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Sample records for antigen molecule induced

  1. Interferon-gamma-like molecule induces Ia antigens on cultured mast cell progenitors.

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, G H; Clark-lewis, I.; McKimm-Breschkin, J L; Schrader, J W

    1982-01-01

    Persisting (P) cells (murine cells that resemble mast cells and grow continuously in vitro for prolonged periods in the presence of a specific growth factor) did not express detectable levels of Ia antigens (murine class II major histocompatibility antigens) when their growth was supported by partially purified P cell-stimulating factor. However, when these Ia-negative P cells were transferred to medium conditioned by concanavalin A-stimulated spleen cells, Ia antigens appeared within 24 hr. ...

  2. Sjogren's Syndrome Antigen B Acts as an Endogenous Danger Molecule to Induce Interleukin-8 Gene Expression in Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Han Wu

    Full Text Available Sjögren's syndrome antigen B is expressed in the nucleus and surface membrane of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils and is released after cell death. However, its biological role is not clear. This study is aimed to investigate the effect of Sjögren's syndrome antigen B on human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.Human recombinant Sjögren's syndrome antigen B (rSSB purified from E. coli was incubated with human polymorphonuclear neutrophils as well as retinoid acid-induced granulocytic differentiated HL-60 cells, HL-60 (RA. Interleukin (IL-8 protein production and mRNA expressions were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and quantitative-polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Uptake of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-rSSB was assessed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Moreover, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways and nuclear factor-kappaB activation were investigated.Human rSSB stimulated IL-8 production from normal human neutrophils and HL-60 (RA cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. This IL-8-stimulated activity was blocked by chloroquine and NH4Cl, indicating that endosomal acidification is important for this effect. We found rSSB activated both MAPK pathway and nuclear factor-kappaB signaling to transcribe the IL-8 gene expression of cells. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor-α exerted an additive effect and rSSB-anti-SSB immune complex exhibited a synergistic effect on rSSB-induced IL-8 production.Sjögren's syndrome antigen B might act as an endogenous danger molecule to enhance IL-8 gene expression in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

  3. Human sunlight-induced basal-cell-carcinoma-associated dendritic cells are deficient in T cell co-stimulatory molecules and are impaired as antigen-presenting cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Nestle, F.O.; Burg, G.; Fäh, J; Wrone-Smith, T; Nickoloff, B. J.

    1997-01-01

    Immune surveillance of skin cancer involves the stimulation of effector T cells by tumor-derived antigens and antigen-presenting cells (APCs). An effective APC must not only display processed antigen in the context of MHC molecules but also express co-stimulatory molecules that are required to fully activate T cells. One of the most common cutaneous neoplasms is basal cell carcinoma. To investigate expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2) on tumor-associated dend...

  4. Purine twisted-intercalating nucleic acids: a new class of anti-gene molecules resistant to potassium-induced aggregation

    OpenAIRE

    Paramasivam, Manikandan; Cogoi, Susanna; Filichev, Vyacheslav V.; Bomholt, Niels; Pedersen, Erik B; Xodo, Luigi E.

    2008-01-01

    Sequence-specific targeting of genomic DNA by triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) is a promising strategy to modulate in vivo gene expression. Triplex formation involving G-rich oligonucleotides as third strand is, however, strongly inhibited by potassium-induced TFO self-association into G-quartet structures. We report here that G-rich TFOs with bulge insertions of (R)-1-O-[4-(1-pyrenylethynyl)-phenylmethyl] glycerol (called twisted intercalating nucleic acids, TINA) show a much lower te...

  5. Purine twisted-intercalating nucleic acids: a new class of anti-gene molecules resistant to potassium-induced aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramasivam, Manikandan; Cogoi, Susanna; Filichev, Vyacheslav V; Bomholt, Niels; Pedersen, Erik B; Xodo, Luigi E

    2008-06-01

    Sequence-specific targeting of genomic DNA by triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) is a promising strategy to modulate in vivo gene expression. Triplex formation involving G-rich oligonucleotides as third strand is, however, strongly inhibited by potassium-induced TFO self-association into G-quartet structures. We report here that G-rich TFOs with bulge insertions of (R)-1-O-[4-(1-pyrenylethynyl)-phenylmethyl] glycerol (called twisted intercalating nucleic acids, TINA) show a much lower tendency to aggregate in potassium than wild-type analogues do. We designed purine-motif TINA-TFOs for binding to a regulatory polypurine-polypyrimidine (pur/pyr) motif present in the promoter of the KRAS proto-oncogene. The binding of TINA-TFOs to the KRAS target has been analysed by electrophoresis mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting experiments. We discovered that in the presence of potassium the wild-type TFOs did not bind to the KRAS target, differently from the TINA analogues, whose binding was observed up to 140 mM KCl. The designed TINA-TFOs were found to abrogate the formation of a DNA-protein complex at the pur/pyr site and to down-regulate the transcription of CAT driven by the murine KRAS promoter. Molecular modelling of the DNA/TINA-TFO triplexes are also reported. This study provides a new and promising approach to create TFOs to target in vivo the genome. PMID:18456705

  6. Human sunlight-induced basal-cell-carcinoma-associated dendritic cells are deficient in T cell co-stimulatory molecules and are impaired as antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestle, F O; Burg, G; Fäh, J; Wrone-Smith, T; Nickoloff, B J

    1997-02-01

    Immune surveillance of skin cancer involves the stimulation of effector T cells by tumor-derived antigens and antigen-presenting cells (APCs). An effective APC must not only display processed antigen in the context of MHC molecules but also express co-stimulatory molecules that are required to fully activate T cells. One of the most common cutaneous neoplasms is basal cell carcinoma. To investigate expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2) on tumor-associated dendritic cells (TADCs), cryosections from basal cell carcinomas were immunostained. In basal cell carcinomas, only 1 to 2% of intratumor and 5 to 10% of peritumor APCs expressed CD80 or CD86. In contrast, biopsies of immunological/inflammatory dermatoses revealed that 38 to 73% of APCs expressed CD80 and CD86. To further evaluate their phenotype and function, TADCs were isolated from tissue samples of basal cell carcinomas; they were non-adherent to plastic, displayed a typical dendritic morphology, and expressed high levels of major histocompatibility class II molecules on their surface. When TADCs were compared with dendritic cells from blood for presentation of superantigens (staphylococcal enterotoxins A and B) to resting autologous T cells, TADCs were consistently weaker stimulators of T cell proliferation than blood dendritic cells. When analyzed by flow cytometry, TADCs expressed high levels of HLA-DR, but only 5 to 10% co-expressed CD80 or CD86. A 3-day culture in granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor-containing medium partially reconstituted the TADC expression of CD80 and CD86 as well as their immunostimulatory capacity. Thus, in this common skin cancer, although there are prominent collections of HLA-DR-positive APCs in and around tumor cells, the TADCs are deficient in important co-stimulatory molecules as well as being weak stimulators of T cell proliferation. The paucity of co-stimulatory molecule expression and functional activity of TADCs may explain why

  7. Photoaffinity labeling demonstrates binding between Ia molecules and nominal antigen on antigen-presenting cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, M L; Yip, C C; Shevach, E M; Delovitch, T L

    1986-01-01

    We have used radioiodinated photoreactive bovine insulin as antigen to examine the molecular nature of immunogenic complexes that form on antigen-presenting cells. The probe was allowed to bind to either insulin-presenting B-hybridoma cells, lipopolysaccharide-stimulated blasts, or bovine insulin-specific helper-T-hybridoma cells in the dark. Samples were then exposed to light to induce crosslinkage, solubilized, and analyzed by gel electrophoresis. Two protein bands at about 36 kDa and 27 kD...

  8. Human epidermal Langerhans cells cointernalize by receptor-mediated endocytosis "nonclassical" major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (T6 antigens) and class II molecules (HLA-DR antigens).

    OpenAIRE

    Hanau, D.; Fabre, M.; Schmitt, D A; Garaud, J C; Pauly, G; Tongio, M M; Mayer, S.; Cazenave, J. P.

    1987-01-01

    HLA-DR and T6 surface antigens are expressed only by Langerhans cells and indeterminate cells in normal human epidermis. We have previously demonstrated that T6 antigens are internalized in Langerhans cells and indeterminate cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. This process is induced by the binding of BL6, a monoclonal antibody directed against T6 antigens. In the present study, using a monoclonal antibody directed against HLA-DR antigens, on human epidermal cells in suspension, we show t...

  9. The radiocontrast molecule in anaphylaxis: a surprising antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasser, Elliott C

    2004-01-01

    X-ray contrast media are individually injected into human blood vessels in greater quantities than any other pharmacological substance. Adverse reactions to these substances have heretofore been considered anaphylactoid in nature. Others and we have demonstrated that the mechanisms involved are multifactorial and may involve activation of mast cells and basophils, activation of the complement system, activation of the contact system, and the conversion of L-arginine into nitric oxide. Appropriate pretreatment with corticosteriods will diminish the incidence of reactions. Most recently we have demonstrated that the contrast media function as 'pseudoantigens' (PsA). They can combine with antibodies, but cannot themselves produce antibodies. This property appears to be dependent on aggregation in high concentrations and varies with the individual media. It furthermore appears to be non-specific in relation to antibodies, and suggests that binding occurs to the Fc portion of immunoglobulins. We have now demonstrated that the least toxic of current media demonstrate the best antibody binding and in sufficient concentration can inhibit contrast induced mast cell activation and/or non-contrast antigen induced mast cell activation, apparently due to in vivo pseudoantigen excess. In lesser concentrations and/or lesser binding, the media can trigger mast cell activation. PMID:15025400

  10. No Major Role for Insulin-Degrading Enzyme in Antigen Presentation by MHC Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Culina, Slobodan; Mauvais, François-Xavier; Hsu, Hsiang-Ting; Burgevin, Anne; Guénette, Suzanne; Moser, Anna; van Endert, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Antigen presentation by MHC class I molecules requires degradation of epitope source proteins in the cytosol. Although the preeminent role of the proteasome is clearly established, evidence suggesting a significant role for proteasome-independent generation of class I ligands has been reported repeatedly. However, an enzyme responsible for such a role has not been identified. Recently insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) was shown to produce an antigenic peptide derived from the tumor antigen MAGE-...

  11. Antigen-induced and non-antigen-induced histamine release from rat mast cells sensitized with mouse antiserum.

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    Kurose,Masao

    1981-10-01

    Full Text Available Marked IgE-mediated histamine release from rat mast cells sensitized in vitro with mouse antiserum occurs in the presence of added Ca++ and phosphatidylserine (PS, although a considerable degree of antigen-induced histamine release which may utilize intracellular or cell-bound calcium is also observed. The decay in the responsiveness to Ca++ of the sensitized cells stimulated by antigen in Ca++-free medium in the presence of PS is relatively slow, and maximum release is produced by Ca++ added 1 min after antigen. Histamine release also occurs when Ca++ is added after PS in the absence of antigen to the sensitized cells suspended in Ca++-free medium. Unlike the antigen-induced release, the intensity of this non-antigen-induced release varies depending on both mast-cell and antiserum pools. A heat-labile factor(s, which is different from antigen-specific IgE antibody and is also contained in normal mouse serum, is involved in this reaction. In the antigen-nondependent (PS + Ca++-induced release, no decay in the responsiveness to Ca++ is observed after PS addition. Both the antigen-induced and non-antigen-induced release are completed fairly rapidly and are dependent of temperature, pH and energy.

  12. Cell adhesion molecules involved in the leukocyte recruitment induced by venom of the snake Bothrops jararaca

    OpenAIRE

    Catarina F. P. Teixeira; Stella R. Zamuner

    2002-01-01

    It has been shown that Bothrops jararaca venom (BjV) induces a significant leukocyte accumulation, mainly neutrophils, at the local of tissue damage. Therefore, the role of the adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), LECAM-1, CD18, leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) on the BjV-induced neutrophil accumulation and the correlation with release of LTB4, TXA2, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (I...

  13. Targeting tumor antigens to secreted membrane vesicles in vivo induces efficient antitumor immune responses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeelenberg, I.S.; Ostrowski, M.; Krumeich, S.; Bobrie, A.; Jancic, C.; Boissonnas, A.; Delcayre, A.; Pecq, JB Le; Combadiere, B.; Amigorena, S.; Thery, C.

    2008-01-01

    Expression of non-self antigens by tumors can induce activation of T cells in vivo, although this activation can lead to either immunity or tolerance. CD8+ T-cell activation can be direct (if the tumor expresses MHC class I molecules) or indirect (after the capture and cross-presentation of tumor an

  14. Single-molecule detection of proteins with antigen-antibody interaction using resistive-pulse sensing of submicron latex particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, T.; Yanagi, I.; Goto, Y.; Ishige, Y.; Kohara, Y.

    2016-03-01

    We developed a resistive-pulse sensor with a solid-state pore and measured the latex agglutination of submicron particles induced by antigen-antibody interaction for single-molecule detection of proteins. We fabricated the pore based on numerical simulation to clearly distinguish between monomer and dimer latex particles. By measuring single dimers agglutinated in the single-molecule regime, we detected single human alpha-fetoprotein molecules. Adjusting the initial particle concentration improves the limit of detection (LOD) to 95 fmol/l. We established a theoretical model of the LOD by combining the reaction kinetics and the counting statistics to explain the effect of initial particle concentration on the LOD. The theoretical model shows how to improve the LOD quantitatively. The single-molecule detection studied here indicates the feasibility of implementing a highly sensitive immunoassay by a simple measurement method using resistive-pulse sensing.

  15. Design and cancer-targeting potential of antibody-based molecules directed against carcinoembryonic antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Huhalov, A.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis examines the use of protein engineering to create antibody-based molecules for cancer treatment. The targeting unit used for these molecules was the single chain Fv antibody fragment MFE-23, which is directed against the tumour-associated marker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). It was hypothesised that implementation of molecular design features such as humanisation, high affinity, multivalency and mannose glycosylation to accelerate systemic clearance would result in the favourabl...

  16. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein regulates endogenous and exogenous antigen presentation by group 1 CD1 molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Kaser, Arthur; Hava, David L.; Dougan, Stephanie K.; Chen, Zhangguo; Zeissig, Sebastian; Brenner, Michael B.; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2008-01-01

    Lipid antigens are presented to T cells by the non-polymorphic MHC class I-related CD1 molecules. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident chaperone that has been shown to lipidate the group 2 CD1 molecule CD1d and thus to regulate its function. We now report that MTP also regulates the function of group 1 CD1 molecules CD1a, CD1b, and CD1c. Pharmacological inhibition of MTP in monocyte-derived dendritic cells and lymphoblastoid B cell lines tra...

  17. Facts on the fragmentation of antigens in presenting cells, on the association of antigen fragments with MHC molecules in cell-free systems, and speculation on the cell biology of antigen processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werdelin, O; Mouritsen, S; Petersen, B L;

    1988-01-01

    The processing of a protein antigen is a multi-step event taking place in antigen-presenting cells. Processing is a prerequisite for the recognition of most antigens by T lymphocytes. The antigen is ingested by endocytosis, transported to an acid cellular compartment and subjected to proteolytic...... fragmentation. Some of the antigen fragments bind to MHC class II molecules and are transported to the surface of the antigen-presenting cell where the actual presentation to T lymphocytes occurs. The nature of the processed antigen, how and where it is derived and subsequently becomes associated with MHC...... molecules are the questions discussed in this review. To us, the entire concept of processing has appeal not only because it explains some hitherto well-established, but poorly understood, phenomena such as the fact that T lymphocytes focus their attention entirely upon antigens on other cells. It has...

  18. No major role for insulin-degrading enzyme in antigen presentation by MHC molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan Culina

    Full Text Available Antigen presentation by MHC class I molecules requires degradation of epitope source proteins in the cytosol. Although the preeminent role of the proteasome is clearly established, evidence suggesting a significant role for proteasome-independent generation of class I ligands has been reported repeatedly. However, an enzyme responsible for such a role has not been identified. Recently insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE was shown to produce an antigenic peptide derived from the tumor antigen MAGE-A3 in an entirely proteasome-independent manner, raising the question of the global impact of IDE in MHC class I antigen processing. Here we report that IDE knockdown in human cell lines, or knockout in two different mouse strains, has no effect on cell surface expression of various MHC class I molecules, including allomorphs such as HLA-A3 and HLA-B27 suggested to be loaded in an at least a partly proteasome-independent manner. Moreover, reduced or absent IDE expression does not affect presentation of five epitopes including epitopes derived from beta amyloid and proinsulin, two preferred IDE substrates. Thus, IDE does not play a major role in MHC class I antigen processing, confirming the dominant and almost exclusive role of the proteasome in cytosolic production of MHC class I ligands.

  19. No major role for insulin-degrading enzyme in antigen presentation by MHC molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culina, Slobodan; Mauvais, François-Xavier; Hsu, Hsiang-Ting; Burgevin, Anne; Guénette, Suzanne; Moser, Anna; van Endert, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Antigen presentation by MHC class I molecules requires degradation of epitope source proteins in the cytosol. Although the preeminent role of the proteasome is clearly established, evidence suggesting a significant role for proteasome-independent generation of class I ligands has been reported repeatedly. However, an enzyme responsible for such a role has not been identified. Recently insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) was shown to produce an antigenic peptide derived from the tumor antigen MAGE-A3 in an entirely proteasome-independent manner, raising the question of the global impact of IDE in MHC class I antigen processing. Here we report that IDE knockdown in human cell lines, or knockout in two different mouse strains, has no effect on cell surface expression of various MHC class I molecules, including allomorphs such as HLA-A3 and HLA-B27 suggested to be loaded in an at least a partly proteasome-independent manner. Moreover, reduced or absent IDE expression does not affect presentation of five epitopes including epitopes derived from beta amyloid and proinsulin, two preferred IDE substrates. Thus, IDE does not play a major role in MHC class I antigen processing, confirming the dominant and almost exclusive role of the proteasome in cytosolic production of MHC class I ligands. PMID:24516642

  20. CM2 antigen, a potential novel molecule participating in glucuronide transport on rat hepatocyte canalicular membrane

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    L. Wang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The polarized molecules predominately distributing at hepatocyte canalicular surface play a vital role in disclosing the process of bile formation and etiopathogenisis of cholestatic live diseases. Therefore, it is important to find novel polarized molecules on hepatocyte canalicular membrane. In the present study, canalicular membrane vesicles (CMVs isolated from rat hepatocyte by density gradient centrifugation were used as immunogens to produce hybridoma and 46 strains of monoclonal antibodies (mAb against CMVs were obtained. With a series of morphological assay methods, including immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and immuno-electron microscope, the antigens recognized by canalicular mAb1 (CM1 and canalicular mAb2 (CM2 were confirmed to predominately distribute at hepatocyte canalicular membrane. Transport activity assay revealed that CM2 could inhibit ATP-dependent E217βG uptake of rat hepatocyte CMVs. Meanwhile, Western blotting analysis showed that the molecular mass of CM2 antigen was approximately 110kDa, which was much less than Mr 180kDa of multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2 involved in glucuronide transport. These data indicated that CM2 antigen might be a potential novel molecule participating in glucuronide transport on the hepatocyte canalicular membrane.

  1. Delivery of Exogenous Antigens to Induce Cytotoxic CD8+ T Lymphocyte Responses

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    Julia Kim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines intended to induce a cytotoxic CD8+ T-cell response are highly sought after. However, some of these vaccines can be problematic if they replicate in the host. An alternative strategy is to exploit cross-presentation of exogenous antigens to express peptides on major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I molecules. During cross-presentation, the delivered exogenous antigen can be taken up and processed through diverse mechanisms. Here, we will discuss the recent advances regarding the complex nature of the cross-priming process and the models that reflect its relevance in vivo. Moreover, we summarize current data that explore potential adjuvants and vaccine vectors that deliver antigens to activate CD8+ T cells relying on cross-presentation.

  2. Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    An antigen is any substance that causes your immune system to produce antibodies against it. This means your immune ... and is trying to fight it off. An antigen may be a substance from the environment, such ...

  3. Expression of costimulatory molecules in antigen-activated peritoneal macrophages treated with either ovalbumin or palmitoyl-ova conjugates

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    Flávia Márcia Oliveira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the mechanisms by which adjuvants are believed to promote T-cell activation and prevent induction of oral tolerance is by up-regulating the expression of co-stimulatory molecules on antigen presenting cells. Mice treated orally with palmitoyl-ovalbumin conjugates become immunized, while those treated with native ovalbumin (Ova become tolerant. Cells from the peritoneal cavity of B6D2F1 mice were cultured in the presence of 0.01, or 0.1 mg/100ml of either Ova, or palmitoyl-Ova and tested for the presence of cell markers. PE-conjugated anti-mouse CD80, CD86, and CD11b antibodies as well as biotin-PE were used to stain the antigen-activated peritoneal cells. A significant increase in the expression of CD86 and CD80 was observed following in vitro stimulation with palmitoyl-Ova; additionally, both Ova and palmitoyl-Ova induced the basal expression of CD11b. These findings could be related with the strong T-cell proliferative response induced by palmitoyl-Ova.

  4. Kinetics of T cell-activation molecules in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens

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    Antas Paulo RZ

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenotypic features acquired subsequent to antigen-specific stimulation in vitro were evaluated by means of the kinetic expressions of CD69 and CD25 activation molecules on T lymphocytes and assayed by flow cytometry in response to PPD, Ag85B, and ferritin in PPD-positive healthy control individuals. In response to PHA, CD69 staining on both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells became initially marked after 4 h, peaked at 24 h, and quickly decreased after 120 h. For CD25, a latter expression was detected around 8 h, having increased after 96 h. As expected, the response rate to the mycobacterial antigens was much lower than that to the mitogen. Positive staining was high after 96 h for CD25 and after 24 h for CD69. CD69 expression was significantly enhanced (p < 0.05 on CD8+ as compared to CD4+ T cells. High levels were also found between 96-120 h. Regarding Ag85B, CD25+ cells were mostly CD4+ instead of CD8+ T cells. Moreover, in response to ferritin, a lower CD25 expression was noted. The present data will allow further characterization of the immune response to new mycobacterial-specific antigens and their evaluation for possible inclusion in developing new diagnostic techniques for tuberculosis as well in a new vaccine to prevent the disease.

  5. Immunochemical properties of antigen-specific monkey T-cell suppressor factor induced with a Streptococcus mutans antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Lamb, J R; Zanders, E D; Kontiainen, S; Lehner, T.

    1980-01-01

    Antigen-specific suppressor factor could be released from monkey suppressor T cells induced in vitro with a protein antigen isolated from the carcinogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans. The suppressor activity was due to the factor itself and not to carryover of free antigen. Characterization of the monkey factor revealed it to have a molecular weight of ca. 70,000, and to contain a constant region and determinants encoded by the major histocompatibility complex. The presence of immunoglobul...

  6. Allele-Independent Turnover of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class Ia Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevosto, Claudia; Usmani, M Farooq; McDonald, Sarah; Gumienny, Aleksandra M; Key, Tim; Goodman, Reyna S; Gaston, J S Hill; Deery, Michael J; Busch, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) glycoproteins present cytosolic peptides to CD8+ T cells and regulate NK cell activity. Their heavy chains (HC) are expressed from up to three MHC gene loci (human leukocyte antigen [HLA]-A, -B, and -C in humans), whose extensive polymorphism maps predominantly to the antigen-binding groove, diversifying the bound peptide repertoire. Codominant expression of MHCI alleles is thus functionally critical, but how it is regulated is not fully understood. Here, we have examined the effect of polymorphism on the turnover rates of MHCI molecules in cell lines with functional MHCI peptide loading pathways and in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). Proteins were labeled biosynthetically with heavy water (2H2O), folded MHCI molecules immunoprecipitated, and tryptic digests analysed by mass spectrometry. MHCI-derived peptides were assigned to specific alleles and isotypes, and turnover rates quantified by 2H incorporation, after correcting for cell growth. MHCI turnover half-lives ranged from undetectable to a few hours, depending on cell type, activation state, donor, and MHCI isotype. However, in all settings, the turnover half-lives of alleles of the same isotype were similar. Thus, MHCI protein turnover rates appear to be allele-independent in normal human cells. We propose that this is an important feature enabling the normal function and codominant expression of MHCI alleles. PMID:27529174

  7. Use of in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT for the identification of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 in vivo-induced bacterial protein antigens

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    Lu Chengping

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2 is a zoonotic agent that causes death and disease in both humans and swine. A better understanding of SS2-host molecular interactions is crucial for understanding SS2 pathogenesis and immunology. Conventional genetic and biochemical approaches used to study SS2 virulence factors are unable to take into account the complex and dynamic environmental stimuli associated with the infection process. In this study, in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT, an immunoscreening technique, was used to identify the immunogenic bacterial proteins that are induced or upregulated in vivo during SS2 infection. Results Convalescent-phase sera from pigs infected with SS2 were pooled, adsorbed against in vitro antigens, and used to screen SS2 genomic expression libraries. Upon analysis of the identified proteins, we were able to assign a putative function to 40 of the 48 proteins. These included proteins implicated in cell envelope structure, regulation, molecule synthesis, substance and energy metabolism, transport, translation, and those with unknown functions. The in vivo-induced changes in the expression of 10 of these 40 genes were measured using real-time reverse transcription (RT-PCR, revealing that the expression of 6 of the 10 genes was upregulated in the in vivo condition. The strain distribution of these 10 genes was analyzed by PCR, and they were found in the most virulent SS2 strains. In addition, protein sequence alignments of the newly identified proteins demonstrate that three are putative virulence-associated proteins. Conclusion Collectively, our results suggest that these in vivo-induced or upregulated genes may contribute to SS2 disease development. We hypothesize that the identification of factors specifically induced or upregulated during SS2 infection will aid in our understanding of SS2 pathogenesis and may contribute to the control SS2 outbreaks. In addition, the proteins identified

  8. Small molecule and peptide-mediated inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 dimerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Evidence that targeting EBNA1 dimer, an EBV onco-antigen, can be achievable. ► A small molecule and a peptide as EBNA1 dimerization inhibitors identified. ► Both inhibitors associated with EBNA1 and blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity. ► Also, prevented its dimerization, and repressed viral gene transcription. -- Abstract: Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with human B cell lymphomas and certain carcinomas. EBV episome persistence, replication, and gene expression are dependent on EBV-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1)’s DNA binding domain (DBD)/dimerization domain (DD)-mediated sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Homodimerization of EBNA1 is essential for EBNA1 DNA binding and transactivation. In this study, we characterized a novel small molecule EBNA1 inhibitor EiK1, screened from the previous high throughput screening (HTS). The EiK1 compound specifically inhibited the EBNA1-dependent, OriP-enhanced transcription, but not EBNA1-independent transcription. A Surface Plasmon Resonance Biacore assay revealed that EiK1 associates with EBNA1 amino acid 459–607 DBD/DD. Consistent with the SPR data, in vitro gel shift assays showed that EiK1 suppressed the activity of EBNA1 binding to the cognate familial repeats (FR) sequence, but not control RBP-Jκ binding to the Jκ site. Subsequently, a cross-linker-mediated in vitro multimerization assay and EBNA1 homodimerization-dependent yeast two-hybrid assay showed that EiK1 significantly inhibited EBNA1 dimerization. In an attempt to identify more highly specific peptide inhibitors, small peptides encompassing the EBNA1 DBD/DD were screened for inhibition of EBNA1 DBD-mediated DNA binding function. The small peptide P85, covering EBNA1 a.a. 560–574, significantly blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity in vitro, prevented dimerization in vitro and in vivo, associated with EBNA1 in vitro, and repressed EBNA1-dependent transcription in vivo. Collectively, this study describes two

  9. Small molecule and peptide-mediated inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 dimerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Young; Song, Kyung-A [Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology (SAIHST), Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Biomedical Research Institute (SBRI), Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kieff, Elliott [Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kang, Myung-Soo, E-mail: mkang@skku.edu [Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology (SAIHST), Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Biomedical Research Institute (SBRI), Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evidence that targeting EBNA1 dimer, an EBV onco-antigen, can be achievable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A small molecule and a peptide as EBNA1 dimerization inhibitors identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both inhibitors associated with EBNA1 and blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Also, prevented its dimerization, and repressed viral gene transcription. -- Abstract: Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with human B cell lymphomas and certain carcinomas. EBV episome persistence, replication, and gene expression are dependent on EBV-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1)'s DNA binding domain (DBD)/dimerization domain (DD)-mediated sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Homodimerization of EBNA1 is essential for EBNA1 DNA binding and transactivation. In this study, we characterized a novel small molecule EBNA1 inhibitor EiK1, screened from the previous high throughput screening (HTS). The EiK1 compound specifically inhibited the EBNA1-dependent, OriP-enhanced transcription, but not EBNA1-independent transcription. A Surface Plasmon Resonance Biacore assay revealed that EiK1 associates with EBNA1 amino acid 459-607 DBD/DD. Consistent with the SPR data, in vitro gel shift assays showed that EiK1 suppressed the activity of EBNA1 binding to the cognate familial repeats (FR) sequence, but not control RBP-J{kappa} binding to the J{kappa} site. Subsequently, a cross-linker-mediated in vitro multimerization assay and EBNA1 homodimerization-dependent yeast two-hybrid assay showed that EiK1 significantly inhibited EBNA1 dimerization. In an attempt to identify more highly specific peptide inhibitors, small peptides encompassing the EBNA1 DBD/DD were screened for inhibition of EBNA1 DBD-mediated DNA binding function. The small peptide P85, covering EBNA1 a.a. 560-574, significantly blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity in vitro, prevented dimerization in vitro and in vivo, associated

  10. A remote arene-binding site on prostate specific membrane antigen revealed by antibody-recruiting small molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhang, A.X.; Murelli, R.P.; Bařinka, Cyril; Michel, J.; Cocleaza, A.; Jorgensen, W.L.; Lubkowski, J.; Spiegel, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 132, č. 36 (2010), s. 12711-12716. ISSN 0002-7863 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Prostate -specific membrane antigen * antibody recruiting molecules * Structure-activity relationship Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 9.019, year: 2010

  11. Regulation of T cell response to leishmania antigens by determinants of histocompatibility leukocyte class I and II molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bacellar O.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that HLA class I molecules play a significant role in the regulation of the proliferation of T cells activated by mitogens and antigens. We evaluated the ability of mAb to a framework determinant of HLA class I molecules to regulate T cell proliferation and interferon gamma (IFN-g production against leishmania, PPD, C. albicans and tetanus toxoid antigens in patients with tegumentary leishmaniasis and healthy subjects. The anti-major histocompatibility complex (MHC mAb (W6/32 suppressed lymphocyte proliferation by 90% in cultures stimulated with aCD3, but the suppression was variable in cultures stimulated with leishmania antigen. This suppression ranged from 30-67% and was observed only in 5 of 11 patients. IFN-g production against leishmania antigen was also suppressed by anti-HLA class I mAb. In 3 patients IFN-g levels were suppressed by more than 60%, while in the other 2 cultures IFN-g levels were 36 and 10% lower than controls. The suppression by HLA class I mAb to the proliferative response in leishmaniasis patients and in healthy controls varied with the antigens and the patients or donors tested. To determine whether the suppression is directed at antigen presenting cells (APCs or at the responding T cells, experiments with antigen-primed non-adherent cells, separately incubated with W6/32, were performed. Suppression of proliferation was only observed when the W6/32 mAb was added in the presence of T cells. These data provide evidence that a mAb directed at HLA class I framework determinants can suppress proliferation and cytokine secretion in response to several antigens.

  12. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1and HLA-DR antigens in uveitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    目的:研究细胞间粘附分子-1(intellular adhesion molecule-1,ICAM-1)和人体组织相关抗原(human leudocyte antigen,HLA-DR)在萄萄膜炎免疫反应中的作用.方法:应用免疫组织化学染色检查20只正常眼和54例葡萄糖膜炎眼球摘除眼(其中外源性33例和内源性21例)的脉络膜和视网膜组织中ICAM-1和HLA-DR的表达.结果:正常眼的脉络膜和视网膜组织没有ICAM-1的阳性染色,没有或较少有HLA-DR的表达,葡萄膜炎眼中二者有增高表达(P<0.01),而外源性和内源性葡萄膜炎眼组间表达统计学上无显著差异(P>0.05).结论:ICAM-1、HLA-DR分子能够介导白细胞和炎症部位组织细胞的识别和粘附,二者的共同表达说明它们在葡萄糖膜炎脉络膜视网膜组织的免疫性损伤中具有重要意义.%Objective :To study the effects of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and human leukocyte antigen (HAL-DR) on the immunopathologic process of uveitis. Methods:Imn- munohistochemical techniques were applied to detect their expression in eyes of both the health (20 cases from eye bank) and patients with uveitis (54 cases with 54 eyes which included 33 ex- ogenous uveitis and 21 endogenous one). Results:Both the two ant igens were detectable in the choroidal and retinal tissues in eyes of uveitis while all the normal eyes showed negative expres- sion of ICAM-1 and negative or little expression of HLA-DR (P<0. 01). However,there was no statistically significant difference between exogenous and endogenous types (P>0. 05). Conclu- sion: Both ICAM-1 and HLA-DR may be responsible for cell recognition and binding in the in- flarnmatory tissues. The co-expression of ICAM-1 and HAL-DR showed that these two factors might play an important role in the immunologic damage of the choroid and retina in uveitis.

  13. A modern approach for epitope prediction: identification of foot-and-mouth disease virus peptides binding bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) class I molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules regulate adaptive immune responses through the presentation of antigenic peptides to CD8positive T-cells. Polymorphisms in the peptide binding region of class I molecules determine peptide binding affinity and stability during antigen presenta...

  14. A small molecule inhibitor for ATPase activity of Hsp70 and Hsc70 enhances the immune response to protein antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Kyung-Hwa; Zhang, Haiying; Lee, Bo Ryeong; Kwon, Young-Guen; Ha, Sang-Jun; Shin, Injae

    2015-12-01

    The ATPase activities of Hsp70 and Hsc70 are known to be responsible for regulation of various biological processes. However, little is known about the roles of Hsp70 and Hsc70 in modulation of immune responses to antigens. In the present study, we investigated the effect of apoptozole (Az), a small molecule inhibitor of Hsp70 and Hsc70, on immune responses to protein antigens. The results show that mice administered with both protein antigen and Az produce more antibodies than those treated with antigen alone, showing that Az enhances immune responses to administered antigens. Treatment of mice with Az elicits production of antibodies with a high IgG2c/IgG1 ratio and stimulates the release of Th1 and Th2-type cytokines, suggesting that Az activates the Th1 and Th2 immune responses. The observations made in the present study suggest that inhibition of Hsp70 and Hsc70 activities could be a novel strategy designing small molecule-based adjuvants in protein vaccines.

  15. Calreticulin promotes folding of functional human leukocyte antigen class I molecules in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culina, Slobodan; Lauvau, Grégoire; Gubler, Brigitte; van Endert, Peter M

    2004-12-24

    The assembly of MHC class I molecules with beta(2)-microglobulin and peptides is assisted by the housekeeping chaperones calnexin, calreticulin, and Erp57 and the dedicated accessory protein, tapasin. Tapasin and calreticulin are essential for efficient MHC class I assembly, but their precise action during class I assembly remains to be elucidated. Previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that the lectin calreticulin interacts with monoglucosylated MHC class I heavy chains, whatever their state of assembly with light chains and peptide, and inhibits their aggregation above physiological temperature. We used a soluble single chain HLA-A2/beta(2)-microglobulin molecule, A2SC, to study the effect of calreticulin on the peptide binding capacity of HLA class I molecules. Calreticulin inhibited the formation of A2SC aggregates both when co-expressed in insect cells and during incubations at elevated temperature. Calreticulin dramatically enhanced acquisition of peptide binding capacity when added to denatured A2SC molecules during refolding at 4 degrees C. However, it had no effect on the rapid loss of A2SC peptide binding capacity at physiological temperature. We conclude that calreticulin promotes the folding of HLA class I molecules to a state in which, at low temperature, they spontaneously acquire peptide binding capacity. However, it does not induce or maintain a peptide-receptive state of the class I-binding site, which is likely to be promoted by one or several other components of the class I loading complexes. By being amenable to complementation with additional proteins, the described system should be useful for identification of these components. PMID:15494401

  16. Electron-impact-induced tryptophan molecule fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In our investigation, we have studied the interactions of low-energy (<70 eV) electrons with tryptophan molecule belonging to the essential amino acids in order to probe the intrinsic properties of the molecule and trace its change(s) under the electron impact. The fragmentation of a gas-phase tryptophan molecule by low-energy electrons was studied both experimentally and theoretically. Various positively charged fragments were observed and analyzed. A special attention was paid to the energy characteristics of the ionic fragment yield. The geometrical parameters of the initial molecule rearrangement were also analyzed. The fragmentation observed was due to either a simple bond cleavage or more complex reactions involving molecular rearrangements

  17. Evasion of peptide, but not lipid antigen presentation, through pathogen-induced dendritic cell maturation

    OpenAIRE

    Hava, David L.; van der Wel, Nicole ,; Cohen, Nadia; Dascher, Christopher C.; Houben, Diane; León, Luis; Agarwal, Sandeep; Sugita, Masahiko; van Zon, Maaike; Kent, Sally C.; Shams, Homayoun; Peters, Peter J.; Brenner, Michael B.

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) present lipid and peptide antigens to T cells on CD1 and MHC Class II (MHCII), respectively. The relative contribution of these systems during the initiation of adaptive immunity after microbial infection is not characterized. MHCII molecules normally acquire antigen and rapidly traffic from phagolysosomes to the plasma membrane as part of DC maturation, whereas CD1 molecules instead continually recycle between these sites before, during, and after DC maturation. We find ...

  18. Differentiation induced by physiological and pharmacological stimuli leads to increased antigenicity of human neuroblastoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lena-Maria Carlson; Sven P(a)hlman; Anna De Geer; Per Kogner; Jelena Levitskaya

    2008-01-01

    Sympathetic neuronal differentiation is associated with favorable prognosis of neuroblastoma (NB), the most common extra-cranial solid tumor of early childhood. Differentiation agents have proved useful in clinical protocols of NB treatment, but using them as a sole treatment is not sufficient to induce tumor elimination in patients. Therefore, complementary approaches, such as immunotherapy, are warranted. Here we demonstrate that differentiation of NB cell lines and ex vivo isolated tumor cells in response to physiological or pharmacological stimuli is associated with acquisition of increased antigenicity. This manifests as increased expression of surface major histocompatibility class I complexes and ICAM-1 molecules and translates into increased sensitivity of NB cells to lysis by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and natural killer (NK) cells. The latter is paralleled by enhanced ability of differentiated cells to form immune conjugates and bind increased amounts of granzyme B to the cell surface. We demonstrate, for the first time, that, regardless of the stimulus applied, the differentiation state in NBs is associated with increased tumor antigenicity that enables more efficient elimination of tumor cells by cytotoxic lymphocytes and paves the way for combined application of differentiation-inducing agents and immunotherapy as an auxiliary approach in NB patients.

  19. Multiscale sensing of antibody-antigen interactions by organic transistors and single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalini, Stefano; Dumitru, Andra C; Leonardi, Francesca; Bortolotti, Carlo A; Herruzo, Elena T; Campana, Alessandra; de Oliveira, Rafael F; Cramer, Tobias; Garcia, Ricardo; Biscarini, Fabio

    2015-05-26

    Antibody-antigen (Ab-Ag) recognition is the primary event at the basis of many biosensing platforms. In label-free biosensors, these events occurring at solid-liquid interfaces are complex and often difficult to control technologically across the smallest length scales down to the molecular scale. Here a molecular-scale technique, such as single-molecule force spectroscopy, is performed across areas of a real electrode functionalized for the immunodetection of an inflammatory cytokine, viz. interleukin-4 (IL4). The statistical analysis of force-distance curves allows us to quantify the probability, the characteristic length scales, the adhesion energy, and the time scales of specific recognition. These results enable us to rationalize the response of an electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistor (EGOFET) operated as an IL4 immunosensor. Two different strategies for the immobilization of IL4 antibodies on the Au gate electrode have been compared: antibodies are bound to (i) a smooth film of His-tagged protein G (PG)/Au; (ii) a 6-aminohexanethiol (HSC6NH2) self-assembled monolayer on Au through glutaraldehyde. The most sensitive EGOFET (concentration minimum detection level down to 5 nM of IL4) is obtained with the first functionalization strategy. This result is correlated to the highest probability (30%) of specific binding events detected by force spectroscopy on Ab/PG/Au electrodes, compared to 10% probability on electrodes with the second functionalization. Specifically, this demonstrates that Ab/PG/Au yields the largest areal density of oriented antibodies available for recognition. More in general, this work shows that specific recognition events in multiscale biosensors can be assessed, quantified, and optimized by means of a nanoscale technique. PMID:25868724

  20. Interaction of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen With DNA at the Single Molecule Level

    KAUST Repository

    Raducanu, Vlad-Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a key factor involved in Eukaryotic DNA replication and repair, as well as other cellular pathways. Its importance comes mainly from two aspects: the large numbers of interacting partners and the mechanism of facilitated diffusion along the DNA. The large numbers of interacting partners makes PCNA a necessary factor to consider when studying DNA replication, either in vitro or in vivo. The mechanism of facilitated diffusion along the DNA, i.e. sliding along the duplex, reduces the six degrees of freedom of the molecule, three degrees of freedom of translation and three degrees of freedom of rotation, to only two, translation along the duplex and rotational tracking of the helix. Through this mechanism PCNA can recruit its partner proteins and localize them to the right spot on the DNA, maybe in the right spatial orientation, more effectively and in coordination with other proteins. Passive loading of the closed PCNA ring on the DNA without free ends is a topologically forbidden process. Replication factor C (RFC) uses energy of ATP hydrolysis to mechanically open the PCNA ring and load it on the dsDNA. The first half of the introduction gives overview of PCNA and RFC and the loading mechanism of PCNA on dsDNA. The second half is dedicated to a diffusion model and to an algorithm for analyzing PCNA sliding. PCNA and RFC were successfully purified, simulations and a mean squared displacement analysis algorithm were run and showed good stability and experimental PCNA sliding data was analyzed and led to parameters similar to the ones in literature.

  1. Role of CD4 molecule in the induction of interleukin 2 and interleukin 2 receptor in class II major histocompatibility complex-restricted antigen-specific T helper clones. T cell receptor/CD3 complex transmits CD4-dependent and CD4-independent signals.

    OpenAIRE

    Oyaizu, N; Chirmule, N; Pahwa, S.

    1992-01-01

    The CD4 molecule plays an essential role in antigen-induced activation of T helper (Th) cells, but its contribution to signal transduction events resulting in physiologic T cell function is ill defined. By utilizing anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that recognize distinct epitopes of CD4, we have investigated the role of CD4 molecule in antigen-induced interleukin 2 (IL-2) and IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) alpha chain expression in class II major histocompatibility complex-restricted antigen-spe...

  2. Hepatitis B Surface Antigen S Gene is an Effective Carrier Molecule for Developing GnRH DNA Immunocastration Vaccine in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Y G; Ye, W J; Liu, G Q; Jiang, X P; Ijaz, N; Zhao, J Y; Tesema, B

    2016-06-01

    Relatively molecular mass of GnRH antigens is small and hence needs to couple to a large carrier molecule to enhance its immunogenicity. This study investigated whether hepatitis B surface antigen S (HBsAg-S) gene can be used as an effective carrier molecule for developing GnRH DNA immunocastration vaccine. Two copies of human GnRH gene were fused with HBsAg-S gene for constructing a recombinant plasmid pVAX-HBsAg-S-2GnRH that coded for 27 kDa target fusion protein. Ten male mice were divided into two equal groups, treatment and control. The vaccine (50 μg/mice) prepared in saline solution was injected into male mice at weeks 0, 1, 2, 4 and 7 of the experiment. Vaccine's efficacy was evaluated in terms of GnRH-specific IgG antibody response, plasma testosterone levels, testicular weight and extent of the testicular tissue damage. The specific anti-GnRH antibody titre in vaccinated animals was significantly higher than in controls in only 4th week of immunization (p vaccinated animals showed lower testicular weight than those of the controls (p vaccinated animals was suppressed. In conclusion, in this study, the engineered plasmid to be used as a GnRH DNA vaccine induced antibody response and suppressed spermatogenesis in mice. This suggests that HBsAg-S gene can be an effective carrier molecule for developing GnRH DNA immunocastration vaccine when relatively molecular mass of the aimed antigens is small. PMID:27157596

  3. Optimization of immune responses induced by therapeutic vaccination with cross-reactive antigens in a humanized hepatitis B surface antigen transgenic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgine, Maryline; Dion, Sarah; Godon, Ophélie; Guillen, Gerardo; Michel, Marie-Louise; Aguilar, Julio Cesar

    2012-08-15

    The absence of relevant animal models of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has hampered the evaluation and development of therapeutic HBV vaccines. In this study, we generated a novel transgenic mouse lineage that expresses human class I and II HLA molecules and the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). HBsAg and hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) administered as plasmid DNAs and recombinant proteins, either alone or in combination, were evaluated as therapeutic vaccine candidates in this mouse model. Our results emphasize the importance of the route of administration in breaking HBsAg tolerance. Although immunizing the transgenic mice with DNA encoding homologous HBsAg was sufficient to induce CD8+ T-cell responses, HBsAg from a heterologous subtype was required to induce a CD4+ T-cell response. Importantly, only prime-boost immunization protocols that combined plasmid DNA injection followed by protein injection induced the production of antibodies against the HBsAg expressed by the transgenic mice. PMID:22591777

  4. Intestinal Dysplasia Induced by Simian Virus 40 T Antigen Is Independent of p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovics, Jennifer A.; Carroll, Patrick A.; Robles, M. Teresa Sáenz; Pope, Hannah; Coopersmith, Craig M.; Pipas, James M.

    2005-01-01

    Transgenic mice expressing simian virus 40 large T antigen in enterocytes develop intestinal hyperplasia that progresses to dysplasia with age. Hyperplasia is dependent on T antigen binding to the retinoblastoma (pRb) family of tumor suppressor proteins. Mice expressing a truncated T antigen that inactivates the pRb-family, but is defective for binding p53, exhibit hyperplasia but do not progress to dysplasia. We hypothesized that the inhibition of the pRb family leads to entry of enterocytes into the cell cycle, resulting in hyperplasia, while inactivation of p53 is required for progression to dysplasia. Therefore, we examined T antigen/p53 complexes from the intestines of transgenic mice. We found that T antigen did not induce p53 stabilization, and we could not detect T antigen/p53 complexes in villus enterocytes. In contrast, T antigen expression led to a large increase in the levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21. Furthermore, mice in which pRb was inactivated by a truncated T antigen in a p53 null background exhibited intestinal hyperplasia but no progression to dysplasia. These data indicate that loss of p53 function does not play a role in T antigen-induced dysplasia in the intestine. Rather, some unknown function of T antigen is essential for progression beyond hyperplasia. PMID:15919904

  5. Target antigen expression on a professional antigen-presenting cell induces superior proliferative antitumor T-cell responses via chimeric T-cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossig, Claudia; Bär, Annette; Pscherer, Sibylle; Altvater, Bianca; Pule, Martin; Rooney, Cliona M; Brenner, Malcolm K; Jürgens, Heribert; Vormoor, Josef

    2006-01-01

    Human T cells expressing tumor antigen-specific chimeric receptors fail to sustain their growth and activation in vivo, which greatly reduces their therapeutic value. The defective proliferative response to tumor cells in vitro can partly be overcome by concomitant CD28 costimulatory signaling. We investigated whether T-cell activation via chimeric receptors (chRec) can be further improved by ligand expression on antigen-presenting cells of B-cell origin. We generated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) expressing a CD19-specific chRec. These CTLs are provided with native receptor stimulation by autologous EBV-transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) but exclusively with chRec (CD19-specific) stimulation by allogeneic, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched CD19+ LCLs. CD19zeta-transduced EBV-specific CTLs specifically lysed both allogeneic EBV targets and CD19+ tumor cells through the chRec in a major histocompatibility complex-independent manner, while maintaining their ability to recognize autologous EBV targets through the native T-cell receptor. The transduced CTLs failed to proliferate in response to CD19+ tumor targets even in the presence of CD28 costimulatory signaling. By contrast, CD19 expressed on HLA-mismatched LCL-induced T-cell activation and long-term proliferation that essentially duplicated the result from native receptor stimulation with autologous LCLs, suggesting that a deficit of costimulatory molecules on target cells in addition to CD28 is indeed responsible for inadequate chRec-mediated T-cell function. Hence, effective tumor immunotherapy may be favored if engagement of the chRec on modified T cells is complemented by interaction with multiple costimulator molecules. The use of T cells with native specificity for EBV may be one means of attaining this objective. PMID:16365597

  6. Tyrosine phosphorylation within the amino-terminal domain of pp60c-src molecules associated with polyoma virus middle-sized tumor antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Yonemoto, W; Jarvis-Morar, M; Brugge, J S; Bolen, J B; Israel, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    We have examined the in vitro phosphorylation of cellular src protein (pp60c-src) molecules associated with the polyoma virus middle-sized tumor antigen in polyoma virus-transformed cells. These pp60c-src molecules possessed an enhanced tyrosyl kinase activity, migrated aberrantly on NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gels, and contained a novel site of tyrosine phosphorylation within the amino-terminal region of the molecule. The pp60c-src molecules not associated with the middle-sized tumor antigen we...

  7. Gene Therapy Induces Antigen-Specific Tolerance in Experimental Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirholt, Pernilla; Turesson, Olof; Wing, Kajsa; Holmdahl, Rikard; Kihlberg, Jan; Stern, Anna; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill; Henningsson, Louise; Gustafsson, Kenth; Gjertsson, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Here, we investigate induction of immunological tolerance by lentiviral based gene therapy in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, collagen II-induced arthritis (CIA). Targeting the expression of the collagen type II (CII) to antigen presenting cells (APCs) induced antigen-specific tolerance, where only 5% of the mice developed arthritis as compared with 95% of the control mice. In the CII-tolerized mice, the proportion of Tregs as well as mRNA expression of SOCS1 (suppressors of cytokine signaling 1) increased at day 3 after CII immunization. Transfer of B cells or non-B cell APC, as well as T cells, from tolerized to naïve mice all mediated a certain degree of tolerance. Thus, sustainable tolerance is established very early during the course of arthritis and is mediated by both B and non-B cells as APCs. This novel approach for inducing tolerance to disease specific antigens can be used for studying tolerance mechanisms, not only in CIA but also in other autoimmune diseases. PMID:27159398

  8. Retrovirus antigens in brains of mice with scrapie- and murine leukemia virus-induced spongiform encephalopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, P M; Pitts, O M; Rohwer, R. G.; Gajdusek, D C; Ruscetti, S K

    1982-01-01

    Wild mouse ecotropic virus-induced spongiform encephalomyelopathy pathologically similar to scrapie was associated with the expression of retrovirus antigens in mouse brains. However, scrapie-infected mice with spongiform encephalopathy showed no increased expression of retrovirus antigens in brain. Thus, the pathogenesis of the scrapie spongiform lesion does not appear to involve activation of endogenous retrovirus.

  9. Cell adhesion molecules involved in the leukocyte recruitment induced by venom of the snake Bothrops jararaca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella R. Zamuner

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that Bothrops jararaca venom (BjV induces a significant leukocyte accumulation, mainly neutrophils, at the local of tissue damage. Therefore, the role of the adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, LECAM-1, CD18, leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1 and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1 on the BjV-induced neutrophil accumulation and the correlation with release of LTB4, TXA2, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL-1 and IL-6 have been investigated. Anti-mouse LECAM-1, LFA-1, ICAM-1 and PECAM-1 monoclonal antibody injection resulted in a reduction of 42%, 80%, 66% and 67%, respectively, of neutrophil accumulation induced by BjV (250 μg/kg, intraperitoneal injection in male mice compared with isotype-matched control injected animals. The anti-mouse CD18 monoclonal antibody had no significant effect on venom-induced neutrophil accumulation. Concentrations of LTB4, TXA2, IL-6 and TNF-α were significant increased in the peritoneal exudates of animals injected with venom, whereas no increment in IL-1 was detected. This results suggest that ICAM-1, LECAM-1, LFA-1 and PECAM-1, but not CD18, adhesion molecules are involved in the recruitment of neutrophils into the inflammatory site induced by BjV. This is the first in vivo evidence that snake venom is able to up-regulate the expression of adhesion molecules by both leukocytes and endothelial cells. This venom effect may be indirect, probably through the release of the inflammatory mediators evidenced in the present study.

  10. Fructose Induces the Inflammatory Molecule ICAM-1 in Endothelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Glushakova, Olena; Kosugi, Tomoki; Roncal, Carlos; Mu, Wei; Heinig, Marcelo; Cirillo, Pietro; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G.; Richard J Johnson; Nakagawa, Takahiko

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have linked fructose intake with the metabolic syndrome, and it was recently reported that fructose induces an inflammatory response in the rat kidney. Here, we examined whether fructose directly stimulates endothelial inflammatory processes by upregulating the inflammatory molecule intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). When human aortic endothelial cells were stimulated with physiologic concentrations of fructose, ICAM-1 mRNA and protein expression increased in a ...

  11. Identification of a sulfate-bearing molecule associated with HLA class II antigens.

    OpenAIRE

    Sant, A J; Cullen, S E; Schwartz, B D

    1984-01-01

    The human Ia antigens (DR, DS, and SB), determined by genes contained within the HLA complex on chromosome 6, are glycoprotein heterodimers consisting of a Mr approximately equal to 34,000 alpha chain and a Mr approximately equal to 28,000 beta chain. As a result of studies exploring the possibility that alpha or beta (or both) might be sulfated, a unique component of the oligomeric Ia antigen complex was discovered. When anti-Ia immunoprecipitates from Nonidet P-40 lysates of [35S]sulfate-la...

  12. Presentation of human minor histocompatibility antigens by HLA-B35 and HLA-B38 molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones specific for human minor histocompatibility antigens (hmHAs) were produced from a patient who had been grafted with the kidneys from his mother and two HLA-identical sisters. Of eight CTL clones generated, four recognized an hmHA (hmHA-1) expressed on cells from the mother and sister 3 (second donor); two recognized another antigen (hmHA-2) on cells from the father, sister (third donor), and sister 3; and the remaining two clones recognized still another antigen (hmHA-3) on cells from the father and sister 3. Panel studies revealed that CTL recognition of hmHA-1 was restricted by HLA-B35 and that of hmHA-2 and hmHA-3 was restricted by HLA-B38. The HLA-B35 restriction of the hmHA-1 -specific CTL clones was substantiated by the fact that they killed HLA-A null/HLA-B null Hmy2CIR targets transfected with HLA-B35 but not HLA-B51, -Bw52, or -Bw53 transfected Hmy2CIR targets. These data demonstrated that the five amino acids substitutions on the α1 domain between HLA-B35 and -Bw53, which are associated with Bw4/Bw6 epitopes, play a critical role in the relationship of hmHA-1 to HLA-B35 molecules. The fact that the hmHA-1-specific CTLs failed to kill Hmy2CIR cells expressing HLA-B35/51 chimeric molecules composed of the α1 domain of HLA-B35 and other domains of HLA-B51 indicated that eight residues on the α2 domain also affect the interaction of hmHA-1 and the HLA-B35 molecules

  13. Major histocompatibility complex class II (DR) antigen and costimulatory molecules on in vitro and in vivo activated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandilands, Gavin P; McCrae, Jame; Hill, Kathryn; Perry, Martin; Baxter, Derek

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that normal human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) contain cytoplasmic ‘stores’ of three key molecules normally associated with antigen presentation and T-cell costimulation, i.e. major histocompatibility complex class II (DR) antigen, CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2). These cytoplasmic molecules were found to translocate to the cell surface within a few minutes following cross-linking (X-L) of Mac-1: an early neutrophil activation signal. In this study we have compared X-L of Mac −1 in parallel with four other well documented in vitro neutrophil activators: phorbol myristate acetate, N-formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine, lipopolysaccharide, and phagocytosis of immunoglobulin G–Latex particles. In addition, we have used paired samples of neutrophils obtained from peripheral blood (as a control) and synovial fluid from patients with rheumatoid arthritis as a source of in vivo activated cells. With the exception of phagocytosis, all activators resulted in the rapid (within 30 min) generation of two populations of activated neutrophils (designated P1 and P2) based on flow-cytometry measurements of size, granularity and phenotype. Significant up-regulation of DR and costimulatory molecules was observed, predominantly on P2 cells, with all activators except phagocytosis. CD80 and CD86 were noted to respond to the various activation signals in a different pattern suggesting that their intracellular granule location may be different. Dual-staining confocal laser microscopy studies showed that CD80 is largely confined to secretory vesicles (SVs) while CD86 appears to have a much wider distribution being found in SVs and within secondary (specific) and primary (azurophilic) granules. Increased surface expression of these antigens was also observed on P2 synovial fluid neutrophils appearing as large heterogeneous clusters on the cell surface when visualized by confocal laser microscopy. PMID:17034427

  14. Impulsive Laser Induced Alignment of Molecules Dissolved in Helium Nanodroplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pentlehner, Dominik; H. Nielsen, Jens; Slenczka, Alkwin;

    2013-01-01

    We show that a 450 fs nonresonant, moderately intense, linearly polarized laser pulse can induce field-free molecular axis alignment of methyliodide (CH3I) molecules dissolved in a helium nanodroplet. Time-resolved measurements reveal rotational dynamics much slower than that of isolated molecules...... and, surprisingly, complete absence of the sharp transient alignment recurrences characteristic of gas phase molecules. Our results presage a range of new opportunities for exploring both molecular dynamics in a dissipative environment and the properties of He nanodroplets....

  15. High expression of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 6 and 8 in primary myelofibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Hans Carl; Skov, Vibe; Larsen, Thomas Stauffer; Thomassen, Mads; Riley, Caroline Hasselbalch; Jensen, Morten; Bjerrum, Ole Weis; Kruse, Torben A

    2011-01-01

    Primary myelofibrosis (PMF) is characterized by leukoerythroblastic anemia with circulating immature myeloid cells, including CD34+ cells, progressive splenomegaly and accumulation of connective tissue and neoangiogenesis in the bone marrow. Altered bone marrow stroma and cell adherence account for...... the egress of CD34+ cells from the bone marrow. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 6 has been implicated in cell adhesion, cellular invasiveness, angiogenesis, and inflammation, which are all key processes in the pathophysiology of PMF. Accordingly, CEACAMs may play an...

  16. Structural requirements for the interaction between class II MHC molecules and peptide antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sette, A; Buus, S; Appella, E; Adorini, L; Grey, H M

    1990-01-01

    Previous work from our and other laboratories indicates that T cells recognize a complex between the MHC restriction element and peptide antigen fragments. This paper reviews the structural characteristics of the formation of such a complex. By analyzing in detail the interactions between purified...

  17. Genetic control of antibody responses induced by recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG expressing a foreign antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Lagranderie, M; Lo-Man, R; Dériaud, E; Gicquel, B; Gheorghiu, M; Leclerc, C

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG expressing foreign antigens represents a promising candidate for the development of future vaccines and was shown in several experimental models to induce protective immunity against bacterial or parasitic infections. Innate resistance to BCG infection is under genetic control and could modify the immune responses induced against an antigen delivered by such engineered microorganisms. To investigate this question, we analyzed the immune responses of various...

  18. Anti-inflammatory effects of intravenous methotrexate associated with lipid nanoemulsions on antigen-induced arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Mello, Suzana B V; Tavares, Elaine R; Maria Carolina Guido; Eloisa Bonfá; Raul C. Maranhão

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that intravenous use of methotrexate associated with lipid nanoemulsions can achieve superior anti-inflammatory effects in the joints of rabbits with antigen-induced arthritis compared with commercial methotrexate. METHODS: Arthritis was induced in New Zealand rabbits sensitized with methylated bovine serum albumin and subsequently intra-articularly injected with the antigen. A nanoemulsion of methotrexate labeled with 3H-cholesteryl ether (4 mg/kg methotrex...

  19. Blockade of LFA-1 augments in vitro differentiation of antigen-induced Foxp3+ Treg cells

    OpenAIRE

    Verhagen, Johan; Wraith, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific, in vitro-induced Foxp3+ Treg (iTreg) cells protects against autoimmune disease. To generate antigen-specific iTreg cells at high purity, however, remains a challenge. Whereas polyclonal T cell stimulation with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibody yields Foxp3+ iTreg cells at a purity of 90–95%, antigen-induced iTreg cells typically do not exceed a purity of 65–75%, even in a TCR-transgenic model. In a similar vein to thymic Treg cell selection, iTreg cell dif...

  20. Antigens linked to synthetic microspheres induce immune responses in primates in the absence of adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlik, C; Perraut, R; Bonnemains, B; Leclerc, C

    1996-01-01

    Although most strategies of vaccination require immunopotentiation to induce efficient immune responses, the development of new adjuvants for human vaccines is highly limited by safety problems. In order to overcome this problem, we developed a new vaccine formulation based on the covalent linkage of protein or peptide to synthetic microspheres. In previous experiments performed in mice, we demonstrated that these particulate antigens induce strong antigen-specific CD4+ T cell proliferative responses in the absence of adjuvant. In the present study, we analyzed the immunogenicity in primate Saimiri sciureus monkeys of two different proteins linked to synthetic microspheres. Immune responses induced by these particulate proteins administered without adjuvant were compared to those stimulated by the soluble antigens injected with alum. We currently demonstrated that, in monkeys, particulate antigens administered without adjuvant, induced good PBMC proliferative response and antibody production. Furthermore, the analysis of antibody responses using mAbs specific for different Saimiri sciureus immunoglobulins showed that the antibody response profiles were different in monkeys immunized with soluble versus particulate form of antigens. Results of this study demonstrate that particulate form of antigen may stimulate qualitatively different immune responses as compared to alum and therefore suggest that this new antigen formulation could be an attractive candidate for the development of vaccines. PMID:8852604

  1. Human lung tumor-associated antigen identified as an extracellular matrix adhesion molecule

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    A single chain glycoprotein with an estimated molecular mass of 160 kD (gp160) was previously identified as a human lung tumor-associated antigen. This tumor marker is shown here to be associated noncovalently with a second 130-kD protein. Sequential immunoprecipitation studies of surface iodinated lung tumor cell lysates reveal that this heterodimeric complex is indistinguishable serologically and structurally from the integrin VLA-2, found originally on activated T lymphocytes and platelets...

  2. Solution NMR characterization of apical membrane antigen 1 and small molecule interactions as a basis for designing new antimalarials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnarjuna, Bankala; Lim, San Sui; Devine, Shane M; Debono, Cael O; Lam, Raymond; Chandrashekaran, Indu R; Jaipuria, Garima; Yagi, Hiromasa; Atreya, Hanudatta S; Scanlon, Martin J; MacRaild, Christopher A; Scammells, Peter J; Norton, Raymond S

    2016-06-01

    Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (PfAMA1) plays an important role in the invasion by merozoites of human red blood cells during a malaria infection. A key region of PfAMA1 is a conserved hydrophobic cleft formed by 12 hydrophobic residues. As anti-apical membrane antigen 1 antibodies and other inhibitory molecules that target this hydrophobic cleft are able to block the invasion process, PfAMA1 is an attractive target for the development of strain-transcending antimalarial agents. As solution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a valuable technique for the rapid characterization of protein-ligand interactions, we have determined the sequence-specific backbone assignments for PfAMA1 from two P. falciparum strains, FVO and 3D7. Both selective labelling and unlabelling strategies were used to complement triple-resonance experiments in order to facilitate the assignment process. We have then used these assignments for mapping the binding sites for small molecules, including benzimidazoles, pyrazoles and 2-aminothiazoles, which were selected on the basis of their affinities measured from surface plasmon resonance binding experiments. Among the compounds tested, benzimidazoles showed binding to a similar region on both FVO and 3D7 PfAMA1, suggesting that these compounds are promising scaffolds for the development of novel PfAMA1 inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26804042

  3. Reassembly and reconstitution of separate alpha and beta chains of human leukocyte antigen DR4 molecule isolated from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J H; Maeng, C Y; Park, J H; Hahm, K S; Han, B D; Kim, K L

    1997-04-30

    The class II major histocompatibility complex molecules play a major role in presentation of exogenous antigenic peptides to the CD4 positive helper T cell. These are heterodimeric cell surface glycoproteins consisting of alpha- and beta-chains. In the present study, we cloned and expressed the alpha- and beta-chain of HLA-DR4 lacking the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain separately in Escherichia coli using the pET-5a expression vector system. The expressed alpha- and beta-chains were purified in a denaturing condition by an ion exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose and a gel filtration chromatography on Sephacryl S-200, respectively. The recombinant proteins were refolded and reassembled by removing the denaturing agent and concomitant reoxidation of the disulfide bond. The refolded heterodimeric rDR4 molecule was resolved by 12.5% SDS-PAGE in a nonreducing condition and confirmed by Western blot using polyclonal antibody against DR-alpha and the monoclonal antibody (L243) for the conformationally correct DR molecule. The rDR4 molecules were reconstituted with a 50-fold molar excess biot-HA (307-319), and the bound peptides to the heterodimer complex were determined by a microplate assay coated with L243 antibody using Extravidin-HRP conjugate. PMID:9163739

  4. L1 Cell Adhesion Molecule-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected Human T Cells Exhibit Specific and Efficient Antitumor Activity against Human Ovarian Cancer in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Hong

    Full Text Available New therapeutic modalities are needed for ovarian cancer, the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated the impressive therapeutic potential of adoptive therapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-redirected T cells to target hematological cancers, and emerging studies suggest a similar impact may be achieved for solid cancers. We sought determine whether genetically-modified T cells targeting the CE7-epitope of L1-CAM, a cell adhesion molecule aberrantly expressed in several cancers, have promise as an immunotherapy for ovarian cancer, first demonstrating that L1-CAM was highly over-expressed on a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, primary ovarian tumor tissue specimens, and ascites-derived primary cancer cells. Human central memory derived T cells (TCM were then genetically modified to express an anti-L1-CAM CAR (CE7R, which directed effector function upon tumor antigen stimulation as assessed by in vitro cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity assays. We also found that CE7R+ T cells were able to target primary ovarian cancer cells. Intraperitoneal (i.p. administration of CE7R+ TCM induced a significant regression of i.p. established SK-OV-3 xenograft tumors in mice, inhibited ascites formation, and conferred a significant survival advantage compared with control-treated animals. Taken together, these studies indicate that adoptive transfer of L1-CAM-specific CE7R+ T cells may offer a novel and effective immunotherapy strategy for advanced ovarian cancer.

  5. Characterization of antigen processing and presentation by peptide-linked MHC class I molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Tiwari, Neeraj

    2005-01-01

    MHC-Klasse-I-Moleküle präsentieren gewöhnlich Peptide, die aus zytosolischen Antigenproteinen durch proteasomalen Verdau generiert und anschließend vom TAP-Peptidtransporter ins endoplasmatische Retikulum transportiert werden. Es können jedoch auch endozytierte Antigene für die MHC-Klasse-I-vermittelten Antigenpräsentation prozessiert werden, wobei dieser alternative Weg entweder in einer Proteasom/TAP-abhängigen oder unabhängigen Weise abläuft. Während diese so genannte „Kreuzpräsentation“ f...

  6. Structural changes of linear DNA molecules induced by cisplatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interaction between long DNA molecules and activated cisplatin is believed to be crucial to anticancer activity. However, the exact structural changes of long DNA molecules induced by cisplatin are still not very clear. In this study, structural changes of long linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) induced by activated cisplatin have been investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results indicated that long DNA molecules gradually formed network structures, beads-on-string structures and their large aggregates. Electrostatic and coordination interactions were considered as the main driving forces producing these novel structures. An interesting finding in this study is the beads-on-string structures. Moreover, it is worth noting that the beads-on-string structures were linked into the networks, which can be ascribed to the strong DNA–DNA interactions. This study expands our knowledge of the interactions between DNA molecules and cisplatin. - Highlights: • We investigate structural changes of dsDNA and ssDNA induced by cisplatin. • AFM results indicated long dsDNA formed network, beads-on-string and aggregates. • ssDNA can form very similar structures as those of long linear dsDNA. • A possible formation process of theses novel structure is proposed

  7. Tunneling electron induced luminescence from porphyrin molecules on monolayer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using epitaxially grown graphene on Ru(0001) as a decoupling layer, we investigate the evolution of tunneling electron induced luminescence from different number of layers of porphyrin molecules. Light emission spectra and photon maps, acquired via a combined optical setup with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), indicate that the electronic decoupling effect of a monolayer (ML) graphene alone is still insufficient for generating molecule-specific emission from both the 1st- and 2nd-layer porphyrin molecules. Nevertheless, interestingly, the plasmonic emission is enhanced for the 1st-layer but suppressed for the 2nd-layer in comparison with the plasmonic emission on the monolayer graphene. Intrinsic intramolecular molecular fluorescence occurs at the 3rd-layer porphyrin. Such molecular thickness is about two MLs thinner than previous reports where molecules were adsorbed directly on metals. These observations suggest that the monolayer graphene does weaken the interaction between molecule and metal substrate and contribute to the reduction of nonradiative decay rates. - Highlights: • Showing molecularly resolved photon maps of graphene and porphyrins on it. • Revealing the influence of spacer thickness on molecular electroluminescence. • Graphene does weaken the interaction between molecules and metal substrate

  8. Tunneling electron induced luminescence from porphyrin molecules on monolayer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Feng; Kuang, Yanmin; Yu, Yunjie; Liao, Yuan; Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Yang; Dong, Zhenchao, E-mail: zcdong@ustc.edu.cn

    2015-01-15

    Using epitaxially grown graphene on Ru(0001) as a decoupling layer, we investigate the evolution of tunneling electron induced luminescence from different number of layers of porphyrin molecules. Light emission spectra and photon maps, acquired via a combined optical setup with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), indicate that the electronic decoupling effect of a monolayer (ML) graphene alone is still insufficient for generating molecule-specific emission from both the 1st- and 2nd-layer porphyrin molecules. Nevertheless, interestingly, the plasmonic emission is enhanced for the 1st-layer but suppressed for the 2nd-layer in comparison with the plasmonic emission on the monolayer graphene. Intrinsic intramolecular molecular fluorescence occurs at the 3rd-layer porphyrin. Such molecular thickness is about two MLs thinner than previous reports where molecules were adsorbed directly on metals. These observations suggest that the monolayer graphene does weaken the interaction between molecule and metal substrate and contribute to the reduction of nonradiative decay rates. - Highlights: • Showing molecularly resolved photon maps of graphene and porphyrins on it. • Revealing the influence of spacer thickness on molecular electroluminescence. • Graphene does weaken the interaction between molecules and metal substrate.

  9. CD50 (intercellular adhesion molecule 3) stimulation induces calcium mobilization and tyrosine phosphorylation through p59fyn and p56lck in Jurkat T cell line

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    The leukocyte differentiation antigen, CD50, has been recently identified as the intercellular adhesion molecule 3 (ICAM-3), the third counter-receptor of leukocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1). This molecule seems to be specially involved in the adhesion events of the initial phases of the immune response. To characterize the role of CD50 in leukocyte interactions, the different molecular events induced after cross-linking of CD50 on T cell-derived Jurkat cell line have been analyze...

  10. Human parvovirus B19 induced apoptotic bodies contain altered self-antigens that are phagocytosed by antigen presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanoktip Thammasri

    Full Text Available Human parvovirus B19 (B19V from the erythrovirus genus is known to be a pathogenic virus in humans. Prevalence of B19V infection has been reported worldwide in all seasons, with a high incidence in the spring. B19V is responsible for erythema infectiosum (fifth disease commonly seen in children. Its other clinical presentations include arthralgia, arthritis, transient aplastic crisis, chronic anemia, congenital anemia, and hydrops fetalis. In addition, B19V infection has been reported to trigger autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. However, the mechanisms of B19V participation in autoimmunity are not fully understood. B19V induced chronic disease and persistent infection suggests B19V can serve as a model for viral host interactions and the role of viruses in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Here we investigate the involvement of B19V in the breakdown of immune tolerance. Previously, we demonstrated that the non-structural protein 1 (NS 1 of B19V induces apoptosis in non-permissive cells lines and that this protein can cleave host DNA as well as form NS1-DNA adducts. Here we provide evidence that through programmed cell death, apoptotic bodies (ApoBods are generated by B19V NS1 expression in a non-permissive cell line. Characterization of purified ApoBods identified potential self-antigens within them. In particular, signature self-antigens such as Smith, ApoH, DNA, histone H4 and phosphatidylserine associated with autoimmunity were present in these ApoBods. In addition, when purified ApoBods were introduced to differentiated macrophages, recognition, engulfment and uptake occurred. This suggests that B19V can produce a source of self-antigens for immune cell processing. The results support our hypothesis that B19V NS1-DNA adducts, and nucleosomal and lysosomal antigens present in ApoBods created in non-permissive cell lines, are a source of self-antigens.

  11. Batf3-Dependent Dendritic Cells in the Renal Lymph Node Induce Tolerance against Circulating Antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Gottschalk, Catherine; Damuzzo, Vera; Gotot, Janine; Kroczek, Richard A.; Yagita, Hideo; Murphy, Kenneth M.; Knolle, Percy A.; Ludwig-Portugall, Isis; Kurts, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Although the spleen is a major site where immune tolerance to circulating innocuous antigens occurs, the kidney also contributes. Circulating antigens smaller than albumin are constitutively filtered and concentrated in the kidney and reach the renal lymph node by lymphatic drainage, where resident dendritic cells (DCs) capture them and induce tolerance of specific cytotoxic T cells through unknown mechanisms. Here, we found that the coinhibitory cell surface receptor programmed death 1 (PD-1...

  12. Application of In Vivo Induced Antigen Technology (IVIAT) to Bacillus anthracis

    OpenAIRE

    Peppercorn, Amanda; Young, John S; Drysdale, Melissa; Baresch, Andrea; Bikowski, Margaret V.; Ashford, David A.; Quinn, Conrad P.; Handfield, Martin; Hillman, Jeffrey D.; Lyons, C. Rick; Koehler, Theresa M.; Sonenshein, Abraham L.; Rollins, Sean McKenzie; Calderwood, Stephen Beaven; Ryan, Edward Thomas

    2008-01-01

    In vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT) is an immuno-screening technique that identifies bacterial antigens expressed during infection and not during standard in vitro culturing conditions. We applied IVIAT to Bacillus anthracis and identified PagA, seven members of a N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase autolysin family, three P60 family lipoproteins, two transporters, spore cortex lytic protein SleB, a penicillin binding protein, a putative prophage holin, respiratory nitrate reductase Nar...

  13. The effects of multiple dosing with zileuton on antigen-induced responses in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuri, M; Allegra, L; Abraham, W M

    1998-01-01

    In a previous study, a single dose of zileuton (10 mg/kg, po) given 2 h before antigen challenge, had a minimal effect on the antigen-induced early airway response (EAR), although it was effective in blocking the late airway response (LAR). Because our previous data indicated that 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) products contribute to the severity of the antigen-induced EAR in these animals, we hypothesized that the lack of effect of zileuton on the EAR may have had to do with inadequate tissue levels. Therefore, in this study, we determined if multiple dosing with zileuton, which theoretically could improve tissue levels, would provide protection against the antigen-induced EAR as well as the LAR. Each sheep was used in each of the three trials (> or = 15 days apart), the order of which was randomized. For trial 1, the sheep were treated with zileuton (10 mg/kg in 0.1% methylcellulose, p.o.) once a day for 4 days; for trials 2, the sheep were treated with zileuton (10 mg/kg, p.o.) for 2 days; and, for trial 3, the animals were treated with vehicle (0.1% methylcellulose) for 4 days as in trial 1. In all trials, antigen challenge followed 1 h after the last treatment. In the placebo trial, antigen challenge resulted in characteristic EAR (407 +/- 102%, increase over baseline) and LAR (335 +/- 75%, increase over baseline). The antigen-induced effects were completely blocked by the 4-day treatment (EAR = 24 +/- 3%; LAR = 17 +/- 3%, P trial, the immediate increase in R1, after antigen challenge was only partially blocked (EAR = 163 +/- 16%, P trial), but the late response was completely blocked (24 +/- 3%). The protection against the EAR obtained with the 4-day treatment was significantly better (P < 0.05) than that obtained with the 2-day treatment. The results of this study show that multiple dosing with the 5-LO inhibitor, zileuton, provides protection against the antigen-induced EAR as well as LAR. The effect on the EAR is dependent on the treatment time, with dosing 4 days

  14. Light-Induced Switching of Tunable Single-Molecule Junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Sendler, Torsten

    2015-04-16

    A major goal of molecular electronics is the development and implementation of devices such as single-molecular switches. Here, measurements are presented that show the controlled in situ switching of diarylethene molecules from their nonconductive to conductive state in contact to gold nanoelectrodes via controlled light irradiation. Both the conductance and the quantum yield for switching of these molecules are within a range making the molecules suitable for actual devices. The conductance of the molecular junctions in the opened and closed states is characterized and the molecular level E 0, which dominates the current transport in the closed state, and its level broadening Γ are identified. The obtained results show a clear light-induced ring forming isomerization of the single-molecule junctions. Electron withdrawing side-groups lead to a reduction of conductance, but do not influence the efficiency of the switching mechanism. Quantum chemical calculations of the light-induced switching processes correlate these observations with the fundamentally different low-lying electronic states of the opened and closed forms and their comparably small modification by electron-withdrawing substituents. This full characterization of a molecular switch operated in a molecular junction is an important step toward the development of real molecular electronics devices.

  15. STM-induced switching of the hydrogen molecule in naphthalocyanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The switching induced by the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) current of an adsorbed hydrogen molecule in the cavity of a naphthalocyanine molecule between two perpendicular orientations is studied. We regard such a system as a good candidate for a molecular size electronic logic gate since it causes a well observed change in the STM tunneling current. To investigate the switching phenomenon theoretically, a dynamical model is proposed in this study. Our suggested model is a three-level system, with the switching as a rotation induced by tunneling electrons considered as a second-order time dependent perturbation, where the electrons tunnel from the STM-tip to the naphthalocyanine molecule then to the metal substrate. The tunneled electrons will excite the hydrogen molecule rotational modes to jump over a potential barrier and then the switching will occur. To verify the model, the probability of the switching is calculated and plotted against the bias voltage at different temperatures using first-principles calculated parameters to fit fairly with experimental observations. In the light of our model and the DFT results, we explain the energy level (highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO), and LUMO+1 orbitals) deviations with different substrates (NaCl and RbI) and the charge density distributions of these orbitals in different cases.

  16. Milk IgA responses are augmented by antigen delivery to the mucosal addressin cellular adhesion molecule 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Susan; Bourges, Dorothee; Wijburg, Odilia; Strugnell, Richard A; Lew, Andrew M

    2006-07-01

    The mucosal addressin cellular adhesion molecule 1 (MAdCAM) is expressed on the venules of the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT); it is also expressed on the venules of the lobules of the mammary gland. We have previously found that MAdCAM-targeting using a rat anti-MAdCAM monoclonal Ab as both antigen and targeting moiety resulted in an enhanced local IgA gut response. We therefore surmised that such targeting may also enhance IgA responses in the mammary gland. We show that our model antigen localizes to the lobules of the mammary glands as well as the GALT, but not to the draining lymph nodes and that targeting MAdCAM results in secretory IgA responses in the milk. We provide evidence that this milk IgA Ab is of a secretory nature and is consistent with derivation from gut plasmablasts that have migrated to the mammary gland. Targeting MAdCAM may be a way for a novel vaccine strategy that affords protection to the mammary gland and the suckling neonate. PMID:16723174

  17. Possible Role of Trichophytin Antigen in Inducing Impaired Immunological Clearance of Fungus in Onychomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Chhavi; Das, Shukla; Ramachandran, V G; Saha, Rumpa; Bhattacharya, S N; Dar, Sajad Ahmad; Atri, Dharmendra

    2016-04-01

    The immunology of onychomycosis is poorly understood. Th1 and Th17 are the principal effector cells responsible for protective immunity against fungi, while it is assumed that Th2 responses are associated with deleterious effects. The study was conducted to appraise the role of interleukin-6 (IL-6), transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and immunoglobulin E (IgE) in onychomycosis patients and to study skin reactivity to trichophytin antigen in them. Serum samples of 60 cases of chronic onychomycosis and 30 healthy controls were assayed for serum IgE, IL-6 and TGF-β levels using specific immunoassay kits; 0.01 ml of trichophytin antigen, Candida antigen and phosphate-buffered saline using separate syringes were injected intradermal at three independent sites of the forearm in cases and controls. Serum IL-6 levels were significantly lower in cases as compared to controls, while serum TGF-β levels in both cases and controls were comparable. Serum IgE levels in cases were significantly higher when compared with controls. Thirty-eight patients showed immediate hypersensitivity response to trichophytin antigen, while none showed delayed hypersensitivity reaction to trichophytin antigen. Constant fungal antigenic stimuli induce a state of anergy as indicated by low serum IL-6 levels and the absence of delayed hypersensitivity reaction to trichophytin antigen in cases, leading to chronicity of infection. High total IgE may indicate a high probability of prior fungal sensitization. PMID:26614362

  18. Identification of in vivo induced protein antigens of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi during human infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    During infectious disease episodes, pathogens express distinct subsets of virulence factors which allow them to adapt to different environments. Hence, genes that are expressed or upregulated in vivo are implicated in pathogenesis. We used in vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT) to identify antigens which are expressed during infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. We identified 7 in vivo induced (IVI) antigens, which included BcfD (a fimbrial structural subunit), GrxC (a glutaredoxin 3), SapB (an ABC-type transport system), T3663 (an ABC-type uncharacterized transport system), T3816 (a putative rhodanese-related sulfurtransferase), T1497 (a probable TonB-dependent receptor) and T3689 (unknown function). Of the 7 identified antigens, 5 antigens had no cross-immunoreactivity in adsorbed control sera from healthy subjects. These 5 included BcfD, GrxC, SapB, T3663 and T3689. Antigens identified in this study are potential targets for drug and vaccine development and may be utilized as diagnostic agents.

  19. Cestode Antigens Induce a Tolerogenic-Like Phenotype and Inhibit LPS Inflammatory Responses in Human Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César A. Terrazas, Fausto Sánchez-Muñoz, Ana M. Mejía-Domínguez, Luis M. Amezcua-Guerra, Luis I. Terrazas, Rafael Bojalil, Lorena Gómez-García

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens have developed strategies to modify Dendritic Cells (DCs phenotypes and impair their functions in order to create a safer environment for their survival. DCs responses to helminths and their derivatives vary among different studies. Here we show that excretory/secretory products of the cestode Taenia crassiceps (TcES do not induce the maturation of human DCs judged by a lack of increment in the expression of CD83, HLA-DR, CD80 and CD86 molecules but enhanced the production of IL-10 and positively modulated the expression of the C-type lectin receptor MGL and negatively modulated the expression of DC-SIGN. Additionally, these antigens were capable of down-modulating the inflammatory response induced by LPS in these cells by reducing the expression of the maturation markers and the production of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNF, IL-12 and IL-6. The effects of TcES upon the DCs responses to LPS were stronger if cells were exposed during their differentiation to the helminth antigens. All together, these findings suggest the ability of TcES to induce the differentiation of human DCs into a tolerogenic-like phenotype and to inhibit the effects of inflammatory stimuli.

  20. Resolving protein interactions and organization downstream the T cell antigen receptor using single-molecule localization microscopy: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Eilon

    2016-06-01

    Signal transduction is mediated by heterogeneous and dynamic protein complexes. Such complexes play a critical role in diverse cell functions, with the important example of T cell activation. Biochemical studies of signalling complexes and their imaging by diffraction limited microscopy have resulted in an intricate network of interactions downstream the T cell antigen receptor (TCR). However, in spite of their crucial roles in T cell activation, much remains to be learned about these signalling complexes, including their heterogeneous contents and size distribution, their complex arrangements in the PM, and the molecular requirements for their formation. Here, we review how recent advancements in single molecule localization microscopy have helped to shed new light on the organization of signalling complexes in single molecule detail in intact T cells. From these studies emerges a picture where cells extensively employ hierarchical and dynamic patterns of nano-scale organization to control the local concentration of interacting molecular species. These patterns are suggested to play a critical role in cell decision making. The combination of SMLM with more traditional techniques is expected to continue and critically contribute to our understanding of multimolecular protein complexes and their significance to cell function.

  1. Multicharged Ion-induced simple molecule fragmentation dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to study the dynamics of swift multicharged ion-induced fragmentation of diatomic (CO) and triatomic (CO2) molecules. Performed at the GANIL facility, this study used the Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy technique (RIMS), which consists of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, coupled with a multi-hit capability position sensitive detector (delay line anode). The high-resolution measurement of the kinetic energy distribution released (KER) during the CO fragmentation points out the limitation of the Coulomb Explosion Model, revealing, for example, the di-cation CO2+ electronic state contribution in the case of C+/O+ fragmentation pathway. Furthermore, the multi-ionization cross section dependence with the orientation of the internuclear axis of CO is compared with a geometrical model calculation. Finally, different behaviours are observed for the dissociation dynamics of a triatomic molecule (CO2). While triple ionization leads mainly to a synchronous concerted fragmentation dynamics, a weak fraction of dissociating molecule follows a sequential dynamics involving CO2+ metastable states. In the case of double ionization, (CO2)2+ di-cation dissociation dynamics is asynchronously concerted and has been interpreted using a simple model involving an asymmetrical vibration of the molecule. (author)

  2. Rydberg molecule-induced remote spin-flips

    CERN Document Server

    Niederprüm, Thomas; Eichert, Tanita; Ott, Herwig

    2016-01-01

    We have performed high resolution photoassociation spectroscopy of rubidium Rydberg molecules in the vicinity of the 25P state. Due to the hyperfine interaction in the ground state perturber atom, the emerging mixed singlet-triplet potentials contain contributions from both hyperfine states. We show that this can be used to induce remote spin-flips in the perturber atom upon excitation of a Rydberg molecule. When furthermore the spin-orbit splitting of the Rydberg state is comparable to the hyperfine splitting in the ground state, the orbital angular momentum of the Rydberg electron is entangled with the nuclear spin of the perturber atom. Our results open new possibilities for the implementation of spin-dependent short and long-range interactions for ultracold atoms in bulk systems and in optical lattices.

  3. Rapid detection of antibodies against cytomegalovirus induced immediate early and early antigens by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.

    OpenAIRE

    M. Musiani; Carpi, C; Zerbini, M

    1984-01-01

    An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detecting antibodies against cytomegalovirus induced immediate early antigens and early antigens was developed using purified nuclear antigens and was compared with the indirect immunofluorescence test. The tests were comparable in their ability to detect positive and negative sera, and antibody titres determined by both assays were similar. The use of ELISA for the detection of antibodies against cytomegalovirus induced immediate early and ear...

  4. Co-adjuvant effects of retinoic acid and IL-15 induce inflammatory immunity to dietary antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under physiological conditions the gut-associated lymphoid tissues not only prevent the induction of a local inflammatory immune response, but also induce systemic tolerance to fed antigens. A notable exception is coeliac disease, where genetically susceptible individuals expressing human leukocyte...

  5. Intravenously delivered glucocorticoid liposomes inhibit osteoclast activity and bone erosion in murine antigen-induced arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofkens, Wouter; Grevers, Lilyanne C.; Walgreen, Birgitte; de Vries, Teun J.; Leenen, Pieter J. M.; Everts, Vincent; Storm, Gert; van den Berg, Wim B.; van Lent, Peter L.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of systemic delivery of prednisolone phosphate (PLP) encapsulated within long circulating 'stealth' liposomes on bone erosion and osteoclast activity during experimental antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Liposomal PLP strongly suppressed knee jo

  6. Modulation of Innate Immune Mechanisms to Enhance Leishmania Vaccine-Induced Immunity: Role of Coinhibitory Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Bhattacharya, Parna; Ismail, Nevien; Kaul, Amit; Singh, Rakesh; Nakhasi, Hira L.

    2016-01-01

    No licensed human vaccines are currently available against any parasitic disease including leishmaniasis. Several antileishmanial vaccine formulations have been tested in various animal models, including genetically modified live-attenuated parasite vaccines. Experimental infection studies have shown that Leishmania parasites utilize a broad range of strategies to undermine effector properties of host phagocytic cells, i.e., dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages (MΦ). Furthermore, Leishmania parasites have evolved strategies to actively inhibit TH1 polarizing functions of DCs and to condition the infected MΦ toward anti-inflammatory/alternative/M2 phenotype. The altered phenotype of phagocytic cells is characterized by decreased production of antimicrobial reactive oxygen, nitrogen molecules, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IFN-γ, IL-12, and TNF-α. These early events limit the activation of TH1-effector cells and set the stage for pathogenesis. Furthermore, this early control of innate immunity by the virulent parasites results in substantial alteration in the adaptive immunity characterized by reduced proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and TH2-biased immunity that results in production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as TGF-β, and IL-10. More recent studies have also documented the induction of coinhibitory ligands, such as CTLA-4, PD-L1, CD200, and Tim-3, that induce exhaustion and/or non-proliferation in antigen-experienced T cells. Most of these studies focus on viral infections in chronic phase, thus limiting the direct application of these results to parasitic infections and much less to parasitic vaccines. However, these studies suggest that vaccine-induced protective immunity can be modulated using strategies that enhance the costimulation that might reduce the threshold necessary for T cell activation and conversely by strategies that reduce or block inhibitory molecules, such as PD-L1 and CD200. In this review, we will focus on the

  7. The T-cell anergy induced by Leishmania amazonensis antigens is related with defective antigen presentation and apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta O. Pinheiro

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania amazonensis is the main agent of diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis, a disease associated with anergic immune responses. In this study we show that the crude antigen of Leishmania amazonensis (LaAg but not L. braziliensis promastigotes (LbAg contains substances that suppress mitogenic and spontaneous proliferative responses of T cells. The suppressive substances in LaAg are thermoresistant (100ºC/1h and partially dependent on protease activity. T cell anergy was not due to a decreased production of growth factors as it was not reverted by addition of exogenous IL-2, IL-4, IFN-gamma or IL-12. LaAg did not inhibit anti-CD3-induced T cell activation, suggesting that anergy was due to a defect in antigen presentation. It was also not due to cell necrosis, but was accompanied by expressive DNA fragmentation in lymph node cells, indicative of apoptosis. Although pre-incubation of macrophages with LaAg prevented their capacity to present antigens, this effect was not due to apoptosis of the former. These results suggest that the T cell anergy found in diffuse leishmaniasis may be the result of parasite antigen-driven apoptosis of those cells following defective antigen presentation.A Leishmania amazonensis é o principal agente etiológico da leishmaniose cutânea difusa, uma doença associada a respostas imunes anérgicas. Neste estudo nós mostramos que o extrato bruto de promastigotas de Leishmania amazonensis (LaAg, mas não de L. braziliensis (LbAg, contém substâncias que suprimem respostas proliferativas, espontâneas e mitogênicas, de células T. As substâncias supressoras no LaAg são termo-resistentes (100°C/1h e parcialmente dependentes da atividade de proteases. A anergia de células T não foi devida à diminuição na produção de fatores de crescimento, uma vez que não foi revertida pela adição de: IL-2, IL-4, IFN-gama ou IL-12. O LaAg não inibiu a ativação de células T induzida por anti-CD3, sugerindo que a anergia

  8. Isoniazid induces expression of the antigen 85 complex in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Garbe, T R; Hibler, N S; Deretic, V

    1996-01-01

    Exposure to isoniazid induced the expression of several secreted proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and immunoblot analyses indicated that two of the prominent isonicotinic acid hydrazide-inducible polypeptides were members of the antigen 85 complex, recently demonstrated to have mycolyltransferase activity. We postulate the existence of an intermediate, whose production is inhibited by isonicotinic acid hydrazide, which plays a negative feedback...

  9. Dendritic Cells in the Periphery Control Antigen-Specific Natural and Induced Regulatory T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yamazaki, Sayuri; Morita, Akimichi

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen-presenting cells that regulate both immunity and tolerance. DCs in the periphery play a key role in expanding naturally occurring Foxp3+ CD25+ CD4+ regulatory T cells (Natural T-regs) and inducing Foxp3 expression (Induced T-regs) in Foxp3− CD4+ T cells. DCs are phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous, and further classified into several subsets depending on distinct marker expression and their location. Recent findings indicate the presence...

  10. Characterization of the Antigen Processing Machinery and Endogenous Peptide Presentation of a Bat MHC Class I Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, James W; Woon, Amanda P; Dudek, Nadine L; Croft, Nathan P; Ng, Justin H J; Baker, Michelle L; Wang, Lin-Fa; Purcell, Anthony W

    2016-06-01

    Bats are a major reservoir of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, including severe acute respiratory syndrome-like coronaviruses, henipaviruses, and Ebola virus. Although highly pathogenic to their spillover hosts, bats harbor these viruses, and a large number of other viruses, with little or no clinical signs of disease. How bats asymptomatically coexist with these viruses is unknown. In particular, little is known about bat adaptive immunity, and the presence of functional MHC molecules is mostly inferred from recently described genomes. In this study, we used an affinity purification/mass spectrometry approach to demonstrate that a bat MHC class I molecule, Ptal-N*01:01, binds antigenic peptides and associates with peptide-loading complex components. We identified several bat MHC class I-binding partners, including calnexin, calreticulin, protein disulfide isomerase A3, tapasin, TAP1, and TAP2. Additionally, endogenous peptide ligands isolated from Ptal-N*01:01 displayed a relatively broad length distribution and an unusual preference for a C-terminal proline residue. Finally, we demonstrate that this preference for C-terminal proline residues was observed in Hendra virus-derived peptides presented by Ptal-N*01:01 on the surface of infected cells. To our knowledge, this is the first study to identify endogenous and viral MHC class I ligands for any bat species and, as such, provides an important avenue for monitoring and development of vaccines against major bat-borne viruses both in the reservoir and spillover hosts. Additionally, it will provide a foundation to understand the role of adaptive immunity in bat antiviral responses. PMID:27183594

  11. Self-Adjuvanting Bacterial Vectors Expressing Pre-Erythrocytic Antigens Induce Sterile Protection against Malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke eBergmann-Leitner

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Genetically inactivated, Gram-negative bacteria that express malaria vaccine candidates represent a promising novel self-adjuvanting vaccine approach. Antigens expressed on particulate bacterial carriers not only target directly to antigen-presenting cells but also provide a strong danger signal thus circumventing the requirement for potent extraneous adjuvants. E. coli expressing malarial antigens resulted in the induction of either Th1 or Th2 biased responses that were dependent on both antigen and sub-cellular localization. Some of these constructs induced higher quality humoral responses compared to recombinant protein and most importantly they were able to induce sterile protection against sporozoite challenge in a murine model of malaria. In light of these encouraging results, two major Plasmodium falciparum pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccine targets, the Cell-Traversal protein for Ookinetes and Sporozoites (CelTOS fused to the Maltose-binding protein in the periplasmic space and the Circumsporozoite Protein (CSP fused to the Outer membrane protein A in the outer membrane were expressed in a clinically relevant, attenuated Shigella strain (Shigella flexneri 2a. This type of live attenuated vector has previously undergone clinical investigations as a vaccine against shigellosis. Using this novel delivery platform for malaria, we find that vaccination with the whole organism represents an effective vaccination alternative that induces protective efficacy against sporozoite challenge. Shigella GeMI-Vax expressing malaria targets warrant further evaluation to determine their full potential as a dual disease, multivalent, self-adjuvanting vaccine system, against both shigellosis and malaria.

  12. Regulation by gut commensal bacteria of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule expression in the intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Yasuaki; Murata, Yoji; Park, Jung-Ha; Kotani, Takenori; Imada, Shinya; Saito, Yasuyuki; Okazawa, Hideki; Azuma, Takeshi; Matozaki, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 1 and CEACAM20, immunoglobulin superfamily members, are predominantly expressed in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and co-localized at the apical surface of these cells. We here showed that the expression of mouse CEACAM1 and CEACAM20 at both mRNA and protein levels was markedly reduced in IECs of the small intestine by the treatment of mice with antibiotics against Gram-positive bacteria. The expression of both proteins was also decreased in IECs of the small intestine from germ-free mice, compared with that from control specific-pathogen-free mice. Exposure of intestinal organoids to IFN-γ markedly increased the expression of either CEACAM1 or CEACAM20, whereas the exposure to TNF-α increased the expression of the former protein, but not that of the latter. In contrast, the expression of CEACAM20, but not of CEACAM1, in intestinal organoids was markedly increased by exposure to butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid produced by bacterial fermentation in the intestine. Collectively, our results suggest that Gram-positive bacteria promote the mRNA expression of CEACAM1 or CEACAM20 in the small intestine. Inflammatory cytokines or butyrate likely participates in such effects of commensal bacteria. PMID:25908210

  13. Cell surface antigens of radiation leukemia virus-induced BALB/c leukemias defined by syngeneic cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cell surface antigens of mouse leukemias were defined by BALB/c cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) generated against syngeneic radiation leukemia virus (RadLV)-induced leukemia, BALBRV1 or BALBRVD. Hyperimmunization of BALB/c mice with irradiated leukemias followed by in vitro sensitization of primed spleen cells resulted in the generation of CTL with high killing activity. The specificity of CTL was examined by direct cytotoxicity assays and competitive inhibition assays. A shared cell surface antigen, designated as BALBRV1 antigen, was detected by BALB/c anti-BALBRV1 CTL. BALBRV1 antigen was expressed not only on RadLV-induced BALB/c leukemias except for BALBRVD, but also on spontaneous or X-ray-induced BALB/c leukemias, chemically-induced leukemias with the H-2d haplotype and some chemically-induced BALB/c sarcomas. In contrast, a unique cell surface antigen, designated as BALBRVD antigen, was detected by BALB/c anti-BALBRVD CTL. BALBRVD antigen was expressed only on BALBRVD, but not on thirty-nine normal lymphoid or tumor cells. These two antigens could be distinguished from those previously defined on Friend, Moloney, Rauscher or Gross murine leukemia virus (MuLV) leukemias, or MuLV-related antigens. Both cytotoxic responses were blocked by antisera against H-2Kd, but not H-2Dd. The relationship of BALBRV1 antigen and BALBRVD antigen to endogenous MuLV is discussed with regard to the antigenic distribution on tumor cell lines. (author)

  14. Preexposure to ozone blocks the antigen-induced late asthmatic response of the canine peripheral airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, C.R.; Kleeberger, S.R.; Spannhake, E.W. (Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The influence of exposure of the airways to ozone on acute allergic responsiveness has been investigated in several species. Little is known, however, about the effect of this environmental pollutant on the late asthmatic response (LAR) in animals in which it is exhibited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate this effect in the canine peripheral airways and to assess the potential role of mast cells in modulating the effect. A series of experiments on seven mongrel dogs demonstrated that the numbers of mast cells at the base of the epithelial region of small subsegmental airways exposed to 1 ppm ozone for 5 min were significantly (p less than .01) increased 3 h following exposure compared to air exposed or nonexposed control airways. In a second series of experiments performed on eight additional mongrel dogs with inherent sensitivity to Ascaris suum antigen, antigen aerosol was administered to the sublobar segment 3 h following ozone preexposure when mast cell numbers were presumed to be increased. These experiments were performed to determine whether ozone preexposure could enhance the late-phase response to antigen by virtue of acutely increasing the number of mast cells available to bind the antigen. Four of the eight dogs tested displayed a late-phase response to antigen following air-sham preexposure. In these four dogs, simultaneous ozone preexposure of a contralateral lobe completely blocked the late-phase response to antigen. These results indicate that the consequences of a single exposure to ozone persist beyond its effects on acute antigen-induced bronchoconstriction and extend to the complex processes involved with the late response. This attenuating effect of ozone is seen under conditions where mast-cell numbers in the airways are increased above baseline levels.

  15. Interleukin 1-induced down-regulation of antibody binding to CD4 molecules on human lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvede, N; Christensen, L D; Ødum, Niels;

    1988-01-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) is involved in the early activation of T lymphocytes. The CD4 antigen, described as a phenotypic marker of helper T cells, is also important in early T-cell activation by its ability to bind to MHC class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells, and to transmit positive (and ...... actinomycin D or cytochalasin B, indicating that protein synthesis and intact microfilament function were essential for re-expression of CD4 binding. The mechanism by which CD4 molecules are physically and/or functionally modulated by IL-1 is unclear....

  16. Antigen handling in antigen-induced arthritis in mice: an autoradiographic and immunofluorescence study using whole joint sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antigen localization after intraarticular antigen injection was studied in immune and nonimmune mice using autoradiographic and immunofluorescence techniques on whole joint sections. After intraarticular injection of radiolabeled methylated bovine serum albumin (125I-mBSA) in immune mice, labeling in the synovium and synovial exudate diminished rapidly, apart from some deposits in fibrinlike material present in the joint cavity. Long-term antigen retention was found in avascular and hypovascular structures lining the joint cavity, albeit not along the whole surface; eg, labeling remained present at the edges of the femoral condyle hyaline cartilage but not at the central weight-bearing region; long-term retention at ligaments was only found at the insertion sites. Immunofluorescence data in immune animals showed antigen retention together with the presence of immunoglobulins and complement, indicating that antigen is retained at least in part in the form of immune complexes. Nonimmune mice showed even higher long-term antigen retention than immune animals, probably related to physico-chemical properties of the antigen enabling nonimmune binding to articular structures, but also indicating that the presence of joint inflammation in the immune animals enhances antigen clearance. Histologic examination of the ligaments and patellar cartilage of immune mice did reveal that long-term antigen retention was not anatomically related to nearby inflammation or to local tissue damage. The importance of long-term antigen retention for the chronicity of arthritis may lie in the leakage of small amounts of this antigen to joint compartments where it does behave as an inflammatory stimulus; it may further be that it renders the joint a specifically hypersensitive area

  17. Construction of bifunctional molecules specific to antigen and antibody’s Fc-fragment by fusion of scFv-antibodies with staphylococcal protein A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolibo D. V.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To develop approach for detection of scFv and their complexes with antigens. Methods. The fusion proteins, which include sequences of scFv and staphylococcal protein A, were constructed and the obtained bifunctional molecules were immunochemically analysed. Results. It was shown, that scFv fused with protein A and their complexes with antigens are effectively recognized by labelled immunoglobulins with unrestricted antigenic specificity. Conclusions. The fusion of scFv with protein A fragment is a perspective approach to increase the efficiency of application in ELISA. The obtained scFv, fused with protein A, could be used for development of test-systems for the detection of diphtheria toxin.

  18. Enhanced T cell responses to antigenic peptides targeted to B cell surface Ig, Ia, or class I molecules

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    The helper T cell recognition of soluble globular protein antigens requires that the proteins be processed by an APC, releasing a peptide that is transported to and held on the APC surface where it is recognized by the specific T cell in conjunction with Ia. When cellular processing functions are blocked, APC lose their ability to present native antigens while retaining the capacity to activate T cells when provided with a cognate peptide fragment that contains the T cell antigenic determinan...

  19. Cellular gene expression induced by parasite antigens and allergens in neonates from parasite-infected mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soboslay, Peter T; Orlikowsky, Thorsten; Huang, Xiangsheng; Gille, Christian; Spring, Bärbel; Kocherscheidt, Lars; Agossou, Abram; Banla, Meba; Bonin, Michael; Köhler, Carsten

    2016-05-01

    Prenatal exposure to parasite antigens or allergens will influence the profile and strength of postnatal immune responses, such contact may tolerize and increase susceptibility to future infections or sensitize to environmental allergens. Exposure in utero to parasite antigens will distinctly alter cellular gene expression in newborns. Gene microarrays were applied to study gene expression in umbilical cord blood cell (UCBC) from parasite-exposed (Para-POS) and non-exposed (Para-NEG) neonates. UCBC were activated with antigens of helminth (Onchocerca volvulus), amoeba (Entamoeba histolytica) or allergens of mite (Dermatophagoides farinae). When UCBC from Para-POS and Para-NEG newborns were exposed to helminth antigens or allergens consistent differences occurred in the expression of genes encoding for MHC class I and II alleles, signal transducers of activation and transcription (STATs), cytokines, chemokines, immunoglobulin heavy and light chains, and molecules associated with immune regulation (SOCS, TLR, TGF), inflammation (TNF, CCR) and apoptosis (CASP). Expression of genes associated with innate immune responses were enhanced in Para-NEG, while in Para-POS, the expression of MHC class II and STAT genes was reduced. Within functional gene networks for cellular growth, proliferation and immune responses, Para-NEG neonates presented with significantly higher expression values than Para-POS. In Para-NEG newborns, the gene cluster and pathway analyses suggested that gene expression profiles may predispose for the development of immunological, hematological and dermatological disorders upon postnatal helminth parasite infection or allergen exposure. Thus, prenatal parasite contact will sensitize without generating aberrant inflammatory immune responses, and increased pro-inflammatory but decreased regulatory gene expression profiles will be present in those neonates lacking prenatal parasite antigen encounter. PMID:27062712

  20. Antigen-specific tolerance induced by IL-10 gene modified immature dendritic cells in experimental autoimmune myocarditis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei-min; LI Yue; LIU Wei; GAO Cheng; ZHOU Bao-guo; YANG Shu-sen; WANG Zheng; ZHANG Rui-hong; GAN Run-tao; KONG Yi-hui

    2006-01-01

    underwent maturation induced by in vitro exposure to LPS. IL-10 gene modified iDC inhibited the antigen specific T cell responses towards cardiac myosin. IκB protein was up-regulated significantly in the IL-10 gene modified iDC group.Conclusions IL-10 gene modified iDC induced antigen-specific tolerance in EAM. The underlying mechanisms may be related to costimulatory molecules down-regulation and NF-κB pathway inhibition.

  1. Leptin Resistance Contributes to Obesity in Mice with Null Mutation of Carcinoembryonic Antigen-related Cell Adhesion Molecule 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Garrett; Russo, Lucia; Castaneda, Tamara R; Pfeiffer, Verena; Ghadieh, Hilda E; Ghanem, Simona S; Wu, Jieshen; Faulkner, Latrice D; Ergün, Süleyman; McInerney, Marcia F; Hill, Jennifer W; Najjar, Sonia M

    2016-05-20

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) promotes hepatic insulin clearance. Consistently, mice with null mutation of Ceacam1 (Cc1(-/-)) exhibit impaired insulin clearance with increased lipid production in liver and redistribution to white adipose tissue, leading to visceral obesity at 2 months of age. When the mutation is propagated on the C57/BL6J genetic background, total fat mass rises significantly with age, and glucose intolerance and systemic insulin resistance develop at 6 months of age. This study was carried out to determine the mechanisms underlying the marked increase in total fat mass in 6-month-old mutants. Indirect calorimetry analysis showed that Cc1(-/-) mice develop hyperphagia and a significant reduction in physical activity, in particular in the early hours of the dark cycle, during which energy expenditure is only slightly lower than in wild-type mice. They also exhibit increased triglyceride accumulation in skeletal muscle, due in part to incomplete fatty acid β-oxidation. Mechanistically, hypothalamic leptin signaling is reduced, as demonstrated by blunted STAT3 phosphorylation in coronal sections in response to an intracerebral ventricular injection of leptin. Hypothalamic fatty-acid synthase activity is also elevated in the mutants. Together, the data show that the increase in total fat mass in Cc1(-/-) mice is mainly attributed to hyperphagia and reduced spontaneous physical activity. Although the contribution of the loss of CEACAM1 from anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin neurons in the arcuate nucleus is unclear, leptin resistance and elevated hypothalamic fatty-acid synthase activity could underlie altered energy balance in these mice. PMID:27002145

  2. Natural Killer Cells and Helicobacter pylori Infection: Bacterial Antigens and Interleukin-12 Act Synergistically To Induce Gamma Interferon Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Cheol H.; Lundgren, Anna; Azem, Josef; Sjöling, Åsa; Holmgren, Jan; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Lundin, B. Samuel

    2005-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is known to induce a local immune response, which is characterized by activation of lymphocytes and the production of IFN-γ in the stomach mucosa. Since not only T cells, but also natural killer (NK) cells, are potent producers of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), we investigated whether NK cells play a role in the immune response to H. pylori infection. Our results showed that NK cells were present in both the gastric and duodenal mucosae but that H. pylori infection did not affect the infiltration of NK cells into the gastrointestinal area. Furthermore, we could show that NK cells could be activated directly by H. pylori antigens, as H. pylori bacteria, as well as lysate from H. pylori, induced the secretion of IFN-γ by NK cells. NK cells were also activated without direct contact when separated from the bacteria by an epithelial cell layer, indicating that the activation of NK cells by H. pylori can also occur in vivo, in the infected stomach mucosa. Moreover, the production of IFN-γ by NK cells was greatly enhanced when a small amount of interleukin-12 (IL-12) was added, and this synergistic effect was associated with increased expression of the IL-12 receptor β2. It was further evident that bacterial lysate alone was sufficient to induce the activation of cytotoxicity-related molecules. In conclusion, we demonstrated that NK cells are present in the gastroduodenal mucosa of humans and that NK cells produce high levels of IFN-γ when stimulated with a combination of H. pylori antigen and IL-12. We propose that NK cells play an active role in the local immune response to H. pylori infection. PMID:15731046

  3. Attenuated recombinant vaccinia virus expressing oncofetal antigen (tumor-associated antigen) 5T4 induces active therapy of established tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulryan, Kate; Ryan, Matthew G; Myers, Kevin A; Shaw, David; Wang, Who; Kingsman, Susan M; Stern, Peter L; Carroll, Miles W

    2002-10-01

    The human oncofetal antigen 5T4 (h5T4) is a transmembrane glycoprotein overexpressed by a wide spectrum of cancers, including colorectal, ovarian, and gastric, but with a limited normal tissue expression. Such properties make 5T4 an excellent putative target for cancer immunotherapy. The murine homologue of 5T4 (m5T4) has been cloned and characterized, which allows for the evaluation of immune intervention strategies in "self-antigen" in vivo tumor models. We have constructed recombinant vaccinia viruses based on the highly attenuated and modified vaccinia virus ankara (MVA strain), expressing h5T4 (MVA-h5T4), m5T4 (MVA-m5T4), and Escherichia coli LacZ (MVA-LacZ). Immunization of BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice with MVA-h5T4 and MVA-m5T4 constructs induced antibody responses to human and mouse 5T4, respectively. C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice vaccinated with MVA-h5T4 were challenged with syngeneic tumor line transfectants, B16 melanoma, and CT26 colorectal cells that express h5T4. MVA-h5T4-vaccinated mice showed significant tumor retardation compared with mice vaccinated with MVA-LacZ or PBS. In active treatment studies, inoculation with MVA-h5T4 was able to treat established CT26-h5T4 lung tumor and to a lesser extent B16.h5T4 s.c. tumors. Additionally, when C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with MVA-m5T4 were challenged with B16 cells expressing m5T4, resulting growth of the tumors was significantly retarded compared with control animals. Furthermore, mice vaccinated with MVA-m5T4 showed no signs of autoimmune toxicity. These data support the use of MVA-5T4 for tumor immunotherapy. PMID:12481437

  4. The Granulocyte Receptor Carcinoembryonic Antigen-Related Cell Adhesion Molecule 3 (CEACAM3) Directly Associates with Vav to Promote Phagocytosis of Human Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitter, Tim; Pils, Stefan; Sakk, Vadim; Frank, Ronald; Fischer, Klaus-Dieter; Hauck, Christof R.

    2007-01-01

    The human granulocyte-specific receptor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM)3 is critically involved in the opsonin-independent recognition of several bacterial pathogens. CEACAM3-mediated phagocytosis depends on the integrity of an ITAM-like sequence within the cytoplasmic domain of CEACAM3 and is characterized by rapid stimulation of the GTPase Rac. By performing a functional screen with CEACAM3-expressing cells, we found that overexpression of a dominant-negativ...

  5. Common Ewing sarcoma-associated antigens fail to induce natural T cell responses in both patients and healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altvater, Bianca; Kailayangiri, Sareetha; Theimann, Nadine; Ahlmann, Martina; Farwick, Nicole; Chen, Christiane; Pscherer, Sibylle; Neumann, Ilka; Mrachatz, Gabriele; Hansmeier, Anna; Hardes, Jendrik; Gosheger, Georg; Juergens, Heribert; Rossig, Claudia

    2014-10-01

    Disseminated or relapsed Ewing sarcoma (EwS) has remained fatal in the majority of patients. A promising approach to preventing relapse after conventional therapy is to establish tumor antigen-specific immune control. Efficient and specific T cell memory against the tumor depends on the expansion of rare T cells with native specificity against target antigens overexpressed by the tumor. Candidate antigens in EwS include six-transmembrane epithelial antigen of the prostate-1 (STEAP1), and the human cancer/testis antigens X-antigen family member 1 (XAGE1) and preferentially expressed antigen in melanoma (PRAME). Here, we screened normal donors and EwS patients for the presence of circulating T cells reactive with overlapping peptide libraries of these antigens by IFN-γ Elispot analysis. The majority of 22 healthy donors lacked detectable memory T cell responses against STEAP1, XAGE1 and PRAME. Moreover, ex vivo detection of T cells specific for these antigens in both blood and bone marrow were limited to a minority of EwS patients and required nonspecific T cell prestimulation. Cytotoxic T cells specific for the tumor-associated antigens were efficiently and reliably generated by in vitro priming using professional antigen-presenting cells and optimized cytokine stimulation; however, these T cells failed to interact with native antigen processed by target cells and with EwS cells expressing the antigen. We conclude that EwS-associated antigens fail to induce efficient T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated antitumor immune responses even under optimized conditions. Strategies based on TCR engineering could provide a more effective means to manipulating T cell immunity toward targeted elimination of tumor cells. PMID:24973179

  6. Antigen Presentation and T-Cell Activation Are Critical for RBP4-Induced Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes-Vieira, Pedro M; Castoldi, Angela; Aryal, Pratik; Wellenstein, Kerry; Peroni, Odile D; Kahn, Barbara B

    2016-05-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) inflammation contributes to impaired insulin action, which is a major cause of type 2 diabetes. RBP4 is an adipocyte- and liver-derived protein with an important role in insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and AT inflammation. RBP4 elevation causes AT inflammation by activating innate immunity, which elicits an adaptive immune response. RBP4-overexpressing mice (RBP4-Ox) are insulin resistant and glucose intolerant and have increased AT macrophages and T-helper 1 cells. We show that high-fat diet-fed RBP4(-/-) mice have reduced AT inflammation and improved insulin sensitivity versus wild type. We also elucidate the mechanism for RBP4-induced macrophage antigen presentation and subsequent T-cell activation. In RBP4-Ox, AT macrophages display enhanced c-Jun N-terminal kinase, extracellular signal-related kinase, and p38 phosphorylation. Inhibition of these pathways and of NF-κB reduces activation of macrophages and CD4 T cells. MyD88 is an adaptor protein involved in proinflammatory signaling. In macrophages from MyD88(-/-) mice, RBP4 fails to stimulate secretion of tumor necrosis factor, IL-12, and IL-6 and CD4 T-cell activation. In vivo blockade of antigen presentation by treating RBP4-Ox mice with CTLA4-Ig, which blocks costimulation of T cells, is sufficient to reduce AT inflammation and improve insulin resistance. Thus, MyD88 and downstream mitogen-activated protein kinase and NF-κB pathways are necessary for RBP4-induced macrophage antigen presentation and subsequent T-cell activation. Also, blocking antigen presentation with CTLA4-Ig improves RBP4-induced insulin resistance and macrophage-induced T-cell activation. PMID:26936962

  7. Degranulation of human mast cells induces an endothelial antigen central to leukocyte adhesion.

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, L M; Lavker, R M; Matis, W L; Murphy, G F

    1989-01-01

    To understand better the role of mast cell secretory products in the genesis of inflammation, a system was developed for in vitro degranulation of human mast cells in skin organ cultures. Within 2 hr after morphine sulfate-induced degranulation, endothelial cells lining microvessels adjacent to affected mast cells expressed an activation antigen important for endothelial-leukocyte adhesion. Identical results were obtained when other mast cell secretagogues (anti-IgE, compound 48/80, and calci...

  8. A common SNP in ER aminopeptidase 2 induces a specificity switch that leads to altered antigen processing

    OpenAIRE

    Evnouchidou, Irini; Birtley, James; Seregin, Sergey; Papakyriakou, Athanasios; Zervoudi, Efthalia; Samiotaki, Martina; Panayotou, George; Giastas, Petros; Petrakis, Olivia; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Amalfitano, Andrea; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Mavridis, Irene M.; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2012-01-01

    ER aminopeptidases 1 and 2 (ERAP1 and ERAP2) cooperate to trim antigenic peptide precursors for loading onto MHC class I molecules and help regulate the adaptive immune response. Common coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ERAP1 and ERAP2 have been linked with predisposition to human diseases ranging from viral and bacterial infections to autoimmunity and cancer. It has been hypothesized that altered antigen processing by these enzymes is a causal link to disease etiology but the ...

  9. Antigen-sensitized CD4+CD62Llow memory/effector T helper 2 cells can induce airway hyperresponsiveness in an antigen free setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagatani Katsuya

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR is one of the most prominent features of asthma, however, precise mechanisms for its induction have not been fully elucidated. We previously reported that systemic antigen sensitization alone directly induces AHR before development of eosinophilic airway inflammation in a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation, which suggests a critical role of antigen-specific systemic immune response itself in the induction of AHR. In the present study, we examined this possibility by cell transfer experiment, and then analyzed which cell source was essential for this process. Methods BALB/c mice were immunized with ovalbumin (OVA twice. Spleen cells were obtained from the mice and were transferred in naive mice. Four days later, AHR was assessed. We carried out bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL to analyze inflammation and cytokine production in the lung. Fluorescence and immunohistochemical studies were performed to identify T cells recruiting and proliferating in the lung or in the gut of the recipient. To determine the essential phenotype, spleen cells were column purified by antibody-coated microbeads with negative or positive selection, and transferred. Then, AHR was assessed. Results Transfer of spleen cells obtained from OVA-sensitized mice induced a moderate, but significant, AHR without airway antigen challenge in naive mice without airway eosinophilia. Immunization with T helper (Th 1 elicited antigen (OVA with complete Freund's adjuvant did not induce the AHR. Transferred cells distributed among organs, and the cells proliferated in an antigen free setting for at least three days in the lung. This transfer-induced AHR persisted for one week. Interleukin-4 and 5 in the BAL fluid increased in the transferred mice. Immunoglobulin E was not involved in this transfer-induced AHR. Transfer of in vitro polarized CD4+ Th2 cells, but not Th1 cells, induced AHR. We finally clarified that CD4+CD62Llow memory

  10. Perillyl alcohol suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits the mevalonate pathway. •We examined whether POH suppresses immune responses with a mouse model of asthma. •POH treatment during sensitization suppressed Ag-induced priming of CD4+ T cells. •POH suppressed airway eosinophila and cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes. -- Abstract: Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits farnesyl transferase and geranylgeranyl transferase, key enzymes that induce conformational and functional changes in small G proteins to conduct signal production for cell proliferation. Thus, it has been tried for the treatment of cancers. However, although it affects the proliferation of immunocytes, its influence on immune responses has been examined in only a few studies. Notably, its effect on antigen-induced immune responses has not been studied. In this study, we examined whether POH suppresses Ag-induced immune responses with a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation. POH treatment of sensitized mice suppressed proliferation and cytokine production in Ag-stimulated spleen cells or CD4+ T cells. Further, sensitized mice received aerosolized OVA to induce allergic airway inflammation, and some mice received POH treatment. POH significantly suppressed indicators of allergic airway inflammation such as airway eosinophilia. Cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes was also significantly suppressed. These results demonstrate that POH suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung. Considering that it exists naturally, POH could be a novel preventive or therapeutic option for immunologic lung disorders such as asthma with minimal side effects

  11. Mycobacterium bovis BCG priming induces a strong potentiation of the antibody response induced by recombinant BCG expressing a foreign antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Gheorghiu, M; Lagranderie, M R; Gicquel, B M; Leclerc, C D

    1994-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated that strong cellular or humoral immune responses can be induced against foreign antigens expressed by recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG. It has therefore been suggested that BCG could represent one of the best candidate vectors for live recombinant vaccines. However, a large percentage of the human population has been immunized by BCG, and this priming could modify the immune response to future recombinant BCG vaccines. In the present study, we have ...

  12. Diversity of natural self-derived ligands presented by different HLA class I molecules in transporter antigen processing-deficient cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Lorente

    Full Text Available The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP translocates the cytosol-derived proteolytic peptides to the endoplasmic reticulum lumen where they complex with nascent human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I molecules. Non-functional TAP complexes and viral or tumoral blocking of these transporters leads to reduced HLA class I surface expression and a drastic change in the available peptide repertoire. Using mass spectrometry to analyze complex human leukocyte antigen HLA-bound peptide pools isolated from large numbers of TAP-deficient cells, we identified 334 TAP-independent ligands naturally presented by four different HLA-A, -B, and -C class I molecules with very different TAP dependency from the same cell line. The repertoire of TAP-independent peptides examined favored increased peptide lengths and a lack of strict binding motifs for all four HLA class I molecules studied. The TAP-independent peptidome arose from 182 parental proteins, the majority of which yielded one HLA ligand. In contrast, TAP-independent antigen processing of very few cellular proteins generated multiple HLA ligands. Comparison between TAP-independent peptidome and proteome of several subcellular locations suggests that the secretory vesicle-like organelles could be a relevant source of parental proteins for TAP-independent HLA ligands. Finally, a predominant endoproteolytic peptidase specificity for Arg/Lys or Leu/Phe residues in the P(1 position of the scissile bond was found for the TAP-independent ligands. These data draw a new and intricate picture of TAP-independent pathways.

  13. Anticancer chemotherapy-induced intratumoral recruitment and differentiation of antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuting; Adjemian, Sandy; Mattarollo, Stephen R; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Aymeric, Laetitia; Yang, Heng; Portela Catani, João Paulo; Hannani, Dalil; Duret, Helene; Steegh, Kim; Martins, Isabelle; Schlemmer, Frederic; Michaud, Mickaël; Kepp, Oliver; Sukkurwala, Abdul Qader; Menger, Laurie; Vacchelli, Erika; Droin, Nathalie; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Krzysiek, Roman; Gordon, Siamon; Taylor, Philip R; Van Endert, Peter; Solary, Eric; Smyth, Mark J; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2013-04-18

    The therapeutic efficacy of anthracyclines relies on antitumor immune responses elicited by dying cancer cells. How chemotherapy-induced cell death leads to efficient antigen presentation to T cells, however, remains a conundrum. We found that intratumoral CD11c(+)CD11b(+)Ly6C(hi) cells, which displayed some characteristics of inflammatory dendritic cells and included granulomonocytic precursors, were crucial for anthracycline-induced anticancer immune responses. ATP released by dying cancer cells recruited myeloid cells into tumors and stimulated the local differentiation of CD11c(+)CD11b(+)Ly6C(hi) cells. Such cells efficiently engulfed tumor antigens in situ and presented them to T lymphocytes, thus vaccinating mice, upon adoptive transfer, against a challenge with cancer cells. Manipulations preventing tumor infiltration by CD11c(+)CD11b(+)Ly6C(hi) cells, such as the local overexpression of ectonucleotidases, the blockade of purinergic receptors, or the neutralization of CD11b, abolished the immune system-dependent antitumor activity of anthracyclines. Our results identify a subset of tumor-infiltrating leukocytes as therapy-relevant antigen-presenting cells. PMID:23562161

  14. Antigenic deletion and malignant enhancement induced in lymphoma cells by passage through X-irradiated hosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies are reported in which lymphoma cells were induced to delete strong virus-associated membrane antigens, and as a result considerably increase their capacity for metastasis, by X-irradiation of the hosts. The studies involved injecting rats at birth with leukaemia virus cells. The cells expressed strong murine leukaemia virus surface antigens and were consistently rejected when transplanted into normal adult syngeneic rats. When the rats were given 300 to 350 R total body X-irradiation, however, lymphoma cells transplanted within 24 hours subcutaneously or intraperitoneally grow progressively at the site of the graft, occasionally spread to distant sites and eventually cause death of the hosts. Examined under the electron microscope the transplanted lymphoma cells appeared devoid of both mature and immature virus particles. The loss of surface antigens was consistently accompanied by increased malignancy of the lymphoma cells. Explanations for the results are offered. Implications for radiotherapy in man are discussed, and it is suggested that whilst such treatment might be effective in the control of local recurrences, it could possibly induce an increase in the number of distant metastases. Some fluorescence studies of the cells are also described. (U.K.)

  15. Analysis of endogenous peptides bound by soluble MHC class I molecules: a novel approach for identifying tumor-specific antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnea, Eilon; Beer, Ilan; Patoka, Renana; Ziv, Tamar; Kessler, Ofra; Tzehoval, Esther; Eisenbach, Lea; Zavazava, Nicholas; Admon, Arie

    2002-01-01

    The Human MHC Project aims at comprehensive cataloging of peptides presented within the context of different human leukocyte antigens (HLA) expressed by cells of various tissue origins, both in health and in disease. Of major interest are peptides presented on cancer cells, which include peptides derived from tumor antigens that are of interest for immunotherapy. Here, HLA-restricted tumor-specific antigens were identified by transfecting human breast, ovarian and prostate tumor cell lines with truncated genes of HLA-A2 and HLA-B7. Soluble HLA secreted by these cell lines were purified by affinity chromatography and analyzed by nano-capillary electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Typically, a large peptide pool was recovered and sequenced including peptides derived from MAGE-B2 and mucin and other new tumor-derived antigens that may serve as potential candidates for immunotherapy. PMID:11782012

  16. Transgenic carrot expressing fusion protein comprising M. tuberculosis antigens induces immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permyakova, Natalia V; Zagorskaya, Alla A; Belavin, Pavel A; Uvarova, Elena A; Nosareva, Olesya V; Nesterov, Andrey E; Novikovskaya, Anna A; Zav'yalov, Evgeniy L; Moshkin, Mikhail P; Deineko, Elena V

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the major infectious diseases, which continues to pose a major global health problem. Transgenic plants may serve as bioreactors to produce heterologous proteins including antibodies, antigens, and hormones. In the present study, a genetic construct has been designed that comprises the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes cfp10, esat6 and dIFN gene, which encode deltaferon, a recombinant analog of the human γ-interferon designed for expression in plant tissues. This construct was transferred to the carrot (Daucus carota L.) genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. This study demonstrates that the fusion protein CFP10-ESAT6-dIFN is synthesized in the transgenic carrot storage roots. The protein is able to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in laboratory animals (mice) when administered either orally or by injection. It should be emphasized that M. tuberculosis antigens contained in the fusion protein have no cytotoxic effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PMID:25949997

  17. Increased expression of beta 2-microglobulin and histocompatibility antigens on human lymphoid cells induced by interferon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, M; Heron, I; Berg, K

    1982-01-01

    Normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes were incubated in the presence of different concentrations of interferon for various incubation periods. Subsequently, the amount of beta 2-Microglobulin and HLA-A, B and C surface antigens was estimated by means of quantitative immunofluorescence (flow...... cytofluorometry) and by a radioimmunoassay for beta 2-Microglobulin. It was found that the amounts of these MHC antigens increased in a dose and time-dependent way after interferon treatment. Furthermore, the influence of different temperatures on this IFN-induced increase in beta 2-Microglobulin was gradually...... enhanced after incubation at 37 degrees C to 39 degrees C incubation mostly suppressed the beta 2-Microglobulin increase observed at 39 degrees C. The total amount of membrane associated beta 2-Microglobulin was estimated by a radioimmunoassay. After interferon treatment a beta 2-Microglobulin increase...

  18. Transgenic Carrot Expressing Fusion Protein Comprising M. tuberculosis Antigens Induces Immune Response in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia V. Permyakova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis remains one of the major infectious diseases, which continues to pose a major global health problem. Transgenic plants may serve as bioreactors to produce heterologous proteins including antibodies, antigens, and hormones. In the present study, a genetic construct has been designed that comprises the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes cfp10, esat6 and dIFN gene, which encode deltaferon, a recombinant analog of the human γ-interferon designed for expression in plant tissues. This construct was transferred to the carrot (Daucus carota L. genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. This study demonstrates that the fusion protein CFP10-ESAT6-dIFN is synthesized in the transgenic carrot storage roots. The protein is able to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in laboratory animals (mice when administered either orally or by injection. It should be emphasized that M. tuberculosis antigens contained in the fusion protein have no cytotoxic effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  19. Immunotoxin Against a Donor MHC Class II Molecule Induces Indefinite Survival of Murine Kidney Allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K; Nowocin, A K; Meader, L; Edwards, L A; Smith, R A; Wong, W

    2016-04-01

    Rejection of donor organs depends on the trafficking of donor passenger leukocytes to the secondary lymphoid organs of the recipient to elicit an immune response via the direct antigen presentation pathway. Therefore, the depletion of passenger leukocytes may be clinically applicable as a strategy to improve graft survival. Because major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II(+) cells are most efficient at inducing immune responses, selective depletion of this population from donor grafts may dampen the alloimmune response and prolong graft survival. In a fully MHC mismatched mouse kidney allograft model, we describe the synthesis of an immunotoxin, consisting of the F(ab')2 fragment of a monoclonal antibody against the donor MHC class II molecule I-A(k) conjugated with the plant-derived ribosomal inactivating protein gelonin. This anti-I-A(k) gelonin immunotoxin depletes I-A(k) expressing cells specifically in vitro and in vivo. When given to recipients of kidney allografts, it resulted in indefinite graft survival with normal graft function, presence of Foxp3(+) cells within donor grafts, diminished donor-specific antibody formation, and delayed rejection of subsequent donor-type skin grafts. Strategies aimed at the donor arm of the immune system using agents such as immunotoxins may be a useful adjuvant to existing recipient-orientated immunosuppression. PMID:26799449

  20. Antigen-oriented T cell migration contributes to myelin peptide induced-EAE and immune tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Peiguo; Fu, Hanxiao; Wei, Gaohui; Wei, Zhongwei; Zhang, Junhua; Ma, Xuehan; Rui, Dong; Meng, Xianchun; Ming, Liang

    2016-08-01

    Treatment with soluble myelin peptide can efficiently and specifically induce tolerance to demyelination autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, however the mechanism underlying this therapeutic effect remains to be elucidated. In actively induced mouse model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) we analyzed T cell and innate immune cell responses in the central nervous system (CNS) and spleen after intraperitoneal (i.p.) infusion of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). We found that i.p. MOG infusion blocked effector T cell recruitment to the CNS and protected mice from EAE and lymphoid organ atrophy. Innate immune CD11b(+) cells preferentially recruited MOG-specific effector T cells, particularly when activated to become competent antigen presenting cells (APCs). During EAE development, mature APCs were enriched in the CNS rather than in the spleen, attracting effector T cells to the CNS. Increased myelin antigen exposure induced CNS-APC maturation, recruiting additional effector T cells to the CNS, causing symptoms of disease. MOG triggered functional maturation of splenic APCs. MOG presenting APCs interacted with MOG-specific T cells in the spleen, aggregating to cluster around CD11b(+) cells, and were trapped in the periphery. This process was MHC II dependent as an MHC II directed antibody blocked CD4(+) T cell cluster formation. These findings highlight the role of myelin peptide-loaded APCs in myelin peptide-induced EAE and immune tolerance. PMID:27327113

  1. Development of monoclonal antibodies to human microsomal epoxide hydrolase and analysis of "preneoplastic antigen"-like molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Hongying; Yoshimura, Kazunori; Kobayashi, Nobuharu; Sugiyama, Kazuo; Sawada, Jun-Ichi; Saito, Yoshiro; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D; Akatsuka, Toshitaka

    2012-04-01

    Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) is a drug metabolizing enzyme which resides on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and catalyzes the hydration of reactive epoxide intermediates that are formed by cytochrome P450s. mEH is also thought to have a role in bile acid transport on the plasma membrane of hepatocytes. It is speculated that efficient execution of such multiple functions is secured by its orientation and association with cytochrome P450 enzymes on the ER membrane and formation of a multiple transport system on the plasma membrane. In certain disease status, mEH loses its association with the membrane and can be detected as distinct antigens in the cytosol of preneoplastic foci of liver (preneoplastic antigen), in the serum in association with hepatitis C virus infection (AN antigen), or in some brain tumors. To analyze the antigenic structures of mEH in physiological and pathological conditions, we developed monoclonal antibodies against different portions of mEH. Five different kinds of antibodies were obtained: three, anti-N-terminal portions; one anti-C-terminal; and one, anti-conformational epitope. By combining these antibodies, we developed antigen detection methods which are specific to either the membrane-bound form or the linearized form of mEH. These methods detected mEH in the culture medium released from a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line and a glioblastoma cell line, which was found to be a multimolecular complex with a unique antigenic structure different from that of the membrane-bound form of mEH. These antibodies and antigen detection methods may be useful to study pathological changes of mEH in various human diseases. PMID:22310175

  2. Effects of T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-containing molecule-3 signaling molecule on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells with hepatitis B virus surface antigen stimulation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhenjun; Jiang, Ting; Zhu, Min; Pan, Kechuan; Yan, Fei; Zhu, Jiansheng

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro effects of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) on the immune function of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MD‑DCs), and the moderating role of T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain‑containing molecule‑3 (Tim‑3) signaling molecule. The monocytes, obtained from healthy adult peripheral blood, were incubated with recombinant human granulocyte‑macrophage colony‑stimulating factor and interleukin (IL)‑4 to induce DCs. DC‑associated cell markers were detected using flow cytometry. MD‑DCs were treated with HBsAg (5 µg/ml) in vitro for 48 h and subsequently, cell markers, lymphocyte stimulatory capacity, signaling protein and downstream cytokines were assessed. In addition, a Tim‑3 monoclonal antibody was used to inhibit the Tim‑3 signaling pathway, and subsequently the immune responses of MD‑DCs to HBsAg stimulation were determined using the aforementioned method. The cell phenotype expressions of MD‑DCs were all significantly increased with cluster of differentiation (CD)11c at 70.09±0.57%, human leukocyte antigen‑DR at 79.83±2.12%, CD80 at 48.33±7.34% and CD86 at 44.21±5.35%. The treatment of MD‑DCs with HBsAg resulted in a CD80 and CD86 enhanced expression, enhanced lymphocyte stimulatory capacity, upregulated expression of Tim‑3 and nuclear factor‑κB (NF‑κB), as well as enhanced cytokine secretion of IL‑6, IL‑10 and interferon (IFN)‑γ. However, a reduced immune response of MD‑DCs in response to HBsAg stimulation was observed when the Tim‑3 signaling pathway was inhibited prior to stimulation. The expression of NF‑κB was decreased and the cytokine secretion level of IL‑6, IL‑10 and IFN‑γ were downregulated. The treatment with HBsAg in vitro resulted in an enhanced immune response of MD‑DCs, which may be positively regulated by the Tim-3 signaling molecule. PMID:26820685

  3. Activation of cord T lymphocytes. III. Role of LFA-1/ICAM-1 and CD2/LFA-3 adhesion molecules in CD3-induced proliferative response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerli, R; Agea, E; Muscat, C; Tognellini, R; Fiorucci, G; Spinozzi, F; Cernetti, C; Bertotto, A

    1993-04-15

    As cord T cells, a model of antigen (Ag)-unprimed cell, display a functional defect when stimulated through the CD3 molecule, the role of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1(LFA-1)/intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and CD2/lymphocyte function-associated antigen 3 (LFA-3) receptor-ligand pairs in cord CD3-triggered T-cell activation was analyzed using specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against each adhesion molecule. The addition of anti-CD11a, anti-CD18, or anti-CD2 to both adult and cord peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) cultures led to a decrease in CD3-induced proliferation. In contrast, CD3-stimulated cord, but not adult, PBMC proliferation was markedly enhanced when anti-CD54 or anti-CD58 were added. Despite the fact that ICAM-1 and LFA-3 molecules were virtually absent on cord resting T cells, mAb against these two molecules boosted both mitogenesis of and interleukin (IL)-2 production by purified cord T cells stimulated with plastic immobilized anti-CD3. Cord T-cell supernatant levels of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) were undetectable with CD3 stimulation, slightly raised with CD58/CD3 costimulation, but normal when T cells were preincubated with IL-2 for 24 hr before being costimulated with anti-CD3/CD58. Evidence that IL-2 and IFN-gamma play a pivotal role in fully activating cord T cells came from the demonstration that IL-2 and IFN-gamma are able to bypass the CD3-proliferative defect through differential up-regulation of the adhesion molecules. It would, therefore, seem that ICAM-1 and LFA-3 molecules are crucially implicated in the CD3-activation pathway of Ag-unprimed T cells. PMID:7684326

  4. Plasmodium berghei: immunosuppression of the cell-mediated immune response induced by nonviable antigenic preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, plasmodial antigens were examined for their ability to suppress the cellular immune response during lethal Plasmodium berghei infection. Splenic enlargement and the number and function of white spleen cells were assessed after injection of normal mice with irradiated parasitized erythrocytes (IPE) or with parasitized erythrocytes (PE) membranes. Both IPE and PE membranes caused splenomegaly and an increase in the number of splenic white cells with concurrent alteration of the relative proportions of T cells and macrophages. The percentage of T lymphocytes was fractionally diminished, but there was a marked increase in Lyt 2.2 positive (suppressor and cytotoxic) T subsets and in the number of splenic macrophage precursors. The pathological enlargement of the spleen was induced by various plasma membrane-derived antigens containing both proteins and carbohydrates. Splenocytes of mice injected with liposomes containing deoxycholate-treated PE or PE fractions showed both diminished interleukin 2 production and a decreased response to mitogen. It appears that some of the changes in the cellular immune response during P. berghei infection are a consequence of the massive provision of a wide spectrum of antigens, capable of suppressing the immune response. Thus, it may be appropriate to evaluate the possible negative effect of parasite epitopes that are candidates for vaccine

  5. Plasmodium berghei: immunosuppression of the cell-mediated immune response induced by nonviable antigenic preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, A.; Frankenburg, S.

    1989-01-01

    In this work, plasmodial antigens were examined for their ability to suppress the cellular immune response during lethal Plasmodium berghei infection. Splenic enlargement and the number and function of white spleen cells were assessed after injection of normal mice with irradiated parasitized erythrocytes (IPE) or with parasitized erythrocytes (PE) membranes. Both IPE and PE membranes caused splenomegaly and an increase in the number of splenic white cells with concurrent alteration of the relative proportions of T cells and macrophages. The percentage of T lymphocytes was fractionally diminished, but there was a marked increase in Lyt 2.2 positive (suppressor and cytotoxic) T subsets and in the number of splenic macrophage precursors. The pathological enlargement of the spleen was induced by various plasma membrane-derived antigens containing both proteins and carbohydrates. Splenocytes of mice injected with liposomes containing deoxycholate-treated PE or PE fractions showed both diminished interleukin 2 production and a decreased response to mitogen. It appears that some of the changes in the cellular immune response during P. berghei infection are a consequence of the massive provision of a wide spectrum of antigens, capable of suppressing the immune response. Thus, it may be appropriate to evaluate the possible negative effect of parasite epitopes that are candidates for vaccine.

  6. Delivery of a multivalent scrambled antigen vaccine induces broad spectrum immunity and protection against tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Nicholas P; Thomson, Scott A; Triccas, James A; Medveczky, C Jill; Ramshaw, Ian A; Britton, Warwick J

    2011-10-13

    The development of effective anti-Tuberculosis (TB) vaccines is an important step towards improved control of TB in high burden countries. Subunit vaccines are advantageous in terms of safety, particularly in the context of high rates of HIV co-infection, but they must contain sufficient Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens to stimulate immunity in genetically diverse human populations. We have used a novel approach to develop a synthetic scrambled antigen vaccine (TB-SAVINE), comprised of overlapping, recombined peptides from four M. tuberculosis proteins, Ag85B, ESAT-6, PstS3 and Mpt83, each of which is immunogenic and protective against experimental TB. This polyvalent TB-SAVINE construct stimulated CD4 and CD8T cell responses against the individual proteins and M. tuberculosis in C57BL/6 and Balb/c mice, when delivered as DNA, Fowl Pox Virus or Vaccinia Virus vaccines. In addition, the DNA-TBS vaccine induced protective immunity against pulmonary M. tuberculosis infection in C57BL/6 mice. Co-immunization of Balb/c mice with virally expressed TBS and HIV1-SAVINE vaccine stimulated strong T cell responses to both the M. tuberculosis and HIV proteins, indicating no effects of antigenic competition. Further development of this TB-SAVINE vaccine expressing components from multiple M. tuberculosis proteins may prove an effective vaccine candidate against TB, which could potentially form part of a safe, combined preventative strategy together with HIV immunisations. PMID:21846485

  7. Perillyl alcohol suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imamura, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Oh; Okunishi, Katsuhide; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Harada, Hiroaki; Kawahata, Kimito; Tanaka, Ryoichi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko [Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Dohi, Makoto, E-mail: mdohi-tky@umin.ac.jp [Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Institute of Respiratory Immunology, Shibuya Clinic for Respiratory Diseases and Allergology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits the mevalonate pathway. •We examined whether POH suppresses immune responses with a mouse model of asthma. •POH treatment during sensitization suppressed Ag-induced priming of CD4{sup +} T cells. •POH suppressed airway eosinophila and cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes. -- Abstract: Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits farnesyl transferase and geranylgeranyl transferase, key enzymes that induce conformational and functional changes in small G proteins to conduct signal production for cell proliferation. Thus, it has been tried for the treatment of cancers. However, although it affects the proliferation of immunocytes, its influence on immune responses has been examined in only a few studies. Notably, its effect on antigen-induced immune responses has not been studied. In this study, we examined whether POH suppresses Ag-induced immune responses with a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation. POH treatment of sensitized mice suppressed proliferation and cytokine production in Ag-stimulated spleen cells or CD4{sup +} T cells. Further, sensitized mice received aerosolized OVA to induce allergic airway inflammation, and some mice received POH treatment. POH significantly suppressed indicators of allergic airway inflammation such as airway eosinophilia. Cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes was also significantly suppressed. These results demonstrate that POH suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung. Considering that it exists naturally, POH could be a novel preventive or therapeutic option for immunologic lung disorders such as asthma with minimal side effects.

  8. Calnexin induces expansion of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells that confer immunity to fungal ascomycetes via conserved epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, Marcel; Brandhorst, Tristan T; Sullivan, Thomas D; Filutowicz, Hanna; Sterkel, Alana; Stewart, Douglas; Li, Mengyi; Lerksuthirat, Tassanee; LeBert, Vanessa; Shen, Zu Ting; Ostroff, Gary; Deepe, George S; Hung, Chiung Yu; Cole, Garry; Walter, Jennifer A; Jenkins, Marc K; Klein, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    Fungal infections remain a threat due to the lack of broad-spectrum fungal vaccines and protective antigens. Recent studies showed that attenuated Blastomyces dermatitidis confers protection via T cell recognition of an unknown but conserved antigen. Using transgenic CD4(+) T cells recognizing this antigen, we identify an amino acid determinant within the chaperone calnexin that is conserved across diverse fungal ascomycetes. Calnexin, typically an ER protein, also localizes to the surface of yeast, hyphae, and spores. T cell epitope mapping unveiled a 13-residue sequence conserved across Ascomycota. Infection with divergent ascomycetes, including dimorphic fungi, opportunistic molds, and the agent causing white nose syndrome in bats, induces expansion of calnexin-specific CD4(+) T cells. Vaccine delivery of calnexin in glucan particles induces fungal antigen-specific CD4(+) T cell expansion and resistance to lethal challenge with multiple fungal pathogens. Thus, the immunogenicity and conservation of calnexin make this fungal protein a promising vaccine target. PMID:25800545

  9. Photon emission induced by impact of electrons on molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author discusses both the history and the present state of emission spectroscopy and presents several previously published papers giving experimental data on some diatomic molecules and for chloro-fluoro methanes. (G.T.H.)

  10. Biochemical identification of the bovine blood group M' antigen as a major histocompatibility complex class I-like molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hønberg, L S; Larsen, B; Koch, C;

    1995-01-01

    Absorption and elution experiments showed that it was impossible to separate antibodies against blood group factor M' from antibodies against bovine lymphocyte antigen (BoLA) A16 in an antiserum showing haemolytic activity against M' as well as lymphocytotoxic activity against BoLA-A16....... To elucidate the structural relationship between BoLA-A16 and blood group antigen M', immunoprecipitation experiments on red and white cell lysates isolated from M'-A16 positive and negative cattle were carried out. These results showed that M(r) 44,000 and M(r) 12000 polypeptides can be precipitated from both...... difference in the pI of the immunoprecipitable components of red and white cells was observed. All together, this indicates that either the blood group antigen M' is the BoLA-A16 class I antigen or M' and BoLA-A16 are two different class I polypeptides with the same relative mass, sharing identical epitopes...

  11. EFFECTS OF ATROPINE ON ANTIGEN-INDUCED BRONCHOSPASM IN THE HORSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.B. Mirbahar, R.B. Mirbahar, Nasreen Akhter, W.N. McDonell1 and P. Eyre2,

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of atropine to attenuate Ascaris suum induced bronchospasm was studied in 6 conscious standing horses. Animals were challenged with saline and a 10-2 dilution of A. suum aerosolized for 3 minutes. Pulmonary function tests (PFT were performed at 15, 30 and 60 minutes after antigen challenge. Pulmonary mechanics and ventilation values were measured using a differential pressure transducer and a Fleisch Pnemotachograph. One week later, animals were treated with atropine sulfate (6.0 mg administered IM and rechallenged with saline followed by same dose of A. suum. Clinical signs noted after the inhalation of A. suum alone included hyperpnea, dyspnea, sweating and salivation. The effect of antigen was rapid in onset starting during the inhalation and lasting for over 60 minutes. The PFT revealed significant (P<0.05 increases in Wb, max.  Ppl RL, V1, f, and VT whereas the Cdyn decreased (P<0.05. The changes were more severe in lower airways. Atropine abolished the clinical signs. Comparison of post atropine saline and A. suum challenge values revealed significant increase in Wb, max.  Ppl at 15 minutes post antigen challenge. Changes in RL, f and Cdyn were abolished. Comparison of responses to A. suum in the presence and absence of atropine revealed a significant (P<0.05 inhibition of changes in max. Ppl, Wb, inspiratory and expiratory RL, VI, f and flow. The study suggested that the A. suum induced bronchospasm in the horses is mediated, at least in part by vagal reflexes.

  12. Mycoplasma gallisepticum in vivo induced antigens expressed during infection in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ron, Merav; Gorelick-Ashkenazi, Anna; Levisohn, Sharon; Nir-Paz, Ran; Geary, Steven J; Tulman, Edan; Lysnyansky, Inna; Yogev, David

    2015-02-25

    Until now only a few genes encoding virulence factors have been characterized in the avian pathogen Mycoplasma gallisepticum. In order to identify candidate targets associated with infection we applied an immunoscreening technique-in vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT)-to detect immunogens of M. gallisepticum strain Rlow expressed preferentially during in vivo infection. We identified 13 in vivo-induced (IVI) proteins that correspond to different functional categories including: previously reported putative virulence factors (GapA, PlpA, Hlp3, VlhA 1.07 and VlhA 4.01), transport (PotE, MGA_0241 and 0654), translation (L2, L23, ValS), chaperone (GroEL) and a protein with unknown function (MGA_0042). To validate the in vivo antigenic reactivity, 10 IVI proteins were tested by Western blot analysis using serum samples collected from chickens experimentally (with strain Rlow) and naturally (outbreaks, N=3) infected with M. gallisepticum. All IVI proteins tested were immunogenic. To corroborate these results, we tested expression of IVI genes in chickens experimentally infected with M. gallisepticum Rlow, and in MRC-5 human lung fibroblasts cell culture by using relative real time reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR). With the exception of MGA_0338, all six genes tested (MGA_1199, 0042, 0654, 0712, 0928 and 0241) were upregulated at least at one time point during experimental infection (2-4 week post-infection). In contrast, the expression of seven out of eight IVI genes (MGA_1199, 0152, 0338, 0042, 0654, 0712, 0928) were downregulated in MRC-5 cell culture at both 2 and 4h PI; MGA_0241 was upregulated 2h PI. Our data suggest that the identified IVI antigens may have important roles in the pathogenesis of M. gallisepticum infection in vivo. PMID:25575879

  13. Kinetics of antibody-induced modulation of respiratory syncytial virus antigens in a human epithelial cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Garcia Beatriz

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The binding of viral-specific antibodies to cell-surface antigens usually results in down modulation of the antigen through redistribution of antigens into patches that subsequently may be internalized by endocytosis or may form caps that can be expelled to the extracellular space. Here, by use of confocal-laser-scanning microscopy we investigated the kinetics of the modulation of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV antigen by RSV-specific IgG. RSV-infected human epithelial cells (HEp-2 were incubated with anti-RSV polyclonal IgG and, at various incubation times, the RSV-cell-surface-antigen-antibody complexes (RSV Ag-Abs and intracellular viral proteins were detected by indirect immunoflourescence. Results Interaction of anti-RSV polyclonal IgG with RSV HEp-2 infected cells induced relocalization and aggregation of viral glycoproteins in the plasma membrane formed patches that subsequently produced caps or were internalized through clathrin-mediated endocytosis participation. Moreover, the concentration of cell surface RSV Ag-Abs and intracellular viral proteins showed a time dependent cyclic variation and that anti-RSV IgG protected HEp-2 cells from viral-induced death. Conclusion The results from this study indicate that interaction between RSV cell surface proteins and specific viral antibodies alter the expression of viral antigens expressed on the cells surface and intracellular viral proteins; furthermore, interfere with viral induced destruction of the cell.

  14. Tunneling electron induced chemisorption of copper phthalocyanine molecules on the Cu(111) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adsorption of up to one monolayer (ML) of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules on a room temperature Cu(111) surface has been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Below 1 ML the molecules are in a fluid state and are highly mobile on the surface. At 1 ML coverage the molecules coalesce into a highly ordered 2D crystal phase. At sub-ML coverages, chemisorption of individual CuPc molecules can be induced through exposure to tunneling electrons at a tunneling bias voltage exceeding a threshold value. This tunneling electron induced effect has been exploited to perform molecular STM lithography

  15. An in vitro selection for small molecule induced switching RNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Laura; Ellington, Andrew D; Mansy, Sheref S

    2016-08-15

    The selection of RNA and DNA aptamers now has a long history. However, the ability to directly select for conformational changes upon ligand binding has remained elusive. These difficulties have stymied attempts at making small molecule responsive strand displacement circuitry as well as synthetic riboswitches. Herein we present a detailed strand displacement based selection protocol to directly select for RNA molecules with switching activity. The library was based on a previously selected thiamine pyrophosphate riboswitch. The fully in vitro methodology gave sequences that showed strong strand displacement activity in the presence of thiamine pyrophosphate. Further, the selected sequences possessed riboswitch activity similar to that of natural riboswitches. The presented methodology should aid in the design of more complex, environmentally responsive strand displacement circuitry and in the selection of riboswitches responsive to toxic ligands. PMID:26899430

  16. Advances in identification and application of tumor antigen inducing anti-cancer responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    @@ Tumor antigen is one of the important bases of tumor immunotherapy[1]. With the discovery of novel tumor antigens, interest in specific immunotherapy for treatment of malignancies has increased substantially. Nowadays more and more scientists paid close attention to various tumor antigens with their roles or/and applications in anti-cancer immune responses, immune tolerance, tumor markers, tumor immunotherapy and so on. Here we discussed the classification of tumor antigens and summarized the technologies of identification and application of tumor antigens.

  17. Hyperfine-structure-induced purely long-range molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Katsunari; Kitagawa, Masaaki; Tojo, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2008-03-28

    We have experimentally observed and theoretically identified a novel class of purely long-range molecules. This novel purely long-range state is formed due to a very weak hyperfine interaction that is usually treated only as a small perturbation in molecular spectra. Photoassociation spectroscopy of ultracold ytterbium (171Yb) atoms with the 1S0-3P1 intercombination transition presents clear identification of molecular states and the shallowest molecular potential depth of about 750 MHz among the purely long-range molecules ever observed. PMID:18517858

  18. Targeted delivery of lipid antigen to macrophages via the CD169/sialoadhesin endocytic pathway induces robust invariant natural killer T cell activation

    OpenAIRE

    Kawasaki, Norihito; Vela, Jose Luis; Nycholat, Corwin M.; Rademacher, Christoph; Khurana, Archana; van Rooijen, Nico; Crocker, Paul R.; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Paulson, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells induce a protective immune response triggered by foreign glycolipid antigens bound to CD1d on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). A limitation of using glycolipid antigens to stimulate immune responses in human patients has been the inability to target them to the most effective APCs. Recent studies have implicated phagocytic CD169+ macrophages as major APCs in lymph nodes for priming iNKT cells in mice immunized with glycolipid antigen in particulate form...

  19. The Effects of Triptolide on HLA Antigens Eapression of Corneal Epithelial Cells Induced by Interferon-γ in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QiZhao; YieziLiu; 等

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To observe the effects of immunosuppressants triptolide(TL) and cyclosporine A(CSA) on HLA antigens expression induced by interferon-γ(INF-γ)in vitro.Method:By using an indirect immunofluorescent method and analyzing with ACAS-570,the abnormal HLA antigen expression of cultured corneal epithelial cells was induced by INF-γ.After incubation with one of the immunosuppressants(CSA,TL) for 72 hrs,the amount of HLA-A BC and HLA-DR antigens was measured.Result:There was no significant difference(P>0.05) between the group with CSA and the positive control group without CSA.In contrast to CSA, TL dramatically inhibited IFN-γ induced expression of HLA antigens of corneal epithelial cells (P<0.001),compared with the control group without TL.Conclusion:TL had direct inhibition on the expression of HLA-ABC and HLA-DR antigens induced by INF-γ in vitro,while CSA had no obvious inhibition.Eye Science 2000;16:34-37.

  20. The Effects of Triptolide on HLA Antigens Expression of Corneal Epithelial Cells Induced by Interferon-γin Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Zhao; Yiezi Liu; Quanfu Li

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effects of immunosuppressants triptolide (TL) and cyclosporine A (CSA) on HLA antigens expression induced by interferon-γ(INF -γ) in vitro.Method: By using an indirect immunofluorescent method and analysing with ACAS-570, the abnormal HLA antigen expression of cultured corneal epithelial cells was induced by INF-γ. After incubation with one of the immunosuppressants (CSA, TL) for 72 hrs, the amount of HLA-A BC and HLA-DR antigens was measured.Result: There was no significant difference ( P > 0.05) between the group with CSA and the positive control group without CSA. In contrast to CSA, TL dramatically inhibited INF-γ induced expression of HLA antigens of corneal epithelial cells (P<0.001), compared with the control group without TL.Conclusion: TL had direct inhibition on the expression of HLA-ABCand HLA-DR antigens induced by INF-γin vitro, while CSA had no obvious inhibition. Eye Science 2000; 16:34 ~ 37.

  1. Light-Induced Production of An Antibody Fragment and Malaria Vaccine Antigen from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    OpenAIRE

    Neera Munjal; Andrea Juliana Garzon-Sanabria; Katelyn Wilson Quinones; James Gregory; Zivko L. Nikolov

    2014-01-01

    The eukaryotic green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, is a unique expression platform that can efficiently express complex therapeutic proteins. However, demonstrating that therapeutic molecules can be produced in quantifiable levels is essential to establish the potential of the C. reinhardtii expression system. Thus, the objective of this investigation was to determine the process conditions that could maximize C. reinhardtii biomass accumulation and induced-production of the two recombinan...

  2. Application of in vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT to Bacillus anthracis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean M Rollins

    Full Text Available In vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT is an immuno-screening technique that identifies bacterial antigens expressed during infection and not during standard in vitro culturing conditions. We applied IVIAT to Bacillus anthracis and identified PagA, seven members of a N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase autolysin family, three P60 family lipoproteins, two transporters, spore cortex lytic protein SleB, a penicillin binding protein, a putative prophage holin, respiratory nitrate reductase NarG, and three proteins of unknown function. Using quantitative real-time PCR comparing RNA isolated from in vitro cultured B. anthracis to RNA isolated from BALB/c mice infected with virulent Ames strain B. anthracis, we confirmed induced expression in vivo for a subset of B. anthracis genes identified by IVIAT, including L-alanine amidases BA3767, BA4073, and amiA (pXO2-42; the bacteriophage holin gene BA4074; and pagA (pXO1-110. The exogenous addition of two purified putative autolysins identified by IVIAT, N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidases BA0485 and BA2446, to vegetative B. anthracis cell suspensions induced a species-specific change in bacterial morphology and reduction in viable bacterial cells. Many of the proteins identified in our screen are predicted to affect peptidoglycan re-modeling, and our results support significant cell wall structural remodeling activity during B. anthracis infection. Identification of L-alanine amidases with B. anthracis specificity may suggest new potential therapeutic targets.

  3. Antigen antibody interactions

    CERN Document Server

    DeLisi, Charles

    1976-01-01

    1. 1 Organization of the Immune System One of the most important survival mechanisms of vertebrates is their ability to recognize and respond to the onslaught of pathogenic microbes to which they are conti- ously exposed. The collection of host cells and molecules involved in this recognition­ 12 response function constitutes its immune system. In man, it comprises about 10 cells 20 (lymphocytes) and 10 molecules (immunoglobulins). Its ontogenic development is c- strained by the requirement that it be capable of responding to an almost limitless variety of molecular configurations on foreign substances, while simultaneously remaining inert to those on self components. It has thus evolved to discriminate, with exquisite precision, between molecular patterns. The foreign substances which induce a response, called antigens, are typically large molecules such as proteins and polysaccharides. The portions of these with which immunoglobulins interact are called epitopes or determinants. A typical protein epitope m...

  4. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 specifically induces expression of the B-cell activation antigen CD23

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of EBV-negative Burkitt lymphoma (BL) cells includes some changes similar to those seen in normal B lymphocytes that have been growth transformed by EBV. The role of individual EBV genes in this process was evaluated by introducing each of the viral genes that are normally expressed in EBV growth-transformed and latently infected lymphoblasts into an EBV-negative BL cell line, using recombinant retrovirus-mediated transfer. Clones of cells were derived that stably express the EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1), EBNA-2, EBNA-3, EBNA-leader protein, or EBV latent membrane protein (LMP). These were compared with control clones infected with the retrovirus vector. All 10 clones converted to EBNA-2 expression differed from control clones or clones expressing other EBV proteins by growth in tight clumps and by markedly increased expression of one particular surface marker of B-cell activation, CD23. Other activation antigens were unaffected by EBNA-2 expression, as were markers already expressed on the parent BL cell line. The results indicate that EBNA-2 is a specific direct or indirect trans-activator of CD23. This establishes a link between an EBV gene and cell gene expression. Since CD23 has been implicated in the transduction of B-cell growth signals, its specific induction by EBNA-2 could be important in EBV induction of B-lymphocyte transformation

  5. Self-assembly of α-6T Molecule on Ag(100) and Related STM Induced Luminescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu-guo Chen; Chao Zhang; Rui Zhang; Zhen-chao Dong

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the self-assembly and light emission properties of organic αsexithiophene (α-6T) molecules on Ag(100) under different coverage by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM).At very low coverage,the α-6T molecules form a unique enantiomer by grouping four molecules into a windmill supermolecular structure.As the coverage is increased,α-6T molecules tend to pack side by side into a denser stripe structure.Further increase of the coverage will lead to the layer-by-layer growth of molecules on Ag(100)with the lower-layer stripe pattern serving as a template.Molecular fluorescence for α-6T molecules on Ag(100) at a coverage of five monolayers has been detected by light excitations,which indicates a well decoupled electronic states for the top-layer α-6T molecules.However,the STM induced luminescent spectra for the same sample reveal only plasmonic-like emission.The absence of intramolecular fluorescence in this case suggests that the electronic decoupling is not a sufficient condition for generating photon emission from molecules.For intramolecular fluorescence to occur,the orientation of the dynamic dipole moment of molecules and the energy-level alignment at the molecule-metal interface are also important so that molecules can be effectively excited through efficient dipolar coupling with local plasmons and by injecting holes into the molecules.

  6. Aluminum hydroxide adjuvant induces macrophage differentiation towards a specialized antigen-presenting cell type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimaniol, Anne-Cécile; Gras, Gabriel; Verdier, François; Capel, Francis; Grigoriev, Vladimir B; Porcheray, Fabrice; Sauzeat, Elisabeth; Fournier, Jean-Guy; Clayette, Pascal; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Dormont, Dominique

    2004-08-13

    Aluminum hydroxide (AlOOH) has been used for many years as a vaccine adjuvant, but little is known about its mechanism of action. We investigated in this study the in vitro effect of aluminum hydroxide adjuvant on isolated macrophages. We showed that AlOOH-stimulated macrophages contain large and persistent intracellular crystalline inclusions, a characteristic property of muscle infiltrated macrophages described in animal models of vaccine injection, as well as in the recently described macrophagic myofasciitis (MMF) histological reaction in humans. AlOOH-loaded macrophages exhibited phenotypical and functional modifications, as they expressed the classical markers of myeloid dendritic cells (HLA-DR(high)/CD86(high)/CD83(+)/CD1a(-)/CD14(-)) and displayed potent ability to induce MHC-II-restricted antigen specific memory responses, but kept a macrophage morphology. This suggests a key role of macrophages, in the reaction to AlOOH-adjuvanted vaccines and these mature antigen-presenting macrophages may therefore be of particular importance in the establishment of memory responses and in vaccination mechanisms leading to long-lasting protection. PMID:15297065

  7. Antigen-induced pleural eosinophilia is suppressed in diabetic rats: role of corticosteroid hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno L Diaz

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have evidenced for the existence of interactive regulatory mechanisms between insulin and steroid hormones in different systems. In this study, we have investigated whether endogenous corticosteroids could be implicated in the hyporeactivity to antigen challenge observed in sensitized diabetic rats. Alloxinated rats showed a long-lasting increase in the blood glucose levels and a reduction in the number of pleural mast cells at 48 and 72 hr, but not at 24 hr after alloxan administration. In parallel, they also showed a significant elevation in the plasma levels of corticosterone together with an increase in the adrenal/body weight ratio. Antigen-evoked eosinophil accumulation appeared significantly reduced in rats pretreated with dexamethasone as well as in those rendered diabetic 72 hr after alloxan. In the same way, naive animals treated with dexamethasone also responded with a significant decrease in the number of pleural mast cells. Interestingly, when sensitized diabetic rats were pretreated with the steroid antagonist RU 38486 a reversion of the reduction in the allergen-induced eosinophil accumulation was noted. We conclude that the down-regulation of the allergic inflammatory response in diabetic rats is close-related to reduction in mast cell numbers and over expression of endogenous corticosteroids.

  8. Immune Responses Induced by the Leishmania (Leishmania) donovani A2 Antigen, but Not by the LACK Antigen, Are Protective against Experimental Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, Eduardo Antonio Ferraz; TAVARES Carlos Alberto Pereira; Carvalho, Fernando Aécio de Amorim; Chaves, Karina Figueiredo; Teixeira, Kadima Nayara; Rodrigues, Rafaela Chitarra; Charest, Hugues; Matlashewski, Greg; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Fernandes, Ana Paula

    2003-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis is one of the major etiologic agents of a broad spectrum of clinical forms of leishmaniasis and has a wide geographical distribution in the Americas, which overlaps with the areas of transmission of many other Leishmania species. The LACK and A2 antigens are shared by various Leishmania species. A2 was previously shown to induce a potent Th1 immune response and protection against L. donovani infection in BALB/c mice. LACK is effective against L. major infection, but no ...

  9. ACE inhibitors can induce circulating antibodies directed to antigens of the superficial epidermal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzani, Emanuele; Rosa, Gian Marco; Drosera, Massimo; Intra, Chiara; Barsotti, Antonio; Parodi, Aurora

    2011-07-01

    Drug-induced pemphigus has been reported in patients receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The aim of this work was to study a group of hypertensive patients without skin diseases treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors (I), to verify the presence of serum circulating anti-antibodies. The indirect immunofluorescence showed that 33 sera (52.38%) presented autoantibodies directed to an antigen of the cytoplasm of the superficial epidermal keratinocytes. Two of the 33 positive sera had antibodies to Dsg1 and/or 3 in ELISA. Immunoblot analyses were negative. All the 48 control sera were found to have no circulating antibodies using the three assays. Our results would confirm that ACEI drugs may trigger the production of circulating autoantibodies also in patients without clinical manifestations of pemphigus. PMID:20563876

  10. Nuclear antigen expression by ultraviolet light irradiation - a contribution to the UV-induced autoimmunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given about nuclear antigen expression due to UVB, UVA, and PUVA. UVB alters DNA resulting in strong immunogenic UVDNA and complementary antibodies. Antibodies to UVDNA cross react with double-stranded DNA. UVDNA plays a (hypothetical) role in the induction of cutaneous lesions in lupus erythematosus (LE). Investigations about SS-A/Ro expression due to UVB seem to be more important under this view. Antibodies against SS-A/Ro are related to an increased photosensitivity in LE. PUVA and UVA are able to induce antinuclear antibodies of unknown specificity. It is likely that PUVA enhances SS-A/Ro expression in vitro. The results are discussed in sense of LE photobiology and unwanted side effects of photo(chemo)therapy in psoriasis. (author)

  11. B700, a murine melanoma-specific antigen, binds Vitamin D3; conservation of binding among albuminoid molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B700, a murine melanoma-specific antigen, is a member of the serum albumin protein family. Other members of this family include serum albumin (SMA), a-fetoprotein (AFP), vitamin D binding protein (DBP), and C700. The primary structure and biochemical functions of B700, as well as its in vivo metabolic fate are largely unknown. The authors examined the functional characteristics of MSA, AFP, and DBP, and for their ability to specifically bind [3H]-1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D3. Scatchard analysis revealed a single binding site for B700 with a Kd of 51,000 M and a Bmax of 4.51 x 10-7. There is no significant difference between the Kd and Bmax values among the albuminoid proteins. However, differences in the binding sites could be distinguished by competition of the 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 with other steroids. 2nM of vitamin D3, vitamin D2, or estrogen competed for the specific binding of 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 by B700 but not by DBP. The MSA binding site for 1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D3 more closely resembles that of DBP than B700. These data indicate that the binding function of the albuminoid proteins has been conserved in the B700 melanoma antigen

  12. Infection with influenza a virus leads to flu antigen-induced cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunewald, Susanne M; Hahn, Christian; Wohlleben, Gisela; Teufel, Martin; Major, Tamas; Moll, Heidrun; Bröcker, Eva-B; Erb, Klaus J

    2002-04-01

    It is well established, that viral infections may trigger urticaria or allergic asthma; however, as viral infections induce T helper 1 polarized responses, which lead to the inhibition of T helper 2 cell development, the opposite would be plausible. We wanted to investigate how viral infections may mediate allergic symptoms in a mouse model; therefore, we infected BALB/C mice with influenza A virus intranasally. Histologic analyses of lung sections and bronchoalveolar lavages were performed. In addition, cells from the mediastinal lymph nodes were restimulated in vitro to analyze which types of cytokines were induced by the flu infection. Furthermore, flu-specific antibody titers were determined and local anaphylaxis was measured after rechallenge with flu antigen. We found that airways inflammation consisted predominately of macrophages and lymphocytes, whereas only a few eosinophils were observed. interferon-gamma but no interleukin-4 and little interleukin-5 could be detected in the culture supernatants from in vitro restimulated T cells from the draining lymph nodes. The antibody response was characterized by high levels of virus-specific IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG1 and, surprisingly, low levels of virus-specific IgE antibodies. Interestingly, flu-infected mice developed active and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis after rechallenge with flu-antigen. As the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis reaction persisted over 48 h and was significantly lower after passive transfer of the serum, which was IgE depleted, local anaphylaxis seemed to be mediated predominately by specific IgE antibodies. Taken together, our results demonstrate that mice infected with flu virus develop virus-specific mast cell degranulation in the skin. Our results may also have implications for the pathogenesis of urticaria or other atopic disorders in humans. PMID:11918711

  13. Cancer regression and autoimmunity induced by cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 blockade in patients with metastatic melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Phan, Giao Q.; Yang, James C.; Sherry, Richard M.; Hwu, Patrick; Topalian, Suzanne L.; Schwartzentruber, Douglas J.; Restifo, Nicholas P; Haworth, Leah R.; Seipp, Claudia A.; Freezer, Linda J.; Morton, Kathleen E.; Mavroukakis, Sharon A.; Duray, Paul H.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Allison, James P.

    2003-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) is a critical immunoregulatory molecule (expressed on activated T cells and a subset of regulatory T cells) capable of down-regulating T cell activation. Blockade of CTLA-4 has been shown in animal models to improve the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy. We thus treated 14 patients with metastatic melanoma by using serial i.v. administration of a fully human anti-CTLA-4 antibody (MDX-010) in conjunction with s.c....

  14. Boron- and iron-bearing molecules in laser-induced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron combines with alkali-earth elements, such as Ca, Mg, and Sr and with oxygen to form molecules in LIP of boron-bearing minerals with strong and characteristic band emission. It may be supposed that those bands are of CaBO2, MgBO2 and SrBO2 type. Besides, emission of BO, BO2 and FeO is also detected. - Highlights: • We studied laser-induced breakdown spectra of B with Ca, Mg and Sr in air. • Emission of polyatomic molecules was found. • Molecules of FeO were found in laser-induced plasma in air

  15. Boron- and iron-bearing molecules in laser-induced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaft, M.; Nagli, L.; Eliezer, N.; Groisman, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Boron combines with alkali-earth elements, such as Ca, Mg, and Sr and with oxygen to form molecules in LIP of boron-bearing minerals with strong and characteristic band emission. It may be supposed that those bands are of CaBO{sub 2}, MgBO{sub 2} and SrBO{sub 2} type. Besides, emission of BO, BO{sub 2} and FeO is also detected. - Highlights: • We studied laser-induced breakdown spectra of B with Ca, Mg and Sr in air. • Emission of polyatomic molecules was found. • Molecules of FeO were found in laser-induced plasma in air.

  16. Opisthorchis viverrini-antigen induces expression of MARCKS during inflammation-associated cholangiocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techasen, Anchalee; Loilome, Watcharin; Namwat, Nisana; Duenngai, Kunyarat; Cha'on, Ubon; Thanan, Raynoo; Sithithaworn, Paiboon; Miwa, Masanao; Yongvanit, Puangrat

    2012-03-01

    Myristoylated alanine rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) has been implicated in PKC-mediated membrane-cytoskeleton alterations that underlie lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced macrophage responses. MARCKS is postulated to be involved in inflammation-associated CCA based on its overexpression in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) and inflammatory cells. The aims of this study were to investigate localization patterns of MARCKS in hamster and human tissue during cholangiocarcinogenesis and to examine the involvement of MARCKS in inflammation. MARCKS protein expression was found prominently in inflammatory cells of Opisthorchis viverrini-treated as well as O. viverrini plus N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA)-treated hamsters from week 2 to week 3 of treatment. The positive signal decreased during week 4 to week 12, then increased again at week 26 when CCA developed. At the last time point the expression of MARCKS was observed in both cancer and inflammatory cells. MARCKS protein expression was also found in inflammatory cells, including macrophages in human CCA tissues. O. viverrini excretory/secretory products or worm antigen induced MARCKS mRNA and protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner in the human U937 macrophage cell line. The relative mRNA expression of MARCKS in white blood cells of O. viverrini-infected patients was significantly higher than in healthy subjects (P = 0.02). Thus, MARCKS is significantly expressed in macrophages and plays a role in inflammation-related CCA induced by O. viverrini. PMID:21763456

  17. Glioma-Associated Antigen HEATR1 Induces Functional Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes in Patients with Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Bao Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A2B5+ glioblastoma (GBM cells have glioma stem-like cell (GSC properties that are crucial to chemotherapy resistance and GBM relapse. T-cell-based antigens derived from A2B5+ GBM cells provide important information for immunotherapy. Here, we show that HEAT repeat containing 1 (HEATR1 expression in GBM tissues was significantly higher than that in control brain tissues. Furthermore, HEATR1 expression in A2B5+ U87 cells was higher than that in A2B5−U87 cells (P=0.016. Six peptides of HEATR1 presented by HLA-A*02 were selected for testing of their ability to induce T-cell responses in patients with GBM. When peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors (n=6 and patients with glioma (n=33 were stimulated with the peptide mixture, eight patients with malignant gliomas had positive reactivity with a significantly increased number of responding T-cells. The peptides HEATR1682–690, HEATR11126–1134, and HEATR1757–765 had high affinity for binding to HLA-A*02:01 and a strong capacity to induce CTL response. CTLs against HEATR1 peptides were capable of recognizing and lysing GBM cells and GSCs. These data are the first to demonstrate that HEATR1 could induce specific CTL responses targeting both GBM cells and GSCs, implicating that HEATR1 peptide-based immunotherapy could be a novel promising strategy for treating patients with GBM.

  18. Paramagnetic molecule induced strong antiferromagnetic exchange coupling on a magnetic tunnel junction based molecular spintronics device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Pawan; Baker, Collin; D'Angelo, Christopher

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports our Monte Carlo (MC) studies aiming to explain the experimentally observed paramagnetic molecule induced antiferromagnetic coupling between ferromagnetic (FM) electrodes. Recently developed magnetic tunnel junction based molecular spintronics devices (MTJMSDs) were prepared by chemically bonding the paramagnetic molecules between the FM electrodes along the tunnel junction’s perimeter. These MTJMSDs exhibited molecule-induced strong antiferromagnetic coupling. We simulated the 3D atomic model analogous to the MTJMSD and studied the effect of molecule’s magnetic couplings with the two FM electrodes. Simulations show that when a molecule established ferromagnetic coupling with one electrode and antiferromagnetic coupling with the other electrode, then theoretical results effectively explained the experimental findings. Our studies suggest that in order to align MTJMSDs’ electrodes antiparallel to each other, the exchange coupling strength between a molecule and FM electrodes should be ˜50% of the interatomic exchange coupling for the FM electrodes.

  19. Hepatitis B virus e antigen induces activation of rat hepatic stellate cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zan, Yanlu [Center for Molecular Virology, CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Yuxia, E-mail: yzhang@wehi.edu.au [Center for Molecular Virology, CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Tien, Po, E-mail: tienpo@sun.im.ac.cn [Center for Molecular Virology, CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •HBeAg expression in HSCs induced production of ECM protein and liver fibrotic markers. •The activation and proliferation of HSCs were mediated by TGF-β. •HBeAg protein purified from cell medium directly activated HSCs. -- Abstract: Chronic hepatitis B virus infection is a major cause of hepatic fibrosis, leading to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) is an accessory protein of HBV, not required for viral replication but important for natural infection in vivo. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the major producers of excessive extracellular matrix during liver fibrogenesis. Therefore, we examined the influence of HBeAg on HSCs. The rat HSC line HSC-T6 was transfected with HBeAg plasmids, and expression of α-smooth muscle actin, collagen I, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β), and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) was investigated by quantitative real-time PCR. The proliferation of HSCs was determined by MTS analysis. HBeAg transduction induced up-regulation of these fibrogenic genes and proliferation of HSCs. We found that HBeAg induced TGF-β secretion in HSCs, and the activation of HSCs was prevented by a neutralizing anti-TGF-β antibody. Depletion and addition of HBeAg protein in conditioned medium from HSC-T6 cells transduced with HBeAg indicated that HBeAg directly induced the activation and proliferation of rat primary HSCs. Taken together, HBeAg induces the activation and proliferation of HSCs, mainly mediated by TGF-β, and HBeAg protein purified from cell medium can directly activate HSCs.

  20. Hepatitis B virus e antigen induces activation of rat hepatic stellate cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •HBeAg expression in HSCs induced production of ECM protein and liver fibrotic markers. •The activation and proliferation of HSCs were mediated by TGF-β. •HBeAg protein purified from cell medium directly activated HSCs. -- Abstract: Chronic hepatitis B virus infection is a major cause of hepatic fibrosis, leading to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) is an accessory protein of HBV, not required for viral replication but important for natural infection in vivo. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the major producers of excessive extracellular matrix during liver fibrogenesis. Therefore, we examined the influence of HBeAg on HSCs. The rat HSC line HSC-T6 was transfected with HBeAg plasmids, and expression of α-smooth muscle actin, collagen I, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β), and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) was investigated by quantitative real-time PCR. The proliferation of HSCs was determined by MTS analysis. HBeAg transduction induced up-regulation of these fibrogenic genes and proliferation of HSCs. We found that HBeAg induced TGF-β secretion in HSCs, and the activation of HSCs was prevented by a neutralizing anti-TGF-β antibody. Depletion and addition of HBeAg protein in conditioned medium from HSC-T6 cells transduced with HBeAg indicated that HBeAg directly induced the activation and proliferation of rat primary HSCs. Taken together, HBeAg induces the activation and proliferation of HSCs, mainly mediated by TGF-β, and HBeAg protein purified from cell medium can directly activate HSCs

  1. Carcinoembryonic Antigen Expression and Resistance to Radiation and 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Apoptosis and Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Jaberie, Hajar; Naghibalhossaini, Fakhraddin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of tumor resistance is critical for cancer therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) overexpression on UV-and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced apoptosis and autophagy in colorectal cancer cells. We used histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, NaB and DNA demethylating agent, 5-azacytidine (5-AZA) to induce CEA expression in HT29/219 and SW742 colorectal cancer cell lines. MTT assay was used to measure IC50 value of the cells exposed to graded concentrations of 5- FU with either 0.1 mM NaB or 1 μM 5-AZA for 72 h . Using CHO- and SW742-CEA transfectants, we also investigated the effect of CEA expression on UV- and 5-FU-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Treatment of HT29/219 cell line with NaB and 5-AZA increased CEA expression by 29% and 31%, respectively. Compared with control cells, the IC50 value for 5-FU of NaB and 5-AZA-treated cells increased by 40% and 57%, respectively. Treatment of SW742 cells with NaB or 5-AZA increased neither CEA expression nor the IC50 value for 5-FU. In comparison to parental cells, CEA expression also significantly protected transfected cells against UV-induced apoptosis. Decreased proportions of autophagy and apoptosis were also observed in 5-FU treated SW742- and CHO-CEA transfectants. We conclude that CEA expression can effectively protect colorectal cancer cells against radiation and drug-induced apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:27478804

  2. Limited transplantation of antigen-expressing hematopoietic stem cells induces long-lasting cytotoxic T cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren L Denning

    Full Text Available Harnessing the ability of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs to recognize and eradicate tumor or pathogen-infected cells is a critical goal of modern immune-based therapies. Although multiple immunization strategies efficiently induce high levels of antigen-specific CTLs, the initial increase is typically followed by a rapid contraction phase resulting in a sharp decline in the frequency of functional CTLs. We describe a novel approach to immunotherapy based on a transplantation of low numbers of antigen-expressing hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs following nonmyeloablative or partially myeloablative conditioning. Continuous antigen presentation by a limited number of differentiated transgenic hematopoietic cells results in an induction and prolonged maintenance of fully functional effector T cell responses in a mouse model. Recipient animals display high levels of antigen-specific CTLs four months following transplantation in contrast to dendritic cell-immunized animals in which the response typically declines at 4-6 weeks post-immunization. Majority of HSC-induced antigen-specific CD8+ T cells display central memory phenotype, efficiently kill target cells in vivo, and protect recipients against tumor growth in a preventive setting. Furthermore, we confirm previously published observation that high level engraftment of antigen-expressing HSCs following myeloablative conditioning results in tolerance and an absence of specific cytotoxic activity in vivo. In conclusion, the data presented here supports potential application of immunization by limited transplantation of antigen-expressing HSCs for the prevention and treatment of cancer and therapeutic immunization of chronic infectious diseases such as HIV-1/AIDS.

  3. An inducible transgenic mouse model for immune mediated hepatitis showing clearance of antigen expressing hepatocytes by CD8+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Cebula

    Full Text Available The liver has the ability to prime immune responses against neo antigens provided upon infections. However, T cell immunity in liver is uniquely modulated by the complex tolerogenic property of this organ that has to also cope with foreign agents such as endotoxins or food antigens. In this respect, the nature of intrahepatic T cell responses remains to be fully characterized. To gain deeper insight into the mechanisms that regulate the CD8+ T cell responses in the liver, we established a novel OVA_X_CreER(T2 mouse model. Upon tamoxifen administration OVA antigen expression is observed in a fraction of hepatocytes, resulting in a mosaic expression pattern. To elucidate the cross-talk of CD8+ T cells with antigen-expressing hepatocytes, we adoptively transferred K(b/OVA257-264-specific OT-I T cells to OVA_X_CreER(T2 mice or generated triple transgenic OVA_X CreER(T2_X_OT-I mice. OT-I T cells become activated in OVA_X_CreER(T2 mice and induce an acute and transient hepatitis accompanied by liver damage. In OVA_X_CreER(T2_X_OT-I mice, OVA induction triggers an OT-I T cell mediated, fulminant hepatitis resulting in 50% mortality. Surviving mice manifest a long lasting hepatitis, and recover after 9 weeks. In these experimental settings, recovery from hepatitis correlates with a complete loss of OVA expression indicating efficient clearance of the antigen-expressing hepatocytes. Moreover, a relapse of hepatitis can be induced upon re-induction of cured OVA_X_CreER(T2_X_OT-I mice indicating absence of tolerogenic mechanisms. This pathogen-free, conditional mouse model has the advantage of tamoxifen inducible tissue specific antigen expression that reflects the heterogeneity of viral antigen expression and enables the study of intrahepatic immune responses to both de novo and persistent antigen. It allows following the course of intrahepatic immune responses: initiation, the acute phase and antigen clearance.

  4. Mechanical force-induced DNA damage during AFM single-molecule manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many environmental factors can cause DNA damage, such as radiation, heat, oxygen free radical, etc., which can induce mutation during DNA replication. Meanwhile, DNA molecules are subjected to various mechanical forces in numerous biological processes. However, it is unknown whether the mechanical force would induce DNA damage and introduce mutation during DNA replication, With the combination of single-molecule manipulation based on atomic force microscopy (AFM), single molecular polymerase chain reaction (SM-PCR) and Sanger's sequencing, we investigated the effect of mechanical force on DNA. The results show that mechanical force can cause DNA damage and induce DNA mutation during amplification. (authors)

  5. Analysis of antigen-specific, Ig-restricted cell-free material made by I-J+ Ly-1 cells (Ly-1 TsiF) that induces Ly-2+ cells to express suppressive activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, K; Murphy, D; Cantor, H; Gershon, R K

    1981-11-01

    A set of T cells defined by a unique profile of cell surface alloantigens (phenotype Ly-1+2-; Qa-1+; I-J+) produces biologically active cell-free material(s) (Ly-1 TsiF) which induces another T cell set (cell surface phenotype Ly-1,2+; I-J/; Qa-1+) to participate in the suppression of primary immune responses to heterologous erythrocytes. The suppression is specific for the inducing antigen, and the Ly-1 TsiF binds antigen in a specific way. The activity of Ly-1 TsiF can be removed by anti-I-J immunosorbents and will not be expressed if the functional producer and acceptor cells do not share gene products that are encoded in or are tightly linked to the VH portion of the Ig complex. There is no requirement for the Ly-1 TsiF and its acceptor cell(s) to share major histocompatibility complex gene products. Thus, for optimal induction of antigen-specific suppression by cell-gree materials from Ly-1 T cells, three necessary conditions must be met: (a) antigen recognition by Ly-1 TsiF; (b) the expression of I-J gene products and (c) identify of VH-linked Ig locus gene products (or other products influenced by those genes) on both the inducer molecule and its acceptor cell. The role of the Ig-linked restriction is particularly intriguing, and its possible meaning is considered in detail. PMID:6173228

  6. INDUCEMENT OF ANTITUMOR-IMMUNITY BY DC ACTIVATED BY HSP70-H22 TUMOR ANTIGEN PEPTIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯作化; 黄波; 张桂梅; 李东; 王洪涛

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of decreasing the dosage of tumor antigen peptides by dendritic cell (DC)-presenting and the characteristics of modification of DC by heat shock protein (Hsp70) and antigen peptides. Methods: Peptides were bound to Hsp70 and used to modify DC in vitro. The metabolism of the modified DC and the cytokines secreted by the modified DC were determined. The activation of lymphocytes by the modified DC and Hsp70-H22 peptides was tested. The cytotoxicity of the activated lymphocytes to H22 tumor cells was analyzed. The inhibitory effect of tumor in mice by the injection of DC and Hsp70-H22 peptides was tested. Results: 0.15μg of H22 peptides bound with Hsp70 could make 2×105 DC mature. 4×103 matured DC could activate 2×106 lymphocytes. The same amount of lymphocytes could be activated to produce similar cytotoxicity to tumor cells by either DC modified by 0.003μg of peptides bound with Hsp70 or by direct stimulation with 0.15μg of peptides bound with Hsp70. The dosage of peptides could be reduced by about 50 folds if the modified DC was used for injection instead of Hsp70-peptides. Peptides from normal hepatocytes, bound with Hsp70, could not make DC mature, nor activate lymphocytes through DC. Conclusion: The dosage of Hsp70-H22 peptides can be reduced significantly by DC-presenting to activate lymphocytes. Peptides from normal cells could not activate lymphocytes by either Hsp70-presenting or DC-presenting and they have little chance to induce autoimmunity.

  7. Biodegradable polylactide microspheres enhance specific immune response induced by Hepatitis B surface antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Shaohui; Wei, Qiang; Liang, Zhenglun; Ma, Guanghui; Wang, Lianyan; An, Wenqi; Ma, Xiaowei; Fang, Xin; He, Peng; Li, Hemin; Hu, Zhongyu

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B (HB) infection caused by Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the most common liver disease in the world. HB vaccine, when administered in conjunction with alum adjuvants, induces Th2 immunity that confers protection against HBV. However, currently available vaccine formulations and adjuvants do not elicit adequate Th1 and CTL responses that are important for prevention of maternal transmission of the virus. Microspheres synthesized from poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or poly (D, L-lactide) (PLA) polymers have been considered as promising tools for in vivo delivery of antigens and drugs. Here we describe PLA microspheres synthesized by premix membrane emulsification method and their application in formulating a new microsphere based HB vaccine. To evaluate the immunogenicity of this microsphere vaccine, BALB/c mice were immunized with microsphere vaccine and a series of immunological assays were conducted. Results of Enzyme-linked ImmunoSpot (ELISPOT) assays revealed that the number of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)-producing splenocytes and CD8(+) T cells increased significantly in the microsphere vaccine group. Microsphere vaccine group showed enhanced specific cell lysis when compared with HB surface antigen (HBsAg) only group in (51)Cr cytotoxicity assays. Moreover, microsphere vaccine elicited a comparable level of antibody production as that of HB vaccine administered with alum adjuvant. We show that phagocytosis of HBsAg by dendritic cells is more pronounced in microsphere vaccine group when compared with other control groups. These results clearly demonstrate the potential of using PLA microspheres as effective HB vaccine adjuvants for an enhanced Th1 immune response. PMID:25424942

  8. Identification of antigenic proteins associated with trichloroethylene-induced autoimmune disease by serological proteome analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although many studies indicated that trichloroethylene (TCE) could induce autoimmune diseases and some protein adducts were detected, the proteins were not identified and mechanisms remain unknown. To screen and identify autoantigens which might be involved in TCE-induced autoimmune diseases, three groups of sera were collected from healthy donors (I), patients suffering from TCE-induced exfoliative dermatitis (ED) (II), and the healed ones (III). Serological proteome analysis (SERPA) was performed with total proteins of TCE-treated L-02 liver cells as antigen sources and immunoglobins of the above sera as probes. Highly immunogenic spots (2-fold or above increase compared with group I) in group II and III were submitted to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry sequencing. Western blot analysis was followed using commercial antibodies and individual serum. Six proteins were identified. Among them, Enoyl Coenzyme A hydratase peroxisoma 1 and lactate dehydrogenase B only showed stronger immunogenicity for group II sera, while Purine nucleoside phosphorylase, ribosomal protein P0 and proteasome activator subunit1 isoform1 also showed stronger immunogenicity for group III sera. Noteworthy, NM23 reacted only with group II sera. Western blot analysis of NM23 expression indicated that all of the individual serum of group II showed immune activity, which confirmed the validity of SERPA result. These findings revealed that there exist autoantibodies in group II and III sera. Besides, autoantibodies of the two stages of disease course were different. These autoantigens might serve as biomarkers to elucidate mechanisms underlying TCE toxicity and are helpful for diagnosis, therapy and prognosis of TCE-induced autoimmune diseases.

  9. Investigation of strong laser field-induced fragmentation dynamics of hydrocarbon molecules using coincidence momentum imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thesis at hand deals with the strong laser field-induced fragmentation of hydrocarbon molecules. During the laser field's action the molecules may become multiply ionized. After the removal of electrons not only the charge density will be redistributed very quickly, also the molecule itself may undergo partly severe structural deformation and may fragment into several parts. Especially the dynamics of protons is of interest since the fragmentation of a molecule can be largely determined by its protons. This proton dynamics bridges the gap between the most fundamental level in molecular dynamics, which is the sub-femtosecond dynamics of the valence electrons, and the rather slow dynamics of the much heavier atoms of a molecule. The experiments were carried out by using the coincidence momentum imaging technique COLTRIMS which allows one to measure the momentum vectors of cations and electrons resulting from the interaction of the laser field with the molecule. From these momentum vectors the induced reaction, for example the fragmentation of the molecule, can be reconstructed. For the experiments laser pulses with intensities in the range of 1013 - 1016 W/cm2 and pulse durations of around 25 fs, delivered by a Ti:Sapphire based laser system, were used. 2-body and 3-boody fragmentation of 1,3-butadiene was investigated. Apart from different fragmentation channels along different fragmentation pathways, hydrogen/proton migration prior to chemical bond breaking was observed. Furthermore, the emission of highly energetic protons emitted from small hydrocarbon molecules was explored. (author)

  10. Synthetic Peptide Ligands of the Antigen Binding Receptor Induce Programmed Cell Death in a Human B-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renschler, Markus F.; Bhatt, Ramesh R.; Dower, William J.; Levy, Ronald

    1994-04-01

    Peptide ligands for the antigen binding site of the surface immunoglobulin receptor of a human B-cell lymphoma cell line were identified with the use of filamentous phage libraries displaying random 8- and 12-amino acid peptides. Corresponding synthetic peptides bound specifically to the antigen binding site of this immunoglobulin receptor and blocked the binding of an anti-idiotype antibody. The ligands, when conjugated to form dimers or tetramers, induced cell death by apoptosis in vitro with an IC50 between 40 and 200 nM. This effect was associated with specific stimulation of intracellular protein tyrosine phosphorylation.

  11. Amplification of rabies virus-induced stimulation of human T-cell lines and clones by antigen-specific antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Celis, E; Wiktor, T J; Dietzschold, B.; Koprowski, H

    1985-01-01

    The effect of antigen-specific antibodies on the response of human T-cell lines and clones to rabies virus was studied. Plasmas from rabies-immune vaccine recipients, but not those from nonimmune individuals, enhanced the proliferative response of rabies-reactive T cells to whole inactivated virus or to the purified glycoprotein and nucleocapsid from the rabies virion. Rabies-immune plasma also increased the antigen-induced production of gamma interferon by the rabies-specific T-cell lines. E...

  12. Targeting proliferating cell nuclear antigen and its protein interactions induces apoptosis in multiple myeloma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekka Müller

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma is a hematological cancer that is considered incurable despite advances in treatment strategy during the last decade. Therapies targeting single pathways are unlikely to succeed due to the heterogeneous nature of the malignancy. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA is a multifunctional protein essential for DNA replication and repair that is often overexpressed in cancer cells. Many proteins involved in the cellular stress response interact with PCNA through the five amino acid sequence AlkB homologue 2 PCNA-interacting motif (APIM. Thus inhibiting PCNA's protein interactions may be a good strategy to target multiple pathways simultaneously. We initially found that overexpression of peptides containing the APIM sequence increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to contemporary therapeutics. Here we have designed a cell-penetrating APIM-containing peptide, ATX-101, that targets PCNA and show that it has anti-myeloma activity. We found that ATX-101 induced apoptosis in multiple myeloma cell lines and primary cancer cells, while bone marrow stromal cells and primary healthy lymphocytes were much less sensitive. ATX-101-induced apoptosis was caspase-dependent and cell cycle phase-independent. ATX-101 also increased multiple myeloma cells' sensitivity against melphalan, a DNA damaging agent commonly used for treatment of multiple myeloma. In a xenograft mouse model, ATX-101 was well tolerated and increased the anti-tumor activity of melphalan. Therefore, targeting PCNA by ATX-101 may be a novel strategy in multiple myeloma treatment.

  13. Vitreous Cavity-Associated Immune Deviation Induced by Retinal S Antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhijie Li; Guanghua Peng; Chen Li

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the vitreous cavity(VC) supports the induction of deviant immune responses to retinal soluble(S) antigen and to observe the influence of interleukin-1 (IL-1) on the immunologic properties of the VC. Methods: Retinal S antigen was inoculated into the anterior chamber(AC) and the VC in Wistar rats. Seven days after antigen inoculation, the recipient animals were immunized with S antigen and complete Freund's adjuvant. Delayed-type hypersen- sitivity(DTH) was assessed by footpad challenge. To alter systemic immune conditions,IL-1 was administrated by intraperitoneal injection.Results: Antigen-specific DTH did not develop in rats in which S antigen was injected into the AC and the VC. By contrast, when IL-1 administrated systemically, S antigen was injected into the AC and VC elicited strong DTH.Conclusion: The VC supports immune deviation for soluble antigen by acitivity suppressing antigen-Specific DTH. Systemic administration of exogenous IL-1 eliminates the capacity of the VC to support immune deviation to soluble antigen locally injected.

  14. Continuum model for chiral induced spin selectivity in helical molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, Ernesto [Centro de Física, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, 21827, Caracas 1020 A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Groupe de Physique Statistique, Institut Jean Lamour, Université de Lorraine, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); González-Arraga, Luis A. [IMDEA Nanoscience, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Finkelstein-Shapiro, Daniel; Mujica, Vladimiro [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Berche, Bertrand [Centro de Física, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, 21827, Caracas 1020 A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Groupe de Physique Statistique, Institut Jean Lamour, Université de Lorraine, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France)

    2015-05-21

    A minimal model is exactly solved for electron spin transport on a helix. Electron transport is assumed to be supported by well oriented p{sub z} type orbitals on base molecules forming a staircase of definite chirality. In a tight binding interpretation, the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) opens up an effective π{sub z} − π{sub z} coupling via interbase p{sub x,y} − p{sub z} hopping, introducing spin coupled transport. The resulting continuum model spectrum shows two Kramers doublet transport channels with a gap proportional to the SOC. Each doubly degenerate channel satisfies time reversal symmetry; nevertheless, a bias chooses a transport direction and thus selects for spin orientation. The model predicts (i) which spin orientation is selected depending on chirality and bias, (ii) changes in spin preference as a function of input Fermi level and (iii) back-scattering suppression protected by the SO gap. We compute the spin current with a definite helicity and find it to be proportional to the torsion of the chiral structure and the non-adiabatic Aharonov-Anandan phase. To describe room temperature transport, we assume that the total transmission is the result of a product of coherent steps.

  15. Neurofibromatosis type 2 tumor suppressor protein, NF2, induces proteasome-mediated degradation of JC virus T-antigen in human glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Beltrami

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 2 protein (NF2 has been shown to act as tumor suppressor primarily through its functions as a cytoskeletal scaffold. However, NF2 can also be found in the nucleus, where its role is less clear. Previously, our group has identified JC virus (JCV tumor antigen (T-antigen as a nuclear binding partner for NF2 in tumors derived from JCV T-antigen transgenic mice. The association of NF2 with T-antigen in neuronal origin tumors suggests a potential role for NF2 in regulating the expression of the JCV T-antigen. Here, we report that NF2 suppresses T-antigen protein expression in U-87 MG human glioblastoma cells, which subsequently reduces T-antigen-mediated regulation of the JCV promoter. When T-antigen mRNA was quantified, it was determined that increasing expression of NF2 correlated with an accumulation of T-antigen mRNA; however, a decrease in T-antigen at the protein level was observed. NF2 was found to promote degradation of ubiquitin bound T-antigen protein via a proteasome dependent pathway concomitant with the accumulation of the JCV early mRNA encoding T-antigen. The interaction between T-antigen and NF2 maps to the FERM domain of NF2, which has been shown previously to be responsible for its tumor suppressor activity. Co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed a ternary complex among NF2, T-antigen, and the tumor suppressor protein, p53 within a glioblastoma cell line. Further, these proteins were detected in various degrees in patient tumor tissue, suggesting that these associations may occur in vivo. Collectively, these results demonstrate that NF2 negatively regulates JCV T-antigen expression by proteasome-mediated degradation, and suggest a novel role for NF2 as a suppressor of JCV T-antigen-induced cell cycle regulation.

  16. Laser-Induced-Fluorescence Spectrum of the CNN Molecule

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis, M. C.; Levick, A. P.; Sarre, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    We have recorded a laser excitation spectrum of the A3Π–X3Σ− electronic band system of the CNN radical in the gas phase, at a resolution of ca. 0.8 cm−1. The rotational branch structure of the vibrational band near 419 nm has been simulated and molecular parameters are obtained. The results are compared with data from laser-induced-fluorescence spectra of CNN trapped in a low-temperature matrix. A revised value for the spin-orbit parameter in the A3Π state is obtained and comparison is made w...

  17. FRET based quantification and screening technology platform for the interactions of leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1 with intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Chakraborty

    Full Text Available The interaction between leukocyte function-associated antigen-1(LFA-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 plays a pivotal role in cellular adhesion including the extravasation and inflammatory response of leukocytes, and also in the formation of immunological synapse. However, irregular expressions of LFA-1 or ICAM-1 or both may lead to autoimmune diseases, metastasis cancer, etc. Thus, the LFA-1/ICAM-1 interaction may serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of these diseases. Here, we developed one simple 'in solution' steady state fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET technique to obtain the dissociation constant (Kd of the interaction between LFA-1 and ICAM-1. Moreover, we developed the assay into a screening platform to identify peptides and small molecules that inhibit the LFA-1/ICAM-1 interaction. For the FRET pair, we used Alexa Fluor 488-LFA-1 conjugate as donor and Alexa Fluor 555-human recombinant ICAM-1 (D1-D2-Fc as acceptor. From our quantitative FRET analysis, the Kd between LFA-1 and D1-D2-Fc was determined to be 17.93±1.34 nM. Both the Kd determination and screening assay were performed in a 96-well plate platform, providing the opportunity to develop it into a high-throughput assay. This is the first reported work which applies FRET based technique to determine Kd as well as classifying inhibitors of the LFA-1/ICAM-1 interaction.

  18. B cell antigen receptor-induced activation of an IRAK4-dependent signaling pathway revealed by a MALT1-IRAK4 double knockout mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dufner Almut

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The B cell antigen receptor (BCR and pathogen recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, act in concert to control adaptive B cell responses. However, little is known about the signaling pathways that integrate BCR activation with intrinsic TLR4 stimulation. Antigen receptors initialize activation of the inducible transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB via recruitment of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase caspase recruitment domain protein 11 (CARD11, the adapter molecule B cell CLL/lymphoma 10 (BCL10, and the "paracaspase" mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation gene 1 (MALT1 into lipid rafts. Upon BCR triggering, this activation strictly depends on BCL10, but not on MALT1, leading to the hypothesis that a MALT1-independent NF-κB activation pathway contributes to BCR-induced NF-κB activation downstream of BCL10. The identity of this pathway has remained elusive. Results Using genetic and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that the IRAK4- and IRAK1-dependent TLR signaling branch is activated upon BCR triggering to induce partial NF-κB activation. BCR-induced MALT1-independent IκB degradation and B cell proliferation were inhibited in MALT1/IRAK4 double knockout B cells. Moreover, IRAK1 was recruited into lipid rafts upon BCR stimulation and activated following transient recruitment of IRAK4. Conclusion We propose that the observed crosstalk between BCR and TLR signaling components may contribute to the discrimination of signals that emanate from single and dual receptor engagement to control adaptive B cell responses.

  19. Action spectroscopy for single-molecule motion induced by vibrational excitation with a scanning tunneling microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Ueba, H.; Persson, B.N.J.

    2007-01-01

    We propose an action spectroscopy for single-molecule motion induced by vibrational excitation with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Calculations of the inelastic tunneling current for excitation of the C-O stretch mode of the CO molecule on metal surfaces are combined with a theory which describes how the energy in the vibrational mode is transferred to a reaction coordinate mode to overcome the activation barrier. The calculated rate for CO hopping on Pd (110) as a function of the bia...

  20. Ultraviolet-laser-induced desorption of atoms, ions, and molecules from lithium niobate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report measurements of ultraviolet-laser-induced desorption of atoms, ions, and molecules from the surface of single-crystal, Y-cut lithium niobate at intensities below the plasma threshold. Particularly striking is the desorption of LiNbO3 molecules at intensities well below the threshold for the atomic and ion emission. Measurement of oxygen and niobium yields above and below the plasma threshold show changes in surface stoichiometry

  1. Shock-induced chemistry in simple organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattelbaum, Dana

    2011-06-01

    Interrogating chemical reactions behind a shock front is immensely difficult, and as a result, the details of shock-induced chemistry remain poorly understood. Shock compression creates transient distorted structures from which molecular reactions initiate. Previous works have reported that dimerizations, polymerizations, ring-opening and decomposition reactions occur under shock compression, depending on molecular structure. Certainly for explosives, exothermic decomposition reactions ultimately drive self-supported detonation. Questions regarding the thresholds for incipient reaction for different chemical functional groups, the nature of first and subsequent reaction steps, and the influence of shock input conditions on reaction kinetics remain to be answered. Evidence of reaction can be discerned from discontinuities in the mechanical variables for reactions with a change in density along the reaction coordinate, similar to first-order phase transformations. Here, we have applied in-situ electromagnetic gauging at multiple Lagrangian positions to elucidate the evolution of multiple-wave structures associated with shock-induced reactions. We have applied in-situ gauging, in concert with reactive molecular dynamic simulations, to investigate shock-reactivity of several simple functional groups: carbon-carbon double (-C=C-) and triple bonds, and nitriles (e.g. phenylacetylene and acrylonitrile), and aromatic ring structures (benzene), all building blocks for explosives. From measurements of the reactive flow, we have obtained detailed information about the temporal evolution of the waves, and global kinetics associated with transformation(s) between partially- and fully-reacted states. Near the reactive threshold, evolution in particle velocities point to reaction timescales on the order of several hundred nanoseconds. We have defined the reactive cusp Hugoniot states, and established the relative order of group reactivity under single shock conditions. These

  2. Phage displaying peptides mimic schistosoma antigenic epitopes selected by rat natural antibodies and protective immunity induced by their immunization in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Wang; Xin-Yuan Yi; Xian-Ping Li; Dong-Ming Zhou; McReynolds Larry; Xian-Fang Zeng

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To obtain the short peptides mimic antigenic epitopes selected by rat natural antibodies to schistosomes, and to explore their immunoprotection against schistosomiasis in mice.METHODS: Adults worm antigens (AWA) were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and enzyme-linked transferred immunoblotting methods with normal SD rat sera (NRS). The killing effects on schistosomula with fresh and heat-inactivated sera from SD rats were observed. Then the purified IgG from sera of SD rats was used to biopan a phage random peptide library and 20 randomly selected positive clones were detected by ELISA and 2 of them were sequenced.Sixty female mice were immunized thrice with positive phage clones (0, 2nd, 4th wk). Each mouse was challenged with 40 cercariae, and all mice were killed 42 d after challenge. The worms and the liver eggs were counted. RESULTS: NRS could specifically react to the molecules of 75 000, 47 000, 34 500 and 23 000 of AWA. Sera from SD rats showed that the mortality rate of schistosomula was 76.2%, and when the sera were heat-inactivated in vitro, the mortality rate was decreased to 41.0% after being cultured for 48 h. The specific phages bound to IgG were enriched about 300-folds after three rounds of biopanning. Twenty clones were detected by ELISA, 19 of them bound to the specific IgG of rat sera. Immunization with these epitopes was carried out in mice. Compared with the control groups, the mixture of two mimic peptides could induce 34.9% (P = 0.000) worm reduction and 67.6% (P = 0.000) total liver egg reduction in mice. Two different mimic peptides could respectively induce 31.0% (P = 0.001), 14.5% (P = 0.074) worm reduction and 61.2% (P = 0.000), 35.7% (P = 0.000) total liver egg reduction. The specific antibody could be induced by immunization of the mimic peptides, and the antibody titer in immunized mice reached more than 1:6 400 as detected by ELISA.CONCLUSION: Specific peptides mimic antigenic

  3. Electric Field Induced Fluorescence Modulation of Single Molecules in PMMA Based on Electron Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suotang Jia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a method to modulate the fluorescence of non-polar single squaraine-derived rotaxanes molecules embedded in a polar poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA matrix under an external electric field. The electron transfer between single molecules and the electron acceptors in a PMMA matrix contributes to the diverse responses of fluorescence intensities to the electric field. The observed instantaneous and non-instantaneous electric field dependence of single-molecule fluorescence reflects the redistribution of electron acceptors in PMMA induced by electronic polarization and orientation polarization of polar polymer chains in an electric field.

  4. Intranasal immunization with protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis induces a long-term immunological memory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sun-Je; Kang, Seok-Seong; Park, Sung-Moo; Yang, Jae Seung; Song, Man Ki; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-10-01

    Although intranasal vaccination has been shown to be effective for the protection against inhalational anthrax, establishment of long-term immunity has yet to be achieved. Here, we investigated whether intranasal immunization with recombinant protective antigen (rPA) of Bacillus anthracis induces immunological memory responses in the mucosal and systemic compartments. Intranasal immunization with rPA plus cholera toxin (CT) sustained PA-specific antibody responses for 6 months in lung, nasal washes, and vaginal washes as well as serum. A significant induction of PA-specific memory B cells was observed in spleen, cervical lymph nodes (CLNs) and lung after booster immunization. Furthermore, intranasal immunization with rPA plus CT remarkably generated effector memory CD4(+) T cells in the lung. PA-specific CD4(+) T cells preferentially increased the expression of Th1- and Th17-type cytokines in lung, but not in spleen or CLNs. Collectively, the intranasal immunization with rPA plus CT promoted immunologic memory responses in the mucosal and systemic compartments, providing long-term immunity. PMID:26278659

  5. Colloidal chromic phosphate 32P synovectomy in antigen-induced arthritis in the rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes have been employed in the therapy of chronic arthritis, in particular, rheumatoid arthritis for many years. A variety of isotopes have been popularized, and in the last ten years a colloidal solution of radioactive chromic phosphate 32P has been in use apparently with equivalent efficacy to others such as 169erbium, 90yttrium, and 165dysprosium. No controlled studies on this modality have been reported and few animal studies were found. The efficacy of therapeutic doses of 32P as a medical synovectomy and its effect on rabbit joints with antigen-induced arthritis were observed in 62 arthritic knee joints in 31 adult rabbits treated on one side with 0.1 microCi of 32P, the opposite serving as control. The animals were observed over a period of 11 months and examined by histologic and biochemical means. The synovium showed no evidence of radiation necrosis in treated joints. Cartilage of treated and control joints showed similar changes consistent with chronic arthritis, persistent synovitis, progressive chondrocyte degeneration, and decreased matrix metachromasia. The radiosynovectomy had neither removed synovium nor protected the cartilage. Its efficacy in humans is therefore questionable

  6. Phenobarbital-induced hepatocellular proliferation: anti-bromodeoxyuridine and anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunocytochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, H B; Clarke, N A; Barrass, N C

    1993-01-01

    We report modifications to immunocytochemical detection procedures for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) which permit its identification in liver samples previously fixed for BrdU immunocytochemistry. Both methods have been used for the assessment of phenobarbital-induced cell proliferation in rat liver. The difficulties associated with the hitherto unsuccessful application of PCNA immunocytochemical methods to tissues fixed in formalin for BrdU visualization were overcome by epitope unmasking with acid hydrolysis, extension of primary antiserum (PC10) incubation, and employment of streptavidin-ABC-HRP. BrdU delivery via osmotic minipumps for 48 hr before euthanasia, followed by fixation in cold formalin for 14 days, yielded reliable and reproducible hepatocellular labeling and a peak of cell proliferation in all lobes on Day 3 (i.e., labeling during Days 1-3) of dosing with 80 mg/kg/day phenobarbital. Labeling indices (LI) of both control and phenobarbital-treated liver were lower in the left and right median lobes as compared with the lateral lobes. In sections of the left lateral lobe from the same liver, PCNA immunocytochemistry revealed a peak of proliferative activity (about one third of the maximum LI generated by BrdU incorporation) on Day 1. These findings, together with the advantages and disadvantages of both techniques, are discussed in the context of their applications to different investigative requirements. PMID:8093255

  7. Therapeutic effects of TNF-α antagonist etanercept and methotrexate on antigen-induced arthritis of the temporomandibular joint

    OpenAIRE

    Rafayelyan, Smbat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) can cause severe growth disturbances of the craniomandibular system. Antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) of the rabbit TMJ is simulating the inflammatory process of the TMJ in JIA. In the first two studies of the present thesis the effect of a systemic administration of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) antagonist etanercept and methotrexate (MTX) on AIA in young rabbits should be investigate...

  8. Intestinal commensal bacteria promote T cell hyporesponsiveness and down-regulate the serum antibody responses induced by dietary antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Masato; Hosono, Akira; Yanagibashi, Tsutomu; Kihara-Fujioka, Miran; Hachimura, Satoshi; Itoh, Kikuji; Hirayama, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Kyoko; Kaminogawa, Shuichi

    2010-08-16

    Colonization of the gut by commensal bacteria modulates the induction of oral tolerance and allergy. However, how these intestinal bacteria modulate antigen-specific T cell responses induced by oral antigens remains unclear. In order to investigate this, we used germ-free (GF) ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cell receptor transgenic (OVA23-3) mice. Conventional (CV) or GF mice were administered an OVA-containing diet. Cytokine production by CD4(+) cells from spleen (SP), mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and Peyer's patches (PP) was evaluated by ELISA, as was the peripheral antibody titer. T cell phenotype was assessed by flow cytometry. CD4(+) cells from the SP and MLN of CV and GF mice fed an OVA diet for 3 weeks produced significantly less IL-2 than the corresponding cells from mice receiving a control diet, suggesting that oral tolerance could be induced at the T cell level in the systemic and intestinal immune systems of both bacterial condition of mice. However, we also observed that the T cell hyporesponsiveness induced by dietary antigen was delayed in the systemic immune tissues and was weaker in the intestinal immune tissues of the GF mice. Intestinal MLN and PP CD4(+) T cells from these animals also produced lower levels of IL-10, had less activated/memory type CD45RB(low) cells, and expressed lower levels of CTLA-4 but not Foxp3 compared to their CV counterparts. Furthermore, GF mice produced higher serum levels of OVA-specific antibodies than CV animals. CD40L expression by SP CD4(+) cells from GF mice fed OVA was higher than that of CV mice. These results suggest that intestinal commensal bacteria promote T cell hyporesponsiveness and down-regulate serum antibody responses induced by dietary antigens through modulation of the intestinal and systemic T cell phenotype. PMID:20621647

  9. Functional activation of the T-cell antigen receptor induces tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C-gamma 1.

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, A; Koretzky, G; Schatzman, R C; Kadlecek, T

    1991-01-01

    Stimulation of the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR), which itself is not a protein-tyrosine kinase (PTK), activates a PTK and phospholipase C (PLC). Using the human T-cell leukemic line Jurkat and normal peripheral blood lymphocytes, we demonstrate that stimulation of the TCR specifically induces the recovery of PLC activity in eluates from anti-phosphotyrosine immunoprecipitates. Stimulation of the human muscarinic receptor, subtype 1, when expressed in Jurkat activates PLC through a guanine nu...

  10. A case of transfusion-related acute lung injury induced by anti-human leukocyte antigen antibodies in acute leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Sun Mi; Jang, Moon Ju; Huh, Ji Young; Park, Myoung Hee; Song, Eun Young; Oh, Doyeun

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a noncardiogenic pulmonary edema that occurs during or within 6 hours after transfusion. Risk factors for TRALI, which is relatively common in critically ill patients, include recent surgery, hematologic malignancy, and sepsis. Here, we report a case of TRALI induced by anti-human leukocyte antigen (anti-HLA) class II antibodies (HLA-DR) occurring after transfusion of platelet concentrates in a patient with acute leukemia. Although most patient...

  11. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) induces cell-surface Ro/SSA antigen expression by human keratinocytes in vitro: a possible mechanism for the UVR induction of cutaneous lupus lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.K. (Bristol Royal Infirmary (United Kingdom))

    1992-06-01

    Antinuclear antibodies are useful markers of connective tissue disease. In this study, UVB but not UVA induced the expression of Ro/SSA antigen on keratinocyte surfaces in vitro. This expression was also found with the extractable nuclear antigens RnP and Sm, but not with single or double-stranded DNA. The expression was prevented by blocking protein synthesis, suggesting that it was an active process. The results suggest that UVB exposure may result in the expression of Ro/SSA antigen on the surfaces of basal keratinocytes in vivo. This antigen could then bind circulating antibody leading to the cutaneous lesions in neonatal and subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. (Author).

  12. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) induces cell-surface Ro/SSA antigen expression by human keratinocytes in vitro: a possible mechanism for the UVR induction of cutaneous lupus lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antinuclear antibodies are useful markers of connective tissue disease. In this study, UVB but not UVA induced the expression of Ro/SSA antigen on keratinocyte surfaces in vitro. This expression was also found with the extractable nuclear antigens RnP and Sm, but not with single or double-stranded DNA. The expression was prevented by blocking protein synthesis, suggesting that it was an active process. The results suggest that UVB exposure may result in the expression of Ro/SSA antigen on the surfaces of basal keratinocytes in vivo. This antigen could then bind circulating antibody leading to the cutaneous lesions in neonatal and subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. (Author)

  13. Supersonic pulsed free-jet of atoms and molecules of refractory metals: laser induced fluorescence spectroscopic studies on zirconium atoms and zirconium oxide molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental setup for generating supersonic pulsed free-jet containing atoms and molecules of refractory nature has been built. The technique of laser vaporization in conjunction with supersonic cooling is used to generate these species. The cooled atoms and molecules in supersonic free-jet are probed by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. In particular, the technique has been used to perform low-resolution laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy, limited by laser linewidth, on cold Zr atoms and ZrO molecules. The translational temperatures of ∼ 26.5 K and the rotational temperatures of ∼ 81 K have been achieved. It is possible to achieve the Doppler width of few tens of MHz allowing it to perform high-resolution spectroscopy on these atomic and molecular species. Also because of low rotational temperature of molecules the spectral congestion is greatly reduced. In general, this technique can be applied to perform spectroscopy on atoms and molecules of refractory nature. (author)

  14. Orientation of azobenzene molecules in polymer films induced by all-optical poling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoxia Zhong(钟晓霞); Shouyu Luo(罗售余); Xiuqin Yu(虞秀琴); Qu Li(李劬); Yingli Chen(陈英礼); Yu Sui(隋郁); Jie Yin(印杰)

    2003-01-01

    A model of the alignment of azobenzene molecules in polymer film induced by all-optical poling is proposedand verified by experiment. We found that when the writing beams of frequencies ω and 2ω are both linearlypolarized with their polarization directions parallel to each other, azobenzene molecules tend to reorientto the direction perpendicular to the writing beams polarization. At the end of the writing process, moremolecules orient to the direction perpendicular to the writing beams polarization than those which orientto the parallel direction. The alignment of molecules parallel or perpendicular to the polarization of thewriting beams is characteristic of polarity or no polarity, respectively. The alignment of molecules alongthe polarization of writing beams results in the second order nonlinearity in the polymer film. Accordingto the model, a new method to improve the optical poling efficiency is put forward.

  15. Vibrational emission analysis of the CN molecules in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of organic materials is based on the analysis of atomic and ionic emission lines and on a few molecular bands, the most important being the CN violet system and the C2 Swan system. This paper is focused in molecular emission of LIBS plasmas based on the CN (B2Σ–X2Σ) band, one of the strongest emissions appearing in all carbon materials when analyzed in air atmosphere. An analysis of this band with sufficient spectral resolution provides a great deal of information on the molecule, which has revealed that valuable information can be obtained from the plume chemistry and dynamics affecting the excitation mechanisms of the molecules. The vibrational emission of this molecular band has been investigated to establish the dependence of this emission on the molecular structure of the materials. The paper shows that excitation/emission phenomena of molecular species observed in the plume depend strongly on the time interval selected and on the irradiance deposited on the sample surface. Precise time resolved LIBS measurements are needed for the observation of distinctive CN emission. For the organic compounds studied, larger differences in the behavior of the vibrational emission occur at early stages after plasma ignition. Since molecular emission is generally more complex than that involving atomic emission, local plasma conditions as well as plume chemistry may induce changes in vibrational emission of molecules. As a consequence, alterations in the distribution of the emissions occur in terms of relative intensities, being sensitive to the molecular structure of every single material. - Highlights: • Vibrational emission of CN species in laser-induced plasmas has been investigated. • Distribution of vibrational emission of CN has been found to be time dependent. • Laser irradiance affects the vibrational distribution of the CN molecules. • Plume chemistry controls the excitation mechanisms of CN molecules in the

  16. Neural cell adhesion molecule induces intracellular signaling via multiple mechanisms of Ca2+ homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiryushko, Darya; Korshunova, Irina; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays a pivotal role in the development of the nervous system, promoting neuronal differentiation via homophilic (NCAM-NCAM) as well as heterophilic (NCAM-fibroblast growth factor receptor [FGFR]) interactions. NCAM-induced intracellular signaling has been...

  17. Preface: Photon and fast Ion induced Processes in Atoms, MOlecules and Nanostructures (PIPAMON)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kövér, László

    2016-02-01

    This Special Issue contains selected papers of contributions presented in the International Workshop on Photon and fast Ion induced Processes in Atoms, MOlecules and Nanostructures (PIPAMON), held between March 24 and 26, 2015 in Debrecen, Hungary. The venue, the Aquaticum Thermal and Wellness Hotel provided a pleasant "all-under-one-roof" environment for the event.

  18. Hot Carrier-Induced Tautomerization within a Single Porphycene Molecule on Cu(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladenthin, Janina N; Grill, Leonhard; Gawinkowski, Sylwester; Liu, Shuyi; Waluk, Jacek; Kumagai, Takashi

    2015-07-28

    Here, we report the study of tautomerization within a single porphycene molecule adsorbed on a Cu(111) surface using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at 5 K. While molecules are adsorbed on the surface exclusively in the thermodynamically stable trans tautomer after deposition, a voltage pulse from the STM can induce the unidirectional trans → cis and reversible cis ↔ cis tautomerization. From the voltage and current dependence of the tautomerization yield (rate), it is revealed that the process is induced by vibrational excitation via inelastic electron tunneling. However, the metastable cis molecules are thermally switched back to the trans tautomer by heating the surface up to 30 K. Furthermore, we have found that the unidirectional tautomerization can be remotely controlled at a distance from the STM tip. By analyzing the nonlocal process in dependence on various experimental parameters, a hot carrier-mediated mechanism is identified, in which hot electrons (holes) generated by the STM travel along the surface and induce the tautomerization through inelastic scattering with a molecule. The bias voltage and coverage dependent rate of the nonlocal tautomerization clearly show a significant contribution of the Cu(111) surface state to the hot carrier-induced process. PMID:26057840

  19. Antigen presentation by liposomes bearing class II MHC and membrane IL-1.

    OpenAIRE

    Bakouche, O; LACHMAN, L.B.

    1990-01-01

    Liposomes containing membrane IL-1, Iak, and the antigen conalbumin were evaluated as "synthetic antigen presenting cells." The role of these three molecules in macrophage-T cell interaction was studied by testing their ability to induce the proliferation of a T-cell clone specific to conalbumin (the D10 cell line) or immune spleen cells sensitized three times in vivo with conalbumin. In the latter case, splenic macrophages were eliminated by adherence and a lysomotropic agent. The antigen co...

  20. The role of Ia molecules in the activation of T lymphocytes. III. Antigen-specific, Ia-restricted, interleukin 2-producing T cell hybridomas with detectable affinity for the restricting I-A molecule

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Antigen-specific I region-restricted, interleukin 2-producing T cell hybridomas were produced by fusing GAT-specific T cell blasts with BW5147. Two antigen-specific phenotypes were identified, one autoreactive and one nonautoreactive. All of the antigen-specific and autoreactive clones were H-2 restricted, mapping to the IA subregion by genetic analysis and monoclonal antibody inhibition. Both the antigen- specific and autoreactive stimulation are the property of a single cell and required no...

  1. CD8α− Dendritic Cells Induce Antigen-Specific T Follicular Helper Cells Generating Efficient Humoral Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changsik Shin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on T follicular helper (Tfh cells have significantly advanced our understanding of T cell-dependent B cell responses. However, little is known about the early stage of Tfh cell commitment by dendritic cells (DCs, particularly by the conventional CD8α+ and CD8α− DC subsets. We show that CD8α− DCs localized at the interfollicular zone play a pivotal role in the induction of antigen-specific Tfh cells by upregulating the expression of Icosl and Ox40l through the non-canonical NF-κB signaling pathway. Tfh cells induced by CD8α− DCs function as true B cell helpers, resulting in significantly increased humoral immune responses against various human pathogenic antigens, including Yersinia pestis LcrV, HIV Gag, and hepatitis B surface antigen. Our findings uncover a mechanistic role of CD8α− DCs in the initiation of Tfh cell differentiation and thereby provide a rationale for investigating CD8α− DCs in enhancing antigen-specific humoral immune responses for improving vaccines and therapeutics.

  2. The granulocyte receptor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 3 (CEACAM3) directly associates with Vav to promote phagocytosis of human pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitter, Tim; Pils, Stefan; Sakk, Vadim; Frank, Ronald; Fischer, Klaus-Dieter; Hauck, Christof R

    2007-03-15

    The human granulocyte-specific receptor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM)3 is critically involved in the opsonin-independent recognition of several bacterial pathogens. CEACAM3-mediated phagocytosis depends on the integrity of an ITAM-like sequence within the cytoplasmic domain of CEACAM3 and is characterized by rapid stimulation of the GTPase Rac. By performing a functional screen with CEACAM3-expressing cells, we found that overexpression of a dominant-negative form of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav, but not the dominant-negative versions SWAP70, Dock2, or ELMO1 interfered with CEACAM3-initiated phagocytosis. Moreover, small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of Vav reduced uptake and abrogated the stimulation of Rac in response to bacterial CEACAM3 engagement. In Vav1/Vav2-deficient cells, CEACAM3-mediated internalization was only observed after re-expression of Vav. Vav colocalized with CEACAM3 upon bacterial infection, coimmunoprecipitated in a complex with CEACAM3, and the Vav Src homology 2 domain directly associated with phosphorylated Tyr(230) of CEACAM3. In primary human granulocytes, TAT-mediated transduction of dominant-negative Vav, but not SWAP70, severely impaired the uptake of CEACAM3-binding bacteria. These data support the view that, different from canonical ITAM signaling, the CEACAM3 ITAM-like sequence short-wires bacterial recognition and Rac stimulation via a direct association with Vav to promote rapid phagocytosis and elimination of CEACAM-binding human pathogens. PMID:17339478

  3. Identification of chimeric antigen receptors that mediate constitutive or inducible proliferation of T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Frigault, Matthew J.; Lee, Jihyun; Basil, Maria Ciocca; Carpenito, Carmine; Motohashi, Shinichiro; Scholler, John; Kawalekar, Omkar U.; Guedan, Sonia; McGettigan, Shannon E; Posey, Avery D; Ang, Sonny; Cooper, Laurence J. N.; Platt, Jesse M.; Johnson, F. Brad; Paulos, Chrystal M.

    2015-01-01

    This study compared second generation chimeric antigen receptors encoding signaling domains composed of CD28, ICOS and 4-1BB. Here we report that certain CARs endow T cells with the ability to undergo long-term autonomous proliferation. Transduction of primary human T-cell with lentiviral vectors encoding some of the CARs resulted in sustained proliferation for up to three months following a single stimulation through the TCR. Sustained numeric expansion was independent of cognate antigen and...

  4. Dendritic cells induce antigen-specific regulatory T cells that prevent graft versus host disease and persist in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Sela, Uri; Olds, Peter; Park, Andrew; Schlesinger, Sarah J.; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2011-01-01

    Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (T reg cells) effectively suppress immunity, but it is not determined if antigen-induced T reg cells (iT reg cells) are able to persist under conditions of inflammation and to stably express the transcription factor Foxp3. We used spleen cells to stimulate the mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR) in the presence of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and retinoic acid. We found that the CD11chigh dendritic cell fraction was the most potent at inducing high numbers of allo...

  5. Interleukin-15-induced CD56(+) myeloid dendritic cells combine potent tumor antigen presentation with direct tumoricidal potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguille, Sébastien; Lion, Eva; Tel, Jurjen; de Vries, I Jolanda M; Couderé, Karen; Fromm, Phillip D; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F; Smits, Evelien L; Berneman, Zwi N

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the quintessential antigen-presenting cells of the human immune system and play a prime role in coordinating innate and adaptive immune responses, explaining the strong and still growing interest in their application for cancer immunotherapy. Much current research in the field of DC-based immunotherapy focuses on optimizing the culture conditions for in vitro DC generation in order to assure that DCs with the best possible immunogenic qualities are being used for immunotherapy. In this context, monocyte-derived DCs that are alternatively induced by interleukin-15 (IL-15 DCs) have attracted recent attention due to their superior immunostimulatory characteristics. In this study, we show that IL-15 DCs, in addition to potent tumor antigen-presenting function, possess tumoricidal potential and thus qualify for the designation of killer DCs. Notwithstanding marked expression of the natural killer (NK) cell marker CD56 on a subset of IL-15 DCs, we found no evidence of a further phenotypic overlap between IL-15 DCs and NK cells. Allostimulation and antigen presentation assays confirmed that IL-15 DCs should be regarded as bona fide myeloid DCs not only from the phenotypic but also from the functional point of view. Concerning their cytotoxic activity, we demonstrate that IL-15 DCs are able to induce apoptotic cell death of the human K562 tumor cell line, while sparing tumor antigen-specific T cells. The cytotoxicity of IL-15 DCs is predominantly mediated by granzyme B and, to a small extent, by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) but is independent of perforin, Fas ligand and TNF-α. In conclusion, our data provide evidence of a previously unappreciated role for IL-15 in the differentiation of human monocytes towards killer DCs. The observation that IL-15 DCs have killer DC capacity lends further support to their implementation in DC-based immunotherapy protocols. PMID:23284789

  6. Surface chemical reactions induced by molecules electronically-excited in the gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrunin, Victor V.

    2011-01-01

    alignment are taking place, guiding all the molecules towards the intersections with the ground state PES, where transitions to the ground state PES will occur with minimum energy dissipation. The accumulated kinetic energy may be used to overcome the chemical reaction barrier. While recombination chemical...... be readily produced. Products of chemical adsorption and/or chemical reactions induced within adsorbates are aggregated on the surface and observed by light scattering. We will demonstrate how pressure and spectral dependencies of the chemical outcomes, polarization of the light and interference of...... two laser beams inducing the reaction can be used to distinguish the new process we try to investigate from chemical reactions induced by photoexcitation within adsorbed molecules and/or gas phase photolysis....

  7. π-Electron rotations in chiral aromatic molecules induced by ultashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    π Electron play an important role in formation of the molecular structures and reactivity of aromatic molecules. In recent years, research fields of electron dynamics in atoms and molecules have attracted considerable attention with rapid progress in laser science and technology in femtosecond to attosecond time regimes [1]. This is a new branch of femtosecond chemistry. In this talk, we present the results of our recent works on control of π-electron rotation in photo-induced chiral aromatic molecules [2-4]. Control of π-electron rotation has potential utility to next-generation ultrafast switching devices. After a short introduction, the principle of generation of unidirectional π-electron rotation in aromatic molecules induced by a linearly polarized UV laser pulse is described. Next, the results of control simulations of π-electron rotations and those of the π- electron ring currents are presented for two representative chiral aromatic molecules; one is 2,5-dichlor[n] (3,6) pyrazinophane with one aromatic pyrzine ring [2], and the other is (P)-2,2’-biphenol with two aromatic rings [3,4]. Finally, the summary of the π-electron rotations and perspectives of ultrashort quantum switching investigations are described. (author)

  8. Differences in immune responses against Leishmania induced by infection and by immunization with killed parasite antigen: implications for vaccine discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Sergio C F

    2016-01-01

    The leishmaniases are a group of diseases caused by different species of the protozoan genus Leishmania and transmitted by sand fly vectors. They are a major public health problem in almost all continents. There is no effective control of leishmaniasis and its geographical distribution is expanding in many countries. Great effort has been made by many scientists to develop a vaccine against leishmaniasis, but, so far, there is still no effective vaccine against the disease. The only way to generate protective immunity against leishmaniasis in humans is leishmanization, consisting of the inoculation of live virulent Leishmania as a means to acquire long-lasting immunity against subsequent infections. At present, all that we know about human immune responses to Leishmania induced by immunization with killed parasite antigens came from studies with first generation candidate vaccines (killed promastigote extracts). In the few occasions that the T cell-mediated immune responses to Leishmania induced by infection and immunization with killed parasite antigens were compared, important differences were found both in humans and in animals. This review discusses these differences and their relevance to the development of a vaccine against leishmaniasis, the major problems involved in this task, the recent prospects for the selection of candidate antigens and the use of attenuated Leishmania as live vaccines. PMID:27600664

  9. Initial characterization of receptors for molecules that induce the settlement and metamorphosis of Haliotis rufescens larvae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larvae of the marine gastropod mollusc Haliotis refescens are induced to undergo metamorphosis by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and stereochemically related compounds. The most potent of these inducers is (-)-β-(parachlorophenyl)-GABA (baclofen). The inductive response exhibits positive cooperatively, and is subject to both facilitation (up-regulation) and habituation (down-regulation). Facilitation is brought about by diamino acids such as L-diaminopropionic acid (L-DAPA), and is characterized by decreased Hill coefficients (n/sub H/) and concentration requirements (EC50) for inducers. Facilitation does not require the simultaneous presence of facilitating and inducing compounds, and the facilitated state is persistent. Larvae are capable of being up-regulated 2 days before they are capable of undergoing settlement and metamorphosis. Habituation can be brought about by exposure of pre-competent larvae to GABA 4 days prior to the attainment of competence; it is then slowly reversible. Larvae specifically bind tritiated (-)-baclofen in a manner that is saturable with both increasing time of exposure of larvae to, and with increasing concentration of, this compound. Specific binding can be competed for by unlabeled GABA-mimetic inducing molecules; the order of effectiveness of these molecules as competitors for specific binding correlates well with their effectiveness as inducers of metamorphosis. Facilitation of larvae by exposure to diamino acids does not alter their specific binding of tritiated (-)-baclofen. It is concluded from these findings that Haliotis larvae possess receptors for GABA-mimetic compounds

  10. Initial characterization of receptors for molecules that induce the settlement and metamorphosis of Haliotis rufescens larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trapido-Rosenthal, H.G.

    1985-01-01

    Larvae of the marine gastropod mollusc Haliotis refescens are induced to undergo metamorphosis by ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and stereochemically related compounds. The most potent of these inducers is (-)-..beta..-(parachlorophenyl)-GABA (baclofen). The inductive response exhibits positive cooperatively, and is subject to both facilitation (up-regulation) and habituation (down-regulation). Facilitation is brought about by diamino acids such as L-diaminopropionic acid (L-DAPA), and is characterized by decreased Hill coefficients (n/sub H/) and concentration requirements (EC/sub 50/) for inducers. Facilitation does not require the simultaneous presence of facilitating and inducing compounds, and the facilitated state is persistent. Larvae are capable of being up-regulated 2 days before they are capable of undergoing settlement and metamorphosis. Habituation can be brought about by exposure of pre-competent larvae to GABA 4 days prior to the attainment of competence; it is then slowly reversible. Larvae specifically bind tritiated (-)-baclofen in a manner that is saturable with both increasing time of exposure of larvae to, and with increasing concentration of, this compound. Specific binding can be competed for by unlabeled GABA-mimetic inducing molecules; the order of effectiveness of these molecules as competitors for specific binding correlates well with their effectiveness as inducers of metamorphosis. Facilitation of larvae by exposure to diamino acids does not alter their specific binding of tritiated (-)-baclofen. It is concluded from these findings that Haliotis larvae possess receptors for GABA-mimetic compounds.

  11. HCI-induced molecule fragmentation: non-Coulombic explosion and three-body effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of highly charged ion-induced diatomic (CO) and triatomic (CO2) molecules fragmentation by the coincident measurement of the fragment momenta is presented. It is shown that the experimental results together with ab initio calculations including a large number of potential energy curves evidence the limitation of the Coulomb explosion model to reproduce the dynamics of the fragmentation. The geometry modification of the CO2 molecule during the breakup is explored and the concerted or sequential nature of the dissociation is discussed for two fragmentation channels. Finally, the fragmentation of the H2 molecules following collisions with slow multicharged ions is analysed for various projectiles and energies. From the energy spectra, the effect of the projectile on the H+ fragments is evidenced. This three-body effect is discussed in connection with the results of two model calculations including or not the role of the projectile. (orig.)

  12. Plasmon-induced strong interaction between chiral molecules and orbital angular momentum of light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tong; Wang, Rongyao; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2015-12-01

    Whether or not chiral interaction exists between the optical orbital angular momentum (OAM) and a chiral molecule remains unanswered. So far, such an interaction has not been observed experimentally. Here we present a T-matrix method to study the interaction between optical OAM and the chiral molecule in a cluster of nanoparticles. We find that strong interaction between the chiral molecule and OAM can be induced by the excitation of plasmon resonances. An experimental scheme to observe such an interaction has been proposed. Furthermore, we have found that the signal of the OAM dichroism can be either positive or negative, depending on the spatial positions of nanocomposites in the cross-sections of OAM beams. The cancellation between positive and negative signals in the spatial average can explain why the interaction has not been observed in former experiments.

  13. Plasmon-induced strong interaction between chiral molecules and orbital angular momentum of light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tong; Wang, Rongyao; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2015-01-01

    Whether or not chiral interaction exists between the optical orbital angular momentum (OAM) and a chiral molecule remains unanswered. So far, such an interaction has not been observed experimentally. Here we present a T-matrix method to study the interaction between optical OAM and the chiral molecule in a cluster of nanoparticles. We find that strong interaction between the chiral molecule and OAM can be induced by the excitation of plasmon resonances. An experimental scheme to observe such an interaction has been proposed. Furthermore, we have found that the signal of the OAM dichroism can be either positive or negative, depending on the spatial positions of nanocomposites in the cross-sections of OAM beams. The cancellation between positive and negative signals in the spatial average can explain why the interaction has not been observed in former experiments. PMID:26656892

  14. Fluctuation Induced Structure in Chemical Reaction with Small Number of Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    We investigate the behaviors of chemical reactions of the Lotka-Volterra model with small number of molecules; hence the occurrence of random fluctuations modifies the deterministic behavior and the law of mass action is replaced by a stochastic model. We model it by using Abstract Rewriting System on Multisets, ARMS; ARMS is a stochastic method of simulating chemical reactions and it is based on the reaction rate equation. We confirmed that the magnitude of fluctuations on periodicity of oscillations becomes large, as the number of involved molecules is getting smaller; and these fluctuations induce another structure, which have not observed in the reactions with large number of molecules. We show that the underling mechanism through investigating the coarse grained phase space of ARMS.

  15. Modeling Complex Organic Molecules in dense regions: Eley-Rideal and complex induced reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Ruaud, M; Hickson, K M; Gratier, P; Hersant, F; Wakelam, V

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed the existence of Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) in cold dense cores and prestellar cores. The presence of these molecules in such cold conditions is not well understood and remains a matter of debate since the previously proposed "warm- up" scenario cannot explain these observations. In this article, we study the effect of Eley- Rideal and complex induced reaction mechanisms of gas-phase carbon atoms with the main ice components of dust grains on the formation of COMs in cold and dense regions. Based on recent experiments we use a low value for the chemical desorption efficiency (which was previously invoked to explain the observed COM abundances). We show that our introduced mechanisms are efficient enough to produce a large amount of complex organic molecules in the gas-phase at temperatures as low as 10K.

  16. The Possible Mechanism of Idiosyncratic Lapatinib-Induced Liver Injury in Patients Carrying Human Leukocyte Antigen-DRB1*07:01.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Hirasawa

    Full Text Available Idiosyncratic lapatinib-induced liver injury has been reported to be associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DRB1*07:01. In order to investigate its mechanism, interaction of lapatinib with HLA-DRB1*07:01 and its ligand peptide derived from tetanus toxoid, has been evaluated in vitro. Here we show that lapatinib enhances binding of the ligand peptide to HLA-DRB1*07:01. Furthermore in silico molecular dynamics analysis revealed that lapatinib could change the β chain helix in the HLA-DRB1*07:01 specifically to form a tightly closed binding groove structure and modify a large part of the binding groove. These results indicate that lapatinib affects the ligand binding to HLA-DRB1*07:01 and idiosyncratic lapatinib-induced liver injury might be triggered by this mechanism. This is the first report showing that the clinically available drug can enhance the binding of ligand peptide to HLA class II molecules in vitro and in silico.

  17. Molecular basis of a unique tumor antigen of radiation leukemia virus-induced leukemia B6RV2: its relation to MuLV gp70 of xenotropic class

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies that reacted with the B6 radiation leukemia virus (RadLV)-induced leukemia B6RV2 were produced by fusion of BALB/c NS-1 myeloma cells with spleen cells from (BALB/c X B6)F1 mice immunized with B6RV2. By direct and absorption analyses with 28 B6 and BALB/c leukemias, the monoclonal antibodies NU7-4 and NU7-99 were shown to react only with B6RV2, indicating that they recognized an individually distinct antigen on B6RV2 that was identified previously with conventional (BALB/c X B6)F1 anti-B6RV2 serum. Another monoclonal antibody, NU1-132, showed relatively restricted reactivity with B6 RadLV leukemias. These three monoclonal antibodies all precipitated material of approximately 80,000 daltons, which is the same size as that precipitated by anti-xenotropic MuLV gp70 serum. Sequential immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that the molecules precipitated by NU7-4 were not removed by pretreatment of NU7-99 or NU1-132 and that the molecules precipitated by NU7-99 were not removed by NU7-4 or NU1-132. The molecules precipitated by NU1-132 were partially removed by pretreatment with NU7-4, but not with NU7-99. The molecules precipitated by these three monoclonal antibodies were removed by pretreatment with anti-xenotropic gp70. These results suggested heterogeneity of the xenotropic MuLV gp70-related molecules expressed on B6RV2 and a possible relation between serologically defined unique tumor antigens and gp70-related molecules

  18. Expression of human carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 and alveolar progenitor cells in normal and injured lungs of transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shin-E; Barrette, Anne Marie; Chapin, Cheryl; Gonzales, Linda W; Gonzalez, Robert F; Dobbs, Leland G; Ballard, Philip L

    2015-12-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) is expressed in the epithelium of various primate tissues, including lung airway and alveoli. In human lung, CEACAM6 is developmentally and hormonally regulated, protects surfactant function, has anti-apoptotic activity and is dysregulated in cancers. We hypothesized that alveolar CEACAM6 expression increases in lung injury and promotes cell proliferation during repair. Studies were performed in CEABAC transgenic mice-containing human CEACAM genes. The level of CEACAM6 in adult CEABAC lung was comparable to that in human infants; expression occurred in epithelium of airways and of some alveoli but rarely co-localized with markers of type I or type II cells. Ten days after bleomycin instillation, both the number of CEACAM6(+) cells and immunostaining intensity were elevated in injured lung areas, and there was increased co-localization with type I and II cell markers. To specifically address type II cells, we crossed CEABAC mice with animals expressing EGFP driven by the SP-C promoter. After bleomycin injury, partially flattened, elongated epithelial cells were observed that expressed type I cell markers and were primarily either EGFP(+) or CEACAM6(+). In cell cycle studies, mitosis was greater in CEACAM6(+) non-type II cells versus CEACAM6(+)/EGFP(+) cells. CEACAM6 epithelial expression was also increased after hyperoxic exposure and LPS instillation, suggesting a generalized response to acute lung injuries. We conclude that CEACAM6 expression is comparable in human lung and the CEABAC mouse. CEACAM6 in this model appears to be a marker of a progenitor cell population that contributes to alveolar epithelial cell replenishment after lung injury. PMID:26702074

  19. Clinical and experimental studies regarding the expression and diagnostic value of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 in non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) is a multifunctional Ig-like cell adhesion molecule that has a wide range of biological functions. According to previous reports, serum CEACAM1 is dysregulated in different malignant tumours and associated with tumour progression. However, the serum CEACAM1 expression in non-small-cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC) is unclear. The different expression ratio of CEACAM1-S and CEACAM1-L isoform has seldom been investigated in NSCLC. This research is intended to study the serum CEACAM1 and the ratio of CEACAM1-S/L isoforms in NSCLC. The expression of the serum CEACAM1 was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The protein expression and the location of CEACAM1 in tumours were observed by immunohistochemical staining. The CEACAM1 mRNA levels in tumour and normal adjacent tissues were measured using quantitative real-time PCR, and the expression patterns and the rate of CEACAM1-S and CEACAM1-L were analysed by reverse transcription-PCR. Serum CEACAM1 levels were significantly higher in NSCLC patients compared with that from normal healthy controls (P <0.0001). 17 patients (81%) among 21 showed high expression of CEACAM1 by immunohistochemical staining. Although no significant differences were found between tumour and normal tissues on mRNA expression levels of CEACAM1 (P >0.05), the CEACAM1-S and the CEACAM1-S/L (S: L) ratios were significantly higher in tumour than normal tissues (P <0.05). Our data indicated that the serum levels of CEACAM1 could discriminate lung cancer patients from health donors and that CEACAM1 might be a useful marker in early diagnosis of NSCLC. Moreover, our results showed that the expression patterns of CEACAM1 isoforms could be changed during oncogenesis, even when total CEACAM1 in tumour tissues did not show significant changes. Our study suggested that the expression ratios of CEACAM1-S/CEACAM1-L might be a better diagnostic indicator in NSCLC than the quantitative

  20. Extracting conformational structure information of benzene molecules via laser-induced electron diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta Ito

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We have measured the angular distributions of high energy photoelectrons of benzene molecules generated by intense infrared femtosecond laser pulses. These electrons arise from the elastic collisions between the benzene ions with the previously tunnel-ionized electrons that have been driven back by the laser field. Theory shows that laser-free elastic differential cross sections (DCSs can be extracted from these photoelectrons, and the DCS can be used to retrieve the bond lengths of gas-phase molecules similar to the conventional electron diffraction method. From our experimental results, we have obtained the C-C and C-H bond lengths of benzene with a spatial resolution of about 10 pm. Our results demonstrate that laser induced electron diffraction (LIED experiments can be carried out with the present-day ultrafast intense lasers already. Looking ahead, with aligned or oriented molecules, more complete spatial information of the molecule can be obtained from LIED, and applying LIED to probe photo-excited molecules, a “molecular movie” of the dynamic system may be created with sub-Ångström spatial and few-ten femtosecond temporal resolutions.

  1. Laser-Induced Continuum Structure of NO Molecules in Two-Colour Femtosecond Pulsed Laser Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Sen-Ming; YUAN Kai-Jun; CONG Shu-Lin

    2006-01-01

    The method of quantum wave packet dynamics is used to study the multiphoton ionization of NO molecules via a two-photon Raman coupling and a laser-induced continuum structure (LICS) state in two-colour strong femtosecond pulsed laser fields.Time-and energy-resolved photoelectron energy spectra are calculated for describing three photoionization channels.The population transfers through the LICS and the Raman coupling passages and discussed.

  2. Tunneling electron induced rotation of a copper phthalocyanine molecule on Cu(111)

    OpenAIRE

    Schaffert, J.; Cottin, M. C.; Sonntag, A.; Bobisch, C. A.; Möller, Rolf; Gauyacq, J. P.; Lorente, N.

    2013-01-01

    The rates of a hindered molecular rotation induced by tunneling electrons are evaluated using scattering theory within the sudden approximation. Our approach explains the excitation of copper phthalocyanine molecules (CuPc) on Cu(111) as revealed in a recent measurement of telegraph noise in a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiment [Schaffert \\textit{et al.}, Nat. Mat. {\\bf 12}, 223 (2013)]. A complete explanation of the experimental data is performed by computing the geometry of the ...

  3. Coil−Globule Transition of DNA Molecules Induced by Cationic Surfactants: A Dynamic Light Scattering Study

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, Rita S.; Innerlohinger, Josef; Glatter, Otto; Miguel, Maria G.; Lindman, Björn

    2005-01-01

    The compaction and aggregation of DNA induced by cationic surfactants was studied by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Furthermore, the effect on surfactant-compacted DNA of the addition of nonionic amphiphiles and salt was studied. When using sufficiently low amounts of DNA and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), compacted DNA molecules could be monitored by the appearance of a band characterized by lower hydrodynamic radius and by the decrease in the intensity of the peak corresponding to ...

  4. Immunohistochemical expression of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules 5, CEACAM6, and SLC7A5: Do they aid in predicting the response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Anju Bansal; Mukesh Garg; Chintamani Chintamani; Sunita Saxena

    2014-01-01

    Context: Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) has become an integral part of multimodality treatment for locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) worldwide. Predictors of therapeutic response to NACT are lacking. Whether carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) like CEACAM5 and CEACAM6 can act as a predictor of response to therapy is unclear. SLC7A5 gene in humans encodes a large neutral amino acid transporter protein, which has an essential role in tumor cell growth and su...

  5. Surface membrane antigen expression changes induced in vitro by exogenous growth factors in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilpo, J; Hulkkonen, J; Hurme, M; Vilpo, L

    2002-09-01

    The factors determining the growth and survival of cells in B chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) have remained poorly understood. We investigated the effects of optimal mitogen combinations (OMCs) on the expression of 26 surface membrane antigens among 33 CLL patients. The seven OMCs used were selected after pre-testing 14 combinations of (1) S. aureus Cowan I (SAC), (2) interleukin-2 (IL-2), (3) tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and (4) 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA; also known as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or PMA). In flow cytometry we revealed that OMCs induced statistically highly significant upregulation of the expression of CD5, CD11c, CD19, CD22, CD23, CD25, CD38, CD40, CD45, CD45RO, CD95, CD126, CD130 and FMC7, and downregulation of CD20 and CD124 expression. Interestingly, the expression of CD27, CD45RA, CD79b, CD80, CD122 and that of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily members CD21, Ig-kappa, Ig-lambda, Ig-delta and Ig-micro were not significantly affected under similar conditions. The expression of several antigens was co-regulated, suggesting common regulatory pathways. These antigens include CD11c/CD5, CD11c/CD22, CD11c/CD126, CD11c/FMC7 as well as CD27/CD45, CD27/CD45RA and CD27/CD79b. Upregulation of surface antigen expression, induced by OMCs, should be applicable in antibody therapy in vitro and in vivo, and in negative stem cell selection for autotransplantation. Furthermore, the current strategy to enhance cell surface antigen expression may be a versatile tool to raise humoral and cell-mediated host defense against CLL cells. Upregulation of proteins mediating positive growth signals (eg CD25, CD40) and negative signals or apoptosis (eg CD95) may be used to sensitize cells to chemotherapy and programmed cell death. PMID:12200683

  6. Commercial bacterins did not induce detectable levels of antibodies in mice against Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antigens strongly recognized by swine immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andressa Fisch

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Enzootic Pneumonia (EP caused by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae results in major economic losses to the swine industry. Hence, the identification of factors that provide protection against EP could help to develop effective vaccines. One such factor that provides partial protection are bacterins. Therefore, the aim of this study was to verify the induction of antibodies against fifteen M. hyopneumoniae antigens, strongly recognized by the swine immune system during natural infection, in mice vaccinated with six commercial bacterins. Each group of mice was inoculated with one bacterin, and seroconversion was assessed by indirect ELISA using recombinant antigens and M. hyopneumoniae 7448 whole cell extract. Sera from one inoculated group recognized antigen MHP_0067, and sera from four inoculated groups recognized antigens MHP_0513 and MHP_0580. None of the bacterins was able to induce seroconversion against the twelve remaining antigens. This absence of a serological response could be attributed to the lack of antigen expression in M. hyopneumoniae strains used in bacterin production. Additionally the partial protection provided by these vaccines could be due to low expression or misfolding of antigens during vaccine preparation. Therefore, the supplementation of bacterins with these recombinant antigens could be a potential alternative in the development of more effective vaccines.

  7. A Fusion Protein between Streptavidin and the Endogenous TLR4 Ligand EDA Targets Biotinylated Antigens to Dendritic Cells and Induces T Cell Responses In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Arribillaga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of tools for efficient targeting of antigens to antigen presenting cells is of great importance for vaccine development. We have previously shown that fusion proteins containing antigens fused to the extra domain A from fibronectin (EDA, an endogenous TLR4 ligand, which targets antigens to TLR4-expressing dendritic cells (DC, are highly immunogenic. To facilitate the procedure of joining EDA to any antigen of choice, we have prepared the fusion protein EDAvidin by linking EDA to the N terminus of streptavidin, allowing its conjugation with biotinylated antigens. We found that EDAvidin, as streptavidin, forms tetramers and binds biotin or biotinylated proteins with a Kd ~ 2.6 × 10−14 mol/L. EDAvidin favours the uptake of biotinylated green fluorescent protein by DC. Moreover, EDAvidin retains the proinflammatory properties of EDA, inducing NF-κβ by TLR4-expressing cells, as well as the production of TNF-α by the human monocyte cell line THP1 and IL-12 by DC. More importantly, immunization of mice with EDAvidin conjugated with the biotinylated nonstructural NS3 protein from hepatitis C virus induces a strong anti-NS3 T cell immune response. These results open a new way to use the EDA-based delivery tool to target any antigen of choice to DC for vaccination against infectious diseases and cancer.

  8. A fusion protein between streptavidin and the endogenous TLR4 ligand EDA targets biotinylated antigens to dendritic cells and induces T cell responses in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arribillaga, Laura; Durantez, Maika; Lozano, Teresa; Rudilla, Francesc; Rehberger, Federico; Casares, Noelia; Villanueva, Lorea; Martinez, Marta; Gorraiz, Marta; Borrás-Cuesta, Francisco; Sarobe, Pablo; Prieto, Jesús; Lasarte, Juan José

    2013-01-01

    The development of tools for efficient targeting of antigens to antigen presenting cells is of great importance for vaccine development. We have previously shown that fusion proteins containing antigens fused to the extra domain A from fibronectin (EDA), an endogenous TLR4 ligand, which targets antigens to TLR4-expressing dendritic cells (DC), are highly immunogenic. To facilitate the procedure of joining EDA to any antigen of choice, we have prepared the fusion protein EDAvidin by linking EDA to the N terminus of streptavidin, allowing its conjugation with biotinylated antigens. We found that EDAvidin, as streptavidin, forms tetramers and binds biotin or biotinylated proteins with a Kd ~ 2.6 × 10(-14) mol/L. EDAvidin favours the uptake of biotinylated green fluorescent protein by DC. Moreover, EDAvidin retains the proinflammatory properties of EDA, inducing NF- κβ by TLR4-expressing cells, as well as the production of TNF- α by the human monocyte cell line THP1 and IL-12 by DC. More importantly, immunization of mice with EDAvidin conjugated with the biotinylated nonstructural NS3 protein from hepatitis C virus induces a strong anti-NS3 T cell immune response. These results open a new way to use the EDA-based delivery tool to target any antigen of choice to DC for vaccination against infectious diseases and cancer. PMID:24093105

  9. Pressure-Induced Glass Transition Probed via the Mobility of Coumarin 1 Fluorescent Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Marco

    2016-05-12

    The route to form a glass is generally achieved upon cooling where the slowing down might be interpreted as the trapping of molecules in potential wells. On the other hand, isothermal compression induces a glassy state by modifying the molecular packing ending in jamming. Here, we focus on how isothermal compression perturbs the mobility of a probe molecule in three different host liquids up to the pressure-induced glass transition. By use of the fluorescence recovery technique, the diffusion of the fluorescent molecule Coumarin 1 (C1) is measured in poly(propylene glycol) (PPG-1000M and -2700M), in the fragile van der Waals propylene carbonate (PC), and in hydrogen-bonded methanol and ethanol. High pressures up to 6 GPa are obtained with a diamond anvil cell. In PC at a pressure ∼1.3 GPa close to the glass-transition pressure, the diffusion coefficient of C1 follows an Arrhenius behavior with an ∼5 orders of magnitude increase of the diffusive time. No decoupling from the Stokes-Einstein equation is noticed. A similar exponential behavior is measured in ethanol and methanol but extended to different pressure ranges up to 2.5 and 6.2 GPa, respectively. In PPG-1000M a decoupling from the Stokes-Einstein relation is observed between 0.3 and 0.8 GPa that could be related to a modification of the interaction between polymer segments and the probe molecule. These results might indicate that interaction between probe and dynamic heterogeneities become less important under applied pressure, unlike in the temperature-induced glass transition. PMID:27110923

  10. A small molecule that induces reactive oxygen species via cellular glutathione depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Tatsuro; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Muroi, Makoto; Kawatani, Makoto; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2014-10-01

    Induction of excessive levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by small-molecule compounds has been considered a potentially effective therapeutic strategy against cancer cells, which are often subjected to chronic oxidative stress. However, to elucidate the mechanisms of action of bioactive compounds is generally a time-consuming process. We have recently identified NPD926, a small molecule that induces rapid cell death in cancer cells. Using a combination of two comprehensive and complementary approaches, proteomic profiling and affinity purification, together with the subsequent biochemical assays, we have elucidated the mechanism of action underlying NPD926-induced cell death: conjugation with glutathione mediated by GST, depletion of cellular glutathione and subsequent ROS generation. NPD926 preferentially induced effects in KRAS-transformed fibroblast cells, compared with their untransformed counterparts. Furthermore, NPD926 sensitized cells to inhibitors of system x(c)⁻, a cystine-glutamate antiporter considered to be a potential therapeutic target in cancers including cancer stem cells. These data show the effectiveness of a newly identified ROS inducer, which targets glutathione metabolism, in cancer treatment. PMID:25011393

  11. Comblike dendrimers containing Tn antigen modulate natural killing and induce the production of Tn specific antibodies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vepřek, Pavel; Hajdúch, M.; Džubák, P.; Kulík, R.; Poláková, J.; Bezouška, Karel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 21 (2006), s. 6400-6407. ISSN 0022-2623 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4020213; GA AV ČR IAA5020403; GA ČR GA304/06/1691 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Tn antigen * glycodendrimer * NKP-P1 Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 5.115, year: 2006

  12. Milk-induced eczema is associated with the expansion of T cells expressing cutaneous lymphocyte antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Abernathy-Carver, K J; Sampson, H A; Picker, L. J.; Leung, D Y

    1995-01-01

    The extravasation of T cells at sites of inflammation is critically dependent on the activity of homing receptors (HR) involved in endothelial cell recognition and binding. Two such HR (the cutaneous lymphocyte antigen [CLA] and L-selectin) have been shown to be selectively involved in T cell migration to skin and peripheral lymph nodes, respectively. This study was designed to assess the relationship between the organ specificity of an allergic reaction to food and the expression of HR on T ...

  13. Cellular immune responses in patients with hepatitis B surface antigen seroclearance induced by antiviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Xiaolin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms by which chronic hepatitis B is completely resolved through antiviral therapy are unknown, and the contribution of acquired T cell immunity to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg seroclearance has not been investigated. Therefore, we measured the T-cell responses to core and envelope antigens in patients with HBsAg seroclearance. Methods Fourteen subjects with HBsAg seroclearance following antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis B, 7 HBeAg-positive immunotolerant HBV carriers and 9 HBeAg-negative inactive HBsAg carriers were recruited. HBV-specific T-cell responses to recombinant HBV core (rHBcAg and envelope (rHBsAg proteins and pools of core and envelope peptides were measured using an ELISPOT assay detecting interferon-gamma and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS assays detecting interferon-gamma or interleukin 2. Results Interferon-gamma ELISPOT assays showed a low frequency of weak responses to the rHBsAg and S peptide pool in the HBsAg seroclearance group, and the response frequency to the rHBcAg and the C peptide pool was higher than to the rHBsAg (P P = 0.001 respectively. A higher response frequency to C than S peptide pools was confirmed in the interferon-gamma ICS assays for both CD4+ (P = 0.033 and CD8+ (P = 0.040 T cells in the HBsAg seroclearance group. The responses to C and S antigens in the inactive carriers were similar. Conclusions There was a low frequency of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell immune responses to envelope antigens in Chinese subjects with HBsAg seroclearance following antiviral therapy. It is unlikely that these immune responses are responsible for HBsAg seroclearance in these subjects.

  14. Recombinant Forms of Leishmania amazonensis Excreted/Secreted Promastigote Surface Antigen (PSA Induce Protective Immune Responses in Dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Petitdidier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Preventive vaccination is a highly promising strategy for interrupting leishmaniasis transmission that can, additionally, contribute to elimination. A vaccine formulation based on naturally excreted secreted (ES antigens was prepared from L. infantum promastigote culture supernatant. This vaccine achieved successful results in Phase III trials and was licensed and marketed as CaniLeish. We recently showed that newly identified ES promastigote surface antigen (PSA, from both viable promastigotes and axenically-grown amastigotes, represented the major constituent and the highly immunogenic antigen of L. infantum and L. amazonensis ES products. We report here that three immunizations with either the recombinant ES LaPSA-38S (rPSA or its carboxy terminal part LaPSA-12S (Cter-rPSA, combined with QA-21 as adjuvant, confer high levels of protection in naive L. infantum-infected Beagle dogs, as checked by bone marrow parasite absence in respectively 78.8% and 80% of vaccinated dogs at 6 months post-challenge. The parasite burden in infected vaccinated dogs was significantly reduced compared to placebo group, as measured by q-PCR. Moreover, our results reveal humoral and cellular immune response clear-cut differences between vaccinated and control dogs. An early increase in specific IgG2 antibodies was observed in rPSA/QA-21- and Cter-rPSA/QA-21-immunized dogs only. They were found functionally active in vitro and were highly correlated with vaccine protection. In vaccinated protected dogs, IFN-γ and NO productions, as well as anti-leishmanial macrophage activity, were increased. These data strongly suggest that ES PSA or its carboxy-terminal part, in recombinant forms, induce protection in a canine model of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis by inducing a Th1-dominant immune response and an appropriate specific antibody response. These data suggest that they could be considered as important active components in vaccine candidates.

  15. Momentum mapping spectrometer for probing the fragmentation dynamics of molecules induced by keV electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a new experimental setup for studying the fragmentation dynamics of molecules induced by the impact of keV electrons using the well-known technique of recoil ion momentum spectroscopy. The apparatus consists of mainly a time- and position-sensitive multi-hit particle detector for ion analysis and a channel electron multiplier detector for detecting the ejected electrons. Different components of the setup and the relevant electronics for data acquisition are described in detail with their working principles. In order to verify the reliable performance of the setup, we have recorded the collision-induced ionic spectra of the CO2 molecule by the impact of keV electrons. Information about the ion pairs of CO+:O+, C+:O+ and O+:O+ resulting from dissociative ionizing collisions of 20 and 26 keV electrons with a dilute gaseous target of CO2 molecules has been obtained. Under conditions of the present experiment, the momentum resolutions of the spectrometer for the combined momenta of CO+ and O+ ions in the direction of the time-of-flight axis and perpendicular to the direction of an electron beam are found to be 10.0 ± 0.2 and 15.0 ± 0.3 au, respectively

  16. Pollen-induced antigen presentation by mesenchymal stem cells and T cells from allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mauli B; Gavrilova, Tatyana; Liu, Jianjun; Patel, Shyam A; Kartan, Saritha; Greco, Steven J; Capitle, Eugenio; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2013-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising cellular suppressor of inflammation. This function of MSCs is partly due to their licensing by inflammatory mediators. In cases with reduced inflammation, MSCs could become immune-enhancer cells. MSCs can suppress the inflammatory response of antigen-challenged lymphocytes from allergic asthma. Although allergic rhinitis (AR) is also an inflammatory response, it is unclear if MSCs can exert similar suppression. This study investigated the immune effects (suppressor vs enhancer) of MSCs on allergen-stimulated lymphocytes from AR subjects (grass or weed allergy). In contrast to subjects with allergic asthma, MSCs caused a significant (Pcells (antigen-presenting cells (APCs)). This correlated with increased production of inflammatory cytokines from T cells, and increased expressions of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-II and CD86 on MSCs. The specificity of APC function was demonstrated in APC assay using MSCs that were knocked down for the master regulator of MHC-II transcription, CIITA. The difference in the effects of MSCs on allergic asthma and AR could not be explained by the sensitivity to the allergen, based on skin tests. Thus, we deduced that the contrasting immune effects of MSCs for antigen-challenged lymphocytes on AR and allergic asthma could be disease specific. It is possible that the enhanced inflammation from asthma might be required to license the MSCs to become suppressor cells. This study underscores the need for robust preclinical studies to effectively translate MSCs for any inflammatory disorder. PMID:25505949

  17. Altered Pattern of Major Histocompatibility Complex Expression in Renal Carcinoma : Tumor-Specific Expression of the Nonclassical Human Leukocyte Antigen-G Molecule Is Restricted to Clear Cell Carcinoma While Up-Regulation of Other Major Histocompatibility Complex Antigens Is Primarily Distributed in All Subtypes of Renal Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, El Chérif; Allory, Yves; Commo, Frédéric; Gattegno, Bernard; Callard, Patrice; Paul, Pascale

    2003-01-01

    Renal epithelial cancers represent a heterogeneous group of neoplasms arising from the malignant transformation of presumed diverse cell lineages. We recently demonstrated that tumor-specific up-regulation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G, a nonclassical HLA class Ib molecule that might be involved in immune evasion by tumor cells, frequently occurs in conventional (clear cell) renal carcinoma. We here examined whether HLA-G activation is a common process affecting all types of renal epithe...

  18. Enhancement of antigen-induced eosinophilic inflammation in the airways of mast-cell deficient mice by diesel exhaust particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was conducted to clarify the involvement of mast cells in the exacerbating effect of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) toward allergic airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Airway inflammation by the infiltration of cosinophils with goblet cell proliferation and AHR, as well as by the production of antigen-specific IgG1 and IgE, in plasma were examined using mast cell-deficient mice (W/Wv) and normal mice (W/W+). Both groups of mice received ovalbumin (OVA) or OVA+DEP intratracheally. The eosinophilic airway inflammation and goblet cell proliferation promoted by OVA were significantly greater in W/W+ than in W/Wv. A similar result was observed in AHR, but was not significant among both groups of mice. DEP enhanced OVA induced-allergic airway inflammation, goblet cell proliferation, and development of AHR in W/Wv, but not in W/W+. DEP decreased production of antigen-specific IgG1 and IgE in both groups of mice. Mast cells were observed in the submucosal layer of the main bronchus in W/Wv. The number of mast cells was significantly decreased by OVA treatment. The results indicate that mast cells are not necessary to enhance airway damage and development of AHR in W/Wv by DEP. However, mast cells may be required for the OVA-induced cosinophilic inflammation, airway damage with goblet cell proliferation, and AHR in W/W+

  19. Signaling mechanisms of neurite outgrowth induced by the cell adhesion molecules NCAM and N-cadherin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S M; Berezin, V; Bock, E

    2008-01-01

    Formation of appropriate neural circuits depends on a complex interplay between extracellular guiding cues and intracellular signaling events that result in alterations of cytoskeletal dynamics and a neurite growth response. Surface-expressed cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) interact with the...... extracellular guidance cues to intracellular events and thereby regulating neurite outgrowth. In this review, we focus on two CAMs, the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and N-cadherin, and their ability to mediate signaling associated with a neurite outgrowth response. In particular, we will focus on direct...... surroundings via the extracellular domain and bind to the cytoskeleton via their intracellular domain. In addition, several CAMs induce signaling events via direct interactions with intracellular proteins or via interactions with cell surface receptors. Thus, CAMs are obvious candidates for transmitting...

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing Molecule N-(3-Oxododecanoyl)-L-Homoserine-Lactone Induces HLA-G Expression in Human Immune Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotti, Daria; LeMaoult, Joel; Trapella, Claudio; Di Luca, Dario; Carosella, Edgardo D; Rizzo, Roberta

    2015-10-01

    HLA-G is a nonclassical class I human leukocyte antigen (HLA) involved in mechanisms of immune tolerance. The objective of this study was to determine whether N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3O-C12-HSL), a quorum sensing molecule produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, could modify HLA-G expression to control the host immune response. We evaluated the ability of 3O-C12-HSL to induce HLA-G expression in primary immune cells, monocytes (U937 and THP1), and T-cell lines (Jurkat) in vitro and analyzed the cellular pathway responsible for HLA-G expression. We studied the HLA-G promoter with a luciferase assay and interleukin-10 (IL-10) and p38/CREB signaling with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunofluorescence, respectively. We observed that 3O-C12-HSL is able to induce HLA-G expression in human monocytes and T cells. We showed that the induction of HLA-G by 3O-C12-HSL is p38/CREB and IL-10 dependent. 3O-C12-HSL treatment is able to arrest only the U937 cell cycle, possibly due to the peculiar expression of the ILT2 receptor in the U937 cell line. Our observations suggest HLA-G as a mechanism to create a protected niche for the bacterial reservoir, similar to the role of HLA-G molecules during viral infections. PMID:26195547

  1. Liver lipid molecules induce PEPCK-C gene transcription and attenuate insulin action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) plays key roles in gluconeogenesis, glyceroneogenesis, and cataplerosis. Experiments were designed to examine the effects of endogenous lipid molecules from rat livers on the expression of PEPCK-C gene in primary rat hepatocytes. The lipid extracts prepared from livers of Zucker fatty, lean, and Wistar rats induced the expression levels of PEPCK-C transcripts. Insulin-mediated reduction of PEPCK-C gene expression was attenuated by the same treatment. The lipid extracts induced the relative luciferase activity of reporter gene constructs that contain a 2.2-kb 5' promoter fragment of PEPCK-C gene, but not the construct that contains only the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of its mRNA. The estimated half life of PEPCK-C transcripts in the presence of the lipid extract is the same as that in the absence of it. My results demonstrate for the first time that endogenous lipid molecules induce PEPCK-C gene transcription and attenuate insulin action in liver

  2. Berberine Decreased Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase mRNA Stability through Negative Regulation of Human Antigen R in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ji-Sun; Choi, Hye-Eun; Seo, SeungHwan; Choi, Jung-Hye; Baek, Nam-In; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2016-07-01

    Berberine, a major isoquinoline alkaloid found in medicinal herbs, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory effects; however, the underlying mechanisms responsible for its actions are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of berberine and the molecular mechanisms involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW 264.7 and THP-1 macrophages and its effects in LPS-induced septic shock in mice. In both macrophage cell types, berberine inhibited the LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) production and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) protein expression, but it had no effect on iNOS mRNA transcription. Suppression of LPS-induced iNOS protein expression by berberine occurred via a human antigen R (HuR)-mediated reduction of iNOS mRNA stability. Molecular data revealed that the suppression on the LPS-induced HuR binding to iNOS mRNA by berberine was accompanied by a reduction in nucleocytoplasmic HuR shuttling. Pretreatment with berberine reduced LPS-induced iNOS protein expression and the cytoplasmic translocation of HuR in liver tissues and increased the survival rate of mice with LPS-induced endotoxemia. These results show that the suppression of iNOS protein expression by berberine under LPS-induced inflammatory conditions is associated with a reduction in iNOS mRNA stability resulting from inhibition of the cytoplasmic translocation of HuR. PMID:27189969

  3. Myeloid-specific Fos-related antigen-1 regulates cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation, not emphysema, in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Michelle; Rajasekaran, Subbiah; Potteti, Haranatha R; Reddy, Sekhar P

    2015-07-01

    Heightened lung inflammation is a cardinal feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Cigarette smoke (CS)-induced macrophage recruitment and activation, accompanied by abnormal secretion of a number of inflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases, play a major role in the pathophysiology of COPD. The Fos-related antigen-1 (Fra-1) transcription factor differentially regulates several cellular processes that are implicated in COPD, such as inflammation and immune responses, cell proliferation and death, and extracellular remodeling. Although CS stimulates Fra-1 expression in the lung, the precise role of this transcription factor in the regulation of CS-induced lung inflammation in vivo is poorly understood. Here, we report that myeloid-specific Fra-1 signaling is important for CS-induced lung macrophagic inflammatory response. In response to chronic CS exposure, mice with Fra-1 specifically deleted in myeloid cells showed reduced levels of CS-induced lung macrophagic inflammation, accompanied by decreased expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines compared with their wild-type counterparts. Consistent with this result, bone marrow-derived Fra-1-null macrophages treated with CS showed decreased levels of proinflammatory mediators and matrix metalloproteinases. Interestingly, deletion of Fra-1 in myeloid cells did not affect the severity of emphysema. We propose that Fra-1 plays a key role in promoting chronic CS-induced lung macrophagic inflammation in vivo, and that targeting this transcription factor may be useful in dampening persistent lung inflammation in patients with COPD. PMID:25489966

  4. HIV infection--induced posttranslational modification of T cell signaling molecules associated with disease progression.

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanová, I; Saville, M W; C. Peters; Cleghorn, F. R.; Schwartz, D; Venzon, D J; Weinhold, K J; Jack, N.; Bartholomew, C; Blattner, W A; Yarchoan, R; Bolen, J B; Horak, I D

    1996-01-01

    In attempt to elucidate the mechanism of the HIV infection induced T cell unresponsiveness, we studied signal-transducing molecules proximal to the T cell receptor (TCR) in T lymphocytes of HIV-infected individuals. Total amounts of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) Lck, Fyn, and ZAP-70 and the zeta chain of the TCR were found significantly decreased in T cells of symptomatic/AIDS patients as well as in T cells of individuals in acute and early asymptomatic stages of HIV infection. Unexpectedly...

  5. Bias voltage induced resistance switching effect in single-molecule magnets’ tunneling junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electric-pulse-induced reversible resistance change effect in a molecular magnetic tunneling junction, consisting of a single-molecule magnet (SMM) sandwiched in one nonmagnetic and one ferromagnetic electrode, is theoretically investigated. By applying a time-varying bias voltage, the SMM's spin orientation can be manipulated with large bias voltage pulses. Moreover, the different magnetic configuration at high-resistance/low-resistance states can be ‘read out’ by utilizing relative low bias voltage. This device scheme can be implemented with current technologies (Khajetoorians et al 2013 Science 339 55) and has potential application in molecular spintronics and high-density nonvolatile memory devices. (paper)

  6. Oxidation of a Single Carbon Monoxide Molecule Manipulated and Induced with a Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A carbon monoxide molecule (CO) was positioned with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) at various distances from an oxygen atom (O) on the Ag(110) surface at 13K. At the closest separation, carbon dioxide (CO2) production was induced by tunneling electrons. Direct reaction of a CO desorbed from the STM tip with an O atom on Ag(110) illustrates another catalytic oxidation mechanism. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy with the STM was used to monitor the vibrations of CO in its different environment

  7. Theoretical study of determining orientation and alignment of symmetric top molecule using laser-induced fluorescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丛书林; 韩克利; 楼南泉

    2000-01-01

    General expressions used for extracting the orientation and alignment parameters of a symmetric top molecule from laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) intensity are derived by employing the density matrix approach. The molecular orientation and alignment are described by molecular state multipoles. Excitation and detection are circularly and linearly polarized lights, respectively. In general cases, the LIF intensity is a complex function of the initial molecular state multipoles, the dynamic factors and the excitation-detection geometrical factors. It contains a population, ten orientation and fourteen alignment multipoles. The problem of how to extract the initial molecular state multipoles from the resolved LIF intensity is discussed.

  8. Plant Male Sterility Induced by Anti-Gene CYP86MFin Brassica oleracea var. Italica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    An anti-gene CYP86MF was introduced into hypocotyls of broccoli (Brassica oleracea L.var. italica Plenck) with Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and the transgenic plants were obtained by kanamycin selection. The results of PCR, Southern blot and Northern blot indicated that the anti-CYP86MF has been integrated into chromosome of the transgenic plant.And also, plants with hypogenetic stamina or ungerminated pollen were observed. The transgenic male sterility plant could fructify via artificial pollination with normal pollen. Thus it was proved that the pistil of male sterility plant was normally developed, and the sterility originated from anti-CYP86MF.

  9. Immunization with FSHβ fusion protein antigen prevents bone loss in a rat ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •A GST-FSH fusion protein was successfully expressed in E. coli. •Immunization with GST-FSH antigen can raise high-titer anti-FSH polyclonal sera. •Anti-FSH polyclonal sera can neutralize osteoclastogenic effect of FSH in vitro. •FSH immunization can prevent bone loss in a rat osteoporosis model. -- Abstract: Osteoporosis, a metabolic bone disease, threatens postmenopausal women globally. Hormone replacement therapy (HTR), especially estrogen replacement therapy (ERT), is used widely in the clinic because it has been generally accepted that postmenopausal osteoporosis is caused by estrogen deficiency. However, hypogonadal α and β estrogen receptor null mice were only mildly osteopenic, and mice with either receptor deleted had normal bone mass, indicating that estrogen may not be the only mediator that induces osteoporosis. Recently, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), the serum concentration of which increases from the very beginning of menopause, has been found to play a key role in postmenopausal osteoporosis by promoting osteoclastogenesis. In this article, we confirmed that exogenous FSH can enhance osteoclast differentiation in vitro and that this effect can be neutralized by either an anti-FSH monoclonal antibody or anti-FSH polyclonal sera raised by immunizing animals with a recombinant GST-FSHβ fusion protein antigen. Moreover, immunizing ovariectomized rats with the GST-FSHβ antigen does significantly prevent trabecular bone loss and thereby enhance the bone strength, indicating that a FSH-based vaccine may be a promising therapeutic strategy to slow down bone loss in postmenopausal women

  10. Immunization with FSHβ fusion protein antigen prevents bone loss in a rat ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Wenxin; Yan, Xingrong; Du, Huicong; Cui, Jihong; Li, Liwen, E-mail: liven@nwu.edu.cn; Chen, Fulin, E-mail: chenfl@nwu.edu.cn

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •A GST-FSH fusion protein was successfully expressed in E. coli. •Immunization with GST-FSH antigen can raise high-titer anti-FSH polyclonal sera. •Anti-FSH polyclonal sera can neutralize osteoclastogenic effect of FSH in vitro. •FSH immunization can prevent bone loss in a rat osteoporosis model. -- Abstract: Osteoporosis, a metabolic bone disease, threatens postmenopausal women globally. Hormone replacement therapy (HTR), especially estrogen replacement therapy (ERT), is used widely in the clinic because it has been generally accepted that postmenopausal osteoporosis is caused by estrogen deficiency. However, hypogonadal α and β estrogen receptor null mice were only mildly osteopenic, and mice with either receptor deleted had normal bone mass, indicating that estrogen may not be the only mediator that induces osteoporosis. Recently, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), the serum concentration of which increases from the very beginning of menopause, has been found to play a key role in postmenopausal osteoporosis by promoting osteoclastogenesis. In this article, we confirmed that exogenous FSH can enhance osteoclast differentiation in vitro and that this effect can be neutralized by either an anti-FSH monoclonal antibody or anti-FSH polyclonal sera raised by immunizing animals with a recombinant GST-FSHβ fusion protein antigen. Moreover, immunizing ovariectomized rats with the GST-FSHβ antigen does significantly prevent trabecular bone loss and thereby enhance the bone strength, indicating that a FSH-based vaccine may be a promising therapeutic strategy to slow down bone loss in postmenopausal women.

  11. Bacterial antigen expression is an important component in inducing an immune response to orally administered Salmonella-delivered DNA vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle E Gahan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The use of Salmonella to deliver heterologous antigens from DNA vaccines is a well-accepted extension of the success of oral Salmonella vaccines in animal models. Attenuated S. typhimurium and S. typhi strains are safe and efficacious, and their use to deliver DNA vaccines combines the advantages of both vaccine approaches, while complementing the limitations of each technology. An important aspect of the basic biology of the Salmonella/DNA vaccine platform is the relative contributions of prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression in production of the vaccine antigen. Gene expression in DNA vaccines is commonly under the control of the eukaryotic cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter. The aim of this study was to identify and disable putative bacterial promoters within the CMV promoter and evaluate the immunogenicity of the resulting DNA vaccine delivered orally by S. typhimurium. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The results reported here clearly demonstrate the presence of bacterial promoters within the CMV promoter. These promoters have homology to the bacterial consensus sequence and functional activity. To disable prokaryotic expression from the CMV promoter a series of genetic manipulations were performed to remove the two major bacterial promoters and add a bacteria transcription terminator downstream of the CMV promoter. S. typhimurium was used to immunise BALB/c mice orally with a DNA vaccine encoding the C-fragment of tetanus toxin (TT under control of the original or the modified CMV promoter. Although both promoters functioned equally well in eukaryotic cells, as indicated by equivalent immune responses following intramuscular delivery, only the original CMV promoter was able to induce an anti-TT specific response following oral delivery by S. typhimurium. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that prokaryotic expression of the antigen and co-delivery of this protein by Salmonella are at least partially responsible for the successful

  12. Malaria-induced acquisition of antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum variant surface antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ofori, Michael F; Dodoo, Daniel; Staalsoe, Trine; Kurtzhals, Jørgen; Koram, Kwadwo; Theander, Thor G; Akanmori, Bartholomew D; Hviid, Lars

    2002-01-01

    In areas of intense Plasmodium falciparum transmission, protective immunity is acquired during childhood in parallel with acquisition of agglutinating antibodies to parasite-encoded variant surface antigens (VSA) expressed on parasitized red blood cells. In a semi-immune child in such an area, cl...... donors (the malaria patient). The data from this first detailed longitudinal study of acquisition of VSA antibodies support the hypothesis that naturally acquired protective immunity to P. falciparum malaria is mediated, at least in part, by VSA-specific antibodies.......In areas of intense Plasmodium falciparum transmission, protective immunity is acquired during childhood in parallel with acquisition of agglutinating antibodies to parasite-encoded variant surface antigens (VSA) expressed on parasitized red blood cells. In a semi-immune child in such an area...... antibody responses to other parasite isolates are relatively unaffected. However, the detailed kinetics of this VSA antibody acquisition are unknown and hence were the aim of this study. We show that P. falciparum malaria in Ghanaian children generally caused a rapid and sustained increase in variant...

  13. Field-induced conductance switching by charge-state alternation in organometallic single-molecule junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Florian; Kastlunger, Georg; Lissel, Franziska; Egler-Lucas, Carolina; Semenov, Sergey N.; Venkatesan, Koushik; Berke, Heinz; Stadler, Robert; Lörtscher, Emanuel

    2016-02-01

    Charge transport through single molecules can be influenced by the charge and spin states of redox-active metal centres placed in the transport pathway. These intrinsic properties are usually manipulated by varying the molecule's electrochemical and magnetic environment, a procedure that requires complex setups with multiple terminals. Here we show that oxidation and reduction of organometallic compounds containing either Fe, Ru or Mo centres can solely be triggered by the electric field applied to a two-terminal molecular junction. Whereas all compounds exhibit bias-dependent hysteresis, the Mo-containing compound additionally shows an abrupt voltage-induced conductance switching, yielding high-to-low current ratios exceeding 1,000 at bias voltages of less than 1.0 V. Density functional theory calculations identify a localized, redox-active molecular orbital that is weakly coupled to the electrodes and closely aligned with the Fermi energy of the leads because of the spin-polarized ground state unique to the Mo centre. This situation provides an additional slow and incoherent hopping channel for transport, triggering a transient charging effect in the entire molecule with a strong hysteresis and large high-to-low current ratios.

  14. CD molecules 2005: human cell differentiation molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zola, H.; Swart, B.; Nicholson, I.; Aasted, B.; Bensussan, A.; Boumsell, L.; Buckley, C.; Clark, G.; Drbal, Karel; Engel, P.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Isacke, C.; Macardle, P.; Malavasi, F.; Mason, D.; Olive, D.; Saalmüller, A.; Schlossman, S.F.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Simmons, P.; Tedder, T.F.; Uguccioni, M.; Warren, H.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 9 (2005), s. 3123-3126. ISSN 0006-4971 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules * leukocyte antigen Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 10.131, year: 2005

  15. Reconstruction of two-dimensional molecular structure with laser-induced electron diffraction from laser-aligned polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging the transient process of molecules has been a basic way to investigate photochemical reactions and dynamics. Based on laser-induced electron diffraction and partial one-dimensional molecular alignment, here we provide two effective methods for reconstructing two-dimensional structure of polyatomic molecules. We demonstrate that electron diffraction images in both scattering angles and broadband energy can be utilized to retrieve complementary structure information, including positions of light atoms. Lastly, with picometre spatial resolution and the inherent femtosecond temporal resolution of lasers, laser-induced electron diffraction method offers significant opportunities for probing atomic motion in a large molecule in a typical pump-probe measurement

  16. Feasibility and diagnostic utility of antigen-specific interferon-gamma responses for rapid immunodiagnosis of tuberculosis using induced sputum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamaryn J Cashmore

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The diagnosis of smear-negative or sputum-scarce tuberculosis (TB is problematic as culture takes several weeks and representative biological samples are difficult to obtain. RD-1 antigen-specific interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs are sensitive and specific blood-based tests for the diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infection. The feasibility and diagnostic utility of this rapid immunodiagnostic assay, using cells from induced sputum, is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cells isolated from induced sputum were co-cultured with ESAT-6 and CFP-10 antigens using a standardized enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT assay (T-SPOT.TB in 101 consecutively recruited TB suspects or non-TB controls. An optimization phase using 28 samples was followed by a validation phase using samples from 73 participants (20 with definite or probable TB, and 48 with non-TB. Despite optimization of sputum processing 65/73 (89% of the IGRAs in the validation phase were inconclusive. 44/73 (60% tests failed due to sputum induction-related factors [sputum induction-related adverse events (n = 5, inadequate sputum volume (n = 8, non-homogenisable sputum (n = 7, and insufficient numbers of cells to perform the assay (n = 24], whilst 20/73 (27% tests failed due T-SPOT.TB assay-related factors [excessive debris precluding reading of spots in the ELISPOT well (n = 6, failure of the positive control (n = 11, or high spot count in the negative control (n = 3]. Only 8/73 (11% of the available samples could therefore be correctly categorized (7 definite or probable TB, and 1 non-TB patient. Thus, 13/20 (65% of the definite or probable TB cases remained undiagnosed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Rapid immunodiagnosis of pulmonary TB by antigen-specific IFN-gamma ELISPOT responses, using cells from induced sputum, is possible. However, the test, in its current ELISPOT format, is not clinically useful because the majority of the assays are inconclusive.

  17. Improved Activation toward Primary Colorectal Cancer Cells by Antigen-Specific Targeting Autologous Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Schlimper

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive therapy of malignant diseases with cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells showed promise in a number of trials; the activation of CIK cells from cancer patients towards their autologous cancer cells still needs to be improved. Here, we generated CIK cells ex vivo from blood lymphocytes of colorectal cancer patients and engineered those cells with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR with an antibody-defined specificity for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA. CIK cells thereby gained a new specificity as defined by the CAR and showed increase in activation towards CEA+ colon carcinoma cells, but less in presence of CEA− cells, indicated by increased secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Redirected CIK activation was superior by CAR-mediated CD28-CD3ζ than CD3ζ signaling only. CAR-engineered CIK cells from colon carcinoma patients showed improved activation against their autologous, primary carcinoma cells from biopsies resulting in more efficient tumour cell lysis. We assume that adoptive therapy with CAR-modified CIK cells shows improved selectivity in targeting autologous tumour lesions.

  18. Suppression of adaptive immunity to heterologous antigens during Plasmodium infection through hemozoin-induced failure of dendritic cell function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips R

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs are central to the initiation and regulation of the adaptive immune response during infection. Modulation of DC function may therefore allow evasion of the immune system by pathogens. Significant depression of the host's systemic immune response to both concurrent infections and heterologous vaccines has been observed during malaria infection, but the mechanisms underlying this immune hyporesponsiveness are controversial. Results Here, we demonstrate that the blood stages of malaria infection induce a failure of DC function in vitro and in vivo, causing suboptimal activation of T cells involved in heterologous immune responses. This effect on T-cell activation can be transferred to uninfected recipients by DCs isolated from infected mice. Significantly, T cells activated by these DCs subsequently lack effector function, as demonstrated by a failure to migrate to lymphoid-organ follicles, resulting in an absence of B-cell responses to heterologous antigens. Fractionation studies show that hemozoin, rather than infected erythrocyte (red blood cell membranes, reproduces the effect of intact infected red blood cells on DCs. Furthermore, hemozoin-containing DCs could be identified in T-cell areas of the spleen in vivo. Conclusion Plasmodium infection inhibits the induction of adaptive immunity to heterologous antigens by modulating DC function, providing a potential explanation for epidemiological studies linking endemic malaria with secondary infections and reduced vaccine efficacy.

  19. Bacterial antigen induced release of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGFR1 before and after surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Mads N; Lykke, J; Werther, Kim;

    2005-01-01

    -induced release of sVEGF and sVEGFR1 from whole blood in vitro. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty-one patients with abdominal diseases undergoing five different surgical procedures were included in the study. Blood samples were drawn from patients before and after the operation. White blood cells and platelets were......OBJECTIVE: The influence of surgery on release of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor (sVEGF) and the soluble inhibitory receptor (sVEGFR1) is unknown. The effect of major and minor surgery on variations in sVEGF and sVEGFR1 concentrations in vivo was studied, and on bacterial antigen...... counted, and plasma sVEGF and sVEGFR1 were determined. Whole blood from each blood sample was stimulated in vitro with bacteria-derived antigens (lipopolysaccharides or protein A) and sVEGF and sVEGFR1 levels were subsequently determined in the supernatants. RESULTS: Neither sVEGF nor sVEGFR1...

  20. Investigations on geometrical features in induced ordering of collagen by small molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Madhan; Aruna Dhathathreyan; V Subramanian; T Ramasami

    2003-10-01

    Binding energies of the interaction of collagen like triple helical peptides with a series of polyphenols, viz. gallic acid, catechin, epigallocatechingallate and pentagalloylglucose have been computed using molecular modelling approaches. A correlation of calculated binding energies with the interfacial molecular volumes involved in the interaction is observed. Calculated interface surface areas for the binding of polyphenols with collagen-like triple helical peptides vary in the range of 60-210 Å2 and hydrogen bond lengths vary in the range of 2.7-3.4 Å. Interfacial molecular volumes can be calculated from the solvent inaccessible surface areas and hydrogen bond lengths involved in the binding of polyphenols to collagen. Molecular aggregation of collagen in the presence of some polyphenols and chromium (III) salts has been probed experimentally in monolayer systems. The monolayer arrangement of collagen seems to be influenced by the presence of small molecules like formaldehyde, gluteraldehyde, tannic acid and chromium (III) salts. A fractal structure is observed on account of two-dimensional aggregation of collagen induced by tanning species. Atomic force microscopy has been employed to probe the topographic images of two-dimensional aggregation of collagen induced by chromium (III) salts. A case is made that long-range ordering of collagen by molecular species involved in its stabilisation is influenced by molecular geometries involved in its interaction with small molecules.

  1. Secretion of protective antigens by tissue-stage nematode larvae revealed by proteomic analysis and vaccination-induced sterile immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitson, James P; Ivens, Al C; Harcus, Yvonne; Filbey, Kara J; McSorley, Henry J; Murray, Janice; Bridgett, Stephen; Ashford, David; Dowle, Adam A; Maizels, Rick M

    2013-08-01

    Gastrointestinal nematode parasites infect over 1 billion humans, with little evidence for generation of sterilising immunity. These helminths are highly adapted to their mammalian host, following a developmental program through successive niches, while effectively down-modulating host immune responsiveness. Larvae of Heligmosomoides polygyrus, for example, encyst in the intestinal submucosa, before emerging as adult worms into the duodenal lumen. Adults release immunomodulatory excretory-secretory (ES) products, but mice immunised with adult H. polygyrus ES become fully immune to challenge infection. ES products of the intestinal wall 4th stage (L4) larvae are similarly important in host-parasite interactions, as they readily generate sterile immunity against infection, while released material from the egg stage is ineffective. Proteomic analyses of L4 ES identifies protective antigen targets as well as potential tissue-phase immunomodulatory molecules, using as comparators the adult ES proteome and a profile of H. polygyrus egg-released material. While 135 proteins are shared between L4 and adult ES, 72 are L4 ES-specific; L4-specific proteins correspond to those whose transcription is restricted to larval stages, while shared proteins are generally transcribed by all life cycle forms. Two protein families are more heavily represented in the L4 secretome, the Sushi domain, associated with complement regulation, and the ShK/SXC domain related to a toxin interfering with T cell signalling. Both adult and L4 ES contain extensive but distinct arrays of Venom allergen/Ancylostoma secreted protein-Like (VAL) members, with acetylcholinesterases (ACEs) and apyrase APY-3 particularly abundant in L4 ES. Serum antibodies from mice vaccinated with L4 and adult ES react strongly to the VAL-1 protein and to ACE-1, indicating that these two antigens represent major vaccine targets for this intestinal nematode. We have thus defined an extensive and novel repertoire of H

  2. Secretion of protective antigens by tissue-stage nematode larvae revealed by proteomic analysis and vaccination-induced sterile immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Hewitson

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal nematode parasites infect over 1 billion humans, with little evidence for generation of sterilising immunity. These helminths are highly adapted to their mammalian host, following a developmental program through successive niches, while effectively down-modulating host immune responsiveness. Larvae of Heligmosomoides polygyrus, for example, encyst in the intestinal submucosa, before emerging as adult worms into the duodenal lumen. Adults release immunomodulatory excretory-secretory (ES products, but mice immunised with adult H. polygyrus ES become fully immune to challenge infection. ES products of the intestinal wall 4th stage (L4 larvae are similarly important in host-parasite interactions, as they readily generate sterile immunity against infection, while released material from the egg stage is ineffective. Proteomic analyses of L4 ES identifies protective antigen targets as well as potential tissue-phase immunomodulatory molecules, using as comparators the adult ES proteome and a profile of H. polygyrus egg-released material. While 135 proteins are shared between L4 and adult ES, 72 are L4 ES-specific; L4-specific proteins correspond to those whose transcription is restricted to larval stages, while shared proteins are generally transcribed by all life cycle forms. Two protein families are more heavily represented in the L4 secretome, the Sushi domain, associated with complement regulation, and the ShK/SXC domain related to a toxin interfering with T cell signalling. Both adult and L4 ES contain extensive but distinct arrays of Venom allergen/Ancylostoma secreted protein-Like (VAL members, with acetylcholinesterases (ACEs and apyrase APY-3 particularly abundant in L4 ES. Serum antibodies from mice vaccinated with L4 and adult ES react strongly to the VAL-1 protein and to ACE-1, indicating that these two antigens represent major vaccine targets for this intestinal nematode. We have thus defined an extensive and novel

  3. Neutrophil transmigration mediated by the neutrophil-specific antigen CD177 is influenced by the endothelial S536N dimorphism of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Behnaz; Werth, Silke; Sachs, Ulrich J H; Newman, Debra K; Newman, Peter J; Santoso, Sentot

    2010-04-01

    The human neutrophil-specific adhesion molecule CD177 (also known as the NB1 alloantigen) becomes upregulated on the cell surface in a number of inflammatory settings. We recently showed that CD177 functions as a novel heterophilic counterreceptor for the endothelial junctional protein PECAM-1 (CD31), an interaction that is mediated by membrane-proximal PECAM-1 IgD 6, which is known to harbor an S(536)N single nucleotide polymorphism of two major isoforms V(98)N(536)G(643) and L(98)S(536)R(643) and a yet-to-be-determined region on CD177. In vitro transendothelial migration experiments revealed that CD177(+) neutrophils migrated significantly faster through HUVECs expressing the LSR, compared with the VNG, allelic variant of PECAM-1 and that this correlated with the decreased ability of anti-PECAM-1 Ab of ITIM tyrosine phosphorylation in HUVECs expressing the LSR allelic variant relative to the VNG allelic variant. Moreover, engagement of PECAM-1 with rCD177-Fc (to mimic heterophilic CD177 binding) suppressed Ab-induced tyrosine phosphorylation to a greater extent in cells expressing the LSR isoform compared with the VNG isoform, with a corresponding increased higher level of beta-catenin phosphorylation. These data suggest that heterophilic PECAM-1/CD177 interactions affect the phosphorylation state of PECAM-1 and endothelial cell junctional integrity in such a way as to facilitate neutrophil transmigration in a previously unrecognized allele-specific manner. PMID:20194726

  4. pp-GalNAc-T13 induces high metastatic potential of murine Lewis lung cancer by generating trimeric Tn antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Yasuyuki; Zhang, Qing [Department of Biochemistry II, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-0065 (Japan); Akita, Kaoru; Nakada, Hiroshi [Department of Molecular Biosciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kamigamo-Motoyama, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Hamamura, Kazunori; Tokuda, Noriyo [Department of Biochemistry II, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-0065 (Japan); Tsuchida, Akiko [Department of Biochemistry II, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-0065 (Japan); Noguchi Institute, 1-8-1 Kaga, Itabashi, Tokyo 173-0003 (Japan); Matsubara, Takeshi; Hori, Tomoko; Okajima, Tetsuya [Department of Biochemistry II, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-0065 (Japan); Furukawa, Keiko [Department of Biochemistry II, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-0065 (Japan); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Chubu University College of Life and Health Sciences, 1200 Matsumoto-cho, Kasugai 487-8501 (Japan); Urano, Takeshi [Department of Biochemistry, Shimane University School of Medicine, Izumo 693-8501 (Japan); Furukawa, Koichi, E-mail: koichi@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry II, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-0065 (Japan)

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ppGalNAc-T13 was up-regulated in high metastatic sublines of Lewis lung cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ppGalNAc-T13 expression enhanced cell invasion activity in low metastatic sublines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trimeric Tn antigen was induced in the transfectant cells of ppGalNAc-T13 cDNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A major protein carrying trimeric Tn structure was identified as Syndecan-1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing of ppGalNAc-T13 resulted in the reduction of invasion and of metastasis.. -- Abstract: In order to analyze the mechanisms for cancer metastasis, high metastatic sublines (H7-A, H7-Lu, H7-O, C4-sc, and C4-ly) were obtained by repeated injection of mouse Lewis lung cancer sublines H7 and C4 into C57BL/6 mice. These sublines exhibited increased proliferation and invasion activity in vitro. Ganglioside profiles exhibited lower expression of GM1 in high metastatic sublines than the parent lines. Then, we established GM1-Si-1 and GM1-Si-2 by stable silencing of GM1 synthase in H7 cells. These GM1-knockdown clones exhibited increased proliferation and invasion. Then, we explored genes that markedly altered in the expression levels by DNA microarray in the combination of C4 vs. C4-ly or H7 vs. H7 (GM1-Si). Consequently, pp-GalNAc-T13 gene was identified as up-regulated genes in the high metastatic sublines. Stable transfection of pp-GalNAc-T13 cDNA into C4 (T13-TF) resulted in increased invasion and motility. Then, immunoblotting and flow cytometry using various antibodies and lectins were performed. Only anti-trimeric Tn antibody (mAb MLS128), showed increased expression levels of trimeric Tn antigen in T13-TF clones. Moreover, immunoprecipitation/immunoblotting was performed by mAb MLS128, leading to the identification of an 80 kDa band carrying trimeric Tn antigen, i.e. Syndecan-1. Stable silencing of endogenous pp-GalNAc-T13 in C4-sc (T13-KD) revealed that primary tumors generated by

  5. pp-GalNAc-T13 induces high metastatic potential of murine Lewis lung cancer by generating trimeric Tn antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► ppGalNAc-T13 was up-regulated in high metastatic sublines of Lewis lung cancer. ► ppGalNAc-T13 expression enhanced cell invasion activity in low metastatic sublines. ► Trimeric Tn antigen was induced in the transfectant cells of ppGalNAc-T13 cDNA. ► A major protein carrying trimeric Tn structure was identified as Syndecan-1. ► Silencing of ppGalNAc-T13 resulted in the reduction of invasion and of metastasis.. -- Abstract: In order to analyze the mechanisms for cancer metastasis, high metastatic sublines (H7-A, H7-Lu, H7-O, C4-sc, and C4-ly) were obtained by repeated injection of mouse Lewis lung cancer sublines H7 and C4 into C57BL/6 mice. These sublines exhibited increased proliferation and invasion activity in vitro. Ganglioside profiles exhibited lower expression of GM1 in high metastatic sublines than the parent lines. Then, we established GM1-Si-1 and GM1-Si-2 by stable silencing of GM1 synthase in H7 cells. These GM1-knockdown clones exhibited increased proliferation and invasion. Then, we explored genes that markedly altered in the expression levels by DNA microarray in the combination of C4 vs. C4-ly or H7 vs. H7 (GM1-Si). Consequently, pp-GalNAc-T13 gene was identified as up-regulated genes in the high metastatic sublines. Stable transfection of pp-GalNAc-T13 cDNA into C4 (T13-TF) resulted in increased invasion and motility. Then, immunoblotting and flow cytometry using various antibodies and lectins were performed. Only anti-trimeric Tn antibody (mAb MLS128), showed increased expression levels of trimeric Tn antigen in T13-TF clones. Moreover, immunoprecipitation/immunoblotting was performed by mAb MLS128, leading to the identification of an 80 kDa band carrying trimeric Tn antigen, i.e. Syndecan-1. Stable silencing of endogenous pp-GalNAc-T13 in C4-sc (T13-KD) revealed that primary tumors generated by subcutaneous injection of T13-KD clones showed lower coalescence to fascia and peritoneum, and significantly reduced lung

  6. Schistosoma mansoni Soluble Egg Antigens Induce Expression of the Negative Regulators SOCS1 and SHP1 in Human Dendritic Cells via Interaction with the Mannose Receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsenoor J Klaver

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a common debilitating human parasitic disease in (subtropical areas, however, schistosome infections can also protect against a variety of inflammatory diseases. This has raised broad interest in the mechanisms by which Schistosoma modulate the immune system into an anti-inflammatory and regulatory state. Human dendritic cells (DCs show many phenotypic changes upon contact with Schistosoma mansoni soluble egg antigens (SEA. We here show that oxidation of SEA glycans, but not heat-denaturation, abrogates the capacity of SEA to suppress both LPS-induced cytokine secretion and DC proliferation, indicating an important role of SEA glycans in these processes. Remarkably, interaction of SEA glycans with DCs results in a strongly increased expression of Suppressor Of Cytokine Signalling1 (SOCS1 and SH2-containing protein tyrosine Phosphatase-1 (SHP1, important negative regulators of TLR4 signalling. In addition, SEA induces the secretion of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β, and the surface expression of the costimulatory molecules Programmed Death Ligand-1 (PD-L1 and OX40 ligand (OX40L, which are known phenotypic markers for the capacity of DCs to polarize naïve T cells into Th2/Treg cell subsets. Inhibition of mannose receptor (MR-mediated internalization of SEA into DCs by blocking with allyl α-D-mannoside or anti-MR antibodies, significantly reduced SOCS1 and SHP1 expression. In conclusion, we demonstrate that SEA glycans are essential for induction of enhanced SOCS1 and SHP1 levels in DCs via the MR. Our data provide novel mechanistic evidence for the potential of S. mansoni SEA glycans to modulate human DCs, which may contribute to the capacity of SEA to down-regulate inflammatory responses.

  7. Gene expression by simian virus 40 large T antigen-induced medulloblastomas in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoluan Wei; Jie Feng; Yinghe Hu

    2012-01-01

    Signaling pathways known to have components with mutations in human medulloblastoma include sonic hedgehog, Wnt/beta-catenin and insulin-like growth factor. Microarray analysis was applied to examine the gene expression changes in medulloblastomas of pTet-on/pTRE-SV40Tag transgenic mice. Altogether, 14 112 genes were detectable, including 152 genes with significantly different expression levels. These genes were associated with immunity, the cell cycle, signal transduction, cytoskeleton and metabolism. To further confirm the microarray data, real-time polymerase chain reactions were used to examine the expression changes of genes related to sonic hedgehog, Wnt/beta-catenin and insulin-like growth factor signal pathways. Immunohistochemistry detected insulin receptor substrate-1 in the nuclei of brain tumor tissue cells from pTet-on/pTRE-SV40Tag transgenic mice, suggesting that SV40 large T antigen may activate the insulin-like growth factor signal pathway to promote tumorigenesis.

  8. Identification of chimeric antigen receptors that mediate constitutive or inducible proliferation of T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigault, Matthew J; Lee, Jihyun; Basil, Maria Ciocca; Carpenito, Carmine; Motohashi, Shinichiro; Scholler, John; Kawalekar, Omkar U; Guedan, Sonia; McGettigan, Shannon E; Posey, Avery D; Ang, Sonny; Cooper, Laurence J N; Platt, Jesse M; Johnson, F Brad; Paulos, Chrystal M; Zhao, Yangbing; Kalos, Michael; Milone, Michael C; June, Carl H

    2015-04-01

    This study compared second-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) encoding signaling domains composed of CD28, ICOS, and 4-1BB (TNFRSF9). Here, we report that certain CARs endow T cells with the ability to undergo long-term autonomous proliferation. Transduction of primary human T cells with lentiviral vectors encoding some of the CARs resulted in sustained proliferation for up to 3 months following a single stimulation through the T-cell receptor (TCR). Sustained numeric expansion was independent of cognate antigen and did not require the addition of exogenous cytokines or feeder cells after a single stimulation of the TCR and CD28. Results from gene array and functional assays linked sustained cytokine secretion and expression of T-bet (TBX21), EOMES, and GATA-3 to the effect. Sustained expression of the endogenous IL2 locus has not been reported in primary T cells. Sustained proliferation was dependent on CAR structure and high expression, the latter of which was necessary but not sufficient. The mechanism involves constitutive signaling through NF-κB, AKT, ERK, and NFAT. The propagated CAR T cells retained a diverse TCR repertoire, and cellular transformation was not observed. The CARs with a constitutive growth phenotype displayed inferior antitumor effects and engraftment in vivo. Therefore, the design of CARs that have a nonconstitutive growth phenotype may be a strategy to improve efficacy and engraftment of CAR T cells. The identification of CARs that confer constitutive or nonconstitutive growth patterns may explain observations that CAR T cells have differential survival patterns in clinical trials. PMID:25600436

  9. Production of dengue virus envelope protein domain III-based antigens in tobacco chloroplasts using inducible and constitutive expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschamel, Johanna; Lössl, Andreas; Ruf, Stephanie; Wang, Yanliang; Skaugen, Morten; Bock, Ralph; Clarke, Jihong Liu

    2016-07-01

    Dengue fever is a disease in many parts of the tropics and subtropics and about half the world's population is at risk of infection according to the World Health Organization. Dengue is caused by any of the four related dengue virus serotypes DEN-1, -2, -3 and -4, which are transmitted to people by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Currently there is only one vaccine (Dengvaxia(®)) available (limited to a few countries) on the market since 2015 after half a century's intensive efforts. Affordable and accessible vaccines against dengue are hence still urgently needed. The dengue envelop protein domain III (EDIII), which is capable of eliciting serotype-specific neutralizing antibodies, has become the focus for subunit vaccine development. To contribute to the development of an accessible and affordable dengue vaccine, in the current study we have used plant-based vaccine production systems to generate a dengue subunit vaccine candidate in tobacco. Chloroplast genome engineering was applied to express serotype-specific recombinant EDIII proteins in tobacco chloroplasts using both constitutive and ethanol-inducible expression systems. Expression of a tetravalent antigen fusion construct combining EDIII polypeptides from all four serotypes was also attempted. Transplastomic EDIII-expressing tobacco lines were obtained and homoplasmy was verified by Southern blot analysis. Northern blot analyses showed expression of EDIII antigen-encoding genes. EDIII protein accumulation levels varied for the different recombinant EDIII proteins and the different expression systems, and reached between 0.8 and 1.6 % of total cellular protein. Our study demonstrates the suitability of the chloroplast compartment as a production site for an EDIII-based vaccine candidate against dengue fever and presents a Gateway(®) plastid transformation vector for inducible transgene expression. PMID:27116001

  10. Lentiviral vector encoding ubiquitinated hepatitis B core antigen induces potent cellular immune responses and therapeutic immunity in HBV transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Shenglan; Zhuo, Meng; Song, Linlin; Chen, Xiaohua; Yu, Yongsheng; Zang, Guoqing; Tang, Zhenghao

    2016-07-01

    Predominant T helper cell type 1 (Th1) immune responses accompanied by boosted HBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity are essential for the clearance of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. Ubiquitin (Ub) serves as a signal for the target protein to be recognized and degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Ubiquitinated hepatitis B core antigen (Ub-HBcAg) has been proved to be efficiently degraded into the peptides, which can be presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I resulting in stimulating cell-mediated responses. In the present study, lentiviral vectors encoding Ub-HBcAg (LV-Ub-HBcAg) were designed and constructed as a therapeutic vaccine for immunotherapy. HBcAg-specific cellular immune responses and anti-viral effects induced by LV-Ub-HBcAg were evaluated in HBV transgenic mice. We demonstrated that immunization with LV-Ub-HBcAg promoted the secretion of cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), generated remarkably high percentages of IFN-γ-secreting CD8(+) T cells and CD4(+) T cells, and enhanced HBcAg-specific CTL activity in HBV transgenic mice. More importantly, vaccination with LV-Ub-HBcAg could efficiently decreased the levels of serum hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), HBV DNA and the expression of HBsAg and HBcAg in liver tissues of HBV transgenic mice. In addition, LV-Ub-HBcAg could upregulate the expression of T cell-specific T-box transcription factor (T-bet) and downregulate the expression of GATA-binding protein 3 (GATA-3) in spleen T lymphocytes. The therapeutic vaccine LV-Ub-HBcAg could break immune tolerance, and induce potent HBcAg specific cellular immune responses and therapeutic effects in HBV transgenic mice. PMID:26874581

  11. Cross-presentation of tumour antigens by human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived CD141(+)XCR1+ dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, K M; Silk, J D; Ichiryu, N; Davies, T J; Nolan, K F; Leishman, A J; Carpenter, L; Watt, S M; Cerundolo, V; Fairchild, P J

    2012-10-01

    Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDC) have been widely used in cancer immunotherapy but show significant donor-to-donor variability and low capacity for the cross-presentation of tumour-associated antigens (TAA) to CD8(+) T cells, greatly limiting the success of this approach. Given recent developments in induced pluripotency and the relative ease with which induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines may be generated from individuals, we have succeeded in differentiating dendritic cells (DC) from human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A(*)0201(+) iPS cells (iPS cell-derived DC (ipDC)), using protocols compliant with their subsequent clinical application. Unlike moDC, a subset of ipDC was found to coexpress CD141 and XCR1 that have been shown previously to define the human equivalent of mouse CD8α(+) DC, in which the capacity for cross-presentation has been shown to reside. Accordingly, ipDC were able to cross-present the TAA, Melan A, to a CD8(+) T-cell clone and stimulate primary Melan A-specific responses among naïve T cells from an HLA-A(*)0201(+) donor. Given that CD141(+)XCR1(+) DC are present in peripheral blood in trace numbers that preclude their clinical application, the ability to generate a potentially unlimited source from iPS cells offers the possibility of harnessing their capacity for cross-priming of cytotoxic T lymphocytes for the induction of tumour-specific immune responses. PMID:22071967

  12. Macrophage specific MRI imaging for antigen induced arthritides. A potential new strategy for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work describes the potential of iron oxides for the detection of macrophages in synovitis in experimental, antigen-induced arthritis. The pivotal role of macrophages in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in humans and in antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in animal models is discussed. The latter appear to be very similar in many aspects to the human RA. We show the potential for iron oxide-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine the macrophage content in the arthritic synovial membranes. The results of our own research, as well as those of other research groups, are presented and discussed. MRI after the intravenous (i.v.) administration of iron oxides enables the depiction of macrophage content in arthritic synovial membranes in AIA through the effects of the intracellular compartmentalisation of iron oxide particles. These effects can be demonstrated in 24-h delayed images after i.v. contrast application, on T2-weighted spin-echo or turbo-spin-echo sequences, and especially on T2*-weighted gradient-echo sequences. The signal effects are not only apparent in high field strength (4.7 Tesla) but also on 1.5 Tesla clinical scanners. The use of iron oxides enables the determination of the macrophage content in synovitis in animals with AIA. This parameter represents a potential marker to determine disease activity, and possibly represents a marker to evaluate the effectiveness of specific therapies in human RA. Current knowledge of iron oxide-enhanced MRI is limited to animal models. The clinical evaluation of this new method in patients with RA has not yet been performed. However, based on the considerations presented here, significant progress in the diagnostic work-up of RA can be expected

  13. Intra-articular methotrexate associated to lipid nanoemulsions: anti-inflammatory effect upon antigen-induced arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mello SB

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Suzana BV Mello,1 Elaine R Tavares,2 Adriana Bulgarelli,2 Eloisa Bonfá,1 Raul C Maranhão2,31Rheumatology Division, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Lipid Metabolism Laboratory, the Heart Institute (INCOR of the Medical School Hospital, São Paulo, Brazil; 3Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, BrazilObjective: Commercial methotrexate formulations (MTX have poor anti-inflammatory action for intra-articular treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Our aim was to investigate whether an association between methotrexate and lipidic nanoemulsions (LDE could improve MTX intra-articular action.Methods: For its association to LDE, MTX was previously esterified with dodecyl bromide. LDE-MTX was prepared by high pressure homogenization. Antigen-induced arthritis (AIA was achieved in rabbits sensitized with methylated bovine serum albumin, and the rabbits were subsequently intra-articularly injected with the antigen. Twenty-four hours after AIA induction, groups of four to nine rabbits were intra-articularly injected with increasing doses (0.0625–0.5 µmol/kg of LDE-MTX, and were compared to treatment with 0.5 µmol/kg commercial MTX, LDE alone, and saline (controls. Synovial fluid was collected 48 hours after AIA induction for analysis of protein leakage and cell content. Synovial membranes were collected for histopathology. Uptake of LDE labeled with 3H-cholesteryl ether by the synovial tissue was also determined.Results: Uptake of radioactive LDE by arthritic joints was 2.5-fold greater than by normal joints. Treatment with intra-articular LDE-MTX elicited a clear dose response pattern by reducing the synovial leukocyte infiltrate (P = 0.004 and protein leakage (P = 0.032 when compared with arthritic non-treated joints. In contrast, the intra-articular injection of commercial MTX and LDE did not reduce leukocyte infiltrate or protein leakage. Toxicity to treatment was not observed

  14. Propofol protects against high glucose-induced endothelial adhesion molecules expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Minmin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperglycemia could induce oxidative stress, activate transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB, up-regulate expression of endothelial adhesion molecules, and lead to endothelial injury. Studies have indicated that propofol could attenuate oxidative stress and suppress NF-κB activation in some situations. In the present study, we examined whether and how propofol improved high glucose-induced up-regulation of endothelial adhesion molecules in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Methods Protein expression of endothelial adhesion molecules, NF-κB, inhibitory subunit of NF-κBα (IκBα, protein kinase Cβ2 (PKCβ2, and phosphorylation of PKCβ2 (Ser660 were measured by Western blot. NF-κB activity was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. PKC activity was measured with SignaTECT PKC assay system. Superoxide anion (O2.- accumulation was measured with the reduction of ferricytochrome c assay. Human peripheral mononuclear cells were prepared with Histopaque-1077 solution. Results High glucose induced the expression of endothelial selectin (E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1, and increased mononuclear-endothelial adhesion. High glucose induced O2.- accumulation, PKCβ2 phosphorylation and PKC activation. Further, high glucose decreased IκBα expression in cytoplasm, increased the translocation of NF-κB from cytoplasm to nuclear, and induced NF-κB activation. Importantly, we found these high glucose-mediated effects were attenuated by propofol pretreatment. Moreover, CGP53353, a selective PKCβ2 inhibitor, decreased high glucose-induced NF-κB activation, adhesion molecules expression, and mononuclear-endothelial adhesion. Conclusion Propofol, via decreasing O2.- accumulation, down-regulating PKCβ2 Ser660 phosphorylation and PKC as well as NF-κB activity, attenuated high glucose-induced endothelial adhesion molecules expression

  15. Candida soluble cell wall β-glucan facilitates ovalbumin-induced allergic airway inflammation in mice: Possible role of antigen-presenting cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamura Hiroshi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although fungi have been implicated as initiating/deteriorating factors for allergic asthma, their contributing components have not been fully elucidated. We previously isolated soluble β-glucan from Candida albicans (CSBG (Ohno et al., 2007. In the present study, the effects of CSBG exposure on airway immunopathology in the presence or absence of other immunogenic allergen was investigated in vivo, and their cellular mechanisms were analyzed both in vivo and in vitro. Methods In vivo, ICR mice were divided into 4 experimental groups: vehicle, CSBG (25 μg/animal, ovalbumin (OVA: 2 μg/animal, and CSBG + OVA were repeatedly administered intratracheally. The bronchoalveolar lavage cellular profile, lung histology, levels of cytokines and chemokines in the lung homogenates, the expression pattern of antigen-presenting cell (APC-related molecules in the lung digests, and serum immunoglobulin values were studied. In vitro, the impacts of CSBG (0–12.5 μg/ml on the phenotype and function of immune cells such as splenocytes and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs were evaluated in terms of cell proliferation, the surface expression of APC-related molecules, and OVA-mediated T-cell proliferating activity. Results In vivo, repeated pulmonary exposure to CSBG induced neutrophilic airway inflammation in the absence of OVA, and markedly exacerbated OVA-related eosinophilic airway inflammation with mucus metaplasia in mice, which was concomitant with the amplified lung expression of Th2 cytokines and IL-17A and chemokines related to allergic response. Exposure to CSBG plus OVA increased the number of cells bearing MHC class II with or without CD80 in the lung compared to that of others. In vitro, CSBG significantly augmented splenocyte proliferation in the presence or absence of OVA. Further, CSBG increased the expression of APC-related molecules such as CD80, CD86, and DEC205 on BMDCs and amplified OVA-mediated T

  16. Immunization with antigenic peptides complexed with β-glucan induces potent cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity in combination with CpG-ODNs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Shinichi; Morishita, Hiromi; Kobiyama, Kouji; Aoshi, Taiki; Ishii, Ken J; Sakurai, Kazuo

    2015-12-28

    The induction of antigen-specific immune responses requires immunization with not only antigens, but also adjuvants. CpG oligonucleotides (CpG-ODNs) are well-known ligands for Toll-like receptor 9 and a potent adjuvant that induces both Th1-type humoral and cellular immune responses including cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses. We previously demonstrated that β-glucan schizophyllan (SPG) can form complexes with CpG-ODNs with attached dA40 (CpG-dA/SPG), which can accumulate in macrophages in the draining inguinal lymph nodes and induce strong immune responses by co-administration of antigenic proteins, namely ovalbumin (OVA). Immunization with antigenic peptides, OVA257-264, did not induce these antigen-specific immune responses even in combination with CpG-dA/SPG, indicating that peptides require a carrier to antigen presenting cells. In this study, we prepared conjugates comprising OVA257-264 and dA40, and made complexes with SPG. Immunization with OVA257-264-dA/SPG induced peptide-specific immune responses in combination with CpG-dA regardless of complexation with SPG both in vitro and in vivo. When splenocytes from immunized mice were incubated with E.G7-OVA tumor model cells presenting OVA peptides, the number of cells drastically decreased after 24h. Furthermore, mice pre-immunized with OVA257-264-dA/SPG and CpG-ODNs exhibited a long delay in tumor growth after tumor inoculation. Therefore, these peptide-dA/SPG and CpG-dA/SPG complexes could be used as a potent vaccine for the treatment of cancers and infectious diseases. PMID:26562685

  17. Cytoprotective effect of selective small-molecule caspase inhibitors against staurosporine-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianghong; Wang, Yuren; Liang, Shuguang; Ma, Haiching

    2014-01-01

    Caspases are currently known as the central executioners of the apoptotic pathways. Inhibition of apoptosis and promotion of normal cell survival by caspase inhibitors would be a tremendous benefit for reducing the side effects of cancer therapy and for control of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases. The objective of this study was to discover small-molecule caspase inhibitors with which to achieve cytoprotective effect. We completed the high-throughput screening of Bionet's 37,500-compound library (Key Organics Limited, Camelford, Cornwall, UK) against caspase-1, -3, and -9 and successfully identified 43 initial hit compounds. The 43 hit compounds were further tested for cytoprotective activity against staurosporine-induced cell death in NIH3T3 cells. Nineteen compounds were found to have significant cytoprotective effects in cell viability assays. One of the compounds, RBC1023, was demonstrated to protect NIH3T3 cells from staurosporine-induced caspase-3 cleavage and activation. RBC1023 was also shown to protect against staurosporine-induced impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential. DNA microarray analysis demonstrated that staurosporine treatment induced broad global gene expression alterations, and RBC1023 co-treatment significantly restored these changes, especially of the genes that are related to cell growth and survival signaling such as Egr1, Cdc25c, cdkn3, Rhob, Nek2, and Taok1. Collectively, RBC1023 protects NIH3T3 cells against staurosporine-induced apoptosis via inhibiting caspase activity, restoring mitochondrial membrane potential, and possibly upregulating some cell survival-related gene expressions and pathways. PMID:24920883

  18. Cytoprotective effect of selective small-molecule caspase inhibitors against staurosporine-induced apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu J

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Jianghong Wu, Yuren Wang, Shuguang Liang, Haiching Ma Reaction Biology Corp, Malvern, PA, USA Abstract: Caspases are currently known as the central executioners of the apoptotic pathways. Inhibition of apoptosis and promotion of normal cell survival by caspase inhibitors would be a tremendous benefit for reducing the side effects of cancer therapy and for control of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases. The objective of this study was to discover small-molecule caspase inhibitors with which to achieve cytoprotective effect. We completed the high-throughput screening of Bionet's 37,500-compound library (Key Organics Limited, Camelford, Cornwall, UK against caspase-1, -3, and -9 and successfully identified 43 initial hit compounds. The 43 hit compounds were further tested for cytoprotective activity against staurosporine-induced cell death in NIH3T3 cells. Nineteen compounds were found to have significant cytoprotective effects in cell viability assays. One of the compounds, RBC1023, was demonstrated to protect NIH3T3 cells from staurosporine-induced caspase-3 cleavage and activation. RBC1023 was also shown to protect against staurosporine-induced impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential. DNA microarray analysis demonstrated that staurosporine treatment induced broad global gene expression alterations, and RBC1023 co-treatment significantly restored these changes, especially of the genes that are related to cell growth and survival signaling such as Egr1, Cdc25c, cdkn3, Rhob, Nek2, and Taok1. Collectively, RBC1023 protects NIH3T3 cells against staurosporine-induced apoptosis via inhibiting caspase activity, restoring mitochondrial membrane potential, and possibly upregulating some cell survival-related gene expressions and pathways. Keywords: cell death, caspase inhibition, mitochondria, RBC1023

  19. The production and crystallization of the human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 complexed with deamidated gliadin peptides implicated in coeliac disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production and crystallization of human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with deamidated gliadin peptides is reported. Crystals of HLA-DQ2PQPELPYPQ diffracted to 3.9 Å, while the HLA-DQ8EGSFQPSQE crystals diffracted to 2.1 Å, allowing structure determination by molecular replacement. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 are key risk factors in coeliac disease, as they bind deamidated gluten peptides that are subsequently recognized by CD4+ T cells. Here, the production and crystallization of both HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with the deamidated gliadin peptides DQ2 α-I (PQPELPYPQ) and DQ8 α-I (EGSFQPSQE), respectively, are reported

  20. The production and crystallization of the human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 complexed with deamidated gliadin peptides implicated in coeliac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Kate N.; Reid, Hugh H.; Borg, Natalie A.; Broughton, Sophie E.; Huyton, Trevor [The Protein Crystallography Unit, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Anderson, Robert P. [Autoimmunity and Transplantation Division, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, 1G Royal Parade, Parkville, Victoria 3050 (Australia); Department of Gastroenterology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Grattan Street, Parkville, Victoria 3050 (Australia); McCluskey, James [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Rossjohn, Jamie, E-mail: jamie.rossjohn@med.monash.edu.au [The Protein Crystallography Unit, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2007-12-01

    The production and crystallization of human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with deamidated gliadin peptides is reported. Crystals of HLA-DQ2{sup PQPELPYPQ} diffracted to 3.9 Å, while the HLA-DQ8{sup EGSFQPSQE} crystals diffracted to 2.1 Å, allowing structure determination by molecular replacement. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 are key risk factors in coeliac disease, as they bind deamidated gluten peptides that are subsequently recognized by CD4{sup +} T cells. Here, the production and crystallization of both HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with the deamidated gliadin peptides DQ2 α-I (PQPELPYPQ) and DQ8 α-I (EGSFQPSQE), respectively, are reported.

  1. Targeted gene delivery to the synovial pannus in antigen-induced arthritis by ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xi; Tang, Yuanjiao; Leng, Qianying; Zhang, Lingyan; Qiu, Li

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to optimize an ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) technique to improve the in vivo transfection efficiency of the gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in the synovial pannus in an antigen-induced arthritis rabbit model. A mixture of microbubbles and plasmids was locally injected into the knee joints of an antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) rabbits. The plasmid concentrations and ultrasound conditions were varied in the experiments. We also tested local articular and intravenous injections. The rabbits were divided into five groups: (1) ultrasound+microbubbles+plasmid; (2) ultrasound+plasmid; (3) microbubble+plasmid; (4) plasmid only; (5) untreated controls. EGFP expression was observed by fluorescent microscope and immunohistochemical staining in the synovial pannus of each group. The optimal plasmid dosage and ultrasound parameter were determined based on the results of EGFP expression and the present and absent of tissue damage under light microscopy. The irradiation procedure was performed to observe the duration of the EGFP expression in the synovial pannus and other tissues and organs, as well as the damage to the normal cells. The optimal condition was determined to be a 1-MHz ultrasound pulse applied for 5 min with a power output of 2 W/cm(2) and a 20% duty cycle along with 300 μg of plasmid. Under these conditions, the synovial pannus showed significant EGFP expression without significant damage to the surrounding normal tissue. The EGFP expression induced by the local intra-articular injection was significantly more increased than that induced by the intravenous injection. The EGFP expression in the synovial pannus of the ultrasound+microbubbles+plasmid group was significantly higher than that of the other four groups (P<0.05). The expression peaked on day 5, remained detectable on day 40 and disappeared on day 60. No EGFP expression was detected in the other tissues and organs. The UTMD

  2. Modified tumour antigen-encoding mRNA facilitates the analysis of naturally occurring and vaccine-induced CD4 and CD8 T cells in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knights, Ashley J; Nuber, Natko; Thomson, Christopher W; de la Rosa, Olga; Jäger, Elke; Tiercy, Jean-Marie; van den Broek, Maries; Pascolo, Steve; Knuth, Alexander; Zippelius, Alfred

    2009-03-01

    The development of effective anti-cancer vaccines requires precise assessment of vaccine-induced immunity. This is often hampered by low ex vivo frequencies of antigen-specific T cells and limited defined epitopes. This study investigates the applicability of modified, in vitro-transcribed mRNA encoding a therapeutically relevant tumour antigen to analyse T cell responses in cancer patients. In this study transfection of antigen presenting cells, by mRNA encoding the tumour antigen NY-ESO-1, was optimised and applied to address spontaneous and vaccine-induced T cell responses in cancer patients. Memory CD8+ T cells from lung cancer patients having detectable humoral immune responses directed towards NY-ESO-1 could be efficiently detected in peripheral blood. Specific T cells utilised a range of different T cell receptors, indicating a polyclonal response. Specific killing of a panel of NY-ESO-1 expressing tumour cell lines indicates recognition restricted to several HLA allelic variants, including a novel HLA-B49 epitope. Using a modified mRNA construct targeting the translated antigen to the secretory pathway, detection of NY-ESO-1-specific CD4+ T cells in patients could be enhanced, which allowed the in-depth characterisation of established T cell clones. Moreover, broad CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses covering multiple epitopes were detected following mRNA stimulation of patients treated with a recombinant vaccinia/fowlpox NY-ESO-1 vaccine. This approach allows for a precise monitoring of responses to tumour antigens in a setting that addresses the breadth and magnitude of antigen-specific T cell responses, and that is not limited to a particular combination of known epitopes and HLA-restrictions. PMID:18663444

  3. Fragmentation of the adenine and guanine molecules induced by electron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secondary electron emission is the most important stage in the mechanism of radiation damage to DNA biopolymers induced by primary ionizing radiation. These secondary electrons ejected by the primary electron impacts can produce further ionizations, initiating an avalanche effect, leading to genome damage through the energy transfer from the primary objects to sensitive biomolecular targets, such as nitrogenous bases, saccharides, and other DNA and peptide components. In this work, the formation of positive and negative ions of purine bases of nucleic acids (adenine and guanine molecules) under the impact of slow electrons (from 0.1 till 200 eV) is studied by the crossed electron and molecular beams technique. The method used makes it possible to measure the molecular beam intensity and determine the total cross-sections for the formation of positive and negative ions of the studied molecules, their energy dependences, and absolute values. It is found that the maximum cross section for formation of the adenine and guanine positive ions is reached at about 90 eV energy of the electron beam and their absolute values are equal to 2.8 × 10−15 and 3.2 × 10−15 cm2, respectively. The total cross section for formation of the negative ions is 6.1 × 10−18 and 7.6 × 10−18 cm2 at the energy of 1.1 eV for adenine and guanine, respectively. The absolute cross-section values for the molecular ions are measured and the cross-sections of dissociative ionization are determined. Quantum chemical calculations are performed for the studied molecules, ions and fragments for interpretation of the crossed beams experiments

  4. Antigens of the basement membranes of the seminiferous tubules induce autoimmunity in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustig, L; Satz, M L; Sztein, M B; Denduchis, B

    1982-05-01

    A preparation enriched in basement membranes from seminiferous tubules was isolated from rat testes (STBM) and injected with complete Freund's adjuvant into Wistar rats. In 60% of animals a mild multifocal orchitis was observed. In damaged areas, perivascular and peritubular mononuclear cell infiltrates and different degrees of cell sloughing of some seminiferous tubules were observed. Electron microscopy revealed focal thickenings and delamination of the basement membrane of the seminiferous tubules as well as vacuolization of Sertoli cell cytoplasm. Using immunofluorescence discontinuous linear deposits of IgG were detected along the seminiferous tubular wall. Moreover, the same pattern of immunofluorescence was observed when the IgG eluted from the testes of the immunized rats was layered on sections of normal rat testis. Circulating antibodies to STBM were detected using passive haemagglutination in approximately 45% of the immunized rats, with titers ranging from 1:20 to 1:80. Leukocyte migration was inhibited when the spleen cells of the immunized rats were incubated with antigens from the basement membrane of seminiferous tubules, whilst a negative reaction was obtained when the soluble fraction of testis homogenate was used. PMID:7050376

  5. Intense 2-cycle laser pulses induce time-dependent bond-hardening in a polyatomic molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Dota, K; Tiwari, A K; Dharmadhikari, J A; Dharmadhikari, A K; Mathur, D

    2012-01-01

    A time-dependent bond-hardening process is discovered in a polyatomic molecule (tetramethyl silane, TMS) using few-cycle pulses of intense 800 nm light. In conventional mass spectrometry, symmetrical molecules like TMS do not exhibit a prominent molecular ion (TMS$^+$) as unimolecular dissociation into [Si(CH$_3$)$_3]^+$ proceeds very fast. Under strong field and few-cycle conditions, this dissociation channel is defeated by time-dependent bond-hardening: a field-induced potential well is created in the TMS$^+$ potential energy curve that effectively traps a wavepacket. The time-dependence of this bond hardening process is verified using longer-duration ($\\geq$ 100 fs) pulses; the relatively "slower" fall-off of optical field in such pulses allows the initially trapped wavepacket to leak out, thereby rendering TMS$^+$ unstable once again. Our results are significant as they demonstrate (i) optical generation of polyatomic ions that are normally inaccessible and (ii) optical control of dynamics in strong field...

  6. Molecule modification andmass deposition induced bythe implantation of lowenergy Fe+ ion beamsinto amino acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Fe+ ion beams with the energy of 110 keV were implanted into films of L(+)-cysteine (HSCH2CH(NH2)COOH). One of the single crystals grown in hydrochloric acid solution with the implanted samples through slow evaporation was structurally characterized by the X-ray crystallography. The crystal is monoclinic, space group C2, with a = 1.8534(4) nm, b = 0.5234(1) nm, c = 0.7212(1) nm, β= 103.72°, V = 0.67965(3) nm3, Z = 4, F(000) = 144.0, Dclac = 1.763 g@cm-3, μ(MoKα) = 1.06 mm-1, T = 293(2) K. R = 0.0379, wR = 0.0835 for 660 observed reflections (I > 2σ(I)). The structural formula of the crystal compound is (CH2CH(NH2)NO2)ClFe (Mr = 180.38 u). Products of heavy ion beam irradiation were purified and it was directly confirmed that the implanted Fe+ ions had been deposited in the novel molecules. The same doses of Fe+ ion beams of the same energy were implanted into films of L(+)-cysteine hydrochloride monohydrate. FTIR spectroscopy of the implanted samples proved that some of the original molecules were seriously damaged and significant modifications were induced.

  7. Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) co-transcriptional scanning at single-molecule resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senavirathne, Gayan; Bertram, Jeffrey G.; Jaszczur, Malgorzata; Chaurasiya, Kathy R.; Pham, Phuong; Mak, Chi H.; Goodman, Myron F.; Rueda, David

    2015-12-01

    Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) generates antibody diversity in B cells by initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) during transcription of immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and switch region (IgS) DNA. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that AID binds to transcribed dsDNA and translocates unidirectionally in concert with RNA polymerase (RNAP) on moving transcription bubbles, while increasing the fraction of stalled bubbles. AID scans randomly when constrained in an 8 nt model bubble. When unconstrained on single-stranded (ss) DNA, AID moves in random bidirectional short slides/hops over the entire molecule while remaining bound for ~5 min. Our analysis distinguishes dynamic scanning from static ssDNA creasing. That AID alone can track along with RNAP during transcription and scan within stalled transcription bubbles suggests a mechanism by which AID can initiate SHM and CSR when properly regulated, yet when unregulated can access non-Ig genes and cause cancer.

  8. Small Molecule-Induced Allosteric Activation of the Vibrio Cholerae RTX Cysteine Protease Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupardus, P.J.; Shen, A.; Bogyo, M.; Garcia, K.C.

    2009-05-19

    Vibrio cholerae RTX (repeats in toxin) is an actin-disrupting toxin that is autoprocessed by an internal cysteine protease domain (CPD). The RTX CPD is efficiently activated by the eukaryote-specific small molecule inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP{sub 6}), and we present the 2.1 angstrom structure of the RTX CPD in complex with InsP{sub 6}. InsP{sub 6} binds to a conserved basic cleft that is distant from the protease active site. Biochemical and kinetic analyses of CPD mutants indicate that InsP{sub 6} binding induces an allosteric switch that leads to the autoprocessing and intracellular release of toxin-effector domains.

  9. From small aromatic molecules to functional nanostructured carbon by pulsed laser-induced photochemical stitching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Gokhale

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel route employing UV laser pulses (KrF Excimer, 248 nm to cleave small aromatic molecules and stitch the generated free radicals into functional nanostructured forms of carbon is introduced. The process differs distinctly from any strategies wherein the aromatic rings are broken in the primary process. It is demonstrated that this pulsed laser-induced photochemical stitching (PLPS process when applied to routine laboratory solvents (or toxic chemical wastes when discarded Chlorobenzene and o-Dichlorobenzene yields Carbon Nanospheres (CNSs comprising of graphene-like sheets assembled in onion-like configurations. This room temperature process implemented under normal laboratory conditions is versatile and clearly applicable to the whole family of haloaromatic compounds without and with additions of precursors or other nanomaterials. We further bring out its applicability for synthesis of metal-oxide based carbon nanocomposites.

  10. Observation of Quantum Interferences via Light Induced Conical Intersections in Diatomic Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Natan, Adi; Bucksbaum, Philip H

    2015-01-01

    We observe energy-dependent angle-resolved diffraction patterns in protons from strong-field dissociation of the molecular hydrogen ion H$_2^+$. The interference is a characteristic of dissociation around a laser-induced conical intersection (LICI), which is a point of contact between two surfaces in the dressed 2-dimensional Born-Oppenheimer potential energy landscape of a diatomic molecule in a strong laser field. The interference magnitude and angular period depend strongly on the energy difference between the initial state and the LICI, consistent with coherent diffraction around a cone-shaped potential barrier whose width and thickness depend on the relative energy of the initial state and the cone apex. These findings are supported by numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schr\\"{o}dinger equation for similar experimental conditions.

  11. Observation of Quantum Interferences via Light-Induced Conical Intersections in Diatomic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natan, Adi; Ware, Matthew R.; Prabhudesai, Vaibhav S.; Lev, Uri; Bruner, Barry D.; Heber, Oded; Bucksbaum, Philip H.

    2016-04-01

    We observe energy-dependent angle-resolved diffraction patterns in protons from strong-field dissociation of the molecular hydrogen ion H2+ . The interference is a characteristic of dissociation around a laser-induced conical intersection (LICI), which is a point of contact between two surfaces in the dressed two-dimensional Born-Oppenheimer potential energy landscape of a diatomic molecule in a strong laser field. The interference magnitude and angular period depend strongly on the energy difference between the initial state and the LICI, consistent with coherent diffraction around a cone-shaped potential barrier whose width and thickness depend on the relative energy of the initial state and the cone apex. These findings are supported by numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for similar experimental conditions.

  12. Disorder-Induced Quantum Beats in Two-Dimensional Spectra of Excitonically Coupled Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butkus, Vytautas; Dong, Hui; Fleming, Graham R; Abramavicius, Darius; Valkunas, Leonas

    2016-01-21

    Quantum superposition of molecular electronic states is very fragile because of thermal energy fluctuations and the static conformational disorder induced by the intimate surrounding of constituent molecules of the system. However, the nature of the long-lived quantum beats, observed in time-resolved spectra of molecular aggregates at physiological conditions, is still being debated. We present our study of the conditions when long-lived electronic quantum coherences originating from recently proposed inhomogeneous broadening mechanism are enhanced and reflected in the two-dimensional electronic spectra of the excitonically coupled molecular dimer. We show that depending on the amount of inhomogeneous broadening, the excitonically coupled molecular system can establish long-lived electronic coherences, caused by a disordered subensemble, for which the dephasing due to static energy disorder becomes significantly reduced. On the basis of these considerations, we present explanations for why the electronic or vibrational coherences were or were not observed in a range of recent experiments. PMID:26720834

  13. Multicharged Ion-induced simple molecule fragmentation dynamics; Dynamique de la fragmentation de molecules simples induite par impact d'ion multicharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarisien, M

    2003-10-01

    The aim of this work is to study the dynamics of swift multicharged ion-induced fragmentation of diatomic (CO) and triatomic (CO{sub 2}) molecules. Performed at the GANIL facility, this study used the Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy technique (RIMS), which consists of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, coupled with a multi-hit capability position sensitive detector (delay line anode). The high-resolution measurement of the kinetic energy distribution released (KER) during the CO fragmentation points out the limitation of the Coulomb Explosion Model, revealing, for example, the di-cation CO{sub 2}{sup +} electronic state contribution in the case of C{sup +}/O{sup +} fragmentation pathway. Furthermore, the multi-ionization cross section dependence with the orientation of the internuclear axis of CO is compared with a geometrical model calculation. Finally, different behaviours are observed for the dissociation dynamics of a triatomic molecule (CO{sub 2}). While triple ionization leads mainly to a synchronous concerted fragmentation dynamics, a weak fraction of dissociating molecule follows a sequential dynamics involving CO{sub 2}{sup +} metastable states. In the case of double ionization, (CO{sub 2}){sup 2+} di-cation dissociation dynamics is asynchronously concerted and has been interpreted using a simple model involving an asymmetrical vibration of the molecule. (author)

  14. Netrin-1 induces local translation of down syndrome cell adhesion molecule in axonal growth cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shruti; Welshhans, Kristy

    2016-07-01

    Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (DSCAM) plays an important role in many neurodevelopmental processes such as axon guidance, dendrite arborization, and synapse formation. DSCAM is located in the Down syndrome trisomic region of human chromosome 21 and may contribute to the Down syndrome brain phenotype, which includes a reduction in the formation of long-distance connectivity. The local translation of a select group of mRNA transcripts within growth cones is necessary for the formation of appropriate neuronal connectivity. Interestingly, we have found that Dscam mRNA is localized to growth cones of mouse hippocampal neurons, and is dynamically regulated in response to the axon guidance molecule, netrin-1. Furthermore, netrin-1 stimulation results in an increase in locally translated DSCAM protein in growth cones. Deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC), a netrin-1 receptor, is required for the netrin-1-induced increase in Dscam mRNA local translation. We also find that two RNA-binding proteins-fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) and cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein (CPEB)-colocalize with Dscam mRNA in growth cones, suggesting their regulation of Dscam mRNA localization and translation. Finally, overexpression of DSCAM in mouse cortical neurons results in a severe stunting of axon outgrowth and branching, suggesting that an increase in DSCAM protein results in a structural change having functional consequences. Taken together, these results suggest that netrin-1-induced local translation of Dscam mRNA during embryonic development may be an important mechanism to regulate axon growth and guidance in the developing nervous system. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 799-816, 2016. PMID:26518186

  15. Synergistic effect of chimeric antigen receptors and cytokine-induced killer cells: An innovative combination for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binh Thanh Vu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the combination of gene and immunotherapy for cancer treatment has been regarded as innovative and promising; together, both therapies can help overcome limitations associated with conventional treatments. In order to augment anti-cancer efficacy and to maintain the specificity of antibody therapy, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-modified T cells, directed toward tumor-specific antigens, have emerged as a novel and promising therapeutic platform. CARs consist of a B cell receptor (BCR-derived extracellular domain and T cell receptor (TCR-associated signaling elements. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells are the effector immune cells that can be activated ex vivo and possess both the anti-tumor potency of T lymphocytes and the non-major histocompatibility complex-restricted elimination of natural killer cells. With their pre-eminent ability for robust proliferation, CIK cells may overcome the main limitations of adoptive immunotherapy strategies. CIK cells have strong tumor cell killing capacity; they are effective against a wide variety of malignant tumors and have been shown to be safe in cancer patients. This review summarizes the characteristics of CARs which make them attractive for in cancer treatment strategies. In addition, the role of CIK cells and the advantages of combining CIK cells with CAR-based therapy will be discussed. Scientific evidence to support their combined therapeutic application will be highlighted, with a focus on how their innovative combination may be translated into cancer clinical trials. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(6.000: 653-665

  16. Bm86 antigen induces a protective immune response against Boophilus microplus following DNA and protein vaccination in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rose, R; McKenna, R V; Cobon, G; Tennent, J; Zakrzewski, H; Gale, K; Wood, P R; Scheerlinck, J P; Willadsen, P

    1999-11-30

    Vaccination of sheep with a plasmid bearing the full length gene for the tick antigen Bm86 either alone or co-administered with plasmid carrying the ovine genes for the cytokines, granulocyte and macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or interleukin (IL)-1beta induced a relatively low level of protection against subsequent tick infestation. This tick damage reached statistical significance only for the groups which were vaccinated with plasmid encoding for Bm86, co-administered with plasmid encoding for ovine GM-CSF. Antibody titres measured against Bm86 were also low in all groups injected with the Bm86 DNA vaccine. Antibody production and anti-tick effect were significantly less than that achieved by two vaccinations with recombinant Bm86 protein. In all cases only a low level of antigen-specific stimulation of peripheral blood lymphocytes was recorded, as measured either by the incorporation of tritiated thymidine or the release of IFN-gamma. Injection of DNA encoding for Bm86, either alone or with co-administered cytokine genes, did however prime for a strong subsequent antibody response following a single injection of recombinant Bm86 protein in adjuvant. Antibody production nevertheless appeared to be slightly less effective than following two vaccinations with recombinant protein. The persistence of antibody following vaccination was the same regardless of the method of primary sensitization. In all cases the half-life of the antibody response was approximately 40-50 days indicating that, in contrast to results reported in mice, DNA vaccination in sheep did not result in sustained antibody production. PMID:10587297

  17. Dendritic Cells from Oral Cavity Induce Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells upon Antigen Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Yamazaki, Sayuri; Maruyama, Akira; Okada, Kohei; Matsumoto, Misako; Morita, Akimichi; Seya, Tsukasa

    2012-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that dendritic cells (DCs) from the intestines have the capacity to induce Foxp3+CD4+ regulatory T cells (T-regs) and regulate immunity versus tolerance in the intestines. However, the contribution of DCs to controlling immunity versus tolerance in the oral cavity has not been addressed. Here, we report that DCs from the oral cavity induce Foxp3+ T-regs as well as DCs from intestine. We found that oral-cavity-draining cervical lymph nodes contained higher frequencies ...

  18. Cell-free antigens from precocious Paracoccidioides brasiliensis culture induce a typical delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fecchio CJ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell-free antigens (CFAg derived from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis have typically been used in immunodiffusion reactions for serodiagnosis or therapeutic follow-up of paracoccidioidomycosis patients. Thus, we investigated the usefulness of CFAg obtained from cultures at different ages, to evaluate cellular immunity by the footpad test, in experimental murine paracoccidioidomycosis. Male mice infected with P. brasiliensis 265 strain were challenged in the footpad with CFAg obtained from four- (4d CFAg or 11-day-old cultures (11d CFAg. The increase in footpad swelling provoked by 4d CFAg and 11d CFAg was similar and showed significant difference in relation to control groups. However, the infiltrate pattern was strikingly different: 4d CFAg induced a predominant mononuclear infiltrate whereas 11d CFAg provoked a predominant polymophonuclear infiltrate. These different inflammatory patterns were associated with distinct electrophoretic characteristics. By comparison with 11d CFAg, 4d CFAg showed more numerous and intense bands, including a strong one of 43 kDa (gp43. These results suggest that CFAg derived from Pb 265 isolate can be used as a reagent to evaluate cellular immunity; however, the culture's age is critical because only young cultures are able to induce a typical mononuclear infiltrate. The efficacy of this new paracoccidioidin to assay the cellular immunity in infections caused by other P. brasiliensis isolates is under investigation.

  19. Novel ISCOMs from Quillaja brasiliensis saponins induce mucosal and systemic antibody production, T-cell responses and improved antigen uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Teixeira, Thais Fumaco; Quirici, Lenora; Roehe, Paulo Michel; Ferreira, Fernando; Silveira, Fernando

    2016-02-24

    In the last decades, significant efforts have been dedicated to the search for novel vaccine adjuvants. In this regard, saponins and its formulations as "immunostimulating complexes" (ISCOMs) have shown to be capable of stimulating potent humoral and cellular immune responses, enhanced cytokine production and activation of cytotoxic T cells. The immunological activity of ISCOMs formulated with a saponin fraction extracted from Quillaja brasiliensis (QB-90 fraction) as an alternative to classical ISCOMs based on Quil A(®) (IQA) is presented here. The ISCOMs prepared with QB-90, named IQB-90, typically consist of 40-50nm, spherical, cage-like particles, built up by QB-90, cholesterol, phospholipids and antigen (ovalbumin, OVA). These nanoparticles were efficiently uptaken in vitro by murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Subcutaneously inoculated IQB-90 induced strong serum antibody responses encompassing specific IgG1 and IgG2a, robust DTH reactions, significant T cell proliferation and increases in Th1 (IFN-γ and IL-2) cytokine responses. Intranasally delivered IQB-90 elicited serum IgG and IgG1, and mucosal IgA responses at distal systemic sites (nasal passages, large intestine and vaginal lumen). These results indicate that IQB-90 is a promising alternative to classic ISCOMs as vaccine adjuvants, capable of enhancing humoral and cellular immunity to levels comparable to those induced by ISCOMs manufactured with Quillaja saponaria saponins. PMID:26826546

  20. Anti-inflammatory effects of red pepper (Capsicum baccatum) on carrageenan- and antigen-induced inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiller, Fernando; Alves, Márcia K; Vieira, Sílvio M; Carvalho, Toni A; Leite, Carlos E; Lunardelli, Adroaldo; Poloni, José A; Cunha, Fernando Q; de Oliveira, Jarbas R

    2008-04-01

    Inflammation is a pivotal component of a variety of diseases, such as atherosclerosis and tumour progression. Various naturally occurring phytochemicals exhibit anti-inflammatory activity and are considered to be potential drug candidates against inflammation-related pathological processes. Capsicum baccatum L. var. pendulum (Willd.) Eshbaugh (Solanaceae) is the most consumed species in Brazil, and its compounds, such as capsaicinoids, have been found to inhibit the inflammatory process. However, the anti-inflammatory effects of C. baccatum have not been characterized. Thus, this study was designed to evaluate the effects of C. baccatum juice in animal models of acute inflammation induced by carrageenan and immune inflammation induced by methylated bovine serum albumin. Pretreatment (30 min) of rats with pepper juice (0.25-2.0 g kg(-1)) significantly decreased leucocyte and neutrophil migration, exudate volume and protein and LDH concentration in pleural exudates of a pleurisy model. This juice also inhibited neutrophil migration and reduced the vascular permeability on carrageenan-induced peritonitis in mice. C. baccatum juice also reduced neutrophil recruitment and exudate levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-1beta in mouse inflammatory immune peritonitis. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the main constituent of C. baccatum juice, as extracted with chloroform, is capsaicin. In agreement with this, capsaicin was able to inhibit the neutrophil migration towards the inflammatory focus. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the anti-inflammatory effect of C. baccatum juice and our data suggest that this effect may be induced by capsaicin. Moreover, the anti-inflammatory effect induced by red pepper may be by inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine production at the inflammatory site. PMID:18380920

  1. Photo-induced reactions in the ion-molecule complex Mg+-OCNC2H5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ju-Long; Liu, Haichuan; Han, Ke-Li; Yang, Shihe

    2003-06-01

    Ion-molecule complexes of magnesium cation with ethyl isocyanate were produced in a laser-ablation supersonic expansion nozzle source. Photo-induced reactions in the 1:1 complexes have been studied in the spectral range of 230-410 nm. Photodissociation mass spectrometry revealed the persistent product Mg+ from nonreactive quenching throughout the entire wavelength range. As for the reactive channels, the photoproducts, Mg+OCN and C2H5+, were produced only in the blue absorption band of the complex with low yields. The action spectrum of Mg+(OCNC2H5) consists of two pronounced peaks on the red and blue sides of the Mg+ 32P←32S atomic transition. The ground state geometry of Mg+-OCNC2H5 was fully optimized at B3LYP/6-31+G** level by using GAUSSIAN 98 package. The calculated absorption spectrum of the complex using the optimized structure of its ground state agrees well with the observed action spectrum. Photofragment branching fractions of the products are almost independent of the photolysis photon energy for the 3Px,y,z excitations. The very low branching ratio of reactive products to nonreactive fragment suggests that evaporation is the main relaxation pathway in the photo-induced reactions of Mg+(OCNC2H5).

  2. Current-induced magnetic switching of a single molecule magnet on a spin valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current-induced magnetic switching of a single-molecule magnet (SMM) attached on the central region of a spin valve is explored, and the condition for the switching current is derived. Electrons flowing through the spin valve will interact with the SMM via the s–d exchange interaction, producing the spin accumulation that satisfies the spin diffusion equation. We further describe the spin motion of the SMM by a Heisenberg-like equation. Based on the linear stability analysis, we obtain the critical current from two coupled equations. The results of the critical current versus the external magnetic field indicate that one can manipulate the magnetic state of the SMM by an external magnetic field. - Highlights: • We theoretically study the current-induced magnetic switching of the SMM. • We describe the spin motion of the SMM by a Heisenberg-like equation. • We describe the spin accumulation by the spin diffusion equation. • We obtain the critical current by the linear stability analysis. • Our approach can be easily extended to other SMMs

  3. Interferon-induced changes in expression of antigens defined by monoclonal antibodies on malignant and nonmalignant mononuclear hematopoietic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, M; Ritz, J; Hokland, P

    1983-01-01

    HLA-antigens detected by beta 2-Microglobulin (beta 2-M) could be demonstrated for peripheral blood mononuclear cells, non-T cells, Null cells, activated T cells, fetal thymocytes, adherent cells, and on four malignant non-T lymphoblastoid cell lines. In contrast, no significant differences were...... number as well as the amount of lymphocytes expressing the T10 antigen. It thus seems that the enhancing effect of IFN on resting cells of the immune system is highly selective. On the four lymphoblastoid cell lines, the expression of the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA) was...... significantly decreased concomitantly with the increase in MHC-antigens. On the other hand, the density of both a HLA-D related Ia antigen (I2) and a B-lymphocyte differentiation antigen (B1) remained unaltered following IFN treatment. The implications of these findings are discussed. Udgivelsesdato: 1983-null...

  4. Multi-antigen vaccines based on complex adenovirus vectors induce protective immune responses against H5N1 avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, David H; Wang, Danher; Raja, Nicholas U; Luo, Min; Moore, Kevin M; Woraratanadharm, Jan; Mytle, Nutan; Dong, John Y

    2008-05-19

    There are legitimate concerns that the highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus could adapt for human-to-human transmission and cause a pandemic similar to the 1918 "Spanish flu" that killed 50 million people worldwide. We have developed pandemic influenza vaccines by incorporating multiple antigens from both avian and Spanish influenza viruses into complex recombinant adenovirus vectors. In vaccinated mice, these vaccines induced strong humoral and cellular immune responses against pandemic influenza virus antigens, and protected vaccinated mice against lethal H5N1 virus challenge. These results indicate that this multi-antigen, broadly protective vaccine may serve as a safer and more effective approach than traditional methods for development of a pandemic influenza vaccine. PMID:18395306

  5. Lack of Th1 or Th2 polarization of CD4+ T cell response induced by particulate antigen targeted to phagocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlik, C; Dériaud, E; Leclerc, C

    1997-01-01

    Several factors are involved in the selective activation of Th1 or Th2 subset of CD4+ T cells, such as the type of antigen-presenting cells, the dose of antigen, the route of immunization, etc. To analyze the influence of accessory cells on Th1/Th2 cell differentiation, we used a particulate antigen prepared by covalent linkage of hemocyanin (LH) to 1 microns synthetic microspheres. This particulate antigen was efficiently presented to T cells by macrophages but not by B lymphocytes. BALB/c mice immunized either with soluble LH in alum or with particulate LH without adjuvant produced both Th1 (IL-2 and IFN-gamma) and Th2 (IL-4 and IL-5) cytokines. Moreover, mice primed either with soluble or particulate LH secreted higher levels of IgG1- than of IgG2a-specific antibodies. The induction of this cytokine profile response was independent of the route of administration of the antigen, and was observed both in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, immunization of mice with particulate LH in the presence of poly(I):(C) or of IL-12 induced a strong activation of Th1 cells, as shown by an up-regulated IFN-gamma production, and by decreased IL-4 and IL-5 levels associated to a greatly enhanced IgG2a antibody response. These results therefore demonstrate that targeting the antigen to phagocytic cells is not sufficient to stimulate a polarized Th response and that environmental cytokines play the major role in the selective activation of Th1 cells. This study provides important conclusions for the development of new vaccines and shows that particulate antigen associated with appropriate cofactor can selectively activate Th1 cells. PMID:9043951

  6. Biodegradable polylactide microspheres enhance specific immune response induced by Hepatitis B surface antigen

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, Shaohui; Wei, Qiang (Ethan); Liang, Zhenglun; Ma, Guanghui; Wang, Lianyan; An, Wenqi; Ma, Xiaowei; Fang, Xin; He, Peng; Li, Hemin; Hu, Zhongyu

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B (HB) infection caused by Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the most common liver disease in the world. HB vaccine, when administered in conjunction with alum adjuvants, induces Th2 immunity that confers protection against HBV. However, currently available vaccine formulations and adjuvants do not elicit adequate Th1 and CTL responses that are important for prevention of maternal transmission of the virus. Microspheres synthesized from poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or poly (D, L...

  7. Curcumin induced nanoscale CD44 molecular redistribution and antigen-antibody interaction on HepG2 cell surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Mu [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, 601 Huangpu Road West, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Ruan Yuxia [Department of Ophthalmology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Jinan University, 601 Huangpu Road West, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Xing Xiaobo; Chen Qian; Peng, Yuan [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, 601 Huangpu Road West, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Cai Jiye, E-mail: tjycai@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, 601 Huangpu Road West, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2011-07-04

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: > In this study, we investigate the changes of CD44 expression and distribution on HepG2 cells after curcumin treatment. > We find curcumin is able to change the morphology and ultrastructure of HepG2 cells. > Curcumin can reduce the expression of CD44 molecules and induce the nanoscale molecular redistribution on cell surface. > The binding force between CD44-modified AFM tip and the HepG2 cell surface decreases after curcumin-treatment. - Abstract: The cell surface glycoprotein CD44 was implicated in the progression, metastasis and apoptosis of certain human tumors. In this study, we used atomic force microscope (AFM) to monitor the effect of curcumin on human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cell surface nanoscale structure. High-resolution imaging revealed that cell morphology and ultrastructure changed a lot after being treated with curcumin. The membrane average roughness increased (10.88 {+-} 4.62 nm to 129.70 {+-} 43.72 nm) and the expression of CD44 decreased (99.79 {+-} 0.16% to 75.14 {+-} 8.37%). Laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) imaging showed that CD44 molecules were located on the cell membrane. The florescence intensity in control group was weaker than that in curcumin treated cells. Most of the binding forces between CD44 antibodies and untreated HepG2 cell membrane were around 120-220 pN. After being incubated with curcumin, the major forces focused on 70-150 pN (10 {mu}M curcumin-treated) and 50-120 pN (20 {mu}M curcumin-treated). These results suggested that, as result of nanoscale molecular redistribution, changes of the cell surface were in response to external treatment of curcumin. The combination of AFM and LSCM could be a powerful method to detect the distribution of cell surface molecules and interactions between molecules and their ligands.

  8. Simultaneous Targeting of Tumor Antigens and the Tumor Vasculature using T Lymphocyte Transfer Synergize to Induce Regression of Established Tumors in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnasamy, Dhanalakshmi; Tran, Eric; Yu, Zhiya; Morgan, Richard A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Most systemic cancer therapies target tumor cells directly though there is increasing interest in targeting the tumor stroma that can comprise a substantial portion of the tumor mass. We report here a synergy between two T cell therapies, one directed against the stromal tumor vasculature and the other directed against antigens expressed on the tumor cell. Simultaneous transfer of genetically engineered syngeneic T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor targeting the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 (VEGFR-2; KDR) that is over expressed on tumor vasculature and T cells specific for the tumor antigens gp100 (PMEL), TRP-1 (TYRP1), or TRP-2 (DCT) synergistically eradicated established B16 melanoma tumors in mice and dramatically increased the tumor-free survival of mice compared to treatment with either cell type alone or T cells coexpressing these two targeting molecules. Host lymphodepletion prior to cell transfer was required to mediate the anti-tumor effect. The synergistic antitumor response was accompanied by a significant increase in the infiltration and expansion and/or persistence of the adoptively transferred tumor antigen-specific T cells in the tumor microenvironment and thus enhanced their anti-tumor potency. The data presented here emphasize the possible beneficial effects of combining anti-angiogenic with tumor-specific immunotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of patients with cancer. PMID:23633494

  9. Dengue encephalitis-associated immunopathology in the mouse model: Implications for vaccine developers and antigens inducer of cellular immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Ernesto; Lazo, Laura; Gil, Lázaro; Izquierdo, Alienys; Suzarte, Edith; Valdés, Iris; Blanco, Aracelys; Ancizar, Julio; Alba, José Suárez; Pérez, Yusleydis de la C; Cobas, Karen; Romero, Yaremis; Guillén, Gerardo; Guzmán, María G; Hermida, Lisset

    2016-08-01

    Despite the many efforts made by the scientific community in the development of vaccine candidates against dengue virus (DENV), no vaccine has been licensed up to date. Although the immunopathogenesis associated to the disease is a key factor to take into account by vaccine developers, the lack of animal models that reproduce the clinical signs of the disease has hampered the vaccine progress. Non-human primates support viral replication, but they are very expensive and do not show signs of disease. Immunocompromised mice develop viremia and some signs of the disease; however, they are not valuable for vaccine testing. Nowadays, immunocompetent mice are the most used model to evaluate the immunogenicity of vaccine candidates. These animals are resistant to DENV infection; therefore, the intracranial inoculation with neuroadapted virus, which provokes viral encephalitis, represents an alternative to evaluate the protective capacity of vaccine candidates. Previous results have demonstrated the crucial role of cellular immune response in the protection induced by the virus and vaccine candidates in this mouse encephalitis model. However, in the present work we are proposing that the magnitude of the cell-mediated immunity and the inflammatory response generated by the vaccine can modulate the survival rate after viral challenge. We observed that the intracranial challenge of naïve mice with DENV-2 induces the recruitment of immune cells that contribute to the reduction of viral load, but does not increase the survival rate. On the contrary, animals treated with cyclophosphamide, an immunosuppressive drug that affects proliferating lymphocytes, had a higher viral load but a better survival rate than untreated animals. These results suggest that the immune system is playing an immunopathogenic role in this model and the survival rate may not be a suitable endpoint in the evaluation of vaccine candidates based on antigens that induce a strong cellular immune response

  10. Nitric oxide modulates lipopolysaccharide-induced endothelial platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression via interleukin-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebeda, C B; Teixeira, S A; Tamura, E K; Muscará, M N; de Mello, S B V; Markus, R P; Farsky, S H P

    2011-08-01

    We have shown previously that nitric oxide (NO) controls platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) expression on both neutrophils and endothelial cells under physiological conditions. Here, the molecular mechanism by which NO regulates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endothelial PECAM-1 expression and the role of interleukin (IL)-10 on this control was investigated. For this purpose, N-(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 20 mg/kg/day for 14 days dissolved in drinking water) was used to inhibit both constitutive (cNOS) and inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) synthase activities in LPS-stimulated Wistar rats (5 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). This treatment resulted in reduced levels of serum NO. Under this condition, circulating levels of IL-10 was enhanced, secreted mainly by circulating lymphocytes, dependent on transcriptional activation, and endothelial PECAM-1 expression was reduced independently on reduced gene synthesis. The connection between NO, IL-10 and PECAM-1 expression was examined by incubating LPS-stimulated (1 µg/ml) cultured endothelial cells obtained from naive rats with supernatant of LPS-stimulated lymphocytes, which were obtained from blood of control or L-NAME-treated rats. Supernatant of LPS-stimulated lymphocytes obtained from L-NAME-treated rats, which contained higher levels of IL-10, reduced LPS-induced PECAM-1 expression by endothelial cells, and this reduction was reversed by adding the anti-IL-10 monoclonal antibody. Therefore, an association between NO, IL-10 and PECAM-1 was found and may represent a novel mechanism by which NO controls endothelial cell functions. PMID:21564091

  11. Cryptotanshinone inhibits oxidized LDL-induced adhesion molecule expression via ROS dependent NF-κB pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenwen; Wu, Chuanhong; Chen, Xiuping

    2016-05-01

    Adhesion molecules, such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and E-selectin, play important roles in the initial stage of atherosclerosis. Cryptotanshinone (CPT), a natural compound isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, exhibits anti-atherosclerotic activity although the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, the protective effect of CPT against oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-induced adhesion molecule expression was investigated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Ox-LDL significantly induced ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin expression at the mRNA and protein levels but reduced eNOS phosphorylation and NO generation, which were reversed by CPT pretreatment. Sodium nitroprusside, a NO donor, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, and BAY117082, a NF-κB inhibitor, inhibited ox-LDL-induced ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin expression. Ox-LDL-induced ROS production was significantly inhibited by CPT and NAC. Furthermore, ox-LDL activated the NF-κB signaling pathway by inducing phosphorylation of IKKβ and IκBα, promoting the interaction of IKKβ and IκBα, and increasing p65 nuclear translocation, which were significantly inhibited by CPT. In addition, CPT, NAC, and BAY117082 inhibited ox-LDL-induced membrane expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin, and endothelial-monocyte adhesion and restored eNOS phosphorylation and NO generation. Results suggested that CPT inhibited ox-LDL-induced adhesion molecule expression by decreasing ROS and inhibiting the NF-κB pathways, which provides new insight into the anti-atherosclerotic mechanism of CPT. PMID:26647279

  12. Myeloid dendritic cells induce Th2 responses to inhaled antigen, leading to eosinophilic airway inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    LAMBRECHT, Bart; Veerman, M De; Coyle, Anthony; Gutierrez-Ramos, J C; Thielemans, Kris; Pauwels, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this study was to investigate whether dendritic cells (DCs) can induce sensitization to aeroallergen in a mouse model of allergic asthma. Ovalbumin-pulsed (OVA-pulsed) or unpulsed myeloid DCs that were injected into the airways of naive mice migrated into the mediastinal lymph nodes. When challenged 2 weeks later with an aerosol of OVA, activated CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes, eosinophils, and neutrophils were recruited to the lungs of actively immunized mice. These CD4(+) ly...

  13. A Requisite Role for Induced Regulatory T cells in Tolerance Based on Expanding Antigen Receptor Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Haribhai, Dipica; Williams, Jason B; Jia, Shuang; Nickerson, Derek; Schmitt, Erica G.; Edwards, Brandon; Ziegelbauer, Jennifer; Yassai, Maryam; Li, Shun-Hwa; Relland, Lance M.; Wise, Petra M; Chen, Andrew; Zheng, Yu-Qian; Simpson, Pippa M.; Gorski, Jack

    2011-01-01

    Although both natural and induced regulatory T (nTreg and iTreg) cells can enforce tolerance, the mechanisms underlying their synergistic actions have not been established. We examined the functions of nTreg and iTreg cells by adoptive transfer immunotherapy of newborn Foxp3-deficient mice. As monotherapy, only nTreg cells prevented disease lethality, but did not suppress chronic inflammation and autoimmunity. Provision of Foxp3-sufficient conventional T cells with nTreg cells reconstituted t...

  14. Omentin inhibits TNF-α-induced expression of adhesion molecules in endothelial cells via ERK/NF-κB pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Omentin inhibited TNF-α-induced adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. ► Omentin reduces expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 induced by TNF-α in HUVECs. ► Omentin inhibits TNF-α-induced ERK and NF-κB activation in HUVECs. ► Omentin supreeses TNF-α-induced expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 via ERK/NF-κB pathway. -- Abstract: In the present study, we investigated whether omentin affected the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) induced human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Our data showed that omentin decreased TNF-α-induced expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in HUVECs. In addition, omentin inhibited TNF-α-induced adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. Further, we found that omentin inhibited TNF-α-activated signal pathway of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) by preventing NF-κB inhibitory protein (IκBα) degradation and NF-κB/DNA binding activity. Omentin pretreatment significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced ERK activity and ERK phosphorylation in HUVECs. Pretreatment with PD98059 suppressed TNF-α-induced NF-κB activity. Omentin, NF-kB inhibitor (BAY11-7082) and ERK inhibitor (PD98059) reduced the up-regulation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 induced by TNF-α. These results suggest that omentin may inhibit TNF-α-induced expression of adhesion molecules in endothelial cells via blocking ERK/NF-κB pathway.

  15. Transfusion Induced Bone Marrow Transplant Rejection Due to Minor Histocompatibility Antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Seema R; Zimring, James C

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, alloimmunization to transfused blood products has focused exclusively upon recipient antibodies recognizing donor alloantigens present on the cell surface. Accordingly, the immunological sequelae of alloimmunization have been antibody mediated effects (i.e. hemolytic transfusion reactions, platelet refractoriness, anti-HLA and anti-HNA effects, etc.). However, in addition to the above sequelae, there is also a correlation between the number of antecedent transfusions in humans and the rate of bone marrow transplant (BMT) rejection - under reduced intensity conditioning with HLA matched or HLA identical marrow. BMT of this nature is the only existing cure for a series of non-malignant hematological diseases (e.g. sickle cell disease, thalassemias, etc.); however, rejection remains a clinical problem. It has been hypothesized that transfusion induces subsequent BMT rejection through immunization. Studies in animal models have observed the same effect and have demonstrated that transfusion induced BMT rejection can occur in response to alloimmunization. However, unlike traditional antibody responses, sensitization in this case results in cellular immune effects, involving populations such as T cell or NK cells. In this case, rejection occurs in the absence of alloantibodies, and would not be detected by existing immune-hematological methods. We review human and animal studies in light of the hypothesis that, for distinct clinical populations, enhanced rejection of BMT may be an unappreciated adverse consequence of transfusion which current blood bank methodologies are unable to detect. PMID:24090731

  16. CD85/LIR-1/ILT2 and CD152 (cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4) inhibitory molecules down-regulate the cytolytic activity of human CD4+ T-cell clones specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, A; Saverino, D; Tenca, C; Grossi, C E; Bruno, S; Ciccone, E

    2001-10-01

    Antigen-specific cytolytic CD4+ T lymphocytes control Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by secreting cytokines and by killing macrophages that have phagocytosed the pathogen. However, lysis of the latter cells promotes microbial dissemination, and other macrophages engulf the released bacteria. Subsequently, CD4+ T-cell-mediated killing of macrophages goes on, and this persistent process may hamper control of infection, unless regulatory mechanisms maintain a subtle balance between lysis of macrophages by cytolytic CD4+ cells and activation of cytolytic CD4+ cells by infected macrophages. We asked whether inhibitory molecules expressed by CD4+ cytolytic T lymphocytes could play a role in such a balance. To this end, human CD4+ T-cell clones specific for M. tuberculosis were produced that displayed an autologous major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted lytic ability against purified protein derivative (PPD)-pulsed antigen-presenting cells. All T-cell clones expressed CD152 (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 [CTLA-4]) and CD85/leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor 1 (LIR-1)/immunoglobulin-like transcript 2 (ILT2) inhibitory receptors, but not CD94 and the killer inhibitory receptor (or killer immunoglobulin-like receptor [KIR]) p58.2. CD3-mediated activation of the clones was inhibited in a redirected killing assay in which CD152 and CD85/LIR-1/ILT2 were cross-linked. Specific antigen-mediated proliferation of the clones was also sharply reduced when CD152 and CD85/LIR-1/ILT2 were cross-linked by specific monoclonal antibody (MAb) followed by goat anti-mouse antiserum. In contrast, blockade of the receptors by specific MAb only increased their proliferation. Production of interleukin 2 (IL-2) and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) by the T-cell clones was also strongly reduced when CD152 and CD85/LIR-1/ILT2 were cross-linked. The lytic activity of the T-cell clones against PPD-pulsed autologous monocytes or Epstein-Barr virus-activated B cells was increased

  17. Microbial antigenic variation mediated by homologous DNA recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Cornelis; Rudenko, Gloria; Seifert, H Steven

    2012-09-01

    Pathogenic microorganisms employ numerous molecular strategies in order to delay or circumvent recognition by the immune system of their host. One of the most widely used strategies of immune evasion is antigenic variation, in which immunogenic molecules expressed on the surface of a microorganism are continuously modified. As a consequence, the host is forced to constantly adapt its humoral immune response against this pathogen. An antigenic change thus provides the microorganism with an opportunity to persist and/or replicate within the host (population) for an extended period of time or to effectively infect a previously infected host. In most cases, antigenic variation is caused by genetic processes that lead to the modification of the amino acid sequence of a particular antigen or to alterations in the expression of biosynthesis genes that induce changes in the expression of a variant antigen. Here, we will review antigenic variation systems that rely on homologous DNA recombination and that are found in a wide range of cellular, human pathogens, including bacteria (such as Neisseria spp., Borrelia spp., Treponema pallidum, and Mycoplasma spp.), fungi (such as Pneumocystis carinii) and parasites (such as the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei). Specifically, the various DNA recombination-based antigenic variation systems will be discussed with a focus on the employed mechanisms of recombination, the DNA substrates, and the enzymatic machinery involved. PMID:22212019

  18. Matrix isolation model studies on the radiation-induced transformations of small molecules of astrochemical and atmospheric interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Vladimir I.; Ryazantsev, Sergey V.; Saenko, Elizaveta V.; Kameneva, Svetlana V.; Shiryaeva, Ekaterina S.

    2016-07-01

    The radiation-induced transformations of small molecules at low temperatures play an important role in the interstellar, planetary and atmospheric chemistry. This work presents a review of our recent model studies on the radiation chemistry of relevant molecules in solid noble gas (Ng) matrices, including some preliminary new results. Among the triatomic molecules, water and carbon dioxide were studied in detail. The radiation-induced degradation of isolated H2O yields hydrogen atoms and OH radicals, while oxygen atoms are produced at higher doses. Isolated CO2 molecules are decomposed to yield CO and trapped oxygen atoms. Upon annealing the trapped O and H atoms are mobilized selectively at different temperatures and react with other trapped species. The formation of HCO and HOCO radicals was observed in the mixed H2O/CO2/Ng systems. Other studies were concerned with the radiation-induced degradation of simple organic molecules (methanol, formic acid) and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCl3, CF2Cl2). Preliminary results for methanol revealed deep dehydrogenation yielding HCO and CO, whereas CO2, CO and HOCO were detected as primary products for formic acid. In the case of chlorofluorocarbons, significance of ionic channels was demonstrated. The implications of the results for modeling the processes in astrochemical ices and atmosphere are discussed.

  19. Enhanced vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell responses to malaria antigen ME-TRAP by fusion to MHC class ii invariant chain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra J Spencer

    Full Text Available The orthodox role of the invariant chain (CD74; Ii is in antigen presentation to CD4+ T cells, but enhanced CD8+ T cells responses have been reported after vaccination with vectored viral vaccines encoding a fusion of Ii to the antigen of interest. In this study we assessed whether fusion of the malarial antigen, ME-TRAP, to Ii could increase the vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell response. Following single or heterologous prime-boost vaccination of mice with a recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus vector, ChAd63, or recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA, higher frequencies of antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were observed, with the largest increases observed following a ChAd63-MVA heterologous prime-boost regimen. Studies in non-human primates confirmed the ability of Ii-fusion to augment the T cell response, where a 4-fold increase was maintained up to 11 weeks after the MVA boost. Of the numerous different approaches explored to increase vectored vaccine induced immunogenicity over the years, fusion to the invariant chain showed a consistent enhancement in CD8+ T cell responses across different animal species and may therefore find application in the development of vaccines against human malaria and other diseases where high levels of cell-mediated immunity are required.

  20. Tolerogenic dendritic cells induce antigen-specific hyporesponsiveness in insulin- and glutamic acid decarboxylase 65-autoreactive T lymphocytes from type 1 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segovia-Gamboa, Norma; Rodríguez-Arellano, Martha Eunice; Rangel-Cruz, Rafael; Sánchez-Díaz, Moisés; Ramírez-Reyes, Julio César; Faradji, Raquel; González-Domínguez, Érika; Sánchez-Torres, Carmen

    2014-09-01

    Tolerogenic dendritic cells (tDC) constitute a promising therapy for autoimmune diseases, since they can anergize T lymphocytes recognizing self-antigens. Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) have autoreactive T cells against pancreatic islet antigens (insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 -GAD65-). We aimed to determine the ability of tDC derived from T1D patients to inactivate their insulin- and GAD65-reactive T cells. CD14+ monocytes and CD4+CD45RA- effector/memory lymphocytes were isolated from 25 patients. Monocyte-derived DC were generated in the absence (control, cDC) or presence of IL-10 and TGF-β1 (tDC), and loaded with insulin or GAD65. DC were cultured with T lymphocytes (primary culture), and cell proliferation and cytokine secretion were determined. These lymphocytes were rechallenged with insulin-, GAD65- or candidin-pulsed cDC (secondary culture) to assess whether tDC rendered T cells hyporesponsive to further stimulation. In the primary cultures, tDC induced significant lower lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2 and IFN-γ secretion than cDC; in contrast, tDC induced higher IL-10 production. Lymphocytes from 60% of patients proliferated specifically against insulin or GAD65 (group 1), whereas 40% did not (group 2). Most patients from group 1 had controlled glycemia. The secondary cultures showed tolerance induction to insulin or GAD65 in 14 and 10 patients, respectively. A high percentage of these patients (70-80%) belonged to group 1. Importantly, tDC induced antigen-specific T-cell hyporesponsiveness, since the responses against unrelated antigens were unaffected. These results suggest that tDC therapy against multiple antigens might be useful in a subset of T1D patients. PMID:24993292

  1. The inducible caspase-9 suicide gene system as a ‘safety switch’ to limit on-target, off-tumor toxicities of chimeric antigen receptor T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa eGargett

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Immune modulation has become a central element in many cancer treatments, and T cells genetically engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CAR may provide a new approach to cancer immunotherapy. Autologous CAR T cells that have been re-directed towards tumor-associated antigens (TAA have shown promising results in phase 1 clinical trials, with some patients undergoing complete tumor regression. However this T-cell therapy must carefully balance effective T-cell activation, to ensure antitumor activity, with the potential for uncontrolled activation that may produce immunopathology. An inducible Caspase 9 (iCasp9 ‘safety switch’ offers a solution that allows for the removal of inappropriately activated CAR T cells. The induction of iCasp9 depends on the administration of the small molecule dimerizer drug AP1903 and dimerization results in rapid induction of apoptosis in transduced cells, preferentially killing activated cells expressing high levels of transgene. The iCasp9 gene has been incorporated into vectors for use in preclinical studies and demonstrates effective and reliable suicide gene activity in phase 1 clinical trials. A third-generation CAR incorporating iCasp9 re-directs T cells towards the GD2 TAA. GD2 is over-expressed in melanoma and other malignancies of neural crest origin and the safety and activity of these GD2-iCAR T cells will be investigated in CARPETS and other actively recruiting phase 1 trials.

  2. Co-Administration of Molecular Adjuvants Expressing NF-Kappa B Subunit p65/RelA or Type-1 Transactivator T-bet Enhance Antigen Specific DNA Vaccine-Induced Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devon J. Shedlock

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA vaccine-induced immunity can be enhanced by the co-delivery of synthetic gene-encoding molecular adjuvants. Many of these adjuvants have included cytokines, chemokines or co-stimulatory molecules that have been demonstrated to enhance vaccine-induced immunity by increasing the magnitude or type of immune responses and/or protective efficacy. In this way, through the use of adjuvants, immune responses can be highly customizable and functionally tailored for optimal efficacy against pathogen specific (i.e., infectious agent or non-pathogen (i.e., cancer antigens. In the novel study presented here, we examined the use of cellular transcription factors as molecular adjuvants. Specifically the co-delivery of (a RelA, a subunit of the NF-κB transcription complex or (b T-bet, a Th1-specific T box transcription factor, along with a prototypical DNA vaccine expressing HIV-1 proteins was evaluated. As well, all of the vaccines and adjuvants were administered to mice using in vivo electroporation (EP, a technology demonstrated to dramatically increase plasmid DNA transfection and subsequent transgene expression with concomitant enhancement of vaccine induced immune responses. As such, this study demonstrated that co-delivery of either adjuvant resulted in enhanced T and B cell responses, specifically characterized by increased T cell numbers, IFN-γ production, as well as enhanced antibody responses. This study demonstrates the use of cellular transcription factors as adjuvants for enhancing DNA vaccine-induced immunity.

  3. TLR Agonist Augments Prophylactic Potential of Acid Inducible Antigen Rv3203 against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv in Experimental Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Owais; Kaur, Jagdeep; Singh, Gurpreet; Faisal, Syed Mohd; Azhar, Asim; Rauf, Mohd Ahmar; Gupta, Umesh Dutt; Gupta, Pushpa; Pal, Rahul; Zubair, Swaleha

    2016-01-01

    In general, the members of Lip gene family of Mycobacterium tuberculosis evoke strong immune response in the host. Keeping this fact into consideration, we investigated role of Rv3203, a cell wall associated protein with lipolytic activity, in imparting protection against experimental murine tuberculosis. The data of the present study suggested that archaeosome encapsulated Rv3203 induce strong lymphocyte proliferation, up-regulated Th-1 biased cytokines profile, increased expression of co-stimulatory markers on both antigen presenting cells and T lymphocytes. The immuno-prophylactic response was further modulated by exposure of the animals to zymosan, a TLR2/6 agonist, prior to immunization with archaeosome encapsulated Rv3203. Interestingly, pre-treatment of experimental animals with zymosan boosted strong immunological memory as compared to archaeosome encapsulated Rv3203 as well as BCG vaccine. We conclude that priming of immunized animal with TLR agonist followed by immunization with archaeosomes encapsulated Rv3203 offer substantial protection against tuberculosis infection and could be a potential subunit vaccine based prophylactic strategy. PMID:27023750

  4. TLR Agonist Augments Prophylactic Potential of Acid Inducible Antigen Rv3203 against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv in Experimental Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Syed Mohd; Azhar, Asim; Rauf, Mohd Ahmar; Gupta, Umesh Dutt; Gupta, Pushpa; Pal, Rahul; Zubair, Swaleha

    2016-01-01

    In general, the members of Lip gene family of Mycobacterium tuberculosis evoke strong immune response in the host. Keeping this fact into consideration, we investigated role of Rv3203, a cell wall associated protein with lipolytic activity, in imparting protection against experimental murine tuberculosis. The data of the present study suggested that archaeosome encapsulated Rv3203 induce strong lymphocyte proliferation, up-regulated Th-1 biased cytokines profile, increased expression of co-stimulatory markers on both antigen presenting cells and T lymphocytes. The immuno-prophylactic response was further modulated by exposure of the animals to zymosan, a TLR2/6 agonist, prior to immunization with archaeosome encapsulated Rv3203. Interestingly, pre-treatment of experimental animals with zymosan boosted strong immunological memory as compared to archaeosome encapsulated Rv3203 as well as BCG vaccine. We conclude that priming of immunized animal with TLR agonist followed by immunization with archaeosomes encapsulated Rv3203 offer substantial protection against tuberculosis infection and could be a potential subunit vaccine based prophylactic strategy. PMID:27023750

  5. Lipid peroxidation causes endosomal antigen release for cross-presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingjan, Ilse; Verboogen, Daniëlle Rj; Paardekooper, Laurent M; Revelo, Natalia H; Sittig, Simone P; Visser, Linda J; Mollard, Gabriele Fischer von; Henriet, Stefanie Sv; Figdor, Carl G; Ter Beest, Martin; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) present foreign antigen in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules to cytotoxic T cells in a process called cross-presentation. An important step in this process is the release of antigen from the lumen of endosomes into the cytosol, but the mechanism of this step is still unclear. In this study, we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by the NADPH-oxidase complex NOX2 cause lipid peroxidation, a membrane disrupting chain-reaction, which in turn results in antigen leakage from endosomes. Antigen leakage and cross-presentation were inhibited by blocking ROS production or scavenging radicals and induced when using a ROS-generating photosensitizer. Endosomal antigen release was impaired in DCs from chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patients with dysfunctional NOX2. Thus, NOX2 induces antigen release from endosomes for cross-presentation by direct oxidation of endosomal lipids. This constitutes a new cellular function for ROS in regulating immune responses against pathogens and cancer. PMID:26907999

  6. Self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptides into microtubes with "turn on" fluorescence using an aggregation-induced emission molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Na; Mu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Qiuling; Wen, Jiying; Wang, Fangfang; Ouyang, Jin

    2013-10-01

    The self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptides (l-Phe-l-Phe) into microtubes with "turn on" bright yellow green fluorescence was described, which was achieved using an aggregation-induced emission (AIE) molecule of 9,10-bis[4-(3-sulfonatopropoxyl)-styryl] anthracene (BSPSA) sodium. PMID:24045462

  7. Quantitative and sensitive analysis of CN molecules using laser induced low pressure He plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardede, Marincan [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Pelita Harapan, 1100 M.H. Thamrin Boulevard, Lippo Village, Tangerang 15811 (Indonesia); Hedwig, Rinda [Department of Computer Engineering, Bina Nusantara University, 9 K.H. Syahdan, Jakarta 14810 (Indonesia); Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Lahna, Kurnia; Idris, Nasrullah; Ramli, Muliadi [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Syiah Kuala University, Darussalam, Banda Aceh 23111, NAD (Indonesia); Jobiliong, Eric [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Pelita Harapan, 1100 M.H. Thamrin Boulevard, Lippo Village, Tangerang 15811 (Indonesia); Suyanto, Hery [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Udayana University, Kampus Bukit Jimbaran, Denpasar 80361, Bali (Indonesia); Marpaung, Alion Mangasi [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Jakarta State University, 10 Rawamangun, Jakarta 13220 (Indonesia); Suliyanti, Maria Margaretha [Research Center for Physics, Indonesia Institute of Sciences, Kawasan Puspiptek, Serpong, Tangerang Selatan, 15314 Banten (Indonesia); Tjia, May On [Physics of Magnetism and Photonics Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, 10 Ganesha, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Research Center of Maju Makmur Mandiri Foundation, 40/80 Srengseng Raya, Jakarta 11630 (Indonesia); Lie, Tjung Jie; Lie, Zener Sukra; Kurniawan, Davy Putra; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik, E-mail: kurnia18@cbn.net.id [Research Center of Maju Makmur Mandiri Foundation, 40/80 Srengseng Raya, Jakarta 11630 (Indonesia); Kagawa, Kiichiro [Research Center of Maju Makmur Mandiri Foundation, 40/80 Srengseng Raya, Jakarta 11630 (Indonesia); Fukui Science Education Academy, Takagi Chuou 2 choume, Fukui 910-0804 (Japan)

    2015-03-21

    We report the results of experimental study on CN 388.3 nm and C I 247.8 nm emission characteristics using 40 mJ laser irradiation with He and N{sub 2} ambient gases. The results obtained with N{sub 2} ambient gas show undesirable interference effect between the native CN emission and the emission of CN molecules arising from the recombination of native C ablated from the sample with the N dissociated from the ambient gas. This problem is overcome by the use of He ambient gas at low pressure of 2 kPa, which also offers the additional advantages of cleaner and stronger emission lines. The result of applying this favorable experimental condition to emission spectrochemical measurement of milk sample having various protein concentrations is shown to yield a close to linear calibration curve with near zero extrapolated intercept. Additionally, a low detection limit of 5 μg/g is found in this experiment, making it potentially applicable for quantitative and sensitive CN analysis. The visibility of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy with low pressure He gas is also demonstrated by the result of its application to spectrochemical analysis of fossil samples. Furthermore, with the use of CO{sub 2} ambient gas at 600 Pa mimicking the Mars atmosphere, this technique also shows promising applications to exploration in Mars.

  8. Model study of collision induced dissociation of a diatomic molecule by an atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The time-dependent Schroedinger equation for the collinear collision of an atom with a diatomic molecule is solved numerically after the manner of McCullough and Wyatt. The binding potential is taken to be a truncated square well and the interaction is impulsive (hard sphere). For the case in which all three masses are equal final relative momentum distributions and dissociation probabilities are obtained as a function of both the initial relative kinetic energy and the initial vibrational level. For purposes of comparison quasiclassical trajectory analyses of the same cases were performed. Quantum effects on collision-induced dissociation (CID) are seen to be important for this model. A very notable characteristic of the model, observed in both the quantum and classical results, yet not in most experimental results, is that CID is severely vibrationally inhibited, i.e., the probability of CID decreases as the initial vibrational quantum number increases at a fixed total collision energy. Probable causes of this strong vibrational inhibition are examined classically by a detailed trajectory analysis. It is concluded that the collinearity of the model is most likely responsible

  9. Quantitative and sensitive analysis of CN molecules using laser induced low pressure He plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the results of experimental study on CN 388.3 nm and C I 247.8 nm emission characteristics using 40 mJ laser irradiation with He and N2 ambient gases. The results obtained with N2 ambient gas show undesirable interference effect between the native CN emission and the emission of CN molecules arising from the recombination of native C ablated from the sample with the N dissociated from the ambient gas. This problem is overcome by the use of He ambient gas at low pressure of 2 kPa, which also offers the additional advantages of cleaner and stronger emission lines. The result of applying this favorable experimental condition to emission spectrochemical measurement of milk sample having various protein concentrations is shown to yield a close to linear calibration curve with near zero extrapolated intercept. Additionally, a low detection limit of 5 μg/g is found in this experiment, making it potentially applicable for quantitative and sensitive CN analysis. The visibility of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy with low pressure He gas is also demonstrated by the result of its application to spectrochemical analysis of fossil samples. Furthermore, with the use of CO2 ambient gas at 600 Pa mimicking the Mars atmosphere, this technique also shows promising applications to exploration in Mars

  10. Quantum dynamics of STM and laser induced desorption of atoms and molecules from surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Boendgen, G

    2001-01-01

    The manipulation of atoms and molecules at solid surfaces by electronic excitations with electrons (or holes) emitted from the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or with laser radiation is both of applied and fundamental interest, e.g. for micro- and nanostructuring of materials, the clarification of elementary (catalytic) reaction mechanisms and for the question of how to treat the quantum dynamics of a laser or STM driven 'system' (the adsorbate) in contact with a dissipative (energy-withdrawing) 'bath' (the substrate). Desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) and its variant DIMET (M = multiple) are among the simplest possible 'reactions' of adsorbate-surface systems; usually involving extremely short-lived electronically excited intermediates. In this thesis, the ultra-short dynamics of directly (localised to the adsorbate-substrate complex) and indirectly (i.e., through the substrate) stimulated DIET and DIMET processes was studied for Si(100)-(2x1):H(D) and Pt(111):NO. Isotope effec...

  11. Quantum dynamics of STM and laser induced desorption of atoms and molecules from surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The manipulation of atoms and molecules at solid surfaces by electronic excitations with electrons (or holes) emitted from the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or with laser radiation is both of applied and fundamental interest, e.g. for micro- and nanostructuring of materials, the clarification of elementary (catalytic) reaction mechanisms and for the question of how to treat the quantum dynamics of a laser or STM driven 'system' (the adsorbate) in contact with a dissipative (energy-withdrawing) 'bath' (the substrate). Desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) and its variant DIMET (M = multiple) are among the simplest possible 'reactions' of adsorbate-surface systems; usually involving extremely short-lived electronically excited intermediates. In this thesis, the ultra-short dynamics of directly (localised to the adsorbate-substrate complex) and indirectly (i.e., through the substrate) stimulated DIET and DIMET processes was studied for Si(100)-(2x1):H(D) and Pt(111):NO. Isotope effects and the influence of substrate temperature and applied electric fields on the desorption yields were examined and possibilities to actively control the outcome (e.g. yields, isotope ratios), for example by laser shaping techniques, were investigated. For that purpose, time-dependent wave packet methods and open system density matrix theory were used to account for energy dissipation and thus resulting ultrashort lifetime of the electronically excited states involved. (author)

  12. Oxidation- and organic-molecule-induced changes of the Si surface optical anisotropy: ab initio predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last couple of years there has been much methodological and computational progress in the modelling of optical properties from first principles. Reflectance anisotropy spectra (RAS) can now be calculated with true predictive power and can thus be used to draw conclusions directly on the surface geometry. In the present work we study two potentially very interesting applications for RAS: the oxidation of Si(001) and the functionalization of the Si surface with organic molecules. Our calculations confirm experimental indications that the polarity of the interface-induced optical anisotropy is reversed layer by layer with increasing oxide thickness. The oscillation of the RAS amplitude should thus allow for the quantitative monitoring of the vertical progression of the oxidation. Our results for Si(001) surfaces modified by cyclopentene and 9,10-phenanthrenequinone adsorption show a strong sensitivity of the RAS signal with respect to the adsorption geometry. Comparison with experimental data shows that cyclopentene most probably adsorbs via a cycloaddition reaction with the Si surface dimers, while phenanthrenequinone seems to adsorb across two Si dimers

  13. Electromagnetically induced transparency and dark fluorescence in a cascade three-level Lithium molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, J; Qi, Jianbing

    2005-01-01

    We observed electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and dark fluorescence in a cascade three-level diatomic Lithium system using Optical-Optical Double Resonance (OODR) spectroscopy. When a strong coupling laser couples the intermediate state $A^{1}\\Sigma^{+}_{u}(v=13, J=14)$ to the upper state $G^{1}\\Pi_{g}(v=11, J=14)$ of $^7Li_2$, the fluorescence from both $A^{1}\\Sigma^{+}_{u}$ and $G^{1}\\Pi_{g}$ states was drastically reduced as the weak probe laser was tuned through the resonance transition between the ground state $X^{1}\\Sigma^{+}_{g}(v=4, J=15)$ and the excited state $A^{1}\\Sigma^{+}_{u}(v=13, J=14)$. The strong coupling laser makes an optically thick medium transparent for the probe transition. In addition, The fact that fluorescence from the upper state $G^{1}\\Pi_{g}(v=11, J=14)$ was also dark when both lasers were tuned at resonance implies that the molecules were trapped in the ground state. We used density matrix methods to simulate the response of an open molecular three-level system to t...

  14. Small-Molecule XIAP Inhibitors Enhance γ-Irradiation-Induced Apoptosis in Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Hari Krishna Vellanki

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Because evasion of apoptosis can cause radioresistance of glioblastoma, there is a need to design rational strategies that counter apoptosis resistance. In the present study, we investigated the potential of targeting the antiapoptotic protein XIAP for the radiosensitization of glioblastoma. Here, we report that small-molecule XIAP inhibitors significantly enhance γ-irradiation-induced loss of viability and apoptosis and cooperate with γ-irradiation to suppress clonogenic survival of glioblastoma cells. Analysis of molecular mechanisms reveals that XIAP inhibitors act in concert with γ-irradiation to cause mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, caspase activation, and caspasedependent apoptosis. Importantly, XIAP inhibitors also sensitize primary cultured glioblastoma cells derived from surgical specimens as well as glioblastoma-initiating stemlike cancer stem cells for γ-irradiation. In contrast, they do not increase the toxicity of γ-irradiation on some nonmalignant cells of the central nervous system, including rat neurons or glial cells, pointing to some tumor selectivity. In conclusion, by demonstrating for the first time that smallmolecule XIAP inhibitors increase the radiosensitivity of glioblastoma cells while sparing normal cells of the central nervous system, our findings build the rationale for further (preclinical development of XIAP inhibitors in combination with γ-irradiation in glioblastoma.

  15. BCG Δzmp1 vaccine induces enhanced antigen specific immune responses in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Bhagwati; Whelan, Adam; Clifford, Derek; Petrera, Agnese; Sander, Peter; Vordermeier, H Martin

    2014-02-01

    Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) causes major economy and public health problem in numerous countries. In Great Britain, despite the use of a test-and-slaughter strategy, the incidence of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in cattle has steadily risen in recent years. One strategy being considered to reduce the burden of bTB in cattle is the development of an efficient vaccine. The only current potentially available vaccine against tuberculosis, live attenuated M. bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), has demonstrated variable efficacy in both humans and cattle and the development of improved vaccination strategies for cattle is a research priority. In this study we assessed the immunogenicity in cattle of two recombinant BCG strains, namely BCG Pasteur Δzmp1::aph and BCG Danish Δzmp1. By applying a recently defined predictive immune-correlate of protection (T cell memory responses measured by cultured ELISPOT), we have compared these two recombinant BCG with wild-type BCG Danish SSI. Our results demonstrated that both strains induced superior T cell memory responses compared to wild-type BCG. These data provide support for the prioritisation of testing BCG Danish Δzmp1 in vaccination/M. bovis challenge studies to determine its protective efficacy. PMID:24394444

  16. Expression of inflammatory mediators in the otitis media induced by Helicobacter pylori antigen in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariya, S; Okano, M; Fukushima, K; Nomiya, S; Kataoka, Y; Nomiya, R; Akagi, H; Nishizaki, K

    2008-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that is recognized as one of the key factors in gastric diseases such as gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. Recent studies have shown relationships between H. pylori and extra-digestive diseases, and the presence of H. pylori in the middle ear and upper respiratory tract has been reported. However, the role of H. pylori in middle ear disease remains unclear. The present study demonstrated that H. pylori whole-cell protein directly induces macrophage migration inhibitory factor, macrophage inflammatory protein 2, interleukin 1 beta and tumor necrosis factor alpha in middle ear epithelium in mice, and severe proliferation of inflammatory cells was observed in middle ear cavity inoculated with H. pylori whole-cell protein. In addition, trans-tympanic injection of macrophage migration inhibitory factor up-regulated expression of macrophage inflammatory protein 2 in the middle ear. These findings indicate that H. pylori infection causes immunological inflammation in middle ear epithelium, and H. pylori may play a significant role in otitis media. PMID:18727622

  17. Role for elevated H-2 antigen expression in resistance to neoplasia caused by radiation-induced leukemia virus. Enhancement of effective tumor surveillance by killer lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resistance to neoplasia caused by radiation-induced leukemia virus (RadLV) is mediated by gene(s) in the H-2D region of the major histocompatibility complex. The previous observation that rapid increases in cellular synthesis and cell-surface expression of H-2 antigens are detectable immediately after virus inoculation has suggested that altered expression of H-2 antigens may play a significant role in the mechanism(s) of host defense to virus infection. This concept is supported by the following observations. First, cell-mediated immunity against RadLV transformed or infected cells can be detected with ease when H-2-positive target cells are used in the cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) assay. Second, resistant mice develop greater numbers of effectors when infected with RadLV than do susceptible mice. Third, injection of normal (uninfected) thymocytes into syngeneic recipients of resistant or susceptible H-2 type does not stimulate a CML response. However, injection of RadLV infected thymocytes from resistant mice produces a vigorous CMI response, and such thymocytes elicit the strongest response at a time when both H-2 and viral antigen expression is elevated. By contrast, injection of infected thymocytes from susceptible mice, which express viral antigens, but low levels of H-2 antigens, does not stimulate a CML reaction. These findings may explain the easier induction of leukemia found by many investigators when virus is inoculated into neonatal mice and the preferential thymus tropism of some oncogenic type-C RNA virus. Cells expressing very low levels of H-2, such as thymocytes, may serve as permissive targets for virus infection because they lack an important component (H-2 antigens) of the dual or altered recognition signal required to trigger a defensive host immune response

  18. Immune responses induced by a Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis recombinant antigen in mice and lymphocytes from vaccinated subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula FERNANDES

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available In the search for Leishmania recombinant antigens that can be used as a vaccine against American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis, we identified a Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis recombinant protein of 33 kD (Larp33 which is recognized by antibodies and peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL from subjects vaccinated with Leishvacin ®, Larp33 was expressed in Escherichia coli after cloning of a 2,2 kb Sau3A digested genomic fragment of L. (L. amazonensis into the pDS56-6 His vector. Immunoblotting analysis indicated that Larp33 corresponds to an approximately 40-kD native protein expressed in promastigotes of L.(L. amazonensis and L. (Viannia braziliensis. Northern blots of total RNA also demonstrated that the gene coding for this protein is expressed in promastigotes of the major lineages of Leishmania causing American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis. Larp33 induced partial protection in susceptible mouse strains (BALB/c and C57BL/10 against L. (L. amazonensis after vaccination using Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG as adjuvant. In vitro stimulation of splenocytes from BALB/c protected mice with Larp33 elicited the secretion of IL-2 and IFN-g, suggesting that a Th1 cell-mediated protective response is associated with the resistance observed in these mice. As revealed by its immunogenic and antigenic properties, this novel recombinant antigen is a suitable candidate to compose a vaccine against cutaneous leishmaniasisA resposta imune induzida por uma proteína recombinante de Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis de 33 kD (Larp33 foi avaliada em linfócitos de indivíduos vacinados com a Leishvacin® e em camundongos através de vacinação. Larp33 foi expressa em Escherichia coli após clonagem de um fragmento genômico de L. (L. amazonensis de 2,2 kb no vetor pDS56-6His. Larp33 foi reconhecida por anticorpos IgG presentes no soro de indivíduos vacinados com Leishvacin® e induziu proliferação em linfócitos desses indivíduos em níveis comparáveis ao ant

  19. A vaccine encoding conserved promiscuous HIV CD4 epitopes induces broad T cell responses in mice transgenic to multiple common HLA class II molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Pereira Ribeiro

    Full Text Available Current HIV vaccine approaches are focused on immunogens encoding whole HIV antigenic proteins that mainly elicit cytotoxic CD8+ responses. Mounting evidence points toward a critical role for CD4+ T cells in the control of immunodeficiency virus replication, probably due to cognate help. Vaccine-induced CD4+ T cell responses might, therefore, have a protective effect in HIV replication. In addition, successful vaccines may have to elicit responses to multiple epitopes in a high proportion of vaccinees, to match the highly variable circulating strains of HIV. Using rational vaccine design, we developed a DNA vaccine encoding 18 algorithm-selected conserved, "promiscuous" (multiple HLA-DR-binding B-subtype HIV CD4 epitopes - previously found to be frequently recognized by HIV-infected patients. We assessed the ability of the vaccine to induce broad T cell responses in the context of multiple HLA class II molecules using different strains of HLA class II- transgenic mice (-DR2, -DR4, -DQ6 and -DQ8. Mice displayed CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses of significant breadth and magnitude, and 16 out of the 18 encoded epitopes were recognized. By virtue of inducing broad responses against conserved CD4+ T cell epitopes that can be recognized in the context of widely diverse, common HLA class II alleles, this vaccine concept may cope both with HIV genetic variability and increased population coverage. The vaccine may thus be a source of cognate help for HIV-specific CD8+ T cells elicited by conventional immunogens, in a wide proportion of vaccinees.

  20. Intramuscular Delivery of Adenovirus Serotype 5 Vector Expressing Humanized Protective Antigen Induces Rapid Protection against Anthrax That May Bypass Intranasally Originated Preexisting Adenovirus Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Shipo; Zhang, Zhe; Yu, Rui; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Ying; Song, Xiaohong; YI, SHAOQIONG; Liu, Ju; Chen, Jianqin; Yin, Ying; Xu, Junjie; Hou, Lihua; Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Developing an effective anthrax vaccine that can induce a rapid and sustained immune response is a priority for the prevention of bioterrorism-associated anthrax infection. Here, we developed a recombinant replication-deficient adenovirus serotype 5-based vaccine expressing the humanized protective antigen (Ad5-PAopt). A single intramuscular injection of Ad5-PAopt resulted in rapid and robust humoral and cellular immune responses in Fisher 344 rats. Animals intramuscularly inoculated with a s...

  1. Activated human γδ T cells induce peptide-specific CD8+ T-cell responses to tumor-associated self-antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altvater, Bianca; Pscherer, Sibylle; Landmeier, Silke; Kailayangiri, Sareetha; Savoldo, Barbara; Juergens, Heribert; Rossig, Claudia

    2012-03-01

    Specific cellular immunotherapy of cancer requires efficient generation and expansion of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) that recognize tumor-associated self-antigens. Here, we investigated the capacity of human γδ T cells to induce expansion of CD8+ T cells specific for peptides derived from the weakly immunogenic tumor-associated self-antigens PRAME and STEAP1. Coincubation of aminobisphosphonate-stimulated human peripheral blood-derived γδ T cells (Vγ9+Vδ2+), loaded with HLA-A*02-restricted epitopes of PRAME, with autologous peripheral blood CD8+ T cells stimulated the expansion of peptide-specific cytolytic effector memory T cells. Moreover, peptide-loaded γδ T cells efficiently primed antigen-naive CD45RA+ CD8+ T cells against PRAME peptides. Direct comparisons with mature DCs revealed equal potency of γδ T cells and DCs in inducing primary T-cell responses and peptide-specific T-cell activation and expansion. Antigen presentation by γδ T-APCs was not able to overcome the limited capacity of peptide-specific T cells to interact with targets expressing full-length antigen. Importantly, T cells with regulatory phenotype (CD4+ CD25hiFoxP3+) were lower in cocultures with γδ T cells compared to DCs. In summary, bisphosphonate-activated γδ T cells permit generation of CTLs specific for weakly immunogenic tumor-associated epitopes. Exploiting this strategy for effective immunotherapy of cancer requires strategies that enhance the avidity of CTL responses to allow for efficient targeting of cancer. PMID:21928126

  2. IRC-082451, a novel multitargeting molecule, reduces L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias in MPTP Parkinsonian primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina Aron Badin

    Full Text Available The development of dyskinesias following chronic L-DOPA replacement therapy remains a major problem in the long-term treatment of Parkinson's disease. This study aimed at evaluating the effect of IRC-082451 (base of BN82451, a novel multitargeting hybrid molecule, on L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LIDs and hypolocomotor activity in a non-human primate model of PD. IRC-082451 displays multiple properties: it inhibits neuronal excitotoxicity (sodium channel blocker, oxidative stress (antioxidant and neuroinflammation (cyclooxygenase inhibitor and is endowed with mitochondrial protective properties. Animals received daily MPTP injections until stably parkinsonian. A daily treatment with increasing doses of L-DOPA was administered to parkinsonian primates until the appearance of dyskinesias. Then, different treatment regimens and doses of IRC-082451 were tested and compared to the benchmark molecule amantadine. Primates were regularly filmed and videos were analyzed with specialized software. A novel approach combining the analysis of dyskinesias and locomotor activity was used to determine efficacy. This analysis yielded the quantification of the total distance travelled and the incidence of dyskinesias in 7 different body parts. A dose-dependent efficacy of IRC-082451 against dyskinesias was observed. The 5 mg/kg dose was best at attenuating the severity of fully established LIDs. Its effect was significantly different from that of amantadine since it increased spontaneous locomotor activity while reducing LIDs. This dose was effective both acutely and in a 5-day sub-chronic treatment. Moreover, positron emission tomography scans using radiolabelled dopamine demonstrated that there was no direct interference between treatment with IRC-082451 and dopamine metabolism in the brain. Finally, post-mortem analysis indicated that this reduction in dyskinesias was associated with changes in cFOS, FosB and ARC mRNA expression levels in the putamen. The data

  3. Retrieval of interatomic separations of molecules from laser-induced high-order harmonic spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We illustrate an iterative method for retrieving the internuclear separations of N2, O2 and CO2 molecules using the high-order harmonics generated from these molecules by intense infrared laser pulses. We show that accurate results can be retrieved with a small set of harmonics and with one or few alignment angles of the molecules. For linear molecules the internuclear separations can also be retrieved from harmonics generated using isotropically distributed molecules. By extracting the transition dipole moment from the high-order harmonic spectra, we further demonstrated that it is preferable to retrieve the interatomic separation iteratively by fitting the extracted dipole moment. Our results show that time-resolved chemical imaging of molecules using infrared laser pulses with femtosecond temporal resolutions is possible

  4. Retrieval of interatomic separations of molecules from laser-induced high-order harmonic spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Van-Hoang; Nguyen, Ngoc-Ty [Department of Physics, University of Pedagogy, 280 An Duong Vuong, Ward 5, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Jin, C; Le, Anh-Thu; Lin, C D [J. R. Macdonald Laboratory, Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States)

    2008-04-28

    We illustrate an iterative method for retrieving the internuclear separations of N{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} molecules using the high-order harmonics generated from these molecules by intense infrared laser pulses. We show that accurate results can be retrieved with a small set of harmonics and with one or few alignment angles of the molecules. For linear molecules the internuclear separations can also be retrieved from harmonics generated using isotropically distributed molecules. By extracting the transition dipole moment from the high-order harmonic spectra, we further demonstrated that it is preferable to retrieve the interatomic separation iteratively by fitting the extracted dipole moment. Our results show that time-resolved chemical imaging of molecules using infrared laser pulses with femtosecond temporal resolutions is possible.

  5. Coimmunization with IL-15 plasmid enhances the longevity of CD8 T cells induced by DNA encoding hepatitis B virus core antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Sheng-Fu Dong; Shu-Hui Sun; Yuan Wang; Guang-Di Li; Di Qu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To test the feasibility of delivering a plasmid encoding IL-15 as a DNA vaccine adjuvant for improving the immune responses induced by hepatitis B virus core gene DNA vaccine.METHODS: We used RT-PCR based strategies to develop IL-15 expression constructs. We first confirmed that the gene could be expressed in Escherichia coli due to the poor expression of IL-15. Then the bioactivity of IL-15 plasmid expression product was identified by CTLL-2 proliferation assay. One hundred micrograms of DNA from each of the IL-15 eukaryotic expressed plasmid and the recombinant plasmid harboring DNA encoding the 144 amino acids of the N-terminus of HBV core gene (abbreviated pHBc144) was used to co-immunize C57 BL/6 mice. The titer of anti-HBcIgG was detected by ELISA and the antigen-specific CD8+T cells (CD8+IFN-γ+ T cells) were detected by intracellular cytokine staining at different time points.RESULTS: After co-immunization by pIL-15 and pHBc144 DNA vaccine the antigen-specific CD8+ cells of mice increased gradually, the first peak of immune response appeared 14 d later, then the number of antigen-specific CD8+ Ts cells decreased gradually and maintained at a steady level in 3 mo. After boosting, the number of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells reached the second peak 10 d later with a double of the 1st peak, then the number of antigen-specific CD8+T cells decreased slowly. IL-15 as a gene adjuvant had no significant effect on humoral immune responses induced by hepatitis B virus core gene DNA vaccine, but increased the memory antigen-specific CD8+ T cells induced by hepatitis B virus core gene DNA vaccine.CONCLUSION: DNA vaccine constructed by HBc Ag 1-144 amino acid induces effective cell immunity, and cytokine plasmid-delivered IL-15 enhances the longevity of CD8+ T cells.

  6. Protection induced by Plasmodium falciparum MSP1(42 is strain-specific, antigen and adjuvant dependent, and correlates with antibody responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Lyon

    Full Text Available Vaccination with Plasmodium falciparum MSP1(42/complete Freund's adjuvant (FA followed by MSP1(42/incomplete FA is the only known regimen that protects Aotus nancymaae monkeys against infection by erythrocytic stage malaria parasites. The role of adjuvant is not defined; however complete FA cannot be used in humans. In rodent models, immunity is strain-specific. We vaccinated Aotus monkeys with the FVO or 3D7 alleles of MSP1(42 expressed in Escherichia coli or with the FVO allele expressed in baculovirus (bv combined with complete and incomplete FA, Montanide ISA-720 (ISA-720 or AS02A. Challenge with FVO strain P. falciparum showed that suppression of cumulative day 11 parasitemia was strain-specific and could be induced by E. coli expressed MSP1(42 in combination with FA or ISA-720 but not with AS02A. The coli42-FVO antigen induced a stronger protective effect than the bv42-FVO antigen, and FA induced a stronger protective effect than ISA-720. ELISA antibody (Ab responses at day of challenge (DOC were strain-specific and correlated inversely with c-day 11 parasitemia (r = -0.843. ELISA Ab levels at DOC meeting a titer of at least 115,000 ELISA Ab units identified the vaccinees not requiring treatment (noTx with a true positive rate of 83.3% and false positive rate of 14.3 %. Correlation between functional growth inhibitory Ab levels (GIA and cumulative day 11 parasitemia was weaker (r = -0.511, and was not as predictive for a response of noTx. The lowest false positive rate for GIA was 30% when requiring a true positive rate of 83.3%. These inhibition results along with those showing that antigen/FA combinations induced a stronger protective immunity than antigen/ISA-720 or antigen/AS02 combinations are consistent with protection as ascribed to MSP1-specific cytophilic antibodies. Development of an effective MSP1(42 vaccine against erythrocytic stage P. falciparum infection will depend not only on antigen quality, but also upon the selection of

  7. Curcumin induced nanoscale CD44 molecular redistribution and antigen-antibody interaction on HepG2 cell surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: → In this study, we investigate the changes of CD44 expression and distribution on HepG2 cells after curcumin treatment. → We find curcumin is able to change the morphology and ultrastructure of HepG2 cells. → Curcumin can reduce the expression of CD44 molecules and induce the nanoscale molecular redistribution on cell surface. → The binding force between CD44-modified AFM tip and the HepG2 cell surface decreases after curcumin-treatment. - Abstract: The cell surface glycoprotein CD44 was implicated in the progression, metastasis and apoptosis of certain human tumors. In this study, we used atomic force microscope (AFM) to monitor the effect of curcumin on human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cell surface nanoscale structure. High-resolution imaging revealed that cell morphology and ultrastructure changed a lot after being treated with curcumin. The membrane average roughness increased (10.88 ± 4.62 nm to 129.70 ± 43.72 nm) and the expression of CD44 decreased (99.79 ± 0.16% to 75.14 ± 8.37%). Laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) imaging showed that CD44 molecules were located on the cell membrane. The florescence intensity in control group was weaker than that in curcumin treated cells. Most of the binding forces between CD44 antibodies and untreated HepG2 cell membrane were around 120-220 pN. After being incubated with curcumin, the major forces focused on 70-150 pN (10 μM curcumin-treated) and 50-120 pN (20 μM curcumin-treated). These results suggested that, as result of nanoscale molecular redistribution, changes of the cell surface were in response to external treatment of curcumin. The combination of AFM and LSCM could be a powerful method to detect the distribution of cell surface molecules and interactions between molecules and their ligands.

  8. Single-molecule spectroscopy of the temperature-induced collapse of unfolded proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Nettels, D; Muller-Spath, S.; Kuster, F.; Hofmann, H.; Haenni, D.; Ruegger, S.; Reymond, L.; Hoffmann, A.; Kubelka, J.; Heinz, B.; Gast, K.; Best, R. B.; Schuler, B

    2009-01-01

    We used single-molecule FRET in combination with other biophysical methods and molecular simulations to investigate the effect of temperature on the dimensions of unfolded proteins. With single-molecule FRET, this question can be addressed even under near-native conditions, where most molecules are folded, allowing us to probe a wide range of denaturant concentrations and temperatures. We find a compaction of the unfolded state of a small cold shock protein with increasing temperature in both...

  9. Apoptosis is induced by infectious bursal disease virus replication in productively infected cells as well as in antigen-negative cells in their vicinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungmann, A; Nieper, H; Müller, H

    2001-05-01

    The kinetics of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) replication and induction of apoptosis were investigated in vitro and in vivo. After infection of chicken embryo (CE) cells with IBDV strain Cu-1, the proportion of apoptotic cells increased from 5.8% at 4 h post-infection (p.i.) to 64.5% at 48 h p.i. The proportion of apoptotic cells correlated with IBDV replication. UV-inactivated IBDV particles did not induce apoptosis. Double labelling revealed that, early after infection, the majority of antigen-expressing cells were not apoptotic; double-labelled cells appeared more frequently at later times. Remarkably, apoptotic cells were frequently located in the vicinity of antigen-expressing cells. This indicated that an apoptosis-inducing factor(s) might be released by cells that replicate IBDV. Since interferon (IFN) production has been demonstrated after IBDV infection, IFN was considered to be one of several factors. However, supernatants of infected CE cells in which virus infectivity had been neutralized were not sufficient to induce apoptosis. Similar results were observed in the infected bursae of Fabricius: early after infection, most of the cells either showed virus antigens or were apoptotic. Again, double-labelled cells appeared more frequently late after infection. This suggests that indirect mechanisms might also be involved in the induction of apoptosis in vivo, contributing to the rapid depletion of cells in the IBDV-infected bursa. PMID:11297685

  10. Recent Developments in β-Cell Differentiation of Pluripotent Stem Cells Induced by Small and Large Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Suresh Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cells, including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs, hold promise as novel therapeutic tools for diabetes treatment because of their self-renewal capacity and ability to differentiate into beta (β-cells. Small and large molecules play important roles in each stage of β-cell differentiation from both hESCs and hiPSCs. The small and large molecules that are described in this review have significantly advanced efforts to cure diabetic disease. Lately, effective protocols have been implemented to induce hESCs and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs to differentiate into functional β-cells. Several small molecules, proteins, and growth factors promote pancreatic differentiation from hESCs and hMSCs. These small molecules (e.g., cyclopamine, wortmannin, retinoic acid, and sodium butyrate and large molecules (e.g. activin A, betacellulin, bone morphogentic protein (BMP4, epidermal growth factor (EGF, fibroblast growth factor (FGF, keratinocyte growth factor (KGF, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, noggin, transforming growth factor (TGF-α, and WNT3A are thought to contribute from the initial stages of definitive endoderm formation to the final stages of maturation of functional endocrine cells. We discuss the importance of such small and large molecules in uniquely optimized protocols of β-cell differentiation from stem cells. A global understanding of various small and large molecules and their functions will help to establish an efficient protocol for β-cell differentiation.

  11. Gamma radiation-induced structural changes in triglyceride molecules in pork fat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the structure of associated and individual triglyceride pork fat molecules, some changes take place under the effect of ionizing radiation. Due to the irradiation of the fat the amount of the di- and tri-unsaturated (UUU, UUS, USU) triglyceride molecules decreases. The occurrence of the unsatured fatty acids on sites 1,3 decreases and the percentage of the individual triglyceride molecules having on their extreme sites C-1,3 unsaturated fatty acids decreases in all combinations. It can be assumed that hydrogenation and pre-esterification occurs in the triglyceride molecules. (author)

  12. The nature of antiidiotype molecules induced by antiallotype. Presence of both latent allotype and allotypic internal images

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Previously (9), I found that immunization of rabbits with antibody directed against variable region heavy chain VH polypeptides of a1 allotype induced the production of antiidiotype (anti-Id) molecules that appeared to bear images of the original a1 allotype. I now show that these anti-Id molecules can be fractionated into two populations: one population (a2a3- anti-Id) that lacks the nominal VH a2 or a3 allotype of the rabbit from which it was derived, and another population (a2a3+ anti-Id) ...

  13. A Viral Vectored Prime-Boost Immunization Regime Targeting the Malaria Pfs25 Antigen Induces Transmission-Blocking Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman, Anna L.; Blagborough, Andrew M.; Sumi Biswas; Yimin Wu; Hill, Adrian V.; Sinden, Robert E.; Draper, Simon J

    2011-01-01

    The ookinete surface protein Pfs25 is a macrogamete-to-ookinete/ookinete stage antigen of Plasmodium falciparum, capable of exerting high-level anti-malarial transmission-blocking activity following immunization with recombinant protein-in-adjuvant formulations. Here, this antigen was expressed in recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus 63 (ChAd63), human adenovirus serotype 5 (AdHu5) and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) viral vectored vaccines. Two immunizations were administered to mice in a ...

  14. Combining Immunodetection with Histochemical Techniques: The Effect of Heat-induced Antigen Retrieval on Picro-Sirius Red Staining

    OpenAIRE

    Gadd, Victoria L.

    2014-01-01

    Picro-Sirius red is a routine diagnostic stain intended for the histological visualization of collagen fibers (fibrosis) in tissue. Multi-label immunohistochemistry is a powerful tool used by researchers to visualize different cell types and their location within a tissue specimen, and to observe co-localization of antigens. Combining the specificity of immunodetection with the simplicity of Sirius red staining will allow researchers to visualize multi-antigen detection in relation to fibrosi...

  15. Cultivation of Inducible Escherichi a Coli RB791 Hepatitis B Core Antigen Producer: Screening and Modelling of Fermentation Process

    OpenAIRE

    Grīgs, O; Ruģele, K

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant Hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) expressed in Escherichia coli, exhibits similar morphology and antigenicity to the native core particles of Hepatitis B virus (HBV). Also core particle has become one of the most frequently studied systems, as a carrier for various foreign epitopes. This aspect leads to great interest of HBcAg as a component for discovery of new type HBV vaccine, as therapeutic and diagnostic tool. Also core particles are examined as vectors for gene engineering. ...

  16. Distribution of a protein antigenically related to the major anaerobically induced gonococcal outer membrane protein among other Neisseria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehn, G T; Clark, V L

    1990-12-01

    The Pan 1 protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a novel 54-kDa outer membrane protein expressed only when gonococci are grown in the absence of oxygen. It is a major antigen recognized by sera from patients with gonococcal infection. We raised mouse monospecific polyclonal antiserum to gel-purified Pan 1 from gonococcal strain F62. The antiserum was broadly cross-reactive among gonococcal strains; all strains tested reacted in immunoblot analysis proportionate to the amount of Pan 1 visible in silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gels. In immunoblot experiments, N. lactamica and N. cinerea reacted very strongly to the anti-Pan 1 antiserum, whereas N. sicca, N. flava, and N. mucosa did not react at all. The other commensals tested, N. subflava and N. perflava, exhibited only a minor reaction. These results correlated with the apparent amount of Pan 1 seen on SDS-polyacrylamide gels of outer membranes. SDS-polyacrylamide gel analysis of six meningococcal strains revealed no visible anaerobically induced outer membrane proteins, and the subsequent immunoblots showed only slight or no reaction to the anti-Pan 1 antibody. In the four meningococcal strains that did react slightly with the antiserum, a Pan 1-like protein was seen only in anaerobically grown cells. Thus, meningococci did not express Pan 1 at levels comparable to that found in gonococci; however, when Pan 1 was expressed in meningococcal strains, it was oxygen regulated. This is the first example of a protein found in the gonococcal outer membrane that, under identical growth conditions, is not expressed at similar levels in the meningococcus. PMID:2123827

  17. Testosterone induces molecular changes in dopamine signaling pathway molecules in the adolescent male rat nigrostriatal pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tertia D Purves-Tyson

    Full Text Available Adolescent males have an increased risk of developing schizophrenia, implicating testosterone in the precipitation of dopamine-related psychopathology. Evidence from adult rodent brain indicates that testosterone can modulate nigrostriatal dopamine. However, studies are required to understand the role testosterone plays in maturation of dopamine pathways during adolescence and to elucidate the molecular mechanism(s by which testosterone exerts its effects. We hypothesized that molecular indices of dopamine neurotransmission [synthesis (tyrosine hydroxylase, breakdown (catechol-O-methyl transferase; monoamine oxygenase, transport [vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT, dopamine transporter (DAT] and receptors (DRD1-D5] would be changed by testosterone or its metabolites, dihydrotestosterone and 17β-estradiol, in the nigrostriatal pathway of adolescent male rats. We found that testosterone and dihydrotestosterone increased DAT and VMAT mRNAs in the substantia nigra and that testosterone increased DAT protein at the region of the cell bodies, but not in target regions in the striatum. Dopamine receptor D2 mRNA was increased and D3 mRNA was decreased in substantia nigra and/or striatum by androgens. These data suggest that increased testosterone at adolescence may change dopamine responsivity of the nigrostriatal pathway by modulating, at a molecular level, the capacity of neurons to transport and respond to dopamine. Further, dopamine turnover was increased in the dorsal striatum following gonadectomy and this was prevented by testosterone replacement. Gene expression changes in the dopaminergic cell body region may serve to modulate both dendritic dopamine feedback inhibition and reuptake in the dopaminergic somatodendritic field as well as dopamine release and re-uptake dynamics at the presynaptic terminals in the striatum. These testosterone-induced changes of molecular indices of dopamine neurotransmission in males are primarily androgen

  18. Neutrophil Transmigration Mediated by the Neutrophil-Specific Antigen CD177 Is Influenced by the Endothelial S536N Dimorphism of Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1

    OpenAIRE

    Bayat, Behnaz; Werth, Silke; Sachs, Ulrich J. H.; Newman, Debra K.; Newman, Peter J.; Santoso, Sentot

    2010-01-01

    The human neutrophil-specific adhesion molecule CD177 (also known as the NB1 alloantigen) becomes upregulated on the cell surface in a number of inflammatory settings. We recently showed that CD177 functions as a novel heterophilic counterreceptor for the endothelial junctional protein PECAM-1 (CD31), an interaction that is mediated by membrane-proximal PECAM-1 IgD 6, which is known to harbor an S536N single nucleotide polymorphism of two major isoforms V98N536G643 and L98S536R643 and a yet-t...

  19. Laser-induced 3D alignment and orientation of quantum state-selected molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nevo, Iftach; Holmegaard, Lotte; Nielsen, Jens H.;

    2009-01-01

    A strong inhomogeneous static electric field is used to spatially disperse a rotationally cold supersonic beam of 2,6-difluoroiodobenzene molecules according to their rotational quantum state. The molecules in the lowest-lying rotational states are selected and used as targets for 3-dimensional...

  20. Graphical prediction of quantum interference-induced transmission nodes in functionalized organic molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Troels; Stadler, Robert; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2011-01-01

    solely from the structure of a conjugated molecule when the energies of the atomic pz orbitals do not vary too much. Here we relax the assumption of equal on-site energies and generalize the graphical scheme to molecules containing different atomic species. We use this diagrammatic scheme together with...

  1. Vaccination with Brucella abortus Recombinant In Vivo-Induced Antigens Reduces Bacterial Load and Promotes Clearance in a Mouse Model for Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Jake E Lowry; Isaak, Dale D.; Leonhardt, Jack A.; Giulia Vernati; Jessie C Pate; Andrews, Gerard P.

    2011-01-01

    Current vaccines used for the prevention of brucellosis are ineffective in inducing protective immunity in animals that are chronically infected with Brucella abortus, such as elk. Using a gene discovery approach, in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT) on B. abortus, we previously identified ten loci that encode products up-regulated during infection in elk and consequently may play a role in virulence. In our present study, five of the loci (D15, 0187, VirJ, Mdh, AfuA) were selected for ...

  2. Antigen receptor signaling: integration of protein tyrosine kinase functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, I; Cambier, J C

    1998-09-17

    Antigen receptors on T and B cells function to transduce signals leading to a variety of biologic responses minimally including antigen receptor editing, apoptotic death, developmental progression, cell activation, proliferation and survival. The response to antigen depends upon antigen affinity and valence, involvement of coreceptors in signaling and differentiative stage of the responding cell. The requirement that these receptors integrate signals that drive an array of responses may explain their evolved structural complexity. Antigen receptors are composed of multiple subunits compartmentalized to provide antigen recognition and signal transduction function. In lieu of on-board enzymatic activity these receptors rely on associated Protein Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) for their signaling function. By aggregating the receptors, and hence their appended PTKs, antigens induce PTK transphosphorylation, activating them to phosphorylate the receptor within conserved motifs termed Immunoreceptor Tyrosine-based Activation Motifs (ITAMs) found in transducer subunits. The tyrosyl phosphorylated ITAMs then interact with Src Homology 2 (SH2) domains within the PTKs leading to their further activation. As receptor phosphorylation is amplified, other effectors, such as Shc, dock by virtue of SH2 binding, and serve, in-turn, as substrates for these PTKs. This sequence of events not only provides a signal amplification mechanism by combining multiple consecutive steps with positive feedback, but also allows for signal diversification by differential recruitment of effectors that provide access to distinct parallel downstream signaling pathways. The subject of antigen receptor signaling has been recently reviewed in depth (DeFranco, 1997; Kurosaki, 1997). Here we discuss the biochemical basis of antigen receptor signal transduction, using the B cell receptor (BCR) as a paradigm, with specific emphasis on the involved PTKs. We review several specific mechanisms by which responses

  3. A modern approach for epitope prediction: identification of foot-and-mouth disease virus peptides binding bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) class I molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandya, Mital; Rasmussen, Michael; Hansen, Andreas;

    2015-01-01

    pathogens, such as foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Six synthetic BoLA class I (BoLA-I) molecules were produced, and the peptide binding motif was generated for five of the six molecules using a combined approach of positional scanning combinatorial peptide libraries (PSCPLs) and neural network......-based predictions (NetMHCpan). The updated NetMHCpan server was used to predict BoLA-I binding peptides within the P1 structural polyprotein sequence of FMDV (strain A24 Cruzeiro) for BoLA-1*01901, BoLA-2*00801, BoLA-2*01201, and BoLA-4*02401. Peptide binding affinity and stability were determined for these Bo....... The results of these analyses showed that BoLA alleles cluster into three distinct groups with the potential to define “BoLA supertypes.” This streamlined approach identifies potential T cell epitopes from pathogens, such as FMDV, and provides insight into T cell immunity following infection or vaccination....

  4. Perioperative prostate specific antigen levels among coronary artery bypass grafting patients: Does extracorporeal circulation and body temperature induce prostate specific antigen levels alterations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patris, Emmanuel; Giakoumidakis, Konstantinos; Patris, Vasileios; Kuduvalli, Manoj; Argiriou, Mihalis; Charitos, Christos; Kalaitzis, Christos; Touloupidis, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare the perioperative total prostate specific antigen (tPSA) levels among coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) patients with and without extracorporeal circulation (ECC), to investigate the changes overtime of tPSA in each group separately and to determine the effect of body core temperature on tPSA levels. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was conducted. Our sample was allocated to: (a) Seven patients who underwent off pump CABG (Group I) and (b) 16 CABG patients with ECC (Group II). The levels of tPSA were measured preoperatively (baseline), intra-operatively and at the 4th postoperative day. We compared the two groups on their tPSA levels and we investigated the changes of tPSA overtime in each group separately. Results: Intra-operative serum samples were obtained in significantly lower body temperature in patients of Group II than in those of Group I (31°C vs. 36.9°C, P < 0.001). In each group separately, postoperative tPSA levels were increased significantly compared to the baseline values (2.55 ng/ml vs. 0.39 ng/ml for Group I, P = 0.005 and 4.36 ng/ml vs. 0.77 for Group II, P < 0.001). CABG patients with ECC had significantly lower intra-operative tPSA levels than the baseline values (0.67 ng/ml vs. 0.77 ng/ml, P = 0.008). We did not observe significant differences of tPSA levels between the two groups. Conclusions: CABG surgery affects similarly the perioperative tPSA independently the involvement of ECC. Although all patients had significantly higher early postoperative tPSA levels, only those who underwent CABG with ECC had exceeded normal values and significantly decreased intra-operative tPSA. Hypothermia seems to be the causal factor of tPSA reduction. PMID:25657546

  5. The role of FcRn in antigen presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi eBaker

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulins are unique molecules capable of simultaneously recognizing a diverse array of antigens and themselves being recognized by a broad array of receptors. The abundance specifically of the IgG subclass and the variety of signaling receptors to which it binds render this an important immunomodulatory molecule. In addition to the classical Fcγ receptors (FcγR which bind IgG at the cell surface, the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn is a lifelong resident of the endolysosomal system of most hematopoietic cells where it determines the intracellular fate of both IgG and IgG-containing immune complexes (IgG IC. Crosslinking of FcRn by multivalent IgG IC within antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DC initiates specific mechanisms which result in trafficking of the antigen-bearing IgG IC into compartments from which the antigen can successfully be processed into peptide epitopes compatible with loading onto both MHC class I and II molecules. In turn, this enables the synchronous activation of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses against the cognate antigen, thereby bridging the gap between the humoral and cellular branches of the adaptive immune response. Critically, FcRn-driven T cell priming is efficient at very low doses of antigen due to the exquisite sensitivity of the IgG-mediated antigen delivery system through which it operates. FcRn-mediated antigen presentation has important consequences in tissue compartments replete with IgG and serves not only to determine homeostatic immune activation at a variety of sites but also to induce inflammatory responses upon exposure to antigens perceived as foreign. Therapeutically targeting the pathway by which FcRn enables T cell activation in response to IgG IC is thus a highly attractive prospect not only for the treatment of diseases that are driven by immune complexes but also for manipulating local immune responses against defined antigens such as those present during infections and

  6. Long-lived antigen-induced IgM plasma cells demonstrate somatic mutations and contribute to long-term protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Caitlin; Powers, Ryan; Satyabhama, Lakshmipriyadarshini; Cui, Ang; Tipton, Christopher; Michaeli, Miri; Skountzou, Ioanna; Mittler, Robert S; Kleinstein, Steven H; Mehr, Ramit; Lee, Francis Eun-Yun; Sanz, Ignacio; Jacob, Joshy

    2016-01-01

    Long-lived plasma cells are critical to humoral immunity as a lifelong source of protective antibodies. Antigen-activated B cells-with T-cell help-undergo affinity maturation within germinal centres and persist as long-lived IgG plasma cells in the bone marrow. Here we show that antigen-specific, induced IgM plasma cells also persist for a lifetime. Unlike long-lived IgG plasma cells, which develop in germinal centres and then home to the bone marrow, IgM plasma cells are primarily retained within the spleen and can develop even in the absence of germinal centres. Interestingly, their expressed IgV loci exhibit somatic mutations introduced by the activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). However, these IgM plasma cells are probably not antigen-selected, as replacement mutations are spread through the variable segment and not enriched within the CDRs. Finally, antibodies from long-lived IgM plasma cells provide protective host immunity against a lethal virus challenge. PMID:27270306

  7. Protective immunity induced in mice by F8.1 and F8.2 antigens purified from Schistosoma mansoni eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Campra Ferreira

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma mansoni soluble egg antigens (SEA were fractionated by isoelectric focusing, resulting in 20 components, characterized by pH, absorbance and protein concentration. The higher absorbance fractions were submitted to electrophoresis, and fraction 8 (F8 presented a specific pattern of bands on its isoelectric point. Protein 3 was observed only on F8, and so, it was utilized to rabbit immunization, in order to evaluate its capacity of inducing protective immunity. IgG antibodies from rabbit anti-F8 serum were coupled to Sepharose, and used to obtain the specific antigen by affinity chromatography. This antigen, submitted to electrophoresis, presented two proteic bands (F8.1 and F8.2, which were transferred to nitrocellulose membrane (PVDF and sequenciated. The homology of F8.2 to known proteins was determined using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool program (BLASTp. Significant homologies were obtained for the rabbit cytosolic Ca2+ uptake inhibitor, and for the bird a1-proteinase inhibitor. Immunization of mice with F8.1 and F8.2, in the presence of Corynebacterium parvum and Al(OH3 as adjuvant, induced a significant protection degree against challenge infection, as observed by the decrease on worm burden recovered from portal system.

  8. Parasite molecules and host responses in cystic echinococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, A; Casaravilla, C; Barrios, A A; Ferreira, A M

    2016-03-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is the infection by the larvae of cestode parasites belonging to the Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato species complex. Local host responses are strikingly subdued in relation to the size and persistence of these larvae, which develop within mammalian organs as 'hydatid cysts' measuring up to tens of cm in diameter. In a context in which helminth-derived immune-suppressive, as well as Th2-inducing, molecules garner much interest, knowledge on the interactions between E. granulosus molecules and the immune system lags behind. Here, we discuss what is known and what are the open questions on E. granulosus molecules and structures interacting with the innate and adaptive immune systems, potentially or in demonstrated form. We attempt a global biological approach on molecules that have been given consideration primarily as protective (Eg95) or diagnostic antigens (antigen B, antigen 5). We integrate glycobiological information, which traverses the discussions on antigen 5, the mucin-based protective laminated layer and immunologically active preparations from protoscoleces. We also highlight some less well-known molecules that appear as promising candidates to possess immune-regulatory activities. Finally, we point out gaps in the molecular-level knowledge of this infectious agent that hinder our understanding of its immunology. PMID:26425838

  9. The neutrophil-specific antigen CD177 is a counter-receptor for platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (CD31).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Ulrich J H; Andrei-Selmer, Cornelia L; Maniar, Amudhan; Weiss, Timo; Paddock, Cathy; Orlova, Valeria V; Choi, Eun Young; Newman, Peter J; Preissner, Klaus T; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Santoso, Sentot

    2007-08-10

    Human neutrophil-specific CD177 (NB1 and PRV-1) has been reported to be up-regulated in a number of inflammatory settings, including bacterial infection and granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor application. Little is known about its function. By flow cytometry and immunoprecipitation studies, we identified platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) as a binding partner of CD177. Real-time protein-protein analysis using surface plasmon resonance confirmed a cation-dependent, specific interaction between CD177 and the heterophilic domains of PECAM-1. Monoclonal antibodies against CD177 and against PECAM-1 domain 6 inhibited adhesion of U937 cells stably expressing CD177 to immobilized PECAM-1. Transendothelial migration of human neutrophils was also inhibited by these antibodies. Our findings provide direct evidence that neutrophil-specific CD177 is a heterophilic binding partner of PECAM-1. This interaction may constitute a new pathway that participates in neutrophil transmigration. PMID:17580308

  10. Pharmacological Correction of Stress-Induced Gastric Ulceration by Novel Small-Molecule Agents with Antioxidant Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin V. Kudryavtsev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine novel small-molecule agents influencing the pathogenesis of gastric lesions induced by stress. To achieve this goal, four novel organic compounds containing structural fragments with known antioxidant activity were synthesized, characterized by physicochemical methods, and evaluated in vivo at water immersion restraint conditions. The levels of lipid peroxidation products and activities of antioxidative system enzymes were measured in gastric mucosa and correlated with the observed gastroprotective activity of the active compounds. Prophylactic single-dose 1 mg/kg treatment with (2-hydroxyphenylthioacetyl derivatives of L-lysine and L-proline efficiently decreases up to 86% stress-induced stomach ulceration in rats. Discovered small-molecule antiulcer agents modulate activities of gastric mucosa tissue superoxide dismutase, catalase, and xanthine oxidase in concerted directions. Gastroprotective effect of (2-hydroxyphenylthioacetyl derivatives of L-lysine and L-proline at least partially depends on the correction of gastric mucosa oxidative balance.

  11. Polyethylene glycol-coated graphene oxide attenuates antigen-specific IgE production and enhanced antigen-induced T-cell reactivity in ovalbumin-sensitized BALB/c mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu HY

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hsin-Ying Wu,1,* Kun-Ju Lin,2,* Ping-Yen Wang,1 Chi-Wen Lin,3 Hong-Wei Yang,3 Chen-Chi M Ma,3 Yu-Jen Lu,4 Tong-Rong Jan1 1Department and Graduate Institute of Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Animal Molecular Imaging Center and Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan; 3Department of Chemical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan; 4Department of Neurosurgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Graphene oxide (GO is a promising nanomaterial for potential application in the versatile field of biomedicine. Graphene-based nanomaterials have been reported to modulate the functionality of immune cells in culture and to induce pulmonary inflammation in mice. Evidence pertaining to the interaction between graphene-based nanomaterials and the immune system in vivo remains scarce. The present study investigated the effect of polyethylene glycol-coated GO (PEG-GO on antigen-specific immunity in vivo. Methods: BALB/c mice were intravenously administered with a single dose of PEG-GO (0.5 or 1 mg/kg 1 hour before ovalbumin (OVA sensitization, and antigen-specific antibody production and splenocyte reactivity were measured 7 days later. Results: Exposure to PEG-GO significantly attenuated the serum level of OVA-specific immunoglobulin E. The production of interferon-γ and interleukin-4 by splenocytes restimulated with OVA in culture was enhanced by treatment with PEG-GO. In addition, PEG-GO augmented the metabolic activity of splenocytes restimulated with OVA but not with the T-cell mitogen concanavalin A. Conclusion: Collectively, these results demonstrate that systemic exposure to PEG-GO modulates several aspects of antigen-specific immune responses, including the serum production of immunoglobulin E and T-cell functionality. Keywords: graphene oxide, T

  12. Ligation of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens (MHC-I) prevents apoptosis induced by Fas or SAPK/JNK activation in T-lymphoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamberth, K; Claesson, M H

    2001-01-01

    Early apoptosis in Jurkat T-lymphoma cells was induced by agonistic anti-Fas Ab or by anisomycin which activates the stress kinases SAPK/JNK. Apoptosis was inhibited by ligation of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens (MHC-I). MHC-I ligation induced upregulation of the anti......-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein and stabilized the mitochondrial membrane potential (Deltapsim). MHC-I ligation also prevented downregulation of Bcl-2 and destabilization of Deltapsim induced by anti-Fas Ab treatment or anisomycin exposure. Studies on three different Jurkat cell mutants deficient for src p56(lck), ZAP......-70 kinase, or TCR/CD3 gamma-chain showed that the cells undergo apoptosis after Fas ligation. Anisomycin exposure induced apoptosis in the src p56(lck)-deficient cell line but not in the two other mutant cell lines. Simultaneous cross-linking of MHC-I and Fas ligation inhibited apoptosis in the ZAP...

  13. The Effect of the LysoPC-induced Endothelial Cell Conditioned Medium on Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen Expression of the Calf Thoracic Aorta Smooth Muscle Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周洪莲; 姚济华; 余枢

    2002-01-01

    In order to study the effect of and mechanism of lysophosphatidylcholine (LysoPC) on proliferation of the calf thoracic aorta smooth muscle cells (ASMCs), the ASMCs were used to observe the effects of LysoPC-induced endothelial cell conditioned medium on the DNA content and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression in the calf thoracic ASMCs by flow cytometry and Western Blot technique. It was found that LysoPC-induced endothelial cell conditioned medium could significantly promote PCNA expression of the calf ASMCs, induce the converting of ASMCs from G0/G1 phase to S phase of DNA synthesis, and increase the tyrosine phosphorylation protein expression. Tyrosine protein kinase inhibitor (TPKi) RG50864 could obviously inhibit proliferation of LysoPC-induced ASMCs in a dose-dependence manner. The results indicated that the effect of LysoPC promoting the proliferation of ASMCs is partly evoked by endothelial cell derived growth factors such as PDGF and so on.

  14. Excitation, two-center interference and the orbital geometry in laser-induced nonsequential double ionization of diatomic molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Shaaran, T.; Augstein, B. B.; Faria, C. Figueira de Morisson

    2011-01-01

    We address the influence of the molecular orbital geometry and of the molecular alignment with respect to the laser-field polarization on laser-induced nonsequential double ionization of diatomic molecules for different molecular species, namely $\\mathrm{N}_2$ and $\\mathrm{Li}_2$. We focus on the recollision excitation with subsequent tunneling ionization (RESI) mechanism, in which the first electron, upon return, promotes the second electron to an excited state, from where it subsequently tu...

  15. A high-resolution tandem mass spectrometer for the collision-induced dissociation of large molecule ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instrumental development in the field of tandem mass spectrometry is described in order to use the technique for the analysis of large organic molecules. Experiments are also described in which the process of collision-induced dissociation (CID) is investigated. The fragmentation pattern of CH4+ has been measured for three different target gases He, Ar and Xe. From these measurements fragmentation cross sections are calculated. 192 refs.; 47 figs.; 6 tabs

  16. Self-induced spontaneous transport of water molecules through a symmetrical nanochannel by ratchetlike mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Wan, R; Li, J; Bao, J; Hu, J; Fang, H; Wan, Rongzheng; Lu, Hangjun; Li, Jinyuan; Bao, Jingdong; Hu, Jun; Fang, Haiping

    2006-01-01

    Gaining work from thermal fluctuations without external input energy is a dream for scientists but is forbidden by the second law of thermodynamics. Feynman proposed a molecular ratchet toward this direction but there are still theoretical arguments against it. Here, we revisit this classical problem by using molecular dynamics simulation to monitor water molecules confined in a carbon nanotube. A spontaneous directional transportation of water molecules was observed in this symmetrical nanochannel by a ratchetlike mechanism. This is the first ratchetlike system without any asymmetrical structure or external field, while the asymmetric ratchetlike potential solely results from the transported water molecules that form hydrogen-bonded chains among themselves. Importantly, the resulting net water fluxes reached the level of biological channel, suggesting possible adoption by life. This effect is ascribed to the exceptive structure of the water molecule; a minute change in hydrogen-bond strength dramatically aff...

  17. Charge migration induced by attosecond pulses in bio-relevant molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calegari, Francesca; Trabattoni, Andrea; Palacios, Alicia; Ayuso, David; Castrovilli, Mattea C.; Greenwood, Jason B.; Decleva, Piero; Martín, Fernando; Nisoli, Mauro

    2016-07-01

    After sudden ionization of a large molecule, the positive charge can migrate throughout the system on a sub-femtosecond time scale, purely guided by electronic coherences. The possibility to actively explore the role of the electron dynamics in the photo-chemistry of bio-relevant molecules is of fundamental interest for understanding, and perhaps ultimately controlling, the processes leading to damage, mutation and, more generally, to the alteration of the biological functions of the macromolecule. Attosecond laser sources can provide the extreme time resolution required to follow this ultrafast charge flow. In this review we will present recent advances in attosecond molecular science: after a brief description of the results obtained for small molecules, recent experimental and theoretical findings on charge migration in bio-relevant molecules will be discussed.

  18. High-order harmonic generation in polyatomic molecules induced by a bicircular laser field

    CERN Document Server

    Odžak, Senad; Milošević, Dejan B

    2016-01-01

    High-order harmonic generation by a bicircular field, which consists of two coplanar counter-rotating circularly polarized fields of frequency $r\\omega$ and $s\\omega$ ($r$ and $s$ are integers), is investigated for a polyatomic molecule. This field possesses dynamical symmetry, which can be adjusted to the symmetry of the molecular Hamiltonian and used to investigate the molecular symmetry. For polyatomic molecules having the $C_{r+s}$ symmetry only the harmonics $n=q(r+s)\\pm r$, $q=1,2,\\ldots$, are emitted having the ellipticity $\\varepsilon_n=\\pm 1$. We illustrate this using the example of the planar molecules BH$_3$ and BF$_3$, which obey the $C_3$ symmetry. We show that for the BF$_3$ molecule, similarly to atoms with a $p$ ground state, there is a strong asymmetry in the emission of high harmonics with opposite helicities. This asymmetry depends on the molecular orientation.

  19. Enhancement of charge transport in DNA molecules induced by the next nearest-neighbor effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakooti, Sadeq; Hedin, Eric R.; Kim, Young D.; Joe, Yong S.

    2012-11-01

    An advanced two-dimensional tight-binding model including the next nearest-neighbor effects for quantum mechanical electron transport through double-stranded DNA molecules is proposed. Considering the next nearest-neighbor hopping strengths between sites gives a more rational and realistic model for the electron path-way through DNA molecules. We show higher overall transmission and enhanced current for a 30 base-pair poly(G)-poly(C) DNA molecule with the inclusion of diagonal electron hopping between the sites. In addition, an optimum condition of the contact hopping strength and Fermi energy to obtain the maximum current for the system is demonstrated. Finally, we present the current-voltage characteristics showing a transition from a semiconductor-like to a metal-like DNA molecule with the variation of the Fermi energy.

  20. Aspergillus antigen induces robust Th2 cytokine production, inflammation, airway hyperreactivity and fibrosis in the absence of MCP-1 or CCR2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charo Israel F

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma is characterized by type 2 T-helper cell (Th2 inflammation, goblet cell hyperplasia, airway hyperreactivity, and airway fibrosis. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 or CCL2 and its receptor, CCR2, have been shown to play important roles in the development of Th2 inflammation. CCR2-deficient mice have been found to have altered inflammatory and physiologic responses in some models of experimental allergic asthma, but the role of CCR2 in contributing to inflammation and airway hyperreactivity appears to vary considerably between models. Furthermore, MCP-1-deficient mice have not previously been studied in models of experimental allergic asthma. Methods To test whether MCP-1 and CCR2 are each required for the development of experimental allergic asthma, we applied an Aspergillus antigen-induced model of Th2 cytokine-driven allergic asthma associated with airway fibrosis to mice deficient in either MCP-1 or CCR2. Previous studies with live Aspergillus conidia instilled into the lung revealed that MCP-1 and CCR2 play a role in anti-fungal responses; in contrast, we used a non-viable Aspergillus antigen preparation known to induce a robust eosinophilic inflammatory response. Results We found that wild-type C57BL/6 mice developed eosinophilic airway inflammation, goblet cell hyperplasia, airway hyperreactivity, elevations in serum IgE, and airway fibrosis in response to airway challenge with Aspergillus antigen. Surprisingly, mice deficient in either MCP-1 or CCR2 had responses to Aspergillus antigen similar to those seen in wild-type mice, including production of Th2 cytokines. Conclusion We conclude that robust Th2-mediated lung pathology can occur even in the complete absence of MCP-1 or CCR2.

  1. Vaccination with replication-deficient recombinant adenoviruses encoding the main surface antigens of toxoplasma gondii induces immune response and protection against infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Bráulia C; Bruña-Romero, Oscar; Fux, Blima; Mendes, Erica A; Penido, Marcus L O; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2006-04-01

    We have generated recombinant adenoviruses encoding three genetically modified surface antigens (SAGs) of the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, that is, AdSAG1, AdSAG2, and AdSAG3. Modifications included the removal of their glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring motifs and, in some cases, the exchange of the native signal peptide for influenza virus hemagglutinin signal sequence. Adenovirus immunization of BALB/c mice elicited potent antibody responses against each protein, displaying a significant bias toward a helper T cell type 1 (Th1) profile in animals vaccinated with AdSAG1. Furthermore, the presence of parasite-specific IFN-gamma-producing T cells was analyzed by proliferation assays and enzyme-linked immunospot assays in the same animals. Splenocytes from immunized mice secreted IFN-gamma after in vitro stimulation with tachyzoite lysate antigen or with a fraction enriched for membrane-purified GPI-anchored proteins (F3) from the T. gondii tachyzoite surface. Epitopes recognized by CD8+ T cells were identified in SAG1 and SAG3, but not SAG2, sequences, although this protein also induced a specific response. We also tested the capacity of the immune responses detected to protect mice against a challenge with live T. gondii parasites. Although no protection was observed against tachyzoites of the highly virulent RH strain, a significant reduction in cyst loads in the brain was observed in animals challenged with the P-Br strain. Thus, up to 80% of the cysts were eliminated from animals vaccinated with a mixture of the three recombinant viruses. Because adenoviruses seemed capable of inducing Th1-biased protective immune responses against T. gondii antigens, other parasite antigens should be tested alone or in combination with those described here to further develop a protective vaccine against toxoplasmosis. PMID:16610929

  2. Vaccination with Brucella abortus recombinant in vivo-induced antigens reduces bacterial load and promotes clearance in a mouse model for infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake E Lowry

    Full Text Available Current vaccines used for the prevention of brucellosis are ineffective in inducing protective immunity in animals that are chronically infected with Brucella abortus, such as elk. Using a gene discovery approach, in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT on B. abortus, we previously identified ten loci that encode products up-regulated during infection in elk and consequently may play a role in virulence. In our present study, five of the loci (D15, 0187, VirJ, Mdh, AfuA were selected for further characterization and compared with three additional antigens with virulence potential (Hia, PrpA, MltA. All eight genes were PCR-amplified from B. abortus and cloned into E. coli. The recombinant products were then expressed, purified, adjuvanted, and delivered subcutaneously to BALB/c mice. After primary immunization and two boosts, mice were challenged i.p. with 5 x 10⁴ CFU of B. abortus strain 19. Spleens from challenged animals were harvested and bacterial loads determined by colony count at various time points. While vaccination with four of the eight individual proteins appeared to have some effect on clearance kinetics, mice vaccinated with recombinant Mdh displayed the most significant reduction in bacterial colonization. Furthermore, mice immunized with Mdh maintained higher levels of IFN-γ in spleens compared to other treatment groups. Collectively, our in vivo data gathered from the S19 murine colonization model suggest that vaccination with at least three of the IVIAT antigens conferred an enhanced ability of the host to respond to infection, reinforcing the utility of this methodology for the identification of potential vaccine candidates against brucellosis. Mechanisms for immunity to one protein, Mdh, require further in vitro exploration and evaluation against wild-type B. abortus challenge in mice, as well as other hosts. Additional studies are being undertaken to clarify the role of Mdh and other IVI antigens in B. abortus virulence

  3. Vaccination with Brucella abortus recombinant in vivo-induced antigens reduces bacterial load and promotes clearance in a mouse model for infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Jake E; Isaak, Dale D; Leonhardt, Jack A; Vernati, Giulia; Pate, Jessie C; Andrews, Gerard P

    2011-01-01

    Current vaccines used for the prevention of brucellosis are ineffective in inducing protective immunity in animals that are chronically infected with Brucella abortus, such as elk. Using a gene discovery approach, in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT) on B. abortus, we previously identified ten loci that encode products up-regulated during infection in elk and consequently may play a role in virulence. In our present study, five of the loci (D15, 0187, VirJ, Mdh, AfuA) were selected for further characterization and compared with three additional antigens with virulence potential (Hia, PrpA, MltA). All eight genes were PCR-amplified from B. abortus and cloned into E. coli. The recombinant products were then expressed, purified, adjuvanted, and delivered subcutaneously to BALB/c mice. After primary immunization and two boosts, mice were challenged i.p. with 5 x 10⁴ CFU of B. abortus strain 19. Spleens from challenged animals were harvested and bacterial loads determined by colony count at various time points. While vaccination with four of the eight individual proteins appeared to have some effect on clearance kinetics, mice vaccinated with recombinant Mdh displayed the most significant reduction in bacterial colonization. Furthermore, mice immunized with Mdh maintained higher levels of IFN-γ in spleens compared to other treatment groups. Collectively, our in vivo data gathered from the S19 murine colonization model suggest that vaccination with at least three of the IVIAT antigens conferred an enhanced ability of the host to respond to infection, reinforcing the utility of this methodology for the identification of potential vaccine candidates against brucellosis. Mechanisms for immunity to one protein, Mdh, require further in vitro exploration and evaluation against wild-type B. abortus challenge in mice, as well as other hosts. Additional studies are being undertaken to clarify the role of Mdh and other IVI antigens in B. abortus virulence and induction of

  4. Post-embedding Mammalian Tissue for Immunoelectron Microscopy: A Standardized Procedure Based on Heat-Induced Antigen Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    We describe a standardized method of fixation, antigen retrieval, and image contrasting for post-embedding immunoelectron microscopy. Tissues are fixed with formaldehyde solutions containing Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions at pH 7.4 and then at pH 8.5. After dehydration with dimethylformamide, the specimens are embedded in LR-White resin. For antigen retrieval, ultrathin sections are heated in 0.5 M Tris-HCl, pH 9.0, for 1-2 h at 95 °C. After immunogold labeling, the sections are treated with a mixture of tannic acid and glutaraldehyde, with OsO4 solution, and then double-stained with uranyl acetate and lead citrate. The standardized method yields strong and reproducible immunoreactions for many antigens showing excellent image contrast without destruction of fine structures. PMID:27515088

  5. Complement-dependent cytotoxicity of antibodies reactive with HIV-induced cell surface antigens in HIV-carrying haemophiliacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sera obtained from HIV positive and from uninfected hemophiliacs and from healthy subjects were investigated for the presence of lymphocytotoxic antibodies. Using the 51Cr-release test, HIV-positive hemophiliacs were found to produce serum antibodies exerting a complement-dependent cytotoxic effect on HIV-infected T4 cells. The antibodies were reactive mainly when HIV-infected target cells were stimulated with concanavalin A. The results of complement-dependent antibody cytotoxicity and indirect membrane immunofluorescence tests suggest that envelope antigen(s) of HIV may be the target(s) for cytotoxic antibodies. (author)

  6. Human cytomegalovirus pp65- and immediate early 1 antigen-specific HLA class I-restricted cytotoxic T cell responses induced by cross-presentation of viral antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabi, Z; Moutaftsi, M; Borysiewicz, L K

    2001-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in the development of anti-viral CD8(+) CTL responses. This is straightforward if they are directly infected with virus, but is less clear in response to viruses that cannot productively infect DCS: Human CMV (HCMV) shows strain-specific cell tropism: fibroblast (Fb)-adapted laboratory strains (AD169) and recent clinical isolates do not infect DCs, whereas endothelial cell-adapted strains (TB40/E) result in productive lytic DC infection. However, we show here that uninfected DCs induce CD8(+) T cell cytotoxicity and IFN-gamma production against HCMV pp65 and immediate early 1 Ags following in vitro coculture with HCMV-AD169-infected Fbs, regardless of the HLA type of these FBS: CD8(+) T cell stimulation was inhibited by pretreatment of DCs with cytochalasin B or brefeldin A, indicating a phagosome/endosome to cytosol pathway. HCMV-infected Fbs were not apoptotic as measured by annexin V binding, and induction of apoptosis of infected Fbs in vitro did not augment CTL induction by DCs, suggesting a mechanism other than apoptosis in the initiation of cross-presentation. Furthermore, HCMV-infected Fbs provided a maturation signal for immature DCs during coculture, as evidenced by increased CD83 and HLA class II expression. Cross-presentation of HCMV Ags by host DCs enables these professional APCs to bypass some of the evasion mechanisms HCMV has developed to avoid T cell recognition. It may also serve to explain the presence of immediate early 1 Ag-specific CTLs in the face of pp65-induced inhibition of Ag presentation at the level of the infected cell. PMID:11313411

  7. Surface-induced vibrational transition of metastable nitrogen molecules passing through a nano-slit grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boustimi, M.; Baudon, J.; Pirani, F.; Ducloy, M.; Reinhardt, J.; Perales, F.; Mainos, C.; Bocvarski, V.; Robert, J.

    2001-12-01

    Metastable nitrogen molecules N2* (A 3Σu+) passing through a Si3N4 nano-slit grating (slit width: 50 nm) experience elastic and various inelastic processes, due to diagonal and off-diagonal interactions with the solid surface at short and intermediate distances (10-100a0), i.e. mainly interactions of the van der Waals (vW) type. These processes are observed by use of a velocity selected beam and a time-of-flight analysis combined with angular measurements of scattered metastable molecules. The main feature is the occurrence of an inelastic exothermal process identified, by both its kinetic energy gain and angular dependence, as being a vibrational transition with Δv = - 1. A semi-classical model using a calculated (vW) dispersion energy depending on the orientation of the molecule and the vibrational coordinate is proposed.

  8. Inflammation induced by Bothrops asper venom: release of proinflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids, and role of adhesion molecules in leukocyte infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamuner, Stella Regina; Zuliani, Juliana Pavan; Fernandes, Cristina Maria; Gutiérrez, José Maria; de Fátima Pereira Teixeira, Catarina

    2005-12-01

    Bothrops asper venom (BaV) causes systemic and local effects characterized by an acute inflammatory reaction with accumulation of leukocytes and release of endogenous mediators. In this study, the effects of BaV on the release of the cytokines IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-alpha and the eicosanoids LTB4 and TXA2 in the peritoneal cavity of mice were analyzed. We also investigated the participation of beta2 integrin chain, l-selectin, LFA-1, ICAM-1 and PECAM-1 adhesion molecules in the BaV-induced leukocyte accumulation. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-alpha, as well as eicosanoids LTB4 and TXA2 were significantly increased after BaV injection (250 microg/kg), whereas no increment in IL-1 was observed. Anti-mouse l-selectin, LFA-1, ICAM-1, PECAM-1 and beta2 integrin chain monoclonal antibodies resulted in a reduction of neutrophil accumulation induced by BaV injection compared with isotype-matched control injected animals. These data suggest that BaV is able to induce the activation of leukocytes and endothelium to express adhesion molecules involved in the recruitment of neutrophils into the inflammed site. Furthermore, these results showed that BaV induces the release of cytokines and eicosanoids in the local of the venom injection; these inflammatory mediators may be important for the initiation and amplification of the inflammatory reaction characteristic from Bothrops sp envenomation. PMID:16198389

  9. Study of the fragmentation of astrophysical interest molecules (CnHm) induced by high velocity collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work shows the study of atom-molecule collision processes in the high velocity domain (v=4,5 a.u). The molecules concerned by this work are small unsaturated hydrocarbons C1-4H and C3H2. Molecules are accelerated with the Tandem accelerator in Orsay and their fragmentation is analyzed by the 4π, 100% efficient detector, AGAT. Thanks to a shape analysis of the current signal from the silicon detectors in association with the well known grid method, we are able to measure all the fragmentation channels of the incident molecule. These dissociation measurements have been introduced in the modelization of two objects of the interstellar medium in which a lot of hydrocarbon molecules have been observed (TMC1, horse-head nebula). We have extended our branching ratios obtained by high velocity collision to other electronic processes included in the chemical database like photodissociation and dissociative recombination. This procedure is feasible under an assumption of the statistical point of view of the molecular fragmentation. The deviations following our modification are very small in the modelization of TMC1 but significant in the photodissociation region. The first part is dedicated to the description of the experimental setting that has enabled us to study the fragmentation of CnHm molecules: the Orsay's Tandem accelerator and the Agat detector. The second part deals with negative ion sources and particularly with the Sahat source that is based on electronic impact and has shown good features for the production of anions and correct stability for its use with accelerators. The third part is dedicated to the experimental results in terms of cross-sections, number of fragments and branching ratios, associated to the various collisional processes. The last part presents an application of our measurement of fragmentation data to astro-chemistry. In this field, the simulation codes of the inter-stellar medium require databases of chemical reactions that depend on

  10. Challenge with innate and protein antigens induces CCR7 expression by microglia in vitro and in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, I. M.; de Haas, A. H.; Brouwer, N.; Boddeke, H. W. G. M.; Biber, K.

    2006-01-01

    Since activated microglia are able to phagocytose damaged cells and subsequently express major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) and co-stimulatory proteins, they are considered to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the central nervous system. The maturation and migratory pote

  11. Tumor-associated antigens identified by mRNA expression profiling induce protective anti-tumor immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiassen, Søren; Lauemøller, S L; Ruhwald, Morten;

    2001-01-01

    to identify TAA, mice were immunized with mixtures of peptides representing putative cytotoxic T cell epitopes derived from one of the gene products. Indeed, such immunized mice were partially protected against subsequent tumor challenge. Despite being immunized with bona fide self antigens, no...

  12. Effects of dexamethasone on human natural killer cell cytotoxicity, interferon production, and interleukin-2 receptor expression induced by microbial antigens.

    OpenAIRE

    E. Piccolella; Lombardi, G.; Vismara, D; Del Gallo, F; Colizzi, V; Dolei, A; Dianzani, F

    1986-01-01

    Dexamethasone inhibits the expression of the interleukin-2 receptor, the synthesis of immune interferon, and the development of natural killer cells when added to peripheral blood mononuclear cells cultured with soluble microbial antigens (purified protein derivative and a polysaccharide extract from Candida albicans [MPPS]) or human recombinant interleukin-2.

  13. Longitudinal photoelectron momentum shifts induced by absorbing a single XUV photon in diatomic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Di; He, Pei-Lun; He, Feng

    2016-06-01

    The photoelectron momentum shifts along the laser propagation are investigated by the time-dependent perturbation theory for diatomic molecules, such as H2+ , N2, and O2. Such longitudinal momentum shifts characterize the photon momentum sharing in atoms and molecules, and oscillate with respect to photon energies, presenting the double-slit interference structure. The atomic and molecular contributions are disentangled analytically, which gives an intuitive picture of how the double-slit interference structure is formed. Calculation results show that the longitudinal photoelectron momentum distribution depends on the internuclear distance, molecular orientation, and photon energy. The current laser technology is ready to verify these theoretical predictions.

  14. Longitudinal photoelectron momentum shifts induced by absorbing a single XUV photon in diatomic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Lao, Di; He, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The photoelectron momentum shifts along the laser propagation are investigated by the time-dependent perturbation theory for diatomic molecules, such as H$_2^+$, N$_2$ and O$_2$. Such longitudinal momentum shifts characterize the photon momentum sharing in atoms and molecules, and oscillate with respect to photon energies, presenting the double-slit interference structure. The atomic and molecular contributions are disentangled analytically, which gives intuitive picture how the double-slit interference structure is formed. Calculation results show the longitudinal photoelectron momentum distribution depends on the internuclear distance, molecular orientation and photon energy. The current laser technology is ready to approve these theoretical predictions.

  15. Enhanced and durable protective immune responses induced by a cocktail of recombinant BCG strains expressing antigens of multistage of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jinping; Teng, Xindong; Yuan, Xuefeng; Zhang, Ying; Shi, Chunwei; Yue, Tingting; Zhou, Lei; Li, Jianrong; Fan, Xionglin

    2015-08-01

    Although Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine confers protection from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in children, its immune protection gradually wanes over time, and consequently leads to an inability to prevent the reactivation of latent infection of M. tuberculosis. Therefore, improving BCG for better control of tuberculosis (TB) is urgently needed. We thus hypothesized that recombinant BCG overexpressing immunodominant antigens expressed at different growth stages of M. tuberculosis could provide a more comprehensive protection against primary and latent M. tuberculosis infection. Here, a novel cocktail of recombinant BCG (rBCG) strains, namely ABX, was produced by combining rBCG::85A, rBCG::85B, and rBCG::X, which overexpressed respective multistage antigens Ag85A, Ag85B, and HspX of M. tuberculosis. Our results showed that ABX was able to induce a stronger immune protection than individual rBCGs or BCG against primary TB infection in C57BL/6 mice. Mechanistically, the immune protection was attributed to stronger antigen-specific CD4(+) Th1 responses, higher numbers of IFN-γ(+) CD4(+) TEM and IL-2(+) CD8(+) TCM cells elicited by ABX. These findings thus provide a novel strategy for the improvement of BCG efficacy and potentially a promising prophylactic TB vaccine candidate, warranting further investigation. PMID:25974877

  16. Isolation of vascular smooth muscle antigen-reactive CD4(+)αβTh1 clones that induce pulmonary vasculitis in MRL/Mp-Fas(+/+) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yoshimasa; Fujii, Takao; Shimizu, Hironori; Sato, Tomomi; Nakamura, Takuji; Iwao, Haruka; Nakajima, Akio; Miki, Miyuki; Sakai, Tomoyuki; Kawanami, Takafumi; Tanaka, Masao; Masaki, Yasufumi; Fukushima, Toshihiro; Okazaki, Toshiro; Umehara, Hisanori; Mimori, Tsuneyo

    2016-05-01

    Here, we established CD4(+)αβTh1 clones specific for rat vascular smooth muscle antigen (VSMAg) that induced vasculitis lesions in the lungs of MRL/Mp-Fas(+/+) mice following adoptive transfer. Six different T cell clones, MV1b1 (Vβ1), MV1b4 (Vβ4), MV1b8.3 (Vβ8.3), MV1b61 (Vβ6), MV1b62 (Vβ6), and MV1b63 (Vβ6), were isolated from the MV1 T cell line from the regional lymph nodes of immunized MRL/Mp-Fas(+/+) mice; the three (Vβ6) clones had unique CDR3 amino acid sequences. Following stimulation with VSMAg-pulsed antigen presenting cells, MV1b61 and MV1b62 failed to secrete interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α, although the other four clones secreted high levels of both cytokines. In adoptive transfer experiments, MV1b61 and MV1b62 did not induce organ involvement including pulmonary vasculitis. In contrast, MV1b1, MV1b4, MV1b8.3, and MV1b63 induced perivascular mononuclear cell infiltration in pulmonary small arteries. These clones may provide useful tools for investigating the underlying mechanisms of vasculitis syndromes and for developing therapeutic strategies. PMID:27019130

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis MmsA, a novel immunostimulatory antigen, induces dendritic cell activation and promotes Th1 cell-type immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Seok; Kim, Woo Sik; Choi, Hong-Hee; Kim, Hong Min; Kwon, Kee Woong; Han, Seung Jung; Cha, Seung Bin; Cho, Sang-Nae; Koh, Won-Jung; Shin, Sung Jae

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis, is an outstanding pathogen that modulates the host immune response. This inconvenient truth drives the continual identification of antigens that generate protective immunity, including Th1-type T cell immunity. Here, the contribution of methylmalonate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (MmsA, Rv0753c) of Mtb to immune responses was examined in the context of dendritic cell (DC) activation and T cell immunity both in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that MmsA induced DC activation by activating the MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways. Additionally, MmsA-treated DCs activated naïve T cells, effectively polarized CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells to secrete IFN-γ and IL-2, and induced T cell proliferation. These results indicate that MmsA is a novel DC maturation-inducing antigen that drives the Th1 immune response. Thus, MmsA was found to potentially regulate immune responses via DC activation toward Th1-type T cell immunity, enhancing our understanding of Mtb pathogenesis. PMID:26507911

  18. PARM-1 is an endoplasmic reticulum molecule involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis in rat cardiac myocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Isodono

    Full Text Available To identify novel transmembrane and secretory molecules expressed in cardiac myocytes, signal sequence trap screening was performed in rat neonatal cardiac myocytes. One of the molecules identified was a transmembrane protein, prostatic androgen repressed message-1 (PARM-1. While PARM-1 has been identified as a gene induced in prostate in response to castration, its function is largely unknown. Our expression analysis revealed that PARM-1 was specifically expressed in hearts and skeletal muscles, and in the heart, cardiac myocytes, but not non-myocytes expressed PARM-1. Immunofluorescent staining showed that PARM-1 was predominantly localized in endoplasmic reticulum (ER. In Dahl salt-sensitive rats, high-salt diet resulted in hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and subsequent heart failure, and significantly stimulated PARM-1 expression in the hearts, with a concomitant increase in ER stress markers such as GRP78 and CHOP. In cultured cardiac myocytes, PARM-1 expression was stimulated by proinflammatory cytokines, but not by hypertrophic stimuli. A marked increase in PARM-1 expression was observed in response to ER stress inducers such as thapsigargin and tunicamycin, which also induced apoptotic cell death. Silencing PARM-1 expression by siRNAs enhanced apoptotic response in cardiac myocytes to ER stresses. PARM-1 silencing also repressed expression of PERK and ATF6, and augmented expression of CHOP without affecting IRE-1 expression and JNK and Caspase-12 activation. Thus, PARM-1 expression is induced by ER stress, which plays a protective role in cardiac myocytes through regulating PERK, ATF6 and CHOP expression. These results suggested that PARM-1 is a novel ER transmembrane molecule involved in cardiac remodeling in hypertensive heart disease.

  19. Dharmendra antigen but not integral M. leprae is an efficient inducer of immunostimulant cytokine production by human monocytes, and M. leprae lipids inhibit the cytokine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, C; Fukutomi, Y; Kashiwabara, Y; Oomoto, Y; Kojima, M; Hayashi, H; Onozaki, K

    1997-03-01

    Killed integral Mycobacterium leprae, Mitsuda antigen, and chloroform-treated M. leprae, Dharmendra antigen (Dh-Ag), have been used for the classification of leprosy patients based on cell-mediated immunity. Heat-killed M. leprae also were used as a component of the Convit vaccine. Human blood monocytes were stimulated with M. leprae or Dh-Ag and their cytokine-inducing ability was compared. Monocytes were cultured in the presence of fresh human serum because of the efficiency of cytokine induction and the phagocytosis of M. leprae have been shown to be optimal in the presence of fresh serum. M. leprae and Dh-Ag were equally phagocytosed by monocytes. Dh-Ag was more potent than M. leprae in the induction of immunostimulatory/proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF). In contrast, a comparable level of IL-1ra, an immunosuppressive cytokine, was induced by M. leprae and Dh-Ag. The lipids extracted from M. leprae induced none of these cytokines by monocytes. Nevertheless, when monocytes were pretreated with the lipids followed by stimulation with Dh-Ag, productions of IL-1, IL-6 and TNF were all inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. However, the lipids did not inhibit the cytokine production induced by other stimuli including BCG and lipopolysaccharide. Moreover the lipids did not affect the production of IL-1ra. These results suggest that the lipids from M. leprae are responsible for the poor cytokine-inducing ability of M. leprae, thus favoring their infection. These results also suggest that Dh-Ag rather than integral M. leprae may be useful as a vaccine candidate because Dh-Ag is able to induce a large amount of cytokines from monocytes. PMID:9207755

  20. Single molecule manipulation at low temperature and laser scanning tunnelling photo-induced processes analysis through time-resolved studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes, firstly, the statistical analysis used to determine the processes that occur during the manipulation of a single molecule through electronically induced excitations with a low temperature (5 K) scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). Various molecular operation examples are described and the ability to probe the ensuing molecular manipulation dynamics is discussed within the excitation context. It is, in particular, shown that such studies can reveal reversible manipulation for tuning dynamics through variation of the excitation energy. Secondly, the photo-induced process arising from the irradiation of the STM junction is also studied through feedback loop dynamics analysis, allowing us to distinguish between photo-thermally and photo-electronically induced signals.

  1. Immune Responses Induced by Gene Gun or Intramuscular Injection of DNA Vaccines That Express Immunogenic Regions of the Serine Repeat Antigen from Plasmodium falciparum

    OpenAIRE

    Belperron, Alexia A.; Feltquate, David; Fox, Barbara A.; Horii, Toshihiro; Bzik, David J.

    1999-01-01

    The liver- and blood-stage-expressed serine repeat antigen (SERA) of Plasmodium falciparum is a candidate protein for a human malaria vaccine. We compared the immune responses induced in mice immunized with SERA-expressing plasmid DNA vaccines delivered by intramuscular (i.m.) injection or delivered intradermally by Gene Gun immunization. Mice were immunized with a pcdna3 plasmid encoding the entire 47-kDa domain of SERA (amino acids 17 to 382) or the N-terminal domain (amino acids 17 to 110)...

  2. Radically altered T cell receptor signaling in glycopeptide-specific T cell hybridoma induced by antigen with minimal differences in the glycan group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T; Nielsen, M; Gad, Monika;

    2001-01-01

    A T cell hybridoma raised against the synthetic glycopeptide T(72)(Tn) was used to study whether the initial TCR signaling events are markedly different when the hybridoma is stimulated with glycopeptides closely related to the cognate glycopeptide antigen. T(72)(Tn) has an alpha-D-GalNAc group O......-linked to the central threonine in the decapeptide VITAFTEGLK, and the hybridoma is known to be highly specific for this carbohydrate group. T(72)(Tn)-pulsed APC induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the TCR-zeta 21- and 23-kDa proteins and the downstream p42/44 MAP kinase and strong IL-2 secretion. APC...

  3. Ultrasensitive detection of single molecules in flowing sample streams by laser-induced fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report here on the detection and fluorescence lifetime measurement of single Rhodamine-110 molecules in a flowing, aqueous sample stream. Time-Correlated Photon Counting (TCPC) used in combination with pulsed excitation allows for the detection, in the presence of significant prompt Raman and Rayleigh background, of photon bursts due to single fluorescent molecules passing through a small detection volume (∼ 1 pL). The fluorescence lifetime of a detected molecule is estimated from the decay curve compiled from photon arrival times in the burst. An improved SMD apparatus which allows the detection and fluorescent lifetime measurement of individual Rhodamine-110 molecules dissolved in an aqueous sample stream. These measurements are made at a flow rate doser to those that are envisioned for rapid DNA sequencing. We present burst size distributions derived from burst data collected at Rhodamine-110 concentrations of 100 fM and 1 pM and discuss the mechanisms that lead to the observed distributions. We also present Monte Carlo generated synthetic data that supports our interpretation of the experimental results

  4. The role of oxygen-induced processes on the emission characteristics of single molecule emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nothaft, Maximilian; Wrachtrup, Joerg [3rd Physics Institute and Research Center SCoPE, University of Stuttgart (Germany); Hoehla, Steffen [Institute for Large Area Microelectronics and Research Center SCoPE, University of Stuttgart (Germany); Jelezko, Fedor [Institute for Quantum Optics, University of Ulm (Germany); Pflaum, Jens [Experimental Physics VI, University of Wuerzburg and ZAE Bayern, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2012-04-15

    Single molecule studies are limited to a defined class of organic dye molecules inserted into respective host materials. Basic requirements for suited material combinations include high photon emission rates and long term photostability. A majority of known aromatic host-guest systems employ crystalline organic matrices to prevent dye molecules from uncontrolled reactions with contaminants. However, in terms of device fabrication and technological potentials it is often desirable to use polymers as room temperature host matrices. Unfortunately, single dye molecule investigations in polymers at room temperature usually report orders of magnitude lower photostabilities compared to their crystalline molecular counterparts, leading to a reduced interest in organic thin film applications. In this report, we exemplary demonstrate the feasibility of engineering a host-guest system based on dibenzoterrylene dye molecules which were diluted into the polymer poly-(p-phenylene-vinylene) (PPV) possessing very low photobleaching probabilities at room temperature. By controlling the oxygen exposure during manufacturing the number of emitted photons prior to photobleaching was significantly increased from 10{sup 6} up to 10{sup 11} photons. Employing suited encapsulation techniques to prevent oxygen penetration after host-guest preparation, photostable devices over prolonged time periods on the order of months to years could be achieved. Therefore, this approach grants access to a variety of new polymer based combinations of host-guest systems for studying single molecular quantum emitters inside organic electronic devices and nanostructured polymer films with sufficient count rates and long-term stability at room temperature. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Reversing hypoxic cell chemoresistance in vitro using genetic and small molecule approaches targeting hypoxia inducible factor-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Louisa M; Cowen, Rachel L; Debray, Camille;

    2006-01-01

    The resistance of hypoxic cells to conventional chemotherapy is well documented. Using both adenovirus-mediated gene delivery and small molecules targeting hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), we evaluated the impact of HIF-1 inhibition on the sensitivity of hypoxic tumor cells to etoposide. The...... genetic therapy exploited a truncated HIF-1alpha protein that acts as a dominant-negative HIF-1alpha (HIF-1alpha-no-TAD). Its functionality was validated in six human tumor cell lines using HIF-1 reporter assays. An EGFP-fused protein demonstrated that the dominant-negative HIF-1alpha was nucleus......-localized and constitutively expressed irrespective of oxygen tension. The small molecules studied were quinocarmycin monocitrate (KW2152), its analog 7-cyanoquinocarcinol (DX-52-1), and topotecan. DX-52-1 and topotecan have been previously established as HIF-1 inhibitors. HT1080 and HCT116 cells were treated...

  6. Helminth Excreted/Secreted Antigens Repress Expression of LPS-Induced Let-7i but Not miR-146a and miR-155 in Human Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Terrazas, Luis I.; Fausto Sánchez-Muñoz; Magaly Pérez-Miranda; Mejía-Domínguez, Ana M.; Yadira Ledesma-Soto; Rafael Bojalil; Lorena Gómez-García

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs have emerged as key regulators of immune responses. They influence immune cells' function and probably the outcome of several infections. Currently, it is largely unknown if helminth parasites and their antigens modify host microRNAs expression. The aim of this study was to explore if excreted/secreted antigens of Taenia crassiceps regulate LPS-induced miRNAs expression in human Dendritic Cells. We found that these antigens repressed LPS-let-7i induction but not mir-146a or mir-155 ...

  7. Probing Electron-Induced Bond Cleavage at the Single-Molecule Level Using DNA Origami Templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Adrian Clemens; Bald, Ilko; Rotaru, Alexandru;

    2012-01-01

    nucleobases. Here we present a strategy that allows for the first time to visualize the electron-induced dissociation of single chemical bonds within complex, but well-defined self-assembled DNA nanostructures. We employ atomic force microscopy to image and quantify LEE-induced bond dissociations within...... chromatin, now becomes feasible....

  8. Interaction-Induced Chiral Quantum States of the Ultracold Polar Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ming-Hao; LIANG Jiu-Qing; MA Jie; CHEN Gang; JIA Suo-Tang

    2012-01-01

    The ultracold polar molecules with the tunable dipole-dipole interaction, not only would enable explorations of a large class of exotic many-body physics phenomena, but also could be used for quantum information processing. In the present paper we demonstrate that this dipole-dipole interaction can generate the degenerate chiral quantum states acting as a qubit robust against noise when the ultracold polar molecules are confined by a triangular lattice. Moreover, we also find two first-order quantum phase transitions by controlling an external driving t~eld. One is the transition with the change of the different degenerate chiral quantum states. The other is the transition with the breaking of the degenerate quantum chirAL states to the nondegenerate state. In experiment, these first-order quantum phase transitions can be detected by measuring the collective molecular population.

  9. Above-Threshold Ionization and Laser-Induced Electron Diffraction in Diatomic Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Suárez, N; Ciappina, M F; Wolter, B; Biegert, J; Lewenstein, M

    2016-01-01

    Strong field photoemission and electron recollision provide a viable route to extract electronic and nuclear dynamics from molecular targets with attosecond temporal resolution. However, since an {\\em ab-initio} treatment of even the simplest diatomic systems is beyond today's capabilities approximate qualitative descriptions are warranted. In this paper, we develop such a theoretical approach to model the photoelectrons resulting from intense laser-molecule interaction. We present a general theory for symmetric diatomic molecules in the single active electron approximation that, amongst other capabilities, allows adjusting both the internuclear separation and molecular potential in a direct and simple way. More importantly we derive an analytic approximate solution of the time dependent Schr\\"odinger equation (TDSE), based on a generalized strong field approximation (SFA) version. Using that approach we obtain expressions for electrons emitted transition amplitudes from two different molecular centres, and a...

  10. HTLV-1 bZIP Factor Impairs Anti-viral Immunity by Inducing Co-inhibitory Molecule, T Cell Immunoglobulin and ITIM Domain (TIGIT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Yasuma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 infects CD4+ T cells and induces proliferation of infected cells in vivo, which leads to the onset of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL in some infected individuals. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ gene, which is encoded in the minus strand of HTLV-1, plays critical roles in pathogenesis. In this study, RNA-seq and ChIP-seq analyses using HBZ transduced T cells revealed that HBZ upregulates the expression and promoter acetylation levels of a co-inhibitory molecule, T cell immunoglobulin and ITIM domain (TIGIT, in addition to those of regulatory T cells related genes, Foxp3 and Ccr4. TIGIT was expressed on CD4+ T cells from HBZ-transgenic (HBZ-Tg mice, and on ATL cells and HTLV-1 infected CD4+ T cells of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP in vivo. Expression of Blimp1 and IL-10 was upregulated in TIGIT+CD4+ cells of HBZ-Tg mice compared with TIGIT-CD4+ T cells, suggesting the correlation between TIGIT expression and IL-10 production. When CD4+ T cells from HBZ-Tg mice were stimulated with TIGIT's ligand, CD155, their production of the inhibitory cytokine IL-10 was enhanced. Furthermore, dendritic cells from HBZ-Tg mice produced high levels of IL-10 after stimulation. These data suggest that HBZ alters immune system to suppressive state via TIGIT and IL-10. Importantly, TIGIT suppressed T-cell responses to another HTLV-1 virus protein, Tax, in vitro. Blocking of TIGIT and PD-1 slightly increased anti-Tax T-cell activity in some HAM/TSP patients. These results suggest that HBZ-induced TIGIT on HTLV-1 infected cells impairs T-cell responses to viral antigens. This study shows that HBZ-induced TIGIT plays a pivotal role in attenuating host immune responses and shaping a microenvironment favorable to HTLV-1.

  11. Prophylaxis and Therapy of Inhalational Anthrax by a Novel Monoclonal Antibody to Protective Antigen That Mimics Vaccine-Induced Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Vitale, Laura; Blanset, Diann; Lowy, Israel; O'Neill, Thomas; Goldstein, Joel; Little, Stephen F.; Andrews, Gerard P.; Dorough, Gary; Taylor, Ronald K.; Keler, Tibor

    2006-01-01

    The neutralizing antibody response to the protective antigen (PA) component of anthrax toxin elicited by approved anthrax vaccines is an accepted correlate for vaccine-mediated protection against anthrax. We reasoned that a human anti-PA monoclonal antibody (MAb) selected on the basis of superior toxin neutralization activity might provide potent protection against anthrax. The fully human MAb (also referred to as MDX-1303 or Valortim) was chosen from a large panel of anti-PA human MAbs gener...

  12. Bacterial Antigen Expression Is an Important Component in Inducing an Immune Response to Orally Administered Salmonella-Delivered DNA Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Gahan, Michelle E.; Webster, Diane E.; Wesselingh, Steven L.; Richard A. Strugnell; Yang, Ji

    2009-01-01

    Background The use of Salmonella to deliver heterologous antigens from DNA vaccines is a well-accepted extension of the success of oral Salmonella vaccines in animal models. Attenuated S. typhimurium and S. typhi strains are safe and efficacious, and their use to deliver DNA vaccines combines the advantages of both vaccine approaches, while complementing the limitations of each technology. An important aspect of the basic biology of the Salmonella/DNA vaccine platform is the relative contribu...

  13. Electric field induced charge transfer through single and double-stranded DNA polymer molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, Marta M. D.; Correia, Helena M. G.

    2011-01-01

    The charge transfer through single-stranded and double-stranded DNA polymer molecules has been the subject of numerous experimental and theoretical studies concerning their applications in molecular electronics. However, the underlying mechanisms responsible for their different electrical conductivity observed in the experiments are poorly understood. Here we use a self-consistent quantum molecular dynamics method to study the effect of an applied electric field along the molecular axis on ch...

  14. Molecule Induced Strong Exchange Coupling between Ferromagnetic Electrodes of a Magnetic Tunnel Junction

    OpenAIRE

    Tyagi, Pawan

    2011-01-01

    Multilayer edge molecular spintronics device (MEMSD) approach can produce novel logic and memory units for the computers. MEMSD are produced by bridging the molecular channels across the insulator, in the exposed edge region(s) of a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ). The bridged molecular channels start serving as the dominant exchange coupling medium between the two ferromagnetic electrodes of a MTJ. Present study focus on the effect of molecule enhanced exchange coupling on the magnetic proper...

  15. Two-photon Induced Hot Electron Transfer to a Single Molecule in a Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Shiwei; Ho, Wilson

    2010-01-01

    The junction of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) operating in the tunneling regime was irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses. A photo-excited hot electron in the STM tip resonantly tunnels into an excited state of a single molecule on the surface, converting it from the neutral to the anion. The electron transfer rate depends quadratically on the incident laser power, suggesting a two-photon excitation process. This nonlinear optical process is further confirmed by the polarization me...

  16. Inelastic transitions of atoms and molecules induced by van der Waals interaction with a surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudon, J.; Hamamda, M.; Boustimi, M.; Bocvarski, V.; Taillandier-Loize, T.; Dutier, G.; Perales, F.; Ducloy, M.

    2012-05-01

    Inelastic processes occuring in thermal-velocity metastable atoms and molecules passing at a mean distance (1-100 nm) are investigated. These processes are caused by the quadrupolar part of the van der Waals interaction: fine-structure transitions in atoms (Ar∗, Kr∗), rovibrational transitions in N2∗(3Σu+), transitions among magnetic sub-levels in the presence of a magnetic field.

  17. Constitutive and stimulus-induced phosphorylation of CD11/CD18 leukocyte adhesion molecules

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    The leukocyte CD11/CD18 adhesion molecules (beta 2 integrins) are a family of three heterodimeric glycoproteins each with a distinct alpha subunit (CD11a, b, or c) and a common beta subunit (CD18). CD11/CD18 mediate crucial leukocyte adhesion functions such as chemotaxis, phagocytosis, adhesion to endothelium, aggregation, and cell-mediated cytotoxicity. The enhanced cell adhesion observed upon activation of leukocytes is associated with increased surface membrane expression of CD11/CD18, as ...

  18. Water-inducing molecular self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules into nanofibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: TPDP nanofibers with smooth surfaces can be obtained by reprecipitation method using ethanol as good solvent and water as poor solvent. In the self-assembly process, during the water adding to the amphiphilic molecules’ saturated solution, the amphiphilic molecules firstly assembled into needle-like small rods. With an increase in the self-assembled time, a large number of the nanofibers are produced. The assembly behavior was revealed in the course of direct in situ monitoring of its growth with optical microscopy. Highlights: ► 2,3,6,7-Tetramethoxy-9,10-di(4-pyridyl)-9,10-dihydroanthracen (TPDP) was synthesized. ► TPDP nanofibers can be obtained by reprecipitation method. ► The assembly behavior was revealed in situ monitoring with optical microscopy. -- Abstract: We present investigations on the microcosmic self-assembly process of new synthesized amphiphilic TPDP molecules. It can be seen that pure TPDP nanofibers with smooth surfaces can be obtained by reprecipitation method using ethanol as good solvent and water as poor solvent. In the self-assembly process, during the water adding to the amphiphilic molecules’ saturated solution, the amphiphilic molecules firstly assembled into needle-like small rods. With an increase in the self-assembled time, a large number of the nanofibers are produced. The assembly behavior was revealed in the course of direct in situ monitoring of its growth with optical microscopy. Field emission scanning electron microscopy was adopted to characterize the morphologies of the products.

  19. Polarization induced water molecule dissociation below the first-order electronic-phase transition temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Arulsamy, Andrew Das; Elersic, Kristina; Modic, Martina; Subramani, Uma Shankar

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen produced from the photocatalytic splitting of water is one of the reliable alternatives to replace the polluting fossil and the radioactive nuclear fuels. Here, we provide unequivocal evidence for the existence of blue- and red-shifting O$-$H covalent bonds within a single water molecule adsorbed on MgO surface as a result of asymmetric displacement polarizabilities. The adsorbed H-O-H on MgO gives rise to one weaker H-O bond, while the other O-H covalent bond from the same adsorbed water molecule compensates this effect with a stronger bond. The weaker bond (nearest to the surface), the interlayer tunneling electrons and the silver substrate are shown to be the causes for the smallest dissociative activation energy on MgO monolayer. The origin that is responsible to initiate the splitting mechanism is proven to be due to the changes in the polarizability of an adsorbed water molecule, which are further supported by the temperature-dependent static dielectric constant measurements for water below the...

  20. Magnetic transitions induced by tunneling electrons in individual adsorbed M-phthalocyanine molecules (M=Fe and Co)

    OpenAIRE

    Gauyacq, J. P.; Novaes, Frederico D; Lorente, N.

    2010-01-01

    We report on a theoretical study of magnetic transitions induced by tunnelling electrons in individual adsorbed M-Phthalocyanine (M-Pc) molecules where M is a metal atom: Fe-Pc on a Cu(110)(2$\\times$1)-O surface and Co-Pc layers on Pb(111) islands. The magnetic transitions correspond to the change of orientation of the spin angular momentum of the metal ion with respect to the surroundings and possibly an applied magnetic field. The adsorbed Fe-Pc system is studied with a Density Functional T...

  1. Control of optical bistability and third-order nonlinearity via tunneling induced quantum interference in triangular quantum dot molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optical bistability of a triangular quantum dot molecules embedded inside a unidirectional ring cavity is studied. The type, the threshold and the hysteresis loop of the optical bistability curves can be modified by the tunneling parameters, as well as the probe laser field. The linear and nonlinear susceptibilities of the medium are also studied to interpret the corresponding results. The physical interpretation is that the tunneling can induce the quantum interference, which modifies the linear and the nonlinear response of the medium. As a consequence, the characteristics of the optical bistability are changed. The scheme proposed here can be utilized for optimizing and controlling the optical switching process

  2. Pressure-induced penetration of guest molecules in high-silica zeolites: the case of mordenite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arletti, R; Leardini, L; Vezzalini, G; Quartieri, S; Gigli, L; Santoro, M; Haines, J; Rouquette, J; Konczewicz, L

    2015-10-01

    A synthetic high-silica mordenite (HS-MOR) has been compressed in both non-penetrating (silicone oil, s.o.) and penetrating [methanol : ethanol : water (16 : 3 : 1) (m.e.w.), water : ethanol (3 : 1) (w.e.), and ethylene glycol (e.gl.)] pressure transmitting media (PTM). In situ high-pressure (HP) synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) experiments allowed the unit cell parameters to be followed up to 1.6, 1.8, 8.4, and 6.7 GPa in s.o., w.e., m.e.w., and e.gl., respectively. Moreover, e.gl. was also used as a PTM in in situ HP Raman and ex situ IR experiments. The structural refinement of HS-MOR compressed in e.gl. at 0.1 GPa - the lowest investigated pressure - revealed the presence of 3.5 ethylene glycol molecules per unit cell. The infrared spectrum of the recovered sample, after compression to 1 GPa, is consistent with the insertion of ethylene glycol molecules in the pores. XRPD and Raman spectroscopy experiments performed under pressure indicated the insertion of a small number of guest molecules. Ethylene glycol is partially retained inside mordenite upon pressure release. A symmetry lowering was observed in s.o. above 0.8 GPa, while above 1.6 GPa the patterns indicated a rapid loss of long range order. From ambient pressure (Pamb) to 1.6 GPa, a high cell volume contraction (ΔV = -9.5%) was determined. The patterns collected with penetrating PTM suggested the penetration of guest molecules into the porous host matrix, starting from a very low P regime. The entrapment of PTM molecules inside micropores contributes to the stiffening of the structure and, as a consequence, to the decrease of the compressibility with respect to that measured in s.o. From the structural point of view, HS-MOR reacts to compression and to the penetration of different guest species with appropriate framework deformations. Interestingly, ethylene glycol is partially retained inside mordenite upon pressure release, which is of importance for potential

  3. Immunostimulatory complexes containing Eimeria tenella antigens and low toxicity plant saponins induce antibody response and provide protection from challenge in broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immunostimulating complexes (ISCOMs) are unique multimolecular structures formed by encapsulating antigens, lipids and triterpene saponins and are one of the most successful antigen delivery systems for microbial antigens. In the current study, both the route of administration and the antigen conce...

  4. A New Potent Route of DNA Vaccine Inoculation: DNA-Liposome Complexes on Bare Skin Induce Antigen-Special Antibody Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxing Duan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcutaneous immunization is a novel strategy for genetic vaccine immunization to induce detectable antigen-special antibody in humor and mucosal. In this study, plasmid expressing hepatitis B surface antigen (pGFP-HBsAg was encapsulated in liposome, then DNA- liposome complexes were glued on bare skin of mice ear in different dosage (50μg, 10μg and 1μg. As control, DNA- liposome complexes of pGFP-HBsAg and pGFP vector were inoculated intraperitoneally. The anti-HBsAg antibodies of serum were detected weekly by ELISA. It was found that the detectable antibodies of transcutaneous immunized mouse were elicited after four weeks, and reached a maximum at the sixth week. Even 1μg plasmid DNA in liposomes through immune skin can elicit the highest ELISA antibody titer (> 1:512 in test group, and corresponding percentage of positive response is up to 71% at sixth week, but higher amounts of plasmid DNA (50μg DNA per mice on immune skin cannot induce higher antibody levels. The result showed that DNA- liposome complexes glued on bare skin appear to be a novel method for the administration of DNA vaccines.

  5. High-pressure-induced structural changes, amorphization and molecule penetration in MFI microporous materials: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzalini, Giovanna; Arletti, Rossella; Quartieri, Simona

    2014-06-01

    This is a comparative study on the high-pressure behavior of microporous materials with an MFI framework type (i.e. natural mutinaite, ZSM-5 and the all-silica phase silicalite-1), based on in-situ experiments in which penetrating and non-penetrating pressure-transmitting media were used. Different pressure-induced phenomena and deformation mechanisms (e.g. pressure-induced over-hydration, pressure-induced amorphization) are discussed. The influence of framework and extra-framework composition and of the presence of silanol defects on the response to the high pressure of MFI-type zeolites is discussed. PMID:24892591

  6. Brugia malayi Antigen (BmA Inhibits HIV-1 Trans-Infection but Neither BmA nor ES-62 Alter HIV-1 Infectivity of DC Induced CD4+ Th-Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily E I M Mouser

    Full Text Available One of the hallmarks of HIV-1 disease is the association of heightened CD4+ T-cell activation with HIV-1 replication. Parasitic helminths including filarial nematodes have evolved numerous and complex mechanisms to skew, dampen and evade human immune responses suggesting that HIV-1 infection may be modulated in co-infected individuals. Here we studied the effects of two filarial nematode products, adult worm antigen from Brugia malayi (BmA and excretory-secretory product 62 (ES-62 from Acanthocheilonema viteae on HIV-1 infection in vitro. Neither BmA nor ES-62 influenced HIV-1 replication in CD4+ enriched T-cells, with either a CCR5- or CXCR4-using virus. BmA, but not ES-62, had the capacity to bind the C-type lectin dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN thereby inhibiting HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ enriched T-cells. As for their effect on DCs, neither BmA nor ES-62 could enhance or inhibit DC maturation as determined by CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR expression, or the production of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α. As expected, due to the unaltered DC phenotype, no differences were found in CD4+ T helper (Th cell phenotypes induced by DCs treated with either BmA or ES-62. Moreover, the HIV-1 susceptibility of the Th-cell populations induced by BmA or ES-62 exposed DCs was unaffected for both CCR5- and CXCR4-using HIV-1 viruses. In conclusion, although BmA has the potential capacity to interfere with HIV-1 transmission or initial viral dissemination through preventing the virus from interacting with DCs, no differences in the Th-cell polarizing capacity of DCs exposed to BmA or ES-62 were observed. Neither antigenic source demonstrated beneficial or detrimental effects on the HIV-1 susceptibility of CD4+ Th-cells induced by exposed DCs.

  7. Interleukin-2 (rIL-2)-induced lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells and their precursors express the VGO1 antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precursor and effector cells of recombinant interleukin-2 (r-IL-2)-induced lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) activity were investigated for their expression of VGO1. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from normal donors were purified and separated in a FACS 420 into VGO1+- and VGO1- cell fractions before and after culture for 96 hr with 100 U/ml of r-IL-2. Their lytic activity against K 562 and Daudi cells was measured in a 51Cr release assay. The majority, if not all, of the LAK effector and precursor cells was VGO1+ lymphocytes. The expression of VGO1 by LAK precursor cells remained stable under the culture conditions used in our experiments. VGO1- lymphocytes cultured with r-IL-2 demonstrated neither LAK-induced activity nor expression of VGO1 antigen

  8. Delayed radiation-induced inflammation accompanying a marked carbohydrate antigen 19-9 elevation in a patient with resected pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattes, Malcolm D.; Cardinal, Jon S.; Jacobson, Geraldine M.

    2016-01-01

    Although carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 is a useful tumor marker for pancreatic cancer, it can also become elevated from a variety of benign and malignant conditions. Herein we describe an unusual presentation of elevated CA 19-9 in an asymptomatic patient who had previously undergone adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy for resected early stage pancreatic cancer. The rise in CA 19-9 might be due to delayed radiation-induced inflammation related to previous intra-abdominal radiation therapy with or without radiation recall induced by gemcitabine. After treatment with corticosteroids the CA 19-9 level decreased to normal, and the patient has not developed any evidence of recurrent cancer to date. PMID:27306770

  9. ONCOLYTIC VIRUS-MEDIATED REVERSAL OF IMPAIRED TUMOR ANTIGEN PRESENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Ashok Gujar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anti-tumor immunity can eliminate existing cancer cells and also maintain a constant surveillance against possible relapse. Such an antigen-specific adaptive response begins when tumor-specific T cells become activated. T cell activation requires two signals on antigen presenting cells (APCs: antigen presentation through MHC molecules and co-stimulation. In the absence of one or both of these signals, T cells remain inactivated or can even become tolerized. Cancer cells and their associated microenvironment strategically hinder the processing and presentation of tumor antigens and consequently prevent the development of anti-tumor immunity. Many studies, however, demonstrate that interventions that overturn tumor-associated immune evasion mechanisms can establish anti-tumor immune responses of therapeutic potential. One such intervention is oncolytic virus (OV-based anti-cancer therapy. Here we discuss how OV-induced immunological events override tumor-associated antigen presentation impairment and promote appropriate T cell:APC interaction. Detailed understanding of this phenomenon is pivotal for devising the strategies that will enhance the efficacy of OV-based anti-cancer therapy by complementing its inherent oncolytic

  10. Per-oral immunization with antigen-conjugated nanoparticles followed by sub-cutaneous boosting immunization induces long-lasting mucosal and systemic antibody responses in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savannah E Howe

    Full Text Available Food or water-borne enteric pathogens invade their hosts via intestinal mucosal surfaces, thus developing effective oral vaccines would greatly reduce the burden of infectious diseases. The nature of the antigen, as well as the mode of its internalization in the intestinal mucosa affects the ensuing immune response. We show that model protein antigen ovalbumin (Ova given per-orally (p.o. induces oral tolerance (OT, characterized by systemic IgG1-dominated antibody response, which cannot be boosted by sub-cutaneous (s.c. immunization with Ova in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA. Intestinal IgA generated in response to Ova feeding diminished over time and was abrogated by s.c. immunization with Ova+CFA. Humoral response to Ova was altered by administering Ova conjugated to 20 nm nanoparticles (NP-Ova. P.o. administration of NP-Ova induced systemic IgG1/IgG2c, and primed the intestinal mucosa for secretion of IgA. These responses were boosted by secondary s.c. immunization with Ova+CFA or p.o. immunization with NP-Ova. However, only in s.c.-boosted mice serum and mucosal antibody titers remained elevated for 6 months after priming. In contrast, s.c. priming with NP-Ova induced IgG1-dominated serum antibodies, but did not prime the intestinal mucosa for secretion of IgA, even after secondary p.o. immunization with NP-Ova. These results indicate that Ova conjugated to NPs reaches the internal milieu in an immunogenic form and that mucosal immunization with NP-Ova is necessary for induction of a polarized Th1/Th2 immune response, as well as intestinal IgA response. In addition, mucosal priming with NP-Ova, followed by s.c. boosting induces superior systemic and mucosal memory responses. These findings are important for the development of efficacious mucosal vaccines.

  11. DNA Vaccines Encoding Antigen Targeted to MHC Class II Induce Influenza-Specific CD8(+) T Cell Responses, Enabling Faster Resolution of Influenza Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Laura; Kinnear, Ekaterina; McDonald, Jacqueline U; Grodeland, Gunnveig; Bogen, Bjarne; Stubsrud, Elisabeth; Lindeberg, Mona M; Fredriksen, Agnete Brunsvik; Tregoning, John S

    2016-01-01

    Current influenza vaccines are effective but imperfect, failing to cover against emerging strains of virus and requiring seasonal administration to protect against new strains. A key step to improving influenza vaccines is to improve our understanding of vaccine-induced protection. While it is clear that antibodies play a protective role, vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells can improve protection. To further explore the role of CD8(+) T cells, we used a DNA vaccine that encodes antigen dimerized to an immune cell targeting module. Immunizing CB6F1 mice with the DNA vaccine in a heterologous prime-boost regime with the seasonal protein vaccine improved the resolution of influenza disease compared with protein alone. This improved disease resolution was dependent on CD8(+) T cells. However, DNA vaccine regimes that induced CD8(+) T cells alone were not protective and did not boost the protection provided by protein. The MHC-targeting module used was an anti-I-E(d) single chain antibody specific to the BALB/c strain of mice. To test the role of MHC targeting, we compared the response between BALB/c, C57BL/6 mice, and an F1 cross of the two strains (CB6F1). BALB/c mice were protected, C57BL/6 were not, and the F1 had an intermediate phenotype; showing that the targeting of antigen is important in the response. Based on these findings, and in agreement with other studies using different vaccines, we conclude that, in addition to antibody, inducing a protective CD8 response is important in future influenza vaccines. PMID:27602032

  12. Differential expression of cruzipain- and gp63-like molecules in the phytoflagellate trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens induced by exogenous proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Camila G R; Chagas, Michel G; Souza-Gonçalves, Ana Luiza; Pascarelli, Bernardo M O; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Branquinha, Marta H; Santos, André L S

    2012-01-01

    Phytomonas serpens synthesizes metallo- and cysteine-proteases that are related to gp63 and cruzipain, respectively, two virulence factors produced by pathogenic trypanosomatids. Here, we described the cellular distribution of gp63- and cruzipain-like molecules in P. serpens through immunocytochemistry and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Both proteases were detected in distinct cellular compartments, presenting co-localization in membrane domains and intracellular regions. Subsequently, we showed that exogenous proteins modulated the production of both protease classes, but in different ways. Regarding the metalloprotease, only fetal bovine serum (FBS) influenced the gp63 expression, reducing its surface exposition (≈30%). Conversely, the cruzipain-like molecule was differentially modulated according to the proteins: human and bovine albumins reduced its expression around 50% and 35%, respectively; mucin and FBS did not alter its production, while IgG and hemoglobin drastically enhanced its surface exposition around 7- and 11-fold, respectively. Additionally, hemoglobin induced an augmentation in the cell-associated cruzipain-like activity in a dose-dependent manner. A twofold increase of the secreted cruzipain-like protein was detected after parasite incubation with 1% hemoglobin compared to the parasites incubated in PBS-glucose. The results showed the ability of P. serpens in modulating the expression and the activity of proteolytic enzymes after exposition to exogenous proteins, with emphasis in its cruzipain-like molecules. PMID:22033075

  13. Ultrafast x-ray-induced nuclear dynamics in diatomic molecules using femtosecond x-ray-pump-x-ray-probe spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, C. S.; Picón, A.; Bostedt, C.; Rudenko, A.; Marinelli, A.; Moonshiram, D.; Osipov, T.; Rolles, D.; Berrah, N.; Bomme, C.; Bucher, M.; Doumy, G.; Erk, B.; Ferguson, K. R.; Gorkhover, T.; Ho, P. J.; Kanter, E. P.; Krässig, B.; Krzywinski, J.; Lutman, A. A.; March, A. M.; Ray, D.; Young, L.; Pratt, S. T.; Southworth, S. H.

    2016-07-01

    The capability of generating two intense, femtosecond x-ray pulses with a controlled time delay opens the possibility of performing time-resolved experiments for x-ray-induced phenomena. We have applied this capability to study the photoinduced dynamics in diatomic molecules. In molecules composed of low-Z elements, K -shell ionization creates a core-hole state in which the main decay mode is an Auger process involving two electrons in the valence shell. After Auger decay, the nuclear wave packets of the transient two-valence-hole states continue evolving on the femtosecond time scale, leading either to separated atomic ions or long-lived quasibound states. By using an x-ray pump and an x-ray probe pulse tuned above the K -shell ionization threshold of the nitrogen molecule, we are able to observe ion dissociation in progress by measuring the time-dependent kinetic energy releases of different breakup channels. We simulated the measurements on N2 with a molecular dynamics model that accounts for K -shell ionization, Auger decay, and the time evolution of the nuclear wave packets. In addition to explaining the time-dependent feature in the measured kinetic energy release distributions from the dissociative states, the simulation also reveals the contributions of quasibound states.

  14. Models for high energy ion induced desorption of molecules from surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classical trajectory calculations of the desorption of large molecules from surfaces are considered. Initial conditions correspond to differing models for the initial excitation mechanism of the molecular adsorbates. A linear chain of anharmonic oscillators is used to model the system. Results for the popcorn and thermal spike mechanism are given. In both cases the essential dynamical feature of the desorption is found to be the coupling of the expansion mode of the system to the desorption mode. Simple dynamical models also will be presented for large molecular adsorbates which include a few important degrees of freedom and an internal heat bath. Applications of these models to large scale simulations will be considered

  15. BASE-INDUCED RELEASE OF MOLECULES FROM HYDROGEN BONDING DIRECTED LAYER-BY-LAYER FILM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Fu; Huan Chen; Shi-long Bai; Feng-wei Huo; Zhi-qiang Wang; Xi Zhang

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of hydrogen bonding directed layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly we have fabricated two multilayer systems, poly(acrylic acid) bearing spironaphthoxazine (PAA-SO)/poly(4-vinylpyridine) and carboxyl-terminated polyether dendrimer (dendrimer-COOH)/poly(4-vinylpyridine). UV-Vis spectroscopy indicates that either PAA-SO or dendrimer COOH can be released from the corresponding multilayer assemblies upon immerssion in a basic aqueous solution.Furthermore, the rate of molecule release can be controlled either by changing the pH value or by adjusting the layer structure.

  16. Inducing elliptically polarized high-order harmonics from aligned molecules with linearly polarized femtosecond pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etches, Adam; Madsen, Christian Bruun; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2010-01-01

    A recent paper reported elliptically polarized high-order harmonics from aligned N2 using a linearly polarized driving field [X. Zhou et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 073902 (2009)]. This observation cannot be explained in the standard treatment of the Lewenstein model and has been ascribed to many...... additional contributions, which can be interpreted as quantum orbits in which the active electron is ionized at one atomic center within the molecule and recombines at another. The associated exchange harmonics are responsible for the nonvanishing ellipticity and result from a correlation between the...

  17. Local spin torque induced by electron electric dipole moment in the Ybf molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Masahiro; Senami, Masato; Ogiso, Yoji; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we show the modification of the equation of motion of the electronic spin, which is derived by the quantum electron spin vorticity principle, by the effect of the electron electric dipole moment (EDM). To investigate the new contribution to spin torque by EDM, using first principle calculations, we visualize distributions of the local spin angular momentum density and local spin torque density of the YbF molecule on which the static electric field and magnetic field are applied at t = 0.

  18. Local spin torque induced by electron electric dipole moment in the YbF molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Masahiro; Senami, Masato; Ogiso, Yoji; Tachibana, Akitomo [Department of Micro Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan)

    2014-10-06

    In this study, we show the modification of the equation of motion of the electronic spin, which is derived by the quantum electron spin vorticity principle, by the effect of the electron electric dipole moment (EDM). To investigate the new contribution to spin torque by EDM, using first principle calculations, we visualize distributions of the local spin angular momentum density and local spin torque density of the YbF molecule on which the static electric field and magnetic field are applied at t = 0.

  19. Adenovirus viral interleukin-10 inhibits adhesion molecule expressions induced by hypoxia/reoxygenation in cerebrovascular endothelial cells1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui KANG; Peng-yuan YANG; Yao-cheng RUI

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of recombinant adenovirus encoding viral interleukin-10 (vIL-10), a potent anti-inflammatory cytokine, on adhesion mol-ecule expressions and the adhesion rates of leukocytes to endothelial cells in cerebrovascular endothelial cells injured by hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R). Methods: A recombinant adenovirus expressing vIL-10 (Ad/vIL-10 (or the green fluorescent protein (Ad/GFP) gene was constructed. A cerebrovascular endothe-lial cell line bend.3 was pretreated with a different multiplicity of infection (MOI) of Ad/vIL-10 or Ad/GFP and then exposed to hypoxia for 9 h followed by reoxygenation for 12 h. The culture supernatants were tested for the expression of vIL-10 and endogenous murine IL-10 (mIL-10) by ELISA. The effects of Ad/vIL-10 on monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion were represented as the adhesion rate. Subsequently, the expressions of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1(VCAM-1) in the endothelial cells after treat-ment with Ad/vIL-10 and H/R were analyzed by Western blotting and real-time PCR. Results: vIL-10 was expressed in cultured bEnd.3 after Ad/vIL-10 transfec-tion and was significantly increased by H/R. Ad/vIL-10 or Ad/GFP did not affect the mlL-10 level. H/R increased the mIL-10 expression, but insignificantly. Mono-cyte-endothelial cell adhesion induced by H/R was significantly inhibited by pretreatment with Ad/vIL-10 (MOI: 80). ICAM-I, and VCAM-1 in bEnd.3 and were significantly increased after H/R, while pretreatment with Ad/vIL-10 (MOI: 80) significantly inhibited their expressions. Ad/GFP did not markedly affect mono-cyte-endothelial adhesion and the expressions of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 induced by H/R. Conclusion: Ad/vIL-10 significantly inhibits the upregulation of endot-helial adhesion molecule expressions and the increase of adhesion of monocytes-endothelial cells induced by H/R, indicating that vIL-10 gene transfer is of far-reaching significance in the therapy of

  20. Identification of small molecule and genetic modulators of AON-induced dystrophin exon skipping by high-throughput screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra A O'Leary

    Full Text Available One therapeutic approach to Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD recently entering clinical trials aims to convert DMD phenotypes to that of a milder disease variant, Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD, by employing antisense oligonucleotides (AONs targeting splice sites, to induce exon skipping and restore partial dystrophin function. In order to search for small molecule and genetic modulators of AON-dependent and independent exon skipping, we screened approximately 10,000 known small molecule drugs, >17,000 cDNA clones, and >2,000 kinase- targeted siRNAs against a 5.6 kb luciferase minigene construct, encompassing exon 71 to exon 73 of human dystrophin. As a result, we identified several enhancers of exon skipping, acting on both the reporter construct as well as endogenous dystrophin in mdx cells. Multiple mechanisms of action were identified, including histone deacetylase inhibition, tubulin modulation and pre-mRNA processing. Among others, the nucleolar protein NOL8 and staufen RNA binding protein homolog 2 (Stau2 were found to induce endogenous exon skipping in mdx cells in an AON-dependent fashion. An unexpected but recurrent theme observed in our screening efforts was the apparent link between the inhibition of cell cycle progression and the induction of exon skipping.

  1. MHC-restricted antigen presentation and recognition: constraints on gene, recombinant and peptide vaccines in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunha-Neto E.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The target of any immunization is to activate and expand lymphocyte clones with the desired recognition specificity and the necessary effector functions. In gene, recombinant and peptide vaccines, the immunogen is a single protein or a small assembly of epitopes from antigenic proteins. Since most immune responses against protein and peptide antigens are T-cell dependent, the molecular target of such vaccines is to generate at least 50-100 complexes between MHC molecule and the antigenic peptide per antigen-presenting cell, sensitizing a T cell population of appropriate clonal size and effector characteristics. Thus, the immunobiology of antigen recognition by T cells must be taken into account when designing new generation peptide- or gene-based vaccines. Since T cell recognition is MHC-restricted, and given the wide polymorphism of the different MHC molecules, distinct epitopes may be recognized by different individuals in the population. Therefore, the issue of whether immunization will be effective in inducing a protective immune response, covering the entire target population, becomes an important question. Many pathogens have evolved molecular mechanisms to escape recognition by the immune system by variation of antigenic protein sequences. In this short review, we will discuss the several concepts related to selection of amino acid sequences to be included in DNA and peptide vaccines.

  2. The effect of lidocaine on in vitro neutrophil and endothelial adhesion molecule expression induced by plasma obtained during tourniquet-induced ischaemia and reperfusion.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lan, W

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Changes in neutrophil and endothelial adhesion molecule expression occur during perioperative ischaemia and reperfusion (I\\/R) injury. We investigated the effects of lidocaine on neutrophil-independent changes in neutrophil and endothelial adhesion molecule expression associated with tourniquet-induced I\\/R. METHODS: Plasma was obtained from venous blood samples (tourniquet arm) taken before (baseline), during, 15 min, 2 and 24 h following tourniquet release in seven patients undergoing elective upper limb surgery with tourniquet application. Isolated neutrophils from healthy volunteers (n = 7) were pretreated in the presence or absence of lidocaine (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 mg mL(-1) for 1 h, and then incubated with I\\/R plasma for 2 h. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were pretreated in the presence or absence of lidocaine (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 mg mL(-1)) for 1 h, and then incubated with the plasma for 4 h. Adhesion molecule expression was estimated using flow cytometry. Data were analysed using ANOVA and post hoc Student-Newman-Keuls tests. RESULTS: I\\/R plasma (withdrawn 15 min following tourniquet release) increased isolated neutrophil CD11b (P = 0.03), CD18 (P = 0.01) and endothelial intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) (P = 0.008) expression compared to baseline. CD11b, CD18 and ICAM-1 expression on lidocaine (0.005 mg mL(-1)) treated neutrophils was similar to control. CD11b (P < 0.001), CD18 (P = 0.03) and ICAM-1 (P = 0.002) expression on lidocaine (0.05 mg mL(-1)) treated neutrophils and HUVECs was less than that on controls. CONCLUSION: Increased in vitro neutrophil and endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression on exposure to plasma obtained during the early reperfusion phase is diminished by lidocaine at greater than clinically relevant plasma concentrations.

  3. The Activation of Macrophage and Upregulation of CD40 Costimulatory Molecule in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxiang Bi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available To study the activation of macrophage and upregulation of costimulatory molecule of CD40 in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced acute lung injury (ALI model, and to investigate the pathogenecy of ALI, mice were randomly divided into two groups. ALI model was created by injecting 0.2 mg/kg LPS in phosphate saline (PBS in trachea. The pathologic changes of mice lungs were observed by HE staining at 24 and 48 hours after LPS treatment, then the alveolar septum damage, abnormal contraction, alveolar space hyperemia, and neutrophils or other inflammatory cells infiltration in the LPS group, but not in the control group, were observed. The expression of CD40 mRNA and CD40 protein molecules were higher in LPS group as compared to the control group by Northern blot and flow cytometry, respectively. Expression of Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4 in activated macrophage (AMΦ was higher in LPS group as compared to the control group by RT-PCR. The activation of NF-κB binding to NF-κB consensus oligos increased in LPS group by EMSA in macrophage. The concentrations of TNF-α, MIP-2, and IL-1β cytokines from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF were increased significantly in LPS group as compared to the control group by ELISA. The activation of AM and upregulation of costimulatory molecule CD40 induced all kinds of inflammatory cytokines releasing, then led to ALI. Therefore, both of them played vital role in the process of development of ALI.

  4. A Vectored Measles Virus Induces Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Antibodies While Protecting Macaques against Measles Virus Challenge▿

    OpenAIRE

    del Valle, Jorge Reyes; Devaux, Patricia; Hodge, Gregory; Wegner, Nicholas J.; McChesney, Michael B.; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) acute and chronic infections remain a major worldwide health problem. Towards developing an anti-HBV vaccine with single-dose scheme potential, we engineered infectious measles virus (MV) genomic cDNAs with a vaccine strain background and expression vector properties. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) expression cassettes were inserted into this cDNA and three MVs expressing HBsAg at different levels generated. All vectored MVs, which secrete HBsAg as subviral partic...

  5. Immune responses induced by a Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis recombinant antigen in mice and lymphocytes from vaccinated subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Ana Paula; Elizabeth Cortez HERRERA; Wilson MAYRINK; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; LIU Wen Yu; Carlos Alberto da COSTA; Tavares, Carlos Alberto Pereira; Melo, Maria Norma; Michalick, Marilene Susan Marques; Gentz, Reiner; NASCIMENTO Evaldo

    1997-01-01

    In the search for Leishmania recombinant antigens that can be used as a vaccine against American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis, we identified a Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis recombinant protein of 33 kD (Larp33) which is recognized by antibodies and peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) from subjects vaccinated with Leishvacin ®, Larp33 was expressed in Escherichia coli after cloning of a 2,2 kb Sau3A digested genomic fragment of L. (L.) amazonensis into the pDS56-6 His vector. Immunoblotting ana...

  6. Small molecule antagonism of oxysterol-induced Epstein-Barr virus induced gene 2 (EBI2) activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Madsen, Christian M; Arfelt, Kristine N;

    2013-01-01

    682753A, which blocks oxysterol-induced G-protein activation, β-arrestin recruitment and B-cell chemotaxis. We furthermore demonstrate that activation triggers pertussis toxin-sensitive MAP kinase phosphorylation, which is also inhibited by GSK682753A. Thus, EBI2 signalling in B cells mediates key...

  7. Immune responses induced by gene gun or intramuscular injection of DNA vaccines that express immunogenic regions of the serine repeat antigen from Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belperron, A A; Feltquate, D; Fox, B A; Horii, T; Bzik, D J

    1999-10-01

    The liver- and blood-stage-expressed serine repeat antigen (SERA) of Plasmodium falciparum is a candidate protein for a human malaria vaccine. We compared the immune responses induced in mice immunized with SERA-expressing plasmid DNA vaccines delivered by intramuscular (i.m.) injection or delivered intradermally by Gene Gun immunization. Mice were immunized with a pcdna3 plasmid encoding the entire 47-kDa domain of SERA (amino acids 17 to 382) or the N-terminal domain (amino acids 17 to 110) of SERA. Minimal antibody responses were detected following DNA vaccination with the N-terminal domain of SERA, suggesting that the N-terminal domain alone is not highly immunogenic by this route of vaccine delivery. Immunization of mice by Gene Gun delivery of the 47-kDa domain of SERA elicited a significantly higher serum antibody titer to the antigen than immunization of mice by i.m. injection with the same plasmid did. The predominant isotype subclass of the antibodies elicited to the SERA protein following i.m. and Gene Gun immunizations with SERA plasmid DNA was immunoglobulin G1. Coimmunization of mice with SERA plasmid DNA and a plasmid expressing the hepatitis B surface antigen (pCMV-s) by the i.m. route resulted in higher anti-SERA titers than those generated in mice immunized with the SERA DNA plasmid alone. Vaccination with DNA may provide a viable alternative or may be used in conjunction with protein-based subunit vaccines to maximize the efficacy of a human malaria vaccine that includes immunogenic regions of the SERA protein. PMID:10496891

  8. Immunohistochemical expression of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules 5, CEACAM6, and SLC7A5: Do they aid in predicting the response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Bansal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (NACT has become an integral part of multimodality treatment for locally advanced breast cancer (LABC worldwide. Predictors of therapeutic response to NACT are lacking. Whether carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs like CEACAM5 and CEACAM6 can act as a predictor of response to therapy is unclear. SLC7A5 gene in humans encodes a large neutral amino acid transporter protein, which has an essential role in tumor cell growth and survival. Materials and Methods: Thirty histopathologically proven cases of LABC, being given NACT, were included in the study. Immunohistochemical examination of the tumor sections was performed for CEACAM5, CEACAM6, and SLC7A5. Response to chemotherapy was assessed using "Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors" (RECIST 1.1 criteria. A total of three cycles were given at 3 weekly intervals. After 3 weeks of the last cycle of NACT, the patients were taken up for modified radical mastectomy. The specimen was subjected to histopathological examination. The immunohistochemical results were correlated with response to NACT based on RECIST criteria and histopathology. Results: 12/30 (40% of the patients had objective clinical response of which 4 (13.33% patients had pathological complete response. The relationship between CEACAM5 and CEACAM6 and response to NACT was found to be statistically significant, P = 0.004 and P = 0.020, respectively. Furthermore, relationship between response to NACT and node-positive tumors with SLC7A5 immunoreactivity was found to be highly significant (P = 0.009. Conclusion: Biomarkers (CEACAM5, CEACAM6, and SLC7A5 showed promise as predictors of poor response to NACT and can help plan an alternative regime in likely nonresponders to prevent the toxicity of chemotherapy and also in tailoring the therapy in a patient with LABC.

  9. Aggregation-induced emission molecules in layered matrices for two-color luminescence films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Weijiang; Lu, Jun; Zhou, Wenjuan; Lu, Chao

    2014-10-14

    We fabricated two-color luminescence ultrathin films (UTFs) composed of the layered double hydroxide host-aggregation-induced emission guests by LBL assembly. The fabricated UTFs were simple, tunable, controllable and highly luminescent. Moreover, reversible thermochromic luminescence further exhibited their potential in practical applications. PMID:25154856

  10. Ligation of MHC class I molecules on peripheral blood T lymphocytes induces new phenotypes and functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregenholt, S; Röpke, M; Skov, S; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    1996-01-01

    Microgram concentrations of immobilized anti-MHC class I (MHC-I) Ab induced proliferation of resting CD3+ T cells from peripheral blood. In contrast, soluble Ab did not activate T cells. Exposure of T cells to immobilized anti-MHC-I Ab for only 24 h was followed by proliferation and development of...

  11. Single Molecule Rectification Induced by the Asymmetry of a Single Frontier Orbital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wendu; Negre, Christian F A; Vogt, Leslie; Batista, Victor S

    2014-08-12

    A mechanism for electronic rectification under low bias potentials is elucidated for the prototype molecule HS-phenyl-amide-phenyl-SH. We apply density functional theory (DFT) combined with the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism (NEGF), as implemented in the TranSIESTA computational code to calculate transport properties. We find that a single frontier orbital, the closest to the Fermi level, provides the dominant contribution to the overall transmission and determines the current. The asymmetric distribution of electron density in that orbital leads to rectification in charge transport due to its asymmetric response, shifting toward (or away from) the Fermi level under forward (or reverse) applied bias voltage. These findings provide a simple design principle to suppress recombination in molecular assemblies of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) where interfacial electron transfer is mediated by frontier orbitals with asymmetric character. PMID:26588307

  12. Combining a CD20 chimeric antigen receptor and an inducible caspase 9 suicide switch to improve the efficacy and safety of T cell adoptive immunotherapy for lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihua E Budde

    Full Text Available Modification of T cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CAR has emerged as a promising treatment modality for human malignancies. Integration of co-stimulatory domains into CARs can augment the activation and function of genetically targeted T cells against tumors. However, the potential for insertional mutagenesis and toxicities due to the infused cells have made development of safe methods for removing transferred cells an important consideration. We have genetically modified human T cells with a lentiviral vector to express a CD20-CAR containing both CD28 and CD137 co-stimulatory domains, a "suicide gene" relying on inducible activation of caspase 9 (iC9, and a truncated CD19 selectable marker. Rapid expansion (2000 fold of the transduced T cells was achieved in 28 days after stimulation with artificial antigen presenting cells. Transduced T cells exhibited effective CD20-specific cytotoxic activity in vitro and in a mouse xenograft tumor model. Activation of the iC9 suicide switch resulted in efficient removal of transduced T cells both in vitro and in vivo. Our work demonstrates the feasibility and promise of this approach for treating CD20(+ malignancies in a safe and more efficient manner. A phase I clinical trial using this approach in patients with relapsed indolent B-NHL is planned.

  13. GD2-specific CAR T Cells Undergo Potent Activation and Deletion Following Antigen Encounter but can be Protected From Activation-induced Cell Death by PD-1 Blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargett, Tessa; Yu, Wenbo; Dotti, Gianpietro; Yvon, Eric S; Christo, Susan N; Hayball, John D; Lewis, Ian D; Brenner, Malcolm K; Brown, Michael P

    2016-06-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells have shown great promise in the treatment of hematologic malignancies but more variable results in the treatment of solid tumors and the persistence and expansion of CAR T cells within patients has been identified as a key correlate of antitumor efficacy. Lack of immunological "space", functional exhaustion, and deletion have all been proposed as mechanisms that hamper CAR T-cell persistence. Here we describe the events following activation of third-generation CAR T cells specific for GD2. CAR T cells had highly potent immediate effector functions without evidence of functional exhaustion in vitro, although reduced cytokine production reversible by PD-1 blockade was observed after longer-term culture. Significant activation-induced cell death (AICD) of CAR T cells was observed after repeated antigen stimulation, and PD-1 blockade enhanced both CAR T-cell survival and promoted killing of PD-L1(+) tumor cell lines. Finally, we assessed CAR T-cell persistence in patients enrolled in the CARPETS phase 1 clinical trial of GD2-specific CAR T cells in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. Together, these data suggest that deletion also occurs in vivo and that PD-1-targeted combination therapy approaches may be useful to augment CAR T-cell efficacy and persistence in patients. PMID:27019998

  14. Preconditioning of Carbon Monoxide Releasing Molecule-derived CO Attenuates LPS-induced Activation of HUVEC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingwei Sun, Xiangqian Zou, Yueling Chen, Ping Zhang, Gengsheng Shi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects and potential mechanisms of preconditioning of tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (III dimer (CORM-2-liberated CO on LPS-induced activation of endothelial cells (HUVEC. Methods: HUVEC were pretreated with CORM-2 at the concentration of 50 or 100μM for 2 hrs, washed and stimulated with LPS (10μg/ml for additional 4 hrs. Activation (oxidative stress of HUVEC was assessed by measuring intracellular oxidation of DHR 123 or nitration of DAF-FM, specific H2O2 and NO fluorochromes, respectively. The expression of HO-1, iNOS (Western blot and ICAM-1 (cell ELISA proteins and activation of inflammation-relevant transcription factor, NF-κB (EMSA were assessed. In addition, PMN adhesion to HUVEC was also assessed. Results: The obtained data indicate that pretreatment of HUVEC with CORM-2 results in: 1 decrease of LPS-induced production of ROS and NO; 2 up-regulation of HO-1 but decrease in iNOS at the protein levels; 3 inhibition of LPS-induced activation of NF-κB; and 4 downregulation of expression of ICAM-1, and this was accompanied by a decrease of PMN adhesion to LPS-stimulated HUVEC. Conclusions: Preconditioning of CO liberated by CORM-2 elicited its anti-inflammatory effects by interfering with the induction of intracellular oxidative stress. In addition, it also supports the notion that CO is a potent inhibitor of iNOS and NF-κB.

  15. Signal transduction by HLA class II molecules in human T cells: induction of LFA-1-dependent and independent adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Yoshizumi, H; Okamoto, Y;

    1992-01-01

    Crosslinking HLA-DR molecules by monoclonal antibodies (moAbs) induces protein tyrosine phosphorylation and results in a secondary elevation of free cytoplasmic calcium concentrations in activated human T cells. Binding of bacterial superantigens or moAbs to DR molecules on activated T cells was...... antigen- and alloantigen-activated T cells, antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell lines, a CD8+ T-cytotoxic cell line, and T-leukemia cells (HUT78). Protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor herbimycin A partly blocked class-II-induced aggregation responses. In contrast, phorbol ester (PMA)-induced aggregation was......, an adenylate cyclase inhibitor (2'5'-dideoxyadenosine), and moAbs against other adhesion molecules (CD2/CD58 [LFA-3], CD28/CD28 ligand B7, CD4, and CD44). In conclusion, HLA class-II-induced aggregation responses in activated T cells appear to involve PTK and PKC activation and to be mediated through...

  16. Abrogation of junctional adhesion molecule-A expression induces cell apoptosis and reduces breast cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Murakami

    Full Text Available Intercellular junctions promote homotypic cell to cell adhesion and transfer intracellular signals which control cell growth and apoptosis. Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A is a transmembrane immunoglobulin located at tight junctions of normal epithelial cells of mammary ducts and glands. In the present paper we show that JAM-A acts as a survival factor for mammary carcinoma cells. JAM-A null mice expressing Polyoma Middle T under MMTV promoter develop significantly smaller mammary tumors than JAM-A positive mice. Angiogenesis and inflammatory or immune infiltrate were not statistically modified in absence of JAM-A but tumor cell apoptosis was significantly increased. Tumor cells isolated from JAM-A null mice or 4T1 cells incubated with JAM-A blocking antibodies showed reduced growth and increased apoptosis which paralleled altered junctional architecture and adhesive function. In a breast cancer clinical data set, tissue microarray data show that JAM-A expression correlates with poor prognosis. Gene expression analysis of mouse tumor samples showed a correlation between genes enriched in human G3 tumors and genes over expressed in JAM-A +/+ mammary tumors. Conversely, genes enriched in G1 human tumors correlate with genes overexpressed in JAM-A-/- tumors. We conclude that down regulation of JAM-A reduces tumor aggressive behavior by increasing cell susceptibility to apoptosis. JAM-A may be considered a negative prognostic factor and a potential therapeutic target.

  17. Isotope-induced partial localization of core electrons in the homonuclear molecule N2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolles, Daniel; Braune, Markus; Cvejanović, Slobodan; Gessner, Oliver; Hentges, Rainer; Korica, Sanja; Langer, Burkhard; Lischke, Toralf; Prümper, Georg; Reinköster, Axel; Viefhaus, Jens; Zimmermann, Björn; McKoy, Vincent; Becker, Uwe

    2005-09-29

    Because of inversion symmetry and particle exchange, all constituents of homonuclear diatomic molecules are in a quantum mechanically non-local coherent state; this includes the nuclei and deep-lying core electrons. Hence, the molecular photoemission can be regarded as a natural double-slit experiment: coherent electron emission originates from two identical sites, and should give rise to characteristic interference patterns. However, the quantum coherence is obscured if the two possible symmetry states of the electronic wavefunction ('gerade' and 'ungerade') are degenerate; the sum of the two exactly resembles the distinguishable, incoherent emission from two localized core sites. Here we observe the coherence of core electrons in N(2) through a direct measurement of the interference exhibited in their emission. We also explore the gradual transition to a symmetry-broken system of localized electrons by comparing different isotope-substituted species--a phenomenon analogous to the acquisition of partial 'which-way' information in macroscopic double-slit experiments. PMID:16193047

  18. Cross sections for electron-induced resonant vibrational excitations in polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We continue our review of experimental data for electron-polyatomic molecule collisions in connection with fusion and processing plasmas, as well as with the associated environmental issues. In this case we focus on vibrational excitation processes, in particular what vibrational modes can be identified in electron energy loss experiments and which of these modes are resonantly enhanced due to the temporary capture of the incident electron by the species in question. In this latter respect we report indicative excitation function data, all of which were originally measured at Sophia University and for which the differential cross section, for excitation of the relevant mode, are studied as a function of the incident electron energy at a fixed scattered electron angle. Unlike our previous compilation (NIFS-DATA-101) for elastic scattering, which was conducted over a broad range of energies (1-100 eV), vibrational excitation cross sections usually only become significant when the resonance enhancement process occurs. As a consequence, this survey encompasses incident electron energies between 1-30 eV. Consistent with our first report, no detailed comparison is made here with any other data that might be available in the literature. This course of action was once again adopted in order to keep this report to a sensible length. (author)

  19. Tumor-associated antigens identified by mRNA expression profiling induce protective anti-tumor immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiassen, S; Lauemøller, S L; Ruhwald, M;

    2001-01-01

    clinical signs of autoimmune reactions were observed. Thus, it appears possible to evaluate the entire metabolism of any given tumor and use this information rationally to identify multiple epitopes of value in the generation of tumor-specific immunotherapy. We expect that human tumors express similar......Defined tumor-associated antigens (TAA) are attractive targets for anti-tumor immunotherapy. Here, we describe a novel genome-wide approach to identify multiple TAA from any given tumor. A panel of transplantable thymomas was established from an inbred p53-/- mouse strain. The resulting tumors were...... examined for gene expression by mRNA microarray scanning. This analysis revealed heterogeneity of the tumors in agreement with the assumption that they represent different tumorigenic events. Several genes were overexpressed in one or more of the tumors. To examine whether overexpressed genes might be used...

  20. Expression cloning and chromosomal mapping of the leukocyte activation antigen CD97, a new seven-span transmembrane molecule of the secretin receptor superfamily with an unusual extracellular domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamann, J. [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands)]|[Max Planck Society, Berlin-Buch (Germany); Hamann, D.; Lier, R.A.W. [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [and others

    1995-08-15

    CD97 is a monomeric glycoprotein of 75 to 85 kDa that is induced rapidly on the surface of most leukocytes upon activation. We herein report the isolation of a cDNA encoding human CD97 by expression cloning in COS cells. The 3-kb cDNA clone encodes a mature polypeptide chain of 722 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 79 kDa. Within the C-terminal part of the protein, a region with seven hydrophobic segments was identified, suggesting that CD97 is a seven-span transmembrane molecule. Sequence comparison indicates that CD97 is the first leukocyte Ag in a recently described superfamily that includes the receptors for secretin, calcitonin, and other mammalian and insect peptide hormones. Different from these receptors, CD97 has an extended extracellular region of 433 amino acids that possesses three N-terminal epidermal growth factor-like domains, two of them with a calcium-binding site, and single Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif. The existence of structural elements characteristic for extracellular matrix proteins in a seven-span transmembrane molecule makes CD97 a receptor potentially involved in both adhesion and signaling processes early after leukocyte activation. The gene encoding CD97 is localized on chromosome 19 (19p13.12-13.2).

  1. Smad Molecules Expression Pattern in Human Bronchial Airway Induced by Sulfur Mustard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Adelipour

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Airway remodelling is characterized by the thickening and reorganization of the airways seen in mustard  lung patients. Mustard lung is the  general description  for  the  chronic obstructive  pulmonary  disease induced  by  sulfur  mustard(SM. Pulmonary  disease was diagnosed as the most important  disorder in individuals that had been exposed to sulfur mustard. Sulfur mustard is a chemical warfare agent developed during Wars. Iraqi forces frequently used it against Iranian during Iran –Iraq in the 1980–1988. Peribronchial fibrosis result  from  airway remodeling  that  include  excess  of  collagen of  extracellular matrix deposition  in  the  airway wall. Some of  Smads families in  association with TGF-β  are involved in airway remodeling due to lung fibrosis. In the present study we compared the mRNA expression of Smad2, Smad3, and Smad4 and Smad7 genes in airway wall biopsies of chemical-injured patients with non-injured patients as control.We used airway wall biopsies of ten unexposed patients and fifteen SM-induced patients. Smads expression was evaluated by RT-PCR followed by bands densitometry.Expression levels of Smad3 and Smad4 in SM exposed patients were upregulated but Smad2 and Smad7 was not significantly altered.Our results revealed that Smad3, and 4 may be involved in airway remodeling process in SM induced  patients  by  activation of  TGF-β.  Smad pathway is  the  most  represented signaling mechanism for  airway remodeling and  peribronchial fibrosis. The  complex of Smads in the nucleus affects a series of genes that results in peribronchial fibrosis in SM- induced patients.

  2. Hepatitis B virus induces IL-23 production in antigen presenting cells and causes liver damage via the IL-23/IL-17 axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghong Wang

    Full Text Available IL-23 regulates myriad processes in the innate and adaptive immune systems, and is a critical mediator of the proinflammatory effects exerted by Th17 cells in many diseases. In this study, we investigated whether and how hepatitis B virus (HBV causes liver damage directly through the IL-23 signaling pathway. In biopsied liver tissues from HBV-infected patients, expression of both IL-23 and IL-23R was remarkably elevated. In vivo observations also indicated that the main sources of IL-23 were myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs and macrophages. Analysis of in vitro differentiated immature DCs and macrophages isolated from healthy donors revealed that the HBV surface antigen (HBsAg efficiently induces IL-23 secretion in a mannose receptor (MR-dependent manner. Culture with an endosomal acidification inhibitor and the dynamin inhibitor showed that, upon binding to the MR, the HBsAg is taken up by mDCs and macrophages through an endocytosis mechanism. In contrast, although the HBV core antigen (HBcAg can also stimulate IL-23 secretion from mDCs, the process was MR- and endocytosis-independent. In addition, IL-23 was shown to be indispensible for HBsAg-stimulated differentiation of naïve CD4(+ T cells into Th17 cells, which were determined to be the primary source of IL-17 in HBV-infected livers. The cognate receptor, IL-17R, was found to exist on the hepatic stellate cells and mDCs, both of which might represent the potential target cells of IL-17 in hepatitis B disease. These data provide novel insights into a yet unrecognized mechanism of HBV-induced hepatitis, by which increases in IL-23 expression, through an MR/endocytosis-dependent or -independent manner, produce liver damage through the IL-23/IL-17 axis.

  3. Major histocompatibility complex class I molecules protect motor neurons from astrocyte-induced toxicity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, SungWon; Miranda, Carlos J; Braun, Lyndsey; Meyer, Kathrin; Frakes, Ashley E; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Likhite, Shibi; Bevan, Adam K; Foust, Kevin D; McConnell, Michael J; Walker, Christopher M; Kaspar, Brian K

    2016-04-01

    Astrocytes isolated from individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are toxic to motor neurons (MNs) and play a non-cell autonomous role in disease pathogenesis. The mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of MNs to cell death remain unclear. Here we report that astrocytes derived from either mice bearing mutations in genes associated with ALS or human subjects with ALS reduce the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) molecules on MNs; reduced MHCI expression makes these MNs susceptible to astrocyte-induced cell death. Increasing MHCI expression on MNs increases survival and motor performance in a mouse model of ALS and protects MNs against astrocyte toxicity. Overexpression of a single MHCI molecule, HLA-F, protects human MNs from ALS astrocyte-mediated toxicity, whereas knockdown of its receptor, the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor KIR3DL2, on human astrocytes results in enhanced MN death. Thus, our data indicate that, in ALS, loss of MHCI expression on MNs renders them more vulnerable to astrocyte-mediated toxicity. PMID:26928464

  4. Radiation induced oxidation of sulphydryl molecules in aqueous solutions. A comprehensive review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Manohar

    1994-06-01

    Radiation degradation studies of thiols in aqueous solutions under variety of conditions during the past more than three decades are reviewed. Radiolytic mechanism of γ-irradiated air free, air and N 2O-saturated solutions of cysteine, cysteamine, dithiothreitol, mercaptoethanol, glutathione and papain are high lighted. A large variety of thiols repair organic radicals by H atom transfer from SH group. The repair rate constants are found to be between 5 × 10 6M -1s -1 to 4.0 × 10 8M -1s -1. The data are tabulated. The rate constants of e -aq and ȮH radicals with variety of thiols evaluated by pulse radioanalysis and flash photolysis are found to be very high and are computed. Sulphur centered radicals e.g. RṠ;, RSSR ⨪ generated in the pulse radioanalysis of thiols are very important species. Their reactions with oxygen and other compounds are of relevance to radiation biology. The results, reaction mechanism, the repair rate constant, the rate constants of e -aq and ȮH radicals with thiols and the rate constants of sulphur centered radicals with oxygen and other compounds of biological interest can be of great use in the interpretation of the mechanism of the protection of cells, animals, DNA and other biological molecules and may well provide basic essential information for the understanding of radiation biology. The protection of biological target at chemical level is generally understood in terms of protecting compounds participating directly in the radiochemical event and reducing the damage to biological target. The damage to the biological target is repaired by the hydrogen transfer from the thiol. Biochemical and metabolic mechanisms are quite complex. There is no single mechanism which explains all the experimental observations on the metabolism of thiols. More work needs to be done in order to understand the metabolic aspect of the protection mechanism.

  5. Radiation induced oxidation of sulphydryl molecules in aqueous solutions. A comprehensive review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation degradation studies of thiols in aqueous solutions under a variety of conditions over the past three decades or more are reviewed. Radiolytic mechanism of γ-irradiated air free, air and N2O-saturated solutions of cysteine, cysteamine, dithiothreitol, mercaptoethanol, glutathione and papain are highlighted. a large variety of thiols repair organic radical by H-radical atom transfer from SH group. The repair rate constants are found to be between 5 x 106 M-1 s-1 to 4.0 x 108 M-1 s-1. The rate constants of eaq- and O-radicalH radicals with variety of thiols evaluated by pulse radiolysis and flash photolysis are found to be very high and are computed. Sulphur centered radicals e.g. RS-radical, RSSR-radical generated in the pulse radiolysis of thiols are very important species. Their reactions with oxygen and other compounds are of relevance to radiation biology. The results, reaction mechanism, the repair rate constants, the rate constants of eaq- and O-radicalH radicals with thiols and the rate constants of sulphur centered radicals with oxygen and other compounds of biological interest can be of great use in the interpretation of the mechanism of the protection of cells, animals, DNA and other biological molecules and may well provide basic essential information for the understanding of radiation biology. There is no single mechanism which explains all the experimental observations on the metabolism of thiols. More work needs to be done in order to understand the metabolic aspect of the protection mechanism. (author)

  6. Effect of Cell Adhesion Molecules on the Neurite Outgrowth of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Dopaminergic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Su-Ping; Schachner, Melitta; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2016-04-01

    Intrastriatal transplantation of dopaminergic neurons has been shown to be a potentially very effective therapeutic approach for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). With the detection of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), an unlimited source of autologous dopaminergic (DA) neurons became available. Although the iPSC-derived dopaminergic neurons exhibited most of the fundamental dopaminergic characteristics, detailed analysis and comparison with primary DA neurons have shown some aberrations in the expression of genes involved in neuronal development and neurite outgrowth. The limited outgrowth of the iPSC-derived DA neurons may hamper their potential application in cell transplantation therapy for PD. In the present study, we examined whether the forced expression of L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) and polysialylated neuronal cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM), via gene transduction, can promote the neurite formation and outgrowth of iPSC-derived DA neurons. In cultures on astrocyte layers, both adhesion factors significantly increased neurite formation of the adhesion factor overexpressing iPSC-derived DA neurons in comparison to control iPSC-derived DA neurons. The same tendency was observed when the DA neurons were plated on postnatal organotypic striatal slices; however, this effect did not reach statistical significance. Next, we examined the neurite outgrowth of the L1CAM- or PSA-NCAM-overexpressing iPSC-derived DA neurons after implantation in the striatum of unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats, the animal model for PD. Like the outgrowth on the organotypic striatal slices, no significant L1CAM- and PSA-NCAM-enforced neurite outgrowth of the implanted DA neurons was observed. Apparently, induced expression of L1CAM or PSA-NCAM in the iPSC-derived DA neurons cannot completely restore the neurite outgrowth potential that was reduced in these DA neurons as a consequence of epigenetic aberrations resulting from the i

  7. A novel small molecule inhibitor of influenza A viruses that targets polymerase function and indirectly induces interferon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mila Brum Ortigoza

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses continue to pose a major public health threat worldwide and options for antiviral therapy are limited by the emergence of drug-resistant virus strains. The antiviral cytokine, interferon (IFN is an essential mediator of the innate immune response and influenza viruses, like many viruses, have evolved strategies to evade this response, resulting in increased replication and enhanced pathogenicity. A cell-based assay that monitors IFN production was developed and applied in a high-throughput compound screen to identify molecules that restore the IFN response to influenza virus infected cells. We report the identification of compound ASN2, which induces IFN only in the presence of influenza virus infection. ASN2 preferentially inhibits the growth of influenza A viruses, including the 1918 H1N1, 1968 H3N2 and 2009 H1N1 pandemic strains and avian H5N1 virus. In vivo, ASN2 partially protects mice challenged with a lethal dose of influenza A virus. Surprisingly, we found that the antiviral activity of ASN2 is not dependent on IFN production and signaling. Rather, its IFN-inducing property appears to be an indirect effect resulting from ASN2-mediated inhibition of viral polymerase function, and subsequent loss of the expression of the viral IFN antagonist, NS1. Moreover, we identified a single amino acid mutation at position 499 of the influenza virus PB1 protein that confers resistance to ASN2, suggesting that PB1 is the direct target. This two-pronged antiviral mechanism, consisting of direct inhibition of virus replication and simultaneous activation of the host innate immune response, is a unique property not previously described for any single antiviral molecule.

  8. Hepatitis C virus core and NS3 antigens induced conjunctival inflammation via toll-like receptor–mediated signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Rajalakshmy, Ayilam Ramachandran; Malathi, Jambulingam; Madhavan, Hajib Naraharirao; Srinivasan, Bhaskar; Iyer, Geetha Krishnan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Dry eye condition is an extrahepatic manifestation associated with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Since conjunctival inflammation can contribute to the dry eye condition, in the present study we analyzed the conjunctival inflammatory response to HCV core and NS3 proteins. Methods We used primary human conjunctival fibroblasts for our study. Cytokines were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Toll-like receptor (TLR) and cell adhesion molecule gene expre...

  9. Laser-induced local decomposition of adsorbed tungsten fluorine molecules for metal deposition on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decomposition of tungsten hexafluoride on silicon substrates under CW argon laser irradiation in the visible domain has been extensively studied in presence of various buffer or reactive gases. The decomposition rate is found to be limited either by a mass transport phenomena or by a thermally activated process. It has been found that no photolytic decomposition can be invoked as the limiting step in the decomposition rate. Depending on the partial pressure of added hydrogen, irradiation results in a local deposition of tungsten, having good electrical properties. In the high pressure domain, deposition kinetics are consistent with mechanisms invoked in conventional chemical vapor deposition reactors. A different mechanism appearing in a lower hydrogen pressure domain is tentatively interpreted in correlation with the laser-induced temperature

  10. Laser-induced breakdown spectra of Zn2 molecule in the violet region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subhash C Singh; K S Ojha; R Gopal

    2006-09-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectrum has been recorded in the region of 380-455 nm using second harmonics of Nd:YAG laser, computer-controlled TRIAX 320 M monochromator with a reciprocal linear dispersion 2.64 nm/mm fitted with ICCD detector. The spectrum consists of 108 bands, which are classified into four new subsystems E0$_{u}^{+}$ $(^{1}\\sum_{u}^{+}) → A1_{g} (^{3}_{g}), JO_{g}^{±}\\backslash 1_{g} (^{3}\\sum_{g}^{+}) → D1_{u} (^{1}_{u}), F1_{u} → A0_{g}^{±} (^{3}_{g})$ and $F1_{u} → A2_{g} (^{3}_{g})$ along with additional bands of the known system $E0_{u}^{+} (^{1}\\sum_{u}^{+}) → A0_{g}^{±} (^{3}_{g})$. The molecular constants for these systems have also been determined.

  11. A viral vectored prime-boost immunization regime targeting the malaria Pfs25 antigen induces transmission-blocking activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna L Goodman

    Full Text Available The ookinete surface protein Pfs25 is a macrogamete-to-ookinete/ookinete stage antigen of Plasmodium falciparum, capable of exerting high-level anti-malarial transmission-blocking activity following immunization with recombinant protein-in-adjuvant formulations. Here, this antigen was expressed in recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus 63 (ChAd63, human adenovirus serotype 5 (AdHu5 and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA viral vectored vaccines. Two immunizations were administered to mice in a heterologous prime-boost regime. Immunization of mice with AdHu5 Pfs25 at week 0 and MVA Pfs25 at week 10 (Ad-MVA Pfs25 resulted in high anti-Pfs25 IgG titers, consisting of predominantly isotypes IgG1 and IgG2a. A single priming immunization with ChAd63 Pfs25 was as effective as AdHu5 Pfs25 with respect to ELISA titers at 8 weeks post-immunization. Sera from Ad-MVA Pfs25 immunized mice inhibited the transmission of P. falciparum to the mosquito both ex vivo and in vivo. In a standard membrane-feeding assay using NF54 strain P. falciparum, oocyst intensity in Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes was significantly reduced in an IgG concentration-dependent manner when compared to control feeds (96% reduction of intensity, 78% reduction in prevalence at a 1 in 5 dilution of sera. In addition, an in vivo transmission-blocking effect was also demonstrated by direct feeding of immunized mice infected with Pfs25DR3, a chimeric P. berghei line expressing Pfs25 in place of endogenous Pbs25. In this assay the density of Pfs25DR3 oocysts was significantly reduced when mosquitoes were fed on vaccinated as compared to control mice (67% reduction of intensity, 28% reduction in prevalence and specific IgG titer correlated with efficacy. These data confirm the utility of the adenovirus-MVA vaccine platform for the induction of antibodies with transmission-blocking activity, and support the continued development of this alternative approach to transmission-blocking malaria subunit

  12. Mitogen and antigen induced B and T cell responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from the harbour seal (Phoca vitulina)

    OpenAIRE

    Swart, Rik; Kluten, Ruud; Huizing, Carla; Vedder, Lies; Reijnders, P.J.H.; Visser, Ilona; Uytdehaag, Fons; Osterhaus, Albert

    1993-01-01

    textabstractIn vitro assays were developed for studies concerning the functioning of the immune system of the harbour seal (Phoca vitulina). Proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were measured after stimulation with different concentrations of the mitogens concanavalin A (Con A), pokeweed mitogen (PWM), phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) or lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella typhimurium (LPS). Con A and PWM induced strong proliferative responses, while PHA and LPS induce...

  13. Treponema pallidum (syphilis) antigen TpF1 induces angiogenesis through the activation of the IL-8 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzobon, Tommaso; Facchinello, Nicola; Bossi, Fleur; Capitani, Nagaja; Benagiano, Marisa; Di Benedetto, Giulietta; Zennaro, Cristina; West, Nicole; Codolo, Gaia; Bernardini, Marialina; Baldari, Cosima Tatiana; D'Elios, Mario Milco; Pellegrini, Luca; Argenton, Francesco; de Bernard, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Over 10 million people every year become infected by Treponema pallidum and develop syphilis, a disease with broad symptomatology that, due to the difficulty to eradicate the pathogen from the highly vascularized secondary sites of infection, is still treated with injections of penicillin. Unlike most other bacterial pathogens, T. pallidum infection produces indeed a strong angiogenic response whose mechanism of activation, however, remains unknown. Here, we report that one of the major antigen of T. pallidum, the TpF1 protein, has growth factor-like activity on primary cultures of human endothelial cells and activates specific T cells able to promote tissue factor production. The growth factor-like activity is mediated by the secretion of IL-8 but not of VEGF, two known angiogenic factors. The pathogen's factor signals IL-8 secretion through the activation of the CREB/NF-κB signalling pathway. These findings are recapitulated in an animal model, zebrafish, where we observed that TpF1 injection stimulates angiogenesis and IL-8, but not VEGF, secretion. This study suggests that the angiogenic response observed during secondary syphilis is triggered by TpF1 and that pharmacological therapies directed to inhibit IL-8 response in patients should be explored to treat this disease. PMID:26728351

  14. Laser-induced dissociation dynamics of triatomic molecule in electronic excited states: A full-dimensional quantum mechanics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhaopeng; Yang, Chuanlu; Zheng, Yujun

    2015-12-14

    We present a detailed theoretical approach to investigate the laser-induced dissociation dynamics of a triatomic molecule on its electronic excited state in full dimensional case. In this method, the time evolution of the time-dependent system is propagated via combined the split operator method and the expansion of Chebyshev polynomials (or short-time Chebyshev propagation) and the system wave functions are expanded in terms of molecular rotational bases. As an example of the application of this formalism, the dissociation dynamics of H3(+)→H2(+)+H induced by ultrashort UV laser pulses are investigated on new Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surfaces. Our numerical results show that the signals of dissociation products will be easier to observe as the increasing of field strength. Driving by a 266 nm laser beam, the calculated central value of kinetic-energy-release is 2.04 eV which shows excellent agreement with the experimental estimation of 2.1 eV. When the H3(+) ion is rotationally excited, the spatial distribution of product fragments will become well converged. PMID:26671377

  15. Repulsive Guidance Molecule-a Is Involved in Th17-Cell-Induced Neurodegeneration in Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo Tanabe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation, demyelination, and neurodegeneration in the CNS. Although it is important to prevent neurodegeneration for alleviating neurological disability, the molecular mechanism of neurodegeneration remains largely unknown. Here, we report that repulsive guidance molecule-a (RGMa, known to regulate axonal growth, is associated with neurodegeneration in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a mouse model of MS. RGMa is highly expressed in interleukin-17-producing CD4+ T cells (Th17 cells. We induced EAE by adoptive transfer of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-specific Th17 cells and then inhibited RGMa with a neutralizing antibody. Inhibition of RGMa improves EAE scores and reduces neuronal degeneration without altering immune or glial responses. Th17 cells induce cultured cortical neuron death through RGMa-neogenin and Akt dephosphorylation. Our results demonstrate that RGMa is involved in Th17-cell-mediated neurodegeneration and that RGMa-specific antibody may have a therapeutic effect in MS.

  16. Laser-induced dissociation dynamics of triatomic molecule in electronic excited states: A full-dimensional quantum mechanics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhaopeng; Yang, Chuanlu; Zheng, Yujun

    2015-12-01

    We present a detailed theoretical approach to investigate the laser-induced dissociation dynamics of a triatomic molecule on its electronic excited state in full dimensional case. In this method, the time evolution of the time-dependent system is propagated via combined the split operator method and the expansion of Chebyshev polynomials (or short-time Chebyshev propagation) and the system wave functions are expanded in terms of molecular rotational bases. As an example of the application of this formalism, the dissociation dynamics of H3 + → H2 + + H induced by ultrashort UV laser pulses are investigated on new Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surfaces. Our numerical results show that the signals of dissociation products will be easier to observe as the increasing of field strength. Driving by a 266 nm laser beam, the calculated central value of kinetic-energy-release is 2.04 eV which shows excellent agreement with the experimental estimation of 2.1 eV. When the H 3+ ion is rotationally excited, the spatial distribution of product fragments will become well converged.

  17. Zinc Induces Dimerization of the Class II Major Histocompatibility Complex Molecule That Leads to Cooperative Binding to a Superantigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li,H.; Zhao, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, Z.; Eislele, L.; Mourad, W.

    2007-01-01

    Dimerization of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays an important role in the MHC biological function. Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived mitogen (MAM) is a superantigen that can activate large fractions of T cells bearing specific T cell receptor V{beta} elements. Here we have used structural, sedimentation, and surface plasmon resonance detection approaches to investigate the molecular interactions between MAM and the class II MHC molecule HLA-DR1 in the context of a hemagglutinin peptide-(306-318) (HA). Our results revealed that zinc ion can efficiently induce the dimerization of the HLA-DR1/HA complex. Because the crystal structure of the MAM/HLA-DR1/hemagglutinin complex in the presence of EDTA is nearly identical to the structure of the complex crystallized in the presence of zinc ion, Zn{sup 2+} is evidently not directly involved in the binding between MAM and HLA-DR1. Sedimentation and surface plasmon resonance studies further revealed that MAM binds the HLA-DR1/HA complex with high affinity in a 1:1 stoichiometry, in the absence of Zn{sup 2+}. However, in the presence of Zn{sup 2+}, a dimerized MAM/HLA-DR1/HA complex can arise through the Zn{sup 2+}-induced DR1 dimer. In the presence of Zn{sup 2+}, cooperative binding of MAM to the DR1 dimer was also observed.

  18. Rationally designed inhibitor targeting antigen-trimming aminopeptidases enhances antigen presentation and cytotoxic T-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervoudi, Efthalia; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Birtley, James R; Seregin, Sergey S; Reeves, Emma; Kokkala, Paraskevi; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Amalfitano, Andrea; Mavridis, Irene M; James, Edward; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2013-12-01

    Intracellular aminopeptidases endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases 1 and 2 (ERAP1 and ERAP2), and as well as insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) process antigenic epitope precursors for loading onto MHC class I molecules and regulate the adaptive immune response. Their activity greatly affects the antigenic peptide repertoire presented to cytotoxic T lymphocytes and as a result can regulate cytotoxic cellular responses contributing to autoimmunity or immune evasion by viruses and cancer cells. Therefore, pharmacological regulation of their activity is a promising avenue for modulating the adaptive immune response with possible applications in controlling autoimmunity, in boosting immune responses to pathogens, and in cancer immunotherapy. In this study we exploited recent structural and biochemical analysis of ERAP1 and ERAP2 to design and develop phosphinic pseudopeptide transition state analogs that can inhibit this family of enzymes with nM affinity. X-ray crystallographic analysis of one such inhibitor in complex with ERAP2 validated our design, revealing a canonical mode of binding in the active site of the enzyme, and highlighted the importance of the S2' pocket for achieving inhibitor potency. Antigen processing and presentation assays in HeLa and murine colon carcinoma (CT26) cells showed that these inhibitors induce increased cell-surface antigen presentation of transfected and endogenous antigens and enhance cytotoxic T-cell responses, indicating that these enzymes primarily destroy epitopes in those systems. This class of inhibitors constitutes a promising tool for controlling the cellular adaptive immune response in humans by modulating the antigen processing and presentation pathway. PMID:24248368

  19. Early Endosomal Antigen 1 (EEA1) Is an Obligate Scaffold for Angiotensin II-induced, PKC-α-dependent Akt Activation in Endosomes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarewicz, Rafal Robert; Salazar, Gloria; Patrushev, Nikolay; Martin, Alejandra San; Hilenski, Lula; Xiong, Shiqin; Alexander, R. Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) activation/phosphorylation by angiotensin II (Ang II) is a critical signaling event in hypertrophy of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Conventional wisdom asserts that Akt activation occurs mainly in plasma membrane domains. Recent evidence that Akt activation may take place within intracellular compartments challenges this dogma. The spatial identity and mechanistic features of these putative signaling domains have not been defined. Using cell fractionation and fluorescence methods, we demonstrate that the early endosomal antigen-1 (EEA1)-positive endosomes are a major site of Ang II-induced Akt activation. Akt moves to and is activated in EEA1 endosomes. The expression of EEA1 is required for phosphorylation of Akt at both Thr-308 and Ser-473 as well as for phosphorylation of its downstream targets mTOR and S6 kinase, but not for Erk1/2 activation. Both Akt and phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt) interact with EEA1. We also found that PKC-α is required for organizing Ang II-induced, EEA1-dependent Akt phosphorylation in VSMC early endosomes. EEA1 expression enables PKC-α phosphorylation, which in turn regulates Akt upstream signaling kinases, PDK1 and p38 MAPK. Our results indicate that PKC-α is a necessary regulator of EEA1-dependent Akt signaling in early endosomes. Finally, EEA1 down-regulation or expression of a dominant negative mutant of PKC-α blunts Ang II-induced leucine incorporation in VSMCs. Thus, EEA1 serves a novel function as an obligate scaffold for Ang II-induced Akt activation in early endosomes. PMID:21097843

  20. Blood feeding by the Rocky Mountain spotted fever vector, Dermacentor andersoni, induces interleukin-4 expression by cognate antigen responding CD4+ T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wikel Stephen K

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tick modulation of host defenses facilitates both blood feeding and pathogen transmission. Several tick species deviate host T cell responses toward a Th2 cytokine profile. The majority of studies of modulation of T cell cytokine expression by ticks were performed with lymphocytes from infested mice stimulated in vitro with polyclonal T cell activators. Those reports did not examine tick modulation of antigen specific responses. We report use of a transgenic T cell receptor (TCR adoptive transfer model reactive with influenza hemagglutinin peptide (110-120 to examine CD4+ T cell intracellular cytokine responses during infestation with the metastriate tick, Dermacentor andersoni, or exposure to salivary gland extracts. Results Infestation with pathogen-free D. andersoni nymphs or administration of an intradermal injection of female or male tick salivary gland extract induced significant increases of IL-4 transcripts in skin and draining lymph nodes of BALB/c mice as measured by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Furthermore, IL-10 transcripts were significantly increased in skin while IL-2 and IFN-γ transcripts were not significantly changed by tick feeding or intradermal injection of salivary gland proteins, suggesting a superimposed Th2 response. Infestation induced TCR transgenic CD4+ T cells to divide more frequently as measured by CFSE dilution, but more notably these CD4+ T cells also gained the capacity to express IL-4. Intracellular levels of IL-4 were significantly increased. A second infestation administered 14 days after a primary exposure to ticks resulted in partially reduced CFSE dilution with no change in IL-4 expression when compared to one exposure to ticks. Intradermal inoculation of salivary gland extracts from both male and female ticks also induced IL-4 expression. Conclusion This is the first report of the influence of a metastriate tick on the cytokine profile of antigen specific CD4+ T cells. Blood feeding

  1. Intra-articular vs. systemic administration of etanercept in antigen-induced arthritis in the temporomandibular point. Part I: histological effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyengaard Jens R

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporomandibular joint (TMJ arthritis in children causes alterations in craniomandibular growth. This abnormal growth may be prevented by an early anti-inflammatory intervention. We have previously shown that intra-articular (IA corticosteroid reduces TMJ inflammation, but causes concurrent mandibular growth inhibition in young rabbits. Blockage of TNF-α has already proven its efficacy in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis not responding to standard therapy. In this paper we evaluate the effect of IA etanercept compared to subcutaneous etanercept in antigen-induced TMJ-arthritis in rabbits on histological changes using histomorphometry and stereology. This article presents the data and discussion on the anti-inflammatory effects of systemic and IA etanercept. In Part II the data on the effects of systemic and IA etanercept on facial growth are presented. Methods Forty-two rabbits (10 weeks old pre-sensitized with ovalbumin and locally induced inflammation in the temporomandibular joints were divided into three groups: a placebo group receiving IA saline injections in both joints one week after arthritis induction (n = 14, an IA etanercept group receiving 0.1 mg/kg etanercept per joint one week after arthritis induction (n = 14 and a systemic etanercept group receiving 0.8 mg/kg etanercept weekly throughout the 12-week study (n = 14. Arthritis was maintained by giving four inductions three weeks apart. Additional IA saline or etanercept injections were also given one week after the re-inductions. Histomorphometric and unbiased stereological methods (optical fractionator were used to assess and estimate the inflammation in the joints. Results The histomorphometry showed synovial proliferation in all groups. The plasma cell count obtained by the optical fractionator was significantly reduced when treating with systemic etanercept but not with IA etanercept. Semi-quantitative assessments of synovial proliferation and

  2. Loss of phosphoinositide 3-kinase γ decreases migration and activation of phagocytes but not T cell activation in antigen-induced arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wetzker Reinhard

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphoinositide 3-kinase γ (PI3Kγ has been depicted as a major regulator of inflammatory processes, including leukocyte activation and migration towards several chemokines. This study aims to explore the role of PI3Kγ in the murine model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA. Methods Development of AIA was investigated in wildtype and PI3Kγ-deficient mice as well as in mice treated with a specific inhibitor of PI3Kγ (AS-605240 in comparison to untreated animals. Inflammatory reactions of leukocytes, including macrophage and T cell activation, and macrophage migration, were studied in vivo and in vitro. Results Genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of PI3Kγ induced a marked decrease of clinical symptoms in early AIA, together with a considerably diminished macrophage migration and activation (lower production of NO, IL-1β, IL-6. Also, macrophage and neutrophil infiltration into the knee joint were impaired in vivo. However, T cell functions, measured by cytokine production (TNFα, IFNγ, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-17 in vitro and DTH reaction in vivo were not altered, and accordingly, disease developed normally at later timepoints Conclusion PI3Kγ specifically affects phagocyte function in the AIA model but has no impact on T cell activation.

  3. Dibutyryl c-AMP as an inducer of sporidia formation: Biochemical and antigenic changes during morphological differentiation of Karnal bunt (Tilletia indica) pathogen in axenic culture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anil Kumar; Kaushlendra Tripathi; Manish Rana; Shalini Purwar; G K Garg

    2004-03-01

    Effect of dibutyryl adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (dbc-AMP), an analogue of c-AMP, was investigated on growth and morphological differentiation of Tilletia indica. Exponential growth was observed up to 21 days in both presence and absence of dbc-AMP; however, increasing concentration of dbc-AMP was deleterious to mycelial growth in liquid culture. A slow increase of mycelial biomass up to 21 days and decline at 30 days in the presence of 2.5 mM dbc-AMP was observed, therefore, this concentration was chosen in subsequent investigations. The inhibitory influence of dbc-AMP was further substantiated by decrease in soluble protein. The fungus on exposure to dbc-AMP experienced morphological differentiation from vegetative mycelial phase to sporogenous mycelial phase, and was induced to produce filiform sporidia. Use of quantitative ELISA further suggested that sporidia formation took more than 21 days in the presence of dbc-AMP. Variations of proteins during different stages of T. indica grown in the presence and absence of dbc-AMP suggested the expression of stage-specific proteins or differential expression of proteins induced by dbc-AMP. The changes in expression of cell surface antigens as evidenced from decrease and increase binding of anti-mycelial and anti-sporidial anti-bodies in dbc-AMP treated culture by ELISA was further interpreted on the basis of morphological differentiation from mycelial to sporidial phase.

  4. Natural variation in small molecule-induced TIR-NB-LRR signaling induces root growth arrest via EDS1- and PAD4-complexed R protein VICTR in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Houn; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Bhattacharjee, Saikat; Hauser, Felix; Park, Jiyoung; Engineer, Cawas; Liu, Amy; Ha, Tracy; Parker, Jane E; Gassmann, Walter; Schroeder, Julian I

    2012-12-01

    In a chemical genetics screen we identified the small-molecule [5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)furan-2-yl]-piperidine-1-ylmethanethione (DFPM) that triggers rapid inhibition of early abscisic acid signal transduction via PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4 (PAD4)- and ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1)-dependent immune signaling mechanisms. However, mechanisms upstream of EDS1 and PAD4 in DFPM-mediated signaling remain unknown. Here, we report that DFPM generates an Arabidopsis thaliana accession-specific root growth arrest in Columbia-0 (Col-0) plants. The genetic locus responsible for this natural variant, VICTR (VARIATION IN COMPOUND TRIGGERED ROOT growth response), encodes a TIR-NB-LRR (for Toll-Interleukin1 Receptor-nucleotide binding-Leucine-rich repeat) protein. Analyses of T-DNA insertion victr alleles showed that VICTR is necessary for DFPM-induced root growth arrest and inhibition of abscisic acid-induced stomatal closing. Transgenic expression of the Col-0 VICTR allele in DFPM-insensitive Arabidopsis accessions recapitulated the DFPM-induced root growth arrest. EDS1 and PAD4, both central regulators of basal resistance and effector-triggered immunity, as well as HSP90 chaperones and their cochaperones RAR1 and SGT1B, are required for the DFPM-induced root growth arrest. Salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signaling pathway components are dispensable. We further demonstrate that VICTR associates with EDS1 and PAD4 in a nuclear protein complex. These findings show a previously unexplored association between a TIR-NB-LRR protein and PAD4 and identify functions of plant immune signaling components in the regulation of root meristematic zone-targeted growth arrest. PMID:23275581

  5. Antigen presentation by small intestinal epithelial cells uniquely enhances IFN-γ secretion from CD4+ intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs). •sIECs are able to induce antigen specific proliferation of CD4+ IELs. •sIECs induce markedly enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4+ IELs. •Induction of enhanced IFN-γ secretion by sIECs is uniquely observed in CD4+ IELs. -- Abstract: Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs) express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules even in a normal condition, and are known to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) at least in vitro. These findings raised the possibility that sIECs play an important role in inducing immune responses against luminal antigens, especially those of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs). We herein showed that antigenic stimulation with sIECs induced markedly greater secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4+ IELs, but not interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17 although the proliferative response was prominently lower than that with T cell-depleted splenic APCs. In contrast, no enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4+ LPLs and primed splenic CD4+ T cells was observed when stimulated with sIECs. Taken together, these results suggest that sIECs uniquely activate CD4+ IELs and induce remarkable IFN-γ secretion upon antigenic stimulation in vivo

  6. Antigen presentation by small intestinal epithelial cells uniquely enhances IFN-γ secretion from CD4{sup +} intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Ryo; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Iwamoto, Taku; Maeda, Nana; Emoto, Tetsuro; Shimizu, Makoto; Totsuka, Mamoru, E-mail: atotuka@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs). •sIECs are able to induce antigen specific proliferation of CD4{sup +} IELs. •sIECs induce markedly enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} IELs. •Induction of enhanced IFN-γ secretion by sIECs is uniquely observed in CD4{sup +} IELs. -- Abstract: Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs) express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules even in a normal condition, and are known to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) at least in vitro. These findings raised the possibility that sIECs play an important role in inducing immune responses against luminal antigens, especially those of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs). We herein showed that antigenic stimulation with sIECs induced markedly greater secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4{sup +} IELs, but not interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17 although the proliferative response was prominently lower than that with T cell-depleted splenic APCs. In contrast, no enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} LPLs and primed splenic CD4{sup +} T cells was observed when stimulated with sIECs. Taken together, these results suggest that sIECs uniquely activate CD4{sup +} IELs and induce remarkable IFN-γ secretion upon antigenic stimulation in vivo.

  7. Effects of protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors on cytokine-induced adhesion molecule expression by human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    May, M. J.; Wheeler-Jones, C. P.; Pearson, J. D.

    1996-01-01

    1. Endothelial cells can be stimulated by the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1 alpha and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) alpha to express the leukocyte adhesion molecules E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 but the intracellular signalling mechanisms leading to this expression are incompletely understood. We have investigated the role of protein tyrosine kinases (PTK) in adhesion molecule expression by cytokine-activated ...

  8. Characterization of a human antigen specific helper factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While antigen (Ag) specific helper factors have been characterized in mice, similar molecules have not been identified in humans. To characterize human antigen specific helper molecules, an IL-2 dependent tetanus toxoid (T.T.) reactive T cell line was fused with a 6-thioguanine resistant CEM line, and hybrids selected in medium containing hypoxanthine and azaserine. Hybrids were screened by culturing the cells with 35S-Met then reacting the supernatants with T.T. or hepatitis vaccine immobilized on nitrocellulose. One hybrid, TT6BA-O, was identified which secreted a Met-containing molecule which bound T.T. but not hepatitis vaccine. Supernatants from TT6BA-O, but not the parent CEM line, when added to autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC's) stimulated secretion of T.T. specific antibodies (Abs). Specificity controls demonstrated that TT6BA-O supernatant did not induce antibodies to diphtheria toxoid, hepatitis vaccine or pneumococcal polysaccharide, and total immunoglobulin (lg) synthesis was minimally increased. In contrast, pokeweed mitogen stimulated significant lg synthesis as well as Ab's to pneumococcal polysaccharide and T.T. TT6BA-O supernatant induced anti-T.T.Ab's in autologous PBMC's but not PBMC's from 3 unrelated donors, suggesting that the activity of the helper factor is restricted, possibly by the MHC. The molecular weight of the helper factor was estimated at 100,000-150,000 by Sephacryl S-300 chromatography. Finally, the helper factor could be demonstrated to bind and elute from sephorose-immobilized T.T. and anti-DR antisera, but not anti-lg antisera or the T40/25 monoclonal antibody, which binds a nonpolymorphic determinant on the human T cell receptor. These results demonstrate that human Ag specific helper factors exist, bind antigen and bear class II MHC determinants

  9. Experimental study on the fragmentation of Adenine and Porphyrin molecules induced by low energy multicharged ion impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the dissociation of small molecules might play key roles in the understanding of radiation induced damages of living tissues at the primary steps and at the molecular levels, fragmentation dynamics of small biomolecules have drawn much attention. The knowledge of the internal energy is of fundamental importance for understanding its fragmentation dynamics following external excitation. For a long time however, it was difficult to measure this parameter in coincidence with the fragmentation patterns until the development of CIDEC (Collision Induced Dissociation under Energy Control) method in 2007. In this work, the CIDEC method was extended to study the fragmentation of gas-phase biomolecules adenine (Ade: H5C5N5) and porphyrin chloride FeTPPCl (C44H28N4FeCl). The population distribution for each dissociation channel as a function of the excitation energy of the parent molecular ions at a well-determined initial charge state has been experimentally determined, which could shed some light on the fragmentation dynamics of these molecules. In collisions between Cl+ and Ade at 3 keV, the fragmentation pattern of Ade2+ is dominated by the loss of H2CN+ and the successive emission of HCN. The energy distribution of the parent dication confirms the successive emission dynamics. A specific decay channel is observed, i.e. the emission of a charged H2CN+ followed by the emission of HC2N2. The measured mean excitation energies of this channel and other competitive channels are compared. In Kr8+ - FeTPPCl collisions at 80 keV, parent ions FeTPPCL1+,2+,3+ are observed, along with the corresponding decay patterns. It is found that, in the first step the dominant low-energy-cost decay channel is the emission of Cl0 independent of the initial charge state of FeTPPClr+. For the resulted dication FeTPP2+, the dominant fragmentation channel is the neutral evaporation; for the tri-cation however, the dominant fragmentation channel is the asymmetrical fission by emission of a

  10. Neural cell adhesion molecule-180-mediated homophilic binding induces epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) down-regulation and uncouples the inhibitory function of EGFR in neurite outgrowth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Povlsen, Gro Klitgaard; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays important roles in neuronal development, regeneration, and synaptic plasticity. NCAM homophilic binding mediates cell adhesion and induces intracellular signals, in which the fibroblast growth factor receptor plays a prominent role. Recent studies on...... this NCAM-180-induced EGFR down-regulation involves increased EGFR ubiquitination and lysosomal EGFR degradation. Furthermore, NCAM-180-mediated EGFR down-regulation requires NCAM homophilic binding and interactions of the cytoplasmic domain of NCAM-180 with intracellular interaction partners, but does...

  11. Transformation of SV40-immortalized human uroepithelial cells by 3-methylcholanthrene increases IFN- and Large T Antigen-induced transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Easton Marilyn J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simian Virus 40 (SV40 immortalization followed by treatment of cells with 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC has been used to elicit tumors in athymic mice. 3-MC carcinogenesis has been thoroughly studied, however gene-level interactions between 3-MC and SV40 that could have produced the observed tumors have not been explored. The commercially-available human uroepithelial cell lines were either SV40-immortalized (HUC or SV40-immortalized and then 3-MC-transformed (HUC-TC. Results To characterize the SV40 - 3MC interaction, we compared human gene expression in these cell lines using a human cancer array and confirmed selected changes by RT-PCR. Many viral Large T Antigen (Tag expression-related changes occurred in HUC-TC, and it is concluded that SV40 and 3-MC may act synergistically to transform cells. Changes noted in IFP 9-27, 2'-5' OAS, IF 56, MxA and MxAB were typical of those that occur in response to viral exposure and are part of the innate immune response. Because interferon is crucial to innate immune host defenses and many gene changes were interferon-related, we explored cellular growth responses to exogenous IFN-γ and found that treatment impeded growth in tumor, but not immortalized HUC on days 4 - 7. Cellular metabolism however, was inhibited in both cell types. We conclude that IFN-γ metabolic responses were functional in both cell lines, but IFN-γ anti-proliferative responses functioned only in tumor cells. Conclusions Synergism of SV40 with 3-MC or other environmental carcinogens may be of concern as SV40 is now endemic in 2-5.9% of the U.S. population. In addition, SV40-immortalization is a generally-accepted method used in many research materials, but the possibility of off-target effects in studies carried out using these cells has not been considered. We hope that our work will stimulate further study of this important phenomenon.

  12. Immunoprotective activity of a Salmonid Alphavirus Vaccine: comparison of the immune responses induced by inactivated whole virus antigen formulations based on CpG class B oligonucleotides and poly I:C alone or combined with an oil adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thim, Hanna L; Iliev, Dimitar B; Christie, Karen E; Villoing, Stéphane; McLoughlin, Marian F; Strandskog, Guro; Jørgensen, Jorunn B

    2012-07-01

    CpG oligonucleotides and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) are toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists that mimic the immunostimulatory properties of bacterial DNA and double-stranded viral RNA respectively, and which have exhibited potential to serve as vaccine adjuvants in previous experiments. Here, a combination of CpGs and poly I:C together with water- or oil-formulated Salmonid Alphavirus (SAV) antigen preparations has been used for a vaccine in Atlantic salmon and tested for protection in SAV challenge trial. The results demonstrate that vaccination with a high dose of the SAV antigen induced protection against challenge with SAV which correlated with production of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). As the high antigen dose alone induced full protection, no beneficial effect from the addition of CpG and poly I:C could be observed. Nevertheless, these TLR ligands significantly enhanced the levels of NAbs in serum of vaccinated fish. Interestingly, gene expression analysis demonstrated that while addition of oil suppressed the CpG/poly I:C-induced expression of IFN-γ, the upregulation of IFNa1 was substantially enhanced. A low dose of the SAV antigen combined with oil did not induce any detectable levels of NAbs either with or without TLR ligands present, however the addition of CpG and poly I:C to the low SAV antigen dose formulation significantly enhanced the protection against SAV suggesting that CpG/poly I:C may have enhanced a cytotoxic response - a process which is dependent on the up-regulation of type I IFN. These results highlight the immunostimulatory properties of the tested TLR ligands and will serve as a ground for further, more detailed studies aimed to investigate their capacity to serve as adjuvants in vaccine formulations for Atlantic salmon. PMID:22634299

  13. Carcinoma-associated antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to novel antigens associated with breast carcinoma, anti-sera specific to said antigens, 125I-labeled forms of said antigens and methods of detecting said antigens in serum or plasma. The invention also relates to a diagnostic kit containing standardised antigens or antisera or marked forms thereof for the detection of said antigens in human blood, serum or plasma. (author)

  14. Charge and Nuclear Dynamics Induced by Deep Inner-Shell Multiphoton Ionization of CH3I Molecules by Intense X-ray Free-Electron Laser Pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motomura, Koji; Kukk, Edwin; Fukuzawa, Hironobu; Wada, Shin-ichi; Nagaya, Kiyonobu; Ohmura, Satoshi; Mondal, Subhendu; Tachibana, Tetsuya; Ito, Yuta; Koga, Ryosuke; Sakai, Tsukasa; Matsunami, Kenji; Rudenko, Artem; Nicolas, Christophe; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Miron, Catalin; Zhang, Yizhu; Jiang, Yuhai; Chen, Jianhui; Anand, Mailam; Kim, Dong Eon; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Yao, Makoto; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, free-electron lasers operating in the true X-ray regime have opened up access to the femtosecond-scale dynamics induced by deep inner-shell ionization. We have investigated charge creation and transfer dynamics in the context of molecular Coulomb explosion of a single molecule, exposed to sequential deep inner-shell ionization within an ultrashort (10 fs) X-ray pulse. The target molecule was CH3I, methane sensitized to X-rays by halogenization with a heavy element, iodine. Time-of-flight ion spectroscopy and coincident ion analysis was employed to investigate, via the properties of the atomic fragments, single-molecule charge states of up to +22. Experimental findings have been compared with a parametric model of simultaneous Coulomb explosion and charge transfer in the molecule. The study demonstrates that including realistic charge dynamics is imperative when molecular Coulomb explosion experiments using short-pulse facilities are performed. PMID:26267186

  15. Identification of In Vivo-Induced Antigens Including an RTX Family Exoprotein Required for Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Virulence ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Vigil, Patrick D.; Alteri, Christopher J.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2011-01-01

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI) are caused most commonly by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). Whole-genome screening approaches, including transcriptomic, proteomic, and signature-tagged mutagenesis, have shown that UPEC highly expresses or requires genes for translational machinery, capsule, lipopolysaccharide, type 1 fimbriae, and iron acquisition systems during UTI. To identify additional genes expressed by UPEC during UTI, an immunoscreening approach termed in vivo-induc...

  16. Programmed Death-1 Antibody Blocks Therapeutic Effects of T-Regulatory Cells in Cockroach Antigen-Induced Allergic Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    McGee, Halvor S; Yagita, Hideo; Shao, Zhifei; Devendra K Agrawal

    2009-01-01

    We recently reported that the adoptive transfer of T-regulatory cells (Tregs) isolated from lung and spleen tissue of green fluorescent protein–transgenic mice reversed airway hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation. Because Programmed Death-1 (PD-1) is a pivotal receptor regulating effector T-cell activation by Tregs, we evaluated whether PD-1 is involved in the therapeutic effect of naturally occurring Tregs (NTregs) and inducible Tregs (iTregs) in cockroach (CRA)-sensitized and challen...

  17. Preventing carbon nanoparticle-induced lung inflammation reduces antigen-specific sensitization and subsequent allergic reactions in a mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Kroker, Matthias; Sydlik, Ulrich; Autengruber, Andrea; Cavelius, Christian; Weighardt, Heike; Kraegeloh, Annette; Unfried, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Background Exposure of the airways to carbonaceous nanoparticles can contribute to the development of immune diseases both via the aggravation of the allergic immune response in sensitized individuals and by adjuvant mechanisms during the sensitization against allergens. The cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in these adverse pathways are not completely understood. We recently described that the reduction of carbon nanoparticle-induced lung inflammation by the application of the compa...

  18. CD8+ T cells prevent antigen-induced antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue disease in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellweger, Raphaël M; Eddy, William E; Tang, William W; Miller, Robyn; Shresta, Sujan

    2014-10-15

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes pathologies ranging from the febrile illness dengue fever to the potentially lethal severe dengue disease. A major risk factor for developing severe dengue disease is the presence of subprotective DENV-reactive Abs from a previous infection (or from an immune mother), which can induce Ab-dependent enhancement of infection (ADE). However, infection in the presence of subprotective anti-DENV Abs does not always result in severe disease, suggesting that other factors influence disease severity. In this study we investigated how CD8(+) T cell responses influence the outcome of Ab-mediated severe dengue disease. Mice were primed with aluminum hydroxide-adjuvanted UV-inactivated DENV prior to challenge with DENV. Priming failed to induce robust CD8(+) T cell responses, and it induced nonneutralizing Ab responses that increased disease severity upon infection. Transfer of exogenous DENV-activated CD8(+) T cells into primed mice prior to infection prevented Ab-dependent enhancement and dramatically reduced viral load. Our results suggest that in the presence of subprotective anti-DENV Abs, efficient CD8(+) T cell responses reduce the risk of Ab-mediated severe dengue disease. PMID:25217165

  19. Latent period and antigenicity of murine tumors induced in C3H mice by short-wavelength ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skin tumors were induced in C3H/HeNCr1BR mice with chronic short-wavelength ultraviolet (UVC) irradiation using a germicidal lamp (254 nm). Fifty percent of mice had developed tumors by 9 1/2 months (range 8-12 months). With progressive irradiation, mice developed multiple tumors on the back reaching a mean of 2.9 tumors/mouse at 11 1/2 months. No tumors developed on the ears. Of 83 lesions examined histologically 66 (80%) were squamous cell carcinomas, 6 (7%) were fibrosarcomas, and 10 (12%) were proliferative squamous lesions without evident invasion. Twenty-two squamous cell carcinomas were transplanted s.c. into normal syngeneic mice and into mice immunosuppressed by adult thymectomy, lethal x-irradiation, and bone marrow or neonatal liver reconstitution. Transplantation of squamous cell carcinomas was successful in a total of 17/22 (77%) cases. Only 11/22 (50%) tumors grew progressively in normal mice. Six of 22 (27%) tumors grew progressively in immunosuppressed mice but not normal syngeneic recipients. Three fibrosarcomas were also transplanted. All 3 grew progressively in immunosuppressed hosts but failed to grow in normal syngeneic recipients. Two fibrosarcomas that were induced by a germicidal lamp were found to grow significantly better in UVB-irradiated (280-320 nm) mice than in normal mice. Conversely, a UVB-induced fibrosarcoma showed enhanced growth in UVC-irradiated mice compared to growth in normal, age-matched controls

  20. Ultrastructure of the extended ribonucleic acid molecules from purified ribosomes of Rous sarcoma virus-induced mouse ascites sarcoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamoto,Goki

    1974-04-01

    Full Text Available To clarify the ultrastructure of the extended ribosomal RNA molecules, electron microscopic observations were carried out on the RNA molecules extracted from purified ribosomes of mouse ascites sarcoma cells. By the treatment with ethylenediamine-tetraacetate agglomerated rRNA molecules were elongated to thread-like structure by partial unfolding. The lengths of thread-like molecules were measured as less than Iii. The strand of RNA molecules stained with uranyl acetate was observed approximately l5A in width.