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Sample records for antigen mouse monoclonal

  1. High throughput production of mouse monoclonal antibodies using antigen microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Masi, Federico; Chiarella, P.; Wilhelm, H.

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in proteomics research underscore the increasing need for high-affinity monoclonal antibodies, which are still generated with lengthy, low-throughput antibody production techniques. Here we present a semi-automated, high-throughput method of hybridoma generation and identification....... Monoclonal antibodies were raised to different targets in single batch runs of 6-10 wk using multiplexed immunisations, automated fusion and cell-culture, and a novel antigen-coated microarray-screening assay. In a large-scale experiment, where eight mice were immunized with ten antigens each, we generated...

  2. In vitro and in vivo properties of human/mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody specific for common acute lymphocytic leukemia antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saga, T.; Endo, K.; Koizumi, M.; Kawamura, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Konishi, J.; Ueda, R.; Nishimura, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Watanabe, T.

    1990-01-01

    A human/mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody specific for a common acute lymphocytic leukemia antigen was efficiently obtained by ligating human heavy-chain enhancer element to the chimeric heavy- and light-chain genes. Cell binding and competitive inhibition assays of both radioiodine and indium-111- (111In) labeled chimeric antibodies demonstrated in vitro immunoreactivity identical with that of the parental murine monoclonal antibodies. The biodistribution of the radiolabeled chimeric antibody in tumor-bearing nude mice was similar to that of the parental murine antibody. Tumor accumulation of radioiodinated parental and chimeric antibodies was lower than that of 111 In-labeled antibodies, probably because of dehalogenation of the radioiodinated antibodies. Indium-111-labeled chimeric antibody clearly visualized xenografted tumor. These results suggest that a human/mouse chimeric antibody can be labeled with 111 In and radioiodine without the loss of its immunoreactivity, and that chimeric antibody localizes in vivo in the same way as the parental murine antibody

  3. Identification of a second T-cell antigen receptor in human and mouse by an anti-peptide γ-chain-specific monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioannides, C.G.; Itoh, K.; Fox, F.E.; Pahwa, R.; Good, R.A.; Platsoucas, C.D.

    1987-01-01

    The authors developed a monoclonal antibody (mAb) (9D7) against a synthetic peptide (P13K) selected from the deduced amino acid sequence of the constant region of the λ chain of the murine T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) (amino acids 118-130). Using this mAb, they identified a putative second TCR expressed on peripheral blood lymphocytes from a patient with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) that were propagated in culture with recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2) and Con A. This mAb immunoprecipitated two polypeptide chains of 40 and 58 kDa under nonreducing conditions and of 40 and 56 kDa under reducing conditions from 125 I-labeled denatured lysates of T3 + WT31 - lymphocytes expanded in culture from a SCID patient. Chemical crosslinking of 125 I-labeled cells followed by immunoprecipitation with anti-Leu-4 mAb under nonreducing or reducing conditions revealed that the 40- and 56-kDa polypeptide chains were associated with the T3 differentiation antigen. These experiments were done with polyclonal cell populations. Cloned T3 + WT31 - cell populations are required to determine whether the TCR contains two λ polypeptide chains. Using the same 9D7 anti-P18K mAb and immunoblotting analysis, they identified a 35 kDa γ-chain polypeptide under reducing conditions expressed on purified L3T4 - Lyt2 - BALB/c mouse thymocytes. This γ-chain TCR is disulfide linked and has a molecular mass of 80 kDa under nonreducing conditions

  4. Generation of monoclonal antibodies against highly conserved antigens.

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    Hongzhe Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Therapeutic antibody development is one of the fastest growing areas of the pharmaceutical industry. Generating high-quality monoclonal antibodies against a given therapeutic target is very crucial for the success of the drug development. However, due to immune tolerance, some proteins that are highly conserved between mice and humans are not very immunogenic in mice, making it difficult to generate antibodies using a conventional approach. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this report, the impaired immune tolerance of NZB/W mice was exploited to generate monoclonal antibodies against highly conserved or self-antigens. Using two highly conserved human antigens (MIF and HMGB1 and one mouse self-antigen (TNF-alpha as examples, we demonstrate here that multiple clones of high affinity, highly specific antibodies with desired biological activities can be generated, using the NZB/W mouse as the immunization host and a T cell-specific tag fused to a recombinant antigen to stimulate the immune system. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We developed an efficient and universal method for generating surrogate or therapeutic antibodies against "difficult antigens" to facilitate the development of therapeutic antibodies.

  5. Demonstration of two distinct antigenic determinants on hepatitis B e antigen by monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, M.; Nomura, M.; Gotanda, T.; Sano, T.; Tachibana, K.; Miyamoto, H.; Takahashi, K.; Toyama, S.; Miyakawa, Y.; Mayumi, M.

    1982-01-01

    Mice were immunized against hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) isolated from sera of asymptomatic carriers of hepatitis B virus. Their spleen cells were fused with mouse myeloma (NS-1) cells, and 5 clones of hybridoma cells secreting antibody against HBeAg (anti-HBe) were isolated. For the production of anti-HBe in large scale, cells were cultivated both in vitro and in the peritoneal cavity of ascitic mice. Although monoclonal antibodies produced by these clones showed a strong reactivity of anti-HBe in hemagglutination tests, individual monoclonal anti-HBe did not reveal any precipitin line in immunodiffusion. When 2 of the 5 monoclonal antibodies were mixed together, however, some combinations showed a precipitin line against HBeAg, whereas others did not. Utilizing solid-phase radioimmunoassay involving a number of combinations of monoclonal antibodies used for solid-phase and radiolabeling, the 5 antibodies were classified into 2 groups. Three of the anti-HBe antibodies were found to be directed to 1 determinant of HBeAg (determinant a); the remaining 2 to the other determinant (determinant b). Determinants a and b were detected on HBeAg in the serum, as well as on the polypeptide of 19,000 daltons (P19) derived from the nucleocapsid of hepatitis B virus. Monoclonal anti-HBe antibodies with different specificities may provide useful tools in delineating the antigenic structure of HBeAg and also in evaluating immune responses of the host directed to its subdeterminants

  6. Monoclonal Antibodies 13A4 and AC133 Do Not Recognize the Canine Ortholog of Mouse and Human Stem Cell Antigen Prominin-1 (CD133.

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    Kristina Thamm

    Full Text Available The pentaspan membrane glycoprotein prominin-1 (CD133 is widely used in medicine as a cell surface marker of stem and cancer stem cells. It has opened new avenues in stem cell-based regenerative therapy and oncology. This molecule is largely used with human samples or the mouse model, and consequently most biological tools including antibodies are directed against human and murine prominin-1. Although the general structure of prominin-1 including its membrane topology is conserved throughout the animal kingdom, its primary sequence is poorly conserved. Thus, it is unclear if anti-human and -mouse prominin-1 antibodies cross-react with their orthologs in other species, especially dog. Answering this issue is imperative in light of the growing number of studies using canine prominin-1 as an antigenic marker. Here, we address this issue by cloning the canine prominin-1 and use its overexpression as a green fluorescent protein fusion protein in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells to determine its immunoreactivity with antibodies against human or mouse prominin-1. We used immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry and immunoblotting techniques and surprisingly found no cross-species immunoreactivity. These results raise some caution in data interpretation when anti-prominin-1 antibodies are used in interspecies studies.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies to antigens on human neutrophils, activated T lymphocytes, and acute leukemia blast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miterev, G.Yu.; Burova, G.F.; Puzhitskaya, M.S.; Danilevich, S.V.; Bulycheva, T.I.

    1987-01-01

    The authors describe the production of two mouse hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies to antigenic determinants of the surface membranes of human neutrophils, activated T lymphocytes, and acute leukemic blast cells. The degree of lymphocyte stimulation was estimated from incorporation of 3 H-thymidine with parallel microculture. Monoclonal antibodies of supernatants of hybridoma cultures shown here reacted in both immunofluorescence test and cytotoxicity test with surface membrane antigens on the majority of neutrophils and PHA-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy subjects, but did not give positive reactions with unactivated lymphocytes, adherent monocytes, erythrocytes, and alloantigen-stimulated lymphocytes

  8. Monoclonal antibodies to antigens on human neutrophils, activated T lymphocytes, and acute leukemia blast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miterev, G.Yu.; Burova, G.F.; Puzhitskaya, M.S.; Danilevich, S.V.; Bulycheva, T.I.

    1987-11-01

    The authors describe the production of two mouse hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies to antigenic determinants of the surface membranes of human neutrophils, activated T lymphocytes, and acute leukemic blast cells. The degree of lymphocyte stimulation was estimated from incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine with parallel microculture. Monoclonal antibodies of supernatants of hybridoma cultures shown here reacted in both immunofluorescence test and cytotoxicity test with surface membrane antigens on the majority of neutrophils and PHA-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy subjects, but did not give positive reactions with unactivated lymphocytes, adherent monocytes, erythrocytes, and alloantigen-stimulated lymphocytes.

  9. Monoclonal antibodies to Nocardia asteroides and Nocardia brasiliensis antigens.

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez, T; Díaz, A M; Zlotnik, H

    1990-01-01

    Nocardia asteroides and Nocardia brasiliensis whole-cell extracts were used as antigens to generate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Six stable hybrid cell lines secreting anti-Nocardia spp. MAbs were obtained. These were characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot (immunoblot), and immunofluorescence assay. Although all the MAbs exhibited different degrees of cross-reactivity with N. asteroides and N. brasiliensis antigens as well as with culture-filtrate antigens from Myco...

  10. Lack of passive transfer of renal tubulointerstitial disease by serum or monoclonal antibody specific for renal tubular antigens in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, B D; Dilwith, R L; Balaban, S L; Rudofsky, U H

    1988-01-01

    Mice immunized with rabbit renal basement membranes form autoantibodies to their kidney glomerular and tubular basement membranes (GBM/TBM). Development of renal tubular disease (RTD) consists of deposition of autoantibodies along the GBM/TBM with the inter- and intratubular accumulation of lymphocytes and macrophages and destruction of the TBM. Transfer of this disease in mice with either serum or monoclonal antibodies, however, has been difficult to demonstrate and, therefore, attempts were made to confirm a report that RTD is passively transferred by anti-TBM autoantibodies. Using the revised protocol in this later report, we found that 12 weeks after transfer autoantibodies were deposited along the GBM and/or TBM of the recipients, yet RTD was not observed. Although qualitative and quantitative characteristics of the antibody may play a role in the pathogenesis in the murine model of RTD, we could not obtain evidence to support and confirm this study.

  11. Identification of a surface antigen on Theileria parva sporozoites by monoclonal antibody.

    OpenAIRE

    Dobbelaere, D A; Shapiro, S Z; Webster, P

    1985-01-01

    A mouse monoclonal antibody (mAbD1) that neutralizes sporozoites of different stocks of the protozoan parasite Theileria parva has been used to localize and identify a sporozoite antigen. Protein A-colloidal gold was used to localize bound mAbD1 in immunoelectron microscopic studies. mAbD1 bound to sporozoite antigen, which was evenly spread over the surface of all sporozoites. Immune complexes were obtained by incubation of sporozoite suspensions with mAbD1 followed by Zwittergent 3-14 extra...

  12. Breast cancer imaging with mouse monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Major, P.; Wang Taqui; Unger, M.; Rosenthall, L.

    1989-10-01

    The localization of /sup 111/In-labelled MA5 monoclonal antibody, reactive with a breast tumor associated antigen, was studied in 17 patients. MA5 was selected because (1) it reacts with >95% of primary and metastatic lesions, (2) the recognized antigen is present on the cell surface in vivo and (3) MA5 gives excellent localization in human breast tumor xenografts. Each patient received 2 mg antibody labeled with 5 mCi /sup 111/In and in some cases, 3 mg or 18 mg unlabeled carrier antibody. No serious allergic reactions were noted. There was a large uptake in the liver, less significant uptake in the spleen and bone and minimal accumulation in the bowel. Bone lesions, primary tumors, soft tissue recurrences and lung metastases larger than 3 cm diameter were imaged, while only 1 lesion smaller than 3 cm was detected. Non specific accumulation of tracer was noted at the site of a port-a-cath, in a hematoma, in fibrocystic lesions, and at sites of previous radiation treatment. Extensive fibrosis and poor vascularization characteristic of breast tumors may explain in part the limited sensitivity of the imaging. (orig.).

  13. Monoclonal antibodies to carcino-embryonic antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teh, Jinghee; McKenzie, I.F.C.

    1990-01-01

    With the aim of producing new MoAb to colorectal carcinoma, immunization with cell suspensions of a fresh colonic tumour was performed and MoAb 17C4 was obtained. To produce other MoAb to colon cancer, an immunization protocol using fresh tumour, colonic cell lines and sera from patients with colonic tumours was employed and resulted in MoAb JGT-13, LK-4 and XPX-13. MoAb I-1 and O-1 were raised against sera from patients with colon cancer to produce MoAb directed against circulating tumour associated antigens. The six antibodies gave a range of reactions with normal and malignant tissues, indicating that they most likely reacted with different epitopes. Thus, apart from the reactions of 17C4, LK-4 and XPX-13 with fresh and formalin-fixed granulocytes, none of the antibodies reacted with formalin-fixed normal tissues. Despite the apparent specificity of these MoAb for colon cancer, serum testing using MoAb gave similar results to carcino-embryonic antigen polyclonal antibodies, that is the MoAb gave no obvious advantage. 9 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  14. Monoclonal Antibody Production against Human Spermatozoal Surface Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Jedi-Tehrani

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As monoclonal antibodies are potential tools for characterization of soluble or cellular surface antigens, use of these proteins has always been considered in infertility and reproduction research. Therefore, in this study, monoclonal antibodies against human sperm surface antigens were produced. Material and Methods: To produce specific clones against human sperm surface antigens, proteins were extracted using solubilization methods. Balb/c mice were immunized intraperitoneally with the proteins using complete Freund’s adjuvant in the first injection and incomplete Adjuvant in the following booster injections. Hybridoma cells producing ASA were cloned by limiting dilution. Results: Five stable ASA producing hybridoma clones were achieved and their antibody isotypes were determined by ELISA. All the isotypes were of IgG class. Their cross reactivity with rat and mice spermatozoa was examined but they did not have any cross reactivity. Conclusion: The produced antibodies can be used in further studies to characterize and evaluate each of the antigens present on human sperm surface and determining their role in fertilization.

  15. Screening for epitope specificity directly on culture supernatants in the early phase of monoclonal antibody production by an ELISA with biotin-labeled antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Ditte C; Jensen, Charlotte H; Gregersen, Annemette; Brandt, Jette; Kliem, Anette; Skjødt, Karsten; Koch, Claus; Teisner, Børge

    2004-01-01

    This report describes an assay for comparison of epitope specificity in groups of monoclonal antibodies against a given antigen. The only prerequisite is the biotin-labeled antigen. One of the monoclonal antibodies is captured onto a plastic surface via a rabbit anti-mouse Ig, and the other preincubated with biotinylated antigen. When the two antibodies react with the same epitope subsequent binding of the biotin-labeled antigen is abolished (inhibition). In the cases where no inhibition was observed, the two antibodies were considered to react with distinct, independent epitopes. The obvious advantages using this assay, are that it can be performed directly on culture supernatants in the early phase of monoclonal antibody production, and also works for antigens with repetitive epitopes. Moreover, the bonus effect, i.e., a signal in excess of the reference signal when sets of monoclonal antibodies with different epitope specificity are compared, gives a relative measure of affinity.

  16. Screening for epitope specificity directly on culture supernatants in the early phase of monoclonal antibody production by an ELISA with biotin-labeled antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte C; Jensen, Charlotte H; Gregersen, Annemette

    2004-01-01

    This report describes an assay for comparison of epitope specificity in groups of monoclonal antibodies against a given antigen. The only prerequisite is the biotin-labeled antigen. One of the monoclonal antibodies is captured onto a plastic surface via a rabbit anti-mouse Ig, and the other...... preincubated with biotinylated antigen. When the two antibodies react with the same epitope subsequent binding of the biotin-labeled antigen is abolished (inhibition). In the cases where no inhibition was observed, the two antibodies were considered to react with distinct, independent epitopes. The obvious...

  17. New monoclonal antibodies to rat testicular antigen, TEC-21

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hálová, Ivana; Dráberová, Lubica; Dráber, Petr

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 5 (2001), s. 180-182 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV312/96/K205; GA ČR GA204/00/0204; GA ČR GA310/00/0205; GA AV ČR IAA5052005; GA AV ČR IAA7052006; GA MŠk LN00A026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : monoclonal antibody * GPI-anchored * testicular antigen Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.519, year: 2001

  18. Abnormal antigens in breast cancer tissues and production of monoclonal antibodies against one of these antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, M. E. A.

    2010-02-01

    Breast cancer is associated with up regulation, down regulation of normal antigens or abnormal antigens. These antigens are very useful candidates as targets for the different breast cancer therapies and for vaccination trials. This study was done to characterize abnormal antigens, extract one of them and to produce monoclonal antibodies against the extracted antigen. One hundred and twenty Sudanese female patients were included in this study after informed consent. The mean age was 47. 2 years (16-80). Two tissue samples were obtained from each patient and they were confirmed as normal and cancerous breast tissues microscopically. 2D PAGE was used to analyze the protein content of samples. LC/MS and nr. fast a database search were used for separation and indentification of the abnormal proteins. Three different patterns of 2D Page results were obtained, the first pattern involved detection of four abnormal proteins in 26.7% of the patient cancerous tissues while they were undetected in the normal tissues of the same patients. In the second 2D PAGE result pattern the cancerous and the normal tissues of 67.5% patients were identical and they did not contain the four abnormal proteins while the third 2D PAGE pattern involved the presence of two abnormal antigens (from the four) in the cancerous tissues of 5.8% of the patients and they were absent from the normal tissues of the same patients. The four abnormal proteins were identified as, human Thioredoxin (D60nmutant), x-ray crystal structure of human galectin-1, retrocopy of tropomyosin 3(rc TPM3) and beta-tropomyosin (isoform 2). The primary and the secondary structures were obtained from the SWISSPROT and the PDB databases. Beta tropomyosin spot was extracted and used as antigen for monoclonal antibody production. Monoclonal antibody against beta- tropomyosin with a concentration of 0.35 mg/ml and a G11 anti beta-tropomyosin hybridoma cell line were produced. The monoclonal antibody was with single bad and

  19. Abnormal antigens in breast cancer tissues and production of monoclonal antibodies against one of these antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammed, M E. A. [University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan)

    2010-02-15

    Breast cancer is associated with up regulation, down regulation of normal antigens or abnormal antigens. These antigens are very useful candidates as targets for the different breast cancer therapies and for vaccination trials. This study was done to characterize abnormal antigens, extract one of them and to produce monoclonal antibodies against the extracted antigen. One hundred and twenty Sudanese female patients were included in this study after informed consent. The mean age was 47. 2 years (16-80). Two tissue samples were obtained from each patient and they were confirmed as normal and cancerous breast tissues microscopically. 2D PAGE was used to analyze the protein content of samples. LC/MS and nr. fast a database search were used for separation and indentification of the abnormal proteins. Three different patterns of 2D Page results were obtained, the first pattern involved detection of four abnormal proteins in 26.7% of the patient cancerous tissues while they were undetected in the normal tissues of the same patients. In the second 2D PAGE result pattern the cancerous and the normal tissues of 67.5% patients were identical and they did not contain the four abnormal proteins while the third 2D PAGE pattern involved the presence of two abnormal antigens (from the four) in the cancerous tissues of 5.8% of the patients and they were absent from the normal tissues of the same patients. The four abnormal proteins were identified as, human Thioredoxin (D60nmutant), x-ray crystal structure of human galectin-1, retrocopy of tropomyosin 3(rc TPM3) and beta-tropomyosin (isoform 2). The primary and the secondary structures were obtained from the SWISSPROT and the PDB databases. Beta tropomyosin spot was extracted and used as antigen for monoclonal antibody production. Monoclonal antibody against beta- tropomyosin with a concentration of 0.35 mg/ml and a G11 anti beta-tropomyosin hybridoma cell line were produced. The monoclonal antibody was with single bad and

  20. Mycobacterium leprae antigens involved in human immune responses. I. Identification of four antigens by monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, W.J.; Hellqvist, L.; Basten, A.; Raison, R.L.

    1985-12-01

    Four distinct antigens were identified in soluble sonicates of Mycobacterium leprae by using a panel of 11 monoclonal antibodies. Cross-reactivity studies with other mycobacterial species were conducted by using ELISA and immunoblot assays, and demonstrated that determinants on two of the antigens were present in many mycobacteria, whereas the other two were limited in distribution. Competitive inhibition experiments with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies showed cross-inhibition between antibodies identifying two of the four antigenicbands. These two bands, of M/sub tau/ 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD, were resistant to protease treatment after immunoblotting. In contrast the two other bands of 16 and 70 KD were protease-sensitive. Although all four bands reacted with some human lepromatous leprosy sera in immunoblots, the 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD bands were most prominent. Lepromatous leprosy sera also inhibited the binding of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies to each of the four antigens, with the mean titer causing 50% inhibition being higher for antibodies reacting with the 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD bands. These findings indicated that all four antigens were involved in the human B cell response to M. leprae.

  1. Mycobacterium leprae antigens involved in human immune responses. I. Identification of four antigens by monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, W.J.; Hellqvist, L.; Basten, A.; Raison, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Four distinct antigens were identified in soluble sonicates of Mycobacterium leprae by using a panel of 11 monoclonal antibodies. Cross-reactivity studies with other mycobacterial species were conducted by using ELISA and immunoblot assays, and demonstrated that determinants on two of the antigens were present in many mycobacteria, whereas the other two were limited in distribution. Competitive inhibition experiments with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies showed cross-inhibition between antibodies identifying two of the four antigenicbands. These two bands, of M/sub tau/ 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD, were resistant to protease treatment after immunoblotting. In contrast the two other bands of 16 and 70 KD were protease-sensitive. Although all four bands reacted with some human lepromatous leprosy sera in immunoblots, the 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD bands were most prominent. Lepromatous leprosy sera also inhibited the binding of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies to each of the four antigens, with the mean titer causing 50% inhibition being higher for antibodies reacting with the 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD bands. These findings indicated that all four antigens were involved in the human B cell response to M. leprae

  2. Immunochemical identification of human trophoblast membrane antigens using monoclonal antibodies

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    Brown, P J; Molloy, C M; Johnson, P M [Liverpool Univ. (UK). Dept. of Immunology

    1983-11-01

    Human trophoblast membrane antigens recognised by monoclonal antibodies (H310, H315, H316 and H317) have been identified using combinations of radioimmunoprecipitation, SDS-PAGE, electroblotting, chromatographic and ELISA-type techniques. H317 is known to identify heat-stable placental-type alkaline phosphatase and accordingly was shown to react with a protein of subunit Msub(r) of 68000. H310 and H316 both recognise an antigen with a subunit Msub(r) of 34000 under reducing conditions. In non-reducing conditions, the H310/316 antigen gave oligomers of a component of Msub(r) 62000. It is unknown whether this 62000 dalton component is a dimer of the 34000 dalton protein with either itself or a second protein chain of presumed Msub(r) around 28000. H315 recognises an antigen with subunit Msub(r) of 36000; in non-reducing conditions this component readily associates to oligomeric structures. The epitope recognised by H315 may be sensitive to SDS. The two proteins recognised by H310/316 and H315 have been termed the p34 and p36 trophoblast membrane proteins, respectively.

  3. Identification of Eimeria acervulina conoid antigen using chicken monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubayashi, Makoto; Minoura, Chisa; Kimura, Shintaro; Tani, Hiroyuki; Furuya, Masaru; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Matsuda, Haruo; Takenaka, Shigeo; Hatta, Takeshi; Tsuji, Naotoshi; Sasai, Kazumi

    2016-11-01

    In the poultry industry, Eimeria spp. is one of the important pathogens which cause significant economic losses. We have previously generated a chicken monoclonal antibody (mAb), 6D-12-G10, with specificity for an antigen located in the apical cytoskeleton of Eimeria acervulina and with cross-reactive among Apicomplexan parasites, including other Eimeria spp., Toxoplasma, Neospora, and Cryptosporidium spp. Furthermore, the protein of Cryptosporidium parvum recognized by the 6D-12-G10 has been identified as elongation factor-1α (EF-1α). In the present study, to identify the target molecule of E. acervulina by the mAb, we performed two-dimensional Western blotting analysis. Finally, we found two positive molecules which are identified as EF-1α and a related protein. Our previous finding using C. parvum and the results in this study suggest that EF-1α could be associated with the invasion facilitated by the cytoskeleton at the apical region of zoites.

  4. Lack of radioimmunodetection and complications associated with monoclonal anticarcinoembryonic antigen antibody cross-reactivity with an antigen on circulating cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillman, R.O.; Beauregard, J.C.; Sobol, R.E.; Royston, I.; Bartholomew, R.M.; Hagan, P.S.; Halpern, S.E.

    1984-01-01

    Characterization of several high-affinity murine monoclonal anticarcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibodies suggested good specificity except for cross-reactivity with an antigen on granulocytes and erythrocytes which was different from the previously described normal cross-reacting antigen of granulocytes. In vivo studies in athymic mice using an indium conjugate of an anti-CEA monoclonal antibody (MoAb) revealed excellent specific uptake in colorectal carcinoma xenografts. Studies were conducted in humans to determine the limitations produced by the cross-reactivity with granulocytes and erythrocytes. Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer received 3 to 6 mg of anti-CEA MoAb over 10 min or 2 hr. In five of six trials, the MoAb infusion was associated with a 40 to 90% decrease in circulating granulocytes and systemic toxicity including fever, rigors, and emesis. One patient had no change in cell count and had no toxicity. Radionuclide scans with 111 In-anti-CEA MoAb showed marked uptake in the spleen when cells were eliminated, and in the liver, especially when pretreatment CEA levels were high. Metastatic tumor sites failed to concentrate the isotope. This study emphasizes the potential limitations for radioimmunodetection and/or radioimmunotherapy imposed by reactivity with circulating cells, and suggests that certain toxic reactions associated with MoAb infusions are related to destruction of circulating cells rather than allergic reactions to mouse protein. It also emphasizes how variables such as dose and binding affinity of antibody, radioisotope used, and assessment at different observation points can obscure lack of antibody specificity

  5. Lack of radioimmunodetection and complications associated with monoclonal anticarcinoembryonic antigen antibody cross-reactivity with an antigen on circulating cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillman, R.O.; Beauregard, J.C.; Sobol, R.E.; Royston, I.; Bartholomew, R.M.; Hagan, P.S.; Halpern, S.E.

    1984-05-01

    Characterization of several high-affinity murine monoclonal anticarcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibodies suggested good specificity except for cross-reactivity with an antigen on granulocytes and erythrocytes which was different from the previously described normal cross-reacting antigen of granulocytes. In vivo studies in athymic mice using an indium conjugate of an anti-CEA monoclonal antibody (MoAb) revealed excellent specific uptake in colorectal carcinoma xenografts. Studies were conducted in humans to determine the limitations produced by the cross-reactivity with granulocytes and erythrocytes. Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer received 3 to 6 mg of anti-CEA MoAb over 10 min or 2 hr. In five of six trials, the MoAb infusion was associated with a 40 to 90% decrease in circulating granulocytes and systemic toxicity including fever, rigors, and emesis. One patient had no change in cell count and had no toxicity. Radionuclide scans with /sup 111/In-anti-CEA MoAb showed marked uptake in the spleen when cells were eliminated, and in the liver, especially when pretreatment CEA levels were high. Metastatic tumor sites failed to concentrate the isotope. This study emphasizes the potential limitations for radioimmunodetection and/or radioimmunotherapy imposed by reactivity with circulating cells, and suggests that certain toxic reactions associated with MoAb infusions are related to destruction of circulating cells rather than allergic reactions to mouse protein. It also emphasizes how variables such as dose and binding affinity of antibody, radioisotope used, and assessment at different observation points can obscure lack of antibody specificity.

  6. A rapid one-step radiometric assay for hepatitis B surface antigen utilising monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodall, A.H.; Meek, F.L.; Waters, J.A.; Miescher, G.C.; Janossy, G.; Thomas, H.C.

    1982-01-01

    A two-site antigen assay for HBsAg has been developed that employs 3 monoclonal antibodies. The antibodies were selected for their high affinity and their particular epitope specificity to establish an assay with a sensitivity for the antigen comparable with that of a conventional assay with heterologous antisera. In addition, by selecting a monoclonal antibody for use as a tracer which does not compete for antigenic binding sites with the solid-phase monoclonal antibodies, it has been possible to perform a two-site assay in a single 1 h incubation step, achieving the same degree of sensitivity. This principle of using monoclonal antibodies in a one-step assay therefore gives advantages of speed and simplicity over assays using heterologous antisera and would be applicable to a variety of antigen assays for which appropriate monoclonal antibodies are available. (Auth.)

  7. Binding of monoclonal antibody to protein antigen in fluid phase or bound to solid supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennel, S J

    1982-01-01

    Rat monoclonal antibody (MoAb) to fragment D (FgD) of human fibrinogen was used to characterize the direct binding of antibody to protein in solution or bound to solid supports. Purified IgG, F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab' were prepared from ascites fluid of hybridoma 104-14B which is a fusion product of spleen cells from a rat immunized with FgD and the mouse myeloma cell line, P3-X63-Ag8. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of radioiodinated antibody preparations demonstrated the presence of hybrid immunoglobulin molecules, but only structures having rat heavy and rat light chains had active antibody combinig sites. The affinity constant for IgG as well as F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab', 6x10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/, was identical when tested using fluid phase antigen (/sup 125/I-labeled FgD). Affinity constants determined for direct binding of iodinated IgG using FgD immobilized on solid supports showed a slight dependence on the antigen concentration used in the measurement. These values ranged from 0.5x10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/ at high antigen concentrations (1.3x10/sup -7/ M) to 9x10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/ at low antigen concentration (1.3x10/sup -10/ M). Binding constants for F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab' gave similar results indicating that binding was homogeneous and univalent. The capacity of solid state antigen to bind antibody varied with the method used to bind FgD to the solid support. FgD bound directly to polystyrene plates was least efficient at binding labeled antibody; FgD bound to plates through intermediate carriers poly(L-lysine) was only slightly more efficient, while antigen bound to Sepharose beads by cyanogen bromide activation was the most active.

  8. Preparation of the Fv fragment from a short-chain mouse IgG2a anti-dansyl monoclonal antibody and use of selectively deuterated Fv analogues for two-dimensional 1H NMR analyses fo the antigen-antibody interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hideo; Igarashi, Takako; Shimada, Ichio; Arata, Yoji

    1991-01-01

    The Fv fragment, a univalent antigen-binding unit with a molecular weight of 25,000, has successfully been prepared in high yield by limited proteolysis with clostripain of a short-chain mouse IgG2a anti-dansyl monoclonal antibody in which the entire C H 1 domain is deleted. The Fv fragment obtained is stable at room temperature and retains its full antigen-binding capability. It has been shown that selective deuterium labeling of the Fv fragment, which is half the size of the Fab fragment, provides 1 H NMR spectral data at a sufficient resolution for a detailed structural analysis of the antigen-combining site. NOESY spectra of an Fv analogue, in which all aromatic protons except for His C2'-H and Tyr C3',5'-H had been deuterated, were measured in the presence of varying amounts of dansyl-L-lysine. On the basis of the NOESY data obtained, it was possible to assign all the ring proton resonances for the dansly group that is bound to the Fv fragment. It was also possible to obtain information about His and Tyr residues of the Fv fragment in the absence and presence of the antigen. On the basis of the NMR data obtained, the authors have shown that at least two Tyr residues along with one of the amide groups are directly involved in antigen binding. The mode of interaction of the dansyl ring with these residues in the Fv fragment has briefly been discussed

  9. Preparation of the Fv fragment from a short-chain mouse IgG2a anti-dansyl monoclonal antibody and use of selectively deuterated Fv analogues for two-dimensional sup 1 H NMR analyses fo the antigen-antibody interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hideo; Igarashi, Takako; Shimada, Ichio; Arata, Yoji (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-03-19

    The Fv fragment, a univalent antigen-binding unit with a molecular weight of 25,000, has successfully been prepared in high yield by limited proteolysis with clostripain of a short-chain mouse IgG2a anti-dansyl monoclonal antibody in which the entire C{sub H}1 domain is deleted. The Fv fragment obtained is stable at room temperature and retains its full antigen-binding capability. It has been shown that selective deuterium labeling of the Fv fragment, which is half the size of the Fab fragment, provides {sup 1}H NMR spectral data at a sufficient resolution for a detailed structural analysis of the antigen-combining site. NOESY spectra of an Fv analogue, in which all aromatic protons except for His C2{prime}-H and Tyr C3{prime},5{prime}-H had been deuterated, were measured in the presence of varying amounts of dansyl-L-lysine. On the basis of the NOESY data obtained, it was possible to assign all the ring proton resonances for the dansly group that is bound to the Fv fragment. It was also possible to obtain information about His and Tyr residues of the Fv fragment in the absence and presence of the antigen. On the basis of the NMR data obtained, the authors have shown that at least two Tyr residues along with one of the amide groups are directly involved in antigen binding. The mode of interaction of the dansyl ring with these residues in the Fv fragment has briefly been discussed.

  10. Characterisation of monoclonal antibodies for human luteinising hormone, and mapping of antigenic determinants on the hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soos, M.; Siddle, K.

    1983-01-01

    Twelve mouse monoclonal antibodies for human luteinising hormone were produced. The affinities varied from 4 X 10 7 to 1 X 10 10 l/mol. The specificity of each antibody was assessed by determining the relative reactivities with luteinising hormone, thyroid stimulating hormone, follicle stimulating hormone and chorionic gonadotrophin. Six antibodies bound to the α-subunit as shown by similar reactivity with all hormones, and the remainder to the β-subunit as shown by specificity for luteinising hormone. This latter group of antibodies cross-reacted only weakly with thyroid stimulating hormone (approximately 10%) and follicle stimulating hormone (approximately 3%). Three of these antibodies also showed low reactivity towards chorionic gonadotrophin (<10%), though the others did not (80-300%). The ability of different antibodies to bind simultaneously to luteinising hormone was examined and it was shown that several distinct antigenic determinants existed on both subunits. The characterisation of monoclonal binding sites is discussed in relation to the use of antibodies in two-site immunoradiometric assays. (Auth.)

  11. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holers, V.M.; Kotzin, B.L.

    1985-01-01

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases

  12. Radioimmunoassay for detecting antibodies against murine malarial parasite antigens: monoclonal antibodies recognizing Plasmodium yoelii antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.J.; Taylor, D.W.; Evans, C.B.; Asofsky, R.

    1980-01-01

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay (SPRIA) in microtiter wells was established for detecting antibodies against Plasmodium yoelii Ag. The SPRIA was found (1) to require as little as 5 μg of crude parasite Ag per well, (2) to be able to detect 0.5 ng of monoclonal Ab, and (3) to be 10 4 times more sensitive than the indirect fluorescent Ab staining technique. In a modification of the above assay using intact RBC as an Ag, hyperimmune serum showed significant binding to the surface of erythrocytes of mice infected with P. yoelii parasites but not to RBC of normal mice. Hybridomas were prepared by fusing infected mouse spleen cells with myeloma cells. Using the SPRIA, hybrids secreting Ab against P. yoelii 17XL Ag were detected

  13. Enhancement of retroviral infection in vitro by anti-Le(y) IgG: reversal by humanization of monoclonal mouse antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Sørensen, A M; Arendrup, M

    1993-01-01

    Monoclonal mouse IgG3 antibody (ABL 364) against the carbohydrate Le(y) antigen enhanced infection in vitro with HTLV-1 and with HIV-1 when propagated in both transformed and normal lymphocytes. Enhancement was independent of complement, occurred with both lymphocytes and monocytes as target cells...

  14. Monoclonal antibody against a serotype antigen of Porphyromonas (Bacteroides) endodontalis and characteristics of the antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanazawa, S; Sagiya, T; Amano, S; Nishikawa, H; Kitano, S

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the presence of three serotypes (O1K1, O1K2, and O1K-) of Porphyromonas (Bacteroides) endodontalis. In the present study, a hybridoma cell line producing monoclonal antibody (BEE11) specific for serotype O1K1 of P. endodontalis was established. The specificity of the antibody was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoslot blot analysis. BEE11 antibody reacted with strains ATCC 35406, HG 400, and HG 421 of the bacterium. However, it did not react with HG 422 or HG 948. Also, the antibody did not react with any of the black-pigmented Bacteroides strains tested. Although the antibody reacted with total cell envelope and capsule materials, it did not do so with lipopolysaccharide. The antibody reacted with antigen material having a molecular mass of 110 kilodaltons (kDa), as judged from fractionation by Superose 12 prep gel chromatography. When the peak fraction from the Superose 12 column was subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot (immunoblot) analysis, the reactivity was detected as a single band at an apparent molecular mass of about 52 kDa. The antigen material purified partially by high-performance liquid chromatography was sensitive to trypsin, V8 protease, and heating to 80 degrees C but not to neuraminidase. Therefore, the present study shows that BEE11 antibody recognizes a serotype antigen of P. endodontalis which may be a dimer consisting of monomers having molecular masses of approximately 52 kDa and sensitivity to proteases and heat. Images PMID:2370106

  15. Antigenic modulation limits the effector cell mechanisms employed by type I anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Thomas R W; Roghanian, Ali; Oldham, Robert J; Carter, Matthew J; Cox, Kerry L; Mockridge, C Ian; French, Ruth R; Dahal, Lekh N; Duriez, Patrick J; Hargreaves, Philip G; Cragg, Mark S; Beers, Stephen A

    2015-03-19

    Following the success of rituximab, 2 other anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), ofatumumab and obinutuzumab, have entered clinical use. Ofatumumab has enhanced capacity for complement-dependent cytotoxicity, whereas obinutuzumab, a type II mAb, lacks the ability to redistribute into lipid rafts and is glycoengineered for augmented antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). We previously showed that type I mAbs such as rituximab have a propensity to undergo enhanced antigenic modulation compared with type II. Here we assessed the key effector mechanisms affected, comparing type I and II antibodies of various isotypes in ADCC and antibody-dependent cellular-phagocytosis (ADCP) assays. Rituximab and ofatumumab depleted both normal and leukemic human CD20-expressing B cells in the mouse less effectively than glycoengineered and wild-type forms of obinutuzumab, particularly when human immunoglobulin G1 (hIgG1) mAbs were compared. In contrast to mouse IgG2a, hIgG1 mAbs were ineffective in ADCC assays with murine natural killer cells as effectors, whereas ADCP was equivalent for mouse IgG2a and hIgG1. However, rituximab's ability to elicit both ADCC and ADCP was reduced by antigenic modulation, whereas type II antibodies remained unaffected. These data demonstrate that ADCP and ADCC are impaired by antigenic modulation and that ADCP is the main effector function employed in vivo. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  16. Novel Monoclonal Antibodies Recognizing Human Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) as Research and Theranostic Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nováková, Zora; Foss, Catherine A; Copeland, Benjamin T; Morath, Volker; Baranová, Petra; Havlínová, Barbora; Skerra, Arne; Pomper, Martin G; Barinka, Cyril

    2017-05-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a validated target for the imaging and therapy of prostate cancer. Here, we report the detailed characterization of four novel murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing human PSMA as well as PSMA orthologs from different species. Performance of purified mAbs was assayed using a comprehensive panel of in vitro experimental setups including Western blotting, immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry, ELISA, flow cytometry, and surface-plasmon resonance. Furthermore, a mouse xenograft model of prostate cancer was used to compare the suitability of the mAbs for in vivo applications. All mAbs demonstrate high specificity for PSMA as documented by the lack of cross-reactivity to unrelated human proteins. The 3F11 and 1A11 mAbs bind linear epitopes spanning residues 226-243 and 271-288 of human PSMA, respectively. 3F11 is also suitable for the detection of PSMA orthologs from mouse, pig, dog, and rat in experimental setups where the denatured form of PSMA is used. 5D3 and 5B1 mAbs recognize distinct surface-exposed conformational epitopes and are useful for targeting PSMA in its native conformation. Most importantly, using a mouse xenograft model of prostate cancer we show that both the intact 5D3 and its Fab fragment are suitable for in vivo imaging. With apparent affinities of 0.14 and 1.2 nM as determined by ELISA and flow cytometry, respectively, 5D3 has approximately 10-fold higher affinity for PSMA than the clinically validated mAb J591 and, therefore, is a prime candidate for the development of next-generation theranostics to target PSMA. Prostate 77:749-764, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Definition of a virulence-related antigen of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with monoclonal antibodies and lectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarco de Hormaeche, R; Bundell, C; Chong, H; Taylor, D W; Wildy, P

    1986-03-01

    Variants of one strain of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, grown in vivo or in vitro, that have been previously shown to differ in infectivity, serum resistance, and capsule production were compared with use of monoclonal antibodies and lectins. Monoclonal antibodies to virulent gonococci recognized an antigenic site of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produced in large amounts by gonococci grown in vivo but present only in a small proportion of in vitro-grown gonococci. This antigen (C-LPS) was found in all 85 different gonococcal isolates studied but not among nonpathogenic neisseriae. It was shared by group B and C meningococci but not by groups A and D. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot analysis showed that N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine form part of the epitope. The C-LPS antigen was shown by immunofluorescence to be present on the surface of the gonococci and also free as slime. This antigen appears to confer resistance to killing by normal sera.

  18. Library of monoclonal antibodies against brush border membrane epithelial antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behar, M.; Katz, A.; Silverman, M.

    1986-01-01

    A purified fraction of proximal tubule brush border membranes (BBM) was prepared from dog kidney and used to immunize mice. The standard technique of hybridoma production was followed as described by Kohler and Milstein. Production of antibodies was detected by indirect immunofluorescence on dog kidney slices and by immunodot against the purified fraction on nitrocellulose. Five hybrids exhibited anti BBM activity. These were cloned twice and yielded stable cell lines producing IgG type monoclonal antibodies against BBM. They were designated A 1 , C 7 , D 3 , D 7 and H 4 . As a family these five monoclonals have broad tissue specificity, i.e. positive staining of the surface mucosa of intestinal kidney proximal tubules. D 3 exhibits even broader specificity for epithelium reacting with bile canaliculi and choroid plexus. The authors have verified that at least 4/5 antibodies are directed against BBM protein as revealed by immunoprecipitation of solubilized BBM and detected by Coomassie blue staining or autoradiography of lactoperoxidase labelled BBM. Most interestingly all antibodies bind to the surface of LL CPK 1 cells, a continuous pig kidney cell line of undefined origin but exhibiting many characteristics of proximal tubule cells. The library of monoclonal antibodies obtained provide important probes with which to study membrane biogenesis and polarization in epithelial cells

  19. Use of Monoclonal Antibodies to Lipopolysaccharide for Antigenic Analysis of Coxiella burnetii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Akitoyo; Kawamura, Midori; To, Ho; Andoh, Masako; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Fukushi, Hideto; Amano, Ken-Ichi; Hirai, Katsuya

    2003-01-01

    Antigenic differences among Coxiella burnetii strains were analyzed. The monoclonal antibodies against the lipopolysaccharide outer core did not react with the strains containing a QpRS plasmid or with plasmidless strains, whereas they reacted with strains containing a QpH1 or QpDV plasmid. C. burnetii isolates could be divided into two groups immunologically. PMID:12682176

  20. Use of Monoclonal Antibodies to Lipopolysaccharide for Antigenic Analysis of Coxiella burnetii

    OpenAIRE

    Hotta, Akitoyo; Kawamura, Midori; To, Ho; Andoh, Masako; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Fukushi, Hideto; Amano, Ken-Ichi; Hirai, Katsuya

    2003-01-01

    Antigenic differences among Coxiella burnetii strains were analyzed. The monoclonal antibodies against the lipopolysaccharide outer core did not react with the strains containing a QpRS plasmid or with plasmidless strains, whereas they reacted with strains containing a QpH1 or QpDV plasmid. C. burnetii isolates could be divided into two groups immunologically.

  1. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-specific monoclonal antibody to detect CD19-specific T cells in clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipulendu Jena

    Full Text Available Clinical trials targeting CD19 on B-cell malignancies are underway with encouraging anti-tumor responses. Most infuse T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR with specificity derived from the scFv region of a CD19-specific mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb, clone FMC63. We describe a novel anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody (mAb to detect CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells before and after their adoptive transfer. This mouse mAb was generated by immunizing with a cellular vaccine expressing the antigen-recognition domain of FMC63. The specificity of the mAb (clone no. 136.20.1 was confined to the scFv region of the CAR as validated by inhibiting CAR-dependent lysis of CD19(+ tumor targets. This clone can be used to detect CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a sensitivity of 1∶1,000. In clinical settings the mAb is used to inform on the immunophenotype and persistence of administered CD19-specific T cells. Thus, our CD19-specific CAR mAb (clone no. 136.20.1 will be useful to investigators implementing CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells to treat B-lineage malignancies. The methodology described to develop a CAR-specific anti-idiotypic mAb could be extended to other gene therapy trials targeting different tumor associated antigens in the context of CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy.

  2. New monoclonal antibodies to rat testicular antigen, TEC-21

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hálová, Ivana; Dráberová, Lubica; Dráber, Petr

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 5 (2001), s. 180-182 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV312/96/K205; GA ČR GA204/00/0204; GA ČR GA310/00/0205; GA AV ČR IAA5052005; GA AV ČR IAA7052006; GA MŠk LN00A026 Keywords : Monoclonal antibody * lipid raft * testicular cells Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 0.519, year: 2001

  3. Rapid production of antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies from a variety of animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurosawa Nobuyuki

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although a variety of animals have been used to produce polyclonal antibodies against antigens, the production of antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies from animals remains challenging. Results We propose a simple and rapid strategy to produce monoclonal antibodies from a variety of animals. By staining lymph node cells with an antibody against immunoglobulin and a fluorescent dye specific for the endoplasmic reticulum, plasma/plasmablast cells were identified without using a series of antibodies against lineage markers. By using a fluorescently labeled antigen as a tag for a complementary cell surface immunoglobulin, antigen-specific plasma/plasmablast cells were sorted from the rest of the cell population by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Amplification of cognate pairs of immunoglobulin heavy and light chain genes followed by DNA transfection into 293FT cells resulted in the highly efficient production of antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies from a variety of immunized animals. Conclusions Our technology eliminates the need for both cell propagation and screening processes, offering a significant advantage over hybridoma and display strategies.

  4. Antigen-specific cytotoxic T cell and antigen-specific proliferating T cell clones can be induced to cytolytic activity by monoclonal antibodies against T3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spits, H.; Yssel, H.; Leeuwenberg, J.; de Vries, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    T3 is a human differentiation antigen expressed exclusively on mature T cells. In this study it is shown that anti-T3 monoclonal antibodies, in addition to their capacity to induce T cells to proliferate, are able to induce antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte clones to mediate antigen

  5. Antigen-binding properties of monoclonal antibodies reactive with EBNA1 and use in immunoaffinity chromatography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J Duellman

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1 was overexpressed and purified from Escherichia coli. Mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs were prepared that react with EBNA1. Eleven high affinity mAbs were recovered. Nine mAbs are isotype IgG (all subisotype IgG(1 and two mAbs are isotype IgM. All mAbs react strongly with EBNA1 in an ELISA assay while only one mAb (designated 1EB6 fails to react in a Western blot assay. The epitopes for these mAbs were mapped to seven different regions, providing good coverage of the entire EBNA1 protein. The mAbs had differing affinity for an EBNA1/DNA complex with four mAbs able to supershift the complex completely. All mAbs can immunoprecipitate EBNA1 from E. coli overexpressing EBNA1. A modified ELISA assay, termed ELISA-elution assay, was used to screen for mAbs that release EBNA1 in the presence of a low molecular weight polyhydroxylated compound (polyol and a nonchaotropic salt. MAbs with this property, termed polyol-responsive (PR-mAbs, allow gentle elution of labile proteins and protein complexes. Four mAbs are polyol-responsive with two showing usefulness in gentle immunoaffinity chromatography. Purification with these PR-mAbs may be useful in purifying EBNA1 complexes and elucidating EBNA1-associated proteins. This panel of anti-EBNA1 mAbs will advance the study of EBV by providing new tools to detect and purify EBNA1.

  6. Topographic antigenic determinants recognized by monoclonal antibodies on human choriogonadotropin beta-subunit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidart, J.M.; Troalen, F.; Salesse, R.; Bousfield, G.R.; Bohuon, C.J.; Bellet, D.H.

    1987-01-01

    We describe a first attempt to study the antibody-combining sites recognized by monoclonal antibodies raised against the beta-subunit of human choriogonadotropin (hCG). Two groups of antibodies were first defined by their ability to recognize only the free beta-subunit or the free and combined subunit. Antibodies FBT-11 and FBT-11-L bind only to hCG beta-subunit but not to hCG, whereas antibodies FBT-10 and D1E8 bind to both the beta-subunit and the hormone. In both cases, the antigenic determinants were localized to the core of the protein (residues 1-112), indicating the weak immunogenicity of the specific carboxyl-terminal extension of hCG-beta. Nine synthetic peptides spanning different regions of hCG-beta and lutropin-beta were assessed for their capacity to inhibit antibody binding. A synthetic peptide inclusive of the NH2-terminal region (residues 1-7) of the hCG beta-subunit was found to inhibit binding to the radiolabeled subunit of a monoclonal antibody specific for free hCG-beta (FBT-11). Further delineation of the antigenic site recognized by this antibody provided evidence for the involvement of fragment 82-92. Moreover, monoclonal antibody FBT-11 inhibited the recombination of hCG-beta to hCG-alpha, indicating that its antigenic determinant might be located nearby or in the hCG-beta portion interacting with the alpha-subunit. Binding of monoclonal antibody FBT-10, corresponding to the second antigenic determinant, was weakly inhibited by fragment 82-105 and did not impair the recombination of the hCG beta-subunit to the hCG alpha-subunit. Its combining site appeared to be located in a region of the intact native choriogonadotropin present at the surface of the hormone-receptor complex

  7. Determining the binding affinity of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies towards their native unpurified antigens in human serum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Bee

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs are a growing segment of therapeutics, yet their in vitro characterization remains challenging. While it is essential that a therapeutic mAb recognizes the native, physiologically occurring epitope, the generation and selection of mAbs often rely on the use of purified recombinant versions of the antigen that may display non-native epitopes. Here, we present a method to measure both, the binding affinity of a therapeutic mAb towards its native unpurified antigen in human serum, and the antigen's endogenous concentration, by combining the kinetic exclusion assay and Biacore's calibration free concentration analysis. To illustrate the broad utility of our method, we studied a panel of mAbs raised against three disparate soluble antigens that are abundant in the serum of healthy donors: proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9, progranulin (PGRN, and fatty acid binding protein (FABP4. We also determined the affinity of each mAb towards its purified recombinant antigen and assessed whether the interactions were pH-dependent. Of the six mAbs studied, three did not appear to discriminate between the serum and recombinant forms of the antigen; one mAb bound serum antigen with a higher affinity than recombinant antigen; and two mAbs displayed a different affinity for serum antigen that could be explained by a pH-dependent interaction. Our results highlight the importance of taking pH into account when measuring the affinities of mAbs towards their serum antigens, since the pH of serum samples becomes increasingly alkaline upon aerobic handling.

  8. Expression of class 5 antigens by meningococcal strains obtained from patients in Brazil and evaluation of two new monoclonal antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth N. De Gaspari

    Full Text Available Determining the profile of antigen expression among meningococci is important for epidemiologic surveillance and vaccine development. To this end, two new mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs have been derived against Neisseria meningitidis proteins (class 5. The MAbs were reactive against outer membrane antigens and were bactericidal. Selected anti-class 5 MAbs [(5.1-3E6-2; (5.3-3BH4-C7; (5.4-1BG11-C7; (5.5-3DH-F5G9 also 5F1F4-T3(5.c], and the two new monoclonal antibodies C14F10Br2 (5.8 and 7F11B5Br3 (5.9, were then tested against different meningococcal strains, (63 strains of serogroup A, 60 strains of serogroup C (from 1972 to 1974; and 136 strains of serogroup B (from 1992 meningococci. Our results demonstrated that the expression of class 5 proteins in the N. meningitidis B Brazilian strains studied is highly heterogeneous. The serotypes and subtypes of B:4:P1.15, B:4:P1.9, B:4:P1.7, B:4:P1.3, B:4:P1.14, B:4:P1.16, B:4:NT, and B:NT:NT were detected in N. meningitidis B serogroups.The strains C:2a:P1.2 and A:4.21:P1.9 were dominant in the C and A serogroups, respectively. Serogroup B organisms expressed the class 5 epitopes 5.4 (18%, 5.5 (22%, 5.8 (3.6%, 5.9 (8.0% and 5c (38%. Serogroup C expressed class 5 epitopes 5.1 (81%, 5.4 (35%, 5.5 (33% and 5.9 (5.0%; and serogroup A showed reactivity directed at the class 5 protein 5c (47%; and reactivity was present with the new monoclonal antibody, 5.9 (5.5%. We conclude that the two new MAbs are useful in detecting important group B, class 5 antigens, and that a broad selection of serogroup B, class 5 proteins would be required for an effective vaccine based on the class 5 proteins.

  9. Monoclonal antibodies to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 reveal differential expression patterns in cancer and low antigen expression in normal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujak, Emil; Pretto, Francesca; Ritz, Danilo; Gualandi, Laura; Wulhfard, Sarah; Neri, Dario

    2014-01-01

    There is a considerable interest for the discovery and characterization of tumor-associated antigens, which may facilitate antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies. Thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 are homologous secreted proteins, which have previously been reported to be overexpressed during remodeling typical for wound healing and tumor progression and to possibly play a functional role in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. To our knowledge, a complete immunohistochemical characterization of thrombospondins levels in normal rodent tissues has not been reported so far. Using antibody phage technology, we have generated and characterized monoclonal antibodies specific to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2, two antigens which share 62% aminoacid identity. An immunofluorescence analysis revealed that both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues, except for a weak staining of heart tissue by antibodies specific to thrombospondin-1. The analysis also showed that thrombospondin-1 was strongly expressed in 5/7 human tumors xenografted in nude mice, while it was only barely detectable in 3/8 murine tumors grafted in immunocompetent mice. By contrast, a high-affinity antibody to thrombospondin-2 revealed a much lower level of expression of this antigen in cancer specimens. Our analysis resolves ambiguities related to conflicting reports on thrombosponding expression in health and disease. Based on our findings, thrombospondin-1 (and not thrombospondin-2) may be considered as a target for antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies, in consideration of its low expression in normal tissues and its upregulation in cancer. - Highlights: • High affinity monoclonal antibodies to murine and human TSP1 and 2 were raised. • Both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues. • Strong positivity of human tumor xenografts for TSP1 was detected. • Study revealed much lower level of TSP2 expression in cancer specimens

  10. Monoclonal antibodies to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 reveal differential expression patterns in cancer and low antigen expression in normal tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bujak, Emil [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Pretto, Francesca; Ritz, Danilo; Gualandi, Laura; Wulhfard, Sarah [Philochem AG, Libernstrasse 3, CH-8112 Otelfingen (Switzerland); Neri, Dario, E-mail: neri@pharma.ethz.ch [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-09-10

    There is a considerable interest for the discovery and characterization of tumor-associated antigens, which may facilitate antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies. Thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 are homologous secreted proteins, which have previously been reported to be overexpressed during remodeling typical for wound healing and tumor progression and to possibly play a functional role in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. To our knowledge, a complete immunohistochemical characterization of thrombospondins levels in normal rodent tissues has not been reported so far. Using antibody phage technology, we have generated and characterized monoclonal antibodies specific to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2, two antigens which share 62% aminoacid identity. An immunofluorescence analysis revealed that both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues, except for a weak staining of heart tissue by antibodies specific to thrombospondin-1. The analysis also showed that thrombospondin-1 was strongly expressed in 5/7 human tumors xenografted in nude mice, while it was only barely detectable in 3/8 murine tumors grafted in immunocompetent mice. By contrast, a high-affinity antibody to thrombospondin-2 revealed a much lower level of expression of this antigen in cancer specimens. Our analysis resolves ambiguities related to conflicting reports on thrombosponding expression in health and disease. Based on our findings, thrombospondin-1 (and not thrombospondin-2) may be considered as a target for antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies, in consideration of its low expression in normal tissues and its upregulation in cancer. - Highlights: • High affinity monoclonal antibodies to murine and human TSP1 and 2 were raised. • Both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues. • Strong positivity of human tumor xenografts for TSP1 was detected. • Study revealed much lower level of TSP2 expression in cancer specimens

  11. Bioactivity assays and application of 125I labeled human mouse chimeric anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody SM03

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Pingping; Meng Zhiyun; Dou Guifang; Wu Yingliang; Wang Minwei

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the bioactivity and application of 125 I labeled human mouse chimeric monoclonal SM03, SM03 was labeled with 125 I using Indogen method. The labeled mixture was purified by Sephacryl S-300 HR separation chromospectry. The purity and concentration of separated fractions were determined by HPLC and Protein Assay Kit, respectively. Competitive binding method and ELISA method were used for bioactivity assays. 125 I-SM03 was applied to screen cell lines which express the most abundant CD22 antigen. The purity and recovery of 125 I-SM03 were >99% and >47%, respectively. The bioactivity of 125 I- SM03 and SM03 hasn't significant difference in statistics. Ramos cell line had the strongest special radioactivity when 125 I-SM03 bound with in Raji, Daudi and Ramos cell lines. Indogen method is a good way to label Human mouse chimeric anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody SM03 and the label will not affect the activity of SM03. The 125 I-SM03 not only can be used for detect agent, but also may be put into market for NHL therapy. (authors)

  12. Ta1, a novel 105 KD human T cell activation antigen defined by a monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, D A; Hussey, R E; Fitzgerald, K A; Acuto, O; Poole, C; Palley, L; Daley, J F; Schlossman, S F; Reinherz, E L

    1984-09-01

    By using a murine monoclonal antibody produced against an IL 2-dependent human T cell line, we defined a T lineage-specific molecule, termed Ta1, that is expressed strongly on activated T lymphocytes of both the T4 and T8 subsets, as well as on T cell lines and clones, but only weakly on a fraction of resting T cells. SDS-PAGE analysis of immunoprecipitates from 125I-labeled, activated T cells demonstrates a single major band of apparent m.w. 105 KD under both reducing and nonreducing conditions. Unlike anti-IL 2 receptor antibodies, anti-Ta1 does not inhibit T cell proliferative responses to mitogen, antigen, or IL 2-containing medium. Moreover, anti-Ta1 has no effect on T cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Ta1 appears to be a novel human T cell-specific activation antigen that may serve as a useful marker of T cell activation in human disease.

  13. Development and Characterization of Mouse Monoclonal Antibodies Reactive with Chicken CD83

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was carried out to develop and characterize mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against chicken CD83 (chCD83), a membrane-bound glycoprotein belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily that is primarily expressed on mature dendritic cells (DCs). A recombinant chCD83/IgG4 fusion protein con...

  14. Monoclonal antibodies against trophectoderm-specific markers during mouse blastocyst formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brûlet, P; Babinet, C; Kemler, R; Jacob, F

    1980-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis has allowed the detection of proteins characteristic of inner cell mass and trophectoderm in mouse blastocyst. Certain of the proteins characterizing trophectoderm copurify with intermediate filaments from trophectoderm and a trophoblastoma cell line. A monoclonal antibody prepared against proteins of these intermediate filaments labels a filament network in trophectoderm but not in inner cell mass cells. Images PMID:6933460

  15. Solid phase radioimmunoassay for detection of malaria antigen. Comparison of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khusmith, S.; Tharavanij, S.; Patarapotikul, J.; Kasemsuth, R.; Bunnag, D.

    1986-01-01

    A solid phase competitive binding radioimmunoassay (RIA) was developed for the detection of Plasmodium falciparum in infected blood. A suspension of NP40 treated red blood cells was mixed with labelled antimalarial IgG, incubated and then added to malarial antigen coated microtitre plate. Antimalarial IgGs were purified either from high titre sera from individuals living in a malaria endemic area in Thailand or from a locally produced monoclonal antibody (MAB) which showed a bright generalized immunofluorescent staining pattern against all blood stages of P. falciparum, including gametocytes. This MAB reacted with 27 of 31 P. falciparum isolates from Thailand. Using dilution of red blood cells from in vitro cultures of P. falciparum, the test was found to detect parasites at levels equivalent to 13 and 2.2 parasites/10 6 red blood cells with labelled polyclonal IgG (PIgG) and labelled monoclonal IgG (MIgG), respectively. No false positive results were obtained among samples from non-malarial subjects. Of the samples that gave negative results upon microscopic examination, 50 and 35% were still positive with RIA using MIgG and PIgG, respectively. There was a correlation between RIA and the number of parasites, especially when MIgG was used. The results indicate that the IgG fraction of sera from individuals with natural acquired immunity to malaria showed a lower degree of sensitivity in parasite detection than the IgG from monoclonal antibody. (author)

  16. Use of monoclonal antibodies against Hendra and Nipah viruses in an antigen capture ELISA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spiropoulou Christina F

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Outbreaks of Hendra (HeV and Nipah (NiV viruses have been reported starting in 1994 and 1998, respectively. Both viruses are capable of causing fatal disease in humans and effecting great economical loss in the livestock industry. Results Through screening of hybridomas derived from mice immunized with γ-irradiated Nipah virus, we identified two secreted antibodies; one reactive with the nucleocapsid (N protein and the other, the phosphoprotein (P of henipaviruses. Epitope mapping and protein sequence alignments between NiV and HeV suggest the last 14 amino acids of the carboxyl terminus of the N protein is the target of the anti-N antibody. The anti-P antibody recognizes an epitope in the amino-terminal half of P protein. These monoclonal antibodies were used to develop two antigen capture ELISAs, one for virus detection and the other for differentiation between NiV and HeV. The lower limit of detection of the capture assay with both monoclonal antibodies was 400 pfu. The anti-N antibody was used to successfully detect NiV in a lung tissue suspension from an infected pig. Conclusion The antigen capture ELISA developed is potentially affordable tool to provide rapid detection and differentiation between the henipaviruses.

  17. Identification of antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies using high-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ju; Li, Ruihua; Liu, Kun; Li, Liangliang; Zai, Xiaodong; Chi, Xiangyang; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-04-22

    High-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire provides a large number of antibody variable region sequences that can be used to generate human monoclonal antibodies. However, current screening methods for identifying antigen-specific antibodies are inefficient. In the present study, we developed an antibody clone screening strategy based on clone dynamics and relative frequency, and used it to identify antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that at least 52% of putative positive immunoglobulin heavy chains composed antigen-specific antibodies. Combining information on dynamics and relative frequency improved identification of positive clones and elimination of negative clones. and increase the credibility of putative positive clones. Therefore the screening strategy could simplify the subsequent experimental screening and may facilitate the generation of antigen-specific antibodies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A murine monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody detects a common idiotope on human, mouse and rabbit antibodies to allergen Lol p IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, E M; Dzuba-Fischer, J M; Rector, E S; Sehon, A H; Kisil, F T

    1991-09-01

    A syngeneic mouse monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody (anti-Id), designated as B1/1, was generated against a monoclonal antibody (MoAb 91) specific for Ryegrass pollen allergen Lol p IV. This anti-Id recognized an idiotope (Id) that was also present on other monoclonal antibodies with the same specificity as MoAb 91. Observations that (i) the anti-Id inhibited the binding of MoAb 91 to Lol p IV and (ii) the Id-anti-Id interaction could be inhibited by Lol p IV indicated that the Id was located within or near the antigen combining site. These properties served to characterize B1/1 as an internal image anti-Id. Evidence that an immune response in different species to Lol p IV elicits the formation of antibodies which express a common Id was provided by the observations that (i) the Id-anti-Id interactions could be inhibited by mouse, human and rabbit antisera to Lol p IV and (ii) the binding of these antisera to Lol p IV could be inhibited by the anti-Id. Interestingly, the internal image anti-Id B1/1 also recognized an Id on a monoclonal antibody which was directed to an epitope of Lol p IV, different from that recognized by MoAb 91.

  19. Generation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies specific for 18 kDa antigen from Taenia solium cysticerci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaohua; Luo, Xuenong; Guo, Aijiang; Zhu, Xueliang; Cai, Xuepeng

    2016-07-01

    The gene encoding a mature 18 kDa glycoprotein of Taenia solium cysticerci (Ts18) was cloned and bacterially expressed with a His-tagged fusion protein. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the recombinant Ts18 antigen were generated in vitro by routine murine hybridoma technique of fusing splenocytes, from BALB/c mice immunized with the vesicular fluid of T. solium cysticerci (TsVF), with mouse myeloma cells (SP2/0). The reactivity and specificity of these MAbs were evaluated by indirect ELISA and immunoblotting techniques. Three stable hybridoma clones, namely 3B11, 6C5, and 6G4, were screened using His-Ts18-based ELISA, and these showed two IgG1 isotypes and one IgM isotype. All MAbs reacted with His-Ts18 at molecular weight (MW) 12.8 kDa and the native antigen at MW 18 kDa in TsVF and whole larval extracts (WLE). In a dot blotting test, MAbs 6C5 and 6G4 showed no obvious cross-reactivity with heterologous vesicular fluids from other taeniid species, including Taenia saginata (TsaVF), Taenia pisiformis (TpVF), Taenia hydatigena (ThVF), Taenia multiceps (TmVF), and Echinococcus granulosus (EgVF). Immunofluorescent assays showed that MAb 6C5 specifically reacted with the Ts18 expressed from pEGFP-N1-Ts18-transfected HeLa cells. Immunolocalization analysis, using MAb 6C5 as a probe, indicated that Ts18 was present at high concentrations in the region of the larval sucker and spiral canal. The results indicate that the Ts18 protein is an abundantly secreted parasite protein and MAbs against it might provide a step forward for improving the diagnosis of porcine cysticercosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Arthrogenicity of type II collagen monoclonal antibodies associated with complement activation and antigen affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koobkokkruad, Thongchai; Kadotani, Tatsuya; Hutamekalin, Pilaiwanwadee; Mizutani, Nobuaki; Yoshino, Shin

    2011-11-04

    The collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) model, which employs a cocktail of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to type II collagen (CII), has been widely used for studying the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis. In this model, not all mAbs to CII are capable of inducing arthritis because one of the initial events is the formation of collagen-antibody immune complexes on the cartilage surface or in the synovium, and subsequent activation of the complement by the complexes induces arthritis, suggesting that a combination of mAbs showing strong ability to bind mouse CII and activate the complement may effectively induce arthritis in mice. In the present study, we examined the relationship between the induction of arthritis by the combination of IgG2a (CII-6 and C2A-12), IgG2b (CII-3, C2B-14 and C2B-16) and IgM (CM-5) subclones of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) of anti-bovine or chicken CII and the ability of mAbs to activate complement and bind mouse CII. DBA/1J mice were injected with several combinations of mAbs followed by lipopolysaccharide. Furthermore, the ability of mAbs to activate the complement and bind mouse CII was examined by ELISA. First, DBA/1J mice were injected with the combined 4 mAbs (CII-3, CII-6, C2B-14, and CM-5) followed by lipopolysaccharide, resulting in moderate arthritis. Excluding one of the mAbs, i.e., using only CII-3, CII-6, and C2B-14, induced greater inflammation of the joints. Next, adding C2A-12 but not C2B-16 to these 3 mAbs produced more severe arthritis. A combination of five clones, consisting of all 5 mAbs, was less effective. Histologically, mice given the newly developed 4-clone cocktail had marked proliferation of synovial tissues, massive infiltration by inflammatory cells, and severe destruction of cartilage and bone. Furthermore, 4 of the 6 clones (CII-3, CII-6, C2B-14, and C2A-12) showed not only a strong cross-reaction with mouse CII but also marked activation of the complement in vitro. The combination of 4 mAbs showing

  1. Arthrogenicity of type II collagen monoclonal antibodies associated with complement activation and antigen affinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizutani Nobuaki

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA model, which employs a cocktail of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs to type II collagen (CII, has been widely used for studying the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis. In this model, not all mAbs to CII are capable of inducing arthritis because one of the initial events is the formation of collagen-antibody immune complexes on the cartilage surface or in the synovium, and subsequent activation of the complement by the complexes induces arthritis, suggesting that a combination of mAbs showing strong ability to bind mouse CII and activate the complement may effectively induce arthritis in mice. In the present study, we examined the relationship between the induction of arthritis by the combination of IgG2a (CII-6 and C2A-12, IgG2b (CII-3, C2B-14 and C2B-16 and IgM (CM-5 subclones of monoclonal antibodies (mAb of anti-bovine or chicken CII and the ability of mAbs to activate complement and bind mouse CII. Methods DBA/1J mice were injected with several combinations of mAbs followed by lipopolysaccharide. Furthermore, the ability of mAbs to activate the complement and bind mouse CII was examined by ELISA. Results First, DBA/1J mice were injected with the combined 4 mAbs (CII-3, CII-6, C2B-14, and CM-5 followed by lipopolysaccharide, resulting in moderate arthritis. Excluding one of the mAbs, i.e., using only CII-3, CII-6, and C2B-14, induced greater inflammation of the joints. Next, adding C2A-12 but not C2B-16 to these 3 mAbs produced more severe arthritis. A combination of five clones, consisting of all 5 mAbs, was less effective. Histologically, mice given the newly developed 4-clone cocktail had marked proliferation of synovial tissues, massive infiltration by inflammatory cells, and severe destruction of cartilage and bone. Furthermore, 4 of the 6 clones (CII-3, CII-6, C2B-14, and C2A-12 showed not only a strong cross-reaction with mouse CII but also marked activation of the

  2. Involvement of lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) in HIV infection: inhibition by monoclonal antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Mathiesen, Lars Reinhardt

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the alpha- and beta-chain of lymphocyte-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) were examined for inhibition of HIV-1 infection in vitro. Infection of the T cell line MT4 and the monocytic cell line U937 by isolates HTLVIIIB and SSI-002, respectively was inhibited...

  3. Enhancement of retroviral infection in vitro by anti-Le(y) IgG: reversal by humanization of monoclonal mouse antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Sørensen, A M; Arendrup, M

    1993-01-01

    Monoclonal mouse IgG3 antibody (ABL 364) against the carbohydrate Le(y) antigen enhanced infection in vitro with HTLV-1 and with HIV-1 when propagated in both transformed and normal lymphocytes. Enhancement was independent of complement, occurred with both lymphocytes and monocytes as target cells...... with no indication of any alternative pathway of infection, as evidenced by abrogation of enhancement by anti-CD4 MAb or soluble recombinant CD4, and also the inability of anti-Le(y) MAb to mediate HIV infection of HSB-2 cells in which HTLV-1/HIV pseudovirus infection was enhanced. While F(ab)2 fragments of ABL 364...

  4. B cell-targeted therapy with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody in a mouse model of Graves' hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, I; Abiru, N; Kobayashi, M; Nakahara, M; Ichikawa, T; Eguchi, K; Nagayama, Y

    2011-03-01

    Graves' disease is a B cell-mediated and T cell-dependent autoimmune disease of the thyroid which is characterized by overproduction of thyroid hormones and thyroid enlargement by agonistic anti-thyrotrophin receptor (TSHR) autoantibody. In addition to antibody secretion, B cells have recently been recognized to function as antigen-presenting/immune-modulatory cells. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of B cell depletion by anti-mouse (m) CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb) on Graves' hyperthyroidism in a mouse model involving repeated injection of adenovirus expressing TSHR A-subunit (Ad-TSHR289). We observe that a single injection of 250 µg/mouse anti-mCD20 mAb eliminated B cells efficiently from the periphery and spleen and to a lesser extent from the peritoneum for more than 3 weeks. B cell depletion before immunization suppressed an increase in serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G levels, TSHR-specific splenocyte secretion of interferon (IFN)-γ, anti-TSHR antibody production and development of hyperthyroidism. B cell depletion 2 weeks after the first immunization, a time-point at which T cells were primed but antibody production was not observed, was still effective at inhibiting antibody production and disease development without inhibiting splenocyte secretion of IFN-γ. By contrast, B cell depletion in hyperthyroid mice was therapeutically ineffective. Together, these data demonstrate that B cells are critical not only as antibody-producing cells but also as antigen-presenting/immune-modulatory cells in the early phase of the induction of experimental Graves' hyperthyroidism and, although therapeutically less effective, B cell depletion is highly efficient for preventing disease development. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2011 British Society for Immunology.

  5. B cell-targeted therapy with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody in a mouse model of Graves' hyperthyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, I; Abiru, N; Kobayashi, M; Nakahara, M; Ichikawa, T; Eguchi, K; Nagayama, Y

    2011-01-01

    Graves' disease is a B cell-mediated and T cell-dependent autoimmune disease of the thyroid which is characterized by overproduction of thyroid hormones and thyroid enlargement by agonistic anti-thyrotrophin receptor (TSHR) autoantibody. In addition to antibody secretion, B cells have recently been recognized to function as antigen-presenting/immune-modulatory cells. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of B cell depletion by anti-mouse (m) CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb) on Graves' hyperthyroidism in a mouse model involving repeated injection of adenovirus expressing TSHR A-subunit (Ad-TSHR289). We observe that a single injection of 250 µg/mouse anti-mCD20 mAb eliminated B cells efficiently from the periphery and spleen and to a lesser extent from the peritoneum for more than 3 weeks. B cell depletion before immunization suppressed an increase in serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G levels, TSHR-specific splenocyte secretion of interferon (IFN)-γ, anti-TSHR antibody production and development of hyperthyroidism. B cell depletion 2 weeks after the first immunization, a time-point at which T cells were primed but antibody production was not observed, was still effective at inhibiting antibody production and disease development without inhibiting splenocyte secretion of IFN-γ. By contrast, B cell depletion in hyperthyroid mice was therapeutically ineffective. Together, these data demonstrate that B cells are critical not only as antibody-producing cells but also as antigen-presenting/immune-modulatory cells in the early phase of the induction of experimental Graves' hyperthyroidism and, although therapeutically less effective, B cell depletion is highly efficient for preventing disease development. PMID:21235532

  6. A novel and effective cancer immunotherapy mouse model using antigen-specific B cells selected in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Moutai

    Full Text Available Immunotherapies such as adoptive transfer of T cells or natural killer cells, or monoclonal antibody (MoAb treatment have recently been recognized as effective means to treat cancer patients. However, adoptive transfer of B cells or plasma cells producing tumor-specific antibodies has not been applied as a therapy because long-term culture and selective expansion of antigen-specific B cells has been technically very difficult. Here, we describe a novel cancer immunotherapy that uses B-cell adoptive transfer. We demonstrate that germinal-center-like B cells (iGB cells induced in vitro from mouse naïve B cells become plasma cells and produce IgG antibodies for more than a month in the bone marrow of non-irradiated recipient mice. When transferred into mice, iGB cells producing antibody against a surrogate tumor antigen suppressed lung metastasis and growth of mouse melanoma cells expressing the same antigen and prolonged survival of the recipients. In addition, we have developed a novel culture system called FAIS to selectively expand antigen-specific iGB cells utilizing the fact that iGB cells are sensitive to Fas-induced cell death unless their antigen receptors are ligated by membrane-bound antigens. The selected iGB cells efficiently suppressed lung metastasis of melanoma cells in the adoptive immunotherapy model. As human blood B cells can be propagated as iGB cells using culture conditions similar to the mouse iGB cell cultures, our data suggest that it will be possible to treat cancer-bearing patients by the adoptive transfer of cancer-antigen-specific iGB cells selected in vitro. This new adoptive immunotherapy should be an alternative to the laborious development of MoAb drugs against cancers for which no effective treatments currently exist.

  7. Affinity isolation of antigen-specific circulating B cells for generation of phage display-derived human monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditzel, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    A method is described for affinity isolation of antigen-specific circulating B cells of interest for subsequent generation of immune antibody phage display libraries. This approach should overcome the problem of low yields of monoclonal antibodies of interest in the libraries generated from...... peripheral blood lymphocytes caused by the low abundance of antigen-specific B cells in the circulation. The preselection of B cells is based on the specificity of the surface Ig receptor and is accomplished using the antigen of interest conjugated to magnetic beads. This method should significantly increase...... the frequency of antibody phage particles of interest in the library and allow for efficient isolation monoclonal antibodies with the predefined specificity....

  8. Generation of Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies from Immunised Mice and Rabbits via Flow Cytometry and Sorting of Antigen-Specific IgG+ Memory B Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale O Starkie

    Full Text Available Single B cell screening strategies, which avoid both hybridoma fusion and combinatorial display, have emerged as important technologies for efficiently sampling the natural antibody repertoire of immunized animals and humans. Having access to a range of methods to interrogate different B cell subsets provides an attractive option to ensure large and diverse panels of high quality antibody are produced. The generation of multiple antibodies and having the ability to find rare B cell clones producing IgG with unique and desirable characteristics facilitates the identification of fit-for-purpose molecules that can be developed into therapeutic agents or research reagents. Here, we describe a multi-parameter flow cytometry single-cell sorting technique for the generation of antigen-specific recombinant monoclonal antibodies from single IgG+ memory B cells. Both mouse splenocytes and rabbit PBMC from immunised animals were used as a source of B cells. Reagents staining both B cells and other unwanted cell types enabled efficient identification of class-switched IgG+ memory B cells. Concurrent staining with antigen labelled separately with two spectrally-distinct fluorophores enabled antigen-specific B cells to be identified, i.e. those which bind to both antigen conjugates (double-positive. These cells were then typically sorted at one cell per well using FACS directly into a 96-well plate containing reverse transcriptase reaction mix. Following production of cDNA, PCR was performed to amplify cognate heavy and light chain variable region genes and generate transcriptionally-active PCR (TAP fragments. These linear expression cassettes were then used directly in a mammalian cell transfection to generate recombinant antibody for further testing. We were able to successfully generate antigen-specific recombinant antibodies from both the rabbit and mouse IgG+ memory B cell subset within one week. This included the generation of an anti-TNFR2 blocking

  9. Distribution of 125I-monoclonal antibodies to antigen Ly 2.1 of T-lymphocytes in mice under the influence of immunomodulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirolyubova, Sh.Yu.; Fadeev, N.P.; Serzhanina, V.A.; Klimovich, V.B.; Makarenko, M.V.; Korsakova, L.N.

    1991-01-01

    A study was made of the distribution of 125 I (a chloramine method of labelling) monoclonal antibodies to the surface antigen Ly 2.1 T-lymphocytes during action of immunomodulators (tactivin, hydrocortisone, tactivin administered after hydrocortisone) on ACR mice. These antibodies were shown to retain antigen binding capacity, permitting monitoring of the redistribution of the antigen in the body exposed to immunomodulators

  10. Enhancement by gamma-interferon of in vivo tumor radiolocalization by a monoclonal antibody against HLA-DR antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowlinson, G.; Balkwill, F.; Snook, D.; Hooker, G.; Epenetos, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    Athymic nu/nu (nude) mice bearing s.c. human breast tumors were treated systemically with recombinant human gamma-interferon. These tumors were phenotypically negative for HLA-DR prior to therapy, but after 4 days of treatment, 80% of the cells expressed this antigen in vivo as assessed by immunoperoxidase (F. R. Balkwill et al., Eur. J. Cancer Clin. Oncol., in press, 1986). A radioiodine-labeled murine monoclonal antibody (TAL-1B5) against HLA-DR specifically localized to the tumors in recombinant human gamma-interferon-treated but not in control mice. An isotype-identical murine monoclonal antibody that did not react with control or recombinant human gamma-interferon-treated tumors did not show any specific localization. These results demonstrate that specific localization to tumors of radio-labeled monoclonal antibodies to HLA-DR can be facilitated by systemic therapy with gamma-interferon

  11. Variability in surface antigen expression on neuroblastoma cells as revealed by monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malpas, J.S.; Kemshead, J.T.; Pritchard, J.; Greaves, M.F.

    1982-01-01

    In treatment programmes for neuroblastoma involving autologous bone marrow transplantation, a problem exists in the identification of small numbers of metastatic tumour cells present in the marrow aspirates. Reinfusion of tumour cells along with normal bone marrow may reseed the tumour within a patient who has received high dose chemotherapy. Formalin-induced fluorescence in neuroblastoma is a possible diagnostic aid, but this method has no therapeutic potential. Other methods of detecting tumour relying on gross physiological changes in the patient are not suitable for diagnosis of minimal metastatic disease. As an immunological approach to the problem, rabbit antisera to neuroblastoma have been raised but these reagents suffer from low titre after absorption to make them specific. The authors have used the technique of somatic cell hybridisation to raise monoclonal antibodies which bind to neuroblastoma cells and not to normal haemopoietic progenitors. A panel of such reagents to demonstrate heterogeneity in antigen expression amongst metastatic neuroblastoma cells was employed in a radioimmunoassay as diagnostic aid for this problem. (Auth.)

  12. Structural and Antigenic Definition of Hepatitis C Virus E2 Glycoprotein Epitopes Targeted by Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Sautto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is the major cause of chronic liver disease as well as the major indication for liver transplantation worldwide. Current standard of care is not completely effective, not administrable in grafted patients, and burdened by several side effects. This incomplete effectiveness is mainly due to the high propensity of the virus to continually mutate under the selective pressure exerted by the host immune response as well as currently administered antiviral drugs. The E2 envelope surface glycoprotein of HCV (HCV/E2 is the main target of the host humoral immune response and for this reason one of the major variable viral proteins. However, broadly cross-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs directed against HCV/E2 represent a promising tool for the study of virus-host interplay as well as for the development of effective prophylactic and therapeutic approaches. In the last few years many anti-HCV/E2 mAbs have been evaluated in preclinical and clinical trials as possible candidate antivirals, particularly for administration in pre- and post-transplant settings. In this review we summarize the antigenic and structural characteristics of HCV/E2 determined through the use of anti-HCV/E2 mAbs, which, given the absence of a crystal structure of this glycoprotein, represent currently the best tool available.

  13. Glycosphingolipid antigens from Leishmania (L. amazonensis amastigotes: Binding of anti-glycosphingolipid monoclonal antibodies in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Straus

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Specific glycosphingolipid antigens of Leishmania (L. amazonensis amastigotes reactive with the monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs ST-3, ST-4 and ST-5 were isolated, and their structure was partially elucidated by negative ion fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. The glycan moieties of five antigens presented linear sequences of hexoses and N-acetylhexosamines ranging from four to six sugar residues, and the ceramide moieties were found to be composed by a sphingosine d18:1 and fatty acids 24:1 or 16:0. Affinities of the three monoclonal antibodies to amastigote glycosphingolipid antigens were also analyzed by ELISA. MoAb ST-3 reacted equally well with all glycosphingolipid antigens tested, whereas ST-4 and ST-5 presented higher affinities to glycosphingolipids with longer carbohydrate chains, with five or more sugar units (slow migrating bands on HPTLC. Macrophages isolated from footpad lesions of BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania (L. amazonensis were incubated with MoAb ST-3 and, by indirect immunofluorescence, labeling was only detected on the parasite, whereas no fluorescence was observed on the surface of the infected macrophages, indicating that these glycosphingolipid antigens are not acquired from the host cell but synthesized by the amastigote. Intravenous administration of 125I-labeled ST-3 antibody to infected BALB/c mice showed that MoAb ST-3 accumulated significantly in the footpad lesions in comparison to blood and other tissues

  14. Characterization of 7A7, an anti-mouse EGFR monoclonal antibody proposed to be the mouse equivalent of cetuximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuzhi; Cruz, Jazmina L; Joseph, Shannon; Pett, Nicola; Chew, Hui Yi; Tuong, Zewen K; Okano, Satomi; Kelly, Gabrielle; Veitch, Margaret; Simpson, Fiona; Wells, James W

    2018-02-23

    The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is selectively expressed on the surface of numerous tumours, such as non-small cell lung, ovarian, colorectal and head and neck carcinomas. EGFR has therefore become a target for cancer therapy. Cetuximab is a chimeric human/mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb) that binds to EGFR, where it both inhibits signaling and induces cell death by antibody-dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Cetuximab has been approved for clinical use in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and colorectal cancer. However, only 15-20% patients benefit from this drug, thus new strategies to improve cetuximab efficiency are required. We aimed to develop a reliable and easy preclinical mouse model to evaluate the efficacy of EGFR-targeted antibodies and examine the immune mechanisms involved in tumour regression. We selected an anti-mouse EGFR mAb, 7A7, which has been reported to be "mouse cetuximab" and to exhibit similar properties to its human counterpart. Unfortunately, we were unable to reproduce previous results obtained with the 7A7 mAb. In our hands, 7A7 failed to recognize mouse EGFR, both in native and reducing conditions. Moreover, in vivo administration of 7A7 in an EGFR-expressing HPV38 tumour model did not have any impact on tumour regression or animal survival. We conclude that 7A7 does not recognize mouse EGFR and therefore cannot be used as the mouse equivalent of cetuximab use in humans. As a number of groups have spent effort and resources with similar issues we feel that publication is a responsible approach.

  15. Immunohistochemical Examination of Novel Rat Monoclonal Antibodies against Mouse and Human Podoplanin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaji, Chiaki; Tsujimoto, Yuta; Kato Kaneko, Mika; Kato, Yukinari; Sawa, Yoshihiko

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to develop new monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against mouse and human podoplanin. Rats were immunized with synthetic peptides, corresponding to amino acids 38–51 of mouse podoplanin or human podoplanin which is 100% homologous to the same site of monkey podoplanin; anti-mouse podoplanin mAb PMab-1 (IgG 2a ) and anti-human mAb NZ-1.2 (IgG 2a ) were established. In immunocytochemistry, the mouse melanoma B16-F10 and mouse podoplanin (mPDPN)-expressed CHO transfectant were stained by PMab-1; human lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) and human podoplanin (hPDPN)-expressed squamous cell carcinoma HSC3 transfectant, were stained by NZ-1.2. Western-blot analysis detected an about 40-kDa protein in CHO-mPDPN and B16-F10 by PMab-1, and in HSC3-hPDPN and LEC by NZ-1.2. In frozen sections, PMab-1 reacted with mouse kidney, pulmonary alveoli, pulmonary pleura, and salivary gland myoepithelial cells while NZ-1.2 reacted to the human salivary gland myoepithelial cells. The immunostaining of paraffin-embedded sections also showed the reaction of PMab-1 or NZ-1.2 to the mouse or monkey kidney glomerulus, pulmonary alveoli, and lung lymphatic vessels. These results indicate that the two novel rat mAbs to the mouse and human/monkey podoplanin are useful for Western-blot and immunostaining of somatic tissues on paraffin-embedded sections as well as frozen sections

  16. Optimization of monoclonal antibody production in mouse ascites by single whole-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witt, S.; Ziegler, B.; Kloeting, I.; Ziegler, M.; Nadrowitz, R.; Schmidt, W.

    1987-01-01

    Hybridoma cells injected intraperitoneally into mice induce formation of ascites tumors producing ascites fluid with high levels of monoclonal antibodies. Several parameters affect the growth of the immunoglobulin-producing tumors in vivo. In 10 different hybridomas the average ascites tumor formation rate could be increased from 32% (n = 338 mice) to 77% (n = 112 mice) by only one whole-body irradiation of paraffin-pretreated Balb/c mice. Production of monoclonal antibodies was better in males because of the significantly (p < 0.01) increased volume of ascites fluid. From the increased tumor formation rate in irradiated mice it is suggested that in non-irradiated recipients the tumor growth rate was lowered by immunological reactions against hybridoma cells provoked by cell surface neoantigens revealed by cell fusion and/or tumor-associated antigens of the myeloma parent cells as well as by altered antigen pattern caused by possible mutations in the myeloma cell line and/or Balb/c/K strain. (author)

  17. Laminin binding protein, 34/67 laminin receptor, carries stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 epitope defined by monoclonal antibody Raft.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagiri, Yohko U.; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka; Nakamura, Kyoko; Takenouchi, Hisami; Taguchi, Tomoko; Okita, Hajime; Umezawa, Akihiro; Fujimoto, Junichiro

    2005-01-01

    We previously produced monoclonal antibodies against the detergent-insoluble microdomain, i.e., the raft microdomain, of the human renal cancer cell line ACHN. Raft.2, one of these monoclonal antibodies, recognizes sialosyl globopentaosylceramide, which has the stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA)-4 epitope. Although the mouse embryonal carcinoma (EC) cell line F9 does not express SSEA-4, some F9 cells stained with Raft.2. Western analysis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry identified the Raft.2 binding molecule as laminin binding protein (LBP), i.e., 34/67 laminin receptor. Weak acid treatment or digestion with Clostridium perfringens sialidase reduced Raft.2 binding to LBP on nitrocellulose sheets and [ 14 C]galactose was incorporated into LBP, indicating LBP to have a sialylated carbohydrate moiety. Subcellular localization analysis by sucrose density-gradient centrifugation and examination by confocal microscopy revealed LBP to be localized on the outer surface of the plasma membrane. An SSEA-4-positive human EC cell line, NCR-G3 cells, also expressed Raft.2-binding LBP

  18. Epitope and functional specificity of monoclonal antibodies to mouse gamma interferon: the synthetic peptide approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, J.K.; Hayes, M.P.; Carter, J.M.; Torres, B.A.; Dunn, B.M.; Johnson, H.M.

    1986-01-01

    Four anti-recombinant mouse gamma interferon (α-IFNγ) monoclonal antibodies were generated using hamster spleen cells. Binding of 125 I-IFNγ by these protein A-bound antibodies was specifically blocked by cold IFNγ. Binding by three of these antibodies was also blocked by a synthetic peptide corresponding to the N-terminal 1-39 amino acids of IFNγ, while a corresponding C-terminal (95-133) peptide had no effect on binding. One of the N-terminal specific monoclonal antibodies inhibited both the antiviral and macrophage priming (for tumor cell killing) activities of IFNγ, while the other two had no effect on either biological function. Blocking experiments with cold IFNγ and N-terminal peptide suggest that the epitope specificities of the monoclonal antibodies could be determined by the conformational or topographic structure of IFNγ. Polyclonal antibodies to either the N-terminal or C-terminal peptides also inhibited both the antiviral and macrophage priming activities of IFNγ. All of the antibodies that inhibited IFNγ function also blocked binding of IFNγ to membrane receptor on cells, while antibodies that did not inhibit function also did not block binding. The data suggest that both the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of IFNγ play an important role in its antiviral and macrophage priming functions, possibly in a cooperative manner

  19. Production of mouse monoclonal antibody against Streptococcus dysgalactiae GapC protein and mapping its conserved B-cell epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Limeng; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Ziyao; Zhou, Xue; Yu, Liquan; Sun, Hunan; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Song, Baifen; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Zhu, Zhanbo; Cui, Yudong

    2015-02-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactiae) GapC protein is a protective antigen that induces partial immunity against S. dysgalactiae infection in animals. To identify the conserved B-cell epitope of S. dysgalactiae GapC, a mouse monoclonal antibody 1E11 (mAb1E11) against GapC was generated and used to screen a phage-displayed 12-mer random peptide library (Ph.D.-12). Eleven positive clones recognized by mAb1E11 were identified, most of which matched the consensus motif TGFFAKK. Sequence of the motif exactly matched amino acids 97-103 of the S. dysgalactiae GapC. In addition, the epitope (97)TGFFAKK(103) showed high homology among different streptococcus species. Site-directed mutagenic analysis further confirmed that residues G98, F99, F100 and K103 formed the core of (97)TGFFAKK(103), and this core motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb1E11. Collectively, the identification of conserved B-cell epitope within S. dysgalactiae GapC highlights the possibility of developing the epitope-based vaccine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Autologous monoclonal antibodies recognize tumour-associated antigens in X-irradiated C57BL/6 mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artus, A; Guillemain, B; Legrand, E; Astier-Gin, T; Mamoun, R; Duplan, J -F

    1986-09-01

    X-irradiation of C57BL/6 mice induces thymic lymphosarcomas which sometimes contain retroviruses which upon injection into normal mice mimic the effect of the irradiation. We examined whether specific antigenicities, viral or cellular, were expressed by tumour cells that could be recognized by antibodies from the irradiated animals. We developed monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) using splenocytes of the diseased animal. The reactivity of such MAbs towards thymoma cell lines established in vitro was investigated by means of an ELISA. At least 10 antibody specificities were detected on the 13 tumours investigated, allowing separation of the MAbs into three classes: (i) those recognizing the autologous tumour, heterologous tumours as well as normal thymic tissue, (ii) those specific for the autologous tumour, and (iii) those specific for one tumour, but not ones of autologous origin. The last two classes corresponded to specific tumour-associated antigens. Our panel of MAbs defined each tumour by the particular pattern of antigens harboured. It is striking that most of the antigens were present in the normal thymus and that only two tumours had additional antigenicities. Additionally, quantitative variations were observed in the levels of expression of these antigens.

  1. Mouse Hepatitis Virus Strain A59 and Blocking Antireceptor Monoclonal Antibody Bind to the N-Terminal Domain of Cellular Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dveksler, Gabriela S.; Pensiero, Michael N.; Dieffenbach, Carl W.; Cardellichio, Christine B.; Basile, Alexis A.; Elia, Patrick E.; Holmes, Kathryn V.

    1993-03-01

    Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) strain A59 uses as cellular receptors members of the carcinoembryonic antigen family in the immunoglobulin superfamily. Recombinant receptor proteins with deletions of whole or partial immunoglobulin domains were used to identify the regions of receptor glycoprotein recognized by virus and by antireceptor monoclonal antibody CC1, which blocks infection of murine cells. Monoclonal antibody CC1 and MHV-A59 virions bound only to recombinant proteins containing the entire first domain of MHV receptor. To determine which of the proteins could serve as functional virus receptors, receptor-negative hamster cells were transfected with recombinant deletion clones and then challenged with MHV-A59 virions. Receptor activity required the entire N-terminal domain with either the second or the fourth domain and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. Recombinant proteins lacking the first domain or its C-terminal portion did not serve as viral receptors. Thus, like other virus receptors in the immunoglobulin superfamily, including CD4, poliovirus receptor, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1, the N-terminal domain of MHV receptor is recognized by the virus and the blocking monoclonal antibody.

  2. 19-DEJ-1, a hemidesmosome-anchoring filament complex-associated monoclonal antibody. Definition of a new skin basement membrane antigenic defect in junctional and dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fine, J D; Horiguchi, Y; Couchman, J R

    1989-01-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody (19-DEJ-1) was recently produced that recognizes a unique antigenic epitope of human skin basement membrane localized to the midlamina lucida exclusively in those areas bordered by overlying hemidesmosomes. To determine whether the antigen defined by 19-DEJ-1 is norma...

  3. In vivo localization of radiolabeled monoclonal antibody to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in a CEA-producing tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamei, Tetsuya; Seto, Hikaru; Taki, Kuniyasu; Soya, Toshio; Kakishita, Masao; Maeda, Masatoshi; Honda, Takashi; Koshimura, Saburou.

    1987-01-01

    To compare accumulation of the 125 I-labeled antibodies(anti-carcinoembryonic antigen(CEA) monoclonal antibody and polyclonal antibody) to a CEA-producing tumor (SC-2-JCK), an in vivo localization study was performed in nude mice. The tumor-to-blood ratio at 120 hours after injection rose to 4.6 for the monoclonal antibody, but remained at 1.3 for the polyclonal antibody. However, no differences were noted between the antibodies up to 72 hours after injection. In autoradiograms, selective accumulation of the tracer was noted in the tumor for both antibodies. However, no superiority or inferiority of imaging for either of the antibodies could be definitely determined. (author)

  4. Differential recognition of the multiple banded antigen isoforms across Ureaplasma parvum and Ureaplasma urealyticum species by monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboklaish, Ali F; Ahmed, Shatha; McAllister, Douglas; Cassell, Gail; Zheng, Xiaotian T; Spiller, Owen B

    2016-08-01

    Two separate species of Ureaplasma have been identified that infect humans: Ureaplasma parvum and Ureaplasma urealyticum. Most notably, these bacteria lack a cell wall and are the leading infectious organism associated with infection-related induction of preterm birth. Fourteen separate representative prototype bacterial strains, called serovars, are largely differentiated by the sequence of repeating units in the C-terminus of the major surface protein: multiple-banded antigen (MBA). Monoclonal antibodies that recognise single or small groups of serovars have been previously reported, but these reagents remain sequestered in individual research laboratories. Here we characterise a panel of commercially available monoclonal antibodies raised against the MBA and describe the first monoclonal antibody that cross-reacts by immunoblot with all serovars of U. parvum and U. urealyticum species. We also describe a recombinant MBA expressed by Escherichia coli which facilitated further characterisation by immunoblot and demonstrate immunohistochemistry of paraffin-embedded antigens. Immunoblot reactivity was validated against well characterised previously published monoclonal antibodies and individual commercial antibodies were found to recognise all U. parvum strains, only serovars 3 and 14 or only serovars 1 and 6, or all strains belonging to U. parvum and U. urealyticum. MBA mass was highly variable between strains, consistent with variation in the number of C-terminal repeats between strains. Antibody characterisation will enable future investigations to correlate severity of pathogenicity to MBA isoform number or mass, in addition to development of antibody-based diagnostics that will detect infection by all Ureaplasma species or alternately be able to differentiate between U. parvum, U. urealyticum or mixed infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Immunochemical and biological properties of a mouse monoclonal antibody reactive to prunus necrotic ringspot ilarvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aebig, J A; Jordan, R L; Lawson, R H; Hsu, H T

    1987-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody reacting with prunus necrotic ringspot ilarvirus was tested in immunochemical studies, neutralization of infectivity assays, and by immuno-electron microscopy. The antibody was able to detect the 27,000 Mr coat protein of prunus necrotic ringspot ilarvirus in western blots and also detected all polypeptide fragments generated after incubation of whole virus with proteolytic enzymes. In neutralization of infectivity studies, the antibody blocked virus infectivity, although it did not precipitate the antigen in agar gel Ouchterlony double diffusion tests. Immuno-electron microscopy confirmed that the antibody coats virions but does not cause clumping. The antibody may be a useful tool for investigating coat protein-dependent initiation of ilarvirus infection.

  6. Human Monoclonal Islet Cell Antibodies From a Patient with Insulin- Dependent Diabetes Mellitus Reveal Glutamate Decarboxylase as the Target Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Wiltrud; Endl, Josef; Eiermann, Thomas H.; Brandt, Michael; Kientsch-Engel, Rosemarie; Thivolet, Charles; Jungfer, Herbert; Scherbaum, Werner A.

    1992-09-01

    The autoimmune phenomena associated with destruction of the β cell in pancreatic islets and development of type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus (IDDM) include circulating islet cell antibodies. We have immortalized peripheral blood lymphocytes from prediabetic individuals and patients with newly diagnosed IDDM by Epstein-Barr virus transformation. IgG-positive cells were selected by anti-human IgG-coupled magnetic beads and expanded in cell culture. Supernatants were screened for cytoplasmic islet cell antibodies using the conventional indirect immunofluorescence test on cryostat sections of human pancreas. Six islet cell-specific B-cell lines, originating from a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM, could be stabilized on a monoclonal level. All six monoclonal islet cell antibodies (MICA 1-6) were of the IgG class. None of the MICA reacted with human thyroid, adrenal gland, anterior pituitary, liver, lung, stomach, and intestine tissues but all six reacted with pancreatic islets of different mammalian species and, in addition, with neurons of rat cerebellar cortex. MICA 1-6 were shown to recognize four distinct antigenic epitopes in islets. Islet cell antibody-positive diabetic sera but not normal human sera blocked the binding of the monoclonal antibodies to their target epitopes. Immunoprecipitation of 35S-labeled human islet cell extracts revealed that a protein of identical size to the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.15) was a target of all MICA. Furthermore, antigen immunotrapped by the MICA from brain homogenates showed glutamate decarboxylase enzyme activity. MICA 1-6 therefore reveal glutamate decarboxylase as the predominant target antigen of cytoplasmic islet cell autoantibodies in a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM.

  7. Radiolocalization of bovine lymphosarcoma cells in athymic mice, using a monoclonal antibody against tumor-associated antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aida, Y.; Ochiai, K.; Ito, K.; Onuma, M.; Fujimori, F.; Fujimoto, Y.; Izawa, H.

    1987-01-01

    Mouse monoclonal antibody c 143 was purified and F(ab')2 fragments were generated by pepsin digestion and then radiolabeled with 125 I. The 125 I-labeled c 143 F(ab')2 fragments were injected into athymic mice bearing bovine lymphoid tumor cells. The fragments became preferentially localized in tumor tissues, but not in normal tissues, as determined by differential counting of tissue radioactivity. The fragments became localized specifically in those tumors that were reactive with c 143 in vitro, but did not become localized in unrelated tumors. Localization of labeled F(ab')2 fragments of a monoclonal antibody of the same isotype directed against Taka virus (a variant of Newcastle disease virus) was not observed in athymic mice bearing bovine lymphoid tumor cells. Tumors were detectable by radioimmunoscintigraphy, using radiolabeled c 143 F(ab')2 fragments, without background subtraction, and by use of silver-grain scattering in light microscopic autoradiography

  8. A human/mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody against intercellular adhesion molecule-1 for tumor radioimmunoimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Miyuki; Hinoda, Yuji; Sasaki, Shigeru; Tsujisaki, Masayuki; Imai, Kohzoh; Oriuchi, Noboru; Endo, Keigo.

    1996-01-01

    A mouse-human chimeric antibody for intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was established by using heavy chain loss mouse mutant hybridoma and human immunoglobulin expression vector. The HA58 hybridoma secreted anti-ICAM-1 monoclonal antibody (MoAb) (IgG1,κ). The gene of the mouse variable region of heavy chain was amplified and cloned by the polymerase chain reaction technique directly from the HA58 hybridoma RNA. The variable region of heavy chain was joined with an expression vector which contains human γ1 constant gene. The expression vector was transfected into heavy chain loss mutant cells HA58-7, which produced only murine immunoglobulin light chains. The resultant chimeric MoAb HA58, chHA58, retained full-binding reactivity to ICAM-1 compared with murine HA58 parental antibody. The chimeric MoAb chHA58 showed little antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxic activity against cultured tumor cells. Biodistribution studies with 99m Tc-labeled chHA58 in nude mice bearing human gastric carcinoma JRST cells, demonstrated that the tumor-blood ratio was 1.55 at 18 h after injection, when the tumors were clearly visible in gamma scintigraphy. These data suggest that chHA58 may be of practical use for radioimmunoimaging of a wide variety of tumors. (author)

  9. 99mTc-Labeling of Monoclonal Antibody to Carcinoembryonic Antigen and Biodistribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Dae Hyuk; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myu ng Chul; Koh, Chang Soon; Chung, Hong Keun; Park, Jae Gahb

    1992-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate a direct method of 99m Tc labeling using β-mercaptoethanol as a reducing agent, and to investigate whether 99m Tc labeled specific monoclonal antibody against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA-92) can be used for the scintigraphic localization of human colon cancer xenograft. Purified CEA-92 IgG was fragmented into F(ab') 2 and then labeled with 99m Tc by transchelation method using glucarate as a chelator. Labeling efficiency, immunological reactivity and in vitro stability of 99m Tc CEA-92 F(ab') 2 were measured and then injected intravenously into nude mice bearing human colon cancer (SNU-C4). Scintigrams were obtained at 24 hour after injection. Then nude mice were sacrificed and the radioactivity was measured. Labeling efficiency of injected 99m Tc CEA-92 F(ab') 2 , immunoreactive fraction and in vitro stability at 24 hour of injected 99m Tc CEA-92 F(ab') 2 was 45.2%, 32.8% and 57.4%, respectively. At 24 hour after injection, %ID/g in kidney (46.77) showed high uptake, but %ID/g in tumor (1.65) was significantly higher than spleen (0.69), muscle (0.16), intestine (0.45), stomach (0.75), heart (0.48) and blood(0.45). There was no significant difference between tumor and liver (1.81). Tumor contrast as quantitated by tumor to blood ratio of 99m Tc CEA-92 F(ab') 2 was increased significantly (p 131 I-CEA-92 F(ab') 2 . The scintigram demonstrated localization of radioactivity over transplanted tumor, but significant background radioactivity was also noted over kidney and abdomen. It is concluded that CEA-92 F(ab') 2 can be labeled with 99m Tc by a direct transchelation method using β-mercaptoethanol as a reducing agent and 99m Tc labeled CEA-92 F(ab') 2 can be used for the scintigraphic localization of human colon cancer xenograft in nude mice model.

  10. Involvement of lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) in HIV infection: inhibition by monoclonal antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Mathiesen, Lars Reinhardt

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the alpha- and beta-chain of lymphocyte-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) were examined for inhibition of HIV-1 infection in vitro. Infection of the T cell line MT4 and the monocytic cell line U937 by isolates HTLVIIIB and SSI-002, respectively was inhibited...... in a concentration dependent manner by MAb against the beta-chain but not against the alpha-chain. No cross-reactivity was found between MAb against LFA-1 and against the CD4 receptor (MAb Leu3a). MAbs against the beta-chain and the CD4 receptor were found to act synergistically in inhibiting HIV infection...

  11. Verification of the Cross Immunoreactivity of A60, a Mouse Monoclonal Antibody against Neuronal Nuclear Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Shanping; Xiong, Guoxiang; Zhang, Lei; Dong, Huimin; Liu, Baohui; Cohen, Noam A; Cohen, Akiva S

    2016-01-01

    A60, the mouse monoclonal antibody against the neuronal nuclear protein (NeuN), is the most widely used neuronal marker in neuroscience research and neuropathological assays. Previous studies identified fragments of A60-immunoprecipitated protein as Synapsin I (Syn I), suggesting the antibody will demonstrate cross immunoreactivity. However, the likelihood of cross reactivity has never been verified by immunohistochemical techniques. Using our established tissue processing and immunofluorescent staining protocols, we found that A60 consistently labeled mossy fiber terminals in hippocampal area CA3. These A60-positive mossy fiber terminals could also be labeled by Syn I antibody. After treating brain slices with saponin in order to better preserve various membrane and/or vesicular proteins for immunostaining, we observed that A60 could also label additional synapses in various brain areas. Therefore, we used A60 together with a rabbit monoclonal NeuN antibody to confirm the existence of this cross reactivity. We showed that the putative band positive for A60 and Syn I could not be detected by the rabbit anti-NeuN in Western blotting. As efficient as Millipore A60 to recognize neuronal nuclei, the rabbit NeuN antibody demonstrated no labeling of synaptic structures in immunofluorescent staining. The present study successfully verified the cross reactivity present in immunohistochemistry, cautioning that A60 may not be the ideal biomarker to verify neuronal identity due to its cross immunoreactivity. In contrast, the rabbit monoclonal NeuN antibody used in this study may be a better candidate to substitute for A60.

  12. Development and characterization of a TAPIR-like mouse monoclonal antibody to amyloid-beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Hara, Hideo; Makifuchi, Takao; Tabira, Takeshi

    2008-06-01

    Tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody was better related to the effect of immunotherapy in Alzheimer's disease (AD) than ELISA antibody. Here we used a hybridoma technique to develop a TAPIR-like anti-human amyloid-beta (Abeta) mouse monoclonal antibody. The obtained monoclonal antibody, 3.4A10, was an IgG2b isotype and recognized N-terminal portion of Abeta1-42 without binding denatured or native amyloid-beta protein precursor. It had higher affinity to Abeta1-42 than to Abeta1-40 by Biacore affinity analysis and stained preferably the peripheral part of senile plaques and recognized the plaque core less than 4G8. It inhibited the Abeta1-42 fibril formation as well as degraded pre-aggregated Abeta1-42 peptide in a thioflavin T fluorescence spectrophotometry assay. The in vivo studies showed that 3.4A10 treatment decreased amyloid burden compared to the control group and significantly reduced Abeta42 levels rather than Abeta40 levels in brain lysates as well as the Abeta*56 oligomer (12mer) in TBS fraction of the brain lysates. 3.4A10 entered brain and decorated some plaques, which is surrounded by more Iba1-positive microglia. 3.4A10 therapy did not induce lymphocytic infiltration and obvious increase in microhemorrhage. We conclude that 3.4A10 is a TAPIR-like anti-human amyloid monoclonal antibody, and has a potential of therapeutic application for AD.

  13. Mouse monoclonal antibodies against human c-Mpl and characterization for flow cytometry applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Christina; Huang, Guo; Ellison, Aaron R; Chen, Ching; Arora, Taruna; Szilvassy, Stephen J; Wei, Ping

    2010-04-01

    Mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against human c-Mpl, the cognate receptor for thrombopoietin (TPO), were generated using hybridoma technology and characterized by various assays to demonstrate their specificity and affinity. Two such MAbs, 1.6 and 1.75, were determined to be superior for flow cytometry studies and exhibited double-digit picomolar (pM) affinities to soluble human c-Mpl protein. Both MAbs specifically bound to cells engineered to overexpress human c-Mpl protein, immortalized human hematopoietic cell lines that express endogenous c-Mpl, primary human bone marrow and peripheral blood-derived CD34(+) cells, and purified human platelets. No binding was detected on cell lines that did not express c-Mpl. Receptor competition and siRNA knock-down studies further confirmed the specificity of antibodies 1.6 and 1.75 for human c-Mpl. In contrast to these newly generated MAbs, none of eight commercially available anti-c-Mpl antibodies tested were found to bind specifically to human c-Mpl and were thus shown to be unsuitable for flow cytometry studies. Monoclonal antibodies 1.6 and 1.75 will therefore be useful flow cytometry reagents to detect cell surface c-Mpl expression.

  14. Clinical usefulness of human-mouse chimeric Fab monoclonal antibody A7 for radioimmunoguided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhito

    1999-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the clinical usefulness of radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS) using the human-mouse chimeric Fab monoclonal antibody A7 (chA7Fab) for colorectal cancer patients. Whole murine monoclonal antibody A7 (whole A7) and chA7Fab were labelled with 125 I and 131 I, and their biodistributions were investigated experimentally and clinically. Radioactivities of the antibodies in the tissues were measured by a portable gamma detecting probe (GDP) purchased from Neoprobe Corp.. Of the four labelled antibodies used in a mouse model, 125 I-chA7Fab revealed the highest tumor/surrounding tissue ratio and all values were greater than 2.0. All tumor/surrounding tissue ratios of 131 I-chA7Fab were greater than 1.5, but the values were lower than those of 125 I-chA7Fab. Due to the limited clinical use of 125 I in Japan, 131 I was used as a radio-tracer for chA7Fab in the clinical trial. RIGS using 131 I-chA7Fab was performed on ten colorectal cancer patients. Tumor localization was intraoperatively determined in four of ten patients using the GDP. Liver metastasis and lymph node metastasis were identified in two patients and one patient, respectively. The GDP revealed tumor/surrounding tissue ratios of 1.5 or greater in eight of the ten resected tumors. Although radioimmunoguided surgery using chA7Fab is a promising tool to intraoperatively determine the tumor localization of colorectal cancer, 125 I and not 131 I should be used as a tracer for radioimmunoguided surgery to increase the accuracy of chA7Fab. (author)

  15. TSOL18 Vaccine Antigen of Taenia solium: Development of Monoclonal Antibodies and Field Testing of the Vaccine in Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assana, E.

    2010-01-01

    necropsy at the end of the trial (110 vaccinated; 102 controls. Viable T. solium cysticerci were identified in 20 control pigs (prevalence 19.6%, including 14 animals that had estimated total body burdens of > 1000 cysticerci. No cysticerci were found in any of the vaccinated animals indicating that the vaccine provided a very high level of protection (P< 0.0001 against naturally acquired infection with T. solium in pigs. Combined application of TSOL18 vaccination and a single oxfendazole treatment in pigs is a simple and relatively sustainable procedure that has the potential to control T. solium transmission in endemic areas and, indirectly, reduce the number of new cases of neurocysticercosis in humans. In chapter 6, the similarity of the antibody responses of pigs and mice to TSOL18 antigen is highlighted. Four IgG1 monoclonal antibodies (MoAb were produced against the conformational epitopes of TSOL18. It was shown that pig antisera inhibit the binding of these MoAbs in a competition ELISA, indicating that pig and mouse antibodies against TSOL18 vaccine react with the same conformational epitopes. For this reason, monoclonal antibodies raised in mice immunized with TSOL18 could be a valuable source of antibodies for further characterisation of the host-protective epitopes of the vaccine. A monoclonal antibody-based inhibitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (mi-ELISA was developed. Serum samples of TSOL18-vaccinated and non-vaccinated pigs were used. In all the vaccinated and protected pigs screened at necropsy, anti-TSOL18 antibodies inhibited the binding of a monoclonal antibody (Mab25D12C1 specific to the conformational epitopes of TSOL18 antigen, suggesting an immune response that correlates with protection. This result was in agreement with the results obtained in an indirect ELISA, which showed that all the vaccinated and protected pigs had developed antibodies to the TSOL18 vaccine. In chapter 7 the efficacy of the TSOL18 vaccine is compared with that of

  16. [Monoclonal antibodies ICO-02 to blast cell antigens in patients with chronic myeloleukemia in blast crisis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryshnikov, A Iu

    1984-01-01

    Mice were immunized with blood cells of a patient with chronic granulocytic leukemia, and their cells were subsequently used for the preparation of hybridoma ICO-02. This hybridoma is continuously producing monoclonal antibodies which reacted with cells in 4 out of 13 patients with blastic crisis of chronic granulocytic leukemia and in 6 out of 38 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Antibodies reacted with blast cells in 2 out of 3 patients with undifferentiated blastic crisis of chronic myelocytic leukemia and in 2 out of 5 patients with lymphoid variant of blastic crisis of chronic granulocytic leukemia. Cells of 6 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia which reacted with the monoclonal antibodies had immunological markers of T lymphocytes bone-marrow precursors. Monoclonal antibodies did not react with cells of blood and bone marrow from healthy people and from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloblastic leukemia, acute myelomonocytic leukemia, acute monoblastic leukemia and lymphosarcoma.

  17. The chicken erythrocyte-specific MHC antigen. Characterization and purification of the B-G antigen by monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, J; Skjødt, K; Crone, M

    1987-01-01

    and affinity-purified once more. Finally, reverse-phase chromatography resulted in a pure product. The B-G antigen was identified in the various fractions by rocket immunoelectrophoresis. The final product was more than 99% pure, as estimated by SDS-PAGE analysis followed by silver stain of proteins. The yield...

  18. Anti-Taenia solium monoclonal antibodies for the detection of parasite antigens in body fluids from patients with neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Adriana; Sáenz, Patricia; Marzal, Miguel W; Orrego, Miguel A; Castillo, Yesenia; Rivera, Andrea; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Guerra-Giraldez, Cristina; García, Hector H; Nash, Theodore E

    2016-07-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC), an infection of the brain by Taenia solium (Ts) cysts, is the most common cause of adult-onset epilepsy in developing countries. Serological testing consists primarily of varying methods to detect antibodies in body fluids and more recently antigen (Ag) detection assays to identify individuals or animals with viable parasites. Antigen assays currently in use employ monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised against T. saginata, which have known cross reactivity to animal cestodes but are highly specific in human samples. We produced, characterized and tested 21 mAbs raised against T. solium whole cyst antigens, vesicular fluid or excretory secretory products. Reactivity of the TsmAbs against specific cyst structures was determined using immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry on histological sections of Ts muscle cysts. Four TsmAbs reacted to vesicular space alone, 9 to the neck and cyst wall, one to the neck and vesicular space and 7 to the neck, cyst wall and vesicular space. An in-house ELISA assay to detect circulating Ts antigen, using the TsmAbs as capture antibodies and a rabbit polyclonal anti-Ts whole cyst antibody as a detector antibody demonstrated that eight of the 21 TsmAbs detected antigens in known NCC-positive human sera and three of these also in urine samples. Reactivity was expressed as normalized ratios of optical densities (OD positive control/OD negative control). Three TsmAbs had ratios >10 and five between 2 and 10. The TsmAbs have potential utility for the diagnosis and post-treatment monitoring of patients with viable NCC infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Epitope mapping of the carcinoembryonic antigen by monoclonal antibodies and establishment of a new improved radioimmunoassay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroki, Masahide; Arakawa, Fumiko; Matsunaga, Akira; Okamoto, Naomi; Takakura, Kyoko; Matsuoka, Yuji; Higuchi, Hiroshi.

    1987-01-01

    A comprehensive mapping of epitopes on the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) molecule has been achieved by analyses of the specificities of 146 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) from more than 300 hybridomas established recently. The reactivities of MAbs were analyzed by radio-immunoassays (RIA) with highly purified preparations of CEA and related antigens including normal fecal antigen-1 (NFA-1), NFA-2 in normal adult feces, nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA) in lung and NCA-2 in meconium. The MAbs could be divided into five groups: group I, 23 clones directed to the NCA-common part of the CEA molecule; group II, 31 clones directed to the normal fecal cross-reacting antigen (NFCA)-common part; group III, 46 clones directed to the NFA-1-common part; group IV, 33 clones reactive with the heterogeneous carbohydrate part; and group V, 13 clones directed to the CEA-distinctive part which seemed to be highly specific for CEA. Mutual inhibitions of CEA binding between MAbs of the individual groups revealed that at least 25 different subgroups can be defined i.e., 4, 7, 8, 4, and 2 subgroups in groups I to V, respectively. The epitopes recognized by the group IV MAbs were found to be sensitive to oxidation with periodate, while the epitopes defined by MAbs of the other groups were resistant to this treatment. A solid-phase sandwich-type RIA system for CEA was established by using 2 MAbs from groups II and III as the CEA catcher and an MAb of group V as the tracer. This assay was shown to exhibit improved cancer-specificity and accuracy in the estimation of serum CEA levels. (author)

  20. Light-chain residue 95 is critical for antigen binding and multispecificity of monoclonal antibody G2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Daiki; Inaba, Satomi; Kamatari, Yuji O; Ishiguro, Naotaka; Oda, Masayuki

    2017-09-02

    The monoclonal antibody, G2, specifically binds to the immunogen peptide derived from the chicken prion protein, Pep18mer, and two chicken proteins derived peptides, Pep8 and Pep395; G2 binds with equal affinity to Pep18mer. The amino acid sequences of the three peptides are completely different, and so the recognition mechanism of G2 is unique and interesting. We generated a single-chain Fv (scFv) antibody of G2, and demonstrated its correct folding with an antigen binding function similar to intact G2 antibody. We also generated a Pro containing mutant of G2 scFv at residue 95 of the light chain, and analyzed its antigen binding using a surface plasmon biosensor. The mutant lost its binding ability to Pep18mer, but remained those to Pep8 and Pep395. The results clearly indicate residue 95 as being critical for multispecific antigen binding of G2 at the site generated from the junctional diversity introduced at the joints between the V and J gene segments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies Against the Protective Antigen Component of Bacillus anthracis Toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-21

    concentration. Radial immmurnodiffusion plates were prepared with rabbit anti-mouse IgG ( Miles Scientific, Naperville, I) or rabbit anti-mouse IgM (Kirkegaard...6. Ezzell , J. W., B. E. Ivins, and S. H. Leppla. 1964. Immunoelectrophoretic analysis, toxicity, and kinetics o4 in 16 vitro production of the

  2. An ELISA-inhibition test using monoclonal antibody for the serology of leprosy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klatser, P. R.; de Wit, M. Y.; Kolk, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    In this study a mouse monoclonal antibody (47-9) is described, which recognized an epitope on the 36 kD protein antigen of M. leprae. The monoclonal antibody showed specificity for M. leprae. An ELISA-inhibition test based on the competitive inhibition by antibodies from human test sera of the

  3. Relative Efficacy of Uptake and Presentation of Mycobacterium bovis BCG Antigens by Type I Mouse Lung Epithelial Cells and Peritoneal Macrophages ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Mandavi; Saxena, Rajiv K.

    2011-01-01

    Flow cytometric studies indicated that both peritoneal macrophages (PMs) and primary lung epithelial (PLE) cells isolated from mouse lungs could take up fluorescence-tagged Mycobacterium bovis BCG. BCG uptake in both cases was significantly inhibited by cytochalasin D, indicating active internalization of BCG by these cells. Confocal microscopy data further confirmed that BCG was internalized by PLE cells. BCG sonicate antigen (sBCG) had marked toxicity toward PMs but was relatively nontoxic to PLE cells. Accordingly, BCG sonicate antigen induced a significantly higher apoptotic and necrotic response in PMs compared to that in PLE cells. Both PMs and PLE cells exposed to BCG antigens and fixed thereafter could efficiently present antigens to purified BCG-sensitized T helper cells, as assessed by the release of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ). If, however, PLE cells were fixed before exposure to BCG, antigen presentation was abrogated, indicating that the PLE cells may in some way process the BCG antigen. A comparison of efficacies of BCG-pulsed PLE cells and PMs to present antigen at various antigen-presenting cell (APC)/T cell ratios indicated that PMs had only marginally greater APC function than that of PLE cells. Staining with specific monoclonal antibodies indicated that the cultured PLE cells used for antigen presentation essentially comprised type I epithelial cells. Our results suggest that type I lung epithelial cells may present BCG antigens to sensitized T helper cells and that their performance as APCs is comparable with that of PMs. PMID:21646448

  4. Target antigens for Hs-14 monoclonal antibody and their various expression in normozoospermic and asthenozoospermic men

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čapková, Jana; Margaryan, Hasmik; Kubátová, Alena; Novák, Petr; Pěknicová, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 11 (2015) ISSN 2051-4190 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/12/1834; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : acrosome * human spermatozoa * monoclonal antibody * asthenozoospermia * transitional endoplasmic reticulum ATPase Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry http://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s12610-015-0025-0

  5. Novel Monoclonal Antibodies Recognizing Human Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) as Research and Theranostic Tools

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, Zora; Foss, C. A.; Copeland, B. T.; Morath, V.; Baranová, Petra; Havlínová, Barbora; Skerra, A.; Pomper, M.G.; Bařinka, Cyril

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 7 (2017), s. 749-764 ISSN 0270-4137 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP301/12/1513; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : monoclonal antibody * glutamate carboxypeptidase II * NAALADase Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition OBOR OECD: Endocrinology and metabolism (including diabetes, hormones) Impact factor: 3.820, year: 2016

  6. Arthrogenicity of type II collagen monoclonal antibodies associated with complement activation and antigen affinity

    OpenAIRE

    Koobkokkruad, Thongchai; Kadotani, Tatsuya; Hutamekalin, Pilaiwanwadee; Mizutani, Nobuaki; Yoshino, Shin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) model, which employs a cocktail of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to type II collagen (CII), has been widely used for studying the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis. In this model, not all mAbs to CII are capable of inducing arthritis because one of the initial events is the formation of collagen-antibody immune complexes on the cartilage surface or in the synovium, and subsequent activation of the complement by the complexes...

  7. Epitope mapping of functional domains of human factor V with human and mouse monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annamalai, A.E.; Rao, A.K.; Chiu, H.C.; Wang, D.; Dutta-Roy, A.K.; Colman, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    The authors previously described two human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) which inactivated factor V. The authors have now purified the predominant antibody (H2) on protein A Sepharose using a pH gradient and typed it as IgG 1 ,. Immunoprecipitation of 125 I-human factor Va with H2 demonstrated specificity for the heavy chain (D), Mr = 105,000. The authors compared using ELISA the competitive binding to factor Va, of H2, H1 and two mouse MAbs, B38 (directed to E) and B10 (to activation peptide, Cl). All four antibodies recognized distinct epitopes in factor V with steric overlap in some cases. Factor Xa showed a concentration dependent competition for binding of H1, H2 and B38 but not B10 to factor V/Va in ELISA. All MAbs bound to factor V/Va in the absence of Ca ++ . However, Ca ++ at 8 mM increased the binding of H1 and H2 to 165% and 360% and did not have any effect on the binding of either mouse MAbs. Prothrombin at a concentration of up to 400 μg/ml did not inhibit binding of any of these antibodies. Thus, both the light (E) and heavy (D) chains of factor Va but not the activation peptide (Cl) interact with factor Xa as defined by the MAbs. In addition, sites on both chains for Ca ++ are recognized by particular MAbs (H1 and H2). These studies increase their knowledge of the interactions of factor V domains in the formation of prothrombinase complex

  8. Generation of monoclonal antibodies against prostate specific antigen (PSA) for the detection of PSA and its purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acevedo Castro, Boris Ernesto

    2012-01-01

    The prostate cancer in Cuba is a problem of health (2672 diagnosed cases and 2769 deaths in 2007). Various diagnostic methods have been implemented for the detection and management of this disease, emphasizing among them (PSA) prostate-specific antigen serological determination. At this work was generated and characterized a panel of 11 antibodies (AcMs) monoclonal IgG1 detected with high affinity described major epitopes of the PSA, both in solution and attached to the test plate. From the panel obtained AcMs was the standardization of an essay type ELISA for the detection of serum total PSA (associated and free) equimolar, based on antibody monoclonal CB-PSA.4 in the coating and the CB-PSA.9 coupled with biotin as liner, with a detection limit of 0.15 ng/mL. Similarly, standardized system for detection in serum free PSA, based on the AcMs CB-PSA.4 (coating) and CB-PSA.2 coupled with biotin (liner), with a detection limit of 0.5 ng/mL. Finally, with the purpose of using PSA as standard in trials type ELISA, developed a simple method of inmunopurificación based on the AcM, CB-PSA.2, which was obtained the PSA with a purity exceeding 90%. Immunoassay Centre on the basis of the AcMs panel and the results of this study, developed and recorded two diagnostic systems for the detection of PSA in human serum. (author)

  9. Mouse in Vivo Neutralization of Escherichia coli Shiga Toxin 2 with Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry H. Stanker

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC food contaminations pose serious health concerns, and have been the subject of massive food recalls. STEC has been identified as the major cause of the life-threatening complication of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. Besides supportive care, there currently are no therapeutics available. The use of antibiotics for combating pathogenic E. coli is not recommended because they have been shown to stimulate toxin production. Clearing Stx2 from the circulation could potentially lessen disease severity. In this study, we tested the in vivo neutralization of Stx2 in mice using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. We measured the biologic half-life of Stx2 in mice and determined the distribution phase or t1/2 α to be 3 min and the clearance phase or t1/2 β to be 40 min. Neutralizing mAbs were capable of clearing Stx2 completely from intoxicated mouse blood within minutes. We also examined the persistence of these mAbs over time and showed that complete protection could be passively conferred to mice 4 weeks before exposure to Stx2. The advent of better diagnositic methods and the availability of a greater arsenal of therapeutic mAbs against Stx2 would greatly enhance treatment outcomes of life threatening E. coli infections.

  10. Intraperitoneal delivery of monoclonal antibodies: enhanced regional delivery advantage using intravenous unlabeled anti-mouse antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, R.L.; Fisher, S.

    1987-01-01

    Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAb) delivered intraperitoneally expose cells in contact with peritoneal fluid to considerably higher levels of MAb than if the MAb dose were given intravenously. This regional delivery advantage for intact MAb is present mainly due to the relatively slow exit of MAb from the peritoneal fluid to the blood. Eventually, following i.p. injection, blood levels of MAb rise resulting in exposure of the animal to high systemic MAb levels and potential toxicity. In this series of experiments, systemic exposure was minimized by the administration of unlabeled goat polyclonal anti-mouse antibody intravenously from 1 1/2 to 6 h following i.p. MAb injection. This maneuver results in the formation of immune complexes with their subsequent clearance and dehalogenation by the reticuloendothelial system, thus minimizing systemic MAb exposure. This approach, of increasing systemic clearance of MAb, did not alter intraperitoneal MAb levels and thus significantly increased the regional delivery advantage to the peritoneal cavity by 70-100%. This approach provides an immunologic rationale for the further enhancement of MAb delivery to i.p. foci of malignant disease and may have diagnostic and therapeutic utility. (author)

  11. Environmental quantification of Pasteuria penetrans endospores using in situ antigen extraction and immunodetection with a monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, L M; Preston, J F; Dickson, D W; Rice, J D; Hewlett, T E

    2003-05-01

    Abstract Pasteuria penetrans is an obligate parasite of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) that has attracted significant attention as a promising biocontrol agent. The inability to culture P. penetrans has invoked the need for a quantitative detection capability to facilitate biocontrol studies. A chemical extraction method using urea, dithiothreitol and CHES buffer (UDC) is shown to release soluble endospore envelope antigen from endospores present in complex matrices, generating an extract that can be used to determine the levels of spores when compared to a standard in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a specific monoclonal antibody, MAb 2A41D10. Extractions can be performed in less than 1 h. Linear regression analysis routinely produced line fits with r(2)>0.90. Antigen extraction efficiency was not influenced by soil type. Three ELISA formats were analyzed for quantitative detection of P. penetrans endospores. A tertiary ELISA immunodetection system provided the lowest level of detection at approximately 300 spores per gram of soil. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis Western blots of soil extracts containing P. penetrans endospore antigen produced signature peptides bearing a common epitope characteristic of endospores of Pasteuria spp. MAb 2A41D10 was specific for Pasteuria spp. and did not react with extracts of Pasteuria-free soil or with spore extracts of native Gram-positive endospore-forming bacteria. Immunofluorescent microscopy revealed that MAb 2A41D10 recognizes an epitope uniformly distributed on the endospore surface. The development of a rapid extraction method and analysis of solubilized antigen by immunodetection has the potential for broad application in food and environmental microbiology.

  12. Use of commercially available rabbit monoclonal antibodies for immunofluorescence double staining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bzorek, M.; Stamp, I.M.; Frederiksen, L.

    2008-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry, that is, the use of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to detect cell and tissue antigens at a microscopical level is a powerful tool for both research and diagnostic purposes. Especially in the field of hematologic disease, there is often a need to detect several antigens...... synchronously, and we report here a fast and easy technique for demonstrating more than 1 antigen in 1 slide using immunofluorescence. We have used commercially available rabbit monoclonal antibodies (Cyclin D1, CD3, CD5, CD23, etc.) paired with mouse monoclonal antibodies (CD7, CD20, CD79a, Pax-5, etc.......) for double immunofluorescence labeling on paraffin-embedded tissue sections. Commercially available rabbit monoclonal antibodies in combination with mouse monoclonal antibodies proved useful in double immunofluorescence labeling on paraffin-embedded tissue, and all combinations used yielded excellent results...

  13. Rapid desensitization induces internalization of antigen-specific IgE on mouse mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Tatsuya; Rios, Eon J; Tsai, Mindy; Kalesnikoff, Janet; Galli, Stephen J

    2013-10-01

    Rapid desensitization transiently prevents severe allergic reactions, allowing administration of life-saving therapies in previously sensitized patients. However, the mechanisms underlying successful rapid desensitization are not fully understood. We sought to investigate whether the mast cell (MC) is an important target of rapid desensitization in mice sensitized to exhibit IgE-dependent passive systemic anaphylaxis in vivo and to investigate the antigen specificity and underlying mechanisms of rapid desensitization in our mouse model. C57BL/6 mice (in vivo) or primary isolated C57BL/6 mouse peritoneal mast cells (PMCs; in vitro) were passively sensitized with antigen-specific anti-2,4-dinitrophenyl IgE, anti-ovalbumin IgE, or both. MCs were exposed over a short period of time to increasing amounts of antigen (2,4-dinitrophenyl-human serum albumin or ovalbumin) in the presence of extracellular calcium in vitro or by means of intravenous administration to sensitized mice in vivo before challenging the mice with or exposing the PMCs to optimal amounts of specific or irrelevant antigen. Rapidly exposing mice or PMCs to progressively increasing amounts of specific antigen inhibited the development of antigen-induced hypothermia in sensitized mice in vivo and inhibited antigen-induced PMC degranulation and prostaglandin D2 synthesis in vitro. Such MC hyporesponsiveness was induced antigen-specifically and was associated with a significant reduction in antigen-specific IgE levels on MC surfaces. Rapidly exposing MCs to progressively increasing amounts of antigen can both enhance the internalization of antigen-specific IgE on the MC surface and also desensitize these cells in an antigen-specific manner in vivo and in vitro. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of sporozoite surface antigens of Plasmodium falciparum, using monoclonal antibodies. Part of a coordinated programme on the preparation of irradiated vaccines against some human diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groot, M.

    1982-10-01

    Sporozoites are considered as a source of potential vaccine. Characterization of their antigens is therefore important and can be achieved by monoclonal antibodies. The purpose of this project is to study the production of monoclonal antibodies against sporozoites of P. falciparum. Various infections of mosquitoes were carried out during the period 1981-1982 to obtain antigens for the production of hybridomas. Hybridomas were produced from mice immunized through the bites of infected mosquitoes and by intravenous inoculation. The anti-sporozoite activity of the hybridomas was tested by an immunofluorescent antibody test using P. falciparum sporozoites as antigens. Positive immunofluorescence was seen in hybridoma cell lines tested with P. falciparum, whereas negative results were obtained when the cell lines were cross-reacted with other human species (P. vivax) and with a rodent malaria parasite (P. berghei)

  15. The perivascular phagocyte of the mouse pineal gland: An antigen-presenting cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten; Rath, Martin F; Klein, David C

    2006-01-01

    The perivascular space of the rat pineal gland is known to contain phagocytic cells that are immunoreactive for leukocyte antigens, and thus they appear to belong to the macrophage/microglial cell line. These cells also contain MHC class II proteins. We investigated this cell type in the pineal g...... for MHC class II protein and for CD68, a marker of monocytes/phagocytes. This study verifies that perivascular phagocytes with antigen-presenting properties are present in the mouse pineal gland....

  16. Novel flow cytometric analysis of the progress and route of internalization of a monoclonal anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, C H; Tsaltas, G C; Osborne, P A; Addetia, K

    1996-03-01

    A flow cytometric method of studying the internalization of a monoclonal antibody (Mab) directed against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) has been compared with Western blotting, using three human colonic cancer cell lines which express varying amounts of the target antigen. Cell samples incubated for increasing time intervals with fluoresceinated or unlabelled Mab were analyzed using flow cytometry or polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting. SDS/PAGE analysis of cytosolic and membrane components of solubilized cells from the cell lines provided evidence of non-degraded internalized anti-CEA Mab throughout seven half hour intervals, starting at 5 min. Internalized anti-CEA was detected in the case of high CEA expressing cell lines (LS174T, SKCO1). Very similar results were obtained with an anti-fluorescein flow cytometric assay. Given that these two methods consistently provided comparable results, use of flow cytometry for the detection of internalized antibody is suggested as a rapid alternative to most currently used methods for assessing antibody internalization. The question of the endocytic route followed by CEA-anti-CEA complexes was addressed by using hypertonic medium to block clathrin mediated endocytosis.

  17. Production of Monoclonal Antibody Against Excretory-Secretory Antigen of Fasciola hepatica and Evaluation of Its Efficacy in the Diagnosis of Fascioliasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolahi Khabisi, Samaneh; Sarkari, Bahador; Moshfe, Abdolali; Jalali, Sedigheh

    2017-02-01

    Parasitological methods are not helpful for the diagnosis of fascioliasis in acute and invasive periods of the disease. Detection of coproantigens seems to be a suitable alternative approach in the diagnosis of fascioliasis. The present study aimed to develop a reliable antigen detection system, using monoclonal antibodies raised against excretory-secretory (ES) antigen of Fasciola hepatica, for the diagnosis of fascioliasis. Fasciola adult worms were collected from the bile ducts of infected animals. Species of the fluke was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP-PCR). ES antigen of F. hepatica was prepared. For production of monoclonal antibodies, mice were immunized with ES antigens of F. hepatica. Spleen cells from the immunized mice were fused with NS-1 myeloma cells, using polyethylene glycol. Hybridoma cells secreting specific antibody were expanded and cloned by limiting dilution. Moreover, polyclonal antibody was produced against F. hepatica ES antigen in rabbits. A capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system, using produced monoclonal antibody, was designed and stool samples of infected animals along with control samples were tested by the system. The capture ELISA detected the coproantigen in 27 of 30 (90%) parasitologically confirmed fascioliasis cases, while 4 of 39 (10.25%) samples infected with other parasitic infections showed a positive reaction in this system. No positive reactivity was found with healthy control samples. Accordingly, sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 94.2% were obtained for the capture ELISA system. The results were compared with those obtained with commercial BIO-X ELISA, and a very good (kappa = 0.9) agreement was found between the commercial kit and the developed capture ELISA. Findings of this study showed that the produced monoclonal antibody has appropriate performance for the detection of Fasciola coproantigen in stool samples and can be appropriately

  18. Comparative analysis of monoclonal antibodies against prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tykvart, Jan; Navrátil, Václav; Sedlák, František; Corey, E.; Colombatti, M.; Fracasso, G.; Koukolík, F.; Bařinka, Cyril; Šácha, Pavel; Konvalinka, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 16 (2014), s. 1674-1690 ISSN 0270-4137 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/12/0847; GA MŠk LO1302; GA ČR GAP301/12/1513; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:86652036 Keywords : glutamate carboxypeptidase II * prostate -specific membrane antigen * folate hydrolase * NAALADase * Western blot * immunohistochemistry * ELISA * flow cytometry * surface plasmon resonance Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.565, year: 2014

  19. Human breast tumor imaging using 111In labeled monoclonal antibody: Anthymic mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban An Khaw; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston; Bailes, J.S.; Schneider, S.L.; Lancaster, J.; Lasher, J.C.; McGuire, W.L.; Powers, J.; Strauss, H.W.

    1988-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody (MoAb) 323/A3, an IgG1, was raised against the human breast tumor cell line MCF-7 and recognized a 43 Kd membrane associated glycoprotein. Histochemical studies with the antibody detected 75% of metastatic lymph nodes, 59% of primary breast tumors, and showed some staining in 20% of benign breast lesions. For radionuclide imaging, the MoAb 323/A3 was labeled with both 125 I and 111 In, via covalently coupled diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) by the mixed anhydride method. The antibody activity of the DTPA modified 323/A3 was assessed by an immunoassay using viable and fixed MCF-7 target cells. Male athymic nude mice bearing BT-20 human mammary tumors were injected with dual 125 I/ 111 In labeled DTPA 323/A3 via the tail veins. The animals were imaged with a gamma camera equipped with a pinhole collimator at 1-3 h, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 days after the tracer administration. On day 5 or 6, the animals were killed, and the biodistribution of the radiotracers was determined for the blood, thyroid, heart, lungs, liver, spleen, kidneys, gastro-intestinal tract and tumor. Target to blood ratio at 6 days for the 111 In tracer was 24:1 in the group with a mean tumor weight of 0.492 g, and 13:1 in another group with a mean tumor weight of 0.1906 g (day 5). However, the 125 I activity showed only 3.6:1 and 5.4:1 target to blood ratios in the corresponding groups. The larger tumors localized less 111 I tracer (27.13%±7.57% injected dose/g, Mean±SD) than the smaller tumors (52.75%±22.25% ID/g). Analysis of the gamma images showed that the maximum tracer concentration occurred in the tumors at about 2 to 3 days after intravenous tracer administration. The excellent tumor resolution observed with BT-20 tumors may be due to increased 43 Kd glycoprotein antigen density in this tumor cell line. (orig.)

  20. Anti-Mycobacterium leprae monoclonal antibodies cross-react with human skin: an alternative explanation for the immune responses in leprosy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naafs, B.; Kolk, A. H.; Chin A Lien, R. A.; Faber, W. R.; van Dijk, G.; Kuijper, S.; Stolz, E.; van Joost, T.

    1990-01-01

    A panel of 17 mouse monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) raised against Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae) antigens was used to detect antigenic determinants in normal human skin. An indirect immunoperoxidase technique was used. Eight of the MoAb detected epidermal antigens similar to patterns well known for

  1. Detection of H5 Avian Influenza Viruses by Antigen-Capture Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Using H5-Specific Monoclonal Antibody▿

    OpenAIRE

    He, Qigai; Velumani, Sumathy; Du, Qingyun; Lim, Chee Wee; Ng, Fook Kheong; Donis, Ruben; Kwang, Jimmy

    2007-01-01

    The unprecedented spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 in Asia and Europe is threatening animals and public health systems. Effective diagnosis and control management are needed to control the disease. To this end, we developed a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the H5N1 avian influenza virus (AIV) and implemented an antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (AC-ELISA) to detect the H5 viral antigen. Mice immunized with denatured hemagglutinin (H...

  2. Effect of polyethylene glycol conjugation on conformational and colloidal stability of a monoclonal antibody antigen-binding fragment (Fab').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, Cristopher; Sheung, Anthony; Rahman, Nausheen; Ausar, S Fernando

    2015-02-02

    We have investigated the effects of site specific "hinge" polyethylene glycol conjugation (PEGylation) on thermal, pH, and colloidal stability of a monoclonal antibody antigen-binding fragment (Fab') using a variety of biophysical techniques. The results obtained by circular dichroism (CD), ultraviolet (UV) absorbance, and fluorescence spectroscopy suggested that the physical stability of the Fab' is maximized at pH 6-7 with no apparent differences due to PEGylation. Temperature-induced aggregation experiments revealed that PEGylation was able to increase the transition temperature, as well as prevent the formation of visible and subvisible aggregates. Statistical comparison of the three-index empirical phase diagram (EPD) revealed significant differences in thermal and pH stability signatures between Fab' and PEG-Fab'. Upon mechanical stress, micro-flow imaging (MFI) and measurement of the optical density at 360 nm showed that the PEG-Fab' had significantly higher resistance to surface-induced aggregation compared to the Fab'. Analysis of the interaction parameter, kD, indicated repulsive intermolecular forces for PEG-Fab' and attractive forces for Fab'. In conclusion, PEGylation appears to protect Fab' against thermal and mechanical stress-induced aggregation, likely due to a steric hindrance mechanism.

  3. Demonstration of monoclonal anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibody internalization by electron microscopy, western blotting and radioimmunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaltas, G; Ford, C H; Gallant, M

    1992-01-01

    One of the important factors affecting the action of monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) or immunoconjugates on tumour sites depends on whether the Mab is internalized by the cancer cells in question. The underexplored subject of internalization is discussed in this paper, and a number of in vitro techniques for investigating internalization are evaluated, using a model which consists of a well characterized anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (anti-CEA) Mab and a number of CEA expressing human cancer cell lines. Employing two alternative radiolabeling assays, evidence for internalization of the anti-CEA Mab by a CEA-positive colorectal cancer cell line (LS174T) was obtained throughout the time intervals examined (5 min to 150 min). Electronmicroscopy employing horseradish-peroxidase labeled anti-CEA Mab and control antibody permitted direct visualization of anti-CEA Mab-related staining in intracellular compartments of a high CEA-expressor human colorectal cell line (SKCO1). Finally Western blots of samples derived from cytosolic and membrane components of solubilized cells from lung and colonic cancer cell lines provided evidence for internalized anti-CEA Mab throughout seven half hour intervals, starting at 5 minutes. Internalized anti-CEA was detected in all CEA expressing cell lines (LS174T, SKCO1, BENN) but not in the case of a very low CEA expressor line (COLO 320).

  4. Effect of operating conditions in production of diagnostic Salmonella Enteritidis O-antigen-specific monoclonal antibody in different bioreactor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyildiz-Tamis, Duygu; Nalbantsoy, Ayse; Elibol, Murat; Deliloglu-Gurhan, Saime Ismet

    2014-01-01

    In this study, different cultivation systems such as roller bottles (RB), 5-L stirred-tank bioreactor (STR), and disposable bioreactors were used to cultivate hybridoma for lab-scale production of Salmonella Enteritidis O-antigen-specific monoclonal antibody (MAb). Hybridoma cell line was cultivated in either serum-containing or serum-free medium (SFM) culture conditions. In STR, MAb production scaled up to 4 L, and production capabilities of the cells were also evaluated in different featured production systems. Moreover, the growth parameters of the cells in all production systems such as glucose consumption, lactate and ammonia production, and also MAb productivities were determined. Collected supernatants from the reactors were concentrated by a cross-flow filtration system. In conclusion, cells were not adapted to SFM in RB and STR. Therefore, less MAb titer in both STR and RB systems with SFM was observed compared to the cultures containing fetal bovine serum-supplemented medium. A higher MAb titer was gained in the membrane-aerated system compared to those in STR and RB. Although the highest MAb titer was obtained in the static membrane bioreactor system, the highest productivity was obtained in STR operated in semicontinuous mode with overlay aeration.

  5. Inhibition of Spontaneous Breast Cancer Metastasis by Anti—Thomsen-Friedenreich Antigen Monoclonal Antibody JAA-F11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Heimburg

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (TF-Ag is expressed in many carcinomas, including those of the breast, colon, bladder, prostate. TF-Ag is important in adhesion and metastasis and as a potential immunotherapy target. We hypothesized that passive transfer of JAAF11, an anti -TF-Ag monoclonal antibody, may create a survival advantage for patients with TIF-Ag -expressing tumors by cytotoxicity, blocking of tumor cell adhesion, inhibition of metastasis. This was tested using in vitro models of tumor cell growth; cytotoxicity assays; in vitro, ex vivo, in vivo models of cancer metastasis; and, finally, in vivo effects in mice with metastatic breast cancer. Unlike some anti-TF-Ag antibodies, JAA-F11 did not enhance breast carcinoma cell growth. JAA-F11 did not induce the killing of 4T1 tumor cells through complement-dependent cytotoxicity or apoptotic mechanisms. However, JAA-F11 blocked the stages of metastasis that involve the adhesion of human breast carcinoma cells to human endothelial cells (human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human bone marrow endothelial cells 60 in in vitro static adhesion models, in a perfused ex vivo model, in murine lung vasculature in an in vivo metastatic deposit formation assay. JAA-F11 significantly extended the median survival time of animals bearing metastatic 4T1 breast tumors and caused a > 50% inhibition of lung metastasis.

  6. Monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyamada, Hiyoshimaru

    1987-01-01

    Some aspects of monoclonal antibodies are described, centering on studies made by the author and those presented at the Second International Conference on Monoclonal Antibody Immunoconjugates for Cancer held in March this year (1987). The history of immuno-nuclear medicine and procedures for producing monoclonal antibodies are briefly outlined. Monoclonal antibodies are immunoglobulins. Here, the structure of IgG, which is used most frequently, is described. An IgG is composed of two antigen binding fragments (Fab) and one crystallizable fragment (Fc). The end portion of a Fab reacts with an antigen. One of the major applications of immuno-nuclear medicine is the diagnosis of cancer. As label nucleides, 131 I and 111 I were selected in most cases in the past while 123 I and 99m Tc are currently used more often. Advantages and disadvantages of this diagnosis method is discussed citing studies presented at the First (1986) and Second (1987) International Conference on Monoclonal Antibody Immunoconjugates for Cancer. The present status of the application of monoclonal antibodies to treatment of cancer is also described. (Nogami, K.)

  7. The biodistribution of mouse monoclonal antibody ONS-M21 and the application for imaging diagnosis with its humanized antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkawa, Motohisa

    1997-01-01

    The mouse monoclonal antibody ONS-M21 combines with medulloblastomas and several gliomas specifically. And also we had already produced it humanized antibody. This study investigated the in vivo biodistribution of ONS-M21 and the application for imaging diagnosis using its humanized antibody. The nude mice (BALB/c nu/nu) bearing human medulloblastoma ONS-76 cells subcutaneously were injected 125 I-labeled ONS-M21 antibody via their tail vein. The radioactivities of their normal organs and the s.c. tumor were counted with γ-counter. And their autoradiograph (ARG) 6 hours after this administration was compared with gadolinium enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance image (Gd-T1-MRI). The brain tumor models transplanted ONS-76 cells stereotaxically was made by the nude rats (F344/N Jcl-rnu). And compared with MRI and ARG after the administration of 125 I-labeled humanized antibody into these models. The ARG indicated the accumulation of 125I -labeled ONS-M21 in the tumors which was detected by Gd-T1-MRI study. In this study, 125 I-labeled ONS-M21 remained in the tumor longer than the other normal organs. The mouse monoclonal antibody ONS-M21 have specific affinity for ONS-76 tumor in vivo. Then this humanized antibody is considerable to apply the imaging diagnosis of the malignant brain tumors. (author)

  8. Vascular targeted therapy with anti-prostate-specific membrane antigen monoclonal antibody J591 in advanced solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milowsky, Matthew I; Nanus, David M; Kostakoglu, Lale; Sheehan, Christine E; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Goldsmith, Stanley J; Ross, Jeffrey S; Bander, Neil H

    2007-02-10

    Based on prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) expression on the vasculature of solid tumors, we performed a phase I trial of antibody J591, targeting the extracellular domain of PSMA, in patients with advanced solid tumor malignancies. This was a proof-of-principle evaluation of PSMA as a potential neovascular target. The primary end points were targeting,toxicity, maximum-tolerated dose, pharmacokinetics (PK), and human antihuman antibody (HAHA) response. Patients had advanced solid tumors previously shown to express PSMA on the neovasculature. They received 111Indium (111ln)-J591 for scintigraphy and PK, followed 2 weeks later by J591 with a reduced amount of 111In for additional PK measurements. J591 dose levels were 5, 10, 20, 40, and 80 mg. The protocol was amended for six weekly administrations of unchelated J591. Patients with a response or stable disease were eligible for re-treatment. Immunohistochemistry assessed PSMA expression in tumor tissues. Twenty-seven patients received monoclonal antibody (mAb) J591. Treatment was well tolerated. Twenty (74%) of 27 patients had at least one area of known metastatic disease targeted by 111In-J591, with positive imaging seen in patients with kidney, bladder, lung, breast, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers, and melanoma. Seven of 10 patient specimens available for immunohistochemical assessment of PSMA expression in tumor-associated vasculature demonstrated PSMA staining. No HAHA response was seen. Three patients of 27 with stable disease received re-treatment. Acceptable toxicity and excellent targeting of known sites of metastases were demonstrated in patients with multiple solid tumor types, highlighting a potential role for the anti-PSMA antibody J591 as a vascular-targeting agent.

  9. MINOR HUMAN-ANTIBODY RESPONSE TO A MOUSE AND CHIMERIC MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODY AFTER A SINGLE IV INFUSION IN OVARIAN-CARCINOMA PATIENTS - A COMPARISON OF 5 ASSAYS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BUIST, MR; KENEMANS, P; VANKAMP, GJ; Haisma, Hidde

    The human anti-(mouse Ig) antibody (HAMA) response was measured in serum of 52 patients suspected of having ovarian carcinoma who had received an i.v. injection of either the murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) OV-TL 3 F(ab')(2) (n = 28, 1 mg) or the chimeric mouse/human mAb MOv18 (cMOv18; n = 24, 3

  10. Minor human antibody response to a mouse and chimeric monoclonal antibody after a single i.v. infusion in ovarian carcinoma patients: a comparison of five assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, M. R.; Kenemans, P.; van Kamp, G. J.; Haisma, H. J.

    1995-01-01

    The human anti-(mouse Ig) antibody (HAMA) response was measured in serum of 52 patients suspected of having ovarian carcinoma who had received an i.v. injection of either the murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) OV-TL 3 F(ab')2 (n = 28, 1 mg) or the chimeric mouse/human mAb MOv18 (cMOv18; n = 24, 3 mg).

  11. Cross-reactivity among antigens of different air-borne fungi detected by ELISA using five monoclonal antibodies against Penicillium notatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, H D; Lin, W L; Chen, R J; Han, S H

    1990-10-01

    Cross-reactivity among antigens of 12 genera of air-borne fungi, 13 species of Penicillium, and 5 species of Aspergillus was studied by ELISA using five monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against Penicillium notatum. Epitopes recognized by all the five MoAbs were susceptible to treatment of mild periodate oxidation and may therefore be associated with carbohydrates. Furthermore, our results showed that there is cross-reactivity among antigens of Penicillium, Aspergillus, and Eurotium species. By using these MoAbs, cross reactivity was not detected between antigens of Penicillium notatum and antigens of Fusarium solani, Alternaria porri, Cladosporium cladosporoides, Curvularia species, Nigrospora species, Aureobasidium pullulans, Wallemia species, Rhizopus arrhizus, and Candida albicans. Cross-reactivity among antigens of 11 species of Penicillium and 5 species of Aspergillus could be detected by ELISA using one of the five MoAbs (MoAb P15). The fact that there may be cross-reactivity among antigens of closely related fungi species should be considered in the diagnosis and treatment of mold allergic diseases.

  12. Transient human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMA) interference in CA 125 measurements during monitoring of ovarian cancer patients treated with murine monoclonal antibody.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oei, A.L.M.; Sweep, F.C.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Olthaar, A.J.; Thomas, C.M.G.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMA) on serial CA 125 measurements in serum of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer following single intraperitoneal (IP) therapy with Yttrium-90-labeled human milk fat globule 1 murine monoclonal antibody ((90)Y-muHMFG1) as

  13. Antibody guided irradiation of brain glioma by arterial infusion of radioactive monoclonal antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor and blood group A antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epenetos, A.A.; Courtenay-Luck, N.; Pickering, D.; Hooker, G.; Lavender, J.P.; McKenzie, C.G. (Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK)); Durbin, H. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London (UK). Labs.)

    1985-05-18

    In a patient with recurrent grade IV glioma of the brain resistant to conventional treatment an antibody guided isotopic scan showed uptake by the tumour of a monoclonal antibody (9A) that was developed against epidermal growth factor receptor but cross reacted with blood group A antigen. As a therapeutic attempt antibody labelled with 1665 MBq (45.0 mCi) iodine-131 was delivered to the tumour area by infusion into the internal carotid artery. Computed tomography showed regression of the tumour after treatment, and an appreciable and sustained clinical improvement was noted without any toxicity. Delivery of irradiation guided by monoclonal antibody delivered by arterial infusion of the tumour area may be of clinical value in the treatment of brain gliomas resistant to conventional forms of treatment.

  14. A simple sandwich ELISA (WELYSSA) for the detection of lyssavirus nucleocapsid in rabies suspected specimens using mouse monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gelin; Weber, Patrick; Hu, Qiaoling; Xue, Honggang; Audry, Laurent; Li, Chengping; Wu, Jie; Bourhy, Herve

    2007-10-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb)-based capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were developed for the diagnosis of rabies-suspect specimens. A combination of four mouse monoclonal antibodies directed against the rabies virus nucleocapsid was selected and used for the detection. The test was optimized and standardized so that maximum concordance could be maintained with the standard procedures of rabies diagnosis recommended by the WHO expert committee. Using prototype viruses from the different genotypes of lyssavirus and from various geographic origins and phylogenetic lineages, this paper presents a reliable, rapid and transferable diagnostic method, named WELYSSA that readily permits the detection of lyssaviruses belonging to the 7 genotypes of lyssavirus circulating in Europe, Africa, Asia and Oceania. The threshold of detection of lyssavirus nucleocapsids is low (0.8 ng/ml). With a panel of 1030 specimens received for rabies diagnostic testing, this test was found to be highly specific (0.999) and sensitive (0.970) when compared to other recommended rabies diagnostic methods.

  15. Generation of competent bone marrow-derived antigen presenting cells from the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrell Regina M

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human infections with Sin Nombre virus (SNV and related New World hantaviruses often lead to hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS, a sometimes fatal illness. Lungs of patients who die from HCPS exhibit cytokine-producing mononuclear infiltrates and pronounced pulmonary inflammation. Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus are the principal natural hosts of SNV, in which the virus establishes life-long persistence without conspicuous pathology. Little is known about the mechanisms SNV employs to evade the immune response of deer mice, and experimental examination of this question has been difficult because of a lack of methodologies for examining such responses during infection. One such deficiency is our inability to characterize T cell responses because susceptible syngeneic deer mice are not available. Results To solve this problem, we have developed an in vitro method of expanding and generating competent antigen presenting cells (APC from deer mouse bone marrow using commercially-available house mouse (Mus musculus granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor. These cells are capable of processing and presenting soluble protein to antigen-specific autologous helper T cells in vitro. Inclusion of antigen-specific deer mouse antibody augments T cell stimulation, presumably through Fc receptor-mediated endocytosis. Conclusions The use of these APC has allowed us to dramatically expand deer mouse helper T cells in culture and should permit extensive characterization of T cell epitopes. Considering the evolutionary divergence between deer mice and house mice, it is probable that this method will be useful to other investigators using unconventional models of rodent-borne diseases.

  16. The binding parameters of radiolabelled monoclonal F (ab')2 and Fab' fragments relative to immunoglobulin G in reactions with surface-bound antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fjeld, J.G.; Nustad, K.; Michaelsen, T.E.

    1992-01-01

    The binding parameters of iodine-125-labelled intact monoclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG), F(ab') 2 and Fab' fragments were compared. The study was carried out with the two monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) K13 and K16 specific for human Ig light chains κ and λ, respectively. When testing the 125 I-MoAbs against monodisperse polymer particles coated with the specific antigens, the K a for the F(ab') 2 fragments were similar to that for IgG, while the K a for the Fab' fragments were reduced to 10%-20% of that for IgG. The number N of effective target sites revealed with Fab' was higher than with F(ab') and IgG, presumably because less surface area is occupied by the small Fab' molecules. The immunoreactive fraction F ranged according to IgG>F(ab') 2 >Fab'. The explanation of the moderate difference between the K a of the monoclonal Fab' and the divalent IgG and F(ab') 2 was that the divalent molecules were not divalently attached to the particles. When testing the same antibody preparations against humanlymphoma cells producing Ig with light chains κ or λ, the binding results were less reliable than when particles were utilised, presumably due to antigen shedding. Different MoAbs vary in their loss of immunoreactivity due to enzymatic degradation and the radiolabelling procedure. The preparation of the radiolabelled fragments should therefore be optimized for each MoAb, and evaluation is necessary before injection. Artificial targets with a low leakage of antigen, like the monodisperse polymer particles here applied, are recommended for the in vitro evaluation of the immunoreactivity of labelled MoAb preparations. (orig.)

  17. Dynamic interaction of 111indium-labeled monoclonal antibodies with surface antigens of solid tumors visualized in vivo by external scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, K.M.; Keenan, A.M.; Frincke, J.; David, G.; Pearson, J.; Oldham, R.K.; Morgan, A.C. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Two 111 indium-labeled murine monoclonal antibodies (MoAb), D3 and 9.2.27, directed to tumor antigens of L-10 hepatocarcinoma and human melanoma, respectively, selectively localized antigen-positive target cells in guinea pigs and nude mice. The fate of MoAb differed in the two antigen-antibody systems after reacting with their corresponding tumor antigens in vivo as reflected by patterns of distribution and turnover in vivo. The 9.2.27 localized in melanoma xenograft in nude mice after intravenous administration with slow loss from tumor but more rapid loss from normal tissues and thus demonstrated optimal imaging of small tumors (approximately equal to 5 mm) between 3 and 6 days after injection of the radiolabeled antibody. In contrast, D3 demonstrated a biphasic localization in guinea pig L-10 hepatocarcinoma with a maximal activity on the 2d day after administration and showed rapid loss from both tumor and normal tissues. Nonspecific localization of antibodies in liver and in kidney was found both in syngeneic (nude mice) and xenogeneic (guinea pig) hosts but was more pronounced in the xenogeneic species. These results indicate that the nature of the antigen-antibody interaction may be of importance in selecting MoAb for both diagnosis and therapy of malignant diseases

  18. Monoclonal antibodies to human mammary tumor-associated antigens and their use for radiolocalization of xenografts in athymic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colcher, D.; Schlom, J.

    1983-01-01

    The authors have utilized membrane-enriched extracts of human metastatic mammary tumor cells as immunogens to generate and characterize monoclonal antibodies reactive with determinants that would be maintained on metastatic, as well as primary, human mammary carcinoma cells. Multiple assays using tumor cells extracts, tissue sections, and live cells in culture have been employed to reveal the diversity of the monoclonal antibodies generated. Then the utility of these antibodies for radiolocalization studies was examined. (Auth.)

  19. Permeation of antigen protein-conjugated nanoparticles and live bacteria through microneedle-treated mouse skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Amit Kumar, Xinran Li, Michael A Sandoval, B Leticia Rodriguez, Brian R Sloat, Zhengrong CuiUniversity of Texas at Austin, College of Pharmacy, Pharmaceutics Division, Austin, TX, USABackground: The present study was designed to evaluate the extent to which pretreatment with microneedles can enhance skin permeation of nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo. Permeation of live bacteria, which are physically nanoparticles or microparticles, through mouse skin pretreated with microneedles was also studied to evaluate the potential risk of microbial infection.Methods and results: It was found that pretreatment of mouse skin with microneedles allowed permeation of solid lipid nanoparticles, size 230 nm, with ovalbumin conjugated on their surface. Transcutaneous immunization in a mouse skin area pretreated with microneedles with ovalbumin nanoparticles induced a stronger antiovalbumin antibody response than using ovalbumin alone. The dose of ovalbumin antigen determined whether microneedle-mediated transcutaneous immunization with ovalbumin nanoparticles induced a stronger immune response than subcutaneous injection of the same ovalbumin nanoparticles. Microneedle treatment permitted skin permeation of live Escherichia coli, but the extent of the permeation was not greater than that enabled by hypodermic injection.Conclusion: Transcutaneous immunization on a microneedle-treated skin area with antigens carried by nanoparticles can potentially induce a strong immune response, and the risk of bacterial infection associated with microneedle treatment is no greater than that with a hypodermic injection.Keywords: antibody responses, safety of microneedles, transepidermal water loss

  20. Permeation of antigen protein-conjugated nanoparticles and live bacteria through microneedle-treated mouse skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Li, Xinran; Sandoval, Michael A; Rodriguez, B Leticia; Sloat, Brian R; Cui, Zhengrong

    2011-01-01

    Background: The present study was designed to evaluate the extent to which pretreatment with microneedles can enhance skin permeation of nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo. Permeation of live bacteria, which are physically nanoparticles or microparticles, through mouse skin pretreated with microneedles was also studied to evaluate the potential risk of microbial infection. Methods and results: It was found that pretreatment of mouse skin with microneedles allowed permeation of solid lipid nanoparticles, size 230 nm, with ovalbumin conjugated on their surface. Transcutaneous immunization in a mouse skin area pretreated with microneedles with ovalbumin nanoparticles induced a stronger antiovalbumin antibody response than using ovalbumin alone. The dose of ovalbumin antigen determined whether microneedle-mediated transcutaneous immunization with ovalbumin nanoparticles induced a stronger immune response than subcutaneous injection of the same ovalbumin nanoparticles. Microneedle treatment permitted skin permeation of live Escherichia coli, but the extent of the permeation was not greater than that enabled by hypodermic injection. Conclusion: Transcutaneous immunization on a microneedle-treated skin area with antigens carried by nanoparticles can potentially induce a strong immune response, and the risk of bacterial infection associated with microneedle treatment is no greater than that with a hypodermic injection. PMID:21753877

  1. Analysis of Tn antigenicity with a panel of new IgM and IgG1 monoclonal antibodies raised against leukemic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blixt, Klas Ola; Lavrova, Olga I; Mazurov, Dmitriy V

    2012-01-01

    antigenicity remain poorly understood. As a consequence, a broad variety of anti-Tn monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been generated. To further investigate the nature and complexity of the Tn antigen, we generated seven different anti-Tn mAbs of IgM and IgG classes raised against human Jurkat T cells, which...... are Tn-positive due to the low activity of T-synthase and mutation in specific chaperone Cosmc. The binding analysis of anti-Tn mAbs with the array of synthetic saccharides, glycopeptides and O-glycoproteins revealed unexpected differences in specificities of anti-Tn mAbs. IgM mAbs bound the terminal Gal...

  2. Evaluation of monoclonal antibody-based sandwich direct ELISA (MSD-ELISA for antigen detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus using clinical samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Morioka

    Full Text Available A monoclonal antibody-based sandwich direct ELISA (MSD-ELISA method was previously developed for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD viral antigen detection. Here we evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of two FMD viral antigen detection MSD-ELISAs and compared them with conventional indirect sandwich (IS-ELISA. The MSD-ELISAs were able to detect the antigen in saliva samples of experimentally-infected pigs for a longer term compared to the IS-ELISA. We also used 178 RT-PCR-positive field samples from cattle and pigs affected by the 2010 type-O FMD outbreak in Japan, and we found that the sensitivities of both MSD-ELISAs were about 7 times higher than that of the IS-ELISA against each sample (P<0.01. In terms of the FMD-positive farm detection rate, the sensitivities of the MSD-ELISAs were about 6 times higher than that of the IS-ELISA against each farm (P<0.01. Although it is necessary to conduct further validation study using the other virus strains, MSD-ELISAs could be appropriate as a method to replace IS-ELISA for FMD antigen detection.

  3. Evaluation of monoclonal antibody-based sandwich direct ELISA (MSD-ELISA) for antigen detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus using clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, Kazuki; Fukai, Katsuhiko; Sakamoto, Kenichi; Yoshida, Kazuo; Kanno, Toru

    2014-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody-based sandwich direct ELISA (MSD-ELISA) method was previously developed for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) viral antigen detection. Here we evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of two FMD viral antigen detection MSD-ELISAs and compared them with conventional indirect sandwich (IS)-ELISA. The MSD-ELISAs were able to detect the antigen in saliva samples of experimentally-infected pigs for a longer term compared to the IS-ELISA. We also used 178 RT-PCR-positive field samples from cattle and pigs affected by the 2010 type-O FMD outbreak in Japan, and we found that the sensitivities of both MSD-ELISAs were about 7 times higher than that of the IS-ELISA against each sample (P<0.01). In terms of the FMD-positive farm detection rate, the sensitivities of the MSD-ELISAs were about 6 times higher than that of the IS-ELISA against each farm (P<0.01). Although it is necessary to conduct further validation study using the other virus strains, MSD-ELISAs could be appropriate as a method to replace IS-ELISA for FMD antigen detection.

  4. A novel mouse monoclonal antibody targeting ErbB2 suppresses breast cancer growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawa, Seiji [Division of Oncology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Shirokanedai 4-6-1, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Matsushita, Hirohisa; Ohbayashi, Hirokazu [Department of Research and Development, Nichirei Biosciences Inc., Tokyo 104-8402 (Japan); Semba, Kentaro [Department of Life Science and Medical Bio-Science, School of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Yamamoto, Tadashi, E-mail: tyamamot@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Division of Oncology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Shirokanedai 4-6-1, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan)

    2009-07-03

    Overexpression of ErbB2 in breast cancer is associated with increased recurrence and worse prognosis. Accumulating evidences suggest that molecular targeted therapy is a promising anticancer strategy. In this study, we produced a novel anti-ErbB2 monoclonal antibody, 6G10, that recognized an epitope distinct from the trastuzumab binding site. 6G10 induced aggregation of BT474 breast cancer cells and inhibited proliferation of various breast cancer cell lines including BT474. A growth inhibition assay showed that 6G10 had EC{sub 50} values comparable to trastuzumab, indicating that the drugs have a similar level of potency. Furthermore, intraperitoneal administration of 6G10 completely inhibited the growth of xenografted tumors derived from BT474 and SK-BR-3 cells. These data suggested that 6G10 has great therapeutic potential and could be administered to patients alternatively, or synergistically, with trastuzumab.

  5. Vaccine and Monoclonal Antibody That Enhance Mouse Resistance to Candidiasis ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Hong; Cutler, Jim E.

    2011-01-01

    Previously we showed that antibodies specific for the glycan β-1,2-mannotriose [β-(Man)3] on the cell surface of Candida albicans protect mice against disseminated candidiasis (H. Xin, S. Dziadek, D. R. Bundle, and J. E. Cutler, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 105:13526–13531, 2008). Furthermore, six 14-mer peptides that are within the N-terminal portion of C. albicans wall proteins were conjugated to the glycan in an attempt to create immunogenic glycopeptide conjugates. By a dendritic cell (DC)-based immunization approach, all were immunogenic and three of the six conjugates induced a high degree of protection in mice. Interestingly, whereas all six peptides induced antibody responses when used alone to pulse DCs for subsequent immunizations, three peptides induced protection, and one in particular, peptide Fba (derived from fructose-bisphosphate aldolase), induced robust protective responses and is the focus of the current work. Fba peptide is not restricted by the major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II), as it induced anti-Fba antibodies in mice of different H-2 haplotypes and in rabbits. Furthermore, the peptide induced protection against disease caused by different C. albicans strains. Partial protection was achieved when alum was used in place of DCs for Fba immunizations. The passive transfer of immune sera from Fba-vaccinated mice, but not immune serum preabsorbed with fungal cells, conferred protection in naïve mice. This result, along with our finding that a monoclonal antibody specific for the peptide, E2-9 (IgM), protected mice against candidiasis, provide strong evidence that antibodies contribute to protection. Our work demonstrates the utility of cell wall peptides alone or as glycopeptides in vaccines designed for the induction of immunity against candidiasis and monoclonal antibodies as a rapid immunoprotective approach against the disease. PMID:21832099

  6. Monoclonal carcinoembryonic antigen radioimmunoassay in prostatic cancer: Validation of the method and comparison to some other tumor-associated markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanovic, V.; Ignjatovic, M.; Milosavljevic, B.; Dinic, A.; Nis Univ.

    1987-01-01

    The use of a monoclonal CEA RIA and of some other biological markers for a diagnosis of prostatic cancer was investigated. The increased level of serum CEA was found in both prostatic cancer and in non-malignant disease. The low sensitivity of the CEA monoclonal assay precludes its use for a clinical diagnosis of prostatic cancer. The simultaneous use of some other biological markers (PAP, TPA, β2-microglobulin and ferritin) did increase sensitivity. However, further studies should be directed to a much more specific and sensitive marker of the human prostatic adenocarcinoma. (orig.) [de

  7. Monoclonal carcinoembryonic antigen radioimmunoassay in prostatic cancer: Validation of the method and comparison to some other tumor-associated markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanovic, V; Ignjatovic, M; Milosavljevic, B; Dinic, A

    1987-04-01

    The use of a monoclonal CEA RIA and of some other biological markers for a diagnosis of prostatic cancer was investigated. The increased level of serum CEA was found in both prostatic cancer and in non-malignant disease. The low sensitivity of the CEA monoclonal assay precludes its use for a clinical diagnosis of prostatic cancer. The simultaneous use of some other biological markers (PAP, TPA, ..beta..2-microglobulin and ferritin) did increase sensitivity. However, further studies should be directed to a much more specific and sensitive marker of the human prostatic adenocarcinoma.

  8. Pan-ebolavirus and Pan-filovirus Mouse Monoclonal Antibodies: Protection against Ebola and Sudan Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtsberg, Frederick W; Shulenin, Sergey; Vu, Hong; Howell, Katie A; Patel, Sonal J; Gunn, Bronwyn; Karim, Marcus; Lai, Jonathan R; Frei, Julia C; Nyakatura, Elisabeth K; Zeitlin, Larry; Douglas, Robin; Fusco, Marnie L; Froude, Jeffrey W; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Herbert, Andrew S; Wirchnianski, Ariel S; Lear-Rooney, Calli M; Alter, Galit; Dye, John M; Glass, Pamela J; Warfield, Kelly L; Aman, M Javad

    2016-01-01

    The unprecedented 2014-2015 Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in West Africa has highlighted the need for effective therapeutics against filoviruses. Monoclonal antibody (MAb) cocktails have shown great potential as EVD therapeutics; however, the existing protective MAbs are virus species specific. Here we report the development of pan-ebolavirus and pan-filovirus antibodies generated by repeated immunization of mice with filovirus glycoproteins engineered to drive the B cell responses toward conserved epitopes. Multiple pan-ebolavirus antibodies were identified that react to the Ebola, Sudan, Bundibugyo, and Reston viruses. A pan-filovirus antibody that was reactive to the receptor binding regions of all filovirus glycoproteins was also identified. Significant postexposure efficacy of several MAbs, including a novel antibody cocktail, was demonstrated. For the first time, we report cross-neutralization and in vivo protection against two highly divergent filovirus species, i.e., Ebola virus and Sudan virus, with a single antibody. Competition studies indicate that this antibody targets a previously unrecognized conserved neutralizing epitope that involves the glycan cap. Mechanistic studies indicated that, besides neutralization, innate immune cell effector functions may play a role in the antiviral activity of the antibodies. Our findings further suggest critical novel epitopes that can be utilized to design effective cocktails for broad protection against multiple filovirus species. Filoviruses represent a major public health threat in Africa and an emerging global concern. Largely driven by the U.S. biodefense funding programs and reinforced by the 2014 outbreaks, current immunotherapeutics are primarily focused on a single filovirus species called Ebola virus (EBOV) (formerly Zaire Ebola virus). However, other filoviruses including Sudan, Bundibugyo, and Marburg viruses have caused human outbreaks with mortality rates as high as 90%. Thus, cross

  9. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with common tumor antigens on UV-induced tumors also react with hyperplastic UV-irradiated skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spellman, C.W.; Beauchamp, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Most murine skin tumors induced by ultraviolet light (UVB, 280-340 nm) can be successfully transplanted only into syngeneic hosts that have received subcarcinogenic doses of UVB. The tumor susceptible state is long-lived and mediated by T suppressor cells that control effector responses against common antigens on UV-induced tumors. Because antigen specific suppression arises prior to the appearance of a tumor, questions arise about the source of the original antigen. They have previously reported transplantation studies indicating that UV-irradiated skin is antigenically cross-reactive with UV-induced tumors. They now report on flow cytometry analyses showing that a series of MoAb reactive with common antigens expressed by UV-induced tumors are also reactive on cells from UV-irradiated skin. Various antigens appear at different times in the UV irradiation scheme, and some persist while others are transient. They speculate that the common antigens detected may be the ones to which functional suppression is directed. If true, these results suggest that successful tumors need not escape host defenses to emerge. Rather, tumors may arise and grow progressively if they express antigens that cross-react with specificities to which the host has previously mounted a suppressive response

  10. Detecting fish parvalbumin with commercial mouse monoclonal anti-frog parvalbumin IgG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lingyun; Hefle, Sue L; Taylor, Steve L; Swoboda, Ines; Goodman, Richard E

    2006-07-26

    Parvalbumin is a calcium-binding muscle protein that is highly conserved across fish species and amphibians. It is the major cross-reactive allergen associated with both fish and frog allergy. We used two-dimensional electrophoretic and immunoblotting techniques to investigate the utility of a commercial monoclonal anti-frog parvalbumin IgG for detecting parvalbumin present in some commonly consumed fish species. The 2D electrophoresis and immunoblots revealed species-specific differences in proteins that appear to represent various numbers of isoforms of parvalbumin in carp (5), catfish (3), cod (1) and tilapia (2). No parvalbumin was detected in yellowfin tuna. Based on minor differences in relative intensities of protein staining and immunodetection, parvalbumin isoforms may have slight differences in the epitope region recognized by the anti-frog parvalbumin antibody. These results suggest that the frog anti-parvalbumin antibody can be used as a valuable tool to detect parvalbumins from the fish tested in this study, except yellowfin tuna.

  11. Characterization of anti-P monoclonal antibodies directed against the ribosomal protein-RNA complex antigen and produced using Murphy Roths large autoimmune-prone mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, H; Onozuka, M; Hagiya, A; Hoshino, S; Narita, I; Uchiumi, T

    2015-02-01

    Autoantibodies, including anti-ribosomal P proteins (anti-P), are thought to be produced by an antigen-driven immune response in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To test this hypothesis, we reconstituted the ribosomal antigenic complex in vitro using human P0, phosphorylated P1 and P2 and a 28S rRNA fragment covering the P0 binding site, and immunized Murphy Roths large (MRL)/lrp lupus mice with this complex without any added adjuvant to generate anti-P antibodies. Using hybridoma technology, we subsequently obtained 34 clones, each producing an anti-P monoclonal antibody (mAb) that recognized the conserved C-terminal tail sequence common to all three P proteins. We also obtained two P0-specific monoclonal antibodies, but no antibody specific to P1, P2 or rRNA fragment. Two types of mAbs were found among these anti-P antibodies: one type (e.g. 9D5) reacted more strongly with the phosphorylated P1 and P2 than that with their non-phosphorylated forms, whereas the other type (e.g. 4H11) reacted equally with both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms of P1/P2. Both 9D5 and 4H11 inhibited the ribosome/eukaryotic elongation factor-2 (eEF-2)-coupled guanosine triphosphate (GTP)ase activity. However, preincubation with a synthetic peptide corresponding to the C-terminal sequence common to all three P proteins, but not the peptide that lacked the last three C-terminal amino acids, mostly prevented the mAb-induced inhibition of GTPase activity. Thus, at least two types of anti-P were produced preferentially following the immunization of MRL mice with the reconstituted antigenic complex. Presence of multiple copies of the C-termini, particularly that of the last three C-terminal amino acid residues, in the antigenic complex appears to contribute to the immunogenic stimulus. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  12. Characterization of anti-P monoclonal antibodies directed against the ribosomal protein–RNA complex antigen and produced using Murphy Roths large autoimmune-prone mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, H; Onozuka, M; Hagiya, A; Hoshino, S; Narita, I; Uchiumi, T

    2015-01-01

    Autoantibodies, including anti-ribosomal P proteins (anti-P), are thought to be produced by an antigen-driven immune response in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To test this hypothesis, we reconstituted the ribosomal antigenic complex in vitro using human P0, phosphorylated P1 and P2 and a 28S rRNA fragment covering the P0 binding site, and immunized Murphy Roths large (MRL)/lrp lupus mice with this complex without any added adjuvant to generate anti-P antibodies. Using hybridoma technology, we subsequently obtained 34 clones, each producing an anti-P monoclonal antibody (mAb) that recognized the conserved C-terminal tail sequence common to all three P proteins. We also obtained two P0-specific monoclonal antibodies, but no antibody specific to P1, P2 or rRNA fragment. Two types of mAbs were found among these anti-P antibodies: one type (e.g. 9D5) reacted more strongly with the phosphorylated P1 and P2 than that with their non-phosphorylated forms, whereas the other type (e.g. 4H11) reacted equally with both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms of P1/P2. Both 9D5 and 4H11 inhibited the ribosome/eukaryotic elongation factor-2 (eEF-2)-coupled guanosine triphosphate (GTP)ase activity. However, preincubation with a synthetic peptide corresponding to the C-terminal sequence common to all three P proteins, but not the peptide that lacked the last three C-terminal amino acids, mostly prevented the mAb-induced inhibition of GTPase activity. Thus, at least two types of anti-P were produced preferentially following the immunization of MRL mice with the reconstituted antigenic complex. Presence of multiple copies of the C-termini, particularly that of the last three C-terminal amino acid residues, in the antigenic complex appears to contribute to the immunogenic stimulus. PMID:25255895

  13. Anti-PrPC monoclonal antibody infusion as a novel treatment for cognitive deficits in an alzheimer's disease model mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strittmatter Stephen M

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's Disease (AD is the most common of the conformational neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the conversion of a normal biological protein into a β-sheet-rich pathological isoform. In AD the normal soluble Aβ (sAβ forms oligomers and fibrils which assemble into neuritic plaques. The most toxic form of Aβ is thought to be oligomeric. A recent study reveals the cellular prion protein, PrPC, to be a receptor for Aβ oligomers. Aβ oligomers suppress LTP signal in murine hippocampal slices but activity remains when pretreated with the PrP monoclonal anti-PrP antibody, 6D11. We hypothesized that targeting of PrPC to prevent Aβ oligomer-related cognitive deficits is a potentially novel therapeutic approach. APP/PS1 transgenic mice aged 8 months were intraperitoneally (i.p. injected with 1 mg 6D11 for 5 days/week for 2 weeks. Two wild-type control groups were given either the same 6D11 injections or vehicle solution. Additional groups of APP/PS1 transgenic mice were given either i.p. injections of vehicle solution or the same dose of mouse IgG over the same period. The mice were then subjected to cognitive behavioral testing using a radial arm maze, over a period of 10 days. At the conclusion of behavioral testing, animals were sacrificed and brain tissue was analyzed biochemically or immunohistochemically for the levels of amyloid plaques, PrPC, synaptophysin, Aβ40/42 and Aβ oligomers. Results Behavioral testing showed a marked decrease in errors in 6D11 treated APP/PS1 Tg mice compared with the non-6D11 treated Tg groups (p C or Aβ oligomer levels. 6D11 treated APP/PS1 Tg mice had significantly greater synaptophysin immunoreactivity in the dentate gyrus molecular layer of the hippocampus compared to vehicle treated APP/PS1 Tg mice (p Conclusions Even short term treatment with monoclonal antibodies such as 6D11 or other compounds which block the binding of Aβ oligomers to PrPC can be used to treat

  14. Monoclonal antibodies to human factor VII: a one step immunoradiometric assay for VII:Ag.

    OpenAIRE

    Takase, T; Tuddenham, E G; Chand, S; Goodall, A H

    1988-01-01

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies (RFF-VII/1, RFF-VII/2, and RFF-VII/3) which bind specifically to different epitopes on human factor VII antigen were raised. Two of the antibodies, RFF-VII/1 and RFF-VII/2, bound strongly to factor VII antigen (VII:Ag), but only RFF-VII/1 and RFF-VII/3 were potent inhibitors of factor VII coagulation activity (VII:C). RFF-VII/1 and RFF-VII/2 were used in a one step, double monoclonal immunoradiometric assay for VII:Ag. This was highly reproducible and detecte...

  15. Development, characterization and diagnostic application of a monoclonal antibody specific for a proteinase K resistant Lawsonia intracellularis antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Henriette T.; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Jungersen, Gregers

    2005-01-01

    Proliferative enteropathy (PE) is one of the most important infections in pigs caused by Lawsonia intracellularis, an obligate intracellular bacterium. The purpose of the present investigation was to develop monoclonal antibodies with specificity to L. intracellularis useful both for diagnostic...... (mAb), Law1-DK, isotyped as IgG2b was selected by indirect immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT). Histological sections of the intestines from pigs affected by proliferative enteropathy and in vitro grown bacteria in cell culture were tested positive for the presence of L. intracellularis...

  16. A novel approach for reliable detection of cathepsin S activities in mouse antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steimle, Alex; Kalbacher, Hubert; Maurer, Andreas; Beifuss, Brigitte; Bender, Annika; Schäfer, Andrea; Müller, Ricarda; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Frick, Julia-Stefanie

    2016-05-01

    Cathepsin S (CTSS) is a eukaryotic protease mostly expressed in professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Since CTSS activity regulation plays a role in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, atherosclerosis, Sjögren's syndrome and psoriasis as well as in cancer progression, there is an ongoing interest in the reliable detection of cathepsin S activity. Various applications have been invented for specific detection of this enzyme. However, most of them have only been shown to be suitable for human samples, do not deliver quantitative results or the experimental procedure requires technical equipment that is not commonly available in a standard laboratory. We have tested a fluorogen substrate, Mca-GRWPPMGLPWE-Lys(Dnp)-DArg-NH2, that has been described to specifically detect CTSS activities in human APCs for its potential use for mouse samples. We have modified the protocol and thereby offer a cheap, easy, reproducible and quick activity assay to detect CTSS activities in mouse APCs. Since most of basic research on CTSS is performed in mice, this method closes a gap and offers a possibility for reliable and quantitative CTSS activity detection that can be performed in almost every laboratory. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Simultaneous establishment of monoclonal antibodies specific for either cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer or (6-4)photoproduct from the same mouse immunized with ultraviolet irradiated DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Toshio; Nakane, Misa; Hattori, Tsuyoshi; Matsunaga, Tsukasa; Nikaido, Osamu; Ihara, Makoto

    1991-01-01

    Six new monoclonal antibodies (TDM-2, TDM-3, 64M-2, 64M-3 64M-4 and 64M-5) specific for ultraviolet (UV) induced DNA damage have been established. In the antibody characterization experiments, two TDM antibodies were found to show a dose-dependent binding to UV-irradiated DNA (UV-DNA), decrease of binding to UV-DNA after cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photoreactivation, binding to DNA containing cyclobutane thymine dimers, and unchanged binding to UV-DNA after photoisomerization of (6-4)photoproducts to Dewar photoproducts. These results indicated that the epitope of TDM monoclonal antibodies was the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer in DNA. On the other hand, four 64M antibodies were found to show a dose-dependent binding to UV-DNA, unchanged binding to UV-DNA after cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photoreactivation, undetectable binding to DNA containing thymine dimers, and decrease of binding to UV-DNA after photoisomerization of (6-4)photoproducts. These results indicated that the epitope of 64M antibodies was the (6-4)photoproduct in DNA. This is the first report of the simultaneous establishment of monoclonal antibodies against the two different types of photolesions from the same mouse. By using these monoclonal antibodies, we have succeeded in measuring both cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and (6-4)photoproducts in the DNA from human primary cells irradiated with physiological UV doses. (author)

  18. ANTIGENIC RELATEDNESS OF SELECTED FLAVIVIRUSES: STUDY WITH HOMOLOGOUS AND HETEROLOGOUS IMMUNE MOUSE ASCITIC FLUIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S. BABA

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available The antigenic relationship of 9 flaviviruses, Yellow fever (YF , Wesselsbron (WSL , Uganda S (UGS , Potiskum (POT, West Nile (WN , Banzi (BAN , Zika (ZK , Dengue type 1 (DEN-1 and Dengue type 2 (DEN-2, was assessed by cross-haemagglutination-inhibition (Cross-HI and cross-complement fixation (Cross-CF reactions between each of the viruses and their homologous immune mouse ascitic fluids. Titre ratios were calculated using the heterologous and homologous titres. Cross-CF reactions revealed wider antigenic variations among viruses than Cross-HI reactions. There was no significant antigenic variation between WSL, POT and YF viruses using either of those methods. However, definite differences in antigenicity were observed between them and UGS, BAN and ZK viruses. There were no significant differences between UGS, BAN and ZK or between DEN-1 and DEN-2. The serological relationship among flaviviruses is important in establishing diagnosis and epidemiology of these infections in Africa.A relação antigênica de 9 Flavivirus, Febre amarela (YF, Wesselsbron (WSL, Uganda S (UGS, Potiskum (POT, West Nile (WN, Banzi (BAN, Zika (ZK, Dengue tipo 1 (DEN-1 e Dengue tipo2 (DEN-2, foi avaliada por reação de inibição da hemaglutinação cruzada (cross-HI e reação de fixação do complemento cruzada (Cross-CF entre cada um dos virus e seu fluido ascítico homólogo em camundongos. Médias de títulos foram calculadas usando os títulos heterólogos e homólogos. Reações cruzadas CF revelaram maiores variações antigênicas entre virus do que reações cruzadas HI. Não houve variação antigênica significativa entre virus WSL, POT e YF usando cada um dos métodos. Todavia, diferenças definidas da antigenicidade foram observadas entre eles e os vírus UGS, BAN e ZK. Não existiram diferenças significativas entre UGS, BAN e ZK ou entre DEN-1 e DEN-2. A relação sorológica entre Flavivirus é importante para se estabelecer o diagnóstico e a

  19. A monoclonal antibody against SV40 large T antigen (PAb416) does not label Merkel cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Daniel J; Czeczok, Thomas W; Bellizzi, Andrew M

    2018-07-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma represents poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma of cutaneous origin. In most studies, the vast majority of Merkel cell carcinomas are Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV)-associated. SV40 polyomavirus immunohistochemistry is typically used in the diagnosis of other polyomavirus-associated diseases, including tubulointerstitial nephritis and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, given cross-reactivity with BK and JC polyomaviruses. MCPyV-specific immunohistochemistry is commercially available, but, if antibodies against SV40 also cross-reacted with MCPyV, that would be advantageous from a resource-utilisation perspective. Tissue microarrays were constructed from 39 Merkel cell carcinomas, 24 small-cell lung carcinomas, and 18 extrapulmonary visceral small-cell carcinomas. SV40 large T antigen immunohistochemistry (clone PAb416) was performed; MCPyV large T antigen immunohistochemistry (clone CM2B4) had been previously performed. UniProt was used to compare the amino acid sequences of the SV40, BK, JC and MCPyV large T antigens, focusing on areas recognised by the PAb416 and CM2B4 clones. SV40 immunohistochemistry was negative in all tumours; MCPyV immunohistochemistry was positive in 38% of Merkel cell carcinomas and in 0% of non-cutaneous poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas. UniProt analysis revealed a high degree of similarity between SV40, BK, and JC viruses in the region recognised by PAb416. There was less homology between SV40 and MCPyV in this region, which was also interrupted by two long stretches of amino acids unique to MCPyV. The CM2B4 clone recognises a unique epitope in one of these stretches. The PAb416 antibody against the SV40 large T antigen does not cross-react with MCPyV large T antigen, and thus does not label Merkel cell carcinoma. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Generation and characterization of rat and mouse monoclonal antibodies specific for MeCP2 and their use in X-inactivation studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Laurence Jost

    Full Text Available Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2 binds DNA, and has a preference for methylated CpGs and, hence, in cells, it accumulates in heterochromatin. Even though it is expressed ubiquitously MeCP2 is particularly important during neuronal maturation. This is underscored by the fact that in Rett syndrome, a neurological disease, 80% of patients carry a mutation in the MECP2 gene. Since the MECP2 gene lies on the X chromosome and is subjected to X chromosome inactivation, affected patients are usually chimeric for wild type and mutant MeCP2. Here, we present the generation and characterization of the first rat monoclonal MeCP2 specific antibodies as well as mouse monoclonal antibodies and a rabbit polyclonal antibody. We demonstrate that our antibodies are suitable for immunoblotting, (chromatin immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence of endogenous and ectopically expressed MeCP2. Epitope mapping revealed that most of the MeCP2 monoclonal antibodies recognize the C-terminal domain and one the N-terminal domain of MeCP2. Using slot blot analysis, we determined a high sensitivity of all antibodies, detecting amounts as low as 1 ng of MeCP2 protein. Moreover, the antibodies recognize MeCP2 from different species, including human, mouse, rat and pig. Lastly, we have validated their use by analyzing and quantifying X chromosome inactivation skewing using brain tissue of MeCP2 heterozygous null female mice. The new MeCP2 specific monoclonal antibodies described here perform well in a large variety of immunological applications making them a very valuable set of tools for studies of MeCP2 pathophysiology in situ and in vitro.

  1. Insights into the biological features of the antigenic determinants recognized by four monoclonal antibodies in redia and adult stages of the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Annia; Sánchez, Jorge; Hernández, Hilda; Mosqueda, Maryani; Rodríguez, Suanel Y; Capó, Virginia; Otero, Oscar; Alfonso, Carlos; Marcet, Ricardo; Sarracent, Jorge

    2016-09-01

    Fasciola hepatica is a digenean trematode which infects a wide variety of domestic animals and also humans. Previous studies have demonstrated that four monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against the total extract of F. hepatica redia (named as 1E4, 6G11, 4E5 and 4G11) also recognized the excretion - secretion antigens (ES Ag) of adult parasites, which is a biologically-relevant mixture of molecules with functional roles during infection and immune evasion on definitive hosts. In the present report we describe the partial characterization of the epitopes recognized by these Mabs by heat treatment, mercaptoethanol reduction, pronase proteolysis and sodium peryodate oxidation, which suggested their predominant protein and conformational nature. Also, a comparative study using immunodetection assays on crude extracts and on histological sections of both rediae and adults of F. hepatica were performed to explore the expression pattern of the antigenic determinants in these developmental stages. From these experiments it was found that the Mabs reacted most likely with the same proteins of approximately 64 and 105 kDa present on both rediae and adult's extracts. However, the 1E4, 6G11 and 4E5 Mabs also recognized other molecules of the total extract of F. hepatica adults, a fact that constitutes an evidence of the antigenic variation between both stages and points at a certain biological relevance of the recognized antigenic determinants. Immunolocalization studies on histological sections revealed that all Mabs reacted with the tegument of F. hepatica in both rediae and adults stages, while the epitopes recognized by 1E4, 6G11 and 4E5 antibodies were also preferentially localized in the intestinal caeca and in different organs of the reproductive system of adult specimens. The immunogenicity of these antigenic determinants, their conserved status among different stages of the life cycle of F. hepatica and their presence in both tegument and ES Ag of adult parasites

  2. A novel rabbit anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal neutralizing antibody inhibits tumor growth in prostate cancer cells and mouse xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Yanlan; Chen, Yicheng; Ding, Guoqing; Wang, Mingchao; Wu, Haiyang; Xu, Liwei; Rui, Xuefang; Zhang, Zhigen

    2015-01-01

    The hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor c-Met are correlated with castration-resistance in prostate cancer. Although HGF has been considered as an attractive target for therapeutic antibodies, the lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human/mouse HGFs is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. We generated a panel of anti-HGF RabMAbs either blocking HGF/c-Met interaction or inhibiting c-Met phosphorylation. We selected one RabMAb with mouse cross-reactivity and demonstrated that it blocked HGF-stimulated downstream activation in PC-3 and DU145 cells. Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibited not only the growth of PC-3 cells but also HGF-dependent proliferation in HUVECs. We further demonstrated the efficacy and potency of the anti-HGF RabMAb in tumor xenograft mice models. Through these in vitro and in vivo experiments, we explored a novel therapeutic antibody for advanced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • HGF is an attractive target for castration-refractory prostate cancer. • We generated and characterized a panel of anti-HGF rabbit monoclonal antibodies. • More than half of these anti-HGF RabMAbs was cross-reactive with mouse HGF. • Anti-HGF RabMAb blocks HGF-stimulated phosphorylation and cell growth in vitro. • Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft mice

  3. A novel rabbit anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal neutralizing antibody inhibits tumor growth in prostate cancer cells and mouse xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yanlan; Chen, Yicheng; Ding, Guoqing; Wang, Mingchao; Wu, Haiyang; Xu, Liwei; Rui, Xuefang; Zhang, Zhigen, E-mail: srrshurology@163.com

    2015-08-14

    The hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor c-Met are correlated with castration-resistance in prostate cancer. Although HGF has been considered as an attractive target for therapeutic antibodies, the lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human/mouse HGFs is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. We generated a panel of anti-HGF RabMAbs either blocking HGF/c-Met interaction or inhibiting c-Met phosphorylation. We selected one RabMAb with mouse cross-reactivity and demonstrated that it blocked HGF-stimulated downstream activation in PC-3 and DU145 cells. Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibited not only the growth of PC-3 cells but also HGF-dependent proliferation in HUVECs. We further demonstrated the efficacy and potency of the anti-HGF RabMAb in tumor xenograft mice models. Through these in vitro and in vivo experiments, we explored a novel therapeutic antibody for advanced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • HGF is an attractive target for castration-refractory prostate cancer. • We generated and characterized a panel of anti-HGF rabbit monoclonal antibodies. • More than half of these anti-HGF RabMAbs was cross-reactive with mouse HGF. • Anti-HGF RabMAb blocks HGF-stimulated phosphorylation and cell growth in vitro. • Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft mice.

  4. [Comparative Study for Anti-Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Titers Based on Two Measurement Methods: Using Monoclonal Antibodies Isolated from Hepatitis B Vaccinated Recipients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oone, Kumiko; Kani, Satomi; Oohashi, Minoru; Shinkai, Noboru; Inoue, Takako; Wakimoto, Yukio; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2015-08-01

    As anti-hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) titers vary depending on the measurement methods, we compared two different methods to measure anti-HBs titers in sera and HBs monoclonal antibodies. The sera from 182 HB virus-resolved patients who were negative for HBsAg but positive for antiHB core protein (HBc) and/or anti-HBs were obtained. The measurement of anti-HBs was compared using either Lumipulse G1200 or Architect i2000SR. Six different monoclonal antibody (mAbs) clones isolated from healthy individuals inoculated with hepatitis B vaccine Bimmugen (genotype C) were used. A statistically significant correlation in anti-HBs titers was found between the two methods tested (Y = 0.951X + 100.7, R = 0.813, p Lumipulse and 12 (6.6%) were opposite results. Measuring 2 mAbs with HBV neutralizing activity, the titers of the 116 antibody (1.0 μg/mL) were comparable (689.3 mIU/mL by Lumipulse and 440.7 mIU/mL by Architect), whereas those of the 478 antibody (1.0 μg/mL) were much lower by Architect than by Lumipulse (42.6 vs. 818.6 mIU/mL, respectively). Of four other mAbs without HBV neutralizing activity, equal titers were observed for one; two mAbs had less anti-HB titers by Architect; and one was below the cut-off index (Lumipulse, and the potential ability to detect the 478 antibody with neutralizing activity is low, indicating that Architect might underestimate anti-HBs titers. Future studies should standardize the anti-HBs titer measurement system.

  5. Comparison of the C-mediating killing activity and C-activating properties of mouse monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Kipnis

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A Mouse polyclonal antiserum against Trypanosoma cruzi or its IgG and IgM fractions and five monoclonal antibodies (two IgM, two IgG1 and one IgG2a recognize and combine with membrane components of trypomastigote forms of the parasite as revealed by immunofluorescence. Although all these antibodies sensitize trypomastigotes and prepare them to activate the complement (C system, as measured by consumption of total C, C4, B and C3, only the polyclonal antiserum or its IgG, IgM and Fabμ fragments were able to induce trypanosome lysis by the alternative C pathway.

  6. A mouse model for chronic lymphocytic leukemia based on expression of the SV40 large T antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ter Brugge, Petra J; Ta, Van B T; de Bruijn, Marjolein J W

    2009-01-01

    The simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigen is a potent oncogene able to transform many cell types and has been implicated in leukemia and lymphoma. In this report, we have achieved sporadic SV40 T-antigen expression in mature B cells in mice, by insertion of a SV40 T antigen gene in opposite...... transcriptional orientation in the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy (H) chain locus between the D and J(H) segments. SV40 T-antigen expression appeared to result from retention of the targeted germline allele and concomitant antisense transcription of SV40 large T in mature B cells, leading to chronic lymphocytic...... leukemia (CLL). Although B-cell development was unperturbed in young mice, aging mice showed accumulation of a monoclonal B-cell population in which the targeted IgH allele was in germline configuration and the wild-type IgH allele had a productive V(D)J recombination. These leukemic B cells were Ig...

  7. Epitope of titin A-band-specific monoclonal antibody Tit1 5 H1.1 is highly conserved in several Fn3 domains of the titin molecule. Centriole staining in human, mouse and zebrafish cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikelsaar Aavo-Valdur

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously we have reported on the development of a new mouse anti-titin monoclonal antibody, named MAb Titl 5 H1.1, using the synthetic peptide N-AVNKYGIGEPLESDSVVAK-C which corresponds to an amino acid sequence in the A-region of the titin molecule as immunogen. In the human skeletal muscles, MAb Titl 5 H1.1 reacts specifically with titin in the A-band of the sarcomere and in different non-muscle cell types with nucleus and cytoplasm, including centrioles. In this report we have studied the evolutionary aspects of the binding of MAb Tit1 5 H1.1 with its target antigen (titin. Results We have specified the epitope area of MAb Tit1 5 H1.1 by subpeptide mapping to the hexapeptide N-AVNKYG-C. According to protein databases this amino acid sequence is located in the COOH-terminus of several different Fn3 domains of the A-region of titin molecule in many organisms, such as human being, mouse, rabbit, zebrafish (Danio rerio, and even in sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis. Our immunohisto- and cytochemical studies with MAb Tit1 5 H1.1 in human, mouse and zebrafish tissues and cell cultures showed a striated staining pattern in muscle cells and also staining of centrioles, cytoplasm and nuclei in non-muscle cells. Conclusions The data confirm that titin can play, in addition to the known roles in striated muscle cells also an important role in non-muscle cells as a centriole associated protein. This phenomenon is highly conserved in the evolution and is related to Fn3 domains of the titin molecule. Using titin A-band-specific monoclonal antibody MAb Tit1 5 H1.1 it was possible to locate titin in the sarcomeres of skeletal muscle cells and in the centrioles, cytoplasm and nuclei of non-muscle cells in phylogenetically so distant organisms as Homo sapiens, Mus musculus and zebrafish (Danio rerio.

  8. Imaging of non-small cell lung cancers with a monoclonal antibody, KC-4G3, which recognizes a human milk fat globule antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienhart, D.G.; Schmelter, R.F.; Lear, J.L.; Miller, G.J.; Glenn, S.D.; Bloedow, D.C.; Kasliwal, R.; Moran, P.; Seligman, P.; Murphy, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    To determine the role of lung cancer tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies directed against high molecular weight human milk fat globule antigens, we administered i.v. 111In-KC-4G3 to 24 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer. One mg of 111In-KC-4G3 was mixed with 0, 9, 49, 99, or 499 mg of unlabeled KC-4G3 and infused i.v. over 1 to 5 h. The mean 111In-KC-4G3 radiochemical purity was greater than 97% and the resultant immunoreactivity averaged 62%. Successful imaging of cancer sites was accomplished in 92% of 24 patients, and 57% of 91 total lesions were visualized. Successful localization of tumor sites related to size (P less than 0.001), with 81% of lesions greater than 3.0 cm in diameter, 50% of lesions 1.5 to 3 cm, and 6% of lesions less than 1.5 cm successfully imaging, and to location (P less than 0.05), with 69% of pulmonary lesions, 80% of soft tissue lesions, and only 32% of bone metastases being visualized. Nonspecific reticulo-endothelial uptake of radioactivity was a major problem. Approximately 35% of 111In was chelated to serum transferrin by 24 and 48 h after infusion. The mean t 1/2 beta for plasma radioisotope and immunoreactive KC-4G3 was 29 and 27 h, respectively. There was no correlation between total infused antibody dose and imaging success or between total dose and effect on 111In and KC-4G3 kinetics. Circulating free KC-4 antigen was measurable in all but one patient before study. Tumor biopsy following infusion could demonstrate antibody presence but not saturable antigen binding. We conclude that (a) 111In-KC-4G3 demonstrates successful tumor localization in non-small cell lung cancers bearing generally high expression of its antigen and (b) further investigations to diminish nonspecific radioactivity for imaging and utilization of high dose radiolabeled antibody for therapeutic intent are warranted

  9. Effect of monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) to class I and class II HLA antigens on lectin- and MoAb OKT3-induced lymphocyte proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Y; Zicht, R; Ferrone, S; Bonnard, G D; Herberman, R B

    1985-04-01

    We have examined the effect of several monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) to monomorphic determinants of class II HLA antigens, and MoAb to monomorphic determinants of class I HLA antigens and to beta-2-microglobulin (beta 2-mu) on lectin- and MoAb OKT3-induced proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) and cultured T cells (CTC). Some, but not all, anti-class II HLA MoAb inhibited the proliferative response of PBMNC to MoAb OKT3 and pokeweed mitogen (PWM). The degree of inhibitory effect varied considerably. This effect was not limited to anti-class II HLA MoAb since anti-class I HLA MoAb and anti-beta 2-mu MoAb also inhibited MoAb OKT3- or PWM-induced proliferative responses. In contrast, the response of PBMNC to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A) was not blocked by any anti-class II HLA MoAb. However, some anti-class II HLA MoAb also inhibited the proliferative response of CTC plus allogeneic peripheral blood adherent accessory cells (AC) to PHA or Con A as well as to MoAb OKT3 or PWM. This may be attributable to the substantially greater class II HLA antigen expression by CTC than by fresh lymphocytes. Pretreatment of either CTC or AC with anti-class II HLA MoAb inhibited OKT3-induced proliferation. In contrast, pretreatment of CTC, but not AC, with anti-class I HLA MoAb inhibited the proliferative response of CTC to OKT3. Pretreatment of CTC with anti-class I HLA MoAb inhibited PHA-, Con A and PWM-induced proliferation, to a greater degree than the anti-class II HLA MoAb. It appears as if lymphocyte activation by different mitogens exhibits variable requirements for the presence of cells expressing major histocompatibility determinants. Binding of Ab to membrane markers may interfere with lymphocyte-AC cooperation, perhaps by inhibiting binding of mitogens to their receptors or by interfering with lymphocyte and AC function. We also have examined the role of class II HLA antigens on CTC by depleting class II HLA-positive cells

  10. Hepatitis B virus core antigen determines viral persistence in a C57BL/6 mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Jiun; Huang, Li-Rung; Yang, Hung-Chih; Tzeng, Horng-Tay; Hsu, Ping-Ning; Wu, Hui-Lin; Chen, Pei-Jer; Chen, Ding-Shinn

    2010-05-18

    We recently developed a mouse model of hepatitis B virus (HBV) persistence, in which a single i.v. hydrodynamic injection of HBV DNA to C57BL/6 mice allows HBV replication and induces a partial immune response, so that about 20-30% of the mice carry HBV for more than 6 months. The model was used to identify the viral antigen crucial for HBV persistence. We knocked out individual HBV genes by introducing a premature termination codon to the HBV core, HBeAg, HBx, and polymerase ORFs. The specific-gene-deficient HBV mutants were hydrodynamically injected into mice and the HBV profiles of the mice were monitored. About 90% of the mice that received the HBcAg-mutated HBV plasmid exhibited high levels of hepatitis B surface antigenemia and maintained HBsAg expression for more than 6 months after injection. To map the region of HBcAg essential for viral clearance, we constructed a set of serial HBcAg deletion mutants for hydrodynamic injection. We localized the essential region of HBcAg to the carboxyl terminus, specifically to the 10 terminal amino acids (HBcAg176-185). The majority of mice receiving this HBV mutant DNA did not elicit a proper HBcAg-specific IFN-gamma response and expressed HBV virions for 6 months. These results indicate that the immune response triggered in mice by HBcAg during exposure to HBV is important in determining HBV persistence.

  11. Application of 99mTc-labeled chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7 for radioimmunoscintigraphy of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Hiroomi

    1999-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal diseases and its prognosis is still poor. To improve the survival rate, it is essential to develop new technologies for early and definitive diagnosis. In this study, chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7 were successfully radio-labeled with 99m Tc, preventing depression of the antigen-binding activity. 99m Tc-labeled monoclonal antibody A7, 99m Tc-labeled chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7, 99m Tc-labeled normal mouse IgG and 99m Tc-labeled Fab fragments of normal mouse IgG were injected intravenously into nude mice bearing human pancreatic cancer xenografts and the radioactivity was subsequently measured. The tumor accumulation was significantly higher with labeled monoclonal antibody A7 than with normal mouse IgG, and higher with chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7 than with Fab fragments of normal mouse IgG. The tumor/blood ratio of radioactivity increased rapidly over time with chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7. These results suggest that chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7 may be useful for diagnosing pancreatic cancer by means of radioimmunoscintigraphy. (author)

  12. Monoclonal antibodies: an overview of their advantages and limitations in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revillard, J.P.; Cohen, J.

    1982-01-01

    The following topics were reviewed: antigen recognition by the immune system; development of immunoassays for antigenic components of biological fluids; monoclonal antibodies against infectious agents; monochonal antibodies against tumor and differentiation antigens; human monoclonal antibodies

  13. Diagnostic efficacy of monoclonal antibody based sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for detection of Fasciola gigantica excretory/secretory antigens in both serum and stool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoheiry Mona K

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This research was carried out to develop a reliable monoclonal antibody (MoAb-based sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for the diagnosis of active Fasciola gigantica infection in both serum and stool for comparative purposes. Methods From a panel of MoAbs raised against F. gigantica excretory/secretory antigens (ES Ags, a pair (12B/11D/3F and 10A/9D/10G was chosen due to its high reactivity and strict specificity to F. gigantica antigen by indirect ELISA. Results The two MoAbs were of the IgG1 and IgG2a subclasses, respectively. Using SDS-PAGE and EITB, the selected MoAbs recognized 83, 64, 45 and 26 kDa bands of ES Ags. The lower detection limit of ELISA assay was 3 ng/ml. In stool, the sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic efficacy of ELISA was 96%, 98.2 and 97.1%; while in serum they were 94%, 94.6% and 94.3%, respectively. Moreover, a positive correlation was found between ova count in stool of F. gigantica infected patients and the OD readings of ELISA in both stool and serum samples (r = 0.730, p Conclusions These data showed that the use of MoAb-based sandwich ELISA for the detection of F. gigantica coproantigens in stool specimens was superior to serum samples; it provides a highly efficient, non-invasive technique for the diagnosis of active F. gigantica infection.

  14. Circulating filarial antigen in the hydrocele fluid from individuals living in a bancroftian filariasis area - Recife, Brazil: detected by the monoclonal antibody Og4C3-assay

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    Abraham Rocha

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the circulating filarial antigen (CFA detected by the monoclonal antibody (mAb Og4C3-ELISA in paired samples of serum and hydrocele fluid from 104 men with hydrocele, living in an endemic area of Wuchereria bancrofti. Nocturnal blood specimens were filtered and examined for microfilariae (MF and ultrasound was used in order to identify the presence of adult worms (the filaria dance sign - FDS in the lymphatic vessels of the scrotal area. Four groups were selected according to their parasitological status: group I - 71 MF- and FDS-; group II - 21 MF+ and FDS+; group III - 10 MF- and FDS+ and group IV- 2 MF+ and FDS-. CFA was identified simultaneously (fluid and serum in 11 (15.5%, 21 (100%, 3 (30%, and 1 (50% in groups I, II, III, and IV, respectively. In despite of high CFA+ level (antigen Og4C3 units/ml, the Geometrical Mean (GM = 2696 in the sera of these 36/104 paired samples, when compared to the hydrocele fluid, (GM = 1079, showed a very good correlation between the CFA level in the serum and CFA level in the fluid (r = 0.731. CFA level in the serum of the 23 microfilaremics (groups II and IV was extremely high (GM = 4189 and was correlated with MF density (r = 0.442. These findings report for the first time the potential alternative use of the hydrocele fluid to investigate CFA using the mAb Og4C3-ELISA.

  15. Phase I trial of yttrium-90-labeled anti-prostate-specific membrane antigen monoclonal antibody J591 for androgen-independent prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milowsky, Matthew I; Nanus, David M; Kostakoglu, Lale; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Goldsmith, Stanley J; Bander, Neil H

    2004-07-01

    To determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), toxicity, human antihuman antibody (HAHA) response, pharmacokinetics, organ dosimetry, targeting, and preliminary efficacy of yttrium-90-labeled anti-prostate-specific membrane antigen monoclonal antibody J591 ((90)Y-J591) in patients with androgen-independent prostate cancer (PC). Patients with androgen-independent PC and evidence of disease progression received indium-111-J591 for pharmacokinetic and biodistribution determinations followed 1 week later by (90)Y-J591 at five dose levels: 5, 10, 15, 17.5, and 20 mCi/m(2). Patients were eligible for up to three re-treatments if platelet and neutrophil recovery was satisfactory. Twenty-nine patients with androgen-independent PC received (90)Y-J591, four of whom were re-treated. Dose limiting toxicity (DLT) was seen at 20 mCi/m(2), with two patients experiencing thrombocytopenia with non-life-threatening bleeding episodes requiring platelet transfusions. The 17.5-mCi/m(2) dose level was determined to be the MTD. No re-treated patients experienced DLT. Nonhematologic toxicity was not dose limiting. Targeting of known sites of bone and soft tissue metastases was seen in the majority of patients. No HAHA response was seen. Antitumor activity was seen, with two patients experiencing 85% and 70% declines in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels lasting 8 and 8.6 months, respectively, before returning to baseline. Both patients had objective measurable disease responses. An additional six patients (21%) experienced PSA stabilization. The recommended dose for (90)Y-J591 is 17.5 mCi/m(2). Acceptable toxicity, excellent targeting of known sites of PC metastases, and biologic activity in patients with androgen-independent PC warrant further investigation of (90)Y-J591 in the treatment of patients with PC.

  16. Influenza human monoclonal antibody 1F1 interacts with three major antigenic sites and residues mediating human receptor specificity in H1N1 viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tshidi Tsibane

    Full Text Available Most monoclonal antibodies (mAbs to the influenza A virus hemagglutinin (HA head domain exhibit very limited breadth of inhibitory activity due to antigenic drift in field strains. However, mAb 1F1, isolated from a 1918 influenza pandemic survivor, inhibits select human H1 viruses (1918, 1943, 1947, and 1977 isolates. The crystal structure of 1F1 in complex with the 1918 HA shows that 1F1 contacts residues that are classically defined as belonging to three distinct antigenic sites, Sa, Sb and Ca(2. The 1F1 heavy chain also reaches into the receptor binding site (RBS and interacts with residues that contact sialoglycan receptors and determine HA receptor specificity. The 1F1 epitope is remarkably similar to the previously described murine HC63 H3 epitope, despite significant sequence differences between H1 and H3 HAs. Both antibodies potently inhibit receptor binding, but only HC63 can block the pH-induced conformational changes in HA that drive membrane fusion. Contacts within the RBS suggested that 1F1 may be sensitive to changes that alter HA receptor binding activity. Affinity assays confirmed that sequence changes that switch the HA to avian receptor specificity affect binding of 1F1 and a mAb possessing a closely related heavy chain, 1I20. To characterize 1F1 cross-reactivity, additional escape mutant selection and site-directed mutagenesis were performed. Residues 190 and 227 in the 1F1 epitope were found to be critical for 1F1 reactivity towards 1918, 1943 and 1977 HAs, as well as for 1I20 reactivity towards the 1918 HA. Therefore, 1F1 heavy-chain interactions with conserved RBS residues likely contribute to its ability to inhibit divergent HAs.

  17. Generation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against Giardia muris trophozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyworth, M F; Ho, K E; Pappo, J

    1989-11-01

    Mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were produced against Giardia muris trophozoite surface antigens. To generate B-cell hybridomas, P3/NS1/1-Ag4-1 myeloma cells were fused with splenic lymphocytes from BALB/c mice that had been immunized parenterally with G. muris trophozoites. Hybridoma culture supernatants were screened for mAb by flow cytometry of G. muris trophozoites incubated with culture supernatant followed by fluorescein-conjugated anti-mouse IgG and IgM. Flow cytometry showed three types of trophozoite staining by mAb: (i) bright staining of greater than 90% of trophozoites, with aggregation of the organisms; (ii) bright staining of approximately 90% of trophozoites, with little or no aggregation; (iii) dull staining of approximately 20% of trophozoites, without aggregation. Western blotting of mAb on G. muris trophozoite antigens separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that a mAb exhibiting the third of these flow cytometry staining patterns recognized trophozoite antigens of MW approximately 31,000 and 35,000. Immunoprecipitation studies indicated that the same mAb specifically precipitated two 125I-labelled trophozoite surface antigens of MW approximately 30,000. Monoclonal antibodies generated in this study may facilitate the purification and biochemical characterization of trophozoite antigens that are targets for protective intestinal antibody in G. muris-infected mice.

  18. Antigenic characterization of an abnormal isoform of prion protein using a new diverse panel of monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chan-Lan; Umetani, Atsushi; Matsui, Toshio; Ishiguro, Naotaka; Shinagawa, Morikazu; Horiuchi, Motohiro

    2004-01-01

    We established a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against prion protein (PrP) by immunizing PrP gene-ablated mice with the pathogenic isoform of prion protein (PrP Sc ) or recombinant prion protein (rPrP). The mAbs could be divided into at least 10 groups by fine epitope analyses using mutant rPrPs and pepspot analysis. Seven linear epitopes, lying within residues 56-90, 119-127, 137-143, 143-149, 147-151, 163-169, and 219-229, were defined by seven groups of mAbs, although the remaining three groups of mAbs recognized discontinuous epitopes. We attempted to examine whether any of these epitopes are located on the accessible surface of PrP Sc . However, no mAbs reacted with protease-treated PrP Sc purified from scrapie-affected mice, even when PrP Sc was dispersed into a detergent-lipid protein complex, to reduce the size of PrP Sc aggregates. In contrast, denaturation of PrP Sc by guanidine hydrochloride efficiently exposed all of the epitopes. This suggests that any epitope recognized by this panel of mAbs is buried within the PrP Sc aggregates. Alternatively, if the corresponding region(s) are on the surface of PrP Sc , the region(s) may be folded into conformations to which the mAbs cannot bind. The reactivity of a panel of mAb also showed that the state of PrP Sc aggregation influenced the denaturation process, and the sensitivity to denaturation appeared to vary between epitopes. Our results demonstrate that this new panel of well-characterized mAbs will be valuable for studying the biochemistry and biophysics of PrP molecules as well as for the immuno-diagnosis of prion diseases

  19. The development of glioblastoma multiforme reactive monoclonal antibodies and their use in drug targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaich, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to develop monoclonal antibodies reactive with the tumor glioblastoma multiforme and to use them to study and develop new treatment modalities for this disease. A tumor antigen enriched immunogen, prepared by immunoaffinity chromatography, was compared to a whole tumor homogenate immunogen with the difference in the yield of tumor reactive, normal brain unreactive monoclonal antibodies proving to be significant. Monoclonal antibody A7, reactive with tumor tissue but unreactive with normal tissue, was isotyped to be an IgG2a immunoglobulin and could be purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by using serum-free culture conditions and protein A sepharose chromatography. Monoclonal antibody A7 is noncytotoxic as measured by the 3 H-nicotinamide release assay and binds to a 138 kd membrane antigen which is not internalized. Localization studies using 14 C-labeled monoclonal antibody A7 and the U-87 MG nude mouse xenograft model resulted in a tumor:serum ratio of 1.25:1.0 as compared to 0.29:1.0 for the negative control. A monoclonal antibody A7-doxorubicin immunoconjugate proved to be more cytotoxic than free doxorubicin in vitro while lethality studies using Swiss mice demonstrated the lack of toxicity of the immunoconjugate as compared to free doxorubicin. In vivo chemotherapy studies using the U-87 MG nude mouse xenograft failed to demonstrate any immunoconjugate anti-tumor activity which may be attributable to the route of administration

  20. Imaging of melanoma with 131I-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, S.M.; Brown, J.P.; Wright, P.W.; Carrasquillo, J.A.; Hellstroem, I.; Hellstroem, K.E.

    1983-01-01

    Mouse monoclonal antibodies and Fab fragments specific for p97, a melanoma-associated antigen, were used to image metastatic human melanoma. Preclinical studies in athymic mice showed antigen-specific uptake in melanoma xenografts, and toxicity tests in rabbits gave no evidence for tissue damage after injection of up to 100 times the amount of antibody used in humans. Six patients received 1 mg labeled antibody, and one patient received 1 mg of labeled Fab. No. toxic side effects were observed. All of the six patients had positive scans, visualizing 22 of 25 (88%) of lesions larger than 1.5 cm. In tumors from two patients, greater uptake of p97-specific, versus control IgG and Fab, respectively, was documented by biopsy. Antibodies to mouse immunoglobulin appeared in three patients receiving 1 mg or more of radiolabeled mouse antibody

  1. The feasibility research of galactosyl-anti-mouse CD3 monoclonal antibody being used as carrier of immunotherapy after surgical operation of liver cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yunchun; Guan Changtian; Yang Xiaochuan; He Sheng; Jiang Ping; Yuan Lin

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To probe into the feasibility of galactosyl-anti-mouse CD 3 monoclonal antibody (Gal-Ant-CD 3 McAb) being used as carrier of immunotherapy after surgical operation of liver cancer. Methods: Gal-Ant-CD 3 McAb was prepared by the covalent coupling of anti-mouse CD 3 monoclonal antibody (Ant-CD 3 McAb) with a bifunctional reagent, 2-imino-2-methoxyethyl-1-thio-galactose. After Gal-Ant-CD 3 McAb and Ant-CD 3 McAb were labelled with 131 I or 125 I, the data of biodistribution in mice, and of imaging in rabbit were obtained. After tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and Gal-Ant-CD 3 McAb were coupled into Gal-Ant-CD 3 McAb-TIL, its liver taxis and cytotoxic activity against autologous cancer cells were measured in vitro. Results: Gal-Ant-CD 3 McAb had remarkable livertaxis and its uptake in per gram liver was (59.0 +- 2.1)% that was more than two-fold higher than that of Ant-CD 3 McAb. Gal-Ant-CD 3 McAb-TIL had an obvious liver taxis and cytotoxic activity against autologous cancer cells in vitro. Conclusion: Gal-Ant-CD 3 McAb can be used as the carrier of immunotherapy after surgical operation of liver cancer

  2. Establishment of the cross-clade antigen detection system for H5 subtype influenza viruses using peptide monoclonal antibodies specific for influenza virus H5 hemagglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hitoshi; Nagata, Shiho; Odagiri, Takato; Kageyama, Tsutomu

    2018-04-15

    The H5 subtype of highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5 HPAI) viruses is a threat to both animal and human public health and has the potential to cause a serious future pandemic in humans. Thus, specific and rapid detection of H5 HPAI viruses is required for infection control in humans. To develop a simple and rapid diagnostic system to detect H5 HPAI viruses with high specificity and sensitivity, we attempted to prepare monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that specifically recognize linear epitopes in hemagglutinin (HA) of H5 subtype viruses. Nine mAb clones were obtained from mice immunized with a synthetic partial peptide of H5 HA molecules conserved among various H5 HPAI viruses. The antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using the most suitable combination of these mAbs, which bound specifically to lysed H5 HA under an optimized detergent condition, was specific for H5 viruses and could broadly detect H5 viruses in multiple different clades. Taken together, these peptide mAbs, which recognize linear epitopes in a highly conserved region of H5 HA, may be useful for specific and highly sensitive detection of H5 HPAI viruses and can help in the rapid diagnosis of human, avian, and animal H5 virus infections. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Crystal structure of the antigen-binding fragment of a monoclonal antibody specific for the multidrug-resistance-linked ABC transporter human P-glycoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esser, Lothar; Shukla, Suneet; Zhou, Fei; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Xia, Di

    2016-07-27

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a polyspecific ATP-dependent transporter linked to multidrug resistance in cancers that plays important roles in the pharmacokinetics of a large number of drugs. The drug-resistance phenotype of P-gp can be modulated by the monoclonal antibody UIC2, which specifically recognizes human P-gp in a conformation-dependent manner. Here, the purification, sequence determination and high-resolution structure of the Fab fragment of UIC2 (UIC2/Fab) are reported. Purified UIC2/Fab binds human P-gp with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Crystals of UIC2/Fab are triclinic (space groupP1), with unit-cell parametersa= 40.67,b= 44.91,c= 58.09 Å, α = 97.62, β = 99.10, γ = 94.09°, and diffracted X-rays to 1.6 Å resolution. The structure was determined by molecular replacement and refined to 1.65 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contains one molecule of UIC2/Fab, which exhibits a positively charged antigen-binding surface, suggesting that it might recognize an oppositely charged extracellular epitope of P-gp.

  4. An inducible transgenic mouse model for immune mediated hepatitis showing clearance of antigen expressing hepatocytes by CD8+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Cebula

    Full Text Available The liver has the ability to prime immune responses against neo antigens provided upon infections. However, T cell immunity in liver is uniquely modulated by the complex tolerogenic property of this organ that has to also cope with foreign agents such as endotoxins or food antigens. In this respect, the nature of intrahepatic T cell responses remains to be fully characterized. To gain deeper insight into the mechanisms that regulate the CD8+ T cell responses in the liver, we established a novel OVA_X_CreER(T2 mouse model. Upon tamoxifen administration OVA antigen expression is observed in a fraction of hepatocytes, resulting in a mosaic expression pattern. To elucidate the cross-talk of CD8+ T cells with antigen-expressing hepatocytes, we adoptively transferred K(b/OVA257-264-specific OT-I T cells to OVA_X_CreER(T2 mice or generated triple transgenic OVA_X CreER(T2_X_OT-I mice. OT-I T cells become activated in OVA_X_CreER(T2 mice and induce an acute and transient hepatitis accompanied by liver damage. In OVA_X_CreER(T2_X_OT-I mice, OVA induction triggers an OT-I T cell mediated, fulminant hepatitis resulting in 50% mortality. Surviving mice manifest a long lasting hepatitis, and recover after 9 weeks. In these experimental settings, recovery from hepatitis correlates with a complete loss of OVA expression indicating efficient clearance of the antigen-expressing hepatocytes. Moreover, a relapse of hepatitis can be induced upon re-induction of cured OVA_X_CreER(T2_X_OT-I mice indicating absence of tolerogenic mechanisms. This pathogen-free, conditional mouse model has the advantage of tamoxifen inducible tissue specific antigen expression that reflects the heterogeneity of viral antigen expression and enables the study of intrahepatic immune responses to both de novo and persistent antigen. It allows following the course of intrahepatic immune responses: initiation, the acute phase and antigen clearance.

  5. Construction of a hepatitis B virus neutralizing chimeric monoclonal antibody recognizing escape mutants of the viral surface antigen (HBsAg).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golsaz-Shirazi, Forough; Amiri, Mohammad Mehdi; Farid, Samira; Bahadori, Motahareh; Bohne, Felix; Altstetter, Sebastian; Wolff, Lisa; Kazemi, Tohid; Khoshnoodi, Jalal; Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad; Chudy, Michael; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Protzer, Ulrike; Shokri, Fazel

    2017-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a global burden on the health-care system and is considered as the tenth leading cause of death in the world. Over 248 million patients are currently suffering from chronic HBV infection worldwide and annual mortality rate of this infection is 686000. The "a" determinant is a hydrophilic region present in all antigenic subtypes of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), and antibodies against this region can neutralize the virus and are protective against all subtypes. We have recently generated a murine anti-HBs monoclonal antibody (4G4), which can neutralize HBV infection in HepaRG cells and recognize most of the escape mutant forms of HBsAg. Here, we describe the production and characterization of the chimeric human-murine antibody 4G4 (c-4G4). Variable region genes of heavy and light chains of the m-4G4 were cloned and fused to constant regions of human kappa and IgG1 by splice overlap extension (SOE) PCR. The chimeric antibody was expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO)-K1 cells and purified from culture supernatant. Competition ELISA proved that both antibodies bind the same epitope within HBsAg. Antigen-binding studies using ELISA and Western blot showed that c-4G4 has retained the affinity and specificity of the parental murine antibody, and displayed a similar pattern of reactivity to 13 escape mutant forms of HBsAg. Both, the parental and c-4G4 showed a comparably high HBV neutralization capacity in cell culture even at the lowest concentration (0.6μg/ml). Due to the ability of c-4G4 to recognize most of the sub-genotypes and escape mutants of HBsAg, this antibody either alone or in combination with other anti-HBs antibodies could be considered as a potent alternative for Hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) as an HBV infection prophylactic or for passive immunotherapy against HBV infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A new and rapid method for immunoglobulin class and subclass determination of mouse monoclonal antibodies using a solid-phase immunoradiometric assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storch, M.-J.; Lohmann-Matthes, M.-L.

    1984-01-01

    A solid-phase immunoradiometric assay is described for the detection of mouse immunoglobulin classes and subclasses in unpurified and unconcentrated supernatants of hybridomas. IgG fractions from rabbit antisera specific for mouse immunoglobulin classes and subclasses are used for coating the wells of flexible microtiter plates. Monoclonal antibody present in hybridoma supernatants is bound only to wells that contain the appropriate anti-subclass antibody. The binding of hybridoma antibodies to corresponding IgG subclasses or IgM is then detected by a labeled rabbit anti-mouse antibody binding to all mouse immunoglobulins (heavy and light chains). Thus, only 1 labeled antibody is needed for all assays. The advantages of the method described are the following: results are obtained within a few hours and antibody containing hybridoma supernatants may be used without a concentration step since minute amounts of antibody are detected by the immunoradiometric assay. Cultures producing several subclasses may be early recognized as oligo/polyclonal. (Auth.)

  7. Use of AN Eosinophil Specific Monoclonal Antibody in Assessing Eosinophil Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkoff, Marjorie Sue

    A monoclonal antibody to an eosinophil specific determinant is very important in assessing eosinophil function during helminthic infection. Eosinophils induced by Schistosoma mansoni infection in BALB/c mice were used to induce C57B1/6 immunocytes for production of hybridomas secreting eosinophil monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies were shown to react with an eosinophil surface epitope but not with neutrophils or macrophages as determined by ELISA, immunodiffusion, immunofluorescence, and immunoblot assay. Affinity chromatography with eosinophil chemotactic factor-sepharose consistently selected out a { rm M_ R} 67,000 protein from solubilized eosinophil membrane antigens but not from neutrophil and macrophage antigens. In vitro studies showed that the eosinophil-specific monoclonal antibodies abrogated antibody-dependent eosinophil -mediated killing of S. mansoni schistosomula using mouse, rat or human eosinophils. Neutrophil and macrophage killing activities were unaffected. The monoclonal antibodies effected complement-dependent lysis of mouse and rat eosinophils but not of human eosinophils. ECF-treated eosinophils showed enhanced killing of schistosomula which was blocked by the monoclonal antibody. Murine and human eosinophils preincubated with monoclonal antibody exhibited decreased chemotaxis to ECF at optimal chemotactic concentrations. The monoclonal antibody also blocked eosinophil binding to ECF- sepharose beads. In vivo induction of peripheral blood eosinophilia by injection of S. mansoni eggs was suppressed by injections of monoclonal antibodies 2CD13 and 2QD45 in mouse and rat experimental models. Eosinophilia induced by keyhole limpet hemocyanin- cyclophosphamide treatment was also suppressed by monoclonal antibody in both murine and rat systems. Pulmonary granulomas in mice given egg injection and monoclonal antibody were smaller and contained fewer eosinophils than those granulomas from mice given eggs only. In immuno-biochemical studies, the

  8. Monoclonal antibodies to Pneumocystis carinii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, J A; Halpern, J L; Lundgren, B

    1989-01-01

    To increase understanding of the antigenic structure of Pneumocystis carinii, we developed monoclonal antibodies to rat and human P. carinii. The specificity of the antibodies was demonstrated by immunofluorescence and immunoblot studies. Only one of five monoclonal antibodies to rat P. carinii r...

  9. Response of mouse splenic lymphocytes to timothy pollen antigens in a microculture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, S S; Malley, A

    1975-12-01

    Spleen cells from LAF1 mice were stimulated in a microculture system with T and B cell mitogens or antigens of timothy pollen. Only cells from mice immunized with crude timothy pollen extract (WST) or a major antigen of timothy pollen conjugated to Ascaris (antigen B-Ascaris) responded to timothy antigens in vitro. Optimum responses were obtained at 120 to 144 hr of culture with 5 to 10 mug WST per culture and ranged from three to 10 times greater than cell background. No correlations could be found between the optimum antigen concentration or the maximum response and the immune status of the spleen cell donor. Response could be inhibited by a dialyzable fraction of timothy pollen, antigen D, which is a monovalent form of a major antigen of timothy pollen.

  10. Direct binding to antigen-coated beads refines the specificity and cross-reactivity of four monoclonal antibodies that recognize polymorphic epitopes of HLA class I molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, H G; Parham, P

    2013-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies with specificity for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I determinants of HLA were originally characterized using serological assays in which the targets were cells expressing three to six HLA class I variants. Because of this complexity, the specificities of the antibodies were defined indirectly by correlation. Here we use a direct binding assay, in which the targets are synthetic beads coated with 1 of 111 HLA class I variants, representing the full range of HLA-A, -B and -C variation. We studied one monoclonal antibody with monomorphic specificity (W6/32) and four with polymorphic specificity (MA2.1, PA2.1, BB7.2 and BB7.1) and compared the results with those obtained previously. W6/32 reacted with all HLA class I variants. MA2.1 not only exhibits high specificity for HLA-A*02, -B*57 and -B*58, but also exhibited cross-reactivity with HLA-A*11 and -B*15:16. At low concentration (1 µg/ml), PA2.1 and BB7.2 were both specific for HLA-A*02 and -A*69, and at high concentration (50 µg/ml) exhibited significant cross-reactions with HLA-A*68, -A*23 and -A*24. BB7.1 exhibits specificity for HLA-B*07 and -B*42, as previously described, but reacts equally well with HLA-B*81, a rare allotype defined some 16 years after the description of BB7.1. The results obtained with cell-based and bead-based assays are consistent and, in combination with amino acid sequence comparison, increase understanding of the polymorphic epitopes recognized by the MA2.1, PA2.1, BB7.2 and BB7.1 antibodies. Comparison of two overlapping but distinctive bead sets from two sources gave similar results, but the overall levels of binding were significantly different. Several weaker reactions were observed with only one of the bead sets. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Mouse-specific antibody responses to a monoclonal antibody during repeated immunoscintigraphy investigations: Comparison of antibody titres and imaging studies in a rat model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimm, M.V.; Gribben, S.J.; Markham, A.J.; Perkins, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    As a model for human mouse-specific antibody responses in patients undergoing immunoscintigraphy, we have investigated in rats the production of mouse-specific antibodies (MA) to the mouse monoclonal antibody 791T/36. At intervals of between 5 and 16 weeks the rats were given repeated cycles of intravenous (IV) injections of antibody with or without a simultaneous intradermal (ID) injection. The IV dose was 60 μg/kg, a dose similar to that used in many clinical immunoscintigraphy studies. The ID injection was 2 μg, which mimicks the skin test dose often given in clinical imaging protocols. The study was carried out with both 131 I-labelled antibody and with antibody labelled with 111 In by DTPA chelation. MA was measured with a passive haemagglutination assay using sheep red blood cells coated with the monoclonal antibody. Of rats given ID injections of unlabelled antibody at the same time as the IV imaging doses, 9/20 produced MA during 4 cycles of injections. In contrast, only 2/16 rats given only the IV dose produced MA. Both 131 I- and 111 In-labelled antibody appeared equally immunogenic with 5/18 and 6/18 overall responders, respectively. The production of MA was associated with a significant perturbation in the biodistribution of the IV dose of labelled antibody as seen by gamma-camera imaging of the rats given 111 In-labelled antibody. There was clearance of immune complexes to the liver, this organ accumulating up to 90% of the whole body count rate of radiolabel. MA titres of between 1/100 and 1/78000 caused equal perturbation of biodistribution, although below 1/100 the effect was more variable. (orig.)

  12. Monoclonal antibodies in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, S.Y.T.; Sikora, K.

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MCAs) can be used to differentiate between normal and neoplastic cells and thus exploited for diagnostic and, ultimately, therapeutic gain. The evidence for the existence of human tumour antigens is reviewed. Several areas of diagnosis are already benefiting from the application of the monoclonal technology. Immunohistology can help the pathologist with difficult diagnostic problems. New classifications of lymphoma and leukaemia can be based on specific surface molecules. Similarly, the detection of shed tumour antigens is already established as part of the routine assessment of many patients with common solid tumours. Isotopically labeled monoclonal antibodies have been used to localise primary and metastatic tumours. The use of antibodies in this way is not only a promising diagnostic tool but also the first step in studying the possibility of arming antibodies to provide therapeutic agents. Such trials are currently in progress. (Auth.)

  13. Immunoglobulin variable region sequences of two human monoclonal antibodies directed to an onco-developmental carbohydrate antigen, lactotetraosylceramide (LcOse4Cer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yago, K; Zenita, K; Ohwaki, I; Harada, R; Nozawa, S; Tsukazaki, K; Iwamori, M; Endo, N; Yasuda, N; Okuma, M

    1993-11-01

    A human monoclonal antibody, 11-50, was generated and was shown to recognize an onco-developmental carbohydrate antigen, LcOse4Cer. The isotype of this antibody was IgM, lambda, similar to the previously known human anti-LcOse4 antibodies, such as IgMWOO and HMST-1. We raised a murine anti-idiotypic antibody G3 (IgG1, kappa) against 11-50, and tested its reactivity towards the affinity purified human polyclonal anti-LcOse4 antibodies prepared from pooled human sera using a Gal beta 1-->3GlcNAc beta-immobilized column. The results indicated that at least a part of the human polyclonal anti-LcOse4 antibodies shared the G3 idiotype with 11-50. We further analyzed the sequence of variable regions of the two anti-LcOse4 antibodies, 11-50 and HMST-1. Sequence analysis of the heavy chain variable regions indicated that the VH regions of these two antibodies were highly homologous to each other (93.5% at the nucleic acid level), and these antibodies utilized the germline genes VH1.9III and hv3005f3 as the VH segments, which are closely related germline genes of the VHIII family. It was noted that these germline VH genes are frequently utilized in fetal B cells. The JH region of both antibodies was encoded by the JH4 gene. For the light chain, the V lambda segments of the two antibodies were 96.3% homologous to each other at the nucleic acid level. The V lambda segments of both antibodies showed the highest homology to the rearranged V lambda gene called V lambda II.DS among reported V lambda genes, while the exact germline V lambda genes encoding the two antibodies were not yet registered in available sequence databanks. The amino acid sequences of the J lambda segments of both antibodies were identical. These results indicate that the two human antibodies recognizing the onco-developmental carbohydrate antigen Lc4 are encoded by the same or very homologous germline genes.

  14. Development of Protective Immunity in New Zealand White Rabbits Challenged with Bacillus anthracis Spores and Treated with Antibiotics and Obiltoxaximab, a Monoclonal Antibody against Protective Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Lisa N; Carpenter, Sarah; Stark, Gregory V; Serbina, Natalya V

    2018-02-01

    The recommended management of inhalational anthrax, a high-priority bioterrorist threat, includes antibiotics and antitoxins. Obiltoxaximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody against anthrax protective antigen (PA), is licensed under the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Animal Rule for the treatment of inhalational anthrax. Because of spore latency, disease reemergence after treatment cessation is a concern, and there is a need to understand the development of endogenous protective immune responses following antitoxin-containing anthrax treatment regimens. Here, acquired protective immunity was examined in New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits challenged with a targeted lethal dose of Bacillus anthracis spores and treated with antibiotics, obiltoxaximab, or a combination of both. Survivors of the primary challenge were rechallenged 9 months later and monitored for survival. Survival rates after primary and rechallenge for controls and animals treated with obiltoxaximab, levofloxacin, or a combination of both were 0, 65, 100, and 95%, and 0, 100, 95, and 89%, respectively. All surviving immune animals had circulating antibodies to PA and serum toxin-neutralizing titers prior to rechallenge. Following rechallenge, systemic bacteremia and toxemia were not detected in most animals, and the levels of circulating anti-PA IgG titers increased starting at 5 days postrechallenge. We conclude that treatment with obiltoxaximab, alone or combined with antibiotics, significantly improves the survival of rabbits that received a lethal inhalation B. anthracis spore challenge dose and does not interfere with the development of immunity. Survivors of primary challenge are protected against reexposure, have rare incidents of systemic bacteremia and toxemia, and have evidence of an anamnestic response. Copyright © 2018 Henning et al.

  15. A lipasin/Angptl8 monoclonal antibody lowers mouse serum triglycerides involving increased postprandial activity of the cardiac lipoprotein lipase

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Zhiyao; Abou-Samra, Abdul B.; Zhang, Ren

    2015-01-01

    Lipasin/Angptl8 is a feeding-induced hepatokine that regulates triglyceride (TAG) metabolism; its therapeutical potential, mechanism of action, and relation to the lipoprotein lipase (LPL), however, remain elusive. We generated five monoclonal lipasin antibodies, among which one lowered the serum TAG level when injected into mice, and the epitope was determined to be EIQVEE. Lipasin-deficient mice exhibited elevated postprandial activity of LPL in the heart and skeletal muscle, but not in whi...

  16. Anti-respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) G monoclonal antibodies reduce lung inflammation and viral lung titers when delivered therapeutically in a BALB/c mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caidi, Hayat; Miao, Congrong; Thornburg, Natalie J; Tripp, Ralph A; Anderson, Larry J; Haynes, Lia M

    2018-06-01

    RSV continues to be a high priority for vaccine and antiviral drug development. Unfortunately, no safe and effective RSV vaccine is available and treatment options are limited. Over the past decade, several studies have focused on the role of RSV G protein on viral entry, viral neutralization, and RSV-mediated pathology. Anti-G murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) 131-2G treatment has been previously shown to reduce weight loss, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell number, airway reactivity, and Th2-type cytokine production in RSV-infected mice more rapidly than a commercial humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb) against RSV F protein (Palivizumab). In this study, we have tested two human anti-RSV G mAbs, 2B11 and 3D3, by both prophylactic and therapeutic treatment for RSV in the BALB/c mouse model. Both anti-G mAbs reduced viral load, leukocyte infiltration and IFN-γ and IL-4 expression in cell-free BAL supernatants emphasizing the potential of anti-G mAbs as anti-inflammatory and antiviral strategies. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  18. A humanized monoclonal antibody neutralizes yellow fever virus strain 17D-204 in vitro but does not protect a mouse model from disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Amanda E; Dixon, Kandice L; Piper, Joseph; Bennett, Susan L; Thibodeaux, Brett A; Barrett, Alan D T; Roehrig, John T; Blair, Carol D

    2016-07-01

    The yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccine 17D-204 is considered safe and effective, yet rare severe adverse events (SAEs), some resulting in death, have been documented following vaccination. Individuals exhibiting post-vaccinal SAEs are ideal candidates for antiviral monoclonal antibody (MAb) therapy; the time until appearance of clinical signs post-exposure is usually short and patients are quickly hospitalized. We previously developed a murine-human chimeric monoclonal antibody (cMAb), 2C9-cIgG, reactive with both virulent YFV and 17D-204, and demonstrated its ability to prevent and treat YF disease in both AG129 mouse and hamster models of infection. To counteract possible selection of 17D-204 variants that escape neutralization by treatment with a single MAb (2C9-cIgG), we developed a second cMAb, 864-cIgG, for use in combination with 2C9-cIgG in post-vaccinal therapy. MAb 864-cIgG recognizes/neutralizes only YFV 17D-204 vaccine substrain and binds to domain III (DIII) of the viral envelope protein, which is different from the YFV type-specific binding site of 2C9-cIgG in DII. Although it neutralized 17D-204 in vitro, administration of 864-cIgG had no protective capacity in the interferon receptor-deficient AG129 mouse model of 17D-204 infection. The data presented here show that although DIII-specific 864-cIgG neutralizes virus infectivity in vitro, it does not have the ability to abrogate disease in vivo. Therefore, combination of 864-cIgG with 2C9-cIgG for treatment of YF vaccination SAEs does not appear to provide an improvement on 2C9-cIgG therapy alone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Expression of the small T antigen of Lymphotropic Papovavirus is sufficient to transform primary mouse embryo fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Tushar; Robles, Maria Teresa Sáenz [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Schowalter, Rachel M.; Buck, Christopher B. [Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892-4263 (United States); Pipas, James M., E-mail: pipas@pitt.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Polyomaviruses induce cell proliferation and transformation through different oncoproteins encoded within the early region (ER): large T antigen (LT), small T antigen (sT) and, in some cases, additional components. Each virus utilizes different mechanisms to achieve transformation. For instance, the LTs of Simian virus 40 (SV40), BK and/or JC virus can induce transformation; but Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV) requires expression of sT. Lymphotropic Papovavirus (LPV) is closely related to Human Polyomavirus 9 (HuPyV9) and, under similar conditions, mice expressing LPV.ER exhibit higher rates of tumor formation than mice expressing SV40.ER. We have investigated the contributions of individual LPV.ER components to cell transformation. In contrast to SV40, LPV.ER transforms mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), but expression of LPV LT is insufficient to transform MEFs. Furthermore, LPV sT induces immortalization and transformation of MEFs. Thus, in the case of LPV, sT is the main mediator of oncogenesis. - Highlights: • Characterization of early region products from the Lymphotropic Polyomavirus (LPV). • On its own, sT immortalizes and transforms mouse primary cells, and is able to block p53 activation. • Combined LT and sT expression induces a greater rate of proliferation than either LT or sT alone.

  20. Effect of radiation on the expression of tumor-associated antigens of human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Immunological study using monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hareyama, Masato

    1988-12-01

    We studied the effects of irradiation on the expression of a tumor-associated antigen (YH206 antigen) of cultured human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and flow cytometry. YH206 antigen is preferentially expressed on adenocarcinoma cells. Irradiation of A549 cells remarkably increased the expression of YH206 antigen on the cell surface and the level of the antigen in the culture supernatant as well as in the cell lysate, whereas it significantly affected the expression of HLA (MHC-class I) antigen on the same cells. The expression of HLA antigen on the cell was also increased after treatment of the cells with interferon-..gamma... In an additional experiment, cells were stained simultaneously for surface antigens (fluorescein coupled antibodies) and for DNA content (propidium iodide), and then dual parameter measurements were performed by flow cytometry to analyse the relationship between antigen levels and the cell cycle. YH206 antigen and HLA antigen increased more in the S and G/sub 2//M phases of the cell cycle than in G/sub 0//G/sub 1/. The expression of YH206 antigen was enhanced in the S and G/sub 2//M phases by irradiation, whereas the expression of HLA antigen was enhanced in each phase of the cell cycle with irradiation or IFN. These results suggest that irradiation plays a key role in the change of the expression of certain tumor-associated antigens.

  1. Utility of a human FcRn transgenic mouse model in drug discovery for early assessment and prediction of human pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Lindsay B.; Wang, Mengmeng; Kavosi, Mania S.; Joyce, Alison; Kurz, Jeffrey C.; Fan, Yao-Yun; Dowty, Martin E.; Zhang, Minlei; Zhang, Yiqun; Cheng, Aili; Hua, Fei; Jones, Hannah M.; Neubert, Hendrik; Polzer, Robert J.; O'Hara, Denise M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Therapeutic antibodies continue to develop as an emerging drug class, with a need for preclinical tools to better predict in vivo characteristics. Transgenic mice expressing human neonatal Fc receptor (hFcRn) have potential as a preclinical pharmacokinetic (PK) model to project human PK of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Using a panel of 27 mAbs with a broad PK range, we sought to characterize and establish utility of this preclinical animal model and provide guidance for its application in drug development of mAbs. This set of mAbs was administered to both hemizygous and homozygous hFcRn transgenic mice (Tg32) at a single intravenous dose, and PK parameters were derived. Higher hFcRn protein tissue expression was confirmed by liquid chromatography-high resolution tandem mass spectrometry in Tg32 homozygous versus hemizygous mice. Clearance (CL) was calculated using non-compartmental analysis and correlations were assessed to historical data in wild-type mouse, non-human primate (NHP), and human. Results show that mAb CL in hFcRn Tg32 homozygous mouse correlate with human (r2 = 0.83, r = 0.91, p PK studies, enhancement of the early selection of lead molecules, and ultimately a decrease in the time for a drug candidate to reach the clinic. PMID:27232760

  2. Motavizumab, A Neutralizing Anti-Respiratory Syncytial Virus (Rsv Monoclonal Antibody Significantly Modifies The Local And Systemic Cytokine Responses Induced By Rsv In The Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafri Hasan S

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Motavizumab (MEDI-524 is a monoclonal antibody with enhanced neutralizing activity against RSV. In mice, motavizumab suppressed RSV replication which resulted in significant reduction of clinical parameters of disease severity. We evaluated the effect of motavizumab on the local and systemic immune response induced by RSV in the mouse model. Balb/c mice were intranasally inoculated with 106.5 PFU RSV A2 or medium. Motavizumab was given once intraperitoneally (1.25 mg/mouse as prophylaxis, 24 h before virus inoculation. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL and serum samples were obtained at days 1, 5 (acute and 28 (long-term post inoculation and analyzed with a multiplex assay (Beadlyte Upstate, NY for simultaneous quantitation of 18 cytokines: IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, KC (similar to human IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-17, TNF-α, MCP-1, RANTES, IFN-γ and GM-CSF. Overall, cytokine concentrations were lower in serum than in BAL samples. By day 28, only KC was detected in BAL specimens at low concentrations in all groups. Administration of motavizumab significantly reduced (p

  3. Importance of Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Multiple Antigenic Sites on the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Spike Glycoprotein To Avoid Neutralization Escape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lingshu; Shi, Wei; Chappell, James D.; Joyce, M. Gordon; Zhang, Yi; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Becker, Michelle M.; van Doremalen, Neeltje; Fischer, Robert; Wang, Nianshuang; Corbett, Kizzmekia S.; Choe, Misook; Mason, Rosemarie D.; Van Galen, Joseph G.; Zhou, Tongqing; Saunders, Kevin O.; Tatti, Kathleen M.; Haynes, Lia M.; Kwong, Peter D.; Modjarrad, Kayvon; Kong, Wing-Pui; McLellan, Jason S.; Denison, Mark R.; Munster, Vincent J.; Mascola, John R.; Graham, Barney S.; Gallagher, Tom

    2018-03-07

    ABSTRACT

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes a highly lethal pulmonary infection with ~35% mortality. The potential for a future pandemic originating from animal reservoirs or health care-associated events is a major public health concern. There are no vaccines or therapeutic agents currently available for MERS-CoV. Using a probe-based single B cell cloning strategy, we have identified and characterized multiple neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specifically binding to the receptor-binding domain (RBD) or S1 (non-RBD) regions from a convalescent MERS-CoV-infected patient and from immunized rhesus macaques. RBD-specific MAbs tended to have greater neutralizing potency than non-RBD S1-specific MAbs. Six RBD-specific and five S1-specific MAbs could be sorted into four RBD and three non-RBD distinct binding patterns, based on competition assays, mapping neutralization escape variants, and structural analysis. We determined cocrystal structures for two MAbs targeting the RBD from different angles and show they can bind the RBD only in the “out” position. We then showed that selected RBD-specific, non-RBD S1-specific, and S2-specific MAbs given prophylactically prevented MERS-CoV replication in lungs and protected mice from lethal challenge. Importantly, combining RBD- and non-RBD MAbs delayed the emergence of escape mutations in a cell-based virus escape assay. These studies identify MAbs targeting different antigenic sites on S that will be useful for defining mechanisms of MERS-CoV neutralization and for developing more effective interventions to prevent or treat MERS-CoV infections.

    IMPORTANCEMERS-CoV causes a highly lethal respiratory infection for which no vaccines or antiviral therapeutic options are currently available. Based on continuing exposure from established reservoirs in dromedary camels and bats, transmission of MERS-CoV into humans and future outbreaks are expected. Using

  4. Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) Regulates Primordial Follicle Assembly by Promoting Apoptosis of Oocytes in Fetal and Neonatal Mouse Ovaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanwei; Jiang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Huan; Ma, Tieliang; Zheng, Wei; Sun, Rui; Shen, Wei; Sha, Jiahao; Cooke, Howard J.; Shi, Qinghua

    2011-01-01

    Primordial follicles, providing all the oocytes available to a female throughout her reproductive life, assemble in perinatal ovaries with individual oocytes surrounded by granulosa cells. In mammals including the mouse, most oocytes die by apoptosis during primordial follicle assembly, but factors that regulate oocyte death remain largely unknown. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a key regulator in many essential cellular processes, was shown to be differentially expressed during these processes in mouse ovaries using 2D-PAGE and MALDI-TOF/TOF methodology. A V-shaped expression pattern of PCNA in both oocytes and somatic cells was observed during the development of fetal and neonatal mouse ovaries, decreasing from 13.5 to 18.5 dpc and increasing from 18.5 dpc to 5 dpp. This was closely correlated with the meiotic prophase I progression from pre-leptotene to pachytene and from pachytene to diplotene when primordial follicles started to assemble. Inhibition of the increase of PCNA expression by RNA interference in cultured 18.5 dpc mouse ovaries strikingly reduced the apoptosis of oocytes, accompanied by down-regulation of known pro-apoptotic genes, e.g. Bax, caspase-3, and TNFα and TNFR2, and up-regulation of Bcl-2, a known anti-apoptotic gene. Moreover, reduced expression of PCNA was observed to significantly increase primordial follicle assembly, but these primordial follicles contained fewer guanulosa cells. Similar results were obtained after down-regulation by RNA interference of Ing1b, a PCNA-binding protein in the UV-induced apoptosis regulation. Thus, our results demonstrate that PCNA regulates primordial follicle assembly by promoting apoptosis of oocytes in fetal and neonatal mouse ovaries. PMID:21253613

  5. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA regulates primordial follicle assembly by promoting apoptosis of oocytes in fetal and neonatal mouse ovaries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Xu

    Full Text Available Primordial follicles, providing all the oocytes available to a female throughout her reproductive life, assemble in perinatal ovaries with individual oocytes surrounded by granulosa cells. In mammals including the mouse, most oocytes die by apoptosis during primordial follicle assembly, but factors that regulate oocyte death remain largely unknown. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, a key regulator in many essential cellular processes, was shown to be differentially expressed during these processes in mouse ovaries using 2D-PAGE and MALDI-TOF/TOF methodology. A V-shaped expression pattern of PCNA in both oocytes and somatic cells was observed during the development of fetal and neonatal mouse ovaries, decreasing from 13.5 to 18.5 dpc and increasing from 18.5 dpc to 5 dpp. This was closely correlated with the meiotic prophase I progression from pre-leptotene to pachytene and from pachytene to diplotene when primordial follicles started to assemble. Inhibition of the increase of PCNA expression by RNA interference in cultured 18.5 dpc mouse ovaries strikingly reduced the apoptosis of oocytes, accompanied by down-regulation of known pro-apoptotic genes, e.g. Bax, caspase-3, and TNFα and TNFR2, and up-regulation of Bcl-2, a known anti-apoptotic gene. Moreover, reduced expression of PCNA was observed to significantly increase primordial follicle assembly, but these primordial follicles contained fewer granulosa cells. Similar results were obtained after down-regulation by RNA interference of Ing1b, a PCNA-binding protein in the UV-induced apoptosis regulation. Thus, our results demonstrate that PCNA regulates primordial follicle assembly by promoting apoptosis of oocytes in fetal and neonatal mouse ovaries.

  6. Monoclonal anti-human factor VII antibodies. Detection in plasma of a second protein antigenically and genetically related to factor VII.

    OpenAIRE

    Broze, G J; Hickman, S; Miletich, J P

    1985-01-01

    Several murine monoclonal anti-human Factor VII antibodies were produced using hybridoma technology. Two noncompetitive monoclonal antibodies were used to examine by Western blotting the Factor VII cross-reactive material (CRM) in normal human plasma and three commercially available congenitally Factor VII-deficient plasmas, and to construct a facile "sandwich" immunoassay for plasma Factor VII. A second, previously undescribed, form of Factor VII CRM was detected in human plasma, which on We...

  7. Radiotoxicity of systemically administered 211At-labeled human/mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody: a long-term survival study with histologic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLendon, Roger E.; Archer, Gary E.; Larsen, Roy H.; Akabani, Gamal; Bigner, Darell D.; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The antitenascin human/mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody labeled with the α-particle-emitting radionuclide 211 At is of interest as an endo radiotherapeutic agent for the treatment of brain tumors. To facilitate the investigation of 211 At-labeled chimeric 81C6 in patients, the long-term radiotoxicity of this radiopharmaceutical has been evaluated. Methods and Materials: Antibody labeling was performed using N-succinimidyl 3-[ 211 At]astato-benzoate. After an initial dose-finding experiment, a second toxicity study was carried out at 4 dose levels in groups of 30 non thyroid blocked B6C3F 1 mice per group (15 males, 15 females). Male mice received either saline or 15-81 kBq/g and females received either saline or 16-83 kBq/g of 211 At-labeled antibody. Ten animals (5 males, 5 females) were followed for 6 months and the remainder for 1 year. Results: The lethal dose in 10% of animals (LD 10 ) for 211 At-labeled chimeric 81C6 was 46 kBq/g in females and 102 kBq/g in males. Toxic effects--perivascular fibrosis of the intraventricular septum of the heart, bone marrow suppression, splenic white pulp atrophy, and spermatic maturational delay--generally were confined to a few animals receiving the highest doses of labeled antibody. Conclusions: The LD 10 of 211 At-labeled chimeric 81C6 in this mouse strain was about half that of [ 211 At]astatide. These results establish the preclinical maximum tolerated dose of 211 At-labeled chimeric 81C6 and define in the mouse the target organs for toxicity. These studies will be useful for determining starting doses for clinical studies with 211 At-labeled chimeric 81C6

  8. A lipasin/Angptl8 monoclonal antibody lowers mouse serum triglycerides involving increased postprandial activity of the cardiac lipoprotein lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhiyao; Abou-Samra, Abdul B; Zhang, Ren

    2015-12-21

    Lipasin/Angptl8 is a feeding-induced hepatokine that regulates triglyceride (TAG) metabolism; its therapeutical potential, mechanism of action, and relation to the lipoprotein lipase (LPL), however, remain elusive. We generated five monoclonal lipasin antibodies, among which one lowered the serum TAG level when injected into mice, and the epitope was determined to be EIQVEE. Lipasin-deficient mice exhibited elevated postprandial activity of LPL in the heart and skeletal muscle, but not in white adipose tissue (WAT), suggesting that lipasin suppresses the activity of LPL specifically in cardiac and skeletal muscles. Consistently, mice injected with the effective antibody or with lipasin deficiency had increased postprandial cardiac LPL activity and lower TAG levels only in the fed state. These results suggest that lipasin acts, at least in part, in an endocrine manner. We propose the following model: feeding induces lipasin, activating the lipasin-Angptl3 pathway, which inhibits LPL in cardiac and skeletal muscles to direct circulating TAG to WAT for storage; conversely, fasting induces Angptl4, which inhibits LPL in WAT to direct circulating TAG to cardiac and skeletal muscles for oxidation. This model suggests a general mechanism by which TAG trafficking is coordinated by lipasin, Angptl3 and Angptl4 at different nutritional statuses.

  9. Therapeutic effects of anti-CD115 monoclonal antibody in mouse cancer models through dual inhibition of tumor-associated macrophages and osteoclasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Fend

    Full Text Available Tumor progression is promoted by Tumor-Associated Macrophages (TAMs and metastasis-induced bone destruction by osteoclasts. Both myeloid cell types depend on the CD115-CSF-1 pathway for their differentiation and function. We used 3 different mouse cancer models to study the effects of targeting cancer host myeloid cells with a monoclonal antibody (mAb capable of blocking CSF-1 binding to murine CD115. In mice bearing sub-cutaneous EL4 tumors, which are CD115-negative, the anti-CD115 mAb depleted F4/80(+ CD163(+ M2-type TAMs and reduced tumor growth, resulting in prolonged survival. In the MMTV-PyMT mouse model, the spontaneous appearance of palpable mammary tumors was delayed when the anti-CD115 mAb was administered before malignant transition and tumors became palpable only after termination of the immunotherapy. When administered to mice already bearing established PyMT tumors, anti-CD115 treatment prolonged their survival and potentiated the effect of chemotherapy with Paclitaxel. As shown by immunohistochemistry, this therapeutic effect correlated with the depletion of F4/80(+CD163(+ M2-polarized TAMs. In a breast cancer model of bone metastasis, the anti-CD115 mAb potently blocked the differentiation of osteoclasts and their bone destruction activity. This resulted in the inhibition of cancer-induced weight loss. CD115 thus represents a promising target for cancer immunotherapy, since a specific blocking antibody may not only inhibit the growth of a primary tumor through TAM depletion, but also metastasis-induced bone destruction through osteoclast inhibition.

  10. Generation of HER2 monoclonal antibodies using epitopes of a rabbit polyclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Francis Jingxin; Uhlen, Mathias; Rockberg, Johan

    2014-01-25

    One of the issues in using polyclonal antibodies is the limited amount of reagent available from an immunisation, leading to batch-to-batch variation and difficulties in obtaining the same antibody performance when the same antigen is re-immunised into several separate animals. This led to the development of hybridoma technology allowing, at least theoretically, for an unlimited production of a specific binder. Nevertheless, polyclonal antibodies are widely used in research and diagnostics and there exists a need for robust methods to convert a polyclonal antibody with good binding performance into a renewable monoclonal with identical or similar binding specificity. Here we have used precise information regarding the functional recognition sequence (epitope) of a rabbit polyclonal antibody with attractive binding characteristics as the basis for generation of a renewable mouse monoclonal antibody. First, the original protein fragment antigen was used for immunisation and generation of mouse hybridoma, without obtaining binders to the same epitope region. Instead a peptide designed using the functional epitope and structural information was synthesised and used for hybridoma production. Several of the monoclonal antibodies generated were found to have similar binding characteristics to those of the original polyclonal antibody. These monoclonal antibodies detected native HER2 on cell lines and were also able to stain HER2 in immunohistochemistry using xenografted mice, as well as human normal and cancer tissues. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisma, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    The usefulness of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and treatment of human (ovarian) cancer was investigated. A review of tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies is presented. Special attention is given to factors that influence the localization of the antibodies in tumors, isotope choice and methods of radiolabeling of the monoclonal antibodies. Two monoclonal antibodies, OC125 and OV-TL3, with high specificity for human epithelial ovarian cancer are characterized. A simple radio-iodination technique was developed for clinical application of the monoclonal antibodies. The behavior of monoclonal antibodies in human tumor xenograft systems and in man are described. Imaging of tumors is complicated because of high background levels of radioactivity in other sites than the tumor, especially in the bloodpool. A technique was developed to improve imaging of human tumor xenographs in nude mice, using subtraction of a specific and a non-specific antibody, radiolabeled with 111 In, 67 Ga and 131 I. To investigate the capability of the two monoclonal antibodies, to specifically localize in human ovarian carcinomas, distribution studies in mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma xenografts were performed. One of the antibodies, OC125, was used for distribution studies in ovarian cancer patients. OC125 was used because of availability and approval to use this antibody in patients. The same antibody was used to investigate the usefulness of radioimmunoimaging in ovarian cancer patients. The interaction of injected radiolabeled antibody OC125 with circulating antigen and an assay to measure the antibody response in ovarian cancer patients after injection of the antibody is described. 265 refs.; 30 figs.; 19 tabs

  12. Antiglycopeptide Mouse Monoclonal Antibody LpMab-21 Exerts Antitumor Activity Against Human Podoplanin Through Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity and Complement-Dependent Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yukinari; Kunita, Akiko; Fukayama, Masashi; Abe, Shinji; Nishioka, Yasuhiko; Uchida, Hiroaki; Tahara, Hideaki; Yamada, Shinji; Yanaka, Miyuki; Nakamura, Takuro; Saidoh, Noriko; Yoshida, Kanae; Fujii, Yuki; Honma, Ryusuke; Takagi, Michiaki; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Murata, Takeshi; Kaneko, Mika K

    2017-02-01

    The interaction between podoplanin (PDPN) and C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) is involved in tumor malignancy. We have established many monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human podoplanin using the cancer-specific mAb (CasMab) technology. LpMab-21, one of the mouse antipodoplanin mAbs, is of the IgG 2a subclass, and its minimum epitope was determined to be Thr76-Arg79 of the human podoplanin. Importantly, sialic acid is linked to Thr76; therefore, LpMab-21 is an antiglycopeptide mAb (GpMab). In this study, we investigated whether LpMab-21 shows antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) against human podoplanin-expressing cancer cell lines in vitro and also studied its antitumor activities using a xenograft model. LpMab-21 showed high ADCC and CDC activities against not only podoplanin-expressing Chinese hamster ovary cells but also LN319 glioblastoma cells and PC-10 lung cancer cells, both of which endogenously express podoplanin. Furthermore, LpMab-21 decreased tumor growth in vivo, indicating that LpMab-21 could be useful for antibody therapy against human podoplanin-expressing cancers.

  13. Programmed Cell Death, Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen and p53 Expression in Mouse Colon Mucosa during Diet-Induced Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Risio

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Western‐style diets (WDs trigger and sustain the early phases of tumorigenesis in mouse colon, and when continued throughout the life span lead to the development of dysplastic crypts. In order to evaluate the roles both of cell proliferation and programmed cell death (PCD in WD‐induced tumorigenesis, immunohistochemical detection of proliferating nuclear antigen (PCNA, in situ end labeling (TUNEL of DNA breaks, and p53 protein were carried out in mouse colonic mucosa during prolonged feeding of two WDs. PCNA Labeling Index of colonic crypts was significantly higher in WD‐treated animals than in controls only at the beginning of the nutritional study, the gap rapidly bridged by increased cell proliferation spontaneously occurring in the colonic mucosa during aging. A transient early homeostatic activation of PCD at the base of the crypt also was observed in WD groups. No changes in PCD were seen in the upper third of the crypt or in surface epithelium throughout the study, indicating that PCD in that colonic crypt segment produces a constant flux of cell loss, uninfluenced by homeostatic fluctuations. A major finding was an irreversible, progressive, age‐related decline of PCD at the crypt base in both control and treated animals that occurred during the second half of the rodents  life span. p53 protein was not immunohistochemically detected, suggesting that neither overexpression of wild‐type nor mutated forms of the protein are involved in the above mentioned changes.

  14. Use of flow cytometry to identify monoclonal antibodies that recognize conserved epitopes on orthologous leukocyte differentiation antigens in goats, llamas, and rabbits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Davis, W. C.; Drbal, Karel; El-Aziz, A.; Mosaad, A.E.; Elbagory, A.R.M.; TIbary, A.; Barrington, G.M.; Park, Y.H.; Hamilton, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 119, 1-2 (2007), s. 123-130 ISSN 0165-2427 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : flow cytometry * monoclonal antibodies * leukocytes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.957, year: 2007

  15. Experimental and clinical analysis of the characteristics of a chimeric monoclonal antibody, MOv18, reactive with an ovarian cancer-associated antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molthoff, C. F.; Buist, M. R.; Kenemans, P.; Pinedo, H. M.; Boven, E.

    1992-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (Mab) MOv18 preferentially reacts with gynecological carcinomas. We have analyzed the characteristics of murine MOv18 (m-MOv18) and chimeric MOv18 (c-MOv18). We found no differences in affinity and binding to IGROV1 cells between c-MOv18 as IgG and F(ab')2 fragments and m-MOv18.

  16. Investigation of antigen-antibody interactions of sulfonamides with a monoclonal antibody in a fluorescence polarization immunoassay using 3D-QSAR models

    Science.gov (United States)

    A three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) model of sulfonamide analogs binding a monoclonal antibody (MAbSMR) produced against sulfamerazine was carried out by Distance Comparison (DISCOtech), comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), and comparative molecular si...

  17. Evaluation of Antigen-Conjugated Fluorescent Beads to Identify Antigen-Specific B Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Isabel; Ilieva, Kristina M; Crescioli, Silvia; Lombardi, Sara; Figini, Mariangela; Cheung, Anthony; Spicer, James F; Tutt, Andrew N J; Nestle, Frank O; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Lacy, Katie E; Karagiannis, Sophia N

    2018-01-01

    Selection of single antigen-specific B cells to identify their expressed antibodies is of considerable interest for evaluating human immune responses. Here, we present a method to identify single antibody-expressing cells using antigen-conjugated fluorescent beads. To establish this, we selected Folate Receptor alpha (FRα) as a model antigen and a mouse B cell line, expressing both the soluble and the membrane-bound forms of a human/mouse chimeric antibody (MOv18 IgG1) specific for FRα, as test antibody-expressing cells. Beads were conjugated to FRα using streptavidin/avidin-biotin bridges and used to select single cells expressing the membrane-bound form of anti-FRα. Bead-bound cells were single cell-sorted and processed for single cell RNA retrotranscription and PCR to isolate antibody heavy and light chain variable regions. Variable regions were then cloned and expressed as human IgG1/k antibodies. Like the original clone, engineered antibodies from single cells recognized native FRα. To evaluate whether antigen-coated beads could identify specific antibody-expressing cells in mixed immune cell populations, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were spiked with test antibody-expressing cells. Antigen-specific cells could comprise up to 75% of cells selected with antigen-conjugated beads when the frequency of the antigen-positive cells was 1:100 or higher. In PBMC pools, beads conjugated to recombinant antigens FRα and HER2 bound antigen-specific anti-FRα MOv18 and anti-HER2 Trastuzumab antibody-expressing cells, respectively. From melanoma patient-derived B cells selected with melanoma cell line-derived protein-coated fluorescent beads, we generated a monoclonal antibody that recognized melanoma antigen-coated beads. This approach may be further developed to facilitate analysis of B cells and their antibody profiles at the single cell level and to help unravel humoral immune repertoires.

  18. Evaluation of Antigen-Conjugated Fluorescent Beads to Identify Antigen-Specific B Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Correa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Selection of single antigen-specific B cells to identify their expressed antibodies is of considerable interest for evaluating human immune responses. Here, we present a method to identify single antibody-expressing cells using antigen-conjugated fluorescent beads. To establish this, we selected Folate Receptor alpha (FRα as a model antigen and a mouse B cell line, expressing both the soluble and the membrane-bound forms of a human/mouse chimeric antibody (MOv18 IgG1 specific for FRα, as test antibody-expressing cells. Beads were conjugated to FRα using streptavidin/avidin-biotin bridges and used to select single cells expressing the membrane-bound form of anti-FRα. Bead-bound cells were single cell-sorted and processed for single cell RNA retrotranscription and PCR to isolate antibody heavy and light chain variable regions. Variable regions were then cloned and expressed as human IgG1/k antibodies. Like the original clone, engineered antibodies from single cells recognized native FRα. To evaluate whether antigen-coated beads could identify specific antibody-expressing cells in mixed immune cell populations, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were spiked with test antibody-expressing cells. Antigen-specific cells could comprise up to 75% of cells selected with antigen-conjugated beads when the frequency of the antigen-positive cells was 1:100 or higher. In PBMC pools, beads conjugated to recombinant antigens FRα and HER2 bound antigen-specific anti-FRα MOv18 and anti-HER2 Trastuzumab antibody-expressing cells, respectively. From melanoma patient-derived B cells selected with melanoma cell line-derived protein-coated fluorescent beads, we generated a monoclonal antibody that recognized melanoma antigen-coated beads. This approach may be further developed to facilitate analysis of B cells and their antibody profiles at the single cell level and to help unravel humoral immune repertoires.

  19. Evaluation of Antigen-Conjugated Fluorescent Beads to Identify Antigen-Specific B Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Isabel; Ilieva, Kristina M.; Crescioli, Silvia; Lombardi, Sara; Figini, Mariangela; Cheung, Anthony; Spicer, James F.; Tutt, Andrew N. J.; Nestle, Frank O.; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Lacy, Katie E.; Karagiannis, Sophia N.

    2018-01-01

    Selection of single antigen-specific B cells to identify their expressed antibodies is of considerable interest for evaluating human immune responses. Here, we present a method to identify single antibody-expressing cells using antigen-conjugated fluorescent beads. To establish this, we selected Folate Receptor alpha (FRα) as a model antigen and a mouse B cell line, expressing both the soluble and the membrane-bound forms of a human/mouse chimeric antibody (MOv18 IgG1) specific for FRα, as test antibody-expressing cells. Beads were conjugated to FRα using streptavidin/avidin-biotin bridges and used to select single cells expressing the membrane-bound form of anti-FRα. Bead-bound cells were single cell-sorted and processed for single cell RNA retrotranscription and PCR to isolate antibody heavy and light chain variable regions. Variable regions were then cloned and expressed as human IgG1/k antibodies. Like the original clone, engineered antibodies from single cells recognized native FRα. To evaluate whether antigen-coated beads could identify specific antibody-expressing cells in mixed immune cell populations, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were spiked with test antibody-expressing cells. Antigen-specific cells could comprise up to 75% of cells selected with antigen-conjugated beads when the frequency of the antigen-positive cells was 1:100 or higher. In PBMC pools, beads conjugated to recombinant antigens FRα and HER2 bound antigen-specific anti-FRα MOv18 and anti-HER2 Trastuzumab antibody-expressing cells, respectively. From melanoma patient-derived B cells selected with melanoma cell line-derived protein-coated fluorescent beads, we generated a monoclonal antibody that recognized melanoma antigen-coated beads. This approach may be further developed to facilitate analysis of B cells and their antibody profiles at the single cell level and to help unravel humoral immune repertoires. PMID:29628923

  20. Differentiation of foot-and-mouth disease virus infected animals from vaccinated animals using a blocking ELISA based on baculovirus expressed FMDV 3ABC antigen and a 3ABC monoclonal antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K.J.; de Stricker, K.; Dyrting, K.C.

    2005-01-01

    A blocking ELISA that differentiated foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infected animals from vaccinated animals was developed which uses baculovirus expressed FMDV 3ABC non-structural protein as antigen and monoclonal antibody against FMDV 3ABC non-structural protein as capture and detector...... infected with all seven serotypes of FMDV. The test detected antibodies from days 7 or 9 following experimental infection of non-vaccinated cattle and sheep, and in cattle strong positive reactions persisted for up to 395 days after infection. In vaccinated cattle that became carriers after challenge...... with homologous FMDV, positive reactions were obtained in all but one case. In some of these cattle the antibody response was detected late in comparison to the non-vaccinated infected cattle. The test gave results that compared favourably with two commercial ELISA's when used to test sera from cattle, pigs...

  1. Therapeutic Effects of Monoclonal Antibody against Dengue Virus NS1 in a STAT1 Knockout Mouse Model of Dengue Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Shu-Wen; Chen, Pei-Wei; Chen, Chin-Yu; Lai, Yen-Chung; Chu, Ya-Ting; Hung, Chia-Yi; Lee, Han; Wu, Hsuan Franziska; Chuang, Yung-Chun; Lin, Jessica; Chang, Chih-Peng; Wang, Shuying; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Ho, Tzong-Shiann; Lin, Chiou-Feng; Lee, Chien-Kuo; Wu-Hsieh, Betty A; Anderson, Robert; Yeh, Trai-Ming; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2017-10-15

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the causative agent of dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and dengue shock syndrome and is endemic to tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Our previous studies showed the existence of epitopes in the C-terminal region of DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) which are cross-reactive with host Ags and trigger anti-DENV NS1 Ab-mediated endothelial cell damage and platelet dysfunction. To circumvent these potentially harmful events, we replaced the C-terminal region of DENV NS1 with the corresponding region from Japanese encephalitis virus NS1 to create chimeric DJ NS1 protein. Passive immunization of DENV-infected mice with polyclonal anti-DJ NS1 Abs reduced viral Ag expression at skin inoculation sites and shortened DENV-induced prolonged bleeding time. We also investigated the therapeutic effects of anti-NS1 mAb. One mAb designated 2E8 does not recognize the C-terminal region of DENV NS1 in which host-cross-reactive epitopes reside. Moreover, mAb 2E8 recognizes NS1 of all four DENV serotypes. We also found that mAb 2E8 caused complement-mediated lysis in DENV-infected cells. In mouse model studies, treatment with mAb 2E8 shortened DENV-induced prolonged bleeding time and reduced viral Ag expression in the skin. Importantly, mAb 2E8 provided therapeutic effects against all four serotypes of DENV. We further found that mAb administration to mice as late as 1 d prior to severe bleeding still reduced prolonged bleeding time and hemorrhage. Therefore, administration with a single dose of mAb 2E8 can protect mice against DENV infection and pathological effects, suggesting that NS1-specific mAb may be a therapeutic option against dengue disease. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  2. Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Small T Antigen Induces Cancer and Embryonic Merkel Cell Proliferation in a Transgenic Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuda, Masahiro; Guastafierro, Anna; Geng, Xuehui; Shuda, Yoko; Ostrowski, Stephen M; Lukianov, Stefan; Jenkins, Frank J; Honda, Kord; Maricich, Stephen M; Moore, Patrick S; Chang, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) causes the majority of human Merkel cell carcinomas (MCC) and encodes a small T (sT) antigen that transforms immortalized rodent fibroblasts in vitro. To develop a mouse model for MCV sT-induced carcinogenesis, we generated transgenic mice with a flox-stop-flox MCV sT sequence homologously recombined at the ROSA locus (ROSAsT), allowing Cre-mediated, conditional MCV sT expression. Standard tamoxifen (TMX) administration to adult UbcCreERT2; ROSAsT mice, in which Cre is ubiquitously expressed, resulted in MCV sT expression in multiple organs that was uniformly lethal within 5 days. Conversely, most adult UbcCreERT2; ROSAsT mice survived low-dose tamoxifen administration but developed ear lobe dermal hyperkeratosis and hypergranulosis. Simultaneous MCV sT expression and conditional homozygous p53 deletion generated multi-focal, poorly-differentiated, highly anaplastic tumors in the spleens and livers of mice after 60 days of TMX treatment. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts from these mice induced to express MCV sT exhibited anchorage-independent cell growth. To examine Merkel cell pathology, MCV sT expression was also induced during mid-embryogenesis in Merkel cells of Atoh1CreERT2/+; ROSAsT mice, which lead to significantly increased Merkel cell numbers in touch domes at late embryonic ages that normalized postnatally. Tamoxifen administration to adult Atoh1CreERT2/+; ROSAsT and Atoh1CreERT2/+; ROSAsT; p53flox/flox mice had no effects on Merkel cell numbers and did not induce tumor formation. Taken together, these results show that MCV sT stimulates progenitor Merkel cell proliferation in embryonic mice and is a bona fide viral oncoprotein that induces full cancer cell transformation in the p53-null setting.

  3. Evaluation of (89Zr-labeled human anti-CD147 monoclonal antibody as a positron emission tomography probe in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Sugyo

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive cancer and its prognosis remains poor. Therefore, additional effective therapy is required to augment and/or complement current therapy. CD147, high expression in pancreatic cancer, is involved in the metastatic process and is considered a good candidate for targeted therapy. CD147-specfic imaging could be useful for selection of appropriate patients. Therefore, we evaluated the potential of a fully human anti-CD147 monoclonal antibody 059-053 as a new positron emission tomography (PET probe for pancreatic cancer. METHODS: CD147 expression was evaluated in four pancreatic cancer cell lines (MIA Paca-2, PANC-1, BxPC-3, and AsPC-1 and a mouse cell line A4 as a negative control. Cell binding, competitive inhibition and internalization assays were conducted with (125I-, (67Ga-, or (89Zr-labeled 059-053. In vivo biodistribution of (125I- or (89Zr-labeled 059-053 was conducted in mice bearing MIA Paca-2 and A4 tumors. PET imaging with [(89Zr]059-053 was conducted in subcutaneous and orthotopic tumor mouse models. RESULTS: Among four pancreatic cancer cell lines, MIA Paca-2 cells showed the highest expression of CD147, while A4 cells had no expression. Immunohistochemical staining showed that MIA Paca-2 xenografts also highly expressed CD147 in vivo. Radiolabeled 059-053 specifically bound to MIA Paca-2 cells with high affinity, but not to A4. [(89Zr]059-053 uptake in MIA Paca-2 tumors increased with time from 11.0±1.3% injected dose per gram (ID/g at day 1 to 16.9±3.2% ID/g at day 6, while [(125I]059-053 uptake was relatively low and decreased with time, suggesting that 059-053 was internalized into tumor cells in vivo and (125I was released from the cells. PET with [(89Zr]059-053 clearly visualized subcutaneous and orthotopic tumors. CONCLUSION: [(89Zr]059-053 is a promising PET probe for imaging CD147 expression in pancreatic cancer and has the potential to select appropriate patients with CD147

  4. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies directed against human thyroid stimulating hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soos, M.; Siddle, K.

    1982-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed against human thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were obtained from hybrid myelomas, following fusion of mouse NSI myeloma cells with mouse spleen cells. Ten different antibodies were obtained from 4 separate fusions. Eight antibodies were of the IgG 1 subclass. Affinities of antibodies for TSH were in the range 2 x 10 8 -5 x 10 10 M -1 . Five of the antibodies were specific for TSH and did not react with LH, FSH or hCG. The remaining antibodies reacted with all these hormones and were assumed to recognise their common (α) subunit. The 5 specific antibodies fell into 3 subgroups recognising distinct antigenic determinants, whereas the 5 non-specific antibodies recognised a single determinant or closely related set of sites. It is concluded that these antibodies should be valuable reagents for use in sensitive and specific two-site immunoradiometric assays. (Auth.)

  5. TU-F-12A-01: Quantitative Non-Linear Compartment Modeling of 89Zr- and 124I- Labeled J591 Monoclonal Antibody Kinetics Using Serial Non-Invasive Positron Emission Tomography Imaging in a Pre-Clinical Human Prostate Cancer Mouse Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fung, EK; Cheal, SM; Chalasani, S; Fareedy, SB; Punzalan, B; Humm, JL; Osborne, JR; Larson, SM; Zanzonico, PB [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Otto, B; Bander, NH [Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the binding kinetics of human IgG monoclonal antibody J591 which targets prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) in a pre-clinical mouse cancer model using quantitative PET compartmental analysis of two radiolabeled variants. Methods: PSMA is expressed in normal human prostate, and becomes highly upregulated in prostate cancer, making it a promising therapeutic target. Two forms of J591, radiolabeled with either {sup 89}Zr or {sup 124}I, were prepared. {sup 89}Zr is a radiometal that becomes trapped in the cell upon internalization by the antigen-antibody complex, while radioiodine leaves the cell. Mice with prostate cancer xenografts underwent non-invasive serial imaging on a Focus 120 microPET up to 144 hours post-injection of J591. A non-linear compartmental model describing the binding and internalization of antibody in tumor xenograft was developed and applied to the PET-derived time-activity curves. The antibody-antigen association rate constant (ka), total amount of antigen per gram tumor (Ag-total), internalization rate of antibody-antigen complex, and efflux rate of radioisotope from tumor were fitted using the model. The surface-bound and the internalized activity were also estimated. Results: Values for ka, Ag-total, and internalization rate were found to be similar regardless of radiolabel payload used. The efflux rate, however, was ∼ 9-fold higher for {sup 124}I-J591 than for {sup 89}Zr-J591. Time-dependent surface-bound and internalized radiotracer activity were similar for both radiolabels at early times post-injection, but clearly differed beyond 24 hours. Conclusion: Binding and internalization of J591 to PSMA-expressing tumor xenografts were similar when radiolabeled with either {sup 89}Zr or {sup 124}I payload. The difference in efflux of radioactivity from tumor may be attributable to differential biological fate intracellularly of the radioisotopes. This has great significance for radioimmunotherapy and antibody

  6. Giardia muris trophozoite antigenic targets for mouse intestinal IgA antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyworth, M F; Vergara, J A

    1994-02-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize Giardia muris trophozoite proteins that are targets for intestinal anti-trophozoite IgA in G. muris-infected mice. Intestinal secretions were obtained from immunocompetent BALB/c mice that had been infected with G. muris cysts 4-5 weeks previously and from control uninfected BALB/c mice. Flow cytometry of G. muris trophozoites that had been incubated with intestinal secretions and with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated anti-mouse IgA showed that anti-trophozoite IgA was present in intestinal secretions obtained from infected BALB/c mice. By immunoblotting on G. muris trophozoite proteins separated by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis, this IgA recognized at least one trophozoite protein of molecular mass of approximately 80 kDa. The 80-kDa G. muris protein(s) has a molecular mass similar to that described for cysteine-rich surface proteins of the human parasite Giardia lamblia.

  7. A protein-conjugate approach to develop a monoclonal antibody-based antigen detection test for the diagnosis of human brucellosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patra, Kailash P.; Saito, Mayuko; Atluri, Vidya L.; Rolán, Hortensia G.; Young, Briana; Kerrinnes, Tobias; Smits, Henk; Ricaldi, Jessica N.; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Gilman, Robert H.; Tsolis, Renee M.; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Human brucellosis is most commonly diagnosed by serology based on agglutination of fixed Brucella abortus as antigen. Nucleic acid amplification techniques have not proven capable of reproducibly and sensitively demonstrating the presence of Brucella DNA in clinical specimens. We sought to optimize

  8. Evaluation of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays based on monoclonal antibodies for the serology and antigen detection in canine parvovirus infections.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); N. Juntti; B. Klingeborn; J. Groen (Jan); F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractAn enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system was developed for the detection of canine parvovirus (CPV) or CPV antigen in dog faeces and two other ELISA systems were developed for the detection of CPV-specific antibodies in dog sera. The ELISA's were based on the use of

  9. Generation and testing anti-influenza human monoclonal antibodies in a new humanized mouse model (DRAGA: HLA-A2. HLA-DR4. Rag1 KO. IL-2Rγc KO. NOD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Mirian; Ballesteros, Angela; Qiu, Qi; Pow Sang, Luis; Shashikumar, Soumya; Casares, Sofia; Brumeanu, Teodor-D

    2018-02-01

    Pandemic outbreaks of influenza type A viruses have resulted in numerous fatalities around the globe. Since the conventional influenza vaccines (CIV) provide less than 20% protection for individuals with weak immune system, it has been considered that broadly cross-neutralizing antibodies may provide a better protection. Herein, we showed that a recently generated humanized mouse (DRAGA mouse; HLA-A2. HLA-DR4. Rag1KO. IL-2Rgc KO. NOD) that lacks the murine immune system and expresses a functional human immune system can be used to generate cross-reactive, human anti-influenza monoclonal antibodies (hu-mAb). DRAGA mouse was also found to be suitable for influenza virus infection, as it can clear a sub-lethal infection and sustain a lethal infection with PR8/A/34 influenza virus. The hu-mAbs were designed for targeting a human B-cell epitope ( 180 WGIHHPPNSKEQ QNLY 195 ) of hemagglutinin (HA) envelope protein of PR8/A/34 (H1N1) virus with high homology among seven influenza type A viruses. A single administration of HA 180-195 specific hu-mAb in PR8-infected DRAGA mice significantly delayed the lethality by reducing the lung damage. The results demonstrated that DRAGA mouse is a suitable tool to (i) generate heterotype cross-reactive, anti-influenza human monoclonal antibodies, (ii) serve as a humanized mouse model for influenza infection, and (iii) assess the efficacy of anti-influenza antibody-based therapeutics for human use.

  10. NOG-hIL-4-Tg, a new humanized mouse model for producing tumor antigen-specific IgG antibody by peptide vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshie Kametani

    Full Text Available Immunodeficient mice transplanted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs are promising tools to evaluate human immune responses to vaccines. However, these mice usually develop severe graft-versus-host disease (GVHD, which makes estimation of antigen-specific IgG production after antigen immunization difficult. To evaluate antigen-specific IgG responses in PBMC-transplanted immunodeficient mice, we developed a novel NOD/Shi-scid-IL2rγnull (NOG mouse strain that systemically expresses the human IL-4 gene (NOG-hIL-4-Tg. After human PBMC transplantation, GVHD symptoms were significantly suppressed in NOG-hIL-4-Tg compared to conventional NOG mice. In kinetic analyses of human leukocytes, long-term engraftment of human T cells has been observed in peripheral blood of NOG-hIL-4-Tg, followed by dominant CD4+ T rather than CD8+ T cell proliferation. Furthermore, these CD4+ T cells shifted to type 2 helper (Th2 cells, resulting in long-term suppression of GVHD. Most of the human B cells detected in the transplanted mice had a plasmablast phenotype. Vaccination with HER2 multiple antigen peptide (CH401MAP or keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH successfully induced antigen-specific IgG production in PBMC-transplanted NOG-hIL-4-Tg. The HLA haplotype of donor PBMCs might not be relevant to the antibody secretion ability after immunization. These results suggest that the human PBMC-transplanted NOG-hIL-4-Tg mouse is an effective tool to evaluate the production of antigen-specific IgG antibodies.

  11. Nuclear lamins and peripheral nuclear antigens during fertilization and embryogenesis in mice and sea urchins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, G.; Schatten, H.; Simerly, C.; Maul, G. G.; Chaly, N.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear structural changes during fertilization and embryogenesis in mice and sea urchins are traced using four antibodies. The oocytes from virgin female mice, morulae and blastocytes from mated females, and gametes from the sea urchin Lytechnius variegatis are studied using mouse monoclonal antibodies to nuclear lamin A/C, monoclonal antibody to P1, human autoimmune antibodies to lamin A/C, and to lamin B. The mouse fertilization data reveal no lamins on the oocyte; however, lamins are present on the pronuclei, and chromosomes are found on the oocytes and pronuclei. It is detected that on the sea urchin sperm the lamins are reduced to acrosomal and centriolar fossae and peripheral antigens are around the sperm nucleus. The mouse sperm bind lamin antibodies regionally and do not contain antigens. Lamins and antigens are observed on both pronuclei and chromosomes during sea urchin fertilization. Mouse embryogenesis reveals that lamin A/C is not recognized at morula and blastocyst stages; however, lamin B stains are retained. In sea urchin embryogenesis lamin recognition is lost at the blastrula, gastrula, and plutei stages. It is noted that nuclear lamins lost during spermatogenesis are restored at fertilization and peripheral antigens are associated with the surface of chromosomes during meiosis and mitosis and with the periphery of the pronuclei and nuclei during interphase.

  12. Mouse fetal antigen 1 (mFA1), the circulating gene product of mdlk, pref-1 and SCP-1: isolation, characterization and biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bachmann, E; Krogh, T N; Højrup, P

    1996-01-01

    The mouse homologue to human fetal antigen 1 (hFA1) was purified from mouse amniotic fluid by cation exchange chromatography and immunospecific affinity chromatography. Mouse FA1 (mFA1) is a single chain glycoprotein with an M(r) of 42-50 kDa (SDS-PAGE). The N-terminal amino acid sequence (39...... residues) revealed 74% identity to hFA1 and 100% identity to the translated cDNAs referred to as mouse dlk, pref-1 and SCP-1. mFA1 is the secreted processed molecule encoded by the mRNA defined by these identical mouse cDNAs. Monospecific rabbit anti-mFA1 antibodies, purified by ammonium sulfate...... precipitation and immunospecific affinity chromatography, were used for immunohistochemical and quantitative ELISA techniques. The indirect immunoperoxidase technique demonstrated mFA1 within the endocrine structures of adult mouse pancreas, whereas the exocrine tissue remained unstained. FA1-positive staining...

  13. Production and Purification of Monoclonal Antibody Against Tumor Marker of TPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Amir Abbas Ghodrat

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Considering the invasive nature of cancer cells, one of the most important and best indicator of them is the markers inside them. One of the most important markers that observed in some types of cancer cells in various parts of the body is the Cytokeratin. Tissue plasminogen activator antigen (TPA is a Cytokeratin composed of molecules with various molecular weights. The level of TPA serum as associated with cellular growth level and tumorization of cells. In this research, the hybrid of spleen cells in BALB/c female mouse with myeloma cells was conducted with a ratio of 10:1. The resulting monoclonal antibodies were confirmed by SDS-PAGE and western blot. Protein G chromatography was utilized to purify monoclonal antibodies. The results for determining isotypes showed IgM and IgG classes. The titer of the antibody obtained from various clones was capable of identifying Cytokeratin antigen with a dilution of 1/10000. The resulting antibodies were finally confirmed by western blot and all the 5 resulting monoclonal antibodies were capable of identifying a 48 kDa protein. The results indicate that with the help of TPA marker and the monoclonal antibodies produced against them, this marker can be recognized quickly with great accuracy in suspicious cases of cancer. Thus, appropriate measures will be taken to prevent and fight off its probable side effects. This factor can be further used to build a diagonal kit with high sensitivity.

  14. Epithelial V-like antigen mediates efficacy of anti-alpha₄ integrin treatment in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Wright

    Full Text Available Natalizumab inhibits the transmigration of activated T lymphocytes into the brain and is highly efficacious in multiple sclerosis (MS. However, from a pharmacogenomic perspective, its efficacy and safety in specific patients remain unclear. Here our goal was to analyze the effects of epithelial V-like antigen (EVA on anti-alpha₄ integrin (VLA4 efficacy in a mouse model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. EVA has been previously characterized in human CD4 T lymphocytes, mouse thymic development, and choroid plexus epithelial cells. Further analysis here demonstrated expression in B lymphocytes and an increase in EVA⁺ lymphocytes following immunization. Following active induction of EAE using the MOG³⁵⁻⁵⁵ active immunization model, EVA deficient mice developed more severe EAE and white matter tissue injury as compared to wild type controls. This severe EAE phenotype did not respond to anti-VLA4 treatment. In both the control antibody and anti-VLA4 conditions, these mice demonstrated persistent CNS invasion of mature B lymphocyte (CD19⁺, CD21⁺, sIgG⁺, increased serum autoantibody levels, and extensive complement and IgG deposition within lesions containing CD5⁺IgG⁺ cells. Wild type mice treated with control antibody also demonstrated the presence of CD19⁺, CD21⁺, sIgG⁺ cells within the CNS during peak EAE disease severity and detectable serum autoantibody. In contrast, wild type mice treated with anti-VLA4 demonstrated reduced serum autoantibody levels as compared to wild type controls and EVA-knockout mice. As expected, anti-VLA4 treatment in wild type mice reduced the total numbers of all CNS mononuclear cells and markedly decreased CD4 T lymphocyte invasion. Treatment also reduced the frequency of CD19⁺, CD21⁺, sIgG⁺ cells in the CNS. These results suggest that anti-VLA4 treatment may reduce B lymphocyte associated autoimmunity in some individuals and that EVA expression is necessary for an

  15. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo e Souza, I.T. de; Okada, H.

    1990-05-01

    Since the description by Kohler and Milstein 1975 of their technique for producing monoclonal antibodies of predefined specificity, it has become a mainstay in most laboratories that utilize immunochemical techniques to study problems in basic, applied or clinical research. Paradoxically, the very success of monoclonal antibodies has generated a literature which is now so vast and scattered that it has become difficult to obtain a perspective. This brief review represents the distillation of many publications relating to the production and use of monoclonaal antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals. Significant advances were made possible in the last few years by combined developments in the fields of tumor-associated antigens and of monoclonal antibodies. In fact monoclonal antibodies against some well defined tumor-associated antigens, has led to significantly greater practical possibilities for producing highly specific radiolabeled antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy of human tumors. One of the main requirements of this methodology is the availability of stable radiopharmaceutical reagents which after labeling in vivo injection retain the capacity of specific interaction with the defined antigen and their molecular integrity. Since injection into human is the objetive of this kind of study all the specifications of radiopharmaceutical have to be fulfilled e.g. sterility, apirogenicity and absence of toxicity. (author) [pt

  16. Diagnóstico rápido de citomegalovirus (CMV en pacientes inmunocomprometidos mediante anticuerpos monoclonales que reconocen proteinas precoces virales Rapid diagnosis of cytomegalovirus infection in immunocompromised patients by using monoclonal antibodies against early viral antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maritza Alvarez

    1989-06-01

    Full Text Available Se aplicó la técnica de detección de antigenos precoces fluorescentes (DAPF usando el anticuerpo monoclonal E-13 McAb, mediante el cual se lograron detectar 15 casos positivos a CMV de 75 muestras de orina o sangre ("buffy coat" tomadas de 52 pacientes inmunocomprometidos ingresados en el Instituto de Nefrología de ciudad Habana. Aplicando las técnicas clásicas de aislamiento en fibroblastos humanos diploides (MRC-5, se lograron aislar 12 cepas de CMV de casos previamente positivos por DAPF; lográndose además un aislamiento en una muestra reportada negativa por fluorescencia. Se observó una coincidencia de un 80% entre ambas técnicas. Se detectó la presencia de anticuerpos IgG contra CMV en todos los casos estudiados, utilizando para ello la técnica ELISA.A technique was applied to detect early fluorescent antigens (DEFA of cytomegalovirus (CMV using the E13 monoclonal antibodies in 52 immunocompromised patients hospitalized in the Nephrology Institute of Havana. Of the 75 urine or blood (buffy coat samples taken, 15 were found positive to CMV. Using classical diploide human fibroblast isolation technique, 12 CMV strains were isloation of previously detected positive samples by DEFA. In addition, CMV was isolated from one sample reported to be negative by DEFA. A coincidence of 80% was found between both techniques. With the ELISA test, all the sample studied have IgG antibodies to CMV.

  17. Identification and typing of herpes simplex viruses with monoclonal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Balachandran, N; Frame, B; Chernesky, M; Kraiselburd, E; Kouri, Y; Garcia, D; Lavery, C; Rawls, W E

    1982-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies which reacted with type-specific antigens of herpes simplex virus type 2 or with antigens shared by herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 were used in an indirect immunofluorescence assay to type virus isolates and to detect viral antigens in cells obtained from herpetic lesions. Complete concordance was obtained for 42 isolates typed by endonuclease restriction analysis of viral DNA and by indirect immunofluorescence with monoclonal antibodies. Examination of a limited num...

  18. Monoclonal Antibodies Directed toward the Hepatitis C Virus Glycoprotein E2 Detect Antigenic Differences Modulated by the N-Terminal Hypervariable Region 1 (HVR1), HVR2, and Intergenotypic Variable Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhammad, Yousef; Gu, Jun; Boo, Irene; Harrison, David; McCaffrey, Kathleen; Vietheer, Patricia T; Edwards, Stirling; Quinn, Charles; Coulibaly, Fásseli; Poumbourios, Pantelis; Drummer, Heidi E

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 form a heterodimer and mediate receptor interactions and viral fusion. Both E1 and E2 are targets of the neutralizing antibody (NAb) response and are candidates for the production of vaccines that generate humoral immunity. Previous studies demonstrated that N-terminal hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) can modulate the neutralization potential of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), but no information is available on the influence of HVR2 or the intergenotypic variable region (igVR) on antigenicity. In this study, we examined how the variable regions influence the antigenicity of the receptor binding domain of E2 spanning HCV polyprotein residues 384 to 661 (E2661) using a panel of MAbs raised against E2661 and E2661 lacking HVR1, HVR2, and the igVR (Δ123) and well-characterized MAbs isolated from infected humans. We show for a subset of both neutralizing and nonneutralizing MAbs that all three variable regions decrease the ability of MAbs to bind E2661 and reduce the ability of MAbs to inhibit E2-CD81 interactions. In addition, we describe a new MAb directed toward the region spanning residues 411 to 428 of E2 (MAb24) that demonstrates broad neutralization against all 7 genotypes of HCV. The ability of MAb24 to inhibit E2-CD81 interactions is strongly influenced by the three variable regions. Our data suggest that HVR1, HVR2, and the igVR modulate exposure of epitopes on the core domain of E2 and their ability to prevent E2-CD81 interactions. These studies suggest that the function of HVR2 and the igVR is to modulate antibody recognition of glycoprotein E2 and may contribute to immune evasion. This study reveals conformational and antigenic differences between the Δ123 and intact E2661 glycoproteins and provides new structural and functional data about the three variable regions and their role in occluding neutralizing and nonneutralizing epitopes on the E2 core domain. The variable regions may therefore function to

  19. [Study of anti-idiotype antibodies to human monoclonal antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, R; Takahashi, N; Owaki, I; Kannagi, R; Endo, N; Morita, N; Inoue, M

    1992-02-01

    A human monoclonal antibody, ll-50 (IgM, lambda), was generated, which reacted specifically with a major of glycolipid present in LS174T colon cancer cells. The glycolipid antigen which reacted with the ll-50 antibody was expected to four sugar residues from its TLC mobility, and it was ascertained that the glycolipid antigen which reacted with ll-50 antibody might be Lc4 antigen [Gal beta 1----3 GLcNAc beta 1----3 Gal beta 1----4 Glc beta 1----1 Cer] judging from TLC immunostaining and ELISA when the reactivity of ll-50 antibody was tested using various pure glycolipids in 3-5 sugar residues as an antigen. Sera in patients with malignant disorders and healthy individuals were analyzed by Sandwich assay of immobilized and biotinylated ll-50 antibody. The serum of the Lc4 antigen recognized by ll-50 antibody was significantly higher in patients with malignant disorders than that in healthy individuals (p less than 0.05). Three mouse monoclonal anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3 and C5 (all IgG1), were generated by the immunization of BALB/c mice with ll-50 antibody. These anti-idiotype antibodies specifically bound to to human monoclonal antibody, ll-50 and had a significant inhibitory activity towards the binding of ll-50 antibody to the Lc4 antigen. This indicated that these anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3, and C5, were paratope-related anti-idiotype antibodies. G3, B3, and C5 were expected to define the nearest idiotope because they could mutually inhibit ll-50 antibody. Sera in patients with malignant disorders and healthy individuals were analyzed by Sandwich assay of immobilized and biotinylated anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3, and C5. As to the ll-50 like antibodies defined by C5 (Id-C5+), the mean serum level in patients with malignant disorders was significantly higher than that in healthy individuals (p less than 0.05). As to the ll-50 like antibodies defined by B3 (Id-B3+), the mean serum level in patients with malignant disorders was significantly higher

  20. Monkey-derived monoclonal antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanley, H.A.; Reese, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    A system has been developed that allows efficient production of monkey monoclonal antibodies from owl monkeys. Splenocytes or peripheral blood lymphocytes from monkeys immune to the human malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, were fused with P3X63 Ag8.653 mouse myelomas. The resulting hybridomas were screened by an indirect fluorescent antibody test for the production of monkey monoclonal antibodies (mAb) reactive with P. falciparum. Most of the mAb reacted with the P. falciparum merozoites and immunoprecipitated a parasite-derived glycoprotein having a relative molecular weight of 185,000. These mAb gave a minimum of five different immunoprecipitation patterns, thus demonstrating that a large number of polypeptides obtained when parasitized erythrocytes are solubilized share epitopes with this large glycoprotein. In addition, mAb were obtained that reacted with antigens associated with the infected erythrocyte membrane. One of these mAb bound a M/sub r/ 95,000 antigen. Radioimmunoprecipitation assays using 125 T-antibodies were done

  1. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for quantification of mouse surfactant protein D (SP-D)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Soren; Schmidt, Vivi; Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard

    2008-01-01

    characterized and validated for use in sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Based on two of these, we established an ELISA that allows for measurements of mouse SP-D in various body fluids. The final ELISA was optimized and calibrated with a standard of purified recombinant mouse SP-D, which......Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a pattern recognition molecule of the collectin family of C-type lectins. It is found in the airways and at mucosal surfaces. SP-D is part of the innate immune system where it neutralizes and leads to elimination of microorganisms. It regulates the functions of other...... innate immune cells, such as macrophages and neutrophils. It also modulates the adaptive immune response by interacting with antigen-presenting cells and T cells. Monoclonal anti-mouse-SP-D antibodies were raised from SP-D deficient mice using recombinant SP-D as antigen. Ten monoclonal antibodies were...

  2. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2018-04-10

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  3. Monoclonal antibody-based Surface Plasmon Resonance sensors for pathogen detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter Durand

    2007-01-01

    .sp. tritici, the cause of wheat yellow rust and Phytophthora infestans, the cause of late blight disease in potato. As no antibody existed against urediniospores from P. striiformis, mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were produced and characterised. IgM-isotype mAbs from nine hybridoma cell lines were...... to the initial cell concentration. Assay performance was investigated by cross-reactivity studies against other rust fungi. Cross-reactivity was found with Puccinia recondita and Puccinia hordei, suggesting that the ~ 39 kDa mAb8-antigen might be a conserved structural component in the surface of Puccinia...

  4. Increased T cell proliferative responses to islet antigens identify clinical responders to anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (rituximab) therapy in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Kevan C; Pescovitz, Mark D; McGee, Paula; Krause-Steinrauf, Heidi; Spain, Lisa M; Bourcier, Kasia; Asare, Adam; Liu, Zhugong; Lachin, John M; Dosch, H Michael

    2011-08-15

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is believed to be due to the autoimmune destruction of β-cells by T lymphocytes, but a single course of rituximab, a monoclonal anti-CD20 B lymphocyte Ab, can attenuate C-peptide loss over the first year of disease. The effects of B cell depletion on disease-associated T cell responses have not been studied. We compare changes in lymphocyte subsets, T cell proliferative responses to disease-associated target Ags, and C-peptide levels of participants who did (responders) or did not (nonresponders) show signs of β-cell preservation 1 y after rituximab therapy in a placebo-controlled TrialNet trial. Rituximab decreased B lymphocyte levels after four weekly doses of mAb. T cell proliferative responses to diabetes-associated Ags were present at baseline in 75% of anti-CD20- and 82% of placebo-treated subjects and were not different over time. However, in rituximab-treated subjects with significant C-peptide preservation at 6 mo (58%), the proliferative responses to diabetes-associated total (p = 0.032), islet-specific (p = 0.048), and neuronal autoantigens (p = 0.005) increased over the 12-mo observation period. This relationship was not seen in placebo-treated patients. We conclude that in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, anti-B cell mAb causes increased proliferative responses to diabetes Ags and attenuated β-cell loss. The way in which these responses affect the disease course remains unknown.

  5. Generation of Monoclonal Antibodies against Ag85A Antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Application in a Competitive ELISA for Serodiagnosis of Bovine Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengzhong Xu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Ag85 complex functions as the main secretory protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis and BCG. This complex is composed of the proteins, Ag85A, Ag85B, and Ag85C, with Ag85A thought to play the largest role within the complex. However, the lack of commercially available monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against Ag85A still hinders the biological and applicative research on this protein. In this study, we developed and identified anti-Ag85A mAbs, and five hybridoma cells were established. Using the indirect immunofluorescence test, we found that two anti-Ag85A mAbs did not cross-react with Ag85B and/or Ag85C. In addition, we showed that all of the mAbs tested in this study are able to react with endogenous Ag85A protein in BCG and rBCG:Ag85A using indirect ELISA and Western blot analyses. A competitive ELISA (cELISA based on mAb 3B8 was developed, the analyses of clinic serum samples from cattle with bovine tuberculosis (TB and healthy cattle demonstrated that the sensitivity of the cELISA was 54.2% (26/48 and the specificity was 83.5% (167/200. This study demonstrated that the mAbs against Ag85A will provide useful reagents for further investigation into the function of the Ag85 complex and can be used for serodiagnosis of bovine TB.

  6. Caracterização de amostras do vírus da raiva, isoladas nas regiões Norte e Centro-Oeste do Brasil, com anticorpos monoclonais antilissavírus Antigenic characterization of Brazilian rabies virus isolate North and Central West regions of Brazil with anti-lyssavirus monoclonal antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.B.C.R. Batista

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of rabies virus antigenic variants in North and Central West regions of Brazil was studied using 61 rabies viruses isolated from different species: 30 from domestic dogs, 20 from cattle, four from horses, two from cats, one from a human and four from unidentified species. The isolates were submitted to antigenic analyses by indirect immunofluorescence with a panel of 12 monoclonal antibodies (Mabs to lyssavirus antigens. Antigenic analyses revealed consistent differences between isolates whose natural hosts were dogs and those of haematophagous bats, often isolated from cattle. Three out of four isolates from horses and one from a domestic dog showed patterns of reactivity found only in viruses of insectivorous bats, indicating that non-haematophagous bats do play a unique role in the transmission of the virus to other species.

  7. Detailed analysis of sequence changes occurring during vlsE antigenic variation in the mouse model of Borrelia burgdorferi infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Coutte

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Lyme disease Borrelia can infect humans and animals for months to years, despite the presence of an active host immune response. The vls antigenic variation system, which expresses the surface-exposed lipoprotein VlsE, plays a major role in B. burgdorferi immune evasion. Gene conversion between vls silent cassettes and the vlsE expression site occurs at high frequency during mammalian infection, resulting in sequence variation in the VlsE product. In this study, we examined vlsE sequence variation in B. burgdorferi B31 during mouse infection by analyzing 1,399 clones isolated from bladder, heart, joint, ear, and skin tissues of mice infected for 4 to 365 days. The median number of codon changes increased progressively in C3H/HeN mice from 4 to 28 days post infection, and no clones retained the parental vlsE sequence at 28 days. In contrast, the decrease in the number of clones with the parental vlsE sequence and the increase in the number of sequence changes occurred more gradually in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice. Clones containing a stop codon were isolated, indicating that continuous expression of full-length VlsE is not required for survival in vivo; also, these clones continued to undergo vlsE recombination. Analysis of clones with apparent single recombination events indicated that recombinations into vlsE are nonselective with regard to the silent cassette utilized, as well as the length and location of the recombination event. Sequence changes as small as one base pair were common. Fifteen percent of recovered vlsE variants contained "template-independent" sequence changes, which clustered in the variable regions of vlsE. We hypothesize that the increased frequency and complexity of vlsE sequence changes observed in clones recovered from immunocompetent mice (as compared with SCID mice is due to rapid clearance of relatively invariant clones by variable region-specific anti-VlsE antibody responses.

  8. Monoclonal for cancer detection and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, R.W.; Byers, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 18 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Monoclonal Antibodies to Breast Cancer and Their Application; Clinical Applications of Radioimmunolocalisation; Localisation of Cancer of the Ovary and Metastases Using 123 I-labelled Monoclonal Antibody HMFG-2 Compared to Surgical Findings; Interest of Globotriaosylceramide Membrane Antigen as Target for Immunotoxins; and Analysis, Results and Future Prospective of the Therapeutic Use of Radiolabeled Antibody in Cancer Therapy

  9. Human anti-plague monoclonal antibodies protect mice from Yersinia pestis in a bubonic plague model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Xiao

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis is the etiologic agent of plague that has killed more than 200 million people throughout the recorded history of mankind. Antibiotics may provide little immediate relief to patients who have a high bacteremia or to patients infected with an antibiotic resistant strain of plague. Two virulent factors of Y. pestis are the capsid F1 protein and the low-calcium response (Lcr V-protein or V-antigen that have been proven to be the targets for both active and passive immunization. There are mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against the F1- and V-antigens that can passively protect mice in a murine model of plague; however, there are no anti-Yersinia pestis monoclonal antibodies available for prophylactic or therapeutic treatment in humans. We identified one anti-F1-specific human mAb (m252 and two anti-V-specific human mAb (m253, m254 by panning a naïve phage-displayed Fab library against the F1- and V-antigens. The Fabs were converted to IgG1s and their binding and protective activities were evaluated. M252 bound weakly to peptides located at the F1 N-terminus where a protective mouse anti-F1 mAb also binds. M253 bound strongly to a V-antigen peptide indicating a linear epitope; m254 did not bind to any peptide from a panel of 53 peptides suggesting that its epitope may be conformational. M252 showed better protection than m253 and m254 against a Y, pestis challenge in a plague mouse model. A synergistic effect was observed when the three antibodies were combined. Incomplete to complete protection was achieved when m252 was given at different times post-challenge. These antibodies can be further studied to determine their potential as therapeutics or prophylactics in Y. pestis infection in humans.

  10. Ablation of human colon carcinoma in nude mice by 131I-labeled monoclonal anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody F(ab')2 fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchegger, F.; Pfister, C.; Fournier, K.; Prevel, F.; Schreyer, M.; Carrel, S.; Mach, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    Pooled F(ab')2 fragments of three MAbs against distinct epitopes of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were used for radioimmunotherapy of nude mice bearing a subcutaneous human colon carcinoma xenograft. 9-10 d after transplantation when tumor nodules were in exponential growth, 36 mice were treated by intravenous injection of different amounts of 131 I-labeled MAb F(ab')2. All 14 mice injected with a single dose of 2,200 (n = 10) or 2,800 microCi (n = 4) showed complete tumor remission. 8 of the 10 mice treated with 2,200 microCi survived in good health for 1 yr when they were killed and shown to be tumor free. Four of nine other mice treated with four fractionated doses of 400 microCi showed no tumor relapse for more than 9 mo. In contrast, all 15 mice injected with 1,600-3,000 microCi 131 I-control IgG F(ab')2 showed tumor growth retardation of only 1-4 wk, and 15 of 16 mice injected with unlabeled anti-CEA MAb F(ab')2 showed unmodified tumor progression as compared with untreated mice. From tissue radioactivity distributions it was calculated that by an injection of 2,200 microCi 131 I-MAb F(ab')2 a mean dose of 8,335 rad was selectively delivered to the tumor, while the tissue-absorbed radiation doses for the normal organs were: peripheral blood, 2,093; stomach, 1,668; kidney, 1,289; lung, 1,185; liver, 617; spleen, 501; small intestine, 427; large intestine, 367; bone, 337; and muscle, 198. These treatments were well tolerated since out of 19 mice with complete tumor remission only 4 required bone marrow transplantation and 17 were in good health for 6-12 mo of observation

  11. Localization of mammary tumors in vivo with 131I-labeled Fab fragments of antibodies against mouse mammary epithelial (MME) antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilbanks, T.; Peterson, J.A.; Miller, S.; Kaufman, L.; Ortendahl, D.; Ceriani, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    The Fab fragments of antibodies against cell-type-specific surface antigens of mouse mammary epithelial cells (MME-antigens) were used to localize mammary tumors successfully. The radioiodine-labeled anti-MME (Fab) was injected into mice carrying simulated mammary metastases, and after 24 hours the amount of label per gram of excised tissue was several times greater in the tumor than in liver, brain, lung, or muscle. Kidney showed considerable accumulation of label but this appeared to be nonspecific. Kinetic studies revealed a rapid elimination of labeled Fab in the urine with only 1% of the injected dose remaining in the entire blood pool after 24 hours. Wit a high-purity germanium camera, mammary tumors were clearly located ty the 131 I-labeled anti-MME (Fab), and normalization to /sup 99m/Tc-pertechnetate distribution in the animal increased the specificity. The density of 131 I-label was fourfold greater over the mammary tumor than over comparable areas of the mouse. No accumulation of 131 I-anti-MME (Fab) was observed in nonmammary tumors nor in mammary tumors when labeled nonspecific Fab was used. An analogous system using an antihuman mammary epithelial antiserum is being developed for localization of breast metastases in humans

  12. Effect of producer cell line on functional activity of anti-D monoclonal antibodies destined for prevention of rhesus sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olovnikova, N I; Ershler, M A; Belkina, E V; Nikolaeva, T L; Miterev, G Yu

    2009-04-01

    The ability of anti-D antibodies to cause antigen-specific immunosuppression depends on their interaction with low-affinity Fcgamma-receptors. Human monoclonal antibodies to D antigen of the rhesus system were investigated by antibody-dependent cytotoxicity assay in order to estimate their ability to induce hemolysis mediated by low-affinity Fcgamma receptors. We demonstrate that affinity of monoclonal antibodies to receptors of this type does not depend on primary structure of Fc-fragment, but depends on the producer cell line which expresses the antibodies. Monoclonal IgG1 antibodies interacting with FcgammaRIIa and FcgammaRIII lost this property, if they were secreted by human-mouse heterohybridoma, but not by human B-cell line. On the opposite, monoclonal antibodies that could not activate low-affinity Fcgamma receptors were highly active after human cells fusion with rat myeloma YB2/0. Hemolytic activity of IgG3 remained unchanged after fusion of human cells with rodent cells.

  13. Radioimmunoimaging of human breast carcinoma xenografts in nude mouse model with 111In-labeled new monoclonal antibody EBA-1 and F(ab')2 fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yemul, Shrishailam; Leon, J.A.; Pozniakoff, Ted; Esser, P.D.; Estabrook, Alison; Met-Path Inc., Teterboro, NJ

    1993-01-01

    Radioimmunoimaging characteristics of a new monoclonal antibody EBA-1 and its F(ab') 2 fragments utilizing nu/nu mice bearing human breast carcinoma xenografts are described. 111 In-DPTA conjugates of EBA-1 localized with tumor/blood ratios of 0.99 ± 0.10 (P 2 radioconjugates at 48 h. These results suggest that EBA-1 and its F(ab') 2 might be useful reagents in radioimmunoimaging and radioimmunotherapy. (author)

  14. Lea blood group antigen on human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunstan, R.A.; Simpson, M.B.; Rosse, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    One- and two-stage radioligand assays were used to determine if human platelets possess the Lea antigen. Goat IgG anti-Lea antibody was purified by multiple adsorptions with Le(a-b-) human red blood cells, followed by affinity chromatography with synthetic Lea substance and labeling with 125 I. Human IgG anti-Lea antibody was used either in a two stage radioassay with 125 I-labeled mouse monoclonal IgG anti-human IgG as the second antibody or, alternatively, purified by Staph protein A chromatography, labeled with 125 I, and used in a one-stage radioassay. Platelets from donors of appropriate red blood cell phenotypes were incubated with the antisera, centrifuged through phthalate esters, and assayed in a gamma scintillation counter. Dose response and saturation curve analysis demonstrate the presence of Lewis a antigen on platelets from Lea+ donors. Furthermore, platelets from an Le(a-b-) donor incubated in Le (a+b-) plasma adsorb Lea antigen in a similar manner to red blood cells. The clinical significance of these antigens in platelet transfusion remains undefined

  15. Isolation and functional effects of monoclonal antibodies binding to thymidylate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastreboff, M M; Todd, M B; Malech, H L; Bertino, J R

    1985-01-29

    Monoclonal antibodies against electrophoretically pure thymidylate synthase from HeLa cells have been produced. Antibodies (M-TS-4 and M-TS-9) from hybridoma clones were shown by enzyme-linked immunoassay to recognize thymidylate synthase from a variety of human cell lines, but they did not bind to thymidylate synthase from mouse cell lines. The strongest binding of antibodies was observed to enzyme from HeLa cells. These two monoclonal antibodies bind simultaneously to different antigenic sites on thymidylate synthase purified from HeLa cells, as reflected by a high additivity index and results of cross-linked radioimmunoassay. Both monoclonal antibodies inhibit the activity of thymidylate synthase from human cell lines. The strongest inhibition was observed with thymidylate synthase from HeLa cells. Monoclonal antibody M-TS-9 (IgM subclass) decreased the rate of binding of [3H]FdUMP to thymidylate synthase in the presence of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate while M-TS-4 (IgG1) did not change the rate of ternary complex formation. These data indicate that the antibodies recognize different epitopes on the enzyme molecule.

  16. The value of gamma camera and computed tomography data set coregistration to assess Lewis Y antigen targeting in small cell lung cancer by 111Indium-labeled humanized monoclonal antibody 3S193

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaia, Emilio; Krug, Lee M.; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Nagel, Andrew; Reuter, Victor E.; Humm, John; Divgi, Chaitanya

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To assess the value of data set coregistration of gamma camera and computed tomography (CT) in the assessment of targeting of humanized monoclonal antibody 3S193 labeled with indium-111 ( 111 In-hu3S193) to small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Methods and materials: Ten patients (6 male and 4 female; mean age ± S.D., 60 ± 4 years), from an overall population of 20 patients with SCLCs expressing Lewis Y antigen at immunohistochemical analysis, completed a four weekly injections of 111 In-hu3S193 and underwent gamma camera imaging. All had had, as part of their baseline evaluation, Fluorine18 fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). Two readers in consensus retrospectively coregistered the gamma camera images with the CT component of the FDG PET/CT by automatic or manual alignment. The resulting image sets were visually examined and SCLC lesions targeting at coregistered gamma camera and CT was correlated side-by-side with the 18 F-FDG uptake. Results: A total number of 31 lesions from SCLC with a thoracic (n = 13) or extrathoracic location (n = 18) were all positive on FDG PET/CT. Coregistration of the gamma camera to the CT demonstrated targeting of antibody to all lesions >2 cm (n = 20) and in a few lesions ≤2 cm (n = 2), with no visualization of most lesions ≤2 cm (n = 9). No 111 In-hu3S193 uptake in normal tissues was observed. Conclusion: Coregistration of antibody gamma camera imaging to FDG PET/CT is feasible and allows valuable assessment of 111 In-hu3S193 antibody targeting to SCLC lesions >2 cm, while lesions ≤2 cm reveal a limited targeting

  17. Assay for the specificity of monoclonal antibodies in crossed immunoelectrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, K; Schou, C; Koch, C

    1984-01-01

    A method is described based on crossed immunoelectrophoresis of a complex antigen mixture in agarose gel followed by incubation of the gel with the monoclonal antibody. The bound monoclonal antibody is detected by the use of a secondary enzyme-labelled antibody. Using this technique we have been ...... I molecules. In other experiments using the same technique we demonstrated the reaction of a monoclonal antibody specific for chicken Ig light chains. Udgivelsesdato: 1984-Aug-3...

  18. Monoclonal antibodies technology. Protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acevado Castro, B.E.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: Immunization. The first step in preparing useful monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is to immunize an animal (Balb/c for example) with an appropriate antigen. Methods (only for soluble antigen): Solubilize selected antigen in Phosphate buffer solution (PBS) at pH 7.2-7.4, ideally at a final concentration per animal between 10 to 50 μg/ml. It is recommended that the antigen under consideration be incorporated into the emulsion adjuvants in 1:1 volumetric relation. We commonly use Frend's adjuvant (FA) to prepared immunized solution. The first immunization should be prepared with complete FA, and the another could be prepared with incomplete FA. It is recommended to inject mice with 0.2 ml intraperitoneal (ip) or subcutaneous (sc). Our experience suggests the sc route is the preferred route. A minimum protocol for immunizing mice to generate cells for preparing hybridomas is s follows: immunize sc on day 0, boost sc on day 21, take a trial bleeding on day 26; if antibody titters are satisfactory, boost ip on day 35 with antigen only, and remove the spleen to obtain cells for fusion on day 38. Fusion protocol. The myeloma cell line we are using is X63 Ag8.653. At the moment of fusion myeloma cells need a good viability (at least a 95%). 1. Remove the spleen cells from immunized mice using sterile conditions. An immune spleen should yield between 7 a 10x10 7 nucleated cells. 2. Place the spleen in 20 ml of serum-free RPMI 1640 in a Petri dish. Using a needle and syringe, inject the spleen with medium to distend and disrupt the spleen stroma and free the nucleated cells. 3. Flush the cell suspension with a Pasteur pipet to disperse clumps of cells. 4. Centrifuge the spleen cell suspension at 250g for 10 min. Resuspend the pellet in serum-free RPMI 1640. Determine cell concentration using Neuhabuer chamber. 5. Mix the myeloma cells and spleen cells in a conical 50-ml tube in serum-free RPMI 1640, 1 x10 7 spleen cells to 1x10 6 myeloma cells (ratio 10:1). Centrifuge

  19. Biodistribution mechanisms of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Mohammad; Bornstein, Gadi Gazit; Suria, Hamza

    2010-03-01

    The monoclonal antibody market continues to witness an impressive rate of growth and has become the leading source of expansion in the biologic segment within the pharmaceutical industry. Currently marketed monoclonal antibodies target a diverse array of antigens. These antigens are distributed in a variety of tissues such as tumors, lungs, synovial fluid, psoriatic plaques, and lymph nodes. As the concentration of drug at the proximity of the biological receptor determines the magnitude of the observed pharmacological responses, a significant consideration in effective therapeutic application of monoclonal antibodies is a thorough understanding of the processes that regulate antibody biodistribution. Monoclonal antibody distribution is affected by factors such as molecular weight, blood flow, tissue and tumor heterogeneity, structure and porosity, target antigen density, turnover rate, and the target antigen expression profile.

  20. Monoclonal anti-melanoma antibodies and their possible clinical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellstroem, K.E.; Hellstroem, Ingegerd; Washington Univ., Seattle; Washington Univ., Seattle

    1985-01-01

    Cell surface antigens of human melanoma, as defined by monoclonal antibodies, are discussed and in particular the three antigens p97, a GD3 ganglioside and a proteoglycan. The potential diagnostic uses of antibodies to melanoma antigens are reviewed including in vitro diagnosis by immuno-histology, in vitro diagnosis by serum assays and in vivo diagnosis by tumour imaging using radioactively labelled antibodies. The potential therapeutic uses of monoclonal antibodies to melanoma antigens are also reviewed including targets for antibody therapy, the use of antibodies alone, radiolabelled antibodies, antibody-toxin conjugates, antibody-drug conjugates, anti-idiotypic antibodies and vaccines. (UK)

  1. Induction and characterization of monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies reactive with idiotopes of canine parvovirus neutralizing monoclonal antibodies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); J. van Es (Johan); G.A. Drost; F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractMonoclonal anti-idiotypic (anti-Id) antibodies (Ab2) were generated against idiotypes (Id) of canine parvovirus (CPV) specific monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs). The binding of most of these anti-Id antibodies to their corresponding Id could be inhibited by antigen, thus classifying these

  2. Antibodies to poliovirus detected by immunoradiometric assay with a monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitz, M.; Fossati, C.A.; Schild, G.C.; Spitz, L.; Brasher, M.

    1982-01-01

    An immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for the assay of antibodies to poliovirus antigens is described. Dilutions of the test sera or whole (finger prick) blood samples were incubated with the poliovirus antigen bound to a solid phase and the specific antibody was detected by the addition of a mouse anti-human IgG monoclonal antibody (McAb), which was itself revealed by iodinated sheep IgG antimouse F(ab). The authors have shown that this technique is suitable for the estimation of IgG anti-poliovirus antibodies induced in children following polio vaccine. The present study shows that SPRIA provides a simple and inexpensive method for serological studies with poliovirus particularly for use in large-scale surveys. (Auth.)

  3. Antibodies to poliovirus detected by immunoradiometric assay with a monoclonal antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitz, M.; Fossati, C.A.; Schild, G.C.; Spitz, L.; Brasher, M. (National Inst. for Biological Standards and Control, London (UK))

    1982-10-01

    An immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for the assay of antibodies to poliovirus antigens is described. Dilutions of the test sera or whole (finger prick) blood samples were incubated with the poliovirus antigen bound to a solid phase and the specific antibody was detected by the addition of a mouse anti-human IgG monoclonal antibody (McAb), which was itself revealed by iodinated sheep IgG antimouse F(ab). The authors have shown that this technique is suitable for the estimation of IgG anti-poliovirus antibodies induced in children following polio vaccine. The present study shows that SPRIA provides a simple and inexpensive method for serological studies with poliovirus particularly for use in large-scale surveys.

  4. Passive vaccination with a human monoclonal antibody: generation of antibodies and studies for efficacy in Bacillus anthracis infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    vor dem Esche, Ulrich; Huber, Maria; Zgaga-Griesz, Andrea; Grunow, Roland; Beyer, Wolfgang; Hahn, Ulrike; Bessler, Wolfgang G

    2011-07-01

    A major difficulty in creating human monoclonal antibodies is the lack of a suitable myeloma cell line to be used for fusion experiments. In order to create fully human monoclonal antibodies for passive immunization, the human mouse heteromyeloma cell line CB-F7 was evaluated. Using this cell line, we generated human monoclonal antibodies against Bacillus anthracis toxin components. Antibodies against protective antigen (PA) and against lethal factor (LF) were obtained using peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) from persons vaccinated with the UK anthrax vaccine. PBL were fused with the cell line CB-F7. We obtained several clones producing PA specific Ig and one clone (hLF1-SAN) producing a monoclonal antibody (hLF1) directed against LF. The LF binding antibody was able to neutralize Anthrax toxin activity in an in vitro neutralization assay, and preliminary in vivo studies in mice also indicated a trend towards protection. We mapped the epitope of the antibody binding to LF by dot blot analysis and ELIFA using 80 synthetic LF peptides of 20 amino acid lengths with an overlapping range of 10 amino acids. Our results suggest the binding of the monoclonal antibody to the peptide regions 121-150 or 451-470 of LF. The Fab-fragment of the antibody hLF1 was cloned in Escherichia coli and could be useful as part of a fully human monoclonal antibody for the treatment of Anthrax infections. In general, our studies show the applicability of the CB-F7 line to create fully human monoclonal antibodies for vaccination. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisma, H.; Hilgers, J.

    1987-01-01

    Many monoclonal antibodies directed against tumor-associated antigens have been identified, but so far none of these are tumor specific. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have been used for imaging of a wide variety of tumors with success. Radiolabeling of antibody is usually done with iodine isotopes of which 123 I is the best candidate for radioimmunodetection purposes. The labeling of antibodies through chelates makes it possible to use metal radioisotopes like 111 In, which is the best radioisotope for imaging with monoclonal antibodies due to its favorable half-life of 2.5 days. Usually imaging cannot be performed within 24 h after injection, but clearance of antibody can be increased by using F(ab) 2 of Fab. Another approach is to clear non-bound antibody by a second antibody, directed against the first. The detection limit of immunoimaging is about 2 cm, but will be improved by tomography or SPECT. There is still a high false positive and false negative rate, which makes it impossible to use radioimmunodetection as the only technique for diagnosis of tumors. In combination with other detection techniques, tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies can improve diagnosis. 44 refs.; 3 tabs

  6. Monoclonal antibodies in oncology. Review article

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, S Y.T.; Sikora, K

    1986-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MCAs) can be used to differentiate between normal and neoplastic cells and thus exploited for diagnostic and, ultimately, therapeutic gain. The evidence for the existence of human tumour antigens is reviewed. Several areas of diagnosis are already benefiting from the application of the monoclonal technology. Immunohistology can help the pathologist with difficult diagnostic problems. New classifications of lymphoma and leukaemia can be based on specific surface molecules. Similarly, the detection of shed tumour antigens is already established as part of the routine assessment of many patients with common solid tumours. Isotopically labeled monoclonal antibodies have been used to localise primary and metastatic tumours. The use of antibodies in this way is not only a promising diagnostic tool but also the first step in studying the possibility of arming antibodies to provide therapeutic agents. Such trials are currently in progress. 69 refs.; 7 figs.; 3 tabs.

  7. Monoclonal antibody technologies and rapid detection assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel methodologies and screening strategies will be outlined on the use of hybridoma technology for the selection of antigen specific monoclonal antibodies. The development of immunoassays used for diagnostic detection of prions and bacterial toxins will be discussed and examples provided demonstr...

  8. Expression of verocytotoxic Escherichia coli antigens in tobacco seeds and evaluation of gut immunity after oral administration in mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi, Luciana; Di Giancamillo, Alessia; Reggi, Serena; Domeneghini, Cinzia; Baldi, Antonella; Sala, Vittorio; Dell'Orto, Vittorio; Coddens, Annelies; Cox, Eric; Fogher, Corrado

    2013-01-01

    Verocytotoxic Escherichia (E.) coli strains are responsible for swine oedema disease, which is an enterotoxaemia that causes economic losses in the pig industry. The production of a vaccine for oral administration in transgenic seeds could be an efficient system to stimulate local immunity. This study was conducted to transform tobacco plants for the seed-specific expression of antigenic proteins from a porcine verocytotoxic E. coli strain. Parameters related to an immunological response and ...

  9. A monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes m6A nucleoside

    OpenAIRE

    Espuny, Ruth; Castro, Ana; Codony, Carles; Eritja Casadellà, Ramón; Bach-Elias, Montse

    1998-01-01

    A hybridoma against the nucleoside m6A has been obtained from mouse spleen. This hybridoma was named H65 and it secretes monoclonal antibodies anti-m6A. The competition assays showed that the monoclonal antibody was highly specific for m6A nucleoside.

  10. Immunity against mouse thymus-leukemia antigen (TL) protects against development of lymphomas induced by a chemical carcinogen, N-butyl-N-nitrosourea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Kunio; Obata, Yuichi; Matsudaira, Yasue; Ozeki, Satoshi; Taguchi, Osamu; Nishida, Keiko; Okanami, Yuko; Akatsuka, Yoshiki; Kuzushima, Kiyotaka; Takahashi, Toshitada

    2004-11-01

    Mouse thymus-leukemia antigens (TL) are aberrantly expressed on T lymphomas in C57BL/6 (B6) and C3H/He (C3H) mice, while they are not expressed on normal T lymphocytes in these strains. When N-butyl-N-nitrosourea (NBU), a chemical carcinogen, was administered orally to B6 and C3H strains, lymphoma development was slower than in T3(b)-TL gene-transduced counterpart strains expressing TL ubiquitously as self-antigens, suggesting that anti-TL immunity may play a protective role. In addition, the development of lymphomas was slightly slower in C3H than in B6, which seems to be in accordance with the results of skin graft experiments indicating that both cellular and humoral immunities against TL were stronger in C3H than B6 mice. The interesting finding that B lymphomas derived from a T3(b)-TL transgenic strain (C3H background) expressing a very high level of TL were rejected in C3H, but not in H-2K(b) transgenic mice (C3H background), raises the possibility that TL-specific effector T cell populations are eliminated and/or energized to a certain extent by interacting with H-2K(b) molecules.

  11. Doxorubicin-anti-carcinoembryonic antigen immunoconjugate activity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, V J; Ford, C H; Tsaltas, G; Gallant, M E

    1989-04-01

    An in vitro model consisting of a series of 11 human cancer cell lines with varying density of expression of membrane carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) has been used to evaluate conjugates of doxorubicin (Adriamycin) covalently linked by a carbodiimide method to goat polyclonal antibodies and mouse monoclonal antibodies to CEA. Conjugates were produced which retained both antigen binding and drug cytotoxicity. IC50 values were determined for free drug, free drug mixed with unconjugated antibodies and for the immunoconjugates. Cell lines that were very sensitive to free drug (IC50 less than 100 ng/ml) were also found to be highly sensitive to conjugated drug and similarly cell lines resistant to drug (IC50 greater than 1,000 ng/ml) were also resistant to conjugated drug. Although there was no correlation between CEA expression and conjugates efficacy, competitive inhibition studies using autologous antibody to block conjugate binding to cells indicated immunoconjugates specificity for the CEA target.

  12. Biodistribution studies of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-directed monoclonal antibodies in the EpCAM-transgenic mouse tumor model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosterink, Jos G. W.; McLaughlin, Pamela M. J.; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N.; Hendrikse, Harry H.; Van Zanten, Jacoba; Van Garderen, Evert; Harmsen, Martin C.; De Leij, Lou F. M. H.

    2007-01-01

    The human pancarcinoma-associated epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) (EGP-2, CO17-1A) is a well-known target for carcinoma-directed immunotherapy. Mouse-derived mAbs directed to EpCAM have been used to treat colon carcinoma patients showing well-tolerable toxic side effects but limited

  13. C-kit-targeted imaging of gastrointestinal stromal tumor using radiolabeled anti-c-kit monoclonal antibody in a mouse tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sogawa, Chizuru; Tsuji, Atsushi B.; Sudo, Hitomi; Sugyo, Aya; Yoshida, Chisato; Odaka, Kenichi; Uehara, Tomoya; Arano, Yasushi; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Saga, Tsuneo

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumor arising from the gastrointestinal tract and highly expresses mutated c-kit. We aimed to develop a specific and sensitive method for detecting GISTs using radiolabeled anti-c-kit monoclonal antibody. Methods: A mutated c-kit-expressing cell clone was established by transfecting an expressing vector of mutated c-kit gene into HEK293 human embryonic kidney cells. The tumors were developed by inoculating c-kit-expressing cells into nude mice. 125 I- and 111 In-labeled anti-c-kit antibodies (12A8 and 41A11) were evaluated in vitro by cell binding, competitive inhibition and cellular internalization assays, and in vivo by biodistribution and imaging studies in tumor-bearing mice. Results: Both 125 I- and 111 In-labeled antibodies showed specific binding with c-kit-expressing cells with high affinity (dissociation constants = 2.2-7.1x10 9 M -1 ). Internalization assay showed that 125 I-labeled antibodies were rapidly internalized and dehalogenated, with the release of 125 I from the cells, resulting in reduction of cell-associated radioactivity with time. In contrast, 111 In-labeled antibody was internalized but did not result in the reduced radioactivity associated with tumor cells. Reflecting this phenomenon, the in vivo tumor uptake of 125 I-labeled antibody was low on Day 1, further decreasing with time, while tumor uptake of 111 In-labeled antibody was high on Day 1, further increasing with time. The xenografted tumor was clearly visualized by scintigraphy after injection of 111 In-labeled antibody. Conclusion: The anti-c-kit monoclonal antibody labeled with a metal radionuclide would be promising for c-kit-targeted imaging of GISTs.

  14. Sensitive radioimmunoassay for the determination of antibodies to mouse hepatitis virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leibowitz, J L [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla (USA); Fung, L S; Levy, G A [Toronto Univ., Ontario (Canada)

    1983-05-01

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay is described for the detection of antibodies to mouse hepatitis virus. Viruses were purified by velocity and isopycnic gradient centrifugation and 96-well plastic plates were coated with viral antigens. To allow the detection of most serotypes of low titered antisera, a pool of antigens from several viral serotypes were employed. The second antibody, an affinity-purified goat antimouse immunoglobulin, detects IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies. This assay is more sensitive than either the plaque reduction assay or the commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay and proved to be useful for screening mouse colonies for the presence of mouse hepatitis virus, following seroconversion in experimental animals and in the production of monoclonal antibodies to both structural and nonstructural proteins.

  15. A sensitive radioimmunoassay for the determination of antibodies to mouse hepatitis virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leibowitz, J.L.; Fung, L.S.; Levy, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay is described for the detection of antibodies to mouse hepatitis virus. Viruses were purified by velocity and isopycnic gradient centrifugation and 96-well plastic plates were coated with viral antigens. To allow the detection of most serotypes of low titered antisera, a pool of antigens from several viral serotypes were employed. The second antibody, an affinity-purified goat antimouse immunoglobulin, detects IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies. This assay is more sensitive than either the plaque reduction assay or the commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay and proved to be useful for screening mouse colonies for the presence of mouse hepatitis virus, following seroconversion in experimental animals and in the production of monoclonal antibodies to both structural and nonstructural proteins. (Auth.)

  16. In vivo amyloid-β imaging in the APPPS1-21 transgenic mouse model with a 89Zr- labeled monoclonal antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Marie eWaldron

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The accumulation of amyloid-β is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease and is a target for molecular imaging probes to aid in diagnosis and disease monitoring. This study evaluated the feasibility of using a radiolabeled monoclonal anti-amyloid-β antibody (JRF/AβN/25 to non-invasively assess amyloid-β burden in aged transgenic mice (APPPS1-21 with μPET imaging.Methods: We investigated the antibody JRF/AβN/25 that binds to full-length Aβ. JRF/AβN/25 was radiolabeled with a [89Zr]-desferal chelate and intravenously injected into 12-13 month aged APPPS1-21 mice and their wild-type (WT controls. Mice underwent in vivo μPET imaging at 2, 4 and 7 days post injection and were sacrificed at the end of each time point to assess brain penetrance, plaque labeling, biodistribution and tracer stability. To confirm imaging specificity we also evaluated brain uptake of a non-amyloid targeting [89Zr]-labeled antibody (Trastuzumab as a negative control, additionally we performed a competitive blocking study with non-radiolabeled Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 and finally we assessed the possible confounding effects of blood retention. Results: Voxel-wise analysis of μPET data demonstrated significant [89Zr]-Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 retention in APPPS1-21 mice at all time points investigated. With ex vivo measures of radioactivity, significantly higher retention of [89Zr]-Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 was found at 4 and 7 day pi in APPPS1-21 mice. Despite the observed genotypic differences, comparisons with immunohistochemistry revealed that in vivo plaque labeling was low. Furthermore, pre-treatment with Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 only partially blocked [89Zr]-Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 uptake indicative of a high contribution of non-specific binding. Conclusion: Amyloid plaques were detected in vivo with a radiolabeled monoclonal anti-amyloid antibody. The low brain penetrance of the antibodies in addition to non-specific binding prevented an accurate estimation of plaque

  17. Monoclonal antibodies for use in an immunoradiometric assay for α-foetoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, W.M.; Bennie, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    The advantages offered by a mouse IgG 1 monoclonal antibody to human α-foetoprotein (AFP) for the preparation of [ 125 I]antibody for use in an immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) have been investigated. The antibody was isolated from ascites fluid by sodium sulphate precipitation followed by gel filtration on Sephadex G-200. The freeze-dried powder and solutions thereof were stable and were used for iodination to 1 atom 125 I/molecule antibody by the chloramine-T procedure. At high antigen concentrations 70-80% of the added [ 125 ]Ab was present in the sandwich. Linear response curves in the range 1-100 μg antigen/l incubate were obtained when [ 125 I]Ab was in slight excess. In this region an Ag : Ab ratio 1.9 : 1 was obtained which is consistent with the saturation of a bifunctional antibody. Although non-specific binding (in the absence of antigen) was consistently 125 I]Ab, this was the main factor in determining assay detection limits. The serum AFP levels from both non-pregnant and pregnant subjects as measured by the IRMA using the [ 125 I]monoclonal Ab and by radioimmunoassay (RIA) using a sheep antiserum to AFP were in excellent agreement. The IRMA was manipulatively simple, employed a shorter incubation time (2h), required shorter counting times than the RIA and gave a much wider working range. The provision of a monoclonal antibody for labelling removes the one major practicability barrier which otherwise limits the development and use of the potentially superior IRMA system. (Auth.)

  18. Monoclonal antibodies for use in an immunoradiometric assay for. cap alpha. -foetoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, W.M.; Bennie, J.G. (Medical Research Council, Edinburgh (UK). Immunoassay Team); Brock, D.J.H.; Heyningen, V. van (Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (UK))

    1982-04-29

    The advantages offered by a mouse IgG/sub 1/ monoclonal antibody to human ..cap alpha..-foetoprotein (AFP) for the preparation of (/sup 125/I)antibody for use in an immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) have been investigated. The antibody was isolated from ascites fluid by sodium sulphate precipitation followed by gel filtration on Sephadex G-200. The freeze-dried powder and solutions thereof were stable and were used for iodination to 1 atom /sup 125/I/molecule antibody by the chloramine-T procedure. At high antigen concentrations 70-80% of the added (/sup 125/)Ab was present in the sandwich. Linear response curves in the range 1-100 ..mu..g antigen/l incubate were obtained when (/sup 125/I)Ab was in slight excess. In this region an Ag : Ab ratio 1.9 : 1 was obtained which is consistent with the saturation of a bifunctional antibody. Although non-specific binding (in the absence of antigen) was consistently <0.1% of added (/sup 125/I)Ab, this was the main factor in determining assay detection limits. The serum AFP levels from both non-pregnant and pregnant subjects as measured by the IRMA using the (/sup 125/I)monoclonal Ab and by radioimmunoassay (RIA) using a sheep antiserum to AFP were in excellent agreement. The IRMA was manipulatively simple, employed a shorter incubation time (2h), required shorter counting times than the RIA and gave a much wider working range. The provision of a monoclonal antibody for labelling removes the one major practicability barrier which otherwise limits the development and use of the potentially superior IRMA system.

  19. Human monoclonal antibodies reactive with human myelomonocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, M R; Santos, D J; Elboim, H S; Tumber, M B; Frackelton, A R

    1989-04-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), in remission, were depleted of CD8-positive T-cells and cultured with Epstein-Barr virus. Four of 20 cultures (20%) secreted human IgG antibodies selectively reactive with the cell surfaces of certain human leukemia cell lines. Three polyclonal, Epstein-Barr virus-transformed, B-cell lines were expanded and fused with the human-mouse myeloma analogue HMMA2.11TG/O. Antibody from secreting clones HL 1.2 (IgG1), HL 2.1 (IgG3), and HL 3.1 (IgG1) have been characterized. All three react with HL-60 (promyelocytic), RWLeu4 (CML promyelocytic), and U937 (monocytic), but not with KG-1 (myeloblastic) or K562 (CML erythroid). There is no reactivity with T-cell lines, Burkitt's cell lines, pre-B-leukemia cell lines, or an undifferentiated CML cell line, BV173. Leukemic cells from two of seven patients with acute myelogenous leukemia and one of five with acute lymphocytic leukemia react with all three antibodies. Normal lymphocytes, monocytes, polymorphonuclear cells, red blood cells, bone marrow cells, and platelets do not react. Samples from patients with other diverse hematopoietic malignancies showed no reactivity. Immunoprecipitations suggest that the reactive antigen(s) is a lactoperoxidase iodinatable series of cell surface proteins with molecular weights of 42,000-54,000 and a noniodinatable protein with a molecular weight of 82,000. Based on these data these human monoclonal antibodies appear to react with myelomonocytic leukemic cells and may detect a leukemia-specific antigen or a highly restricted differentiation antigen.

  20. In vivo time-related evaluation of a therapeutic neutralization monoclonal antibody against lethal enterovirus 71 infection in a mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqun Li

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is a neurotropic virus capable of inducing severe neurological symptoms and death. No direct targeting antivirals are useful in the treatment of severe EV71 infection. Because of low toxicity and good specificity, monoclonal antibodies (MAb are a potential candidate for the treatment of viral infections. Therefore, we developed an EV71-specific conformational MAb with high in vitro cross-neutralization activity to heterologous EV71 subgenotypes. The in vivo treatment experiment at different days post-infection indicated that a single treatment of MAb CT11F9 within day 3 post-infection fully protected mice from morbidity and mortality (0% PBS vs. 100% at 10 µg/g per body weight ***P<0.0001. Immunohistochemical and histological analysis confirmed that CT11F9 significantly prohibited EV71 VP1 expression in various tissues and prevented EV71-induced myonecrosis. Moreover, thrice-treatment at day 4, 5, 6 post-infection was associated with an increased survival rate (18.2% single vs. 50% thrice at 20 µg/g per body weight, and the mice recovered from limb paralysis. Competitive ELISA also confirmed that CT11F9-recognized epitopes were immunodominant in humans. In conclusion, MAb CT11F9 is an ideal candidate to be humanized and used in severe EV71 infection.

  1. Biosynthetic incorporation of [75Se]selenomethionine: a new method for labelling lymphocyte membrane antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosseto, M.; Rohner, C.; Pierres, M.; Goridis, C.

    1981-01-01

    A novel approach for radiolabelling lymphocyte membrane antigens is described. This technique is based on the use of the γ-emitting amino acid analogue [ 75 Se]selenomethionine. Human HLA-A, B, C and DR heavy and light chains and mouse Ia antigens were efficiently labelled by this technique and were precipitated with monoclonal antibodies. Approximately the same radioactivity was incorporated into the HLA-A, B, C chains whether [ 75 Se]selenomethionine, [ 35 S]methionine or [ 3 H]leucine were used as precursors. Easily detectable as a γ-emitter, [ 75 Se]selenomethionine thus constitutes a useful biosynthetic label of lymphocyte surface antigens. The same method was used to label immunoglobulins produced by hybridomas and to determine the nature of the secreted light chains. (Auth.)

  2. Linear pharmacokinetic parameters for monoclonal antibodies are similar within a species and across different pharmacological targets: A comparison between human, cynomolgus monkey and hFcRn Tg32 transgenic mouse using a population-modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Alison; Keunecke, Anne; van Steeg, Tamara J; van der Graaf, Piet H; Avery, Lindsay B; Jones, Hannah; Berkhout, Jan

    2018-04-10

    The linear pharmacokinetics (PK) of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can be considered a class property with values that are similar to endogenous IgG. Knowledge of these parameters across species could be used to avoid unnecessary in vivo PK studies and to enable early PK predictions and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) simulations. In this work, population-pharmacokinetic (popPK) modeling was used to determine a single set of 'typical' popPK parameters describing the linear PK of mAbs in human, cynomolgus monkey and transgenic mice expressing the human neonatal Fc receptor (hFcRn Tg32), using a rich dataset of 27 mAbs. Non-linear PK was excluded from the datasets and a 2-compartment model was applied to describe mAb disposition. Typical human popPK estimates compared well with data from comparator mAbs with linear PK in the clinic. Outliers with higher than typical clearance were found to have non-specific interactions in an affinity-capture self-interaction nanoparticle spectroscopy assay, offering a potential tool to screen out these mAbs at an early stage. Translational strategies were investigated for prediction of human linear PK of mAbs, including use of typical human popPK parameters and allometric exponents from cynomolgus monkey and Tg32 mouse. Each method gave good prediction of human PK with parameters predicted within 2-fold. These strategies offer alternative options to the use of cynomolgus monkeys for human PK predictions of linear mAbs, based on in silico methods (typical human popPK parameters) or using a rodent species (Tg32 mouse), and call into question the value of completing extensive in vivo preclinical PK to inform linear mAb PK.

  3. Radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancer, using anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tadashi; Tadokoro, Masanori; Takagi, Hiroshi; Sakuma, Sadayuki; Sakamoto, Junichi.

    1989-01-01

    Aiming at radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancer, anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies (CEA102) were produced by immunization with purified CEA. CEA102 showed high specificity with clorectal cancer by mixed hemadsorption assay and immunoperoxidase technique. The antigen detected by CEA102 was confirmed to be carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and its molecular weight was estimated to be ca. 180,000 by biochemical analysis. The in vivo study using nude mice grafted a human colorectal cancer or a human malignant melanoma showed greater accumulation of 125 I-labeled CEA102 in CEA-positive colorectal cancer than in nude mouse tissues and CEA-negative malignant melanoma. Moreover we successfully obtained scans with good localization of the grafted colorectal cancer on FCR (Fuji Computed Radiography). Using 131 I-labeled CEA102 liver metastasis in the patient with colorectal cancer was successfully detected by external scanning with γ-camera. These results suggest that radiolabeled CEA102 is useful for the detection of colorectal cancer. (author)

  4. Screening individual hybridomas by microengraving to discover monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunniyi, Adebola O; Story, Craig M; Papa, Eliseo; Guillen, Eduardo; Love, J Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The demand for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in biomedical research is significant, but the current methodologies used to discover them are both lengthy and costly. Consequently, the diversity of antibodies available for any particular antigen remains limited. Microengraving is a soft lithographic technique that provides a rapid and efficient alternative for discovering new mAbs. This protocol describes how to use microengraving to screen mouse hybridomas to establish new cell lines producing unique mAbs. Single cells from a polyclonal population are isolated into an array of microscale wells (~105 cells per screen). The array is then used to print a protein microarray, where each element contains the antibodies captured from individual wells. The antibodies on the microarray are screened with antigens of interest, and mapped to the corresponding cells, which are then recovered from their microwells by micromanipulation. Screening and retrieval require approximately 1–3 d (9–12 d including the steps for preparing arrays of microwells). PMID:19528952

  5. Efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies against peptide in the context of MHCII using magnetic enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanier, Justin A; Frederick, Daniel R; Taylor, Justin J; Heffernan, James R; Kotov, Dmitri I; Martinov, Tijana; Osum, Kevin C; Ruggiero, Jenna L; Rust, Blake J; Landry, Samuel J; Jenkins, Marc K; McLachlan, James B; Fife, Brian T

    2016-06-13

    Monoclonal antibodies specific for foreign antigens, auto-antigens, allogeneic antigens and tumour neo-antigens in the context of major histocompatibility complex II (MHCII) are highly desirable as novel immunotherapeutics. However, there is no standard protocol for the efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies that recognize peptide in the context of MHCII, and only a limited number of such reagents exist. In this report, we describe an approach for the generation and screening of monoclonal antibodies specific for peptide bound to MHCII. This approach exploits the use of recombinant peptide:MHC monomers as immunogens, and subsequently relies on multimers to pre-screen and magnetically enrich the responding antigen-specific B cells before fusion and validation, thus saving significant time and reagents. Using this method, we have generated two antibodies enabling us to interrogate antigen presentation and T-cell activation. This methodology sets the standard to generate monoclonal antibodies against the peptide-MHCII complexes.

  6. Construction of a recombinant adenovirus co-expressing truncated human prostate-specific membrane antigen and mouse 4-1BBL genes and its effect on dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Weng

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to construct a recombinant adenovirus co-expressing truncated human prostate-specific membrane antigen (tPSMA and mouse 4-1BBL genes and to determine its effect on dendritic cells (DCs generated from bone marrow suspensions harvested from C57BL/6 mice for which the effect of 4-1BBL on DCs is not clear, especially during DCs processing tumor-associated antigen. Replication deficient adenovirus AdMaxTM Expression System was used to construct recombinant adenovirus Ad-tPSMA-internal ribosome entry site-mouse 4-1BBL (Ad-tPSMA-IRES-m4-1BBL and Ad-enhanced green fluorescent protein. Day 7 proliferating DC aggregates generated from C57BL/6 mice were collected as immature DCs and further mature DCs were obtained by lipopolysaccharide activated immature DCs. After DCs were exposed to the recombinant adenovirus with 250 multiplicity of infection, the expression of tPSMA and m4-1BBL proteins were detected by Western blot, and the apoptosis and phenotype of DCs were analyzed by flow cytometry. Cytokines (IL-6 and IL-12 in the supernatant were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Proliferation of T cells was detected by allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reactions. The tPSMA and m4-1BBL proteins were expressed correctly. The apoptosis rate of DCs transfected with Ad-tPSMA-IRES-m4-1BBL was 14.6%, lower than that of control DCs. The expression of co-stimulatory molecules [CD80 (81.6 ± 5.4% and CD86 (80.13 ± 2.81%] up-regulated in Ad-tPSMA-IRES-m4-1BBL-pulsed DCs, and the level of IL-6 (3960.2 ± 50.54 pg/mL and IL-12 (249.57 ± 12.51 pg/mL production in Ad-tPSMA-IRES-m4-1BBL-transduced DCs were significantly higher (P < 0.05 than those in control DCs. Ad-tPSMA-IRES-m4-1BBL induced higher T-cell proliferation (OD450 = 0.614 ± 0.018, indicating that this recombinant adenovirus can effectively enhance the activity of DCs.

  7. Antibodies and Selection of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanack, Katja; Messerschmidt, Katrin; Listek, Martin

    Monoclonal antibodies are universal binding molecules with a high specificity for their target and are indispensable tools in research, diagnostics and therapy. The biotechnological generation of monoclonal antibodies was enabled by the hybridoma technology published in 1975 by Köhler and Milstein. Today monoclonal antibodies are used in a variety of applications as flow cytometry, magnetic cell sorting, immunoassays or therapeutic approaches. First step of the generation process is the immunization of the organism with appropriate antigen. After a positive immune response the spleen cells are isolated and fused with myeloma cells in order to generate stable, long-living antibody-producing cell lines - hybridoma cells. In the subsequent identification step the culture supernatants of all hybridoma cells are screened weekly for the production of the antibody of interest. Hybridoma cells producing the antibody of interest are cloned by limited dilution till a monoclonal hybridoma is found. This is a very time-consuming and laborious process and therefore different selection strategies were developed since 1975 in order to facilitate the generation of monoclonal antibodies. Apart from common automation of pipetting processes and ELISA testing there are some promising approaches to select the right monoclonal antibody very early in the process to reduce time and effort of the generation. In this chapter different selection strategies for antibody-producing hybridoma cells are presented and analysed regarding to their benefits compared to conventional limited dilution technology.

  8. Critical epitopes in the nucleocapsid protein of SFTS virus recognized by a panel of SFTS patients derived human monoclonal antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SFTS virus (SFTSV is a newly discovered pathogen to cause severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS in human. Successful control of SFTSV epidemic requires better understanding of the antigen target in humoral immune responses to the new bunyavirus infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have generated a combinatorial Fab antibody phage library from two SFTS patients recovered from SFTSV infection. To date, 94 unique human antibodies have been generated and characterized from over 1200 Fab antibody clones obtained by screening the library with SFTS purified virions. All those monoclonal antibodies (MAbs recognized the nucleocapsid (N protein of SFTSV while none of them were reactive to the viral glycoproteins Gn or Gc. Furthermore, over screening 1000 mouse monoclonal antibody clones derived from SFTSV virions immunization, 462 clones reacted with N protein, while only 16 clones were reactive to glycoprotein. Furthermore, epitope mapping of SFTSV N protein was performed through molecular simulation, site mutation and competitive ELISA, and we found that at least 4 distinct antigenic epitopes within N protein were recognized by those human and mouse MAbs, in particular mutation of Glu10 to Ala10 abolished or significantly reduced the binding activity of nearly most SFTS patients derived MAbs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The large number of human recombinant MAbs derived from SFTS patients recognized the viral N protein indicated the important role of the N protein in humoral responses to SFTSV infection, and the critical epitopes we defined in this study provided molecular basis for detection and diagnosis of SFTSV infection.

  9. Sequential appearance of thymocyte subpopulations and T cell antigen receptor gene messages in the mouse thymus after sublethal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomooka, S.; Matsuzaki, G.; Kishihara, K.; Tanaka, K.; Yoshikai, Y.; Taniguchi, K.; Himeno, K.; Nomoto, K.

    1987-01-01

    The sequential differentiation patterns of thymocyte were observed with cell surface phenotypes and the expression of T cell antigen receptor in 800 rad irradiated adult mice. Thymus was severely reduced in size and cell number by day 5 after whole body irradiation and rapidly recovered from day 7 to day 14. Surface marker analysis on day 5 after irradiation showed thymocytes with Thy-1low L3T4+/Lyt-2- dominantly existed and suggested that these cells were radioresistant-survived cells. On the other hand, thymocytes on day 7 were composed of a large number of Thy-1high L3T4+/Lyt-2+ blast-like cells and a relatively high proportion of Thy-1high L3T4-/Lyt-2- cells which expressed a large amount of gamma-chain gene messages but scarcely any alpha- and beta-chain gene messages similar to the fetal thymocytes. On day 14, thymocytes were composed mostly of Thy-1high H-2low L3T4+/Lyt-2+ subpopulation which expressed a remarkably low level of gamma-chain gene messages, and high levels of alpha- and beta-chain transcripts analogous to those of normal adult thymus. Taken together, intrathymic radioresistent stem cells for T thymocytes seem to proliferate and differentiate after irradiation with the same pattern as was seen in a fetal thymus development

  10. Gamma ray-induced mutants as a tool for the production and characterisation of monoclonal antibodies against HLA-alloantigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spring, B.; Pawelec, G.; Ziegler, A.

    1986-01-01

    To simplify the screening procedure for murine monoclonal antibodies specific for polymorphic HLA determinants, spleen cells from a mouse immunized with the human cell line BJAB-B95.8.6 were fused with NS1 mouse myeloma cells, and hybridoma supernatants were screened for their reactivity on BJAB-B95.8.6 and two gamma ray-induced HLA-loss mutants of this line. The use of these HLA-loss mutants allowed the rapid identification of two new allospecific MOABs designated TU160 and TU161. Serological as well as biochemical studies revealed TU160 to be specific for HLA=A2, and TU161 for HLA-B13 molecules, respectively. Bo- th MOABs were determined to be antibodies of the IgG class and were able to precipitate their antigens from lysates of radioactively labeled cells. (author)

  11. MicroRNA-29b modulates innate and antigen-specific immune responses in mouse models of autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apolline Salama

    Full Text Available In addition to important regulatory roles in gene expression through RNA interference, it has recently been shown that microRNAs display immune stimulatory effects through direct interaction with receptors of innate immunity of the Toll-like receptor family, aggravating neuronal damage and tumour growth. Yet no evidence exists on consequences of microRNA immune stimulatory actions in the context of an autoimmune disease. Using microRNA analogues, we here show that pancreatic beta cell-derived microRNA sequences induce pro-inflammatory (TNFa, IFNa, IL-12, IL-6 or suppressive (IL-10 cytokine secretion by primary mouse dendritic cells in a sequence-dependent manner. For miR-29b, immune stimulation in RAW264.7 macrophages involved the endosomal Toll-like receptor-7, independently of the canonical RNA interference pathway. In vivo, the systemic delivery of miR-29b activates CD11b+B220- myeloid and CD11b-B220+ plasmacytoid dendritic cells and induces IFNa, TNFa and IL-6 production in the serum of recipient mice. Strikingly, in a murine model of adoptive transfer of autoimmune diabetes, miR-29b reduces the cytolytic activity of transferred effector CD8+ T-cells, insulitis and disease incidence in a single standalone intervention. Endogenous miR-29b, spontaneously released from beta-cells within exosomes, stimulates TNFa secretion from spleen cells isolated from diabetes-prone NOD mice in vitro. Hence, microRNA sequences modulate innate and ongoing adaptive immune responses raising the question of their potential role in the breakdown of tolerance and opening up new applications for microRNA-based immune therapy.

  12. Preclinical evaluation of racotumomab, an anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody to N-glycolyl-containing gangliosides, with or without chemotherapy in a mouse model of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segatori, Valeria I.; Vazquez, Ana M.; Gomez, Daniel E.; Gabri, Mariano R.; Alonso, Daniel F.

    2012-01-01

    N-glycolylneuraminic acid (NeuGc) is a sialic acid molecule usually found in mammalian cells as terminal constituents of different membrane glycoconjugates such as gangliosides. The NeuGcGM3 ganglioside has been described as a tumor antigen for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in humans. Racotumomab is an anti-NeuGc-containing gangliosides anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody (mAb) (formerly known as 1E10) that has received attention as a potential active immunotherapy for advanced lung cancer in clinical trials. In this work, we have examined the antitumor activity of racotumomab in combination or not with chemotherapy, using the 3LL Lewis lung carcinoma as a preclinical model of NSCLC in C57BL/6 mice. Vaccination with biweekly doses of racotumomab at 50–200 μg/dose formulated in aluminum hydroxide (racotumomab-alum vaccine) demonstrated a significant antitumor effect against the progression of lung tumor nodules. Racotumomab-alum vaccination exerted a comparable effect on lung disease to that of pemetrexed-based chemotherapy (100 mg/kg weekly). Interestingly, chemo-immunotherapy was highly effective against lung nodules and well-tolerated, although no significant synergistic effect was observed as compared to each treatment alone in the present model. We also obtained evidence on the role of the exogenous incorporation of NeuGc in the metastatic potential of 3LL cells. Our preclinical data provide support for the combination of chemotherapy with the anti-idiotype mAb racotumomab, and also reinforce the biological significance of NeuGc in lung cancer.

  13. Preclinical evaluation of racotumomab, an anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody to N-glycolyl-containing gangliosides, with or without chemotherapy in a mouse model of non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segatori, Valeria I. [Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Department of Science and Technology, Quilmes National University, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Vazquez, Ana M. [Center of Molecular Immunology, Innovation Managing Direction, La Habana (Cuba); Gomez, Daniel E.; Gabri, Mariano R.; Alonso, Daniel F., E-mail: dfalonso@unq.edu.ar [Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Department of Science and Technology, Quilmes National University, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-11-08

    N-glycolylneuraminic acid (NeuGc) is a sialic acid molecule usually found in mammalian cells as terminal constituents of different membrane glycoconjugates such as gangliosides. The NeuGcGM3 ganglioside has been described as a tumor antigen for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in humans. Racotumomab is an anti-NeuGc-containing gangliosides anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody (mAb) (formerly known as 1E10) that has received attention as a potential active immunotherapy for advanced lung cancer in clinical trials. In this work, we have examined the antitumor activity of racotumomab in combination or not with chemotherapy, using the 3LL Lewis lung carcinoma as a preclinical model of NSCLC in C57BL/6 mice. Vaccination with biweekly doses of racotumomab at 50–200 μg/dose formulated in aluminum hydroxide (racotumomab-alum vaccine) demonstrated a significant antitumor effect against the progression of lung tumor nodules. Racotumomab-alum vaccination exerted a comparable effect on lung disease to that of pemetrexed-based chemotherapy (100 mg/kg weekly). Interestingly, chemo-immunotherapy was highly effective against lung nodules and well-tolerated, although no significant synergistic effect was observed as compared to each treatment alone in the present model. We also obtained evidence on the role of the exogenous incorporation of NeuGc in the metastatic potential of 3LL cells. Our preclinical data provide support for the combination of chemotherapy with the anti-idiotype mAb racotumomab, and also reinforce the biological significance of NeuGc in lung cancer.

  14. Antigenic determinants of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and development of assays specific for different forms of PSA.

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, O.; Peter, A.; Andersson, I.; Nilsson, K.; Grundstr?m, B.; Karlsson, B.

    1997-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were raised against prostate-specific antigen (PSA) by immunization with purified free PSA, i.e. not in complex with any protease inhibitor (F-PSA) and PSA in complex with alpha1-anti-chymotrypsin (PSA-ACT). Epitope mapping of PSA using the established monoclonal antibody revealed a complex pattern of independent and partly overlapping antigenic domains in the PSA molecule. Four independent antigenic domains and at least three partly overlapping domains were exposed both...

  15. Rapid screening of monoclonal antibodies: new 'microstick' radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheinberg, D.A.; Strand, M.; Wilsnack, R.

    1983-01-01

    A new system for assaying monoclonal antibodies consisting of an 8 x 12 array of sticks which fits into a 96-well microtiter plate is described. Tests using virus specific monoclonal antibodies and virus proteins demonstrated sensitivity equivalent to the conventional microtiter plate assay. Antibody production, antigen specific antibody, and immunoglobulin isotypes could be measured under sterile conditions directly in the original fusion mixture wells and much greater rapidity than with the microtiter plate assay. (Auth.)

  16. Monoclonal antibodies to human chorionic gonadotropin and their application to two-site sandwich radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuchi, A.; Iio, M.; Miyachi, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were prepared against human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG). One monoclonal antibody recognized a conformational determinant expressed only on native HCG molecule and another monoclonal antibody had the specificity for the epitopes located on the β-subunit of HCG. Monoclonal antibodies reacting with different antigenic determinants on the HCG molecule were used to develop a simplified 2-site sandwich radioimmunoassay in which one monoclonal antibody was immobilized and another labeled with 125 iodine. This assay was highly specific for HCG and there was no cross-reactivity with α,β-subunit of HCG, luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone. (Auth.)

  17. Evaluation of Efficacy of Radioimmunotherapy with 90Y-Labeled Fully Human Anti-Transferrin Receptor Monoclonal Antibody in Pancreatic Cancer Mouse Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Sugyo

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive tumor and the prognosis remains poor. Therefore, development of more effective therapy is needed. We previously reported that 89Zr-labeled TSP-A01, an antibody against transferrin receptor (TfR, is highly accumulated in a pancreatic cancer xenograft, but not in major normal organs. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of radioimmunotherapy (RIT with 90Y-TSP-A01 in pancreatic cancer mouse models.TfR expression in pancreatic cancer cell lines (AsPC-1, BxPC-3, MIAPaCa-2 was evaluated by immunofluorescence staining. 111In-labeled anti-TfR antibodies (TSP-A01, TSP-A02 were evaluated in vitro by cell binding assay with the three cell lines and by competitive inhibition assay with MIAPaCa-2. In vivo biodistribution was evaluated in mice bearing BxPC-3 and MIAPaCa-2 xenografts. Tumor volumes of BxPC-3 and MIAPaCa-2 were sequentially measured after 90Y-TSP-A01 injection and histological analysis of tumors was conducted.MIAPaCa-2 cells showed the highest TfR expression, followed by AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cells. 111In-TSP-A01 and 111In-TSP-A02 bound specifically to the three cell lines according to TfR expression. The dissociation constants for TSP-A01, DOTA-TSP-A01, TSP-A02, and DOTA-TSP-A02 were 0.22, 0.28, 0.17, and 0.22 nM, respectively. 111In-TSP-A01 was highly accumulated in tumors, especially in MIAPaCa-2, but this was not true of 111In-TSP-A02. The absorbed dose for 90Y-TSP-A01 was estimated to be 8.3 Gy/MBq to BxPC-3 and 12.4 Gy/MBq to MIAPaCa-2. MIAPaCa-2 tumors treated with 3.7 MBq of 90Y-TSP-A01 had almost completely disappeared around 3 weeks after injection and regrowth was not observed. Growth of BxPC-3 tumors was inhibited by 3.7 MBq of 90Y-TSP-A01, but the tumor size was not reduced.90Y-TSP-A01 treatment achieved an almost complete response in MIAPaCa-2 tumors, whereas it merely inhibited the growth of BxPC-3 tumors. 90Y-TSP-A01 is a promising RIT agent for pancreatic cancer, although further

  18. Conservation of myeloid surface antigens on primate granulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letvin, N L; Todd, R F; Palley, L S; Schlossman, S F; Griffin, J D

    1983-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with myeloid cell surface antigens were used to study evolutionary changes in granulocyte surface antigens from primate species. Certain of these granulocyte membrane antigens are conserved in phylogenetically distant species, indicating the potential functional importance of these structures. The degree of conservation of these antigens reflects the phylogenetic relationship between primate species. Furthermore, species of the same genus show similar patterns of binding to this panel of anti-human myeloid antibodies. This finding of conserved granulocyte surface antigens suggests that non-human primates may provide a model system for exploring uses of monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of human myeloid disorders.

  19. Generation of monoclonal antibodies against prostate specific antigen (PSA) for the detection of PSA and its purification; Generación de anticuerpos monoclonales contra el antígeno específico de próstata (PSA) para la detección del PSA y su purificación

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acevedo Castro, Boris Ernesto [Centro de Ingeniería Genética y Biotecnología, CIGB, La Habana (Cuba)

    2012-07-01

    The prostate cancer in Cuba is a problem of health (2672 diagnosed cases and 2769 deaths in 2007). Various diagnostic methods have been implemented for the detection and management of this disease, emphasizing among them (PSA) prostate-specific antigen serological determination. At this work was generated and characterized a panel of 11 antibodies (AcMs) monoclonal IgG1 detected with high affinity described major epitopes of the PSA, both in solution and attached to the test plate. From the panel obtained AcMs was the standardization of an essay type ELISA for the detection of serum total PSA (associated and free) equimolar, based on antibody monoclonal CB-PSA.4 in the coating and the CB-PSA.9 coupled with biotin as liner, with a detection limit of 0.15 ng/mL. Similarly, standardized system for detection in serum free PSA, based on the AcMs CB-PSA.4 (coating) and CB-PSA.2 coupled with biotin (liner), with a detection limit of 0.5 ng/mL. Finally, with the purpose of using PSA as standard in trials type ELISA, developed a simple method of inmunopurificación based on the AcM, CB-PSA.2, which was obtained the PSA with a purity exceeding 90%. Immunoassay Centre on the basis of the AcMs panel and the results of this study, developed and recorded two diagnostic systems for the detection of PSA in human serum. (author)

  20. Prognosis in monoclonal proteinaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaar, Cornelis Gerardus

    2006-01-01

    Monoclonal proteinaemia (M-proteinemia) is associated with multiple myeloma (MM) or other hematological malignancies. In the absence of these diseases the term MGUS (Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance) is used. During 1991-1993 1464 patients with newly diagnosed M-proteinemia in the

  1. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  2. Nuclear medicine: Monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, K.; Sakahara, H.; Koizumi, M.; Kawamura, Y.; Torizuka, K.; Yokoyama, A.

    1986-01-01

    Antitumor monoclonal antibody was successfully labeled with Tc-99m by using dithiosemicarbazone (DTS) as a bifunctional chelating agent. In the first step, DTS was coupled to antibody without loss of immunoreactivity; the compound then efficiently formed a neutral 1:1 chelate with pentavalent or tetravalent Tc-99m. Imaging with Tc-99m-labeled monoclonal antibody to human osteosarcoma (OST-7) clearly displayed a small tumor in nude mice at 6 and 24 hours after intravenous administration. The tumor-to-blood ratio of the Tc-99m-labeled monoclonal antibody was higher than that of a radioiodinated antibody and similar to that of an In-111-labeled antibody. Thus, conjugation of DTS to monoclonal antibody followed by radiometalation is a simple and efficient method of preparing Tc-99m-labeled monoclonal antibody

  3. USAGE OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES FOR DETERMINATION OF LOCALIZATION OF ANTIGENIC DETERMINANTS AND FIBRIN POLYMERIZATION SITES WITHIN FIBRINOGEN AND FIBRIN MOLECULES AND THEIR APPLICATION IN TEST--SYSTEMS FOR DIAGNOSTICS AND THE THREAT OF THROMBUS FORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Lugovskoi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It was shown by monoclonal antibodies that B?N-region of fibrin desA molecule (B?1-53 comprises the polymerization site including the peptide bond B?14-15. This site participates in the second stage of fibrin polymerization — lateral association of protofibrils. In the B?15-53 fragment was also found the site called «C», which together with the site «A» participate in the first stage of polymerization — the protofibrils formation. The model of the primary intermolecular interaction of fibrin was designed. It was found by monoclonal antibodies II-4d the site («c» in the N-terminal half of ? chain of the fibrin D-region. This site participates in the protofibrils formation and is complement to site «C» as we assume. We have discovered two neoantigenic determinants. One of these determinants exposes within the coiledcoil fragment B?126-135 of fibrin as a result of fibrinopeptide A splitting off from fibrinogen by thrombin. The structural rearrangements discovered in this site of the fibrin molecule are necessary for the following protofibrils lateral association. The second neoantigenic determinant is localized in the fragment B?134-190 of D-dimer formed after plasmin degradation of fibrin stabilized by FXIIIa. We have obtained the fibrin-specific monoclonal antibodie FnI-3C to the first determinant and D-dimer-specific mAb III-3b to the second one. Three monoclonal antibodies were obtained against the ?C-region of fibrin(ogen molecule. It has been experimentally shown by of one of them that ?C-domains is connected with the fibrinopeptides B in fibrinogen and fibrin desA molecules, but removes from the core of the molecules after fibrinopeptides B splitting off by thrombin. Two other monoclonal antibodies specifically inhibit the fibrin polymerization by blocking two unknown polymerization sites within the ?C-region. The test-systems for the soluble fibrin and D-dimer quantification in human blood plasma were designed on the basis of

  4. Administration of sulfosuccinimidyl-4-[N-maleimidomethyl] cyclohexane-1-carboxylate conjugated GP10025–33 peptide-coupled spleen cells effectively mounts antigen-specific immune response against mouse melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Xiaoli; Xia, Chang-Qing

    2015-01-01

    It remains a top research priority to develop immunotherapeutic approaches to induce potent antigen-specific immune responses against tumors. However, in spite of some promising results, most strategies are ineffective because they generate low numbers of tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Here we designed a strategy to enhance antigen-specific immune response via administering sulfosuccinimidyl-4-[N-maleimidomethyl] cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (sulfo-SMCC)-conjugated melanoma tumor antigen GP100 25–33 peptide-coupled syngeneic spleen cells in a mouse model of melanoma. We found that infusion of GP100 25–33 peptide-coupled spleen cells significantly attenuated the growth of melanoma in prophylactic and therapeutic immunizations. Consistent with these findings, the adoptive transfer of spleen cells from immunized mice to naïve syngeneic mice was able to transfer anti-tumor effect, suggesting that GP100 25–33 peptide-specific immune response was induced. Further studies showed that, CD8+ T cell proliferation and the frequency of interferon (IFN)-γ-producing CD8+ T cells upon ex vivo stimulation by GP100 25–33 were significantly increased compared to control groups. Tumor antigen, GP100 25–23 specific immune response was also confirmed by ELISpot and GP100-tetramer assays. This approach is simple, easy-handled, and efficiently delivering antigens to lymphoid tissues. Our study offers an opportunity for clinically translating this approach into tumor immunotherapy. - Highlights: • Infusion of GP100 25–33 -coupled spleen cells leads to potent anti-melanoma immunity. • GP100 25–33 -coupled spleen cell treatment induces antigen-specific IFN-γ-producing CD8 T cells. • This approach takes advantage of homing nature of immune cells.

  5. Administration of sulfosuccinimidyl-4-[N-maleimidomethyl] cyclohexane-1-carboxylate conjugated GP100{sub 25–33} peptide-coupled spleen cells effectively mounts antigen-specific immune response against mouse melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Xiaoli [Department of Hematology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Xia, Chang-Qing, E-mail: cqx65@yahoo.com [Department of Hematology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Department of Pathology, Immunology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL32610 (United States)

    2015-12-04

    It remains a top research priority to develop immunotherapeutic approaches to induce potent antigen-specific immune responses against tumors. However, in spite of some promising results, most strategies are ineffective because they generate low numbers of tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Here we designed a strategy to enhance antigen-specific immune response via administering sulfosuccinimidyl-4-[N-maleimidomethyl] cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (sulfo-SMCC)-conjugated melanoma tumor antigen GP100{sub 25–33} peptide-coupled syngeneic spleen cells in a mouse model of melanoma. We found that infusion of GP100{sub 25–33} peptide-coupled spleen cells significantly attenuated the growth of melanoma in prophylactic and therapeutic immunizations. Consistent with these findings, the adoptive transfer of spleen cells from immunized mice to naïve syngeneic mice was able to transfer anti-tumor effect, suggesting that GP100{sub 25–33} peptide-specific immune response was induced. Further studies showed that, CD8+ T cell proliferation and the frequency of interferon (IFN)-γ-producing CD8+ T cells upon ex vivo stimulation by GP100{sub 25–33} were significantly increased compared to control groups. Tumor antigen, GP100{sub 25–23} specific immune response was also confirmed by ELISpot and GP100-tetramer assays. This approach is simple, easy-handled, and efficiently delivering antigens to lymphoid tissues. Our study offers an opportunity for clinically translating this approach into tumor immunotherapy. - Highlights: • Infusion of GP100{sub 25–33}-coupled spleen cells leads to potent anti-melanoma immunity. • GP100{sub 25–33}-coupled spleen cell treatment induces antigen-specific IFN-γ-producing CD8 T cells. • This approach takes advantage of homing nature of immune cells.

  6. Monoclonal antibodies in pediatric allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Licari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs involving human-mouse hybrid cells was first described in 1970s, but these biologics are now used for a variety of diseases including cancers, autoimmune disorders and allergic diseases. The aim of this article is to review current and future applications of mAbs, in particular focusing on anti-IgE therapy, in the field of pediatric allergy. Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai, China, Dorret I. Boomsma (Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Gavino Faa (Cagliari, Italy, Antonio Giordano (Philadelphia, USA

  7. {sup 99m}Tc-labeled chimeric anti-NCA 95 antigranulocyte monoclonal antibody for bone marrow imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarwar, M.; Higuchi, Tetsuya; Tomiyoshi, Katsumi [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    1998-09-01

    Chimeric mouse-human antigranulocyte monoclonal antibody (ch MAb) against non-specific cross-reacting antigen (NCA-95) was labeled with {sup 99m}Tc (using a direct method) and {sup 125}I (using the chloramine T method), and its binding to human granulocytes and LS-180 colorectal carcinoma cells expressing carcinoembryonic antigen on their surfaces, cross-reactive with anti-NCA-95 chimeric monoclonal antibody, increased in proportion to the number of cells added and reached more than 80% and 90%, respectively. In biodistribution studies, {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 125}I-labeled ch anti-NCA-95 MAb revealed high tumor uptake, and the tumor-to-blood ratio was 2.9 after 24 hours. The tumor-to-normal-organ ratio was also more than 3.0 in all organs except for the tumor-to-kidney ratio. Scintigrams of athymic nude mice confirmed the results of biodistribution studies that showed higher radioactivity in tumor and kidney of the mice administered with {sup 99m}Tc-labeled ch MAb. A normal volunteer injected with {sup 99m}Tc-labeled ch anti-NCA-95 antigranulocyte MAb showed clear bone marrow images, and a patient with aplastic anemia revealed irregular uptake in his lumbar spine, suggesting its utility for bone marrow scintigraphy and for the detection of hematological disorders, infections, and bone metastasis. (author)

  8. Bone marrow dosimetry in rats using direct tissue counting after injection of radio-iodinated intact monoclonal antibodies or F(ab')2 fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchegger, F.; Chalandon, Y.; Pelegrin, A.; Hardman, N.; Mach, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    Normal rats were injected intravenously with 131I- and 125I-labeled intact murine and chimeric mouse-human monoclonal antibodies directed against carcinoembryonic antigen or with the corresponding F(ab')2 fragments. At different times after injection, individual animals were killed and radioactivity of blood and major organs, including bones and bone marrow, was determined. Ratios comparing radioactivity concentration in different tissues with that of bone marrow were calculated and found to remain stable during several effective half-lives of the antibodies. Mean bone marrow radioactivity was 35% (range, 29%-40%) of that of blood and 126% (range, 108%-147%) of that of liver after injection of intact Mabs or F(ab')2 fragments. In nude rats bearing human colon carcinoma xenografts producing carcinoembryonic antigen, relative bone marrow radioactivity was slightly lower than that in normal rats

  9. IgM but not IgG monoclonal anti-Nocardia brasiliensis antibodies confer protection against experimental actinomycetoma in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Suarez, Maria L; Salinas-Carmona, Mario C; Pérez-Rivera, Isabel

    2009-10-01

    Nocardia brasiliensis is a facultative intracellular microorganism that produces a human chronic infection known as actinomycetoma. Human and mouse anti-N. brasiliensis antibody response identify P24, P26 and P61 immunodominant antigens. In this work, we generated immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific to immunodominant P61 antigen. The monoclonal IgM (NbM1) and IgG2a (NbG1) antibodies were assessed for their in vitro bactericidal activity, in vivo protective effect and ability to block catalase activity. These mAbs specifically recognized P61, but they did not inhibit its enzyme activity. The in vitro bactericidal effect of NbG1 was higher than the killing ability of the IgM mAb. In vivo experiments with a murine model of experimental infection with N. brasiliensis injected into rear footpads was used to test the effect of NbM1 and NbG1. The negative untreated group developed a chronic actinomycetoma within 4 weeks. IgM mAbs conferred protection to BALB/c mice infected with N. brasiliensis. IgG mAb lacked this protective effect. IgM mAb showed a dose-response correlation between antibody concentration and lesion size. These results demonstrate that humoral immune response mediated by antigen-specific IgM antibody protects against an intracellular bacterial infection.

  10. Multicompartmental analysis of the kinetics of monoclonal antibody in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, K.; De Nardo, G.L.; De Nardo, S.J.; Peng, J.S.; Macey, D.J.; Hisada, K.; Tonami, N.

    1985-01-01

    Multicompartmental models were applied for analysis of kinetics of iodide labeled monoclonal antibody in cancer patients. About 14 compartments such as intravascular antibody pool, interstitial antibody pool, antibody processors, tumor antigen site, intravascular immune complex pool, intravascular iodide pool, and urine iodide pool were assumed. This model accounts for three molecular species, the antibody, and antibody complex, and free iodide or iodinated peptides. Patients were injected with I-123-Lym-1 IgG2a (anti B cell lymphoma antibody). After injection, blood and urine samples were sequentially collected. Plasma and urine were separated by HPLC into fractions of intact antibody, immune complex, and free iodide. This information was used for input data in the theoretical model. SAAM computer program was used to solve these compartmental models. Published linear rate constants for human serum albumin and human non-immune IgG were initially used. However, data calculated from the model differed from observed curves in several respects. The kinetics of mouse monoclonal antibody, a foreign protein in a patient, were significantly different from those reported for human IgG. When a nonlinear, saturable hepatic processor was incorporated in the model, calculated data fit the observed data better. This kinetic model provides a basis for calculating radiation doses for radioiodinated antibodies

  11. Application of murine monoclonal antibodies to the serodiagnosis of tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanyl, J.; Coates, A.R.M.; Krambovitis, E.

    1982-01-01

    The immune response during infectious diseases leads to a rise in antibody titre to the various different antigenic determinants of the causative organism. The response is further complicated by the fact that it is relatively unusual for one individual to respond to all antigenic components of an organism. Demonstration of the specific immune response of an infected host by serological tests is often hampered by the broad cross-reactivity between several bacterial antigens. The authors report on a serodiagnostic application of murine monoclonal antibodies (MAB), specific for a human pathogen, M. tuberculosis by a technique which is applicable in principle to the serodiagnosis of many other infectious diseases. The serum diagnostic test is based on the competitive inhibition by human sera of the binding of 125 I-labelled murine monoclonal antibodies to M. tuberculosis-coated polyvinyl plates. Five monoclonal antibodies binding to distinct antigenic determinants of the organism were used as structural probes which conferred their stringent combining site specificities to the polyclonal mixture of antibodies from patients' sera. When compared with healthy controls, increased titres of inhibitory antibodies were found in about 70% of patients with active tuberculosis. The diagnostic value of the individual monoclonal antibodies as well as the benefit from the use of multiple specificity probes has been qualified

  12. Monoclonal antibodies AC-43 and AC-29 disrupt Plasmodium vivax ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    malaria vaccines that block the transmission of parasites by mosquito vectors ... A repertoire of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was generated against the midgut proteins of Anopheles culicifacies ... from the midgut protein extract, as indicated by western blot analysis. Similarly .... 2.2 Antigen preparation and immunization.

  13. [International classification of various types of monoclonal antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, A J

    2009-01-01

    Significant advances in the development of monoclonal antibodies ("mabs") have been acknowledged during the last two decades. Successive developments led to the marketing of murine antibodies ("o-mab" first, followed by chimeric antibodies ("xi-mab"), humanised antibodies ("zu-mab") and, finally, human monoclonal antibodies ("u-mab"). In order to facilitate the distinction between the various monoclonal antibodies used in clinical practice, an international nomenclature has been proposed with the use of a specific suffix corresponding to the origine/source of "mabs" preceded by an infix referring to the medicine's target. The efforts in developing new types of monoclonal antibodies aimed at improving their pharmacokinetics (longer half-life), pharmacodynamics (better efficacy because of stronger affinity to human receptor), and safety profile (less antigenic and immunogenic reactions). These progresses could be obtained thanks to the remarkable development of molecular biotechnology.

  14. Single-domain monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute seeks parties to license human monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugates and co-develop, evaluate, and/or commercialize large-scale antibody production and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) xenograft mouse models.

  15. Recent developments in monoclonal antibody radiolabeling techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mease, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have shown the potential to serve as selective carriers of radionuclides to specific in vivo antigens. Accordingly, there has been an intense surge of research activity in an effort to develop and evaluate MAb-based radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging (radioimmunoscintigraphy) and therapy (radioimmunotherapy), as well as for diagnosing nonmalignant diseases. A number of problems have recently been identified, related to the MAbs themselves and to radiolabeling techniques, that comprise both the selectivity and the specificity of the in vivo distribution of radiolabeled MAbs. This paper will address some of these issues and primarily discuss recent developments in the techniques for radiolabeling monoclonal antibodies that may help resolve problems related to the poor in vivo stability of the radiolabel and may thus produce improved biodistribution. Even though many issues are identical with therapeutic radionuclides, the discussion will focus mainly on radioimmunoscintigraphic labels. 78 refs., 6 tabs.

  16. [Monoclonal antibodies in diagnosis of acute leukemias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyńska, A; Robak, T

    1996-01-01

    Immunophenotyping has become an essential component for the study of acute myeloblastic (AML) and lymphoblastic (ALL) leukaemias. The recent development of highly specific monoclonal antibodies (Mc Ab) to differentiation antigens (CD) of haematopoetic cells have made it readily available to clinical laboratories in most major hospitals. Immunophenotyping complements standard morphology by providing information on lineage, stage of differentiation and clonality. In addition some of the flow cytometry findings have independent prognostic significance. Monoclonal antibodies useful in defining lineage (B-cell versus T-cell) and stages of differentiation of ALL. It can be also used in identifying characteristic feature of AML and aiding in lineage determination in acute leukaemias that are morphologically undifferentiated. Surface immunophenotyping is especially helpful for recognizing mixed lineage acute leukaemia and diagnosing certain rare entities such as erythroleukaemia (M6), acute megakaryocytic leukaemia (M7) and minimally differentiation acute myeloid leukaemia.

  17. Recent developments in monoclonal antibody radiolabeling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mease, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have shown the potential to serve as selective carriers of radionuclides to specific in vivo antigens. Accordingly, there has been an intense surge of research activity in an effort to develop and evaluate MAb-based radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging (radioimmunoscintigraphy) and therapy (radioimmunotherapy), as well as for diagnosing nonmalignant diseases. A number of problems have recently been identified, related to the MAbs themselves and to radiolabeling techniques, that comprise both the selectivity and the specificity of the in vivo distribution of radiolabeled MAbs. This paper will address some of these issues and primarily discuss recent developments in the techniques for radiolabeling monoclonal antibodies that may help resolve problems related to the poor in vivo stability of the radiolabel and may thus produce improved biodistribution. Even though many issues are identical with therapeutic radionuclides, the discussion will focus mainly on radioimmunoscintigraphic labels. 78 refs., 6 tabs

  18. Experimental radioimmunoimaging of human lung small cell carcinoma xenograft H-69 by NCC-ST-433 monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Tetsuro; Nakamura, Kayoko; Kubo, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Shozo; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ishibiki, Kyuya; Abe, Osahiko

    1989-01-01

    NCC-ST-433 monoclonal antibody raised against human gastric carcinoma xenograft (St-4) was labeled with l25 I using enzymatic and Iodogen methods. While labeling efficiency of the antibody was more excellent by enzymatic method, specific radioactivity of the antibody labeled by Iodogen method was higher than that by enzymatic method. The labeled antibody was stable in vitro and in vivo, and the labeled NCC-ST-433 was specifically accumulated in NCC-ST-433 antigen positive human tumor cell lines in vitro. The specificity of 125 I-NCC-ST-433 in vivo was found to be more excellent when this antibody was labeled by Iodogen method and acutually excellent images of H-69, a human small cell lung carcioma, were obtained 5 days after injection of 7 μg of 125 I-NCC-ST-433 per mouse. This method seemed to be promising for imaging human lung small cell carcinoma. (author)

  19. Monoclonal Idiotope Vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Mary K.; Ward, Ronald E.; Kohler, Heinz

    1984-12-01

    A monoclonal anti-idiotope antibody coupled to a carrier protein was used to immunize BALB/c mice against a lethal Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. Vaccinated mice developed a high titer of antibody to phosphorylcholine, which is known to protect against infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Measurement of the median lethal dose of the bacteria indicated that anti-idiotope immunization significantly increased the resistance of BALB/c mice to the bacterial challenge. Antibody to an idiotope can thus be used as an antigen substitute for the induction of protective immunity.

  20. Studies of cytotoxic antibodies against eye muscle antigens in patients with thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.-G.; Hiromatsu, Y.; Salvi, M.; Triller, H.; Bernard, N.; Wall, J.R.; Medeiros-Neto, G.; Iacona, A.; Lima, N.

    1989-01-01

    We have studied the prevalence and significance of cytotoxic antibodies against human eye muscle cells, as detected in antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-mediated antibody-dependent cytotoxicity (CMAC) in 51 Cr release assays, in patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy or Hashimoto's thyroiditis. A high prevalence of positive ADCC tests was found in all groups of patients with ophthalmopathy tested. Tests were positive in 64% of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy from an area of severe iodine deficiency (Sao Paulo) and in 64% of such patients from an iodine replete area (Montreal). In patients with so-called ''euthyroid ophthalmopathy'', i.e. eye disease associated with thyroiditis, ADCC tests were positive in 75 and 38% of patients from the two areas, respectively, while tests were positive in 40 and 22%, respectively, of patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism without evident eye disease. In normal subjects, levels of 51 Cr release was always at background levels. In a group of patients from the high-iodine area, levels of antibodies in ADCC correlated positively with the intraocular pressure (mmHg) in primary position as a parameter of eye muscle dysfunction. In patients with ophthalmopathy, positive ADCC tests were assciated with antibodies to eye muscle membrane antigens of 55,65 and 95 kD as detected by immunoblotting, although the correlation was not close for any antigen. in contrast, CMAC tests were negative in all patients with ophthalmopathy. We also tested 9 mouse and 10 human monoclonal antibodies, reactive with orbital antigens in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, for cytotoxic activity, in ADCC and CMAC, against eye muscle and thyroid cells. All monoclonal antibodies were of the IgM class and negative in ADCC assays. When tested in CMAC against eye muscle cells, one of 9 mouse and 5 of 8 human monoclonal antibodies showed significant activity while tests were positive in one of 9 and one of 10 monoclonal antibodies

  1. Molecular cloning of cDNA for the human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 and identification of related transmembrane antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szala, S.; Kasai, Yasushi; Steplewski, Z.; Rodeck, U.; Koprowski, H.; Linnenbach, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    The human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 is a monoclonal antibody-defined cell surface glycoprotein of 27-34 kDa. By using the high-efficiency COS cell expression system, a full-length cDNA clone for CO-029 was isolated. When transiently expressed in COS cells, the cDNA clone directed the synthesis of an antigen reactive to monoclonal antibody CO-029 in mixed hemadsorption and immunoblot assays. Sequence analysis revealed that CO-029 belongs to a family of cell surface antigens that includes the melanoma-associated antigen ME491, the leukocyte cell surface antigen CD37, and the Sm23 antigen of the parasitic helminth Schistosoma mansoni. CO-029 and ME491 antigen expression and the effect of their corresponding monoclonal antibodies on cell growth were compared in human tumor cell lines of various histologic origins

  2. Antigen-specific immature dendritic cell vaccine ameliorates anti-dsDNA antibody-induced renal damage in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yumin; Jiang, Shan; Weng, Shenhong; Lv, Xiaochun; Cheng, Hong; Fang, Chunhong

    2011-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) can inhibit immune response by clonal anergy when immature. Recent studies have shown that immature DCs (iDCs) may serve as a live cell vaccine after specific antigen pulse based on its potential of blocking antibody production. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of nuclear antigen-pulsed iDCs in the treatment of lupus-like renal damages induced by anti-dsDNA antibodies. iDCs were generated from haemopoietic stem cells in bone marrow and then pulsed in vitro with nuclear antigen. The iDC vaccine and corresponding controls were injected into mice with lupus-like renal damages. The evaluation of disease was monitored by biochemical parameters and histological scores. Anti-dsDNA antibody isotypes and T-lymphocyte-produced cytokines were analysed for elucidating therapeutic mechanisms. RESULTS; The mice treated with antigen-pulsed iDCs had a sustained remission of renal damage compared with those injected with non-pulsed iDCs or other controls, including decreased anti-dsDNA antibody level, less proteinuria, lower blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine values, and improved histological evaluation. Analysis on isotypes of anti-dsDNA antibody showed that iDC vaccine preferentially inhibited the production of IgG3, IgG2b and IgG2a. Furthermore, administration of antigen-treated iDCs to mice resulted in significantly reduced IL-2, IL-4 and IL-12 and IFN-γ produced by T-memory cells. Conversely, the vaccination of antigen-pulsed mature DCs led to increased anti-dsDNA antibody production and an aggravation of lupus-like disease in the model. CONCLUSIONS; These results suggested the high potency of iDC vaccine in preventing lupus-like renal injuries induced by pathogenic autoantibodies.

  3. Pneumocystis carinii and specific fungi have a common epitope, identified by a monoclonal antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, B; Kovacs, J A; Nelson, N N

    1992-01-01

    Because Pneumocystis carinii may be related to fungi, we evaluated the reactivities of monoclonal antibodies raised against P. carinii with a variety of fungi. Fifty-two fungi and six protozoa were evaluated by immunofluorescence. One of three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) tested (MAb 7D7) reacted...... with 15 fungi but no protozoa. Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed the strongest reactivity by immunofluorescence. The reactive antigen was characterized for four fungi by the immunoblot technique. In all cases the antigen that was reactive with MAb 7D7 was larger than the P. carinii antigens that reacted...

  4. Fc receptors for mouse IgG1 on human monocytes: polymorphism and role in antibody-induced T cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tax, W J; Hermes, F F; Willems, R W; Capel, P J; Koene, R A

    1984-09-01

    In previous studies, it was shown that there is polymorphism in the mitogenic effect of mouse IgG1 monoclonal antibodies against the T3 antigen of human T cells. This polymorphism implies that IgG1 anti-T3 antibodies are not mitogenic for T cells from 30% of healthy individuals. The present results demonstrate that this polymorphism is caused by polymorphism of an Fc receptor for mouse IgG1, present on human monocytes. The Fc receptor for murine IgG1 could be detected by a newly developed rosetting assay on monocytes from all individuals responsive to the mitogenic effect of IgG1 anti-T3 antibodies. This Fc receptor was not detectable on monocytes from those individuals exhibiting no mitogenic responses to IgG1 anti-T3 monoclonal antibodies. Cross-linking of T3 antigens appears to be essential for antibody-induced mitosis of T cells, because mononuclear cells that did not proliferate in response to WT 31 (an IgG1 antibody against T3 antigen) showed a proliferative response to Sepharose beads coated with WT 31. The Fc receptor--if functionally present--may be involved in the cross-linking of T3 antigens through anti-T3 antibodies. Further evidence for the involvement of this Fc receptor in antibody-induced T cell proliferation was provided by inhibition studies. Immune complexes containing IgG1 antibodies were able to inhibit the proliferative response to IgG1 anti-T3 antibodies. This inhibition by immune complexes appears to be mediated through the monocyte Fc receptor for mouse IgG1. These findings are important for the interpretation of previously described inhibitory effects of anti-T cell monoclonal antibodies on T cell proliferation, and show that such inhibitory effects may be monocyte-mediated (via immune complexes) rather than caused by a direct involvement of the respective T cell antigens in T cell mitosis. The Fc receptor for mouse IgG1 plays a role in antibody-induced T cell proliferation. Its polymorphism may have important implications for the

  5. Quantitative studies of the brain specific antigens GFA, 14-3-2, synaptin C1, D1, D2, D3 and D5 in jimpy mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacque, C M; Baumann, N A; Bock, E

    1976-01-01

    Seven antigens specific to the nervous tissue were measured in both Jimpy and control mice. The D5 and the GFA protein, both components of the glia, are strongly increased in the mutant while the neuronal components 14-3-2, synaptin C1, D1, D2 and D3 are unchanged....

  6. N-Trimethyl chitosan (TMC) nanoparticles loaded with influenza subunit antigen for intranasal vaccination : Biological properties and immunogenicity in a mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amidi, Maryam; Romeijn, Stefan G.; Verhoef, J. Coos; Junginger, Hans E.; Bungener, Laura; Huckriede, Anke; Crommelin, Daan J. A.; Jiskoot, Wim

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the potential of N-trimethyl chitosan (TMC) nanoparticles as a carrier system for the nasal delivery of a monovalent influenza subunit vaccine was investigated. The antigen-loaded nanoparticles were prepared by mixing a solution containing TMC and monovalent influenza A subunit H3N2

  7. Nuclear oncology with monoclonal antibodies and peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosono, Makoto

    1998-01-01

    Imaging and therapy using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies have proved useful in many clinical studies. However, immunogenicity of mouse antibodies to human and insufficient tumor-to-normal tissue ratios remained to be solved. Chimerization and humanization by genetic engineering, and multistep targeting techniques have enabled lower immunogenicity and higher tumor-to-normal tissue contrast. Peptides like somatostatin-analogs have been reportedly useful in imaging tumors, which are either somatostatin receptor positive or negative. Elevated normal tissue accumulation of radiolabeled peptides is a drawback in aiming internal radiation therapy. (author). 51 refs

  8. Recombinant human monoclonal autoantibodies specific for citrulline-containing peptides from phage display libraries derived from patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raats, J.M.H.; Wijnen, E.M.; Pruijn, G.J.M.; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den; Venrooij, W.J.W. van

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To isolate and characterize monoclonal autoantibodies (Mab) directed to citrullinated antigens from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Using lymphocytes from bone marrow or peripheral blood from RA patients, we constructed antibody fragment libraries representing the

  9. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergeld, P.; van de Donk, N. W. C. J.; Richardson, P. G.

    2015-01-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting add...

  10. Antigenic analysis of some Nigerian street rabies virus using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The authors studied 12 street rabies virus isolates from 3 states of Nigeria using both the anti-nucleocapsid and anti-glycoprotein monoclonal antibodies and cross-protection tests. It was observed that all the viruses were rabies having divergent antigenic presentation. Also noticed was an antigenic shift when the viruses ...

  11. The interaction of beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) with mouse class I major histocompatibility antigens and its ability to support peptide binding. A comparison of human and mouse beta 2m

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, L O; Stryhn, A; Holter, T L

    1995-01-01

    of class I molecules are involved in peptide binding, whereas most of class I molecules are involved in beta 2m binding. We propose that mouse beta 2m interacts with the minor peptide binding (i.e. the "empty") fraction with a lower affinity than human beta 2m does, whereas mouse and human beta 2m interact......The function of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules is to sample peptides derived from intracellular proteins and to present these peptides to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In this paper, biochemical assays addressing MHC class I binding of both peptide and beta 2-microglobulin...... (beta 2m) have been used to examine the assembly of the trimolecular MHC class I/beta 2m/peptide complex. Recombinant human beta 2m and mouse beta 2ma have been generated to compare the binding of the two beta 2m to mouse class I. It is frequently assumed that human beta 2m binds to mouse class I heavy...

  12. Vaccination with Brucella abortus recombinant in vivo-induced antigens reduces bacterial load and promotes clearance in a mouse model for infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake E Lowry

    Full Text Available Current vaccines used for the prevention of brucellosis are ineffective in inducing protective immunity in animals that are chronically infected with Brucella abortus, such as elk. Using a gene discovery approach, in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT on B. abortus, we previously identified ten loci that encode products up-regulated during infection in elk and consequently may play a role in virulence. In our present study, five of the loci (D15, 0187, VirJ, Mdh, AfuA were selected for further characterization and compared with three additional antigens with virulence potential (Hia, PrpA, MltA. All eight genes were PCR-amplified from B. abortus and cloned into E. coli. The recombinant products were then expressed, purified, adjuvanted, and delivered subcutaneously to BALB/c mice. After primary immunization and two boosts, mice were challenged i.p. with 5 x 10⁴ CFU of B. abortus strain 19. Spleens from challenged animals were harvested and bacterial loads determined by colony count at various time points. While vaccination with four of the eight individual proteins appeared to have some effect on clearance kinetics, mice vaccinated with recombinant Mdh displayed the most significant reduction in bacterial colonization. Furthermore, mice immunized with Mdh maintained higher levels of IFN-γ in spleens compared to other treatment groups. Collectively, our in vivo data gathered from the S19 murine colonization model suggest that vaccination with at least three of the IVIAT antigens conferred an enhanced ability of the host to respond to infection, reinforcing the utility of this methodology for the identification of potential vaccine candidates against brucellosis. Mechanisms for immunity to one protein, Mdh, require further in vitro exploration and evaluation against wild-type B. abortus challenge in mice, as well as other hosts. Additional studies are being undertaken to clarify the role of Mdh and other IVI antigens in B. abortus virulence

  13. V-set and Ig domain-containing 4 (VSIG4)-expressing hepatic F4/80+ cells regulate oral antigen-specific responses in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Wonhwa; Jeon, Youkyoung; Choi, Inhak; Kim, Yeon-Jeong

    2018-04-01

    Oral tolerance can prevent unnecessary immune responses against dietary antigens. Members of the B7 protein family play critical roles in the positive and/or negative regulation of T cell responses to interactions between APCs and T cells. V-set and Ig domain-containing 4 (VSIG4), a B7-related co-signaling molecule, has been known to act as a co-inhibitory ligand and may be critical in establishing immune tolerance. Therefore, we investigated the regulation of VSIG4 signaling in a food allergy and experimental oral tolerance murine models. We analyzed the contributions of the two main sites involved in oral tolerance, the mesenteric lymph node (MLN) and the liver, in VSIG4-mediated oral tolerance induction. Through the comparative analysis of major APCs, dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages, we found that Kupffer cells play a critical role in inducing regulatory T cells (Tregs) and establishing immune tolerance against oral antigens via VSIG4 signaling. Taken together, these results suggest the possibility of VSIG4 signaling-based regulation of orally administered antigens. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Characterization of Periplasmic Protein BP26 Epitopes of Brucella melitensis Reacting with Murine Monoclonal and Sheep Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingbo; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Yuanzhi; Qiao, Jun; Chen, Chuangfu; Gao, Goege F.; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Li, Chengyao

    2012-01-01

    More than 35,000 new cases of human brucellosis were reported in 2010 by the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention. An attenuated B. melitensis vaccine M5-90 is currently used for vaccination of sheep and goats in China. In the study, a periplasmic protein BP26 from M5-90 was characterized for its epitope reactivity with mouse monoclonal and sheep antibodies. A total of 29 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against recombinant BP26 (rBP26) were produced, which were tested for reactivity with a panel of BP26 peptides, three truncated rBP26 and native BP26 containing membrane protein extracts (NMP) of B. melitensis M5-90 in ELISA and Western-Blot. The linear, semi-conformational and conformational epitopes from native BP26 were identified. Two linear epitopes recognized by mAbs were revealed by 28 of 16mer overlapping peptides, which were accurately mapped as the core motif of amino acid residues 93DRDLQTGGI101 (position 93 to 101) or residues 104QPIYVYPD111, respectively. The reactivity of linear epitope peptides, rBP26 and NMP was tested with 137 sheep sera by ELISAs, of which the two linear epitopes had 65–70% reactivity and NMP 90% consistent with the results of a combination of two standard serological tests. The results were helpful for evaluating the reactivity of BP26 antigen in M5-90. PMID:22457830

  15. Antigenic typing Polish isolates of canine parvovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizak, B. [National Veterinary Research Institute, Pulawy (Poland); Plucienniczak, A. [Polish Academy ofd Sciences. Microbiology and Virology Center, Lodz (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Polish strains of canine parvovirus isolated between 1982 and 1993 were examined to determine the extent to which the virus has evolved antigenically and genetically over eleven years. Two CPV isolates obtained in Warsaw in 1982 and Pulawy in 1993, were examined using monoclonal antibody typing, restriction analysis and sequencing VP-2 protein gene. Five other isolates from Warsaw and Pulawy were tested with the panel of monoclonal antibodies specific to CPV-2, CPV-2a and common for canine parvovirus, feline panleukopenia virus and milk enteritis virus. Results of the studies demonstrated that all isolates tested represented CPV-2a antigenic type. Rapid antigenic strain replacement recorded by Parrish and Senda in the U.S.A and Japan was not confirmed in Poland. (author). 30 refs, 2 tabs.

  16. Antigenic typing Polish isolates of canine parvovirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizak, B.; Plucienniczak, A.

    1995-01-01

    Polish strains of canine parvovirus isolated between 1982 and 1993 were examined to determine the extent to which the virus has evolved antigenically and genetically over eleven years. Two CPV isolates obtained in Warsaw in 1982 and Pulawy in 1993, were examined using monoclonal antibody typing, restriction analysis and sequencing VP-2 protein gene. Five other isolates from Warsaw and Pulawy were tested with the panel of monoclonal antibodies specific to CPV-2, CPV-2a and common for canine parvovirus, feline panleukopenia virus and milk enteritis virus. Results of the studies demonstrated that all isolates tested represented CPV-2a antigenic type. Rapid antigenic strain replacement recorded by Parrish and Senda in the U.S.A and Japan was not confirmed in Poland. (author). 30 refs, 2 tabs

  17. Monoclonal antibodies: potential role in radiation therapy and oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Order, S.E.

    1982-01-01

    Specificity, which is a hallmark of the immune system, will be used in radiation oncology in both diagnosis and therapy through the application of radiolabelled monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Antigenic specificities, antibody preparations, and the tumor as a target for radiolabelled antibody is reviewed. Several clinical situations, i.e. single tumor cell suspensions, intraperitoneal single cells and masses, and solid tumors are reviewed in regard to both immune antibody targeting and specific differences between tumors in these regions. The concentration of tumor associated antigens is introductory to radiolabelled antibodies in diagnosis. In the radiation therapy of solid tumors, data regarding tumor dose, tumor effective half-life, varied antibody preparations, and the use of radiolabelled antibody as a method of tumor implantation is discussed using antiferritin 131 I-IgG as a model in hepatoma. The theoretical applications of monoclonal antibody integrated in cancer therapy are then presented as a new goal for future development

  18. Reactivity of eleven anti-human leucocyte monoclonal antibodies with lymphocytes from several domestic animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasted, Bent; Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete; Larsen, Else Bang

    1988-01-01

    Nine commercially available monoclonal antibodies and two monoclonal antibodies from The American Type Culture Collection, raised against various human leucocyte surface antigens, were tested on lymphocytes from cow, sheep, goat, swine, horse, cat, dog, mink, and rabbit as well as man. Four...... antibodies bound to lymphocytes from some of the animals. These were the antibodies against CD8 and CD4 antigen, the antibody to C3b-receptor, and the antibody to the HLA-DR antigen. The CD8 antigen-reactive antibody reacted with lymphocytes from mink, cat, dog, and sheep, while the CD4 antigen......-reactive antibody reacted with lymphocytes from mink. The anti-C3b-R antibody reacted with lymphocytes from horse, swine, dog, and cat, and the anti-HLA-DR reacted with lymphocytes from cow, goat, sheep, horse, dog, cat, and mink....

  19. Radioimmunodetection of human melanoma tumor xenografts with human monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomibuchi, Makoto; Saxton, R.E.; Lake, R.R.; Katano, Mitsuo; Irie, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    A human IgM monoclonal antibody has been established that defines a tumor-associated membrane antigen expressed on human melanoma cells. The antigen has been identified as the ganglioside GD2. In this paper, the authors describe the potential usefulness of the human monoclonal antibody for radioimaging. Nude mice bearing tumors derived from a human melanoma cell line were used as a model. Antibody activity was degradated significantly after labeling with 131 I by the use of a modified chloramine-T method. After testing various concentrations, labeled antibody of a specific activity of 2.8μCi/μg produced the best results. Balb/c nude mice bearing a GD2-positive M14 melanoma cell line were injected with 10-30μg of labeled antibody, and its radiolocalization in different organs and in the whole body were evaluated. The best tumor image was obtained on Day 6. The labeled antibody uptake ratio between tumor and muscle was 9.2:1; the ratio between tumor and liver was 1.4:1. These studies represent the first report of experimental tumor imaging with human monoclonal antibody. Human monoclonals will probably prove to be superior reagents for tumor imaging in melanoma patients if the problem of anti-body radiolysis is resolved. (author)

  20. [Diagnostic and therapeutic use of human anti-D (Rho) monoclonal antibodies. Evaluation and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouger, P; Goossens, D; Champomier, F; Tsikas, G; Liberge, G; Leblanc, J; Richard, C; Bailleul, C; Salmon, C

    1985-12-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies will be essential in medicine. They are valuable tools for biological diagnosis and therapeutics. Our model, human monoclonal antibodies directed against the Rhesus D antigen can be used for the determination of the Rhesus D phenotype and for the suppression of Rh(D) immunisation in women. These new products require new procedures of preparation, new regulations for the quality controls, which will be discussed in this paper.

  1. Monoclonal antibodies directed to E1 glycoprotein of rubella virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umino, Y.; Sato, A.; Katow, S.; Matsuno, T.; Sugiura, A.

    1985-01-01

    We have prepared four monoclonal antibodies to rubella virus E1 glycoprotein. Three nonoverlapping antigenic sites were delineated on E1 protein by competitive binding assays. Antibodies binding to one site were characterized by high hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titer but poor neutralizing activity. The addition of antiglobulin conferred neutralizing activity. Antibodies directed to two other antigenic sites had modest hemolysis inhibition but little or no HI and neutralizing activities. The addition of antiglobulin markedly augmented HI activity but had little effect on neutralizing activity. Epitopes defined by three antibodies were conserved among four rubella virus strains examined. (Author)

  2. Development of indirect sandwich ELISA for determination of excretory-secretory antigens of Fasciola hepatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libertad Alzamora-Gonzales

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Fasciolosis is a cosmopolitan parasitosis medical-veterinary importance caused by Fasciola hepatica, which affects sheep, goats and cattle; and it affects man accidentally causing an epidemic-endemic infection difficult to diagnose. The aim was to develop an indirect sandwich ELISA with 3 antibodies for detecting excretory-secretory antigens of Fasciola hepatica (ESFh. For the development of indirect sandwich ELISA were used, as capture antibody, mouse polyclonal antibodies anti ESFh and polyclonal antibodies rabbit anti-ESFh as detection antibody, at the concentrations of 10 and 5 µg/mL respectively. The conjugate used was mouse monoclonal anti- total immunoglobulins rabbit linked to peroxidase (1/1000. Were analized 31 sheep fecal samples, and the results were compared with those obtained by direct coproparasitological examination (DC and counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIEP. The detection limit obtained for indirect sandwich ELISA was 100 ng/mL. The test had a 100% sensitivity, 96.6% specificity, positive and negative predictive values of 50% and 96.6% respectively, in relation to DC test. Comparing with CIEP the specificity obtained for indirect sandwich ELISA was 93.5% and a negative predictive value of 100%. We concluded that indirect sandwich ELISA designed is able to detect metabolic antigens in ovine feces samples and can be used for Fasciola hepatica diagnosis.

  3. Purification of HBsAg produced by the human hepatoma cell line PLC/PRE/5 by affinity chromatography using monoclonal antibodies and application for ELISA diagnostic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merten, O W; Reiter, S; Scheirer, W; Katinger, H

    1983-01-01

    The human cell line PLC/PRF/5 (5) was used for the production of hepatitis B surface antigen subtype ad (HBsAg ad) and purified by affinity chromatography (AC) with monoclonal antibodies (mAb). mAb to HBsAg from mouse ascites have been purified by Protein A - AC prior coupling to AH-Sepharose 4B (Pharmacia). The combined procedure of ammonium-sulphate-precipitation of HBsAg from culture supernatants and immunosorbent-AC leads to approx. 700-fold purification. ELISA results using the mAb and the HBsAg for diagnostics of human serum, positive for anti-HBsAg-antibodies correlate with the RIA (AUSAB, Abbott).

  4. Monoclonal antibodies based on hybridoma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagami, Hisanori; Kato, Hiroshi; Tsumoto, Kanta; Tomita, Masahiro

    2013-03-01

    Based on the size and scope of the present global market for medicine, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have a very promising future, with applications for cancers through autoimmune ailments to infectious disease. Since mAbs recognize only their target antigens and not other unrelated proteins, pinpoint medical treatment is possible. Global demand is dramatically expanding. Hybridoma technology, which allows production of mAbs directed against antigens of interest is therefore privileged. However, there are some pivotal points for further development to generate therapeutic antibodies. One is selective generation of human mAbs. Employment of transgenic mice producing human antibodies would overcome this problem. Another focus is recognition sites and conformational epitopes in antigens may be just as important as linear epitopes, especially when membrane proteins such as receptors are targeted. Recognition of intact structures is of critical importance for medical purposes. In this review, we describe patent related information for therapeutic mAbs based on hybridoma technology and also discuss new advances in hybridoma technology that facilitate selective production of stereospecific mAbs.

  5. The induction of autoimmune hepatitis in the human leucocyte antigen-DR4 non-obese diabetic mice autoimmune hepatitis mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, M; Xiao, X; Tai, N; Vijay, G M; Gülden, E; Beland, K; Lapierre, P; Alvarez, F; Hu, Z; Colle, I; Ma, Y; Wen, L

    2016-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic liver disease characterized by progressive inflammation, female preponderance and seropositivity for autoantibodies such as anti-smooth muscle actin and/or anti-nuclear, anti-liver kidney microsomal type 1 (anti-LKM1) and anti-liver cytosol type 1 (anti-LC1) in more than 80% of cases. AIH is linked strongly to several major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles, including human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR3, -DR7 and -DR13. HLA-DR4 has the second strongest association with adult AIH, after HLA-DR3. We investigated the role of HLA-DR4 in the development of AIH by immunization of HLA-DR4 (DR4) transgenic non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice with DNA coding for human CYP2D6/FTCD fusion autoantigen. Immunization of DR4 mice leads to sustained mild liver injury, as assessed biochemically by elevated alanine aminotransferase, histologically by interface hepatitis, plasma cell infiltration and mild fibrosis and immunologically by the development of anti-LKM1/anti-LC1 antibodies. In addition, livers from DR4 mice had fewer regulatory T cells (T regs ), which had decreased programmed death (PD)-1 expression. Splenic T regs from these mice also showed impaired inhibitory capacity. Furthermore, DR4 expression enhanced the activation status of CD8 + T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells in naive DR4 mice compared to naive wild-type (WT) NOD mice. Our results demonstrate that HLA-DR4 is a susceptibility factor for the development of AIH. Impaired suppressive function of T regs and reduced PD-1 expression may result in spontaneous activation of key immune cell subsets, such as antigen-presenting cells and CD8 + T effectors, facilitating the induction of AIH and persistent liver damage. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  6. Studies of cytotoxic antibodies against eye muscle antigens in patients with thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z.-G.; Hiromatsu, Y.; Salvi, M.; Triller, H.; Bernard, N.; Wall, J.R. (Thyroid Research Unit, The Montreal General Hospital Research Institute, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)); Medeiros-Neto, G.; Iacona, A.; Lima, N. (Thyroid Clinic, Hospital das Clinicas, Sao Paulo (Brazil))

    1989-01-01

    We have studied the prevalence and significance of cytotoxic antibodies against human eye muscle cells, as detected in antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-mediated antibody-dependent cytotoxicity (CMAC) in {sup 51}Cr release assays, in patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy or Hashimoto's thyroiditis. A high prevalence of positive ADCC tests was found in all groups of patients with ophthalmopathy tested. Tests were positive in 64% of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy from an area of severe iodine deficiency (Sao Paulo) and in 64% of such patients from an iodine replete area (Montreal). In patients with so-called ''euthyroid ophthalmopathy'', i.e. eye disease associated with thyroiditis, ADCC tests were positive in 75 and 38% of patients from the two areas, respectively, while tests were positive in 40 and 22%, respectively, of patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism without evident eye disease. In normal subjects, levels of {sup 51}Cr release was always at background levels. In a group of patients from the high-iodine area, levels of antibodies in ADCC correlated positively with the intraocular pressure (mmHg) in primary position as a parameter of eye muscle dysfunction. In patients with ophthalmopathy, positive ADCC tests were assciated with antibodies to eye muscle membrane antigens of 55,65 and 95 kD as detected by immunoblotting, although the correlation was not close for any antigen. in contrast, CMAC tests were negative in all patients with ophthalmopathy. We also tested 9 mouse and 10 human monoclonal antibodies, reactive with orbital antigens in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, for cytotoxic activity, in ADCC and CMAC, against eye muscle and thyroid cells. All monoclonal antibodies were of the IgM class and negative in ADCC assays. (Abstract Truncated)

  7. A portion of the Pf155/RESA antigen of Plasmodium falciparum is accessible on the surface of infected erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saul, A.; Maloy, W.L.; Howard, R.J.; Rock, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of antigens accessible to lactoperoxidase-catalysed cell surface iodination on intact Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (RBC) has identified a 125 I-labelled antigen with an apparent size of about 155 kD. This labelled protein was specifically immunoprecipitated by the following antibodies: a rabbit antiserum and a mouse monoclonal antibody raised against a synthetic peptide comprising the 3',8-mer repeat EENVEHDA of the Pf155/RESA protein; a rabbit antiserum raised against a synthetic octapeptide comprising two copies of the 3',4-mer repeat EENV of the Pf155/RESA protein; and rabbit antisera against another synthetic peptide C(MYSNNNVED) 2 . The last antibody shows a strong reaction in asexual blood state parasites with the Pf155/RESA antigen. While this antigen has been described previously as a submembrane component of the outer membrane of infected RBC, this report shows that at least part of it is accessible to the surface of both ring and late trophozoite-infected erythrocytes. 21 refs., 4 figs

  8. Clinical prospective study with radioiodinated monoclonal antibodies directed against colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatal, J.F.; Douillard, J.Y.; Kremer, M.; Curtet, C.; Le Mevel, B.; Saccavini, J.C.; Maurel, C.; Aubry, J.

    1985-01-01

    The diagnostic application of three monoclonal antibodies are studied: an anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibody designated as 202 and two monoclonal antibodies, designated as 17-1A and 19-9, which recognize different antigens associated with gastrointestinal carcinomas. The complementary specificity of these antibodies was determined by an immuno-histochemical study and the scintigraphic detection parameters by a radiopharmacokinetic study in colic-tumour-bearing nude mice. On the basis of a prospective study, the value of immunoscintigraphy was compared with conventional methods such as ultrasonography and computed tomography for localization of recurrences of colorectal cancers. (UK)

  9. Antigenic characterisation of lyssaviruses in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Ngoepe

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available There are at least six Lyssavirus species that have been isolated in Africa, which include classical rabies virus, Lagos bat virus, Mokola virus, Duvenhage virus, Shimoni bat virus and Ikoma lyssavirus. In this retrospective study, an analysis of the antigenic reactivity patterns of lyssaviruses in South Africa against a panel of 15 anti-nucleoprotein monoclonal antibodies was undertaken. A total of 624 brain specimens, collected between 2005 and 2009, confirmed as containing lyssavirus antigen by direct fluorescent antibody test, were subjected to antigenic differentiation. The lyssaviruses were differentiated into two species, namely rabies virus (99.5% and Mokola virus (0.5%. Furthermore, rabies virus was further delineated into two common rabies biotypes in South Africa: canid and mongoose. Initially, it was found that the canid rabies biotype had two reactivity patterns; differential staining was observed with just one monoclonal antibody. This difference was likely to have been an artefact related to sample quality, as passage in cell culture restored staining. Mongoose rabies viruses were more heterogeneous, with seven antigenic reactivity patterns detected. Although Mokola viruses were identified in this study, prevalence and reservoir host species are yet to be established. These data demonstrate the usefulness of monoclonal antibody typing panels in lyssavirus surveillance with reference to emergence of new species or spread of rabies biotypes to new geographic zones.

  10. Monoclonal antibodies to drosophila cytochrome P-450's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundseth, S.S.; Kennel, S.J.; Waters, L.C.

    1987-01-01

    Hybridomas producing monoclonal antibodies were prepared by the fusion of SP2/0 myeloma cells and spleen cells from a female BALB/c mouse immunized by cytochrome P-450-A and P-450-B purified from Drosophila Hikone-R (BG) microsomes. P-450-A and P-450-B are electrophoretically distinct subsets of Drosophila P-450. P-450-A is ubiquitous among strains tested, while P-450-B is present in only a few strains displaying unique enzyme activities and increased insecticide resistance. The Oregon-R strain contains only cytochromes P-450-A and is susceptible to insecticides. The authors Hikone-R (BG) strain expresses both cytochromes P-450-A and P-450-B and is insecticide resistant. Antibody producing hybridomas were detected in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay (RIA) by binding to Hikone-R (BG) or Oregon-R microsomes. Four independent hybridomas were identified as producing monoclonal antibodies that recognized proteins in the P-450 complex by immunoblot experiments. Three monoclonal antibodies recognized P-450-A proteins, while one monoclonal antibody bound predominantly P-450-B. This monoclonal antibody also recognized southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania, Cramer) microsomal proteins

  11. Monoclonal antibodies against pregnancy-specific β1-glycoprotein (SP1) in immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlstroem, T.; Heikinheimo, M.

    1983-01-01

    Monoclonal mouse antibodies against pregnancy-specific beta-1-glycoprotein (SP 1 ) have been studied for their suitability in immunoperoxidase staining and radioimmunoassay methodologies. These antibodies were useful in staining normal placentas, hydatidiform moles, invasive moles and choriocarcinomas. They showed good specificity, with minimal background staining, and will thus be superior to conventional polyclonal antisera in immunohistochemistry. However, the presently tested monoclonal anti-SP 1 antibodies were found not to be suitable for radioimmunoassay. (Auth.)

  12. Mammalian tissue distribution of a large heparan sulfate proteoglycan detected by monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Ljubimov, A V

    1989-01-01

    muscle, endothelia, peripheral nerve fibers and epithelia so far examined. In addition, two of the monoclonal antibodies show cross-species reactivity, staining bovine and human basement membranes, and immunoprecipitating proteoglycans from human endothelial cell cultures. These antibodies do not......A panel of nine monoclonal antibodies has been characterized, all of which have reactivity with the core protein of a large heparan sulfate proteoglycan derived from the murine EHS tumor matrix. These rat monoclonal antibodies stained mouse basement membranes intensely, including those of all...

  13. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells secreting anti-PD-L1 antibodies more effectively regress renal cell carcinoma in a humanized mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Eloah Rabello; Chang, De Kuan; Sun, Jiusong; Sui, Jianhua; Freeman, Gordon J; Signoretti, Sabina; Zhu, Quan; Marasco, Wayne A

    2016-06-07

    Advances in the treatment of metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) have led to improved progression-free survival of many patients; however the therapies are toxic, rarely achieve durable long-term complete responses and are not curative. Herein we used a single bicistronic lentiviral vector to develop a new combination immunotherapy that consists of human anti-carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX)-targeted chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells engineered to secrete human anti-programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) antibodies at the tumor site. The local antibody delivery led to marked immune checkpoint blockade. Tumor growth diminished 5 times and tumor weight reduced 50-80% when compared with the anti-CAIX CAR T cells alone in a humanized mice model of ccRCC. The expression of PD-L1 and Ki67 in the tumors decreased and an increase in granzyme B levels was found in CAR T cells. The anti-PD-L1 IgG1 isotype, which is capable of mediating ADCC, was also able to recruit human NK cells to the tumor site in vivo. These armed second-generation CAR T cells empowered to secrete human anti-PD-L1 antibodies in the ccRCC milieu to combat T cell exhaustion is an innovation in this field that should provide renewed potential for CAR T cell immunotherapy of solid tumors where limited efficacy is currently seen.

  14. Comparison of a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody conjugated with visible or near-infrared fluorescent dyes for imaging pancreatic cancer in orthotopic nude mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maawy, Ali A.; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Luiken, George A.; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a set of visible and near-infrared dyes conjugated to a tumor-specific chimeric antibody for high-resolution tumor imaging in orthotopic models of pancreatic cancer. BxPC-3 human pancreatic cancer was orthotopically implanted into pancreata of nude mice. Mice received a single intravenous injection of a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody conjugated to one of the following fluorophores: 488-nm group (Alexa Fluor 488 or DyLight 488); 550-nm group (Alexa Fluor 555 or DyLight 550); 650-nm group (Alexa Fluor 660 or DyLight 650), or the 750-nm group (Alexa Fluor 750 or DyLight 755). After 24 h, the Olympus OV100 small-animal imaging system was used for noninvasive and intravital fluorescence imaging of mice. Dyes were compared with respect to depth of imaging, resolution, tumor-to-background ratio (TBR), photobleaching, and hemoglobin quenching. The longer wavelength dyes had increased depth of penetration and ability to detect the smallest tumor deposits and provided the highest TBRs, resistance to hemoglobin quenching, and specificity. The shorter wavelength dyes were more photostable. This study showed unique advantages of each dye for specific cancer imaging in a clinically relevant orthotopic model.

  15. DETECTION OF THE ICHTHYOTOXIC DINOFLAGELLATE GYRODINIUM (CF) AUREOLUM AND MORPHOLOGICALLY RELATED GYMNODINIUM SPECIES USING MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODIES - A SPECIFIC IMMUNOLOGICAL TOOL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VRIELING, EG; PEPERZAK, L; GIESKES, WWC; VEENHUIS, M

    Sixteen monoclonal antibodies which recognize different cell surface antigens of the ichthyotoxic marine dinoflagellate Gyrodinium cf. aureolum were prepared and characterized for use in identification by both immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Based on the labeling results obtained

  16. New-onset mediastinal and central nervous system sarcoidosis in a patient with metastatic melanoma undergoing CTLA4 monoclonal antibody treatment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Kevin P

    2014-01-01

    Ipilimumab, a cytotoxic monoclonal antibody that inhibits cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4), has been established as an effective therapy in the management of advanced melanoma. Immune-mediated adverse events are a common side effect.

  17. Development and characterization of novel chimeric monoclonal antibodies for broad spectrum neutralization of rabies virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Kyeom Kim

    Full Text Available Current post-exposure prophylaxis for rabies virus infection has several limitations in terms of supply, cost, safety, and efficacy. Attempts to replace human or equine rabies immune globulins (HRIG or ERIG have been made by several companies and institutes. We developed potent monoclonal antibodies to neutralize a broad spectrum of rabies viruses by screening hybridomas received from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC. Two kinds of chimeric human antibodies (chimeric #7 and #17 were constructed by cloning the variable regions from selected hybridomas and the constant region of a human antibody. Two antibodies were bound to antigenic site III and I/IV, respectively, and were able to neutralize 51 field isolates of rabies virus that were isolated at different times and places such as Asia, Africa, North America, South America, and Australia. These two antibodies neutralize rabies viruses with high efficacy in an in vivo test using Syrian hamster and mouse models and show low risk for adverse immunogenicity.

  18. Development and characterization of novel chimeric monoclonal antibodies for broad spectrum neutralization of rabies virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pan Kyeom; Keum, Sun Ju; Osinubi, Modupe O V; Franka, Richard; Shin, Ji Young; Park, Sang Tae; Kim, Man Su; Park, Mi Jung; Lee, Soo Young; Carson, William; Greenberg, Lauren; Yu, Pengcheng; Tao, Xiaoyan; Lihua, Wang; Tang, Qing; Liang, Guodong; Shampur, Madhusdana; Rupprecht, Charles E; Chang, Shin Jae

    2017-01-01

    Current post-exposure prophylaxis for rabies virus infection has several limitations in terms of supply, cost, safety, and efficacy. Attempts to replace human or equine rabies immune globulins (HRIG or ERIG) have been made by several companies and institutes. We developed potent monoclonal antibodies to neutralize a broad spectrum of rabies viruses by screening hybridomas received from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Two kinds of chimeric human antibodies (chimeric #7 and #17) were constructed by cloning the variable regions from selected hybridomas and the constant region of a human antibody. Two antibodies were bound to antigenic site III and I/IV, respectively, and were able to neutralize 51 field isolates of rabies virus that were isolated at different times and places such as Asia, Africa, North America, South America, and Australia. These two antibodies neutralize rabies viruses with high efficacy in an in vivo test using Syrian hamster and mouse models and show low risk for adverse immunogenicity.

  19. CHARACTERIZATION OF TWO MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES WHICH RECOGNIZE DIFFERENT SUBPOPULATIONS OF CHICKEN T LYMPHOCYTES

    OpenAIRE

    KONDO, Takashi; HATTORI, Masakazu; KODAMA, Hiroshi; ONUMA, Misao; MIKAMI, Takeshi

    1990-01-01

    Distribution among peripheral T lymphocyte subpopulations and biochemical properties of the chicken lymphocyte surface antigens defined by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) Lc-4 and Lc-6 were examined. Two-color immunofluorescence analysis revealed that Lc-4 and Lc-6 antigens were expressed on mutually exclusive subpopulations of peripheral T lymphocytes but not on B lymphocytes. Lc-4 mAb precipitated a polypeptide with apparent molecular mass of 35 and 65 kilodalton under reducing and non-reducin...

  20. Ultraviolet light-induced suppression of antigen presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spellman, C.W.; Tomasi, T.B.

    1983-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation of animals results in the development of specific T suppressor cells that inhibit antitumor immune responses. It is thought that suppression may arise as a consequence of altered antigen presentation by UV-irradiated epidermal cells. This hypothesis is based on evidence demonstrating that specific lymphoid tissues from UV-irradiated hosts exhibit impaired antigen-presenting function and that animals cannot be contact sensitized when antigens are applied to a UV-irradiated skin site. Langerhans cells of the skin are likely candidates as targets of UV-induced defects in antigen presentation as they bear Fc and C3b receptors, express Ia antigens, are of bone marrow origin, and are capable of presenting antigen in vitro. We speculate on the possible clinical usefulness of UV-induced tolerance to specific antigens such as those encountered in monoclonal antibody therapy and tissue transplantation

  1. cDNA sequence analysis of a 29-kDa cysteine-rich surface antigen of pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torian, B.E.; Stroeher, V.L.; Stamm, W.E.; Flores, B.M.; Hagen, F.S.

    1990-01-01

    A λgt11 cDNA library was constructed from poly(U)-Spharose-selected Entamoeba histolytica trophozoite RNA in order to clone and identify surface antigens. The library was screened with rabbit polyclonal anti-E. histolytica serum. A 700-base-pair cDNA insert was isolated and the nucleotide sequence was determined. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cDNA revealed a cysteine-rich protein. DNA hybridizations showed that the gene was specific to E. histolytica since the cDNA probe reacted with DNA from four axenic strains of E. histolytica but did not react with DNA from Entamoeba invadens, Acanthamoeba castellanii, or Trichomonas vaginalis. The insert was subcloned into the expression vector pGEX-1 and the protein was expressed as a fusion with the C terminus of glutathione S-transferase. Purified fusion protein was used to generate 22 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and a mouse polyclonal antiserum specific for the E. histolytica portion of the fusion protein. A 29-kDa protein was identified as a surface antigen when mAbs were used to immunoprecipitate the antigen from metabolically 35 S-labeled live trophozoites. The surface location of the antigen was corroborated by mAb immunoprecipitation of a 29-kDa protein from surface- 125 I-labeled whole trophozoites as well as by the reaction of mAbs with live trophozoites in an indirect immunofluorescence assay performed at 4 degree C. Immunoblotting with mAbs demonstrated that the antigen was present on four axenic isolates tested. mAbs recognized epitopes on the 29-kDa native antigen on some but not all clinical isolates tested

  2. cDNA sequence analysis of a 29-kDa cysteine-rich surface antigen of pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torian, B.E.; Stroeher, V.L.; Stamm, W.E. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA)); Flores, B.M. (Louisiana State Univ. Medical Center, New Orleans (USA)); Hagen, F.S. (Zymogenetics Incorporated, Seattle, WA (USA))

    1990-08-01

    A {lambda}gt11 cDNA library was constructed from poly(U)-Spharose-selected Entamoeba histolytica trophozoite RNA in order to clone and identify surface antigens. The library was screened with rabbit polyclonal anti-E. histolytica serum. A 700-base-pair cDNA insert was isolated and the nucleotide sequence was determined. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cDNA revealed a cysteine-rich protein. DNA hybridizations showed that the gene was specific to E. histolytica since the cDNA probe reacted with DNA from four axenic strains of E. histolytica but did not react with DNA from Entamoeba invadens, Acanthamoeba castellanii, or Trichomonas vaginalis. The insert was subcloned into the expression vector pGEX-1 and the protein was expressed as a fusion with the C terminus of glutathione S-transferase. Purified fusion protein was used to generate 22 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and a mouse polyclonal antiserum specific for the E. histolytica portion of the fusion protein. A 29-kDa protein was identified as a surface antigen when mAbs were used to immunoprecipitate the antigen from metabolically {sup 35}S-labeled live trophozoites. The surface location of the antigen was corroborated by mAb immunoprecipitation of a 29-kDa protein from surface-{sup 125}I-labeled whole trophozoites as well as by the reaction of mAbs with live trophozoites in an indirect immunofluorescence assay performed at 4{degree}C. Immunoblotting with mAbs demonstrated that the antigen was present on four axenic isolates tested. mAbs recognized epitopes on the 29-kDa native antigen on some but not all clinical isolates tested.

  3. Dissecting Immunogenicity of Monoclonal Antibodies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Snyder, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    The potential of monoclonal antibodies, (mAbs), for use in therapeutic and diagnostic applications has not been fully realized in part due to counter-immune responses that often arise in patient recipients of mAb...

  4. B lymphocyte depletion with the monoclonal antibody rituximab in Graves' disease: a controlled pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Fassi, Daniel; Nielsen, Claus H; Bonnema, Steen J

    2007-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is a common TSH receptor autoantibody (TRAb)-mediated disorder. Because B lymphocytes are important self-antigen presenting cells and precursors for antibody-secreting plasma cells, temporary B-lymphocyte depletion with the monoclonal antibody rituximab (RTX) might...

  5. Radiolabeled Humanized Anti-CD3 Monoclonal Antibody Visilizumab for Imaging Human T-Lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malviya, Gaurav; D'Alessandria, Calogero; Bonanno, Elena; Vexler, Vladimir; Massari, Roberto; Trotta, Carlo; Scopinaro, Francesco; Dierckx, Rudi; Signore, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Visilizumab is an IgG(2) humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb) characterized by non-Fc gamma R binding and specific to the CD3 antigen, expressed on more than 95% of circulating resting T-lymphocytes and on activated T-lymphocytes homing in inflamed tissues. We hypothesized that the use of a

  6. Antigenic determinants and functional domains in core antigen and e antigen from hepatitis B virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salfeld, J.; Pfaff, E.; Noah, M.; Schaller, H.

    1989-01-01

    The precore/core gene of hepatitis B virus directs the synthesis of two polypeptides, the 21-kilodalton subunit (p21c) forming the viral nucleocapsid (serologically defined as core antigen [HBcAg]) and a secreted processed protein (p17e, serologically defined as HBe antigen [HBeAg]). Although most of their primary amino acid sequences are identical, HBcAg and HBeAg display different antigenic properties that are widely used in hepatitis B virus diagnosis. To locate and to characterize the corresponding determinants, segments of the core gene were expressed in Escherichia coli and probed with a panel of polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies in radioimmunoassays or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blots, and competition assays. Three distinct major determinants were characterized. It is postulated that HBcAg and HBeAg share common basic three-dimensional structure exposing the common linear determinant HBe1 but that they differ in the presentation of two conformational determinants that are either introduced (HBc) or masked (HBe2) in the assembled core. The simultaneous presentation of HBe1 and HBc, two distinctly different antigenic determinants with overlapping amino acid sequences, is interpreted to indicate the presence of slightly differently folded, stable conformational states of p21c in the hepatitis virus nucleocapsid

  7. Chimpanzee-Human Monoclonal Antibodies for Treatment of Chronic Poliovirus Excretors and Emergency Postexposure Prophylaxis▿‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaochun; Chumakov, Konstantin; Dragunsky, Eugenia; Kouiavskaia, Diana; Makiya, Michelle; Neverov, Alexander; Rezapkin, Gennady; Sebrell, Andrew; Purcell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Six poliovirus-neutralizing Fabs were recovered from a combinatorial Fab phage display library constructed from bone marrow-derived lymphocytes of immunized chimpanzees. The chimeric chimpanzee-human full-length IgGs (hereinafter called monoclonal antibodies [MAbs]) were generated by combining a chimpanzee IgG light chain and a variable domain of heavy chain with a human constant Fc region. The six MAbs neutralized vaccine strains and virulent strains of poliovirus. Five MAbs were serotype specific, while one MAb cross-neutralized serotypes 1 and 2. Epitope mapping performed by selecting and sequencing antibody-resistant viral variants indicated that the cross-neutralizing MAb bound between antigenic sites 1 and 2, thereby covering the canyon region containing the receptor-binding site. Another serotype 1-specific MAb recognized a region located between antigenic sites 2 and 3 that included parts of capsid proteins VP1 and VP3. Both serotype 2-specific antibodies recognized antigenic site 1. No escape mutants to serotype 3-specific MAbs could be generated. The administration of a serotype 1-specific MAb to transgenic mice susceptible to poliovirus at a dose of 5 μg/mouse completely protected them from paralysis after challenge with a lethal dose of wild-type poliovirus. Moreover, MAb injection 6 or 12 h after virus infection provided significant protection. The MAbs described here could be tested in clinical trials to determine whether they might be useful for treatment of immunocompromised chronic virus excretors and for emergency protection of contacts of a paralytic poliomyelitis case. PMID:21345966

  8. Monoclonal antibodies for radioimmunodetection of tumours and for targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, R.W.; Embleton, M.J.; Pimm, M.V.

    1983-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody 791T/36 prepared against human osteogenic sarcoma has been used to detect primary and metastatic colorectal carcinomas by external imaging of patients following injection of 131 I-labelled antibody. In 10 of 11 patients radiolabelled 791T/36 antibody localized in tumours, the tumour/non tumour ratio of radioactivity ranging from 1.5:1 to 8.1. 791T/36 antibody was also evaluated for its potential for targeting anti-tumour agents including cytotoxic drugs (Vindesine) and immunomodulating agents (interferon). Vindesine-791T/36 conjugates were preferentially cytotoxic in vitro for target cells expressing the 791T/36 anti-body defined antigen. Also interferon conjugated to 791T/36 antibody, like free interferon activated peripheral blood natural killer cell activity. These in vitro tests together with related studies on antibody localization in vivo indicate the potential of monoclonal antibody targeting of anti-tumour agents

  9. Three-site sandwich radioimmunoassay with monoclonal antibodies for a sensitive determination of human alpha-fetoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, M.; Imai, M.; Takahashi, K.; Kumakura, T.; Tachibana, K.; Aoyagi, S.; Usuda, S.; Nakamura, T.; Miyakawa, Y.; Mayumi, M.

    1983-01-01

    Utilizing monoclonal antibodies against human alpha-fetoprotein, 3 distinct antigenic determinants were identified. These antigenic determinants, provisionally designated a, b and c, were arranged in such a manner that the binding of one determinant with the corresponding antibody did not inhibit, or only barely inhibited the binding of antibodies directed to the other 2 determinants. Monoclonal antibodies with 3 different specificities were, therefore, applied to develop a sandwich-type solid-phase radioimmunoassay of the antigen in which wells were coated with anti-a, and radiolabeled anti-b together with radiolabeled anti-c was employed to detect the bound antigen. The 3-site sandwich radioimmunoassay involving 3 different determinants gave a higher sensitivity than 2-site assays in which only anti-b or anti-c was employed as a radiolabeled reagent, because the radioactivity of the 2 labeled antibodies was added on the antigen bound to immobilized anti-a. (Auth.)

  10. Selectivity verification of cardiac troponin monoclonal antibodies for cardiac troponin detection by using conventional ELISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathil, M. F. M.; Arshad, M. K. Md; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Adzhri, R.; Ruslinda, A. R.; Hashim, U.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents preparation and characterization of conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for cardiac troponin detection to determine the selectivity of the cardiac troponin monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies, used to capture and bind the targets in this experiment, are cTnI monoclonal antibody (MAb-cTnI) and cTnT monoclonal antibody (MAb-cTnT), while both cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and T (cTnT) are used as targets. ELISA is performed inside two microtiter plates for MAb-cTnI and MAb-cTnT. For each plate, monoclonal antibodies are tested by various concentrations of cTnI and cTnT ranging from 0-6400 µg/l. The binding selectivity and level of detection between monoclonal antibodies and antigen are determined through visual observation based on the color change inside each well on the plate. ELISA reader is further used to quantitatively measured the optical density of the color changes, thus produced more accurate reading. The results from this experiment are utilized to justify the use of these monoclonal antibodies as bio-receptors for cardiac troponin detection by using field-effect transistor (FET)-based biosensors coupled with substrate-gate in the future.

  11. [The electron microscopic observation of the effect of monoclonal antibody on the form and structure of mutans streptococci OMZ176].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, L; Yue, S

    1996-01-01

    The effect of monoclonal antibody on the form and structure of Mutans Streptococci OMZ176 was studied. The result showed that a great number of Mutans Streptococci OMZ176 was agglutianated after treating with monoclonal antibody prepared by a cell wall protein antigen (molecular weight 220 kd) of Mutans Streptococci OMZ176. Bacterial cells were swollen obviously. The gap between cell wall and cytoplasmic was widened. The electronic density of cell plasm was greatly decreased.

  12. Monoclonal antibody against Porphyromonas (Bacteroides) endodontalis lipopolysaccharide and application of the antibody for direct identification of the species.

    OpenAIRE

    Hanazawa, S; Sagiya, T; Kitami, H; Ohta, K; Nishikawa, H; Kitano, S

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a monoclonal antibody that recognizes the shared antigen of Porphyromonas endodontalis so that we could use the antibody in direct identification and detection of P. endodontalis in infectious material from apical periodontal patients. We established a hybridoma cell line producing monoclonal antibody (BEB5) specific for P. endodontalis. BEB5 antibody reacted with all of the P. endodontalis strains tested, but not with any of the other black-pigment...

  13. Identification of a novel dendritic cell surface antigen defined by carbohydrate specific CD24 antibody cross-reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, L A; McLellan, A D; Summers, K L; Sorg, R V; Fearnley, D B; Hart, D N

    1996-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are characterized as leucocytes that lack mature lineage specific markers and stimulate naive T-lymphocyte proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The mouse heat stable antigen (HSA) participates in T lymphocyte co-stimulation and is expressed by DC isolated from thymus, skin and spleen. The human HSA homologue, CD24, is predominantly expressed by B lymphocytes and granulocytes, but its expression on DC has not been studied in detail. CD24 clearly participates in B-lymphocyte signalling but co-stimulatory activity for T lymphocytes has not yet been described. We have examined the expression of CD24 on human peripheral blood DC populations isolated directly or following in vitro culture. The CD24 antigen was absent from blood DC however, cross-reactive sialylated carbohydrate epitopes were detected on DC with some CD24 monoclonal antibodies (mAb). These CD24 mAb define a protein surface antigen, which is expressed by an immature or resting subpopulation of peripheral blood DC and is down-regulated following activation differentiation in vitro. PMID:8911149

  14. Induced refolding of a temperature denatured llama heavy-chain antibody fragment by its antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolk, E.; Vliet, C. van; Perez, J.M.J.; Vriend, G.; Darbon, H.; Ferrat, G.; Cambillau, C.; Frenken, L.G.J.; Verrips, T.

    2005-01-01

    In a previous study we have shown that llama VHH antibody fragments are able to bind their antigen after a heat shock of 90°C, in contrast to the murine monoclonal antibodies. However, the molecular mechanism by which antibody:antigen interaction occurs under these extreme conditions remains

  15. Docking of B-cell epitope antigen to specific hepatitis B antibody

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The interaction of pres1 region of hepatitis B virus B-cell epitope antigen with specific hepatitis B neutralizing monoclonal antibody was examined by docking study. We modelled the 3D complex structure of B-cell epitope antigen residues CTTPAQGNSMFPSCCCTKPTDGNCY by homology modelling and docked it with the ...

  16. Characterization of plant plasma membrane antigens: [Annual] progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galbraith, D.W.; Afonso, C.L.; Meyer, D.; Harkins, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    Protoplast plasma membranes were used to raise antibodies in mice to cell surface antigens. Monoclonal antibodies were selected from those produced and used for indirect immunofluorescence microscopic analysis of N. tabacum cells. In parallel studies cDNA expression libraries were prepared. (DT)

  17. Tissue distribution of histo-blood group antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, V; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2000-01-01

    carrier carbohydrate chains. Histo-blood group antigens are found in most epithelial tissues. Meanwhile, several factors influence the type, the amount, and the histological distribution of histoblood group antigens, i.e. the ABO, Lewis, and saliva-secretor type of the individual, and the cell- and tissue......The introduction of immunohistochemical techniques and monoclonal antibodies to specific carbohydrate epitopes has made it possible to study in detail the tissue distribution of histo-blood group antigens and related carbohydrate structures. The present paper summarizes the available data...... concerning the histological distribution of histo-blood group antigens and their precursor structures in normal human tissues. Studies performed have concentrated on carbohydrate antigens related to the ABO, Lewis, and TTn blood group systems, i.e. histo-blood group antigens carried by type 1, 2, and 3 chain...

  18. A fundamental study of immunoscintigraphy with sup 131 I-labeled anti-CA 19-9 and anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies; Imaging of tumor-bearing mice by IMACIS-1 and cell ELISA with human tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogami, Toshihiko; Miura, Hiroshi; Ohmi, Shoichi; Kazahaya, Yasuhiro [CIS DIAGNOSTIC K.K., Chiba (Japan)

    1990-05-01

    A study was made on 2 types of {sup 131}I-labeled anti-CA 19-9 and anti-CEA mouse monoclonal antibodies (IMACIS-1) against human cancer related antigen as to their usefulness in radioimmunoimaging. Tumor-bearing nude mice were used for comparison. The transplanted tumors (SW948, COLO 201) were clearly visualized 48-72 hours after administration of IMACIS-1. Tumor/blood ratio 72 hours after administration: 8.69 in COLO 201 and 5.70 in SW948, showing ca. 10-15 times as high as those in PC-3 and HEp-2. IMACIS-1 therefore is considered useful in radioimmunoimaging of cancer. Analysis was made by in vitro cell ELISA. As a result, both of the cells specifically reacted with anti-CA 19-9 but not anti-CEA. (author).

  19. Molecular aspects of antibody-antigen interactions : size reduction of a herpes simplex virus neutralizing antibody and its antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, Gerardus Antonius

    1996-01-01

    Antibody molecules, produced as a response against foreign substances, interact with their antigen in a very specific manner. Antibodies with a predetermined specificity (monoclonal antibodies) can be produced and are widely used in medicine and science as indicator molecules. Genetic engineering of

  20. Self-Assembly of Protein Monolayers Engineered for Improved Monoclonal Immunoglobulin G Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy H. Lakey

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial outer membrane proteins, along with a filling lipid molecule can be modified to form stable self-assembled monolayers on gold. The transmembrane domain of Escherichia coli outer membrane protein A has been engineered to create a scaffold protein to which functional motifs can be fused. In earlier work we described the assembly and structure of an antibody-binding array where the Z domain of Staphylococcus aureus protein A was fused to the scaffold protein. Whilst the binding of rabbit polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG to the array is very strong, mouse monoclonal IgG dissociates from the array easily. This is a problem since many immunodiagnostic tests rely upon the use of mouse monoclonal antibodies. Here we describe a strategy to develop an antibody-binding array that will bind mouse monoclonal IgG with lowered dissociation from the array. A novel protein consisting of the scaffold protein fused to two pairs of Z domains separated by a long flexible linker was manufactured. Using surface plasmon resonance the self-assembly of the new protein on gold and the improved binding of mouse monoclonal IgG were demonstrated.

  1. Porcine humoral immune responses to multiple injections of murine monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Louise; Nielsen, Jens; Kamstrup, Søren

    2005-01-01

    In humans and cattle, multiple injections of murine monoclonal antibodies (m-mAbs) induce anti-mouse antibody responses. The objectives of the present. study were to investigate whether a similar response could be seen when pigs were subjected to m-mAb therapy, and to study the kinetics of such a...

  2. A simple method for affinity purification of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juweid, M; Sato, J; Paik, C; Onay-Basaran, S; Weinstein, J N; Neumann, R D [National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1993-04-01

    A simple method is described for affinity purification of radiolabeled antibodies using glutaraldehyde-fixed tumor target cells. The cell-bound antibody fraction is removed from the cells by an acid wash and then immediately subjected to buffer-exchange chromatography. The method was applied to the D3 murine monoclonal antibody which binds to a 290 kDa antigen on the surface of Line 10 guinea pig carcinoma cells. No alteration in the molecular size profile was detected after acid washing. Purification resulted in a significant increase in immunoreactivity by an average of 14 [+-] 47% (SD; range 4-30%). (author).

  3. Recombinant Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Monoclonal Antibody Fab is Effective Therapeutically when Introduced Directly into the Lungs of RSV-Infected Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, James E., Jr.; Murphy, Brian R.; Chanock, Robert M.; Williamson, R. Anthony; Barbas, Carlos F., III; Burton, Dennis R.

    1994-02-01

    Previously, recombinant human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) monoclonal antibody Fabs were generated by antigen selection from random combinatorial libraries displayed at the tip of filamentous phage. Two such Fabs, which exhibited high binding affinity for RSV F glycoprotein (a major protective antigen), were evaluated for therapeutic efficacy in infected mice just before or at the time of peak virus replication in the lungs. Fab 19, which neutralized RSV infectivity with high efficiency in tissue culture, was effective therapeutically when delivered directly into the lungs by intranasal instillation under anesthesia. In contrast, RSV Fab 126, which failed to neutralize virus in cell culture, did not exhibit a therapeutic effect under these conditions. The amount of Fab 19 required to effect a 5000- to 12,000-fold reduction in titer of RSV in the lungs within 24 hr was rather small. In four separate experiments, a single instillation of 12.9-50 μg of RSV Fab 19 was sufficient to achieve such a reduction in pulmonary virus in a 25g mouse. The use of Fabs instead of the whole immunoglobulin molecules from which they are derived reduced the protein content of a therapeutic dose. This is important because the protein load that can be delivered effectively into the lungs is limited. The therapeutic effect of a single treatment with Fab 19 was not sustained, so that a rebound in pulmonary virus titer occurred on the 2nd day after treatment. This rebound in pulmonary RSV titer could be prevented by treating infected mice with a single dose of Fab 19 daily for 3 days. These observations suggest that human monoclonal Fabs grown in Escherichia coli may prove useful in the treatment of serious RSV disease as well as diseases caused by other viruses where replication in vivo is limited primarily to the lumenal lining of the respiratory tract.

  4. An ultra-sensitive monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosobent assay for dibutyl phthalate in human urinary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Lifang [Institute of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Lei, Yajing [Hangzhou EPIE Bio-detection Technology Limited, Hangzhou 310051 (China); Zhang, Dai; Ahmed, Shabbir [Institute of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Chen, Shuqing, E-mail: chenshuqing@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Dibutyl phthalate (DBP) has been extensively used as a plasticizer in many daily products, which is highly toxic to human, notably affecting the reproductive and developmental function. As the previous method is expensive, time-consuming, low sensitivity and just focused on the environment. Present study was aimed to establish an ultra-sensitive and simple method based on good quality monoclonal antibody, applying to evaluate excretion level of DBP in urine samples of Chinese population directly. A monoclonal antibody was generated and characterized after fusion of myeloma cells with spleen cells isolated from BALB/c mouse. The mouse was previously immunized using a specially designed amino derivative of DBP conjugated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) as immunogen. Cross-reactivity values of the monoclonal antibody against DBP, di-isobutyl phthalate (DIBP) were observed 100% and 1.25%, while for dimethyl phthalate (DMP), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) and didecyl phthalate (DDP) the values were < 0.06%. The standard curve was constructed at 0–50 ng mL{sup −1} and good linearity (R{sup 2} = 0.994) was achieved. The observed IC{sub 50} (7.34 ng mL{sup −1}) and LOD (0.06 ng mL{sup −1}) values was improved 1000-fold to polyclonal antibody and 5-fold to other monoclonal antibodies. A total 1246 urine samples were analyzed and the detection frequency of DBP was observed 72.87% by ic-ELISA. The 95th percentile and mean concentration of DBP were 12.07 and 3.00 ng mL{sup −1}. Acceptable recovery rates of DBP were 97.8–114.3% and coefficients variation 5.93–11.09%. The concentrations of DBP in females were found significantly higher (p < 0.05) than males. Similarly, the DBP in middle aged and low educated individuals was found higher (p < 0.001) than the others. Considering the adverse health effects, DBP internal exposure in the Chinese population should be reduced. The ic-ELISA method has been proved as a cost effective, specific, and highly sensitive screening

  5. Immunity to tumour antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Geng; Ali, Selman A; McArdle, Stephanie E B; Mian, Shahid; Ahmad, Murrium; Miles, Amanda; Rees, Robert C

    2005-01-01

    During the last decade, a large number of human tumour antigens have been identified. These antigens are classified as tumour-specific shared antigens, tissue-specific differentiation antigens, overexpressed antigens, tumour antigens resulting from mutations, viral antigens and fusion proteins. Antigens recognised by effectors of immune system are potential targets for antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy. However, most tumour antigens are self-proteins and are generally of low immunogenicity and the immune response elicited towards these tumour antigens is not always effective. Strategies to induce and enhance the tumour antigen-specific response are needed. This review will summarise the approaches to discovery of tumour antigens, the current status of tumour antigens, and their potential application to cancer treatment.

  6. Monoclonal antibodies for the identification and purification of vNAR domains and IgNAR immunoglobulins from the horn shark Heterodontus francisci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Karla; Dubberke, Gudrun; Lugo, Pavel; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich; Buck, Friedrich; Haag, Friedrich; Licea, Alexei

    2011-08-01

    In addition to conventional antibodies, cartilaginous fish have evolved a distinctive type of immunoglobulin, designated as IgNAR, which lacks the light polypeptide chains and is composed entirely by heavy chains. IgNAR molecules can be manipulated by molecular engineering to produce the variable domain of a single heavy chain polypeptide (vNARs). These, together with the VHH camel domains, constitute the smallest naturally occurring domains able to recognize an antigen. Their special features, such as small size, long extended finger-like CDR3, and thermal and chemical stability, make them suitable candidates for biotechnological purposes. Here we describe the generation of two mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), MAb 370-12 and MAb 533-10, that both specifically react with vNAR domains of the horn shark Heterodontus francisci. While the former recognizes a broad spectrum of recombinant vNAR proteins, the latter is more restricted. MAb 370-12 precipitated a single band from whole shark serum, which was identified as IgNAR by mass spectrometry. Additionally, we used MAb 370-12 to follow the IgNAR-mediated immune response of sharks during immunization protocols with two different antigens (complete cells and a synthethic peptide), thus corroborating that MAb 370-12 recognizes both isolated vNAR domains and whole IgNAR molecules. Both MAbs represent an affordable molecular, biochemical, and biotechnological tool in the field of shark single-domain antibodies.

  7. Production of monoclonal antibody against Salmonella typhimurium by hybridoma technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasibuan, Adria P M; Sadi, Suharni

    1998-01-01

    In this research S.typhimurium killed by irradiation was used as antigen was prepared by exposing the bacteria to gamma rays from 60 Cobalt source with the dose of 2.5 kGy, Specific lymphocyte cell were obtained by immunizing 3 months old Balb-C mice with the antigen. the immunizations were done by subcutan route with the interval of 2 weeks. The hybridoma cells were made by fussing the specific lymphocyte cells with the myeloma cells. It was found that the animals (immunization + irradiation with a low dose of I Gy ) yielded monoclonal antibody with higher value (5.15 mg/ml) than the control animals (3.25 mg/ml). (author)

  8. New Insights into the Functional Behavior of Antibodies as Revealed by Binding Studies on an Anti-Uranium Monoclonal Antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, Diane A.; Xia Li; Haini Yu; Blake, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to develop immunoassays for chelated uranium(VI) on a hand-held flow fluorimeter, an anti-uranium monoclonal antibody designated as 8A11 was fluorescently labeled using two different strategies. When 8A11 was coupled via reactive lysines to either ALEXATM 488 or Cy5TM, the resulting fluorescent antibody conjugate exhibited positive cooperativity in the presence of its antigen, U(VI) chelated with 2,9-dicarboxy-1,10-phenanthroline (U(VI)-DCP). That is, when one of the two binding sites on the covalently modified 8A11 was occupied with bound antigen, the affinity of the remaining site on the antibody for U(VI)-DCP appeared to increase. Unmodified 8A11 bound U(VI)-DCP with the expected hyperbolic dependence on the concentration of antigen, consistent with independent and equal binding of ligand at both sites. Proteolytic cleavage of the fluorescently conjugated 8A11 to produce the fluorescent monovalent Fab fragment yielded an active preparation that now bound U(VI)-DCP with no evidence of positive cooperativity. Although, in principle, any divalent antibody has the potential to exhibit positive cooperativity in its binding interactions with its antigen, very little literature precedent for this type of behavior exists. Native 8A11 was also noncovalently labeled with highly fluorescent ZENONTM reagents. These reagents are fluorescently-labeled Fab fragments of goat anti-mouse antibodies that bind to the Fc portion of 8A11. These high-affinity, monovalent fluorescent reagents permitted the intact 8A11 mouse antibody to be labeled in situ with no covalent modifications. Incubation of the 8A11 with ZENON 647 produced a fluorescent protein complex that showed an 8-fold higher affinity for U(VI)-DCP than did the free 8A11 alone. Again, very few literature precedents exist for this phenomenon, where agents that bind to the Fc portion of an intact antibody change the affinity of the antibody for the antigen at the structurally distant Fab portion

  9. A method for the isolation and characterization of functional murine monoclonal antibodies by single B cell cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonetti, Sara; Oliver, Brian G; Vigdorovich, Vladimir; Dambrauskas, Nicholas; Sack, Brandon; Bergl, Emilee; Kappe, Stefan H I; Sather, D Noah

    2017-09-01

    Monoclonal antibody technologies have enabled dramatic advances in immunology, the study of infectious disease, and modern medicine over the past 40years. However, many monoclonal antibody discovery procedures are labor- and time-intensive, low efficiency, and expensive. Here we describe an optimized mAb discovery platform for the rapid and efficient isolation, cloning and characterization of monoclonal antibodies in murine systems. In this platform, antigen-binding splenic B cells from immunized mice are isolated by FACS and cocultured with CD40L positive cells to induce proliferation and mAb production. After 12days of coculture, cell culture supernatants are screened for antigen, and IgG positivity and RNA is isolated for reverse-transcription. Positive-well cDNA is then amplified by PCR and the resulting amplicons can be cloned into ligation-independent expression vectors, which are then used directly to transfect HEK293 cells for recombinant antibody production. After 4days of growth, conditioned medium can be screened using biolayer interferometry for antigen binding and affinity measurements. Using this method, we were able to isolate six unique, functional monoclonal antibodies against an antigen of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Importantly, this method incorporates several important advances that circumvent the need for single-cell PCR, restriction cloning, and large scale protein production, and can be applied to a wide array of protein antigens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Human Monoclonal antibodies - A dual advantaged weapon to tackle cancer and viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurosawa G

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs are powerful tools as pharmaceutical agents to tackle cancer and infectious diseases. Antibodies (Abs are present in blood at the concentration of 10 mg/ml and play a vital role in humoral immunity. Many therapeutic Abs have been reported since early 1980s. Human mAb technology was not available at that time and only the hybridoma technology for making mouse mAbs had been well established. In order to avoid various potential problems associated with use of mouse proteins, two different technologies to make human/mouse chimeric Ab as well as humanized Ab were developed crossing the various hurdles for almost twenty years and mAb based drugs such as rituximab, anti-CD20 Ab, and trastuzumab, anti-HER2 Ab, have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA for treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and breast cancer in 1997 and 1998, respectively. These drugs are well recognized and accepted by clinicians for treatment of patients. The clinical outcome of the treatment with mAb has strongly encouraged the researchers to develop much more refined mAbs. In addition to chimeric Ab and humanized Ab, now human mAbs can be produced by two technologies. The first is transgenic mice that produce human Abs and the second is human Ab libraries using phage-display system. Until now, several hundreds of mAbs against several tens of antigens (Ags have been developed and subjected to clinical examinations. While many Abs have been approved as therapeutic agents against hematological malignancies, the successful mAbs against solid tumors are still limited. However, many researchers have suggested that developing potential mAbs agents should be possible and incurable cancers may become curable within another decade. Though it is hard to say explicitly that this prediction is correct, a passion for this development should be worth supporting to lead to a successful outcome which will lead to patient benefits. Our institute

  11. Microdosimetry of monoclonal antibodies labeled with alpha emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    The recent discovery of new techniques for the production of monoclonal antibodies (MoAB) has opened up a number of potential new applications in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Monoclonal antibodies labeled with alpha-emitting radionuclides promise to be particularly effective therapeutic agents due to the efficient cell killing ability of highly ionizing, short-range alpha particle tracks localized at specific antigen sites within the tumor mass. For a radioimmunotherapy treatment plan to be effective, one must be able to estimate the absorbed radiation dose to both tumor cells and normal tissues in the body. However, conventional methods used in nuclear medicine for estimating absorbed doses and specific absorbed fractions for radiopharmaceuticals do not apply to alpha emitters owing to their short range and the large variations in the local distribution of energy at the cellular level that result. Microdosimetric techniques developed for assessment of the radiological effects of internally deposited transuranic radionuclides take into account the statistical aspects of alpha particle track structure, energy distribution patterns, and radionuclide distribution within tissues, and provide a means for determining the number and frequency of cells irradiated, the probability densities in specific energy, and the average dose delivered to cells of interest. These techniques can be applied to the study of radiation absorbed dose from alpha-labeled monoclonal antibodies. 16 references, 6 figures

  12. Monoclonal antibodies specific to heat-treated porcine blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja Nhari, Raja Mohd Hafidz; Hamid, Muhajir; Rasli, Nurmunirah Mohamad; Omar, Abdul Rahman; El Sheikha, Aly Farag; Mustafa, Shuhaimi

    2016-05-01

    Porcine blood is potentially being utilized in food as a binder, gelling agent, emulsifier or colorant. However, for certain communities, the usage of animal blood in food is strictly prohibited owing to religious concerns and health reasons. This study reports the development of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against heat-treated soluble proteins (HSPs) of autoclaved porcine blood; characterization of MAbs against blood, non-blood and plasma from different animal species using qualitative indirect non-competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); and immunoblotting of antigenic components in HSPs of porcine blood. Fifteen MAbs are specific to heat-treated and raw porcine blood and not cross-reacted with other animal blood and non-blood proteins (meat and non-meat). Twelve MAbs are specific to porcine plasma, while three MAbs specific to porcine plasma are cross-reacted with chicken plasma. Immunoblotting revealed antigenic protein bands (∼60, ∼85-100 and ∼250 kDa) in porcine blood and plasma recognized by the MAbs. Selection of MAbs that recognized 60 kDa HSPs of porcine blood and plasma as novel monoclonal antibodies would be useful for detection of porcine plasma in processed food using the immunoassay method. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Recent Advances in Monoclonal Antibody Therapies for Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavropoulos, Nikolaos; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Dasari, Harika; Abdelrahim, Murtada A.; Henley, John R.; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Warrington, Arthur E.; Rodriguez, Moses

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common chronic inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the CNS and results in neurological disability. Existing immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive approaches lower the number of relapses but do not cure or reverse existing deficits nor improve long-term disability in MS patients. Areas Covered Monogenic antibodies were described as treatment options for MS, however the immunogenicity of mouse antibodies hampered the efficacy of potential therapeutics in humans. Availability of improved antibody production technologies resulted in a paradigm shift in MS treatment strategies. In this review, an overview of immunotherapies for MS that use conventional monoclonal antibodies reactive to immune system and their properties and mechanisms of action will be discussed, including recent advances in MS therapeutics and highlight natural autoantibodies (NAbs) that directly target CNS cells. Expert Opinion Recent challenges for MS therapy are the identification of relevant molecular and cellular targets, time frame of treatment, and antibody toxicity profiles to identify safe treatment options for MS patients. The application of monoclonal antibody therapies with better biological efficacy associated with minimum side effects possesses huge clinical potential. Advances in monoclonal antibody technologies that directly target cells of nervous system may promote the CNS regeneration field from bench to bedside. PMID:26914737

  14. Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen-2 alpha participates in axial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-2 alpha (CTLA-2α) has been discovered and expressed in mouse activated T-cells and mast cells. Structurally, it is homologous to the proregion of mouse cathepsin L, a lysosomal cystein proteinase. Expressed recombinant CTLA-2α is shown to exhibit selective inhibition to cathepsin L and ...

  15. Localisation of lung cancer by a radiolabelled monoclonal antibody against the c-myc oncogene product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, S Y.T.; Evan, G I; Ritson, A; Watson, J; Wraight, P; Sikora, K

    1986-11-01

    A set of mouse monoclonal antibodies against the c-myc oncogene product, a 62,000 dalton nuclear binding protein involved in cell cycle control, has been constructed by immunisation with synthetic peptide fragments. One such antibody, CT14, was radiolabelled with /sup 131/I and administered to 20 patients with different malignant diseases. Good tumour localisation was observed in 12 out of 14 patients with primary bronchial carcinoma but not in patients with pulmonary metastases from primary tumours elsewhere. Successfully localised tumours were all 3 cm or more in diameter. Monoclonal antibodies against oncogene products may provide novel selective tools for the diagnosis and therapy of cancer.

  16. Application of monoclonal antibodies in functional and comparative investigations of heavy-chain immunoglobulins in new world camelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, L P; Gagliardo, L F; Duffy, M S; Smith, M C; Appleton, J A

    2005-03-01

    Of the three immunoglobulin G (IgG) isotypes described to occur in camelids, IgG2 and IgG3 are distinct in that they do not incorporate light chains. These heavy-chain antibodies (HCAbs) constitute approximately 50% of the IgG in llama serum and as much as 75% of the IgG in camel serum. We have produced isotype-specific mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) in order to investigate the roles of HCAbs in camelid immunity. Seventeen stable hybridomas were cloned, and three MAbs that were specific for epitopes on the gamma chains of llama IgG1, IgG2, or IgG3 were characterized in detail. Affinity chromatography revealed that each MAb bound its isotype in solution in llama serum. The antibodies bound to the corresponding alpaca IgGs, to guanaco IgG1 and IgG2, and to camel IgG1. Interestingly, anti-IgG2 MAbs bound three heavy-chain species in llama serum, confirming the presence of three IgG2 subisotypes. Two IgG2 subisotypes were detected in alpaca and guanaco sera. The MAbs detected llama serum IgGs when they were bound to antigen in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and were used to discern among isotypes induced during infection with a parasitic nematode. Diseased animals, infected with Parelaphostrongylus tenuis, did not produce antigen-specific HCAbs; rather, they produced the conventional isotype, IgG1, exclusively. Our data document the utility of these MAbs in functional and physiologic investigations of the immune systems of New World camelids.

  17. Characterization of a Broadly Reactive Anti-CD40 Agonistic Monoclonal Antibody for Potential Use as an Adjuvant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Martin

    Full Text Available Lack of safe and effective adjuvants is a major hindrance to the development of efficacious vaccines. Signaling via CD40 pathway leads to enhanced antigen processing and presentation, nitric oxide expression, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression by antigen presenting cells, and stimulation of B-cells to undergo somatic hypermutation, immunoglobulin class switching, and proliferation. Agonistic anti-CD40 antibodies have shown promising adjuvant qualities in human and mouse vaccine studies. An anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody (mAb, designated 2E4E4, was identified and shown to have strong agonistic effects on primary cells from multiple livestock species. The mAb recognize swine, bovine, caprine, and ovine CD40, and evoked 25-fold or greater proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from these species relative to cells incubated with an isotype control (p<0.001. In addition, the mAb induced significant nitric oxide (p<0.0001 release by bovine macrophages. Furthermore, the mAb upregulated the expression of MHC-II by PBMCs, and stimulated significant (p<0.0001 IL-1α, IL6, IL-8, and TNF-α expression by PBMCs. These results suggest that the mAb 2E4E4 can target and stimulate cells from multiple livestock species and thus, it is a potential candidate for adjuvant development. This is the first study to report an anti-swine CD40 agonistic mAb that is also broadly reactive against multiple species.

  18. Carcinoma-associated antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartorelli, A.; Accinni, R.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to novel antigens associated with breast carcinoma, anti-sera specific to said antigens, 125 I-labeled forms of said antigens and methods of detecting said antigens in serum or plasma. The invention also relates to a diagnostic kit containing standardised antigens or antisera or marked forms thereof for the detection of said antigens in human blood, serum or plasma. (author)

  19. Selective elution of HLA antigens and beta 2-microglobulin from human platelets by chloroquine diphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, K.J.

    1988-01-01

    To determine whether chloroquine can specifically elute HLA antigens and beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2-M) from the platelet surface, quantitative immunofluorescence flow cytometry and monoclonal antibodies were used to show that HLA antigens and beta 2-M were proportionally eluted from the platelet surface without affecting the membrane glycoproteins IIb and IIIa. Second, an autoradiogram of electrophoresed I-125-labeled platelets showed that only beta 2-M but not other I-125-labeled membrane proteins could be eluted. Although HLA antigens were poorly labeled by I-125 and could not be detected on the autoradiogram, the eluted HLA antigens could be detected by anti-HLA monoclonal antibody and immunoblotting techniques. No loss of plasma membrane integrity was observed by transmission electron microscopy after chloroquine treatment of platelets. The results indicate that chloroquine selectively elutes HLA antigens and their noncovalently associated beta 2-M without affecting other integral platelet membrane proteins

  20. Phytochrome quantitation in crude extracts of Avena by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimazaki, Y; Cordonnier, M M; Pratt, L H

    1983-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), which uses both rabbit polyclonal and mouse monoclonal antibodies to phytochrome, has been adapted for quantitation of phytochrome in crude plant extracts. The assay has a detection limit of about 100 pg phytochrome and can be completed within 10 h. Quantitation of phytochrome in crude extracts of etiolated oat seedlings by ELISA gave values that agreed well with those obtained by spectrophotometric assay. When etiolated oat seedlings were irradiated continuously for 24 h, the amount of phytochrome detected by ELISA and by spectrophotometric assay decreased by more than 1000-fold and about 100-fold, respectively. This discrepancy indicates that phytochrome in light-treated plants may be antigenically distinct from that found in fully etiolated plants. When these light-grown oat seedlings were kept in darkness for 48 h, phytochrome content detected by ELISA increased by 50-fold in crude extracts of green oat shoots, but only about 12-fold in extracts of herbicide-treated oat shoots. Phytochrome reaccumulation in green oat shoots was initially more rapid in the more mature cells of the primary leaf tip than near the basal part of the shoot. The inhibitory effect of Norflurazon on phytochrome accumulation was much more evident near the leaf tip than the shoot base. A 5-min red irradiation of oat seedlings at the end of a 48-h dark period resulted in a subsequent, massive decrease in phytochrome content in crude extracts from both green and Norflurazon-bleached oat shoots. These observations eliminate the possibility that substantial accumulation of chromophore-free phytochrome was being detected and indicate that Norflurazon has a substantial effect on phytochrome accumulation during a prolonged dark period. 25 references, 9 figures, 3 tables.

  1. An Immunoglobulin G1 Monoclonal Antibody Highly Specific to the Wall of Cryptosporidium Oocysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, C.; Vesey, G.; Slade, M.; Ferrari, B.; Veal, D. A.; Williams, K.

    2000-01-01

    The detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in drinking water is critically dependent on the quality of immunofluorescent reagents. Experiments were performed to develop a method for producing highly specific antibodies to Cryptosporidium oocysts that can be used for water testing. BALB/c mice were immunized with six different antigen preparations and monitored for immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM responses to the surface of Cryptosporidium oocysts. One group of mice received purified oocyst walls, a second group received a soluble protein preparation extracted from the outside of the oocyst wall, and the third group received whole inactivated oocysts. Three additional groups were immunized with sequentially prepared oocyst extracts to provide for a comparison of the immune response. Mice injected with the soluble protein extract demonstrated an IgG response to oocysts surface that was not seen in the whole-oocyst group. Mice injected with whole oocysts showed an IgM response only, while mice injected with purified oocyst walls showed little increase in IgM or IgG levels. Of the additional reported preparations only one, BME (2-mercaptoethanol treated), produced a weak IgM response to the oocyst wall. A mouse from the soluble oocyst extract group yielding a high IgG response was utilized to produce a highly specific IgG1 monoclonal antibody (Cry104) specific to the oocyst surface. Comparative flow cytometric analysis indicated that Cry104 has a higher avidity and specificity to oocysts in water concentrates than other commercially available antibodies. PMID:10973448

  2. Distinct antigenic characteristics of murine parietal yolk sac laminin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Tichy, D; Damjanov, A

    1987-01-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies (LAM-A and LAM-B) specific for laminin from normal and neoplastic parietal yolk sac (PYS) cells were produced in rats immunized with a mouse yolk sac carcinoma cell line. Both antibodies immunoprecipitated the 400,000- and 200,000-Da chains of laminin and reacted...... with purified PYS laminin in ELISA. LAM-A reacted with mouse and rat PYS laminin, whereas LAM-B reacted only with mouse PYS laminin. Formaldehyde- and methanol-fixed adult and fetal somatic tissues were immunohistochemically unreactive with either of the two antibodies. In acetone-fixed tissue sections, both...

  3. Assessment of a serum tumour marker for carcinoma of the pancreas: the carbohydrate antigen C.A. 19-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, D.; Venot, J.; Catanzano, G.; Clement, M.N.; Piquet, M.F.; Veyriras, E.; Beck, C.

    1985-01-01

    A radio-immunological assay with monoclonal antibodies was used to measure the C 19-9 antigen in 51 patients to determine its diagnostic value in cancer of the pancreas. The results show that the C 19-9 antigen is a good marker for carcinoma of the pancreas and that it can be commonly used [fr

  4. Development of a new in vivo kit for detection of prostate specific antigen in human serum using immunoradiometric assay method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babaei, M. H.; Behradkia, P.; Shafii, M.; Movla, M.; Forutan, H.; Najafi, R.

    2006-01-01

    Prostate is a leading site for the cancer incidence, accounted for 31.0% of new cancer cases in men. Prostate-specific antigen is widely used in the detection and monitoring of the prostate cancer. Currently, immunoassay is used to detect Prostate-specific antigen in human serum. This technique is based on the interaction between antibody and antigen. The varied immunoassay formats and equipment to run the assays allow the users to measure the analytes rapidly, with the flexibility to run a small or a large number of samples. Among different immunoassay methods, immunoradiometric assay is a more sensitive and valuable detection approach. This study has been made in 4 parts: (1) purification of Prostate-specific antigen from seminal fluid; (2) preparation of hybridoma cells which secrete monoclonal antibody (mAb) against Prostate-specific antigen , (3) selection of pair monoclonal antibody among those antibodies, and finally (4) design of an immunoradiometric assay kit and it's quality control . The results of this study were: (1) obtaining a huge amount of Prostate-specific antigen as semi-purified and purified, that is a valuable material for preparation of standard kits; (2) preparation of 8 kinds of monoclonal antibodies; (3) finding 4 pairs of monoclonal antibodies which react with different epitopes on Prostate-specific antigen molecule; and (4) preparation of immunoradiometric assay kit for measuring Prostate-specific antigen concentration in human serum

  5. Improved radioimaging and tumor localization with monoclonal F(ab')2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, R.L.; Parker, C.W.; Philpott, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    Monoclonal anti-tumor antibodies have great promise for radioimmunodetection and localization of tumors. Fab and F(ab')2 fragments, which lack the Fc fragment of antibody (Ab), are cleared more rapidly from the circulation and may have less nonspecific tissue binding than intact Ab. In radioimaging studies using a murine monoclonal antibody to carcinoembryonic antigen in a human colon carcinoma xenografted into hamsters, F(ab')2 fragments were shown superior to Fab fragments and intact antibody for scintiscanning. In double-label experiments with anti-CEA antibody and control monoclonal IgG, F(ab')2 fragments were found to give better and more rapid specific tumor localization than intact antibody or Fab fragments. F(ab')2 fragments offer significant promise for tumor imaging and possibly therapy

  6. Generation of chimeric bispecific G250/anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody, a tool to combat renal cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten, R. M.; Coney, L. R.; Fleuren, G. J.; Warnaar, S. O.; Litvinov, S. V.

    1996-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody (MAb) G250 binds to a tumour-associated antigen, expressed in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), which has been demonstrated to be a suitable target for antibody-mediated immunotherapy. A bispecific antibody having both G250 and anti-CD3 specificity can cross-link G250

  7. Ki-67 immunoreactivity in meningiomas--determination of the proliferative potential of meningiomas using the monoclonal antibody Ki-67

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, C; Schrøder, H D

    1997-01-01

    The proliferative potential of 66 human intracranial meningiomas (15 benign, 15 atypical, 15 recurrent, 13 bone-invasive, and 8 brain-invasive) was investigated by means of immunohisto-chemistry using the monoclonal antibody Ki-67. This antibody recognizes a nuclear antigen present in human cells...

  8. The original Pathologische Anatomie Leiden-Endothelium monoclonal antibody recognizes a vascular endothelial growth factor binding site within neuropilin-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaalouk, Diana E.; Ozawa, Nfichael G.; Sun, Jessica; Lahdenranta, Johanna; Schlingemann, Reinier O.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2007-01-01

    For two decades, the antigen recognized by the Pathologische Anatomie Leiden-Endothelium (PAL-E) monoclonal antibody, a standard vascular endothelial cell marker, has remained elusive. Here, we used a combinatorial phage display-based approach ("epitope mapping") to select peptides binding to the

  9. A high-affinity human monoclonal IgM antibody reacting with multiple strains of Mycoplasma hominis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, SA; Birkelund, Svend; Borrebaeck, CA

    1990-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies were produced against Mycoplasma hominis by in vitro immunization of peripheral blood lymphocytes from a healthy seropositive donor using low amounts of antigen (5 ng/ml). The immune B lymphocytes were subsequently immortalized by Epstein-Barr virus transformation...

  10. Indium 111 ZCE-025 immunoscintigraphy in occult recurrent colorectal cancer with elevated carcinoembryonic antigen level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerr, R.J.; Abdel-Nabi, H.; Merchant, B.

    1990-01-01

    We investigated the utility of scanning with indium 111 labeled to monoclonal antibody in 13 patients after curative resection of colorectal cancer who had elevated carcinoembryonic antigen levels and negative results of clinical workup. Each patient received 1 mg of anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody type ZCE 025 labeled with 5.5 mCi of 111 In, plus 9 to 39 mg of the same antibody unlabeled. Patients underwent scanning 3 to 7 days after infusion by planar and emission computed tomography. ZCE-025 monoclonal antibody imaging detected tumor recurrence or metastasis in 11 of 13 patients. In one patient the monoclonal antibody scan gave a true-negative result, and in one patient the monoclonal antibody scan failed to disclose a metachronous cecal primary. Tumor sites identified were the pelvis (2 patients), abdominal wall (2), retroperitoneum (1), lymph nodes (3); liver (2), bone (2), and lung (1). The accurate localization of colorectal carcinoma recurrences by means of 111 In ZCE-025 monoclonal antibody demonstrates the usefulness of this diagnostic agent in the setting of elevated carcinoembryonic antigen level and negative results of clinical and radiologic workup

  11. Large Scale Generation and Characterization of Anti-Human IgA Monoclonal Antibody in Ascitic Fluid of Balb/c Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzatifar, Fatemeh; Majidi, Jafar; Baradaran, Behzad; Aghebati Maleki, Leili; Abdolalizadeh, Jalal; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies are potentially powerful tools used in biomedical research, diagnosis, and treatment of infectious diseases and cancers. The monoclonal antibody against Human IgA can be used as a diagnostic application to detect infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to improve an appropriate protocol for large-scale production of mAbs against IgA. Methods: For large-scale production of the monoclonal antibody, hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibodies against Human IgA were injected intraperitoneally into Balb/c mice that were previously primed with 0.5 ml Pristane. After ten days, ascitic fluid was harvested from the peritoneum of each mouse. The ELISA method was carried out for evaluation of the titration of produced mAbs. The ascitic fluid was investigated in terms of class and subclass by a mouse mAb isotyping kit. MAb was purified from the ascitic fluid by ion exchange chromatography. The purity of the monoclonal antibody was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, and the purified monoclonal antibody was conjugated with HRP. Results: Monoclonal antibodies with high specificity and sensitivity against Human IgA were prepared by hybridoma technology. The subclass of antibody was IgG1 and its light chain was the kappa type. Conclusion: This conjugated monoclonal antibody could have applications in designing ELISA kits in order to diagnose different infectious diseases such as toxoplasmosis and H. Pylori. PMID:25789225

  12. Large Scale Generation and Characterization of Anti-Human IgA Monoclonal Antibody in Ascitic Fluid of Balb/c Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Ezzatifar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies are potentially powerful tools used in biomedical research, diagnosis, and treatment of infectious diseases and cancers. The monoclonal antibody against Human IgA can be used as a diagnostic application to detect infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to improve an appropriate protocol for large-scale production of mAbs against IgA. Methods: For large-scale production of the monoclonal antibody, hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibodies against Human IgA were injected intraperitoneally into Balb/c mice that were previously primed with 0.5 ml Pristane. After ten days, ascitic fluid was harvested from the peritoneum of each mouse. The ELISA method was carried out for evaluation of the titration of produced mAbs. The ascitic fluid was investigated in terms of class and subclass by a mouse mAb isotyping kit. MAb was purified from the ascitic fluid by ion exchange chromatography. The purity of the monoclonal antibody was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, and the purified monoclonal antibody was conjugated with HRP. Results: Monoclonal antibodies with high specificity and sensitivity against Human IgA were prepared by hybridoma technology. The subclass of antibody was IgG1 and its light chain was the kappa type. Conclusion: This conjugated monoclonal antibody could have applications in designing ELISA kits in order to diagnose different infectious diseases such as toxoplasmosis and H. Pylori.

  13. Large Scale Generation and Characterization of Anti-Human CD34 Monoclonal Antibody in Ascetic Fluid of Balb/c Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghebati Maleki, Leili; Majidi, Jafar; Baradaran, Behzad; Abdolalizadeh, Jalal; Kazemi, Tohid; Aghebati Maleki, Ali; Sineh sepehr, Koushan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies or specific antibodies are now an essential tool of biomedical research and are of great commercial and medical value. The purpose of this study was to produce large scale of monoclonal antibody against CD34 in order to diagnostic application in leukemia and purification of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Methods: For large scale production of monoclonal antibody, hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibody against human CD34 were injected into the peritoneum of the Balb/c mice which have previously been primed with 0.5 ml Pristane. 5 ml ascitic fluid was harvested from each mouse in two times. Evaluation of mAb titration was assessed by ELISA method. The ascitic fluid was examined for class and subclasses by ELISA mouse mAb isotyping Kit. mAb was purified from ascitic fluid by affinity chromatography on Protein A-Sepharose. Purity of monoclonal antibody was monitored by SDS -PAGE and the purified monoclonal antibody was conjugated with FITC. Results: Monoclonal antibodies with high specificity and sensitivity against human CD34 by hybridoma technology were prepared. The subclass of antibody was IgG1 and its light chain was kappa. Conclusion: The conjugated monoclonal antibody could be a useful tool for isolation, purification and characterization of human hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:24312838

  14. Large Scale Generation and Characterization of Anti-Human CD34 Monoclonal Antibody in Ascetic Fluid of Balb/c Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koushan Sineh sepehr

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies or specific antibodies are now an essential tool of biomedical research and are of great commercial and medical value. The purpose of this study was to produce large scale of monoclonal antibody against CD34 in order to diagnostic application in leukemia and purification of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Methods: For large scale production of monoclonal antibody, hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibody against human CD34 were injected into the peritoneum of the Balb/c mice which have previously been primed with 0.5 ml Pristane. 5 ml ascitic fluid was harvested from each mouse in two times. Evaluation of mAb titration was assessed by ELISA method. The ascitic fluid was examined for class and subclasses by ELISA mouse mAb isotyping Kit. mAb was purified from ascitic fluid by affinity chromatography on Protein A-Sepharose. Purity of monoclonal antibody was monitored by SDS -PAGE and the purified monoclonal antibody was conjugated with FITC. Results: Monoclonal antibodies with high specificity and sensitivity against human CD34 by hybridoma technology were prepared. The subclass of antibody was IgG1 and its light chain was kappa. Conclusion: The conjugated monoclonal antibody could be a useful tool for isolation, purification and characterization of human hematopoietic stem cells.

  15. Development, characterization, and use of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against the myxosporean, Ceratomyxa shasta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, J.L.; Rohovec, J.S.; Fryer, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Both monoclonal and polyclonal antisera were produced against Ceratomyxa shasta. Ascites containing trophozoites of the parasite was collected from infected fish and used as antigen for immunization of mice. The resulting monoclonal antibodies reacted specifically with trophozoite and sporoblast stages but did not react with C. shasta spores by either indirect fluorescent antibody techniques or in Western blots. This indicates that some C. shasta antigens are specific to certain life stages of the parasite. Polyclonal antiserum was produced in a rabbit by injecting a spore protein electro-eluted from an SDS-polyacrylamide gel. This antiserum reacted with both trophozoites and spores by indirect fluorescent antibody techniques and in Western blots. All antisera were tested for cross-reactivity to trout white blood cells, a contaminant of the ascites, and to other myxosporea. Two monoclonal antibodies reacted with white blood cells and myxosporea of the genera Sphaerospora and Myxobilatus. One hybridoma produced antibodies of high specificity for C. shasta pre-spore stages. This is the first report of a monoclonal antibody produced against a myxosporean parasite.

  16. Radioimmunoimaging of subacute infective endocarditis using a technetium-99m monoclonal granulocyte-specific antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munz, D L; Sandrock, D; Emrich, D [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin; Morguet, A J; Heim, A; Sold, G; Figulla, H R; Kreuzer, H [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Kardiologie und Pulmonologie

    1991-12-01

    Immunoscintigraphy with a technetium-99m murine monoclonal IgG{sub 1} antibody directed against non-specific cross-reacting antigen (NCA-95) and carcinoembryonic antigen was performed with 20 patients with suspected subacute infective endocarditis (SIE) and 6 controls with suspected inflammatory/infectious disease elsewhere in the body. Immunoscintigraphy and echocardiography localised SIE in 11 of 15 patients in whom the disease could be confirmed. In 4 patients with validated SIE, the immunoscan was abnormal, and the echocardiogram was normal. In another 4 patients, the result was exactly the opposite. These findings suggest that the combination of immunoscintigraphy and echocardiography improves diagnostic efficacy in patients with suspected SIE. (orig.).

  17. Radioimmunoimaging of subacute infective endocarditis using a technetium-99m monoclonal granulocyte-specific antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munz, D.L.; Sandrock, D.; Emrich, D.; Morguet, A.J.; Heim, A.; Sold, G.; Figulla, H.R.; Kreuzer, H.

    1991-01-01

    Immunoscintigraphy with a technetium-99m murine monoclonal IgG 1 antibody directed against non-specific cross-reacting antigen (NCA-95) and carcinoembryonic antigen was performed with 20 patients with suspected subacute infective endocarditis (SIE) and 6 controls with suspected inflammatory/infectious disease elsewhere in the body. Immunoscintigraphy and echocardiography localised SIE in 11 of 15 patients in whom the disease could be confirmed. In 4 patients with validated SIE, the immunoscan was abnormal, and the echocardiogram was normal. In another 4 patients, the result was exactly the opposite. These findings suggest that the combination of immunoscintigraphy and echocardiography improves diagnostic efficacy in patients with suspected SIE. (orig.)

  18. Production of Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for Progesterone, Estradiole by Simultaneous Injection of Different Steroids

    OpenAIRE

    YÜCEL, Fatima ŞAHİNGÖZ

    2014-01-01

    We report here the development of hybrid cells producing monoclonal antibodies specific for two different steroid hormones with mixed immunization using hybridoma technology. BALB/c mice were immunized with a mixture of three steroid antigens: progesterone, estradiole and testosterone linked to bovine serum albumine. These mice were used for fusion. In the two fusion experiments, ELISA tests showed that among 645 wells only 2 hybrids reacted with progesterone (MAM 3C2, MAM 3E3) and one o...

  19. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and therapy: Potential, problems, and prospects: Scientific highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Buraggi, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    This meeting focused on areas of research on radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Topics covered included the production, purification, and fragmentation of monoclonal antibodies and immunochemistry of hybridomas; the production and the chemistry of radionuclides; the radiohalogenation and radiometal labeling techniques; the in-vivo pharmacokinetics of radiolabeled antibodies; the considerations of immunoreactivity of radiolabeled preparations; the instrumentation and imaging techniques as applied to radioimmunodetection; the radiation dosimetry in diagnostic and therapeutic use of labeled antibodies; the radioimmunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy studies; and perspectives and directions for future research. Tutorial as well as scientific lectures describing the latest research data on the above topics were presented. Three workshop panels were convened on ''Methods for Determining Immunoreactivity of Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibodies - Problems and Pitfalls,'' Radiobiological and Dosimetric Considerations for Immunotherapy with Labeled Antibodies,'' and ''The Human Anti-Mouse Antibody Response in Patients.''

  20. Comparative tumour localization properties of radiolabelled monoclonal antibody preparations of defined immunoreactivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimm, M.V.; Baldwin, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    The immunoreactive fraction of an anti-CEA monoclonal antibody preparation has been progressively decreased by the addition of increasing proportions of impurity in the form of immunologically inert mouse immunoglobulin. Following radioiodination, the immunoreactive fractions of the preparations were determined and their localization in a human tumour xenograft in nude mice was assessed. There was a progressive decline in tumour localization, from tumour to blood ratios of 2:1 with unadulterated antibody to 0.6:1 with preparations only 15% with respect to the initial antibody. These findings demonstrate that the immunoreactive fraction of monoclonal antibody preparations is a major limiting factor in tumour localization and this has implications for experimental and clinical applications of monoclonal antibodies. (orig.)

  1. Production of Monoclonal Antibodies specific for Progesterone

    OpenAIRE

    YÜCEL, Fatıma

    2014-01-01

    Progesterone levels in milk and serum are indicators of pregnancy in cattle. The progesterone level reaches a peak on the 21 st and 22 nd days of pregnancy. Monoclonal antibodies specific to progesterone could be used for the immunodetection of milk and serum progesterone levels. We report here the development of hybrid cells prdoducing monoclonal antibodies specific for progesterone using hybridoma technology. Hybridoma cells secreting monoclonal antibodies against progesterone (MAM 2H1...

  2. Production and characterization of a monoclonal antibody against recombinant cathepsin L1 of Fasciola gigantica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuracpreeda, Panat; Srirakam, Thippawan; Pandonlan, Sudarat; Changklungmoa, Narin; Chotwiwatthanakun, Charoonroj; Tinikul, Yotsawan; Poljaroen, Jaruwan; Meemon, Krai; Sobhon, Prasert

    2014-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against a recombinant cathepsin L1 of Fasciola gigantica (rFgCatL1) were produced in vitro by fusion of BALB/c mice spleen cells immunized with rFgCatL1 and mouse myeloma cells. Reactivity and specificity of these MoAbs were evaluated by indirect ELISA and immunoblotting techniques. Seven MoAb clones were selected from the stable hybridoma clones, namely 1E10, 1F5, 3D11, 4B10, 4D3, 4E3 and 5E7. Clones 1E10, 1F5 and 3D11 were IgM, whereas clones 4B10, 4D3, 4E3 and 5E7 were IgG1. All MoAbs had kappa light chain isotypes. All MoAbs reacted with rCatL1 at molecular weight (MW) 30kDa and with the native CatL1 at MW 27kDa in whole body (WB) extracts of metacercariae (Met), newly excysted juveniles (NEJ), 1, 3, 5-week-old juveniles (Ju), adult WB and adult excretory-secretory (ES) fractions, but not with adult tegumental antigens (TA). All of these MoAbs showed no cross-reactions with antigens of other parasites commonly found in ruminants and human, including Paramphistomum cervi, Eurytrema pancreaticum, Gigantocotyle explanatum, Schistosoma spindale, Schistosoma mansoni, Moniezia benedeni, Avitellina centripunctata, Trichuris sp., Haemonchus placei and Setaria labiato-papillosa. Localization of CatL1 in each developmental stages of F. gigantica by immunoperoxidase technique, using these MoAbs as probes, indicated that CatL1 was present at high concentration in the caecal epithelium and caecal lumen of metacercariae, NEJ, 1, 3, 5-week-old juveniles and adult fluke. This finding indicated that CatL1 is a copiously expressed parasite protein that is released into the ES, thus CatL1 and its MoAb could be a good candidate for immunodiagnosis of fasciolosis in ruminant and human. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Targetted localisation and imaging of a murine lymphoma using 131I-labelled monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbiah, Krishnan; Rayala, Suresh Kumar; Ananthanarayanan, Meenakshi; Thangarajan, Rajkumar

    2001-01-01

    In vivo tumor targetting with radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies is a promising approach for the diagnosis and therapy of tumors. A specific monoclonal antibody (mAb), DLAB was generated to the Dalton's lymphoma associated antigen (DLAA) from Haemophilus paragallinarum -induced spontaneous fusion. In order to study the tumor localisation and biodistribution properties of the monoclonal antibody, scintigraphic studies were performed using the radiolabelled DLAB. 131I -labelled DLAB was administered intravenously into Swiss mice bearing Dalton's lymphoma and external scintiscanning was performed at different time intervals. Clear tumor images were obtained which revealed selective and specific uptake of radiolabel and the results were compared with biodistribution data. The radioiodinated monoclonal antibody showed fast tumor uptake which increased significantly to 14.6% injected dose (ID)/g at 12 hr post-injection. Enhanced blood clearance of radioactivity resulted in higher tumor/blood ratio of 5.96 at 48 hr. 131I -labelled DLAB resulted in selective and enhanced uptake of the radioactivity by the tumor compared to the non-specific antibody and the results suggest the potential use of spontaneous fusion for producing specific monoclonal antibodies for tumor detection and therapy. (author)

  4. Clinical assay stage I clinical trial with the murine monoclonal antibody IOR-T1: Pharmacokinetic and immune answers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faxas Garcia, Maria E.; Guerra Yi, Marta E.; Alvarez, Alejandro; Calderon, Carlos

    2003-01-01

    As part of the stage I clinical trial with the murine monoclonal antibody IOR-T1 at repeated doses (200-800 mg) in patients carriers of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, the pharmacokinetics and the response against the mouse protein (HAMA) were studied in the 10 patients under treatment. It was observed a great individual variation in the maximum concentration in serum, which was estimated at 2 hours. The mean life time of the monoclonal antibody was between 13.93 and 19.6 hours. Most of the patients developed antibodies against the monoclonal antibody IOR-T1. The presence of this second antibody did not alter significantly the pharmacokinetics of the administered monoclonal antibody

  5. Monoclonal antibodies against plant viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandler, E.; Dietzgen, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    Ever since antigenic properties of plant viruses were discovered antisera have been raised and used for plant virus diagnosis and for the analysis of virus structure as well. From the early qualitative diagnosis method of precipitating the virus in clarified sap of an infected plant and the first quantitative application of the precipitin test vast progress has been made with regard to the development of highly sensitive and highly quantitative methods for virus detection. Of equal importance was the improvement of methods for separating virus from host cell components since the specificity of antisera raised against a virus could be increased by using an antigen for immunization highly concentrated and largely freed from contaminating host substances. The introduction of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) into plant virology allows detection of virus in nanogram quantities. Still, the conventionally raised antisera, no matter how pure an antigen was used for immunization, are polyclonal. They contain products of thousands of different antibody-secreting plasma cell clones which can be directed against all antigenic determinants (epitopes) of the virus, but also against antigens of the host plant that may not have been entirely separated from the immunizing virus during the purification procedure. Even after cross adsorption of polyclonal antisera some residual heterogeneity can be expected to remain. Within these boundaries the information gained with polyclonal antisera on virus structure and on virus diagnosis has to be interpreted

  6. Isolation of monoclonal antibodies with predetermined conformational epitope specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton M Sholukh

    Full Text Available Existing technologies allow isolating antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs from B cells. We devised a direct approach to isolate mAbs with predetermined conformational epitope specificity, using epitope mimetics (mimotopes that reflect the three-dimensional structure of given antigen subdomains. We performed differential biopanning using bacteriophages encoding random peptide libraries and polyclonal antibodies (Abs that had been affinity-purified with either native or denatured antigen. This strategy yielded conformational mimotopes. We then generated mimotope-fluorescent protein fusions, which were used as baits to isolate single memory B cells from rhesus monkeys (RMs. To amplify RM immunoglobulin variable regions, we developed RM-specific PCR primers and generated chimeric simian-human mAbs with predicted epitope specificity. We established proof-of-concept of our strategy by isolating mAbs targeting the conformational V3 loop crown of HIV Env; the new mAbs cross-neutralized viruses of different clades. The novel technology allows isolating mAbs from RMs or other hosts given experimental immunogens or infectious agents.

  7. Characterization of Endotrypanum Parasites Using Specific Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramos Franco Antonia Maria

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of Endotrypanum stocks (representing an heterogeneous population of strains have been screened against a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs derived for selected species of Endotrypanum or Leishmania, to see whether this approach could be used to group/differentiate further among these parasites. Using different immunological assay systems, MAbs considered specific for the genus Endotrypanum (E-24, CXXX-3G5-F12 or strain M6159 of E. schaudinni (E-2, CXIV-3C7-F5 reacted variably according to the test used but in the ELISA or immunofluorescence assay both reacted with all the strains tested. Analyses using these MAbs showed antigenic diversity occurring among the Endotrypanum strains, but no qualitative or quantitative reactivity pattern could be consistently related to parasite origin (i.e., host species involved or geographic area of isolation. Western blot analyses of the parasites showed that these MAbs recognized multiple components. Differences existed either in the epitope density or molecular forms associated with the antigenic determinants and therefore allowed the assignment of the strains to specific antigenic groups. Using immunofluorescence or ELISA assay, clone E-24 produced reaction with L. equatorensis (which is a parasite of sloth and rodent, but not with other trypanosomatids examined. Interestingly, the latter parasite and the Endotrypanum strains cross-reacted with a number of MAbs that were produced against members of the L. major-L. tropica complex

  8. Monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillman, R.O.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of in-vivo use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer. Publications appearing between 1980 and 1988 were identified by computer searches using MEDLINE and CANCERLIT, by reviewing the table of contents of recently published journals, and by searching bibliographies of identified books and articles. More than 700 articles, including peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, were identified and selected for analysis. The literature was reviewed and 235 articles were selected as relevant and representative of the current issues and future applications for in-vivo monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy and of the toxicity and efficacy which has been associated with clinical trials. Approaches include using antibody alone (interacting with complement or effector cells or binding directly with certain cell receptors) and immunoconjugates (antibody coupled to radioisotopes, drugs, toxins, or other biologicals). Most experience has been with murine antibodies. Trials of antibody alone and radiolabeled antibodies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and the in-vivo trafficking of antibodies to tumor cells. However, tumor cell heterogeneity, lack of cytotoxicity, and the development of human antimouse antibodies have limited clinical efficacy. Although the immunoconjugates are very promising, heterogeneity and the antimouse immune response have hampered this approach as has the additional challenge of chemically or genetically coupling antibody to cytotoxic agents. As a therapeutic modality, monoclonal antibodies are still promising but their general use will be delayed for several years. New approaches using human antibodies and reducing the human antiglobulin response should facilitate treatment. 235 references

  9. Monoclonal antibody-based immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, P; Reischl, U

    1998-01-01

    An immunoassay may be defined as an assay that employs an immunological reagent, usually an antibody, to confer specificity for the ligand being measured. As a corollary to this, the discovery, and subsequent development, of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) has greatly expanded the application and use of immunoassays. Polyclonal reagents, with their associated problems of specificity and quality control, have now been largely replaced by readily available MAbs of potential immortality and well-defined specificity and affinity. This has resulted, in the last two decades, in a great expansion in the range of immunoassays available and also a significant improvement in their reproducibility and reliability.

  10. Detection of eight different tospovirus species by a monoclonal antibody against the common epitope of NSs protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, T.C.; Lu, Y.Y.; Kang, Y.C.; Li, J.T.; Yeh, Y.C.; Kormelink, R.J.M.; Yeh, S.D.

    2008-01-01

    Rabbit antisera against the nucleocapsid protein (NP) have been commonly used for detection of tospoviruses and classification into serogroups or serotypes. Mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with high specificity to the NPs have also been widely used to identify tospovirus species. Recently, a

  11. Pattern of distribution of blood group antigens on human epidermal cells during maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik; Buschard, Karsten; Hakomori, Sen-Itiroh

    1984-01-01

    The distribution in human epidermis of A, B, and H blood group antigens and of a precursor carbohydrate chain, N-acetyl-lactosamine, was examined using immunofluorescence staining techniques. The material included tissue from 10 blood group A, 4 blood group B, and 9 blood group O persons. Murine...... on the lower spinous cells whereas H antigen was seen predominantly on upper spinous cells or on the granular cells. Epithelia from blood group A or B persons demonstrated A or B antigens, respectively, but only if the tissue sections were trypsinized before staining. In such cases A or B antigens were found...... monoclonal antibodies were used to identify H antigen (type 2 chain) and N-acetyl-lactosamine. Human antisera were used to identify A and B antigens. In all groups N-acetyl-lactosamine and H antigen were found on the cell membranes of the spinous cell layer. N-acetyl-lactosamine was present mainly...

  12. A novel polymorphism of human complement component C3 detected by means of a monoclonal antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, C; Behrendt, N

    1986-01-01

    A mouse monoclonal antibody, HAV 4-1, obtained after immunization of a BALB/c mouse with purified C3F, detected a novel genetic polymorphism of human complement component C3 in a simple immunoblotting system. The frequency of HAV 4-1-positive genes was 20.1%. Reactivity of HAV 4-1 was closely...... related to C3F, but certain individuals with the C3F allele did not react with HAV 4-1. Conversely, certain C3S homozygous individuals did react with HAV 4-1. The polymorphism detected by this monoclonal antibody is therefore different from the previously described polymorphism based on charge differences....

  13. The biological characteristics of anti-CD71 mouse/human chimeric antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shuo; Jiang Lin; Lei Ping; Zhu Huifen; Shen Guanxin; Cui Wuren; Wang Yanggong

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the biological characteristics of an anti-CD71 mouse/human chimeric antibody (D2C). Methods: Analysis of the chimeric Ab production in culture supernatant was made by the standard concentration curve method with ELISA. The antibody was purified by DEAE-Sephredax-A50 ion-exchange chromatography and was confirmed by SDS-PAGE. The competition inhibition studies for binding to the same epitope on CD71 were performed between the chimeric Ab(D2C) in the culture supernatant was about 0.5-5 μg/ml in 5-day cultures when seeded at 1 x 10 5 cells/5ml compared with 12.5-25 μg/ml in the supernatant from their parental monoclonal Ab(7579). The purified chimeric Ab(D2C) from mouse ascetics was 1-2 mg/ml. The SDS-PAGE analysis of purified chimeric Ab(D2C) with discontinuous system confirmed two protein bands of 55 kDa and 25 kDa. It was clear that both chimeric Ab(D2C) and murine monoclonal Ab (7579) compete effectively to join the same epitope of CD71 each other. The chimeric antibody's affinity constant (Ka), quantitated by Scatchard analysis, is about 9.34-9.62 x 10 9 L/mol. Conclusion: The chimeric Ab(D2C) produced from the transfectomas is stable. The binding capacity of the chimeric Ab(D2C) to the antigen (CD71) was retained

  14. Simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens in major salivary glands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, M H; Mandel, U; Thorn, J

    1994-01-01

    Simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens Tn, sialosyl-Tn and T are often markers of neoplastic transformation and have very limited expression in normal tissues. We performed an immunohistological study of simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens, including H and A variants, with well......-defined monoclonal antibodies (MAb) on frozen and paraffin-embedded normal salivary gland tissue from 22 parotid, 14 submandibular, six sublingual, and 13 labial glands to elucidate the simple mucin-type glycosylation pattern in relation to cyto- and histodifferentiation. The investigated carbohydrate structures...

  15. Drug delivery systems--2. Site-specific drug delivery utilizing monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranade, V V

    1989-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are purified antibodies produced by a single clone of cells. They are engineered to recognize and bind to a single specific antigen. Accordingly, when administered, MAbs home in on a particular circulating protein or on cells that bear the correct antigenic signature on their surfaces. It is the specificity of MAbs that has made them valuable tools for health professions. Following the discovery of Kohler and Milstein regarding the method of somatic cell hybridization, a number of investigators have successfully adopted this technique to obtain T-lymphocyte hybrid cell lines by fusion of activated T (thymus derived) lymphocytes with a T lymphoma cell line leading to an immortalization of a specific differentiated function. The hybrids thus obtained were subsequently shown to produce homogeneous effector molecules with a wide variety of immune functions such as enhancement or suppression of antibody responses, generation of helper T cells, suppressor T cells and cytotoxic T cells. Study of these regulatory molecules has been further shown to provide a greater insight into the genetic, biochemical and molecular mechanisms responsible for cellular development, and the interaction and triggering of various cell types. The successful application of hybridoma technology has now resulted into several advances in the understanding the mechanism and treatment of diseases, especially cancer and development of vaccines, promotion of organ transplantation and therapy against parasites as well. Since monoclonal antibodies could be made in unlimited supply, they have been used in genetic studies such as mRNA and gene isolation, chromosomal isolation of specific genes, immunoglobulin structure, detection of new or rare immunoglobulin gene products, structural studies of enzymes and other proteins and structural and population studies of protein polymorphisms. In some instances, the monoclonal antibodies have been found to replace conventional antisera

  16. Common tree shrews and primates share leukocyte membrane antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palley, L S; Schlossman, S F; Letvin, N L

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with human peripheral blood lymphocyte and myeloid cell surface antigens were utilized to study the phylogeny of the common tree shrew. Blood cells from the common tree shrew, but not the bat or short-tailed shrew, react with certain of these antibodies. These data strengthen the argument that the Tupaiidae are primitive primates rather than insectivores. They also indicate that this approach should be useful for further work in taxonomic systemization.

  17. Monoclonal antibody studies in B(non-T)-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoyama, M; Minato, K; Tobinai, K; Nagai, M; Hirose, M

    1983-09-01

    Tumor cells suspensions prepared from 129 B- or non-T cell malignancies were investigated with a panel of 10 monoclonal antibodies and conventional surface marker techniques. Surface immunoglobulin (sIg) and B1 antigen proved to be the most useful markers for B-cell lineage. Six major subtypes of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) of non-T cell nature are now recognized by these immunological techniques, including null-ALL, Ia-ALL, lymphoid stem cell ALL, pre-pre-B ALL, pre-B ALL and B-ALL. In cases of chronic leukemias and lymphomas of non-T cell nature, 80% of the tumor was defined by sIg and 88% by B1 antigen as definitely of B-cell lineage. The clonal character was also defined in 68% of the tumor on the basis of the detection of predominant single light chain in sIg. Ia-like antigen was detected in almost all cases (96%). Leukemic cells from all cases of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), chronic lymphosarcoma cell leukemia (CLsCL) and hairy cell leukemia (HCL) reacted with OKIa1 and anti-B1, and leukemic cells from most of them with anti-pan T monoclonal antibody (10.2). In more than half of CLL and CLsCL, leukemic cells were reactive with J5, OKM1, 9.6 and OKT8, but not with OKT3, OKT4 and OKT6. HCL cells had almost the same reactivity with these monoclonal antibodies as CLL and CLsCL cells except that J5 remained unreactive. These results indicated that Japanese CLL, CLsCL and HCL were different from Western ones at least with respect to surface marker characteristics. In cases of lymphomas, heavy chains of sIg were expressed in polyclonal fashion, especially in follicular lymphoma and diffuse lymphomas of medium sized cell type and large cell type, indicating that lymphomas of these types may originate from follicular center cells of the heavy chain switching stage. Anti-T monoclonals were also reactive with lymphoma cells. In about half of follicular lymphomas and diffuse lymphomas of the medium sized cell type, lymphoma cells reacted with 10.2, and less

  18. Monoclonal antibody to DNA containing thymine glycol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leadon, S A; Hanawalt, P C [Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1983-08-01

    Exposure of DNA to ionizing or near ultraviolet radiation modifies thymine to form ring-saturated products. One of the major products formed is 5,6-dihydroxy-5.6-dihydrothymine (thymine glycol). Thymine glycol can also be selectively formed by oxidizing DNA with OsO/sub 4/. We have isolated hybrids that produce monoclonal antibodies against thymine glycol by fusing mouse myeloma cells (P3X63-Ag8-6.5.3) with spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with OsO/sub 4/-oxidized poly(dT) complexed with methylated bovine serum albumin. This report describes the characterization of the antibody from one hybridoma using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The antibody reacted with both single- and double-stranded DNA treated with OsO/sub 4/, and with OsO/sub 4/-treated poly(dA-dT) and poly(dT); it did not crossreact with unmodified or apurinic DNA. It also reacted with DNA treated with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ or with ..gamma..-rays at doses as low as 250 rad. We were able to detect 2 fmoles of thymine glycol in OsO/sub 4/-treated DNA and could quantitate 1 thymine glycol per 220000 thymines. Using the antibody and the ELISA, the formation and removal of thymine glycol was examined in cultures of African green monkey cells irradiated with 25 krad of ..gamma..-rays. The antibody reactive sites produced by irradiation (8.5 per 10/sup 6/ thymines) were efficiently removed from the cellular DNA.

  19. Monoclonal antibody hapten radiopharmaceutical delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, D.A.; McTigue, M.

    1986-01-01

    One hundred μg of monoclonal antibody (MoAb) CHA255 with a binding constant Kb of 4 x 10 9 was complexed with indium-111 labelled BLEDTA II, BLEDTA IV, benzyl EDTA, and an EDTA conjugate of Fab. The 24-h tumour and organ distribution of BALB/c mice bearing KHJJ tumours was studied for each compound alone, the antibody complex, and 3 h following a chelate chase of the antibody complex. Whole body biological half-life was measured for 7 days with and without a chelate chase for each antibody complex. The 24-h whole body counts dropped 20 to 60% and blood concentration fell over 89% within 3 h of administering the chelate chase. Theoretical equivalent human organ doses were calculated from the 24-h organ concentrations, effective half-life, and MIRD 11 S values (absorbed dose per cumulated activity). Liver and spleen were the target organs, with the dose ranging from 0.50 to 3.91 rads mCi -1 . The reduction in organ radiation dose varied up to 95% following the chelate chase. Rapid selective renal clearance of chelate labelled radiopharmaceuticals by competitive inhibition (chelate chase) of their reversible binding to monoclonal antibodies enhances tumour imaging and improves the radiation dosimetry. (author)

  20. Immunohistochemical localization of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA in the pig ovary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan TomĂĄnek

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein (PCNA in the pig ovary. The localization of PCNA was demonstrated in paraffin sections of pig ovarian tissue using primary mouse monoclonal anti-PCNA antibody. In primordial follicles, no remarkable staining for PCNA either in granulosa cells or in the oocytes was observed. In primary to secondary follicles, positive staining in oocytes and in some granulosa cells was detected. The advanced preantral and particularly actively growing small to large antral follicles showed extensive PCNA labeling in the layers of granulosa and theca cells and in the cumulus cells encircling the oocyte. PCNA labeling was expressed in nuclei of oocytes in preantral and small antral follicles. In atretic follicles, the level of PCNA protein expression was dependent on the stage of atresia. Follicles demonstrating advanced atresia showed only limited or no PCNA labeled granulosa and theca cells. The results of the study demonstrate that follicular growth and development in pig ovary may be effectively monitored by determining the granulosa cell expression of PCNA.

  1. A monoclonal antibody to pestviruses in bovine and ovine sera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mweene, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) has been developed to defeat antibodies to pestviruses in bovine and ovine sera. Single sera from 211 cattle and 22 sheep from 7 different farms were tested using ELISA and Serum Neutralisation Test (SNT). 17 Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) directed against P80, gp48 and gp53 were tested for ability to coat ELISA plates and capture the bovine viral diarrhea antigen. 5 mabs(WB 103, WB, 105, WB 112 against P80 kDa protein, WB 210 and WB 214 directed against gp48 and gp 53 kDa protein. Specific antibody to BVDV was detected by rabbit anti-bovine and anti-ovine IgG antisera. The quantitative correlation between two tests was good

  2. Microbials for the production of monoclonal antibodies and antibody fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadiut, Oliver; Capone, Simona; Krainer, Florian; Glieder, Anton; Herwig, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and antibody fragments represent the most important biopharmaceutical products today. Because full length antibodies are glycosylated, mammalian cells, which allow human-like N-glycosylation, are currently used for their production. However, mammalian cells have several drawbacks when it comes to bioprocessing and scale-up, resulting in long processing times and elevated costs. By contrast, antibody fragments, that are not glycosylated but still exhibit antigen binding properties, can be produced in microbial organisms, which are easy to manipulate and cultivate. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the expression systems, strain engineering, and production processes for the three main microbials used in antibody and antibody fragment production, namely Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, and Escherichia coli. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Noninvasive diagnosis of axillary node metastases with monoclonal antibody lymphoscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fig, L.M.; Von Moll, L.; Brown, R.; Harness, J.; Appleman, H.; Stevens, R.; Johnson, J.W.; Mudgett, E.; Colcher, D.; Schlom, J.; Lichter, A.; Wicha, M.; Wahl, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether 131-I labeled B72.3 monoclonal antibody, when injected subcutaneously in patients with known breast cancer, successfully detects lymph node metastases. Eleven women with biopsy-proven B72.3 antibody-reactive breast cancer (determined by immunoperoxidase staining) received subcutaneous injections of 500 μ Ci 131-I B72.3 in ipsilateral finger web spaces (or, in three cases, intralesional injections into the site of the breast tumor). The antibody is a IgGlk reactive with a high molecular weight antigen found on most breast carcinomas. Images of the axilla were obtained immediately after injection and serially to 72 hours. Nodal uptake was scored on a 0-3+ scale in a blinded fashion and correlated with pathologic findings from lymph node dissection

  4. Development of rabbit monoclonal antibodies for detection of alpha-dystroglycan in normal and dystrophic tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa J Fortunato

    Full Text Available Alpha-dystroglycan requires a rare O-mannose glycan modification to form its binding epitope for extracellular matrix proteins such as laminin. This functional glycan is disrupted in a cohort of muscular dystrophies, the secondary dystroglycanopathies, and is abnormal in some metastatic cancers. The most commonly used reagent for detection of alpha-dystroglycan is mouse monoclonal antibody IIH6, but it requires the functional O-mannose structure for recognition. Therefore, the ability to detect alpha-dystroglycan protein in disease states where it lacks the full O-mannose glycan has been limited. To overcome this hurdle, rabbit monoclonal antibodies against the alpha-dystroglycan C-terminus were generated. The new antibodies, named 5-2, 29-5, and 45-3, detect alpha-dystroglycan from mouse, rat and pig skeletal muscle by Western blot and immunofluorescence. In a mouse model of fukutin-deficient dystroglycanopathy, all antibodies detected low molecular weight alpha-dystroglycan in disease samples demonstrating a loss of functional glycosylation. Alternately, in a porcine model of Becker muscular dystrophy, relative abundance of alpha-dystroglycan was decreased, consistent with a reduction in expression of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex in affected muscle. Therefore, these new rabbit monoclonal antibodies are suitable reagents for alpha-dystroglycan core protein detection and will enhance dystroglycan-related studies.

  5. Histone H1(0) mapping using monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dousson, S; Gorka, C; Gilly, C; Lawrence, J J

    1989-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to ox liver histone H1 degree were produced and characterized. Two sets of mice were immunized either with pure H1(0) or with an H1(0)-yeast tRNA complex. Eleven hybridomas of various clonal origin were selected. Typing of the antibodies indicated that all but three IgM belonged to the IgG1 class and contained kappa light chains. Immunoblotting experiments using peptides derived from H1(0) or H5 treated by various proteolytic agents (trypsin, N-bromosuccinimide, cyanogen bromide, acetic acid), revealed that nine of the mAb reacted with the globular part of H1(0). More advanced characterization of the antigenic determinants allowed us to determine distinct regions within this globular part which are involved in the antigenic recognition. The peptopes could be subdivided into two groups. Three mAb bound to residues 24-27 and were specific for H1(0). Six mAb bound to residues 27-30 and were specific for H1(0) except one of them which strongly cross-reacted with H5 and GH5. Two mAb reacted with the entire histone H1(0) but failed to react with any of the peptides, suggesting that the corresponding epitope is a conformational antigenic determinant. In order to confirm the localization of the two distinct regions which are involved in the antigenic recognition, a synthetic decapeptide corresponding to the beginning of human H1(0) globular part (from residue 19 to residue 28) was synthesized. Inhibition experiments of the reaction between H1(0) and the various IgG1 mAb by increasing amounts of peptide-bovine serum albumin conjugates were then performed.

  6. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human serum albumin (HSA) for the development of an immunoaffinity system with oriented anti-HSA mAbs as immobilized ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajak, Poonam; Vijayalakshmi, M A; Jayaprakash, N S

    2013-05-05

    Proteins present in human serum are of immense importance in the field of biomarker discovery. But, the presence of high-abundant proteins like albumin makes the analysis more challenging because of masking effect on low-abundant proteins. Therefore, removal of albumin using highly specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can potentiate the discovery of low-abundant proteins. In the present study, mAbs against human serum albumin (HSA) were developed and integrated in to an immunoaffinity based system for specific removal of albumin from the serum. Hybridomas were obtained by fusion of Sp2/0 mouse myeloma cells with spleen cells from the mouse immunized with HSA. Five clones (AHSA1-5) producing mAbs specific to HSA were established and characterized by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblotting for specificity, sensitivity and affinity in terms of antigen binding. The mAbs were able to bind to both native albumin as well as its glycated isoform. Reactivity of mAbs with different mammalian sera was tested. The affinity constant of the mAbs ranged from 10(8) to 10(9)M(-1). An approach based on oriented immobilization was followed to immobilize purified anti-HSA mAbs on hydrazine activated agarose gel and the dynamic binding capacity of the column was determined. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. TL transgenic mouse strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obata, Y.; Matsudaira, Y.; Hasegawa, H.; Tamaki, H.; Takahashi, T.; Morita, A.; Kasai, K.

    1993-01-01

    As a result of abnormal development of the thymus of these mice, TCR αβ lineage of the T cell differentiation is disturbed and cells belonging to the TCR γδ CD4 - CD8 - double negative (DN) lineage become preponderant. The γδ DN cells migrate into peripheral lymphoid organs and constitute nearly 50% of peripheral T cells. Immune function of the transgenic mice is severely impaired, indicating that the γδ cells are incapable of participating in these reactions. Molecular and serological analyses of T-cell lymphomas reveal that they belong to the γδ lineage. Tg.Tla a -3-1 mice should be useful in defining the role of TL in normal and abnormal T cell differentiation as well as in the development of T-cell lymphomas, and further they should facilitate studies on the differentiation and function of γδ T cells. We isolated T3 b -TL gene from B6 mice and constructed a chimeric gene in which T3 b -TL is driven by the promoter of H-2K b . With the chimeric gene, two transgenic mouse strains, Tg. Con.3-1 and -2 have been derived in C3H background. Both strains express TL antigen in various tissues including skin. The skin graft of transgenic mice on C3H and (B6 X C3H)F 1 mice were rejected. In the mice which rejected the grafts, CD8 + TCRαβ cytotoxic T cells (CTL) against TL antigens were recognized. The recognition of TL by CTL did not require the antigen presentation by H-2 molecules. The results indicated that TL antigen in the skin becomes a transplantation antigen and behaves like a typical allogeneic MHC class I antigen. The facts that (B6 X C3H)F 1 mice rejected the skin expressing T3 b -TL antigen and induced CTL that killed TL + lymphomas of B6 origin revealed that TL antigen encoded by T3 b -TL is recognized as non-self in B6 mice. Experiments are now extended to analyze immune responses to TL antigen expressed on autochthonous T cell lymphomas. (J.P.N.)

  8. Oral administration of recombinant Neisseria meningitidis PorA genetically fused to H. pylori HpaA antigen increases antibody levels in mouse serum, suggesting that PorA behaves as a putative adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Abel E; Manzo, Ricardo A; Soto, Daniel A; Barrientos, Magaly J; Maldonado, Aurora E; Mosqueira, Macarena; Avila, Anastasia; Touma, Jorge; Bruce, Elsa; Harris, Paul R; Venegas, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane protein PorA from a Chilean strain was purified as a recombinant protein. PorA mixed with AbISCO induced bactericidal antibodies against N. meningitidis in mice. When PorA was fused to the Helicobacter pylori HpaA antigen gene, the specific response against H. pylori protein increased. Splenocytes from PorA-immunized mice were stimulated with PorA, and an increase in the secretion of IL-4 was observed compared with that of IFN-γ. Moreover, in an immunoglobulin sub-typing analysis, a substantially higher IgG1 level was found compared with IgG2a levels, suggesting a Th2-type immune response. This study revealed a peculiar behavior of the purified recombinant PorA protein per se in the absence of AbISCO as an adjuvant. Therefore, the resistance of PorA to proteolytic enzymes, such as those in the gastrointestinal tract, was analyzed, because this is an important feature for an oral protein adjuvant. Finally, we found that PorA fused to the H. pylori HpaA antigen, when expressed in Lactococcus lactis and administered orally, could enhance the antibody response against the HpaA antigen approximately 3 fold. These observations strongly suggest that PorA behaves as an effective oral adjuvant.

  9. Screening and identification of mimotope of gastric cancer associated antigen MGb1-Ag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhe-Yi; Wu, Kai-Chun; He, Feng-Tian; Han, Quan-Li; Nie, Yong-Zhan; Han, Ying; Liu, Xiao-Nan; Zheng, Jian-Yong; Xu, Mei-Hong; Lin, Tao; Fan, Dai-Ming

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Using a monoclonal antibody against gastric cancer antigen named MGb1 to screen a phage-displayed random peptide library fused with coat protein pIII in order to get some information on mimotopes. METHODS: Through affinity enrichment and ELISA screening, positive clones of phages were amplified. 10 phage clones were selected after three rounds of biopanning and the ability of specific binding of the positive phage clones to MGb1-Ab were detected by ELISA assay (DNA sequencing was performed and the amino acid sequences were deduced) By blocking test, specificity of the mimic phage epitopes was identified. RESULTS: There were approximately 200 times of enrichment about the titer of bound phages after three rounds of biopanning procedures. DNA of 10 phage clones after the third biopanning was assayed and the result showed that the positive clones had a specific binding activity to MGb1-Ab and a weak ability of binding to control mAb or to mouse IgG. DNA sequencing of 10 phage clones was performed and the amino acid sequences were deduced. According to the homology of the amino acid sequences of the displayed peptides, most of the phage clones had motifs of H(x)Q or L(x)S. And these 10 phage clones could also partly inhibit the binding of MGb1-Ab to gastric cancer cell KATO-III. The percentage of blocking was from (21.0 ± 1.6)% to (39.0 ± 2.7)%. CONCLUSION: Motifs of H(x)Q and L(x)S selected and identified show a high homology in the mimic epitopes of gastric cancer associated antigen. There may be one or more clones which can act as candidates of tumor vaccines. PMID:12970876

  10. Detection of cyclobutane thymine dimers in DNA of human cells with monoclonal antibodies raised against a thymine dimer-containing tetranucleotide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roza, L; Wulp, K.J.M. van der; MacFarlane, S J; Lohman, P H.M.; Baan, R A

    1988-11-01

    A hybrid cell line (hybridoma) has been isolated after fusion between mouse-plasmacytoma cells and spleen cells from mice immunized with a thymine dimer-containing tetranucleotide coupled to a carrier protein. Monoclonal antibodies produced by this hybridoma were characterized by testing the effect of various inhibitors in a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The antibodies have a high specificity for thymine dimers in single-stranded DNA or poly(dT), but do not bind UV-irradiated d(TpC)/sub 5/. Less binding is observed with short thymine dimer-containing sequences. In vitro treatment of UV-irradiated DNA with photoreactivating enzyme in the presence of light, or with Micrococcus luteus UV-endonuclease results in disappearance of antigenicity. Antibody-binding to DNA isolated from UV-irradiated human fibroblasts (at 254 nm) is linear with dose. Removal of thymine dimers in these cells during a post-irradiation incubation, as detected with the antibodies, is fast initially but the rate rapidly decreases (about 50% residual dimers at 20 h after 10 J/m/sup 2/). The induction of thymine dimers in human skin irradiated with low doses of UV-B, too, was demonstrated immunochemically, by ELISA as well as by quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy.

  11. Iodination of monoclonal antibodies, proteins and peptide using iodogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhanpo, Niu [Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, BJ (China). PUMC Hospital; and others

    1988-05-01

    The use of the iodinating reagent 1,3,4,6-tetrachloro-3{alpha}, 6{alpha}-diphenylglycholuril (Iodogen) to label monoclonal antibodies (McAbs). Proteins and peptides was invesrigated with McAbs identified as mouse IgG and IgM, arginine-vasopressin (AVP), glucagon (Glu), human insulin(hI) and albumin(Alb). The labeled products were purified by gel chromatography and their immunoreactivity were detected by RIA or IRMA> Comparison of the Iodogen method with the lactoperoxides and chloramine-T methods showed that the Iodogen method had a number of advantages: (1) technically simpler ; (2) a high labeling efficiency could be obtained; (3) the immunoreactivity of the products was minimally affected; (4) the products were stable for up to 4 months.

  12. Antigenic structure of the capsid protein of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L.; Cortes, Elena; Vela, Carmen

    1998-01-01

    Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) causes an important disease in rabbits. The virus capsid is composed of a single 60 kDa protein. The capsid protein gene was cloned in Escherichia coli using the pET3 system, and the antigenic structure of RHDV VP60 was dissected using 11 monoclonal...

  13. Increased prevalence of late stage T cell activation antigen (VLA-1) in active juvenile chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Morling, Niels; Platz, P

    1987-01-01

    The presence of activated T cells as judged from the reaction with monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) against (a) a late stage T cell activation antigen (VLA-1), (b) the interleukin 2 (IL2) receptor (CD25), and (c) four different HLA class II molecules (HLA-DR, DRw52, DQ, and DP) was studied in 15 pati...

  14. Isolation of highly active monoclonal antibodies against multiresistant gram-positive bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike S Rossmann

    Full Text Available Multiresistant nosocomial pathogens often cause life-threatening infections that are sometimes untreatable with currently available antibiotics. Staphylococci and enterococci are the predominant Gram-positive species associated with hospital-acquired infections. These infections often lead to extended hospital stay and excess mortality. In this study, a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies was isolated from a healthy individual by selection of B-cells producing antibodies with high opsonic killing against E. faecalis 12030. Variable domains (VH and VL of these immunoglobulin genes were amplified by PCR and cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector containing the constant domains of a human IgG1 molecule and the human lambda constant domain. These constructs were transfected into CHO cells and culture supernatants were collected and tested by opsonophagocytic assay against E. faecalis and S. aureus strains (including MRSA. At concentrations of 600 pg/ml, opsonic killing was between 40% and 70% against all strains tested. Monoclonal antibodies were also evaluated in a mouse sepsis model (using S. aureus LAC and E. faecium, a mouse peritonitis model (using S. aureus Newman and LAC and a rat endocarditis model (using E. faecalis 12030 and were shown to provide protection in all models at a concentration of 4 μg/kg per animal. Here we present a method to produce fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibodies that are opsonic in vitro and protective in vivo against several multiresistant Gram-positive bacteria. The monoclonal antibodies presented in this study are significantly more effective compared to another monoclonal antibody currently in clinical trials.

  15. Multinuclear NMR study of the structure of the Fv fragment of anti-dansyl mouse IgG2a antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hideo; Odaka, Asano; Matsunaga, Chigusa; Kato, Koichi; Shimada, Ichio; Arata, Yoji (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)); Kawaminami, Shunro (Kao Corp., Tochigi (Japan))

    1991-07-02

    A multinuclear NMR study is reported of Fv, which is a minimum antigen-binding unit of immunoglobulin. Fv has been prepared by clostripain digestion of a mouse anti-dansyl IgG2a monoclonal antibody that lacks the entire C{sub H}1 domain. A variety of Fv analogues labeled with {sup 2}H in the aromatic rings and with {sup 13}C and/or {sup 15}N in the peptide bonds have been prepared and used for multinuclear NMR analyses of Fv spectra of Fv sensitively reflect the antigen binding and can be used along with {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C spectral data for the structural analyses of antigen-antibody interactions. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange of the amide protons has been folowed in the absence and presence of DNS-Lys by using the {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N shift correlation spectra. Use of the {beta}-shift observed for the carbonyl carbon resonances has also been helpful in following the hydrogen-deuterium exchange. On the basis of the NMR data obtained, the static and dynamic structure of the Fv fragment in the absence and presence of DNS-Lys has been discussed.

  16. Multinuclear NMR study of the structure of the Fv fragment of anti-dansyl mouse IgG2a antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hideo; Odaka, Asano; Matsunaga, Chigusa; Kato, Koichi; Shimada, Ichio; Arata, Yoji; Kawaminami, Shunro

    1991-01-01

    A multinuclear NMR study is reported of Fv, which is a minimum antigen-binding unit of immunoglobulin. Fv has been prepared by clostripain digestion of a mouse anti-dansyl IgG2a monoclonal antibody that lacks the entire C H 1 domain. A variety of Fv analogues labeled with 2 H in the aromatic rings and with 13 C and/or 15 N in the peptide bonds have been prepared and used for multinuclear NMR analyses of Fv spectra of Fv sensitively reflect the antigen binding and can be used along with 1 H and 13 C spectral data for the structural analyses of antigen-antibody interactions. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange of the amide protons has been folowed in the absence and presence of DNS-Lys by using the 1 H- 15 N shift correlation spectra. Use of the β-shift observed for the carbonyl carbon resonances has also been helpful in following the hydrogen-deuterium exchange. On the basis of the NMR data obtained, the static and dynamic structure of the Fv fragment in the absence and presence of DNS-Lys has been discussed

  17. Current status of cancer immunodetection with radiolabeled human monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jager, R; Abdel-Nabi, H; Serafini, A; Pecking, A; Klein, J L; Hanna, M G

    1993-04-01

    The use of radiolabeled murine monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) for cancer immunodetection has been limited by the development of human antimouse antibodies (HAMA). Human monoclonal antibodies do not elicit a significant human antihuman (HAHA) response. The generation and production of human monoclonal antibodies met with technical difficulties that resulted in delaying their clinical testing. Human monoclonal antibodies of all isotypes have been obtained. Most were immunoglobulin (Ig) M directed against intracellular antigens. Two antibodies, 16.88 (IgM) and 88BV59 (IgG3k), recognize different epitopes on a tumor-associated antigen, CTA 16.88, homologous to cytokeratins 8, 18, and 19. CTA 16.88 is expressed by most epithelial-derived tumors including carcinomas of the colon, pancreas, breast, ovary, and lung. The in vivo targeting by these antibodies is related to their localization in nonnecrotic areas of tumors. Repeated administration of 16.88 over 5 weeks to a cumulative dose of 1,000 mg did not elicit a HAHA response. Two of 53 patients developed a low titer of HAHA 1 to 3 months after a single administration of 88BV59. Planar imaging of colorectal cancer with Iodine-131 (131I)-16.88 was positive in two studies in 9 of 12 and 16 of 20 patients preselected by immunohistochemistry. Tumors less than 2 cm in diameter are usually not detected. The lack of immunogenicity and long tumor residence time (average = 17 days) makes 16.88 a good candidate for therapy. Radioimmunlymphoscintigraphy with indium-111 (111In)-LiLo-16.88 administered by an intramammary route was used in the presurgical staging of primary breast cancer. The negative predictive value of lymph node metastases for tumors less than 3 cm was 90.5%. Planar and single photon emission computed tomography imaging of colorectal carcinoma with technetium-99m (99mTc) 88BV59 was compared with computed tomography (CT) scan in 36 surgical patients. The antibody scan was more sensitive than the CT scan in detecting

  18. Abnormal expression of blood group-related antigens in uterine endometrial cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukazaki, K; Sakayori, M; Arai, H; Yamaoka, K; Kurihara, S; Nozawa, S

    1991-08-01

    The expression of A, B, and H group antigens, Lewis group antigens (Lewis(a), Lewis(b), Lewis(x), and Lewis(y)), and Lc4 and nLc4 antigens, the precursor antigens of both groups, was examined immunohistochemically with monoclonal antibodies in 9 normal endometria, 6 endometrial hyperplasias, and 31 endometrial cancers. 1) A, B and/or H antigens were detected in endometrial cancers at an incidence of 51.6%, while no distinct localization of these antigens was observed in normal endometria. H antigen, the precursor of A and B antigens, was particularly frequently detected in endometrial cancers. 2) An increased rate of expression of Lewis group antigens, particularly Lewis(b) antigen, was observed in endometrial cancers compared with its expression in normal endometria. 3) Lc4 and nLc4 antigens were detected in endometrial cancers at rates of 41.9% and 38.7%, respectively, these expressions being increased compared with those in normal endometria. 4) These results suggest that a highly abnormal expression of blood group-related antigens in endometrial cancers occurs not only at the level of A, B, and H antigens and Lewis group antigens, but also at the level of their precursor Lc4 and nLc4 antigens. 5) Lewis(a), Lewis(b), and Lc4 antigens, built on the type-1 chain, are more specific to endometrial cancers than their respective positional isomers, Lewis(x), Lewis(y), and nLc4 antigens, built on the type-2 chain.

  19. Mass-Production and Characterization of Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody in Peritoneum of Balb/c Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leili Aghebati

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies are important tools are used in basic research as well as, in diagnosis, imaging and treatment of immunodeficiency diseases, infections and cancers. The purpose of this study was to produce large scale of monoclonal antibody against CD20 in order to diagnostic application in leukemia and lymphomas disorders. Methods: Hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibody against human CD20 were administered into the peritoneum of the Balb/c mice which have previously been primed with 0.5 ml Pristane. After twelve days, approximately 7 ml ascetic fluid was harvested from the peritoneum of each mouse. Evaluation of mAb titration was assessed by ELISA method. In the present study, we describe a protocol for large scale production of MAbs. Results: We prepared monoclonal antibodies (mAbs with high specificity and sensitivity against human CD20 by hybridoma method and characterized them by ELISA. The subclass of antibody was IgG2a and its light chain was kappa. Ascetic fluid was purified by Protein-A Sepharose affinity chromatography and the purified monoclonal antibody was conjugated with FITC and Immunofluorescence was done for confirming the specific binding. Conclusion: The conjugated monoclonal antibody could have application in diagnosis B-cell lymphomas, hairy cell leukemia, B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and melanoma cancer stem cells.

  20. Mass-Production and Characterization of Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody in Peritoneum of Balb/c Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sineh sepehr, Koushan; Baradaran, Behzad; Majidi, Jafar; Abdolalizadeh, Jalal; Aghebati, leili; Zare Shahneh, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies are important tools are used in basic research as well as, in diagnosis, imaging and treatment of immunodeficiency diseases, infections and cancers. The purpose of this study was to produce large scale of monoclonal antibody against CD20 in order to diagnostic application in leukemia and lymphomas disorders. Methods: Hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibody against human CD20 were administered into the peritoneum of the Balb/c mice which have previously been primed with 0.5 ml Pristane. After twelve days, approximately 7 ml ascetic fluid was harvested from the peritoneum of each mouse. Evaluation of mAb titration was assessed by ELISA method. In the present study, we describe a protocol for large scale production of MAbs. Results: We prepared monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with high specificity and sensitivity against human CD20 by hybridoma method and characterized them by ELISA. The subclass of antibody was IgG2a and its light chain was kappa. Ascetic fluid was purified by Protein-A Sepharose affinity chromatography and the purified monoclonal antibody was conjugated with FITC and Immunofluorescence was done for confirming the specific binding. Conclusion: The conjugated monoclonal antibody could have application in diagnosis B-cell lymphomas, hairy cell leukemia, B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and melanoma cancer stem cells. PMID:24312821

  1. Generation and Characterization of Anti-CD34 Monoclonal Antibodies that React with Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghebati Maleki, Leili; Majidi, Jafar; Baradaran, Behzad; Movassaghpour, Aliakbar; Abdolalizadeh, Jalal

    2014-01-01

    CD34 is a type I membrane protein with a molecular mass of approximately 110 kDa. This antigen is associated with human hematopoietic progenitor cells and is a differentiation stage-specific leukocyte antigen. In this study we have generated and characterized monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against a CD34 marker. Mice were immunized with two keyhole lympet hemocyanin (KLH)-conjugated CD34 peptides. Fused cells were grown in hypoxanthine, aminopterine and thymidine (HAT) selective medium and cloned by the limiting dilution (L.D) method. Several monoclones were isolated by three rounds of limited dilutions. From these, we chose stable clones that presented sustained antibody production for subsequent characterization. Antibodies were tested for their reactivity and specificity to recognize the CD34 peptides and further screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting analyses. One of the mAbs (3D5) was strongly reactive against the CD34 peptide and with native CD34 from human umbilical cord blood cells (UCB) in ELISA and Western blotting analyses. The results have shown that this antibody is highly specific and functional in biomedical applications such as ELISA and Western blot assays. This monoclonal antibodies (mAb) can be a useful tool for isolation and purification of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). PMID:24611141

  2. Anti-tick monoclonal antibody applied by artificial capillary feeding in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsioroski, Andressa Varella; Bezerra, Isis Abel; Utiumi, Kiyoko Uemura; Driemeier, David; Farias, Sandra Estrazulas; da Silva Vaz, Itabajara; Masuda, Aoi

    2012-04-01

    The tick Rhipicephalus microplus is an ectoparasite harmful to livestock, a vector of disease agents that affects meat and milk production. However, resistance to acaricides reflects the need for alternative tick control methods, among which vaccines have gained increasing relevance. In this scenario, monoclonal antibodies can be used to identify and characterize antigens that can be used as vaccine immunogens. Capillary tube artificial feeding of partially engorged R. microplus females with monoclonal antibodies against proteins from the gut of tick were used to test the effects of immunoglobulins in the physiology of the parasite. The results of artificial feeding showed that female ticks over 25mg and under 60 mg in weight performed better in the artificial feeding process, with a 94-168% weight increase after 24h of feeding. Results showed that artificial feeding of ticks proved to be a viable technique to study the effects of antibodies or drugs in the physiology of the parasite. One monoclonal antibody (BrBm2) induced decreased oviposition. Moreover, the antigen recognized by BrBm2 was identified as a 27-kDa protein and immunolabeled on digestive vesicles membranes of digestive cells of partially and fully engorged females. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Electrochemical immunoassay for the prostate specific antigen using a reduced graphene oxide functionalized with a high molecular-weight silk peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yanying; Qu, Ying; Li, Chunya; Wu, Kangbing; Liu, Guishen; Hou, Xiaodong; Huang, Yina; Wu, Wangze

    2015-01-01

    High molecular-weight silk peptide (SP) was used to functionalize the surface of nanosheets of reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The SP-rGO nanocomposite was then mixed with mouse anti-human prostate specific antigen monoclonal antibody (anti-PSA) and coated onto a glassy carbon electrode to fabricate an immunosensor. By using the hexacyanoferrate redox system as electroactive probe, the immunosensor was characterized by voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The peak current, measured at the potential of 0.24 V (vs. SCE), is distinctly reduced after binding prostate specific antigen (PSA). Response (measured by differential pulse voltammetry) is linearly related to PSA concentration in the range from 0.1 to 5.0 ng · mL −1 and from 5.0 to 80.0 ng∙mL −1 , and the detection limit is 53 pg∙mL −1 (at an SNR of 3). The immunosensor was successfully applied to the determination of PSA in clinical serum samples, and the results were found to agree well with those obtained with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. (author)

  4. Production, Characterization and Use of Monoclonal Antibodies Recognizing IgY Epitopes Shared by Chicken, Turkey, Pheasant, Peafowl and Sparrow

    OpenAIRE

    Narat, Mojca; Biček, Ajda; Vadnjal, Robert; Benčina, Dušan

    2004-01-01

    Chicken antibodies are not only a part of immune defense but are more and more popular commercial products in form of chicken polyclonal, monoclonal or recombinant antibodies. We produced and characterized mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that recognize epitopes located on heavy or light chain of chicken immunoglobulin Y (chIgY) shared also by some other Phasianidae birds. The use of mAbs 1F5 and 2F10 that recognize heavy chain on chIgY common epitopes was demonstrated on immunoglobulins of...

  5. Monoclonal gammopathy in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yue; Chen, Long; Jia, Yuan; Liu, Yang; Wen, Lei; Liang, Yaoxian; An, Yuan; Chen, Shi; Su, Yin; Li, Zhanguo

    2018-07-01

    To analyze the clinical spectrum, laboratory characteristics, and outcomes of monoclonal gammopathy (MG) in patients with rheumatic diseases. Screening for the presence of MG was performed in 872 inpatients with rheumatic diseases from January 2010 to July 2017. A total of 41 patients were enrolled. Their clinical and biological features in addition to outcomes were described. For each patient with primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS), 2 age- and sex-matched pSS patients without MG were selected as controls. Risk factors for the presence of MG and malignant hematological neoplasias were assessed. MG was observed in patients with SS, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, polymyositis, hypomyopathic dermatomyositis, psoriatic arthritis, ANCA-associated vasculitis, polyarteritis nodosa, and polymyalgia rheumatic, with SS the most frequent type. Serum M protein was detected in 37 patients. The monoclonal bands identified in serum were 16 IgG (5 κ, 11 λ), 11 IgA (6 κ, 5 λ), 6 IgM (5 κ, 1 λ), and 4 free λ chains. M components were observed in urine in the other 4 patients. High ESR, albumin/globulin inversion, rheumatoid factor positivity, hypergammaglobulinemia, and hypocomplementemia were common features, presented in more than half of the 41 patients. Patients with pSS, when complicated with MG, showed a higher rate of abnormal urine NAG (71.4 vs 15.8%, P = 0.025), higher levels of ESR [55.0 (53.5) mm/h vs 21.0 (31.8) mm/h, P = 0.001], ESSDAI [26.0 (25.0) vs 12.0 (9.0), P = 0.006], and ClinESSDAI scores [24.0 (25.0) vs 10.5 (10.0), P = 0.011]. Multivariate analysis revealed that the disease activity, assessed by either ESSDAI [adjusted OR 1.127 (95%CI 1.015-1.251), P = 0.025] or ClinESSDAI [adjusted OR 1.121 (95%CI 1.011-1.242), P = 0.030], was the only independent risk factor for the presence of MG. During the follow-up, 2 patients had transient serum M protein, 2 had isotype

  6. Perfusion of tumor-bearing kidneys as a model for scintigraphic screening of monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Dijk, J.; Oosterwijk, E.; van Kroonenburgh, M.J.; Jonas, U.; Fleuren, G.J.; Pauwels, E.K.; Warnaar, S.O.

    1988-01-01

    Tumor-bearing human kidneys were used in an ex vivo perfusion model to screen monoclonal antibodies, recognizing renal cell carcinoma-associated antigens for diagnostic potential in vivo. Perfusion of tumor-bearing kidneys with /sup 99m/Tc-labeled G250 and RC38 antibody resulted in visualization of the tumor, whereas perfusion with two other monoclonal antibodies, RC2 and RC4, did not lead to tumor visualization. Uptake of radiolabel in normal kidney tissue was low for G250 and RC38 antibody. Tumor-to-kidney tissue ratios after perfusion with G250 and RC38 antibody were 2.7 and 2.2, respectively. After rinsing for 3 hr with unlabeled perfusion fluid the tumor-to-kidney tissue ratios increased to 8.6 for G250 antibody and to 2.7 for RC38 antibody. We conclude that perfusion of tumor-bearing human kidneys with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies is a relatively simple way to evaluate renal cell carcinoma associated monoclonal antibodies as diagnostic agents in vivo

  7. Solid-phase peptide quantitation assay using labeled monoclonal antibody and glutaraldehyde fixation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasprzyk, P.G.; Cuttitta, F.; Avis, I.; Nakanishi, Y.; Treston, A.; Wong, H.; Walsh, J.H.; Mulshine, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay utilizing iodinated peptide-specific monoclonal antibody as a detection system instead of labeled peptide has been developed. Regional specific monoclonal antibodies to either gastrin-releasing peptide or gastrin were used as models to validate the general application of our modified assay. Conditions for radioactive labeling of the monoclonal antibody were determined to minimize oxidant damage, which compromises the sensitivity of other reported peptide quantitation assays. Pretreatment of 96-well polyvinyl chloride test plates with a 5% glutaraldehyde solution resulted in consistent retention of sufficient target peptide on the solid-phase matrix to allow precise quantitation. This quantitative method is completed within 1 h of peptide solid phasing. Pretreatment of assay plates with glutaraldehyde increased binding of target peptide and maximized antibody binding by optimizing antigen presentation. The hypothesis that glutaraldehyde affects both peptide binding to the plate and orientation of the peptide was confirmed by analysis of several peptide analogs. These studies indicate that peptide binding was mediated through a free amino group leaving the carboxy-terminal portion of the target peptide accessible for antibody binding. It was observed that the length of the peptide also affects the amount of monoclonal antibody that will bind. Under the optimal conditions, results from quantitation of gastrin-releasing peptide in relevant samples agree well with those from previously reported techniques. Thus, we report here a modified microplate assay which may be generally applied for the rapid and sensitive quantitation of peptide hormones

  8. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies against human thyrotropin and use in an immunoradiometric assay and immunohistochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benkirane, M.; Bon, D.; Bellot, F.; Prince, P.; Delori, P.; Hassoun, J.; Carayon, P.

    1987-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were prepared against human thyrotropin. 13 different antibodies were characterized. Ten antibodies were of the IgG1 subclass. The affinities of the antibodies were in the range 10 9 -10 11 mol -1 .l. Four of them were specific for hTSH and did not react with hLH, hFSH, hCG or αhCG. Four reacted with these hormones and recognized the α subunit of hCG. One cross-reacted only with HFSH. The remaining four antibodies recognized the holo-hTSH only, and thus were designated as anti-conformational determinants. Monoclonal antibodies reacting with different antigenic determinants on the hTSH molecule defined seven clusters. Two of them were used to develop a simplified two-site sandwich radioimmunoassay in which one monoclonal antibody was immobilized on tubes (anti-βTSH) and another (anti-α) labelled with 125 I. This assay was highly specific and demonstrated a sensitivity level of 0.1 μIU/ml. Two monoclonal antibodies were used in immunohistochemistry and their quality and specificity was assessed in the detection of hTSH immunoreactivity in human pituitary biological sections. 20 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 tabs

  9. Relationship between hyperthyroidism and monoclonal gammapathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canas, Carlos Alberto

    2007-01-01

    A 66-year-old man with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and monoclonal gammapathy associated to it of uncertain significance (MGUS). A possible pathogenic relationship between HPTP and MGUS is analyzed. Interleukin 6 could play a pivotal role.

  10. Monoclonal antibody therapy of inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deventer, S. J.; Camoglio, L.

    1997-01-01

    Animal models of inflammatory bowel disease have provided insight in the regulation of mucosal inflammation. This has resulted in novel therapeutic approaches that specifically target a single inflammatory mediator. Monoclonal antibody therapy has been used in steroid refractory Crohn's disease

  11. Cuban Monoclonal Antibodies for Radioimmunodiagnosis and Radioimmunotherapy of Cancer Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casaco, A.

    2009-01-01

    tumours. Nevertheless, the lack of a direct evidence of this antigenic display in human cancers has kept the subject controversial. For the first time, we described herein the 'in vivo' detection of GM3(NeuGc) ganglioside in human breast primary tumours using a radioimmunoscintigraphic technique with 14F7, a highly specific anti-GM3(NeuGc) ganglioside monoclonal antibody, labelled with 99mTc. In an open, prospective Phase I/II clinical trial, including women diagnosed in stage II breast cancer, the 14F7 monoclonal antibody accumulation in tumours at doses of 0.3 (n=5), 1 (n=5) and 3 mg (n=4) was evaluated. Noteworthy, the immunoscintigraphic study showed antibody accumulation in 100% of patients' tumours for the 1 mg dose group. In turn, the radioimmunoconjugate injected at doses of 0.3 mg or 3 mg of the antibody, was uptaken by 60 and 33.3% of breast tumours, respectively. 'In vivo' immune recognition of GM3(NeuGc) in breast tumours reinforces the value of this peculiar target for cancer immunotherapy. In two phase II Clinical Trials including women with metastatic breast cancer (n=14) and patients with colon cancer (n=19) in all stages, the 14F7 monoclonal antibody (3 mg) labelled with 99mTc (30-40 mCi) was also able to detect distant metastasis over expressing the GM3(NeuGc) ganglioside. (author)

  12. In vivo activity of a mixture of two human monoclonal antibodies (anti-HBs) in a chronic hepatitis B virus carrier chimpanzee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Heijtink; W. Paulij; P.A.C. van Bergen (Patrick); M.H. van Roosmalen (Mark); D. Rohm; B. Eichentopf (Bertram); E. Muchmore; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A. de Man (Robert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractA 35-year-old female hepatitis B virus carrier chimpanzee was infused with one dose of a mixture of human monoclonal antibodies 9H9 and 4-7B (antibodies against hepatitis B virus surface antigen; HBsAg). Blood samples were taken before and up to 3 weeks

  13. First clinical use of ofatumumab, a novel fully human anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody in relapsed or refractory follicular lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagenbeek, Anton; Gadeberg, Ole Vestergaard; Johnson, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Ofatumumab is a unique monoclonal antibody that targets a distinct small loop epitope on the CD20 molecule. Preclinical data show that ofatumumab is active against B-cell lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells with low CD20-antigen density and high expression of complement inhibitory molecules...

  14. Identification of a novel 27-kDa protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture fluid by a monoclonal antibody specific for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rambukkana, A.; Das, P. K.; Kolk, A. H.; Burggraaf, J. D.; Kuijper, S.; Harboe, M.

    1993-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens inducing species-specific immune responses are likely to be particularly important for serodiagnosis or for skin testing of tuberculosis. In the present study, we describe the characterization of two novel monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) A3h4 (IgG2a) and B5g1 (IgM)

  15. Dog Erythrocyte Antigen 1 (DEA 1): Mode of Inheritance and Initial Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Klaudia; Acierno, Michelle; Raj, Karthik; Mizukami, Keijiro; Siegel, Don L.; Giger, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Background The Dog Erythrocyte Antigen (DEA) 1 blood group system remains poorly defined. Objectives The purpose of the study was to determine the DEA 1 mode of inheritance and to characterize the DEA 1 antigen and alloantibodies. Animals Canine research colony families, clinic canine patients, and DEA 1.2+ blood bank dogs were studied. Methods Canine blood was typed by flow cytometry and immunochromatographic strips using anti-DEA 1 monoclonal antibodies. Gel column experiments with polyclonal and immunoblotting with monoclonal anti-DEA 1 antibodies were performed to analyze select samples. Cross-reactivity of human typing reagents against canine RBCs and one monoclonal anti-DEA 1 antibody against human RBC panels was assessed. Results Typing of 12 families comprising 144 dogs indicated an autosomal dominant inheritance with ≥4 alleles: DEA 1− (0) and DEA 1+ weak (1+), intermediate (2+) and strong (3+ and 4+). Samples from 6 dogs previously typed as DEA 1.2+ were typed as DEA 1+ or DEA 1− using monoclonal antibodies. Human typing reagents produced varied reactions in tube agglutination experiments against DEA 1+ and DEA 1− RBCs. Polypeptide bands were not detected on immunoblots using a monoclonal anti-DEA 1 antibody, therefore the anti-DEA 1 antibody may be specific for conformational epitopes lost during denaturation. Conclusions The autosomal dominant inheritance of DEA 1 with ≥4 alleles indicates a complex blood group system; the antigenicity of each DEA 1+ type will need to be determined. The biochemical nature of the DEA 1 antigen(s) appears different from human blood group systems tested. PMID:26291052

  16. Toward low-cost affinity reagents: lyophilized yeast-scFv probes specific for pathogen antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean A Gray

    Full Text Available The generation of affinity reagents, usually monoclonal antibodies, remains a critical bottleneck in biomedical research and diagnostic test development. Recombinant antibody-like proteins such as scFv have yet to replace traditional monoclonal antibodies in antigen detection applications, in large part because of poor performance of scFv in solution. To address this limitation, we have developed assays that use whole yeast cells expressing scFv on their surfaces (yeast-scFv in place of soluble purified scFv or traditional monoclonal antibodies. In this study, a nonimmune library of human scFv displayed on the surfaces of yeast cells was screened for clones that bind to recombinant cyst proteins of Entamoeba histolytica, an enteric pathogen of humans. Selected yeast-scFv clones were stabilized by lyophilization and used in detection assay formats in which the yeast-scFv served as solid support-bound monoclonal antibodies. Specific binding of antigen to the yeast-scFv was detected by staining with rabbit polyclonal antibodies. In flow cytometry-based assays, lyophilized yeast-scFv reagents retained full binding activity and specificity for their cognate antigens after 4 weeks of storage at room temperature in the absence of desiccants or stabilizers. Because flow cytometry is not available to all potential assay users, an immunofluorescence assay was also developed that detects antigen with similar sensitivity and specificity. Antigen-specific whole-cell yeast-scFv reagents can be selected from nonimmune libraries in 2-3 weeks, produced in vast quantities, and packaged in lyophilized form for extended shelf life. Lyophilized yeast-scFv show promise as low cost, renewable alternatives to monoclonal antibodies for diagnosis and research.

  17. Mouse Xenograft Model for Mesothelioma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize a new mouse model for monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugates that target malignant mesotheliomas. Applications of the technology include models for screening compounds as potential therapeutics for mesothelioma and for studying the pathology of mesothelioma.

  18. Systemic radiotherapy with monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sautter-Bihl, M.L.; Matzku, S.; Bihl, H.

    1993-01-01

    In this experimental study, feasibility and efficiency of systematic radiotherapy with the I-131 labelled monoclonal antibody BW575/9 (radioimmunotherapy) are investigated using human SK-N-SH neuroblastoma transplated into nude mice. Series of six nude mice were treated with intravenous application of 400 μCi (group 1), 700 μCi (group 2) of the I-131 labelled and of the unlabelled MAb (group 3). An untreated group (group 4) served as control. Tumors of group (3) and (4) showed an identical growth. In group (1), tumor growth was arrested for seven days. In group (2), the tumor showed complete regression after eight days which lasted for 55 days. Thereafter, the tumor started to regrow. This growth characteristics are correlated with the doses achieved in the tumor using a medical radiation dose (MIRD) formulation. The biodistribution data necessary for MIRD calculation were obtained by previously performed experiments with the I-125 labelled MAb. The doses assessed in the tumor turned out to be five to ten times greater than those in normal tissues (liver, bone, etc.) These results confirm feasibility, selectivity and efficiency of radioimmunotherapy in the above described model. Moreover, this in vivo model seems suitable for further investigations concerning fundamental issues of radioimunotherapy. (orig.) [de

  19. Lymphocyte antibody-dependent cytotoxicity test for evaluation of clinical role of monoclonal anti-D-antibodies for prevention of rhesus sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olovnikova, N I; Belkina, E V; Nikolaeva, T L; Miterev, G Yu; Chertkov, I L

    2006-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to D antigen were studied in the reaction of antibody-dependent cytotoxicity for evaluation of the possibility of using these antibodies for preventing rhesus sensitization. High hemolytic activity of four anti-D-monoclonal antibodies in the antibody-dependent cytotoxicity test, mediated by their interaction with FcgammaRI, and the capacity to accelerate elimination of D+ erythrocytes from circulation did not provide the immunosuppressive effect. It was hypothesized that monoclonal antibodies for prevention of rhesus sensitization should interact with FcgammaRIII on lymphocytes. These monoclonal antibodies are extremely rare: only 4 of 125 studied antibodies mediated hemolysis in the antibody-dependent cytotoxicity test with lymphocytes, while all polyclonal anti-D-preparations exhibited this activity.

  20. Mutational analysis of polyomavirus small-T-antigen functions in productive infection and in transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, I; Nilsson, S A; Linder, S; Magnusson, G

    1989-05-01

    The function of polyomavirus small T antigen in productive infection and in transformation was studied. Transfection of permissive mouse cells with mixtures of mutants that express only one type of T antigen showed that small T antigen increased large-T-antigen-dependent viral DNA synthesis approximately 10-fold. Under the same conditions, small T antigen was also essential for the formation of infectious virus particles. To analyze these activities of small T antigen, mutants producing protein with single amino acid replacements were constructed. Two mutants, bc1073 and bc1075, were characterized. Although both mutations led to the substitution of amino acid residues of more than one T antigen, the phenotype of both mutants was associated with alterations of the small T antigen. Both mutant proteins had lost their activity in the maturation of infectious virus particles. The bc1075 but not the bc1073 small T antigen had also lost its ability to stimulate viral DNA synthesis in mouse 3T6 cells. Finally, both mutants retained a third activity of small T antigen: to confer on rat cells also expressing middle T antigen the ability to grow efficiently in semisolid medium. The phenotypes of the mutants in these three assays suggest that small T antigen has at least three separate functions.

  1. Combining Phage and Yeast Cell Surface Antibody Display to Identify Novel Cell Type-Selective Internalizing Human Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Su, Yang; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Using phage antibody display, large libraries can be generated and screened to identify monoclonal antibodies with affinity for target antigens. However, while library size and diversity is an advantage of the phage display method, there is limited ability to quantitatively enrich for specific binding properties such as affinity. One way of overcoming this limitation is to combine the scale of phage display selections with the flexibility and quantitativeness of FACS-based yeast surface display selections. In this chapter we describe protocols for generating yeast surface antibody display libraries using phage antibody display selection outputs as starting material and FACS-based enrichment of target antigen-binding clones from these libraries. These methods should be widely applicable for the identification of monoclonal antibodies with specific binding properties.

  2. Detection of human cancer in an animal model using radio-labelled tumour-associated monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epenetos, A.A.; Arklie, J.; Knowles, R.W.; Bodmer, W.F.

    1982-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to epithelial-cell antigenic determinants, labelled with 123 I and 125 I, were administered parenterally to immunodeficient mice bearing human tumours derived from a human cancer cell line. Anterior, posterior and lateral radioscans of the body were taken with a gamma scintillation camera at various times from immediately to 65 days after injection. Visual displays of the images were processed by standard computer techniques. The model used a human colon-cancer cell line, HT29, and the monoclonal antibody, AUAl, which is specific to an epithelial proliferating antigen. Tumour detection was achieved in all the mice. The smallest tumour detectable appeared to be about 1 mm in diameter. The degree of antibody uptake in a tumour depended on its size and the blood supply of its surrounding tissues. (author)

  3. A sensitive radioimmunoassay for the detection of monoclonal anti-idiotype antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morahan, G.

    1983-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay was developed in order to detect anti-idiotypic antibodies in the supernatants of hybrid cells. This assay is both sensitive and specific for anti-idiotypic (but not anti-allotypic) antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies present in test supernatants are bound by an anti-immunoglobulin coated solid phase. Subsequent incubation with a source of mouse immunoglobulin 'blocks' unreacted anti-immunoglobulin antibodies on the solid phase. Anti-idiotypic antibodies are then detected by their ability to bind 125 I-labelled idiotype-bearing antibody. This paper describes the use of this assay to detect monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies in 2 systems; the cross-reactive idiotype of A/J anti-ABA antibodies, and the idiotype expressed by the myeloma protein HOPC 8. Similarly, 125 I-labelled anti-idiotype antibodies may be used in this assay to detect monoclonal idiotype-bearing antibodies. Further modifications are described which would allow the detection of monoclonal anti-allotype antibodies. (Auth.)

  4. A high affinity monoclonal antibody recognizing the light chain of human coagulating factor VII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarial, Sheila; Asadi, Farzad; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Hadavi, Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Taghizadeh-Jahed, Masoud; Shokri, Fazel; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2012-12-01

    Factor VII (FVII) is a serine protease-coagulating element responsible for the initiation of an extrinsic pathway of clot formation. Here we generated and characterized a high affinity monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes human FVII. Recombinant human FVII (rh-FVII) was used for the production of a monoclonal antibody using BALB/c mice. The specificity of the antibody was determined by Western blot using plasma samples from human, mouse, sheep, goat, bovine, rabbit, and rat. Furthermore, the antibody was used to detect transiently expressed rh-FVII in BHK21 cell line using Western blot and sandwich ELISA. A mouse IgG1 (kappa chain) monoclonal antibody clone 1F1-B11 was produced against rh-FVII. The affinity constant (K(aff)) of the antibody was calculated to be 6.4×10(10) M(-1). The antibody could specifically recognize an epitope on the light chain of hFVII, with no reactivity with factor VII from several other animals. In addition, transiently expressed rh-FVII in BHK21 cells was recognized by 1F1-B11. The high affinity as well as the specificity of 1F1-B11 for hFVII will facilitate the affinity purification of hFVII and also production of FVII deficient plasma and minimizes the risk of bovine FVII contamination when fetal bovine serum-supplemented media are used for production and subsequent purification of rh-FVII.

  5. Development of new versions of anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies with potentially reduced immunogenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Weizhu; Wang Ling; Li Bohua; Wang Hao; Hou Sheng; Hong Xueyu; Zhang Dapeng; Guo Yajun

    2008-01-01

    Despite the widespread clinical use of CD34 antibodies for the purification of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, all the current anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are murine, which have the potential to elicit human antimouse antibody (HAMA) immune response. In the present study, we developed three new mouse anti-human CD34 mAbs which, respectively, belonged to class I, class II and class III CD34 epitope antibodies. In an attempt to reduce the immunogenicity of these three murine mAbs, their chimeric antibodies, which consisted of mouse antibody variable regions fused genetically to human antibody constant regions, were constructed and characterized. The anti-CD34 chimeric antibodies were shown to possess affinity and specificity similar to that of their respective parental murine antibodies. Due to the potentially better safety profiles, these chimeric antibodies might become alternatives to mouse anti-CD34 antibodies routinely used for clinical application

  6. Localization studies of metastatic axillary lymph node by radioimmunoimmaging with monoclonal antibody C50 in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Jue; Gao Yougong

    1993-01-01

    Eleven patients with breast cancer and 2 normal controls (26 axillary lymph-nodes) were studied by the radio immunoimaging with 131 I labelled anti-CEA monoclonal antibody C 50 . Among them, the imaging was positive in 8 patients and negative in 3 patients. 7 of the 8 positive patients were proven by the pathological examination of postoperative lymph nodes. Other one had proved with the presence of CEA-antigen and antigen-antibody immuno complexes in the lymphoid sinus by immuno histochemistry. Cancer cell was not found by pathology in the axillary lymph node of 3 negative imaging patients. 2 normal controls was also negative

  7. [Identification and production of monoclonal antibody of Siberian tiger's immunoglobulin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaonglong; Zhang, Duanling; Zhou, Ming; Xue, Yuan; Hua, Yuping; Ma, Jianzhang

    2010-03-01

    To purify immunoglobulin (Ig) of Siberian Tiger and prepare monoclonal antibody (mAb) against the Ig,which can be used to develop immunological diagnostic kits for diagnosing infectious disease in Siberian Tiger. The Ig of Siberian tigers was purified with saturated ammonium sulfate combined with recombinant Protein G. The C57BL/6 mice were immunized with the purified Ig. Spleno-cytes of the mice immunized were collected and fused with the mouse myeloma cell line (Sp2/0-Ag14). The positive hybridoma clones were selected by ELISA and were identified by western blot. The sandwich ELISA was used to detect immunocompetence of the purified Ig and the mAb. We obtained three mouse hybridoma clones that produced mAbs against Ig of Siberian Tiger. The derived McAbs could recognize Ig heavy chain of Siberian Tiger specifically. The biological activity of the Ig and obtained McAbs also could be identified by detecting the antibody induced by panleukopenia virus (FPV-HLJ) vaccine in Siberian Tiger. The antibody also would be useful for assess the vaccine efficacy against the infectious disease on the Siberian Tiger. Protein G can be used in Ig purification of Siberian Tiger. The obtained McAbs from the hybridoma ADT11 in this study owned strong ability to bind Ig of Siberian Tiger and have a stable immunocompetence. They can be used to develop diagnostic methods for detecting infectious disease in Siberian Tiger and vaccine research.

  8. Kinetic analysis of a monoclonal therapeutic antibody and its single-chain homolog by surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rekha; Andrien, Bruce A

    2010-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and antibody fragments have become an emerging class of therapeutics since 1986. Their versatility enables them to be engineered for optimal efficiency and decreased immunogenicity, and the path to market has been set by recent regulatory approvals. One of the initial criteria for success of any protein or antibody therapeutic is to understand its binding characteristics to the target antigen. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has been widely used and is an important tool for ligand-antigen binding characterization. In this work, the binding kinetics of a recombinant mAb and its single-chain antibody homolog, single-chain variable fragment (scFv), was analyzed by SPR. These two proteins target the same antigen. The binding kinetics of the mAb (bivalent antibody) and scFv (monovalent scFv) for this antigen was analyzed along with an assessment of the thermodynamics of the binding interactions. Alternative binding configurations were investigated to evaluate potential experimental bias because theoretically experimental binding configuration should have no impact on binding kinetics. Self-association binding kinetics in the proteins' respective formulation solutions and antigen epitope mapping were also evaluated. Functional characterization of monoclonal and single-chain antibodies has become just as important as structural characterization in the biotechnology field.

  9. Investigation of the mechanism of action of alemtuzumab in a human CD52 transgenic mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yanping; Turner, Michael J; Shields, Jacqueline; Gale, Matthew S; Hutto, Elizabeth; Roberts, Bruce L; Siders, William M; Kaplan, Johanne M

    2009-01-01

    Alemtuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody against CD52, an antigen found on the surface of normal and malignant lymphocytes. It is approved for the treatment of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and is undergoing Phase III clinical trials for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. The exact mechanism by which alemtuzumab mediates its biological effects in vivo is not clearly defined and mechanism of action studies have been hampered by the lack of cross-reactivity between human and mouse CD52. To address this issue, a transgenic mouse expressing human CD52 (hCD52) was created. Transgenic mice did not display any phenotypic abnormalities and were able to mount normal immune responses. The tissue distribution of hCD52 and the level of expression by various immune cell populations were comparable to those seen in humans. Treatment with alemtuzumab replicated the transient increase in serum cytokines and depletion of peripheral blood lymphocytes observed in humans. Lymphocyte depletion was not as profound in lymphoid organs, providing a possible explanation for the relatively low incidence of infection in alemtuzumab-treated patients. Interestingly, both lymphocyte depletion and cytokine induction by alemtuzumab were largely independent of complement and appeared to be mediated by neutrophils and natural killer cells because removal of these populations with antibodies to Gr-1 or asialo-GM-1, respectively, strongly inhibited the activity of alemtuzumab whereas removal of complement by treatment with cobra venom factor had no impact. The hCD52 transgenic mouse appears to be a useful model and has provided evidence for the previously uncharacterized involvement of neutrophils in the activity of alemtuzumab. PMID:19740383

  10. Detection of proliferating cell nuclear antigens and interleukin-2 beta receptor molecules on mitogen- and antigen-stimulated lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesketh, J; Dobbelaere, D; Griffin, J F; Buchan, G

    1993-01-01

    The expression of interleukin-2 receptors (IL-2R) and proliferating cell nuclear antigens (PCNA) were compared for their usefulness as markers of lymphocyte activation. Heterologous polyclonal (anti-bovine IL-2R) and monoclonal (anti-human PCNA) antibodies were used to detect the expression of these molecules on activated deer lymphocytes. Both molecules were co-expressed on blast cells which had been activated with mitogen [concanavalin A (Con A)]. There was detectable up-regulation of IL-2R expression in response to antigen [Mycobacterium bovis-derived purified protein derivative (PPD)] stimulation while PCNA expression mimicked lymphocyte transformation (LT) reactivity. PCNA expression was found to more accurately reflect both antigen- and mitogen-activated lymphocyte activation, as estimated by LT activity. The expression of PCNA was used to identify antigen reactive cells from animals exposed to M. bovis. A very low percentage (1.1 +/- 0.4%) of peripheral blood lymphocytes from non-infected animals could be stimulated to express PCNA by in vitro culture with antigen (PPD). Within the infected group both diseased and healthy, 'in-contact', animals expressed significantly higher levels of PCNA upon antigen stimulation. PMID:8104884

  11. Enhanced expression in vivo of HLA-ABC antigens and beta 2-microglobulin on human lymphoid cells induced by human interferon-alpha in patients with lung cancer. Enhanced expression of class I major histocompatibility antigens prior to treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Holst; Plesner, T; Larsen, J K

    1985-01-01

    than 0.5, respectively) by day-to-day analysis of an untreated healthy control group. An increased expression of both HLA-ABC (mean 55%, P less than 0.0005) and beta 2m (mean 23%, P less than 0.01) was also observed prior to treatment in the lung cancer patients when compared to a group of age matched......The effect of cloned human interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) on the expression of HLA-ABC antigens (HLA-ABC) and beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) on human peripheral lymphoid cells in vivo was studied by cytofluorometry using monoclonal antibodies and fluorescein-labelled rabbit anti-mouse immunoglobulin....... A significant increase in the mean fluorescence intensity of HLA-ABC (median 59%, P less than 0.001) and beta 2m (median 57%, P less than 0.001) on small lymphoid cells was observed 24 h after initiation of IFN-alpha treatment (50 X 10(6) units IFN-alpha/m2 three times a week). The enhanced expression...

  12. Investigation of the antigenic evolution of field isolates using the reverse genetics system of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durairaj, Vijay; Sellers, Holly S; Linnemann, Erich G; Icard, Alan H; Mundt, Egbert

    2011-10-01

    The antigenic profiles of over 300 infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) isolates were analyzed using a panel of monoclonal antibodies in a reverse genetics system. In addition, the sequences of a large portion of the neutralizing-antibody-inducing VP2 of IBDV were determined. Phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide and amino acid sequences in combination with the antigenic profiles obtained using the monoclonal antibody panel, revealed a lack of correlation between antigenicity and isolate's placement within the phylogenetic tree. In-depth analysis of amino acid exchanges revealed that changes within a certain region of the VP2 molecule resulted in differences in the antigenicity of the virus. This comprehensive analysis of VP2 sequences indicated a high selective pressure in the field that was likely due to vaccination programs, which increase the rate of evolution of the virus.

  13. Selection of matched pair of monoclonal antibodies for development of immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) : our experience with IRMA of TSH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadwad, V.B.; Jyotsna, N.; Sivaprasad, N.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: In immunoradiometricassay (IRMA) two antibodies raised against two different epitopes of the same antigen are used, one bound to a solid phase (capture antibody) and the other labelled with 125 I (detector antibody). The development of any IRMA thus involves proper selection of the capture and detector antibody, preparation of solid phase, labelling of the antibody and assay optimization. Extensive studies have been carried out on these aspects in our laboratory with greater emphasis on the behavior of different pairs of antibodies as sandwich partners : monoclonal-monoclonal and monoclonal-polyclonal antibodies. The parameters studied include the ease of radio-iodination of different monoclonal antibodies, the effect of interchange of capture and detector antibody etc. Keeping TSH antibody as a model, two different monoclonal antibodies, a polyclonal antibody and a tracer from a commercial TSH IRMA kit were used in this study. Based on our studies an assay procedure for in-house IRMA of TSH has been developed with a sensitivity of 0.1 μIU/ml and validated

  14. Directed Selection of Recombinant Human Monoclonal Antibodies to Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoproteins from Phage Display Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Pietro Paolo; Williamson, R. Anthony; de Logu, Alessandro; Bloom, Floyd E.; Burton, Dennis R.

    1995-07-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies have considerable potential in the prophylaxis and treatment of viral disease. However, only a few such antibodies suitable for clinical use have been produced to date. We have previously shown that large panels of human recombinant monoclonal antibodies against a plethora of infectious agents, including herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, can be established from phage display libraries. Here we demonstrate that facile cloning of recombinant Fab fragments against specific viral proteins in their native conformation can be accomplished by panning phage display libraries against viral glycoproteins "captured" from infected cell extracts by specific monoclonal antibodies immobilized on ELISA plates. We have tested this strategy by isolating six neutralizing recombinant antibodies specific for herpes simplex glycoprotein gD or gB, some of which are against conformationally sensitive epitopes. By using defined monoclonal antibodies for the antigen-capture step, this method can be used for the isolation of antibodies to specific regions and epitopes within the target viral protein. For instance, monoclonal antibodies to a nonneutralizing epitope can be used in the capture step to clone antibodies to neutralizing epitopes, or antibodies to a neutralizing epitope can be used to clone antibodies to a different neutralizing epitope. Furthermore, by using capturing antibodies to more immunodominant epitopes, one can direct the cloning to less immunogenic ones. This method should be of value in generating antibodies to be used both in the prophylaxis and treatment of viral infections and in the characterization of the mechanisms of antibody protective actions at the molecular level.

  15. Detection of experimental myocarditis by monoclonal antimyosin antibody, Fab fragment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezkalla, S.; Kloner, R.A.; Khaw, B.A.; Haber, E.; Fallon, J.T.; Smith, F.E.; Khatib, R.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether monoclonal antimyosin Fab (antigen binding fragment) was capable of labeling hearts with experimental coxsackievirus myocarditis, and to determine whether Fab could be used for detecting myocardial damage in either early or chronic phases of the disease. Sixty-five, 3-week-old cesarean-derived 1 (CD 1) mice were divided into two groups: group I (noninfected animals) and group II (infected with coxsackievirus B3). Mice from each group were killed on days 7, 17, 30, or 90 of infection. Forty-eight hours before killing, mice were injected with monoclonal I-125 antimyosin, Fab (25 microCi/injection) and radioactivity was counted in the heart. Selected heart sections were also examined by autoradiography. Heart radioactivity, count/m/mg (m +/- SEM) on days 7, 17, 30, and 90 of infection was 10.8 +/- 1.7, 21.3 +/- 1.1, 11.2 +/- 3.4, and 12.4 +/- 1.5 for group I, versus 36.7 +/- 8.0 (p less than 0.01), 50.0 +/- 4.5 (p less than 0.001), 33.4 +/- 16.1 (p = NS), and 40.6 +/- 8.5 (p less than 0.01) for group II, respectively. Autoradiography revealed focal uptake within areas of necrotic myocardium. We conclude that I125 Fab may be useful in detecting myocardial damage in the experimental model of murine myocarditis up to day 90 of infection.

  16. Detection of experimental myocarditis by monoclonal antimyosin antibody, Fab fragment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezkalla, S.; Kloner, R.A.; Khaw, B.A.; Haber, E.; Fallon, J.T.; Smith, F.E.; Khatib, R.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether monoclonal antimyosin Fab (antigen binding fragment) was capable of labeling hearts with experimental coxsackievirus myocarditis, and to determine whether Fab could be used for detecting myocardial damage in either early or chronic phases of the disease. Sixty-five, 3-week-old cesarean-derived 1 (CD 1) mice were divided into two groups: group I (noninfected animals) and group II (infected with coxsackievirus B3). Mice from each group were killed on days 7, 17, 30, or 90 of infection. Forty-eight hours before killing, mice were injected with monoclonal I-125 antimyosin, Fab (25 microCi/injection) and radioactivity was counted in the heart. Selected heart sections were also examined by autoradiography. Heart radioactivity, count/m/mg (m +/- SEM) on days 7, 17, 30, and 90 of infection was 10.8 +/- 1.7, 21.3 +/- 1.1, 11.2 +/- 3.4, and 12.4 +/- 1.5 for group I, versus 36.7 +/- 8.0 (p less than 0.01), 50.0 +/- 4.5 (p less than 0.001), 33.4 +/- 16.1 (p = NS), and 40.6 +/- 8.5 (p less than 0.01) for group II, respectively. Autoradiography revealed focal uptake within areas of necrotic myocardium. We conclude that I125 Fab may be useful in detecting myocardial damage in the experimental model of murine myocarditis up to day 90 of infection

  17. Localization of ras antigenicity in rat hepatocyte plasma membrane and rough endoplasmic reticulum fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, J.M.; Lanoix, J.; Paiement, J.

    1991-01-01

    We have examined the