral, which contains nanophase and microphase iron and carbon. We varied the abundance of nanophase and microphase iron and carbon to fit the observed spectra. We found that the nanophase and microphase iron alone inadequately fits the visible portion of the observed spectra. By adding carbon, we find that nanophase and microphase iron and nanophase amorphous carbon fit the VIRS spectra consistently. We produced a global nanophase amorphous carbon map as well as nanophase and microphase iron maps. From the carbon map (see figure), we find that nanophase amorphous carbon is sensitive to geologic features associated with space weathering, such as fresh crater rays. Thus, amorphous carbon is a new indicator for regolith maturity. We also observe that the global average submicroscopic carbon content is 1.4±0.3 wt.% C, which is consistent with MESSENGER Gamma-Ray Spectrometer measurements. Using this abundance, we can constrain the source of water and carbon on Mercury. Assuming the water ice in the poles is derived from wet impactors, both asteroids and comets, and knowing C/H ratios of those sources, the surface nanophase carbon layer can be no thicker than 10 m if all carbon is derived from an exogenous source. It is almost certain the space weathered regolith on Mercury is thicker than 10 m, so the majority of carbon on Mercury must be endogenous. Figure: Nanophase amorphous carbon map. In this map, fresh craters and their rays are distinguishable by the lower proportion of

  20. Mercury's Crustal Magnetic Field from Low-Altitude Measurements by MESSENGER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. L.; Phillips, R. J.; Purucker, M. E.; Anderson, B. J.; Byrne, P. K.; Denevi, B. W.; Fan, K. A.; Feinberg, J. M.; Hauck, S. A., II; Head, J. W., III; Korth, H.; James, P. B.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Philpott, L. C.; Siegler, M. A.; Strauss, B. E.; Tsyganenko, N. A.; Solomon, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetized rocks can record the history of a planet's magnetic field, a key constraint for understanding interior evolution. From orbital vector magnetic field measurements of Mercury taken by the MESSENGER spacecraft at altitudes below 150 km, we have detected fields indicative of crustal magnetization. Fields from non-crustal sources, which dominate the observations even at low altitudes, were estimated and subtracted from the observations using both magnetospheric models and signal filtering. The resulting high-pass filtered fields have amplitudes of a few to 20 nT. The first low-altitude signals were detected over the Suisei Planitia region and were confirmed by upward continuation to be of crustal origin. At least some contribution from thermoremanent magnetization is required to account for these signals, and we infer a lower bound on the average age of magnetization of 3.7-3.9 Ga on the basis of correlation of crustal magnetic fields with volcanic units of that age range. Ancient field strengths that range from those similar to Mercury's present dipole field to Earth-like values are consistent with the magnetic field observations and with the low iron content of Mercury's crust derived from MESSENGER elemental composition data. Here, we extend these initial results with observations obtained at spacecraft altitudes below 60 km at all body-fixed longitudes from ~40°N to ~75°N. The strongest crustal fields occur in the region 120°E to 210°E, and weaker signals characterize the northern volcanic plains. We test the hypothesis that the longest-wavelength crustal field signals in this region reflect magnetization contrasts between the Caloris basin and the surrounding intercrater plains and circum-Caloris plains. We report the spatial distribution of observed crustal fields, together with magnetization models derived from them and the implications of these models, particularly for the depth distribution of sources compatible with the observations.

  1. Second messenger signaling mechanisms of the brown adipocyte thermogenic program: an integrative perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fubiao; Collins, Sheila

    2017-09-26

    β-adrenergic receptors (βARs) are well established for conveying the signal from catecholamines to adipocytes. Acting through the second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) they stimulate lipolysis and also increase the activity of brown adipocytes and the 'browning' of adipocytes within white fat depots (so-called 'brite' or 'beige' adipocytes). Brown adipose tissue mitochondria are enriched with uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), which is a regulated proton channel that allows the dissipation of chemical energy in the form of heat. The discovery of functional brown adipocytes in humans and inducible brown-like ('beige' or 'brite') adipocytes in rodents have suggested that recruitment and activation of these thermogenic adipocytes could be a promising strategy to increase energy expenditure for obesity therapy. More recently, the cardiac natriuretic peptides and their second messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) have gained attention as a parallel signaling pathway in adipocytes, with some unique features. In this review, we begin with some important historical work that touches upon the regulation of brown adipocyte development and physiology. We then provide a synopsis of some recent advances in the signaling cascades from β-adrenergic agonists and natriuretic peptides to drive thermogenic gene expression in the adipocytes and how these two pathways converge at a number of unexpected points. Finally, moving from the physiologic hormonal signaling, we discuss yet another level of control downstream of these signals: the growing appreciation of the emerging roles of non-coding RNAs as important regulators of brown adipocyte formation and function. In this review, we discuss new developments in our understanding of the signaling mechanisms and factors including new secreted proteins and novel non-coding RNAs that control the function as well as the plasticity of the brown/beige adipose tissue as it responds to the energy needs and environmental

  2. Measurements of Neutron-absorbing Elements on Mercury's Surface with the MESSENGER Neutron Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David J.; Feldman, William C.; Goldsten, John O.; McCoy, Timothy J.; Blewett, David T.; Boynton, William V.; Evans, Larry G.; Nittler, Larry R.; Rhodes, Edgar A.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2010-05-01

    The Neutron Spectrometer (NS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission has made measurements of cosmic-ray-generated thermal neutrons during each of MESSENGER's three Mercury flybys. These thermal neutron data have allowed us to make the first direct measurements of Mercury's surface elemental composition. Specifically, we show that Mercury's surface is enriched in neutron-absorbing elements and has a measured macroscopic neutron absorption cross section of (70-130) × 10^(-4) cm^2/g, which is similar to the neutron absorption of lunar basalts from Mare Fecunditatis. The expected neutron-absorbing elements are Fe and Ti, with possible trace amounts of Gd and Sm. Fe and Ti, in particular, are important for understanding Mercury's formation and how its surface may have changed over time through magmatic processes. With the neutron Doppler filter technique - a neutron energy separation technique based on spacecraft velocity - we demonstrate that Mercury's surface composition cannot be matched by prior models having characteristically low abundances of Fe, Ti, Gd, and Sm. While neutron spectroscopy alone cannot separate the relative contributions of individual neutron-absorbing elements, these results provide strong new constraints on the nature of Mercury's surface materials. For example, if all the measured neutron absorption were due to the presence of a Fe-Ti oxide and that oxide were ilmenite, then Mercury's surface would have an ilmenite content of 14 to 31 wt.%. This result is in agreement with the inference from color imaging and visible-near-infrared spectroscopy that Mercury's overall low reflectance is consistent with a surface composition that is enriched in Fe-Ti oxides. The incorporation of substantial Fe and Ti in oxides would imply that the oxygen fugacity of basalts on Mercury is at the upper range of oxygen fugacity inferred for basalts on the Moon.

  3. The velocity distribution of pickup He{sup +} measured at 0.3 AU by MESSENGER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gershman, Daniel J. [Geospace Physics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Fisk, Lennard A.; Gloeckler, George; Raines, Jim M.; Slavin, James A.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Solomon, Sean C., E-mail: djgersh@umich.edu [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)

    2014-06-20

    During its interplanetary trajectory in 2007-2009, the MErcury Surface, Space ENvrionment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft passed through the gravitational focusing cone for interstellar helium multiple times at a heliocentric distance R ≈ 0.3 AU. Observations of He{sup +} interstellar pickup ions made by the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer sensor on MESSENGER during these transits provide a glimpse into the structure of newly formed inner heliospheric pickup-ion distributions. This close to the Sun, these ions are picked up in a nearly radial interplanetary magnetic field. Compared with the near-Earth environment, pickup ions observed near 0.3 AU will not have had sufficient time to be energized substantially. Such an environment results in a nearly pristine velocity distribution function that should depend only on pickup-ion injection velocities (related to the interstellar gas), pitch-angle scattering, and cooling processes. From measured energy-per-charge spectra obtained during multiple spacecraft observational geometries, we have deduced the phase-space density of He{sup +} as a function of magnetic pitch angle. Our measurements are most consistent with a distribution that decreases nearly monotonically with increasing pitch angle, rather than the more commonly modeled isotropic or hemispherically symmetric forms. These results imply that pitch-angle scattering of He{sup +} may not be instantaneous, as is often assumed, and instead may reflect the velocity distribution of initially injected particles. In a slow solar wind stream, we find a parallel-scattering mean free path of λ {sub ||} ∼ 0.1 AU and a He{sup +} production rate of ∼0.05 m{sup –3} s{sup –1} within 0.3 AU.

  4. Gene Expression in Archaea: Studies of Transcriptional Promoters, Messenger RNA Processing, and Five Prime Untranslated Regions in "Methanocaldococcus Jannashchii"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression in Archaea is less understood than those in Bacteria and Eucarya. In general, three steps are involved in gene expression--transcription, RNA processing, and translation. To expand our knowledge of these processes in Archaea, I have studied transcriptional promoters, messenger RNA processing, and 5'-untranslated regions in…

  5. Differential intragraft cytokine messenger RNA profiles during rejection and repair of clinical heart transplants. A longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot-Kruseman, Hester A; Mol, Wendy M; Niesters, Hubert G M; Maat, Alex P W; van Gelder, Teun; Balk, Aggie H M M; Weimar, Willem; Baan, Carla C

    2003-01-01

    After clinical heart transplantation, ischemia, acute rejection, and repair mechanisms can trigger the up-regulation of cytokines. To investigate the cytokine profile early after transplantation, we monitored messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), monocyte

  6. The Effects of a Synchronous Communication Tool (Yahoo Messenger) on Online Learners' Sense of Community and Their Multimedia Authoring Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiang-Kwei

    2008-01-01

    Literature suggests that developing a community of learners is the key to a successful online-learning experience. In this study, the instructor of a multimedia authoring course adopted a synchronous communication tool (Yahoo Messenger) to interact with learners orally on a weekly basis and, thereby, to establish a sense among the learners that…

  7. Gene Expression in Archaea: Studies of Transcriptional Promoters, Messenger RNA Processing, and Five Prime Untranslated Regions in "Methanocaldococcus Jannashchii"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression in Archaea is less understood than those in Bacteria and Eucarya. In general, three steps are involved in gene expression--transcription, RNA processing, and translation. To expand our knowledge of these processes in Archaea, I have studied transcriptional promoters, messenger RNA processing, and 5'-untranslated regions in…

  8. Models and Messengers of Resilience: A Theoretical Model of College Students' Resilience, Regulatory Strategy Use, and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marcus L.; Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Kestler, Jessica L.; Cordova, Jackie R.

    2015-01-01

    We tested a theoretical model of college students' ratings of messengers of resilience and models of resilience, students' own perceived resilience, regulatory strategy use and achievement. A total of 116 undergraduates participated in this study. The results of a path analysis indicated that ratings of models of resilience had a direct effect on…

  9. The Effectiveness of Using WhatsApp Messenger as One of Mobile Learning Techniques to Develop Students' Writing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattah, Said Fathy El Said Abdul

    2015-01-01

    The present study was an attempt to determine the effectiveness of using a WhatsApp Messenger as one of mobile learning techniques to develop students' writing skills. Participants were 30 second year college students, English department from a private university in Saudi Arabia. The experimental group (N = 15) used WhatsApp technology to develop…

  10. Just How Important Is the Messenger versus the Message? The Case of Framing Physician-Assisted Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider-Markel, Donald P.; Joslyn, Mark R.

    2004-01-01

    As a political issue, death and dying topics only sometimes reach the political agenda. However, some issues, such as physician-assisted suicide (PAS) have been highly salient. This article explores attitudes toward PAS by examining the malleability of opinion when respondents are exposed to issue frames and when specific messengers present those…

  11. Sharing Planetary Exploration: The Education and Public Outreach Program for the NASA MESSENGER Mission to Orbit Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S. C.; Stockman, S.; Chapman, C. R.; Leary, J. C.; McNutt, R. L.

    2003-12-01

    The Education and Public Outreach (EPO) Program of the MESSENGER mission to the planet Mercury, supported by the NASA Discovery Program, is a full partnership between the project's science and engineering teams and a team of professionals from the EPO community. The Challenger Center for Space Science Education (CCSSE) and the Carnegie Academy for Science Education (CASE) are developing sets of MESSENGER Education Modules targeting grade-specific education levels across K-12. These modules are being disseminated through a MESSENGER EPO Website developed at Montana State University, an Educator Fellowship Program managed by CCSSE to train Fellows to conduct educator workshops, additional workshops planned for NASA educators and members of the Minority University - SPace Interdisciplinary Network (MU-SPIN), and existing inner-city science education programs (e.g., the CASE Summer Science Institute in Washington, D.C.). All lessons are mapped to national standards and benchmarks by MESSENGER EPO team members trained by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Project 2061, all involve user input and feedback and quality control by the EPO team, and all are thoroughly screened by members of the project science and engineering teams. At the college level, internships in science and engineering are provided to students at minority institutions through a program managed by MU-SPIN, and additional opportunities for student participation across the country are planned as the mission proceeds. Outreach efforts include radio spots (AAAS), museum displays (National Air and Space Museum), posters and traveling exhibits (CASE), general language books (AAAS), programs targeting underserved communities (AAAS, CCSSE, and MU-SPIN), and a documentary highlighting the scientific and technical challenges involved in exploring Mercury and how the MESSENGER team has been meeting these challenges. As with the educational elements, science and engineering team members

  12. Pancreatic Beta Cell G-Protein Coupled Receptors and Second Messenger Interactions: A Systems Biology Computational Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridlyand, Leonid E; Philipson, Louis H

    2016-01-01

    Insulin secretory in pancreatic beta-cells responses to nutrient stimuli and hormonal modulators include multiple messengers and signaling pathways with complex interdependencies. Here we present a computational model that incorporates recent data on glucose metabolism, plasma membrane potential, G-protein-coupled-receptors (GPCR), cytoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum calcium dynamics, cAMP and phospholipase C pathways that regulate interactions between second messengers in pancreatic beta-cells. The values of key model parameters were inferred from published experimental data. The model gives a reasonable fit to important aspects of experimentally measured metabolic and second messenger concentrations and provides a framework for analyzing the role of metabolic, hormones and neurotransmitters changes on insulin secretion. Our analysis of the dynamic data provides support for the hypothesis that activation of Ca2+-dependent adenylyl cyclases play a critical role in modulating the effects of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and catecholamines. The regulatory properties of adenylyl cyclase isoforms determine fluctuations in cytoplasmic cAMP concentration and reveal a synergistic action of glucose, GLP-1 and GIP on insulin secretion. On the other hand, the regulatory properties of phospholipase C isoforms determine the interaction of glucose, acetylcholine and free fatty acids (FFA) (that act through the FFA receptors) on insulin secretion. We found that a combination of GPCR agonists activating different messenger pathways can stimulate insulin secretion more effectively than a combination of GPCR agonists for a single pathway. This analysis also suggests that the activators of GLP-1, GIP and FFA receptors may have a relatively low risk of hypoglycemia in fasting conditions whereas an activator of muscarinic receptors can increase this risk. This computational analysis demonstrates that study of second messenger

  13. Transforming growth factor-beta1 induces transforming growth factor-beta1 and transforming growth factor-beta receptor messenger RNAs and reduces complement C1qB messenger RNA in rat brain microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, T E; Rozovsky, I; Sarkar, D K; Young-Chan, C S; Nichols, N R; Laping, N J; Finch, C E

    2000-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 is a multifunctional peptide with increased expression during Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative conditions which involve inflammatory mechanisms. We examined the autoregulation of transforming growth factor-beta1 and transforming growth factor-beta receptors and the effects of transforming growth factor-beta1 on complement C1q in brains of adult Fischer 344 male rats and in primary glial cultures. Perforant path transection by entorhinal cortex lesioning was used as a model for the hippocampal deafferentation of Alzheimer's disease. In the hippocampus ipsilateral to the lesion, transforming growth factor-beta1 peptide was increased >100-fold; the messenger RNAs encoding transforming growth factor-beta1, transforming growth factor-beta type I and type II receptors were also increased, but to a smaller degree. In this acute lesion paradigm, microglia are the main cell type containing transforming growth factor-beta1, transforming growth factor-beta type I and II receptor messenger RNAs, shown by immunocytochemistry in combination with in situ hybridization. Autoregulation of the transforming growth factor-beta1 system was examined by intraventricular infusion of transforming growth factor-beta1 peptide, which increased hippocampal transforming growth factor-beta1 messenger RNA levels in a dose-dependent fashion. Similarly, transforming growth factor-beta1 increased levels of transforming growth factor-beta1 messenger RNA and transforming growth factor-beta type II receptor messenger RNA (IC(50), 5pM) and increased release of transforming growth factor-beta1 peptide from primary microglia cultures. Interactions of transforming growth factor-beta1 with complement system gene expression are also indicated, because transforming growth factor-beta1 decreased C1qB messenger RNA in the cortex and hippocampus, after intraventricular infusion, and in cultured glia. These indications of autocrine regulation of transforming growth

  14. Mercury surface composition: how the new insights from MESSENGER can drive the future exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carli, Cristian; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Filacchione, Gianrico; Zambon, Francesca; Serventi, Giovanna; Altieri, Francesca; De Sanctis, MariaCristina; Sgavetti, Maria

    2016-04-01

    The surface composition of Mercury, as well as the relationship between morphological expressions and lithologies, is one of the most interesting goal to be still explored. After Mariner10, despite relevant differences observed in geophysical characteristics, Mercury surface composition was compared to the Moon (Murray et al, 1974, Science), and, subsequently, lunar surface was considered as analogue (e.g., Blewett et al., 2002, Meteor.Planet.Sci.). After MESSENGER, Mercury surface appeared mainly volcanic in origin. Plains (intercrater and smooth) seem to have a primary flood effusive origin, and even cratered terrains could have the same origin with a higher crater concentration. These volcanic units range from high reflectance red plains to low reflectance blue plains (Denevi et al., 2009, Science). No absorption is present in the visible and near-infrared spectra, indicating very low abundance of transitional elements in silicates (i.e. very low iron and titanium, e.g. FeO < 1%, Klima et al., 2014, Whispers). XRS and GRS, onboard MESSENGER, confirmed a very low Fe/Si ratio in the surface material (Weider et al., 2014, Icarus), not only in silicates, differently from the volcanic compositions present in all the other planetary surfaces. K, Th, U GRS-based are consistent with chondritic source but with greater volatile abundances (Peplowski et al., 2011, Science; 2012, JGR). Moreover, XRS measured high volatile abundances (i.e., S, Na, K) (Evans et al., 2012, JGR; Weider et al., 2012, JGR), with a variable distribution on the surface. The presence of high level of volatiles is in agreement with the evidence of pyroclastic materials (Kerber et al., 2009, EPSL). Mg/Si shows relative high values, with a high variability on the surface. Higher values of Mg/Si are detected in some terrains related to high concentration of Ca/Si, and low Al/Si, indicating ultramafic composition, a relative high degree of partial melting and high temperature, in particular in older

  15. Informing the public about radiation--the messenger and the message: 1997 G. William Morgan lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakey, J

    1998-10-01

    I am greatly honored to be invited by the Presidents Emeritus Committee of the Health Physics Society as a G. William Morgan Lecturer for 1997. The topic of this Plenary Session on Public Information and Public Relations is very close to my heart; it was a theme for my term as President of the International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA). I met IRPA members from all of the societies affiliated to IRPA and found that they shared a common concern about the need to improve public information especially in the event of a nuclear emergency. But who should tell them and what should be the message? There is considerable agreement about the desired characteristics of the messenger in risk communication. These include credibility, openness, and the sharing of uncertainty. The profession must maintain the status and credibility of the members, it must train members in communication skills, and above all win the cooperation of other professions. There are many obstacles to radiation protection communication, and, in particular, the complex language, derived from research, should be reserved for colleagues, and our message to the public must be clarified and freed from unnecessary jargon. Communication would be more efficient and possibly cause less anxiety if people were better educated about ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. There is considerable disagreement within the profession about the content of our message to the public. Consistency in the message would be helpful although it would be wrong to expect total unanimity in research. The profession should seek the support of the international agencies and commissions to use plain and consistent language wherever possible. I will discuss the desired characteristics of the messenger, the nature of the message, and examine some of the obstacles in the path of communication using evidence from experience with IRPA and the European Union. In this paper I will suggest some action to improve radiological protection

  16. Mercury's Time-Averaged and Induced Magnetic Fields from MESSENGER Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. L.; Winslow, R. M.; Anderson, B. J.; Purucker, M. E.; Korth, H.; Al Asad, M. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Baker, D. N.; Hauck, S. A.; Phillips, R. J.; Zuber, M. T.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Observations from MESSENGER's Magnetometer (MAG) have allowed the construction of a baseline, time-averaged model for Mercury's magnetosphere. The model, constructed with the approximation that the magnetospheric shape can be represented as a paraboloid, includes two external (magnetopause and magnetotail) current systems and an internal (dipole) field. We take advantage of the geometry of the orbital MAG data to constrain all but one of the model parameters, and their ranges, directly from the observations. These parameters are then used as a priori constraints in the magnetospheric model, and the remaining parameter, the dipole moment, is estimated from a grid search. The model provides an excellent fit to the MAG observations, with a root-mean-square misfit of less than 20 nT globally. The mean distance from the planetary dipole origin to the magnetopause subsolar point, RSS, is 1.45 RM (where RM = 2440 km) and the mean planetary dipole moment is 190 nT- RM3. Temporal variations in the global-scale magnetic fields result from changes in solar wind ram pressure, Pram, at Mercury that arise from the planet's 88-day eccentric orbit around the Sun and from transient, rapid changes in solar wind conditions. For a constant planetary dipole moment, RSS varies as Pram-1/6. However, magnetopause crossings obtained from several Mercury years of MESSENGER observations indicate that RSS is proportional to Pram-1/a where a is greater than 6, suggesting induction in Mercury's highly conducting metallic interior. We obtain an effective dipole moment that varies by up to ˜15% about its mean value. We further investigate the periodic 88-day induction signature and use the paraboloid model to describe the spatial structure in the inducing magnetopause field, together with estimates for the outer radius of Mercury's liquid core and possible overlying solid iron sulfide layer, to calculate induced core fields. The baseline magnetospheric model is adapted to include the 88-day

  17. MESSENGER Educator Fellows Taking the Nation on a Ride to the Innermost Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhala, H. A.; Goldstein, J. J.; Chapman, C. R.; Edmonds, J. P.; Hallau, K. G.; Hirshon, B.; Weir, H. M.; Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    Exploration of the mysterious planet Mercury offers an unprecedented opportunity for teachers, students, and citizens to tag along for the ride, and the MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) Educator Fellows are making sure classrooms across the U.S. are treated to quite a show. The Fellows, a nationally selected team of 30 master science educator volunteers, conduct workshops to teachers on how to bring educational materials developed in support of the mission into the classroom. The goal of the program is to provide teachers and school districts with exceptional educational materials and professional development strongly tied to the space science curriculum, and the materials are designed to inspire the next generation of America's scientists and engineers through NASA missions. Since the program's inception in 2003, more than 17,000 educators have been trained by the Fellows. On the basis of data gathered from the Fellows, this figure could translate to over two million student experiences. The success of the Fellowship program can also be gauged by determining how well it has maintained its volunteer corps over the years. The Fellows, selected to the program through a national announcement of opportunity every two years, reflect a geographically and institutionally diverse mix of individuals from a variety of settings such as science centers, museums, school districts, and universities. The Fellows sign up to the program for two years at a time, and at the end of their term they have the option to reapply. To keep the number of Fellows at 30 in each cadre, new Fellows are recruited to replace those who have retired. The current, fourth cadre of Fellows includes 30 individuals in 19 states and territories. Of these, seven have been in the program since the first cadre, and the other 23 include Fellows from the second, third, and fourth recruitment campaigns in 2006, 2008, and 2010. The current cadre is conducting its work

  18. The effect of 648 nm diode laser irradiation on second messengers in senescent human keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins Evans, D.; Abrahamse, H.

    2009-02-01

    Background/purpose: Stress induced premature senescence (SIPS) is defined as the long-term effect of subcytotoxic stress on proliferative cell types. Cells in SIPS display differences at the level of protein expression which affect energy metabolism, defense systems, redox potential, cell morphology and transduction pathways. This study aimed to determine the effect of laser irradiation on second messengers in senescent cells and to establish if that effect can be directly linked to changes in cellular function such as cell viability or proliferation. Materials and Methods: Human keratinocyte cell cultures were modified to induce premature senescence using repeated sub-lethal stresses of 200 uM H2O2 or 5% OH every day for four days with two days recovery. SIPS was confirmed by senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining. Control conditions included normal, repeated stress of 500 uM H2O2 to induce apoptosis and 200 uM PBN as an anti-oxidant or free radical scavenger. Cells were irradiated with 1.5 J/cm2 on day 1 and 4 using a 648 nm diode laser (3.3 mW/cm2) and cellular responses were measured 1 h post irradiation. The affect on second messengers was assessed by measuring cAMP, cGMP, nitric oxide and intracellular calcium (Ca2+) while functional changes were assessed using cell morphology, ATP cell viability, LDH membrane integrity and WST-1 cell proliferation. Results: Results indicate an increase in NO and a decrease in cGMP and Ca2+ in 200 uM H2O2 irradiated cells while PBN irradiated cells showed a decrease in cAMP and an increase in ATP viability and cell proliferation. Conclusion: Laser irradiation influences cell signaling which ultimately changes the biological function of senescent cells. If laser therapy can stimulate the biological function of senescent cells it may be beneficial to conditions such as immune senescence, skin ageing, muscle atrophy, premature ageing of arteries in patients with advanced heart disease, neurodegenerative disorders and

  19. Muon g -2 in gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking models with adjoint messengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoladze, Ilia; Ün, Cem Salih

    2017-02-01

    We explored the sparticle mass spectrum in light of the muon g -2 anomaly and the little hierarchy problem in a class of the gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking model. Here, the messenger fields transform in the adjoint representation of the Standard Model gauge symmetry. To avoid unacceptably light right-handed slepton masses, the Standard Model is supplemented by the additional U (1 )B-L gauge symmetry. A nonzero U (1 )B-L D term makes the right-handed slepton masses compatible with the current experimental bounds. We show that in the framework of Λ3muon g -2 anomaly and the observed 125 GeV Higgs boson mass can be simultaneously accommodated. The slepton masses in this case are predicted to lie in the few hundred GeV range, which can be tested at the LHC. Despite the heavy colored sparticle spectrum, the little hierarchy problem in this model can be ameliorated, and the electroweak fine-tuning parameter can be as low as 10 or so.

  20. Inherent regulation of EAL domain-catalyzed hydrolysis of second messenger cyclic di-GMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundriyal, Amit; Massa, Claudia; Samoray, Dietrich; Zehender, Fabian; Sharpe, Timothy; Jenal, Urs; Schirmer, Tilman

    2014-03-01

    The universal second messenger cyclic di-GMP (cdG) is involved in the regulation of a diverse range of cellular processes in bacteria. The intracellular concentration of the dinucleotide is determined by the opposing actions of diguanylate cyclases and cdG-specific phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Whereas most PDEs have accessory domains that are involved in the regulation of their activity, the regulatory mechanism of this class of enzymes has remained unclear. Here, we use biophysical and functional analyses to show that the isolated EAL domain of a PDE from Escherichia coli (YahA) is in a fast thermodynamic monomer-dimer equilibrium, and that the domain is active only in its dimeric state. Furthermore, our data indicate thermodynamic coupling between substrate binding and EAL dimerization with the dimerization affinity being increased about 100-fold upon substrate binding. Crystal structures of the YahA-EAL domain determined under various conditions (apo, Mg(2+), cdG·Ca(2+) complex) confirm structural coupling between the dimer interface and the catalytic center. The built-in regulatory properties of the EAL domain probably facilitate its modular, functional combination with the diverse repertoire of accessory domains.

  1. LIN28 binds messenger RNAs at GGAGA motifs and regulates splicing factor abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbert, Melissa L; Huelga, Stephanie C; Kapeli, Katannya; Stark, Thomas J; Liang, Tiffany Y; Chen, Stella X; Yan, Bernice Y; Nathanson, Jason L; Hutt, Kasey R; Lovci, Michael T; Kazan, Hilal; Vu, Anthony Q; Massirer, Katlin B; Morris, Quaid; Hoon, Shawn; Yeo, Gene W

    2012-10-26

    LIN28 is a conserved RNA-binding protein implicated in pluripotency, reprogramming, and oncogenesis. It was previously shown to act primarily by blocking let-7 microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis, but here we elucidate distinct roles of LIN28 regulation via its direct messenger RNA (mRNA) targets. Through crosslinking and immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (CLIP-seq) in human embryonic stem cells and somatic cells expressing exogenous LIN28, we have defined discrete LIN28-binding sites in a quarter of human transcripts. These sites revealed that LIN28 binds to GGAGA sequences enriched within loop structures in mRNAs, reminiscent of its interaction with let-7 miRNA precursors. Among LIN28 mRNA targets, we found evidence for LIN28 autoregulation and also direct but differing effects on the protein abundance of splicing regulators in somatic and pluripotent stem cells. Splicing-sensitive microarrays demonstrated that exogenous LIN28 expression causes widespread downstream alternative splicing changes. These findings identify important regulatory functions of LIN28 via direct mRNA interactions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Multi-messenger Light Curves from Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Internal Shock Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Mauricio; Heinze, Jonas; Murase, Kohta; Winter, Walter

    2017-03-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are promising as sources of neutrinos and cosmic rays. In the internal shock scenario, blobs of plasma emitted from a central engine collide within a relativistic jet and form shocks, leading to particle acceleration and emission. Motivated by present experimental constraints and sensitivities, we improve the predictions of particle emission by investigating time-dependent effects from multiple shocks. We produce synthetic light curves with different variability timescales that stem from properties of the central engine. For individual GRBs, qualitative conclusions about model parameters, neutrino production efficiency, and delays in high-energy gamma-rays can be deduced from inspection of the gamma-ray light curves. GRBs with fast time variability without additional prominent pulse structure tend to be efficient neutrino emitters, whereas GRBs with fast variability modulated by a broad pulse structure can be inefficient neutrino emitters and produce delayed high-energy gamma-ray signals. Our results can be applied to quantitative tests of the GRB origin of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, and have the potential to impact current and future multi-messenger searches.

  3. Multi-messenger light curves from gamma-ray bursts in the internal shock model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustamante, Mauricio [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics (CCAPP); Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Murase, Kohta [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Center for Particle and Gravitational Astrophysics; Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Astronomy and Astrophysics; Winter, Walter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are promising as sources of neutrinos and cosmic rays. In the internal shock scenario, blobs of plasma emitted from a central engine collide within a relativistic jet and form shocks, leading to particle acceleration and emission. Motivated by present experimental constraints and sensitivities, we improve the predictions of particle emission by investigating time-dependent effects from multiple shocks. We produce synthetic light curves with different variability timescales that stem from properties of the central engine. For individual GRBs, qualitative conclusions about model parameters, neutrino production efficiency, and delays in high-energy gamma rays can be deduced from inspection of the gamma-ray light curves. GRBs with fast time variability without additional prominent pulse structure tend to be efficient neutrino emitters, whereas GRBs with fast variability modulated by a broad pulse structure tend to be inefficient neutrino emitters and produce delayed high-energy gamma-ray signals. Our results can be applied to quantitative tests of the GRB origin of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, and have the potential to impact current and future multi-messenger searches.

  4. Genome-wide analysis demonstrates conserved localization of messenger RNAs to mitotic microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blower, Michael D; Feric, Elma; Weis, Karsten; Heald, Rebecca

    2007-12-31

    RNA localization is of critical importance in many fundamental cell biological and developmental processes by regulating the spatial control of gene expression. To investigate how spindle-localized RNAs might influence mitosis, we comprehensively surveyed all messenger RNAs (mRNAs) that bound to microtubules during metaphase in both Xenopus laevis egg extracts and mitotic human cell extracts. We identify conserved classes of mRNAs that are enriched on microtubules in both human and X. laevis. Active mitotic translation occurs on X. laevis meiotic spindles, and a subset of microtubule-bound mRNAs (MT-mRNAs) associate with polyribosomes. Although many MT-mRNAs associate with polyribosomes, we find that active translation is not required for mRNA localization to mitotic microtubules. Our results represent the first genome-wide survey of mRNAs localized to a specific cytoskeletal component and suggest that microtubule localization of specific mRNAs is likely to function in mitotic regulation and mRNA segregation during cell division.

  5. Disturbances in lipid second messengers generation by stimulated blood lymphocytes in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galstyan H. M.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The main objective of this study was the comparative investigation of diverse lipid second messenger (LSM generation by human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBL at different (5, 10, 30 and 60 s time points of cell co-stimulation by anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 monoclonal antibodies in norm and breast cancer (BC. Methods. Ficoll-Hypaque gradient centrifugation. Results. The data obtained indicate that some mechanisms of LSM generation/utilization in stimulated crude HPBL were significantly altered in BC compared to norm. Particularly, the reliable generation of arachidonyl-1,2-diacylglycerol (1,2-DAG at the initial step (5 s of cell stimulation observed in norm was depressed in BC and reached the value below the basal level in unstimulated cells. It is important that the disturbances in 1,2-DAG formation in HPBL obtained from patients with BC were identical with those observed earlier in other forms of cancer. Conclusions. We conclude that the regularities revealed are common characteristics for all the types of malignancy studied and can be used as additional testing parameters for cancer definition and individual correction of the chemotherapy programs for disease treatment

  6. Large Impact Basins on Mercury: Global Distribution, Characteristics, and Modification History from MESSENGER Orbital Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassett, Caleb I.; Head, James W.; Baker, David M. H.; Zuber, Maria T.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Klimczak, Christian; Strom, Robert G.; Chapman, Clark R.; Prockter, Louise M.; Phillips, Roger J.; Oberst, Juergen; Preusker, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The formation of large impact basins (diameter D greater than or equal to 300 km) was an important process in the early evolution of Mercury and influenced the planet's topography, stratigraphy, and crustal structure. We catalog and characterize this basin population on Mercury from global observations by the MESSENGER spacecraft, and we use the new data to evaluate basins suggested on the basis of the Mariner 10 flybys. Forty-two certain or probable impact basins are recognized a few additional basins that may have been degraded to the point of ambiguity are plausible on the basis of new data but are classified as uncertain. The spatial density of large basins (D greater than or equal to 500 km) on Mercury is lower than that on the Moon. Morphological characteristics of basins on Mercury suggest that on average they are more degraded than lunar basins. These observations are consistent with more efficient modification, degradation, and obliteration of the largest basins on Mercury than on the Moon. This distinction may be a result of differences in the basin formation process (producing fewer rings), greater relaxation of topography after basin formation (subduing relief), and/or higher rates of volcanism during the period of heavy bombardment on Mercury compared to the Moon (burying basin rings and interiors).

  7. The Gravity Field, Orientation, and Ephemeris of Mercury from MESSENGER Observations After Three Years in Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazarico, Erwan M.; Genova, Antonio; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Gregory; Neumann, Gregory A.; Zuber, Maria T.; Smith, David E.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2014-01-01

    We have analyzed three years of radio tracking data from the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit around Mercury and determined the gravity field, planetary orientation, and ephemeris of the innermost planet. With improvements in spatial coverage, force modeling, and data weighting, we refined an earlier global gravity field both in quality and resolution, and we present here a spherical harmonic solution to degree and order 50. In this field, termed HgM005, uncertainties in low-degree coefficients are reduced by an order of magnitude relative to the earlier global field, and we obtained a preliminary value of the tidal Love number k(sub 2) of 0.451+/-0.014. We also estimated Mercury's pole position, and we obtained an obliquity value of 2.06 +/- 0.16 arcmin, in good agreement with analysis of Earth-based radar observations. From our updated rotation period (58.646146 +/- 0.000011 days) and Mercury ephemeris, we verified experimentally the planet's 3: 2 spin-orbit resonance to greater accuracy than previously possible. We present a detailed analysis of the HgM005 covariance matrix, and we describe some near-circular frozen orbits around Mercury that could be advantageous for future exploration.

  8. p53 family members - important messengers in cell death signaling in photodynamic therapy of cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acedo, Pilar; Zawacka-Pankau, Joanna

    2015-08-01

    TP53 is one of the genes most frequently inactivated in cancers. Mutations in TP53 gene are linked to worse prognosis and shorter overall survival of cancer patients. TP53 encodes a critical tumor suppressor, which dictates cell fate decisions upon stress stimuli. As a sensor of cellular stress, p53 is a relevant messenger of cell death signaling in ROS-driven photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer. The significant role of p53 in response to PDT has been reported for several clinically approved photosensitizers. Multiple reports described that wild-type p53 contributes to cell killing upon photodynamic therapy with clinically approved photosensitizers but the mechanism is still not fully understood. This work outlines the diverse functions of p53 family members in cancer cells' susceptibility and resistance to PDT. In summary p53 and p53 family members are emerging as important mediators of cell death signaling in photodynamic therapy of cancer, however the mechanism of cell death provoked during PDT might differ depending on the tissue type and the photosensitizer applied.

  9. Exercise does not influence myostatin and follistatin messenger RNA expression in young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensky, Nicole E; Sims, Jennifer K; Dieli-Conwright, Christina M; Sattler, Fred R; Rice, Judd C; Schroeder, E Todd

    2010-02-01

    We evaluated changes in myostatin, follistatin, and MyoD messenger RNA (mRNA) gene expression using eccentric exercise (EE) and concentric exercise (CE) as probes to better understand the mechanisms of muscle hypertrophy in young women. Twelve women performed single-leg maximal eccentric (n = 6, 25 +/- 1 years, 59 +/- 7 kg) or concentric (n = 6, 24 +/- 1 years, 65 +/- 7 kg) isokinetic knee extension exercise for 7 sessions. Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis at baseline, 8 hours after the first exercise session, and 8 hours after the seventh exercise session. In the EE group, there were no changes in myostatin and follistatin (p > or = 0.17); however, MyoD expression increased after 1 exercise bout (p = 0.02). In the CE group, there were no changes in myostatin, follistatin, or MyoD mRNA gene expression (p > or = 0.07). Differences between the EE and CE groups were not significant (p > or = 0.05). These data suggest that a single bout or multiple bouts of maximal EE or CE may not significantly alter myostatin or follistatin mRNA gene expression in young women. However, MyoD mRNA expression seems to increase only after EE.

  10. Primary cilium and sonic hedgehog signaling during neural tube patterning: role of GPCRs and second messengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Kasturi; Mukhopadhyay, Saikat

    2015-04-01

    The ventral neural tube in vertebrates is patterned by a gradient of sonic hedgehog (Shh) secreted from the notochord and floor plate. Forward genetic screens first pointed to the role of the primary cilium in ventral neural tube patterning. Further research has shown that most components of the Shh pathway localize to or shuttle through the primary cilium. In the absence of Shh, the bifunctional Gli transcription factors are proteolytically processed into repressor forms in a protein kinase A (PKA)- and cilium-dependent manner. Recent work suggests that the orphan G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) Gpr161 localizes to cilia, and functions as a negative regulator of Shh signaling by determining Gli processing via cAMP signaling. The primary cilium also functions as a signaling compartment for calcium in the Shh pathway. A better understanding of the role of the cilium as a signaling compartment, and the interplay of second messenger systems that regulate PKA activation and Gli amplification during signaling is critical for deciphering the role of Shh during development, neuronal differentiation, and tumorigenesis.

  11. Messenger RNA- versus retrovirus-based induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming strategies: analysis of genomic integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steichen, Clara; Luce, Eléanor; Maluenda, Jérôme; Tosca, Lucie; Moreno-Gimeno, Inmaculada; Desterke, Christophe; Dianat, Noushin; Goulinet-Mainot, Sylvie; Awan-Toor, Sarah; Burks, Deborah; Marie, Joëlle; Weber, Anne; Tachdjian, Gérard; Melki, Judith; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne

    2014-06-01

    The use of synthetic messenger RNAs to generate human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is particularly appealing for potential regenerative medicine applications, because it overcomes the common drawbacks of DNA-based or virus-based reprogramming strategies, including transgene integration in particular. We compared the genomic integrity of mRNA-derived iPSCs with that of retrovirus-derived iPSCs generated in strictly comparable conditions, by single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and copy number variation (CNV) analyses. We showed that mRNA-derived iPSCs do not differ significantly from the parental fibroblasts in SNP analysis, whereas retrovirus-derived iPSCs do. We found that the number of CNVs seemed independent of the reprogramming method, instead appearing to be clone-dependent. Furthermore, differentiation studies indicated that mRNA-derived iPSCs differentiated efficiently into hepatoblasts and that these cells did not load additional CNVs during differentiation. The integration-free hepatoblasts that were generated constitute a new tool for the study of diseased hepatocytes derived from patients' iPSCs and their use in the context of stem cell-derived hepatocyte transplantation. Our findings also highlight the need to conduct careful studies on genome integrity for the selection of iPSC lines before using them for further applications.

  12. Role of WhatsApp Messenger in the Laboratory Management System: A Boon to Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorwal, Pranav; Sachdev, Ritesh; Gautam, Dheeraj; Jain, Dharmendra; Sharma, Pooja; Tiwari, Assem Kumar; Raina, Vimarsh

    2016-01-01

    The revolution of internet and specifically mobile internet has occurred at a blinding pace over the last decade. With the advent of smart phones, the hand held device has become much more than a medium of voice calling. Healthcare has been catching up with the digital revolution in the form of Hospital Information System and Laboratory Information System. However, the advent of instant messaging services, which are abundantly used by the youth, can be used to improve communication and coordination among the various stake holders in the healthcare sector. We have tried to look at the impact of using the WhatsApp messenger service in the laboratory management system, by forming multiple groups of the various subsections of the laboratory. A total of 35 members used this service for a period of 3 months and their response was taken on a scale of 1 to 10. There was significant improvement in the communication in the form of sharing photographic evidence, information about accidents, critical alerts, duty rosters, academic activities and getting directives from seniors. There was also some increase in the load of adding information to the application and disturbance in the routine activities; but the benefits far outweighed the minor hassles. We thereby suggest and foresee another communication revolution which will change the way information is shared in a healthcare sector, with hospital specific dedicated apps.

  13. Circulating thyroid stimulating hormone receptor messenger RNA and differentiated thyroid cancer: A diagnostic meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Chao-Yue; Li, Zhan-Ming; Wang, Li-Shun

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor messenger RNA (TSHR-mRNA) is over-expressed in thyroid cancer patients, which indicates that TSHR-mRNA is a potential biomarker of thyroid cancer. However, system evaluation for TSHR-mRNA as a diagnostic biomarker of thyroid cancer is deficient. The performance of TSHR-mRNA for thyroid cancer diagnosis was evaluated in this study. Three common international databases as well as a Chinese database were applied for literature researching. Quality assessment of the included literatures was conducted by the QUADAS-2 tool. Totally, 1027 patients from nine studies eligible for the meta-analysis were included in this study. Global sensitivity and specificity for the positivity of TSHR-mRNA in the thyroid cancer diagnosis is 72% and 82%. The value of AUC for this test performance was 0.84. Our meta-analysis suggests that TSHR-mRNA might be a potential biomarker to complete present diagnostic methods for early and precision diagnosis of thyroid cancer. Notably, this findings need validation thorough large-scale clinical studies. PMID:28036261

  14. Systemic delivery of factor IX messenger RNA for protein replacement therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Suvasini; Tonnu, Nina; Tachikawa, Kiyoshi; Limphong, Pattraranee; Vega, Jerel B.; Karmali, Priya P.; Chivukula, Pad; Verma, Inder M.

    2017-01-01

    Safe and efficient delivery of messenger RNAs for protein replacement therapies offers great promise but remains challenging. In this report, we demonstrate systemic, in vivo, nonviral mRNA delivery through lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) to treat a Factor IX (FIX)-deficient mouse model of hemophilia B. Delivery of human FIX (hFIX) mRNA encapsulated in our LUNAR LNPs results in a rapid pulse of FIX protein (within 4–6 h) that remains stable for up to 4–6 d and is therapeutically effective, like the recombinant human factor IX protein (rhFIX) that is the current standard of care. Extensive cytokine and liver enzyme profiling showed that repeated administration of the mRNA–LUNAR complex does not cause any adverse innate or adaptive immune responses in immune-competent, hemophilic mice. The levels of hFIX protein that were produced also remained consistent during repeated administrations. These results suggest that delivery of long mRNAs is a viable therapeutic alternative for many clotting disorders and for other hepatic diseases where recombinant proteins may be unaffordable or unsuitable. PMID:28202722

  15. Nitric Oxide as a Unique Bioactive Signaling Messenger in Physiology and Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Tuteja

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is an intra- and extracellular messenger that mediates diverse signaling pathways in target cells and is known to play an important role in many physiological processes including neuronal signaling, immune response, inflammatory response, modulation of ion channels, phagocytic defense mechanism, penile erection, and cardiovascular homeostasis and its decompensation in atherogenesis. Recent studies have also revealed a role for NO as signaling molecule in plant, as it activates various defense genes and acts as developmental regulator. In plants, NO can also be produced by nitrate reductase. NO can operate through posttranslational modification of proteins (nitrosylation. NO is also a causative agent in various pathophysiological abnormalities. One of the very important systems, the cardiovascular system, is affected by NO production, as this bioactive molecule is involved in the regulation of cardiovascular motor tone, modulation of myocardial contractivity, control of cell proliferation, and inhibition of platelet activation, aggregation, and adhesion. The prime source of NO in the cardiovascular system is endothelial NO synthase, which is tightly regulated with respect to activity and localization. The inhibition of chronic NO synthesis leads to neurogenic and arterial hypertensions, which later contribute to development of myocardial fibrosis. Overall, the modulation of NO synthesis is associated with hypertension. This review briefly describes the physiology of NO, its synthesis, catabolism, and targeting, the mechanism of NO action, and the pharmacological role of NO with special reference to its essential role in hypertension.

  16. Ames stereo pipeline-derived digital terrain models of Mercury from MESSENGER stereo imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassett, Caleb I.

    2016-12-01

    In this study, 96 digital terrain models (DTMs) of Mercury were created using the Ames Stereo Pipeline, using 1456 pairs of stereo images from the Mercury Dual Imaging System instrument on MESSENGER. Although these DTMs cover only 1% of the surface of Mercury, they enable three-dimensional characterization of landforms at horizontal resolutions of 50-250 m/pixel and vertical accuracy of tens of meters. This is valuable in regions where the more precise measurements from the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) are sparse. MLA measurements nonetheless provide an important geodetic framework for the derived stereo products. These DTMs, which are publicly released in conjunction with this paper, reveal topography of features at relatively small scales, including craters, graben, hollows, pits, scarps, and wrinkle ridges. Measurements from these data indicate that: (1) hollows have a median depth of 32 m, in basic agreement with earlier shadow measurement, (2) some of the deep pits (up to 4 km deep) that are interpreted to form via volcanic processes on Mercury have surrounding rims or rises, but others do not, and (3) some pits have two or more distinct, low-lying interior minima that could represent multiple vents.

  17. Multi-frequency, multi-messenger astrophysics with Swift. The case of blazars

    CERN Document Server

    Giommi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    During its first 10 years of orbital operations Swift dedicated approximately 11% of its observing time to blazars, carrying out more than 12,000 observations of ~1,600 different objects, for a total exposure time of over 25 million seconds. This is probably the largest contribution to multi-frequency (optical, UV, soft and hard X-rays) and multi-temporal data archives about this type of sources. In this paper I briefly discuss the impact that Swift is having on blazar multi-frequency and time-domain astrophysics, as well as how it is contributing to the opening of the era of multi-messenger astronomy. Finally, I present some preliminary results from a systematic analysis of a very large number of Swift XRT observations of blazars. All the "science ready" data products that are being generated by this project will be publicly released. Specifically, deconvolved X-ray spectra and best fit spectral parameters will be available through the ASDC "SED builder" tool (https://tools.asdc.asi.it/SED) and by means of i...

  18. Isoform composition of connexin channels determines selectivity among second messengers and uncharged molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevans, C G; Kordel, M; Rhee, S K; Harris, A L

    1998-01-30

    Intercellular connexin channels (gap junction channels) have long been thought to mediate molecular signaling between cells, but the nature of the signaling has been unclear. This study shows that connexin channels from native tissue have selective permeabilities, partially based on pore diameter, that discriminate among cytoplasmic second messenger molecules. Permeability was assessed by measurement of selective loss/retention of tracers from liposomes containing reconstituted connexin channels. The tracers employed were tritiated cyclic nucleotides and a series of oligomaltosaccharides derivatized with a small uncharged fluorescent moiety. The data define different size cut-off limits for permeability through homomeric connexin-32 channels and through heteromeric connexin-32/connexin-26 channels. Connexin-26 contributes to a narrowed pore. Both cAMP and cGMP were permeable through the homomeric connexin-32 channels. cAMP was permeable through only a fraction of the heteromeric channels. Surprisingly, cGMP was permeable through a substantially greater fraction of the heteromeric channels than was cAMP. The data suggest that isoform stoichiometry and/or arrangement within a connexin channel determines whether cyclic nucleotides can permeate, and which ones. This is the first evidence for connexin-specific selectivity among biological signaling molecules.

  19. Statistical study of ICME effects on Mercury's magnetospheric boundaries and northern cusp region from MESSENGER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Reka M.; Philpott, Lydia; Paty, Carol S.; Lugaz, Noé; Schwadron, Nathan A.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Korth, Haje

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a systematic investigation of the large-scale processes in Mercury's magnetosphere during interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) using observations from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission. We study the motion of the bow shock and magnetopause boundaries, quantify the magnetospheric compression, and characterize the size, extent, and plasma pressure of the northern cusp region and the plasma precipitation to the surface. During ICMEs, the magnetopause was substantially compressed, as the subsolar standoff distance from the center of the planet was reduced by ˜15% compared with the value during nominal solar wind conditions, and the magnetopause reached the surface of the planet ˜30% of the time. On the other hand, the bow shock under ICME conditions was located farther from the planet than for nominal solar wind conditions. The cusp was observed to extend ˜10° farther equatorward and 2 h wider in local time. In addition, the average plasma pressure in the cusp was more than double that determined under nominal conditions. For the most extreme cases, the particle precipitation to the surface was an order of magnitude higher than on average. The solar wind ram pressure and the Alfvén Mach number are found to be the dominant factors affecting these changes in the magnetosphere, with the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction and the IMF magnetic pressure playing a small but likely nonnegligible role.

  20. MESSENGER observations of the energization and heating of protons in the near-Mercury magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W. J.; Raines, J. M.; Fu, S. Y.; Slavin, J. A.; Wei, Y.; Poh, G. K.; Pu, Z. Y.; Yao, Z. H.; Zong, Q. G.; Wan, W. X.

    2017-08-01

    The energization and heating processes for protons in the near-Mercury tail are examined with MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) observations. In a case study, suprathermal proton particle flux (STPF) and proton temperature are observed to be clearly enhanced during near-Mercury substorm dipolarizations, indicating the proton energization and heating processes. STPF and proton temperature distributions in near-Mercury central plasma sheets display dawn-dusk asymmetries, with higher values in the dawnside plasma sheet, i.e., postmidnight, than in the duskside, i.e., premidnight. Further investigations reveal that these asymmetries are more prominent during active periods in Mercury's magnetosphere, as compared to quiet periods. Magnetic field variations in the ZMSM component display a similar feature, with variations being more prominent on the dawnside than the duskside during active periods. We propose that the dawn-dusk asymmetry in the distributions of protons could be due to the fact that more substorm dipolarizations were initiated on the dawnside of Mercury's magnetotail.

  1. A Bayesian approach to multi-messenger astronomy: identification of gravitational-wave host galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, XiLong [School of Physics and Electronics Information, Hubei University of Education, 430205 Wuhan (China); Messenger, Christopher; Heng, Ik Siong [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-01

    We present a general framework for incorporating astrophysical information into Bayesian parameter estimation techniques used by gravitational wave data analysis to facilitate multi-messenger astronomy. Since the progenitors of transient gravitational wave events, such as compact binary coalescences, are likely to be associated with a host galaxy, improvements to the source sky location estimates through the use of host galaxy information are explored. To demonstrate how host galaxy properties can be included, we simulate a population of compact binary coalescences and show that for ∼8.5% of simulations within 200 Mpc, the top 10 most likely galaxies account for a ∼50% of the total probability of hosting a gravitational wave source. The true gravitational wave source host galaxy is in the top 10 galaxy candidates ∼10% of the time. Furthermore, we show that by including host galaxy information, a better estimate of the inclination angle of a compact binary gravitational wave source can be obtained. We also demonstrate the flexibility of our method by incorporating the use of either the B or K band into our analysis.

  2. Cadmium-induced accumulation of metallothionein messenger RNA in rat liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohi, S.; Cardenosa, G.; Pine, R.; Huang, P.C.

    1981-03-10

    Multiple injections of nontoxic levels of cadmium to a rat result in much higher level of metallothionein (MT) production in the liver than does the single injection. In order to understand the underlying mechanisms we have quantitated and compared the metallothionein-specific messenger RNA contents in the livers following the two induction regimens. Cell-free translation assays coupled with specific immunoprecipitation of MT revealed that MT-mRNA activity in livers of animals multiply injected with Cd is 7- to 10-fold higher than that in livers 4 h after a single Cd-induction. By oligo(dT)-cellulose chromatography, sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and methylmercuric hydroxide-agarose gel electrophoresis this mRNA has been enriched approximately 100-fold from the total RNA. The size of the mRNA is about 400 nucleotides. Hybridization assays with a complementary DNA probe synthesized against the enriched MT-mRNA showed a 4-fold difference in the level of MT-mRNA between the two induction regimens in agreement with the results obtained by the cell-free translation assays. The possible mechanisms for these observations in consideration of the short lived nature of MT-mRNA are discussed.

  3. Aberrant herpesvirus-induced polyadenylation correlates with cellular messenger RNA destruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon J Lee

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of messenger RNA (mRNA stability plays critical roles in controlling gene expression, ensuring transcript fidelity, and allowing cells to respond to environmental cues. Unregulated enhancement of mRNA turnover could therefore dampen cellular responses to such signals. Indeed, several herpesviruses instigate widespread destruction of cellular mRNAs to block host gene expression and evade immune detection. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV promotes this phenotype via the activity of its viral SOX protein, although the mechanism of SOX-induced mRNA turnover has remained unknown, given its apparent lack of intrinsic ribonuclease activity. Here, we report that KSHV SOX stimulates cellular transcriptome turnover via a unique mechanism involving aberrant polyadenylation. Transcripts in SOX-expressing cells exhibit extended poly(A polymerase II-generated poly(A tails and polyadenylation-linked mRNA turnover. SOX-induced polyadenylation changes correlate with its RNA turnover function, and inhibition of poly(A tail formation blocks SOX activity. Both nuclear and cytoplasmic poly(A binding proteins are critical cellular cofactors for SOX function, the latter of which undergoes striking nuclear relocalization by SOX. SOX-induced mRNA turnover therefore represents both a novel mechanism of host shutoff as well as a new model system to probe the regulation of poly(A tail-stimulated mRNA turnover in mammalian cells.

  4. ATP, an extracellular signaling molecule in red blood cells: A messenger for malaria?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghania Ramdani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine 5′ triphosphate (ATP, discovered in 1929 by Karl Lohmannest, is described as an essential energy source for cells. In the biochemistry of all living organisms, ATP hydrolysis provides the energy required for the chemical reactions of metabolism. It is the precursor of a number of essential enzyme cofactors, such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + and coenzyme A [NAD + , flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD, and is ATP coenzyme A are all formed from ATP] and is the source of the phosphoryl group in most kinase-mediated phosphorylation reactions. Another essential, but less known function is that ATP plays a very important role as an extracellular signaling molecule, allowing cells and tissues to communicate. ATP is converted into cAMP, a major second messenger involved in many cellular processes, by adenylyl cyclase, a membrane-associated enzyme. In this review, we describe the role of ATP as a beneficial extracellular molecule released by healthy red blood cells (RBCs in response to hypoxia to mediate a vasodilator signal, by oxidatively stressed RBCs, and by Plasmodium falciparum-infected RBCs (iRBCs, and its similarity with released ATP that by the combined action of the ectonucleotidases CD39 and CD73 is converted to adenosine that mediates sickling in sickle cell disease (SCD.

  5. Comment on ``Length-dependent translation of messenger RNA by ribosomes''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunxin

    2012-02-01

    In a recent paper by Valleriani [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.83.042903 83, 042903 (2011)], a simple model for the translation of messenger RNA (mRNA) is presented. Using this model, the protein translational ratio r, defined as the ratio of protein translation rate ωtl from mRNA to protein degradation rate ωp, is obtained. The key point in obtaining the translational ratio r is to get the protein translation rate ωtl. In Valleriani 's paper, ωtl is obtained as the mean value of the measured translation rate, which is the ratio of the synthesized protein number to the mRNA lifetime. However, in experiments, different methods might be used to obtain the value of ωtl. Therefore, to apply Valleriani 's model to more general experiments, in this Comment three methods to obtain the translation rate ωtl, and consequently the translational ratio r, are presented. Based on one of the methods which might be employed in most of the experiments, we find that the translational ratio r decays exponentially with mRNA length in prokaryotic cells, and decays reciprocally with mRNA length in eukaryotic cells. This result is slight different from that which was obtained in Valleriani 's paper.

  6. Mercury's Atmosphere in the Age of Messenger: Calcium and New Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bida, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    We propose to observe Mercury?s atmosphere using HIRES in order map the temporal and spatial variability of Ca which has been measured in our previous NASA-allocated observations, and to make a deep search for the refractory elements Al and Fe. Observations of Ca are required to define the temporal and spatial variability, density, velocity distribution, and line profile of Ca. Our objectives are to determine its source process, motion, and loss from the exosphere; to explore the effect of solar cycle variations on the exosphere; and to provide a global view of the exosphere to aid in the interpretation of the more targeted MESSENGER observations. Detection of Al and/or Fe in addition to Ca in the atmosphere can be used to derive the Ca/Al and Ca/Fe ratios in the surface, both key compositional diagnostics. A wide range of compositional models, from refractory to volatile-rich, predict significant mantle abundances for Al and Fe (Goettel, 1988). We are now reporting strin! gent upper limits based on 4-sigma detections with Keck/HIRES of an Al tangent column of 1.5e+07 cm-2, and an Fe tangent column of 1.6e+08 cm-2 (Bida and Killen, 2010). We believe that it is essential to confirm these upper limits for Al and Fe and to push hard for a confirmed detection of both, as well as Ca+.

  7. An Overview of Ultraviolet Through Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopic Observations of Mercury During the First MESSENGER Flyby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izenberg, N. R.; McClintock, W. E.; Holsclaw, G. M.; Robinson, M. S.; Blewett, D. T.; Domingue, D. L.; Head, J. W.; Jensen, E. A.; Kochte, M. C.; Lankton, M. R.; Murchie, S. L.; Sprague, A. L.; Vilas, F.; Solomon, S. C.

    2008-05-01

    During the first MESSENGER flyby of Mercury on January 14, 2008, the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) measured reflectance spectra from Mercury's surface over the wavelength range 220-1450 nm. These are the first high-spatial-resolution (Mozart crater and in Tir Planitia. Ground-based observations of Mercury reveal a surface with a red, nearly featureless spectrum in the visible and near-infrared (wavelengths greater than ~ 500 nm) that has been interpreted as evidence for a largely iron-poor feldspathic composition. Initial analyses of VIRS spectra also show strongly red-sloped, near featureless spectra, appearing to support contentions of low iron abundance in surface materials. However, interpretation of Mercury's spectral reflectance is complicated by our lack of knowledge about the effects on its surface materials of space weathering, which both suppresses the strength of spectral absorption features and reddens the spectrum. Brightness variations and absorption bands in ultraviolet reflectance may help determine both the nature and extent of processes that modify observed reflectance at longer wavelengths. MASCS surface observation data demonstrate spectral variations across the Mercury surface that can be related to previous telescopic observations, compared and contrasted with lunar observations, and linked to possible influences of space weathering.

  8. Characterization of striatal neurons expressing high levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase messenger RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesselet, M F; Robbins, E

    1989-07-17

    Two types of labelled cells are detected in sections of rat and mouse striata processed for in situ hybridization histochemistry with 35S-radiolabelled RNA probes complementary to the messenger RNA (mRNA) encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the synthesis enzyme for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA): numerous lightly, and fewer very densely labelled neurons. In order to determine whether the densely labelled cells correspond to the striatal somatostatinergic neurons with which they share morphological characteristics, the presence of GAD mRNA was examined in brain sections processed successively for dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) diaphorase histochemistry, a marker of striatal somatostatinergic neurons, and in situ hybridization histochemistry. In addition, the distribution of GABAergic interneurons was analyzed with regard to striatal compartments (striosomes) indicated by patches of dense opiate binding sites. The results show that NADPH diaphorase activity and GAD mRNA do not co-exist in striatal neurons. Furthermore, in contrast to the somatostatinergic neurons which are almost exclusively located in the extrastriosomal matrix, densely labelled GAD cells were present both in the striosomes and the matrix, further suggesting that GABAergic and somatostatinergic neurons form two distinct interneuronal systems in the striatum of rats and mice.

  9. Messages do diffuse faster than messengers: reconciling disparate estimates of the morphogen bicoid diffusion coefficient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Sigaut

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The gradient of Bicoid (Bcd is key for the establishment of the anterior-posterior axis in Drosophila embryos. The gradient properties are compatible with the SDD model in which Bcd is synthesized at the anterior pole and then diffuses into the embryo and is degraded with a characteristic time. Within this model, the Bcd diffusion coefficient is critical to set the timescale of gradient formation. This coefficient has been measured using two optical techniques, Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP and Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS, obtaining estimates in which the FCS value is an order of magnitude larger than the FRAP one. This discrepancy raises the following questions: which estimate is "correct''; what is the reason for the disparity; and can the SDD model explain Bcd gradient formation within the experimentally observed times? In this paper, we use a simple biophysical model in which Bcd diffuses and interacts with binding sites to show that both the FRAP and the FCS estimates may be correct and compatible with the observed timescale of gradient formation. The discrepancy arises from the fact that FCS and FRAP report on different effective (concentration dependent diffusion coefficients, one of which describes the spreading rate of the individual Bcd molecules (the messengers and the other one that of their concentration (the message. The latter is the one that is more relevant for the gradient establishment and is compatible with its formation within the experimentally observed times.

  10. Messenger RNA profiling for forensic body fluid identification: research and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Su-hua; Di, Zhou; Zhao, Shu-min; Li, Cheng-tao

    2013-10-01

    Identifying the origin of body fluids left at a crime scene can give a significant insight into crime scene reconstruction by supporting a link between sample donors and actual criminal acts. However, the conventional body fluid identification methods are prone to various limitations, such as time consumption, intensive labor, nonparallel manner, varying degrees of sensitivity and limited specificity. Recently, the analysis of cell-specific messenger RNA expression (mRNA profiling) has been proposed to supplant conventional methods for body fluid identification. Since 2011, the collaborative exercises have been organized by the European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP) in order to evaluate the robustness and reproducibility of mRNA profiling for body fluid identification. The major advantages of mRNA profiling, compared to the conventional methods, include higher sensitivity, greater specificity, the ability of detecting several body fluids in one multiplex reaction, and compatibility with current DNA extraction and analysis procedure. In the current review, we provided an overview of the present knowledge and detection methodologies of mRNA profiling for forensic body fluid identification and discussed its possible practical application to forensic casework.

  11. Solar Flare Element Abundances from the Solar Assembly for X-rays (SAX) on MESSENGER

    CERN Document Server

    Dennis, B R; Schwartz, R A; Tolbert, A K; Starr, R D; Nittler, L R

    2015-01-01

    X-ray spectra in the range $1.5-8.5$~keV have been analyzed for 526 large flares detected with the Solar Assembly for X-rays (SAX) on the Mercury {\\em MESSENGER} spacecraft between 2007 and 2013. For each flare, the temperature and emission measure of the emitting plasma were determined from the spectrum of the continuum. In addition, with the SAX energy resolution of 0.6 keV (FWHM) at 6~keV, the intensities of the clearly resolved Fe-line complex at 6.7~keV and the Ca-line complex at 3.9~keV were determined, along with those of unresolved line complexes from S, Si, and Ar at lower energies. Comparisons of these line intensities with theoretical spectra allow the abundances of these elements relative to hydrogen to be derived, with uncertainties due to instrument calibration and the unknown temperature distribution of the emitting plasma. While significant deviations are found for the abundances of Fe and Ca from flare to flare, the abundances averaged over all flares are found to be enhanced over photospheri...

  12. Messenger RNA Profiling for Forensic Body Fluid Identifica-tion:Research and Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zheng; ZHANG Su-hua; ZHOU Di; ZHAO Shu-min; LI Cheng-tao

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the origin of body fluids left at a crime scene can give a significant insight into crime scene reconstruction by supporting a link betw een sample donors and actual criminal acts. How ev-er, the conventional body fluid identification methods are prone to various limitations, such as time con-sumption, intensive labor, nonparallel manner, varying degrees of sensitivity and limited specificity. Re-cently, the analysis of cell-specific messenger RNA expression (mRNA profiling) has been proposed to supplant conventional methods for body fluid identification. Since 2011, the collaborative exercises have been organized by the European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP ) in order to evaluate the robustness and reproducibility of mRNA profiling for body fluid identification. The major advantages of mRNA profil-ing, compared to the conventional methods, include higher sensitivity, greater specificity, the ability of detecting several body fluids in one multiplex reaction, and compatibilitywith current DNA extraction and analysis procedure. In the current review ,we provided an overview of the present know ledge and detection methodologies of mRNA profiling for forensic body fluid identification and discussed its possi-ble practical application to forensic casew ork.

  13. Calcium sensing receptors and calcium oscillations: calcium as a first messenger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitwieser, Gerda E

    2006-01-01

    Calcium sensing receptors (CaR) are unique among G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) since both the first (extracellular) and second (intracellular) messengers are Ca(2+). CaR serves to translate small fluctuations in extracellular Ca(2+) into intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations. In many cells and tissues, CaR also acts as a coincidence detector, sensing both changes in extracellular Ca(2+) plus the presence of various allosteric activators including amino acids, polyamines, and/or peptides. CaR oscillations are uniquely shaped by the activating agonist, that is, Ca(2+) triggers sinusoidal oscillations while Ca(2+) plus phenylalanine trigger transient oscillations of lower frequency. The distinct oscillation patterns generated by Ca(2+)versus Ca(2+) plus phenylalanine are the results of activation of distinct signal transduction pathways. CaR is a member of Family C GPCRs, having a large extracellular agonist binding domain, and functioning as a disulfide-linked dimer. The CaR dimer likely can be driven to distinct active conformations by various Ca(2+) plus modulator combinations, which can drive preferential coupling to divergent signaling pathways. Such plasticity with respect to both agonist and signaling outcomes allows CaR to uniquely contribute to the physiology of organs and tissues where it is expressed. This chapter will examine the structural features of CaR, which contribute to its unique properties, the nature of CaR-induced intracellular Ca(2+) signals and the potential role(s) for CaR in development and differentiation.

  14. Multi-Messenger Tests for Fast-Spinning Newborn Pulsars Embedded in Stripped-Envelope Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Kashiyama, Kazumi; Bartos, Imre; Kiuchi, Kenta; Margutti, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Fast-spinning strongly-magnetized newborn neutron stars, including nascent magnetars, are popularly implemented as the engine of luminous stellar explosions. Here, we consider the scenario that they power various stripped-envelope supernovae, not only super-luminous supernovae Ic but also broad-line supernova Ibc and possibly some ordinary supernovae Ibc. This scenario is also motivated by the hypothesis that Galactic magnetars largely originate from fast-spinning neutron stars as remnants of stripped-envelope supernovae. By consistently modeling the energy injection from magnetized wind and Ni decay, we show that proto-neutron stars with >~ 10 ms rotation and B_dip >~ 5 x 10^14 G can be harbored in ordinary supernovae Ibc. On the other hand, millisecond proto-neuton stars can solely power broad-line supernovae Ibc if they are born with poloidal magnetic field of B_dip >~ 5 x 10^14 G, and superluminous supernovae Ic with B_dip >~ 10^13 G. Then, we study how multi-messenger emission can be used to discriminate...

  15. Synaptic plasticity in the medial vestibular nuclei: role of glutamate receptors and retrograde messengers in rat brainstem slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, S; Pettorossi, V E

    2001-08-01

    The analysis of cellular-molecular events mediating synaptic plasticity within vestibular nuclei is an attempt to explain the mechanisms underlying vestibular plasticity phenomena. The present review is meant to illustrate the main results, obtained in vitro, on the mechanisms underlying long-term changes in synaptic strength within the medial vestibular nuclei. The synaptic plasticity phenomena taking place at the level of vestibular nuclei could be useful for adapting and consolidating the efficacy of vestibular neuron responsiveness to environmental requirements, as during visuo-vestibular recalibration and vestibular compensation. Following a general introduction on the most salient features of vestibular compensation and visuo-vestibular adaptation, which are two plastic events involving neuronal circuitry within the medial vestibular nuclei, the second and third sections describe the results from rat brainstem slice studies, demonstrating the possibility to induce long-term potentiation and depression in the medial vestibular nuclei, following high frequency stimulation of the primary vestibular afferents. In particular the mechanisms sustaining the induction and expression of vestibular long-term potentiation and depression, such as the role of various glutamate receptors and retrograde messengers have been described. The relevant role of the interaction between the platelet-activating factor, acting as a retrograde messenger, and the presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors, in determining the full expression of vestibular long-term potentiation is also underlined. In addition, the mechanisms involved in vestibular long-term potentiation have been compared with those leading to long-term potentiation in the hippocampus to emphasize the most significant differences emerging from vestibular studies. The fourth part, describes recent results demonstrating the essential role of nitric oxide, another retrograde messenger, in the induction of vestibular

  16. Insight into the messenger role of reactive oxygen intermediates in immunostimulated hemocytes from the scallop Argopecten purpuratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyanedel, Daniel; Gonzalez, Roxana; Brokordt, Katherina; Schmitt, Paulina; Mercado, Luis

    2016-12-01

    Reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) are metabolites produced by aerobic cells which have been linked to oxidative stress. Evidence reported in vertebrates indicates that ROI can also act as messengers in a variety of cellular signaling pathways, including those involved in innate immunity. In a recent study, an inhibitor of NF-kB transcription factors was identified in the scallop Argopecten purpuratus, and its functional characterization suggested that it may regulate the expression of the big defensin antimicrobial peptide ApBD1. In order to give new insights into the messenger role of ROI in the immune response of bivalve mollusks, the effect of ROI production on gene transcription of ApBD1 was assessed in A. purpuratus. The results showed that 48 h-cultured hemocytes were able to display phagocytic activity and ROI production in response to the β-glucan zymosan. The immune stimulation also induced the transcription of ApBD1, which was upregulated in cultured hemocytes. After neutralizing the ROI produced by the stimulated hemocytes with the antioxidant trolox, the transcription of ApBD1 was reduced near to base levels. The results suggest a potential messenger role of intracellular ROI on the regulation of ApBD1 transcription during the immune response of scallops.

  17. MESSENGER, MErcury: Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging; A Mission to Orbit and Explore the Planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    MESSENGER is a scientific mission to Mercury. Understanding this extraordinary planet and the forces that have shaped it is fundamental to understanding the processes that have governed the formation, evolution, and dynamics of the terrestrial planets. MESSENGER is a MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging mission to orbit Mercury for one Earth year after completing two flybys of that planet following two flybys of Venus. The necessary flybys return significant new data early in the mission, while the orbital phase, guided by the flyby data, enables a focused scientific investigation of this least-studied terrestrial planet. Answers to key questions about Mercury's high density, crustal composition and structure, volcanic history, core structure, magnetic field generation, polar deposits, exosphere, overall volatile inventory, and magnetosphere are provided by an optimized set of miniaturized space instruments. Our goal is to gain new insight into the formation and evolution of the solar system, including Earth. By traveling to the inner edge of the solar system and exploring a poorly known world, MESSENGER fulfills this quest.

  18. Space Environment of Mercury at the Time of the First MESSENGER Flyby: Solar Wind and Interplanetary Magnetic Field Modeling of Upstream Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    passed over the planet (and MESSENGER) several days prior to the flyby of Mercury with the highest-speed (600 km/s) stream features having been expected...when MESSENGER is in orbit around Mercury , the spacecraft will be within the magnetosphere and magnetotail of the planet for extended portions of...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Space environment of Mercury at the time of the first 3HESSENGER flyby: Solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field •Modeling

  19. Physics of gamma-ray bursts and multi-messenger signals from double neutron star mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, He

    My dissertation includes two parts: Physics of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs): Gamma-ray bursts are multi-wavelength transients, with both prompt gamma-ray emission and late time afterglow emission observed by telescopes in different wavelengths. I have carried out three investigations to understand GRB prompt emission and afterglow. Chapter 2 develops a new method, namely, "Stepwise Filter Correlation" method, to decompose the variability components in a light curve. After proving its reliability through simulations, we apply this method to 266 bright GRBs and find that the majority of the bursts have clear evidence of superposition of fast and slow variability components. Chapter 3 gives a complete presentation of the analytical approximations for synchrotron self-compton emission for all possible orders of the characteristic synchrotron spectral breaks (nua, nu m, and nuc). We identify a "strong absorption" regime whennua > nuc, and derive the critical condition for this regime. The external shock theory is an elegant theory to model GRB afterglows. It invokes a limit number of model parameters, and has well predicted spectral and temporal properties. Chapter 4 gives a complete reference of all the analytical synchrotron external shock afterglow models by deriving the temporal and spectral indices of all the models in all spectral regimes. This complete reference will serve as a useful tool for afterglow observers to quickly identify relevant models to interpret their data and identify new physics when the models fail. Milti-messenger signals from double neutron star merger: As the multi-messenger era of astronomy ushers in, the second part of the dissertation studies the possible electromagnetic (EM) and neutrino emission counterparts of double neutron star mergers. Chapter 6 suggests that if double neutron star mergers leave behind a massive magnetar rather than a black hole, the magnetar wind could push the ejecta launched during the merger process, and under

  20. Opioid Tolerance and Physical Dependence: Role of Spinal Neuropeptides, Excitatory Amino Acids and Their Messengers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khem Jhamandas

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic opioid treatment results in the development of tolerance and physical dependence. The mechanisms underlying opioid tolerance and/or physical dependence are unclear. Recent studies suggest that opioid receptor or nociceptive, neural network-based adaptations contribute to this phenomenon. At the spinal level, the genesis of tolerance and physical dependence is associated with increased excitatory amino acid activity expressed through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in the dorsal horn. However, recent evidence also implicates spinal neuropeptide transmitters such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP and  substance P in the development of opioid tolerance. Long term spinal morphine treatment increases CGRP-like immunostaining in the dorsal horn, and coadministration of morphine with CGRP8-37, a competitive CGRP1 receptor antagonist, prevents this response as well as loss of the analgesic potency. CGRP8-37, like N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, has the potential to restore morphine potency in experimental animals who are already tolerant to the opioid agonist. Recent evidence suggests that the effects of excitatory amino acid and neuropeptide receptor activity may be expressed through the generation of messengers such as nitric oxide and prostanoids. Agents that inhibit the synthesis of nitric oxide and prostanoids have the potential to inhibit and reverse spinal opioid tolerance, suggesting that this phenomenon may be expressed through the activity of these mediators. Nociceptive transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord also involves activity of a number of other mediators including morphine modulatory neuropeptides, neuropeptide FF  and neuropeptide SF. The role of these mediators and their relationship with other factors implicated in tolerance remain to be determined.

  1. Analysis of MESSENGER high-resolution images of Mercury's hollows and implications for hollow formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewett, David T.; Stadermann, Amanda C.; Susorney, Hannah C.; Ernst, Carolyn M.; Xiao, Zhiyong; Chabot, Nancy L.; Denevi, Brett W.; Murchie, Scott L.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Kinczyk, Mallory J.; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-09-01

    High-resolution images from MESSENGER provide morphological information on the nature and origin of Mercury's hollows, small depressions that likely formed when a volatile constituent was lost from the surface. Because graphite may be a component of the low-reflectance material that hosts hollows, we suggest that loss of carbon by ion sputtering or conversion to methane by proton irradiation could contribute to hollows formation. Measurements of widespread hollows in 565 images with pixel scales <20 m indicate that the average depth of hollows is 24 ± 16 m. We propose that hollows cease to increase in depth when a volatile-depleted lag deposit becomes sufficiently thick to protect the underlying surface. The difficulty of developing a lag on steep topography may account for the common occurrence of hollows on crater central peaks and walls. Disruption of the lag, e.g., by secondary cratering, could restart growth of hollows in a location that had been dormant. Images at extremely high resolution (~3 m/pixel) show that the edges of hollows are straight, as expected if the margins formed by scarp retreat. These highest-resolution images reveal no superposed impact craters, implying that hollows are very young. The width of hollows within rayed crater Balanchine suggests that the maximum time for lateral growth by 1 cm is ~10,000 yr. A process other than entrainment of dust by gases evolved in a steady-state sublimation-like process is likely required to explain the high-reflectance haloes that surround many hollows.

  2. Spatial distribution of Mercury's flux ropes and reconnection fronts: MESSENGER observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W. J.; Fu, S. Y.; Slavin, J. A.; Raines, J. M.; Zong, Q. G.; Poh, G. K.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2016-08-01

    We perform a statistical study of flux ropes and reconnection fronts based on MErcury Surface, Space ENviroment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) magnetic field and plasma observations to study the implications for the spatial distribution of reconnection sites in Mercury's near magnetotail. The results show important differences of temporal and spatial distributions as compared to Earth. We have surveyed the plasma sheet crossings between -2 RM and -3 RM downtail from the planet, i.e., the location of Near-Mercury Neutral Line (NMNL). Plasma sheets were defined to be regions with β ≥ 0.5. Using this definition, 39 flux ropes and 86 reconnection fronts were identified in the plasma sheet. At Mercury, the distributions of flux ropes and reconnection fronts show clear dawn-dusk asymmetry with much higher occurrence rate on the dawnside plasma sheet than on the duskside. This suggests that magnetic reconnection in Mercury's magnetotail occurs more frequently in the dawnside than in the duskside plasma sheet, which is different than the observations in Earth's magnetotail showing more reconnection signatures in the duskside plasma sheet. The distribution of plasma sheet thickness shows that plasma sheet near the midnight is the thinnest part and does not show obvious asymmetry. Thus, the reasons that cause magnetic reconnection to preferentially occur on the dawnside of the magnetotail at Mercury may not be the plasma sheet thickness and require further study. The peak occurrence rates of flux ropes and reconnection fronts in Mercury's plasma sheet are ~ 60 times higher than that of Earth's values, which we interpret to be due to the highly variable magnetospheric conditions at Mercury. Such higher occurrence rate of magnetic reconnection would generate more plasma flows in the dawnside plasma sheet than in the duskside. These plasma flows would mostly brake and initiate the substorm dipolarization on the postmidnight sector at Mercury rather than the

  3. Bacterial rotary export ATPases are allosterically regulated by the nucleotide second messenger cyclic-di-GMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trampari, Eleftheria; Stevenson, Clare E M; Little, Richard H; Wilhelm, Thomas; Lawson, David M; Malone, Jacob G

    2015-10-01

    The widespread second messenger molecule cyclic di-GMP (cdG) regulates the transition from motile and virulent lifestyles to sessile, biofilm-forming ones in a wide range of bacteria. Many pathogenic and commensal bacterial-host interactions are known to be controlled by cdG signaling. Although the biochemistry of cyclic dinucleotide metabolism is well understood, much remains to be discovered about the downstream signaling pathways that induce bacterial responses upon cdG binding. As part of our ongoing research into the role of cdG signaling in plant-associated Pseudomonas species, we carried out an affinity capture screen for cdG binding proteins in the model organism Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25. The flagella export AAA+ ATPase FliI was identified as a result of this screen and subsequently shown to bind specifically to the cdG molecule, with a KD in the low micromolar range. The interaction between FliI and cdG appears to be very widespread. In addition to FliI homologs from diverse bacterial species, high affinity binding was also observed for the type III secretion system homolog HrcN and the type VI ATPase ClpB2. The addition of cdG was shown to inhibit FliI and HrcN ATPase activity in vitro. Finally, a combination of site-specific mutagenesis, mass spectrometry, and in silico analysis was used to predict that cdG binds to FliI in a pocket of highly conserved residues at the interface between two FliI subunits. Our results suggest a novel, fundamental role for cdG in controlling the function of multiple important bacterial export pathways, through direct allosteric control of export ATPase proteins.

  4. A Novel Route Controlling Begomovirus Resistance by the Messenger RNA Surveillance Factor Pelota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshe Lapidot

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV is a devastating disease of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum that can be effectively controlled by the deployment of resistant cultivars. The TYLCV-resistant line TY172 carries a major recessive locus for TYLCV resistance, designated ty-5, on chromosome 4. In this study, the association between 27 polymorphic DNA markers, spanning the ty-5 locus, and the resistance characteristics of individual plants inoculated with TYLCV in 51 segregating recombinant populations were analyzed. These analyses localized ty-5 into a 425 bp region containing two transversions: one in the first exon of a gene encoding the tomato homolog of the messenger RNA surveillance factor Pelota (Pelo, and a second in its proximal promoter. Analyses of susceptible and resistant lines revealed that the relative transcript level of the gene remained unchanged, regardless of whether the plants were infected with TYLCV or not. This suggests that the polymorphism discovered in the coding region of the gene controls the resistance. Silencing of Pelo in a susceptible line rendered the transgenic plants highly resistant, while in the resistant line TY172 had no effect on symptom development. In addition, over-expression of the susceptible allele of the gene in the resistant TY172 line rendered it susceptible, while over-expression of the resistant allele in susceptible plants had no effect. These results confirm that Pelo is the gene controlling resistance at the ty-5 locus. Pelo, implicated in the ribosome recycling-phase of protein synthesis, offers an alternative route to promote resistance to TYLCV and other viruses.

  5. MicroRNA and messenger RNA profiling reveals new biomarkers and mechanisms for RDX induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Youping; Ai, Junmei; Guan, Xin; Wang, Zhaohui; Yan, Bin; Zhang, Daqin; Liu, Chang; Wilbanks, Mitch S; Escalon, Barbara Lynn; Meyers, Sharon A; Yang, Mary Qu; Perkins, Edward J

    2014-01-01

    RDX is a well-known pollutant to induce neurotoxicity. MicroRNAs (miRNA) and messenger RNA (mRNA) profiles are useful tools for toxicogenomics studies. It is worthy to integrate MiRNA and mRNA expression data to understand RDX-induced neurotoxicity. Rats were treated with or without RDX for 48 h. Both miRNA and mRNA profiles were conducted using brain tissues. Nine miRNAs were significantly regulated by RDX. Of these, 6 and 3 miRNAs were up- and down-regulated respectively. The putative target genes of RDX-regulated miRNAs were highly nervous system function genes and pathways enriched. Fifteen differentially genes altered by RDX from mRNA profiles were the putative targets of regulated miRNAs. The induction of miR-71, miR-27ab, miR-98, and miR-135a expression by RDX, could reduce the expression of the genes POLE4, C5ORF13, SULF1 and ROCK2, and eventually induce neurotoxicity. Over-expression of miR-27ab, or reduction of the expression of unknown miRNAs by RDX, could up-regulate HMGCR expression and contribute to neurotoxicity. RDX regulated immune and inflammation response miRNAs and genes could contribute to RDX- induced neurotoxicity and other toxicities as well as animal defending reaction response to RDX exposure. Our results demonstrate that integrating miRNA and mRNA profiles is valuable to indentify novel biomarkers and molecular mechanisms for RDX-induced neurological disorder and neurotoxicity.

  6. Retinoic acid stimulates interstitial collagenase messenger ribonucleic acid in osteosarcoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, T. J.; Clohisy, J. C.; Shilt, J. S.; Bergman, K. D.; Partridge, N. C.; Quinn, C. O.

    1994-01-01

    The rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma cell line UMR 106-01 secretes interstitial collagenase in response to retinoic acid (RA). The present study demonstrates by Northern blot analysis that RA causes an increase in collagenase messenger RNA (mRNA) at 6 h, which is maximal at 24 h (20.5 times basal) and declines toward basal level by 72 h. This stimulation is dose dependent, with a maximal response at 5 x 10(-7) M RA. Nuclear run-on assays show a greater than 20-fold increase in the rate of collagenase mRNA transcription between 12-24 h after RA treatment. Cycloheximide blocks RA stimulation of collagenase mRNA, demonstrating the need for de novo protein synthesis. RA not only causes an increase in collagenase secretion, but is known to decrease collagen synthesis in UMR 106-01 cells. In this study, the increase in collagenase mRNA is accompanied by a concomitant decrease in the level of alpha 1(I) procollagen mRNA, which is maximal at 24 h (70% decrease), with a return to near-control levels by 72 h. Nuclear run-on assays demonstrated that the decrease in alpha 1 (I) procollagen expression does not have a statistically significant transcriptional component. RA did not statistically decrease the stability of alpha 1 (I) procollagen mRNA (calculated t1/2 = 8.06 +/- 0.30 and 9.01 +/- 0.62 h in the presence and absence of RA, respectively). However, transcription and stability together probably contribute to the major decrease in stable alpha 1 (I) procollagen mRNA observed. Cycloheximide treatment inhibits basal level alpha 1 (I) procollagen mRNA accumulation, demonstrating the need for on-going protein synthesis to maintain basal expression of this gene.

  7. Parathyroid hormone induces c-fos and c-jun messenger RNA in rat osteoblastic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clohisy, J. C.; Scott, D. K.; Brakenhoff, K. D.; Quinn, C. O.; Partridge, N. C.

    1992-01-01

    PTH is a potent regulator of osteoblast gene expression, yet the nuclear events that mediate PTH action are poorly understood. We were interested in identifying immediate early genes which may regulate PTH-altered gene expression in the osteoblast. Therefore, we examined the effects of PTH on c-fos and c-jun gene expression in a rat osteoblastic cell line (UMR 106-01). Under control conditions, c-fos and c-jun mRNAs were present at low basal levels. After PTH treatment, c-fos mRNA abundance dramatically increased, with a maximal and transient response at 30 min. PTH also stimulated an increase in c-jun mRNA, but in a biphasic manner, with maximal levels at 30 min and 2 h. These responses were dose dependent, not altered by cotreatment with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, and preceded PTH-induced expression of matrix metallo-proteinase-1 mRNA. Nuclear run-on assays demonstrated an increased rate of c-fos and c-jun transcription after PTH exposure. To determine the signal transduction pathways involved, second messenger analogs were tested for their ability to mimic the effects of PTH. 8-Bromo-cAMP and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) caused increases in the abundance of c-fos and c-jun transcripts. Ionomycin had no effect on the expression of these genes. Pretreatment of the cells with PMA resulted in a decrease in basal c-jun expression, but did not alter the PTH-mediated increase in c-fos, c-jun, or matrix metalloproteinase-1 mRNAs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  8. Antigen-presenting cells transfected with Hsp65 messenger RNA fail to treat experimental tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, C.D.; Trombone, A.P.F.; Lorenzi, J.C.C.; Almeida, L.P.; Gembre, A.F.; Padilha, E. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Ramos, S.G. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Silva, C.L.; Coelho-Castelo, A.A.M. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2012-09-21

    In the last several years, the use of dendritic cells has been studied as a therapeutic strategy against tumors. Dendritic cells can be pulsed with peptides or full-length protein, or they can be transfected with DNA or RNA. However, comparative studies suggest that transfecting dendritic cells with messenger RNA (mRNA) is superior to other antigen-loading techniques in generating immunocompetent dendritic cells. In the present study, we evaluated a new therapeutic strategy to fight tuberculosis using dendritic cells and macrophages transfected with Hsp65 mRNA. First, we demonstrated that antigen-presenting cells transfected with Hsp65 mRNA exhibit a higher level of expression of co-stimulatory molecules, suggesting that Hsp65 mRNA has immunostimulatory properties. We also demonstrated that spleen cells obtained from animals immunized with mock and Hsp65 mRNA-transfected dendritic cells were able to generate a mixed Th1/Th2 response with production not only of IFN-γ but also of IL-5 and IL-10. In contrast, cells recovered from mice immunized with Hsp65 mRNA-transfected macrophages were able to produce only IL-5. When mice were infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and treated with antigen-presenting cells transfected with Hsp65 mRNA (therapeutic immunization), we did not detect any decrease in the lung bacterial load or any preservation of the lung parenchyma, indicating the inability of transfected cells to confer curative effects against tuberculosis. In spite of the lack of therapeutic efficacy, this study reports for the first time the use of antigen-presenting cells transfected with mRNA in experimental tuberculosis.

  9. Differential distribution of glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 and glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 messenger RNAs in the entopeduncular nucleus of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, P Q; Grånäs, C; Källström, L; Yu, J; Huhman, K; Larhammar, D; Albers, H E; Johnson, A E

    1997-05-01

    The entopeduncular nucleus is one of the major output nuclei of the basal ganglia, with topographically organized projections to both motor and limbic structures. Neurons of the entopeduncular nucleus use GABA as the principal transmitter, and glutamic acid decarboxylase (the GABA synthetic enzyme) is widely distributed throughout the region. Previous studies have shown that glutamate decarboxylase exists in two forms (glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 and glutamic acid decarboxylase-67), and that the messenger RNAs for these different enzymes are widely distributed in rat brain. The purpose of the present experiment was to describe the distribution of glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 and glutamic decarboxylase-67 messenger RNAs throughout the entopeduncular nucleus using recently developed oligodeoxynucleotide probes and in situ hybridization histochemical methods. In agreement with previous studies, northern analysis of rat brain poly(A)+ messenger RNA preparations showed that the glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 and glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 probes used in the present study hybridized to messenger RNAs of approximately 5.7 and 3.7 kb, respectively. Film autoradiographic analysis revealed large region-dependent, isoform-specific differences in the levels of expression of the two messenger RNAs, with glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 messenger RNA predominating in rostral and medial regions of the entopeduncular nucleus and glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 messenger RNA most abundant in the caudal region. Cellular analysis showed that these region-dependent differences in labelling were due to differences in the relative amounts of glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 and glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 messenger RNAs expressed per cell rather than the number of cells expressing each form of glutamic acid decarboxylase messenger RNA. The differences in the distribution of glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 and glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 messenger RNAs are closely related to the

  10. Nitric oxide in guard cells as an important secondary messenger during stomatal closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunja eGayatri

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available he modulation of guard cell function is the basis of stomatal closure, essential for optimizing water use and CO2 uptake by leaves. Nitric oxide (NO in guard cells plays a very important role as a secondary messenger during stomatal closure induced by effectors, including hormones. For example, exposure to abscisic acid (ABA triggers a marked increase in NO of guard cells, well before stomatal closure. In guard cells of multiple species, like Arabidopsis, Vicia and pea, exposure to ABA or methyl jasmonate or even microbial elicitors (e.g. chitosan induces production of NO as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS. The role of NO in stomatal closure has been confirmed by using NO donors (e.g. SNP and NO scavengers (like cPTIO and inhibitors of NOS (L-NAME or NR (tungstate. Two enzymes: a L-NAME-sensitive, nitric oxide synthase (NOS-like enzyme and a tungstate-sensitive nitrate reductase (NR, can mediate ABA-induced NO rise in guard cells. However, the existence of true NOS in plant tissues and its role in guard cell NO-production are still a matter of intense debate. Guard cell signal transduction leading to stomatal closure involves the participation of several components, besides NO, such as cytosolic pH, ROS, free Ca2+ and phospholipids. Use of fluorescent dyes has revealed that the rise in NO of guard cells occurs after the increase in cytoplasmic pH and ROS. The rise in NO causes an elevation in cytosolic free Ca2+ and promotes the efflux of cations as well as anions from guard cells. Stomatal guard cells have become a model system to study the signalling cascade mechanisms in plants, particularly with NO as a dominant component. The interrelationships and interactions of NO with cytosolic pH, ROS, and free Ca2+ are quite complex and need further detailed examination. While assessing critically the available literature, the present review projects possible areas of further work related to NO-action in stomatal guard cells.

  11. Mercury's lithospheric thickness and crustal density, as inferred from MESSENGER observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, P. B.; Mazarico, E.; Genova, A.; Smith, D. E.; Neumann, G. A.; Solomon, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    The gravity field and topography of Mercury measured by the MESSENGER spacecraft have provided insights into the thickness of the planet's elastic lithosphere, Te. We localized the HgM006 free-air gravity anomaly and gtmes_125v03 shape datasets to search for theoretical elastic thickness solutions that best fit a variety of localized coherence spectra between Bouguer gravity anomaly and topography. We adopted a crustal density of ρcrust =2700 kg m-3 for the Bouguer gravity correction, but density uncertainty did not markedly affect the elastic thickness estimates. A best-fit solution in the northern smooth plains (NSP) gives an elastic thickness of Te =30-60 km at the time of formation of topography for a range of ratios of top to bottom loading from 1 to 5. For a mechanical lithosphere with a thickness of ~2Te and a temperature of 1600 °C at the base, this solution is consistent with a geothermal gradient of 9-18 K km-1. A similar coherence analysis exterior to the NSP produces an elastic thickness estimate of Te =20-50 km, albeit with a poorer fit. Coherence in the northern hemisphere as a whole does not approach zero at any wavelength, because of the presence of variations in crustal thickness that are unassociated with elastic loading. The ratios and correlations of gravity and topography at intermediate wavelengths (harmonic degree l between 30 and 50) also constrain regional crustal densities. We localized gravity and topography with a moving Slepian taper and calculated regionally averaged crustal densities with the approximation ρcrust=Zl/(2πG), where Zl is the localized admittance and G is the gravitational constant. The only regional density estimates greater than 2000 kg m-3 for l=30 correspond to the NSP. Density estimates outside of the NSP were unreasonably low, even for highly porous crust. We attribute these low densities to the confounding effects of crustal thickness variations and Kaula filtering of the gravity dataset at the highest harmonic

  12. Structure of Mercury's Global Magnetic Field Determined from MESSENGER Orbital Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. J.; Johnson, C. L.; Korth, H.; Purucker, M. E.; Winslow, R. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Solomon, S. C.; McNutt, R. L.; Raines, J. M.; Zurbuchen, T.

    2011-12-01

    On 18 March 2011, the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft was inserted into a near-polar orbit about Mercury with a periapsis altitude of 200 km, an inclination of 82.5°, an apoapsis altitude of 15,300 km, and nominal orbit period of 12 hours. Magnetometer (MAG) data acquired since 23 March provide multiple circuits in solar local time and planetary longitude and yield extensive coverage of the planetary magnetic field sufficient to resolve the dominant magnetic fields of internal and external origin. Plasma pressures exceeding the magnetic pressure are commonly found within ±30° latitude of the equator and complicate solutions for the planetary field that use conventional spherical harmonic analysis. However, because the planetary field constrains the locations of external currents (e.g., the magnetopause and tail currents) to be symmetric about the magnetic equator, the location of that equator can be identified from the geometry of the magnetic field without the need to correct for local plasma pressures and external currents. We identify Mercury's magnetic equator from the orbital positions at which the cylindrical radial magnetic field component vanishes and find that the magnetic equator is offset north of the geographic equator by 484 ± 11 km. With this offset for the dipole we then analyze the tilt, position, and intensity of the best-fit dipole moment and find that the global planetary field is best represented as a southward-directed dipole, centered on the spin axis, tilted from that axis by less than 2.5°, and having a moment of 195 ± 10 nT-RM3, where RM is Mercury's radius. Mercury's axially symmetric but equatorially asymmetric field may imply lateral variations in heat flow at the planet's core-mantle boundary. This solution provides the basis for defining Mercury-solar-magnetospheric coordinates used to order observations of Mercury's magnetosphere, constructing a model for the magnetopause and

  13. Gingival Toll-like receptor and cytokine messenger RNA levels in equine periodontitis and oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, R; Lappin, D F; Dixon, P M; Bennett, D; Riggio, M P

    2017-05-01

    Equine periodontitis is a common and painful condition. However, the disease often goes unnoticed by owners and is thus a major welfare concern. The aetiopathogenesis of the condition remains poorly understood and has been investigated in few studies. The innate immune system is known to play an important role in human periodontitis, but its role in equine periodontitis has not been examined. To quantify the messenger (m)RNA levels of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and cytokines in gingival tissue from orally healthy horses and those affected by periodontitis. Observational study. Gingival tissue samples were taken post-mortem from 13 horses with no clinical signs of oral disease and 20 horses with periodontitis. mRNA levels of TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9 and cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IL-17 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) were determined using quantitative real-time PCR. The statistical significance of results was assessed using appropriate t tests. mRNA levels of all TLRs and cytokines were upregulated in equine periodontitis. Significant increases in mRNA levels of TLR2, TLR9, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12 (P≤0.05) and IFN-γ (P≤0.01) were observed for both unweighted and age-weighted analyses of diseased gingival tissue samples compared with healthy gingival samples. In comparisons of samples of periodontitis lesions with healthy gingival control samples from the same horse, significant increases in mRNA levels of TLR4, TLR9, IL-10, IFN-γ (P≤0.05), TLR2, IL-1β and IL-12p35 (P≤0.01) were observed. This study has provided an initial insight into the involvement of the immune system in equine periodontitis. Increased mRNA levels of TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9 indicate substantial microbial challenge in diseased gingival tissue. A mixed Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokine response is produced in equine periodontitis. Further studies are required to more fully characterise the role of the innate immune system in this disease. © 2016

  14. Genome-Wide Scleral Micro- and Messenger-RNA Regulation During Myopia Development in the Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metlapally, Ravikanth; Park, Han Na; Chakraborty, Ranjay; Wang, Kevin K; Tan, Christopher C; Light, Jacob G; Pardue, Machelle T; Wildsoet, Christine F

    2016-11-01

    MicroRNA (miRNAs) have been previously implicated in scleral remodeling in normal eye growth. They have the potential to be therapeutic targets for prevention/retardation of exaggerated eye growth in myopia by modulating scleral matrix remodeling. To explore this potential, genome-wide miRNA and messenger RNA (mRNA) scleral profiles in myopic and control eyes from mice were studied. C57BL/6J mice (n = 7; P28) reared under a 12L:12D cycle were form-deprived (FD) unilaterally for 2 weeks. Refractive error and axial length changes were measured using photorefraction and 1310-nm spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, respectively. Scleral RNA samples from FD and fellow control eyes were processed for microarray assay. Statistical analyses were performed using National Institute of Aging array analysis tool; group comparisons were made using ANOVA, and gene ontologies were identified using software available on the Web. Findings were confirmed using quantitative PCR in a separate group of mice (n = 7). Form-deprived eyes showed myopic shifts in refractive error (-2.02 ± 0.47 D; P RNA profiles of test eyes with those of control eyes revealed 54 differentially expressed miRNAs and 261 mRNAs fold-change >1.25 (maximum fold change = 1.63 and 2.7 for miRNAs and mRNAs, respectively) (P < 0.05; minimum, P = 0.0001). Significant ontologies showing gene over-representation (P < 0.05) included intermediate filament organization, scaffold protein binding, detection of stimuli, calcium ion, G protein, and phototransduction. Significant differential expression of Let-7a and miR-16-2, and Smok4a, Prph2, and Gnat1 were confirmed. Scleral mi- and mRNAs showed differential expression linked to myopia, supporting the involvement of miRNAs in eye growth regulation. The observed general trend of relatively small fold-changes suggests a tightly controlled, regulatory mechanism for scleral gene expression.

  15. A simple procedure for the isolation and purification of protamine messenger ribonucleic acid from trout testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedamu, L; Iatrou, K; Dixon, G H

    1978-06-01

    Preparation of milligram quantities of purified poly(A)+ (polyadenylated) protamine mRNA from trout testis tissue was accomplished by a simple procedure using gentle conditions. This involves chromatography of the total nucleic acids isolated by dissociation of polyribosomes with 25 mM-EDTA to release messenger ribonucleoprotein particles and deproteinization of the total postmitochondrial supernatant with 0.5% sodium dodecyl sulphate in 0.25 M-NaCl by binding it to a DEAE-cellulose column. Total RNA was bound under these conditions, and low-molecular-weight RNA, lacking 18S and 28S RNA, could be eluted with 0.5 M-NaCl and chromatographed on oligo(dT)-cellulose columns to select for poly(A)+ RNA. Further purification of both the unbound poly(A)- RNA and the bound poly(A)+ mRNA on sucrose density gradients showed that both 18S and 28S rRNA were absent, being removed during the DEAE-cellulose chromatography step. Poly(A)- RNA sedimented in the 4S region whereas the bound poly(A)+ RNA fraction showed a main peak at 6S [poly(A+) protamine mRNA] and a shoulder in the 3-4S region. Analysis of the main peak and the shoulder on a second gradient showed that most of the main peak sedimented at 6S, whereas the shoulder sedimented slower than 4S. The identity of the poly(A)+ protamine mRNA was established by the following criteria: (1) purified protamine mRNA migrated as a set of four bands on urea/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis; (2) analysis of the polypeptides synthesized in the wheat-germ extract by starch-gel electrophoresis showed a single band of radioactivity which co-migrated exactly with the carrier trout testis protamine standard; and (3) chromatography of the polypeptide products on CM-cellulose (CM-52) showed the presence of three or four radioactively labelled protamine components that were co-eluted with the unlabelled trout testis protamine components added as carrier. The availability of large quantities of purified protamine mRNA should now permit a more

  16. Expression of estrogen receptor and estrogen receptor messenger RNA in gastric carcinoma tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Han Zhao; Shan-Zhi Gu; Shan-Xi Liu; Bo-Rong Pan

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study estrogen receptor (ER) and estrogen receptor messenger RNA (ERmRNA) expression in gastric carcinoma tissues and to investigate their association with the pathologic types of gastric carcinoma.METHODS: The expression of ER and ERmRNA in gastric carcinoma tissues (15 males and 15 females, 42-70 years old) was detected by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, respectively.RESULTS: The positive rate of ER (immunohistochemistry)was 33.3% in males and 46.7% in females. In Borrmann Ⅳ gastric carcinoma ER positive rate was greater than that in other pathologic types, and in poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma and signet ring cell carcinoma the positive rates were greater than those in other histological types of both males and females (P<0.05). The ER was more highly expressed in diffused gastric carcinoma than in non-diffused gastric carcinoma (P<0.05). The ER positive rate was also related to regional lymph nodes metastases (P<0.05), and was significantly higher in females above 55 years old, and higher in males under 55 years old (P<0.05). The ERmRNA (in situ hybridization) positive rate was 73.3% in males and 86.7% in females. The ERmRNA positive rates were almost the same in Borrmann Ⅰ, Ⅱ, Ⅲ and Ⅳ gastric carcinoma (P>0.05). ERmRNA was expressed in all tubular adenocarcinoma, poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma and signet ring cell carcinoma (P<0.05). The ERmRNA positive rate was related to both regional lymph nodes metastases and gastric carcinoma growth patterns, and was higher in both sexes above 55 years old but without statistical significance (P>0.05). The positive rate of ERmRNA expression by in situ hybridization was higher than that of ER expression by immunohistochemistry (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: ERmRNA expression is related to the pathological behaviors of gastric carcinoma, which might help to predict the prognosis and predict the effectiveness of endocrine therapy for gastric carcinoma.

  17. Exploring the Planet Mercury: 1.5 Years of MESSENGER Orbital Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Sean C.; Nittler, L. R.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.

    2012-10-01

    Launched in 2004, MESSENGER flew by Mercury three times in 2008-2009 en route to becoming the first spacecraft to orbit the solar system’s innermost planet in March 2011. MESSENGER’s chemical remote sensing measurements of Mercury’s surface indicate that the planet’s bulk silicate fraction, low in Fe and high in Mg, differs from those of the other inner planets. Moreover, surface materials are richer in the moderately volatile constituents S and K than predicted by most current models for inner planet formation. Global image mosaics and targeted high-resolution images reveal that Mercury experienced globally extensive volcanism, with large expanses of plains emplaced as flood lavas and widespread examples of pyroclastic deposits likely emplaced during explosive eruptions of volatile-bearing magmas. Bright deposits within impact craters host fresh-appearing, rimless depressions or hollows, often with high-reflectance interiors and halos and likely formed through processes involving the geologically recent loss of volatiles. The large-scale deformational history of Mercury, although dominated by near-global contractional deformation as first seen by Mariner 10, is more complex than first appreciated, with numerous examples of extensional deformation that accompanied impact crater and basin modification. Mercury’s magnetic field is dominantly dipolar, but the field is axially symmetric and equatorially asymmetric, a geometry that poses challenges to dynamo models for field generation. The interaction between the solar wind and Mercury’s magnetosphere, among the most dynamic in the solar system, serves both to replenish the exosphere and space weather the planet’s surface. Plasma ions of planetary origin are seen throughout the sampled volume of Mercury’s magnetosphere, with maxima in heavy-ion fluxes in the planet’s magnetic-cusp regions. Bursts of energetic electrons, seen at most local times, point to an efficient acceleration mechanism operating

  18. Mercury's radius change estimates revisited using high incidence angle MESSENGER data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Achille, G.; Popa, C.; Massironi, M.; Ferrari, S.; Mazzotta Epifani, E.; Zusi, M.; Cremonese, G.; Palumbo, P.

    2012-04-01

    obtained in the present study are up to five times higher with respect to previous estimates. Our results are more compatible with recent studies suggesting that the Mercury's radius contraction could have been up to 5-6 km throughout its thermal evolution than previous results, supporting the idea that Mercury could have recorded more tectonism than that required to account for 1-2 km of radial contraction. These estimates should be confirmed by further observations over significant portions of the planet and at most favorable sun angle conditions using data from the MESSENGER orbital phase and the high resolution basemaps which will be provided by the next BepiColombo mission.

  19. Venus upper clouds and the UV-absorber from MESSENGER/MASCS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin; Garcia Munoz, Antonio; Irwin, Patrick; Peralta, Javier; Holsclaw, Greg; McClintock, William

    2014-11-01

    In June 2007, the MESSENGER spacecraft performed its second Venus flyby on its route to Mercury. The spacecraft’s MASCS instrument (VIRS channel) acquired numerous spectra of the sunlight reflected from the equatorial region of the planet at wavelengths from the near ultraviolet (300nm) to the near infrared (1450 nm). In this work we present an analysis of the data and their spectral and spatial variability following the mission footprint on the Venus disk. In order to reproduce the observed reflectivity and obtain information on the upper clouds and the unknown UV absorber, we use the NEMESIS retrieval code, including SO2 , CO2 and H2O absorption together with absorption and scattering by mode-1, -2 and -3 cloud particles. This spectral range provides sensitivity to the uppermost cloud levels, above 60 km. Vertical profiles of the mode-1 and mode-2 particles have been retrieved along the equatorial region of Venus, with average retrieved sounding levels of 70 +/- 2 km at 1 micron, in good agreement with previous investigations. This spectral range is also very interesting because of the existence of a mysterious absorber in the blue and UV side of the reflected spectra, whose origin remains as one of the key questions about the Venus atmosphere. Here we report a comparison with some of the previously proposed absorbers: (1) sulfur-related compounds (amorphous and liquid sulfur, S3, S4, S8, S2O); (2) chlorine related species (Cl2, FeCl3); (3) organics (C3O2, Croconic acid). Preliminary results show that the first group provides better fits to the data, although combinations of the proposed agents might be required in order to produce better results. Acknowledgements: This work was supported by the Spanish MICIIN projects AYA2009- 10701, AYA2012-38897-C02-01, and AYA2012-36666 with FEDER support, PRICIT-S2009/ESP-1496, Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT765-13, and UPV/EHU UFI11/55. S.P.-H. acknowledges support from the Jose Castillejo Program funded by Ministerio de Educaci

  20. The Swift and Secret Messenger: John Wilkins’s Mercury and the Paradoxes of Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łączyńska Klaudia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available John Wilkins’s Mercury or the Secret and Swift Messenger: Showing How a Man May with Privacy and Speed Communicate His Thoughts to a Friend at Any Distance was first published in 1641. As a book on cryptography presenting a variety of secret means of communication at a distance it seems to have appeared at just the right time, when the biblical curse of the confusion of tongues was doubled by the curse of political confusion on the brink of the English civil war. However, the book seems to be more than just a detailed account of methods of secret writing; its topic gives the author a chance to present his views on language which he would later develop in his life’s work An Essay towards Real Character and a Philosophical Language published in 1668. The Essay had received much greater critical attention than the early pamphlet, which is usually referred to as merely a prelude to an account of his universal language project. Indeed, in the little book on cryptography, Wilkins already demonstrated his awareness of the conventional character of language and its role within the system of human interactions, as well as advertised a project of philosophical language that would enhance communication between all nations and remedy the curse of Babel. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that the value of the pamphlet lies also in the insight that it gives into the seventeenth-century debates on the nature of language and into arguments which were often provided, in equal measure, by theology, Hermetic lore, mythology, literature and early modern science. Wilkins’s meticulous recording of the contradictory views and propositions on language produces a sense of methodological inconsistency that leads to ambiguities and paradoxes. However, in the medley of concepts and the collection of linguistic “curiosities” that Mercury presents, a careful reader will discern the growing mistrust of language as a means of representing reality and as a

  1. Resolved Ultraviolet Reflectance Spectra of Mercury from the Third MESSENGER Flyby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsclaw, G. M.; McClintock, W. E.; Blewett, D. T.; Denevi, B. W.; Domingue, D. L.; Izenberg, N. R.; Jensen, E. A.; Robinson, M. S.; Solomon, S. C.; Sprague, A. L.; Vilas, F.

    2009-12-01

    Reflectance spectroscopy at ultraviolet wavelengths is a valuable remote sensing tool for studying the chemical makeup of planetary surfaces. The MESSENGER spacecraft instrument payload includes the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS), which contains the Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS), capable of acquiring point-reflectance spectra from the far to near ultraviolet (115-350 nm). The first disk-integrated reflectance spectrum of Mercury at middle-ultraviolet wavelengths (220-300 nm) was obtained by MASCS-UVVS during the first flyby of the planet on 14 January 2008. A comparison of this spectrum with the reflectance of the Moon obtained with the same instrument showed that an inflection, interpreted as a volume absorption due to an electronic charge-transfer between oxygen and a transition-metal cation, was present in the Mercury data but absent in the lunar spectrum. Given the intense space weathering environment at Mercury, it was expected that such volume absorptions might be obscured by even small amounts of nanophase metallic iron within vapor-deposited coatings. During the second Mercury flyby on 6 October 2008, several spatially resolved middle-ultraviolet spectra were acquired. These spectra were found to have spectral characteristics similar to those of the disk-integrated spectrum. However, it was not possible to discern subtle spectral variations because of the spatial-spectral coupling of the data. The UVVS operates as a scanning-grating monochromator. Consequently, during acquisition of a spectrum (obtained one wavelength at a time) the instrument field of view is carried across the planet’s surface by spacecraft motion. Therefore, variations in albedo, composition, maturity, topography, and shadowing all contribute to structure in the spectrum. During MESSENGER’s third flyby of Mercury on 29 September 2009, a specialized observing strategy was implemented. From multispectral images obtained during the

  2. Development with MESSENGER Data of a Model of Mercury's Magnetospheric Magnetic Field Confined within the Average Observed Magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korth, H.; Tsyganenko, N. A.; Johnson, C. L.; Philpott, L. C.; Anderson, B. J.; Al Asad, M.; Solomon, S. C.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate knowledge of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field is required to understand the sources of the planet's internal field. We present the first model of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field that is confined within a magnetopause shape derived from Magnetometer observations by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. The model consists of individual modules for magnetic fields of internal origin, approximated by a dipole of magnitude 190 nT RM3, where RM is Mercury's radius, offset northward by 479 km along the spin axis, and of external origin resulting from currents flowing on the magnetopause boundary and in the cross-tail current sheet. The cross-tail current is prescribed having a disk shape near the planet and extending into a Harris sheet at larger distances. The magnitude of the tail current is fit to minimize the root mean square residual between the magnetic field within the magnetosphere observed by MESSENGER and the model field. The magnetic field contribution from each module is shielded individually by a scalar potential function consisting of Cartesian harmonic expansions with linear and non-linear coefficients, which are fit to minimize the root-mean-square normal magnetic field component at the magnetopause. The resulting model resembles the observed magnetic field better than the previously developed paraboloid model in regions that are close to the magnetopause, i.e., at northern high latitudes and on the dayside. It will allow more accurate characterization of crustal magnetization, which may be observed during low-altitude orbits in the final months of the MESSENGER mission.

  3. Light-induced appearance of polysomal poly(A)-rich messenger RNA during greening of barley plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, H; Herzfeld, F; Kiper, M

    1980-10-01

    Changes in polysomal poly(A)-rich mRNA during greening of etiolated barley plants were studied by the technique of cDNA-mRNa hybridization. Hybridizaiton data of the homologous reactions reveal that in etiolated as well as in greened shoots a complexity of 5 X 10(7) nucleotides or about 33000 different average-sized mRNAs are present. These are organized in different abundancy classes with 94% of the total complexicity present in each of the slowest reacting class representing rare messengers. Heterologous hybridizations indicate that 92% of all polysomal poly(A)-rich mRNAs in etiolated shoots are complementary to those of greened and 82% of 'green' poly(A)-rich mRNAs are complementary to white ones. It is shown that the abundant mRNA clases are essentially responsible for these differences. The prevalent classes making up 15% ('white') and 31% ('green') of the poly(A)-rich mRNA mass but comprising only a complexity of 1.8 X 10(4) and 2.1 X 10(4) nucleotides are identical to 50% with each other. Hybridization of isolated prevalent 'green' cDNA with whole 'white' poly(A)-rich mRNA indicates that the additionally appearing 50% prevalent green messengers must be regarded as green-specific, only present in polysomal poly(A)-rich mRNA after illumination. This conclusion is underlined by the hybridization of the 'green' cDNA with total polysomal RNa of etiolated shoots. Evidently appearance of these prevalent messengers in functional polysomes is not caused by a shift from poly(A)-free mRNA to poly(A)-rich mRNA. The results clearly demonstrate that light induces greening by turning on genes or influencing post-transcriptional processing to produce mature green-specific poly(A)-rich mRNA.

  4. Compact, Passively Q-Switched Nd:YAG Laser for the MESSENGER Mission to the Planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Danny J.; Novo-Gradac, Anne-Marie; Li, Steven X.; Lindauer, Steven J.; Afzal, Robert S.; Yu, Antony

    2004-01-01

    A compact, passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser has been developed for the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) instrument which is an instrument on the MESSENGER mission to the planet Mercury. The laser achieves 5.4 percent efficiency with a near diffraction limited beam. It has passed all space flight environmental tests at system, instrument, and satellite integration. The laser design draws on a heritage of previous laser altimetry missions, specifically ISESAT and Mars Global Surveyor; but incorporates thermal management features unique to the requirements of an orbit of the planet Mercury.

  5. Cancer-Associated Perturbations in Alternative Pre-messenger RNA Splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Bell, Brendan; Revil, Timothée; Venables, Julian P; Prinos, Panagiotis; Elela, Sherif Abou; Chabot, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    For most of our 25,000 genes, the removal of introns by pre-messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) splicing represents an essential step toward the production of functional messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Alternative splicing of a single pre-mRNA results in the production of different mRNAs. Although complex organisms use alternative splicing to expand protein function and phenotypic diversity, patterns of alternative splicing are often altered in cancer cells. Alternative splicing contributes to tumorigenesis by producing splice isoforms that can stimulate cell proliferation and cell migration or induce resistance to apoptosis and anticancer agents. Cancer-specific changes in splicing profiles can occur through mutations that are affecting splice sites and splicing control elements, and also by alterations in the expression of proteins that control splicing decisions. Recent progress in global approaches that interrogate splicing diversity should help to obtain specific splicing signatures for cancer types. The development of innovative approaches for annotating and reprogramming splicing events will more fully establish the essential contribution of alternative splicing to the biology of cancer and will hopefully provide novel targets and anticancer strategies. Metazoan genes are usually made up of several exons interrupted by introns. The introns are removed from the pre-mRNA by RNA splicing. In conjunction with other maturation steps, such as capping and polyadenylation, the spliced mRNA is then transported to the cytoplasm to be translated into a functional protein. The basic mechanism of splicing requires accurate recognition of each extremity of each intron by the spliceosome. Introns are identified by the binding of U1 snRNP to the 5' splice site and the U2AF65/U2AF35 complex to the 3' splice site. Following these interactions, other proteins and snRNPs are recruited to generate the complete spliceosomal complex needed to excise the intron. While many introns are constitutively

  6. Structural Analysis of the Victoria Quadrangle (H2) of Mercury based on NASA MESSENGER Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galluzzi, Valentina

    2015-04-01

    Objective of this thesis is the mapping and structural analysis of the H2 quadrangle, “Victoria”, and a reconnaissance study of the geometry and kinematics of lobate scarps on Mercury. To this end, I produced a 1:3,000,000 geologic map of the area using the images provided by the NASA spacecraft MESSENGER, which has been orbiting the planet since March, 2011. The geologic map shows the distribution of smooth plains, intermediate plains, intercrater plains units and a classification of crater materials based on an empirical distinction among three stages of degradation. Structural mapping shows that the H2 quadrangle is dominated by N-S faults (here grouped into the Victoria system) to the east and NE-SW faults (Larrocha system) to the west, with the secondary existence of NW-SE-trending faults (Carnegie system) in the north-western area of the quadrangle. A systematic analysis of these systems has led to the following results. 1) The Victoria system is characterized by a main array of faults located along Victoria Rupes - Endeavour Rupes - Antoniadi Dorsum. The segmentation of this array into three different sectors changes from north to south and is spatially linked to the presence of three volcanic vents located at the boundaries between each sector and at the northern end of the Victoria Rupes sector, suggesting that volcanism and faulting are interrelated. 2) The main array of Carnegie system is kinematically linked and antithetical to the Victoria system. Both systems have arguably controlled the growth of a longitudinal, fault-free, crustal and gravimetric bulge in the central area of the Victoria quadrangle, which is interpreted as a regional contractional pop-up. 3) The Larrocha system is interrupted against the central bulge and thus is probably older than the Victoria and Carnegie systems. Buffered crater counting performed on the Victoria system confirms the young relative age of its fault segments with respect to the map units. The faults of the

  7. Making Sense of 2.5 Million Surface Reflectance Spectra of Mercury from MESSENGER

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amore, M.; Helbert, J.; D'Incecco, P.; Domingue, D. L.; Izenberg, N. R.; McClintock, W. E.

    2012-12-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface and Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has mapped the surface of Mercury on a global basis during its one-year primary orbital mission and the first third of its extended mission, producing ~2.5 million spectra from March 2011 to July 2012. The primary challenge to analyzing this dataset is to cope with its large size. In earlier studies of MASCS data, we combined several approaches, ranging from principal component analysis (PCA) to unsupervised cluster analysis and regridding to global and local fixed grids. Each of those techniques provided insight into spectral variations for different volumes of data, but each was quickly overcome by the growing dataset. The most recent version of our data analysis procedure uses PostgreSQL, a type of database management that controls the creation, integrity, maintenance, and use of a database. It embeds a high-level query language, which greatly simplifies database organization as well as retrieval and presentation of database information. We set up a data pipeline to update automatically the MASCS data, read them from the NASA Planetary Data System format, regrid the data to a common grid length, and store all information in the database. All data are then readily available to any authorized user in our network. We are working on a library to access the data directly from within our analysis software, and some preliminary functions have been implemented. As an example, the calculation of a parameter representing the database takes 2 s even for the full dataset of 2.5 million entries. It is thus straightforward to create and analyze rapidly the data, as for example the distribution of normalized radiance at a fixed wavelength. The new methodology provides facilities for controlling data access, enforcing data integrity, managing concurrency control, and recovering the database after a failure and

  8. Venus Measurements by the MESSENGER Gamma-Ray and X-Ray Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, E. A.; Starr, R. D.; Goldsten, J. O.; Schlemm, C. E.; Boynton, W. V.

    2007-12-01

    The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS), which is a part of the Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer Instrument, and the X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) on the MESSENGER spacecraft made calibration measurements during the Venus flyby on June 5, 2007. The purpose of these instruments is to determine elemental abundances on the surface of Mercury. The GRS measures gamma-rays emitted from element interactions with cosmic rays impinging on the surface, while the XRS measures X-ray emissions induced on the surface by the incident solar flux. The GRS sensor is a high-resolution high-purity Ge detector cooled by a Stirling cryocooler, surrounded by a borated-plastic anticoincidence shield. The GRS is sensitive to gamma-rays up to ~10 MeV and can identify most major elements, sampling down to depths of about ten centimeters. Only the shield was powered on for this flyby in order to conserve cooler lifetime. Gamma-rays were observed coming from Venus as well as from the spacecraft. Although the Venus gamma-rays originate from its thick atmosphere rather than its surface, the GRS data from this encounter will provide useful calibration data from a source of known composition. In particular, the data will be useful for determining GRS sensitivity and pointing options for the Mercury flybys, the first of which will be in January 2008. The X-ray spectrum of a planetary surface is dominated by a combination of the fluorescence and scattered solar X-rays. The most prominent fluorescent lines are the Kα lines from the major elements Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Ti, and Fe (1-10 keV). The sampling depth is less than 100 u m. The XRS is similar in design to experiments flown on Apollo 15 and 16 and the NEAR-Shoemaker mission. Three large-area gas-proportional counters view the planet, and a small Si-PIN detector mounted on the spacecraft sunshade monitors the Sun. The energy resolution of the gas proportional counters (~850 eV at 5.9 keV) is sufficient to resolve the X-ray lines above 2 keV, but Al and Mg

  9. Ubiquitous learning model using interactive internet messenger group (IIMG) to improve engagement and behavior for smart campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umam, K.; Mardi, S. N. S.; Hariadi, M.

    2017-01-01

    The recent popularity of internet messenger based smartphone technologies has motivated some university lecturers to use them for educational activities. These technologies have enormous potential to enhance the teaching and ubiquitous learning experience for smart campus development. However, the design ubiquitous learning model using interactive internet messenger group (IIMG) and empirical evidence that would favor a broad application of mobile and ubiquitous learning in smart campus settings to improve engagement and behavior is still limited. In addition, the expectation that mobile learning could improve engagement and behavior on smart campus cannot be confirmed because the majority of the reviewed studies followed instructions paradigms. This article aims to present ubiquitous learning model design and showing learners’ experiences in improved engagement and behavior using IIMG for learner–learner and learner–lecturer interactions. The method applied in this paper includes design process and quantitative analysis techniques, with the purpose of identifying scenarios of ubiquitous learning and realize the impressions of learners and lecturers about engagement and behavior aspect, and its contribution to learning.

  10. Affleck-Dine baryogenesis, condensate fragmentation and gravitino dark matter in gauge-mediation with a large messenger mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doddato, Francesca; McDonald, John, E-mail: f.doddato@lancaster.ac.uk, E-mail: j.mcdonald@lancaster.ac.uk [Dept. of Physics, Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics Group, University of Lancaster, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-01

    We study the conditions for successful Affleck-Dine baryogenesis and the origin of gravitino dark matter in GMSB models. AD baryogenesis in GMSB models is ruled out by neutron star stability unless Q-balls are unstable and decay before nucleosynthesis. Unstable Q-balls can form if the messenger mass scale is larger than the flat-direction field Φ when the condensate fragments. We provide an example based on AD baryogenesis along a d = 6 flat direction for the case where m{sub 3/2} ≈ 2GeV, as predicted by gravitino dark matter from Q-ball decay. Using a phenomenological GMSB potential which models the Φ dependence of the SUSY breaking terms, we numerically solve for the evolution of Φ and show that the messenger mass can be sufficiently close to the flat-direction field when the condensate fragments. We compute the corresponding reheating temperature and the baryonic charge of the condensate fragments and show that the charge is large enough to produce late-decaying Q-balls which can be the origin of gravitino dark matter.

  11. A whole new Mercury: MESSENGER reveals a dynamic planet at the last frontier of the inner solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Catherine L.; Hauck, , Steven A.

    2016-11-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission yielded a wealth of information about the innermost planet. For the first time, visible images of the entire planet, absolute altimetry measurements and a global gravity field, measurements of Mercury's surface composition, magnetic field, exosphere, and magnetosphere taken over more than four Earth years are available. From these data, two overarching themes emerge. First, multiple data sets and modeling efforts point toward a dynamic ancient history. Signatures of graphite in the crust suggest solidification of an early magma ocean, image data show extensive volcanism and tectonic features indicative of subsequent global contraction, and low-altitude measurements of magnetic fields reveal an ancient magnetic field. Second, the present-day Mercury environment is far from quiescent. Convective motions in the outer core support a modern magnetic field whose strength and geometry are unique among planets with global magnetic fields. Furthermore, periodic and aperiodic variations in the magnetosphere and exosphere have been observed, some of which couple to the surface and the planet's deep interior. Finally, signatures of geologically recent volatile activity at the surface have been detected. Mercury's early history and its present-day environment have common elements with the other inner solar system bodies. However, in each case there are also crucial differences and these likely hold the key to further understanding of Mercury and terrestrial planet evolution. MESSENGER's exploration of Mercury has enabled a new view of the innermost planet, and more importantly has set the stage for much-needed future exploration.

  12. Affleck-Dine Baryogenesis, Condensate Fragmentation and Gravitino Dark Matter in Gauge-Mediation with a Large Messenger Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Doddato, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    We study the conditions for successful Affleck-Dine baryogenesis and the origin of gravitino dark matter in GMSB models. AD baryogenesis in GMSB models is ruled out by neutron star stability unless Q-balls are unstable and decay before nucleosynthesis. Unstable Q-balls can form if the messenger mass scale is larger than the flat-direction field Phi when the condensate fragments. We provide an example based on AD baryogenesis along a d = 6 flat direction for the case where m_{3/2} \\approx 2 GeV, as predicted by gravitino dark matter from Q-ball decay. Using a phenomenological GMSB potential which models the Phi dependence of the SUSY breaking terms, we numerically solve for the evolution of Phi and show that the messenger mass can be sufficiently close to the flat-direction field when the condensate fragments. We compute the corresponding reheating temperature and the baryonic charge of the condensate fragments and show that the charge is large enough to produce late-decaying Q-balls which can be the origin of...

  13. Observations of Kelvin-Helmholtz Waves Along the Dusk-Side Boundary of Mercury's Magnetosphere During MESSENGER's Third Flyby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boardsen, Scott A.; Sundberg, Torgjoern; Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Solomon, Sean C.; Blomberg, Lars G.

    2010-01-01

    During the third MESSENGER flyby of Mercury on 29 September 2009, 15 crossings of the dusk-side magnetopause were observed in the magnetic field data over a 2-min period, during which the spacecraft traveled a distance of 0.2 R(sub M) (where R(sub M) is Mercury's radius). The quasi-periodic nature of the magnetic field variations during the crossings, the characteristic time separations of approx.16 s between pairs of crossings, and the variations of the magnetopause normal directions indicate that the signals are likely the signature of surface waves highly steepened at their leading edge that arose from the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. At Earth, the Kelvin- Helmholtz instability is believed to lead to the turbulent transport of solar wind plasma into Earth's plasma sheet. This solar wind entry mechanism could also be important at Mercury. Citation: Boardsen, S. A., T. Sundberg, J. A.Slavin, B. J. Anderson, H. Korth, S. C. Solomon, and L. G. Blomberg (2010), Observations of Kelvin-Helmholtz waves along the dusk-side boundary of Mercury s magnetosphere during MESSENGER's third flyby,

  14. Germination Potential of Dormant and Nondormant Arabidopsis Seeds Is Driven by Distinct Recruitment of Messenger RNAs to Polysomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basbouss-Serhal, Isabelle; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Bailly, Christophe; Leymarie, Juliette

    2015-07-01

    Dormancy is a complex evolutionary trait that temporally prevents seed germination, thus allowing seedling growth at a favorable season. High-throughput analyses of transcriptomes have led to significant progress in understanding the molecular regulation of this process, but the role of posttranscriptional mechanisms has received little attention. In this work, we have studied the dynamics of messenger RNA association with polysomes and compared the transcriptome with the translatome in dormant and nondormant seeds of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) during their imbibition at 25 °C in darkness, a temperature preventing germination of dormant seeds only. DNA microarray analysis revealed that 4,670 and 7,028 transcripts were differentially abundant in dormant and nondormant seeds in the transcriptome and the translatome, respectively. We show that there is no correlation between transcriptome and translatome and that germination regulation is also largely translational, implying a selective and dynamic recruitment of messenger RNAs to polysomes in both dormant and nondormant seeds. The study of 5' untranslated region features revealed that GC content and the number of upstream open reading frames could play a role in selective translation occurring during germination. Gene Ontology clustering showed that the functions of polysome-associated transcripts differed between dormant and nondormant seeds and revealed actors in seed dormancy and germination. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the essential role of selective polysome loading in this biological process.

  15. MESSENGER's special delivery: Comets 2P/Encke and C/2012 S1 (ISON) at small heliocentric distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Yanga R.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Knight, Matthew M.; McCandliss, Stephan R.; Dello Russo, Neil; Feldman, Paul D.; Lisse, Casey M.; Tamblyn, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Observations of comets when they are close to the Sun can potentially reveal interesting aspects of their behavior thanks to the rapid change of both seasons on the nucleus and the local insolation environment. However this is typically the most difficult time to make observations from Earth because the solar elongation is small, so studies of comets that are near the Sun generally require special facilities. In autumn 2013, the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft observed comets 2P/Encke and C/2012 S1 (ISON) from its orbital perch around Mercury when both comets were poorly located for most Earth-based telescopes. The observations included visible-wavelength, multi-filter imaging as well as ultraviolet spectroscopy. Both comets were observed down to about 0.3 AU from the Sun; in Encke's case it was followed through perihelion, which has rarely been done before. The data provide us with a look at the behavior of the dust and gas (e.g., OH, CO, OI, CI, SI, HI) production rates over several weeks, and we can investigate how the rates change with time, rotational phase, and heliocentric distance. In this poster we will present preliminary analyses of the time-series photometry and spectroscopy of these MESSENGER-observed comets, and place their behaviors into context.

  16. EFFECTS OF DYNORPHIN A ( 1-17) ON MOTOR FUNCTION AND SPINAL INTRACELLULAR MESSENGER SYSTEMS IN RAT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志媛; 李富春; 任民峰; 刘景生

    1996-01-01

    The effect of intrathecal injection of dynorphin A(1-17) on second messenger systems of spinal cord relative to behavioral change in rats was studied. Dynorphin A(1-17) 5,10 (20nmol) caused dose-depen-dent flaccid paralysis of hindlimbs. Dynorphin A (1-17) 10, 20 nmol do,e-dependently decreased spinal adenylate cyclase (AC) activity, cyclic AMP production, calmodulin (CAM) level and cyclic-nucleotidephosphodiesterase(PDE) activity 10 rain after intrathecal injection. They recovered to a varying extent two hours later. Pretreatment -with selective K-opioid receptor antagonist nor-BN| 30 nmol 10 min before dynorphin A(1-17) markedly antagonized the effects of dynorphin A(1-17) at 20 nmol on hindlimb paralysis and inhibition of intraeelhilar second messengers. The L-type calcium channel blocker verapamil (100nmol) also played a role in blocking dynorphin neurotoxicity. The NMDA receptor antagonist APV toddpartially or completely block dynorphin inhibition of CaM level and PDE activity without affecting paralysis and decrease of AC-cAMP level induced by dynorphin A(1-17) 10 rain after intrathecal injection.

  17. Expression of {mu}, {kappa}, and {delta} opioid receptor messenger RNA in the human CNS: a {sup 33}P in situ hybridization study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peckys, D.; Landwehrmeyer, G.B. [Department of Neurology, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Neurozentrum, Breisacherstrasse 64, D-79106 Freiburg (Germany)

    1999-02-01

    The existence of at least three opioid receptor types, referred to as {mu}, {kappa}, and {delta}, is well established. Complementary DNAs corresponding to the pharmacologically defined {mu}, {kappa}, and {delta} opioid receptors have been isolated in various species including man. The expression patterns of opioid receptor transcripts in human brain has not been established with a cellular resolution, in part because of the low apparent abundance of opioid receptor messenger RNAs in human brain. To visualize opioid receptor messenger RNAs we developed a sensitive in situ hybridization histochemistry method using {sup 33}P-labelled RNA probes. In the present study we report the regional and cellular expression of {mu}, {kappa}, and {delta} opioid receptor messenger RNAs in selected areas of the human brain. Hybridization of the different opioid receptor probes resulted in distinct labelling patterns. For the {mu} and {kappa} opioid receptor probes, the most intense regional signals were observed in striatum, thalamus, hypothalamus, cerebral cortex, cerebellum and certain brainstem areas as well as the spinal cord. The most intense signals for the {delta} opioid receptor probe were found in cerebral cortex. Expression of opioid receptor transcripts was restricted to subpopulations of neurons within most regions studied demonstrating differences in the cellular expression patterns of {mu}, {kappa}, and {delta} opioid receptor messenger RNAs in numerous brain regions. The messenger RNA distribution patterns for each opioid receptor corresponded in general to the distribution of opioid receptor binding sites as visualized by receptor autoradiography. However, some mismatches, for instance between {mu} opioid receptor receptor binding and {mu} opioid receptor messenger RNA expression in the anterior striatum, were observed. A comparison of the distribution patterns of opioid receptor messenger RNAs in the human brain and that reported for the rat suggests a homologous

  18. Effect of the Intelligent Health Messenger Box on health care professionals' knowledge, attitudes, and practice related to hand hygiene and hand bacteria counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffari, Mohsen; Ghanizadeh, Ghader; Fattahipour, Rasoul; Khalaji, Kazem; Pakpour, Amir H; Koenig, Harold G

    2016-12-01

    We assessed the effectiveness of the Intelligent Health Messenger Box in promoting hand hygiene using a quasiexperimental design. Knowledge, attitudes, and self-reported practices related to hand hygiene as well as hand bacteria counts and amount of liquid soap used were measured. The intervention involved broadcasting preventive audio messages. All outcomes showed significant change after the intervention compared with before. The Intelligent Health Messenger Box can serve as a practical way to improve hand hygiene. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Theoretical Study on Proton-Transfer Reaction of Intracellular Second-messenger 3',5'-Cyclic Nucleotide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ai-Hua; YANG Bao-Hua; LI Zong-He

    2008-01-01

    The gas-phase proton-transfer reaction mechanism of intracellular second-messenger 3',5'-cyclic nucleotide (cAMPm) has been theoretically investigated at the B3LYP/6-31G** level. One or two H2O molecules have been used to simulate the catalyst. It is found that H shift reaction between conformation Bm and conformation Dm of cAMPm involves a cyclic transition state with one or two water molecules as a shuttle. Furthermore, H shift reac- tion proceeds easily with the participation of two water molecules. The results provide evidence in theory to study proton-transfer reaction mechanism of related phosphodiesters. Our present calculations have rationalized all the possible reaction channels.

  20. LONGITUDINAL AND RADIAL DEPENDENCE OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE PEAK INTENSITIES: STEREO, ACE, SOHO, GOES, AND MESSENGER OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lario, D.; Ho, G. C.; Decker, R. B.; Roelof, E. C. [The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Aran, A. [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Gomez-Herrero, R.; Dresing, N.; Heber, B., E-mail: david.lario@jhuapl.edu [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Christian-Albrechts University of Kiel, Kiel (Germany)

    2013-04-10

    Simultaneous measurements of solar energetic particle (SEP) events by two or more of the spacecraft located near 1 AU during the rising phase of solar cycle 24 (i.e., STEREO-A, STEREO-B, and near-Earth spacecraft such as ACE, SOHO, and GOES) are used to determine the longitudinal dependence of 71-112 keV electron, 0.7-3 MeV electron, 15-40 MeV proton, and 25-53 MeV proton peak intensities measured in the prompt component of SEP events. Distributions of the peak intensities for the selected 35 events with identifiable solar origin are approximated by the form exp [ - ({phi} - {phi}{sub 0}){sup 2}/2{sigma}{sup 2}], where {phi} is the longitudinal separation between the parent active region and the footpoint of the nominal interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) line connecting each spacecraft with the Sun, {phi}{sub 0} is the distribution centroid, and {sigma} determines the longitudinal gradient. The MESSENGER spacecraft, at helioradii R < 1 AU, allows us to determine a lower limit to the radial dependence of the 71-112 keV electron peak intensities measured along IMF lines. We find five events for which the nominal magnetic footpoint of MESSENGER was less than 20 Degree-Sign apart from the nominal footpoint of a spacecraft near 1 AU. Although the expected theoretical radial dependence for the peak intensity of the events observed along the same field line can be approximated by a functional form R {sup -{alpha}} with {alpha} < 3, we find two events for which {alpha} > 3. These two cases correspond to SEP events occurring in a complex interplanetary medium that favored the enhancement of peak intensities near Mercury but hindered the SEP transport to 1 AU.

  1. TRANSLATION START SITE MULTIPLICITY OF THE CCAAT ENHANCER-BINDING PROTEIN-ALPHA MESSENGER-RNA IS DICTATED BY A SMALL 5' OPEN READING FRAME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CALKHOVEN, CF; BOUWMAN, PRJ; SNIPPE, L; AB, G

    1994-01-01

    The CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBP) alpha and beta of the bZIP family of transcription factors each occur as multiple forms due to translation initiation at different in-frame AUG codons from the same messenger RNA. The C/EBP alpha mRNAs of chicken, rat and Xenopus all contain a small 5' ope

  2. Contrasting responses to interferon β-1b treatment in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: Does baseline interleukin- 12p35 messenger RNA predict the efficacy of treatment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxel van-Dezaire, A.H.H.; Trigt van-Hoff, S.C.J.; Killestein, J.; Schrijver, H.M.; Houwelingen, J.C. van; Polman, C.H.; Nagelkerken, L.

    2000-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-β treatment is effective in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR-MS) via an as yet unidentified mechanism. In the present study, we investigated whether the expression of messenger RNA (mRNA) encoding the interleukin (IL)-12 subunits p40 and p35, IL-12 receptor chains, IL-18,

  3. Expression of messenger RNAs for glutamic acid decarboxylase, preprotachykinin, cholecystokinin, somatostatin, proenkephalin and neuropeptide Y in the adult rat superior colliculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, A R; Heavens, R P; Yellachich, L A; Sirinathsinghji, D J

    2001-01-01

    The mammalian superior colliculus is an important subcortical integrator of sensorimotor behaviours. It is multi-layered, each layer containing specific neuronal types and possessing distinct input/output relationships. Here we use in situ hybridisation methods to map the distribution of seven neurotransmitters/neuromodulator systems in adult rat superior colliculus. Coronal sections were probed for preprotachykinin, cholecystokinin, somatostatin, proenkephalin, neuropeptide Y and the enzymes glutamic acid decarboxylase and choline acetyltransferase, markers for GABA and acetylcholine respectively. Cells expressing glutamic acid decarboxylase messenger RNA were the most abundant, the highest density being found in the superficial layers. Many cells containing proprotachykinin messenger RNA were found in stratum zonale and the upper two-thirds of stratum griseum superficiale; cells were also located in deeper tectal laminae, particularly caudomedially. Most cholecystokinin messenger RNA expressing cells were located in the superficial layers with a prominent band in the middle third of stratum griseum superficiale. Cells expressing moderate to high levels of somatostatin messenger RNA formed a dense band in the lower third of stratum griseum superficiale/upper stratum opticum; two less distinct tiers of labelling were seen in deeper layers. These in situ hybridisation data reveal three distinct sub-laminae in rat stratum griseum superficiale. Cells expressing moderate to low levels of proenkephalin messenger RNA were located in lower stratum griseum superficiale/upper stratum opticum and intermediate laminae. A cluster of enkephalinergic cells was located medially in the deep tectal laminae. Expression of neuropeptide Y messenger RNA was relatively low and mostly confined to cells in stratum griseum superficiale and stratum opticum. No choline acetyltransferase messenger RNA was detected. This in situ analysis of seven different neurotransmitters

  4. The Chloride Anion Acts as a Second Messenger in Mammalian Cells - Modifying the Expression of Specific Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel G. Valdivieso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Cystic Fibrosis (CF is caused by mutations in the CFTR gene, encoding a cAMP-activated chloride (Cl- channel. We have previously demonstrated that the expression of several genes can be modulated by the CFTR activity; among them, SRC, MTND4, CISD1, and IL1B. However, the CFTR signalling mechanism involved in the expression of CFTR-dependent genes is unknown. The aim of this work was to determine if intracellular chloride (Cl-i might function as a second messenger modulating the expression of specific genes. Methods: Differential display (DD was applied to IB3-1 cells (CF cells, cultured under conditions that produce different intracellular Cl- concentrations ([Cl-]i, to analyse their expression profile. Results: Several differentially expressed gene products were observed by using DD, suggesting the presence of chloride-dependent gene expression. Two cDNA fragments, derived from differentially expressed mRNAs and showing opposed response to Cl-‚ were isolated, cloned, sequenced and its Cl- dependency validated by reverse transcription quantitative-PCR (RT-qPCR. We identified the gene RPS27, which encodes the multifunctional ribosomal protein RPS27, also known as metallopanstimulin-1 (MPS-1, and the gene GLRX5, encoding glutaredoxin-related protein 5, as chloride-dependent genes. RPS27 was negatively regulated with increased [Cl-]i, approximately from 25-75 mM Cl- (EC50 = 46 ± 7 mM, and positively regulated from 75-125 mM Cl- (EC50 = 110 ± 11 mM (biphasic response. In contrast, GLRX5 was positively modulated by [Cl-]i, showing a typical sigmoidal dose-response curve from 0-50 mM Cl-, reaching a plateau after 50 mM Cl- (EC50 ∼ 34 mM. Conclusion: The results suggest the existence of chloride-dependent genes. The Cl- anion, therefore, might act as a second messenger for channels or receptors able to modulate the intracellular Cl- concentration, regulating in turn the expression of specific genes.

  5. Carbon monoxide: a critical quantitative analysis and review of the extent and limitations of its second messenger function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levitt DG

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available David G Levitt,1 Michael D Levitt2 1Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 2Research Service, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN, USA Abstract: Endogenously produced carbon monoxide (CO is commonly believed to be a ubiquitous second messenger involved in a wide range of physiological and pathological responses. The major evidence supporting this concept is that CO is produced endogenously via heme oxygenase-catalyzed breakdown of heme and that experimental exposure to CO alters tissue function. However, it remains to be conclusively demonstrated that there are specific receptors for CO and that endogenous CO production is sufficient to alter tissue function. Unlike other signaling molecules, CO is not significantly metabolized, and it is removed from cells solely via rapid diffusion into blood, which serves as a near infinite sink. This non-metabolizable nature of CO renders the physiology of this gas uniquely susceptible to quantitative modeling. This review analyzes each of the steps involved in CO signaling: 1 the background CO partial pressure (PCO and the blood and tissue CO binding; 2 the affinity of the putative CO receptors; 3 the rate of endogenous tissue CO production; and 4 the tissue PCO that results from the balance between this endogenous CO production and diffusion to the blood sink. Because existing data demonstrate that virtually all endogenous CO production results from the routine “housekeeping” turnover of heme, only a small fraction can play a signaling role. The novel aspect of the present report is to demonstrate via physiological modeling that this small fraction of CO production is seemingly insufficient to raise intracellular PCO to the levels required for the conventional, specific messenger receptor activation. It is concluded that the many physiological alterations observed with exogenous CO administration are probably produced by the non

  6. Effects of cold stress on hypothalamic corticotrophin-releasing and thyrotropin-releasing hormone messenger RNA levels in chickens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jintao; XU Shiwen

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that stress can activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis and hypothalamic-pituitarythyroid-axis, and further affect the synthesis and secretion of corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH). To evaluate the effect of cold stress on the hypothalamic CRH and TRH messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in Yisha chickens, male Yisha chickens were subjected to acute (1, 6, 12 h) and chronic (5, 10, 20 d) cold stress (12±1)℃. Hypothalami were collected for assessment of mRNA levels by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Acute stress resulted in a significant decrease of CRH mRNA levels at 6 and 12 h, and a significant increase of TRH mRNA levels at every stress time point. Chronic cold stress resulted in a significant increase of CRH mRNA levels and a significant decrease of TRH mRNA levels compared with the control group at every stress time point. The results suggest that the two genes differently respond to cold stress at the mRNA levels. And the different degrees of cold stress will produce different effects on the identical gene.

  7. Uncoupling protein-2 messenger ribonucleic acid expression during very-low-calorie diet in obese premenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbe, P; Millet, L; Larrouy, D; Galitzky, J; Berlan, M; Louvet, J P; Langin, D

    1998-07-01

    Uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) is a mitochondrial protein expressed in a wide range of human tissues. By uncoupling respiration from ATP synthesis, UCP2 might be involved in the control of energy expenditure. We have investigated UCP2 gene expression in human adipose tissue. In eight subjects, we found a positive correlation (r = 0.91, P < 0.002) between subcutaneous and visceral fat depots UCP2 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels, suggesting that UCP2 mRNA level in subcutaneous adipose tissue is a good index of UCP2 gene expression in whole body adipose tissues. The effect of a 25-day very-low-calorie diet un UCP2 mRNA level and resting metabolic rate was investigated in eight obese premenopausal women. There was no difference in UCP2 mRNA levels before and during the diet. After 25 days of hypocaloric diet, a positive correlation was found between adipose tissue UCP2 mRNA level and resting metabolic rate adjusted for lean body mass (r = 0.82, P < 0.01). These results show that very-low-calorie diet, unlike short-term fasting, is not associated with an induction in UCP2 mRNA expression, and that adipose tissue UCP2 mRNA levels may be related to variations in resting energy expenditure in humans.

  8. Xp54 and related (DDX6-like) RNA helicases: roles in messenger RNP assembly, translation regulation and RNA degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Andrew; Sommerville, John

    2006-01-01

    The DEAD-box RNA helicase Xp54 is an integral component of the messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) particles of Xenopus oocytes. In oocytes, several abundant proteins bind pre-mRNA transcripts to modulate nuclear export, RNA stability and translational fate. Of these, Xp54, the mRNA-masking protein FRGY2 and its activating protein kinase CK2α, bind to nascent transcripts on chromosome loops, whereas an Xp54-associated factor, RapA/B, binds to the mRNP complex in the cytoplasm. Over-expression, mutation and knockdown experiments indicate that Xp54 functions to change the conformation of mRNP complexes, displacing one subset of proteins to accommodate another. The sequence of Xp54 is highly conserved in a wide spectrum of organisms. Like Xp54, Drosophila Me31B and Caenorhabditis CGH-1 are required for proper meiotic development, apparently by regulating the translational activation of stored mRNPs and also for sorting certain mRNPs into germplasm-containing structures. Studies on yeast Dhh1 and mammalian rck/p54 have revealed a key role for these helicases in mRNA degradation and in earlier remodelling of mRNP for entry into translation, storage or decay pathways. The versatility of Xp54 and related helicases in modulating the metabolism of mRNAs at all stages of their lifetimes marks them out as key regulators of post-transcriptional gene expression. PMID:16769775

  9. Calcium influx factor (CIF) as a diffusible messenger for the activation of capacitative calcium entry in Xenopus oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H Y; Hanley, M R

    1999-06-30

    Acid extracts of thapsigargin-treated Xenopus oocytes revealed Ca2(+)-dependent Cl- currents by microinjection into Xenopus oocytes. These currents were detected in highly purified fractions by carrying out a sequence of purification steps including gel filtration chromatography and high performance thin layer chromatography. The nature of the membrane currents evoked by the highly purified fractions were carried by chloride ions as blockade by the selective chloride channel blocker 1 mM niflumic acid. Injection of the Ca2+ chelator 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA) eradicated the current activities, indicating that the current responses are completely Ca2(+)-dependent. Moreover, the currents were sensitive to the removal of extracellular calcium, indicating the dependence on calcium entry through plasma membrane calcium entry channels. These results elucidate that the highly purified fractions aquired by thapsigargin-stimulated oocytes is an authentic calcium influx factor (CIF). Thus, the detection of increased CIF production from thapsigargin treatment in Xenopus oocytes would give strong support for the existence of CIF as a diffusible messenger for the activation of capacitative calcium entry pathways in Xenopus oocytes.

  10. Proopiomelanocortin messenger RNA levels are increased in the anterior pituitary of the sheep fetus after adrenalectomy in late gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, I C; Antolovich, G C; Mercer, J E; Perry, R A; Silver, M

    1990-09-01

    We have investigated the effect of bilateral adrenalectomy at 116-119 days' gestation on the levels of the messenger (m) RNA for proopiomelanocortin (POMC) in the anterior pituitary of the fetal sheep and in the ovine placentome during late gestation (134-136 days' gestation). After fetal adrenalectomy there was a significant (p less than 0.001) and sustained increase in circulating ACTH concentrations in the adrenalectomised group (1,838 +/- 155 ng/l at 130-136 days) when compared with the intact control group (131 +/- 25 ng/l at 130-136 days). The mean levels of POMCmRNA relative to 18S RNA were also significantly higher (p less than 0.001) in the adrenalectomised fetal sheep pituitaries (2.8 +/- 0.12; n = 4) than in the intact/control fetal sheep pituitaries (1.31 +/- 0.13; n = 4). In contrast to the findings in the anterior pituitary, POMCmRNA was not detected in RNA extracted from the placentomes of either the adrenalectomised or intact fetal sheep. There was also a significant arteriovenous difference in ACTH concentrations in the umbilical circulation in both adrenalectomised and intact fetal sheep at 134-136 days' gestation. This study demonstrates therefore that the fetal adrenals act to suppress POMCmRNA levels in late gestation and also that the increase in circulating ACTH after adrenalectomy originates from the pituitary and not the placentome.

  11. Effects of Ca2+/CaM Messenger System Inhibitors on Ethylene-Induced Increase in Lycopene Content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Cai-qin; XI Yu-fang; GUAN Jun-feng; LI Guang-min

    2003-01-01

    The changes of lycopene content during ripening and senescence of tomato fruit and the relationship between ethylene glycol-bis (EGTA, Ca2+ chelator), verapamil (Vp, Ca2+ channel blockers), trifluoperazine (TFP), chloropromaize (CPZ) (CaM antagonism) and ethylene-induced increase in lycopene content in tomato fruit were investigated. Lycopene content accumulated obviously during ripening and senescence of tomato fruit after harvest at pink stage. Low temperature inhibited but ethylene enhanced the lycopene content.Meanwhile, ethylene also promoted calmodulin (CaM) content in tomato fruit, which was related to the concentration of ethylene. When EGTA, Vp, TFP and CPZ with ethylene were used to treat tomato fruit, ethylene-induced increase in lycopene content could be reversed, indicating that blocking Ca2+ channel in plasma membrane or chelating extracellular Ca2+ or inhibiting the activity of CaM could decrease the action of ethylene, and suggesting that Ca2+-CaM messenger system may be involved in lycopene increase inducedby ethylene.

  12. The Bacterial Second Messenger Cyclic di-GMP Regulates Brucella Pathogenesis and Leads to Altered Host Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mike; Harms, Jerome S; Marim, Fernanda M; Armon, Leah; Hall, Cherisse L; Liu, Yi-Ping; Banai, Menachem; Oliveira, Sergio C; Splitter, Gary A; Smith, Judith A

    2016-12-01

    Brucella species are facultative intracellular bacteria that cause brucellosis, a chronic debilitating disease significantly impacting global health and prosperity. Much remains to be learned about how Brucella spp. succeed in sabotaging immune host cells and how Brucella spp. respond to environmental challenges. Multiple types of bacteria employ the prokaryotic second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) to coordinate responses to shifting environments. To determine the role of c-di-GMP in Brucella physiology and in shaping host-Brucella interactions, we utilized c-di-GMP regulatory enzyme deletion mutants. Our results show that a ΔbpdA phosphodiesterase mutant producing excess c-di-GMP displays marked attenuation in vitro and in vivo during later infections. Although c-di-GMP is known to stimulate the innate sensor STING, surprisingly, the ΔbpdA mutant induced a weaker host immune response than did wild-type Brucella or the low-c-di-GMP guanylate cyclase ΔcgsB mutant. Proteomics analysis revealed that c-di-GMP regulates several processes critical for virulence, including cell wall and biofilm formation, nutrient acquisition, and the type IV secretion system. Finally, ΔbpdA mutants exhibited altered morphology and were hypersensitive to nutrient-limiting conditions. In summary, our results indicate a vital role for c-di-GMP in allowing Brucella to successfully navigate stressful and shifting environments to establish intracellular infection. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Evidence for a second messenger function of dUTP during Bax mediated apoptosis of yeast and mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Drew; Norman, Grant; Khoury, Chamel; Metcalfe, Naomi; Briard, Jennie; Laporte, Aimee; Sheibani, Sara; Portt, Liam; Mandato, Craig A; Greenwood, Michael T

    2011-02-01

    The identification of novel anti-apoptotic sequences has lead to new insights into the mechanisms involved in regulating different forms of programmed cell death. For example, the anti-apoptotic function of free radical scavenging proteins supports the pro-apoptotic function of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). Using yeast as a model of eukaryotic mitochondrial apoptosis, we show that a cDNA corresponding to the mitochondrial variant of the human DUT gene (DUT-M) encoding the deoxyuridine triphosphatase (dUTPase) enzyme can prevent apoptosis in yeast in response to internal (Bax expression) and to exogenous (H(2)O(2) and cadmium) stresses. Of interest, cell death was not prevented under culture conditions modeling chronological aging, suggesting that DUT-M only protects dividing cells. The anti-apoptotic function of DUT-M was confirmed by demonstrating that an increase in dUTPase protein levels is sufficient to confer increased resistance to H(2)O(2) in cultured C2C12 mouse skeletal myoblasts. Given that the function of dUTPase is to decrease the levels of dUTP, our results strongly support an emerging role for dUTP as a pro-apoptotic second messenger in the same vein as ROS and ceramide.

  14. Relationship between expression of muscle-specific uncoupling protein 2 messenger RNA and genetic selection toward growth in channel catfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Y; Peterson, B C; Waldbieser, G C

    2015-04-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that increased growth in channel catfish is associated with expression of the genes that code for uncoupling proteins (UCP) 2 and 3, members of the mitochondrial channel proteins involved in nutrient sensing and metabolism. The specific objective was to contrast the levels of UCP2 messenger RNA (mRNA) in fast vs slow growing catfish as well as in fed vs fasted catfish. Two distinct UCP2 transcripts were identified and named UCP2a and UCP2b, respectively. Nucleotide and amino acid sequence of catfish UCP2s were highly similar to UCP2 and other UCPs from other fish and mammals (>75%). Expression of UCP2a mRNA was detectable at very low levels in various metabolically active tissues, whereas the expression of UCP2b mRNA was readily detectable in the muscle and heart. In a 21-wk feeding study, fish that grew faster had a greater percent body fat at the end of the study (P muscle was increased (P growth and associated fat accumulation appears to be independent of muscle UCP2b mRNA expression and UCP2b-mediated mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Differences in Brand Image of Online Chat Application of Blackberry Messenger, Whatsapp, and Line for Bina Nusantara University’s Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuspuji C. B. Wicaksono

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article was written to find out whether there were any differences on brand image for each online chat Application such as Blackberry Messenger, Whatsapp, and LINE based on six factors of the brand image which are: benefits, attributes, cultures, values, personality, and user. Data for the research were collected from questionnaires given to respondents who had used each mention online chat application. Then each respondent was asked to give scores based on the six factors of brand image for each online chat Application. Using the ANOVA method for testing the differences between brand images for each online chat application. The result reveales that there are differences in the brand image between BlackBerry Messenger, Whatsapp, and LINE for benefits, cultures, and values. There is no difference in attributes, and personality cannot be tested. The company that creates online chat application are expected to improve their brand image to distinguish one another differently.

  16. Identification and localization of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP) messenger RNAs in human hair follicle dermal papilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batch, J A; Mercuri, F A; Werther, G A

    1996-03-01

    The role of the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) in hair follicle biology has recently been recognized, although their actions, sites of production, and modulation by the insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins (IGFBPs) have not to date been defined. IGF-I is essential for normal hair growth and development, and may be important in regulation of the hair growth cycle. In many culture systems, IGF-I actions are modulated by the IGFBPs. Thus, if IGFBPs are produced in the human hair follicle, they may play a role in targeting IGF-I to its receptor or may modulate IGF-I action by interaction with matrix proteins. We have used in situ hybridization to localize messenger RNA for the six IGFBPs in anagen hair follicles. Anti-sense and sense RNA probes for the IGFBPs (IGFBP-1 to -6) were produced, and 5-micrometer sections of adult facial skin were probed. Messenger RNA for IGFBP-3, -4, and -5 were identified, with predominantly IGFBP-3 and -5 mRNA found in the dermal papilla, and to a lesser extent IGFBP-4 mRNA. IGFBP-4 mRNA was also found at the dermal papilla/epithelial matrix border. Messenger RNAs for both IGFBP-4 and -5 were also demonstrated in the dermal sheath surrounding the hair follicle. Messenger RNAs for IGFBP-1, -2, and -6 were not identified. These studies demonstrate specific localization of IGFBP mRNAs in hair follicles, suggesting that they each play specific roles in the local modulation of IGF action during the hair growth cycle.

  17. Expression of 10 GABA(A) receptor subunit messenger RNAs in the motor-related thalamic nuclei and basal ganglia of Macaca mulatta studied with in situ hybridization histochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kultas-Ilinsky, K; Leontiev, V; Whiting, P J

    1998-07-01

    In situ hybridization histochemistry technique with [35S]UTP-labelled riboprobes was used to study the expression pattern of 10 GABA(A) receptor subunit messenger RNAs in the basal ganglia and motor thalamic nuclei of rhesus monkey. Human transcripts were used for the synthesis of alpha2, alpha4, beta2, beta3, gamma1 and delta subunit messenger RNA probes. Rat complementary DNAs were used for generating alpha1, alpha3, beta1 and gamma2 subunit messenger RNA probes. Nigral, pallidal and cerebellar afferent territories in the ventral tier thalamic nuclei all expressed alpha1, alpha2, alpha3, alpha4, beta1, beta2, beta3, delta and gamma2 subunit messenger RNAs but at different levels. Each intralaminar nucleus displayed its own unique expression pattern. In the thalamus, gamma1 subunit messenger RNA was detected only in the parafascicular nucleus. Comparison of the expression patterns with the known organization of GABA(A) connections in thalamic nuclei suggests that (i) the composition of the receptor associated with reticulothalamic synapses, except for those in the intralaminar nuclei, may be alpha1alpha4beta2delta, (ii) receptors of various other subunit compositions may operate in the local GABAergic circuits, and (iii) the composition of receptors at nigro- and pallidothalamic synapses may differ, with those at nigrothalamic probably containing beta1 and gamma2 subunits. In the medial and lateral parts of the globus pallidus, the subthalamic nucleus and the substantia nigra pars reticularis, the alpha1, beta2 and gamma2 messenger RNAs were co-expressed at a high level suggesting that this subunit composition was associated with all GABAergic synapses in the direct and indirect striatal output pathways. Various other subunit messenger RNAs were also expressed but at a lower level. In the substantia nigra pars compacta the most highly expressed messenger RNAs were alpha3, alpha4 and beta3; all other subunit messenger RNAs studied, except for gamma1, alpha1 and

  18. Hydrogen peroxide functions as a secondary messenger for brassinosteroids-induced CO2 assimilation and carbohydrate metabolism in Cucumis sativus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yu-ping; Cheng, Fei; Zhou, Yan-hong; Xia, Xiao-jian; Mao, Wei-hua; Shi, Kai; Chen, Zhi-xiang; Yu, Jing-quan

    2012-10-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are potent regulators of photosynthesis and crop yield in agricultural crops; however, the mechanism by which BRs increase photosynthesis is not fully understood. Here, we show that foliar application of 24-epibrassinolide (EBR) resulted in increases in CO(2) assimilation, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) accumulation, and leaf area in cucumber. H(2)O(2) treatment induced increases in CO(2) assimilation whilst inhibition of the H(2)O(2) accumulation by its generation inhibitor or scavenger completely abolished EBR-induced CO(2) assimilation. Increases of light harvesting due to larger leaf areas in EBR- and H(2)O(2)-treated plants were accompanied by increases in the photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (Φ(PSII)) and photochemical quenching coefficient (q(P)). EBR and H(2)O(2) both activated carboxylation efficiency of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate oxygenase/carboxylase (Rubisco) from analysis of CO(2) response curve and in vitro measurement of Rubisco activities. Moreover, EBR and H(2)O(2) increased contents of total soluble sugar, sucrose, hexose, and starch, followed by enhanced activities of sugar metabolism such as sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose synthase, and invertase. Interestingly, expression of transcripts of enzymes involved in starch and sugar utilization were inhibited by EBR and H(2)O(2). However, the effects of EBR on carbohydrate metabolisms were reversed by the H(2)O(2) generation inhibitor diphenyleneodonium (DPI) or scavenger dimethylthiourea (DMTU) pretreatment. All of these results indicate that H(2)O(2) functions as a secondary messenger for EBR-induced CO(2) assimilation and carbohydrate metabolism in cucumber plants. Our study confirms that H(2)O(2) mediates the regulation of photosynthesis by BRs and suggests that EBR and H(2)O(2) regulate Calvin cycle and sugar metabolism via redox signaling and thus increase the photosynthetic potential and yield of crops.

  19. Recombinant messenger RNA technology and its application in cancer immunotherapy, transcript replacement therapies, pluripotent stem cell induction, and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallazza, Britta; Petri, Sebastian; Poleganov, Marco A; Eberle, Florian; Kuhn, Andreas N; Sahin, Ugur

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the interest in using messenger RNA (mRNA) as a therapeutic means to tackle different diseases has enormously increased. This holds true not only for numerous preclinical studies, but mRNA has also entered the clinic to fight cancer. The advantages of using mRNA compared to DNA were recognized very early on, e.g., the lack of risk for genomic integration, or the expression of the encoded protein in the cytoplasm without the need to cross the nuclear membrane. However, it was generally assumed that mRNA is just not stable enough to give rise to sufficient expression of the encoded protein. Yet, an initially small group of mRNA aficionados could demonstrate that the stability of mRNA and the efficiency, by which the encoded protein is translated, can be significantly increased by selecting the right set of cis-acting structural elements (including the 5'-cap, 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions, poly(A)-tail, and modified building blocks). In parallel, significant advances in RNA packaging and delivery have been made, extending the potential for this molecule. This paved the way for further work to prove mRNA as a promising therapeutic for multiple diseases. Here, we review the developments to optimize mRNA regarding stability, translational efficiency, and immune-modulating properties to enhance its functionality and efficacy as a therapeutic. Furthermore, we summarize the current status of preclinical and clinical studies that use mRNA for cancer immunotherapy, for the expression of functional proteins as so-called transcript (or protein) replacement therapy, as well as for induction of pluripotent stem cells.

  20. Hydrogen peroxide functions as a secondary messenger for brassinosteroids-induced CO2 assimilation and carbohydrate metabolism in Cucumis sativus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-ping JIANG; Fei CHENG; Yan-hong ZHOU; Xiao-jian XIA; Wei-hua MAO; Kai SHI; Zhi-xiang CHEN; Jing-quan YU

    2012-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are potent regulators of photosynthesis and crop yield in agricultural crops;however,the mechanism by which BRs increase photosynthesis is not fully understood.Here,we show that foliar application of 24-epibrassinolide (EBR) resulted in increases in CO2 assimilation,hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation,and leaf area in cucumber.H2O2 treatment induced increases in CO2 assimilation whilst inhibition of the H2O2 accumulation by its generation inhibitor or scavenger completely abolished EBR-induced CO2 assimilation.Increases of light harvesting due to larger leaf areas in EBR- and H2O2-treated plants were accompanied by increases in the photochemical efficiency of photosystem Ⅱ (ΦPSⅡ) and photochemical quenching coefficient (qp).EBR and H2O2 both activated carboxylation efficiency of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate oxygenase/carboxylase (Rubisco) from analysis of CO2 response curve and in vitro measurement of Rubisco activities.Moreover,EBR and H2O2 increased contents of total soluble sugar,sucrose,hexose,and starch,followed by enhanced activities of sugar metabolism such as sucrose phosphate synthase,sucrose synthase,and invertase.Interestingly,expression of transcripts of enzymes involved in starch and sugar utilization were inhibited by EBR and H2O2.However,the effects of EBR on carbohydrate metabolisms were reversed by the H2O2 generation inhibitor diphenyleneodonium (DPI) or scavenger dimethylthiourea (DMTU) pretreatment.All of these results indicate that H2O2 functions as a secondary messenger for EBR-induced CO2 assimilation and carbohydrate metabolism in cucumber plants.Our study confirms that H2O2 mediates the regulation of photosynthesis by BRs and suggests that EBR and H2O2 regulate Calvin cycle and sugar metabolism via redox signaling and thus increase the photosynthetic potential and yield of crops.

  1. Identification of novel chicken estrogen receptor-alpha messenger ribonucleic acid isoforms generated by alternative splicing and promoter usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, C; Flouriot, G; Sonntag-Buck, V; Nestor, P; Gannon, F

    1998-11-01

    Using the rapid amplification of complementary DNA ends (RACE) methodology we have identified three new chicken estrogen receptor-alpha (cER alpha) messenger RNA (mRNA) variants in addition to the previously described form (isoform A). Whereas one of the new variants (isoform B) presents a 5'-extremity contiguous to the 5'-end of isoform A, the two other forms (isoforms C and D) are generated by alternative splicing of upstream exons (C and D) to a common site situated 70 nucleotides upstream of the translation start site in the previously assigned exon 1 (A). The 3'-end of exon 1C has been located at position -1334 upstream of the transcription start site of the A isoform (+1). Whereas the genomic location of exon 1D is unknown, 700 bp 5' to this exon were isolated by genomic walking, and their sequence was determined. The transcription start sites of the cER alpha mRNA isoforms were defined. In transfection experiments, the regions immediately upstream of the A-D cER alpha mRNA isoforms were shown to possess cell-specific promoter activities. Three of these promoters were down-regulated in the presence of estradiol and ER alpha protein. It is concluded, therefore, that the expression of the four different cER alpha mRNA isoforms is under the control of four different promoters. Finally, RT-PCR, S1 nuclease mapping, and primer extension analysis of these different cER alpha mRNA isoforms revealed a differential pattern of expression of the cER alpha gene in chicken tissues. Together, the results suggest that alternative 5'-splicing and promoter usage may be mechanisms used to modulate the levels of expression of the chicken ER alpha gene in a tissue-specific and/or developmental stage-specific manner.

  2. Fecal bile acid excretion and messenger RNA expression levels of ileal transporters in high risk gallstone patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miquel Juan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholesterol gallstone disease (GS is highly prevalent among Hispanics and American Indians. In GS, the pool of bile acids (BA is decreased, suggesting that BA absorption is impaired. In Caucasian GS patients, mRNA levels for ileal BA transporters are decreased. We aimed to determine fecal BA excretion rates, mRNA levels for ileal BA transporter genes and of regulatory genes of BA synthesis in Hispanic GS patients. Results Excretion of fecal BA was measured in seven GS females and in ten GS-free individuals, all with a body mass index 2O3 (300 mg/day for 10 days, and fecal specimens were collected on the last 3 days. Chromium was measured by a colorimetric method, and BA was quantitated by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. Intake of calories, nutrients, fiber and cholesterol were similar in the GS and GS-free subjects. Mean BA excretion levels were 520 ± 80 mg/day for the GS-free group, and 461 ± 105 mg/day for the GS group. Messenger RNA expression levels were determined by RT-PCR on biopsy samples obtained from ileum during diagnostic colonoscopy (14 GS-free controls and 16 GS patients and from liver during surgery performed at 8 and 10 AM (12 GS and 10 GS-free patients operated on for gastrointestinal malignancies, all with a body mass index Conclusion Hispanics with GS have fecal BA excretion rates and mRNA levels of genes for ileal BA transporters that are similar to GS-free subjects. However, mRNA expression levels of Cyp7A1 are increased in GS, indicating that regulation of BA synthesis is abnormal in Hispanics with GS.

  3. Bisphenol S alters embryonic viability, development, gallbladder size, and messenger RNA expression in chicken embryos exposed via egg injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, Doug; Chiu, Suzanne; Williams, Kim L

    2016-06-01

    Amid concerns about the toxicological effects and environmental prevalence of bisphenol A (BPA), efforts to find suitable, safer replacement alternatives are essential. Bisphenol S (BPS) is a potential chemical substitute for BPA; however, few studies are available confirming that it has a more desirable ecotoxicological profile. In the present study, BPS was injected into the air cell of unincubated, fertilized chicken embryos at 6 concentrations ranging from 0 μg/g to 207 μg/g egg to determine effects on pipping success, development, hepatic messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression, thyroid hormone levels, and circulating bile acid concentrations. Concentrations of BPS increased in a dose-dependent manner in whole-embryo homogenates, and exposure to the highest dose, 207 μg/g, resulted in decreased pipping success (estimated median lethal dose  = 279 μg/g; 95% confidence interval = 161-486 μg/g). Exposure to BPS also reduced growth metrics including embryo mass and tarsus length, whereas the most pronounced phenotypic effect was the concentration-dependent, significant increase in gallbladder size at concentrations ≥52.8 μg/g. These adverse phenotypic outcomes were associated with the modulation of gene targets from a chicken ToxChip polymerase chain reaction array, which are involved with xenobiotic metabolism, lipid homeostasis, bile acid synthesis, and the thyroid hormone pathway. Expression levels of 2 estrogen-responsive genes, apolipoprotein II and vitellogenin, were too low at the sampling time point assessed (i.e., pipping embryos) to quantify changes, and no effects were observed on circulating free thyroxine or bile acid concentrations. The present study provides novel, whole-animal toxicological data for a BPA replacement alternative that is not well characterized. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1541-1549. © 2015 SETAC.

  4. Alteration of glycerolipid and sphingolipid-derived second messenger kinetics in ras transformed 3T3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenz, J C; Gunn, J M; Jolly, C A; Chapkin, R S

    1996-01-05

    The effect of ras transformation (rasB fibroblasts) on basal and serum-stimulated diacylglycerol (DAG) composition and mass was examined over time with respect to changes in membrane phospholipid composition and ceramide mass. RasB cells vs. nontransformed control cells (rasD and NR6) had chronically elevated DAG levels (up to 240 min) following serum stimulation, indicating a defect in the recovery phase of the intracellular DAG pulse. Ras transformation also had a dramatic effect on DAG composition. Molecular species analysis revealed that DAG from unstimulated rasB cells was enriched in the delta 9 desaturase fatty acyl species (monoenoate 18:1(n - 7) and 18:1(n - 9)), and depleted in arachidonic acid (20:4(n - 6)). With the exception of glycerophosphoinositol (GPI), DAG remodeling paralleled the compositional alterations in individual phospholipid classes. Importantly, ras transformation altered the fatty acyl composition of sphingomyelin, a precursor to the ceramide second messenger. With the addition of serum, control cells (rasD) had a progressive increase in ceramide mass with levels approximately 5-fold higher by 240 min. In contrast, ceramide levels did not increase in rasB cells at either 4 or 240 min. These results demonstrate that ras-oncogene, in addition to its effects on DAG metabolism, can also abolish the cellular increase in ceramide mass in response to serum stimulation. Since DAG and ceramide may have opposing biological functions, the prolonged elevation of DAG and the suppression of ceramide levels would be consistent with an enhanced proliferative capacity.

  5. Regulation of Ras exchange factors and cellular localization of Ras activation by lipid messengers in T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse E. Jun

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Ras-MAPK signaling pathway is highly conserved throughout evolution and is activated downstream of a wide range of receptor stimuli. Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RasGEFs catalyze GTP loading of Ras and play a pivotal role in regulating receptor-ligand induced Ras activity. In T cells, three families of functionally important RasGEFs are expressed: RasGRF, RasGRP, and SOS-family GEFs.Early on it was recognized that Ras activation is critical for T cell development and that the RasGEFs play an important role herein. More recent work has revealed that nuances in Ras activation appear to significantly impact T cell development and selection. These nuances include distinct biochemical patterns of analog versus digital Ras activation, differences in cellular localization of Ras activation, and intricate interplays between the RasGEFs during distinct T cell developmental stages as revealed by various new mouse models. In many instances, the exact nature of these nuances in Ras activation or how these may result from fine-tuning of the RasGEFs is not understood.One large group of biomolecules critically involved in the control of Ras-GEFs´functions are lipid second messengers. Multiple, yet distinct lipid products are generated following T cell receptor (TCR stimulation and bind to different domains in the RasGRP and SOS RasGEFs to facilitate the activation of the membrane-anchored Ras GTPases. In this review we highlight how different lipid-based elements are generated by various enzymes downstream of the TCR and other receptors and how these dynamic and interrelated lipid products may fine-tune Ras activation by RasGEFs in developing T cells.

  6. Plant serine/arginine-rich proteins: roles in precursor messenger RNA splicing, plant development, and stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Anireddy S N; Shad Ali, Gul

    2011-01-01

    Global analyses of splicing of precursor messenger RNAs (pre-mRNAs) have revealed that alternative splicing (AS) is highly pervasive in plants. Despite the widespread occurrence of AS in plants, the mechanisms that control splicing and the roles of splice variants generated from a gene are poorly understood. Studies on plant serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins, a family of highly conserved proteins, suggest their role in both constitutive splicing and AS of pre-mRNAs. SR proteins have a characteristic domain structure consisting of one or two RNA recognition motifs at the N-terminus and a C-terminal RS domain rich in arginine/serine dipeptides. Plants have many more SR proteins compared to animals including several plant-specific subfamilies. Pre-mRNAs of plant SR proteins are extensively alternatively spliced to increase the transcript complexity by about six-fold. Some of this AS is controlled in a tissue- and development-specific manner. Furthermore, AS of SR pre-mRNAs is altered by various stresses, raising the possibility of rapid reprogramming of the whole transcriptome by external signals through regulation of the splicing of these master regulators of splicing. Most SR splice variants contain a premature termination codon and are degraded by up-frameshift 3 (UPF3)-mediated nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), suggesting a link between NMD and regulation of expression of the functional transcripts of SR proteins. Limited functional studies with plant SRs suggest key roles in growth and development and plant responses to the environment. Here, we discuss the current status of research on plant SRs and some promising approaches to address many unanswered questions about plant SRs.

  7. To what end does nature produce superoxide? NADPH oxidase as an autocrine modifier of membrane phospholipids generating paracrine lipid messengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saran, Manfred

    2003-10-01

    Production of superoxide anion O2*- by the membrane-bound enzyme NADPH oxidase of phagocytes is a long-known phenomenon; it is generally assumed that O2*-helps phagocytes kill bacterial intruders. The details and the chemistry of the killing process have, however, remained a mystery. Isoforms of NADPH oxidase exist in membranes of nearly every cell, suggesting that reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate in intra- and intercellular signaling processes. What the nature of the signal is exactly, how it is transmitted, and what structural characteristics a receptor of a "radical message" must have, have not been addressed convincingly. This review discusses how the action of messengers is in agreement with radical-specific behavior. In search for the smallest common denominator of cellular free radical activity we hypothesize that O2*- and its conjugate acid, HO2*, may have evolved under primordial conditions as regulators of membrane mechanics and that isoprostanes, widely used markers of "oxidative stress", may be an adventitious correlate of this biologic activity of O2*-/HO2*. An overall picture is presented that suggests that O2*-/HO2* radicals, by modifying cell membranes, help other agents gain access to the hydrophobic region of phospholipid bilayers and hence contribute to lipid-dependent signaling cascades. With this, O2*-/HO2* are proposed as indispensable adjuvants for the generation of cellular signals, for membrane transport, channel gating and hence, in a global sense, for cell viability and growth. We also suggest that many of the allegedly O2*- dependent bacterial pathologies and carcinogenic derailments are due to membrane-modifying activity rather than other chemical reactions of O2*-/HO2*. A consequence of this picture is the potential evolution of the "radical theory of ageing" to a "lipid theory of aging".

  8. MULTI-MESSENGER ASTRONOMY OF GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE SOURCES WITH FLEXIBLE WIDE-AREA RADIO TRANSIENT SURVEYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yancey, Cregg C.; Shawhan, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Bear, Brandon E.; Akukwe, Bernadine; Simonetti, John H.; Tsai, Jr-Wei [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Chen, Kevin [Department of Physics, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ 08628 (United States); Dowell, Jayce; Obenberger, Kenneth; Taylor, Gregory B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM, 87131 (United States); Gough, Jonathan D. [Department of Chemistry, Lehman College, Bronx, NY 10468 (United States); Kanner, Jonah [LIGO-California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California CA 91125 (United States); Kavic, Michael [Department of Physics, Long Island University, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States)

    2015-10-20

    We explore opportunities for multi-messenger astronomy using gravitational waves (GWs) and prompt, transient low-frequency radio emission to study highly energetic astrophysical events. We review the literature on possible sources of correlated emission of GWs and radio transients, highlighting proposed mechanisms that lead to a short-duration, high-flux radio pulse originating from the merger of two neutron stars or from a superconducting cosmic string cusp. We discuss the detection prospects for each of these mechanisms by low-frequency dipole array instruments such as LWA1, the Low Frequency Array and the Murchison Widefield Array. We find that a broad range of models may be tested by searching for radio pulses that, when de-dispersed, are temporally and spatially coincident with a LIGO/Virgo GW trigger within a ∼30 s time window and ∼200–500 deg{sup 2} sky region. We consider various possible observing strategies and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. Uniquely, for low-frequency radio arrays, dispersion can delay the radio pulse until after low-latency GW data analysis has identified and reported an event candidate, enabling a prompt radio signal to be captured by a deliberately targeted beam. If neutron star mergers do have detectable prompt radio emissions, a coincident search with the GW detector network and low-frequency radio arrays could increase the LIGO/Virgo effective search volume by up to a factor of ∼2. For some models, we also map the parameter space that may be constrained by non-detections.

  9. Messengers from outer space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jockers, K.

    1981-12-11

    In connection with the planned ESA space probe to Halley's Comet, a survey of our current knowledge of comets, and of open questions concerning them. The coma and the plasma and dust tail arise from the nucleus of the comet. Comets contain large amounts of water ice, and are surrounded by a gigantic cloud of hydrogen that is not visible to ground observation. The plasma tail arises by interaction with the solar wind. The cometary dust probably contains the most significant information on the origins of the solar system. Comets may contain prebiotic complex molecules.

  10. Reference genes for real-time PCR quantification of messenger RNAs and microRNAs in mouse model of obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Matoušková

    Full Text Available Obesity and metabolic syndrome is increasing health problem worldwide. Among other ways, nutritional intervention using phytochemicals is important method for treatment and prevention of this disease. Recent studies have shown that certain phytochemicals could alter the expression of specific genes and microRNAs (miRNAs that play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of obesity. For study of the obesity and its treatment, monosodium glutamate (MSG-injected mice with developed central obesity, insulin resistance and liver lipid accumulation are frequently used animal models. To understand the mechanism of phytochemicals action in obese animals, the study of selected genes expression together with miRNA quantification is extremely important. For this purpose, real-time quantitative PCR is a sensitive and reproducible method, but it depends on proper normalization entirely. The aim of present study was to identify the appropriate reference genes for mRNA and miRNA quantification in MSG mice treated with green tea catechins, potential anti-obesity phytochemicals. Two sets of reference genes were tested: first set contained seven commonly used genes for normalization of messenger RNA, the second set of candidate reference genes included ten small RNAs for normalization of miRNA. The expression stability of these reference genes were tested upon treatment of mice with catechins using geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper algorithms. Selected normalizers for mRNA quantification were tested and validated on expression ofquinone oxidoreductase, biotransformation enzyme known to be modified by catechins. The effect of selected normalizers for miRNA quantification was tested on two obesity- and diabetes- related miRNAs, miR-221 and miR-29b, respectively. Finally, the combinations of B2M/18S/HPRT1 and miR-16/sno234 were validated as optimal reference genes for mRNA and miRNA quantification in liver and 18S/RPlP0/HPRT1 and sno234/miR-186 in small intestine of

  11. Reference genes for real-time PCR quantification of messenger RNAs and microRNAs in mouse model of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoušková, Petra; Bártíková, Hana; Boušová, Iva; Hanušová, Veronika; Szotáková, Barbora; Skálová, Lenka

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome is increasing health problem worldwide. Among other ways, nutritional intervention using phytochemicals is important method for treatment and prevention of this disease. Recent studies have shown that certain phytochemicals could alter the expression of specific genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) that play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of obesity. For study of the obesity and its treatment, monosodium glutamate (MSG)-injected mice with developed central obesity, insulin resistance and liver lipid accumulation are frequently used animal models. To understand the mechanism of phytochemicals action in obese animals, the study of selected genes expression together with miRNA quantification is extremely important. For this purpose, real-time quantitative PCR is a sensitive and reproducible method, but it depends on proper normalization entirely. The aim of present study was to identify the appropriate reference genes for mRNA and miRNA quantification in MSG mice treated with green tea catechins, potential anti-obesity phytochemicals. Two sets of reference genes were tested: first set contained seven commonly used genes for normalization of messenger RNA, the second set of candidate reference genes included ten small RNAs for normalization of miRNA. The expression stability of these reference genes were tested upon treatment of mice with catechins using geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper algorithms. Selected normalizers for mRNA quantification were tested and validated on expression of quinone oxidoreductase, biotransformation enzyme known to be modified by catechins. The effect of selected normalizers for miRNA quantification was tested on two obesity- and diabetes- related miRNAs, miR-221 and miR-29b, respectively. Finally, the combinations of B2M/18S/HPRT1 and miR-16/sno234 were validated as optimal reference genes for mRNA and miRNA quantification in liver and 18S/RPlP0/HPRT1 and sno234/miR-186 in small intestine of MSG mice. These

  12. Reference Genes for Real-Time PCR Quantification of Messenger RNAs and MicroRNAs in Mouse Model of Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoušková, Petra; Bártíková, Hana; Boušová, Iva; Hanušová, Veronika; Szotáková, Barbora; Skálová, Lenka

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome is increasing health problem worldwide. Among other ways, nutritional intervention using phytochemicals is important method for treatment and prevention of this disease. Recent studies have shown that certain phytochemicals could alter the expression of specific genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) that play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of obesity. For study of the obesity and its treatment, monosodium glutamate (MSG)-injected mice with developed central obesity, insulin resistance and liver lipid accumulation are frequently used animal models. To understand the mechanism of phytochemicals action in obese animals, the study of selected genes expression together with miRNA quantification is extremely important. For this purpose, real-time quantitative PCR is a sensitive and reproducible method, but it depends on proper normalization entirely. The aim of present study was to identify the appropriate reference genes for mRNA and miRNA quantification in MSG mice treated with green tea catechins, potential anti-obesity phytochemicals. Two sets of reference genes were tested: first set contained seven commonly used genes for normalization of messenger RNA, the second set of candidate reference genes included ten small RNAs for normalization of miRNA. The expression stability of these reference genes were tested upon treatment of mice with catechins using geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper algorithms. Selected normalizers for mRNA quantification were tested and validated on expression of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase, biotransformation enzyme known to be modified by catechins. The effect of selected normalizers for miRNA quantification was tested on two obesity- and diabetes- related miRNAs, miR-221 and miR-29b, respectively. Finally, the combinations of B2M/18S/HPRT1 and miR-16/sno234 were validated as optimal reference genes for mRNA and miRNA quantification in liver and 18S/RPlP0/HPRT1 and sno234/miR-186 in small intestine of MSG mice

  13. MicroRNA Seed Region Length Impact on Target Messenger RNA Expression and Survival in Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lila E Mullany

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNA repress messenger RNAs post-transcriptionally through binding to the 3' UTR of the mRNA with the miRNA seed region. It has been purported that longer seed regions have a greater efficacy on mRNA repression. We tested this hypothesis by evaluating differential expression of miRNAs involved in regulating the immune response, an important mechanism in colorectal cancer (CRC, by seed length category. We subsequently evaluated differential expression of these miRNAs' targets in colonic tissue and the impact of these miRNAs on CRC survival. We determined sequence complementarity between each miRNA seed region and the 3' UTR of each experimentally verified mRNA target gene. We classified miRNAs into groups based on seed regions matching perfectly to a mRNA UTR with six bases beginning at position two, seven bases beginning at position one, seven bases beginning at position two, or eight bases beginning at position one. We analyzed these groups in terms of miRNA differential expression between carcinoma and normal colorectal mucosa, differential colonic target mRNA expression, and risk of dying from CRC. After correction for multiple comparisons, the proportion of the miRNAs that were associated with differential mRNA expression was 0% for the 6-mer, 13.64% for the 7α-mer group, 12.82% for the 7β-mer group, and 8.70% for the 8-mer group. The proportion of miRNAs associated with survival was 20% for the 6-mer group, 27.27% for the 7α-mer group, 10.23% for the 7β-mer group, and 21.74% for the 8-mer group. We did not see a linear relationship between seed length and miRNA expression dysregulation, mRNA expression, or survival. Our findings do not support the hypothesis the seed region length alone influences mRNA repression.

  14. Electrochemical branched-DNA assay for polymerase chain reaction-free detection and quantification of oncogenes in messenger RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ai-Cheng; Dai, Ziyu; Chen, Baowei; Wu, Hong; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Aiguo; Zhang, Lurong; Lim, Tit-Meng; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-12-15

    We describe a novel electrochemical branched-DNA (bDNA) assay for polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-free detection and quantification of p185 BCR-ABL leukemia fusion transcripts in the population of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) extracted from cell lines. The bDNA amplifier carrying high loading of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) tracers was used to amplify the target signal. The targets were captured on microplate well surfaces through cooperative sandwich hybridization prior to the labeling of bDNA. The activity of captured ALP was monitored by square-wave voltammetric (SWV) analysis of the electroactive enzymatic product in the presence of 1-naphthyl phosphate. The voltammetric characteristics of substrate and enzymatic product as well as the parameters of SWV analysis were systematically optimized. A detection limit of 1 fM (1 x 10(-19) mol of target transcripts in 100 microL) and a 3-order-wide dynamic range of target concentration were achieved by the electrochemical bDNA assay. Such limit corresponded to approximately 17 fg of the p185 BCR-ABL fusion transcripts. The specificity and sensitivity of assay enabled direct detection of target transcripts in as little as 4.6 ng of mRNA population without PCR amplification. In combination with the use of a well-quantified standard, the electrochemical bDNA assay was capable of direct use for a PCR-free quantitative analysis of target transcripts in mRNA population. A mean transcript copy number of 62,900/ng of mRNA was determined, which was at least 50-fold higher than that of real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The finding was consistent with the underestimation of targets by qPCR reported earlier. In addition, the unique design based on bDNA technology increases the assay specificity as only the p185 BCR-ABL fusion transcripts will respond to the detection. The approach thus provides a simple, sensitive, accurate, and quantitative tool alternative to the qPCR for early disease diagnosis.

  15. Comparison of circulating, hepatocyte specific messenger RNA and microRNA as biomarkers for chronic hepatitis B and C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaonan; Zhang, Zhanqing; Dai, Fahui; Shi, Bisheng; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Xinxin; Zang, Guoqing; Zhang, Jiming; Chen, Xiaorong; Qian, Fangxing; Hu, Yunwen; Yuan, Zhenghong

    2014-01-01

    Circulating microRNAs have been widely recognized as a novel category of biomarker in a variety of physiological and pathological conditions. Other reports revealed that fragments of organ specific messenger RNAs are also detectable in serum/plasma and can be utilized as sensitive indicators of liver pathology and cancer. In order to assess the sensitivity and reliability of these two class of RNAs as marker of hepatitis B or C induced chronic liver disease, we collected plasma samples from 156 chronic hepatitis B or C patients (HBV active n = 112, HBV carrier n = 19, hepatitis C n = 25) and 22 healthy donors and quantified their circulating mRNA for albumin, HP (haptoglobin), CYP2E1 (cytochrome P450, family 2, subfamily E) and ApoA2 (Apolipoprotein A2) in conjunction with microRNA-122, a well established marker for acute and chronic liver injury. We found that plasma microRNA-122 level is significantly elevated in patients with active HBV but not in HBV carriers. Furthermore, microRNA-122 is not elevated in HCV patients even though their median serum alanine aminotransferase (sALT) was three fold of the healthy donors. Nevertheless, circulating mRNAs, especially albumin mRNA, showed much more sensitivity in distinguishing active hepatitis B, hepatitis B carrier or HCV patients from healthy control. Correlation and multiple linear regression analysis suggested that circulating mRNAs and miRNAs are much more related to HBsAg titre than to sALT. Immunoprecipitation of HBsAg in HBV patients' plasma resulted in enrichment of albumin and HP mRNA suggesting that fragments of liver specific transcripts can be encapsidated into HBsAg particles. Taken together, our results suggest that hepatocyte specific transcripts in plasma like albumin mRNA showed greater sensitivity and specificity in differentiating HBV or HCV induced chronic liver disease than microRNA-122. Circulating mRNA fragments merit more attention in the quest of next generation biomarkers for

  16. Emergence of the β-CASP ribonucleases: highly conserved and ubiquitous metallo-enzymes involved in messenger RNA maturation and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominski, Zbigniew; Carpousis, Agamemnon J; Clouet-d'Orval, Béatrice

    2013-01-01

    The β-CASP ribonucleases, which are found in the three domains of life, have in common a core of 460 residues containing seven conserved sequence motifs involved in the tight binding of two catalytic zinc ions. A hallmark of these enzymes is their ability to catalyze both endo- and exo-ribonucleolytic degradation. Exo-ribonucleolytic degradation proceeds in the 5' to 3' direction and is sensitive to the phosphorylation state of the 5' end of a transcript. Recent phylogenomic analyses have shown that the β-CASP ribonucleases can be partitioned into two major subdivisions that correspond to orthologs of eukaryal CPSF73 and bacterial RNase J. We discuss the known functions of the CPSF73 and RNase J orthologs, their association into complexes, and their structure as it relates to mechanism of action. Eukaryal CPSF73 is part of a large multiprotein complex that is involved in the maturation of the 3' end of RNA Polymerase II transcripts and the polyadenylation of messenger RNA. RNase J1 and J2 are paralogs in Bacillus subtilis that are involved in the degradation of messenger RNA and the maturation of non-coding RNA. RNase J1 and J2 co-purify as a heteromeric complex and there is recent evidence that they interact with other enzymes to form a bacterial RNA degradosome. Finally, we speculate on the evolutionary origin of β-CASP ribonucleases and on their functions in Archaea. Orthologs of CPSF73 with endo- and exo-ribonuclease activity are strictly conserved throughout the archaea suggesting a role for these enzymes in the maturation and/or degradation of messenger RNA. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA Decay mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Differential effect of functional olfactory bulb deafferentation on tyrosine hydroxylase and glutamic acid decarboxylase messenger RNA levels in rodent juxtaglomerular neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, D M; Grillo, M; Margolis, F L; Joh, T H; Baker, H

    1991-09-08

    Expression of the dopaminergic phenotype in olfactory bulb (OB) juxtaglomerular neurons (constituting a population of periglomerular and external tufted cells) is dependent upon functional innervation by peripheral olfactory receptors. Loss of functional input in rodents, by either peripheral deafferentation or deprivation of odorant access, results in a profound decrease in the expression of juxtaglomerular tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). We have examined the effects of such treatments on the expression of the neurotransmitter biosynthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), which is colocalized with TH in the majority of TH-containing juxtaglomerular neurons. Following either chemically induced OB deafferentation in adult mice or unilateral odor deprivation in neonatal rats, steady-state OB GAD messenger RNA levels remained essentially unchanged as assessed by Northern blot analysis 20-40 days after treatment. These results were confirmed by in situ hybridization analysis, which demonstrated a profound loss of juxtaglomerular TH messenger RNA but no accompanying decrease in regionally colocalized GAD message. Since GAD is found in nearly all dopaminergic OB cells, the preservation of juxtaglomerular GAD message implies that olfactory receptor neurons exert a differential transneuronal regulation of TH and GAD gene transcription.

  18. A receptor for activated C kinase is part of messenger ribonucleoprotein complexes associated with polyA-mRNAs in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angenstein, Frank; Evans, Anne M; Settlage, Robert E; Moran, Stewart T; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Klintsova, Anna Y; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F; Greenough, William T

    2002-10-15

    Long-lasting changes in synaptic functions after an appropriate stimulus require altered protein expression at the synapse. To restrict changes in protein composition to activated synapses, proteins may be synthesized locally as a result of transmitter receptor-triggered signaling pathways. Second messenger-controlled mechanisms that affect mRNA translation are essentially unknown. Here we report that a receptor for activated C kinase, RACK1, is a component of messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes. RACK1 is predominantly associated with polysome-bound, polyA-mRNAs that are being actively translated. We find it to be present in a complex with beta-tubulin and at least two mRNA-binding proteins, polyA-binding protein 1 and a 130 kDa polyA-mRNA binding protein (KIAA0217). Activation of PKCbeta2 in vitro by phosphatidylserine/diacylglycerol or in hippocampal slices by metabotropic glutamate receptor stimulation increased the amount of RACK1/PKCbeta2 associated with polysome-bound polyA-mRNAs. In vitro, PKCbeta2 can phosphorylate a subset of polyA-mRNA-associated proteins that are also phosphorylated under in vivo conditions. On the basis of these findings plus the somatodendritic localization of RACK1, we hypothesize that metabotropic glutamate receptor-triggered binding of activated PKCbeta2 to mRNP complexes bound to polyA-mRNAs is involved in activity-triggered control of protein synthesis.

  19. $H_{u,d}$-messenger Couplings Address the $\\mu/B_\\mu$ \\& $A_t/m_{H_u}^2$ Problem and $(g-2)_\\mu$ Puzzle

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Zhaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Gauge mediated supersymmetry (SUSY)-breaking (GMSB) furnishes the best idea to overcome the flavor problem in SSMs, supersymmetric stand models (SM). However, implemented in the minimal SSM (MSSM), a very serious fine-tuning problem arises, owing to the absence of a large $A_t$ term in the stop sector to radiatively enhance the SM-like Higgs boson mass. In the extended GMSB coupling $H_u$ to messengers can alleviate this problem but encounters the $A_t/m_{H_u}^2$ problem, i.e., at the same time a large $m_{H_u}^2$ is generated, rendering radiative electroweak spontaneously breaking (EWSB) problematic. This issue shows similarity to another long-standing problem of GMSB, the $\\mu/{B_\\mu }$ problem, and, of great interest, we find that they may admit the same solution, nonradiative EWSB. Such a solution is naturally accommodated when both $H_u$ and $H_d$ couple to messengers. As a bonus of nonradiative EWSB, the sleptons tend to be very light due to the significant renormalization group equation effect and they...

  20. Inhibitors of second messenger pathways and Ca(2+)-induced exposure of phosphatidylserine in red blood cells of patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gbotosho, O T; Cytlak, U M; Hannemann, A; Rees, D C; Tewari, S; Gibson, J S

    2014-07-01

    The present work investigates the contribution of various second messenger systems to Ca(2+)-induced phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure in red blood cells (RBCs) from sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. The Ca(2+) dependence of PS exposure was confirmed using the Ca(2+) ionophore bromo-A23187 to clamp intracellular Ca(2+) over 4 orders of magnitude in high or low potassium-containing (HK or LK) saline. The percentage of RBCs showing PS exposure was significantly increased in LK over HK saline. This effect was reduced by the Gardos channel inhibitors, clotrimazole and charybdotoxin. Nevertheless, although Ca(2+) loading in the presence of an outwardly directed electrochemical gradient for K(+) stimulated PS exposure, substantial exposure still occurred in HK saline. Under the conditions used inhibitors of other second messenger systems (ABT491, quinacrine, acetylsalicylic acid, 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin, GW4869 and zVAD-fmk) did not inhibit the relationship between [Ca(2+)] and PS exposure. Inhibitors of phospholipase A2, cyclooxygenase, platelet-activating factor, sphingomyelinase and caspases, therefore, were without effect on Ca(2+)-induced PS exposure in RBCs, incubated in either HK or LK saline.

  1. The influences of reserpine and imipramine on the 5-HT2 receptor binding site and its coupled second messenger in rat cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Jen; Wei, Jiann-Wu

    2013-08-31

    An investigation on the molecular mechanism of depression state, less attention was focused on changes at the intracellular messenger level. In this study the effects of reserpine, a monoamine depletor, and imipramine, an antidepressant, on serotonin-2 (5-HT2) receptor binding and its second messenger system of rat cerebral cortex were studied. The level of inositol 4-monophosphate (IP1) accumulation elicited by 100 microM 5-HT via activation of the 5-HT2 receptor on cerebral cortical slices at twelve hours after a single dose of reserpine (2 mg/kg, i.p.) was significantly higher in treated rats, when compared to that of saline-treated rats; this significant level lasted for at least four days. The level of IP1 accumulation in rat cerebral cortical slices elicited by 100 microM serotonin was higher in the group pretreated with reserpine (0.25 mg/kg/day) sub-chronically for seven days than the group pretreated with normal saline. In the receptor binding study, the maximum binding (B(max)) of 5-HT2 receptor binding was increased, when compared to the corresponding controls; whereas, the dissociation equilibrium constant (K(d)) value of the 5-HT2 receptor was found unchanged in the reserpine treated group. Increases in the sensitivity of phosphoinositol (PI) turnover coupled with the 5-HT2 receptor were also found in the long-term (21 days) low dose (0.1 mg/kg/day) administration of reserpine. However, a long-term administration of imipramine (10 mg/kg/day) reduced the function of the PI turnover coupled with the 5-HT2 receptor. Results obtained from the combined use of reserpine and imipramine demonstrated that this combination was able to antagonize the super-sensitivity of the second messenger responses in 5-HT2 receptor induced by long-term treatment with reserpine. Long-term treatment with reserpine but not imipramine also caused an increase in the B(max) of the 5-HT2 receptor. This up-regulation of the 5-HT2 receptor by reserpine could be antagonized by

  2. Dietary iron supplements and Moringa oleifera leaves influence the liver hepcidin messenger RNA expression and biochemical indices of iron status in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, R K; Manoj, P; Shetty, N P; Srinivasan, K; Giridhar, P

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the effects of iron depletion and repletion on biochemical and molecular indices of iron status were investigated in growing male Wistar rats. We hypothesized that iron from Moringa leaves could overcome the effects of iron deficiency and modulate the expression of iron-responsive genes better than conventional iron supplements. Iron deficiency was induced by feeding rats an iron-deficient diet for 10 weeks, whereas control rats were maintained on an iron-sufficient diet (35.0-mg Fe/kg diet). After the depletion period, animals were repleted with different source of iron, in combination with ascorbic acid. Iron deficiency caused a significant (P Moringa leaf was found to be superior compared with ferric citrate in overcoming the effects of iron deficiency in rats. These results suggest that changes in the relative expression of liver hepcidin messenger RNA can be used as a sensitive molecular marker for iron deficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Overexpression of interleukin 2 receptor, thymidine kinase and immunoglobulin-associated alpha-1 messenger RNA in a clinical case of enzootic bovine leukosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfeeq, Mohammad Monir; Tagawa, Michihito; Itoh, Yuuki; Sugimoto, Kazuya; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Inokuma, Hisashi

    2012-09-01

    A 49-month-old Holstein cow with anorexia, tachypnea, enlarged peripheral lymph nodes, and difficulty standing up was suspected of bovine leukosis. Hematological examination revealed lymphocytosis with the presence of neoplastic cells. Increased total lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, isozymes of LDH-2 and LDH-3 activities and thymidine kinase activity were observed. Cytological findings of fine needle aspiration of subiliac lymph nodes indicated lymphosarcoma. Histopathology and antibody analysis confirmed the diagnosis of enzootic bovine leukosis, a B-cell bovine lymphoma caused by bovine leukemia virus. Gene expressions known as biomarkers of hematopoietic neoplasia in human were also examined in the present case. Increased messenger RNA expression of interleukin 2 receptor, thymidine kinase, and immunoglobulin-associated alpha-1 was observed in the case animal.

  4. Vanillin inhibits translation and induces messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) granule formation in saccharomyces cerevisiae: application and validation of high-content, image-based profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, Aya; Ohnuki, Shinsuke; Suga, Yohei; Izawa, Shingo; Ohya, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Vanillin, generated by acid hydrolysis of lignocellulose, acts as a potent inhibitor of the growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we investigated the cellular processes affected by vanillin using high-content, image-based profiling. Among 4,718 non-essential yeast deletion mutants, the morphology of those defective in the large ribosomal subunit showed significant similarity to that of vanillin-treated cells. The defects in these mutants were clustered in three domains of the ribosome: the mRNA tunnel entrance, exit and backbone required for small subunit attachment. To confirm that vanillin inhibited ribosomal function, we assessed polysome and messenger ribonucleoprotein granule formation after treatment with vanillin. Analysis of polysome profiles showed disassembly of the polysomes in the presence of vanillin. Processing bodies and stress granules, which are composed of non-translating mRNAs and various proteins, were formed after treatment with vanillin. These results suggest that vanillin represses translation in yeast cells.

  5. Messenger system and its application%一种新的卫星移动通信系统及其应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任丹

    2012-01-01

    本文综述了卫星移动通信的现状,介绍了一种新的卫星移动通信系统——"信使"系统,并把它与现有的全球移动通信系统进行了比较,为我国发展卫星移动通信提供了参考。%This paper summarized the present situation of the mobile satellite communication,Inthis paper,a new mobile satellite communication system——Messenger system,and put it and existing global system for mobile communications are compared,and the development in our country for mobile satellite communication provides reference.

  6. Práticas de produção textual no MSN Messenger: ressignificando a escrita colaborativa Text production practices on MSN: redifining collaborative writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrilson Alan Pinheiro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo tem por objetivo articular as práticas de escrita escolarese as tecnologias da comunicação e da informação disponibilizadas na Internet, buscando, com isso, possibilitar um repensar e uma redefinição dos modelos de produção textual com os quais a escola ainda opera. Na tentativa de explorar tal relação, propomos a realização de um trabalho que aponte como o uso de alguns gêneros digitais do ciberespaço, como o MSN Messenger, contribuem para a construção de práticas colaborativas de escrita de alunos do ensino médio. Para tanto, tomaremos como base teórica os construtos bakhtinianos de gêneros do discurso e na teoria situada de gênero (ERICKSON, 1997; Yates; Orlikowski; Rennecker, 1997; SHEPHERD; WATTERS, 1999; Devitt, 2000 para dar conta do comportamento dos gêneros digitais. Trata-se de uma pesquisa empírica realizada com dezesseis aprendizes e um professor do ensino médio de uma escola estadual localizada no município de Campinas _ SP. Os alunos criaram um site para a divulgação de um jornal digital e, para produzir os textos que são expostos nesse jornal, eles fazem uso do e-mail e do MSN Messenger. Como proposta de análise multimodal da produção textual desses aprendizes na Internet, tomaremos como base as metafunções semióticas nos níveis apresentacional, orientacional e organizacional, propostas por Lemke (1995, 1998a, 1998b, como dispositivos teórico-analíticos dos dados gerados a partir dos registros dos diversos modos com que os alunos constroem sentidos ao aprenderem e desenvolverem seus textos de forma colaborativa a partir do uso dos gêneros digitais.The objective of this paper is to articulate school writing practices and the new communication and information technology from the Internet, by searching a way of rethinking and redefining the text production patterns with which schools still deal. In order to explore such relationship, we propose a paper which points out how the use of

  7. Protein and messenger RNA expression of interleukin 1 system members in bovine ovarian follicles and effects of interleukin 1β on primordial follicle activation and survival in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, J R S; Costa, J J N; da Cunha, E V; Silva, A W B; Ribeiro, R P; de Souza, G B; Barroso, P A A; Dau, A M P; Saraiva, M V A; Gonçalves, P B D; van den Hurk, R; Silva, J R V

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the expression of interleukin 1 (IL-1) system members (proteins and messenger RNA of ligands and receptors) and its distribution in ovarian follicles of cyclic cows and to evaluate the effects of IL-1β on the survival and activation of primordial follicles in vitro. The ovaries were processed for localization of IL-1 system in preantral and antral follicles by immunohistochemical, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot analysis. For in vitro studies, ovarian fragments were cultured in α-MEM(+) supplemented with IL-1β (0, 1, 10, 50, or 100 ng/mL), and after 6 d, the cultured tissues were processed for histologic analysis. Immunohistochemical results showed that the IL-1 system proteins IL-1β, IL-1RA, IL-1RI, and IL-1RII were detected in the cytoplasm of oocytes and granulosa cells from all follicular categories and theca cells of antral follicles. Variable levels of messenger RNA for the IL-1 system members were observed at different stages of development. After 6 d of culture, the presence of IL-1β (10 or 50 ng/mL) was effective in maintaining the percentage of normal follicles and in promoting primordial follicle activation. In conclusion, IL-1 system members are differentially expressed in ovarian follicles according to their stage of development. Moreover, IL-1β promotes the development of primordial follicles. These results indicate an important role of the IL-1 system in the regulation of bovine folliculogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Analisa Forensik Whatsapp dan LINE Messenger Pada Smartphone Android Sebagai Rujukan Dalam Menyediakan Barang Bukti yang Kuat dan Valid di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syukur Ikhsani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aplikasi pengolah pesan yang populer di Indonesia adalah WhatsApp dan LINE Messenger. Peningkatan penggunaan aplikasi tersebut berbanding lurus dengan peningkatan tingkat kejahatan yang menggunakan aplikasi pengolah pesan itu. Tidak jarang, aplikasi pengolah pesan digunakan untuk bertukar informasi yang ilegal ataupun tindakan pemerasan. Hal ini membutuhkan penanganan khusus dan peran forensika digital untuk menyelesaikan kasus yang ada. Penelitian ini menggunakan skenario percakapan dan eksperimen modifikasi terhadap kondisi aplikasi, diantaranya penggunaan normal, penghapusan percakapan dan aplikasi. Data setiap eksperimen akan diambil dengan menggunakan metode yang menyesuaikan dengan kondisi perangkat. Data yang berhasil diambil akan dianalisa menggunakan FTK Imager dan SQLite Browser untuk mencari data-data yang penting terkait pengungkapan kasus. Setelah data penting berhasil diketahui, maka dilakukan analisa lanjutan untuk membuktikan data tersebut dapat dipakai dalam pengungkapan sebuah kasus. Setelah data dapat dibuktikan maka dilanjutkan dengan analisa perbandingan data digital terkait eksperimen, perangkat, dan aplikasi pengolah pesan. Langkah terakhir adalah melakukan analisa keamanan dari setiap aplikasi untuk memberikan rekomendasi terkait aplikasi pengolah pesan yang terbaik pada bidang forensika digital. Didapatkan kesimpulan bahwa bukti data digital telah berhasil didapat dengan menggunakan dua metode, yaitu secara manual dan menggunakan aplikasi tambahan. Data yang berhasil didapatkan adalah data utama seperti data kontak dan percakapan serta data pendukung seperti media dan database cadangan. Faktor yang mempengaruhi keberhasilan mendapatkan bukti digital adalah aktivitas modifikasi pada kondisi aplikasi dan perangkat yang digunakan. Dan pada akhirnya WhatsApp merupakan aplikasi yang menjadi rujukan dalam forensika digital sedangkan LINE Messenger merupakan aplikasi yang lebih aman karena lebih sulit untuk dilakukan analisa

  9. Toward high-resolution global topography of Mercury from MESSENGER orbital stereo imaging: A prototype model for the H6 (Kuiper) quadrangle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preusker, Frank; Stark, Alexander; Oberst, Jürgen; Matz, Klaus-Dieter; Gwinner, Klaus; Roatsch, Thomas; Watters, Thomas R.

    2017-08-01

    We selected approximately 10,500 narrow-angle camera (NAC) and wide-angle camera (WAC) images of Mercury acquired from orbit by MESSENGER's Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) with an average resolution of 150 m/pixel to compute a digital terrain model (DTM) for the H6 (Kuiper) quadrangle, which extends from 22.5°S to 22.5°N and from 288.0°E to 360.0°E. From the images, we identified about 21,100 stereo image combinations consisting of at least three images each. We applied sparse multi-image matching to derive approximately 250,000 tie-points representing 50,000 ground points. We used the tie-points to carry out a photogrammetric block adjustment, which improves the image pointing and the accuracy of the ground point positions in three dimensions from about 850 m to approximately 55 m. We then applied high-density (pixel-by-pixel) multi-image matching to derive about 45 billion tie-points. Benefitting from improved image pointing data achieved through photogrammetric block adjustment, we computed about 6.3 billion surface points. By interpolation, we generated a DTM with a lateral spacing of 221.7 m/pixel (192 pixels per degree) and a vertical accuracy of about 30 m. The comparison of the DTM with Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) profiles obtained over four years of MESSENGER orbital operations reveals that the DTM is geometrically very rigid. It may be used as a reference to identify MLA outliers (e.g., when MLA operated at its ranging limit) or to map offsets of laser altimeter tracks, presumably caused by residual spacecraft orbit and attitude errors. After the relevant outlier removals and corrections, MLA profiles show excellent agreement with topographic profiles from H6, with a root mean square height difference of only 88 m.

  10. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, estrogenic responses and biotransformation system in the liver of salmon exposed to tributyltin and second messenger activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlikova, Nela; Kortner, Trond M; Arukwe, Augustine

    2010-08-15

    The mechanisms by which organotin compounds produce modulations of the endocrine systems and other biological responses are not fully understood. In this study, juvenile salmon were force-fed diet containing TBT (0: solvent control, 0.1, 1 and 10mg/kg fish) for 72 h. Subsequently, fish exposed to solvent control and 10mg TBT were exposed to waterborne concentration (200 microg/l) of the adenylate cyclase (AC) stimulator, forskolin for 2 and 4h. The overall aim of the study was to explore whether TBT endocrine disruptive effects involve second messenger activation. Liver was sampled from individual fish (n=8) at the end of the exposures. The transcription patterns of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) isotype and acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 (ACOX1), aromatase isoform, estrogen receptor-alpha (ER alpha), pregnane X receptor (PXR), CYP3A and glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes were measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Our data showed a consistent increase in PPAR alpha, PPAR beta and PPAR gamma mRNA and protein expression after TBT exposure that were inversely correlated with ACOX1 mRNA levels. Forskolin produced PPAR isotype-specific mRNA and protein effects that were modulated by TBT. ACOX1 expression was decreased (at 2h) and increased (at 4h) by forskolin and the presence of TBT potentiated these effects. TBT apparently increased mRNA and protein levels of cyp19a, compared to the solvent control, whereas cyp19b mRNA levels were unaffected by TBT treatment. Combined TBT and forskolin exposure produced respective decrease and increase of mRNA levels of cyp19a and cyp19b, compared with control. TBT decreased ER alpha mRNA at low dose (1mg/kg) and forskolin exposure alone produced a consistent decrease of ER alpha mRNA levels that were not affected by the presence of TBT. Interestingly, PXR and CYP3A mRNA levels were differentially affected, either decreased or increased, after exposure to TBT and forskolin, singly and also in

  11. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, estrogenic responses and biotransformation system in the liver of salmon exposed to tributyltin and second messenger activator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlikova, Nela [Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Hogskoleringen 5, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); RECETOX Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Masaryk University, Kamenice 3, CZ62500 Brno (Czech Republic); Kortner, Trond M. [Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Hogskoleringen 5, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Arukwe, Augustine, E-mail: arukwe@bio.ntnu.no [Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Hogskoleringen 5, 7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2010-08-15

    The mechanisms by which organotin compounds produce modulations of the endocrine systems and other biological responses are not fully understood. In this study, juvenile salmon were force-fed diet containing TBT (0: solvent control, 0.1, 1 and 10 mg/kg fish) for 72 h. Subsequently, fish exposed to solvent control and 10 mg TBT were exposed to waterborne concentration (200 {mu}g/l) of the adenylate cyclase (AC) stimulator, forskolin for 2 and 4 h. The overall aim of the study was to explore whether TBT endocrine disruptive effects involve second messenger activation. Liver was sampled from individual fish (n = 8) at the end of the exposures. The transcription patterns of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) isotype and acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 (ACOX1), aromatase isoform, estrogen receptor-{alpha} (ER{alpha}), pregnane X receptor (PXR), CYP3A and glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes were measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Our data showed a consistent increase in PPAR{alpha}, PPAR{beta} and PPAR{gamma} mRNA and protein expression after TBT exposure that were inversely correlated with ACOX1 mRNA levels. Forskolin produced PPAR isotype-specific mRNA and protein effects that were modulated by TBT. ACOX1 expression was decreased (at 2 h) and increased (at 4 h) by forskolin and the presence of TBT potentiated these effects. TBT apparently increased mRNA and protein levels of cyp19a, compared to the solvent control, whereas cyp19b mRNA levels were unaffected by TBT treatment. Combined TBT and forskolin exposure produced respective decrease and increase of mRNA levels of cyp19a and cyp19b, compared with control. TBT decreased ER{alpha} mRNA at low dose (1 mg/kg) and forskolin exposure alone produced a consistent decrease of ER{alpha} mRNA levels that were not affected by the presence of TBT. Interestingly, PXR and CYP3A mRNA levels were differentially affected, either decreased or increased, after exposure to TBT and forskolin, singly

  12. Making Sense of the Information Seeking Process of Undergraduates in a Specialised University: Revelations from Dialogue Journaling on WhatsApp Messenger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorcas E Krubu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: The research work investigated the information seeking process of undergraduates in a specialised university in Nigeria, in the course of a group assignment. Background: Kuhlthau’s Information Search Process (ISP model is used as lens to reveal how students interact with information in the affective, cognitive and physical realms. Methodology: Qualitative research methods were employed. The entire seventy-seven third year students in the Department of Petroleum and Natural Gas and their course lecturer were the participants. Group assignment question was analysed using Bloom’s Taxonomy while the information seeking process of the students was garnered through dialogue journaling on WhatsApp Messenger. Contribution: The research explicates how students’ information seeking behaviour can be captured beyond the four walls of a classroom by using a Web 2.0 tool such as WhatsApp Messenger. Findings: The apparent level of uncertainty, optimism, and confusion/doubt common in the initiation, selection, and exploration phases of the ISP model and low confidence levels were not markedly evident in the students. Consequently, Kuhlthau’s ISP model could not be applied in its entirety to the study’s particular context of teaching and learning due to the nature of the assignment. Recommendations for Practitioners: The study recommends that the Academic Planning Unit (APU should set a benchmark for all faculties and, by extension, the departments in terms of the type/scope and number of assignments per semester, including learning outcomes. Recommendation for Researchers: Where elements of a guided approach to learning are missing, Kuhlthau’s ISP may not be employed. Therefore, alternative theory, such as Theory of Change could explain the poor quality of education and the type of intervention that could enhance students’ learning. Impact on Society: The ability to use emerging technologies is a form of literacy that is required by

  13. The transition from complex crater to peak-ring basin on Mercury: New observations from MESSENGER flyby data and constraints on basin formation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David M. H.; Head, James W.; Schon, Samuel C.; Ernst, Carolyn M.; Prockter, Louise M.; Murchie, Scott L.; Denevi, Brett W.; Solomon, Sean C.; Strom, Robert G.

    2011-12-01

    The study of peak-ring basins and other impact crater morphologies transitional between complex craters and multi-ring basins is important to our understanding of the mechanisms for basin formation on the terrestrial planets. Mercury has the largest population, and the largest population per area, of peak-ring basins and protobasins in the inner solar system and thus provides important data for examining questions surrounding peak-ring basin formation. New flyby images from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft have more than doubled the area of Mercury viewed at close range, providing nearly complete global coverage of the planet's surface when combined with flyby data from Mariner 10. We use this new near-global dataset to compile a catalog of peak-ring basins and protobasins on Mercury, including measurements of the diameters of the basin rim crest, interior ring, and central peak (if present). Our catalog increases the population of peak-ring basins by ˜150% and protobasins by ˜100% over previous catalogs, including 44 newly identified peak-ring basins (total=74) and 17 newly identified protobasins (total=32). A newly defined transitional basin type, the ringed peak-cluster basin (total=9), is also described. The new basin catalog confirms that Mercury has the largest population of peak-ring basins of the terrestrial planets and also places the onset rim-crest diameter for peak-ring basins at 126-26+33km, which is intermediate between the onset diameter for peak-ring basins on the Moon and those for the other terrestrial planets. The ratios of ring diameter to rim-crest diameter further emphasize that protobasins and peak-ring basins are parts of a continuum of basin morphologies relating to their processes of formation, in contrast to previous views that these forms are distinct. Comparisons of the predictions of peak-ring basin-formation models with the characteristics of the basin catalog for Mercury

  14. Bi-modal distribution of the second messenger c-di-GMP controls cell fate and asymmetry during the caulobacter cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sören Abel

    Full Text Available Many bacteria mediate important life-style decisions by varying levels of the second messenger c-di-GMP. Behavioral transitions result from the coordination of complex cellular processes such as motility, surface adherence or the production of virulence factors and toxins. While the regulatory mechanisms responsible for these processes have been elucidated in some cases, the global pleiotropic effects of c-di-GMP are poorly understood, primarily because c-di-GMP networks are inherently complex in most bacteria. Moreover, the quantitative relationships between cellular c-di-GMP levels and c-di-GMP dependent phenotypes are largely unknown. Here, we dissect the c-di-GMP network of Caulobacter crescentus to establish a global and quantitative view of c-di-GMP dependent processes in this organism. A genetic approach that gradually reduced the number of diguanylate cyclases identified novel c-di-GMP dependent cellular processes and unraveled c-di-GMP as an essential component of C. crescentus cell polarity and its bimodal life cycle. By varying cellular c-di-GMP concentrations, we determined dose response curves for individual c-di-GMP-dependent processes. Relating these values to c-di-GMP levels modeled for single cells progressing through the cell cycle sets a quantitative frame for the successive activation of c-di-GMP dependent processes during the C. crescentus life cycle. By reconstructing a simplified c-di-GMP network in a strain devoid of c-di-GMP we defined the minimal requirements for the oscillation of c-di-GMP levels during the C. crescentus cell cycle. Finally, we show that although all c-di-GMP dependent cellular processes were qualitatively restored by artificially adjusting c-di-GMP levels with a heterologous diguanylate cyclase, much higher levels of the second messenger are required under these conditions as compared to the contribution of homologous c-di-GMP metabolizing enzymes. These experiments suggest that a common c-di-GMP pool

  15. In vitro Study of a Novel Stent Coating Using Modified CD39 Messenger RNA to Potentially Reduce Stent Angioplasty-Associated Complications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike-Kristin Abraham

    Full Text Available Stent angioplasty provides a minimally invasive treatment for atherosclerotic vessels. However, no treatment option for atherosclerosis-associated endothelial dysfunction, which is accompanied by a loss of CD39, is available, and hence, adverse effects like thromboembolism and restenosis may occur. Messenger RNA (mRNA-based therapy represents a novel strategy, whereby de novo synthesis of a desired protein is achieved after delivery of a modified mRNA to the target cells.Our study aimed to develop an innovative bioactive stent coating that induces overexpression of CD39 in the atherosclerotic vessel. Therefore, a modified CD39-encoding mRNA was produced by in vitro transcription. Different endothelial cells (ECs were transfected with the mRNA, and CD39 expression and functionality were analyzed using various assays. Furthermore, CD39 mRNA was immobilized using poly(lactic-co-glycolic-acid (PLGA, and the transfection efficiency in ECs was analyzed. Our data show that ECs successfully translate in vitro-generated CD39 mRNA after transfection. The overexpressed CD39 protein is highly functional in hydrolyzing ADP and in preventing platelet activation. Furthermore, PLGA-immobilized CD39 mRNA can be delivered to ECs without losing its functionality.In summary, we present a novel and promising concept for a stent coating for the treatment of atherosclerotic blood vessels, whereby patients could be protected against angioplasty-associated complications.

  16. Elevated level of the second messenger c-di-GMP in Comamonas testosteroni enhances biofilm formation and biofilm-based biodegradation of 3-chloroaniline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yichao; Ding, Yuanzhao; Cohen, Yehuda; Cao, Bin

    2015-02-01

    The bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger that determines bacterial lifestyle between the planktonic and biofilm modes of life. Although the role of c-di-GMP signaling in biofilm development and dispersal has been extensively studied, how c-di-GMP signaling influences environmental bioprocess activities such as biodegradation remains unexplored. To elucidate the impacts of elevating c-di-GMP level on environmental bioprocesses, we constructed a Comamonas testosteroni strain constitutively expressing a c-di-GMP synthase YedQ from Escherichia coli and examined its capability in biofilm formation and biodegradation of 3-chloroaniline (3-CA). The high c-di-GMP strain exhibited an increased binding to Congo red dye, a decreased motility, and an enhanced biofilm formation capability. In planktonic cultures, the strain with an elevated c-di-GMP concentration and the wild type could degrade 3-CA comparably well. However, under batch growth conditions with a high surface to volume ratio, an elevated c-di-GMP concentration in C. testosteroni significantly increased the contribution of biofilms in 3-CA biodegradation. In continuous submerged biofilm reactors, C. testosteroni with an elevated c-di-GMP level exhibited an enhanced 3-CA biodegradation and a decreased cell detachment rate. Taken together, this study provides a novel strategy to enhance biofilm-based biodegradation of toxic xenobiotic compounds through manipulating bacterial c-di-GMP signaling.

  17. Towards High-Resolution Mercury Global Topography from MESSENGER Orbital Stereo Imaging - A Prototype Model for the H6 Quadrangle "Kuiper"

    CERN Document Server

    Preusker, Frank; Oberst, Jürgen; Matz, Klaus-Dieter; Gwinner, Klaus; Watters, Tom R

    2016-01-01

    We selected approximately 10,500 Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) and Wide-Angle Camera (WAC) stereo images obtained by the MESSENGER spacecraft during its orbital mission with average resolutions of 150 m/pixel to compute a Digital Terrain Model (DTM) for the so-called H6 quadrangle (Kuiper), extending between 22.5{\\deg}S to 22.5{\\deg}N and 288.0{\\deg}E to 360.0{\\deg}E. Among the images, we identified about 21,100 stereo image combinations with each combination consisting of at least 3 images. We applied sparse multi-image matching to derive approximately 250,000 tie-points representing 50,000 ground points. We used the tie-points to carry out a photogrammetric block adjustment, which improves the image pointing and the accuracy of (3D) ground points from about 850 m to approximately 55 m. Subsequently, we applied high density (pixel-by-pixel) multi-image matching to derive about 45 billion tie-points. Benefitting from improved image pointing data, we compute about 6.3 billion surface points. By interpolation, we g...

  18. The DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX3 associates with export messenger ribonucleoproteins as well as tip-associated protein and participates in translational control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ming-Chih; Lee, Yan-Hwa Wu; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2008-09-01

    Nuclear export of mRNA is tightly linked to transcription, nuclear mRNA processing, and subsequent maturation in the cytoplasm. Tip-associated protein (TAP) is the major nuclear mRNA export receptor, and it acts coordinately with various factors involved in mRNA expression. We screened for protein factors that associate with TAP and identified several candidates, including RNA helicase DDX3. We demonstrate that DDX3 directly interacts with TAP and that its association with TAP as well as mRNA ribonucleoprotein complexes may occur in the nucleus. Depletion of TAP resulted in nuclear accumulation of DDX3, suggesting that DDX3 is, at least in part, exported along with messenger ribonucleoproteins to the cytoplasm via the TAP-mediated pathway. Moreover, the observation that DDX3 localizes transiently in cytoplasmic stress granules under cell stress conditions suggests a role for DDX3 in translational control. Indeed, DDX3 associates with translation initiation complexes. However, DDX3 is probably not critical for general mRNA translation but may instead promote efficient translation of mRNAs containing a long or structured 5' untranslated region. Given that the DDX3 RNA helicase activity is essential for its involvement in translation, we suggest that DDX3 facilitates translation by resolving secondary structures of the 5'-untranslated region in mRNAs during ribosome scanning.

  19. A study of ribonucleoproteins: The sequence of rabbit 18S ribosomal RNA and the identification of proteins associated with messenger RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connaughton, J.F. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    This study considers the functional role of ribosomal RNA and messenger ribonucleoproteins in the translational regulation of gene expression. The primary structure of rabbit 18S ribosomal RNA was determined by nucleotide sequence analysis of the RNA directly. Rabbit 18S RNA was cleaved with either T{sub 1} ribonuclease or RNase H, using a Pst 1 DNA linker to generate a unique set of overlapping fragments spanning the entire molecule. Both intact and fragmented 18S RNA were end-labeled with {sup 32}P and base-specifically cleaved enzymatically and chemically. Nucleotide sequences were determined from long polyacrylamide sequencing gels run in formamide. To assess functional roles of RNA in gene expression, specific mRNA-protein interactions were also examined. Eukaryotic mRNA is associated with specific proteins that may be important in translational regulation and mRNA stability; mRNP complexes were reconstituted in a message-dependent, cell-free rabbit reticulocyte translation system, using unique mRNA species transcribed in vitro with SP6 polymerase. Transcripts of both rabbit and human {beta}-globin cDNA were labeled with {sup 32}P either throughout the molecule ore selectively at the 5{prime} and 3{prime} terminus.

  20. Arnold Sommerfeld. Atomic physicist and messenger of culture 1868-1951. A biography; Arnold Sommerfeld. Atomphysiker und Kulturbote 1868-1951. Eine Biografie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckert, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Arnold Sommerfeld is beside Albert Einstein, Niels Bohr, and Max Planck one of the founders of modern atomic and quantum theory. His career began in the 1890th years at the University of Goettingen, the world center of mathematics of that time. Since 1906 he created on the professorship for theoretical physics at the Munich university one of the most important schools of science, the students of which are well-known theorists of the atomic era like as the Nobel-price winners Hans Bethe, Peter Debye, Wolfgang Pauli, and Werner Heisenberg. He also developed far beyond his subject an unprecedented impact. He travelled as ''messenger of culture'' in many countries in order to advertise in the years after the first world war for the reputation of Germany as culture nation. By the nationalsocialism the Munich ''nursery of theoretical physics'' however was prepared an inglorious end, because Sommerfeld counted for a ''main propagandist of Jewish theories''. By the example of this life of a physicist also the eventful history of a whole subject.

  1. Involvement of second messengers in the signaling pathway of vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone and their effects on vitellogenin mRNA expression in the whiteleg shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sun-Hye; Okutsu, Tomoyuki; Tsutsui, Naoaki; Kang, Bong Jung; Chen, Hsiang-Yin; Wilder, Marcy N

    2017-05-15

    We incubated fragments of Litopenaeus vannamei ovary to investigate second messengers involved in the regulation of vitellogenin (vg) mRNA levels. The use of 100nM recombinant vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone (VIH) (corresponding to recombinant L. vannamei sinus gland peptide-G: rLiv-SGP-G) significantly reduced vg mRNA expression in sub-adults after 8h incubation to less than 20% of the control. The concentration of intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) increased 3.2-fold relative to the control after 2h incubation with rLiv-SGP-G. However, it reached levels 18-fold relative to the control after 0.5h incubation with rLiv-SGP-G where 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (a phosphodiesterase inhibitor) was also added. Moreover, vg mRNA expression was significantly reduced to less than 50% of the control after 24h incubation with 1μM A23187 (a calcium ionophore). Thus, rLiv-SGP-G and calcium ionophore reduced vg mRNA expression in in vitro-cultured ovary, and cGMP may be involved in the signaling pathway of VIH. Overall, the above results suggest that vg mRNA expression might be inhibited in vitro by increasing intracellular cGMP and Ca(2+) in L. vannamei ovary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Delivery of messenger RNA using poly(ethylene imine)-poly(ethylene glycol)-copolymer blends for polyplex formation: biophysical characterization and in vitro transfection properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debus, Heiko; Baumhof, Patrick; Probst, Jochen; Kissel, Thomas

    2010-12-20

    Nucleic acid based therapies have so far mainly been focused on plasmid DNA (pDNA), small interfering RNA (siRNA), antisense and immunostimulatory oligonucleotides. Messenger RNA (mRNA) was the subject of only a few studies. The objective of this investigation was the preparation of new composite polyplexes with mRNA consisting of poly(ethylene imine) (PEI) and poly(ethylene imine)-poly(ethylene glycol)-copolymers (PEI-PEG) as blends. These complexes were designed to increase the stability of mRNA, to improve transfection efficiency and to reduce cytotoxicity. Hydrodynamic diameters of the polyplexes were measured by dynamic light scattering, polyplex stability was analyzed by gel retardation assay and transfection efficiency of luciferase (Luc) encoding mRNA was evaluated under in vitro conditions. Most of the polyplexes generated showed small particle sizes application of mRNA merit further investigation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Consequence of nigrostriatal denervation and L-dopa therapy on the expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase messenger RNA in the pallidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, M T; Levy, R; Ruberg, M; Luquin, M R; Villares, J; Guillen, J; Faucheux, B; Javoy-Agid, F; Guridi, J; Agid, Y; Obeso, J A; Hirsch, E C

    1996-07-01

    To examine the consequences of nigrostriatal denervation and L-dopa treatment on the basal ganglia output system, we analyzed, by quantitative in situ hybridization, the messenger RNA coding for glutamic acid decarboxylase (Mr 67,000) (GAD67 mRNA) in pallidal cells from patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), monkeys rendered parkinsonian by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) receiving or not receiving L-dopa, and their respective control subjects. In MPTP-treated monkeys, the expression of GAD67 mRNA was increased in cells from the internal pallidum, and this effect was abolished by L-dopa treatment. There were no differences in the levels of GAD67 mRNA between patients with PD, who were all treated with L-dopa, and control subjects. These results indicate that the level of GAD67 mRNA is increased in the cells of the internal pallidum after nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation and that this increase can be reversed by L-dopa therapy.

  4. Intestinal adaptation after extensive small bowel resection: differential changes in growth and insulin-like growth factor system messenger ribonucleic acids in jejunum and ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, T R; Mantell, M P; Chow, J C; Rombeau, J L; Smith, R J

    1998-07-01

    The distal small bowel exhibits greater adaptive growth than proximal segments after partial small intestine resection. To explore this process, we evaluated adaptive cellularity, intestinal insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts, and effects of recombinant IGF-I treatment in jejunum and ileum of adult rats. Gastrostomy-fed animals underwent 80% jejuno-ileal resection or intestinal transection and reanastomosis without resection, followed by infusion of human recombinant IGF-I (2.4 mg/kgXday) or vehicle. After 7 days, resected rats demonstrated modest adaptive growth in jejunum and marked cell proliferation in ileum. Resection increased IGF-I mRNA in both jejunum (183%) and ileum (249%) and up-regulated IGFBP-4 mRNA levels in both tissues. IGFBP-3 mRNA fell significantly in ileum after resection. IGF-I infusion modestly increased ileal cellularity after resection, but had no effect in jejunum. IGF-I markedly increased IGFBP-3 mRNA levels in jejunum after both transection and resection. These data confirm that bowel resection induces greater adaptive growth in ileum than jejunum. IGF-I administration modestly increases ileal, but not jejunal, growth after resection. Increased levels of intestinal IGF-I and IGFBP-4 mRNA suggest roles for IGF-I and IGFBP-4 in mediating small bowel adaptation. Higher levels of jejunal IGFBP-3 mRNA may be related to limited jejunal vs. ileal growth after extensive jejuno-ileal resection.

  5. Skeletal muscle microRNA and messenger RNA profiling in cofilin-2 deficient mice reveals cell cycle dysregulation hindering muscle regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah U Morton

    Full Text Available Congenital myopathies are rare skeletal muscle diseases presenting in early age with hypotonia and weakness often linked to a genetic defect. Mutations in the gene for cofilin-2 (CFL2 have been identified in several families as a cause of congenital myopathy with nemaline bodies and cores. Here we explore the global messenger and microRNA expression patterns in quadriceps muscle samples from cofillin-2-null mice and compare them with sibling-matched wild-type mice to determine the molecular pathways and mechanisms involved. Cell cycle processes are markedly dysregulated, with altered expression of genes involved in mitotic spindle formation, and evidence of loss of cell cycle checkpoint regulation. Importantly, alterations in cell cycle, apoptosis and proliferation pathways are present in both mRNA and miRNA expression patterns. Specifically, p21 transcript levels were increased, and the expression of p21 targets, such as cyclin D and cyclin E, was decreased. We therefore hypothesize that deficiency of cofilin-2 is associated with interruption of the cell cycle at several checkpoints, hindering muscle regeneration. Identification of these pathways is an important step towards developing appropriate therapies against various congenital myopathies.

  6. Associations of B- and C-Raf with cholesterol, phosphatidylserine, and lipid second messengers: preferential binding of Raf to artificial lipid rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekman, Mirko; Hamm, Heike; Villar, Ana V; Bader, Benjamin; Kuhlmann, Jurgen; Nickel, Joachim; Rapp, Ulf R

    2002-07-01

    The serine/threonine kinase C-Raf is a key mediator in cellular signaling. Translocation of Raf to membranes has been proposed to be facilitated by Ras proteins in their GTP-bound state. In this study we provide evidence that both purified B- and C-Raf kinases possess lipophilic properties and associate with phospholipid membranes. In the presence of phosphatidylserine and lipid second messengers such as phosphatidic acid and ceramides these associations were very specific with affinity constants (K(D)) in the range of 0.5-50 nm. Raf association with liposomes was accompanied by displacement of 14-3-3 proteins and inhibition of Raf kinase activities. Interactions of Raf with cholesterol are of particular interest, since cholesterol has been shown to be involved, together with sphingomyelin and glycerophospholipids in the formation of specialized lipid microdomains called rafts. We demonstrate here that purified Raf proteins have moderate binding affinity for cholesterol. However, under conditions of lipid raft formation, Raf association with cholesterol (or rafts) increased dramatically. Since ceramides also support formation of rafts and interact with Raf we propose that Raf may be present at the plasma membrane in two distinct microdomains: in raft regions via association with cholesterol and ceramides and in non-raft regions due to interaction with phosphatidylserine and phosphatidic acid. At either location Raf kinase activity was inhibited by lipid binding in the absence or presence of Ras. Ras-Raf interactions with full-length C-Raf were studied both in solution and in phospholipid environment. Ras association with Raf was GTP dependent as previously demonstrated for C-Raf-RBD fragments. In the presence of liposomes the recruitment of C-Raf by reconstituted Ras-farnesyl was only marginal, since almost 70% of added C-Raf was bound by the lipids alone. Thus Ras-Raf binding in response to activation of Ras-coupled receptors may utilize Raf protein that is

  7. Disc distraction shows evidence of regenerative potential in degenerated intervertebral discs as evaluated by protein expression, magnetic resonance imaging, and messenger ribonucleic acid expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guehring, Thorsten; Omlor, Georg W; Lorenz, Helga; Engelleiter, Karl; Richter, Wiltrud; Carstens, Claus; Kroeber, Markus

    2006-07-01

    An animal model of degeneration was used to determine the effects of disc distraction, and was evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as gene and protein expression levels. To investigate gene expression and MRI effects of distraction. Disc degeneration can result from hyper-physiologic loading. Distracted discs with degeneration showed histologic signs of tissue recovery. There were 18 rabbits that underwent 28 days of compression (200 N) to induce moderate disc degeneration followed by 28 days of distraction (120 N; attached and loaded distraction device) or sham distraction (attached but unloaded distraction device). Comparison was performed with 56 days of compressed discs without distraction. Quantitative outcome measures were MRI signal intensity and gene expression analysis to determine: messenger ribonucleic acid levels for extracellular matrix genes, including collagen 1, collagen 2, biglycan, decorin, aggrecan, fibromodulin, and osteonectin; and matrix-regulative genes, including matrix metalloproteinase-13, tissue-inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1, and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2. Immunohistology was performed for collagen 2 and BMP-2 to label cells semiquantitatively by staining of the cell-surrounding matrix. A total of 28 days of compression decreased signal intensity. Distraction over the same period reestablished physiologic signal intensity, however, a persistent reduction was found in sham distraction. Distraction resulted in gene expression up-regulation of collagen 1 (5.4-fold), collagen 2 (5.5-fold), biglycan (7.7-fold), and decorin (3.4-fold), while expression of fibromodulin (0.16-fold), tissue-inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (0.05-fold), and BMP-2 (0.15-fold) was decreased, as compared with 56 days compression. Distracted discs showed more BMP-2 (19.67 vs. 3.67 in 56 days compression) and collagen 2 (18.67 vs. 11.33 in 56 days compression) positive cells per field. Distraction results in disc rehydration

  8. Effects of estradiol-17beta administration on steady-state messenger ribonucleic acid (MRNA) encoding equine alpha and LH/CGbeta subunits in pituitaries of ovariectomized pony mares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, D C; Wolfe, M W; Cleaver, B D; Nilson, J

    2001-03-15

    The process of sexual recrudescence in the springtime in mares is characterized by renewal of follicular growth and acquisition of steroidogenic competence. Concomitant with renewal of follicular steroidogenesis is re-establishment of LH biosynthesis and secretion. Research results from our laboratory indicate that increased estradiol and LH secretion occur in close temporal association before the first ovulation of the year. Therefore, the hypothesis tested in this experiment was that estrogen administration to ovariectomized pony mares during the equivalent time of early vernal transition would enhance LH biosynthesis as monitored by messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) encoding for the pituitary subunits of LH (alpha and LH/CGbeta). Mares were administered either sesame oil vehicle control, or estradiol (5 mg i.m. twice daily in sesame oil) for 3, 6 or 9 days, beginning on February 2. The pituitary glands were harvested, and examined for LH subunit mRNA by Northern Blot and slot blot analysis. There was a significant increase in LH secretion after 6 days of estradiol secretion compared with control vehicle administration. Similarly, there was a significant increase in both alpha and LH/CGbeta subunit mRNA when estradiol was administered for 9 days. These data indicate that estrogen stimulates LH subunit formation in mares during early equivalent vernal transition. These data do not, however, discriminate between a direct pituitary effect of estrogen, and a hypothalamic effect. Whether the surge of estradiol just prior to the first ovulation of the year is essential for the renewed biosynthesis of LH subunits cannot be determined from these data. However an important role of estrogen in the final stages of sexual recrudescence is indicated.

  9. Polyamine regulates tolerance to water stress in leaves of white clover associated with antioxidant defense and dehydrin genes via involvement in calcium messenger system and hydrogen peroxide signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou eLi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous polyamine (PA may play a critical role in tolerance to water stress in plants acting as a signaling molecule activator. Water stress caused increases in endogenous PA content in leaves, including putrescine (Put, spermidine (Spd, and spermine (Spm. Exogenous application of Spd could induce the instantaneous H2O2 burst and accumulation of cytosolic free Ca2+, and activate NADPH oxidase and CDPK gene expression in cells. To a great extent, PA biosynthetic inhibitor reduced the water stress-induced H2O2 accumulation, free cytosolic Ca2+ release, antioxidant enzyme activities and genes expression leading to aggravate water stress-induced oxidative damage, while these suppressing effects were alleviated by the addition of exogenous Spd, indicating PA was involved in water stress-induced H2O2 and cytosolic free Ca2+ production as well as stress tolerance. Dehydrin genes (Y2SK, Y2K, and SK2 were showed to be highly responsive to exogenous Spd. PA-induced antioxidant defense and dehydrin genes expression could be blocked by the scavenger of H2O2 and the inhibitors of H2O2 generation or Ca2+ channels blockers, a calmodulin antagonist, as well as the inhibitor of CDPK. These findings suggested that PA regulated tolerance to water stress in white clover associated with antioxidant defenses and dehydrins via involvement in the calcium messenger system and H2O2 signaling pathways. PA-induced H2O2 production required Ca2+ release, while PA-induced Ca2+ release was also essential for H2O2 production, suggesting an interaction between PA-induced H2O2 and Ca2+ signaling.

  10. In situ changes in the relative abundance of human epidermal cytokine messenger RNA levels following exposure to the poison ivy/oak contact allergen urushiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, K D; Yun, J K; Strohl, K P; Trefzer, U; Häffner, A; Elmets, C A

    1996-06-01

    Abstract: Epidermal keratinocytes in culture have been shown to produce many cytokines, and their proteins have been identified in skin tissue samples. It has therefore been assumed that these cytokines are transcribed in vivo by the epidermis in response to contact allergens. In this report, in situ hybridization was used to detect the messenger RNAs for interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in samples of human skin prior to and at various times after application of urushiol, the immunogenic component of poison ivy/oak. In sensitive subjects, IL-1 alpha and TNF-alpha mRNAs showed a progressive increase in transcript levels that paralleled the clinical and histological features of the inflammatory process. The time-course of the IL-1 beta response differed from that of IL-1 alpha and TNF-alpha, in that there was an early (by 6 h after urushiol administration) elevation in IL-1 beta mRNA that occurred before there was evidence of inflammation and had returned to background levels by 72 h when the reaction had reached its peak. In contrast to urushiol-sensitive subjects, urushiol-anergic individuals did not exhibit an increase in IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta or TNF-alpha mRNA levels. The data provide evidence for an in vivo role for epidermal IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha transcription in the regulation of IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha polypeptide levels in the epidermis in response to this common contact allergen.

  11. Evaluation of a Salmonella Strain Lacking the Secondary Messenger C-di-GMP and RpoS as a Live Oral Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Begoña; Gil, Carmen; García-Ona, Enrique; Burgui, Saioa; Casares, Noelia; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Lasarte, Juan José; Lasa, Iñigo

    2016-01-01

    Salmonellosis is one of the most important bacterial zoonotic diseases transmitted through the consumption of contaminated food, with chicken and pig related products being key reservoirs of infection. Although numerous studies on animal vaccination have been performed in order to reduce Salmonella prevalence, there is still a need for an ideal vaccine. Here, with the aim of constructing a novel live attenuated Salmonella vaccine candidate, we firstly analyzed the impact of the absence of cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) in Salmonella virulence. C-di-GMP is an intracellular second messenger that controls a wide range of bacterial processes, including biofilm formation and synthesis of virulence factors, and also modulates the host innate immune response. Our results showed that a Salmonella multiple mutant in the twelve genes encoding diguanylate cyclase proteins that, as a consequence, cannot synthesize c-di-GMP, presents a moderate attenuation in a systemic murine infection model. An additional mutation of the rpoS gene resulted in a synergic attenuating effect that led to a highly attenuated strain, referred to as ΔXIII, immunogenic enough to protect mice against a lethal oral challenge of a S. Typhimurium virulent strain. ΔXIII immunogenicity relied on activation of both antibody and cell mediated immune responses characterized by the production of opsonizing antibodies and the induction of significant levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-17 and IL-10. ΔXIII was unable to form a biofilm and did not survive under desiccation conditions, indicating that it could be easily eliminated from the environment. Moreover, ΔXIII shows DIVA features that allow differentiation of infected and vaccinated animals. Altogether, these results show ΔXIII as a safe and effective live DIVA vaccine. PMID:27537839

  12. Comparative Diagnosis of Human Bocavirus 1 Respiratory Infection With Messenger RNA Reverse-Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), DNA Quantitative PCR, and Serology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Man; Arku, Benedict; Jartti, Tuomas; Koskinen, Janne; Peltola, Ville; Hedman, Klaus; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria

    2017-05-15

    Human bocavirus (HBoV) 1 can cause life-threatening respiratory tract infection in children. Diagnosing acute HBoV1 infection is challenging owing to long-term airway persistence. We assessed whether messenger RNA (mRNA) detection would correlate better than DNA detection with acute HBoV1 infection. Paired serum samples from 121 children with acute wheezing were analyzed by means of serology. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse-transcription (RT) PCR were applied to nasopharyngeal swab (NPS) samples from all acutely HBoV1-infected children and from controls with nonacute infection. By serology, 16 of 121 children (13.2%) had acute HBoV1 infection, all of whom had HBoV1 DNA in NPS samples, and 12 of 16 (75%) had HBoV1 mRNA. Among 25 children with nondiagnostic results, 6 had HBoV1 DNA in NPS samples, and 1 had mRNA. All 13 mRNA-positive samples exhibited high DNA loads (≥106 copies/mL). No mRNA persisted for 2 weeks, whereas HBoV1 DNA persisted for 2 months in 4 children; 1 year later all 15 samples were DNA negative. Compared with serology, DNA PCR had high clinical sensitivity (100%) but, because of viral persistence, low specificity (76%). In contrast, mRNA RT-PCR had low clinical sensitivity (75%) but high specificity (96%). A combination of HBoV1 serology and nasopharyngeal DNA quantitative PCR and mRNA RT-PCR should be used for accurate diagnosis of HBoV1 infection.

  13. Role of Dopaminergic D2 Receptors in the Regulation of Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Messenger RNA in the Striatum of the Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caboche, Jocelyne; Vernier, Philippe; Rogard, Monique; Julien, Jean-François; Mallet, Jacques; Besson, Marie-Jo

    1992-01-01

    Levels of messenger RNA (mRNA) encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and preproenkephalin (PPE) were measured by Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses in the striatum of the rat, after chronic injections of two neuroleptics, sulpiride and haloperidol. The Northern blot analysis showed that the chronic injection of sulpiride at high doses (80 mg/kg, twice a day, 14 days) increased striatal GAD and PPE mRNA levels by 120% and 78% respectively, when compared to vehicle-injected rats. Haloperidol injections at relatively low doses (1 mg/kg, once a day, 14 days) produced parallel increases in GAD (40%) and PPE (52%) mRNA levels. After in situ hybridization densitometric measurements were performed on autoradiograms from rats treated with sulpiride, haloperidol or vehicle. The distribution of GAD and PPE mRNA signals in control rats was homogeneous along the rostrocaudal extension of the striatum. A similar increase was found along this axis after sulpiride (20%) and haloperidol (30%) treatments. The cellular observation of hybridization signals showed that grain density for GAD mRNA was increased in a majority of striatal cells after both treatments. By contrast, the PPE mRNA hybridization signal only increased in a subpopulation of neurons. The effects of such treatments were also analysed by measuring GAD activity in the striatum and in its output structures, the globus pallidus and the substantia nigra. After the administration of sulpiride, GAD activity was not modified in the striatum but increased in the globus pallidus (by 17%). After haloperidol treatment, GAD activity was increased in the globus pallidus (20%) and the substantia nigra (17%). It is concluded that the interruption of dopaminergic transmission, more precisely the D2 receptor blockade, promotes in striatopallidal neurons an increase in GAD mRNA accompanied by an increase in GAD activity and PPE mRNA. A possible regulation of GAD mRNA and GAD activity in striatonigral neurons is also

  14. 肿瘤基因信使RNA可变剪接及其应用%Alternative splicing of tumor associated genes messenger RNA and application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鑫桐; 岳文涛

    2014-01-01

    可变剪接作为基因的一种修饰方式,是真核细胞表达调控过程的重要因素。它使同一蛋白质编码基因能够产生多种转录本,极大地扩展了遗传信息的应用。在人类肿瘤细胞中前体信使RN A的可变剪接扮演着重要角色,一些重要基因通过可变剪接产生不同于正常细胞中的剪接异构体。这些肿瘤特异性剪接异构体的存在导致了肿瘤的发生、发展。深入探索肿瘤相关基因的可变剪接对肿瘤的诊断、治疗具有重要意义。%As a way of gene modification,alternative splicing is an important factor of eukaryotic gene expression and regulation.It makes various transcripts from one protein-coding gene,and greatly extends the genetic information.Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNA plays an important role in tumor cells.By alter-native splicing,some important genes can generate splicing variants different from those in normal cells.The existence of tumor-specific splicing variants leads to the occurrence and progression of tumor.Therefore,explo-ration on the alternative splicing of tumor-associated genes may be of great significance in tumor diagnosis and treatment.

  15. Glutathione Regulates 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Synthase Transcription via WRKY33 and 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Oxidase by Modulating Messenger RNA Stability to Induce Ethylene Synthesis during Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Riddhi; Kumar, Deepak; Sultana, Asma; Hazra, Saptarshi; Bhattacharyya, Dipto; Chattopadhyay, Sharmila

    2015-12-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays a fundamental role in plant defense-signaling network. Recently, we have established the involvement of GSH with ethylene (ET) to combat environmental stress. However, the mechanism of GSH-ET interplay still remains unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that GSH induces ET biosynthesis by modulating the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations of its key enzymes, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (ACS) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO). Transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants with enhanced GSH content (AtECS) exhibited remarkable up-regulation of ACS2, ACS6, and ACO1 at transcript as well as protein levels, while they were down-regulated in the GSH-depleted phytoalexin deficient2-1 (pad2-1) mutant. We further observed that GSH induced ACS2 and ACS6 transcription in a WRKY33-dependent manner, while ACO1 transcription remained unaffected. On the other hand, the messenger RNA stability for ACO1 was found to be increased by GSH, which explains our above observations. In addition, we also identified the ACO1 protein to be a subject for S-glutathionylation, which is consistent with our in silico data. However, S-glutathionylation of ACS2 and ACS6 proteins was not detected. Further, the AtECS plants exhibited resistance to necrotrophic infection and salt stress, while the pad2-1 mutant was sensitive. Exogenously applied GSH could improve stress tolerance in wild-type plants but not in the ET-signaling mutant ethylene insensitive2-1, indicating that GSH-mediated resistance to these stresses occurs via an ET-mediated pathway. Together, our investigation reveals a dual-level regulation of ET biosynthesis by GSH during stress.

  16. Research of covert channel based on GTALK instant messenger protocol%基于GTALK即时通讯协议的隐蔽通道研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许蓉; 吴灏; 张航

    2012-01-01

    To alleviate the weakness of existed network covert channels in anti-detection, GTALK instant messenger protocol is analyzed and, a new method of constructing covert channel based on GTALK chat is proposed, and the detail design and code framework is provided. The legality of GTALK provides protection of the covert channel. In the end some experiments are carried to verify that the covert channel has excellent penetrability and covertness, and some safety suggestions are given to protect against this kind of network covert channel.%针对现有基于公共网络通信协议的网络隐蔽通道易被检测的不足,详细分析了第三方即时通讯协议GTALK,利用GTALK文本消息通信模型,提出了一种基于GTALK即时通讯协议构建网络隐蔽通道的方法,给出了该隐蔽通道方案的详细设计和代码框架,GTALK协议本身的“合法性”为该隐蔽通道的伪装提供了有利条件.实验测试表明,该隐蔽通道具有良好的穿透性和隐蔽性.针对该隐蔽通道可能被恶意利用而带来的危害,给出了几点防御建议.

  17. Characterization and distribution of a maize cDNA encoding a peptide similar to the catalytic region of second messenger dependent protein kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biermann, B.; Johnson, E. M.; Feldman, L. J.

    1990-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays) roots respond to a variety of environmental stimuli which are perceived by a specialized group of cells, the root cap. We are studying the transduction of extracellular signals by roots, particularly the role of protein kinases. Protein phosphorylation by kinases is an important step in many eukaryotic signal transduction pathways. As a first phase of this research we have isolated a cDNA encoding a maize protein similar to fungal and animal protein kinases known to be involved in the transduction of extracellular signals. The deduced sequence of this cDNA encodes a polypeptide containing amino acids corresponding to 33 out of 34 invariant or nearly invariant sequence features characteristic of protein kinase catalytic domains. The maize cDNA gene product is more closely related to the branch of serine/threonine protein kinase catalytic domains composed of the cyclic-nucleotide- and calcium-phospholipid-dependent subfamilies than to other protein kinases. Sequence identity is 35% or more between the deduced maize polypeptide and all members of this branch. The high structural similarity strongly suggests that catalytic activity of the encoded maize protein kinase may be regulated by second messengers, like that of all members of this branch whose regulation has been characterized. Northern hybridization with the maize cDNA clone shows a single 2400 base transcript at roughly similar levels in maize coleoptiles, root meristems, and the zone of root elongation, but the transcript is less abundant in mature leaves. In situ hybridization confirms the presence of the transcript in all regions of primary maize root tissue.

  18. Transcriptional regulation of inhibin beta B messenger ribonucleic acid levels in TM.4 or primary rat Sertoli cells by 8-bromo-cyclic adenosine monophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najmabadi, H; Rosenberg, L A; Yuan, Q X; Reyaz, G; Bhasin, S

    1993-04-01

    FSH, a major regulator of inhibin production in the testis, is believed to exert its effects via cAMP second messenger system. Inhibin alpha-subunit gene appears to be regulated by cAMP and has a palindromic cAMP response element sequence TGACGTCA. However, the regulation of the inhibin beta B-subunit gene by cAMP has been less clear. It has been assumed that beta B may not be regulated by cAMP, based mainly on observations that FSH stimulates only alpha, not beta B, mRNA levels, and that the 5'-up-stream regulatory region of the beta B gene does not contain the classical cAMP response element. However, we have observed that 8-bromo-cAMP stimulates beta B mRNA levels in both primary Sertoli (approximately 2-fold) and TM.4 cells (approximately 5-fold). We examined whether this cAMP-induced increase in beta B mRNA levels is the result of increased transcription or altered mRNA stability. Data from nuclear run-on assays demonstrate about a 2-fold increase in relative mRNA synthesis rates in primary Sertoli-cells and about a 4- to 5-fold increase in TM.4 cells. Transfection studies in TM.4 and JEG.3 cell lines with beta B:luciferase chimeric reporter gene constructs containing 1.5 kilobases of the beta B 5'-up-stream regulatory region revealed marked cAMP induction of reporter gene activity in both cell types.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Gravitational Waves: Elusive Cosmic Messengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest g ravitational wave source for ground-based interferometers such as LIG O, VIRGO, and GE0600, as well as the space-based interferometer LISA. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires t hat we know the radiation waveforms they emit. Since these mergers ta ke place in regions of extreme gravity, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate t hese waveforms. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to comp ute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could comple te even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situ ation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthro ughs. This talk will focus on new simulations that are revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applic ations in gravitational wave detection, data analysis, and astrophysi cs.

  20. Production in vitro by the cytochrome P450 CYP94A1 of major C18 cutin monomers and potential messengers in plant-pathogen interactions: enantioselectivity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinot, F; Benveniste, I; Salaün, J P; Loreau, O; Noël, J P; Schreiber, L; Durst, F

    1999-08-15

    The major C(18) cutin monomers are 18-hydroxy-9,10-epoxystearic and 9,10,18-trihydroxystearic acids. These compounds are also known messengers in plant-pathogen interactions. We have previously shown that their common precursor 9,10-epoxystearic acid was formed by the epoxidation of oleic acid in Vicia sativa microsomes (Pinot, Salaün, Bosch, Lesot, Mioskowski and Durst (1992) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 184, 183-193). Here we determine the chirality of the epoxide produced as (9R,10S) and (9S,10R) in the ratio 90:10 respectively. We further show that microsomes from yeast expressing the cytochrome P450 CYP94A1 are capable of hydroxylating the methyl terminus of 9,10-epoxystearic and 9,10-dihydroxystearic acids in the presence of NADPH to form the corresponding 18-hydroxy derivatives. The reactions were not catalysed by microsomes from yeast transformed with a void plasmid or in absence of NADPH. After incubation of a synthetic racemic mixture of 9,10-epoxystearic acid with microsomes of yeast expressing CYP94A1, the chirality of the residual epoxide was shifted to 66:34 in favour of the (9S,10R) enantiomer. Both enantiomers were incubated separately and V(max)/K(m) values of 16 and 3.42 ml/min per nmol of P450 for (9R, 10S) and (9S,10R) respectively were determined, demonstrating that CYP94A1 is enantioselective for the (9R,10S) enantiomer, which is preferentially formed in V. sativa microsomes. Compared with the epoxide, the diol 9,10-dihydroxystearic acid was a much poorer substrate for the omega-hydroxylase, with a measured V(max)/K(m) of 0.33 ml/min per nmol of P450. Our results indicate that the activity of CYP94A1 is strongly influenced by the stereochemistry of the 9, 10-epoxide and the nature of substituents on carbons 9 and 10, with V(max)/K(m) values for epoxide>oleic acid>diol.

  1. Acceptability and Accuracy of Cervical Cancer Screening Using a Self-Collected Tampon for HPV Messenger-RNA Testing among HIV-Infected Women in South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C Adamson

    Full Text Available HIV increases women's risk for high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV infection and invasive cervical cancer. South Africa has a high HIV prevalence but low cervical cancer screening coverage. Self-collection of cervical specimens and hrHPV testing, including hrHPV messenger-RNA (mRNA testing, are methods aimed at increasing screening rates. However, data are limited on the acceptability and accuracy of tampon-based self-collection for hrHPV mRNA testing in HIV-infected women.We recruited 325 HIV-infected women seeking care at a government HIV clinic in Pretoria, South Africa. A clinician performed a pelvic examination and obtained an endocervical specimen. Study participants performed self-collection using a tampon. Both clinician- and self-collected specimens were tested for hrHPV mRNA. Acceptability of both collection methods was assessed, the prevalence of hrHPV mRNA in our study population was estimated, test positivity of the two collection methods were compared, and test agreement was assessed by calculating the κ-statistic, sensitivity, and specificity.Over 90% of women reported no difficulties self-collecting specimens and 82% were willing to perform the tampon-collection at home. Based on clinician-collection specimens, the prevalence of hrHPV mRNA in our study population was 36.7% (95% CI: 31.4%- 42.0%. There was no difference in test positivity between clinician-collection, 36.7%, and tampon-collection, 43.5% (p-value = 0.08. Using clinician-collection as the reference test, the sensitivity and specificity for hrHPV mRNA of tampon-collection were 77.4% (95% CI: 69.8-85.0% and 77.8% (95% CI: 71.9-83.6%, respectively.Tampon-based self-collection is acceptable to women and has similar hrHPV mRNA positivity rates as clinician-collection, but has reduced sensitivity and specificity compared to clinician-collection. The hrHPV mRNA prevalence in our study population is high, but similar to other high-risk populations, and highlights the

  2. The effects of orbital spaceflight on bone histomorphometry and messenger ribonucleic acid levels for bone matrix proteins and skeletal signaling peptides in ovariectomized growing rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavolina, J. M.; Evans, G. L.; Harris, S. A.; Zhang, M.; Westerlind, K. C.; Turner, R. T.

    1997-01-01

    A 14-day orbital spaceflight was performed using ovariectomized Fisher 344 rats to determine the combined effects of estrogen deficiency and near weightlessness on tibia radial bone growth and cancellous bone turnover. Twelve ovariectomized rats with established cancellous osteopenia were flown aboard the space shuttle Columbia (STS-62). Thirty ovariectomized rats were housed on earth as ground controls: 12 in animal enclosure modules, 12 in vivarium cages, and 6 killed the day of launch for baseline measurements. An additional 18 ovary-intact rats were housed in vivarium cages as ground controls: 8 rats were killed as baseline controls and the remaining 10 rats were killed 14 days later. Ovariectomy increased periosteal bone formation at the tibia-fibula synostosis; cancellous bone resorption and formation in the secondary spongiosa of the proximal tibial metaphysis; and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels for the prepro-alpha2(1) subunit of type 1 collagen, osteocalcin, transforming growth factor-beta, and insulin-like growth factor I in the contralateral proximal tibial metaphysis and for the collagen subunit in periosteum pooled from tibiae and femora and decreased cancellous bone area. Compared to ovariectomized weight-bearing rats, the flight group experienced decreases in periosteal bone formation, collagen subunit mRNA levels, and cancellous bone area. The flight rats had a small decrease in the cancellous mineral apposition rate, but no change in the calculated bone formation rate. Also, spaceflight had no effect on cancellous osteoblast and osteoclast perimeters or on mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins and signaling peptides. On the other hand, spaceflight resulted in an increase in bone resorption, as ascertained from the diminished retention of a preflight fluorochrome label. This latter finding suggests that osteoclast activity was increased. In a follow-up ground-based experiment, unilateral sciatic neurotomy of ovariectomized rats resulted in cancellous

  3. Regional age-related changes in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS, messenger RNA levels and activity in SAMP8 brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guidon Gérard

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitric oxide (NO is a multifunctional molecule synthesized by three isozymes of the NO synthase (NOSs acting as a messenger/modulator and/or a potential neurotoxin. In rodents, the role of NOSs in sleep processes and throughout aging is now well established. For example, sleep parameters are highly deteriorated in senescence accelerated-prone 8 (SAMP8 mice, a useful animal model to study aging or age-associated disorders, while the inducible form of NOS (iNOS is down-regulated within the cortex and the sleep-structures of the brainstem. Evidence is now increasing for a role of iNOS and resulting oxidative stress but not for the constitutive expressed isozyme (nNOS. To better understand the role of nNOS in the behavioural impairments observed in SAMP8 versus SAMR1 (control animals, we evaluated age-related variations occurring in the nNOS expression and activity and nitrites/nitrates (NOx- levels, in three brain areas (n = 7 animals in each group. Calibrated reverse transcriptase (RT and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR and biochemical procedures were used. Results We found that the levels of nNOS mRNA decreased in the cortex and the hippocampus of 8- vs 2-month-old animals followed by an increase in 12-vs 8-month-old animals in both strains. In the brainstem, levels of nNOS mRNA decreased in an age-dependent manner in SAMP8, but not in SAMR1. Regional age-related changes were also observed in nNOS activity. Moreover, nNOS activity in hippocampus was found lower in 8-month-old SAMP8 than in SAMR1, while in the cortex and the brainstem, nNOS activities increased at 8 months and afterward decreased with age in SAMP8 and SAMR1. NOx- levels showed profiles similar to nNOS activities in the cortex and the brainstem but were undetectable in the hippocampus of SAMP8 and SAMR1. Finally, NOx- levels were higher in the cortex of 8 month-old SAMP8 than in age-matched SAMR1. Conclusion Concomitant variations occurring in NO levels

  4. Regulation of progesterone receptor messenger ribonucleic acid in the rat medial preoptic nucleus by estrogenic and antiestrogenic compounds: an in situ hybridization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shughrue, P J; Lane, M V; Merchenthaler, I

    1997-12-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) messenger RNA (mRNA) is concentrated in neurons of the preoptic area and other regions of the rat hypothalamus where it is colocalized with the estrogen receptor and regulated by changes in the steroid hormonal milieu. To date, little is known about the regulation of PR mRNA by estrogens and whether antiestrogenic compounds are capable of modulating its expression. The present studies used in situ hybridization to ascertain the time course of PR mRNA regulation in the medial preoptic nucleus by 17beta-estradiol, determine the effective dose required to elicit a response, and compare the efficacy of 17beta-estradiol with a variety of estrogenic or antiestrogenic compounds. The first series of studies revealed that the treatment of ovariectomized rats with 17beta-estradiol resulted in an increase in PR expression within 2 h, after which it remained elevated until 10 h postinjection and then returned to baseline levels. When ovariectomized rats were injected with 25-1000 ng/kg of 17beta-estradiol and euthanized 6 h later, a dose-dependent increase in the level of PR mRNA was observed, with a maximal response at 1000 ng/kg and an EC50 of 93.5 ng/kg. Subsequent studies evaluated the efficacy of a variety of estrogenic and antiestrogenic compounds in the rat preoptic nucleus. 17Beta-estradiol, diethylstilbestrol, and 17alpha-estradiol all significantly increased the level of PR mRNA, although the degree of induction varied with each compound. The injection of tamoxifen, raloxifene, toremifene, droloxifene, clomiphene, GW 5638, or ICI 182,780 had no significant estrogenic effect on PR gene expression at the dose evaluated. In contrast, when tamoxifen or raloxifene, but not ICI 182,780, was administered in the antagonist mode, a significant dose-related decrease in the estradiol-induced level of PR mRNA was seen in the preoptic area. The results of these studies clearly demonstrate that PR mRNA expression in the rat preoptic area is rapidly

  5. The microRNA and messengerRNA profile of the RNA-induced silencing complex in human primary astrocyte and astrocytoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna J Moser

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: GW/P bodies are cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein-rich foci involved in microRNA (miRNA-mediated messenger RNA (mRNA silencing and degradation. The mRNA regulatory functions within GW/P bodies are mediated by GW182 and its binding partner hAgo2 that bind miRNA in the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC. To date there are no published reports of the profile of miRNA and mRNA targeted to the RISC or a comparison of the RISC-specific miRNA/mRNA profile differences in malignant and non-malignant cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: RISC mRNA and miRNA components were profiled by microarray analysis of malignant human U-87 astrocytoma cells and its non-malignant counterpart, primary human astrocytes. Total cell RNA as well as RNA from immunoprecipitated RISC was analyzed. The novel findings were fourfold: (1 miRNAs were highly enriched in astrocyte RISC compared to U-87 astrocytoma RISC, (2 astrocytoma and primary astrocyte cells each contained unique RISC miRNA profiles as compared to their respective cellular miRNA profiles, (3 miR-195, 10b, 29b, 19b, 34a and 455-3p levels were increased and the miR-181b level was decreased in U-87 astrocytoma RISC as compared to astrocyte RISC, and (4 the RISC contained decreased levels of mRNAs in primary astrocyte and U-87 astrocytoma cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The observation that miR-34a and miR-195 levels were increased in the RISC of U-87 astrocytoma cells suggests an oncogenic role for these miRNAs. Differential regulation of mRNAs by specific miRNAs is evidenced by the observation that three miR34a-targeted mRNAs and two miR-195-targeted mRNAs were downregulated while one miR-195-targeted mRNA was upregulated. Biological pathway analysis of RISC mRNA components suggests that the RISC plays a pivotal role in malignancy and other conditions. This study points to the importance of the RISC and ultimately GW/P body composition and function in miRNA and mRNA deregulation in astrocytoma cells and

  6. Spatial distribution of CYP2B1/2 messenger RNA within the rat liver acinus following exposure to the inducers phenobarbital and dieldrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dail, Mary B; Burgess, Shane C; Meek, Edward C; Wagner, Jennifer; Baravik, Jeffrey; Chambers, Janice E

    2007-09-01

    Traditionally, the liver has been considered a homogeneous organ, but literature suggests that the cytochromes P450 are differentially distributed among the hepatocytes and that the pattern of this distribution is altered by various xenobiotics. In this study, the CYP2B1/2 messenger RNA (mRNA) in the hepatocytes was compared following treatment of rats with either of two inducers, phenobarbital (PB), or dieldrin. Adult male Sprague-Dawley-derived rats were treated with either ip PB in saline at 80 mg/kg/day for 5 days or dieldrin in corn oil by oral gavage at 2.5 mg/kg/day for 13 days. Control rats received ip saline or po corn oil for the same time. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) followed by duplex quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR was used to measure the CYP2B1/2 mRNA produced in bands of hepatocytes isolated from three locations along the sinusoidal path. The amounts of mRNA present in whole liver subsamples were also analyzed. CYP2B1/2 enzyme activity was determined by assaying 16beta-hydroxytestosterone formation. Whole liver mRNA samples exhibited significant induction in CYP2B1/2 transcript levels: sixfold for PB and 2200-fold for dieldrin. All the LCM band samples also showed significant fold induction in CYP2B1/2 mRNA compared to controls. Dieldrin caused marked increases in CYP2B1/2 mRNA levels in the direction of blood flow through the acinus: periportal, 300-fold; midzonal, 600-fold; and centrilobular, 1700-fold. A different pattern of induction was observed in the PB-treated rats: periportal, 1800-fold; midzonal, 8800-fold; and centrilobular, 1600-fold. The present study indicates the differences in spatial responses that can be exhibited within the liver following exposure to various xenobiotics. It also indicates the importance of examining xenobiotic metabolism in the liver in light of its nonhomogeneous, zoned microenvironment.

  7. Onapristone (ZK299) and mifepristone (RU486) regulate the messenger RNA and protein expression levels of the progesterone receptor isoforms A and B in the bovine endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekawiecki, Robert; Kowalik, Magdalena K; Kotwica, Jan

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether progesterone (P(4)) and its antagonists, onapristone (ZK299) and mifepristone (RU486), affect the levels of PGRA and PGRB messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein in the cow uterus which may be important in understanding whether the final physiological effect evoked by an antagonist depends on PGR isoform bound to the antagonist. Endometrial slices on Days 6 to 10 and 17 to 20 of the estrous cycle were treated for 6 or 24 hours for mRNA and protein expression analysis, respectively, with P4, ZK299, or RU486 at a dose of 10(-4), 10(-5), or 10(-6) M. In the samples on Days 6 to 10 of the estrous cycle, PGRAB mRNA was stimulated by P(4) (10(-4) M; P < 0.01) and RU486 (10(-6); P < 0.001) and was decreased by ZK299 (10(-5); P < 0.05). In contrast, PGRB mRNA was decreased by the all P(4) (P < 0.01) and ZK299 (P < 0.001) doses and by two of the RU486 doses (10(-4) M; P < 0.01 and 10(-5) M; P < 0.01). In samples on Days 17 to 20 of the estrous cycle, PGRAB mRNA was stimulated by RU486 (10(-5) M; P < 0.001). PGRB mRNA was decreased by P(4) (10(-4) and 10(-5) M; P < 0.001), ZK299 (10(-4) and 10(-5) M; P < 0.001), and RU486 (10(-4) M; P < 0.01 and 10(-6) M; P < 0.001) and was increased by ZK299 (10(-6) M; P < 0.001) and RU486 (10(-5) M; P < 0.001). In samples on Days 6 to 10 of the estrous cycle, PGRB protein levels were decreased (P < 0.05) by all three ZK299 doses and by two of the RU486 doses (10(-4) M; P < 0.05 and 10(-5) M; P < 0.01). In contrast, in samples on Days 17 to 20, both PGRA and PGRB protein levels were decreased by ZK299 stimulation (10(-5) M; P < 0.05 and 10(-5) M; P < 0.01, respectively), whereas only PGRA protein levels were increased by RU486 (10(-5) M; P < 0.01). Both ZK299 and RU486 may exhibit both agonist and antagonist properties depending on which receptor isoform they affect. As a result, an increase or decrease in the expression of a particular PGR isoform will be observed.

  8. Exploring the Dynamic X-ray Universe (Summarising report of the ISSI-BJ Forum on monitoring the transient X-ray Universe in the multi-messenger era, Beijing, May 6-7, 2014)

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    This white paper is a summarising report of the Forum on monitoring the transient X-ray Universe in the multi-messenger era organized by the International Space Science Institute in Beijing (ISSI-BJ) on May 6-7, 2014. Time-domain astronomy will enter a golden era towards the end of this decade with the advent of major facilities across the electromagnetic spectrum and in the multi-messenger realms of gravitational wave and neutrino. In the soft X-ray regime, the novel micro-pore lobster-eye optics provides a promising technology to realise, for the first time, focusing X-ray optics for wide-angle monitors to achieve a good combination of sensitivity and wide field of view. In this context, Einstein Probe - a soft X-ray all-sky monitor - has been proposed and selected as a candidate mission of priority in the space science programme of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. This report summarises the most important science developments in this field towards 2020 and beyond and how to achieve them technologically, wh...

  9. Effect of Ca2+/CaM Messenger on Drought Resistance of Phyllostachys edulis%Ca2+/CaM信使对毛竹抗旱生理的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜琴; 应叶青; 解楠楠; 方伟

    2012-01-01

    The effect of calcium messenger on main drought resistance physiological indexes of Phyl-lostachys edulis was studied by investigating the activities of antioxidant enzymes, the content of praline, MDA, hydrogen peroxide and soluble protein in Phyllostachys edulis under water stress, after being blocked calcium messenger transduction by EGTA,LaCl3 and heparin,CPZ and CaCl2. Compared with the control,CaCl2 treatment increased SOD, POD and CAT enzyme activity, and soluble protein content, decreased MDA, proline and hydrogen peroxide content. Compared with the control, EGTA, LaCl3 and heparin, and CPZ could increase the hydrogen peroxide content, decrease SOD and CAT enzyme activity, and proline and soluble protein content. However, LaCl3 and heparin led to little changes of MDA content; heparin and CPZ had no obviously effect on POD enzyme activity. The results suggested that Ca2 + /CaM messenger might control drought resistance of Phyllostachys edulis by affecting activities of antioxidant enzymes and contents of proline and soluble protein through different transduction paths to affect them.%为了探讨钙信号对毛竹抗旱生理指标的影响,在水分胁迫下用EGTA、LaCl3、heparin、CPZ和CaCl2处理毛竹幼苗后,研究干旱胁迫下毛竹叶片内保护酶活性、脯氨酸、丙二醛、过氧化氢和可溶性蛋白的变化.结果表明:与对照相比,CaCl2处理明显提高了毛竹叶片保护酶活性和可溶性蛋白含量,降低了MDA、脯氨酸和过氧化氢含量;EGTA、LaCl3 、heparin和CPZ处理提高了毛竹过氧化氢含量,抑制了SOD和CAT活性的上升,破坏了脯氨酸和可溶性蛋白的积累.但LaCl3和heparin处理对MDA含量的影响不大,heparin和CPZ处理对POD活性没有显著影响.这些结果暗示Ca2+/CaM信使可能主要通过调节抗氧化酶活性、脯氨酸和可溶性蛋白提高毛竹对干旱的适应性,且通过不同的传递路径调节以上生理指标.

  10. 即时通讯软件文件传输审计系统的研究与实现%Research and implementation of files audit system for instant messenger

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董苹苹; 王建新; 孙志慧; 马宇超

    2012-01-01

    已有的网络行为审计软件没有针对即时通讯软件(IM)的文件传输记录模块.通过搭建协议分析环境,根据主流即时通讯软件通信数据明文传输的特点,利用网络捕包工具,并采用逆推方法,对多种即时通讯软件(IM)(QQ,Fetion,MSN和雅虎通等)文件传输协议进行深入分析,设计并实现一个IM文件传输审计系统(FAudit).FAudit系统基于Libpcap库捕获数据包,提取应用层数据,应用特有的文件重组算法,通过计算网络数据包的ACK和SEQ数,对数据包进行过滤、排序、解压、重组和写入,最后还原出用户传输的文件.测试结果表明:FAudit系统可在不同网络环境特别是网络环境突变、网络状况异常恶劣的情况下,有效地审计各类IM传输的各种类型(DOC,PDF,TXT和视频等)和大小的文件,同时还可解决即时通讯软件版本升级带来的系统升级问题.%Since most network behavior audit software cannot record files sent by instant messenger (IM), based on the exoteric communication data between popular instant messenger client softwares, using sniffer tools, the unopened and non-uniform file transmitting protocols of those software were analyzed in converse way. And a new network behavior audit system (FAudit) was presented on the base of analysis on IMs files transmission protocol. As IMs file packets were captured based on Libpcap database, application layer data was extracted, the ACK number and SEQ number were analyzed, and then the packets were recovered from the original file by filtering ordering, decompression, reassembling and writing. The simulation results show that FAudit can audit all formats of files (such as DOC, PDF, TXT and videos) with arbitrary size in different network environments no matter however bad it is. At the same time FAudit can be extended to other kinds of IMs.

  11. Experiment K-7-22: Growth Hormone Regulation Synthesis and Secretion in Microgravity. Part 2; Hypothalamic Growth Hormone-Releasing Factor, Somatostatin Immunoreactivity, and Messenger RNA Levels in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawchenko, P. E.; Arias, C.; Krasnov, I.; Grindeland, R. E.; Vale, W.

    1994-01-01

    Immunohistochemical analyses of hypothalamic hormones carried out on tissue from rats flown on an earlier flight (Cosmos 1887) suggested preferential effects on hypophysiotropic principles involved in the regulation of growth hormone secretion and synthesis. We found that staining in the median eminence for peptides that provide both stimulatory (growth hormone-releasing factor, or GRF) and inhibitory (somatostatin, SS) influences on growth hormone secretion were depressed in flight animals relative to synchronous controls, while staining for other neuroendocrine peptides, cortocotropin-releasing factor and arginine vasopressin, were similar in these two groups. While this suggests some selective impact of weightlessness on the two principal central nervous system regulators of growth hormone dynamics, the fact that both GRF- and SS-immunoreactivity (IR) appeared affected in the same direction is somewhat problematic, and makes tentative any intimation that effects on CNS control mechanisms may be etiologically significant contributors to the sequelae of reduced growth hormone secretion seen in prolonged space flight. To provide an additional, and more penetrating, analysis we attempted in hypothalamic material harvested from animals flown on Cosmos 2044 to complement immunohistochemical analyses of GRF and SS staining with quantitative, in situ assessments of messenger RNAs encoding the precursors for both these hormones.

  12. Mercury and frame-dragging in light of the MESSENGER flybys: conflict with general relativity, poor knowledge of the physical properties of the Sun, data reduction artifact, or still insufficient observations?

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    The Lense-Thirring precession of the longitude of perihelion of Mercury, as predicted by general relativity by using the value of the Sun's angular momentum S = 190 x 10^39 kg m^2 s^-1 from helioseismology, is -2.0 milliarcseconds per century, computed in a celestial equatorial reference frame. It disagrees at 4-{\\sigma} level with the correction 0.4 +/- 0.6 milliarcseconds per century to the standard Newtonian/Einsteinian precession. It was recently determined in a global fit with the INPOP10a ephemerides to a long planetary data record (1914-2010) including also 3 data points collected in 2008-2009 from the MESSENGER spacecraft. The INPOP10a models did not include the solar gravitomagnetic field at all, so that its signature might have partly been removed in the data reduction process. On the other hand, the Lense-Thirring precession may have been canceled to a certain extent by the competing precession caused by a small mismodeling in the quadrupole mass moment of the Sun, actually modeled, of the order of...

  13. High-fat diet-induced reduction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α messenger RNA levels and oxidative capacity in the soleus muscle of rats with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatomo, Fumiko; Fujino, Hidemi; Kondo, Hiroyo; Takeda, Isao; Tsuda, Kinsuke; Ishihara, Akihiko

    2012-02-01

    Animal models of type 2 diabetes exhibit reduced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) messenger RNA (mRNA) levels, which are associated with decreased oxidative capacity, in skeletal muscles. In contrast, animal models with metabolic syndrome show normal PGC-1α mRNA levels. We hypothesized that a high-fat diet decreases PGC-1α mRNA levels in skeletal muscles of rats with metabolic syndrome, reducing muscle oxidative capacity and accelerating metabolic syndrome or inducing type 2 diabetes. We examined mRNA levels and fiber profiles in the soleus muscles of rats with metabolic syndrome (SHR/NDmcr-cp [cp/cp]; CP) fed a high-fat diet. Five-week-old CP rats were assigned to a sedentary group (CP-N) that was fed a standard diet (15.1 kJ/g, 23.6% protein, 5.3% fat, and 54.4% carbohydrates) or a sedentary group (CP-H) that was fed a high-fat diet (21.6 kJ/g, 23.6% protein, 34.9% fat, and 25.9% carbohydrates) and were housed for 10 weeks. Body weight, energy intake, and systolic blood pressure were higher in the CP-H group than in the CP-N group. Nonfasting glucose, triglyceride, total cholesterol, and leptin levels were higher in the CP-H group than in the CP-N group. There was no difference in insulin levels between the CP-N and CP-H groups. Muscle PGC-1α mRNA levels and succinate dehydrogenase activity were lower in the CP-H group than in the CP-N group. We concluded that a high-fat diet reduces PGC-1α mRNA levels and oxidative capacity in skeletal muscles and accelerates metabolic syndrome.

  14. Active and accurate trans-translation requires distinct determinants in the C-terminal tail of SmpB protein and the mRNA-like domain of transfer messenger RNA (tmRNA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camenares, Devin; Dulebohn, Daniel P; Svetlanov, Anton; Karzai, A Wali

    2013-10-18

    Unproductive ribosome stalling in eubacteria is resolved by the actions of SmpB protein and transfer messenger (tm) RNA. We examined the functional significance of conserved regions of SmpB and tmRNA to the trans-translation process. Our investigations reveal that the N-terminal 20 residues of SmpB, which are located near the ribosomal decoding center, are dispensable for all known SmpB activities. In contrast, a set of conserved residues that reside at the junction between the tmRNA-binding core and the C-terminal tail of SmpB play an important role in tmRNA accommodation. Our data suggest that the highly conserved glycine 132 acts as a flexible hinge that enables movement of the C-terminal tail, thus permitting proper positioning and establishment of the tmRNA open reading frame (ORF) as the surrogate template. To gain further insights into the function of the SmpB C-terminal tail, we examined the tagging activity of hybrid variants of tmRNA and the SmpB protein, in which the tmRNA ORF or the SmpB C-terminal tail was substituted with the equivalent but highly divergent sequences from Francisella tularensis. We observed that the hybrid tmRNA was active but resulted in less accurate selection of the resume codon. Cognate hybrid SmpB was necessary to restore activity. Furthermore, accurate tagging was observed when the identity of the resume codon was reverted from GGC to GCA. Taken together, these data suggest that the engagement of the tmRNA ORF and the selection of the correct translation resumption point are distinct activities that are influenced by independent tmRNA and SmpB determinants.

  15. Shooting the Messenger: The Case of ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Gretchen Lefever; Arcona, Andrea Powell; Antonuccio, David O; Healy, David

    2014-01-01

    Medicating ADHD is a controversial subject that was acutely inflamed in 1995 when high rates of ADHD diagnosis and treatment were documented in southeastern Virginia. Psychologists in southeastern Virginia formed a regional school health coalition to implement and evaluate interventions to address the problem. Other professionals with strong ties to the pharmaceutical industry launched ad hominem attacks on the coalition's research and work. These attacks contributed to the work being terminated in 2005. In the ensuing years, ADHD drug treatment continued to escalate. Today, the national rate of ADHD diagnosis exceeds all reasonable estimates of the disorder's true prevalence, with 14 % of American children being diagnosed before reaching young adulthood. Notable key opinion leaders continue to claim that there is no cause for concern, but with a message shift from "the prevalence is not too high" to "high prevalence is not too concerning." This paper provides an object lesson about how innovative research can be derailed to the detriment of sound medical and mental health care of children when industry interests are threatened. Tenure may be the only option for protecting innovative research from specious attacks. The authors offer a summary of the data on ADHD drug treatments, suggest judicious use of such treatments, and add their voices to others who are once again sounding a cautionary alarm.

  16. Estrogen Regulation of Messenger RNA Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-17

    ribonuclease inhibitor, inhibits activity of RNase A-type enzymes. RNP-CS- ribonucleoprotein consensus sequence (K/R)G(F/Y)(G/A)FVX(F/Y) rRNA - ribosomal...CJ r i ɡ a 5S ^ S i C9 3 3 *» • - M 19 > • h- O C9 ^ h- 5 C9 > l - « < • - U f t - o CJ k u a u Q. < 2 C9 S C9 3 3 "ai t- 41 (9...mRNA molecules will need to be examined. Which of these factors degrade mRNAs? Which factors degrade other types of RNA molecules such as rRNA and

  17. Microvesicles: Messengers and mediators of tumor progression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Al-Nedawi, Khalid; Meehan, Brian; Rak, Janusz

    2009-01-01

    .... Recent findings, however, suggest the existence of another mode of intercellular communication, where the 'units' of information are microvesicles containing a multitude of biologically active...

  18. The cosmic messengers; Les messagers cosmiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parizot, E. [Paris-7 Denis Diderot Univ., Lab. Astroparticule et Cosmologie (APC), 75 (France); Boratav, M. [Paris-6 Univ., Lab. de Physique Nucleaire et de Hautes Energies, 75 (France); Suomijarvi, T. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire; Stolarczyk, Th. [CEA Saclay, IRFU, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Degrange, B. [Ecole Polytechnique, CRNS/IN2P3, Lab. Leprince-Ringuet, 91 - Palaiseau (France); Sol, H. [Observatoire de Paris, CRNS/INSU, Lab. Univers et Theories, 92 - Meudon (France); Peter, P. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 75 - Paris (France); Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, Physique Theorique, 75 (France); Jacquemont, G

    2009-01-15

    This series of brief articles, that are popular works, presents the issue of cosmic radiations: their origin and their detection on earth. The Pierre-Auger Observatory that detects atmospheric showers and the Antares detector that is the first underwater neutrino detector are described. Another article deals with the issue of dark matter and its detection. The last article deals with cosmology. (A.C.)

  19. Exosomes and the kidney: blaming the messenger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Doreen Yp; King, Hamish W; Li, Jordan Yz; Gleadle, Jonathan M

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are membrane-bound vesicles of endosomal origin, present in a wide range of biological fluids, including blood and urine. They range between 30 and 100 nm in diameter, and consist of a limiting lipid bilayer, transmembrane proteins and a hydrophilic core containing proteins, mRNAs and microRNAs (miRNA). Exosomes can act as extracellular vehicles by which cells communicate, through the delivery of their functional cargo to recipient cells, with many important biological, physiological and pathological implications. The exosome release pathway contributes towards protein secretion, antigen presentation, pathogen transfer and cancer progression. Exosomes and exosome-mediated signalling have been implicated in disease processes such as atherosclerosis, calcification and kidney diseases. Circulating levels of exosomes and extracellular vesicles can be influenced by the progression of renal disease. Advances in methods for purification and analysis of exosomes are leading to potential diagnostic and therapeutic avenues for kidney diseases. This review will focus on biophysical properties and biogenesis of exosomes, their pathophysiological roles and their potential as biomarkers and therapeutics in kidney diseases.

  20. Meteorites: messengers from the early solar system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Beda A

    2010-01-01

    Meteorites are fragments from solar system bodies, dominantly asteroids. A small fraction is derived from the Moon and from Mars. These rocks tell a rich history of the early solar system and range from solids little changed since the earliest phases of solid matter condensation in the solar nebula (chondrites) to material representing asteroidal metamorphism and melting, impact processes on the Moon and even aqueous alteration near the surface of Mars. Meteorites are very rare. Currently many meteorites result from searches in Antarctica and the hot deserts of North Africa and Arabia. The present high find rate likely represents a unique short-term event, asking for a careful management of this scarce scientific resource.

  1. RNA decay by messenger RNA interferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Mikkel; Overgaard, Martin; Winther, Kristoffer Skovbo

    2008-01-01

    Two abundant toxin-antitoxin (TA) gene families, relBE and mazEF, encode mRNA cleaving enzymes whose ectopic overexpression abruptly inhibits translation and thereby induces a bacteriostatic condition. Here we describe and discuss protocols for the overproduction, purification, and analysis of mRNA...... cleaving enzymes such as RelE of Escherichia coli and the corresponding antitoxin RelB. In particular, we describe a set of plasmid vectors useful for the detailed analysis of cleavage sites in model mRNAs....

  2. A carvacrol-thymol blend decreased intestinal oxidative stress and influenced selected microbes without changing the messenger RNA levels of tight junction proteins in jejunal mucosa of weaning piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, H-K; Xue, H-X; Zhou, Z X; Peng, J

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies indicate that intestinal oxidative stress and microbiota imbalance is involved in weaning-induced intestinal dysfunction in piglets. We have investigated the effect of feeding a carvacrol-thymol blend supplemented diet on intestinal redox status, selected microbial populations and the intestinal barrier in weaning piglets. The piglets (weaned at 21 days of age) were randomly allocated to two groups with six pens per treatment and 10 piglets per pen. At weaning day (21 days of age), six piglets were sacrificed before weaning to serve as the preweaning group. The weaned group was fed with a basal diet, while the weaned-CB group was fed with the basal diet supplemented with 100 mg/kg carvacrol-thymol (1 : 1) blend for 14 days. On day 7 post-weaning, six piglets from each group were sacrificed to determine intestinal redox status, selected microbial populations, messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript levels of proinflammatory cytokines and biomarkers of intestinal barrier function. Weaning resulted in intestinal oxidative stress, indicated by the increased concentration of reactive oxygen species and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances present in the intestine. Weaning also reduced the population of Lactobacillus genus and increased the populations of Enterococcus genus and Escherichia coli in the jejunum, and increased mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β and interleukin 6 (IL-6). In addition, decreased mRNA levels of zonula occludens and occludin in the jejunal mucosa and increased plasma diamine oxidase concentrations indicated that weaning induced dysfunction of the intestinal barrier. On day 7 post-weaning, supplementation with the carvacrol-thymol blend restored weaning-induced intestinal oxidative stress. Compared with the weaned group, the weaned-CB group had an increased population of Lactobacillus genus but reduced populations of Enterococcus genus and E. coli in the jejunum and decreased mRNA levels of TNF-α. The

  3. Comparing the effects of tetrabromobisphenol-A, bisphenol A, and their potential replacement alternatives, TBBPA-bis(2,3-dibromopropyl ether) and bisphenol S, on cell viability and messenger ribonucleic acid expression in chicken embryonic hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Melissa; Crump, Doug; Farmahin, Reza; Kennedy, Sean W

    2015-02-01

    A market for alternative brominated flame retardants (BFRs) has emerged recently due to the phase out of persistent and inherently toxic BFRs. Several of these replacement compounds have been detected in environmental matrices, including wild birds. A chicken embryonic hepatocyte (CEH) assay was utilized to assess the effects of the BFR, tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA), and its replacement alternative, tetrabromobisphenol A bis(2,3-dibromopropyl ether [TBBPA-DBPE]) on cell viability and messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression. Bisphenol A (BPA) and 1 of its replacement alternatives, bisphenol S (BPS), were also screened for effects. Both TBBPA and BPA decreased CEH viability with calculated median lethal concentration (LC50) values of 40.6 μM and 61.7 μM, respectively. However, the replacement alternatives, TBBPA-DBPE and BPS, did not affect cell viability (up to 300 μM). Effects on mRNA expression were determined using an Avian ToxChip polymerse chain reaction (PCR) array and a real-time (RT)-PCR assay for the estrogen-responsive genes, apolipoproteinII (ApoII) and vitellogenin (Vtg). A luciferase reporter gene assay was used to assess dioxin-like effects. Tetrabromobisphenol-A altered mRNA levels of 4 genes from multiple toxicity pathways and increased luciferase activity in the luciferase reporter gene assay, whereas its alternative, TBBPA-DBPE, only altered 1 gene on the array, Cyp1a4, and increased luciferase activity. At 300 μM, a concentration that decreased cell viability for TBBPA and BPA, the BPA replacement, BPS, altered the greatest number of transcripts, including both ApoII and Vtg. Bisphenol A exposure did not alter any genes on the array but did up-regulate Vtg at 10 μM. Characterization of the potential toxicological and molecular-level effects of these compounds will ideally be useful to chemical regulators tasked with assessing the risk of new and existing chemicals.

  4. Molt-inhibiting hormone stimulates vitellogenesis at advanced ovarian developmental stages in the female blue crab, Callinectes sapidus 2: novel specific binding sites in hepatopancreas and cAMP as a second messenger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmora, Nilli; Sagi, Amir; Zohar, Yonathan; Chung, J Sook

    2009-01-01

    The finding that molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) regulates vitellogenesis in the hepatopancreas of mature Callinectes sapidus females, raised the need for the characterization of its mode of action. Using classical radioligand binding assays, we located specific, saturable, and non-cooperative binding sites for MIH in the Y-organs of juveniles (J-YO) and in the hepatopancreas of vitellogenic adult females. MIH binding to the hepatopancreas membranes had an affinity 77 times lower than that of juvenile YO membranes (KD values: 3.22 × 10-8 and 4.19 × 10-10 M/mg protein, respectively). The number of maximum binding sites (BMAX) was approximately two times higher in the hepatopancreas than in the YO (BMAX values: 9.24 × 10-9 and 4.8 × 10-9 M/mg protein, respectively). Furthermore, MIH binding site number in the hepatopancreas was dependent on ovarian stage and was twice as high at stage 3 than at stages 2 and 1. SDS-PAGE separation of [125I] MIH or [125I] crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) crosslinked to the specific binding sites in the membranes of the J-YO and hepatopancreas suggests a molecular weight of ~51 kDa for a MIH receptor in both tissues and a molecular weight of ~61 kDa for a CHH receptor in the hepatopancreas. The use of an in vitro incubation of hepatopancreas fragments suggests that MIH probably utilizes cAMP as a second messenger in this tissue, as cAMP levels increased in response to MIH. Additionally, 8-Bromo-cAMP mimicked the effects of MIH on vitellogenin (VtG) mRNA and heterogeneous nuclear (hn) VtG RNA levels. The results imply that the functions of MIH in the regulation of molt and vitellogenesis are mediated through tissue specific receptors with different kinetics and signal transduction. MIH ability to regulate vitellogenesis is associated with the appearance of MIH specific membrane binding sites in the hepatopancreas upon pubertal/final molt. PMID:19583849

  5. Temporal changes in glial fibrillary acidic protein messenger RNA and [{sup 3}H]PK11195 binding in relation to imidazoline-I{sub 2}-receptor and {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenoceptor binding in the hippocampus following transient global forebrain ischaemia in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craven, J.A.; Gundlach, A.L.; Conway, E.L. [The University of Melbourne, Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics Unit (Australia); Department of Medicine, Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre (Australia)

    1997-10-24

    Immunohistochemical studies have demonstrated that following global forebrain ischaemia the selective neuronal loss that occurs in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer of the hippocampus is accompanied by a reactive astrocytosis, characterized by increases in glial fibrillary acidic protein, and activation of microglia. In this study the spatial changes in glial fibrillary acidic protein messenger RNA levels in the hippocampus have been mapped four, eight, 12, 16 and 20 days following 10 min of global forebrain ischaemia in the rat and related to changes in [{sup 3}H]PK11195 binding to peripheral benzodiazepine receptors, a putative marker of activated microglia. Recent studies have suggested that the imidazoline-I{sub 2}-receptor, one of a class of non-adrenergic receptors related to, but structurally and functionally distinct from {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenoceptors, may have a functional role in controlling the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein. To explore this possibility further we have also mapped changes in imidazoline-I{sub 2}-receptor and {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenoceptor binding sites. Following transient ischaemia there was a marked, biphasic increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein messenger RNA levels throughout the vulnerable CA1 region of the hippocampus, peaking four days after ischaemia and then increasing gradually during the remainder of the study period. There was also a sustained increase in [{sup 3}H]PK11195 binding, however, in contrast to the initial increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein messenger RNA levels that peaked four days after ischaemia the density of [{sup 3}H]PK11195 binding increased rapidly in all strata of the CA1 region over the first eight days and then increased more slowly throughout days 12 to 20. Despite the marked increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein messenger RNA levels there was no concomitant alteration in imidazoline-I{sub 2}-receptor binding sites detected using the specific radioligand, [{sup 3}H]2

  6. The Messenger Calling Humanity back:On the Figure of Doctor's Wife in "Blindness"%呼唤人性回归的使者——浅析《失明症漫记》医生妻子的形象

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    饶丹婷

    2012-01-01

    Taking puzzlement,restless and the question to the humanity's own and the relation with the periphery world,Saramago creates his most callous work in content and most heavy one in subject Blindess.In this work,Blindess was ruining characteristic of human and the civilization heartlessly.In the enwironment where was full of the most intense conflict in this contradiction,The doctor's wife was showing a messenger image calling the reture of humon nature in the world without sight.Doctor's wife has two characteristics,one is possesing a normal eye,another is manifesting a firm emotion to the human characteristics when dealing the relation with others.These two features fill multiple significances to the image.As such a very image with ideal color,doctor's wife in the work by own eye,helps and influence the blind by her own words and manners,she is a messenger calling the reture of human nature in the world without sight.%若泽.萨拉马戈带着对人类在文明世界中逐渐丢失人性的不安和疑虑,创作了在其众多作品中内容最为冷酷、主题最沉重的作品——《失明症漫记》。在这部作品中,作者虚构一种通过目光对视传染的失明症无情地败坏人类和文明的特征,通过这个矛盾冲突最为激烈的失明世界来凸现医生妻子呼唤人性回归的使者形象。医生妻子的两个特征——拥有一双正常的眼睛和对人性的执著感情,使医生妻子的形象具有多重意义。医生的妻子以自己的眼睛和具体的言行举止,在生活上无私地帮助周围的盲人,在精神上给盲人们信心和勇气,让他们得以在失明惨剧中慢慢找回人性,体现了其呼唤人性回归的使者形象。这也正是萨拉马戈关切人类命运和探索世界前途的具体表现。

  7. Cotranscriptional Recruitment of RNA Exosome Cofactors Rrp47p and Mpp6p and Two Distinct Trf-Air-Mtr4 Polyadenylation (TRAMP) Complexes Assists the Exonuclease Rrp6p in the Targeting and Degradation of an Aberrant Messenger Ribonucleoprotein Particle (mRNP) in Yeast*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuparevic, Igor; Mosrin-Huaman, Christine; Hervouet-Coste, Nadège; Remenaric, Mateja; Rahmouni, A. Rachid

    2013-01-01

    The cotranscriptional mRNA processing and packaging reactions that lead to the formation of export-competent messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) are under the surveillance of quality control steps. Aberrant mRNPs resulting from faulty events are retained in the nucleus with ensuing elimination of their mRNA component. The molecular mechanisms by which the surveillance system recognizes defective mRNPs and stimulates their destruction by the RNA degradation machinery are still not completely elucidated. Using an experimental approach in which mRNP formation in yeast is disturbed by the action of the bacterial Rho helicase, we have shown previously that the targeting of Rho-induced aberrant mRNPs is mediated by Rrp6p, which is recruited cotranscriptionally in association with Nrd1p following Rho action. Here we investigated the specific involvement in this quality control process of different cofactors associated with the nuclear RNA degradation machinery. We show that, in addition to the main hydrolytic action of the exonuclease Rrp6p, the cofactors Rrp47p, Mpp6p as well as the Trf-Air-Mtr4 polyadenylation (TRAMP) components Trf4p, Trf5p, and Air2p contribute significantly by stimulating the degradation process upon their cotranscriptional recruitment. Trf4p and Trf5p are apparently recruited in two distinct TRAMP complexes that both contain Air2p as component. Surprisingly, Rrp47p appears to play an important role in mutual protein stabilization with Rrp6p, which highlights a close association between the two partners. Together, our results provide an integrated view of how different cofactors of the RNA degradation machinery cooperate to target and eliminate aberrant mRNPs. PMID:24047896

  8. The Influence of Fol ow up Management with Special Messenger on the Treatment of Warfarin Anticoagulation in Patients with Per-manent Atrial Fibril ation%专人随访管理在持续性心房颤动病人服用华法林抗凝治疗中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志强; 李锦玉; 蒋庆渊; 傅咏华; 汤燕颖; 马晶; 王春燕; 胡春燕

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the influence of fol ow up management with special messenger on the treatment of warfarin antico-agulation in patients with permanent atrial fibril ation.Methods One hundred and sixty patients with permanent atrial fibril ation were recruited and divided into the routine fol ow up visit group (control group)and special messenger fol ow up management group (manage group)randomly according to the registration order.Al patients were accepted fol ow up visit for 12 months.The interna-tional normalized ratio (INR),warfarin dose,the status of INR up to the standard and the complications of each patient were recor-ded.Results The average warfarin dose,the detection frequency after INR up to the standard for the first time and the detection fre-quency of INR in the whole course in the manage group patients were significantly lower than the control group(P0.05).The status of INR up to the standard in the first month,the third month,the fourth month,the seventh month,the nineth month,the eleventh month and twelfth month were significantly different between the two groups during the 12 months fol ow up visit(P<0.01).The incidence of complications of ischemic stroke,other arterial embolism,mucocutaneous hemor-rhage,gingival hemorrhage,rhinorrhagia,haematuria and gastrointestinal hemorrhage in the manage group patients were significantly lower than the control group patients(P<0.05).Conclusion The fol ow up management with special messenger for the treatment of warfarin anticoagulation in patients with permanent atrial fibril ation could decrease the warfarin dose and the detection frequency of INR,improve the anticoagulant effect,reduce the complication of thromboembolism and hemorrhage.%目的:研究专人随访管理对持续性心房颤动(房颤)病人服用华法林抗凝效果的影响。方法随机选取160例持续性房颤病人,按就诊顺序编号分为管理组和对照组,各80例,分别接受专人随访

  9. Seasonal Variations of Mercury's Magnesium Dayside Exosphere from MESSENGER Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Aimee W.; Cassidy, Timothy A.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; McClintock, William E.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.

    2017-01-01

    The Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer channel of the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer instrument aboard the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging spacecraft made near-daily observations of solar-scattered resonant emission from magnesium in Mercury's exosphere during the mission's orbital phase (March 2011-April 2015, approx.17 Mercury years). In this paper, a subset of these data (March 2013-April 2015) is described and analyzed to illustrate Mg's spatial and temporal variations. Dayside altitude profiles of emission are used to make estimates of the Mg density and temperature. The main characteristics of the Mg exosphere are (a) a predominant enhancement of emission in the morning (6 am-10 am) near perihelion, (b) a bulk temperature of approx. 6000 K, consistent with impact vaporization as the predominant ejection process, (c) a near-surface density that varies from 5/cu cm to 50/cu cm and (d) a production rate that is strongest in the morning on the inbound leg of Mercury's orbit with rates ranging from 1×10(exp 5)/sq cm/s to 8×10(exp 5)/sq cm/s.

  10. Black Hole Mergers, Gravitational Waves, and Multi-Messenger Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan M.

    2010-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest source of gravitational waves for both ground-based detectors such as LIGO and VIRGO, as well as the space-based LISA. Since the merger takes place in the regime of strong dynamical gravity, computing the resulting gravitational waveforms requires solving the full Einstein equations of general relativity on a computer. Although numerical codes designed to simulate black hole mergers were plagued for many years by a host of instabilities, recent breakthroughs have conquered these problems and opened up this field dramatically. This talk will focus on the resulting gold rush of new results that is revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, astrophysics, and testing general relativity.

  11. Messengers without borders: mediators of systemic inflammatory response in AKI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, Brian B; Rabadi, May M; Vasko, Radovan; Yasuda, Kaoru; Goligorsky, Michael S

    2013-03-01

    The list of signals sent by an injured organ to systemic circulation, so-called danger signals, is growing to include multiple metabolites and secreted moieties, thus revealing a highly complex and integrated network of interlinked systemic proinflammatory and proregenerative messages. Emerging new data indicate that, apart from the well established local inflammatory response to AKI, danger signaling unleashes a cascade of precisely timed, interdependent, and intensity-gradated mediators responsible for development of the systemic inflammatory response. This fledgling realization of the importance of the systemic inflammatory response to the localized injury and inflammation is at the core of this brief overview. It has a potential to explain the additive effects of concomitant diseases or preexisting chronic conditions that can prime the systemic inflammatory response and exacerbate it out of proportion to the actual degree of acute kidney damage. Although therapies for ameliorating AKI per se remain limited, a potentially powerful strategy that could reap significant benefits in the future is to modulate the intensity of danger signals and consequently the systemic inflammatory response, while preserving its intrinsic proregenerative stimuli.

  12. Celestial messengers. Cosmic rays. The story of a scientific adventure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolotti, Mario [Roma Univ. (Italy). Dipt. die Scienze di Base e Applicate per l' Ingegneria (SBAI)

    2013-07-01

    The book describes from a historical point of view how cosmic rays were discovered. The book describes the research in cosmic rays. The main focus is on how the knowledge was gained, describing the main experiments and the conclusions drawn. Biographical sketches of main researchers are provided. Cosmic rays have an official date of discovery which is linked to the famous balloon flights of the Austrian physicist Hess in 1912. The year 2012 can therefore be considered the centenary of the discovery.

  13. Lone or idiopathic atrial fibrillation, messenger of misery in sight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijs, B; Crijns, H J G M

    2014-12-20

    This editorial refers to 'Gender-related differences in risk of cardiovascular morbidity and all-cause mortality in patients hospitalized with incident atrial fibrillation without concomitant diseases: a nationwide cohort study of 9519 patients' by T. Andersson et al. In order to adequately describe root causes and adverse consequences of apparently idiopathic AF, the requested study population has to be large and be followed for a very long time. Andersson et al. adequately deployed the excellent national Swedish health registries in order to cover the hiatus of aforementioned studies in the current idiopathic AF literature. Considering the notion that patients with idiopathic or lone AF have comparable prospects as AF patients overall but are only caught early in their 'arrhythmia and vascular career', the study by Andersson et al. should trigger physicians to give high priority to exposing predisposing factors or early stages of underlying cardiovascular disease in such a way that preventative measures can be accurately deployed in these patients.

  14. Hunting Gravitational Waves with Multi-Messenger Counterparts: Australia's Role

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Howell, E.J.; Rowlinson, A.; Coward, D.M.; Lasky, P.D.; Kaplan, D.L.; Thrane, E.; Rowell, G.; Galloway, D.K.; Yuan, F.; Dodson, R.; Murphy, T.; Hill, G.C.; Andreoni, L.; Spitler, L.; Horton, A.

    2015-01-01

    The first observations by a worldwide network of advanced interferometric gravitational wave detectors offer a unique opportunity for the astronomical community. At design sensitivity, these facilities will be able to detect coalescing binary neutron stars to distances approaching 400 Mpc, and

  15. Multi-messenger observations of neutron rich matter

    CERN Document Server

    Horowitz, C J

    2011-01-01

    Neutron rich matter is central to many fundamental questions in nuclear physics and astrophysics. Moreover, this material is being studied with an extraordinary variety of new tools such as the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) and the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO). We describe the Lead Radius Experiment (PREX) that uses parity violating electron scattering to measure the neutron radius in $^{208}$Pb. This has important implications for neutron stars and their crusts. We discuss X-ray observations of neutron star radii. These also have important implications for neutron rich matter. Gravitational waves (GW) open a new window on neutron rich matter. They come from sources such as neutron star mergers, rotating neutron star mountains, and collective r-mode oscillations. Using large scale molecular dynamics simulations, we find neutron star crust to be very strong. It can support mountains on rotating neutron stars large enough to generate detectable gravitational waves. Finally...

  16. Role of Second Messengers in Ischemic Tissue Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-01

    complete absence in spindle-shaped cells. Interferon gamma alters several functional properties of both epitheliod and spindle shaped cells. In the absence...and changes in endothelial cell shape for a period of three weeks. Effect of Interferon - gamma on MEC Cultures Transition of MEC from epithelial into...spindle-shaped cells was analyzed in cultures grown on 35mm dishes in the presence of CIM with recombinant interferon - gamma (Biogen Corp., Cambridge, MA

  17. The Z boson spin observables as messengers of new physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A. [Universidad de Granada, Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Granada (Spain); Bernabeu, J.; Segarra, A. [Universitat de Valencia, Departament de Fisica Teorica, Burjassot (Spain); CSIC-Universitat de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Paterna (Spain); Mitsou, V.A. [CSIC-Universitat de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Paterna (Spain)

    2017-04-15

    We demonstrate that the eight multipole parameters describing the spin state of the Z boson are able to disentangle known Z production mechanisms and signals from new physics at the LHC. They can be extracted from appropriate asymmetries in the angular distribution of lepton pairs from the Z boson decay. The power of this analysis is illustrated by (1) the production of Z boson plus jets; (2) Z boson plus missing transverse energy; (3) W and Z bosons originating from the two-body decay of a heavy resonance. (orig.)

  18. WIMP dark matter as radiative neutrino mass messenger

    CERN Document Server

    Hirsch, M; Morisi, S; Palacio, J; Rojas, N; Valle, J W F

    2013-01-01

    The minimal seesaw extension of the Standard SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1) Model requires two electroweak singlet fermions in order to accommodate the neutrino oscillation parameters at tree level. Here we consider a next to minimal extension where light neutrino masses are generated radiatively by two electroweak fermions: one singlet and one triplet under SU(2). These should be odd under a parity symmetry and their mixing gives rise to a stable weakly interactive massive particle (WIMP) dark matter candidate. For mass in the GeV--TeV range, it reproduces the correct relic density, and provides an observable signal in nuclear recoil direct detection experiments. The fermion triplet component of the dark matter has gauge interactions, making it also detectable at present and near future collider experiments.

  19. 750 GeV messenger of dark conformal symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Zhang, Cen

    2016-03-01

    The tentative hints for a diphoton resonance at a mass of ˜750 GeV from the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC may be interpreted as first contact with a "dark" sector with a spontaneously broken conformal symmetry. The implied TeV scale of the dark sector may be motivated by the interaction strength required to accommodate a viable thermal relic dark matter (DM) candidate. We model the conformal dynamics using a Randall-Sundrum-type five-dimensional geometry whose IR boundary is identified with the dynamics of the composite dark sector, while the Standard Model (SM) matter content resides on the UV boundary, corresponding to "elementary" fields. We allow the gauge fields to reside in the five-dimensional bulk, which can be minimally chosen to be S U (3 )c×U (1 )Y. The "dark" radion is identified as the putative 750 GeV resonance. Heavy vectorlike fermions, often invoked to explain the diphoton excess, are not explicitly present in our model and are not predicted to appear in the spectrum of TeV scale states. Our minimal setup favors scalar DM of O (TeV ) mass. A generic expectation in this scenario, suggested by DM considerations, is the appearance of vector bosons at ˜ few TeV, corresponding to the gluon and hypercharge Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes that couple to UV boundary states with strengths that are suppressed uniformly compared to their SM values. Our analysis suggests that these KK modes could be within the reach of the LHC in the coming years.

  20. Neuron-microglia signaling : Chemokines as versatile messengers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biber, K.; Vinet, J.; Boddeke, H. W. G. M.

    2008-01-01

    Our understanding of microglia biology has significantly changed in the last Couple of years. Instead of being predominantly detrimental cells showing a stereotypic activation pattern, microglia today are considered highly adaptive elements with many distinct phenotypes. Microglia activity is aimed

  1. Seasonal Variations of Mercury's Magnesium Dayside Exosphere from MESSENGER Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Aimee W.; Cassidy, Timothy A.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; McClintock, William E.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.

    2017-01-01

    The Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer channel of the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer instrument aboard the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging spacecraft made near-daily observations of solar-scattered resonant emission from magnesium in Mercury's exosphere during the mission's orbital phase (March 2011-April 2015, approx.17 Mercury years). In this paper, a subset of these data (March 2013-April 2015) is described and analyzed to illustrate Mg's spatial and temporal variations. Dayside altitude profiles of emission are used to make estimates of the Mg density and temperature. The main characteristics of the Mg exosphere are (a) a predominant enhancement of emission in the morning (6 am-10 am) near perihelion, (b) a bulk temperature of approx. 6000 K, consistent with impact vaporization as the predominant ejection process, (c) a near-surface density that varies from 5/cu cm to 50/cu cm and (d) a production rate that is strongest in the morning on the inbound leg of Mercury's orbit with rates ranging from 1×10(exp 5)/sq cm/s to 8×10(exp 5)/sq cm/s.

  2. Myeloid extracellular vesicles: messengers from the demented brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria eNigro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood-borne monocyte derived cells play a pivotal, initially unrecognized, role in most central nervous system disorders, including diseases initially classified as purely neurodegenerative (i.e. AD, PD, and ALS. Their trafficking to the brain and spinal cord has been extensively studied in classical neuroinflammatory disorders such as multiple sclerosis. Central nervous system resident myeloid cells, namely microglia and perivascular macrophages, also are in the spotlight of investigations on neurological disorders. Myeloid cells, such as infiltrating macrophages and microglia, have been described as having both protective and destructive features in neurological disorders, thus identification of their functional phenotype during disease evolution would be of paramount importance. Extracellular vesicles, namely exosomes and shed vesicles, are released by virtually any cell type and can be detected and identified in terms of cell origin in biological fluids. They therefore constitute an ideal tool to access information on cells residing in an inaccessible site such as the brain. We will review here available information on extracellular vesicles detection in neurological disorders with special emphasis on neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Translational regulation of MOS messenger RNA in pig oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yanfeng; Newman, Barbara; Moor, Robert

    2005-11-01

    The temporal and spatial translation control of stored mRNA in oocytes is regulated by elements in their 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR). The MOS 3'-UTR in pig oocytes is both heterogeneous (180, 480, or 530 nucleotides), and it contains multiple U-rich elements and extensive A-rich sequences (CA13CA5CA5CA6). We have examined the role of these potential regulatory elements by fusing wild-type or mutant MOS 3'-UTRs to luciferase mRNA and then injecting these chimeric transcripts into oocytes. We draw six main conclusions. First, the length of the MOS 3'-UTR tightly controls the level of translation of luciferase during oocyte maturation. Second, two U-rich (U5A) elements and the hexanucleotide signal (AAUAAA) are required for translation. Third, mutations, duplications, or relocations of the A-rich sequence reduce or block translation. Fourth, the relative importance of the A-rich and U-rich elements in controlling the level of translation differs. Fifth, none of our MOS 3'-UTR manipulations relieved translational repression before germinal vesicle breakdown. Sixth, all the MOS mRNA variants underwent polyadenylation during maturation. Whereas mutations to the hexanucleotide signal block both polyadenylation and translation, mutations to either the A-rich sequence or the U-rich elements block translation without fully blocking polyadenylation. We conclude that MOS mRNA translation in pig oocytes is subject to a more extensive series of controls than that in lower vertebrates.

  4. Value-Based Delivery of Education: MOOCs as Messengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilfoil, David M.; Focht, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Value-based delivery of healthcare has been discussed in the literature for almost a decade. The concept focuses on the patient and defines value as the improvement of patient outcomes divided by healthcare costs. Further refinements, called the Triple Aim model, focus on improving patient outcomes, reducing treatment costs, and improving patient…

  5. Inherited Retinal Disease Therapies Targeting Precursor Messenger Ribonucleic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Huang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Inherited retinal diseases are an extremely diverse group of genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous conditions characterized by variable maturation of retinal development, impairment of photoreceptor cell function and gradual loss of photoreceptor cells and vision. Significant progress has been made over the last two decades in identifying the many genes implicated in inherited retinal diseases and developing novel therapies to address the underlying genetic defects. Approximately one-quarter of exonic mutations related to human inherited diseases are likely to induce aberrant splicing products, providing opportunities for the development of novel therapeutics that target splicing processes. The feasibility of antisense oligomer mediated splice intervention to treat inherited diseases has been demonstrated in vitro, in vivo and in clinical trials. In this review, we will discuss therapeutic approaches to treat inherited retinal disease, including strategies to correct splicing and modify exon selection at the level of pre-mRNA. The challenges of clinical translation of this class of emerging therapeutics will also be discussed.

  6. Seasonal variations of Mercury's magnesium dayside exosphere from MESSENGER observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Aimee W.; Cassidy, Timothy A.; Vervack, Ronald J.; McClintock, William E.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.

    2017-01-01

    The Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer channel of the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer instrument aboard the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging spacecraft made near-daily observations of solar-scattered resonant emission from magnesium in Mercury's exosphere during the mission's orbital phase (March 2011-April 2015, ∼17 Mercury years). In this paper, a subset of these data (March 2013-April 2015) is described and analyzed to illustrate Mg's spatial and temporal variations. Dayside altitude profiles of emission are used to make estimates of the Mg density and temperature. The main characteristics of the Mg exosphere are (a) a predominant enhancement of emission in the morning (6 am-10 am) near perihelion, (b) a bulk temperature of ∼6000 K, consistent with impact vaporization as the predominant ejection process, (c) a near-surface density that varies from 5 cm-3 to 50 cm-3 and (d) a production rate that is strongest in the morning on the inbound leg of Mercury's orbit with rates ranging from 1 × 105 cm-2 s-1 to 8 × 105 cm-2 s-1.

  7. Supernova Neutrinos - MeV Messengers of the Extreme

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    A core-collapse supernova is a nearly perfect neutrino bomb. While capable of outshining its entire host galaxy, this stunning light show represents just a small portion of the explosion.  Indeed, each such cataclysmic event typically radiates two orders of magnitude more energy as low-energy neutrinos than it does as electromagnetic radiation or as kinetic shockwaves. Consequently, MeV-scale neutrinos are made in huge numbers as the star is dying, and because these ghostly subatomic particles interact so rarely with normal matter they easily escape the fireball, providing a window into one of the most violent and interesting volumes in space: the heart of a stellar collapse. This talk will cover some of the history of neutrinos and supernovas, as well as how we are preparing new technology and partnerships to observe the next spectacular explosion in all its multimessenger glory.

  8. Messenger RNA (mRNA) nanoparticle tumour vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phua, Kyle K. L.; Nair, Smita K.; Leong, Kam W.

    2014-06-01

    Use of mRNA-based vaccines for tumour immunotherapy has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies applying nanomedicine concepts to mRNA tumour vaccination show that the mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format can generate a more robust immune response. Advances in the past decade have deepened our understanding of gene delivery barriers, mRNA's biological stability and immunological properties, and support the notion for engineering innovations tailored towards a more efficient mRNA nanoparticle vaccine delivery system. In this review we will first examine the suitability of mRNA for engineering manipulations, followed by discussion of a model framework that highlights the barriers to a robust anti-tumour immunity mediated by mRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles. Finally, by consolidating existing literature on mRNA nanoparticle tumour vaccination within the context of this framework, we aim to identify bottlenecks that can be addressed by future nanoengineering research.

  9. Hunting Gravitational Waves with Multi-Messenger Counterparts: Australia's Role

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Howell, E.J.; Rowlinson, A.; Coward, D.M.; Lasky, P.D.; Kaplan, D.L.; Thrane, E.; Rowell, G.; Galloway, D.K.; Yuan, F.; Dodson, R.; Murphy, T.; Hill, G.C.; Andreoni, L.; Spitler, L.; Horton, A.

    2015-01-01

    The first observations by a worldwide network of advanced interferometric gravitational wave detectors offer a unique opportunity for the astronomical community. At design sensitivity, these facilities will be able to detect coalescing binary neutron stars to distances approaching 400 Mpc, and neutr

  10. Exosomes: messengers and mediators of tumor–stromal interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shkarina K. A.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular communication is one of the most important factors involved in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. The alteration of intercellular interaction correlates with a lot of human diseases including cancerogenesis. There are several types of such interconnection. First of all, it is a direct cell-cell contact, as it takes place in epithelium. The disturbance of this communication is expressed as a loss of cell-cell, cell-matrix contacts, disturbances of cell polarity etc. Another way of intercellular interaction involves mutual influence via paracrine factors produced by corresponding cells. However, there is another kind of information exchange between the cells, namely microvesicular transportation. It was revealed that the exosomes take part in intercellular communication in normal tissues as well as in malignant neoplasia. The present review provides the recent information on the formation of exosomes, their composition and especially the exosome participation in tumor-stromal interactions.

  11. Shooting the Messenger: Diplomats Crushed by Wave of New Terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-26

    Terrorism for UN Field Missions,” In Woodrow Wilson Sc/tool Graduate Policy Workshop. Princeton Unii’ersitv, April, 2014. ‘ Ibid. 14 Robert Pape is a...Daphne McCurdy, Owen McDougall, and Steve Ros..tPAdapting and Evolving: The Implications of Transnational Terrorism for UN Field Missions.” In Woodrow

  12. Kinetic models for nucleocytoplasmic transport of messenger RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, H C; Müller, W E; Agutter, P S

    1995-05-21

    Much is known about the mechanism by which mRNAs cross the nuclear envelope (the translocation stage of nucleocytoplasmic transport), but far less is known about the preceding (intranuclear migration/release) and succeeding (cytoplasmic binding) stages. Therefore, existing information suffices for articulating detailed kinetic models of translocation, but not models for the overall mRNA transport process. In this paper, we show that simple kinetic models of translocation can (i) accommodate data about nucleocytoplasmic distributions of endogenous transcripts; (ii) predict the overall effects on these distributions of effectors such as insulin and epidermal growth factor; (iii) throw some light on the mechanism(s) of action of the HIV-1 protein Rev and produce experimentally testable predictions about this mechanism; and (iv) account for the action of influenza virus NS1 protein. However, the simplest forms of translocation models apparently fail to account for some properties of viral regulators such as HIV Rev and adenovirus E1B-E4 complex. To elucidate these topics, less narrowly focused models of mRNA transport are required, describing intranuclear binding/release as well as translocation. On the basis of our examination of translocation models, we suggest some criteria that the requisite broadly based models must satisfy.

  13. The HERMES Network: a messenger of international cooperation

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2013-01-01

    In June 2012, the CERN-HERMES Network was set up with the aim of enhancing collaboration between CERN and Greek research institutes and universities. Today, the network offers eight doctoral scholarships for Greek students in various biomedical-related fields. The students will be involved in research projects conducted in collaboration with CERN.   The CERN-HERMES Network (CERN-HEllenic Research network on Medical and novEl technologieS) was approved by the Greek Secretariat of Research and Technology in 2012 and by the CERN Director-General in March of the same year. The network has three main pillars: “The first is to develop common research projects between Greek and CERN teams. The second is to train young Greek students and researchers, and the third and final aim is to submit common proposals to the European Commission for Horizon 2020,” says Evangelia Dimovasili, technical coordinator of the HERMES Network. Recently, the head of the Greek State Scholarships Foundation ...

  14. Messenger RNA exchange between scions and rootstocks in grafted grapevines

    Science.gov (United States)

    We demonstrated the existence of genome-scale mRNA exchange in grafted grapevines, a woody fruit species with significant economic importance. By using diagnostic SNPs derived from high throughput genome sequencing, we identified more than three thousand genes transporting mRNAs across graft junctio...

  15. Regulatory effect of nylestrio l on ex pression of interleukin-6 messenger ribonucleic acid in the bone of ovariectomi zed rats%尼尔雌醇对去势大鼠骨组织白介素-6 mRNA表达水平的调节

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    权金星; 李茂欣; 郑景晨; 汪大望; 邱明才

    2001-01-01

    目的:探讨细胞因子在绝经后骨质疏松发病中 的分子机制。方法:通过复制大鼠骨质疏松动物模型,直接从成熟的骨组织中提取RNA,采 用半定量逆转录-聚合酶链式反应(RT-PCR)技术检测骨组织IL-6 mRNA的表达水平,采 用放免法测定雌激素水平,研究雌激素对IL-6基因表达的调节作用。结果:尼尔雌醇治疗组大鼠骨组织IL-6mRNA表达水平显著低于切除卵巢组 ,与假手术组差异无显著性。结论:尼尔雌醇可以抑制IL-6基因表达,从而抑制破骨细胞骨吸收,减少 骨量丢失。%Objective :To study the molecular mechanism of cytokine in the pathogenesis of po stmenopausal osteoporosis.Methods:Ovariectomized female Wistar rats were used as animal o steoporosis models.RNA was directly isolated from rat bone, semi-quantitati ve Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to detect t he IL-6mRNA levels of expression in normal and OVX rat bone. Serum levels of estr o gen were detected by using Ridioimmunoassay before sacrifice, to study the regul atory effect of estrogen on expression of interleukin-6 messenger ribonucleic acid.Results:The expression of bone IL-6mRNA of estrogen therapy gr o up was significantly lower than that of OVX group, and was almost similar to tha t of sham group, while serum levels of estrogen in estrogen therapy group were m arkedly higher than that of OVX group, and were similar to that of sham g roup.Conclusion:Nylestriol can inhibit expression of IL-6 mRNA, red uce osteoclastic bone resorption and decrease loss of bone mass.

  16. In vivo effect of 3,5,3 prime -triiodothyronine on calcium uptake in several tissues in the rat: Evidence for a physiological role for calcium as the first messenger for the prompt action of thyroid hormone at the level of the plasma membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segal, J. (Hebrew Univ. Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem (Israel))

    1990-07-01

    Calcium has been shown in vitro to serve as the first messenger for the rapid effect of thyroid hormone at the level of the plasma membrane. In the present study the physiological relevance of this mechanism is examined in the whole animal. To this end, the effect of T3 on 45calcium uptake and sugar 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) uptake, an effect that requires extracellular calcium, and the influence of calcium blockers thereon were measured in ventricles, atria, diaphragm, fat, and liver in the rat. In the first three tissues, T3 produced comparable changes in 45Ca uptake and 2-DG uptake (T3 increased 2-DG uptake in fat, where 45Ca uptake was undetected, and had no effect in liver); this activity was blocked by the calcium channel blocker cadmium. The effect of T3 on 45Ca uptake, like its effect on the in vivo uptake of 2-DG described previously, was biphasic and time related; at physiological doses of 0.01 and 0.1 micrograms/100 g BW, T3 increased 45Ca uptake, whereas at greater (pharmacological) doses of 1 and 100 micrograms/100 g BW, T3 was without effect or inhibited 45Ca uptake. In ventricles and atria, the stimulatory effect of T3 on 45Ca uptake was very rapid within 2 min, at which time it was at or near maximum (50-90% above control) and then declined gradually and was not seen after 10-20 min. Of the several calcium blockers employed, verapamil (organic) and cadmium (inorganic) were found to be the most effective. Verapamil and cadmium produced a rapid, transient, and dose-related inhibition of 45Ca uptake in the tissues examined (except fat tissue where, under the experimental conditions employed, 45Ca uptake was undetected). Verapamil, given iv (200 micrograms/100 g BW) or ip (1 mg/100 g BW), reduced tissue 45Ca uptake by 50-90% within 2 or 10 min, respectively, and then its inhibitory effect diminished rapidly and was not seen after 20-30 min.

  17. Study on a multi-messenger basis and phenomenology of the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays: the pierre auger observatory contribution; Etude multi-messagers et phenomenologie des sources de rayons cosmiques d'ultra-haute energie: l'eclairage de l'Observatoire Pierre Auger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decerprit, G.

    2010-09-15

    numerical tool, truly multi-messengers oriented (neutrinos are considered) and comprehensive, that allows us to build a global concordance model, able to fit the entire set of available constraints, including today's experimental upper limits on the diffusive photon flux at TeV scales (Fermi/LAT). This concordance model is addressed in the last chapter. We will conclude with the future prospects possibly opened from a global model of the UHECRs. (author)

  18. Up-regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR-alpha) and PPAR-gamma messenger ribonucleic acid expression in the liver in murine obesity: troglitazone induces expression of PPAR-gamma-responsive adipose tissue-specific genes in the liver of obese diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, R A; Tecott, L H; Nonogaki, K; Beigneux, A; Moser, A H; Grunfeld, C; Feingold, K R

    2000-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are transcription factors that play an important role in the regulation of genes involved in lipid utilization and storage, lipoprotein metabolism, adipocyte differentiation, and insulin action. The three isoforms of the PPAR family, i.e. alpha, delta, and gamma, have distinct tissue distribution patterns. PPAR-alpha is predominantly present in the liver, and PPAR-gamma in adipose tissue, whereas PPAR-delta is ubiquitously expressed. A recent study reported increased PPAR-gamma messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in the liver in ob/ob mice; however, it is not known whether increased PPAR-gamma expression in the liver has any functional consequences. The expression of PPAR-alpha and -delta in the liver in obesity has not been determined. We have now examined the mRNA levels of PPAR-alpha, -delta, and -gamma in three murine models of obesity, namely, ob/ob (leptin-deficient), db/db (leptin-receptor deficient), and serotonin 5-HT2c receptor (5-HT2cR) mutant mice. 5-HT2cR mutant mice develop a late-onset obesity that is associated with higher plasma leptin levels. Our results show that PPAR-alpha mRNA levels in the liver are increased by 2- to 3-fold in all three obese models, whereas hepatic PPAR-gamma mRNA levels are increased by 7- to 9-fold in ob/ob and db/db mice and by 2-fold in obese 5-HT2cR mutant mice. PPAR-delta mRNA expression is not altered in ob/ob or db/db mice. To determine whether increased PPAR-gamma expression in the liver has any functional consequences, we examined the effect of troglitazone treatment on the hepatic mRNA levels of several PPAR-gamma-responsive adipose tissue-specific genes that have either no detectable or very low basal expression in the liver. The treatment of lean control mice with troglitazone significantly increased the expression of adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (aP2) and fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) in the liver. This troglitazone-induced increase in the expression

  19. CKD患者尿沉渣中CCN2/CCN3mRNA检测的临床意义探讨%Investigation of messenger RNA expression of CCN2/CCN3 in the urinary sediments in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈珑; 高民; 刘丹; 倪海峰; 曹玉涵; 刘宏; 张建东; 刘必成

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the messenger RNA ( mRNA ) expression in urinary sediment emerged as a promising tool to monitor renal damage in patients with chronic kidney diseases ( CKDs ). We investigated whether urinary mRNA of connective tissue growth factor ( CCN2 ) and nephroblastoma overexpressed ( CCN3 ), two molecules involved in the pathogenesis of glomerulosclerosis, has some clinical insights into the management of nondiabetic CKDs. Methods: A total of 35 patients with nondiabetic CKDs were enrolled in our study, as well as 12 healthy controls. mRNA expression of CCN2 and CCN3 were measured by realtime PCR. There were 17 out of those 35 patients who received renal biopsy. Glomerular histological changes were also analyzed on PAS stained slides of those biopsied patients. Results: Urinary mRNA of both CCN2 and CCN3 were distinctively greater in CKD patients compared to healthy controls. However, urinary mRNA level of neither of those two markers was differently distributed among CKD patients with variable stages of proteinuria. Nevertheless, urinary mRNA of CCN3, but not CCN2 was shown to inversely correlate to the degree of glomerular histological changes. Furthermore, ratio of urinary mRNA of CCN2 to CCN3 had an even stronger correlation efficient with glomerulosclerosis. Conclusion: In summary, our study demonstrates that urinary mRNA of CCN2/3 correlated to the degree of glomerular histological changes in non-diabetic CKDs patients, suggesting that this measurement may be a useful noninvasive tool for evaluating patients with nondiabetic CKDs.%目的:探讨慢性肾脏疾病(CKD)患者尿沉渣中CCN2(结缔组织生长因子,CTGF)和CCN3(肾母细胞瘤过度表达因子,NOV)mRNA检测及其在监测肾脏损伤中的意义.方法:研究包括35名非糖尿病的CKD患者和12名健康成人.尿沉渣中CCN2/CCN3 mRNA的检测采用Real time-PCR方法.35例CKD患者中17例患者接受了肾活检,这些肾活检组织的肾小球病变程度经PAS染色

  20. Evaluation of Immune Responses Mediated by Listeria-Stimulated Human Dendritic Cells: Implications for Cancer Vaccine Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    determine optimal dosing. Extracellular bacteria were removed by washing, and DCs were cultured for 5 36 hours. A separate cohort of DCs was matured...than retroviral transgenes , which carry the risk of genome integration 27. mRNA electroporation also allows 7 individuals of any HLA type to

  1. Messenger RNA Turnover Processes in Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Emerging Studies in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsi L. Anderson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of mRNA turnover is a recently appreciated phenomenon by which bacteria modulate gene expression. This review outlines the mechanisms by which three major classes of bacterial trans-acting factors, ribonucleases (RNases, RNA binding proteins, and small noncoding RNAs (sRNA, regulate the transcript stability and protein production of target genes. Because the mechanisms of RNA decay and maturation are best characterized in Escherichia coli, the majority of this review will focus on how these factors modulate mRNA stability in this organism. However, we also address the effects of RNases, RNA binding proteins, sRNAs on mRNA turnover, and gene expression in Bacillus subtilis, which has served as a model for studying RNA processing in gram-positive organisms. We conclude by discussing emerging studies on the role modulating mRNA stability has on gene expression in the important human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus.

  2. Culture temperature affects human chondrocyte messenger RNA expression in monolayer and pellet culture systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Ito

    Full Text Available Cell-based therapy has been explored for articular cartilage regeneration. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is a promising cell-based technique for repairing articular cartilage defects. However, there are several issues such as chondrocyte de-differentiation. While numerous studies have been designed to overcome some of these issues, only a few have focused on the thermal environment that can affect chondrocyte metabolism and phenotype. In this study, the effects of different culture temperatures on human chondrocyte metabolism- and phenotype-related gene expression were investigated in 2D and 3D environments. Human chondrocytes were cultured in a monolayer or in a pellet culture system at three different culture temperatures (32°C, 37°C, and 41°C for 3 days. The results showed that the total RNA level, normalized to the threshold cycle value of internal reference genes, was higher at lower temperatures in both culture systems. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH and citrate synthase (CS, which are involved in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle, respectively, were expressed at similar levels at 32°C and 37°C in pellet cultures, but the levels were significantly lower at 41°C. Expression of the chondrogenic markers, collagen type IIA1 (COL2A1 and aggrecan (ACAN, was higher at 37°C than at 32°C and 41°C in both culture systems. However, this phenomenon did not coincide with SRY (sex-determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9, which is a fundamental transcription factor for chondrogenesis, indicating that a SOX9-independent pathway might be involved in this phenomenon. In conclusion, the expression of chondrocyte metabolism-related genes at 32°C was maintained or enhanced compared to that at 37°C. However, chondrogenesis-related genes were further induced at 37°C in both culture systems. Therefore, manipulating the culture temperature may be an advantageous approach for regulating human chondrocyte metabolic activity and chondrogenesis.

  3. Detection and Quantification of N (6)-Methyladenosine in Messenger RNA by TLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodi, Zsuzsanna; Fray, Rupert G

    2017-01-01

    The base-modified nucleotide, N (6)-methyladenosine, is a relatively abundant modification found in the mRNA of most higher eukaryotes. Methylation levels can change dependent upon environmental conditions, cell differentiation state, or following knockdown of members of the methylase complex, and it is often useful to directly measure and compare N (6)-methyladenosine levels between samples. Two dimensional chromatography of radiolabeled nucleotides, following specific nuclease treatments, provides a robust, sensitive, and reproducible assay for this modification.

  4. Correlation between mechanical strength of messenger RNA pseudoknots and ribosomal frameshifting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Møller; Reihani, S Nader S; Oddershede, Lene B

    2007-01-01

    the Infectious Bronchitis Virus were used, differing by one base pair in the first stem. In Escherichia coli, these two pseudoknots caused frameshifting frequencies that differed by a factor of two. We used optical tweezers to unfold the pseudoknots. The pseudoknot giving rise to the highest degree...

  5. Wounding the messenger: the new economy makes occupational health indicators too good to be true.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azaroff, Lenore S; Lax, Michael B; Levenstein, Charles; Wegman, David H

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and workers' compensation insurers reported dramatic drops in rates of occupational injuries and illnesses during the 1990s. The authors argue that far-reaching changes in the 1980s and 1990s, including the rise of precarious employment, falling wages and opportunities, and the creation of a super-vulnerable population of immigrant workers, probably helped create this apparent trend by preventing employees from reporting some injuries and illnesses. Changes in the health care system, including loss of access to health care for growing numbers of workers and increased obstacles to the use of workers' compensation, compounded these effects by preventing the diagnosis and documentation of some occupational injuries and illnesses. Researchers should examine these forces more closely to better understand trends in occupational health.

  6. An exploration of hadronic interactions in blazars using multi-messenger data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchernin, C.; Aguilar, J. A.; Neronov, A.; Montaruli, T.

    2014-04-01

    High energy photon and neutrino emissions are expected from the interactions of high-energy protons with matter and/or radiation in the blazars environment. In these proceedings, we use the sensitivity of the IceCube neutrino detector estimated for different neutrino spectral indices (derived in Tchernin et al. (2013) [12]) to show that already in its 40-string configuration (IC-40), the sensitivity of the IceCube neutrino telescope is already at the level of constraining the parameter space of purely hadronic scenarios of blazar activity. As a result, using the full detector sensitivity, those constraints should be about a factor of 3 better than what discussed here. Assuming that the γ-ray flux observed by Fermi can be explained with purely hadronic interactions, we estimate the expected neutrino flux from blazars based on the combination of the γ-ray flux observed by Fermi, with the simultaneous IC-40 observations. We consider separately the cases where the proton-proton or proton-γ interactions are dominant. In both cases, we set some constraints on the primary proton spectrum. In the case where pp interactions dominate, the tightest constraints are set for the source 3C 454.3, for which the high energy part of the spectrum is constrained to be harder than E-2 and the cut-off energy larger than 1018 eV. Alternatively, in the case where the dominant channel is the interaction of the high-energy protons with the soft radiation fields, the magnitude of the constraints depends on the radiation field energy distribution. For the source 3C 273, the most constrained source of our sample for the pγ interaction, the cut-off energy is constrained to be Ecut ≳1018 eV for any spectral index and for different soft photon fields, including the radiation from the accretion disk (Big Blue Bump), the broad line region or the synchrotron radiation from the jet.

  7. Corticosteroids and interleukin-1, messengers for communication between the endocrine and immune system in carp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijts, F.A.A.

    1998-01-01

    SummaryStress-induced inummosuppression is a well known phenomenon and mostly attributed to actions of steroid hormones released upon activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis. In mammals, this endocrine-immune interaction is part of a bidirectional communication n

  8. EUSO: using high energy cosmic rays and neutrinos as messengers from the unknown universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Scarsi

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Exploiting the earth atmosphere as a giant detector for the incoming extraterrestrial fl ux of high energy cosmic rays and cosmic neutrinos, the mission «EUSO-Extreme Universe Space Observatory» is devoted to the exploration of the domain of the highest energy processes occurring in the universe up to its accessible boundaries. The observable is provided by the air nitrogen fl uorescence light emitted in the UV band 300-400 nm by the extensive air showers produced by the cascading processes of the primary cosmic radiation particles interacting with the atmosphere. The EUSO telescope is based on a double Fresnel lens optics (diameter 2.5 m coupled to a highly pixelized focal surface composed multianode PMTs; the image at the earth surface is detailed at 1 km2 over a total of several hundred thousand of km2. EUSO will fl y on the International Space Station accommodated as external payload of the European Space Agency Columbus module. The mission is scheduled to last 3 years, with the start of operations foreseen for 2007/8. The expectations are of a collection rate of a thousand events/year for cosmic rays at E > 1020 eV together with tens/hundreds of cosmic neutrinos at energy above about 4 ¥ 1019 eV. EUSO is the result of the collaborative effort of several institutions in Europe, Japan and USA and it is conceived within the science program sponsored by various space agencies coordinated by ESA.

  9. Quantitative correlation between promoter methylation and messenger RNA levels of the reduced folate carrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kheradpour Albert

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methotrexate (MTX uptake is mediated by the reduced folate carrier (RFC. Defective drug uptake in association with decreased RFC expression is a common mechanism of MTX resistance in many tumor types. Heavy promoter methylation was previously identified as a basis for the complete silencing of RFC in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, its role and prevalence in RFC transcription regulation are, however, not widely studied. Methods In the current study, RFC promoter methylation was assessed using methylation specific PCR in a panel of malignant cell lines (n = 8, including MDA-MB-231, and M805, a MTX resistant cell line directly established from the specimen of a patient with malignant fibrohistocytoma, whom received multiple doses of MTX. A quantitative approach of real-time PCR for measuring the extent of RFC promoter methylation was developed, and was validated by direct bisulfite genomic sequencing. RFC mRNA levels were determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and were related to the extent of promoter methylation in these cell lines. Results A partial promoter methylation and RFC mRNA down-regulation were observed in M805. Using the quantitative approach, a reverse correlation (correlation coefficient = -0.59, p Conclusion This study further suggests that promoter methylation is a potential basis for MTX resistance. The quantitative correlation identified in this study implies that promoter methylation is possibly a mechanism involved in the fine regulation of RFC transcription.

  10. Genetic recombination in plant-infecting messenger-sense RNA viruses: overview and research perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Julian Bujarski

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available RNA recombination is one of the driving forces of genetic variability in (+-strand RNA viruses. Various types of RNA-RNA crossovers were described including crosses between the same or different viral RNAs or between viral and cellular RNAs. Likewise, a variety of molecular mechanisms are known to support RNA recombination, such as replicative events (based on internal or end-to-end replicase switchings along with nonreplicative joining among RNA fragments of viral and/or cellular origin. Such mechanisms as RNA decay or RNA interference are responsible for RNA fragmentation and trans-esterification reactions which are likely accountable for ligation of RNA fragments. Numerous host factors were found to affect the profiles of viral RNA recombinants and significant differences in recombination frequency were observed among various RNA viruses. Comparative analyses of viral sequences allowed for the development of evolutionary models in order to explain adaptive phenotypic changes and co-evolving sites. Many questions remain to be answered by forthcoming RNA recombination research. (i How various factors modulate the ability of viral replicase to switch templates, (ii What is the intracellular location of RNA-RNA template switchings, (iii Mechanisms and factors responsible for non-replicative RNA recombination, (iv Mechanisms of integration of RNA viral sequences with cellular genomic DNA, and (v What is the role of RNA splicing and ribozyme activity. From an evolutionary stand point, it is not known how RNA viruses parasitize new host species via recombination, nor is it obvious what the contribution of RNA recombination is among other RNA modification pathways. We do not understand why the frequency of RNA recombination varies so much among RNA viruses and the status of RNA recombination as a form of sex is not well documented.

  11. Multi-messenger light curves from gamma-ray bursts in the internal shock model

    CERN Document Server

    Bustamante, Mauricio; Winter, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are promising as sources of neutrinos and cosmic rays. In the internal shock scenario, blobs of plasma emitted from a central engine collide within a relativistic jet and form shocks, leading to particle acceleration and emission. Motivated by present experimental constraints and sensitivities, we improve the predictions of particle emission by investigating time-dependent effects from multiple shocks. We produce synthetic light curves with different variability timescales that stem from properties of the central engine. For individual GRBs, qualitative conclusions about model parameters, neutrino production efficiency, and delays in high-energy gamma rays can be deduced from inspection of the gamma-ray light curves. GRBs with fast time variability without additional prominent pulse structure tend to be efficient neutrino emitters, whereas GRBs with fast variability modulated by a broad pulse structure tend to be inefficient neutrino emitters and produce delayed high-energy gamma-ray s...

  12. The Messenger is the Medium: Communication and Diffusion Principles in the Process of Behavior Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W. Valente

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available El enfoque más común para comunicar el mensaje de promoción de la salud ha sido recurrir a un solo medio de información, sea radio o televisión. No obstante, conforme avanza la tecnología y la comunicación, los expertos coinciden, hoy en día, en afirmar que es importante utilizar un enfoque multimedios al transmitir mensajes de promoción de la salud, con el fin de acelerar el cambio en los comportamientos. Este artículo explica cómo es que la comunicación, y en particular la comunicación interpersonal, pueden incorporarse a la acción comunitaria y a los esfuerzos de promoción de la salud. La teoría de la difusión de innovaciones fundamenta este artículo, por lo que empieza por discutir sus principios. Enseguida se presenta una explicación de su uso en la evaluación de campañas de comunicación masiva. Se destaca, en todo momento, tanto la importancia como el papel desempeñados por la comunicación interpersonal y las redes sociales.

  13. Neutrophils alter the inflammatory milieu by signal-dependent translation of constitutive messenger RNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Lindemann, Stephan W.; Yost, Christian C.; Denis, Melvin M.; McIntyre, Thomas M.; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Zimmerman, Guy A.

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms by which neutrophils, key effector cells of the innate immune system, express new gene products in inflammation are largely uncharacterized. We found that they rapidly translate constitutive mRNAs when activated, a previously unrecognized response. One of the proteins synthesized without a requirement for transcription is the soluble IL-6 receptor α, which translocates to endothelial cells and induces a temporal switch to mononuclear leukocyte recruitment. Its synthesis is regu...

  14. Neutrophils alter the inflammatory milieu by signal-dependent translation of constitutive messenger RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann, Stephan W.; Yost, Christian C.; Denis, Melvin M.; McIntyre, Thomas M.; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Zimmerman, Guy A.

    2004-05-01

    The mechanisms by which neutrophils, key effector cells of the innate immune system, express new gene products in inflammation are largely uncharacterized. We found that they rapidly translate constitutive mRNAs when activated, a previously unrecognized response. One of the proteins synthesized without a requirement for transcription is the soluble IL-6 receptor , which translocates to endothelial cells and induces a temporal switch to mononuclear leukocyte recruitment. Its synthesis is regulated by a specialized translational control pathway that is inhibited by rapamycin, a bacterial macrolide with therapeutic efficacy in transplantation, inflammatory syndromes, and neoplasia. Signal-dependent translation in activated neutrophils may be a critical mechanism for alteration of the inflammatory milieu and a therapeutic target.

  15. A major second messenger mediator of Electrophorus electricus electric tissue is CaM kinase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotter, A L; Kaetzel, M A; Dedman, J R

    1997-09-01

    Electric tissue of the electric eel, Electrophorus electricus, has been used extensively as a model system for the study of excitable membrane biochemistry and electrophysiology. Membrane receptors, ion channels, and ATPases utilized by electrocytes are conserved in mammalian neurons and myocytes. In this study, we show that Ca2+ predominates as the major mediator of electric tissue phosphorylation relative to cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP-induced phosphorylation. Mastoparan, a calmodulin inhibitor peptide, and a peptide corresponding to the pseudosubstrate region of mammalian calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII (281-302)) attenuated Ca(2+)-dependent phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner. These experiments demonstrated that calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activity predominates in electric tissue. The Electrophorus kinase was purified by a novel affinity chromatography procedure utilizing Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent binding to the CaMKII (281-302) peptide coupled to Sepharose. The purified 51 kDa calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II demonstrated extensive autophosphorylation and exhibited a 3- to 4-fold increase in Ca(2+)-independent activity following autophosphorylation. Immunofluorescent localization experiments demonstrated calmodulin to be abundant in electrocytes, particularly subjacent to the plasma membrane. Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II had a punctate distribution indicating that it may be compartmentalized by association with vesicles or the cytoskeleton. As the primary mediator of phosphorylation within electric tissue, CaM kinase II may be critical for the regulation of the specialized electrophysiological function of electrocytes.

  16. Messenger RNA Interferase RelE Controls relBE Transcription by Conditional Cooperativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Martin; Borch, Jonas; Jørgensen, Mikkel G;

    2008-01-01

    Prokaryotic toxin-antitoxin (TA) loci consist of two genes in an operon that encodes a metabolically stable toxin and an unstable antitoxin. The antitoxin neutralises its cognate toxin by forming a tight complex with it. In all cases known, the antitoxin autoregulates TA operon transcription...... by binding to one or more operators in the promoter region while the toxin functions as a co-repressor of transcription. Interestingly, the toxin can also stimulate TA operon transcription. Here we analyse mechanistic aspects of how RelE of Escherichia coli can function both as a co-repressor and derepressor...... of relBE transcription. When RelB was in excess to RelE, two trimeric RelB(2)*RelE complexes bound cooperatively to two adjacent operator-sites in the relBE promoter region and repressed transcription. By contrast, RelE in excess stimulated relBE transcription and released the RelB(2)*RelE complex from...

  17. Decision-Makers As Messengers Of Climate Change Impacts And Ambassadors For Their Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudrias, M. A.; DeBenedict, C.; Bruce, L.; Estrada, M.; Hedge, N.; Silva-Send, N. J.

    2016-12-01

    Over the past several years there have been many coordinated efforts to improve climate change literacy of diverse audiences. The challenge has been to balance science content with audience-specific messaging with a goal to reach solutions and build community resilience. In the San Diego Region, Climate Education Partners (CEP) has been working with business leaders, elected officials, tribal leaders, and other community leaders to develop a suite of programs and activities to enhance the channels of communication outside traditional settings. CEP has employed a multidisciplinary approach that integrates climate science, social and learning sciences and effective communication strategies to create innovative resources and new approaches to climate change communication in order to engage audiences more effectively. We have interviewed over 140 key San Diego leaders and invited them to serve as ambassadors to the project by engaging them directly in the creation of a variety of innovative educational resources as well as serving as spokespersons for outreach activities. Our program has evolved from having only scientists, educators and community practitioners serve as presenters to strategically and deliberately engaging a mix of scientists, educators and decision makers as the conveyers of key messages. Our protocol for events includes preparing all speakers in advance, researching our audience, creating a script, immediate debriefs of each activity and a qualitative and quantitative assessment of each event. Two examples of this integrated approach will show how to engage decision-makers more deeply: (1) coastal flooding tour as a place-based activity and (2) impact videos that blend climate science, local personal stories and key messages from decision makers themselves. For climate change communication to be successful in the future, we will need creative and coordinated approaches.

  18. Nuclear transfer protocol affects messenger RNA expression patterns in cloned bovine blastocysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrenzycki, C; Wells, D; Herrmann, D; Miller, A; Oliver, J; Tervit, R; Niemann, H

    2001-07-01

    The successful production of embryos by nuclear transfer (NT) employing cultured somatic donor cells depends upon a variety of factors. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects 1) of two different activation protocols, 2) the use of quiescent or nonquiescent donor cells (G(0) or G(1) of the cell cycle), and 3) passage number of donor cells on the relative abundance (RA) of eight specific mRNAs (DNA methyltransferase, DNMT; mammalian achaete-scute homologue, Mash2; glucose transporter-1, Glut-1; heat shock protein 70.1, Hsp; desmocollin II, Dc II; E-cadherin, E-cad; interferon tau, IF; insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor, Igf2r) in single blastocysts employing a semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay. The results were compared with those for their in vitro (IVP)- and in vivo-generated noncloned counterparts. In experiment 1, employing either FBA (fusion before activation) or AFS (fusion and activation simultaneously) to generate NT blastocysts, Hsp mRNAs were not found in NT embryos from either protocol, whereas Hsp transcripts were detectable in IVP embryos. The relative abundance (RA) of IF transcripts was significantly increased in the AFS and IVP groups compared to the FBA treatment. In experiment 2, the use of either G(0) or G(1) donor cells to produce cloned embryos both significantly reduced the relative amount of DNMT transcripts and significantly increased the RA of Mash2 compared to the IVP embryos. In addition, IF transcript levels were significantly elevated in NT blastocysts employing G(1) donor cells for NT compared to IVP embryos and those generated using G(0) cells. In experiment 3, donor cells, either from passsage 5/6 or 8, were employed for NT. DNMT transcripts were significantly decreased, whereas Mash2 transcripts were significantly increased in both NT groups compared to their IVP counterparts. The amount of IF mRNA was significantly higher in P8-derived than in P5/6 and IVP embryos. In experiment 4, the RA of DNMT transcripts was decreased in in vivo-derived blastocysts compared to those produced in vitro. Mash2 expression was increased in in vivo embryos and those IVP embryos produced in medium containing Sigma BSA. The RA of Hsp was higher in IVP embryos produced in serum containing medium than in those produced in Sigma BSA or in vivo. In vivo embryos and those produced in Life Technologies BSA had the lowest expression of IF transcripts. Expression of all other genes was not affected by variation in NT methodology or IVP culture systems throughout experiments 1-4. In conclusion, depending on steps of the cloning procedure NT-derived embryos display marked differences from their IVP- and in vivo-derived counterparts. An aberrant expression pattern in NT embryos was found with respect to genes thought to be involved in stress adaptation, trophoblastic function, and DNA methylation during preimplantation development.

  19. MESSENGER Mission to Planet Mercury%人类派往水星的使者--"信使"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    山丹

    2004-01-01

    @@ 8月3日,令科学家们期盼已久的美国航字局"信使"探测器终于在卡纳维拉尔角空军站由一枚德尔它2运载火箭发射升空,开始了它飞往水星的旅程.它将在2011年3月进入绕水星运行的轨道,开始其为期一年的探测使命.本文在已作过的发射报道的基础上,进一步介绍了"信使"此次探测任务所要回答的科学问题、任务设计、探测器设计和科学仪器的情况.

  20. A 750 GeV Messenger of Dark Conformal Symmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Davoudiasl, Hooman

    2015-01-01

    The tentative hints for a diphoton resonance at a mass of $\\sim 750$ GeV from the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC may be interpreted as first contact with a "dark" sector with a spontaneously broken conformal symmetry. The implied TeV scale of the dark sector may be motivated by the interaction strength required to accommodate a viable thermal relic dark matter (DM) candidate. We model the conformal dynamics using a Randall-Sundrum type 5D geometry whose IR boundary is identified with the dynamics of the composite dark sector, while the Standard Model (SM) matter content resides on the UV boundary, corresponding to "elementary" fields. We allow the gauge fields to reside in the 5D bulk, which can be minimally chosen to be $SU(3)_c\\times U(1)_Y$. The "dark" radion $\\phi_D$ is identified as the putative 750 GeV resonance. Heavy vector-like fermions, often invoked to explain the diphoton excess, are not explicitly present in our model and are not predicted to appear in the spectrum of TeV scale states. Our ...

  1. Cloned human neuropeptide Y receptor couples to two different second messenger systems.

    OpenAIRE

    Herzog, H.; Hort, Y J; Ball, H J; Hayes, G; Shine, J; Selbie, L A

    1992-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant neuropeptides in the mammalian nervous system and exhibits a diverse range of important physiological activities, including effects on psychomotor activity, food intake, regulation of central endocrine secretion, and potent vasoactive effects on the cardiovascular system. Two major subtypes of NPY receptor (Y1 and Y2) have been defined by pharmacological criteria. We report here the molecular cloning of a cDNA sequence encoding a human NPY rece...

  2. MCT-1 protein interacts with the cap complex and modulates messenger RNA translational profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinert, Line; Shi, B; Nandi, S

    2006-01-01

    enzymes. Here, we established that MCT-1 protein interacts with the cap complex through its PUA domain and recruits the density-regulated protein (DENR/DRP), containing the SUI1 translation initiation domain. Through the use of microarray analysis on polysome-associated mRNAs, we showed that up...

  3. In situ hybridization of oxytocin messenger RNA: macroscopic distribution and quantitation in rat hypothalamic cell groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burbach, J.P.; Voorhuis, T.A.; van Tol, H.H.; Ivell, R.

    1987-05-29

    Oxytocin mRNA was detected in the rat hypothalamus by in situ hybridization to a single stranded /sup 35/S-labelled DNA probe and the distribution of oxytocin mRNA-containing cell groups was studied at the macroscopic level. Specificity of hybridization was confirmed by comparison to vasopressin mRNA hybridization in parallel tissue sections. Cell groups containing oxytocin mRNA were confined to a set of hypothalamic cell groups, i.c. the supraoptic, paraventricular, anterior commissural nuclei, nucleus circularis and scattered hypothalamic islets. These cell groups displayed similar densities of autoradiographic signals indicating that the oxytocin gene is expressed at approximately the same average level at these various sites.

  4. Controlling the Messenger: Regulated Translation of Maternal mRNAs in Xenopus laevis Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Michael D; Fox, Catherine A; Dowdle, Megan E; Blaser, Susanne Imboden; Chung, Andy; Park, Sookhee

    2017-01-01

    The selective translation of maternal mRNAs encoding cell-fate determinants drives the earliest decisions of embryogenesis that establish the vertebrate body plan. This chapter will discuss studies in Xenopus laevis that provide insights into mechanisms underlying this translational control. Xenopus has been a powerful model organism for many discoveries relevant to the translational control of maternal mRNAs because of the large size of its oocytes and eggs that allow for microinjection of molecules and the relative ease of manipulating the oocyte to egg transition (maturation) and fertilization in culture. Consequently, many key studies have focused on the expression of maternal mRNAs during the oocyte to egg transition (the meiotic cell cycle) and the rapid cell divisions immediately following fertilization. This research has made seminal contributions to our understanding of translational regulatory mechanisms, but while some of the mRNAs under consideration at these stages encode cell-fate determinants, many encode cell cycle regulatory proteins that drive these early cell cycles. In contrast, while maternal mRNAs encoding key developmental (i.e., cell-fate) regulators that function after the first cleavage stages may exploit aspects of these foundational mechanisms, studies reveal that these mRNAs must also rely on distinct and, as of yet, incompletely understood mechanisms. These findings are logical because the functions of such developmental regulatory proteins have requirements distinct from cell cycle regulators, including becoming relevant only after fertilization and then only in specific cells of the embryo. Indeed, key maternal cell-fate determinants must be made available in exquisitely precise amounts (usually low), only at specific times and in specific cells during embryogenesis. To provide an appreciation for the regulation of maternal cell-fate determinant expression, an overview of the maternal phase of Xenopus embryogenesis will be presented. This section will be followed by a review of translational mechanisms operating in oocytes, eggs, and early cleavage-stage embryos and conclude with a discussion of how the regulation of key maternal cell-fate determinants at the level of translation functions in Xenopus embryogenesis. A key theme is that the molecular asymmetries critical for forming the body axes are established and further elaborated upon by the selective temporal and spatial regulation of maternal mRNA translation.

  5. Messenger RNA vaccine based on recombinant MS2 virus-like particles against prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinming; Sun, Yanli; Jia, Tingting; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Kuo; Wang, Lunan

    2014-04-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most diagnosed cancer in the western male population with high mortality. Recently, alternative approaches based on immunotherapy including mRNA vaccines for PCa have shown therapeutic promise. However, for mRNA vaccine, several disadvantages such as the instability of mRNA, the high cost of gold particles, the limited production scale for mRNA-transfected dendritic cells in vitro, limit their development. Herein, recombinant bacteriophage MS2 virus-like particles (VLPs), which based on the interaction of a 19-nucleotide RNA aptamer and the coat protein of bacteriophage MS2, successfully addressed these questions, in which target mRNA was packaged by MS2 capsid. MS2 VLP-based mRNA vaccines were easily prepared by recombinant protein technology, nontoxic and RNase-resistant. We show the packaged mRNA was translated into protein as early as 12 hr after phagocytosed by macrophages. Moreover, MS2 VLP-based mRNA vaccines induced strong humoral and cellular immune responses, especially antigen-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) and balanced Th1/Th2 responses without upregulation of CD4(+) regulatory T cells, and protected C57BL/6 mice against PCa completely. As a therapeutic vaccine, MS2 VLP-based mRNA vaccines delayed tumor growth. Our results provide proof of concept on the efficacy and safety of MS2 VLP-based mRNA vaccine, which provides a new delivery approach for mRNA vaccine and implies important clinical value for the prevention and therapy of PCa.

  6. Talking to histone: methylated RelA serves as a messenger

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Dong Yang; Lin-Feng Chen

    2011-01-01

    @@ The mammalian NF-кB family of transcription factors functions as a major regulator of innate and adaptive immunity and inflammatory responses,plays critical roles in controlling cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis by regulating a wide range of genes that govern these various processes [1].

  7. Transforming growth factor-beta messenger RNA and protein in murine colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whiting, C V; Williams, A M; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    2001-01-01

    Using a CD4+ T-cell-transplanted SCID mouse model of colitis, we have analyzed TGF-beta transcription and translation in advanced disease. By in situ hybridization, the epithelium of both control and inflamed tissues transcribed TGF-beta1 and TGF-beta3 mRNAs, but both were expressed significantly...... TGF-beta. By ELISA, very low levels (0-69 pg/mg) of soluble total or active TGF-beta were detected in hypotonic tissue lysates. TGF-beta1 and TGF-beta3 are produced by SCID mouse colon and transcription is increased in the colitis caused by transplantation of CD4+ T-cells, but this does not result...

  8. Characterization of human endothelial cell urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor protein and messenger RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnathan, E S; Kuo, A; Karikó, K

    1990-01-01

    Human umbilical vein endothelial cells in culture (HUVEC) express receptors for urokinase-type plasminogen activators (u-PA). The immunochemical nature of this receptor and its relationship to u-PA receptors expressed by other cell types is unknown. Cross-linking active site-blocked u-PA to HUVEC...

  9. DNA-water interactions distinguish messenger RNA genes from transfer RNA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Garima; Jayaram, B

    2012-05-30

    Physicochemical properties of DNA sequences as a guide to developing insights into genome organization has received little attention. Here, we utilize the energetics of DNA to further advance the knowledge on its language at a molecular level. Specifically, we ask the question whether physicochemical properties of different functional units on genomes differ. We extract intramolecular and solvation energies of different DNA base pair steps from a comprehensive set of molecular dynamics simulations. We then investigate the solvation behavior of DNA sequences coding for mRNAs and tRNAs. Distinguishing mRNA genes from tRNA genes is a tricky problem in genome annotation without assumptions on length of DNA and secondary structure of the product of transcription. We find that solvation energetics of DNA behaves as an extremely efficient property in discriminating 2,063,537 genes coding for mRNAs from 56,251 genes coding for tRNAs in all (~1500) completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes.

  10. The Messenger May Be Wrong, but the Message May Be Right.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juel, Connie

    1995-01-01

    Suggests that abandoning controlled vocabulary texts on the assumption that reading is a psycholinguistic guessing game was wrong. Claims that the current emphasis on strategy instruction, scaffolded reading experiences, and the use of writing to foster letter-sounds may provide good outcomes for those teachers and children who dreaded reading…

  11. Melatonin, Noncoding RNAs, Messenger RNA Stability and Epigenetics—Evidence, Hints, Gaps and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüdiger Hardeland

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is a highly pleiotropic regulator molecule, which influences numerous functions in almost every organ and, thus, up- or down-regulates many genes, frequently in a circadian manner. Our understanding of the mechanisms controlling gene expression is actually now expanding to a previously unforeseen extent. In addition to classic actions of transcription factors, gene expression is induced, suppressed or modulated by a number of RNAs and proteins, such as miRNAs, lncRNAs, piRNAs, antisense transcripts, deadenylases, DNA methyltransferases, histone methylation complexes, histone demethylases, histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases. Direct or indirect evidence for involvement of melatonin in this network of players has originated in different fields, including studies on central and peripheral circadian oscillators, shift work, cancer, inflammation, oxidative stress, aging, energy expenditure/obesity, diabetes type 2, neuropsychiatric disorders, and neurogenesis. Some of the novel modulators have also been shown to participate in the control of melatonin biosynthesis and melatonin receptor expression. Future work will need to augment the body of evidence on direct epigenetic actions of melatonin and to systematically investigate its role within the network of oscillating epigenetic factors. Moreover, it will be necessary to discriminate between effects observed under conditions of well-operating and deregulated circadian clocks, and to explore the possibilities of correcting epigenetic malprogramming by melatonin.

  12. Prolactin increases hepatic Na+/taurocholate co-transport activity and messenger RNA post partum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, T C; Liu, Y; Hyde, J F; Hagenbuch, B; Meier, P J; Vore, M

    1994-01-01

    We have shown that Na+/taurocholate co-transport activity is decreased in pregnancy, but rebounds post partum relative to non-pregnant controls, and that activity can be increased by treatment with ovine prolactin [Ganguly, Hyde and Vore (1993) J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 267, 82-87]. To determine the basis for these effects, Na+/taurocholate co-transport was determined in purified basolateral liver plasma-membrane (bLPM) vesicles and compared with steady-state mRNA levels encoding the Na+/taurocholate-co-transporting polypeptide (Ntcp) in non-pregnant controls, pregnant rats (19-20 days pregnant), rats post partum (48 h post partum) and rats post partum treated with bromocriptine to inhibit prolactin secretion. Na+/taurocholate co-transport activity (nmol/5 s per mg of protein) in bLPM was decreased from 10.4 +/- 1.8 in non-pregnant controls to 7.9 +/- 0.6 in bLPM in pregnant rats, but rebounded to 17.5 +/- 1.3 post partum; treatment of rats post partum with bromocriptine to inhibit prolactin secretion decreased activity to 14.1 +/- 0.9. Northern and slot-blot analyses revealed similar changes in mRNA for Ntcp, so that a positive correlation was observed between Na+/taurocholate co-transport activity and Ntcp mRNA. Furthermore, treatment of ovariectomized rats with ovine prolactin increased Ntcp mRNA 10-fold compared with solvent-treated controls, consistent with the 2-fold increase in Vmax, for Na+/taurocholate co-transport in isolated hepatocytes. These data are the first to demonstrate endogenous physiological regulation by prolactin of Ntcp mRNA in parallel with Na+/taurocholate co-transport activity. Images Figure 2 PMID:7945260

  13. Leishmania pifanoi: kinetics of messenger RNA expression during amastigote to promastigote transformation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, S M; Rainey, P M

    1993-08-01

    Conditions have been developed which induce axenically grown Leishmania pifanoi amastigotes to transform into the promastigote stage in a highly reproducible fashion. Transformation was induced by a temperature shift from 31 to 22 degrees C, was inhibited by high cell concentration (> or = 40 x 10(6) cells/ml), and was unaffected by pH from 5.5-7.2. Morphologic transformation was first evident at 8 hr after induction, had occurred in > 50% of cells by 24 hr, and was > 90% complete by 48 hr. This system enabled study of the kinetics of mRNA expression during the transformation of Leishmania. The differentially expressed mRNAs for ATPase 1a and 1b, alpha- and beta-tubulin, P100/11E, Pro-1, and pLm 2, 7, 14, and 16 exhibited complex patterns of temporal expression, suggesting a highly regulated process. Differentiation on the biochemical level was evident within an hour and continued throughout the course of morphologic transformation. In addition, transformed L. pifanoi promastigotes in the plateau growth phase expressed genes characteristic of metacyclic promastigotes. Axenically cultured L. pifanoi should provide an excellent model for the study of differentiation in Leishmania.

  14. Evaluating the message or the messenger? Implications for self-validation in persuasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jason K; Wegener, Duane T; Sawicki, Vanessa; Petty, Richard E; Briñol, Pablo

    2013-12-01

    Characteristics of persuasive message sources have been extensively studied. However, little attention has been paid to situations when people are motivated to form an evaluation of the communicator rather than the communicated issue. We postulated that these different foci can affect how a source validates message-related cognitions. Participants focused on the source (Studies 1 and 2) or the issue (Study 2) while reading weak or strong message arguments. Later, the communicator was described as low or high in credibility. When focused on the source, highly motivated participants were more confident and their attitudes were more reflective of thoughts when argument quality matched (e.g., weak arguments-low credibility) rather than mismatched (e.g., weak arguments-high credibility) source credibility. Conversely, when participants were focused on the issue, self-validation was greater when credibility was high rather than low-regardless of argument quality. Implications of these findings for the study and practice of persuasion are discussed.

  15. The Multi-Messenger Approach to High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Paredes, Josep M; Torres, Diego F

    2008-01-01

    This book provides a theoretical and observational overview of the state of the art of gamma-ray astrophysics, and their impact and connection with the physics of cosmic rays and neutrinos. With the aim of shedding new and fresh light on the problem of the nature of the gamma-ray sources, particularly those yet unidentified, this book summarizes contributions to a workshop that continues with the series initiated by the meeting held at Tonantzintla in October 2000, and Hong-Kong in May 2004. This books will be of interest for all active researchers in the field of high energy astrophysics and astroparticle physics, as well as for graduate students entering into the subject.

  16. Messenger RNA expression of chicken CLOCK gene in the response to Campylobacter jejuni inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyi; Liu, Liying; Zhang, Maozhi; Yang, Ning; Qi, Yukai; Sun, Yu; Li, Xianyao

    2015-09-01

    Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) is a leading cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Previous research has shown that circadian rhythm plays a critical role in host response to C. jejuni colonization. The CLOCK gene is one of the core genes regulating circadian rhythms and shows significant expression on 7 d post-C. jejuni inoculation. The objective of this study was to investigate temporal and spatial expression of chicken CLOCK gene post-C. jejuni inoculation. Cecal and splenic RNA were isolated from 2 distinct chicken breeds and used to compare the mRNA expression of CLOCK gene between inoculated and noninoculated chickens within each breed and between breeds within each of inoculated and noninoculated groups. Our results showed that the CLOCK gene was significantly down-regulated at 20 h postinoculation (hpi) in cecum and spleen in Jiningbairi chicken. CLOCK gene was significantly down-regulated at 4 and 16 hpi and up-regulated at 8 hpi in cecum and spleen in specific pathogen free white leghorn noninoculated chicken. The findings suggested that expression of CLOCK gene was significantly changed post C. jejuin inoculation. This change was affected by genetic background, tissue, and time points postinoculation. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  17. Molecular hydrogen messengers can lead to structural infidelity: A cautionary tale of protonated glycine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Antoine; Williams, Evan R.; Rizzo, Thomas R.

    2015-09-01

    The effects of tagging protonated glycine with either He or between 1 and 14 H2 molecules on the infrared photodissociation spectra and the ion structure were investigated. Differences in the IR spectra with either a single He atom or H2 molecule attached indicate that even a single H2 molecule can affect the frequencies of some vibrational bands of this simple ion. The protonation site is the preferred location of the tag with He and with up to two H2 molecules, but evidence for H2 attachment to the hydrogen atom of the uncharged carboxylic acid is observed for ions tagged with three or more H2 molecules. This results in a 55 cm-1 red shift in the carboxylic acid OH stretch, and evidence for some structural isomers where the hydrogen bond between the protonated nitrogen and the carbonyl oxygen is partially broken; as a result H2 molecules attached to this site are observed. These results are supported by theory, which indicates that H2 molecules can effectively break this weak hydrogen bond with three or more H2 molecules. These results indicate that large spectral shifts as a result of H2 molecules attaching to sites remote from the charge can occur and affect stretching frequencies as a result of charge transfer, and that tagging with multiple H2 molecules can change the structure of the ion itself.

  18. Melanocortin-4 receptor messenger ribonucleic acid expression in rat cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal, and integumentary systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountjoy, Kathleen G; Jenny Wu, C-S; Dumont, Laurence M; Wild, J Martin

    2003-12-01

    We determined melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4-R) mRNA ontogeny in the rat using in situ hybridization and a rat MC4-R riboprobe and showed numerous peripheral sites of expression for MC4-R. The developing heart showed MC4-R mRNA expression as early as embryonic day (E) 14. In the lungs of E16-E20 fetuses, the cells surrounding developing bronchi expressed relatively strong in situ signal. Muscles associated with the respiratory system such as diaphragm and intercostal muscle expressed MC4-R mRNA as early as E14. Occipital and tongue muscles, in particular the genioglossus, showed diffuse signal at E15-E20. In the eye, a discrete signal was detected in an outer neuroblastic layer which may correspond to retina or extraocular muscle. Developing limb buds expressed relatively strong signal at E14, whereas skull bone and joint capsules of the paw of the forelimb showed signal at E18-E20. Using RT-PCR and ribonuclease protection assays, we determined that MC4-R mRNA is also expressed in adult rat heart, lung, kidney, and testis. The expression of the MC4-R in cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal, and integumentary systems supports functional roles for the MC4-R in addition to its roles in appetite, weight control, and regulation of linear growth.

  19. Integrated microRNA and messenger RNA analysis in aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Sean; Williams, Michael J A; Phillips, L Vicky; Galvin, Ivor F; Bunton, Richard W; Jones, Gregory T

    2016-11-23

    Aortic valve stenosis (AS) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, with no effective medical therapies. Investigation into the underlying biology of AS in humans is limited by difficulties in obtaining healthy valvular tissue for use as a control group. However, micro-ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) are stable in post-mortem tissue. We compared valve specimens from patients undergoing aortic valve replacement for AS to non-diseased cadaveric valves. We found 106 differentially expressed miRNAs (p Integrated miRNA/gene expression analysis validated the microarray results as a whole, while quantitative polymerase chain reaction confirmed downregulation of miR-122-5p, miR-625-5p, miR-30e-5p and upregulation of miR-21-5p and miR-221-3p. Pathway analysis of the integrated miRNA/mRNA network identified pathways predominantly involved in extracellular matrix function. A number of currently available therapies target products of upregulated genes in the integrated miRNA/mRNA network, with these genes being predominantly more peripheral members of the network. The identification of a group of tissue miRNA associated with AS may contribute to the development of new therapeutic approaches to AS. This study highlights the importance of systems biology-based approaches to complex diseases.

  20. GEMM-I riboswitches from Geobacter sense the bacterial second messenger cyclic AMP-GMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellenberger, Colleen A; Wilson, Stephen C; Hickey, Scott F; Gonzalez, Tania L; Su, Yichi; Hallberg, Zachary F; Brewer, Thomas F; Iavarone, Anthony T; Carlson, Hans K; Hsieh, Yu-Fang; Hammond, Ming C

    2015-04-28

    Cyclic dinucleotides are an expanding class of signaling molecules that control many aspects of bacterial physiology. A synthase for cyclic AMP-GMP (cAG, also referenced as 3'-5', 3'-5' cGAMP) called DncV is associated with hyperinfectivity of Vibrio cholerae but has not been found in many bacteria, raising questions about the prevalence and function of cAG signaling. We have discovered that the environmental bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens produces cAG and uses a subset of GEMM-I class riboswitches (GEMM-Ib, Genes for the Environment, Membranes, and Motility) as specific receptors for cAG. GEMM-Ib riboswitches regulate genes associated with extracellular electron transfer; thus cAG signaling may control aspects of bacterial electrophysiology. These findings expand the role of cAG beyond organisms that harbor DncV and beyond pathogenesis to microbial geochemistry, which is important to environmental remediation and microbial fuel cell development. Finally, we have developed an RNA-based fluorescent biosensor for live-cell imaging of cAG. This selective, genetically encodable biosensor will be useful to probe the biochemistry and cell biology of cAG signaling in diverse bacteria.

  1. Androstenedione increases cytochrome P450 aromatase messenger ribonucleic acid transcripts in nonluteinizing bovine granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Mélanie; Vanselow, Jens; Nicola, Edmir S; Price, Christopher A

    2005-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if androgens regulate granulosa cell steroidogenesis at physiological doses found in small bovine follicles. Bovine granulosa cells were cultured under serum-free conditions that permit the induction and maintenance of FSH-dependent estradiol secretion. Increasing androstenedione concentrations from 0.1 to 1 or 10 microM significantly increased estradiol accumulation and cytochrome P450 aromatase (P450arom) mRNA abundance. No increase in progesterone accumulation or abundance of mRNA for P450 side-chain cleavage or 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes was observed. The addition of 0.1, 1, or 10 microM progestins or estrogens had no stimulatory effect on P450arom mRNA levels. An analysis of the 5'-untranslated region of P450arom mRNA transcripts indicated that the majority was derived from Cyp19 ovary-specific promoter 2, with some contribution from promoters 1.1 and 1.5. Transcripts from these three promoters were all significantly increased by androstenedione. Testosterone increased promoter 1.1 and 1.5-derived transcripts, but only promoter 2-derived transcripts at the highest dose tested (100 microM). Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) did not affect Cyp19 expression. Collectively, these data show that androgens may exert specific stimulatory effects on P450arom mRNA concentrations in granulosa cells. Interestingly, different androgens had different effects on Cyp19 promoter usage, suggesting differential regulation of aromatase gene expression in the developing follicle.

  2. BD +44 493: A Ninth Magnitude Messenger from the Early Universe; Carbon Enhanced and Beryllium Poor

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Hiroko; Honda, Satoshi; Beers, Timothy C

    2009-01-01

    We present a 1D LTE chemical abundance analysis of the very bright (V=9.1) Carbon-Enhanced Metal-Poor (CEMP) star BD +44 493, based on high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra obtained with Subaru/HDS. The star is shown to be a subgiant with an extremely low iron abundance ([Fe/H]=-3.7), while it is rich in C ([C/Fe]=+1.3) and O ([O/Fe]=+1.6). Although astronomers have been searching for extremely metal-poor stars for decades, this is the first star found with [Fe/H]<-3.5 and an apparent magnitude V<12. Based on its low abundances of neutron-capture elements (e.g., [Ba/Fe]=-0.59), BD +44 493 is classified as a "CEMP-no" star. Its abundance pattern implies that a first-generation faint supernova is the most likely origin of its carbon excess, while scenarios related to mass loss from rapidly-rotating massive stars or mass transfer from an AGB companion star are not favored. From a high-quality spectrum in the near-UV region, we set an very low upper limit on this star's beryllium abundance (A(Be)=lo...

  3. The selective elimination of messenger RNA underlies the mitosis-meiosis switch in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    The cellular programs for meiosis and mitosis must be strictly distinguished but the mechanisms controlling the entry to meiosis remain largely elusive in higher organisms. In contrast, recent analyses in yeast have shed new light on the mechanisms underlying the mitosis-meiosis switch. In this review, the current understanding of these mechanisms in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is discussed. Meiosis-inducing signals in this microbe emanating from environmental conditions including the nutrient status converge on the activity of an RRM-type RNA-binding protein, Mei2. This protein plays pivotal roles in both the induction and progression of meiosis and has now been found to govern the meiotic program in a quite unexpected manner. Fission yeast contains an RNA degradation system that selectively eliminates meiosis-specific mRNAs during the mitotic cell cycle. Mmi1, a novel RNA-binding protein of the YTH-family, is essential for this process. Mei2 tethers Mmi1 and thereby stabilizes the transcripts necessary for the progression of meiosis.

  4. The selective elimination of messenger RNA underlies the mitosis–meiosis switch in fission yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    The cellular programs for meiosis and mitosis must be strictly distinguished but the mechanisms controlling the entry to meiosis remain largely elusive in higher organisms. In contrast, recent analyses in yeast have shed new light on the mechanisms underlying the mitosis–meiosis switch. In this review, the current understanding of these mechanisms in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is discussed. Meiosis-inducing signals in this microbe emanating from environmental conditions inclu...

  5. MCT-1 protein interacts with the cap complex and modulates messenger RNA translational profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinert, Line; Shi, B; Nandi, S;

    2006-01-01

    MCT-1 is an oncogene that was initially identified in a human T cell lymphoma and has been shown to induce cell proliferation as well as activate survival-related pathways. MCT-1 contains the PUA domain, a recently described RNA-binding domain that is found in several tRNA and rRNA modification e...

  6. Peripheral lipopolysaccharide stimulation induces interleukin-1β messenger RNA in rat brain microglial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buttini, M.; Boddeke, H.

    1995-01-01

    The inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 acts as an endogenous pyrogenin organisms affected by infectious diseases and has been shown to influence the activity of the central nervous system. Using in situ hybridization histochemistry, we have examined the cellular source of interleukin-1β in rat brai

  7. Messengers from the Early Solar System - The Similarity and Diversity of Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumma, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Viewed from a cosmic perspective, Earth is a dry planet yet its oceans are enriched in deuterium by a large factor relative to nebular hydrogen. Can comets have delivered Earth's water? The question of exogenous delivery of water and organics to Earth and other young planets is of critical importance for understanding the origin of Earth's water, and for assessing the possible existence of exo-planets similar to Earth. Strong gradients in temperature and chemistry in the proto-planetary disk, coupled with dynamical models, imply that comets from the Oort Cloud and Kuiper Disk reservoirs should have diverse composition. The primary volatiles in comets (ices native to the nucleus) provide the preferred metric, and taxonomies based on them are now beginning to emerge [1,2,3]. The measurement of cosmic parameters such as the nuclear spin temperatures for H2O, NH3, and CH4, and of enrichment factors for isotopologues (D/H in water and hydrogen cyanide, N-14/N-15 in CN and hydrogen cyanide provide additional important tests for the origin of cometary material. I will provide an overview of these aspects, and their implications for the origin of Earth's water and prebiotic organics.

  8. Messenger RNAs in metaphase II oocytes correlate with successful embryo development to the blastocyst stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biase, Fernando Henrique; Everts, Robin Edward; Oliveira, Rosane; Santos-Biase, Weruska Karyna Freitas; Fonseca Merighe, Giovana Krempel; Smith, Lawrence Charles; Martelli, Lúcia; Lewin, Harris; Meirelles, Flávio Vieira

    2014-02-01

    The mRNAs accumulated in oocytes provide support for embryo development until embryo genomic activation. We hypothesized that the maternal mRNA stock present in bovine oocytes is associated with embryo development until the blastocyst stage. To test our hypothesis, we analyzed the transcriptome of the oocyte and correlated the results with the embryo development. Our goal was to identify genes expressed in the oocyte that correlate with its ability to develop to the blastocyst stage. A fraction of oocyte cytoplasm was biopsied using micro-aspiration and stored for further expression analysis. Oocytes were activated chemically, cultured individually and classified according to their capacity to develop in vitro to the blastocyst stage. Microarray analysis was performed on mRNA extracted from the oocyte cytoplasm fractions and correlated with its ability to develop to the blastocyst stage (good quality oocyte) or arrest at the 8-16-cell stage (bad quality oocyte). The expression of 4320 annotated genes was detected in the fractions of cytoplasm that had been collected from oocytes matured in vitro. Gene ontology classification revealed that enriched gene expression of genes was associated with certain biological processes: 'RNA processing', 'translation' and 'mRNA metabolic process'. Genes that are important to the molecular functions of 'RNA binding' and 'translation factor activity, RNA binding' were also enriched in oocytes. We identified 29 genes with differential expression between the two groups of oocytes compared (good versus bad quality). The content of mRNAs expressed in metaphase II oocytes influences the activation of the embryonic genome and enables further develop to the blastocyst stage.

  9. Two insulin-like growth factor I messenger RNAs are expressed in human liver.

    OpenAIRE

    Rotwein, P

    1986-01-01

    Through use of a synthetic oligonucleotide probe, human insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) cDNA clones were isolated from a liver library. Two types of cDNAs were defined by restriction enzyme analysis and DNA sequencing. Both encode IGF-I precursors of either 195 or 153 amino acids. The two predicted protein precursors are identical from their amino terminus to a lysine residue 16 codons beyond the IGF-I sequence, and then they diverge. Both cDNAs predict additional unique carboxyl-termina...

  10. Shooting the Messenger: Mediating the Public and the Role of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    chifaou.amzat

    2011-08-02

    Aug 2, 2011 ... media, and although an appeal was being launched at the time of writing, a vigorous debate has .... As De Fleur has explained: 'The all-consuming question that has ..... Only one focus group (women in Mamelodi) discussed.

  11. Radioactive Elements on Mercury's Surface from MESSENGER: Implications for the Planet's Formation and Evolution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patrick N. Peplowski; Larry G. Evans; Steven A. Hauck; Timothy J. McCoy; William V. Boynton; Jeffery J. Gillis-Davis; Denton S. Ebel; John O. Goldsten; David K. Hamara; David J. Lawrence; Ralph L. McNutt; Larry R. Nittler; Sean C. Solomon; Edgar A. Rhodes; Ann L. Sprague; Richard D. Starr; Karen R. Stockstill-Cahill

    2011-01-01

    ...) in Mercury's northern hemisphere. The abundance of the moderately volatile element K, relative to Th and U, is inconsistent with physical models for the formation of Mercury requiring extreme heating of the planet or its precursor...

  12. PERIPHERAL LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE STIMULATION INDUCES INTERLEUKIN-1-BETA MESSENGER-RNA IN RAT-BRAIN MICROGLIAL CELLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BUTTINI, M; BODDEKE, H

    The inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 acts as an endogenous pyrogen in organisms affected by infectious diseases and has been shown to influence the activity of the central nervous system. Using in situ hybridization histochemistry, we have examined the cellular source of interleukin-1 beta in rat

  13. Compensatory evolution of a precursor messenger RNA secondary structure in the Drosophila melanogaster Adh gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Stephan, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Evidence for the evolutionary maintenance of a hairpin structure possibly involved in intron processing had been found in intron 1 of the alcohol dehydrogenase gene (Adh) in diverse Drosophila species. In this study, the putative hairpin structure was evaluated systematically in Drosophila melanogaster by elimination of either side of the stem using site-directed mutagenesis. The effects of these mutations and the compensatory double mutant on intron splicing efficiency and ADH protein production were assayed in Drosophila melanogaster Schneider L2 cells and germ-line transformed adult flies. Mutations that disrupt the putative hairpin structure right upstream of the intron branch point were found to cause a significant reduction in both splicing efficiency and ADH protein production. In contrast, the compensatory double mutant that restores the putative hairpin structure was indistinguishable from the WT in both splicing efficiency and ADH level. It was also observed by mutational analysis that a more stable secondary structure (with a longer stem) in this intron decreases both splicing efficiency and ADH protein production. Implications for RNA secondary structure and intron evolution are discussed. PMID:12972637

  14. Messenger RNas : their utilization and degradation during pollen germination and tube growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P. Mascarenhas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During pollen germination and tube growth at least 230 new proteins are synthesized, as determined by 35S-methionime labeling and two dimensional gel electrophoretic analysis of the labeled proteins. The same number and pattern of protein spots is seen whether or not actinomycin D is included in the, medium, indicating that the mRNAs present in the unger-minated pollen grain and those newly synthesized code for the same proteins. The genetic program during at least the latter part of pollen maturation prior to anthesis and that during pollen germination and tube growth thus appears to be similar if not identical. During the first hour of pollen tube growth about 500/0 of the protein synthesis that occurs utilizes previously synthesized mRNAs. The remaining 50% occurs on newly made mRNAs. The ungerminated mature pollen grain contains 196 pg of RNA and approximately 6 X 106 molecules of poly(A+ RNA, i.e. mRNAs. The rate of protein synthesis corrected for internal pool changes in the labeled amino acid used (3H-leucine is highest during the first 15 min of pollen tube growth. The rate decreases rapidly thereafter for the next 45 min. Concurrent with the reduction in rate of protein synthesis there is a reduction in the poly(A content of the pollen RNA and in the amount of poly(A per pollen, grain. The total RNA per pollen grain, however, appears not to change during this period.

  15. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray, Neutrino, and Photon Propagation and the Multi-Messenger Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Andrew M; Castillo-Ruiz, Edith

    2009-01-01

    The propagation of UHECR nuclei for A=1 (protons) to A=56 (iron) from cosmological sources through extragalactic space is discussed in the first lecture. This is followed in the second and third lectures by a consideration of the generation and propagation of secondary particles produced via the UHECR loss interactions. In the second lecture we focus on the generation of the diffuse cosmogenic UHE-neutrino flux. In the third lecture we investigate the arriving flux of UHE-photon flux at Earth. In the final lecture the results of the previous lectures are put together in order to provide new insights into UHECR sources. The first of these providing a means with which to investigate the local population of UHECR sources through the measurement of the UHECR spectrum and their photon fraction at Earth. The second of these providing contraints on the UHECR source radiation fields through the possible observation at Earth of UHECR nuclei.

  16. The brain's silent messenger: using selective attention to decode human thought for brain-based communication.