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Sample records for antifibrinolytic trial tranexamic

  1. Tranexamic Acid as Antifibrinolytic Agent in Non Traumatic Intracerebral Hemorrhages

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    ARUMUGAM, Ananda; A RAHMAN, Noor Azman; THEOPHILUS, Sharon Casilda; SHARIFFUDIN, Ashraf; ABDULLAH, Jafri Malin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mortality and morbidity associated with intracerebral hemorrhage is still high. Up to now, there are no evidence-based effective treatments for acute ICH. This study is to assess the effect of tranexamic acid (TXA) on hematoma growth of patients with spontaneous ICH compared to a placebo. Methods: We performed a single-blinded, randomised placebo-controlled trial of TXA (intravenous 1g bolus, followed by infusion TXA 1 g/hour for 8 hours) in acute (< 8 hours) primary ICH. Strict blood pressure control (target SBP 140-160 mmHg). A repeat Computed Tomography brain was done after 24 hours to reassess hematoma growth. The primary objective is to test the effect of TXA on hematoma growth. Other objective was to test the feasibility, tolerability, and adverse events of TXA in primary ICH. Results: Statistical analysis showed significant hematoma growth in control group after 24 hours compared to baseline (14.3300 vs 17.9940, P = 0.001) whereas the treatment group there is no significant hematoma size expansion between baseline and after 24 hours (P = 0.313). Conclusions: This study showed a significant hematoma volume expansion in the control group compared to the treatment group. PMID:27006639

  2. Antifibrinolytics in liver surgery

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    Jalpa Makwana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperfibrinolysis, a known complication of liver surgery and orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT, plays a significant role in blood loss. This fact justifies the use of antifibrinolytic drugs during these procedures. Two groups of drug namely lysine analogues [epsilon aminocaproic acid (EACA and tranexamic acid (TA] and serine-protease-inhibitors (aprotinin are frequently used for this purpose. But uniform data or guidelines on the type of antifibrinolytic drugs to be used, their indications and correct dose, is still insufficient. Antifibrinolytics behave like a double-edged sword. On one hand, there are benefits of less transfusion requirements but on the other hand there is potential complication like thromboembolism, which has been reported in several studies. We performed a systematic search in PubMed and Cochrane Library, and we included studies wherein antifibrinolytic drugs (EACA, TA, or aprotinin were compared with each other or with controls/placebo. We analysed factors like intraoperative red blood cell and fresh frozen plasma requirements, the perioperative incidence of hepatic artery thrombosis, venous thromboembolic events and mortality. Among the three drugs, EACA is least studied. Use of extensively studied drug like aprotinin has been restricted because of its side effects. Haemostatic effect of aprotinin and tranexamic acid has been comparable. However, proper patient selection and individualized treatment for each of them is required. Purpose of this review is to study various clinical trials on antifibrinolytic drugs and address the related issues like benefits claimed and associated potential complications.

  3. Antifibrinolytic treatment in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, M.; Lindsay, K. W.; Murray, G. D.; Cheah, F.; Hijdra, A.; Muizelaar, J. P.; Schannong, M.; Teasdale, G. M.; van Crevel, H.; van Gijn, J.

    1984-01-01

    We enrolled 479 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to determine whether treatment with the antifibrinolytic agent tranexamic acid improves outcome by preventing rebleeding. At three months there was no statistical difference

  4. Tranexamic acid for upper gastrointestinal bleeding

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    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Klingenberg, Sarah Louise; Langholz, Ebbe

    2012-01-01

    Tranexamic acid reduces haemorrhage through its antifibrinolytic effects. In a previous version of the present review, we found that tranexamic acid may reduce mortality. The present review includes updated searches of randomised trials on tranexamic acid versus placebo, cimetidine or lansoprazole....

  5. The antifibrinolytic drug tranexamic acid reduces liver injury and fibrosis in a mouse model of chronic bile duct injury.

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    Joshi, Nikita; Kopec, Anna K; Towery, Keara; Williams, Kurt J; Luyendyk, James P

    2014-06-01

    Hepatic fibrin deposition has been shown to inhibit hepatocellular injury in mice exposed to the bile duct toxicant α-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT). Degradation of fibrin clots by fibrinolysis controls the duration and extent of tissue fibrin deposition. Thus, we sought to determine the effect of treatment with the antifibrinolytic drug tranexamic acid (TA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) deficiency on ANIT-induced liver injury and fibrosis in mice. Plasmin-dependent lysis of fibrin clots was impaired in plasma from mice treated with TA (1200 mg/kg i.p., administered twice daily). Prophylactic TA administration reduced hepatic inflammation and hepatocellular necrosis in mice fed a diet containing 0.025% ANIT for 2 weeks. Hepatic type 1 collagen mRNA expression and deposition increased markedly in livers of mice fed ANIT diet for 4 weeks. To determine whether TA treatment could inhibit this progression of liver fibrosis, mice were fed ANIT diet for 4 weeks and treated with TA for the last 2 weeks. Interestingly, TA treatment largely prevented increased deposition of type 1 collagen in livers of mice fed ANIT diet for 4 weeks. In contrast, biliary hyperplasia/inflammation and liver fibrosis were significantly increased in PAI-1(-/-) mice fed ANIT diet for 4 weeks. Overall, the results indicate that fibrinolytic activity contributes to ANIT diet-induced liver injury and fibrosis in mice. In addition, these proof-of-principle studies suggest the possibility that therapeutic intervention with an antifibrinolytic drug could form a novel strategy to prevent or reduce liver injury and fibrosis in patients with liver disease.

  6. Tranexamic Acid for Lower GI Hemorrhage: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial.

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    Smith, Stephen R; Murray, David; Pockney, Peter G; Bendinelli, Cino; Draganic, Brian D; Carroll, Rosemary

    2018-01-01

    Lower GI hemorrhage is a common source of morbidity and mortality. Tranexamic acid is an antifibrinolytic that has been shown to reduce blood loss in a variety of clinical conditions. Information regarding the use of tranexamic acid in treating lower GI hemorrhage is lacking. The aim of this trial was to determine the clinical efficacy of tranexamic acid when used for lower GI hemorrhage. This was a prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial. The study was conducted at a tertiary referral university hospital in Australia. Consecutive patients aged >18 years with lower GI hemorrhage requiring hospital admission from November 2011 to January 2014 were screened for trial eligibility (N = 265). A total of 100 patients were recruited after exclusions and were randomly assigned 1:1 to either tranexamic acid or placebo. The primary outcome was blood loss as determined by reduction in hemoglobin levels. The secondary outcomes were transfusion rates, transfusion volume, intervention rates for bleeding, length of hospital stay, readmission, and complication rates. There was no difference between groups with respect to hemoglobin drop (11 g/L of tranexamic acid vs 13 g/L of placebo; p = 0.9445). There was no difference with respect to transfusion rates (14/49 tranexamic acid vs 16/47 placebo; p = 0.661), mean transfusion volume (1.27 vs 1.93 units; p = 0.355), intervention rates (7/49 vs 13/47; p = 0.134), length of hospital stay (4.67 vs 4.74 d; p = 0.934), readmission, or complication rates. No complications occurred as a direct result of tranexamic acid use. A larger multicenter trial may be required to determine whether there are more subtle advantages with tranexamic acid use in some of the secondary outcomes. Tranexamic acid does not appear to decrease blood loss or improve clinical outcomes in patients presenting with lower GI hemorrhage in the context of this trial. see Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A453.

  7. Tranexamic acid for acute intracerebral hemorrhage growth predicted by spot sign trial: Rationale and design.

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    Liu, Liping; Wang, Yilong; Meng, Xia; Li, Na; Tan, Ying; Nie, Ximing; Liu, Dacheng; Zhao, Xingquan

    2017-04-01

    Rationale Acute intracerebral hemorrhage inflicts a high-economic and -health burden. Computed tomography angiography spot sign is a predictor of hematoma expansion, is associated with poor clinical outcome and is an important stratifying variable for patients treated with haemostatic therapy. Aims We aim to compare the effect of treatment with tranexamic acid to placebo for the prevention of hemorrhage growth in patients with high-risk acute intracerebral hemorrhage with a positive spot sign. Design The tranexamic acid for acute intracerebral hemorrhage growth predicted by spot sign (TRAIGE) is a prospective, multicenter, placebo-controlled, double-blind, investigator-led, randomized clinical trial that will include an estimated 240 participants. Patients with intracerebral hemorrhage demonstrating symptom onset within 8 h and with the spot sign as a biomarker for ongoing hemorrhage, and no contraindications for antifibrinolytic therapy, will be enrolled to receive either tranexamic acid or placebo. The primary outcome measure is the presence of hemorrhage growth defined as an increase in intracerebral hemorrhage volume >33% or >6 ml from baseline to 24 ± 2 h. The secondary outcomes include safety and clinical outcomes. Conclusion The TRAIGE trial evaluates the efficacy of haemostatic therapy with tranexamic acid in the prevention of hemorrhage growth among high-risk patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage.

  8. Tranexamic acid for upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Cathy; Klingenberg, Sarah Louise; Langholz, Ebbe

    2014-01-01

    Background Tranexamic acid reduces haemorrhage through its antifibrinolytic effects. In a previous version of the present review, we found that tranexamic acid may reduce mortality. This review includes updated searches and new trials.Objectives To assess the effects of tranexamic acid versus......-effect and random-effects model meta-analyses and presented results as risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and used I² as a measure of between-trial heterogeneity. We analysed tranexamic acid versus placebo or no intervention and tranexamic acid versus antiulcer drugs separately. To analyse...... sources of heterogeneity and robustness of the overall results, we performed subgroup, sensitivity and sequential analyses.Main results We included eight randomised controlled trials on tranexamic acid for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Additionally, we identified one large ongoing pragmatic randomised...

  9. Anti-hemorrhagic effect of prophylactic tranexamic acid in benign hysterectomy-a double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topsoee, Märta Fink; Bergholt, Thomas; Ravn, Pernille

    2016-01-01

    and in 2004, 8% of all women in Denmark undergoing benign hysterectomy experienced a bleeding complication. Tranexamic acid is an antifibrinolytic agent that has shown to effectively reduce bleeding complications within other surgical and medical areas. However, knowledge about the drug's effect in relation...... to benign hysterectomy is still missing. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the antihemorrhagic effect of prophylactic tranexamic acid in elective benign hysterectomy. STUDY DESIGN: A double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled trial was conducted at 4 gynecological departments in Denmark from April 2013 to October...... 2014. A total of 332 women undergoing benign abdominal, laparoscopic, or vaginal hysterectomy were included in the trial, randomized to either 1 g of intravenous tranexamic acid or placebo at start of surgery. Chi-square test and Student t test statistical analyses were applied. RESULTS: The primary...

  10. A comparison of high-dose and low-dose tranexamic acid antifibrinolytic protocols for primary coronary artery bypass surgery

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    Stephen M McHugh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Tranexamic acid (TA is used for prophylactic antifibrinolysis in coronary artery bypass surgeries to reduce bleeding. We evaluated the efficacy of two different doses of TA for prophylactic antifibrinolysis in patients undergoing primary coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG surgery in this retrospective cohort study at a tertiary care referral centre. Methods: One-hundred eighty-four patients who underwent primary CABG with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB via sternotomy between January 2009 and June 2011 were evaluated. Pre-operative patient characteristics, intraoperative data, post-operative bleeding, transfusions, organ dysfunction and 30-day mortality were compared between high-dose TA (30 mg/kg loading dose followed by infusion of 15 mg/kg/h until the end of surgery along with 2 mg/kg priming dose in the bypass circuit and low-dose TA (15 mg/kg loading dose followed by infusion of 6 mg/kg/h until the end of surgery along with 1 mg/kg priming dose in the bypass circuit groups. Univariate comparative analysis of all categorical and continuous variables was performed between the two groups by appropriate statistical tests. Linear and logistic regression analyses were performed to control for the effect of confounding on the outcome variables. Results: Chest tube output, perioperative transfusion of blood products and incidence of re-exploration for bleeding did not differ significantly (P> 0.05 between groups. Post-operative complications and 30-day mortality were comparable between the groups. The presence of cardiogenic shock and increased pre-operative creatinine were found to be associated with increased chest tube output on the post-operative day 2 by multivariable linear regression model. Conclusions: Low-dose TA protocol is as effective as high-dose protocol for antifibrinolysis in patients undergoing primary CABG with CPB.

  11. Intravenous Tranexamic Acid Bolus plus Infusion Is Not More Effective than a Single Bolus in Primary Hip Arthroplasty: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

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    Zufferey, Paul J; Lanoiselée, Julien; Chapelle, Céline; Borisov, Dmitry B; Bien, Jean-Yves; Lambert, Pierre; Philippot, Rémi; Molliex, Serge; Delavenne, Xavier

    2017-09-01

    Preoperative administration of the antifibrinolytic agent tranexamic acid reduces bleeding in patients undergoing hip arthroplasty. Increased fibrinolytic activity is maintained throughout the first day postoperation. The objective of the study was to determine whether additional perioperative administration of tranexamic acid would further reduce blood loss. This prospective, double-blind, parallel-arm, randomized, superiority study was conducted in 168 patients undergoing unilateral primary hip arthroplasty. Patients received a preoperative intravenous bolus of 1 g of tranexamic acid followed by a continuous infusion of either tranexamic acid 1 g (bolus-plus-infusion group) or placebo (bolus group) for 8 h. The primary outcome was calculated perioperative blood loss up to day 5. Erythrocyte transfusion was implemented according to a restrictive transfusion trigger strategy. The mean perioperative blood loss was 919 ± 338 ml in the bolus-plus-infusion group (84 patients analyzed) and 888 ± 366 ml in the bolus group (83 patients analyzed); mean difference, 30 ml (95% CI, -77 to 137; P = 0.58). Within 6 weeks postsurgery, three patients in each group (3.6%) underwent erythrocyte transfusion and two patients in the bolus group experienced distal deep-vein thrombosis. A meta-analysis combining data from this study with those of five other trials showed no incremental efficacy of additional perioperative administration of tranexamic acid. A preoperative bolus of tranexamic acid, associated with a restrictive transfusion trigger strategy, resulted in low erythrocyte transfusion rates in patients undergoing hip arthroplasty. Supplementary perioperative administration of tranexamic acid did not achieve any further reduction in blood loss.

  12. Antifibrinolytics in cardiac surgery

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    Achal Dhir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac surgery exerts a significant strain on the blood bank services and is a model example in which a multi-modal blood-conservation strategy is recommended. Significant bleeding during cardiac surgery, enough to cause re-exploration and/or blood transfusion, increases morbidity and mortality. Hyper-fibrinolysis is one of the important contributors to increased bleeding. This knowledge has led to the use of anti-fibrinolytic agents especially in procedures performed under cardiopulmonary bypass. Nothing has been more controversial in recent times than the aprotinin controversy. Since the withdrawal of aprotinin from the world market, the choice of antifibrinolytic agents has been limited to lysine analogues either tranexamic acid (TA or epsilon amino caproic acid (EACA. While proponents of aprotinin still argue against its non-availability. Health Canada has approved its use, albeit under very strict regulations. Antifibrinolytic agents are not without side effects and act like double-edged swords, the stronger the anti-fibrinolytic activity, the more serious the side effects. Aprotinin is the strongest in reducing blood loss, blood transfusion, and possibly, return to the operating room after cardiac surgery. EACA is the least effective, while TA is somewhere in between. Additionally, aprotinin has been implicated in increased mortality and maximum side effects. TA has been shown to increase seizure activity, whereas, EACA seems to have the least side effects. Apparently, these agents do not differentiate between pathological and physiological fibrinolysis and prevent all forms of fibrinolysis leading to possible thrombotic side effects. It would seem prudent to select the right agent knowing its risk-benefit profile for a given patient, under the given circumstances.

  13. The effect of tranexamic acid on the risk of death and hysterectomy in women with post-partum haemorrhage: statistical analysis plan for the WOMAN trial.

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    Shakur, Haleema; Roberts, Ian; Edwards, Philip; Elbourne, Diana; Alfirevic, Zarko; Ronsmans, Carine

    2016-05-17

    Severe haemorrhage is a leading cause of maternal death worldwide. Most haemorrhage deaths occur soon after childbirth. Severe post-partum bleeding is sometimes managed by the surgical removal of the uterus (hysterectomy). Death and hysterectomy are important health consequences of post-partum haemorrhage, and clinical trials of interventions aimed at preventing these outcomes are needed. The World Maternal Antifibrinolytic trial aims to determine the effect of tranexamic acid on death, hysterectomy and other health outcomes in women with post-partum haemorrhage. It is an international, multicentre, randomised trial. Approximately 20,000 women with post-partum haemorrhage will be randomly allocated to receive an intravenous injection of either tranexamic acid or matching placebo in addition to usual care. The primary outcome measure is a composite of death in hospital or hysterectomy within 42 days of delivery. The cause of death will be described. Secondary outcomes include death, death due to bleeding, hysterectomy, thromboembolic events, blood transfusion, surgical and radiological interventions, complications, adverse events and quality of life. The health status and occurrence of thromboembolic events in breastfed babies will also be reported. We will conduct subgroup analyses for the primary outcome by time to treatment, type of delivery and cause of haemorrhage. We will conduct an analysis of treatment effect adjusted for baseline risk. The World Maternal Antifibrinolytic trial should provide reliable evidence for the efficacy of tranexamic acid in the prevention of death, hysterectomy and other outcomes that are important to patients. We present a protocol update and the statistical analysis plan for the trial. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN76912190 (Registration date 08 December 2008), Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00872469 (Registration date 30 March 2009) and Pan African Clinical Trials Registry: PACTR201007000192283 (Registration date 02 September 2010).

  14. Antifibrinolytics for heavy menstrual bleeding.

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    Bryant-Smith, Alison C; Lethaby, Anne; Farquhar, Cindy; Hickey, Martha

    2018-04-15

    Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) is an important physical and social problem for women. Oral treatment for HMB includes antifibrinolytic drugs, which are designed to reduce bleeding by inhibiting clot-dissolving enzymes in the endometrium.Historically, there has been some concern that using the antifibrinolytic tranexamic acid (TXA) for HMB may increase the risk of venous thromboembolic disease. This is an umbrella term for deep venous thrombosis (blood clots in the blood vessels in the legs) and pulmonary emboli (blood clots in the blood vessels in the lungs). To determine the effectiveness and safety of antifibrinolytic medications as a treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding. We searched the Cochrane Gynaecology and Fertility (CGF) Group trials register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO and two trials registers in November 2017, together with reference checking and contact with study authors and experts in the field. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing antifibrinolytic agents versus placebo, no treatment or other medical treatment in women of reproductive age with HMB. Twelve studies utilised TXA and one utilised a prodrug of TXA (Kabi). We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. The primary review outcomes were menstrual blood loss (MBL), improvement in HMB, and thromboembolic events. We included 13 RCTs (1312 participants analysed). The evidence was very low to moderate quality: the main limitations were risk of bias (associated with lack of blinding, and poor reporting of study methods), imprecision and inconsistency.Antifibrinolytics (TXA or Kabi) versus no treatment or placeboWhen compared with a placebo, antifibrinolytics were associated with reduced mean blood loss (MD -53.20 mL per cycle, 95% CI -62.70 to -43.70; I² = 8%; 4 RCTs, participants = 565; moderate-quality evidence) and higher rates of improvement (RR 3.34, 95% CI 1.84 to 6.09; 3 RCTS, participants = 271; moderate-quality evidence). This suggests that

  15. Tranexamic acid for treatment of women with post-partum haemorrhage in Nigeria and Pakistan: a cost-effectiveness analysis of data from the WOMAN trial.

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    Li, Bernadette; Miners, Alec; Shakur, Haleema; Roberts, Ian

    2018-02-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa and southern Asia account for almost 85% of global maternal deaths from post-partum haemorrhage. Early administration of tranexamic acid, within 3 h of giving birth, was shown to reduce the risk of death due to bleeding in women with post-partum haemorrhage in the World Maternal Antifibrinolytic (WOMAN) trial. We aimed to assess the cost-effectiveness of early administration of tranexamic acid for treatment of post-partum haemorrhage. For this economic evaluation we developed a decision model to assess the cost-effectiveness of the addition of tranexamic acid to usual care for treatment of women with post-partum haemorrhage in Nigeria and Pakistan. We used data from the WOMAN trial to inform model parameters, supplemented by estimates from the literature. We estimated costs (calculated in 2016 US$), life-years, and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) with and without tranexamic acid, calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs), and compared these to threshold values in each country. Costs were assessed from the health-care provider perspective and discounted at 3% per year in the base case analysis. We did a series of one-way sensitivity analyses and probabilistic sensitivity analysis to assess the robustness of the results to parameter uncertainty. Early treatment of post-partum haemorrhage with tranexamic acid generated an average gain of 0·18 QALYs at an additional cost of $37·12 per patient in Nigeria and an average gain of 0·08 QALYs at an additional cost of $6·55 per patient in Pakistan. The base case ICER results were $208 per QALY in Nigeria and $83 per QALY in Pakistan. These ICERs were below the lower bound of the cost-effectiveness threshold range in both countries. The ICERs were most sensitive to uncertainty in parameter inputs for the relative risk of death due to bleeding with tranexamic acid, the discount rate, the cost of the drug, and the baseline probability of death due to bleeding. Early treatment of post

  16. Efficacy and Safety of Tranexamic Acid in Control of Bleeding Following TKR: A Randomized Clinical Trial

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    P N Kakar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Total knee arthroplasty (TKA is generally carried out using a tourniquet and blood loss occurring mainly post operatively is collected in drains. Tranexamic acid is an antifibrinolytic agent which decreases the total blood loss. Patients had unilateral / bilateral cemented TKA using combined spinal and epidural anaesthesia. In a double-blind fashion, they received either placebo (n=25 or tranexamic acid (n=2510 mg.kg -1 i.v., just before tourniquet inflation, followed by 1 mg kg -1 h -1 i.v. till closure of the wound. The postoperative blood loss, transfusion requirement, cost effectiveness and complications were noted. The groups had similar characteristics. The mean volume of drainage fluid was 270 ml and 620 ml for unilateral(U/L and bilateral(B/L TKR patients in placebo group. Whereas it was 160ml and 286 ml respectively in unilateral(U/L and bilateral(B/L TKR patients who received tranexamic acid. This was considered statistically significant. Control group patients received 26 units of PRBC as compared to 4 units in tranexamic acid groups (p 80% blood transfusion.

  17. Treatment of intracerebral haemorrhage with tranexamic acid – A review of current evidence and ongoing trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Law, Zhe Kang; Meretoja, Atte; Engelter, Stefan T

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Haematoma expansion is a devastating complication of intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) with no established treatment. Tranexamic acid had been an effective haemostatic agent in reducing post-operative and traumatic bleeding. We review current evidence examining the efficacy of tranexamic acid...... in improving clinical outcome after ICH. Method We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL and clinical trial registers for studies using search strategies incorporating the terms ‘intracerebral haemorrhage’, ‘tranexamic acid’ and ‘antifibrinolytic’. Authors of ongoing clinical trials were contacted for further...... details. Findings We screened 268 publications and retrieved 17 articles after screening. Unpublished information from three ongoing clinical trials was obtained. We found five completed studies. Of these, two randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing intravenous tranexamic acid to placebo (n = 54...

  18. Effect of tranexamic acid on gross hematuria: A pilot randomized clinical trial study.

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    Moharamzadeh, Payman; Ojaghihaghighi, Seyedhossein; Amjadi, Mohsen; Rahmani, Farzad; Farjamnia, Arezoo

    2017-12-01

    Local forms of the tranexamic acid have been effective in treating many haemorrhagic cases. So that the aim of the current study is to assess the effectiveness of local tranexamic acid in controlling painless hematuria in patients referred to the emergency department. This is a randomized, double-blind clinical trial study, which was conducted on 50 patients with complaints of painless lower urinary tract bleeding during June 2014 and August 2015. The patients were randomly divided into two groups of 25 people each, one group receiving tranexamic acid and the other given a placebo. During bladder irrigation, local tranexamic acid and the placebo were injected into the bladder via Foley catheter. Patients were examined over 24h in terms of the amount of normal saline serum used for irrigation, level of hemoglobin, and blood in urine. In this study it was observed that consumption of tranexamic acid significantly decreased the volume of used serum for bladder irrigation (P=0.041) and the microscopic status of urine decreased significantly in terms of the hematuria after 24h (P=0.026). However, the rate of packed cell transfusion and drop in hemoglobin levels showed no significant difference in both groups of patients (P˃0.05). The results of this study showed that tranexamic acid could significantly reduce the volume of required serum for bladder irrigation to clear urine, but it had no significant effect on the drop in serum hemoglobin levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Treatment of menorrhagia during menstruation: randomised controlled trial of ethamsylate, mefenamic acid, and tranexamic acid.

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    Bonnar, J; Sheppard, B L

    1996-09-07

    To compare the efficacy and acceptability of ethamsylate, mefenamic acid, and tranexamic acid for treating menorrhagia. Randomised controlled trial. A university department of obstetrics and gynaecology. 76 women with dysfunctional uterine bleeding. Treatment for five days from day 1 of menses during three consecutive menstrual periods. 27 patients were randomised to take ethamsylate 500 mg six hourly, 23 patients to take mefenamic acid 500 mg eight hourly, and 26 patients to take tranexamic acid 1 g six hourly. Menstrual loss measured by the alkaline haematin method in three control menstrual periods and three menstrual periods during treatment; duration of bleeding; patient's estimation of blood loss; sanitary towel usage; the occurrence of dysmenorrhoea; and unwanted events. Ethamsylate did not reduce mean menstrual blood loss whereas mefenamic acid reduced blood loss by 20% (mean blood loss 186 ml before treatment, 148 ml during treatment) and tranexamic acid reduced blood loss by 54% (mean blood loss 164 ml before treatment, 75 ml during treatment). Sanitary towel usage was significantly reduced in patients treated with mefenamic acid and tranexamic acid. Tranexamic acid given during menstruation is a safe and highly effective treatment for excessive bleeding. Patients with dysfunctional uterine bleeding should be offered medical treatment with tranexamic acid before a decision is made about surgery.

  20. Antifibrinolytic drugs for treating primary postpartum haemorrhage.

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    Shakur, Haleema; Beaumont, Danielle; Pavord, Sue; Gayet-Ageron, Angele; Ker, Katharine; Mousa, Hatem A

    2018-02-20

    Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) - heaving bleeding within the first 24 hours after giving birth - is one of the main causes of death of women after childbirth. Antifibrinolytics, primarily tranexamic acid (TXA), have been shown to reduce bleeding in surgery and safely reduces mortality in trauma patients with bleeding without increasing the risk of adverse events.An earlier Cochrane review on treatments for primary PPH covered all the various available treatments - that review has now been split by types of treatment. This new review concentrates only on the use of antifibrinolytic drugs for treating primary PPH. To determine the effectiveness and safety of antifibrinolytic drugs for treating primary PPH. We searched Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth's Trials Register, ClinicalTrials.gov, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (28 May 2017) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), including cluster-randomised trials of antifibrinolytic drugs (aprotinin, TXA, epsilon-aminocaproic acid (EACA) and aminomethylbenzoic acid, administered by whatever route) for primary PPH in women.Participants in the trials were women after birth following a pregnancy of at least 24 weeks' gestation with a diagnosis of PPH, regardless of mode of birth (vaginal or caesarean section) or other aspects of third stage management.We have not included quasi-randomised trials, or cross-over studies. Studies reported as abstracts have not been included if there was insufficient information to allow assessment of risk of bias.In this review we only identified studies looking at TXA. Two review authors independently extracted data from each study using an agreed form. We entered data into Review Manager software and checked for accuracy.For key review outcomes, we rated the quality of the evidence as 'high', 'moderate', 'low' or 'very low' according to the GRADE approach. Three trials (20,412 women) met our inclusion criteria. Two trials

  1. Use of topical tranexamic acid or aminocaproic acid to prevent bleeding after major surgical procedures.

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    Ipema, Heather J; Tanzi, Maria G

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the literature describing topical use of tranexamic acid or aminocaproic acid for prevention of postoperative bleeding after major surgical procedures. Literature was retrieved through MEDLINE (1946-September 2011) and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970-September 2011) using the terms tranexamic acid, aminocaproic acid, antifibrinolytic, topical, and surgical. In addition, reference citations from publications identified were reviewed. All identified articles in English were evaluated. Clinical trials, case reports, and meta-analyses describing topical use of tranexamic acid or aminocaproic acid to prevent postoperative bleeding were included. A total of 16 publications in the setting of major surgical procedures were included; the majority of data were for tranexamic acid. For cardiac surgery, 4 trials used solutions containing tranexamic acid (1-2.5 g in 100-250 mL of 0.9% NaCl), and 1 trial assessed a solution containing aminocaproic acid (24 g in 250 mL of 0.9% NaCl). These solutions were poured into the chest cavity before sternotomy closure. For orthopedic procedures, all of the data were for topical irrigation solutions containing tranexamic acid (500 mg-3 g in 50-100 mL of 0.9% NaCl) or for intraarticular injections of tranexamic acid (250 mg to 2 g in 20-50 mL of 0.9% sodium chloride, with or without carbazochrome sodium sulfate). Overall, use of topical tranexamic acid or aminocaproic acid reduced postoperative blood loss; however, few studies reported a significant reduction in the number of packed red blood cell transfusions or units given, intensive care unit stay, or length of hospitalization. Topical application of tranexamic acid and aminocaproic acid to decrease postsurgical bleeding after major surgical procedures is a promising strategy. Further data are needed regarding the safety of this hemostatic approach.

  2. Double blind, placebo-controlled trial of Tranexamic acid on recent internal hemorrhoid bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul A. Rani

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Double blind randomized placebo controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of Tranexamic acid in 54 patients with recent hemorrhoid bleeding. Age, gender, body weight, height, grade of hemorrhoid, time of onset of recent bleeding were comparable between two groups. Analysis of haemostatic effect or stop bleeding as an immediate outcome of this study revealed that in the grade 2 patients, 23/23 (100% of tranexamic group and 18/23(78.26% of placebo group the bleeding stop. After 3 days of observation, there was statistically significant different for the rate of stop bleeding as well as at the end of observation. Bleeding stop earlier in the Tranexamic group with median 4 days (3-5 days, compare to placebo, median 11(9.55-12.45. Analysis of recurrent bleeding as an outcome of this study revealed that in the placebo group 9/18(50% of grade 2 patients and all grade 3 (100%patients suffered from recurrent bleeding. Since the days 4, both group have significant different time for recurrent bleeding and at the end of observation, cumulative probability of free of bleeding between two groups significantly different. Median still stop bleeding in the placebo group was 36 days, and the tranexamic group never reaches the median until the end of observation. Conclusion: tranexamic acid was an effective drug to stop recent hemorrhoid bleeding and prevent further recurrent bleeding, significantly better than placebo. (Med J Indones 2002;11: 215-21Keywords: Tranexamic acid, hemorrhoid bleeding, haemostatic effect, recurrent bleeding.

  3. Zinc phosphide toxicity with a trial of tranexamic acid in its management

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    Abdel Rahman M. El Naggar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Zinc phosphide is a highly effective rodenticide used widely to protect grain in stores and domestically to kill rodents. Acute poisoning may be direct by ingestion or indirect through accidental inhalation of phosphine gas generated during its use. This study aims to identify the patterns of intoxication with zinc phosphide among Egyptian patients admitted to the National Egyptian Center of Clinical and Environmental Toxicological Research (NECTR; to study the role of antifibrinolytics in management of zinc phosphide toxicity; and to publish the results of the study, which include recommendations for action towards planning prevention and education programs. The study provides descriptive data and analysis of 188 cases admitted to the NECTR with acute zinc phosphide poisoning over a period of 22 months. Results show that poisoning is more common among females (60.6% of cases than males (39.4%; the mean age is nearly 21 years old. The most common cause of poisoning is suicidal attempts (83.6% followed by accidental exposure (16.4%. The most common causative factors that lead to self-poisoning are marital disharmony, economic hardship, social problems and scolding from other family members. Signs and symptoms of toxicity include gastrointestinal disturbances, respiratory compromise and changes in mental status. Other features include disseminated intravascular coagulation, hepatic and renal impairment. Metabolic disturbances had been reported. Death can result immediately due to pulmonary edema or delayed due to cardiotoxicity. Patients must be admitted to hospital and observed for at least 3 days. Symptomatic and supportive care is the mainstay of therapy. Zinc phosphide poisoning requires gastric lavage with excessive sodium bicarbonate solution. Tranexamic acid – an antifibrinolytic agent – was found to be of help in some cases. Psychosocial counseling in cases of intentional poisoning is an important aspect of overall management of the

  4. What is the Ideal Route of Administration of Tranexamic Acid in TKA? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

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    Lee, Sung Yup; Chong, Suri; Balasubramanian, Dhanasekaraprabu; Na, Young Gon; Kim, Tae Kyun

    2017-08-01

    TKA commonly involves substantial blood loss and tranexamic acid has been used to reduce blood loss after TKA. Numerous clinical trials have documented the efficacy and safety of intravenous (IV) or intraarticular (IA) use of tranexamic acid. Combined administration of tranexamic acid also has been suggested; however, there is no consensus regarding the ideal route of tranexamic acid administration. (1) To compare the efficacy of tranexamic acid in terms of total blood loss and the allogeneic transfusion rate among three routes of administration: IV alone, IA alone, and combined IV and IA. (2) To compare these regimens in terms of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and the frequency of wound complications. In total, 376 patients undergoing TKA between March 2014 and March 2015 were randomized to four groups by the route of tranexamic acid administration: IV only, IA only, low-dose combined (IV + IA injection of 1 g), and high-dose combined (IV + IA injection of 2 g). The calculated total blood loss, allogeneic transfusion rate, decrease in hemoglobin, the frequency of symptomatic deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, wound complications, and periprosthetic joint infection were compared among the groups. Total blood loss was calculated using estimated total body blood volume and hemoglobin loss. The decision regarding when to transfuse was determined based on preset criteria. The high- and low-dose combined groups and the IA-only group had lower total blood loss (564 ± 242 mL, 642 ± 242 mL, and 633 ± 205 mL, respectively) than the IV-only group (764 ± 217 mL; mean differences = 199 mL [95% CI, 116-283 mL], p tranexamic acid administration further reduces blood loss after TKA in comparison to IV use alone; no additional effect in further reducing blood loss was found in combination with IV tranexamic acid. Appropriately powered studies are needed to confirm the safety of this route of administration as the preferred route of administration in TKA. Level I

  5. A comparative study of tranexamic acid and ethamsylate in menorrhagia

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    Nita K. Patel; Manish R. Pandya

    2012-01-01

    Background: Menorrhagia interferes with the woman's physical, social, emotional, and/or material quality of life. Antifibrinolytic drugs are effective in decreasing excessive menstrual bleeding. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of tranexamic acid and ethamsylate on quality of life in women with menorrhagia. Methods: The 50 women with menorrhagia were randomised to receive either tranexamic acid or ethamsylate. Twenty five patients were allocated to receive tranexamic aci...

  6. Use of Tranexamic Acid Is Associated with Reduced Blood Product Transfusion in Complex Skull Base Neurosurgical Procedures: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

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    Mebel, Dmitry; Akagami, Ryojo; Flexman, Alana M

    2016-02-01

    Compared with other procedures, complex skull base neurosurgery has the potential for increased intraoperative blood loss yet coagulation near eloquent cranial structures should be minimized. The safety and efficacy of the antifibrinolytic, tranexamic acid in elective neurosurgical procedures is not known. Our primary objective was to determine the relationship between the use of tranexamic acid and transfusion at our institution. Our secondary objective was to determine the incidence of adverse events associated with the use of tranexamic acid. In this retrospective cohort study, we included all patients who underwent complex skull base neurosurgical procedures at our institution between 2001 and 2013. Tranexamic acid was introduced during these procedures in 2006. Patient and surgical variables, transfusion data, and adverse events in the perioperative period were abstracted from the medical record. The rates of transfusion and adverse events were compared between patients who did and did not receive tranexamic acid. Multivariate regression was used to identify independent predictors of perioperative transfusion. We compared 245 patients who received tranexamic acid with 274 patients who did not receive the drug during the study period. The 2 groups were similar, with the exception that patients who received tranexamic acid had larger tumors (mean, 3.5 vs 2.9 cm; P tranexamic acid was lower (7% vs 13%, P = 0.04). After adjusting for preoperative hemoglobin, tumor diameter, and surgical procedure category, the use of tranexamic acid was independently predictive of perioperative transfusion (adjusted odds ratio, 0.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.15-0.65, P = 0.002). The rates of thromboembolic events and seizure were similar between the 2 groups. Our results demonstrate that tranexamic acid use is associated with reduced transfusion rates in our study population, with no apparent increase in seizure or thrombotic complications. Our data support the need for further

  7. Low-Dose Epinephrine Plus Tranexamic Acid Reduces Early Postoperative Blood Loss and Inflammatory Response: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

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    Zeng, Wei-Nan; Liu, Jun-Li; Wang, Fu-You; Chen, Cheng; Zhou, Qiang; Yang, Liu

    2018-02-21

    The reductions of perioperative blood loss and inflammatory response are important in total knee arthroplasty. Tranexamic acid reduced blood loss and the inflammatory response in several studies. However, the effect of epinephrine administration plus tranexamic acid has not been intensively investigated, to our knowledge. In this study, we evaluated whether the combined administration of low-dose epinephrine plus tranexamic acid reduced perioperative blood loss or inflammatory response further compared with tranexamic acid alone. This randomized placebo-controlled trial consisted of 179 consecutive patients who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty. Patients were randomized into 3 interventions: Group IV received intravenous low-dose epinephrine plus tranexamic acid, Group TP received topical diluted epinephrine plus tranexamic acid, and Group CT received tranexamic acid alone. The primary outcome was perioperative blood loss on postoperative day 1. Secondary outcomes included perioperative blood loss on postoperative day 3, coagulation and fibrinolysis parameters (measured by thromboelastography), inflammatory cytokine levels, transfusion values (rate and volume), thromboembolic complications, length of hospital stay, wound score, range of motion, and Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) score. The mean calculated total blood loss (and standard deviation) in Group IV was 348.1 ± 158.2 mL on postoperative day 1 and 458.0 ± 183.4 mL on postoperative day 3, which were significantly reduced (p 0.05). The combined administration of low-dose epinephrine and tranexamic acid demonstrated an increased effect in reducing perioperative blood loss and the inflammatory response compared with tranexamic acid alone, with no apparent increased incidence of thromboembolic and other complications. Therapeutic Level I. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  8. CRASH-2 Study of Tranexamic Acid to Treat Bleeding in Trauma Patients: A Controversy Fueled by Science and Social Media.

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    Binz, Sophia; McCollester, Jonathon; Thomas, Scott; Miller, Joseph; Pohlman, Timothy; Waxman, Dan; Shariff, Faisal; Tracy, Rebecca; Walsh, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the application of tranexamic acid, an antifibrinolytic, to trauma. CRASH-2, a large randomized controlled trial, was the first to show a reduction in mortality and recommend tranexamic acid use in bleeding trauma patients. However, this paper was not without controversy. Its patient recruitment, methodology, and conductance in moderate-to-low income countries cast doubt on its ability to be applied to trauma protocols in countries with mature trauma networks. In addition to traditional vetting in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, CRASH-2 came about at a time when advances in communication technology allowed debate and influence to be leveraged in new forms, specifically through the use of multimedia campaigns, social media, and Internet blogs. This paper presents a comprehensive view of tranexamic acid utilization in trauma from peer-reviewed evidence to novel multimedia influences.

  9. Optimisation of the dosage of tranexamic acid in trauma patients with population pharmacokinetic analysis.

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    Grassin-Delyle, S; Theusinger, O M; Albrecht, R; Mueller, S; Spahn, D R; Urien, S; Stein, P

    2018-06-01

    Tranexamic acid is used both pre-hospital and in-hospital as an antifibrinolytic drug to treat or prevent hyperfibrinolysis in trauma patients; dosing, however, remains empirical. We aimed to measure plasma levels of tranexamic acid in patients receiving pre-hospital anti-hyperfibrinolytic therapy and to build a population pharmacokinetic model to propose an optimised dosing regimen. Seventy-three trauma patients were enrolled and each received tranexamic acid 1 g intravenously pre-hospital. A blood sample was drawn after arrival in the emergency department, and we measured the plasma tranexamic acid concentration using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and modelled the data using non-linear mixed effect modelling. Tranexamic acid was administered at a median (IQR [range]) time of 43 (30-55 [5-135]) min after trauma. Plasma tranexamic acid levels were determined on arrival at hospital, 57 (43-70 [20-148]) min after pre-hospital administration of the drug. The measured concentration was 28.7 (21.5-38.5 [8.7-89.0]) μg.ml -1 . Our subjects had sustained severe trauma; injury severity score 20 (16-29 [5-75]), including penetrating injury in 2.8% and isolated traumatic brain injury in 19.7%. The pharmacokinetics were ascribed a two-compartment open model with body-weight as the main covariate. As tranexamic acid concentrations may fall below therapeutic levels during initial hospital treatment, we propose additional dosing schemes to maintain a specific target blood concentration for as long as required. This is the first study to investigate plasma level and pharmacokinetics of tranexamic acid after pre-hospital administration in trauma patients. Our proposed dosing regimen could be used in subsequent clinical trials to better study efficacy and tolerance profiles with controlled blood concentrations. © 2018 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  10. Tranexamic acid-induced fixed drug eruption

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    Natsuko Matsumura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old male showed multiple pigmented patches on his trunk and extremities after he took tranexamic acid for common cold. He stated that similar eruptions appeared when he was treated with tranexamic acid for influenza 10 months before. Patch test showed positive results at 48 h and 72 h by 1% and 10% tranexamic acid at the lesional skin only. To our knowledge, nine cases of fixed drug eruption induced by tranexamic acid have been reported in Japan. Tranexamic acid is a safe drug and frequently used because of its anti-fibrinolytic and anti-inflammatory effects, but caution of inducing fixed drug eruption should be necessary.

  11. Influence of tranexamic acid on cerebral hemorrhage: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

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    Huang, Beilei; Xu, Qiusheng; Ye, Ru; Xu, Jun

    2018-06-12

    Tranexamic acid might be beneficial for cerebral hemorrhage. However, the results remained controversial. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to explore the influence of tranexamic acid on cerebral hemorrhage. PubMed, EMbase, Web of science, EBSCO, and Cochrane library databases were systematically searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effect of tranexamic acid on cerebral hemorrhage were included. Two investigators independently searched articles, extracted data, and assessed the quality of included studies. This meta-analysis was performed using the random-effect model. Seven RCTs involving 1702 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, compared with control intervention in cerebral hemorrhage, tranexamic acid could significantly reduce growth of hemorrhagic mass (RR = 0.78; 95% CI = 0.61-0.99; P = 0.04) and unfavorable outcome (RR = 0.75; 95% CI = 0.61-0.93; P = 0.008), but demonstrated no substantial influence on volume of hemorrhagic lesion (Std. MD = -0.10; 95% CI = -0.27 to 0.08; P = 0.28), neurologic deterioration (RR = 1.25; 95% CI = 0.60-2.60; P = 0.56), rebleeding (RR = 0.62; 95% CI = 0.35-1.09; P = 0.10), surgery requirement (RR = 0.78; 95% CI = 0.40-1.51; P = 0.46), and mortality (RR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.69-1.05; P = 0.14). Compared to control intervention in cerebral hemorrhage, tranexamic acid was found to significantly decrease growth of hemorrhagic mass and unfavorable outcome, but showed no notable impact on volume of hemorrhagic lesion, neurologic deterioration, rebleeding, surgery requirement and mortality. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Safety of intravenous tranexamic acid in patients undergoing majororthopaedic surgery: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

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    Franchini, Massimo; Mengoli, Carlo; Marietta, Marco; Marano, Giuseppe; Vaglio, Stefania; Pupella, Simonetta; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio; Liumbruno, Giancarlo M.

    2018-01-01

    Among the various pharmacological options to decrease peri-operative bleeding, tranexamic acid appears to be one of the most interesting. Several trials have consistently documented the efficacy of this synthetic drug in reducing the risk of blood loss and the need for allogeneic blood transfusion in patients undergoing total hip and knee arthroplasty. The safety of intravenous tranexamic acid in major orthopaedic surgery, particularly regarding the risk of venous thromboembolism, was systematically analysed in this review. A systematic search of the literature identified 73 randomised controlled trials involving 4,174 patients and 2,779 controls. The raw overall incidence of venous thromboembolism was 2.1% in patients who received intravenous tranexamic acid and 2.0% in controls. A meta-analytic pooling showed that the risk of venous thromboembolism in tranexamic acid-treated patients was not significantly different from that of controls (risk difference: 0.01%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: −0.05%, 0.07%; risk ratio: 1.067, 95% CI: 0.760–1.496). Other severe drug-related adverse events occurred very rarely (0.1%). In conclusion, the results of this systematic review and meta-analysis show that intravenous tranexamic acid is a safe pharmacological treatment to reduce blood loss and transfusion requirements in patients undergoing major orthopaedic surgery. PMID:29337665

  13. Can local application of Tranexamic acid reduce post-coronary bypass surgery blood loss? A randomized controlled trial

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    Latter David

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diffuse microvascular bleeding remains a common problem after cardiac procedures. Systemic use of antifibrinolytic reduces the postoperative blood loss. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of local application of tranexamic acid to reduce blood loss after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG. Methods Thirty eight patients scheduled for primary isolated coronary artery bypass grafting were included in this double blind, prospective, randomized, placebo controlled study. Tranexamic acid (TA group (19 patients received 1 gram of TA diluted in 100 ml normal saline. Placebo group (19 patients received 100 ml of normal saline only. The solution was purred in the pericardial and mediastinal cavities. Results Both groups were comparable in their baseline demographic and surgical characteristics. During the first 24 hours post-operatively, cumulative blood loss was significantly less in TA group (median of 626 ml compared to Placebo group (median of 1040 ml (P = 0.04. There was no significant difference in the post-op Packed RBCs transfusion between both groups (median of one unit in each (P = 0.82. Significant less platelets transfusion required in TA group (median zero unit than in placebo group (median 2 units (P = 0.03. Apart from re-exploration for excessive surgical bleeding in one patient in TA group, no difference was found in morbidity or mortality between both groups. Conclusion Topical application of tranexamic acid in patients undergoing primary coronary artery bypass grafting led to a significant reduction in postoperative blood loss without adding extra risk to the patient.

  14. Anti-fibrinolytic use for minimising perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion

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    Henry, David A; Carless, Paul A; Moxey, Annette J; O’Connell, Dianne; Stokes, Barrie J; Fergusson, Dean A; Ker, Katharine

    2014-01-01

    Background Concerns regarding the safety of transfused blood have led to the development of a range of interventions to minimise blood loss during major surgery. Anti-fibrinolytic drugs are widely used, particularly in cardiac surgery, and previous reviews have found them to be effective in reducing blood loss, the need for transfusion, and the need for re-operation due to continued or recurrent bleeding. In the last few years questions have been raised regarding the comparative performance of the drugs. The safety of the most popular agent, aprotinin, has been challenged, and it was withdrawn from world markets in May 2008 because of concerns that it increased the risk of cardiovascular complications and death. Objectives To assess the comparative effects of the anti-fibrinolytic drugs aprotinin, tranexamic acid (TXA), and epsilon aminocaproic acid (EACA) on blood loss during surgery, the need for red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, and adverse events, particularly vascular occlusion, renal dysfunction, and death. Search methods We searched: the Cochrane Injuries Group’s Specialised Register (July 2010), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 3), MEDLINE (Ovid SP) 1950 to July 2010, EMBASE (Ovid SP) 1980 to July 2010. References in identified trials and review articles were checked and trial authors were contacted to identify any additional studies. The searches were last updated in July 2010. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of anti-fibrinolytic drugs in adults scheduled for non-urgent surgery. Eligible trials compared anti-fibrinolytic drugs with placebo (or no treatment), or with each other. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. This version of the review includes a sensitivity analysis excluding trials authored by Prof. Joachim Boldt. Main results This review summarises data from 252 RCTs that recruited over 25,000 participants. Data from

  15. Tranexamic acid-associated seizures: Causes and treatment.

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    Lecker, Irene; Wang, Dian-Shi; Whissell, Paul D; Avramescu, Sinziana; Mazer, C David; Orser, Beverley A

    2016-01-01

    Antifibrinolytic drugs are routinely used worldwide to reduce the bleeding that results from a wide range of hemorrhagic conditions. The most commonly used antifibrinolytic drug, tranexamic acid, is associated with an increased incidence of postoperative seizures. The reported increase in the frequency of seizures is alarming, as these events are associated with adverse neurological outcomes, longer hospital stays, and increased in-hospital mortality. However, many clinicians are unaware that tranexamic acid causes seizures. The goal of this review is to summarize the incidence, risk factors, and clinical features of these seizures. This review also highlights several clinical and preclinical studies that offer mechanistic insights into the potential causes of and treatments for tranexamic acid-associated seizures. This review will aid the medical community by increasing awareness about tranexamic acid-associated seizures and by translating scientific findings into therapeutic interventions for patients. © 2015 The Authors Annals of Neurology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Neurological Association.

  16. Tranexamic acid–associated seizures: Causes and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecker, Irene; Wang, Dian‐Shi; Whissell, Paul D.; Avramescu, Sinziana; Mazer, C. David

    2015-01-01

    Antifibrinolytic drugs are routinely used worldwide to reduce the bleeding that results from a wide range of hemorrhagic conditions. The most commonly used antifibrinolytic drug, tranexamic acid, is associated with an increased incidence of postoperative seizures. The reported increase in the frequency of seizures is alarming, as these events are associated with adverse neurological outcomes, longer hospital stays, and increased in‐hospital mortality. However, many clinicians are unaware that tranexamic acid causes seizures. The goal of this review is to summarize the incidence, risk factors, and clinical features of these seizures. This review also highlights several clinical and preclinical studies that offer mechanistic insights into the potential causes of and treatments for tranexamic acid–associated seizures. This review will aid the medical community by increasing awareness about tranexamic acid–associated seizures and by translating scientific findings into therapeutic interventions for patients. ANN NEUROL 2016;79:18–26 PMID:26580862

  17. Efficacy of tranexamic acid on surgical bleeding in spine surgery: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheriyan, Thomas; Maier, Stephen P; Bianco, Kristina; Slobodyanyuk, Kseniya; Rattenni, Rachel N; Lafage, Virginie; Schwab, Frank J; Lonner, Baron S; Errico, Thomas J

    2015-04-01

    Spine surgery is usually associated with large amount of blood loss, necessitating blood transfusions. Blood loss-associated morbidity can be because of direct risks, such as hypotension and organ damage, or as a result of blood transfusions. The antifibrinolytic, tranexamic acid (TXA), is a lysine analog that inhibits activation of plasminogen and has shown to be beneficial in reducing surgical blood loss. To consolidate the findings of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the use of TXA on surgical bleeding in spine surgery. A metaanalysis. Randomized controlled trials investigating the effectiveness of intravenous TXA in reducing blood loss in spine surgery, compared with a placebo/no treatment group. MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane controlled trials register, and Google Scholar were used to identify RCTs published before January 2014 that examined the effectiveness of intravenous TXA on reduction of blood loss and blood transfusions, compared with a placebo/no treatment group in spine surgery. Metaanalysis was performed using RevMan 5. Weighted mean difference with 95% confidence intervals was used to summarize the findings across the trials for continuous outcomes. Dichotomous data were expressed as risk ratios with 95% confidence intervals. A pTranexamic acid reduced intraoperative, postoperative, and total blood loss by an average of 219 mL ([-322, -116], pTranexamic acid led to a reduction in proportion of patients who received a blood transfusion (risk ratio 0.67 [0.54, 0.83], pTranexamic acid reduces surgical bleeding and transfusion requirements in patients undergoing spine surgery. Tranexamic acid does not appear to be associated with an increased incidence of pulmonary embolism, DVT, or MI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Tranexamic acid--an old drug still going strong and making a revival.

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    Tengborn, Lilian; Blombäck, Margareta; Berntorp, Erik

    2015-02-01

    Antifibrinolytic in Significant Haemorrhage) comprising more than 20,000 patients. It showed that the survival was increased when tranexamic acid was given early after the accident compared to placebo; further studies are taking place is this field to get more information. Of utmost importance is the ongoing WOMAN (World Maternal Antifibrinolytic) a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial among 15,000 with clinical diagnosis of postpartum haemorrhage bearing in mind that each year a large number of women in low and middle income countries, die from causes related to childbirth. In summary, we consider tranexamic acid is a drug of great value to reduce almost any kind of bleeding, it is cheap and convenient to use and has principally few contraindications. It may be added, that tranexamic acid is included in the WHOs list of essential medicines. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Tranexamic acid reduces blood loss during and after cesarean section: A double blinded, randomized, controlled trial

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    Amr H. Yehia

    2014-03-01

    Conclusions: Tranexamic acid can be used safely to reduce blood loss during cesarean section. Reduced blood loss after tranexamic acid was associated with improvement of post-operative hemoglobin, hematocrit and with reduction of post-partum need for iron replacement.

  20. Comparison of topical versus intravenous tranexamic acid in primary total knee arthroplasty: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled and prospective cohort trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Shen, Bin; Zeng, Yi

    2014-12-01

    There has been much debate and controversy about the optimal regimen of tranexamic acid in primary total knee arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to undertake a meta-analysis to compare the efficacy of topical and intravenous regimen of tranexamic acid in primary total knee arthroplasty. A systematic review of the electronic databases PubMed, CENTRAL, Web of Science, and Embase was undertaken. All randomized controlled trials and prospective cohort studies evaluating the effectiveness of topical and intravenous tranexamic acid during primary total knee arthroplasty were included. The focus of the analysis was on the outcomes of blood loss, transfusion rate, and thromboembolic complications. Subgroup analysis was performed when possible. Of 328 papers identified, six trials were eligible for data extraction and meta-analysis comprising 679 patients (739 knees). We found no statistically significant difference between topical and intravenous administration of tranexamic acid in terms of blood loss, transfusion requirements and thromboembolic complications. Topical tranexamic acid has a similar efficacy to intravenous tranexamic acid in reducing both blood loss and transfusion rate without sacrificing safety in primary total knee arthroplasty. II. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Randomized controlled trial of tranexamic acid among parturients at increased risk for postpartum hemorrhage undergoing cesarean delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujata, Nambiath; Tobin, Raj; Kaur, Ranjeet; Aneja, Anjila; Khanna, Mona; Hanjoora, Vijay M

    2016-06-01

    To assess the effects of tranexamic acid among patients undergoing cesarean delivery who were at high risk of postpartum hemorrhage. Between August 1, 2012, and April 30, 2013, a randomized controlled trial was performed at a tertiary care center in India. Women undergoing an elective or emergency cesarean delivery who were at high risk for postpartum hemorrhage were enrolled. They were randomly assigned using sealed, opaque envelopes to receive 10mg/kg tranexamic acid or normal saline 10min before skin incision. Anesthesiologists were not masked to group assignment, but patients and obstetricians were. The primary outcome was need for additional uterotonic drugs within 24h after delivery. Analyses were by intention to treat. Thirty patients were assigned to each group. Additional uterotonic drugs were required in 7 (23%) patients assigned to tranexamic acid and 25 (83%) patients in the control group (Ptranexamic acid, administered before skin incision, significantly reduced the requirement for additional uterotonics among women at increased risk for postpartum hemorrhage. Clinical Trials Registry India: CTRI/2015/05/005752. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Topical tranexamic acid as a novel treatment for bleeding peptic ulcer: A randomised controlled trial

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    Mandana Rafeey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peptic ulcers are among the most common causes of upper gastrointestinal (GI bleeding in children. The standard care for GI bleeding is endoscopy for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. We aimed to assess the effect of topical tranexamic acid (TXA via endoscopic procedures in children with GI bleeding caused by bleeding ulcers. Procedure: In this randomised controlled trial, 120 children were evaluated by diagnostic procedures for GI bleeding, of which 63 (30 girls, 33 boys aged 1-month to 15 years were recruited. The patients were randomly divided into case and control groups. In the case group, TXA was administered directly under endoscopic therapy. In the control group, epinephrine (1/10,000 was submucosally injected to the four quadrants of ulcer margins as the routine endoscopic therapy. In both groups, the patients received supportive medical therapy with intravenous fluids and proton pump inhibitor drugs. Results: The mean ± standard deviation age of the children was 5 ± 2.03 years. Rebleeding occurred in 15 (11.4% and 21 (9.8% patients in the case and control groups, respectively (P = 0.50. The frequency of blood transfusion episodes (P = 0.06 and duration of hospital stay (P = 0.07 were not statistically different between the groups. Conclusion: Using topical TXA via endoscopic procedures may be effective in cases of GI bleedings caused by active bleeding ulcers. In order to establish this therapeutic effect, a large number of clinical studies are needed.

  3. Treatment of epistaxis in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia with tranexamic acid - a double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over phase IIIB study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisthoff, Urban W; Seyfert, Ulrich T; Kübler, Marcus; Bieg, Birgitt; Plinkert, Peter K; König, Jochem

    2014-09-01

    Epistaxis is the most frequent manifestation in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, in which no optimal treatment exists. It can lead to severe anemia and reduced quality of life. Positive effects of tranexamic acid, an antifibrinolytic drug, have been reported on epistaxis related to this disorder. We sought to evaluate the efficacy of treating nosebleeds in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia with tranexamic acid. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled, cross-over phase IIIB study, 1 gram of tranexamic acid or placebo was given orally 3 times daily for 3 months for a total of 6 months. 22 patients were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. Hemoglobin levels, the primary outcome measure, did not change significantly (p=0.33). The secondary outcome measure was epistaxis score and patients reported a statistically significant reduction in nosebleeds, equaling a clinically relevant 54% diminution (p=0.0031), as compared to the placebo period. No severe side effects were observed. Tranexamic acid reduces epistaxis in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. (Clinical trial registration numbers: BfArM 141 CHC 9008-001 and ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01031992). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of tranexamic acid on coagulation and fibrinolysis in women with postpartum haemorrhage (WOMAN-ETAC): protocol and statistical analysis plan for a randomized controlled trial.

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    Shakur, Haleema; Fawole, Bukola; Kuti, Modupe; Olayemi, Oladapo; Bello, Adenike; Ogunbode, Olayinka; Kotila, Taiwo; Aimakhu, Chris O; Huque, Sumaya; Gregg, Meghann; Roberts, Ian

    2016-12-16

    Background : Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is a leading cause of maternal death. Tranexamic acid has the potential to reduce bleeding and a large randomized controlled trial of its effect on maternal health outcomes in women with PPH (The WOMAN trial) is ongoing. We will examine the effect of tranexamic acid on fibrinolysis and coagulation in a subset of WOMAN trial participants. Methods . Adult women with clinically diagnosed primary PPH after vaginal or caesarean delivery are eligible for inclusion in the WOMAN trial. In a sub-group of trial participants, blood samples will be collected at baseline and 30 minutes after the first dose of tranexamic acid or matching placebo.  Our primary objective is to evaluate the effect of tranexamic acid on fibrinolysis. Fibrinolysis will be assessed by measuring D-dimers and by rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM). Secondary outcomes are international normalized ratio (INR), prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen, haemoglobin and platelets. We aim to include about 180 women from the University College Hospital, Ibadan in Nigeria. Discussion:  This sub-study of WOMAN trial participants should provide information on the mechanism of action of tranexamic acid in women with postpartum haemorrhage. We present the trial protocol and statistical analysis plan. The trial protocol was registered prior to the start of patient recruitment. The statistical analysis plan was completed before un-blinding. Trial registration: The trial was registered: ClinicalTrials.gov, Identifier NCT00872469 https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00872469; ISRCTN registry, Identifier ISRCTN76912190 http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN76912190 (Registration date: 22/03/2012).

  5. Tranexamic Acid Failed to Reverse the Anticoagulant Effect and Bleeding by an Oral Direct Factor Xa Inhibitor Edoxaban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Yuko; Furugohri, Taketoshi; Morishima, Yoshiyuki

    2018-01-01

    Agents to reverse the anticoagulant effect of edoxaban, an oral direct factor Xa inhibitor, would be desirable in emergency situations. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of tranexamic acid, an antifibrinolytic agent, on the anticoagulant activity and bleeding by edoxaban in rats. A supratherapeutic dose of edoxaban (3 mg/kg) was intravenously administered to rats. Three minutes after dosing, tranexamic acid (100 mg/kg) was given intravenously. Bleeding was induced by making an incision with a blade on the planta 8 min after edoxaban injection and bleeding time was measured. Prothrombin time (PT) and clot lysis were examined. A supratherapeutic dose of edoxaban significantly prolonged PT and bleeding time. Tranexamic acid did not affect PT or bleeding time prolonged by edoxaban, although tranexamic acid significantly inhibited clot lysis in rat plasma. An antifibrinolytic agent tranexamic acid failed to reverse the anticoagulant effect and bleeding by edoxaban in rats. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Safety and Effectiveness of two treatment regimes with tranexamic acid to minimize inflammatory response in elective cardiopulmonary bypass patients: a randomized double-blind, dose-dependent, phase IV clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Beatriz

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB patients, fibrinolysis may enhance postoperative inflammatory response. We aimed to determine whether an additional postoperative dose of antifibrinolytic tranexamic acid (TA reduced CPB-mediated inflammatory response (IR. Methods We performed a randomized, double-blind, dose-dependent, parallel-groups study of elective CPB patients receiving TA. Patients were randomly assigned to either the single-dose group (40 mg/Kg TA before CPB and placebo after CPB or the double-dose group (40 mg/Kg TA before and after CPB. Results 160 patients were included, 80 in each group. The incident rate of IR was significantly lower in the double-dose-group TA2 (7.5% vs. 18.8% in the single-dose group TA1; P = 0.030. After adjusting for hypertension, total protamine dose and temperature after CPB, TA2 showed a lower risk of IR compared with TA1 [OR: 0.29 (95% CI: 0.10-0.83, (P = 0.013]. Relative risk for IR was 2.5 for TA1 (95% CI: 1.02 to 6.12. The double-dose group had significantly lower chest tube bleeding at 24 hours [671 (95% CI 549-793 vs. 826 (95% CI 704-949 mL; P = 0.01 corrected-P significant] and lower D-dimer levels at 24 hours [489 (95% CI 437-540 vs. 621(95% CI: 563-679 ng/mL; P = 0.01 corrected-P significant]. TA2 required lower levels of norepinephrine at 24 h [0.06 (95% CI: 0.03-0.09 vs. 0.20(95 CI: 0.05-0.35 after adjusting for dobutamine [F = 6.6; P = 0.014 corrected-P significant]. We found a significant direct relationship between IL-6 and temperature (rho = 0.26; P P P P P P P Conclusions Prolonged inhibition of fibrinolysis, using an additional postoperative dose of tranexamic acid reduces inflammatory response and postoperative bleeding (but not transfusion requirements in CPB patients. A question which remains unanswered is whether the dose used was ideal in terms of safety, but not in terms of effectiveness. Current Controlled Trials number ISRCTN: ISRCTN84413719

  7. Oral tranexamic acid is equivalent to topical tranexamic acid without drainage in primary total hip arthroplasty: A double-blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ze-Yu; Wang, Duan; Meng, Wei-Kun; Wang, Hao-Yang; Pan, Hui; Pei, Fu-Xing; Zhou, Zong-Ke

    2018-05-01

    To compare the efficacy of multiple doses of oral tranexamic acid (TXA) with topical TXA administration in reducing blood loss following total hip arthroplasty (THA). In this double-blinded trial, 117 patients undergoing primary THA were randomized to receive 2 g TXA orally 2 h preoperatively, and two doses of 1 g TXA postoperatively (oral group) or 3 g of TXA topical administration in the operating room (topical group). The primary outcome was a reduction in hemoglobin concentration. Other outcomes-such as blood loss, TXA-related cost (¥), length of hospital stay (days), complications such as pulmonary thromboembolism (PE), deep vein thrombosis (DVT), and infection, blood coagulation and fibrinolysis, and hip function-were recorded. The mean reduction in hemoglobin level was similar between the oral and topical groups (3.07 g/dL compared with 3.12 g/dL; p = 0.85). Similarly, there was no significant difference in the mean total blood loss between oral and topical administration (863 mL compared with 902 mL; p = 0.62). Three patients received an allogeneic blood transfusion, including one patient in the oral group and two patients in the topical group (p = 0.55). The oral group had a significantly lower TXA-related cost than the topical group: ¥944 and ¥4359, respectively (p = 0.01). No PE, DVT, cardiac infarction or renal failure occurred during the 90-day follow-up. The coagulation and fibrinolysis parameters were similar between the two groups. Oral TXA is equivalent to topical TXA administration in the reduction of blood loss in the setting of primary THA without drainage. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. The impact of early outcome events on the effect of tranexamic acid in post-partum haemorrhage: an exploratory subgroup analysis of the WOMAN trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Amy; Shakur-Still, Haleema; Chaudhri, Rizwana; Fawole, Bukola; Arulkumaran, Sabaratnam; Roberts, Ian

    2018-06-07

    In severe post-partum haemorrhage, death can occur within hours of bleeding onset so interventions to control the bleeding must be given immediately. In clinical trials of treatments for life-threatening bleeding, established treatments are given priority and the trial treatment is usually given last. However, enrolling patients in whom severe maternal morbidity or death is imminent or inevitable at the time of randomisation may dilute the effects of a trial treatment. We conducted an exploratory analysis of data from the WOMAN trial, an international, randomised placebo-controlled trial of the effects of tranexamic acid on death and surgical intervention in 20,060 women with post-partum haemorrhage. We assessed the impact of early maternal death or hysterectomy due to exsanguination on the effect of tranexamic acid on each of these respective outcomes. We conducted repeated analyses excluding patients with these outcomes at increasing intervals from the time of randomisation. We quantified treatment effects using risk ratios (RR) and 99% confidence intervals (CI) and prepared cumulative failure plots. Among 14,923 women randomised within 3 h of delivery (7518 tranexamic acid and 7405 placebo), there were 216 bleeding deaths (1.5%) and 383 hysterectomies due to bleeding (2.8%). After excluding deaths from exsanguination at increasing time intervals following randomization, there was a significant reduction in the risk of death due to bleeding with tranexamic acid (RR = 0.41; 99% CI 0.19-0.89). However, after excluding hysterectomies at increasing time intervals post-randomization, there was no reduction in the risk of hysterectomy due to bleeding with tranexamic acid (RR = 0.79; 99% CI 0.33-1.86). Findings from this analysis provide further evidence that tranexamic acid reduces the risk of death from exsanguination in women who experience postpartum haemorrhage. It is uncertain whether tranexamic acid reduces the risk of hysterectomy for bleeding after

  9. Use of intravenous tranexamic acid in total knee arthroplasty: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FU De-jie

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: The effect of tranexamic acid (TA on patients receiving total knee arthroplasty (TKA has been reported in many small clinical trials. But single trials are not sufficient enough to clarify the effectiveness and safety of TA. So, we carried out a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to investigate the efficacy and safety of the intravenous use of TA in TKA. Methods: Literatures were retrieved in Cochrane Library, OVID, PubMed, EMBASE, CNKI and Wanfang Data. All the related literatures were checked by two independent investigators and only the high quality randomized con-trolled trials were enrolled. Relevant data were analyzed using RevMan 5.1 to compare the difference of blood loss, transfusion and complications between TA group and con-trol group. Results: There were 353 related literatures and only 22 randomized controlled trials met the inclusion criteria. The use of TA in TKA significantly reduced total blood loss by a mean of 435.41 ml (95% CI 300.62-570.21, P<0.01, post-operative blood loss by a mean of 406.69 ml (95% CI 333.16-480.22, P<0.01. TA also significantly lowered the transfu-sion rate (risk difference 0.30, 95% CI 0.21-0.39, P<0.01 and transfusion volume (mean difference 0.95 unit, 95% CI 0.53-1.37, P<0.01. The risks between TA group and control group in developing deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embo-lism were not statistically significant. Conclusion: TA is beneficial for patients undergoing TKA, which can significantly reduce total blood loss, post-operative blood loss, transfusion rate, and transfusion volume. Meanwhile TA is recommended to reduce deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism following TKA. Key words: Tranexamic acid; Arthroplasty; Knee; Blood loss, surgical; Meta-analysis

  10. Differential effects of aprotinin and tranexamic acid on outcomes and cytokine profiles in neonates undergoing cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Eric M; Atz, Andrew M; Gillis, Jenna; Desantis, Stacia M; Haney, A Lauren; Deardorff, Rachael L; Uber, Walter E; Reeves, Scott T; McGowan, Francis X; Bradley, Scott M; Spinale, Francis G

    2012-05-01

    Factors contributing to postoperative complications include blood loss and a heightened inflammatory response. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that aprotinin would decrease perioperative blood product use, reduce biomarkers of inflammation, and result in improved clinical outcome parameters in neonates undergoing cardiac operations. This was a secondary retrospective analysis of a clinical trial whereby neonates undergoing cardiac surgery received either aprotinin (n = 34; before May 2008) or tranexamic acid (n = 42; after May 2008). Perioperative blood product use, clinical course, and measurements of cytokines were compared. Use of perioperative red blood cells, cryoprecipitate, and platelets was reduced in neonates receiving aprotinin compared with tranexamic acid (P factor VII use (2/34 [6%] vs 18/42 [43%]; P Production of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-2 activation were attenuated in the aprotinin group at 24 hours postoperatively. No differential effects on renal function were seen between agents. Aprotinin, compared with tranexamic acid, was associated with reduced perioperative blood product use, improved early indices of postoperative recovery, and attenuated indices of cytokine activation, without early adverse effects. These findings suggest that aprotinin may have unique effects in the context of neonatal cardiac surgery and challenge contentions that antifibrinolytics are equivalent with respect to early postoperative outcomes. Copyright © 2012 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Tranexamic Acid versus Placebo to Prevent Blood Transfusion during Radical Cystectomy for Bladder Cancer (TACT): Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breau, Rodney H; Lavallée, Luke T; Cnossen, Sonya; Witiuk, Kelsey; Cagiannos, Ilias; Momoli, Franco; Bryson, Gregory; Kanji, Salmaan; Morash, Christopher; Turgeon, Alexis; Zarychanski, Ryan; Mallick, Ranjeeta; Knoll, Greg; Fergusson, Dean A

    2018-05-02

    Radical cystectomy for bladder cancer is associated with a high risk of needing red blood cell transfusion. Tranexamic acid reduces blood loss during cardiac and orthopedic surgery, but no study has yet evaluated tranexamic acid use during cystectomy. A randomized, double-blind (surgeon-, anesthesiologist-, patient-, data-monitor-blinded), placebo-controlled trial of tranexamic acid during cystectomy was initiated in June 2013. Prior to incision, the intervention arm participants receive a 10 mg/kg loading dose of intravenously administered tranexamic acid, followed by a 5 mg/kg/h maintenance infusion. In the control arm, the patient receives an identical volume of normal saline that is indistinguishable from the intervention. The primary outcome is any blood transfusion from the start of surgery up to 30 days post operative. There are no strict criteria to mandate the transfusion of blood products. The decision to transfuse is entirely at the discretion of the treating physicians who are blinded to patient allocation. Physicians are allowed to utilize all resources to make transfusion decisions, including serum hemoglobin concentration and vital signs. To date, 147 patients of a planned 354 have been randomized to the study. This protocol reviews pertinent data relating to blood transfusion during radical cystectomy, highlighting the need to identify methods for reducing blood loss and preventing transfusion in patients receiving radical cystectomy. It explains the clinical rationale for using tranexamic acid to reduce blood loss during cystectomy, and outlines the study methods of our ongoing randomized controlled trial. Canadian Institute for Health Research (CIHR) Protocol: MOP-342559; ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT01869413. Registered on 5 June 2013.

  12. Tranexamic acid treatment of hemothorax in two patients with malignant mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, W. A.; Koolen, M. G.; Roos, C. M.; ten Cate, J. W.

    1991-01-01

    Patients with malignant mesothelioma may present with hemothorax. We used a combination of oral and intrapleural tranexamic acid to treat two patients with this severe complication. Initiation of treatment with this potent anti-fibrinolytic drug resulted in rapid reduction of bleeding and of

  13. Tranexamic Acid Does Not Influence Cardioprotection by Ischemic Preconditioning and Remote Ischemic Preconditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Caster, Patrick; Eiling, Sandra; Boekholt, Yvonne; Behmenburg, Friederike; Dorsch, Marianne; Heinen, André; Hollmann, Markus W.; Huhn, Ragnar

    2018-01-01

    Prior studies have suggested that the antifibrinolytic drug aprotinin increases the infarct size after ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) and attenuates the effect of ischemic preconditioning (IPC). Aprotinin was replaced by tranexamic acid (TXA) in clinical practice. Here, we investigated whether TXA

  14. Combined versus single application of tranexamic acid in total knee and hip arthroplasty: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng Zhang, M M; Jifeng Li, M M; Xiao Wang, M M

    2017-07-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of the combined application of both intravenous and topical tranexamic acid versus the single use of either application in patients with total knee and hip arthroplasty. Potentially relevant studies were identified from electronic databases including Medline, PubMed, Embase, ScienceDirect and the Cochrane Library. Patients undergoing primary total knee and hip arthroplasty were included in our studies, with an experimental group that received combined intravenous and topical application of tranexamic acid and a control group that received a single application of tranexamic acid or normal saline. The primary outcomes were total blood loss, hemoglobin decline and transfusion requirements. The secondary outcomes were length of stay, operation time and tranexamic acid-related adverse effects, such as superficial infection, deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. Modified Jadad scores were used to assess the quality of the included randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The data was pooled using RevMan 5.3. After testing for heterogeneity across studies, the data were aggregated using random-effects modeling when appropriate. We have registered the trial at http://www.researchregistry.com. Six RCTs that included 704 patients met the inclusion criteria. The present meta-analysis indicated significant differences existed in the total blood loss (MD = -134.65, 95% CI: -191.66 to -77.64, P tranexamic acid in total knee and hip arthroplasty was associated with significantly reduced total blood loss, postoperative hemoglobin decline, drainage volume, and transfusion requirements. Based on the limitations of current meta-analysis, well-designed, high-quality RCTs with long-term follow-up are still required. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Tranexamic acid for hyperacute primary IntraCerebral Haemorrhage (TICH-2): an international randomised, placebo-controlled, phase 3 superiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprigg, Nikola; Flaherty, Katie; Appleton, Jason P; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Bereczki, Daniel; Beridze, Maia; Christensen, Hanne; Ciccone, Alfonso; Collins, Ronan; Czlonkowska, Anna; Dineen, Robert A; Duley, Lelia; Egea-Guerrero, Juan Jose; England, Timothy J; Krishnan, Kailash; Laska, Ann Charlotte; Law, Zhe Kang; Ozturk, Serefnur; Pocock, Stuart J; Roberts, Ian; Robinson, Thompson G; Roffe, Christine; Seiffge, David; Scutt, Polly; Thanabalan, Jegan; Werring, David; Whynes, David; Bath, Philip M

    2018-05-26

    Tranexamic acid can prevent death due to bleeding after trauma and post-partum haemorrhage. We aimed to assess whether tranexamic acid reduces haematoma expansion and improves outcome in adults with stroke due to intracerebral haemorrhage. We did an international, randomised placebo-controlled trial in adults with intracerebral haemorrhage from acute stroke units at 124 hospital sites in 12 countries. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive 1 g intravenous tranexamic acid bolus followed by an 8 h infusion of 1 g tranexamic acid or a matching placebo, within 8 h of symptom onset. Randomisation was done centrally in real time via a secure website, with stratification by country and minimisation on key prognostic factors. Treatment allocation was concealed from patients, outcome assessors, and all other health-care workers involved in the trial. The primary outcome was functional status at day 90, measured by shift in the modified Rankin Scale, using ordinal logistic regression with adjustment for stratification and minimisation criteria. All analyses were done on an intention-to-treat basis. This trial is registered with the ISRCTN registry, number ISRCTN93732214. We recruited 2325 participants between March 1, 2013, and Sept 30, 2017. 1161 patients received tranexamic acid and 1164 received placebo; the treatment groups were well balanced at baseline. The primary outcome was assessed for 2307 (99%) participants. The primary outcome, functional status at day 90, did not differ significantly between the groups (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0·88, 95% CI 0·76-1·03, p=0·11). Although there were fewer deaths by day 7 in the tranexamic acid group (101 [9%] deaths in the tranexamic acid group vs 123 [11%] deaths in the placebo group; aOR 0·73, 0·53-0·99, p=0·0406), there was no difference in case fatality at 90 days (250 [22%] vs 249 [21%]; adjusted hazard ratio 0·92, 95% CI 0·77-1·10, p=0·37). Fewer patients had serious adverse events after tranexamic

  16. Does Tranexamic Acid Reduce Bleeding during Femoral Fracture Operation?

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    Mohammad Haghighi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:Proximal Femoral shaft fractures are commonly associated with marked blood loss which can lead topostoperative acute anemia and some other complications.Tranexamic acid (TA is an antifibrinolytic medication that reduces intra-and postoperative blood loss and transfusionrequirements during some elective surgeries (1-3.The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of intravenous Tranexamic acid (TA on intraoperative blood loss and asubsequent need for transfusion in patients who were undergoing surgery for femoral shaft fractures in trauma setting.Methods:Thirty-eight ASA grade I-II patients undergoing proximal femoral shaft fracture surgery with intra medullarynailing were included in this double blind randomized controlled clinical trial. They were allocated into two groups. GroupI, the intervention group with eighteen patients received 15 mg/kg (TA via intravenous infusion before surgical incision.Patients in the placebo group received an identical volume of normal saline.Hemoglobin level was measured four hours before and after the surgeries. Postoperative blood loss and hemoglobinchange as well as transfusion rates and volumes were compared between the two groups.Results:Mean Percentage fall in hemoglobin after surgery were 1.75±0.84 and 2.04±1.9 in the study and placebo groups,respectively (P=0.570. Hemoglobin loss was higher in the placebo group. Transfusion rates was lower in TA group(5.6% compared to the placebo group (30% (P=0.06. No significant difference in The Allowable Blood Loss during thesurgery was found between the two groups (P=0.894.Conclusion:Preoperative treatment with TA reduces postoperative blood loss and the need for blood transfusion duringtraumatic femoral fracture operation.

  17. High Concentrations of Tranexamic Acid Inhibit Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecker, Irene; Wang, Dian-Shi; Kaneshwaran, Kirusanthy; Mazer, C David; Orser, Beverley A

    2017-07-01

    The antifibrinolytic drug tranexamic acid is structurally similar to the amino acid glycine and may cause seizures and myoclonus by acting as a competitive antagonist of glycine receptors. Glycine is an obligatory co-agonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptors. Thus, it is plausible that tranexamic acid inhibits NMDA receptors by acting as a competitive antagonist at the glycine binding site. The aim of this study was to determine whether tranexamic acid inhibits NMDA receptors, as well as α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid and kainate subtypes of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Tranexamic acid modulation of NMDA, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, and kainate receptors was studied using whole cell voltage-clamp recordings of current from cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. Tranexamic acid rapidly and reversibly inhibited NMDA receptors (half maximal inhibitory concentration = 241 ± 45 mM, mean ± SD; 95% CI, 200 to 281; n = 5) and shifted the glycine concentration-response curve for NMDA-evoked current to the right. Tranexamic acid also inhibited α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (half maximal inhibitory concentration = 231 ± 91 mM; 95% CI, 148 to 314; n = 5 to 6) and kainate receptors (half maximal inhibitory concentration = 90 ± 24 mM; 95% CI, 68 to 112; n = 5). Tranexamic acid inhibits NMDA receptors likely by reducing the binding of the co-agonist glycine and also inhibits α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid and kainate receptors. Receptor blockade occurs at high millimolar concentrations of tranexamic acid, similar to the concentrations that occur after topical application to peripheral tissues. Glutamate receptors in tissues including bone, heart, and nerves play various physiologic roles, and tranexamic acid inhibition of these receptors may contribute to adverse drug effects.

  18. Tranexamic acid in epistaxis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhieh, Y; Fox, H

    2016-12-01

    The role of tranexamic acid in the management of epistaxis remains unclear. There is uncertainty about its safety and about the contraindications for its use. We performed a systematic review of the use of systemic and topical tranexamic acid in epistaxis and a comparative review of its use in other specialties. This review assesses and summarises the existing evidence for the efficacy and safety of tranexamic acid in the management of epistaxis. Systematic review. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for 'epistaxis' and equivalent MESH terms, combined with the Boolean operator 'OR' and 'tranexamic acid'. The Cochrane library and society guidelines were reviewed for evidence regarding the use of tranexamic acid in other specialties. All five relevant RCTs were included in the review and were evaluated according to the recommendations of the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews. Three RCTS pertained to spontaneous epistaxis; of these, one trial found no benefit of oral tranexamic acid in acute epistaxis, one trial found no significant benefit of topical tranexamic acid, but the largest of the trials showed significant benefit of topical tranexamic acid in acute epistaxis management. Two RCTs examined oral tranexamic acid for prophylaxis of recurrent epistaxes in patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia; both showed significant reduction in severity and frequency. Tranexamic acid, as a WHO 'essential medicine', is a powerful, readily available tool, the use of which in epistaxis has been limited by uncertainty over its efficacy and its safety profile. This systematic review summarises the existing evidence and extrapolates from the wealth of data for other specialties to address the clinical question - does TXA have a role in epistaxis management? © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Can Tranexamic Acid Reduce Blood Loss during Major Cardiac Surgery? A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Frances; Wahed, Amer; Gregoric, Igor; Kar, Biswajit; Dasgupta, Amitava; Tint, Hlaing

    2017-09-01

    We examined the effectiveness of tranexamic acid in preventing intraoperative blood loss during major cardiac surgery. Out of initial 81 patients undergoing major cardiac surgery (both coronary artery bypass and valve repair procedures) at our teaching hospital, sixty-seven patients were selected for this study. We compared estimated blood loss, decrease in percent hemoglobin and hematocrit following surgery between two groups of patients (none of them received any blood product during surgery), one group receiving no tranexamic acid (n=17) and another group receiving tranexamic acid (n=25). In the second study, we combined these patients with patients receiving modest amounts of blood products (1-2 unit) and compared these parameters between two groups of patients (25 patients received no tranexamic acid, 42 patients received tranexamic acid). In patients who received no blood product during surgery, those who received no tranexamic acid showed statistically significant (independent t-test two tailed at p tranexamic acid (mean: 987.2 mL, SD: 459.9, n=25). We observed similar results when the patients receiving no blood products and patients receiving modest amount of blood products were combined based on the use of tranexamic acid or not. No statistically significant difference was observed in percent reduced hemoglobin or hematocrit following surgery in any group of patients. We conclude that intraoperative antifibrinolytic therapy with tranexamic acid does not reduce intraoperative blood loss during major cardiac surgery which contradicts popular belief. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  20. Tranexamic Acid: From Trauma to Routine Perioperative Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Jeff; Sikorski, Robert A.; Pittet, Jean-Francois

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Of Review Optimizing hemostasis with antifibrinolytics is becoming a common surgical practice. Large clinical studies have demonstrated efficacy and safety of tranexamic acid (TXA) in the trauma population to reduce blood loss and transfusions. Its use in patients without preexisting coagulopathies is debated, as thromboembolic events are a concern. In this review, perioperative administration of TXA is examined in non-trauma surgical populations. Additionally, risk of thromboembolism, dosing regimens, and timing of dosing are assessed. Recent Findings Perioperative use of tranexamic acid is associated with reduced blood loss and transfusions. Thromboembolic effects do not appear to be increased. However, optimal dosing and timing of TXA administration is still under investigation for non-trauma surgical populations. Summary As part of a perioperative blood management program, tranexamic acid can be used to help reduce blood loss and mitigate exposure to blood transfusion. PMID:25635366

  1. The effectiveness and safety of antifibrinolytics in patients with acute intracranial haemorrhage: statistical analysis plan for an individual patient data meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ker, Katharine; Prieto-Merino, David; Sprigg, Nikola; Mahmood, Abda; Bath, Philip; Kang Law, Zhe; Flaherty, Katie; Roberts, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The Antifibrinolytic Trialists Collaboration aims to increase knowledge about the effectiveness and safety of antifibrinolytic treatment by conducting individual patient data (IPD) meta-analyses of randomised trials. This article presents the statistical analysis plan for an IPD meta-analysis of the effects of antifibrinolytics for acute intracranial haemorrhage. Methods: The protocol for the IPD meta-analysis has been registered with PROSPERO (CRD42016052155). We will conduct a...

  2. Prevention of haematoma progression by tranexamic acid in intracerebral haemorrhage patients with and without spot sign on admission scan: a statistical analysis plan of a pre-specified sub-study of the TICH-2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovesen, Christian; Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Gluud, Christian; Steiner, Thorsten; Law, Zhe; Flaherty, Katie; Dineen, Rob A; Bath, Philip M; Sprigg, Nikola; Christensen, Hanne

    2018-06-13

    We present the statistical analysis plan of a prespecified Tranexamic Acid for Hyperacute Primary Intracerebral Haemorrhage (TICH)-2 sub-study aiming to investigate, if tranexamic acid has a different effect in intracerebral haemorrhage patients with the spot sign on admission compared to spot sign negative patients. The TICH-2 trial recruited above 2000 participants with intracerebral haemorrhage arriving in hospital within 8 h after symptom onset. They were included irrespective of radiological signs of on-going haematoma expansion. Participants were randomised to tranexamic acid versus matching placebo. In this subgroup analysis, we will include all participants in TICH-2 with a computed tomography angiography on admission allowing adjudication of the participants' spot sign status. Primary outcome will be the ability of tranexamic acid to limit absolute haematoma volume on computed tomography at 24 h (± 12 h) after randomisation among spot sign positive and spot sign negative participants, respectively. Within all outcome measures, the effect of tranexamic acid in spot sign positive/negative participants will be compared using tests of interaction. This sub-study will investigate the important clinical hypothesis that spot sign positive patients might benefit more from administration of tranexamic acid compared to spot sign negative patients. Trial registration ISRCTN93732214 ( http://www.isrctn.com ).

  3. Intra-articular versus intravenous tranexamic acid application in total knee arthroplasty: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Bobin; Liu, Guohui; Zhou, Wu; Lv, Huijuan; Liu, Yi; Zha, Kun; Wu, Qipeng; Liu, Jing

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this meta-analysis was to compare the blood loss and complications of intra-articular (IA) with intravenous (IV) tranexamic acid (TXA) for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A comprehensive search of studies was conducted to identify related articles in Pubmed, Embase, Cochrane central Register of Controlled Trials, springerLink, OVID and the Research published from January 1980 to September 2016. All studies that compared IA TXA with IV TXA application on TKA were included. Main outcomes of the two methods were collected and analyzed by using Review Manager 5.3. There were 16 randomized controlled trials with 1308 cases met the criteria. Compared with IV TXA, IA TXA had similar blood volume of drainage, hidden blood loss, transfusion rate and complications (P > 0.05). IA TXA had lower total blood loss than IV TXA, and there was significant difference (P  0.05) when compared with IA TXA. Both IA TXA and single dose of IV TXA are effective in reducing total blood loss and postoperative hemoglobin drop without increasing complications of DVT or PE. The current meta-analysis suggests that 1.5 g TXA by IA administration or 1 g TXA by IV administration 10 min before tourniquet deflation is effective and safe in patients undergoing TKA.

  4. Simple, rapid, and sensitive liquid chromatography-fluorescence method for the quantification of tranexamic acid in blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huertas-Pérez, José Fernando; Heger, Michal; Dekker, Henk; Krabbe, Hans; Lankelma, Jan; Ariese, Freek

    2007-01-01

    Tranexamic acid (TA) is a synthetic antifibrinolytic agent that is being considered as a candidate adjuvant drug for site-specific pharmaco-laser therapy of port wine stains. For drug utility studies, a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-fluorescence method was developed for the

  5. Effect of tranexamic acid irrigation on perioperative blood loss during orthognathic surgery: a double-blind, randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekharian, Hamidreza; Vahedi, Ruhollah; Karagah, Tuba; Tabrizi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Perioperative hemorrhage is an important concern during orthognathic surgery. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of tranexamic acid (TXA) irrigation on perioperative hemorrhage during orthognathic surgery. In this double-blind, randomized controlled clinical trial, 56 participants who underwent orthognathic surgery were divided into 2 groups. The patients in the first group received TXA irrigation with normal saline (1 mg/mL), and the patients in the second group had normal saline for irrigation during orthognathic surgery. Age, gender, operation duration, the amount of irrigation solution used, and preoperative hemoglobin, hematocrit, and weight were the variables that were studied. The use of TXA solution for irrigation was the predictive factor of the study. Each group consisted of 28 patients. Group 1 consisted of 15 male patients (53.6%) and 13 female patients (46.4%) and group 2 consisted of 14 male patients (50%) and 14 female patients (50%). There was no difference in the distributions of the variables between the 2 groups, except for the duration of the operation. The mean duration of the operation was 3.94 ± 0.61 hours in group 1 and 4.17 ± 0.98 hours in group 2, and the difference in this respect between the 2 groups was statistically significant (P .05). TXA is effective in reducing intraoperative blood loss in patients for whom substantial blood loss is anticipated. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of tranexamic acid on coagulation and fibrinolysis in women with postpartum haemorrhage (WOMAN-ETAC: protocol and statistical analysis plan for a randomized controlled trial [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haleema Shakur

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH is a leading cause of maternal death. Tranexamic acid has the potential to reduce bleeding and a large randomized controlled trial of its effect on maternal health outcomes in women with PPH (The WOMAN trial is ongoing. We will examine the effect of tranexamic acid on fibrinolysis and coagulation in a subset of WOMAN trial participants.   Methods. Adult women with clinically diagnosed primary PPH after vaginal or caesarean delivery are eligible for inclusion in the WOMAN trial. In a sub-group of trial participants, blood samples will be collected at baseline and 30 minutes after the first dose of tranexamic acid or matching placebo.  Our primary objective is to evaluate the effect of tranexamic acid on fibrinolysis. Fibrinolysis will be assessed by measuring D-dimers and by rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM. Secondary outcomes are international normalized ratio (INR, prothrombin time (PT, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT, fibrinogen, haemoglobin and platelets. We aim to include about 180 women from the University College Hospital, Ibadan in Nigeria.   Discussion:  This sub-study of WOMAN trial participants should provide information on the mechanism of action of tranexamic acid in women with postpartum haemorrhage. We present the trial protocol and statistical analysis plan. The trial protocol was registered prior to the start of patient recruitment. The statistical analysis plan was completed before un-blinding.     Trial registration: The trial was registered: ClinicalTrials.gov, Identifier NCT00872469 https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00872469; ISRCTN registry, Identifier   ISRCTN76912190 http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN76912190 (Registration date: 22/03/2012.

  7. Tranexamic acid for epistaxis in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia patients: a European cross-over controlled trial in a rare disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, S; Dupuis-Girod, S; Boutitie, F; Rivière, S; Morinière, S; Hatron, P-Y; Manfredi, G; Kaminsky, P; Capitaine, A-L; Roy, P; Gueyffier, F; Plauchu, H

    2014-09-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a genetic disorder associated with abnormal angiogenesis and disabling epistaxis. Tranexamic acid (TA) has been widely used in the treatment of these severe bleeds but with no properly designed trial. To demonstrate the efficacy of TA in epistaxis in HHT patients and to explore its safety of use. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over trial was conducted. Participants were randomized to receive TA (3 g a day) then placebo or the opposite sequence. The main analysis compared intra-individual mean duration of epistaxis under TA vs. placebo on a log scale. The primary outcome was the mean duration of epistaxis per month, assessed with specific grids to be completed by participants. The number of epistaxis episodes was recorded as a secondary outcome. A total of 118 randomized patients contributed to the statistical analysis. The mean duration of epistaxis per month was significantly shorter with TA than placebo (0.19 on the log scale; SD = 0.07; P = 0.005), corresponding to a decrease of 17.3% (15.7 min) in the duration of epistaxis per month (CI 95%, 5.5-27.6). The median number of epistaxis episodes per month was 22.1 episodes in the placebo arm vs. 23.3 episodes in the TA arm. No thrombophlebitis was observed. In the ATERO study, we demonstrated a significant decrease in the duration of epistaxis in HHT patients taking TA. No safety issues were recorded in our cohort of patients. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  8. Effects of Tranexamic Acid on Death, Vascular Occlusive Events ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Tranexamic acid can reduce bleeding in patients undergoing elective surgery. We assessed the effects of early administration of a short course of tranexamic acid on death, vascular occlusive events, and the receipt of blood transfusion in trauma patients. Methods: This randomised controlled trial was ...

  9. Tranexamic Acid Reduced the Percent of Total Blood Volume Lost During Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kristen E; Butler, Elissa K; Barrack, Tara; Ledonio, Charles T; Forte, Mary L; Cohn, Claudia S; Polly, David W

    2017-01-01

    Multilevel posterior spine fusion is associated with significant intraoperative blood loss. Tranexamic acid is an antifibrinolytic agent that reduces intraoperative blood loss. The goal of this study was to compare the percent of total blood volume lost during posterior spinal fusion (PSF) with or without tranexamic acid in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Thirty-six AIS patients underwent PSF in 2011-2014; the last half (n=18) received intraoperative tranexamic acid. We retrieved relevant demographic, hematologic, intraoperative and outcomes information from medical records. The primary outcome was the percent of total blood volume lost, calculated from estimates of intraoperative blood loss (numerator) and estimated total blood volume per patient (denominator, via Nadler's equations). Unadjusted outcomes were compared using standard statistical tests. Tranexamic acid and no-tranexamic acid groups were similar (all p>0.05) in mean age (16.1 vs. 15.2 years), sex (89% vs. 83% female), body mass index (22.2 vs. 20.2 kg/m2), preoperative hemoglobin (13.9 vs. 13.9 g/dl), mean spinal levels fused (10.5 vs. 9.6), osteotomies (1.6 vs. 0.9) and operative duration (6.1 hours, both). The percent of total blood volume lost (TBVL) was significantly lower in the tranexamic acid-treated vs. no-tranexamic acid group (median 8.23% vs. 14.30%, p = 0.032); percent TBVL per level fused was significantly lower with tranexamic acid than without it (1.1% vs. 1.8%, p=0.048). Estimated blood loss (milliliters) was similar across groups. Tranexamic acid significantly reduced the percentage of total blood volume lost versus no tranexamic acid in AIS patients who underwent PSF using a standardized blood loss measure.Level of Evidence: 3. Institutional Review Board status: This medical record chart review (minimal risk) study was approved by the University of Minnesota Institutional Review Board.

  10. Effect of antifibrinolytic drugs on transfusion requirement and blood loss during orthotopic liver transplantation: Results from a single center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: During orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT, activation of the fibrinolytic system can contribute significantly to perioperative bleeding. Prophylactic administration of antifibrinolytic agents has been shown to reduce blood loss and the need for allogenic transfusion. Objective: To study the effect of antifibrinolytics on requirement of blood components, blood loss and operative time during OLT in patients with end stage liver disease, reporting to a single centre. Materials and Methods: Consecutive patients who underwent OLT at this centre during the period February 2003-October 2007 were the subjects of this study. Based on the individual anesthesiologist′s preference, patients were assigned to receive either two million units of aprotinin (AP as a bolus followed by 5,00,000 units/hour or 10 mg/kg tranexamic acid (TAas a bolus followed by 10 mg/kg every six to eight hours, administered from the induction till the end of the surgery. Transfusion policy was standardized in all patients. Intraoperative red cell salvage was done wherever possible. The effect of these two antifibrinolytic drugs on transfusion requirement was evaluated as a whole and in a sub group of patients from each treatment group and compared with a concurrent control group that did not receive antifibrinolytic drugs. Results: Fifty patients (40 M / 10 F, 44 adults, 6 pediatric patients underwent OLT in the study period. Fourteen patients were given AP, 25 patients were given TA and 11 patients did not receive any of the agents(control group. The median volume of total blood components transfused in antifibrinolytic group (n=39 was 4540 ml(0-19,200ml, blood loss 5 l(0.7-35l and operative time 9h (4.5-17h and that of control group(n=11 was 5700 ml(0-15,500ml, 10 l(0.6-25 l and 9h (6.4-15.8h respectively. The median volume of blood transfusions, blood loss and operative time was lesser in AP group(n=14 than that of TA group(n=25. Conclusion: There is definite

  11. Antifibrinolytic amino acids for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with acute or chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Solà, Ivan

    2015-06-09

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is one of the most frequent causes of morbidity and mortality in the course of liver cirrhosis. People with liver disease frequently have haemostatic abnormalities such as hyperfibrinolysis. Therefore, antifibrinolytic amino acids have been proposed to be used as supplementary interventions alongside any of the primary treatments for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with liver diseases. This is an update of this Cochrane review. To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of antifibrinolytic amino acids for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with acute or chronic liver disease. We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Controlled Trials Register (February 2015), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 2 of 12, 2015), MEDLINE (Ovid SP) (1946 to February 2015), EMBASE (Ovid SP) (1974 to February 2015), Science Citation Index EXPANDED (1900 to February 2015), LILACS (1982 to February 2015), World Health Organization Clinical Trials Search Portal (accessed 26 February 2015), and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (accessed 26 February 2015). We scrutinised the reference lists of the retrieved publications. Randomised clinical trials irrespective of blinding, language, or publication status for assessment of benefits and harms. Observational studies for assessment of harms. We planned to summarise data from randomised clinical trials using standard Cochrane methodologies and assessed according to the GRADE approach. We found no randomised clinical trials assessing antifibrinolytic amino acids for treating upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with acute or chronic liver disease. We did not identify quasi-randomised, historically controlled, or observational studies in which we could assess harms. This updated Cochrane review identified no randomised clinical trials assessing the benefits and harms of antifibrinolytic amino acids for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with acute or

  12. A nested mechanistic sub-study into the effect of tranexamic acid versus placebo on intracranial haemorrhage and cerebral ischaemia in isolated traumatic brain injury: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial (CRASH-3 Trial Intracranial Bleeding Mechanistic Sub-Study [CRASH-3 IBMS]).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Abda; Roberts, Ian; Shakur, Haleema

    2017-07-17

    Tranexamic acid prevents blood clots from breaking down and reduces bleeding. However, it is uncertain whether tranexamic acid is effective in traumatic brain injury. The CRASH-3 trial is a randomised controlled trial that will examine the effect of tranexamic acid (versus placebo) on death and disability in 13,000 patients with traumatic brain injury. The CRASH-3 trial hypothesizes that tranexamic acid will reduce intracranial haemorrhage, which will reduce the risk of death. Although it is possible that tranexamic acid will reduce intracranial bleeding, there is also a potential for harm. In particular, tranexamic acid may increase the risk of cerebral thrombosis and ischaemia. The protocol detailed here is for a mechanistic sub-study nested within the CRASH-3 trial. This mechanistic sub-study aims to examine the effect of tranexamic acid (versus placebo) on intracranial bleeding and cerebral ischaemia. The CRASH-3 Intracranial Bleeding Mechanistic Sub-Study (CRASH-3 IBMS) is nested within a prospective, double-blind, multi-centre, parallel-arm randomised trial called the CRASH-3 trial. The CRASH-3 IBMS will be conducted in a cohort of approximately 1000 isolated traumatic brain injury patients enrolled in the CRASH-3 trial. In the CRASH-3 IBMS, brain scans acquired before and after randomisation are examined, using validated methods, for evidence of intracranial bleeding and cerebral ischaemia. The primary outcome is the total volume of intracranial bleeding measured on computed tomography after randomisation, adjusting for baseline bleeding volume. Secondary outcomes include progression of intracranial haemorrhage (from pre- to post-randomisation scans), new intracranial haemorrhage (seen on post- but not pre-randomisation scans), intracranial haemorrhage following neurosurgery, and new focal ischaemic lesions (seen on post-but not pre-randomisation scans). A linear regression model will examine whether receipt of the trial treatment can predict haemorrhage

  13. Efficacy of tranexamic acid as compared to aprotinin in open heart surgery in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarajan Muthialu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coagulopathy is a major issue in children undergoing high-risk pediatric cardiac surgery. Use of anti-fibrinolytics is well documented in adults, but recently there are questions raised about safety and effectiveness of their use on routine use. Tranexamic acid is a potent anti-fibrinolytic, but its role is not fully understood in children. This study aims to study the benefits tranexamic acid in controlling postoperative bleeding in pediatric cardiac surgical patients. Methods and Results: Fifty consecutive children who underwent cardiac surgery were randomized prospectively to receive either aprotinin (Group A; n = 24 or tranexamic acid (Group B; n = 26 from September 2009 to February 2010 were studied. Primary end points were early mortality, postoperative drainage, reoperation for bleeding and complications. Mean age and body weight was smaller in Group A (Age: 48.55 vs. 64.73 months; weight 10.75 vs. 14.80 kg respectively. Group A had more cyanotic heart disease than Group B (87.5% vs. 76.92%. Mean cardiopulmonary bypass time (144.33 vs. 84.34 min and aortic cross-clamp time (78.5 vs. 41.46 min were significantly higher in group A. While the blood and products usage was significantly higher in Group A, there was no difference in indexed postoperative drainage in first 4, 8 and 12 h and postoperative coagulation parameters. Mean C-reactive protein was less in Group A than B and renal dysfunction was seen more in Group A (25% vs. 7.6%. Mortality in Group A was 16.66% and 7.6% in Group B. Conclusion: Anti-fibrinolytics have a definitive role in high-risk children who undergo open-heart surgery. Tranexamic acid is as equally effective as aprotinin with no additional increase in morbidity or mortality. Ultramini Abstract: Coagulopathy has been a major issue in pediatric cardiac surgery, and anti-fibrinolytics have been used fairly regularly in various settings. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of tranexamic acid as compared

  14. Effect of early tranexamic acid administration on mortality, hysterectomy, and other morbidities in women with post-partum haemorrhage (WOMAN): an international, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-27

    Post-partum haemorrhage is the leading cause of maternal death worldwide. Early administration of tranexamic acid reduces deaths due to bleeding in trauma patients. We aimed to assess the effects of early administration of tranexamic acid on death, hysterectomy, and other relevant outcomes in women with post-partum haemorrhage. In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we recruited women aged 16 years and older with a clinical diagnosis of post-partum haemorrhage after a vaginal birth or caesarean section from 193 hospitals in 21 countries. We randomly assigned women to receive either 1 g intravenous tranexamic acid or matching placebo in addition to usual care. If bleeding continued after 30 min, or stopped and restarted within 24 h of the first dose, a second dose of 1 g of tranexamic acid or placebo could be given. Patients were assigned by selection of a numbered treatment pack from a box containing eight numbered packs that were identical apart from the pack number. Participants, care givers, and those assessing outcomes were masked to allocation. We originally planned to enrol 15 000 women with a composite primary endpoint of death from all-causes or hysterectomy within 42 days of giving birth. However, during the trial it became apparent that the decision to conduct a hysterectomy was often made at the same time as randomisation. Although tranexamic acid could influence the risk of death in these cases, it could not affect the risk of hysterectomy. We therefore increased the sample size from 15 000 to 20 000 women in order to estimate the effect of tranexamic acid on the risk of death from post-partum haemorrhage. All analyses were done on an intention-to-treat basis. This trial is registered with ISRCTN76912190 (Dec 8, 2008); ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00872469; and PACTR201007000192283. Between March, 2010, and April, 2016, 20 060 women were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive tranexamic acid (n=10 051) or placebo (n=10

  15. Intravenous tranexamic acid for hyperacute primary intracerebral hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprigg, Nikola; Robson, Katie; Bath, Philip

    2016-01-01

    RATIONALE: Outcome after intracerebral hemorrhage remains poor. Tranexamic acid is easy to administer, readily available, inexpensive, and effective in other hemorrhagic conditions. AIM: This randomized trial aims to test the hypothesis that intravenous tranexamic acid given within 8 h...... of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage reduces death or dependency. DESIGN: Phase III prospective double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial. Participants within 8 h of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage are randomized to receive either intravenous tranexamic acid 1 g 10 min bolus followed by 1 g 8 h......, and institutionalization. DISCUSSION: This pragmatic trial is assessing efficacy of tranexamic acid after spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. Recruitment started in 2013; as of 15th January 2016 1355 participants have been enrolled, from 95 centers in seven countries. Recruitment is due to end in 2017. TICH-2 Trial...

  16. Systematic review: tranexamic acid for upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingenberg, S.L.; Langholz, S.E.; Gluud, Lise Lotte

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tranexamic acid may reduce upper gastrointestinal bleeding and stabilize patients before endoscopic treatments. AIM: To review randomized trials on tranexamic acid for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. METHODS: Manual and electronic searches of The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE...... and Science Citation Index were combined. Intention-to-treat random effect meta-analyses were performed and results presented as RRs with 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: Seven double-blind randomized trials on tranexamic acid vs. placebo were included. Of 1754 patients randomized, 21% were excluded. Only...... one trial included endoscopic treatments or proton pump inhibitors. Five per cent of patients on tranexamic acid and 8% of controls died (RR: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.42-0.89). No significant differences were found on bleeding, bleeding-related mortality, surgery or transfusion requirements. Adverse events...

  17. Systemic and Topical Use of Tranexamic Acid in Spinal Surgery: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Sebastian F.; Santaguida, Carlo; Wong, Jean; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Combination of narrative and systematic literature reviews. Objectives Massive perioperative blood loss in complex spinal surgery often requires blood transfusions and can negatively affect patient outcome. Systemic use of the antifibrinolytic agent tranexamic acid (TXA) has become widely used in the management of surgical bleeding. We review the clinical evidence for the use of intravenous TXA as a hemostatic agent in spinal surgery and discuss the emerging role for its complementary use as a topical agent to reduce perioperative blood loss from the surgical site. Through a systematic review of published and ongoing investigations on topical TXA for spinal surgery, we wish to make spine practitioners aware of this option and to suggest opportunities for further investigation in the field. Methods A narrative review of systemic TXA in spinal surgery and topical TXA in surgery was conducted. Furthermore, a systematic search (using PRISMA guidelines) of PubMed (MEDLINE), EMBASE, and Cochrane CENTRAL databases as well as World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, ClinicalTrials.gov (National Institutes of Health), and International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number registries was conducted to identify both published literature and ongoing clinical trials on topical TXA in spinal surgery. Results Of 1,631 preliminary search results, 2 published studies were included in the systematic review. Out of 285 ongoing clinical trials matching the search criteria, a total of 4 relevant studies were included and reviewed. Conclusion Intravenous TXA is established as an efficacious hemostatic agent in spinal surgery. Use of topical TXA in surgery suggests similar hemostatic efficacy and potentially improved safety as compared with intravenous TXA. For spinal surgery, the literature on topical TXA is sparse but promising, warranting further clinical investigation and consideration as a clinical option in cases with

  18. Preventive and therapeutic effects of tranexamic acid on postpartum bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Solltani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Postpartum hemorrhage is among the leading causes of maternal mortality throughout the world. Severe blood loss contributes to  the increased blood transfusion risk with its concerned inherent adverse events and therefore increased rate of emergency re-operative interventions such as arterial ligation or hysterectomy. It also can lead to protracted anemia, particularly in low or median income countries. Extended application of antifibrinolytic agents such as tranexamic acid has been customary for long years to stop or reduce blood loss in postpartum period. However, there are not enough reliable evidence to approve the real efficacy of these drugs. In this brief and summary review, we pointed to a few conducted studies. The PubMed was searched for keyword including postpartum hemorrhage, tranexamic acid, cesarean section, vaginal delivery, and blood loss prevention. The articles with language other than English were excluded from our review.  We concluded that more convincing information is needed to determine the precise effects of tranexamic acid, and its benefits against adverse effects.

  19. Tranexamic Acid in Patients Undergoing Coronary-Artery Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myles, Paul S; Smith, Julian A; Forbes, Andrew; Silbert, Brendan; Jayarajah, Mohandas; Painter, Thomas; Cooper, D James; Marasco, Silvana; McNeil, John; Bussières, Jean S; McGuinness, Shay; Byrne, Kelly; Chan, Matthew T V; Landoni, Giovanni; Wallace, Sophie

    2017-01-12

    Tranexamic acid reduces the risk of bleeding among patients undergoing cardiac surgery, but it is unclear whether this leads to improved outcomes. Furthermore, there are concerns that tranexamic acid may have prothrombotic and proconvulsant effects. In a trial with a 2-by-2 factorial design, we randomly assigned patients who were scheduled to undergo coronary-artery surgery and were at risk for perioperative complications to receive aspirin or placebo and tranexamic acid or placebo. The results of the tranexamic acid comparison are reported here. The primary outcome was a composite of death and thrombotic complications (nonfatal myocardial infarction, stroke, pulmonary embolism, renal failure, or bowel infarction) within 30 days after surgery. Of the 4662 patients who were enrolled and provided consent, 4631 underwent surgery and had available outcomes data; 2311 were assigned to the tranexamic acid group and 2320 to the placebo group. A primary outcome event occurred in 386 patients (16.7%) in the tranexamic acid group and in 420 patients (18.1%) in the placebo group (relative risk, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.81 to 1.05; P=0.22). The total number of units of blood products that were transfused during hospitalization was 4331 in the tranexamic acid group and 7994 in the placebo group (Ptranexamic acid group and in 2.8% of the patients in the placebo group (P=0.001), and seizures occurred in 0.7% and 0.1%, respectively (P=0.002 by Fisher's exact test). Among patients undergoing coronary-artery surgery, tranexamic acid was associated with a lower risk of bleeding than was placebo, without a higher risk of death or thrombotic complications within 30 days after surgery. Tranexamic acid was associated with a higher risk of postoperative seizures. (Funded by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council and others; ATACAS Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry number, ACTRN12605000557639 .).

  20. Use of tranexamic acid for controlling bleeding in thoracolumbar scoliosis surgery with posterior instrumentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Magno da Rocha

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Scoliosis surgery involves major blood loss and frequently requires blood transfusion. The cost and risks involved in using allogeneic blood have motivated investigation of methods capable of reducing patients' bleeding during operations. One of these methods is to use antifibrinolytic drugs, and tranexamic acid is among these. The aim of this study was to assess the use of this drug for controlling bleeding in surgery to treat idiopathic scoliosis.METHODS: This was a retrospective study in which the medical files of 40 patients who underwent thoracolumbar arthrodesis by means of a posterior route were analyzed. Of these cases, 21 used tranexamic acid and were placed in the test group. The others were placed in the control group. The mean volumes of bleeding during and after the operation and the need for blood transfusion were compared between the two groups.RESULTS: The group that used tranexamic acid had significantly less bleeding during the operation than the control group. There was no significant difference between the groups regarding postoperative bleeding and the need for blood transfusion.CONCLUSIONS: Tranexamic acid was effective in reducing bleeding during the operation, as demonstrated in other studies. The correlation between its use and the reduction in the need for blood transfusion is multifactorial and could not be established in this study. We believe that tranexamic acid may be a useful resource and that it deserves greater attention in randomized double-blind prospective series, with proper control over variables that directly influence blood loss.

  1. Which Route of Tranexamic Acid Administration is More Effective to Reduce Blood Loss Following Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyhani, Sohrab; Esmailiejah, Ali Akbar; Abbasian, Mohammad Reza; Safdari, Farshad

    2016-01-01

    The most appropriate route of tranexamic acid administration is controversial. In the current study, we compared the efficacy of intravenous (IV) and topical intra-articular tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss and transfusion rate in patients who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty. One hundred twenty 120 patients were scheduled to undergo primary total knee arthroplasty. Patients were randomly allocated to three equal groups: IV tranexamic acid (500 mg), topical tranexamic acid (3 g in 100 mL normal saline) and the control. In the topical group, half of the volume was used to irrigate the joint and the other half was injected intra-articularly. The volume of blood loss, hemoglobin (Hb) level at 24 hours postoperative, and rate of transfusion was compared between groups. The blood loss and Hb level were significantly greater and lower in the control group, respectively (P=0.031). Also, the rate of transfusion was significantly greater in the control group (P=0.013). However, IV and topical groups did not differ significantly in terms of measured variables. No patient experienced a thromboembolic event in our study. Tranexamic acid is a useful antifibrinolytic drug to reduce postoperative blood loss, Hb drop, and rate of blood transfusion in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. The route of tranexamic acid administration did not affect the efficacy and safety.

  2. The effectiveness and safety of antifibrinolytics in patients with acute intracranial haemorrhage: statistical analysis plan for an individual patient data meta-analysis [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine Ker

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Antifibrinolytic Trialists Collaboration aims to increase knowledge about the effectiveness and safety of antifibrinolytic treatment by conducting individual patient data (IPD meta-analyses of randomised trials. This article presents the statistical analysis plan for an IPD meta-analysis of the effects of antifibrinolytics for acute intracranial haemorrhage. Methods: The protocol for the IPD meta-analysis has been registered with PROSPERO (CRD42016052155. We will conduct an individual patient data meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials with 1000 patients or more assessing the effects of antifibrinolytics in acute intracranial haemorrhage. We will assess the effect on two co-primary outcomes: 1 death in hospital at end of trial follow-up, and 2 death in hospital or dependency at end of trial follow-up. The co-primary outcomes will be limited to patients treated within three hours of injury or stroke onset. We will report treatment effects using odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. We use logistic regression models to examine how the effect of antifibrinolytics vary by time to treatment, severity of intracranial bleeding, and age. We will also examine the effect of antifibrinolytics on secondary outcomes including death, dependency, vascular occlusive events, seizures, and neurological outcomes. Secondary outcomes will be assessed in all patients irrespective of time of treatment. All analyses will be conducted on an intention-to-treat basis. Conclusions: This IPD meta-analysis will examine important clinical questions about the effects of antifibrinolytic treatment in patients with intracranial haemorrhage that cannot be answered using aggregate data. With IPD we can examine how effects vary by time to treatment, bleeding severity, and age, to gain better understanding of the balance of benefit and harms on which to base recommendations for practice.

  3. The effectiveness and safety of antifibrinolytics in patients with acute intracranial haemorrhage: statistical analysis plan for an individual patient data meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ker, Katharine; Prieto-Merino, David; Sprigg, Nikola; Mahmood, Abda; Bath, Philip; Kang Law, Zhe; Flaherty, Katie; Roberts, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Introduction : The Antifibrinolytic Trialists Collaboration aims to increase knowledge about the effectiveness and safety of antifibrinolytic treatment by conducting individual patient data (IPD) meta-analyses of randomised trials. This article presents the statistical analysis plan for an IPD meta-analysis of the effects of antifibrinolytics for acute intracranial haemorrhage. Methods : The protocol for the IPD meta-analysis has been registered with PROSPERO (CRD42016052155). We will conduct an individual patient data meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials with 1000 patients or more assessing the effects of antifibrinolytics in acute intracranial haemorrhage. We will assess the effect on two co-primary outcomes: 1) death in hospital at end of trial follow-up, and 2) death in hospital or dependency at end of trial follow-up. The co-primary outcomes will be limited to patients treated within three hours of injury or stroke onset. We will report treatment effects using odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. We use logistic regression models to examine how the effect of antifibrinolytics vary by time to treatment, severity of intracranial bleeding, and age. We will also examine the effect of antifibrinolytics on secondary outcomes including death, dependency, vascular occlusive events, seizures, and neurological outcomes. Secondary outcomes will be assessed in all patients irrespective of time of treatment. All analyses will be conducted on an intention-to-treat basis. Conclusions : This IPD meta-analysis will examine important clinical questions about the effects of antifibrinolytic treatment in patients with intracranial haemorrhage that cannot be answered using aggregate data. With IPD we can examine how effects vary by time to treatment, bleeding severity, and age, to gain better understanding of the balance of benefit and harms on which to base recommendations for practice.

  4. The effect of prophylactic intravenous tranexamic acid on blood loss after vaginal delivery in women at low risk of postpartum haemorrhage: a double-blind randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirghafourvand, Mojgan; Mohammad-Alizadeh, Sakineh; Abbasalizadeh, Fatemeh; Shirdel, Mina

    2015-02-01

    To determine the effect of prophylactic tranexamic acid (TA) on calculated and measured blood loss after vaginal delivery in women at low risk of postpartum haemorrhage. In this double-blind randomised controlled trial, 120 women with a singleton pregnancy were randomly allocated to receive either one gram intravenous TA or placebo in addition to 10 IU oxytocin after delivery of the fetus. Calculated blood loss was determined based on haematocrit before delivery and 12-24 h postdelivery. The quantity of blood loss was measured during two time periods: from delivery of the fetus to placental expulsion and from placental expulsion to the end of the second hour after childbirth. The mean (SD) calculated total blood loss (519 (320) vs 659 (402) mL, P = 0.036) and measured blood loss from placental delivery to 2 h postpartum (69 (39) vs 108 (53) mL, P  1000 mL was lower in the TA group (7% vs 18%, P = 0.048). Prophylactic TA reduces blood loss after vaginal delivery in women with a low risk of postpartum haemorrhage. The prophylactic use of TA may reduce blood loss complications and enhance maternal health. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  5. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Low-Dose Tranexamic Acid versus Placebo to Reduce Red Blood Cell Transfusion During Complex Multilevel Spine Fusion Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabini, Louanne M; Moreland, Natalie C; Vealey, Ryan J; Bebawy, John F; Koski, Tyler R; Koht, Antoun; Gupta, Dhanesh K; Avram, Michael J

    2018-02-01

    Multilevel spine fusion surgery for adult deformity correction is associated with significant blood loss and coagulopathy. Tranexamic acid reduces blood loss in high-risk surgery, but the efficacy of a low-dose regimen is unknown. Sixty-one patients undergoing multilevel complex spinal fusion with and without osteotomies were randomly assigned to receive low-dose tranexamic acid (10 mg/kg loading dose, then 1 mg·kg -1 ·hr -1 throughout surgery) or placebo. The primary outcome was the total volume of red blood cells transfused intraoperatively. Thirty-one patients received tranexamic acid, and 30 patients received placebo. Patient demographics, risk of major transfusion, preoperative hemoglobin, and surgical risk of the 2 groups were similar. There was a significant decrease in total volume of red blood cells transfused (placebo group median 1460 mL vs. tranexamic acid group 1140 mL; median difference 463 mL, 95% confidence interval 15 to 914 mL, P = 0.034), with a decrease in cell saver transfusion (placebo group median 490 mL vs. tranexamic acid group 256 mL; median difference 166 mL, 95% confidence interval 0 to 368 mL, P = 0.042). The decrease in packed red blood cell transfusion did not reach statistical significance (placebo group median 1050 mL vs. tranexamic acid group 600 mL; median difference 300 mL, 95% confidence interval 0 to 600 mL, P = 0.097). Our results support the use of low-dose tranexamic acid during complex multilevel spine fusion surgery to decrease total red blood cell transfusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The effectiveness and safety of antifibrinolytics in patients with acute intracranial haemorrhage: statistical analysis plan for an individual patient data meta-analysis [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine Ker

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Antifibrinolytic Trialists Collaboration aims to increase knowledge about the effectiveness and safety of antifibrinolytic treatment by conducting individual patient data (IPD meta-analyses of randomised trials. This article presents the statistical analysis plan for an IPD meta-analysis of the effects of antifibrinolytics for acute intracranial haemorrhage. Methods: The protocol for the IPD meta-analysis has been registered with PROSPERO (CRD42016052155. We will conduct an individual patient data meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials with 1000 patients or more assessing the effects of antifibrinolytics in acute intracranial haemorrhage. We will assess the effect on two co-primary outcomes: 1 Death in hospital within 30 days of randomisation, and 2 Death  or dependency at final follow-up within 90 days of randomisation. The co-primary outcomes will be limited to patients treated within three hours of injury or stroke onset. We will report treatment effects using odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. We use logistic regression models to examine how the effect of antifibrinolytics vary by time to treatment, severity of intracranial bleeding, and age. We will also examine the effect of antifibrinolytics on secondary outcomes including death, dependency, vascular occlusive events, seizures, and neurological outcomes. Secondary outcomes will be assessed in all patients irrespective of time of treatment. All analyses will be conducted on an intention-to-treat basis. Conclusions: This IPD meta-analysis will examine important clinical questions about the effects of antifibrinolytic treatment in patients with intracranial haemorrhage that cannot be answered using aggregate data. With IPD we can examine how effects vary by time to treatment, bleeding severity, and age, to gain better understanding of the balance of benefit and harms on which to base recommendations for practice.

  7. Topical vs. intravenous administration of tranexamic acid in knee arthroplasty and prevalence of deep venous thrombosis: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Zekcer

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tranexamic acid (TXA is widely used in orthopedic surgery to reduce perioperative bleeding. Since TXA inhibits fibrinolysis, there is concern that it may increase the risk of thromboembolic events. Objectives To verify the prevalence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT in patients receiving TXA during total knee arthroplasty and to compare topical with intravenous administration of the drug. Methods All patients admitted for total knee arthroplasty due to primary arthrosis between June and November of 2014 were recruited consecutively. Thirty patients were randomized to a “topical group” (1.5 g TXA diluted in 50ml saline sprayed over the area operated, before tourniquet release, 30 to an “intravenous group” (20mg/kg TXA in 100 ml of saline, given at the same time as anesthesia, and 30 to a control group (100 ml of saline, given at the same time as anesthesia. All patients had duplex ultrasound scans of the legs on the 15th postoperative day. Results Deep venous thrombosis events occurred in five of the 90 patients operated (one out of 30 in the topical group [3.3%], four out of 30 in the control group [13.3%], and zero in the intravenous group. All were confirmed by duplex ultrasound scans and all were asymptomatic. Prevalence rates of DVT were similar between groups (p = 0.112 for control vs. intravenous; p = 0.353 for control vs. topical; and p =1.000 for intravenous vs. topical, according to two-sided exact tests. Conclusions Both topical and intravenous administration of TXA are safe with regard to occurrence of DVT, since the number of DVT cases in patients given TXA was not different to the number in those given placebo.

  8. Preventing Excessive Blood Loss During Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy by Using Tranexamic Acid: A Double Blinded Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Siddiq

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL is most frequently performed procedure for renal stones 2 cm and larger. Perioperative hemorrhage being most common complication, warrants as important predicting factor of adverse outcomes. Prevention with inexpensive and safe drug like tranexamic acid (TA would ultimately turn out to be cornerstone for establishing future guidelines. Aim of this study is to evaluate whether TA is efficacious in preventing blood loss during PCNL. Materials and Methods: Ethical review board approval taken. Sample size calculation yielded 240 patients, comprising 120 in each group. Group A receiving TA and group B receiving placebo. Age, gender, body mass index (BMI, stone size, volume and location, preoperative blood count, creatinine, urine analysis, coagulation profile and necessary radiological investigations done. Randomization through lottery method. Both patient and investigator were blinded. Hemoglobin (Hb and hematocrit (Hct levels done at 24 hours postoperatively and fall in values recorded. Results: Both groups were equal in characteristics like age, gender, BMI, stone size, volume and location (p>0.05. Operative variables like calyx punctured, position of puncture and operative time were also found to be similar in both groups. Median change in Hb in placebo group was 1.6 interquartile range (IQR 4, while in TA group was 1.3 (IQR 7.8 (p=0.001. Similarly, median change in Hct level in placebo group was 3.6 (IQR 11.8 and in TA group was 2.4 (IQR 13 (p<0.001. Sixteen patients were transfused after surgery; 12 (75% belonged to placebo group while 4 (25% belonged to TA group (p=0.038. Hospital stay was not significantly different in both groups (p=0.177 with median of 4.0 and IQR of 0 in both groups. Conclusion: TA during PCNL reduces blood loss and minimizes blood transfusion rate.

  9. Tranexamic Acid Safely Reduced Blood Loss in Hemi- and Total Hip Arthroplasty for Acute Femoral Neck Fracture: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Chad D; Houdek, Matthew T; Sems, S Andrew; Cross, William W; Pagnano, Mark W

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to determine whether (1) tranexamic acid (TXA) reduces the incidence of transfusion (2) TXA reduces the calculated blood loss, and (3) there are any observable differences in 30- and 90-day complications with TXA administration during arthroplasty for femoral neck fracture (FNF). Prospective, double-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Level 1 Academic Trauma Center. One hundred thirty-eight patients who presented with a low-energy, isolated, FNF (AO 31B) treated with either hemi- or total hip arthroplasty within 72 hours of injury were randomized to either the TXA group (69 patients) or placebo group (69 patients). In the TXA group, patients received 2 doses of 15 mg/kg intravenous TXA dissolved in 100 mL of saline, each administered over 10 minutes; 1 dose just before incision, and the second at wound closure. In the placebo group, 100 mL of saline solution was administered in a similar fashion. Perioperative care was otherwise standardized including conservative transfusion criteria. Our primary outcome was to determine the proportion of patients who underwent blood transfusion during hospitalization. Secondary outcomes were calculated blood loss, number of units transfused during hospitalization, and incidence of adverse events at 30 and 90 days including thromboembolic event, wound complications, reoperation, hospital readmission, and all-cause mortality. TXA reduced mean incidence of transfusion by 305 mL (P = 0.0005). There was a trend toward decreased transfusion rate in the TXA group (17% vs. 26%, P = 0.22). TXA was safe with no differences in adverse events at 30 and 90 days. This randomized clinical trial found that TXA administration safely reduced blood loss with a tendency for decreased transfusion rate and total blood product consumption for patients undergoing hip arthroplasty for acute FNF. More studies are needed to further ascertain the role of TXA in the management of patients with FNF. Therapeutic Level I. See Instructions for Authors

  10. effects of tranexamic acid on death, vascular occlusive events

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the effects of early administration of a short course of tranexamic acid on death, ... study staff (site investigators and trial coordinating centre staff ) were masked to .... supply company (Bilcare, Crickhowell, UK). ..... establishing the presence or absence of haemorrhage, ... would have reduced the power of the trial to show an.

  11. Effect of oral tranexamic acid on macular edema associated with retinal vein occlusion or diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeyama M

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Masayuki Takeyama,1 Fumio Takeuchi,2 Masahiko Gosho,3 Keijiro Sugita,1 Masahiro Zako,4 Masayoshi Iwaki,5 Motohiro Kamei1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Aichi Medical University, Nagakute, 2Department of Biochemistry, Aichi Medical University, Nagakute, 3Department of Clinical Trial and Clinical Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, 4Department of Ophthalmology, Asia Hospital, Seto, 5Department of Ophthalmology, Yokkaichi, Digestive Disease Center, Komono, Japan Purpose: Tranexamic acid (TXA is a widely used antifibrinolytic agent that can also cause a decrease in vascular permeability. We hypothesized that TXA could improve macular edema (ME that is caused by an increase in retinal vascular permeability. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of oral TXA for ME associated with retinal vein occlusion (RVO or diabetic ME (DME.Patients and methods: Oral TXA (1,500 mg daily for 2 weeks was administered to patients with persistent ME secondary to RVO (7 eyes and DME (7 eyes. After 2 weeks (ie, the final day of administration and 6 weeks (ie, 4 weeks after the final administration, best-corrected visual acuity and central macular thickness (CMT were measured and compared with baseline. Analyses were performed for RVO and DME cases. No other treatment was performed during the study period.Results: In RVO cases, significant improvement in CMT was found between baseline (467.7±121.4 µm and 2-week measurements after treatment (428.7±110.5 µm, p=0.024. No significant change was found in CMT between measurements taken at baseline and 6 weeks after treatment. In DME cases, no significant change was found in CMT between measurements taken at baseline and 2 or 6 weeks after treatment. In all analyses of best-corrected visual acuity, no significant change was observed.Conclusion: The results support the hypothesis that plasmin plays a role in the development of ME associated with RVO, and oral TXA administration may be

  12. Topical versus intravenous administration of tranexamic acid in primary total hip arthroplasty: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammy A. Hanna

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tranexamic acid (TA is widely used by orthopedic surgeons to decrease blood loss and the need for transfusion following total hip arthroplasty (THA. Although both intravenous and topical applications are described in the literature, there remains no consensus regarding the optimal regimen, dosage and method of delivery of TA during THA. In addition, concerns still exist regarding the risk of thromboembolic events with intravenous administration. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to compare the efficacy and safety of topical versus intravenous administration of TA in THA. A systemic review of the electronic databases PubMed, CENTRAL, EMBASE and Google Scholar was undertaken to identify all randomized controlled trials (RCTs comparing the topical and intravenous administration of TA during THA, in terms of total blood loss, rate of blood transfusion and incidence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary embolism (PE post-operatively. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate and compare the efficacy and safety of both methods of administration. Of 248 potentially relevant papers, three RCTs comprising (482 were eligible for data extraction and metaanalysis. The results showed a slightly higher amount of blood loss [Mean Difference (MD – 46.37, P=0.12, 95% confidence interval (CI – 12.54 to 105.29] and rate of transfusion (Risk Ratio 1.30, P=0.39, 95%CI 0.71 to 2.37 postoperatively in the topical TA group, but both did not reach statistical significance. There were 3 cases (1.2% of DVT/PE in the intravenous group and one case (0.4% in the topical group. Topical TA is an effective and safe method to reduce blood loss and the rate of transfusion following primary THA. It has comparative effectiveness to IV administration with slightly less post-operative thromboembolic complications. Larger and better-designed RCTs are required to establish the optimum dosage and regimen for topical use.

  13. Effect of Tranexamic Acid on Blood Loss, D-Dimer, and Fibrinogen Kinetics in Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pong, Ryan P; Leveque, Jean-Christophe A; Edwards, Alicia; Yanamadala, Vijay; Wright, Anna K; Herodes, Megan; Sethi, Rajiv K

    2018-05-02

    Antifibrinolytics such as tranexamic acid reduce operative blood loss and blood product transfusion requirements in patients undergoing surgical correction of scoliosis. The factors involved in the unrelenting coagulopathy seen in scoliosis surgery are not well understood. One potential contributor is activation of the fibrinolytic system during a surgical procedure, likely related to clot dissolution and consumption of fibrinogen. The addition of tranexamic acid during a surgical procedure may mitigate the coagulopathy by impeding the derangement in D-dimer and fibrinogen kinetics. We retrospectively studied consecutive patients who had undergone surgical correction of adult spinal deformity between January 2010 and July 2016 at our institution. Intraoperative hemostatic data, surgical time, estimated blood loss, and transfusion records were analyzed for patients before and after the addition of tranexamic acid to our protocol. Each patient who received tranexamic acid and met inclusion criteria was cohort-matched with a patient who underwent a surgical procedure without tranexamic acid administration. There were 17 patients in the tranexamic acid cohort, with a mean age of 60.7 years, and 17 patients in the control cohort, with a mean age of 60.9 years. Estimated blood loss (932 ± 539 mL compared with 1,800 ± 1,029 mL; p = 0.005) and packed red blood-cell transfusions (1.5 ± 1.6 units compared with 4.0 ± 2.1 units; p = 0.001) were significantly lower in the tranexamic acid cohort. In all single-stage surgical procedures that met inclusion criteria, the rise of D-dimer was attenuated from 8.3 ± 5.0 μg/mL in the control cohort to 3.3 ± 3.2 μg/mL for the tranexamic acid cohort (p tranexamic acid cohort to 60.6 ± 35.1 mg/dL (p = 0.004). In patients undergoing spinal surgery, intravenous administration of tranexamic acid is effective at reducing intraoperative blood loss. Monitoring of D-dimer and fibrinogen during spinal surgery suggests that tranexamic acid

  14. A randomized trial of the effect of low dose epinephrine infusion in addition to tranexamic acid on blood loss during total hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jans, Ø.; Grevstad, U.; Mandoe, H.

    2016-01-01

    procedure. Intraoperative tranexamic acid (TXA) was administered to all subjects. The primary outcome was intraoperative blood loss directly measured by drains and weighing swabs. Secondary outcome was total blood loss at 24 h postoperatively calculated using the Gross formula. Results: Of 106 subjects...

  15. Synergistic effects of intravenous and intra-articular tranexamic acid on reducing hemoglobin loss in revision total knee arthroplasty: a prospective, randomized, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiangwei; Wang, Jiaxing; Wang, Qiaojie; Zhang, Xianlong

    2018-04-01

    Tranexamic acid decreases blood loss in primary total knee arthroplasty, and no related prospective randomized clinical trials have been conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of tranexamic acid in revision total knee arthroplasty. Thus, we conducted this work to evaluate the synergistic effects of intravenous plus intra-articular tranexamic acid on reducing hemoglobin loss compared with intra-articular tranexamic acid alone in revision total knee arthroplasty. This prospective, controlled study randomized 96 patients undergoing revision total knee arthroplasty into two groups: an intravenous plus intra-articular tranexamic acid group (48 patients who received 20 mg/kg intravenous tranexamic acid and 3.0 g intra-articular tranexamic acid); and an intra-articular tranexamic acid alone group (48 patients who received the same intravenous volume of normal saline and 3.0 g intra-articular tranexamic acid). The primary outcome was hemoglobin loss. Secondary outcomes included the volume of drain output, the percentage of patients who received transfusions, the number of units transfused, and thromboembolic events. The baseline data, preoperative hemoglobin, and tourniquet time were similar in both groups. There was significantly less hemoglobin loss in the intravenous plus intra-articular tranexamic acid group compared with the intra-articular tranexamic acid alone group (2.7 ± 0.6 g/dL and 3.7 ± 0.7 g/dL; p tranexamic acid alone group, the intravenous plus intra-articular tranexamic acid group also had significantly less drain output, fewer patients who received transfusions, and fewer units transfused (all p tranexamic acid alone, combined intravenous plus intra-articular tranexamic acid significantly reduced hemoglobin loss and the need for transfusion without an apparent increase in thromboembolic events in patients who underwent revision total knee arthroplasty. © 2018 AABB.

  16. Tranexamic Acid in the Management of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: an Evidence-based Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Atikah

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to review the effectiveness of tranexamic acid therapy which has been proposed to reduce bleeding and in turn lower mortality rate. Methods: following literature searching based on our clinical question on Cochrane Library, PubMed, Clinical Key, EBSCO, Science Direct and Proquest, one systematic review that includes seven randomized controlled trials is obtained. The article meets validity and relevance criteria. Results: the systematic review found that there is no any clear evidence between intervention and control groups in term of mortality. Conclusion: the use of tranexamic acid to reduce mortality in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding is not recommended. Key words: tranexamic acid, mortality, upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  17. LC-MS/MS determination of tranexamic acid in human plasma after phospholipid clean-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabresse, Nicolas; Fall, Fanta; Etting, Isabelle; Devillier, Philippe; Alvarez, Jean-Claude; Grassin-Delyle, Stanislas

    2017-07-15

    Tranexamic acid is a widely used antifibrinolytic drug but its pharmacology and pharmacokinetics remains poorly understood. Owing to the recent knowledge on phospholipid-induced matrix effects during human plasma analysis, our aim was to develop a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the quantitation of tranexamic acid after efficient sample clean-up. Sample preparation consisted in phospholipid removal and protein precipitation. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography was used and the detection was achieved with multiple reaction monitoring. The method was validated according to the European Medicine Agency guideline in the range 1.0-1000.0μg/mL. The performance of the method was excellent with a precision in the range 1.2-3.0%, an accuracy between 88.4 and 96.6% and a coefficient of variation of the internal standard-normalized matrix factor below 6.7%. This method is suitable for the quantification of tranexamic acid in the wide range of concentrations observed during clinical studies, with all the advantages related to phospholipid removal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Systematic review and meta-analysis of perioperative intravenous tranexamic acid use in spinal surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baohui Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tranexamic acid (TXA is well-established as a versatile oral, intramuscular, and intravenous (IV antifibrinolytic agent. However, the efficacy of IV TXA in reducing perioperative blood transfusion in spinal surgery is poorly documented. METHODOLOGY: We conducted a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs and quasi-randomized (qi-RCTs trials that included patients for various spinal surgeries, such as adolescent scoliosis surgery administered with perioperative IV TXA according to Cochrane Collaboration guidelines using electronic PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Embase databases. Additional journal articles and conference proceedings were manually located by two independent researchers. RESULTS: Totally, nine studies were included, with a total sample size of 581 patients. Mean blood loss was decreased in patients treated with perioperative IV TXA by 128.28 ml intraoperatively (ranging from 33.84 to 222.73 ml, 98.49 ml postoperatively (ranging from 83.22 to 113.77 ml, and 389.21 ml combined (ranging from 177.83 to 600.60 ml. The mean volume of transfused packed cells were reduced by 134.55 ml (ranging 51.64 to 217.46 (95% CI; P = 0.0001. Overall, the number of patients treated with TXA who required blood transfusions was lower by 35% than that of patients treated with the comparator and who required blood transfusions (RR 0.65; 95% CI; 0.53 to 0.85; P<0.0001, I(2 = 0%. A dose-independent beneficial effect of TXA was observed, and confirmed in subgroup and sensitivity analyses. A total of seven studies reported DVT data. The study containing only a single DVT case was not combined. CONCLUSIONS: The blood loss was reduced in spinal surgery patients with perioperative IV TXA treatment. Also the percentage of spinal surgery patients who required blood transfusion was significantly decreased. Further evaluation is required to confirm our findings before TXA can be safely used in patients

  19. A double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of tranexamic acid in irrigant solution on blood loss during percutaneous nephrolithotomy: a pilot study from tertiary care center of North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ankur; Arora, Aditi

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of 0.1% tranexamic acid in irrigant fluid in reducing blood loss during PCNL. The study involved 400 patients who were planned for PCNL and were prospectively randomized into two equal groups. In tranexamic group, 0.1% tranexamic acid was given in irrigant fluid, while in placebo group, distilled water was added to irrigant fluid during surgery. Operative data were recorded which included fall in hemoglobin, total blood loss, operative time, irrigation fluid, length of stay in hospital, requirement of blood transfusion, complications related to PCNL and adverse events of tranexamic acid. Baseline parameters were comparable between two groups. The fall in hemoglobin and total blood loss in the tranexamic group was significantly lower than placebo group (1.71 vs. 2.67 gm/dL, 154.55 vs. 212.61 mL, respectively, p tranexamic group were significantly less compared to placebo (p tranexamic group versus 82% in placebo (p = 0.12). The blood transfusion requirement was significantly lower in the tranexamic group versus placebo (5 vs. 12.5%, p = 0.012), as was the complication rate (19 vs. 28%, p = 0.044). The requirement of angioembolization in the tranexamic group was significantly less as compared to placebo (0.5 vs. 4%, p = 0.03). No adverse events related to administration of tranexamic acid were noted. 0.1% tranexamic acid in irrigant fluid is safe and significantly reduces perioperative blood loss and requirement of blood transfusion during percutaneous nephrolithotomy. It is associated with lower perioperative complication rates.

  20. Use of antifibrinolytic mouthwash solution in anticoagulated oral surgery patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Evrosimovska, Biljana; Papakoca, Kiro; Georgiev, Zlatko; Angelovska, Bistra; Ristoska, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Introduction:The ordinary treatment of anticoagulated patients includes the interruption of anticoagulant therapy for oral surgery interventions to prevent hemorrhage. However, this practice may logically increase the risk of a potentially life-threatening thromboembolism, so this issue is still controversial. The aim of the study was to evaluate the antifibrinolitic mouthwash solution (tranexamic acid) as a local haemostatic modality after oral surgery interventions. Methods:To realize the a...

  1. Use of Tranexamic acid is a cost effective method in preventing blood loss during and after total knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umer Chaudhry Muhammad

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & Purpose Allogenic blood transfusion in elective orthopaedic surgery is best avoided owing to its associated risks. Total knee replacement often requires blood transfusion, more so when bilateral surgery is performed. Many strategies are currently being employed to reduce the amount of peri-operative allogenic transfusions. Anti-fibrinolytic compounds such as aminocaproic acid and tranexamic acid have been used systemically in perioperative settings with promising results. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of tranexamic acid in reducing allogenic blood transfusion in total knee replacement surgery. Methodology This was a retrospective cohort study conducted on patients undergoing total knee replacement during the time period November 2005 to November 2008. Study population was 99 patients, of which 70 underwent unilateral and 29 bilateral knee replacement. Forty-seven patients with 62 (49.5% knees (group-I had received tranexamic acid (by surgeon preference while the remaining fifty-two patients with 66 (51.5% knees (group-II had did not received any tranexamic acid either pre- or post-operatively. Results The mean drop in the post-operative haemoglobin concentration in Group-II for unilateral and bilateral cases was 1.79 gm/dl and 2.21 gm/dl, with a mean post-operative drainage of 1828 ml (unilateral and 2695 ml (bilateral. In comparison, the mean drop in the post-op haemoglobin in Group-I was 1.49 gm/dl (unilateral and 1.94 gm/dl (bilateral, with a mean drainage of 826 ml (unilateral and 1288 ml (bilateral (p-value Interpretation Tranexamic acid is effective in reducing post-operative drainage and requirement of blood transfusion after knee replacement.

  2. Efficacy of tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss in posterior lumbar spine surgery for degenerative spinal stenosis with instability: a retrospective case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endres Stefan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Degenerative spinal stenosis and instability requiring multilevel spine surgery has been associated with large blood losses. Factors that affect perioperative blood loss include time of surgery, surgical procedure, patient height, combined anterior/posterior approaches, number of levels fused, blood salvage techniques, and the use of anti-fibrinolytic medications. This study was done to evaluate the efficacy of tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss in spine surgery. Methods This retrospective case control study includes 97 patients who had to undergo surgery because of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis and instability. All operations included spinal decompression, interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation (4-5 segments. Forty-six patients received 1 g tranexamic acid intravenous, preoperative and six hours and twelve hours postoperative; 51 patients without tranexamic acid administration were evaluated as a control group. Based on the records, the intra- and postoperative blood losses were measured by evaluating the drainage and cell saver systems 6, 12 and 24 hours post operation. Additionally, hemoglobin concentration and platelet concentration were reviewed. Furthermore, the number of red cell transfusions given and complications associated with tranexamic acid were assessed. Results The postoperative hemoglobin concentration demonstrated a statistically significant difference with a p value of 0.0130 showing superiority for tranexamic acid use (tranexamic acid group: 11.08 g/dl, SD: 1.68; control group: 10.29 g/dl, SD: 1.39. The intraoperative cell saver volume and drainage volume after 24 h demonstrated a significant difference as well, which indicates a less blood loss in the tranexamic acid group than the control group. The postoperative drainage volume at12 hours showed no significant differences; nor did the platelet concentration Allogenic blood transfusion (two red cell units was needed for eight patients

  3. Role of topical tranexamic acid in the management of idiopathic anterior epistaxis in adult patients in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Jill K; Pantle, Hardin

    2016-11-01

    The role of topical tranexamic acid in the management of anterior epistaxis in adult patients in the emergency department (ED) is examined. The use of alternative agents for the treatment of epistaxis before the use of nasal packing may be reasonable due to patient discomfort, potential complications, and the need for follow-up with a healthcare provider for packing removal. One such agent is tranexamic acid. Two published studies evaluated the off-label use of topical tranexamic acid for the treatment of epistaxis. The first trial compared the efficacy of a topical gel containing 10% tranexamic acid with a placebo gel containing glycerin for the treatment of epistaxis. The percentage of patients whose bleeding ceased within 30 minutes of the intervention did not significantly differ between the tranexamic acid and placebo groups (p = 0.16). The second trial compared the efficacy of cotton pledgets soaked in the i.v. formulation of tranexamic acid inserted into the bleeding naris with standard nasal packing therapy. Bleeding cessation occurred within 10 minutes in 71% of the tranexamic acid group versus 31.2% of the standard treatment group (odds ratio, 2.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.68-3.09; p epistaxis in select ED patients, though additional studies are needed to confirm its role in treatment algorithms. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Blood Loss and Transfusion After Topical Tranexamic Acid Administration in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Shen, Bin; Zeng, Yi

    2015-11-01

    There has been much debate and controversy about the safety and efficacy of the topical use of tranexamic acid in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to perform a meta-analysis to evaluate whether there is less blood loss and lower rates of transfusion after topical tranexamic acid administration in primary TKA. A systematic review of the electronic databases PubMed, CENTRAL, Web of Science, and Embase was undertaken. All randomized, controlled trials and prospective cohort studies evaluating the effectiveness of topical tranexamic acid during primary TKA were included. The focus of the analysis was on the outcomes of blood loss results, transfusion rate, and thromboembolic complications. Subgroup analysis was performed when possible. Of 387 studies identified, 16 comprising 1421 patients (1481 knees) were eligible for data extraction and meta-analysis. This study indicated that when compared with the control group, topical application of tranexamic acid significantly reduced total drain output (mean difference, -227.20; 95% confidence interval, -347.11 to -107.30; Ptranexamic acid in primary TKA. Furthermore, the currently available evidence does not support an increased risk of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism due to tranexamic acid administration. Topical tranexamic acid was effective for reducing postoperative blood loss and transfusion requirements without increasing the prevalence of thromboembolic complications. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Statistical analysis plan for the WOMAN-ETAPlaT study: Effect of tranexamic acid on platelet function and thrombin generation [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kastriot Dallaku

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH is a potentially life-threatening complication for women, and the leading cause of maternal mortality. Tranexamic acid (TXA is an antifibrinolytic used worldwide to treat uterine haemorrhage and to reduce blood loss in general surgery. TXA may have effects on thrombin generation, platelet function and coagulation factors as a result of its inhibition on the plasmin.   Methods. WOMAN ETAPlaT is a sub-study of the World Maternal Antifibrinolitic trial (WOMAN trial. All adult women clinically diagnosed with PPH after a vaginal delivery or caesarean section, are eligible for inclusion in the study. Blood samples will be collected at the baseline and 30 minutes after the first dose of study treatment is given. Platelet function will be evaluated in whole blood immediately after sampling with Multiplate® tests (ADPtest and TRAPtest. Thrombin generation, fibrinogen, D-dimer, and coagulation factors vW, V and VIII will be analysed using platelet poor plasma.   Results. Recruitment to WOMAN ETAPlaT started on 04 November 2013 and closed on 13 January 2015, during this time  188 patients were recruited. The final participant follow-up was completed on 04 March 2015. This article introduces the statistical analysis plan for the study, without reference to unblinded data.   Conclusion. The data from this study will provide evidence for the effect of TXA on thrombin generation, platelet function and coagulation factors in women with PPH.   Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00872469; ISRCTN76912190

  6. Statistical analysis plan for the WOMAN-ETAPlaT study: Effect of tranexamic acid on platelet function and thrombin generation [version 2; referees: 2 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kastriot Dallaku

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH is a potentially life-threatening complication for women, and the leading cause of maternal mortality. Tranexamic acid (TXA is an antifibrinolytic used worldwide to treat uterine haemorrhage and to reduce blood loss in general surgery. TXA may have effects on thrombin generation, platelet function and coagulation factors as a result of its inhibition on the plasmin.   Methods. WOMAN ETAPlaT is a sub-study of the World Maternal Antifibrinolitic trial (WOMAN trial. All adult women clinically diagnosed with PPH after a vaginal delivery or caesarean section, are eligible for inclusion in the study. Blood samples will be collected at the baseline and 30 minutes after the first dose of study treatment is given. Platelet function will be evaluated in whole blood immediately after sampling with Multiplate® tests (ADPtest and TRAPtest. Thrombin generation, fibrinogen, D-dimer, and coagulation factors vW, V and VIII will be analysed using platelet poor plasma.   Results. Recruitment to WOMAN ETAPlaT started on 04 November 2013 and closed on 13 January 2015, during this time  188 patients were recruited. The final participant follow-up was completed on 04 March 2015. This article introduces the statistical analysis plan for the study, without reference to unblinded data.   Conclusion. The data from this study will provide evidence for the effect of TXA on thrombin generation, platelet function and coagulation factors in women with PPH.   Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00872469; ISRCTN76912190

  7. Role of Tranexamic Acid in Reducing Blood Loss in Vaginal Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Priyankur; Sujatha, M S; Bhandiwad, Ambarisha; Biswas, Bivas

    2016-10-01

    Anti-fibrinolytic agents are used to reduce obstetric blood loss as the fibrinolytic system is known to get activated after placental delivery. To evaluate the efficacy of parenteral tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss during normal labour and to compare it with the amount of blood loss in patients who received placebo in the third stage of labour. Patients with spontaneous labour or planned for induction of labour and fulfilling the inclusion criteria were recruited for the study. In each patient, the pre-delivery pulse rate, blood pressure, Hb gm% and PCV% were noted. Labour was monitored carefully using a partogram. The study group received Inj. Oxytocin and Inj. Tranexamic acid. The control group received Inj. Oxytocin and Placebo injection. Immediately after delivery of the baby, when all the liquor was drained, the patient was placed over a blood drape-a disposable conical, graduated plastic collection bag. The amount of blood collected in the blood drape was measured. Then the patient was given pre-weighed pads, which were weighed 2 h post-partum. The blood loss was measured by measuring the blood collected in the drape and by weighing the swabs before and after delivery. The total number of patients studied was 100-equally distributed in both the groups. The age group of the patients and BMI were comparable. There was a significant increase in the pulse rate and decrease in blood pressure in the control group as compared with the study group. The post-delivery haemoglobin and haematocrit were significantly reduced in the control group as compared to the study group. The mean blood loss at the end of 2 h was 105 ml in the study group and 252 ml in the control group. There was a significant increase in the usage of uterotonics and also in the need for blood transfusion in the control group; 12 % of the patients in the control group had to stay for more than 3 days compared to 2 % in the study group. Tranexamic acid injection, an antifibrinolytic

  8. Prevention of haematoma progression by tranexamic acid in intracerebral haemorrhage patients with and without spot sign on admission scan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ovesen, Christian; Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Gluud, Christian

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We present the statistical analysis plan of a prespecified Tranexamic Acid for Hyperacute Primary Intracerebral Haemorrhage (TICH)-2 sub-study aiming to investigate, if tranexamic acid has a different effect in intracerebral haemorrhage patients with the spot sign on admission compared...... to spot sign negative patients. The TICH-2 trial recruited above 2000 participants with intracerebral haemorrhage arriving in hospital within 8 h after symptom onset. They were included irrespective of radiological signs of on-going haematoma expansion. Participants were randomised to tranexamic acid...... versus matching placebo. In this subgroup analysis, we will include all participants in TICH-2 with a computed tomography angiography on admission allowing adjudication of the participants' spot sign status. RESULTS: Primary outcome will be the ability of tranexamic acid to limit absolute haematoma...

  9. Combined Intra-Articular and Intravenous Tranexamic Acid Reduces Blood Loss in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian Skovgaard; Jans, Øivind; Ørsnes, Thue

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In total knee arthroplasty, both intravenous (IV) and intra-articular (IA) administration of tranexamic acid (TXA) have been shown to reduce blood loss in several randomized controlled trials, although routine use of systemic TXA is considerably more common. However, to our knowledge...

  10. Development and validation of a prognostic model to predict death in patients with traumatic bleeding, and evaluation of the effect of tranexamic acid on mortality according to baseline risk: a secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perel, P; Prieto-Merino, D; Shakur, H; Roberts, I

    2013-06-01

    Severe bleeding accounts for about one-third of in-hospital trauma deaths. Patients with a high baseline risk of death have the most to gain from the use of life-saving treatments. An accurate and user-friendly prognostic model to predict mortality in bleeding trauma patients could assist doctors and paramedics in pre-hospital triage and could shorten the time to diagnostic and life-saving procedures such as surgery and tranexamic acid (TXA). The aim of the study was to develop and validate a prognostic model for early mortality in patients with traumatic bleeding and to examine whether or not the effect of TXA on the risk of death and thrombotic events in bleeding adult trauma patients varies according to baseline risk. Multivariable logistic regression and risk-stratified analysis of a large international cohort of trauma patients. Two hundred and seventy-four hospitals in 40 high-, medium- and low-income countries. We derived prognostic models in a large placebo-controlled trial of the effects of early administration of a short course of TXA [Clinical Randomisation of an Antifibrinolytic in Significant Haemorrhage (CRASH-2) trial]. The trial included 20,127 trauma patients with, or at risk of, significant bleeding, within 8 hours of injury. We externally validated the model on 14,220 selected trauma patients from the Trauma Audit and Research Network (TARN), which included mainly patients from the UK. We examined the effect of TXA on all-cause mortality, death due to bleeding and thrombotic events (fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction, stroke, deep-vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism) within risk strata in the CRASH-2 trial data set and we estimated the proportion of premature deaths averted by applying the odds ratio (OR) from the CRASH-2 trial to each of the risk strata in TARN. For the stratified analysis according baseline risk we considered the intervention TXA (1 g over 10 minutes followed by 1 g over 8 hours) or matching placebo. For the

  11. Topical Application of Tranexamic Acid Reduces Postoperative Bleeding in Open-Heart Surgery: Myth or Fact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, M. U. A.; Asghar, M. I.; Cahaudhri, M. S.; Janjua, A. M.; Iqbal, A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy of topical application of Tranexamic acid in controlling postoperative bleeding in open-heart surgery. Study Design: Double blind randomized control trial. Place and Duration of Study: Departments of Cardiac Surgery and Intensive Care of Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology and National Institute of Heart Diseases (AFIC-NIHD), Rawalpindi, Pakistan, from May to October 2011. Methodology: A total of 100 consecutive adult patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria undergoing elective on-pump cardiac surgeries were randomly divided in groups A and B. A study solution that contained 2.5 g of Tranexamic acid in 250 ml normal saline in group-A and equal amount of normal saline (placebo) in group-B was poured in the pericardial cavity over the mediastinal tissues before sternal closure. Postoperative bleeding was measured in both groups for 24 hours in the cardiac surgical ICU. Efficacy of Topical Tranexamic Acid / Placebo was measured in terms of mean postoperative bleeding in ml. Kindly again include these lines which seem to have been omitted in the final proof. Results: There was significant difference in the mean postoperative bleeding within 24 hours among the two groups 340.1 ± 112.4 ml in Tranexamic acid group vs. 665 ± 187.28 ml in placebo group (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Patients who did not have topical Tranexamic acid before chest closure had a significantly higher postoperative bleeding. Topical Tranexamic acid application is an effective and economical way for controlling non-surgical bleeding in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. (author)

  12. The pre-hospital administration of tranexamic acid to patients with multiple injuries and its effects on rotational thrombelastometry: a prospective observational study in pre-hospital emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze-Szikszay, Nils; Krack, Lennart A; Wildenauer, Pauline; Wand, Saskia; Heyne, Tim; Walliser, Karoline; Spering, Christopher; Bauer, Martin; Quintel, Michael; Roessler, Markus

    2016-10-10

    Hyperfibrinolysis (HF) is a major contributor to coagulopathy and mortality in trauma patients. This study investigated (i) the rate of HF during the pre-hospital management of patients with multiple injuries and (ii) the effects of pre-hospital tranexamic acid (TxA) administration on the coagulation system. From 27 trauma patients with pre-hospital an estimated injury severity score (ISS) ≥16 points blood was obtained at the scene and on admission to the emergency department (ED). All patients received 1 g of TxA after the first blood sample was taken. Rotational thrombelastometry (ROTEM) was performed for both blood samples, and the results were compared. HF was defined as a maximum lysis (ML) >15 % in EXTEM. The median (min-max) ISS was 17 points (4-50 points). Four patients (15 %) had HF diagnosed via ROTEM at the scene, and 2 patients (7.5 %) had HF diagnosed via ROTEM on admission to the ED. The median ML before TxA administration was 11 % (3-99 %) vs. 10 % after TxA administration (4-18 %; p > 0.05). TxA was administered 37 min (10-85 min) before ED arrival. The ROTEM results before and after TxA administration did not significantly differ. No adverse drug reactions were observed after TxA administration. HF can be present in severely injured patients during pre-hospital care. Antifibrinolytic therapy administered at the scene is a significant time saver. Even in milder trauma fibrinogen can be decreased to critically low levels. Early administration of TxA cannot reverse or entirely stop this decrease. The pre-hospital use of TxA should be considered for severely injured patients to prevent the worsening of trauma-induced coagulopathy and unnecessarily high fibrinogen consumption. ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01938768 (Registered 5 September 2013).

  13. Adsorption of tranexamic acid on hydroxyapatite: Toward the development of biomaterials with local hemostatic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarda, Stéphanie; Errassifi, Farid; Marsan, Olivier; Geffre, Anne; Trumel, Catherine; Drouet, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    This work proposes to combine tranexamic acid (TAX), a clinically used antifibrinolytic agent, and hydroxyapatite (HA), widely used in bone replacement, to produce a novel bioactive apatitic biomaterial with intrinsic hemostatic properties. The aim of this study was to investigate adsorptive behavior of the TAX molecule onto HA and to point out its release in near physiological conditions. No other phase was observed by X-ray diffraction or transmission electron microscopy, and no apparent change in crystal size was detected. The presence of TAX on the powders was lightly detected on Raman spectra after adsorption. The adsorption data could be fitted with a Langmuir–Freundlich equation, suggesting a strong interaction between adsorbed molecules and the formation of multilayers. The concentration of calcium and phosphate ions in solution remained low and stable during the adsorption process, thus ion exchange during the adsorption process could be ruled out. The release of TAX was fast during the first hours and was governed by a complex process that likely involved both diffusion and dissolution of HA. Preliminary aPTT (activated partial thromboplastin time) hemostasis tests offered promising results for the development of osteoconductive apatitic biomaterials with intrinsic hemostatic properties, whether for dental or orthopedic applications. - Highlights: • Interaction of tranexamic acid (TAX)/hydroxyapatite was studied. • The adsorption data could be fitted with a Langmuir–Freundlich equation. • The release of TAX, fast during the first hours, was governed by a complex process. • Preliminary aPTT hemostasis tests show promising results. • The aim is to develop biomaterials with local hemostatic activity.

  14. Adsorption of tranexamic acid on hydroxyapatite: Toward the development of biomaterials with local hemostatic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarda, Stéphanie, E-mail: stephanie.sarda@iut-tlse3.fr [CIRIMAT, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, INPT, UPS, Université Toulouse 3 Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Errassifi, Farid [CIRIMAT, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, INPT, UPS, Université Toulouse 3 Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Marsan, Olivier [CIRIMAT, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, INPT, UPS, ENSIACET, Toulouse (France); Geffre, Anne; Trumel, Catherine [Université de Toulouse, INP, ENVT, UMS006, Laboratoire Central de Biologie Médicale, Toulouse (France); INSERM-UPS, UMS 006, Laboratoire Central de Biologie Médicale, Toulouse (France); Drouet, Christophe [CIRIMAT, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, INPT, UPS, ENSIACET, Toulouse (France)

    2016-09-01

    This work proposes to combine tranexamic acid (TAX), a clinically used antifibrinolytic agent, and hydroxyapatite (HA), widely used in bone replacement, to produce a novel bioactive apatitic biomaterial with intrinsic hemostatic properties. The aim of this study was to investigate adsorptive behavior of the TAX molecule onto HA and to point out its release in near physiological conditions. No other phase was observed by X-ray diffraction or transmission electron microscopy, and no apparent change in crystal size was detected. The presence of TAX on the powders was lightly detected on Raman spectra after adsorption. The adsorption data could be fitted with a Langmuir–Freundlich equation, suggesting a strong interaction between adsorbed molecules and the formation of multilayers. The concentration of calcium and phosphate ions in solution remained low and stable during the adsorption process, thus ion exchange during the adsorption process could be ruled out. The release of TAX was fast during the first hours and was governed by a complex process that likely involved both diffusion and dissolution of HA. Preliminary aPTT (activated partial thromboplastin time) hemostasis tests offered promising results for the development of osteoconductive apatitic biomaterials with intrinsic hemostatic properties, whether for dental or orthopedic applications. - Highlights: • Interaction of tranexamic acid (TAX)/hydroxyapatite was studied. • The adsorption data could be fitted with a Langmuir–Freundlich equation. • The release of TAX, fast during the first hours, was governed by a complex process. • Preliminary aPTT hemostasis tests show promising results. • The aim is to develop biomaterials with local hemostatic activity.

  15. Role of Local Infiltration of Tranexamic Acid in Reducing Blood Loss in Peritrochanteric Fracture Surgery in the Elderly Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virani SR

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Peritrochanteric fractures are common injuries occurring in elderly patients. Surgeries for these fractures are associated with significant blood loss. Intravenous tranexamic acid has a proven track record in many orthopaedic surgeries including trauma, arthroplasty and spine surgeries. Objective: To study the effect of local subfascial and intramuscular infiltration of tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss and the requirement for blood transfusion in intertrochanteric fracture surgery. Study Design: Single centre prospective analytical study. Materials and Methods: One hundred and thirty seven patients above 65 years of age were included in the study, divided into two groups: the intervention group received subfascial and intramuscular infiltration of 2g tranexamic acid before wound closure and the control group of alternate patients did not receive any tranexamic acid infiltration. The postoperative drain output was recorded, as well as the haemoglobin level and the patients needing blood transfusion. Results and Conclusions: The preoperative and postoperative haemoglobin values were recorded. The mean preoperative haemoglobin was 10.9% and 10.8% (p=0.79 in the trial and control groups respectively. The mean postoperative haemoglobin was 9.5gm% and 9.2gm% (p=0.36 in the two groups. The total postoperative blood loss in the tranexamic acid group and the control group was 190.3ml and 204.3ml respectively (p=0.25. Ten patients (14.9% in the intervention group and 12 patients (17.1% in the control group required blood transfusion. We conclude that tranexamic acid does not play a significant role in reducing postoperative blood loss and blood transfusion when used locally in peritochanteric fracture surgery. However a larger double blinded study comparing various modalities of use of tranexamic acid is needed to conclusively establish its role.

  16. Comparison of topical use of protamine and tranexamic acid in surgical patients requiring cardio-pulmonary bypass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqeh, M.; Siddiqi, R.; Ali, N.; Iqbal, A.; Younus, Z.; Haq, I.U.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of local protamine in reducing post-operative blood loss compared to local tranexamic acid. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology/National Institute of Heart Diseases Rawalpindi from January 2011 to September 2011. Patients and Methods: One hundred and twenty cardiac surgical patients were randomly divided into two equal groups, one receiving local protamine while the other group receiving local tranexamic acid before chest closure. The efficiency was measured as post-operative blood loss and requirement of blood and blood products in the post-surgical ICU. Results: Average blood loss in protamine group was significantly less (252.97 ml) compared to tranexamic acid group (680.67 ml). Number of patients requiring no post-operative blood transfusion was significantly higher in protamine group (76.7%) compared to tranexamic acid group (53.3%). Conclusion: Local protamine is more effective in reducing post-operative blood loss than local tranexamic acid. (author)

  17. Oral tranexamic acid lightens refractory melasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Aaron Wei Min; Sen, Priya; Chua, Sze Hon; Goh, Boon Kee

    2017-08-01

    Melasma is a common acquired hyperpigmentary disorder, particularly among Asians and Hispanics, but its exact pathomechanism is poorly understood. Tranexamic acid has been found to lighten melasma by interfering with the interaction of melanocytes and keratinocytes by inhibiting the plasminogen/plasmin system. The aim was to evaluate the therapeutic effects of oral tranexamic acid in the treatment of melasma refractory to topical skin-lightening agents. This retrospective study analyses patients with melasma recruited from a tertiary dermatological centre in Singapore between 1 August 2009 and 31 March 2011. The patients chosen had refractory melasma treated with oral tranexamic acid 250 mg twice daily in addition to pre-existing combination topical therapy. Objective assessment using the physician's global assessment and melasma area and severity index (MASI) scores were performed based on a post-hoc analysis of photographic records by three independent physicians. A paired t-test was used to evaluate the changes in the MASI scores pre-therapy and post-treatment. Statistical significance was defined as P tranexamic acid for a mean period of 3.7 ± 0.33 months, in addition to combination topical therapy. Their mean age was 47.2 ± 1.61 years. The mean MASI scores after tranexamic acid treatment (2.7 ± 1.6) were significantly lower (P tranexamic acid can serve as a safe and useful adjunct in the treatment of refractory melasma. © 2016 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  18. Adsorption of tranexamic acid on hydroxyapatite: Toward the development of biomaterials with local hemostatic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarda, Stéphanie; Errassifi, Farid; Marsan, Olivier; Geffre, Anne; Trumel, Catherine; Drouet, Christophe

    2016-09-01

    This work proposes to combine tranexamic acid (TAX), a clinically used antifibrinolytic agent, and hydroxyapatite (HA), widely used in bone replacement, to produce a novel bioactive apatitic biomaterial with intrinsic hemostatic properties. The aim of this study was to investigate adsorptive behavior of the TAX molecule onto HA and to point out its release in near physiological conditions. No other phase was observed by X-ray diffraction or transmission electron microscopy, and no apparent change in crystal size was detected. The presence of TAX on the powders was lightly detected on Raman spectra after adsorption. The adsorption data could be fitted with a Langmuir-Freundlich equation, suggesting a strong interaction between adsorbed molecules and the formation of multilayers. The concentration of calcium and phosphate ions in solution remained low and stable during the adsorption process, thus ion exchange during the adsorption process could be ruled out. The release of TAX was fast during the first hours and was governed by a complex process that likely involved both diffusion and dissolution of HA. Preliminary aPTT (activated partial thromboplastin time) hemostasis tests offered promising results for the development of osteoconductive apatitic biomaterials with intrinsic hemostatic properties, whether for dental or orthopedic applications. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Pharmacological strategies for blood conservation in cardiac surgery: erythropoietin and antifibrinolytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, J F

    2001-04-01

    We review the clinically important benefits of the two principal pharmacological strategies, erythropoietin (EPO) and antifibrinolytics (aprotinin and lysine analogues), to decrease transfusion of allogeneic blood products (ABP) during and after cardiac surgery. Articles were selected from an ongoing review of the literature, with special attention to meta-analyses dealing with EPO and/or antifibrinolytics and cardiac surgery. The few studies available include a number of patients insufficient to allow definitive conclusions on the benefits of EPO in cardiac surgery. Further studies are required to determine the optimal dose of EPO and to compare its cost-effectiveness with other blood sparing strategies in this context. Both aprotinin and lysine analogues effectively decrease ABP transfusions and the incidence of re-thoracotomy. In addition, high-dose aprotinin reduces cerebrovascular morbidity and mortality after cardiopulmonary bypass. Several mechanisms have been put forward to explain these beneficial effects, some of which could well be common to all antifibrinolytics. The clinical benefits of aprotinin's unique anti-inflammatory effect are not entirely clear but the finding that it reduces the incidence of stroke and death is certainly a major argument in favor of its utilization. Yet, we have to ensure that aprotinin's benefits are not offset by side-effects such as allergy. We still need large scale studies to definitely confirm the benefits and exclude the deleterious effects of these drugs on outcomes other than ABP requirements. At present, aprotinin is the only agent that has been shown to reduce the risk of cerebrovascular accident and mortality after cardiac surgery in adults.

  20. Effectiveness of tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss during cytoreductive surgery for advanced ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kietpeerakool, Chumnan; Supoken, Amornrat; Laopaiboon, Malinee; Lumbiganon, Pisake

    2016-01-23

    Ovarian cancer is the third most common gynaecological cancer worldwide, with an age-standardised incidence rate of 6.1 per 10,000 women. Standard therapy for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) includes a combination of cytoreductive surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. Cytoreductive surgery aims to remove as much of the visible tumour as possible. As extensive intraperitoneal metastases are typical of advanced EOC, cytoreductive surgery is usually an extensive procedure with the risk of excessive bleeding. Tranexamic acid given perioperatively is effective in reducing blood loss and allogeneic blood transfusion requirements in a variety of surgical settings. Therefore, tranexamic acid seems to be a promising agent for minimising blood loss and the need for blood transfusion among women with advanced EOC undergoing cytoreductive surgery. To assess the effects of tranexamic acid for reducing blood loss associated with cytoreductive surgery in women with advanced EOC (stage III to IV). We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological, Neuro-oncology and Orphan Cancers Trial Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 5, 2015), MEDLINE, EMBASE and conference proceedings to May 2015. We also checked registers of clinical trials, citation lists of included studies, key textbooks and previous systematic reviews for potentially relevant studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing tranexamic acid given during surgery versus placebo or no treatment, in adult women diagnosed with advanced EOC. Two review authors (CK, AS) independently selected potentially relevant trials, extracted data, assessed risk of bias, compared results and resolved disagreements by discussion. We found only one study that met our inclusion criteria. This was a randomised double blind, placebo-controlled multicentre study conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a single dose of intravenous tranexamic acid (15 mg/kg body weight) versus

  1. The effect of Tranexamic acid on cardiac surgery bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Esmaeelzadeh

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Serious bleeding in cardiac surgery leads to re-exploration, blood transfusion and increases the risks of mortality and morbidity. Using the lysine analogous of antifibrionlytic agents are the preferred strategy to suppress the need for transfusion procedures and blood products. Although tranexamic acid has been very influential in reducing the transfusion requirement after operation, tranexamic acid induced seizures is one of the common side effects of this drug. Due to inhibiting the fibrinolysis, thrombotic events are other possible side effects of using tranexamic acid. There are no certain results regarding decreasing the mortality rate by using the drug but it is identified that tranexamic acid does not increase the mortality. In this article, we aimed to review the literature on using tranexamic acid in cardiac surgeries.

  2. Safety, Efficacy, and Cost-effectiveness of Tranexamic Acid in Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zilan X; Woolf, Shane K

    2016-01-01

    Perioperative bleeding and postsurgical hemorrhage are common in invasive surgical procedures, including orthopedic surgery. Tranexamic acid (TXA) is a pharmacologic agent that acts through an antifibrinolytic mechanism to stabilize formed clots and reduce active bleeding. It has been used successfully in orthopedics to reduce perioperative blood loss, particularly in total hip and knee arthroplasty and spine surgery. Numerous research studies have reported favorable safety and efficacy in orthopedic cases, although there is no universal standard on its administration and its use has not yet become the standard of practice. Reported administration methods often depend on the surgeon's preference, with both topical and intravenous routes showing efficacy. The type and anatomic site of the surgery seem to influence the decision making but also result in conflicting opinions. Reported complication rates with TXA use are low. The incidence of both arterial and venous thromboembolic events, particularly deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, has not been found to be significantly different with TXA use for healthy patients. The route of administration and dosage do not appear to affect complication rates either. However, data on patients with higher-risk conditions are deficient. In addition, TXA has shown potential to reduce blood loss, transfusion rates and volumes, perioperative hemoglobin change, and hospital-related costs at various degrees among the published studies. Conservation of blood products, reduced laboratory costs, and shorter hospital stays are likely the major factors driving the cost savings associated with TXA use. This article reviews current data supporting the safety, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness of TXA in orthopedic surgery. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. The effects of intra-articular tranexamic acid given intraoperatively and intravenous tranexamic acid given preoperatively on post surgical bleeding and transfusion rate post total knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aryo N. Triyudanto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the advances in the design and fixation of implants in total knee replacement (TKR. the amount of postoperative bleeding is still an important issue that has not been resolved. This study aimed to measure the effectiveness of various tranexamic acid administration.Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial study, held from August 2014 to February 2016 at Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta. Twenty two patients having TKR were divided into three groups: the control group, the tranexamic acid intra-articular-intraoperative group, and the intravenous preoperative group. Intraoperative bleeding, haemoglobin (Hb level on preoperative to five-day-post-surgery, total drain production, total blood tranfusion needed and the drain removal timing were recorded and compared. Numerical data were analyzed by using parametric and non-parametric test, depended on the normality of the data.Results: The amount of blood transfusion needed in both the intra-articular group (200±SD 100 mL and the intravenous group (238±SD 53 mL were significantly different compared to those in the control group (1,016±SD 308.2 mL (p=0.001. Meanwhile, there was no significant difference between the amount of blood transfusion needed in the intra-articular group and the intravenous group. Total drain production in the intra-articular group (328±SD 193 mL and intravenous group (391±SD 185 mL was significantly different compared to the control group (652±SD 150 mL (p=0.003. No significant difference between the levels of both preoperative and postoperative haemoglobin, the amount of intraoperative bleeding, and the duration of drain usage.Conclusion: Intravenous and intra-articular tranexamic acid effectively decreased transfusion volume and drain production in patients undergoing TKR.

  4. LOCAL APPLICATION OF TRANEXAMIC ACID IN KNEE REPLACEMENT

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    E. V. Pshenitsyna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study – assessment of the efficacy of local application of tranexamic acid in TKA and the choice of the optimal dosage. Materials and methods. 48 patients were included in open-prospective study and were randomized to one of four groups. In the first group tranexamic acid was used as intravenous bolus at the beginning of the operation at a dose of 15 mg/kg. Additionally, after the installation of the prosthetic components, the surgeon performed periarticular infiltration of soft tissue by tranexamic acid solution at a dose of 15 mg/kg. In the second group of patients tranexamic acid was used as 500 mg intravenous bolus before surgery, and 500 mg locally after installation of the prosthesis components. In the third group of patients received tranexamic acid once at the beginning of the operation at a dose of 15 mg/kg iv bolus. In the fourth group tranexam was used after surgery once at a dose of 10 mg/kg. Results. In the first group of patients were achieved statistically significant, 5-6 times, reduction of blood loss on drainage in comparison with other groups, where the volume of postoperative blood loss was not significantly different between groups. Also in the first group recorded the smallest decrease in hemoglobin at the 5th postoperative day compared to the third and fourth groups. Complications associated with the use of tranexamic acid were not revealed. Conclusion. The method of periarticular infiltration by tranexamic acid in combination with its intravenous use in knee joint replacement is an effective and safe method for reduction of post-operative blood loss.

  5. An international based survey on perioperative use of tranexamic acid in neurotrauma

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    Moscote-Salazar Luis Rafael

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tranexamic acid is used to reduce bleeding, easy to use, affordable and relatively safe. There are few studies on the use of tranexamic acid in trauma and especially in neurosurgery. There is no published study on the trend the use of tranexamic acid in neurotrauma surgery among international doctors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the current practice for use of tranexamic acid during neurotrauma surgery.

  6. Assessment of the effect of tranexamic acid on perioperative bleeding in pediatric patients undergoing tonsillectomy

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    Rabie Soliman

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: The present study showed no effect of tranexamic acid in decreasing the tonsillectomy-related bleeding and there is no complication related to tranexamic acid. We are recommending other studies to measure the fibrinolytic activity during tonsillectomy and its inhibition by tranexamic acid.

  7. Intravenous Tranexamic Acid Decreases Allogeneic Transfusion Requirements in Periacetabular Osteotomy.

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    Bryan, Andrew J; Sanders, Thomas L; Trousdale, Robert T; Sierra, Rafael J

    2016-01-01

    Bernese (Ganz) periacetabular osteotomy is associated with significant blood loss and the need for perioperative transfusion. Tranexamic acid decreases blood loss and minimizes transfusion rates in total joint arthroplasty. However, no reports have described its use in patients undergoing Bernese periacetabular osteotomy. This study reports the use of intravenous tranexamic acid in these patients. The study included 137 patients (150 hips) who underwent isolated periacetabular osteotomy at a single institution between 2003 and 2014. Of these, 68 patients (75 hips) received intravenous tranexamic acid 1 g at the time of incision and 1 g at the time of closure. A group of 69 patients (75 hips) served as control subjects who underwent periacetabular osteotomy without administration of intravenous tranexamic acid. Thromboembolic disease was defined as deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism occurring within 6 weeks of surgery. Outcomes measured included transfusion requirements, pre- and postoperative hemoglobin values, operative times, and thromboembolic disease rates. Aspirin was used as the thromboembolic prophylactic regimen in 95% of patients. The rate of allogeneic transfusion was 0 in the tranexamic acid group compared with 21% in the control group (P=.0001). No significant difference was found in the autologous cell salvage requirement (.96 vs 1.01; P=.43) or the thromboembolic disease rate between the tranexamic acid group and the control group (2.67% vs 1.33%; P=.31). The use of intravenous tranexamic acid led to a decreased transfusion requirement with no increased risk of thromboembolic disease in this contemporary cohort of patients undergoing periacetabular osteotomy. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Secapin, a bee venom peptide, exhibits anti-fibrinolytic, anti-elastolytic, and anti-microbial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Sik; Kim, Bo Yeon; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Choi, Yong Soo; Jin, Byung Rae

    2016-10-01

    Bee venom contains a variety of peptide constituents that have various biological, toxicological, and pharmacological actions. However, the biological actions of secapin, a venom peptide in bee venom, remain largely unknown. Here, we provide the evidence that Asiatic honeybee (Apis cerana) secapin (AcSecapin-1) exhibits anti-fibrinolytic, anti-elastolytic, and anti-microbial activities. The recombinant mature AcSecapin-1 peptide was expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells. AcSecapin-1 functions as a serine protease inhibitor-like peptide that has inhibitory effects against plasmin, elastases, microbial serine proteases, trypsin, and chymotrypsin. Consistent with these functions, AcSecapin-1 inhibited the plasmin-mediated degradation of fibrin to fibrin degradation products, thus indicating the role of AcSecapin-1 as an anti-fibrinolytic agent. AcSecapin-1 also inhibited both human neutrophil and porcine pancreatic elastases. Furthermore, AcSecapin-1 bound to bacterial and fungal surfaces and exhibited anti-microbial activity against fungi and gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Taken together, our data demonstrated that the bee venom peptide secapin has multifunctional roles as an anti-fibrinolytic agent during fibrinolysis and an anti-microbial agent in the innate immune response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A randomized controlled trial of cell salvage in routine cardiac surgery.

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    Klein, Andrew A; Nashef, Samer A M; Sharples, Linda; Bottrill, Fiona; Dyer, Matthew; Armstrong, Johanna; Vuylsteke, Alain

    2008-11-01

    Previous trials have indicated that cell salvage may reduce allogeneic blood transfusion during cardiac surgery, but these studies have limitations, including inconsistent use of other blood transfusion-sparing strategies. We designed a randomized controlled trial to determine whether routine cell salvage for elective uncomplicated cardiac surgery reduces blood transfusion and is cost effective in the setting of a rigorous transfusion protocol and routine administration of antifibrinolytics. Two-hundred-thirteen patients presenting for first-time coronary artery bypass grafting and/or cardiac valve surgery were prospectively randomized to control or cell salvage groups. The latter group had blood aspirate during surgery and mediastinal drainage the first 6 h after surgery processed in a cell saver device and autotransfused. All patients received tranexamic acid and were subjected to an algorithm for red blood cell and hemostatic blood factor transfusion. There was no difference between the two groups in the proportion of patients exposed to allogeneic blood (32% in both groups, relative risk 1.0 P = 0.89). At current blood products and cell saver prices, the use of cell salvage increased the costs per patient by a minimum of $103. When patients who had mediastinal re-exploration for bleeding were excluded (as planned in the protocol), significantly fewer units of allogeneic red blood cells were transfused in the cell salvage compared with the control group (65 vs 100 U, relative risk 0.71 P = 0.04). In patients undergoing routine first-time cardiac surgery in an institution with a rigorous blood conservation program, the routine use of cell salvage does not further reduce the proportion of patients exposed to allogeneic blood transfusion. However, patients who do not have excessive bleeding after surgery receive significantly fewer units of blood with cell salvage. Although the use of cell savage may reduce the demand for blood products during cardiac surgery, this

  10. Maternal malaria induces a procoagulant and antifibrinolytic state that is embryotoxic but responsive to anticoagulant therapy.

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    John W Avery

    Full Text Available Low birth weight and fetal loss are commonly attributed to malaria in endemic areas, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie these poor birth outcomes are incompletely understood. Increasing evidence suggests that dysregulated hemostasis is important in malaria pathogenesis, but its role in placental malaria (PM, characterized by intervillous sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum, proinflammatory responses, and excessive fibrin deposition is not known. To address this question, markers of coagulation and fibrinolysis were assessed in placentae from malaria-exposed primigravid women. PM was associated with significantly elevated placental monocyte and proinflammatory marker levels, enhanced perivillous fibrin deposition, and increased markers of activated coagulation and suppressed fibrinolysis in placental plasma. Submicroscopic PM was not proinflammatory but tended to be procoagulant and antifibrinolytic. Birth weight trended downward in association with placental parasitemia and high fibrin score. To directly assess the importance of coagulation in malaria-induced compromise of pregnancy, Plasmodium chabaudi AS-infected pregnant C57BL/6 mice were treated with the anticoagulant, low molecular weight heparin. Treatment rescued pregnancy at midgestation, with substantially decreased rates of active abortion and reduced placental and embryonic hemorrhage and necrosis relative to untreated animals. Together, the results suggest that dysregulated hemostasis may represent a novel therapeutic target in malaria-compromised pregnancies.

  11. The amelioration effect of tranexamic acid in wrinkles induced by skin dryness.

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    Hiramoto, Keiichi; Sugiyama, Daijiro; Takahashi, Yumi; Mafune, Eiichi

    2016-05-01

    Tranexamic acid (trans-4-aminomethylcyclohexanecarboxylic acid) is a medical amino acid widely used as an anti-inflammatory and a whitening agent. This study examined the effect of tranexamic acid administration in wrinkle formation following skin dryness. We administered tranexamic acid (750mg/kg/day) orally for 20 consecutive days to Naruto Research Institute Otsuka Atrichia (NOA) mice, which naturally develop skin dryness. In these NOA mice, deterioration of transepidermal water loss (TEWL), generation of wrinkles, decrease of collagen type I, and increases in mast cell proliferation and tryptase and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-1) release were observed. However, these symptoms were improved by tranexamic acid treatment. Moreover, the increase in the β-endorphin level in the blood and the expression of μ-opioid receptor on the surface of fibroblasts increased by tranexamic acid treatment. In addition, when the fibroblasts induced by tranexamic acid treatment were removed, the amelioration effect by tranexamic acid treatment was halved. On the other hand, tranexamic acid treated NOA mice and mast cell removal in tranexamic acid treated NOA mice did not result in changes in the wrinkle amelioration effect. Additionally, the amelioration effect of mast cell deficient NOA mice was half that of tranexamic acid treated NOA mice. These results indicate that tranexamic acid decreased the proliferation of mast cells and increases the proliferation of fibroblasts, subsequently improving wrinkles caused by skin dryness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Risk factors associated with postoperative seizures in patients undergoing cardiac surgery who received tranexamic acid: A case-control study

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    Felix R Montes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Antifibrinolytic agents are used during cardiac surgery to minimize bleeding and reduce exposure to blood products. Several reports suggest that tranexamic acid (TA can induce seizure activity in the postoperative period. To examine factors associated with postoperative seizures in patients undergoing cardiac surgery who received TA. University-affiliated hospital. Case-control study. Patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB between January 2008 and December 2009 were identified. During this time, all patients undergoing heart surgery with CPB received TA. Cases were defined as patients who developed seizures that required initiation of anticonvulsive therapy within 48 h of surgery. Exclusion criteria included subjects with preexisting epilepsy and patients in whom the convulsive episode was secondary to a new ischemic lesion on brain imaging. Controls who did not develop seizures were randomly selected from the initial cohort. From an initial cohort of 903 patients, we identified 32 patients with postoperative seizures. Four patients were excluded. Twenty-eight cases and 112 controls were analyzed. Cases were more likely to have a history of renal impairment and higher preoperative creatinine values compared with controls (1.39 ± 1.1 vs. 0.98 ± 0.02 mg/dL, P = 0.02. Significant differences in the intensive care unit, postoperative and total lengths of stay were observed. An association between high preoperative creatinine value and postoperative seizure was identified. TA may be associated with the development of postoperative seizures in patients with renal dysfunction. Doses of TA should be reduced or even avoided in this population.

  13. Does topical tranexamic acid reduce postcoronary artery bypass graft bleeding?

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    Amir Mirmohammadsadeghi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative bleeding is a common problem in cardiac surgery. We tried to evaluate the effect of topical tranexamic acid (TA on reducing postoperative bleeding of patients undergoing on-pump coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty-six isolated primary CABG patients were included in this clinical trial. They were divided blindly into two groups; Group 1, patients receiving 1 g TA diluted in 100 ml normal saline poured into mediastinal cavity before closing the chest and Group 2, patients receiving 100 ml normal saline at the end of operation. First 24 and 48 h chest tube drainage, hemoglobin decrease and packed RBC transfusion needs were compared. Results: Both groups were the same in baseline characteristics including gender, age, body mass index, ejection fraction, clamp time, bypass time, and operation length. During the first 24 h postoperatively, mean chest tube drainage in intervention group was 567 ml compared to 564 ml in control group (P = 0.89. Mean total chest tube drainage was 780 ml in intervention group and 715 ml in control group (P = 0.27. There was no significant difference in both mean hemoglobin decrease (P = 0.26 and packed RBC transfusion (P = 0.7. Topical application of 1 g TA diluted in 100 ml normal saline does not reduce postoperative bleeding of isolated on-pump CABG surgery. Conclusion: We do not recommend topical usage of 1 g TA diluted in 100 ml normal saline for decreasing blood loss in on-pump CABG patients.

  14. Tranexamic acid for control of haemorrhage in acute promyelocytic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avvisati, G.; ten Cate, J. W.; Büller, H. R.; Mandelli, F.

    1989-01-01

    In a double-blind study, 12 consecutive patients with acute promyelocytic leukaemia were randomised either to tranexamic acid (TA group) or to placebo (control group) for 6 days to see whether inhibition of fibrinolysis would reduce haemorrhage and transfusion requirements. The total study period

  15. Microscopic haematuria as a relative contraindication for tranexamic acid

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    Schultz, M.; van der Lelie, H.

    1995-01-01

    Tranexamic acid has been advocated for patients with severe bleeding tendency due to thrombocytopenia not responding to platelet transfusions. Macroscopic haematuria is a well-known contraindication for its use in such patients. We present three clinical cases with microscopic haematuria, in whom

  16. Topical use of tranexamic acid in open heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Farid Ahmad; Pervaz, Zahid; Ilyas, Sana; Niaz, Muhammad Nabeel

    2018-04-01

    To determine the efficacy of topical pouring of tranexamic acid in reducing post-operative mediastinal bleeding, requirement for blood products and the rate of re-exploration for re-securing haemostasis or relief of pericardial tamponade after open heart surgery. The prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind comparative study was conducted from March 2013 to September 2015 at Rehmatul-lil-Alameen Institute of Cardiology, Punjab Employees Social Security Institution, Lahore, and comprised patients scheduled for primary isolated elective or urgent open heart surgery. The subjects were divided into two equal groups. The hetranexamic acid group received cardiac bath with 2gm of tranexamic acid diluted in 50mlof normal saline, while the placebo group received cardiac bath without tranexamic acid. Before the closure of sternum, the solution was poured into pericardial cavity as cardiac bath while the chest tubes were temporarily clamped. Data was entered into a pre-designed proforma. Of the 100 subjects, there were 50(50%) in each of the two groups. There was no difference in surgical characteristics and perioperative complications in the groups (p>0.05). After 48 post-operative hours, total blood loss was significantly less in the tranexamic acid group compared to the placebo group (pacid group than the placebo group (pacid group was re-explored for excessive bleeding compared to 4(8%) in the placebo group. There was significant reduction in post-operative blood drainage, need of blood products and rate of re-exploration after topical use of tranexamic acid in open heart surgery.

  17. Antifibrinolíticos e cirurgia cardíaca com circulação extracorpórea Antifibrinolíticos y cirugía cardíaca con circulación extracorpórea Antifibrinolytics and cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass

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    Ari-Tadeu Lírio dos Santos

    2007-10-01

    para auxiliar en la hemostasia de los pacientes sometidos a la circulación extracorpórea. El objetivo de este trabajo fue presentar la fisiopatología del sangramiento en cirugía cardiaca y la actual situación de los antifibrinolíticos en cuanto a su eficacia y complicaciones cuando usados en estos procedimientos dando más énfasis al ácido tranexámico y a la aprotinina. CONTENIDO: Son discutidos los mecanismos por los cuales la circulación extracorpórea provoca alteración en la hemostasia y de que manera los antifibrinolíticos actúan para disminuir el sangramiento y el uso de sangre alogénica en cirugía cardiaca. Se le da énfasis al problema del trombo embolismo que puede ocurrir con el uso de esos antifibrinolíticos, con revisión de la literatura. CONCLUSIONES: La fibrinólisis es uno de los principales factores relacionados con el aumento del sangramiento en cirugía cardiaca con circulación extracorpórea. La inhibición de la fibrinólisis, conjuntamente con la preservación de la función plaquetaria es probablemente el mecanismo por el cual los antifibrinolíticos disminuyen el sangramiento. El uso de esos fármacos reduce el sangramiento en cirugía cardiaca con circulación extracorpórea en un porcentaje que puede alcanzar el 50%. Con relación a la preocupación con el trombo embolismo, el ácido tranexámico y el ácido epsilon-aminocapróico son opciones que ofrecen una mayor seguridad que la aprotinina.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Cardiac surgery is the surgical subspecialty most often associated with bleeding, bleeding disorders, and the need of blood products. Agents such as aprotinin, episilon-aminocaproic acid, and tranexamic acid are frequently used to aid the hemostasis of patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass. The objective of this report is to present the physiopathology of bleeding during cardiac surgeries and the current role of antifibrinolytics regarding their efficacy and complications when used in those procedures, with

  18. Comparison of topical and intravenous administration of tranexamic acid for blood loss control during total joint replacement: Review of literature

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    Georgi P. Georgiev

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Many randomised controlled trials and meta-analysis studies have presented the efficacy of tranexamic acid (TXA without an increase of complications. However, questions still remain about the type of administration, optimal dose and secondary outcomes of TXA in total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty. The aim of this review is to summarise the existing information in literature concerning the pharmacological characteristics of TXA, forms, doses, types of application and contraindications for its use. Methods: A literature review containing 63 articles from the PubMed data starting from the first description of tranexamic acid until now was made in trying to present the existing information in a simple and effective way. Results: TXA leads to statistically significant reduction of peri and postoperative bleeding and in that way decreases blood transfusion rates and the infection risk. Topical and intravenous (IV use of TXA revealed similar results, with no increase of deep venous thrombosis. Therefore, topical TXA could be a reasonable alternative in patients with contraindications for IV application of TXA. Conclusions: Blood loss control with TXA, a synthetic analogue of the amino acid lysine, may be an excellent and safe alternative to allogeneic blood transfusion after total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty. Further studies are needed to establish the efficacy of combined IV and topical administration of TXA with regard to diminishing blood loss and reducing hospital stay. The Translational Potential of this Article: This review briefly presents the pharmacological characteristics of TXA, forms, doses, types of application and contraindications for its use with regard to diminishing blood loss and reducing hospital stay for better therapeutic strategies in orthopaedics. Keywords: Arthroplasty, Review, Tranexamic acid

  19. Effect of tranexamic acid administration on bleeding in primary total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Cortiñas, A B; Quintáns-Vázquez, J M; Gómez-Suárez, F; Murillo, O Simón; Sánchez-López, B R; Pena-Gracía, J M

    To study the efficacy of tranexamic acid to decrease perioperative bleeding in patients who have undergone a total hip arthroplasty operation and to evaluate drug safety. Observational, prospective, controlled and randomized study on the efficacy of tranexamic acid as a method to reduce bleeding in primary hip replacement surgery. We included 134 patients operated during 2014 in our centre, who were divided into 2 groups according to whether or not they had received tranexamic acid. The main study variables were haemoglobin and haematocrit levels, the amount of blood collected from the post-operative drain in the first 12, 24 and 48hours and transfusion requirements. Post-operative haemoglobin and haematocrit levels were statistically higher (Ptranexamic acid. Statistically significant differences (P=.001) were found as to the need for transfusion according to group, more transfusions were performed in the cohort that had not received tranexamic acid: 25.37% compared to 4.48% for the group with tranexamic acid. No adverse events related to administration of tranexamic acid were recorded. Administration of tranexamic acid has proved to be an effective and safe method to reduce peri-operative bleeding in patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty and avoids allogenic blood transfusion. Therefore, tranexamic acid treatment could entail a financial saving for the healthcare system and expose the patient to less risk. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of tranexamic acid in endoscopic sinus surgery - A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pundir, V.; Pundir, J.; Georgalas, C.; Fokkens, W. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The role of tranexamic acid in patients undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) is not clearly defined. The aim of our study is to systematically review the existing evidence on the role of tranexamic acid in patients undergoing ESS. Methodology: Systematic search of MEDLINE (1950 -

  1. Intratumoral Vasculopathy in Leiomyoma Treated With Tranexamic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudose, Satoru; Krigman, Hannah R

    2017-07-01

    Although intravascular thrombi and infarct-type necrosis have been reported in leiomyomas following tranexamic acid therapy, intratumoral vasculopathy resembling acute atherosis has not been reported to date in patients without exposure to gonadotropin receptor agonist. We describe a case of intratumoral vasculopathy resembling acute atherosis in a leiomyoma in a 49-year-old woman, with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and menorrhagia, treated with tranexamic acid. The patient had no exposure to gonadotropin receptor agonists. Pathologic examination of the hysterectomy specimen showed a 5.7-cm submucosal leiomyoma containing multiple arteries with fibrinoid change accompanied with abundant subintimal foamy macrophages and occasional luminal thrombi. The vascular media showed scant lymphocytic inflammation without necrosis. The leiomyoma contained numerous mast cells and edematous areas. Vessels outside of the leiomyoma showed neither fibrinoid changes nor inflammation. The patient is alive and well with no signs of systemic vasculitis. We demonstrate that intratumoral vasculopathy resembling acute atherosis may be seen in leiomyomas from patients taking tranexamic acid and postulate that this change results in vascular thrombosis, tumoral edema, and infarct-type necrosis.

  2. Anti-fibrinolytic and anti-microbial activities of a serine protease inhibitor from honeybee (Apis cerana) venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Lee, Kwang Sik; Kim, Bo Yeon; Choi, Yong Soo; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Jia, Jingming; Jin, Byung Rae

    2017-10-01

    Bee venom contains a variety of peptide constituents, including low-molecular-weight protease inhibitors. While the putative low-molecular-weight serine protease inhibitor Api m 6 containing a trypsin inhibitor-like cysteine-rich domain was identified from honeybee (Apis mellifera) venom, no anti-fibrinolytic or anti-microbial roles for this inhibitor have been elucidated. In this study, we identified an Asiatic honeybee (A. cerana) venom serine protease inhibitor (AcVSPI) that was shown to act as a microbial serine protease inhibitor and plasmin inhibitor. AcVSPI was found to consist of a trypsin inhibitor-like domain that displays ten cysteine residues. Interestingly, the AcVSPI peptide sequence exhibited high similarity to the putative low-molecular-weight serine protease inhibitor Api m 6, which suggests that AcVSPI is an allergen Api m 6-like peptide. Recombinant AcVSPI was expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells, and it demonstrated inhibitory activity against trypsin, but not chymotrypsin. Additionally, AcVSPI has inhibitory effects against plasmin and microbial serine proteases; however, it does not have any detectable inhibitory effects on thrombin or elastase. Consistent with these inhibitory effects, AcVSPI inhibited the plasmin-mediated degradation of fibrin to fibrin degradation products. AcVSPI also bound to bacterial and fungal surfaces and exhibited anti-microbial activity against fungi as well as gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. These findings demonstrate the anti-fibrinolytic and anti-microbial roles of AcVSPI as a serine protease inhibitor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigation of the effect of Acute Normovolemic Hemodilution and Tranexamic Acid on the amount of bleeding during off-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery: a systematic review

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    Reza Jalaeian Taghadoomi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Postoperative bleeding and transfusion remain a source of morbidity and cost after open heart operations . To evaluate the effect of ANH method and tranexamic acid on blood transfusion requirements and blood loss after off pump coronary artery bypass surgery (OPCAB. Materials and Methods: The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, and EMBASE from inception to December 2014; reference lists of published guidelines, reviews, and associated articles, as well as conference proceedings.We included articles with available abstract in English language. Manual searching was done within the reference list of articles. Three reviewers independently reviewed and assessed eligibility criteria, assessed quality, and extracted data. Results: Bleeding and hemorrhagic complications and the consequent need for allogeneic transfusion are still major problems after off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery that can reduced in combination of ANH method and tranexamic acid. Conclusion: Tranexamic acid and ANH appear to be effective in reducing postoperative bleeding and the need for allogeneic blood products.

  4. Efficacy and Safety of Tranexamic Acid in Prehospital Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock: Outcomes of the Cal-PAT Study

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    Michael M. Neeki

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The California Prehospital Antifibrinolytic Therapy (Cal-PAT study seeks to assess the safety and impact on patient mortality of tranexamic acid (TXA administration in cases of trauma-induced hemorrhagic shock. The current study further aimed to assess the feasibility of prehospital TXA administration by paramedics within the framework of North American emergency medicine standards and protocols. Methods: This is an ongoing multi-centered, prospective, observational cohort study with a retrospective chart-review comparison. Trauma patients identified in the prehospital setting with signs of hemorrhagic shock by first responders were administered one gram of TXA followed by an optional second one-gram dose upon arrival to the hospital, if the patient still met inclusion criteria. Patients administered TXA make up the prehospital intervention group. Control group patients met the same inclusion criteria as TXA candidates and were matched with the prehospital intervention patients based on mechanism of injury, injury severity score, and age. The primary outcomes were mortality, measured at 24 hours, 48 hours, and 28 days. Secondary outcomes measured included the total blood products transfused and any known adverse events associated with TXA administration. Results: We included 128 patients in the prehospital intervention group and 125 in the control group. Although not statistically significant, the prehospital intervention group trended toward a lower 24-hour mortality rate (3.9% vs 7.2% for intervention and control, respectively, p=0.25, 48-hour mortality rate (6.3% vs 7.2% for intervention and control, respectively, p=0.76, and 28-day mortality rate (6.3% vs 10.4% for intervention and control, respectively, p=0.23. There was no significant difference observed in known adverse events associated with TXA administration in the prehospital intervention group and control group. A reduction in total blood product usage was observed

  5. The effect of three different doses of tranexamic acid on blood loss after cardiac surgery with mild systemic hypothermia (32 degrees C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karski, J M; Dowd, N P; Joiner, R; Carroll, J; Peniston, C; Bailey, K; Glynn, M F; Teasdale, S J; Cheng, D C

    1998-12-01

    Prophylactic administration of tranexamic acid (TA), an antifibrinolytic agent, decreases bleeding after cardiac surgery with systemic hypothermia (25 degrees C to 29 degrees C). Warmer systemic temperatures during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) may reduce bleeding and thus alter the requirement for TA. The effect of three different doses of TA on bleeding after cardiac surgery with mild systemic hypothermia (32 degrees C) is evaluated. Double-blind, prospective, randomized study. University hospital. One hundred fifty adult patients undergoing aortocoronary bypass or valvular cardiac surgery. Patients received TA, 50 (n = 50), 100 (n = 50), or 150 (n = 50) mg/kg intravenously before CPB with mild systemic hypothermia. Blood loss through chest drains over 6, 12, and 24 hours after surgery and total hemoglobin loss were measured. Autotransfused blood, transfused banked blood and blood products, and coagulation profiles were measured. Analysis of variance on log-transformed data for blood loss and confidence intervals (CIs) of 0.95 were calculated and transformed to milliliters of blood. No patient was re-explored for bleeding. Blood loss at 6 hours was statistically greater in the 50-mg/kg group compared with the other two groups (p = 0.03; p = 0.02). Total hemoglobin loss was statistically greater in the 50-mg/kg group compared with the 150-mg/kg group (p = 0.04). There was no statistical difference in blood tranfusion rate or coagulation profiles among the three groups. However, preoperative hemoglobin level was statistically lower in the 150-mg/kg group compared with the other two groups (p = 0.01). Of the three doses of TA studied, the most efficacious and cost-effective dose to reduce bleeding after cardiac surgery with mild hypothermic systemic perfusion is 100 mg/kg.

  6. Prospective observational study of the effect of dual antiplatelet therapy with tranexamic acid treatment on platelet function and bleeding after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amour, J; Garnier, M; Szymezak, J; Le Manach, Y; Helley, D; Bertil, S; Ouattara, A; Riou, B; Gaussem, P

    2016-12-01

    The bleeding impact of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT), aspirin and clopidogrel, maintained until coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG), is still a matter of debate. The lack of preoperative antiplatelet activity measurement and heterogeneity of antifibrinolytic protocols in prior studies make the conclusions questionable. The aim of this prospective study was to determine, after preoperative antiplatelet activity measurement, if the maintenance of DAPT until CABG increases bleeding in patients treated with tranexamic acid (TA). This observational study included 150 consecutive patients, 89 treated with aspirin and 61 treated with DAPT, undergoing a first-time planned on-pump CABG with TA treatment. Antiplatelet activity was measured with platelet aggregation tests and quantification of VASP phosphorylation. Postoperative bleeding at 24 h was recorded and propensity score analysis was performed. Based on VASP assay, 54% of patients showed high on-clopidogrel platelet activity inhibition. Postoperative bleeding at 24 h increased by 22% in the DAPT group, compared with the aspirin group (680 [95% CI: 360-1670] vs 558 [95%CI: 267-1270] ml, P < 0.01), consistent with increased blood transfusion (21% vs 7%, P = 0.01); a higher incidence of mediastinitis did not reach statistical significance (15% vs 4%, P = 0.05). Bleeding correlated with the extent of clopidogrel antiplatelet effect, with the best correlation for the VASP assay. Maintenance of DAPT until the day of CABG in patients treated with TA, increased postoperative bleeding at 24 h in parallel with preoperative antiplatelet activity induced by clopidogrel. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Telangiectasia hemorrágica hereditária: ácido tranexâmico no tratamento de úlcera plantar Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: tranexamic acid for plantar ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Corrêa de Albuquerque

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Relato de um caso de úlcera plantar por fístula arteriovenosa em paciente portador de telangiectasia hemorrágica hereditária ou doença de Rendu-Osler-Weber tratado com ácido tranexâmico. Este fármaco é utilizado para tratamento de epistaxe, referindo-se o principal achado deste artigo ao uso eficaz desse medicamento na terapia de úlceras plantares hemorrágicas. São descritos os aspectos fisiopatológicos e clínicos da doença e as propriedades antifibrinolíticas do ácido tranexâmico. Este foi bem tolerado e apresentou evidências de eficácia na utilização para controle do sangramento e cicatrização da úlcera.Case report of one patient with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia, also known as Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome, treated with Tranexamic Acid for arteriovenous plantar ulcer. This drug has proved effective in controlling epistaxis, but the main point of this report is to expose the success use of this medication in the therapy of skin bleeding ulcer. The pathophysiologic and clinical features of the disease are reviewed and also the pharmacological aspects of the antifibrinolytic drugs. This drug was well tolerated by the patient and show evidence of good activity in the bleeding and healed the ulcer.

  8. Use of Tranexamic Acid during Total Endoprosthetic Replacement of the Hip Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D. Selivanov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the blood-saving activity, efficacy, and safety of tranexamic acid. Subjects and methods. Thirty-seven patients allocated into two groups were enrolled in the study of the efficacy of tranexamic acid as an agent in reducing blood loss during hip joint replacement. Group 2 patients were injected tranexamic acid, 10 mg/kg body weight, 20—30 minutes before and 3 hours after surgery in the same dosage. This resulted in a significant (48.5% reduction in total blood loss (from 1089.6 to 560.8 ml (p<0.05. No tranexamic acid-induced complications were found. The administration of tranexamic acid during total endoprosthetic replacement of the hip joint could reduce blood loss by 35 and 59.4% in the intraoperative and postoperative periods, respectively, and total blood loss by 48.4%. The use of tranexamic acid allows one to refuse transfusion of blood components during total endoprosthetic replacement of the hip joint. Key words: hip joint replacement, blood loss, tranexamic acid.

  9. Matched cohort study of topical tranexamic acid in cementless primary total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Reig, Javier; Mas Martinez, Jesus; Verdu Román, Carmen; Morales Santias, Manuel; Martínez Gimenez, Enrique; Bustamante Suarez de Puga, David

    2018-03-29

    Tranexamic acid has been shown to be effective in reducing blood loss after total hip replacement. The purpose of this study was to prospectively assess the effectiveness of topical TXA use to reduce blood loss after primary total hip replacement and to compare these outcomes with those of a matched control group from a similar cohort that did not have received tranexamic acid. This is a prospective matched control study to assess the effect of a 2 g topical tranexamic acid in 50 mL physiological saline solution in total hip replacement. Primary outcomes were hemoglobin and hematocrit drop, and total blood loss. Secondary outcomes were transfusion rates, length of hospital stay, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism events. We could match 100 patients to a control group. There were no statistical significantly differences between the two groups. The hemoglobin and hematocrit postoperative values were significantly higher in topical tranexamic acid group than in control group (P tranexamic acid group and 1163 in control group with significant differences (P = 0.001), which meant 34% reduction in total blood loss. Length of stay was lower in topical tranexamic acid group. The risk of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary events did not increase. A single dose of 2 g tranexamic acid in 50 mL physiological saline solution topical administration was effective and safe in reducing bleeding in patients undergoing unilateral primary non-cemented total hip replacement compared to a matched control group.

  10. Tranexamic acid administration to older patients undergoing primary total hip arthroplasty conserves hemoglobin and reduces blood loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Beheiry, Hossam; Lubberdink, Ashley; Clements, Nigel; Dihllon, Kiran; Sharma, Vicky

    2018-06-01

    Tranexamic acid effects in older people are difficult to predict. This study investigated the following research questions: 1) Is tranexamic acid effective in older patients undergoing primary total hip arthroplasty (THA)? and 2) Is there a difference in the effect of tranexamic acid between younger and older patients? This was a 2-phase retrospective matched-pair study of patients who underwent THA in 2007-2013. All procedures were performed by surgeons with at least 10 years' experience as senior consultant. In the first phase, 58 patients aged 65 years or more who received tranexamic acid were matched 1:1 with patients who did not receive tranexamic acid for age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification and body mass index. In the second phase, 58 patients aged 65 years or more who received tranexamic acid were matched 1:1 with patients less than 65 years of age who received tranexamic acid for sex, ASA classification and body mass index. The primary outcome measures were percent maximum decrease in hemoglobin level and estimated blood loss after surgery. In the first phase, patients who received tranexamic acid conserved postoperative hemoglobin by a mean of 10.26 g/L (standard deviation [SD] 9.89 g/L) compared to the control group ( p Tranexamic acid reduced the postoperative decrease in hemoglobin level and blood loss in older patients. Moreover, the significant hemoglobin-sparing effect of tranexamic acid in older patients was similar to that observed in younger patients.

  11. Effects of tranexamic acid during endoscopic sinsus surgery in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A Eldaba

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of tranexamic acid (TA on the intra-operative bleeding during the functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS in children. Methods: A total of 100 children recruited to undergo FESS were randomized into two groups. Group I: Was given just after induction, intra-venous 25 mg/kg TA diluted in 10 ml of normal saline. Group II: Was given 10 ml of normal saline. Non-invasive blood pressure, heart rate, and quality of the surgical field were estimated every 15 min. Volume of bleeding and duration of the surgical procedure were recorded. Results: Surgical field quality after 15 min revealed that seven patients in group I had minimal bleeding versus no one in group II, P=0.006. Meanwhile, 35 patients in group I had mild bleeding versus 26 patients in group II, P=0.064. Higher number of patients in group II than in group I had moderate bleeding, P=0006. Also, at 30 min, revealed that 10 patients in group I had minimal bleeding versus one patient in group II, P=0.004. Meanwhile, 37 patients in group I had mild bleeding versus 28 patients in group II, P=0.059. Higher number of patients in group II than in group I had moderate bleeding, P<0001. Duration of the surgeries and volume of bleeding were significantly less in tranexamic group than the placebo group, P<0.0001. Conclusion: Single intra-venous bolus dose of tranexamic in children during the FESS improves quality of surgical field, reduces intra-operative bleeding, and duration of surgery.

  12. What dose of tranexamic acid is most effective and safe for adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Sam; Larvin, Joseph T; Dearman, Charles

    2015-09-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: what dose of tranexamic acid is most effective and safe for adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery? Altogether 586 papers were found using the reported search, of which 12 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Current evidence shows clinical benefit of using high-dose tranexamic acid (>80 mg/kg total dose) as opposed to low-dose tranexamic acid (tranexamic acid lose less blood postoperatively than patients receiving low-dose tranexamic acid (590 vs 820 ml, P = 0.01). Patients receiving high-dose tranexamic acid also require fewer units of blood product transfusion (2.5 units vs 4.1 units; P = 0.02) and are less likely to undergo repeat surgery to achieve haemostasis. This effect is larger in those who are at high risk of bleeding. Several prospective studies comparing doses found no difference in clinical outcomes between high- and low-dose regimens, but excluded patients at high risk of bleeding. However, data from numerous observational studies demonstrate that tranexamic acid use is associated with an increased risk of postoperative seizure; one analysis showed tranexamic acid use to be a very strong independent predictor (odds ratio = 14.3, P tranexamic acid. We conclude that, in general, patients with a high risk of bleeding should receive high-dose tranexamic acid, while those at low risk of bleeding should receive low-dose tranexamic acid with consideration given to potential dose-related seizure risk. We recommend the regimens of high-dose (30 mg kg(-1) bolus + 16 mg kg(-1) h(-1) + 2 mg kg(-1) priming) and low-dose (10 mg kg(-1) bolus + 1 mg kg(-1) h(-1) + 1 mg kg(-1) priming) tranexamic acid, as these are well established in terms of safety profile and have the

  13. Discovery and Evaluation of Anti-Fibrinolytic Plasmin Inhibitors Derived from 5-(4-Piperidyl)isoxazol-3-ol (4-PIOL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Thomas C.; Eriksson, Per-Olof; Gustafsson, David

    2017-01-01

    Inhibition of plasmin has been found to effectively reduce fibrinolysis and to avoid hemorrhage. This can be achieved by addressing its kringle 1 domain with the known drug and lysine analogue tranexamic acid. Guided by shape similarities toward a previously discovered lead compound, 5-(4-piperidyl...

  14. Oral Tranexamic Acid Reduces Transfusions in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, Roger E; Fournier, Christine A; Mattingly, David A; Junghans, Richard P; Talmo, Carl T

    2017-10-01

    Tranexamic acid (TXA) reduces intraoperative blood loss and transfusions in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Although numerous studies demonstrate the efficacy of intravenous and topical TXA in these patients, few demonstrate the effectiveness and appropriate dosing recommendations of oral formulations. A retrospective cohort study was performed to evaluate differences in transfusion requirements in patients undergoing primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty with either no TXA (n = 866), a single-dose of oral TXA (n = 157), or both preoperative and postoperative oral TXA (n = 1049). Secondary outcomes included postoperative hemoglobin drop, total units transfused, length of stay, drain output, and cell salvage volume. Transfusion rates decreased from 15.4% in the no-oral tranexamic acid (OTA) group to 9.6% in the single-dose OTA group (P < .001) and 7% in the 2-dose group (P < .001), with no difference in transfusion rates between the single- and 2-dose groups (P = .390). In addition, postoperative hemoglobin drop was reduced from 4.2 g/dL in the no-OTA group to 3.5 g/dL in the single-dose group (P < .01) and to 3.4 g/dL in the 2-dose group (P < .01), without a difference between the single- and 2-dose groups (P = .233). OTA reduces transfusions, with greater ease of administration and improved cost-effectiveness relative to other forms of delivery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Aminocaproic Acid and Tranexamic Acid Fail to Reverse Dabigatran-Induced Coagulopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Michael; Huang, Margaret; Henderson, Sean O; Carmelli, Guy; Thomas, Stephen H

    In recent years, dabigatran has emerged as a popular alternative to warfarin for treatment of atrial fibrillation. If rapid reversal is required, however, no reversal agent has clearly been established. The primary purpose of this manuscript was to evaluate the efficacy of tranexamic acid and aminocaproic acid as agents to reverse dabigatran-induced coagulopathy. Rats were randomly assigned to 6 groups. Each rat received either dabigatran or oral placebo, followed by saline, tranexamic acid, or aminocaproic acid. An activated clotting test was used to measure the coagulopathy. Neither tranexamic acid nor aminocaproic acid successfully reversed dabigatran-induced coagulopathy. In this rodent model of dabigatran-induced coagulopathy, neither tranexamic acid nor aminocaproic acid were able to reverse the coagulopathy.

  16. Efficacy and Safety of Tranexamic Acid in Melasma: A Meta-analysis and Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Moon, Seok Hoon; Cho, Sang Hyun; Lee, Jeong Deuk; Kim, Hei Sung

    2017-07-06

    Tranexamic acid is a novel treatment option for melasma; however, there is no consensus on its use. This systematic review searched major databases for relevant publications to March 2016. Eleven studies with 667 participants were included. Pooled data from tranexamic acid-only observational studies with pre- and post-treatment Melasma Area and Severity Index (MASI) showed a decrease of 1.60 in MASI (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.20-2.00; ptranexamic acid. The addition of tranexamic acid to routine treatment modalities resulted in a further decrease in MASI of 0.94 (95% CI 0.10-1.79; p = 0.03). Side-effects were minor, with a few cases reporting hypo-menorrhoea, mild abdominal discomfort, and transient skin irritation. These results support the efficacy and safety of tranexamic acid, either alone or as an adjuvant to routine treatment modalities for melasma.

  17. Tranexamic acid for the treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding: efficacy and safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leminen, Henri; Hurskainen, Ritva

    2012-01-01

    Tranexamic acid has proven to be an effective treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB). It reduces menstrual blood loss (MBL) by 26%–60% and is significantly more effective than placebo, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, oral cyclical luteal phase progestins, or oral etamsylate, while the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system reduces MBL more than tranexamic acid. Other treatments used for HMB are oral contraceptives, danazol, and surgical interventions (endometrial ablation and hysterectomy). Medical therapy is usually considered a first-line treatment for idiopathic HMB. Tranexamic acid significantly improves the quality of life of women treated for HMB. The recommended oral dosage is 3.9–4 g/day for 4–5 days starting from the first day of the menstrual cycle. Adverse effects are few and mainly mild. No evidence exists of an increase in the incidence of thrombotic events associated with its use. An active thromboembolic disease is a contraindication. In the US, a history of thrombosis or thromboembolism, or an intrinsic risk for thrombosis or thromboembolism are considered contraindications as well. This review focuses on the efficacy and safety of tranexamic acid in the treatment of idiopathic HMB. We searched for medical literature published in English on tranexamic acid from Ovid Medline, PubMed, and Cinahl. Additional references were identified from the reference lists of articles. Ovid Medline, PubMed, and Cinahl search terms were “tranexamic acid” and “menorrhagia” or “heavy menstrual bleeding.” Searches were last updated on March 25, 2012. Studies with women receiving tranexamic acid for HMB were included; randomized controlled studies with a description of appropriate statistical methodology were preferred. Relevant data on the physiology of menstruation and the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of tranexamic acid are also included. PMID:22956886

  18. DOES TRANEXAMIC ACID REDUCE BLOOD LOSS IN OFF-PUMP CORONARY ARTERY BYPASS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mehr-Aein

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Tranexamic acid is now used on a routine basis for on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG. We assessed the hemostatic effects of tranexamic acid to decrease bleeding tendency and transfusion requirements in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery (OPCAB. A total of 66 patients were enrolled to elective OPCAB in a double-blind, prospective randomized study. Of these, 33 patients received tranexamic acid (15 mg/kg before the infusion of heparin and 15 mg/kg after protamin infusion, and 33 patients received only saline. Preoperative hematologic variables, postoperative bleeding and allogeneic transfusions were considered. D-dimer plasma levels were also evaluated to monitor the activation of fibrinolysis. Postoperative bleeding was significantly lower in the tranexamic acid group compared with the control group (320 ± 38 mL vs. 480 ± 75 mL at 12 hour, P < 0.001. The tranexamic acid group had significantly lesser need for allogeneic blood products (0.46 units/patients vs. 0.94 units/patients, P < 0.001. They had also lower post-operative D-dimer plasma levels. No postoperative thrombotic complications were observed in either group. The defective hemostasis occurs even in the OPCABG. Tranexamic acid effectively reduces postoperative blood loss and the need for allogeneic blood products after OPCAB is decreased.

  19. Tranexamic acid: optimal blood loss management in surface replacement arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassoon, A; Nam, D; Jackups, R; Johnson, S R; Nunley, R M; Barrack, R L

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated whether the use of tranexamic acid (TXA) decreased blood loss and transfusion related cost following surface replacement arthroplasty (SRA). A retrospective review of patients treated with TXA during a SRA, who did not receive autologous blood (TXA group) was performed. Two comparison groups were established; the first group comprised of patients who donated their own blood pre-operatively (auto group) and the second of patients who did not donate blood pre-operatively (control). Outcomes included transfusions, post-operative haemoglobin (Hgb), complications, and length of post-operative stay. Between 2009 and 2013, 150 patients undergoing SRA were identified for inclusion: 51 in the auto, 49 in the control, and 50 in the TXA group. There were no differences in the pre-operative Hgb concentrations between groups. The mean post-operative Hgb was 11.3 g/dL (9.1 to 13.6) in the auto and TXA groups, and 10.6 g/dL (8.1 to 12.1)in the control group (p = 0.001). Accounting for cost of transfusions, administration of TXA, and length of stay, the cost per patient was $1731, $339, and $185 for the auto, control and TXA groups, respectively. TXA use demonstrated higher post-operative Hgb concentrations when compared with controls and decreased peri-operative costs. Tranexamic acid safely limits allogeneic transfusion, maintains post-operative haemoglobin, and decreases direct and indirect transfusion related costs in surface replacement arthroplasty. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  20. [Single intravenous tranexamic acid dose to reduce blood loss in primary total knee replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Reig, J; Parra Ruiz, B; Ferrández Martínez, J; Martínez López, J F

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a single intravenous dose of tranexamic acid in order to reduce blood loss in total knee replacement. Prospective observational study of the administration of tranexamic acid in patients undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty from November 2013 to February 2015, in which an autologous blood recovery system was used. The study included 98 patients, distributed into two groups of 49 patients according to whether or not they received intravenous tranexamic acid. The primary endpoint was the number of patients requiring autologous transfusion from the recovery system autologous blood recovery system. No drop-outs were recorded during follow-up. There were no significant differences between groups as regards the preoperative and hospital variables. The mean preoperative haemoglobin and haematocrit at 24 and 48 hours postoperatively were similar in both groups. The average volume of bleeding in the autologous blood recovery system and estimated average blood loss was lower in patients who had been administered tranexamic acid, with significant differences. No patients in the group that was administered tranexamic acid required blood autotransfusion. The transfusion rate was zero in the two groups. No adverse events related to the administration of tranexamic acid were recorded. Intravenous administration of tranexamic acid, according to the described protocol, has presented a non-autotransfusion or allo-transfusion rate of 100%, with no increased incidence of thrombotic events. Thus, its use in this group of patients is recommended. The indication should be individualized, its use justified in the patient medical records, and informed consent is mandatory. Copyright © 2015 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Aprotinin vs. tranexamic acid in isolated coronary artery bypass surgery: A multicentre observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloge, Elsa; Amour, Julien; Provenchère, Sophie; Rozec, Bertrand; Scherrer, Bruno; Ouattara, Alexandre

    2017-05-01

    Aprotinin appears to be more efficacious than lysine analogues to reduce bleeding and transfusion of blood products in high-transfusion-risk cardiac surgical patients. However, in isolated coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, the results from head-to-head trials remain less conclusive. Our objective was to compare the efficacies and safety of aprotinin and tranexamic acid (TXA) in patients undergoing isolated on-pump CABG. A multicentre before-and-after study pooling individual data from published trials and unpublished data from three other databases. Four tertiary care teaching hospitals (Haut-Lévêque Hospital in Bordeaux, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital and Bichat-Claude Bernard Hospital in Paris, and Laennec Hospital in Nantes). We included data of 2496 isolated on-pump CABG surgery patients who received either aprotinin between November 2003 and May 2008 (n = 1267) or TXA between November 2007 and November 2013 (n = 1229). The primary outcome was total blood loss within 24 h after operation. Secondary outcomes were transfusion of blood products, reoperation for bleeding, renal replacement therapy, ICU length of stay and in-hospital mortality. Adjusted mean (SEM) 24-h blood loss after surgery [483 (11) vs. 634 (11) ml, P < 0.0001] and the proportion of patients requiring intraoperative blood product transfusion (32.7 vs. 46.5%, P = 0.01) were lower in aprotinin-treated patients. No difference was observed with regard to reoperations for bleeding, renal replacement therapy and in-hospital mortality. However, patients receiving aprotinin had a significantly shorter adjusted ICU length of stay. In patients undergoing isolated CABG, aprotinin was more effective than TXA in reducing postoperative blood loss, and no safety concerns were identified. The benefits of aprotinin should be considered when evaluating the risk of major blood loss and transfusion in patients scheduled for isolated CABG surgery.

  2. Systematic review and meta-analyses of tranexamic acid use for bleeding reduction in prostate surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Marcelo A; Cavalheiro, Bárbara T; de Oliveira Filho, Getúlio R

    2018-05-01

    Prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia have an increased incidence with aging. The most effective treatments are radical prostatectomy and transurethral resection of the prostate. To reduce perioperative bleeding in these surgeries, an approach is the use of tranexamic acid (TXA). Studies show that TXA is effective in reducing the blood loss and the need for transfusion in cardiac, orthopedic, and gynecological surgeries. In prostate surgeries, its efficacy and safety have not been established yet. To determine whether there are differences between TXA versus placebo in terms of intraoperative blood loss, transfusion requirements, hemoglobin levels and the incidence of thromboembolic events. Systematic review with meta-analyses. Anesthesia for prostate surgery. We searched the Medline, Cochrane, EBSCO, and Web of Science databases up to 2017 for randomized controlled trials that compared TXA administration with a control group in patients who submitted to prostate surgery. The primary outcomes were the intraoperative blood loss and transfusion rate. Data on hemoglobin levels and the incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) were also collected. Nine comparative studies were included in the meta-analyses. The estimated blood loss and transfusion rate were lower in patients receiving TXA, with a standardized mean difference of -1.93 (95% CI = -2.81 to -1.05, I 2  = 96%), and a risk ratio of 0.61 (95% CI = 0.47 to 0.80, I 2  = 0%), respectively. The hemoglobin levels and the incidence of DVT and PE did not differ between the groups. TXA reduced intraoperative blood loss and the need for transfusion, without increasing the risk of DVT and PE in prostate surgeries. Due to the limited number of studies and the high heterogeneity of the results, more clinical trials with a large number of patients are necessary to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison between Topical and Oral Tranexamic Acid in Management of Traumatic Hyphema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahadi Hosseini, Seyed Hamid Reza; Khalili, Mohammad Reza; Motallebi, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: We sought to determine the efficacy of topical tranexamic acid (5%) in the management of traumatic hyphema. Methods: Thirty eyes with gross traumatic hyphema were enrolled in this study. The patients were treated with tranexamic acid (5%) eye drop every 6 hours for 5 days. The main outcome measures were best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), Intra-ocular pressure (IOP), day of clot absorption, and rate of rebleeding. These parameters were evaluated daily for 4 days and thereafter at the 8th and 14th days after treatment. The patients were also compared with two historical control groups of patients (80 eyes) with traumatic hyphema; the first control group was treated with oral placebo and the other group was treated with oral tranexamic acid at our department. Result: Prior to treatment, the mean logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) BCVA was 0.59±0.62. BCVA was increased to 0.08±0.14 at day 14 (Ptranexamic acid seems promising in the management of traumatic hyphema. However, the small sample size of the present study precludes the conclusion that topical tranexamic acid can replace the oral tranexamic acid. PMID:24753640

  4. Tranexamic acid reduces intraoperative occult blood loss and tourniquet time in obese knee osteoarthritis patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yutong; Li, Zhirui; Gong, Ke; An, Xiao; Dong, Jiyuan; Tang, Peifu

    2018-01-01

    Obesity can result in increased blood loss, which is correlated with poor prognosis in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Clinical application of tranexamic acid is effective in reducing blood loss in TKA. However, most previous studies focused on the effect of tranexamic acid in the whole population, neglecting patients with specific health conditions, such as obesity. We hypothesized that tranexamic acid would reduce blood loss to a greater extent in obese patients than in those of normal weight. A total of 304 patients with knee osteoarthritis treated with TKA from October 2013 to March 2015 were separated into tranexamic, non-tranexamic, obese, and non-obese groups. The demographic characteristics, surgical indices, and hematological indices were all recorded. We first investigated the ability of intravenous tranexamic acid to reduce intraoperative blood loss in knee osteoarthritis patients undergoing unilateral TKA. Second, we performed subgroup analysis to compare the effects of tranexamic acid between obese and non-obese patients separately. Of the 304 patients, 146 (52.0%) received tranexamic acid and 130 (42.8%) were obese. In the analysis of the whole group, both the actual and occult blood loss volume were lower in the tranexamic acid group (both P tranexamic acid group ( P tranexamic acid was shown to reduce theoretical and actual blood loss in both the obese and non-obese groups ( P Tranexamic acid reduced occult blood loss and tourniquet time in the obese group ( P 0.05). Tranexamic acid can reduce occult blood loss and tourniquet time in obese patients to a greater extent than in patients of normal weight. Therefore, obese knee osteoarthritis patients undergoing TKA can benefit more from tranexamic acid.

  5. The effect of tranexamic acid on the quality of life of women with heavy menstrual bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, U H

    2001-12-01

    To investigate whether medical treatment with tranexamic acid would increase the quality of life of women with heavy menstrual bleeding. This open, uncontrolled usage study included 849 women diagnosed with heavy menstrual bleeding and considered eligible for tranexamic-acid treatment. The condition of the women was investigated at baseline and after the first and the third treated menstruation. Quality of life and subjectively experienced state of health were assessed with the aid of a questionnaire. Satisfaction with the treatment was registered. After the third menstruation, 80% of the women were satisfied with the treatment. Impairment of social activities and impairment at work were greatly reduced by the treatment. Substantial improvements were also recorded with regard to alertness, productivity, cleanliness, spirits, action radius and overall well-being. Adverse reactions to the drug used for the treatment were few and non-serious. Medical treatment with tranexamic acid increases quality of life for women with heavy menstrual bleeding.

  6. Tranexamic acid for the prevention and management of orthopedic surgical hemorrhage: current evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Christopher; Park, Sam Si-Hyeong; Davey, J Roderick

    2015-01-01

    Total joint arthroplasty can be associated with major blood loss and require subsequent blood transfusions for postoperative anemia. Measures to effectively and safely decrease blood loss and reduce the need for blood transfusions would help improve patient safety and lower health care costs. A possible pharmacological option to reduce surgical blood loss in total joint arthroplasty is the use of tranexamic acid. Abundant literature has shown that intravenous and/or topical administration of tranexamic acid is effective in reducing blood loss and blood transfusions, with no increased risk of venous thromboembolic events or other complications. PMID:26345147

  7. The efficacy of topical tranexamic acid in total hip arthroplasty: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shubiao; Wu, Kezhou; Kong, Gengbin; Feng, Weili; Deng, Zhihua; Wang, Hu

    2016-02-16

    Topical tranexamic acid (TXA) has been shown to be effective in reducing blood loss and the need for transfusion after total knee arthroplasty. However, the effectiveness of topical TXA use in total hip arthroplasty (THA) still remains unclear. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to examine the safety and efficacy of topical use of TXA following THA. Topical TXA reduces blood loss and transfusion rates without increasing risk of deep vein thrombosis in patients with THA. An electronic literature search of PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, Web of Science and Chinese Biomedical Database was performed, to identify studies published before February 2015. All randomized controlled trials and cohort studies evaluating the efficacy of topical TXA during THA were included. Two independent authors identified the eligible studies, assessed their methodological quality, and extracted data. The data were using fixed-effects or random-effects models with (standard) mean differences and risk ratios for continuous and dichotomous variables, respectively. Data were analysed using RevMan 5.3 software. Fourteen studies encompassing 2594 patients met the inclusion criteria for our meta-analysis. Our meta-analysis indicated that when compared with the placebo group, topical use of TXA significantly reduced total blood loss (MD = -297.65 ml, 95 % CI -371.68 ml, 116.08 ml; P level (SMD = -0.66, 95 % CI -0.91, -0.41; P Topical TXA could significantly reduce total blood loss, drainage loss, transfusion rates and decrease haemoglobin level following THA, without increasing risk of venous thromboembolisms.

  8. Therapeutic Effects of Topical Tranexamic Acid in Comparison with Hydroquinone in Treatment of Women with Melasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atefi, Najmolsadat; Dalvand, Behzad; Ghassemi, Mahammadreza; Mehran, Golnaz; Heydarian, Amir

    2017-09-01

    Few studies have focused on therapeutic as well as side effects of tranexamic acid (TXA) as a topical drug compared to other topical drugs in treating melasma. The present study aimed to assess and compare the beneficial therapeutic effects and also side effects of local TXA in comparison with hydroquinone in treating women with melasma. This randomized double-blinded clinical trial was performed on 60 women who suffered from melasma and were referred to the skin disorders clinic at the Rasoul-e-Akram hospital in Tehran in 2015. The patients were then randomly assigned via computerized randomization to two groups: group A received TXA%5 (topically twice a day for 12 weeks in the location of the melasma) and group B (received hydroquinone 2% with the same treatment order). Prior to intervention and at 12 weeks after intervention, the intensity and extension of melasma were assessed based on the Melasma Area and Severity Index (MASI) scoring method. The mean MASI score in both treatment groups decreased considerably after completion of treatment and was not significant between the two groups. No side effects were detected in group A, but 10% of those in group B complained of drug-related side effects including erythema and skin irritation (p = 0.131). Regarding the level of patient satisfaction, the patients in group A had a significantly higher level of satisfaction level of 33.3% compared with 6.7% in group B (p = 0.015) (Fig. 9). Multivariate linear regression modeling with the presence of age, history of systemic disorder, drug history, and family history of melasma demonstrated no difference in the mean MASI between the two groups. Topical use of TXA significantly reduced both melanin level and MASI score. Given its high efficiency and low drug side effects, this regimen results in high patient satisfaction compared with topical hydroquinone. IRCT code: IRCT2016040627220N2.

  9. Effect of tranexamic acid on intraoperative blood loss and transfusion requirements in patients undergoing excision of intracranial meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooda, Bhavna; Chouhan, Rajendra Singh; Rath, Girija Prasad; Bithal, Parmod Kumar; Suri, Ashish; Lamsal, Ritesh

    2017-07-01

    Surgical excision of meningioma is often complicated by significant blood loss requiring blood transfusion with its attendant risks. Although tranexamic acid is used to reduce perioperative blood loss, its blood conservation effect is uncertain in neurosurgery. Sixty adults undergoing elective craniotomy for meningioma excision were randomized to receive either tranexamic acid or placebo, initiated prior to skin incision. Patients in the tranexamic acid group received intravenous bolus of 20mg/kg over 20min followed by an infusion of 1mg/kg/h till the conclusion of surgery. Intraoperative blood loss, transfusion requirements and estimation of surgical hemostasis using a 5-grade scale were noted. Postoperatively, the extent of tumor excision on CT scan and complications were observed. Demographics, tumor characteristics, amount of fluid infusion, and duration of surgery and anesthesia were comparable between the two groups. The amount of blood loss was significantly less in tranexamic acid group compared to placebo (830mlvs 1124ml; p=0.03). The transfusion requirement was less in tranexamic acid group (p>0.05). The patients in tranexamic acid group fared better on a 5-grade surgical hemostasis scale with more patients showing good hemostasis (p=0.007). There were no significant differences between the groups with regards to extent of tumor removal, perioperative complications, hospital stay or neurologic outcome. To conclude, administration of tranexamic acid significantly reduced blood loss in patients undergoing excision of meningioma. Fewer patients in the tranexamic acid group received blood transfusions. Surgical field hemostasis was better achieved in patients who received tranexamic acid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Treatment of postoperative bleeding after fondaparinux with rFVIIa and tranexamic acid.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huvers, F.C.; Slappendel, R.; Benraad, B.; Hellemondt, G. van; Kraaij, M.G.J. van

    2005-01-01

    Treatment of a haemorrhagic shock after just a single dose of fondaparinux in an orthopaedic patient with reduced renal clearance is presented. Since all routine haemostatic parameters were nearly normal, single doses of rFVIIa (90 microg/kg) and of tranexamic acid (15 mg/kg) were administered to

  11. Tranexamic acid reduces blood loss in patients with extracapsular fractures of the hip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tengberg, P T; Foss, N B; Palm, H

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: We chose unstable extra-capsular hip fractures as our study group because these types of fractures suffer the largest blood loss. We hypothesised that tranexamic acid (TXA) would reduce total blood loss (TBL) in extra-capsular fractures of the hip. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A single...

  12. Efficacy of tranexamic acid in paediatric cardiac surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faraoni, David; Willems, Ariane; Melot, Christian; de Hert, Stefan; van der Linden, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The benefit-to-risk ratio of using tranexamic acid (TXA) in paediatric cardiac surgery has not yet been determined. This systematic review evaluated studies that compared TXA to placebo in children undergoing cardiac surgery. A systematic search was conducted in all relevant randomized controlled

  13. Low Risk of Thromboembolic Events After Routine Administration of Tranexamic Acid in Hip and Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Rune V; Nielsen, Christian S.; Kallemose, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The blood-conserving effect of intravenous (IV) tranexamic acid (TXA) is well-documented for total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, the risk of thromboembolic (TE) events after routine use of TXA is unclear and the safety profile is debated...

  14. Comparison of intravenous versus topical tranexamic acid in total knee arthroplasty: a prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jay N; Spanyer, Jonathon M; Smith, Langan S; Huang, Jiapeng; Yakkanti, Madhusudhan R; Malkani, Arthur L

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of topical Tranexamic Acid (TXA) versus Intravenous (IV) Tranexamic Acid for reduction of blood loss following primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). This prospective randomized study involved 89 patients comparing topical administration of 2.0g TXA, versus IV administration of 10mg/kg. There were no differences between the two groups with regard to patient demographics or perioperative function. The primary outcome measure, perioperative change in hemoglobin level, showed a decrease of 3.06 ± 1.02 in the IV group and 3.42 ± 1.07 in the topical group (P = 0.108). There were no statistical differences between the groups in preoperative hemoglobin level, lowest postoperative hemoglobin level, or total drain output. One patient in the topical group required blood transfusion (P = 0.342). Based on our study, topical Tranexamic Acid has similar efficacy to IV Tranexamic Acid for TKA patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Use of tranexamic acid in total knee arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    MARRA, FRANCESCO; ROSSO, FEDERICA; BRUZZONE, MATTEO; BONASIA, DAVIDE EDOARDO; DETTONI, FEDERICO; ROSSI, ROBERTO

    2016-01-01

    Purpose different strategies have been developed to reduce blood loss in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The efficacy of both systemic and local tranexamic acid (TXA) administration is demonstrated in the literature. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of systemic, local and combined (systemic + local) administration of TXA in reducing blood loss after TKA. Methods we enrolled all patients submitted to a primary TKA in our department between November 2014 and August 2015. They were divided into three groups corresponding to the method of TXA administration used: intravenous (IV), intra-articular (IA), and a combination of the two. Demographic data, as well as preoperative hemoglobin and platelet levels, were collected. The primary outcome was the maximum hemoglobin loss, while the secondary outcomes were the amount of blood in the drain (cc/hour) and the rate of transfusions; postoperative pain was also assessed. Student’s t-test or a χ2 test was used to evaluate between-group differences, using p<0.05 as the cut-off for statistically significant differences. Results the sample comprised 34 patients: IV, 10 cases; IA, 15 cases, and combined (IV + IA), 9 cases. The average age of the patients was 71.1±6.4 years. No significant differences in the outcome measures were found between the groups, with the exception of a significantly lower maximum hemoglobin loss in the combined versus the IV group (p=0.02). There were no differences between the groups in the amount of blood in the drain or the rate of transfusions. Conclusions the data from this preliminary study, as well as data from the literature, confirm that TXA administration is safe and effective in reducing total blood loss in TKA, and no administration protocol seems to be superior to the others. Level of evidence Level II, prospective comparative study. PMID:28217656

  16. Efficacy and safety of topical tranexamic acid in knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Hualda, Álvaro; Dauder-Gallego, Cristina; Ferreño-Márquez, David; Martínez-Martín, Javier

    2018-02-26

    Tranexamic acid (TXA) is commonly used to control postoperative blood loss in total knee arthroplasty. In order to avoid adverse effects associated with intravenous administration, topical use has been proposed as an alternative. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of topical TXA in total knee arthroplasty. A total of 90 patients scheduled for unilateral total knee arthroplasty were included in a prospective randomised study. All surgeries were performed under spinal anaesthesia, tourniquet and the same postoperative protocol. Patients were allocated to one of the 3 groups according to the application of TXA: group A (n=30) 1g of topical TXA; group B (n=30) 1g of TXA intravenous and in group C or the control group (n=30) no drug was administrated. Parameters related to blood loss and drain outputs were compared between the 3 groups. The results revealed that post-operative decrease in haemoglobin level was significantly lower in group A (1.95g/dL) than group B (2.25g/dL) and group C (2.96g/dL), P<.01. Total postoperative blood loss was lower in group A (195mL) than group B (466mL) and group C (718mL), P<.01. There was no significant difference in complications and allogenic blood transfusion rate between the 3 groups. According to the results, topical application of 1g TXA significantly reduced blood loss in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty more than intravenous or no administration of TXA. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Prevention of Bleeding in Orthognathic Surgery--A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jesper J; Skov, Jane; Ingerslev, Janne

    2016-01-01

    and operating time. This review is registered at PROSPERO (CRD42014014840). RESULTS: Eleven trials were included for review. The individual trials demonstrated the effects on IOB from hypotensive anesthetic regimens, the use of aprotinin, and the herbal medicine Yunnan Baiyao. Six studies of tranexamic acid...

  18. Role of tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss during and after caesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simran Kaur Bhatia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Association between caesarean section and intra operative and post operative bleeding is known. Post-partum hemorrhage is still a leading cause for maternal morbidity and mortality. This study will evaluate the efficacy and safety of tranexamic acid in reducing the blood loss after placental delivery following lower segment caesarean section (LSCS and note any adverse effects. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 women, who underwent elective or emergency primary caesarean section at term between 37 and 41 weeks have been studied prospectively. They were divided into two groups. In the study group of 50, tranexamic acid 1 gm IV was given 20 minutes before making incision for caesarean section and the control group of 50 did not receive tranexamic acid. Statistical Analysis: For quantitative outcomes, the t-test was used to test for difference in the two groups. For categorical outcomes, chi square and odds ratio with 95% confidence interval were used as applicable. Results: The patient characteristics, namely age, height, weight, gestational age and gravidity in two groups were similar which was statistically insignificant. Hemoglobin decreased slightly after birth in both groups but no statistical difference between two groups was noticed. There was no episode of thrombosis in the study. Tranexamic acid significantly reduced the quantity of the blood loss from time of placental delivery to 2 hours postpartum (P < 0.001 and from end of LSCS to 2 hours postpartum (P < 0.001. However, there was no statistical difference in quantity of blood loss from time of placental delivery to end of LSCS in both groups (P < 0.001. Conclusion: A safe dose of tranexamic acid has an effective role in reducing blood loss during LSCS without causing adverse reaction. Thus, drug can be used effectively in reducing maternal morbidity and mortality during LSCS.

  19. Should anti-inhibitor coagulant complex and tranexamic acid be used concomitantly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, L A; Holme, P A

    2015-11-01

    Inhibitor development in haemophilia patients is challenging especially when undergoing surgical procedures. The development of an inhibitor precludes using factor VIII (FVIII) therapy thereby requiring a bypassing agent (BPA) for surgical bleeding prophylaxis if the FVIII inhibitor titre >5 BU. Concomitant use of anti-inhibitor coagulant complex (AICC) and tranexamic acid has been reported in the literature as a beneficial treatment for this population. Anti-inhibitor coagulant complex is known to cause an increase in thrombin generation and tranexamic acid inhibits fibrinolysis. Hence, the combined used of AICC and tranexamic acid has been limited due to safety concerns over possibilities of increased risk of thrombotic events and disseminated intravascular coagulation. However, the rationale for concomitant therapy is to obtain a potential synergistic effect and to increase clot stability. We conducted a literature review of past studies and individual case reports of concomitant use of AICC and tranexamic acid, which was extensively used during dental procedures. Evidence also exists for concomitant use of the combined therapy in orthopaedic procedures, control of gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis and cerebral haemorrhages. Some patients who received the combined therapy had failed monotherapy with a single BPA prior to combined therapy. There were no reports of thrombotic complications related to the concomitant therapy and haemostasis was achieved in all cases. Anti-inhibitor coagulant complex and tranexamic acid therapy was found to be safe, well-tolerated and effective therapy in haemophilia patients with inhibitors. Additional randomized controlled studies should be performed to confirm these findings. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Safety and efficacy of intravenous administration for tranexamic acid-induced emesis in dogs with accidental ingestion of foreign substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orito, Kensuke; Kawarai-Shimamura, Asako; Ogawa, Atsushi; Nakamura, Atsushi

    2017-12-22

    A prospective observational study was performed in canine clinical medicine to evaluate the emetic action and adverse effects of tranexamic acid. Veterinarians treated 137 dogs with a single dose of tranexamic acid (50 mg/kg, IV) after accidental ingestion of foreign substances. If needed, a second (median, 50 mg/kg; range, 20-50 mg/kg, IV) or third dose (median, 50 mg/kg; range, 25-50 mg/kg, IV) was administered. Tranexamic acid induced emesis in 116 of 137 (84.7%) dogs. Median time to onset of emesis was 116.5 sec (range, 26-370 sec), median duration of emesis was 151.5 sec (range, 30-780 sec), and median number of emesis episodes was 2 (range, 1-8). Second and third administrations of tranexamic acid induced emesis in 64.7 and 66.7% of dogs, respectively. In total, IV administration of tranexamic acid successfully induced emesis in 129 of 137 (94.2%) dogs. Adverse effects included a tonic-clonic convulsion and hemostatic disorder in two different dogs, both of which recovered after receiving medical care. Tranexamic acid induced emesis in most dogs following a single-dose. When a single dose was not sufficient, an additional dosage effectively induced emesis. Overall, adverse effects were considered low and self-limiting.

  1. Does tranexamic acid increase the risk of thromboembolism after bilateral simultaneous total knee arthroplasties in Asian Population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hoo; Park, Jang-Won; Kim, Jun-Shik; Seo, Dong-Hyuk

    2018-01-01

    To ascertain whether tranexamic acid reduces the blood loss and transfusion rate and volumes; increase the prevalence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT); and investigate factors associated with DVT in patients undergoing primary bilateral total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) without use of chemical thromboprophylaxis. There were 874 patients (1748 knees) in the control group who did not receive tranexamic acid and 871 patients (1742 knees) in the study group who received tranexamic acid. Mechanical compression device was applied without any chemical thromboprophylaxis. Transfusion rates and volumes were recorded. DVT was diagnosed using both sonogram and venogram at 7 or 8 day post-operatively. Intra- and post-operative blood loss and transfusion volumes were significantly lower in the tranexamic acid group. The prevalence of DVT was 14% (245 of 1748 knees) in the control group and 18% (314 of 1742 knees) in the tranexamic acid group. Pre- and post-operative perfusion lung scans revealed no evidence of PE in any patients in either group. Coagulation or thrombophilic data or molecular genetic testing was not significantly different between the two groups. The use of tranexamic acid reduces the volume of blood transfusion and does not increase the prevalence of DVT or PE in the patients who did not receive routine chemical thromboprophylaxis after primary bilateral simultaneous sequential TKAs in Asian patients.

  2. The gender differences in the inhibitory action of UVB-induced melanocyte activation by the administration of tranexamic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramoto, Keiichi; Yamate, Yurika; Sugiyama, Daijiro; Takahashi, Yumi; Mafune, Eiichi

    2016-05-01

    Tranexamic acid has an inhibitory action on ultraviolet (UV) B-induced melanocyte activation. This study examined the sex differences in the inhibitory action of tranexamic acid on UVB-induced melanocyte activation. We irradiated the eye and ear of male and female mice with UVB at a dose of 1.0 kJ/m(2) using a 20SE sunlamp. We orally administered tranexamic acid (750 mg/kg/day) at 30 min before UVB exposure. Tranexamic acid inhibited the UVB-induced epidermal melanocyte activation, and the effect was more remarkable under UVB eye irradiation than under UVB ear irradiation. Furthermore, the melanocyte activity suppression effect was stronger in female mice than in male mice. Following the administration of tranexamic acid, the female displayed increased blood levels of β-endorphin and μ-opioid receptor and estradiol receptor β expression in comparison with the male. Furthermore, the effect of melanocyte activity suppression in the female mice was decreased by the administration of tamoxifen (antagonist of estrogen receptor) or naltrexone (antagonist of μ-opioid receptor). These results suggest that the suppression by tranexamic acid of the UVB-induced melanocyte activation (UVB sensitivity) is stronger in female mice than in male mice and that female hormones and β-endorphin play an important role in this sex difference. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Combined application versus topical and intravenous application of tranexamic acid following primary total hip arthroplasty: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pei; Liang, Yuan; Chen, Pengtao; Fang, Yongchao; He, Jinshan; Wang, Jingcheng

    2017-02-21

    The use of intravenous (IV) or topical tranexamic acid (TXA) in total hip arthroplasty has been proven to be effective and safe in total hip arthroplasty. However, which of these two administration routes is better has not been determined. The combined administration of TXA has been used in total knee arthroplasty with satisfactory results. We hypothesized that combined application of TXA may be the most effective way without increased rate of thrombotic events such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolisms (PE) in patients subjected to primary total hip replacement (THA). A meta-analysis was conducted to compare the efficacy and safety of the combined use of tranexamic acid (TXA) relative to topical or intravenous (IV) use alone for treatment of primary THA. The outcomes included total blood loss, postoperative hemoglobin decline, transfusion rates, and the incidence rates of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolisms (PE). We searched electronic databases including PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, Web of Science, the Chinese Biomedical Literature database, the CNKI database, and Wanfang Data until September 2016. The references of the included articles were also checked for additional potentially relevant studies. There were no language restrictions for the search. The data of the included studies were analyzed using RevMan 5.3 software. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria, encompassing a total of 1762 patients. Our meta-analysis demonstrated that total blood loss, postoperative hemoglobin decline, and transfusion rates were significantly lower for patients that received the combined treatment compared to patients that received either topical or intravenous administration of TXA. No statistical differences were found in the incidence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE). The group that received the combined treatment had lower total blood loss, postoperative hemoglobin decline, and transfusion rates without an

  4. A systematic review and meta-analysis comparing combined intravenous and topical tranexamic acid with intravenous administration alone in THA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangbai Sun

    Full Text Available To compare the effectiveness and safety of combined intravenous and topical tranexamic acid with intravenous use alone in THA.The electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS, Cochrane central, and further adapted for Google and Google Scholar internet, last updated on Dec 30, 2016, were searched. Evaluated outcomes included total blood loss, transfusion rate, maximum postoperative Hb drop, and incidence of thromboembolic complications. The standard mean difference (SMD or the relative risk (RR was calculated for continuous or dichotomous data respectively. The quality of the trial was assessed, and meta-analyses were performed with the Cochrane Collaboration's RevMan 5.0 software.Five RCTs with 457 patients were included. Combined TXA administration reduced blood loss (SMD, 1.39; 95%CI, 0.55 to 2.23; P<0.00001, I2 = 94%, hemoglobin decline (SMD, 0.84; 95%CI, 0.13 to 1.54; P = 0.01, I2 = 83% and the need for transfusion (RR, 2.58; 95%CI, 1.59 to 4.18; P = 0.65, I2 = 0% without increasing the rate of thromboembolic complications significantly (RR, 0.83; 95%CI, 0.27 to 2.54; P = 0.81, I2 = 0%.The present study has emphasized that combined TXA administration can effectively reduce blood loss, hemoglobin decline and the need for transfusion without increasing the rate of thromboembolic complications.

  5. Tranexamic acid use in severely injured civilian patients and the effects on outcomes: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Elaine; Davenport, Ross; Willett, Keith; Brohi, Karim

    2015-02-01

    To characterize the relationship between tranexamic acid (TXA) use and patient outcomes in a severely injured civilian cohort, and to determine any differential effect between patients who presented with and without shock. TXA has demonstrated survival benefits in trauma patients in an international randomized control trial and the military setting. The uptake of TXA into civilian major hemorrhage protocols (MHPs) has been variable. The evidence gap in mature civilian trauma systems is limiting the widespread use of TXA and its potential benefits on survival. Prospective cohort study of severely injured adult patients (Injury severity score > 15) admitted to a civilian trauma system during the adoption phase of TXA into the hospital's MHP. Outcomes measured were mortality, multiple organ failure (MOF), venous thromboembolism, infection, stroke, ventilator-free days (VFD), and length of stay. Patients receiving TXA (n = 160, 42%) were more severely injured, shocked, and coagulopathic on arrival. TXA was not independently associated with any change in outcome for either the overall or nonshocked cohorts. In multivariate analysis, TXA was independently associated with a reduction in MOF [odds ratio (OR) = 0.27, confidence interval (CI): 0.10-0.73, P = 0.01] and was protective for adjusted all-cause mortality (OR = 0.16 CI: 0.03-0.86, P = 0.03) in shocked patients. TXA as part of a major hemorrhage protocol within a mature civilian trauma system provides outcome benefits specifically for severely injured shocked patients.

  6. Study of Tranexamic Acid During Air Medical Prehospital Transport Trial (STAAMP Trial)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    to complete the project. Include the approved target number for statistical significance, followed by type of submission and type of approval with...assigned Number]: Title: Targets required and approved for statistical significance: Submitted to and Approved by: Provide a bullet point list of...applicable, the Quad Chart (available on https://www.usamraa.army.mil) should be updated and submitted with attachments. DELINQUENT REPORTS If the

  7. Tranexamic acid for the management of uterine fibroid tumors: A systematic review of the current evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitsidis, Panagiotis; Koukoulomati, Anna

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To conduct a detailed systematic review of the current evidence on the administration and efficacy of tranexamic acid in patients with menorrhagia due to uterine fibroids. METHODS: We conducted an electronic search on the following databases PubMed and Medline (1950-2013); (1980-2013); Cochrane library (1993-2013). RESULTS: A total of 36 articles were retrieved after the initial electronic search. Careful assessment of the retrieved studies led to the final selection of 5 articles for inclusion in the review. CONCLUSION: Tranexamic acid may reduce blood loss perioperatively in myomectomies. It may reduce the menorrhagia in patients with fibroids, however a stratification of fibroids by size and location is required to define the responses. It is safe in general, with mild adverse effects observed in some cases. More studies with a double-blind randomized design and larger numbers of participants are necessary to reach more precise and safe conclusions. PMID:25516866

  8. Tranexamic Acid in Bolus Alone Vs Bolus and Continuous Infusion in Hip Arthroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Fatih Karaaslan; Roberto Seijas; Andrea Sallent; Oscar Ares; Wenceslao Espinosa; Pedro Alvarez; Ramón Cugat; Patricia Lopez

    2017-01-01

    AIM: the present study examines the effects of tranexamic acid (TXA) on reducing blood loss during hip arthroscopy, comparing two different methods of administration (bolus vs infusion). METHODS: a prospective study with 70 patients undergoing hip arthroscopy was carried out. The patients within the TXA infusion group (group A) received TXA an 2-g intravenous bolus 30 min before skin incision intravenously followed by 10 mg/kg/h infusion (continued during the entire surgery)...

  9. Use of tranexamic acid in primary total knee replacement: effects on perioperative blood loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volquind, Daniel; Zardo, Remi Antônio; Winkler, Bruno Costamilan; Londero, Bruno Bertagnolli; Zanelatto, Natália; Leichtweis, Gisele Perondi

    2016-01-01

    The use of tranexamic acid in primary total knee replacement surgeries has been the subject of constant study. The strategies to reduce bleeding are aimed at reducing the need for blood transfusion due to the risks involved. In this study we evaluated the use of tranexamic acid in reducing bleeding, need for blood transfusion, and prevalence of postoperative deep vein thrombosis in primary total knee replacement. 62 patients undergoing primary total knee replacement were enrolled in the study, from June 2012 to May 2013, and randomized to receive a single dose of 2.5g of intravenous tranexamic acid (Group TA) or saline (Group GP), 5min before opening the pneumatic tourniquet, respectively. Hemoglobin, hematocrit, and blood loss were recorded 24h after surgery. Deep vein thrombosis was investigated during patient's hospitalization and 15 and 30 days after surgery in review visits. There was no demographic difference between groups. Group TA had 13.89% decreased hematocrit (p=0.925) compared to placebo. Group TA had a decrease of 12.28% (p=0.898) in hemoglobin compared to Group GP. Group TA had a mean decrease of 187.35mL in blood loss (25.32%) compared to group GP (p=0.027). The number of blood transfusions was higher in Group GP (p=0.078). Thromboembolic events were not seen in this study. Tranexamic acid reduced postoperative bleeding without promoting thromboembolic events. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of oral versus intravenous application of tranexamic acid in total knee and hip arthroplasty: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu-Kai; Ma, Jian-Xiong; Kuang, Ming-Jie; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Ying; Lu, Bin; Sun, Lei; Ma, Xin-Long

    2017-09-01

    Tranexamic acid (TXA) is regarded as one of the most important drugs in reducing blood loss and hemoglobin (Hb) drop after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or total hip arthroplasty (THA). Treatment with tranexamic acid (TXA) by intravenous application has been discussed extensively. Recently, several studies have reported that oral administration has an effect on blood sparing. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate the efficacy and safety between oral TXA and intravenous TXA (IV-TXA) for blood sparing in total knee and hip arthroplasty. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or retrospective cohort studies (RCSs) about relevant research were searched for by using PubMed (1996-April 2017), Embase (1980-April 2017), and the Cochrane Library (CENTRAL, April 2017). Five studies that compared oral with IV administration of TXA were included in our meta-analysis. Meta-analysis results were collected and analyzed by the software Review Manager 5.3 (Copenhagen: The Nordic Cochrane Center, The Collaboration, 2014). Five studies containing 3474 patients met the inclusion criteria. Our pooled data analysis indicated that oral TXA was as effective as the IV-TXA in terms of the average Hb drop (P = 0.88), total Hb loss (P = 0.57), total blood loss (P = 0.42), transfusion rate (P = 0.16), complications (P = 0.61), and length of hospital stay (P = 1.00). Compared with the IV-TXA method, oral TXA shows similar blood-sparing efficacy for preventing hemoglobin drop, total hemoglobin loss, and total blood loss following TKA or THA. In addition, no significant differences of transfusion rate, complications, or length of hospital stay were found between the 2 groups. However, because of the limited number of included studies, more studies of high quality are needed to further identify the optimal administration time for oral TXA. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bronchoscopic intratumoral injection of tranexamic acid to prevent excessive bleeding during multiple forceps biopsies of lesions with a high risk of bleeding: a prospective case series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamani, Adil

    2014-01-01

    Significant bleeding may occur following endobronchial forceps biopsy or brushing of necrotic or hypervascular tumors in the airways. In some cases, methods such as endobronchial instillation of iced saline lavage and epinephrine may fail to control bleeding. The present study evaluated the efficacy and safety of a new bronchoscopic technique using intratumoral injection of tranexamic acid (IIT) for control of bleeding during forceps biopsy in patients with endobronchial tumors with a high risk of bleeding. The study was a prospective case series carried out in a single center. Bronchoscopic IIT was performed in those patients who had endoscopically visible tumoral lesions with persistent active bleeding following the first attempt at bronchoscopic sampling. Tranexamic acid (TEA) was injected through a 22-gauge Wang cytology needle into the lesion in nominal doses of 250–500 mg. After 2–3 minutes, multiple forceps biopsy specimens were obtained from the lesion. Of the 57 consecutive patients included in the study, 20 patients (35.1%) underwent bronchoscopic IIT. The first attempt in 18 patients was endobronchial forceps biopsy (EBB), and because of a high risk of bleeding, the first attempt for the remaining two patients, who were on continuous dual antiplatelet therapy (aspirin and clopidogrel), employed endobronchial needle aspiration (EBNA) as a precautionary measure. Following IIT, subsequent specimens were obtained using EBB in all patients. Multiple forceps biopsy specimens (3–10) were obtained from the lesions (8 necrotic and 12 hypervascular) without incurring active bleeding. The following histopathologic diagnoses were made: squamous cell carcinoma (n = 14), adenocarcinoma (n = 2), small-cell lung cancer (n = 3), and malignant mesenchymal tumor (n = 1). No side effects of TEA were observed. Bronchoscopic IIT is a useful and safe technique for controlling significant bleeding from a forceps biopsy procedure and can be considered as a pre

  12. Biocompatible polymer microneedle for topical/dermal delivery of tranexamic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Machekposhti, S; Soltani, M; Najafizadeh, P; Ebrahimi, S A; Chen, P

    2017-09-10

    Recently-introduced biocompatible polymeric microneedles offer an efficient method for drug delivery. Tranexamic acid is a novel drug for treating melasma that is administered both locally and orally and inhibits excessive melanin via melanocyte. The tranexamic acid biocompatible polymer microneedle used in this study was fabricated from PVP and methacrylic acid, using the lithography method. The required mechanical strength to pierce skin was attained by optimizing the ratio of PVP to methacrylic acid. Acute dermal toxicity was done, and drug diffusion in skin layers was simulated by calculating the diffusion coefficient of tranexamic acid in interstitial fluid (plasma). The biocompatible polymer microneedle was fabricated at 60°C. Needles could sustain 0.6N that is enough to pierce stratum corneum. 34% of the released drug was locally effective and the rest permeated through the skin. The pyramidal polymer microneedle in this study was fully released in skin in approx. 7h. This polymer microneedle has no dermal toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Tranexamic Acid in Total Joint Arthroplasty: Efficacy and Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Rasouli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite improvements in surgical and anesthetic techniques, total joint arthroplasty (TJA is still associated with substantial blood loss and postoperative anemia (1. A considerable portion of patients with postoperative anemia require blood transfusion, which has been shown to negatively affect the outcome of TJA and predisposes patients to development of surgical site infection and periprosthetic joint infection (2,3.   Various blood conservation strategies have been developed to reduce the need for allogeneic blood transfusion in patients undergoing TJA (3. Administration of tranexamic acid (TA is one of the most effective (4. TA is a synthetic lysine derivative drug that binds to plasminogen and prevents the interaction of plasminogen and fibrin, eventually leading to dissolution of fibrin clots (5.   There is level I evidence supporting the need for allogeneic transfusion in primary total hip and total knee arthroplasties, and the efficacy of TA in particular for reducing blood loss (6,7. TA is also effective in reducing the need for blood transfusion in bilateral TJA and revision surgeries (4. Moreover, when TA is used, other blood conservation strategies are rendered unnecessary (4.   The drug can be used intravenously in a weight-based manner (10-20 mg/kg, or administered 1gm intravenously at the start of surgery and 1gm intravenously at the end of surgery, or up to 3 hours after the first dose. TA can also be applied topically to the surgical site to provide hemostasis, or it can be injected intra-articularly (1g in 50 cc saline. Although oral administration of TA (25 mg/kg, maximum 2g, two hours preoperatively has also been reported to be effective, it is not routinely used in TJA patients and intravenous and topical methods are preferred (4.   Despite the proven efficacy of the use of TA in TJA, there are still some concerns about the development of venous thromboembolism (VTE after TA is used. Since VTE following TJA is

  14. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Tranexamic Acid on the Surgical Field in Primary Cleft Palate Surgery on Children-A Prospective, Randomized Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durga, Padmaja; Raavula, Parvathi; Gurajala, Indira; Gunnam, Poojita; Veerabathula, Prardhana; Reddy, Mukund; Upputuri, Omkar; Ramachandran, Gopinath

    2015-09-01

    To assess the effect of tranexamic acid on the quality of the surgical field. Prospective, randomized, double-blind study. Institutional, tertiary referral hospital. American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status class I patients, aged 8 to 60 months with Group II or III (Balakrishnan's classification) clefts scheduled for cleft palate repair. Children were randomized into two groups. The control group received saline, and the tranexamic acid group received tranexamic acid 10 mg/kg as a bolus, 15 minutes before incision. Grade of surgical field on a 10-point scale, surgeon satisfaction, and primary hemorrhage. Significant improvements were noted in surgeon satisfaction and median grade of assessment of the surgical field (4 [interquartile range, 4 to 6] in the control group vs. 3 [interquartile range, 2 to 4] in the test group; P = .003) in the tranexamic acid group compared to the control group. Preincision administration of 10 mg/kg of tranexamic acid significantly improved the surgical field during cleft palate repair.

  15. Synthesis, spectroscopy and antimicrobial activity of vanadium(III) and vanadium(IV) complexes involving Schiff bases derived from tranexamic acid and X-ray structure of Zwitter ion of tranexamic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahzadi, S.; Ali, S.; Badshah, A.; Parvez, M.; Ahmed, E.; Malik, A.

    2007-01-01

    The synthesis of six new vanadium complexes of Schiff base derived from Tranexamic acid is reported. All the complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, infrared, electronic spectra, and mass spectrometry. FTIR data reveals that the Schiff base acts as a bidentate and the complexes exhibit the hexa-coordinated geometry in solid state. These complexes were screened for their biological activity against various bacterial and fungal strains. All the ligands show higher activity after complexation. The crystal structure of the Zwitter ion of the Tranexamic acid has been determined by X-ray single crystal diffraction [ru

  16. [Tranexamic acid as first-line emergency treatment for episodes of bradykinin-mediated angioedema induced by ACE inhibitors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchêne, C; Martins-Héricher, J; Denis, D; Martin, L; Maillard, H

    2018-05-04

    Episodes of acquired bradykinin-mediated angioedema due to angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors may result in fatal outcomes. There is no consensus regarding emergency pharmacological management of these episodes. Treatment options include icatibant and C1INH concentrate. Tranexamic acid is administered for moderate episodes. Its efficacy in the treatment of ACE inhibitor-induced episodes of angioedema is not established. The aim of this retrospective study is to assess the benefits of emergency tranexamic acid administration in the management of ACE inhibitor-induced episodes of angioedema. Retrospective analysis of the medical files of patients who consulted between 2010 and 2016 in two French tertiary care hospitals for a bradykinic angioedema attributed to an ACE treatment. All of them had received tranexamic acid as a first line treatment. Thirty three patients who had experienced severe episode of angioedema were included. Twenty seven patients showed significant improvement when treated with tranexamic acid alone. The six remaining patients were treated with icatibant (5/33) or C1INH concentrate (1/33), due to partial improvement after tranexamic acid therapy. None of the patients were intubated, no fatalities were recorded and no side effects were reported. Tranexamic acid is an easily accessible and affordable therapy that may provide effective treatment for ACE inhibitor-induced episodes of angioedema. It may help while waiting for a more specific treatment (icatibant and C1INH concentrate) that is at times unavailable in emergency departments. Copyright © 2018 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of tranexamic acid on blood coagulation in total hip replacement arthroplasty: rotational thromboelastographic (ROTEM®) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, H S; Shin, H J; Lee, Y J; Kim, J H; Koo, K H; Do, S H

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated changes in rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM(®) ) parameters and clinical outcomes in patients undergoing total hip replacement arthroplasty, with concomitant infusions of tranexamic acid and of 6% hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4. Fifty-five patients were randomly assigned to either the tranexamic acid (n = 29) or the control (n = 26) group. Hydroxyethyl starch was administered in the range of 10-15 ml.kg(-1) during the operation in both groups. In the control group, the clot formation time and maximum clot firmness of APTEM showed significant differences when compared with those of EXTEM at one hour postoperatively, suggestive of fibrinolysis. In the tranexamic acid group, there was no significant difference between each postoperative EXTEM and APTEM parameter. In the tranexamic acid and control group, postoperative blood loss was 308 ml (210-420 [106-745]) and 488 ml (375-620 [170-910], p = 0.002), respectively, and total blood loss was 1168 ml (922-1470 [663-2107]) and 1563 ml (1276-1708 [887-1494], p = 0.003). Haemoglobin concentration was higher in the tranexamic acid group on the second postoperative day (10.5 (9.4-12.1 [7.9-14.0]) vs. 9.6 (8.9-10.5[7.3-16.0]) g.dl(-1) , p = 0.027). In patients undergoing total hip replacement arthroplasty, postoperative fibrinolysis aggravated by hydroxyethyl starch was attenuated by co-administration of 10 mg.kg(-1) tranexamic acid, which may have led to less postoperative blood loss. © 2015 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  18. Comparison of Two Methods of Bolus and Infusion of Tranexamic Acid in Reduction of Blood Loss in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadreza Moshari; Bahman Malek; Mohammadreza Minator-Sajjadi; Maryam Vosoghian; Mastaneh Dahi; Mahshid Ghasemi; Razieh Shekari

    2018-01-01

    AbstractBackground: So far, many studies have been performed to determine the optimal dose and regimen of tranexamic acid to reduce preoperative and postoperative blood loss in primary total knee arthroplasty. In the present study, two different methods of administration (bolus and infusion), were compared.Materials and Methods: Forty patients were randomized in the two groups (A and B) of 20 patients each. All patients received 500 mg tranexamic acid before inflation of tourniquet. Group A (...

  19. The efficacy and safety of topical administration of tranexamic acid in spine surgery: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Sun, Ru-Xin; Jiang, Han; Ma, Xin-Long

    2018-04-24

    We conducted a meta-analysis from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs to assess the efficacy and safety of tranexamic acid (TXA) in spine surgery. Potentially relevant academic articles were identified from the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (1966-2017.11), PubMed (1966-2017.11), Embase (1980-2017.11), and ScienceDirect (1985-2017.11). Secondary sources were identified from the references of the included literature. The pooled data were analyzed using RevMan 5.1. Three RCTs and one non-RCT met the inclusion criteria. There were significant differences in total blood loss (MD = - 267.53, 95% CI - 373.04 to - 106.02, P < 0.00001), drainage volume (MD = - 157.00, 95% CI - 191.17 to - 122.84, P < 0.00001), postoperative hemoglobin level (MD = 0.95, 95% CI 0.44 to 1.47, P = 0.0003), and length of hospital stay (MD = - 1.42, 95% CI - 1.92 to - 0.93, P < 0.00001). No significant differences were found regarding transfusion requirement, deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), wound hematoma, and infection between the two groups. The present meta-analysis indicated that the topical application of TXA in spinal surgery decreases the total blood loss and drainage volume and preserves higher postoperative hemoglobin level without increasing the risk of DVT infection, hematoma, DVT, and PE.

  20. Comparison of Therapeutic Efficacies of Norethisterone, Tranexamic Acid and Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine System for the Treatment of Heavy Menstrual Bleeding: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiseli, Mine; Kayikcioglu, Fulya; Evliyaoglu, Ozlem; Haberal, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to compare the therapeutic efficacies of norethisterone acid (NETA), tranexamic acid and levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) in treating idiopathic heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB). Women with heavy uterine bleeding were randomized to receive NETA, tranexamic acid or LNG-IUS for 6 months. The primary outcome was a decrease in menstrual bleeding as assessed by pictorial blood loss assessment charts and hematological parameters analyzed at the 1st, 3rd and 6th months. Health-related quality of life (QOL) variables were also recorded and analyzed. Twenty-eight patients were enrolled in each treatment group, but the results of only 62 were evaluated. NETA, tranexamic acid, and LNG-IUS reduced menstrual blood loss (MBL) by 53.1, 60.8, and 85.8%, respectively, at the 6th month. LNG-IUS was more effective than NETA and tranexamic acid in decreasing MBL. LNG-IUS was also more efficient than tranexamic acid in correcting anemia related to menorrhagia. Satisfaction rates were comparable among the NETA (70%), tranexamic acid (63%) and LNG-IUS (77%) groups. QOL in physical aspects increased significantly in the tranexamic acid and LNG-IUS groups. The positive effect of LNG-IUS on QOL parameters, as well as its high efficacy, makes it a first-line option for HMB. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Combination Intravenous and Intra-Articular Tranexamic acid compared with Intravenous Only Administration and No Therapy in Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Case Series Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Buntting

    2016-07-01

    This study supports the existing literature and suggests that the use of IV Tranexamic acid alone or in combination with intra-articular dose in TKA may reduce the requirement for transfusion (Level IV evidence. Furthermore, this study suggests that the use of tranexamic acid as a combination of Intravenous and intra-articular administration has no effect on range of motion, or medical complications during hospital stay. Although it was not a statistically significant finding, our study suggested a trend towards a greater reduction in haemoglobin and haematocrit fall in the combination therapy group when compared to IV Tranexamic acid alone

  2. Efficacy of tranexamic acid in reducing allogeneic blood products in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Wen-yuan; Ye, Fang; Yang, Jun-lin

    2016-04-27

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) surgery usually require prolonged operative times with extensive soft tissue dissection and significant perioperative blood loss, and allogeneic blood products are frequently needed. Methods to reduce the requirement for transfusion would have a beneficial effect on these patients. Although many previous studies have revealed the efficacy of tranexamic acid (TXA) in spinal surgery, there is still a lack of agreement concerning the reduction of both blood loss and transfusion requirements of large dose tranexamic acid (TXA) in surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). The objective of this study was to elevate the efficacy and safety of a large dose tranexamic acid (TXA) in reducing transfusion requirements of allogeneic blood products in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) surgery using a retrospective study designed with historical control group. One hundred thirty seven consecutive AIS patients who underwent surgery treatment with posterior spinal pedicle systems from August 2011 to March 2015 in our scoliosis center were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into two groups, the TXA group and the historical recruited no TXA group (NTXA). Preoperative demographics, radiographic parameters, operative parameters, estimated blood loss (EBL), total irrigation fluid, number of patients requiring blood transfusion, mean drop of Hb (Pre-op Hb-Post-op Hb), haematocrit pre and post-surgery, mean volume of blood transfusion, hospitalization time, and adverse effect were recorded and compared. All the patients were successfully treated with satisfied clinical and radiographic outcomes. There were 71 patients in the TXA group and 66 patients in the NTXA group. The preoperative demographics were homogeneity between two groups (P > 0.05). There were no significant difference in average operative time between two groups (209 min vs 215 min, p >0.05). Number of patients in the TXA group showed a significant decrease in

  3. Intravenous versus topical tranexamic acid in primary total hip replacement: A systemic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiang; Dong, Qiang; Zhang, Yin-Guang

    2016-08-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is associated with substantial blood loss. Tranexamic acid (TXA) could reduce perioperative blood loss. The optimal administration routine of TXA remains controversial. The objective of the present systemic review and meta-analysis was to compare the effectiveness and safety of various application methods of tranexamic acid in primary THA. Potential relevant literature was identified from electronic databases including Medline, PubMed, Embase, ScienceDirect, web of science and Cochrane Library. Grey academic studies were also identified from the references of the included literature. There was no language restriction. The pooling of data was carried out by using RevMan 5.1. Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and two non-RCTs involving 1614 patients met the inclusion criteria. Current meta-analysis indicated that there were no significant differences in terms of total blood loss (MD = -30.04, 95% CI: -114.67 to 54.59, P = 0.49), postoperative hemoglobin level (MD = -0.29, 95% CI: -0.68 to 0.10, P = 0.14), transfusion rate (RD = -0.02, 95% CI: -0.5 to -0.00, P = 0.09), length of stay ((MD = -0.14, 95% CI: -0.30 to 0.01, P = 0.07) or operation time ((MD = 1.00, 95% CI: -0.31 to 2.31, P = 0.14) between treatment groups. No significant differences were found regarding the incidence of adverse effects such as wound infection (RD = -0.01, 95% CI: -0.06 to 0.04, P = 0.66), myocardial infarction (MI) (RD = -0.01, 95% CI: -0.04 to 0.02, P = 0.61), deep venous thrombosis (DVT) (RD = 0.00, 95% CI: -0.01 to 0.01, P = 0.51) or pulmonary embolism (PE) (RD = RD = 0.00, 95% CI: -0.01 to 0.01, P = 0.63) between groups. The topical administration of TXA in THA carried similar hemostasis effects compared with intravenous use without an increased risk of thrombotic complications. No other adverse effect was identified. Topical TXA application was a simple, safe, effective and cost-effective adjunct for

  4. Fibrinolytic Inhibitors in Off-pump Coronary Surgery: A Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind TAP Study (Tranexamic Acid, Aprotinin, Placebo)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaněk, T.; Jareš, M.; Fajt, R.; Straka, Z.; Jirásek, K.; Kolesár, M.; Brůček, P.; Malý, Marek

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 4 (2005), s. 563-568 ISSN 1010-7940 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : tranexamic acid * protinin * off-pump coronary artery bypass * hemostasis Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 1.802, year: 2005

  5. Tranexamic acid, an inhibitor of plasminogen activation, reduces urinary collagen cross-link excretion in both experimental and rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronday, H.K.; TeKoppele, J.M.; Greenwald, R.A.; Moak, S.A.; Roos, J.A.D.M. de; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; Breedveld, F.C.; Verheijen, J.H.

    1998-01-01

    The plasminogen activation system is one of the enzyme systems held responsible for bone and cartilage degradation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study, we evaluated the effect of tranexamic acid (TEA), an inhibitor of plasminogen activation, on urinary collagen cross-link excretion and

  6. Tranexamic acid combined with recombinant factor VIII increases clot resistance to accelerated fibrinolysis in severe hemophilia A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Anne-Mette; Sørensen, Hanne Thykjær; Norengaard, Lisbeth

    2007-01-01

    examined whether the clot stability in hemophiliacs could be improved by treatment with tranexamic acid (TXA) in combination with recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII). PATIENTS/METHODS: Baseline blood samples were obtained from eight males with severe hemophilia A. Thereafter, a bolus injection of r...

  7. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect of prophylactic tranexamic acid treatment in major benign uterine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topsoee, Märta F; Settnes, Annette; Ottesen, Bent

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The value of tranexamic acid (TA) treatment as bleeding prophylaxis in major uterine surgery is unclear. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the antihemorrhagic effect of prophylactic TA treatment in major benign uterine surgery. SEARCH STRATEGY: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science...

  8. Pregabalin and Tranexamic Acid Evaluation by Two Simple and Sensitive Spectrophotometric Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawab Sher

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates colorimetric visible spectrophotometric quantification methods for amino acid, namely, tranexamic acid and pregabalin. Both drugs contain the amino group, and when they are reacted with 2,4-dinitrophenol and 2,4,6-trinitrophenol, they give rise to yellow colored complexes showing absorption maximum at 418 nm and 425 nm, respectively, based on the Lewis acid base reaction. Detailed optimization process and stoichiometric studies were conducted along with investigation of thermodynamic features, that is, association constant and standard free energy changes. The method was linear over the concentration range of 0.02–200 µgmL−1 with correlation coefficient of more than 0.9990 in all of the cases. Limit of detection was in range from 0.0041 to 0.0094 µgmL−1 and limit of quantification was in the range from 0.0137 to 0.0302 µgmL−1. Excellent recovery in Placebo spiked samples indicated that there is no interference from common excipients. The analytical methods under proposal were successfully applied to determine tranexamic acid and pregabalin in commercial products. t-test and F ratio were evaluated without noticeable difference between the proposed and reference methods.

  9. Tranexamic acid increases early perioperative functional outcomes after total knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Grosso, MD

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of tranexamic acid (TXA on functional outcomes in the immediate postoperative period after total knee arthroplasty (TKA. We hypothesized that the known benefits of TXA would confer measurable clinical improvements in physical therapy (PT performance, decrease pain, and decrease hospital length of stay (LOS. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 560 TKA patients, including 280 consecutive patients whose surgery was performed before the initiation of a standardized TXA protocol and the first 280 patients who received TXA after protocol initiation. Outcome measurements included postoperative changes in hemoglobin and hematocrit, LOS, pain scores, destination of discharge, and steps ambulated with PT over 5 sessions. Results: TXA administration resulted in less overall drops in hemoglobin (P < .001 and hematocrit levels (P < .001. Moreover, patients administered TXA ambulated more than their counterparts during every PT session, which was statistically significant during the second (P = .010, third (P = .011, and fourth (P = .024 sessions. On average, the TXA cohort ambulated 20% more per PT session than patients who did not receive TXA (P < .001. TXA administration did not influence pain levels during PT, hospital LOS, or discharge destination in this investigation. Conclusions: It is well known that TXA reduces postoperative anemia, but this study also demonstrates that it confers early perioperative functional benefits for TKA patients. Potential mechanisms for this benefit include reduced rates of postoperative anemia and reduced rates of hemarthroses. Keywords: Tranexamic acid, Total knee arthroplasty, Blood loss, Physical therapy

  10. USE OF TRANEXAMIC ACID IN TRAUMA PATIENTS: AN ANALYSIS OF COST-EFFECTIVENESS FOR USE IN BRAZIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Marcelo A; Silva, Jair G da; Chedid, Aljamir D; Chedid, Marcio F

    2016-01-01

    Use of tranexamic acid (TXA) in trauma has been the subject of growing interest by researchers and health professionals. However, there are still several open questions regarding its use. In some aspects medical literature is controversial. The points of disagreement among experts include questions such as: Which patients should receive TXA in trauma? Should treatment be performed in the pre-hospital environment? Is there any need for laboratory parameters before starting TXA treatment? What is the drug safety profile? The main issue on which there is still no basis in literature is: What is the indication for treatment within massive transfusion protocols? Answer the questions proposed based on critical evaluation of the evidence gathered so far and carry out a study of cost-effectiveness of TXA use in trauma adapted to the Brazilian reality. A literature review was performed through searching Pubmed.com, Embase and Cab Abstract by headings "tranexamic AND trauma", in all languages, yielding 426 articles. Manuscripts reporting on TXA utilization for elective procedures were excluded, remaining 79 articles. Fifty-five articles were selected, and critically evaluated in order to answer study questions. The evaluation of cost effectiveness was performed using CRASH-2 trial data and Brazilian official population data. TXA is effective and efficient, and should be administered to a wide range of patients, including those with indication evaluated in research protocols and current indication criteria for TXA should be expanded. As for the cost-effectiveness, the TXA proved to be cost-effective with an average cost of R$ 61.35 (currently US$16) per year of life saved. The use of TXA in trauma setting seems to be effective, efficient and cost-effective in the various groups of polytrauma patients. Its use in massive transfusion protocols should be the subject of further investigations. O uso do ácido tranexâmico (TXA) no trauma tem sido alvo de interesse crescente por

  11. Tranexamic acid use and postoperative outcomes in patients undergoing total hip or knee arthroplasty in the United States: retrospective analysis of effectiveness and safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeran, Jashvant; Rasul, Rehana; Suzuki, Suzuko; Danninger, Thomas; Mazumdar, Madhu; Opperer, Mathias; Boettner, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the effectiveness and safety of perioperative tranexamic acid use in patients undergoing total hip or knee arthroplasty in the United States. Design Retrospective cohort study; multilevel multivariable logistic regression models measured the association between tranexamic acid use in the perioperative period and outcomes. Setting 510 US hospitals from the claims based Premier Perspective database for 2006-12. Participants 872 416 patients who had total hip or knee arthroplasty. Intervention Perioperative intravenous tranexamic acid use by dose categories (none, ≤1000 mg, 2000 mg, and ≥3000 mg). Main outcome measures Allogeneic or autologous transfusion, thromboembolic complications (pulmonary embolism, deep venous thrombosis), acute renal failure, and combined complications (thromboembolic complications, acute renal failure, cerebrovascular events, myocardial infarction, in-hospital mortality). Results While comparable regarding average age and comorbidity index, patients receiving tranexamic acid (versus those who did not) showed lower rates of allogeneic or autologous transfusion (7.7% v 20.1%), thromboembolic complications (0.6% v 0.8%), acute renal failure (1.2% v 1.6%), and combined complications (1.9% v 2.6%); all Ptranexamic acid dose categories (versus no tranexamic acid use) were associated with significantly (PTranexamic acid was effective in reducing the need for blood transfusions while not increasing the risk of complications, including thromboembolic events and renal failure. Thus our data provide incremental evidence of the potential effectiveness and safety of tranexamic acid in patients requiring orthopedic surgery. PMID:25116268

  12. Tranexamic acid suppresses ultraviolet B eye irradiation-induced melanocyte activation by decreasing the levels of prohormone convertase 2 and alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramoto, Keiichi; Yamate, Yurika; Sugiyama, Daijiro; Takahashi, Yumi; Mafune, Eiichi

    2014-12-01

    Tranexamic acid (trans-4-aminomethylcyclohexanecarboxylic acid) is a medicinal amino acid used in skin whitening care. This study examined the effects of tranexamic acid on the melanocyte activation of the skin induced by an ultraviolet (UV) B eye irradiation. The eye or ear was locally exposed to UVB at a dose of 1.0 kJ/m(2) using a 20SE sunlamp after covering the remaining body surface with aluminum foil. UVB eye irradiation induced melanocyte activation of the skin, similar to that observed following UVB ear irradiation, which was suppressed by the administration of tranexamic acid treatment. The plasma α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) content was increased by UVB irradiation of the eye; however, the increase in α-MSH was suppressed by tranexamic acid treatment. In addition, UVB eye irradiation induced the up-regulation of prohormone convertase (PC) 2 in the pituitary gland. Meanwhile, the increase in PC2 induced by UVB eye irradiation was suppressed by tranexamic acid treatment. These results clearly indicate that tranexamic acid decreases the expression of PC2, which cleavages from proopiomelanocortin to α-MSH in the pituitary gland, thereby suppressing melanocyte activation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The effect of different dosage regimens of tranexamic acid on blood loss in bimaxillary osteotomy: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apipan, B; Rummasak, D; Narainthonsaenee, T

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of three dosage regimens of intravenous tranexamic acid and normal saline placebo on blood loss and the requirement for transfusion during bimaxillary osteotomy. A prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was performed. Eighty patients scheduled for elective bimaxillary osteotomy were divided into four groups: a placebo group and three groups receiving a single dose of tranexamic acid 10, 15, or 20mg/kg body weight after the induction of anaesthesia. Demographic data, the anaesthetic time, the operative time, and the experience of the surgical team were similar in the four groups. Patients receiving placebo had increased blood loss compared to those receiving tranexamic acid. No significant difference in blood loss was found among those who received 10, 15, or 20mg/kg body weight of tranexamic acid. There was no significant difference in transfusion requirement, amount of 24-h postoperative vacuum drainage, length of hospital stay, or complications among the four groups. Prophylactic tranexamic acid decreased bleeding during bimaxillary osteotomy. Of the three dosages of tranexamic acid studied, the most efficacious and cost-effective dose to reduce bleeding was 10mg/kg body weight. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Tranexamic acid versus aminocaproic acid for blood management after total knee and total hip arthroplasty: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiuliang; Geng, Peishuo; Shi, Longyan; Wang, Qi; Wang, Pengliang

    2018-06-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of tranexamic acid and aminocaproic acid for reducing blood loss and transfusion requirements after total knee and total hip arthroplasty. We conduct electronic searches of Medline (1966-2017.11), PubMed (1966-2017.11), Embase (1980-2017.11), ScienceDirect (1985-2017.11) and the Cochrane Library (1900-2017.11). The primary outcomes, including total blood loss, hemoglobin decline and transfusion requirements. Secondary outcomes include length of hospital stay and postoperative complications such as the incidence of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Each outcome is combined and calculated using the statistical software STATA 12.0. Fixed/random effect model is adopted based on the heterogeneity tested by I 2 statistic. A total of 1714 patients are analyzed across three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and one non-RCT. The present meta-analysis reveals that TXA is associated with a significantly reduction of total blood loss and postoperative hemoglobin drop compared with EACA. No significant differences are identified in terms of transfusion rates, length of hospital stay, and the incidence of postoperative complications. Although total blood loss and postoperative hemoglobin drop are significant greater in EACA groups, there is no significant difference between TXA and EACA groups in terms of transfusion rates. Based on the current evidence available, higher quality RCTs are still required for further research. Copyright © 2018 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison between intravenous boluses versus infusion of tranexamic acid (TXA) to reduce bleeding in paediatric cyanotic congenital heart disease (CHD) surgeries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junejo, F.; Irfan, M.; Akhtar, M.I.; Hamid, M.; Ahmed, S.S.

    2018-01-01

    To compare the intravenous boluses and intravenous continuous infusion of tranexamic acid (TXA) to reduce postoperative bleeding in cyanotic congenital heart disease surgeries. Study Design:Single-blinded randomised clinical trial. Place and Duration of Study:Anaesthesia Department, The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from July 2016 to April 2017. Methodology:Sixty patients of cyanotic congenital heart disease, undergoing either palliative or corrective surgery involving cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), were recruited. These 60 patients were divided randomly into two groups. The infusion group received intravenous infusion of TXA at 5 mg/kg/hour while the bolus group received three intravenous boluses of 10 mg/kg after induction, after going to bypass and after protamine reversal. Data was collected through predesigned proforma. There were two primary outcomes: postoperative bleeding in the first 24 hours, and chest closure time. Results:Postoperative bleeding was 13.94 (10.27-20.18) ml/kg in the first 24 hours in infusion group and 15.05 (9.04-23.50) ml/kg in the bolus group. Chest closure time was 38.5 (25-45) in infusion group and 30 (20-46.25) minutes in the bolus group. There was no statistically significant and clinical difference between both groups regarding postoperative bleeding in the first 24 hours and chest closure time. Conclusion:These infusion and bolus groups had comparable postoperative bleeding and chest closure time. (author)

  16. Study of Tranexamic Acid During Air Medical Prehospital Transport (STAAMP) Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion 5 6. Publications, Abstracts, and Presentations 6 7. Inventions, Patents and Licenses 6 8. Reportable Outcomes 6 9. Other Achievements 6 10...Nothing to report 7. INVENTIONS, PATENTS AND LICENSES: List all inventions made and patents and licenses applied for and/or issued. Each entry...shall include the inventor(s), invention title, patent application number, filing date, patent number if issued, patent issued date, national, or

  17. Ultra-early tranexamic acid after subarachnoid hemorrhage (ULTRA): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Germans, Menno R.; Post, René; Coert, Bert A.; Rinkel, Gabriël J. E.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Verbaan, Dagmar

    2013-01-01

    A frequent complication in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is recurrent bleeding from the aneurysm. The risk is highest within the first 6 hours after the initial hemorrhage. Securing the aneurysm within this timeframe is difficult owing to logistical delays. The rate of recurrent

  18. DOES INTRAVENOUS TRANEXAMIC ACID REDUCE BLOOD LOSS DURING SURGICALLY ASSISTED RAPID PALATAL EXPANSION?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine AKBAŞ

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of tranexamic acid (TXA in reducing blood loss during surgically assisted rapid palatal expansion (SARPE procedure. Subjects and Methods: A total of 34 patients (12 male, 22 female who had been treated surgically under general anesthesia with SARPE including pterygoid disjunction for transverse maxillary deficiency (TMD were included in this study. The study group (n=17 received intravenous (IV TXA 10 mg/kg as a preoperative bolus; the control group (n=17 received normal saline solution. Preoperative and postoperative haemoglobin and haematocrit values, intraoperative blood loss, and any blood product transfusion were recorded. Results: Blood loss during SARPE was statistically significantly less in the study group than the control group (p=0.0001. Conclusion: Preoperative IV administration of TXA can effectively control blood loss during when SARPE with pterygoid disjunction is performed.

  19. Postpartum hemorrhage in a Jehovah's Witness patient controlled with Tisseel, tranexamic acid, and recombinant factor VIIa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab, Tarek Samir; Al-Wazzan, Ahmad Bakr; Maslow, Ken

    2010-10-01

    The management of a patient refusing blood transfusion who subsequently experiences a severe postpartum hemorrhage is a particular clinical challenge. A 30-year-old nulliparous patient (who was a Jehovah's Witness) had labour induced for post-dates at 41+4 weeks' gestational age after an uncomplicated pregnancy. She delivered by Caesarean section for dystocia and suspected chorioamnionitis, and subsequently developed postpartum hemorrhage that required management with oxytocin, ergometrine, carboprost, uterine artery ligation, and Hayman compression sutures. The patient ultimately required two additional visits to the operating room, culminating in hysterectomy. Use of tranexamic acid, recombinant factor VIIa, and Tisseel was instrumental in halting the ongoing hemorrhage. Optimal management of a patient refusing administration of blood products requires a multidisciplinary approach as well as a combination of traditional and novel therapies.

  20. Comparative study of topical vs. intravenous tranexamic acid regarding blood loss in total knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Zekcer

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To compare topical vs. intravenous tranexamic acid (TA in total knee arthroplasty regarding blood loss and transfusion., Methods: Ninety patients were randomized to receive TA intravenously (20 mg/kg in 100 mL of saline; group IV, topically (1.5 g in 50 mL of saline, sprayed over the operated site, before release of the tourniquet; topical group, or intravenous saline (100 mL with anesthesia; control group. The volume of drained blood in 48, h, the amount of transfused blood, and the serum levels of hemoglobin and hematocrit before and after surgery were evaluated., Results: The groups were similar for gender, age, weight, laterality, and preoperative hemoglobin and hematocrit levels (p> 0.2. The hemoglobin level dropped in all groups when comparing the preoperative and the 48-h evaluations: the control group decreased 3.8 mg/dL on average, while the IV, group had a decrease of 3.0, and the topical group, of 3.2 (p= 0.019. The difference between the control and IV, groups was confirmed by Bonferroni test (p= 0.020. The difference between the control group and the topical group was not significant (p= 0.130, although there was less reduction in hemoglobin in the topical group; the comparison between the IV, group and the topical group was also not significant (p= 1.000. Conclusion: Using topic and IV, tranexamic acid decreased blood loss and the need for transfusion in total knee arthroplasty. Topical application showed results similar to IV use regarding the need for blood transfusion, but without the possible side effects of IV, administration.

  1. Stability of tranexamic acid in 0.9% sodium chloride, stored in type 1 glass vials and ethylene/propylene copolymer plastic containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluskey, Susan V; Sztajnkrycer, Matthew D; Jenkins, Donald A; Zietlow, Scott P; Berns, Kathleen S; Park, Myung S

    2014-01-01

    Tranexamic acid has recently been demonstrated to decrease all-cause mortality and deaths due to hemorrhage in trauma patients. The optimal administration of tranexamic acid is within one hour of injury, but not more than three hours from the time of injury. To aid with timely administration, a premixed solution of 1 gram tranexamic acid and 0.9% sodium chloride was proposed to be stocked as a medication in both the aeromedical transport helicopters and Emergency Department at Mayo Clinic Hospital--Rochester Saint Marys Campus. Since no published stability data exists for tranexamic acid diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride, this study was undertaken to determine the stability of tranexamic acid diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride while being stored in two types of containers. Stability was determined through the use of a stability-indicating high-performance liquid reverse phase chromatography assay, pH, and visual tests. Tranexamic acid solutions of 1 gram in 0.9% sodium chloride 65 mL were studied at predetermined intervals for 90 days in ethylene/propylene copolymer plastic containers, protected from light, and at both controlled room and refrigerated temperatures. Tranexamic acid solutions of 1 gram in 0.9% sodium chloride 50 mL were studied at predetermined intervals for 180 days in clear Type 1 borosilicate glass vials sealed with intact elastomeric, Flourotec-coated stoppers, stored protected from light at controlled room temperature. Solutions stored in the ethylene/propylene copolymer plastic containers at both storage temperatures maintained at least 98% of initial potency throughout the 90-day study period. Solutions stored in glass vials at controlled room temperature maintained at least 92% of initial potency throughout the 180-day study period. Visual and pH tests revealed stable, clear, colorless, and particulate-free solutions throughout the respective study periods.

  2. The effectiveness of low-dose and high-dose tranexamic acid in posterior lumbar interbody fusion: a double-blinded, placebo-controlled randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Tack; Kim, Cheung-Kue; Kim, Yong-Chan; Juh, Hyung-Suk; Kim, Hyo-Jong; Kim, Hyeon-Soo; Hong, Se Jung; Hey, Hwee Weng Dennis

    2017-11-01

    Tranexamic acid is a proven drug used for reduction of intraoperative blood loss in spinal surgery. However, optimal dosing considering risk/benefits is not well established owing to the heterogeneity in patient selection and surgical procedures of previous studies. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of various tranexamic acid regimens in reducing perioperative blood loss in single-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Patients were randomly grouped into three different interventions: low-dose tranexamic acid (LD), high-dose tranexamic acid (HD), and placebo-controlled (PC) groups. The HD and LD groups received 10 and 5 mg/kg of bolus loading dose and 2 and 1 mg/kg of continuous infusion until 5 h after surgery, respectively. Data on patient demographics and preoperative and 24-h postoperative laboratory values were collected. Outcome parameters include intraoperative blood loss, 24-h postoperative blood loss, and blood loss during removal of the last drain. Seventy-two patients (mean age 63.3 ± 7.6 years) showed similar baseline characteristics. Intraoperatively, blood loss was reduced by the administration of tranexamic acid (P = 0.04), contributed predominantly by a difference between the LD and HD groups (123 mL; P tranexamic acid use were noted. Tranexamic acid administration for single-level PLIF was effective and safe in reducing perioperative blood loss in a dose-dependent manner. An HD regimen comprising 10 mg/kg of bolus loading dose and 2 mg/kg/h of continuous infusion is recommended. Level 1 study according to Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine 2011 Levels of Evidence.

  3. The effect of tranexamic acid on blood loss and maternal outcome in the treatment of persistent postpartum hemorrhage: A nationwide retrospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada Gillissen

    Full Text Available Recent results show a protective effect of tranexamic acid on death due to bleeding in patients with postpartum hemorrhage in low- and middle-resource countries. We quantify the association between early administration of tranexamic acid compared to late or no administration and severe acute maternal morbidity and blood loss among women suffering from persistent severe postpartum hemorrhage in a high-income country.We performed a nationwide retrospective cohort study in 61 hospitals in the Netherlands. The study population consisted of 1260 women with persistent postpartum hemorrhage who had received at least four units of red cells, or fresh frozen plasma or platelets in addition to red cells. A review of medical records was performed and cross-referenced with blood bank data. The composite endpoint comprised maternal morbidity (hysterectomy, ligation of the uterine arteries, emergency B-Lynch suture, arterial embolization or admission into an intensive care unit and mortality.247 women received early tranexamic acid treatment. After adjustment for confounding, odds ratio for the composite endpoint for early tranexamic acid (n = 247 versus no/late tranexamic acid (n = 984 was 0.92 (95% confidence interval (CI 0.66 to 1.27. Propensity matched analysis confirmed the absence of a difference between women with and without tranexamic acid. Blood loss after administration of first line therapy did not differ significantly between the two groups (adjusted difference -177 mL, CI -509.4 to +155.0.Our findings suggest that in a high-resource country the effect of tranexamic acid on both blood loss and the combined endpoint of maternal mortality and morbidity may be disappointing.

  4. The effect of tranexamic acid on blood loss and maternal outcome in the treatment of persistent postpartum hemorrhage: A nationwide retrospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriquez, Dacia D. C. A.; van den Akker, Thomas; Wind, Merlijn; Zwart, Joost J.; van Roosmalen, Jos; Eikenboom, Jeroen; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W. M.; van der Bom, Johanna G.

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent results show a protective effect of tranexamic acid on death due to bleeding in patients with postpartum hemorrhage in low- and middle-resource countries. We quantify the association between early administration of tranexamic acid compared to late or no administration and severe acute maternal morbidity and blood loss among women suffering from persistent severe postpartum hemorrhage in a high-income country. Methods and findings We performed a nationwide retrospective cohort study in 61 hospitals in the Netherlands. The study population consisted of 1260 women with persistent postpartum hemorrhage who had received at least four units of red cells, or fresh frozen plasma or platelets in addition to red cells. A review of medical records was performed and cross-referenced with blood bank data. The composite endpoint comprised maternal morbidity (hysterectomy, ligation of the uterine arteries, emergency B-Lynch suture, arterial embolization or admission into an intensive care unit) and mortality. Results 247 women received early tranexamic acid treatment. After adjustment for confounding, odds ratio for the composite endpoint for early tranexamic acid (n = 247) versus no/late tranexamic acid (n = 984) was 0.92 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.66 to 1.27). Propensity matched analysis confirmed the absence of a difference between women with and without tranexamic acid. Blood loss after administration of first line therapy did not differ significantly between the two groups (adjusted difference -177 mL, CI -509.4 to +155.0). Conclusions Our findings suggest that in a high-resource country the effect of tranexamic acid on both blood loss and the combined endpoint of maternal mortality and morbidity may be disappointing. PMID:29107951

  5. Effectiveness of tranexamic acid for decreasing bleeding in prostate surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Sergio Hernando; Garcia-Perdomo, Herney Andres

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of tranexamic acid in decreasing bleeding in patients undergoing prostate surgery. All clinical experiments were included without language restrictions. The inclusion criteria were as follows: men over 18 years of age who underwent prostate surgery (transurethral, prostate adenectomy, and radical prostatectomy) and received tranexamic acid prior to prostate surgery as a preventive measure for perioperative hemorrhage. Prophylactic tranexamic acid vs. no intervention or placebo were compared. The primary outcomes were as follows: 1) intraoperative blood loss and 2) the need for red blood cell transfusion. A systematic search was performed in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL and LILACS. Other sources were used to discover published and unpublished literature sources. The statistical analysis was performed in Review Manager v.5.3. Four studies were included with a total of 436 patients. Three of the four studies had small sample sizes. There was a low risk of attrition bias and reporting bias. Unclear risk of selection bias, performance bias, or detection bias was presented. A mean difference (MD) of -174.49 [95% CI (-248.43 to -100.56)] was found for perioperative blood loss (the primary outcome). At the end of the procedure, the hemoglobin concentration had a MD of -1.19 [95% CI (-4.37 to 1.99)]. Tranexamic acid is effective at preventing perioperative blood loss compared with the placebo in patients undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). However, this treatment was not effective neither at preventing the need for transfusions nor at increasing hemoglobin values at the end of the procedure.

  6. Comparison of Two Methods of Bolus and Infusion of Tranexamic Acid in Reduction of Blood Loss in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Moshari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: So far, many studies have been performed to determine the optimal dose and regimen of tranexamic acid to reduce preoperative and postoperative blood loss in primary total knee arthroplasty. In the present study, two different methods of administration (bolus and infusion, were compared.Materials and Methods: Forty patients were randomized in the two groups (A and B of 20 patients each. All patients received 500 mg tranexamic acid before inflation of tourniquet. Group A (mean age, 64± 6.1 years received 500 mg tranexamic acid 10 minutes before loosening of tourniquet and group B (mean age, 63.5 ± 7.7 years received 500 mg tranexamic acid through IV infusion during 6 hours from the time of tourniquet loosening (total dose of TA, 1 g in both groups. Intraoperative blood loss,postoperative drainage (in 6 and 12 hours, blood transfusion (in 48 hours, and decrease in hematocrit and hemoglobin (6 and 12 hours later, were compared between the two groups.Results: The patients in group B had lower intra- and postoperative blood loss in 6 and 12 hours and also had lower decrease in hemoglobin, and their packed cell transfusion rate was significantly lower compared to the group A.Conclusion: The findings of this study indicated that infusion administration of tranexamic acid in primary total knee arthroplasty, was more effective in the reduction of perioperative blood loss as well as need for blood transfusion in 48 hours.

  7. Tranexamic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... during your monthly period but does not stop menstrual bleeding. Call your doctor if your bleeding does not improve or gets worse during your treatment.Ask your pharmacist or doctor for a copy of the manufacturer's information for the patient.

  8. TRANEXAMIC ACID ACTION ON LIVER REGENERATION AFTER PARTIAL HEPATECTOMY: EXPERIMENTAL MODEL IN RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobral, Felipe Antonio; Daga, Henrique; Rasera, Henrique Nogueira; Pinheiro, Matheus da Rocha; Cella, Igor Furlan; Morais, Igor Henrique; Marques, Luciana de Oliveira; Collaço, Luiz Martins

    2016-01-01

    Different lesions may affect the liver resulting in harmful stimuli. Some therapeutic procedures to treat those injuries depend on liver regeneration to increase functional capacity of this organ. Evaluate the effects of tranexamic acid on liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy in rats. 40 rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus, Rodentia mammalia) of Wistar-UP lineage were randomly divided into two groups named control (CT) and tranexamic acid (ATX), with 20 rats in each. Both groups were subdivided, according to liver regeneration time of 32 h or seven days after the rats had been operated. The organ regeneration was evaluated through weight and histology, stained with HE and PCNA. The average animal weight of ATX and CT 7 days groups before surgery were 411.2 g and 432.7 g, and 371.3 g and 392.9 g after the regeneration time, respectively. The average number of mitotic cells stained with HE for the ATX and CT 7 days groups were 33.7 and 32.6 mitosis, and 14.5 and 14.9 for the ATX and CT 32 h groups, respectively. When stained with proliferating cell nuclear antigen, the numbers of mitotic cells counted were 849.7 for the ATX 7 days, 301.8 for the CT 7 days groups, 814.2 for the ATX 32 hand 848.1 for the CT 32 h groups. Tranexamic acid was effective in liver regeneration, but in longer period after partial hepatectomy. Muitas são as injúrias que acometem o fígado e levam a estímulo lesivo. Alguns procedimentos terapêuticos para tratamento dessas lesões dependem da regeneração hepática para aumentar a sua capacidade funcional. Avaliar o efeito do ácido tranexâmico na regeneração hepática após hepatectomia parcial em ratos. Foram utilizados 40 ratos (Rattus norvegicus albinus, Rodentia mammalia) convencionais da linhagem Wistar-UP. Foram divididos aleatoriamente em dois grupos de 20: grupo controle (CT) e grupo ácido tranexâmico (ATX). Cada um deles foi divido em dois subgrupos para avaliar a regeneração hepática no tempo de 32 h e 7 dias do p

  9. Tranexamic acid reduces blood loss and blood transfusions in primary total hip arthroplasty: a prospective randomized double-blind study in 40 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik; Blønd, Lars; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We performed a prospective, randomized, double-blind study on 40 patients scheduled for primary total hip arthroplasty due to arthrosis or osteonecrosis to determine the effect of tranexamic acid on per- and postoperative blood losses and on the number of blood transfusions needed....... PATIENTS AND METHODS: 40 patients were randomized to tranexamic acid (10 mg/kg given as a bolus intravenous injection, followed by a continuous infusion of 1 mg/kg/hour for 10 hours) or placebo (20 mL saline given intravenously) 15 minutes before the incision. We recorded the peroperative and postoperative...... blood losses at removal of the drain 24 hours after the operation and the number of blood transfusions. RESULTS: Patients receiving tranexamic acid had a mean peroperative blood loss of 480 mL versus 622 mL in patients receiving placebo (p = 0.3), a postoperative blood loss of 334 mL versus 609 mL (p...

  10. Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Fornaro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental Retardation (MR is a developmental disability characterized by impairments in adaptive daily life skills and difficulties in social and interpersonal functioning. Since multiple causes may contribute to MR, associated clinical pictures may vary accordingly. Nevertheless, when psychiatric disorders as Treatment Resistant Depression (TRD and/or alcohol abuse co-exist, their proper detection and management is often troublesome, essentially due to a limited vocabulary MR people could use to describe their symptoms, feelings and concerns, and the lack of reliable screening tools. Furthermore, MR people are among the most medicated subjects, with (over prescription of antidepressants and/or typical antipsychotics being the rule rather than exception. Thus, treatment resistance or even worsening of depression, constitute frequent occurrences. This report describes the case of a person with MR who failed to respond to repetitive trials of antidepressant monotherapies, finally recovering using aripiprazole to fluvoxamine augmentation upon consideration of a putative bipolar diathesis for “agitated” TRD. Although further controlled investigations are needed to assess a putative bipolar diathesis in some cases of MR associated to TRD, prudence is advised in the long-term prescription of antidepressant monotherapies in such conditions.

  11. The effect of tranexamic acid in unilateral and bilateral total knee arthroplasty in the South Asian population: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mufarrih, Syed Hamza; Malik, Azeem Tariq; Qureshi, Nada Qaisar; Lakdawala, Riaz Hussain; Rabbani, Muhammad Umar; Ali, Arif; Noordin, Shahryar

    2018-04-01

    Together with evidence of higher bleeding tendencies, the vulnerability of the South-Asian population to anemia secondary to a higher prevalence of hemoglobinopathies and micronutrient deficiencies merits further exploration of the effects of tranexamic acid on this population. Additionally, limited access to self-care facilities and certain sociocultural beliefs and practices may not be conducive to a speedy recovery from surgical complications. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of intraoperative administration of tranexamic acid during total knee arthroplasty when considering the South-Asian population. Medical record files of 355 patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty (2007-2015) were reviewed to collect data regarding patient characteristics, surgical variables and post-operative complications. Unilateral and Bilateral total knee arthroplasty were studied separately. Analysis was done using t-test, Mann-Whitney U test, chi-square and Fisher's exact square where appropriate. The threshold for significance was p tranexamic acid caused a significant reduction in estimated blood loss (p-value=0.011), total operative time, calculated blood loss, and hemoglobin change (p-valuetranexamic acid only caused a significant reduction in calculated blood loss (p-value tranexamic acid vs. those who did not, there was a significant increase in length of hospital stay (ptranexamic acid effectively reduces intraoperative blood loss, it does not have an effect on the need for post-operative blood transfusions. The increased length of stay and special care unit admissions associated with tranexamic acid use should be explored further to reveal the complete safety profile of tranexamic acid administration in the South-Asian population during total knee arthroplasty. Copyright © 2018 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. PATTERNS OF SEVEN AND COMPLICATED MALARIA IN CHILDREN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    ABSTRACT. BACKGROUND: Open heart surgeries under cardiopulmonary bypass are associated with excessive perioperative bleeding that often requires reoperation. Antifibrinolytics like epsilon aminocaproic acid and tranexamic acid are widely used to control bleeding. There are limited studies primarily showing the.

  13. Hyperfibrinolyse som årsag til blødning og øget mortalitet hos traumepatienter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikkelsø, Anne Juul; Afshari, Arash; Stensballe, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    mortality. Hyperfibrinolysis is easily detected by thromboelastography. The condition is treated with antifibrinolytics such as tranexamic acid--whereas transfusion with blood products is inefficient. This article explores the mechanisms and diagnostics of hyperfibrinolysis in trauma patients...

  14. Use of tranexamic acid in dynamic hip screw plate fixation for trochanteric fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruah, Ranjit Kumar; Borah, Pranab Jyoti; Haque, Russel

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate perioperative blood loss and blood transfusion requirement in patients who underwent dynamic hip screw plate fixation for a stable trochanteric fracture with or without preoperative intravenous tranexamic acid (TXA). 49 men and 11 women (mean age, 56.5 years) who underwent open reduction and internal fixation with a dynamic hip screw plate for a stable trochanteric fracture by a single surgeon were equally randomised to receive either a single dose of intravenous TXA (15 mg/kg) 15 minutes prior to surgery or an equal volume of normal saline by slow infusion. Intra- and post-operative blood loss and the need for blood transfusion were assessed, as was any thromboembolic adverse event. The TXA and control groups were comparable in terms of age, gender, body mass index, blood pressure, pulse rate, time from injury to surgery, operating time, and preoperative haematological data. Blood loss was lower in the TXA than control group intraoperatively (320.3 vs. 403.33 ml, ptrochanteric fractures.

  15. Synthesis and description of intermolecular interactions in new sulfonamide derivatives of tranexamic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashfaq, Muhammad; Arshad, Muhammad Nadeem; Danish, Muhammad; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Khatoon, Sadia; Mustafa, Ghulam; Zolotarev, Pavel N.; Butt, Rabia Ayub; Şahin, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Tranexamic acid (4-aminomethyl-cyclohexanecarboxylic acid) was reacted with sulfonyl chlorides to produce structurally related four sulfonamide derivatives using simple and environmental friendly method to check out their three-dimensional behavior and van der Walls interactions. The molecules were crystallized in different possibilities, as it is/after alkylation at its O and N atoms/along with a co-molecule. All molecules were crystallized in monoclinic crystal system with space group P21/n, P21/c and P21/a. X-ray studies reveal that the molecules stabilized themselves by different kinds of hydrogen bonding interactions. The molecules are getting connected through O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds to form inversion dimers which are further connected through N-H⋯O interactions. The molecules in which N and O atoms were alkylated showed non-classical interaction and generated centro-symmetric R22(24) ring motif. The co-crystallized host and guest molecules are connected to each other via O-H⋯O interactions to generate different ring motifs. By means of the ToposPro software an analysis of the topologies of underlying nets that correspond to molecular packings and hydrogen-bonded networks in structures under consideration was carried out.

  16. Vibrational spectroscopic study and NBO analysis on tranexamic acid using DFT method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, S.; Prabhakaran, A.

    2014-08-01

    In this work, we reported the vibrational spectra of tranexamic acid (TA) by experimental and quantum chemical calculation. The solid phase FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra of the title compound were recorded in the region 4000 cm-1 to 100 cm-1 and 4000 cm-1 to 400 cm-1 respectively. The molecular geometry, harmonic vibrational frequencies and bonding features of TA in the ground state have been calculated by using density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP method with standard 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The scaled theoretical wavenumber showed very good agreement with the experimental values. The vibrational assignments were performed on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes. Stability of the molecule, arising from hyperconjugative interactions and charge delocalization, has been analyzed using Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis. The results show that ED in the σ* and π* antibonding orbitals and second order delocalization energies E(2) confirm the occurrence of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) within the molecule. The electrostatic potential mapped onto an isodensity surface has been obtained. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. The thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy, and enthalpy) of the title compound at different temperatures were calculated in gas phase.

  17. Treatment of Persistent Gross Hematuria with Tranexamic Acid in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Yao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In this retrospective study we aimed to compare the effect of tranexamic acid (TXA vs etamsylate, two hemostatic agents, on hematuria duration in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD patients with persistent gross hematuria. Methods: This is a retrospective study of 40 patients with ADPKD and macroscopic hematuria. 20 patients receiving TXA and snake venom blood clotting enzyme injection were compared with 20 matched patients receiving etamsylate and snake venom blood clotting enzyme injection. The primary outcome was hematuria duration and the secondary outcomes were blood transfusion requirements and adverse events. Results: The hematuria duration was shorter in the TXA group compared with the etamsylate group (4[3-5] d vs 7[6-10] d, P<0.001. The volume of blood transfusion tended to be less in the TXA group than in the etamsylate group (300±115 ml vs 486±195 ml, P=0.12, and the number of patients needing a blood transfusion also tended to be lower [20% (4/20 vs 35% (7/20, P=0.29]. TXA and etamsylate were equally well tolerated and no serious adverse events were observed in both groups. Conclusions: Our study indicates that TXA treatment was more effective than etamsylate in stopping bleeding in ADPKD patients with persistent gross hematuria.

  18. Tranexamic acid for control of blood loss in bilateral total knee replacement in a single stage

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    Mandeep S Dhillon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tranexamic acid (TEA reduces blood loss and red cell transfusions in patients undergoing unilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA. However, there is not much literature regarding the use of TEA in patients undergoing bilateral TKA in a single stage and the protocols for administration of TEA in such patients are ill-defined. Materials and Methods: We carried out a case control study evaluating the effect of TEA on postoperative hemoglobin (Hb, total drain output, and number of blood units transfused in 52 patients undergoing bilateral TKA in a single stage, and compared it with 56 matched controls who did not receive TEA. Two doses of TEA were administered in doses of 10 mg / kg each (slow intravenous (IV infusion, with the first dose given just before tourniquet release of the first knee and the second dose three hours after the first one. Results: A statistically significant reduction in the total drain output and requirement of allogenic blood transfusion in cases who received TEA, as compared to the controls was observed. The postoperative Hb and Hb at the time of discharge were found to be lower in the control group, and this result was found to be statistically significant. Conclusion: TEA administered in patients undergoing single stage bilateral TKA helped reduce total blood loss and decreased allogenic blood transfusion requirements. This might be particularly relevant, where facilities such as autologous reinfusion might not be available.

  19. Composite Alginate-Hyaluronan Sponges for the Delivery of Tranexamic Acid in Postextractive Alveolar Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catanzano, Ovidio; D'Esposito, Vittoria; Formisano, Pietro; Boateng, Joshua S; Quaglia, Fabiana

    2018-02-01

    The management of wounds in patients on anticoagulant therapy who require oral surgical procedures is problematic and often results in a nonsatisfactory healing process. Here, we report a method to prepare an advanced dressing able to avoid uncontrolled bleeding by occluding the postextractive alveolar wounds, and simultaneously, capable of a fast release of tranexamic acid (TA). Composite alginate/hyaluronan (ALG/HA) sponge dressings loaded with TA were prepared by a straightforward internal gelation method followed by a freeze-drying step. Both blank and drug-loaded sponges were soft, flexible, and elegant in appearance and nonbrittle in nature. Scanning electron microscopy analysis confirmed the porous nature of these dressings. The integration of HA influenced the microstructure, reducing the porosity, modifying the water uptake kinetic, and increasing the resistance to compression. TA release from ALG/HA sponges showed a controlled release up to 3 h, and it was faster in the presence of HA. Finally, an in vitro clotting test performed on human whole blood confirmed that the TA-loaded sponges significantly reduce the blood clotting index by 30% compared with ALG/HA 20 sponges. These results suggest that, if placed in a socket cavity, these dressings could give a relevant help to the blood hemostasis after dental extractions, especially in patients with coagulation disorders. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Can venous iron and tranexamic acid reduce the transfusion need? Report on a non randomized, case control study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essola, L; Kouégnigan Rérambiah, L; Obame, R; Issembè, H; Sima Zué, A

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate if the association of injectable iron and tranexamic acid allows a significant saving in transfusion, in cases of myomectomies and hysterectomies. This is a prospective, non randomized study done over 8 months (from January 2013 to August 2013). Were included, patients undergoing hysterectomy or myomectomy who had a hemoglobin level greater than or equal to 8g/dl and less than 12g/dl. Two groups were compared: group A consisting of patients for whom a pack red cells was ordered and the group B which patients received intravenous iron preoperatively and tranexamic acid perioperatively. The level of hemoglobin, pre- and postoperative, the average number of blood units per patient and estimated blood loss was compared. The transfusion economy was evaluated. During this period, 87 patients with a mean age of 40±9 years (range: 23 and 70years) were included according to our criteria: 44 patients in group A and 43 patients in group B. Initial mean hemoglobin in both groups was 9.1±0.7g/dl. In group B, after iron administration, the mean hemoglobin was 11.3±0.7g/dl. The average number of red blood cells received intraoperative patient in group A was 1.54±0.51. The estimated blood loss was significant greater (P=0.0002) in group A (571.6±237.1ml) than in group B (213.7±131.7ml). No transfusion was performed in group B. The association intravenous iron and tranexamic acid resulted in the reduction of transfusion requirements in our setting. It could be integrated in the strategy for sparing blood transfusion in scheduled surgery with hemorrhagic risks. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  1. The effect of aprotinin, tranexamic acid, and aminocaproic acid on blood loss and use of blood products in major pediatric surgery : A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Esther S.; van de Pol, Alma C.; Schouten, Anton N. J.; Turner, Nigel M.; Jansen, Nicolaas J. G.; Bollen, Casper W.

    Objective: Aprotinin reduces the blood loss and transfusion of blood products in children undergoing major surgery. Aprotinin has been associated with severe side effects in adults, and tranexamic acid and aminocaproic acid have been found to be safer alternatives in adults. This systematic review

  2. EFFICACY OF TRANEXAMIC ACID IN DECREASING BLOOD LOSS DURING AND AFTER CAESAREAN SECTION IN MULTIGRAVIDA PARTURIENTS: A CASE CONTROLLED PROSPECTIVE STUDY

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    Gunavathi Kandappan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES To study the efficacy of Tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss during and after the lower segment caesarean section in Multigravida parturients. METHODOLOGY A case controlled prospective study was conducted in 50 multigravida parturient women undergoing elective lower segment caesarean section in our hospital after getting Institutional Ethical Committee approval, over a period of two months. 25 of them were given Tranexamic acid 15 mg/kg immediately before caesarean section. Blood loss was collected and measured during two periods. The first period was from placental delivery to end of LSCS and the second from the end LSCS to 2 hours postpartum. RESULTS Tranexamic acid significantly reduces the quantity of blood loss from the end of LSCS to 2 hours post-partum in multigravida parturients. No complications or side effects are noted in both the groups. CONCLUSION Tranexamic acid significantly reduces the amount of blood loss during and after the lower segment caesarean section in multigravida parturients and its use was not associated with any side effects or complications.

  3. Does tranexamic acid stabilised fibrin support the osteogenic differentiation of human periosteum derived cells?

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    J Demol

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Fibrin sealants have long been used as carrier for osteogenic cells in bone regeneration. However, it has not been demonstrated whether fibrin’s role is limited to delivering cells to the bone defect or whether fibrin enhances osteogenesis. This study investigated fibrin’s influence on the behaviour of human periosteum-derived cells (hPDCs when cultured in vitro under osteogenic conditions in two-dimensional (fibrin substrate and three-dimensional (fibrin carrier environments. Tranexamic acid (TEA was used to reduce fibrin degradation after investigating its effect on hPDCs in monolayer culture on plastic.TEA did not affect proliferation nor calcium deposition of hPDCs under these conditions. Expression profiles of specific osteogenic markers were also maintained within the presence of TEA, apart from reduced alkaline phosphatase (ALP expression (day 14. Compared to plastic, proliferation was upregulated on 2D fibrin substrates with a 220% higher DNA content by day 21. Gene expression was also altered, with significantly (p<0.05 decreased Runx2 (day 7 and ALP (day 14 expression and increased collagen I expression (day 14 and 21. In contrast to plastic, mineralisation was absent on fibrin substrates. Inside fibrin carriers, hPDCs were uniformly distributed. Moderate cell growth and reduced osteogenic marker expression was observed inside fibrin carriers. After 2 weeks, increased cell death was present in the carrier’s centre. In conclusion, fibrin negatively influences osteogenic differentiation, compared to culture plastic, but enhanced proliferation (at least in 2D cultures for hPDCs cultured in osteogenic conditions. TEA maintained the integrity of fibrin-based constructs, with minor effects on the osteogenic differentiation of hPDCs.

  4. Giving tranexamic acid to reduce surgical bleeding in sub-Saharan Africa: an economic evaluation

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    Perel Pablo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of safe and effective alternatives to blood transfusion is a public health priority. In sub-Saharan Africa, blood shortage is a cause of mortality and morbidity. Blood transfusion can also transmit viral infections. Giving tranexamic acid (TXA to bleeding surgical patients has been shown to reduce both the number of blood transfusions and the volume of blood transfused. The objective of this study is to investigate whether routinely administering TXA to bleeding elective surgical patients is cost effective by both averting deaths occurring from the shortage of blood, and by preventing infections from blood transfusions. Methods A decision tree was constructed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of providing TXA compared with no TXA in patients with surgical bleeding in four African countries with different human immunodeficiency virus (HIV prevalence and blood donation rates (Kenya, South Africa, Tanzania and Botswana. The principal outcome measures were cost per life saved and cost per infection averted (HIV, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C averted in 2007 International dollars ($. The probability of receiving a blood transfusion with and without TXA and the risk of blood borne viral infection were estimated. The impact of uncertainty in model parameters was explored using one-way deterministic sensitivity analyses. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was performed using Monte Carlo simulation. Results The incremental cost per life saved is $87 for Kenya and $93 for Tanzania. In Botswana and South Africa, TXA administration is not life saving but is highly cost saving since fewer units of blood are transfused. Further, in Botswana the administration of TXA averts one case of HIV and four cases of Hepatitis B (HBV per 1,000 surgical patients. In South Africa, one case of HBV is averted per 1,000 surgical patients. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of the model. Conclusion An economic

  5. Topical Tranexamic Acid Use in Knee Periprosthetic Joint Infection Is Safe and Effective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Bradford S; Zahoor, Talal; Meyer, Mark; Ochsner, Lock; Chimento, George

    2016-07-01

    Tranexamic acid (TXA) has been shown to decrease hemoglobin loss and reduce the need for transfusions in primary hip and knee arthroplasty. Our study evaluated the safety and efficacy of topical TXA in revision TKA for periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). We performed a retrospective review of patients who underwent removal of hardware with antibiotic spacer placement (stage 1) and/or revision TKA (stage 2) for PJI at our institution between September 2007 and July 2013. During that time, 49 patients underwent stage-1 procedures (20 knees with TXA, 29 without TXA) and 47 patients underwent stage-2 revisions (28 with TXA, 19 without TXA). We evaluated hemoglobin loss, need for transfusion, reinfection rate, length of stay (LOS), complications, and mortality with and without the use of TXA in these patients. All data sets were analyzed with a two-sample t-test. Average follow-up was 3.15 years (range, 1-7 years). TXA use led to a significantly lower percentage drop in the postoperative lowest hemoglobin compared with the preoperative hemoglobin in stage-1 surgeries (19.8 vs. 30.05%, p = 0.0004) and stage-2 revisions (24.5 vs 32.01%, p = 0.01). In both groups, TXA use was associated with a significant reduction in transfusion rates (stage-1, 25 vs 51.7%, p = 0.04; stage-2, 25 vs. 52.6%, p = 0.05). There was a nonstatistical decreased LOS in both groups in which TXA was used (stage 1, 5.15 vs. 6.72 days, p = 0.055; stage 2, 5.21 vs. 6.84 days, p = 0.09). There was no difference in the reinfection rate (4 vs. 4, p = 0.56) or mortality rate between groups (0 vs. 2 non-TXA group). A single upper extremity deep vein thrombosis occurred in a stage-1 patient who received TXA, and no pulmonary embolism occurred. We show that topical TXA is safe and effective for use in both stages of revision TKA for PJI. Previous studies have shown TXA to aggravate a staphylococcal infection in mice; however, topical TXA doesn't appear to negatively effect on the

  6. An In Vivo Study of Low-Dose Intra-Articular Tranexamic Acid Application with Prolonged Clamping Drain Method in Total Knee Replacement: Clinical Efficacy and Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa-ngasoongsong, Paphon; Chanplakorn, Pongsthorn; Wongsak, Siwadol; Uthadorn, Krisorn; Panpikoon, Tanapong; Jittorntam, Paisan; Aryurachai, Katcharin; Angchaisukisiri, Pantap; Kawinwonggowit, Viroj

    2015-01-01

    Recently, combined intra-articular tranexamic acid (IA-TXA) injection with clamping drain method showed efficacy for blood loss and transfusion reduction in total knee replacement (TKR). However, until now, none of previous studies revealed the effect of this technique on pharmacokinetics, coagulation, and fibrinolysis. An experimental study was conducted, during 2011-2012, in 30 patients undergoing unilateral TKR. Patients received IA-TXA application and then were allocated into six groups regarding clamping drain duration (2-, 4-, 6-, 8-, 10-, and 12-hours). Blood and drainage fluid were collected to measure tranexamic acid (TXA) level and related coagulation and fibrinolytic markers. Postoperative complication was followed for one year. There was no significant difference of serum TXA level at 2 hour and 24 hour among groups (p application in TKR with prolonged clamping drain method is a safe and effective blood conservative technique with only minimal systemic absorption and without significant increase in systemic absorption over time.

  7. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF TRANEXAMIC ACID VERSUS ETHAMSYLATE USED PROPHYLACTICALLY IN LOWER SEGMENT CAESAREAN SECTION- A PROSPECTIVE RANDOMISED DOUBLE-BLINDED STUDY

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    Bondada Suryakumari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Recently, caesarean section rates are increased in developing countries like India. Postpartum haemorrhage is more after caesarean section. Most of the maternal mortality is attributed to postpartum haemorrhage. This study was undertaken to find out the drug effective in reducing blood loss in lower segment caesarean section. The aim of the study is to compare the efficacy of ethamsylate versus tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss during and after caesarean section. MATERIALS AND METHODS All women undergoing LSCS were divided in 3 groups, viz. 2 study groups and control group. All were requested for preop and postop Hb%, PCV and TRBC. Tranexamic acid and ethamsylate, 1 g diluted in 10 mL NS were given intravenously for both the study groups and control group with NS, 20 minutes prior to skin incision and blood loss was measured from placental delivery up to 2 hours in all the groups was calculated by weighing pre-weighted pads soaked in blood. RESULTS Statistical analysis was done quantitatively by Student’s t-test. Postoperative blood loss was similar and lower in both the study groups compared to the control group. Hb% change in postop period is significant in control group. CONCLUSION Ethamsylate is safe and effective alternative to tranexamic acid in preventing postpartum haemorrhage after caesarean section.

  8. Intravenous versus topical tranexamic acid administration in primary total knee arthroplasty: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Young-Soo; Yoon, Jung-Ro; Lee, Hoon-Nyun; Park, Se-Hwan; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2017-11-01

    This meta-analysis was designed to compare the effectiveness and safety of intravenous (IV) versus topical administration of tranexamic acid (TXA) in patients undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) by evaluating the need for allogenic blood transfusion, incidence of postoperative complications, volume of postoperative blood loss, and change in haemoglobin levels. Studies were included in this meta-analysis to check whether they assessed the allogenic blood transfusion rate, postoperative complications including pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) or deep vein thrombosis (DVT), volume of postoperative blood loss via drainage, estimated blood loss, total blood loss, and change in haemoglobin levels before and after surgery in primary TKA with TXA administered through both the IV and topical routes. Ten studies were included in this meta-analysis. The proportion of patients requiring allogenic blood transfusion (OR 1.34, 95 % CI 0.63-2.81; n.s.) and the proportion of patients who developed postoperative complications including PTE or DVT (OR 0.85, 95 % CI 0.41 to 1.77; n.s.) did not significantly differ between the two groups. There was 52.3 mL less blood loss via drainage (95 % CI -50.74 to 185.66 mL; n.s.), 52.1 mL greater estimated blood loss (95 % CI -155.27 to 51.03 mL; n.s.), and 51.4 mL greater total blood loss (95 % CI -208.16 to 105.31 mL; n.s.) in the topical TXA group as compared to the IV TXA group. The two groups were also similar in terms of the change in haemoglobin levels (0.02 g/dL, 95 % CI -0.36 to 0.39 g/dL; n.s.). In primary TKA, there are no significant differences in the transfusion requirement, postoperative complications, blood loss, and change in haemoglobin levels between the IV and topical administration of TXA. In addition, results from subgroup analysis evaluating the effect of the times of TXA administration through the IV route suggested that double IV dose of TXA is more effective than single dose in terms of the

  9. A self-controlled comparative clinical trial to explore the effectiveness of three topical hemostatic agents for stopping severe epistaxis in pediatrics with inherited coagulopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshghi, P; Jenabzade, A; Habibpanah, B

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of localized treatments to persistently stop epistaxis in patients with inherited bleeding disorders. In a self-controlled comparative clinical trial, to offer the best solution to stop epistaxis at home (within 10 minutes), patients with inherited bleeding disorders were treated using three different topical hemostatic agents, including Tranexamic acid impregnated tampon, EpiCell tampon prepared from oxidized regenerated cellulose pad, and ChitoHem tampon (reinforced with chitosan). The results of using these different products on three groups of randomly selected patients were ultimately compared using the χ(2) and Fisher's exact test statistics. A total of 31 patients, 5 females and 26 males with a mean age of 5.6 years, were included in the study. Twenty-three patients had Glanzmann disease, four had von-Willebrand disease, two had Bernard soulier syndrome, two had activated factor VII deficiency, and one patient had impaired secretion of adenosine deaminase. The study exhibited that statistically there was no significant difference between EpiCell tampon and Tranexamic acid impregnated tampon treatments with respect to the hemostasis duration. However, ChitoHem tampon was more efficient than Tranexamic acid impregnated tampon (P value stop epistaxis. We recommend further research on the use of other hemostatic agents for localized bleeding in patients with inherited bleeding disorders.

  10. Topical versus intravenous tranexamic acid as a blood conservation intervention for reduction of post-operative bleeding in hemiarthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emara, Walid Mohamed; Moez, Khaled K; Elkhouly, Abeer H

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to test the effectiveness of topical tranexamic acid (TXA) in reducing blood loss in pelvic hemiarthoplasty surgeries compared with intravenous TXA, regarding the incidence of thromboembolic complications (deep vein thrombosis [DVT], pulmonary embolism (PE) and cerebrovascular stroke [CVS]). After obtaining institutional ethical approval 60 patients divided into three groups. Group A: Received intravenous TXA Group B: Received topical TXA Group C: Control group (placebo saline). All patients were received general anesthesia and post-operative bleeding, immediate and 24 h post-operatively, hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, platelets and coagulation profile (prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time and international normalized ratio) baseline, immediate and 24 h post-operatively. Thromboelastography was recorded baseline, immediate and 24 h post-operatively. Incidence of DVT, PE and CVS was recorded. There was statistical significant elevation hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit in both Groups A and B, significant increase in blood loss in Group C, significant increase in number of patients receiving blood in Group C, there was a significant decrease in "r" and "k" times and a significant increase in maximum amplitude and α-angle in Group A, statistically significant increase in the incidence of thromboembolic events in the form of DVT, PE and CVS in Group A. Topical TXA is effective in decreasing post-operative blood loss with possible side-effects of this route of administration.

  11. Is intraarticular administration of tranexamic acid better than its intravenous administration in reducing blood loss after total knee arthroplasty?

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    Ameet Pispati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: It has been well-established now that intravenous (IV tranexamic acid (TXA is a potent agent to control postoperative blood loss following total knee arthroplasty (TKA. Recently, intraarticular administration of this agent has also shown good efficacy for the same. Aims: Comparison of postoperative blood loss between IV and topical administration of TXA in TKAs. Materials and Design: Eighty-six TKAs on knees were included in this study. Randomization was done so that 40 TKA received 1 g of IV TXA, while 46 had intraarticular administration of 1 g TXA. Subjets and Methods: We compared the postoperative blood loss by calculating the difference in pre- and postop hemoglobin and need for blood transfusion. Functional assessment was done on basis of Western Ontario McMaster Osteo-Arthritis Index (WOMAC scores and complications like postoperative infection, oozing from the wound site and thromboembolic manifestations. Results: Blood loss was significantly less in the intraarticular administration group as compared to the IV injection group. Total blood loss, blood transfusion group, and drain output was also less but the difference was not significant. The functional assessment (WOMAC scores were equivocal and so were the complications including thromboembolic manifestations (two cases each of deep vein thrombosis (DVT and no cases of pulmonary embolism (PE. Conclusion: Intraarticular administration of TXA to prevent postoperative blood loss in TKA is a safe and effective alternative/adjunct to its IV administration.

  12. [Intra-Articular Application of Tranexamic Acid Significantly Reduces Blood Loss and Transfusion Requirement in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lošťák, J; Gallo, J; Špička, J; Langová, K

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the effect of topical application of tranexamic acid (TXA, Exacyl) on the amount of post-operative blood loss, and blood transfusion requirement in patients undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Attention was paid to early complications potentially associated with TXA administration, such as haematoma, wound exudate, or knee swelling. In addition, the economic benefit of TXA treatment was also taken into account. MATERIAL AND METHODS The study included 238 patients (85 men and 153 women) who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) at our department between January 2013 and November 2015. A group of 119 patients (41 men and 78 women) received intraarticular TXA injections according to the treatment protocol (TXA group). A control group matched in basic characteristics to the TXA group also consisted of 119 patients. The average age in the TXA group was 69.8 years, and the most frequent indication for TKA surgery was primary knee osteoarthritis (81.5%). In each patient, post-operative volume of blood lost from drains and total blood loss including hidden blood loss were recorded, as well as post-operative haemoglobin and haematocrit levels. On discharge of each patient from hospital, the size and site of a haematoma; wound exudate, if present after post-operative day 4; joint swelling; range of motion and early revision surgery, if performed, were evaluated. Requirements of analgesic drugs after surgery were also recorded. RESULTS In the TXA group, blood losses from drains were significantly lower than in the control group (456.7 ± 270.8 vs 640.5 ±448.2; p = 0.004). The median value for blood losses from drains was lower by 22% and the average value for total blood loss, including hidden losses, was also lower than in the control group (762.4 ± 345.2 ml vs 995.5 ± 457.3 ml). The difference in the total amount of blood loss between the two groups was significant (p = 0

  13. Tranexamic Acid Attenuates The Loss of Lung Barrier Function in a Rat Model of Polytrauma And Hemorrhage With Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaowu; Dubick, Michael A; Schwacha, Martin G; Cap, Andrew P; Darlington, Daniel N

    2017-04-01

    Severe trauma, hemorrhage, and resuscitation can lead to a trauma-related acute lung injury that involves rapid infiltration of immune cells and platelets. This infiltration involves exymatic degradation of matrix proteins, including plasmin, and causes loss of barrier function. Since tranexamic acid (TXA) inhibits plasminogen/ plasmin binding to target substrates, it may attenuate loss of barrier function after severe trauma, hemorrhage, and resuscitation. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to polytrauma (laparotomy, and trauma to intestines, liver, right leg skeletal muscle, and right femur fracture), then bled 40% of their blood volume. One hour after completion of polytrauma and hemorrhage, resuscitation was begun with fresh whole blood (FWB) or FWB with prior bolus administration of TXA (10 mg/kg in 0.2 mL). Polytrauma, hemorrhage, and resuscitation with FWB led to an elevation in lung water content that was significantly reduced with TXA administration. Polytrauma and hemorrhage led to rise in the number of neutrophils/monocytes and platelets in the lungs, and a rise in myeloperoxidase (MPO), neutrophil elastase and complement C5a content. While resuscitation with FWB significantly reduced the cellular infiltrate and MPO, FWB/TXA further reduced the levels of neutrophil/monocytes, neutrophil elastase, and complement C5a. Polytrauma and hemorrhage led to rise in lung plasmin activity that was significantly reduced with either FWB or FWB/TXA resuscitation. Severe trauma and hemorrhage leads to increases in lung water content, and immune cell, platelets, MPO, elastase, and C5a content in lung tissue, all markers of inflammation and acute lung injury. The addition of TXA to FWB resuscitation markedly attenuated the rise in these parameters suggesting its utility in treating acute lung injury.

  14. Thermodynamic and spectroscopic study of Al3+ interaction with glycine, l-cysteine and tranexamic acid in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiano, Paola; Giacobello, Fausta; Giuffrè, Ottavia; Sammartano, Silvio

    2017-11-01

    In this paper a thermodynamic and spectroscopic study on the interaction between Al 3+ and glycine (Gly), l-cysteine (Cys), tranexamic acid (Tranex) is reported. Speciation models have been obtained by processing potentiometric titration data to determine stability constants of the species formed in aqueous solution at T=298.15K, 0.15≤I/molL -1 ≤1 in NaCl. Thermodynamic formation parameters have been obtained from calorimetric titration data, at T=298.15K, I=0.15molL -1 using NaCl as ionic medium. Al 3+ -Cys system was also investigated by spectrophotometric and 1 H NMR measurements. 1 H NMR experiments were performed on Al 3+ -Tranex system as well. Different speciation models have been observed for the three systems. The results showed the formation of MLH, ML and M 2 L 2 (OH) 2 species for Gly, ML, M 2 L and MLOH for Cys, MLH and MLOH for Tranex. The formed species are quite stable, i.e. for ML, logβ=7.18, 11.91 for Gly and Cys, respectively, at I=0.15molL -1 and T=298.15K. For all the systems the dependence of formation constants on ionic strength over the range 0.1-1molL -1 is reported. The sequestering ability of the ligands under study was also evaluated by pL 0.5 empiric parameter. For Gly, Cys and Tranex, pL 0.5 =2.51, 3.74, 3.91 respectively, at pH=5, I=0.15molL -1 and T=298.15K. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Enteral tranexamic acid attenuates vasopressor resistance and changes in α1-adrenergic receptor expression in hemorrhagic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, Marco Henry; Aletti, Federico; Li, Joyce B; Tan, Aaron; Chang, Monica; Leon, Jessica; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W; Kistler, Erik B

    2017-08-01

    Irreversible hemorrhagic shock is characterized by hyporesponsiveness to vasopressor and fluid therapy. Little is known, however, about the mechanisms that contribute to this phenomenon. Previous studies have shown that decreased intestinal perfusion in hemorrhagic shock leads to proteolytically mediated increases in gut permeability, with subsequent egress of vasoactive substances systemically. Maintenance of blood pressure is achieved in part by α1 receptor modulation, which may be affected by vasoactive factors; we thus hypothesized that decreases in hemodynamic stability and vasopressor response in shock can be prevented by enteral protease inhibition. Rats were exposed to experimental hemorrhagic shock (35 mm Hg mean arterial blood pressure for 2 hours, followed by reperfusion for 2 hours) and challenged with phenylephrine (2 μg/kg) at discrete intervals to measure vasopressor responsiveness. A second group of animals received enteral injections with the protease inhibitor tranexamic acid (TXA) (127 mM) along the small intestine and cecum 1 hour after induction of hemorrhagic shock. Blood pressure response (duration and amplitude) to phenylephrine after reperfusion was significantly attenuated in animals subjected to hemorrhagic shock compared with baseline and control nonshocked animals and was restored to near baseline by enteral TXA. Arteries from shocked animals also displayed decreased α1 receptor density with restoration to baseline after enteral TXA treatment. In vitro, rat shock plasma decreased α1 receptor density in smooth muscle cells, which was also abrogated by enteral TXA treatment. Results from this study demonstrate that experimental hemorrhagic shock leads to decreased response to the α1-selective agonist phenylephrine and decreased α1 receptor density via circulating shock factors. These changes are mitigated by enteral TXA with correspondingly improved hemodynamics. Proteolytic inhibition in the lumen of the small intestine improves

  16. Tranexamic acid reduces blood loss and blood transfusions in primary total hip arthroplasty: a prospective randomized double-blind study in 40 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik; Blønd, Lars; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We performed a prospective, randomized, double-blind study on 40 patients scheduled for primary total hip arthroplasty due to arthrosis or osteonecrosis to determine the effect of tranexamic acid on per- and postoperative blood losses and on the number of blood transfusions needed...... blood losses at removal of the drain 24 hours after the operation and the number of blood transfusions. RESULTS: Patients receiving tranexamic acid had a mean peroperative blood loss of 480 mL versus 622 mL in patients receiving placebo (p = 0.3), a postoperative blood loss of 334 mL versus 609 mL (p...... = 0.001), a total blood loss of 814 mL versus 1231 mL (p = 0.001) and a total need for 4 blood transfusions versus 25 (p = 0.04). No patient in either group had symptoms of deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism or prolonged wound drainage. INTERPRETATION: Transemic acid is effective in reducing...

  17. An In Vivo Study of Low-Dose Intra-Articular Tranexamic Acid Application with Prolonged Clamping Drain Method in Total Knee Replacement: Clinical Efficacy and Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paphon Sa-ngasoongsong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recently, combined intra-articular tranexamic acid (IA-TXA injection with clamping drain method showed efficacy for blood loss and transfusion reduction in total knee replacement (TKR. However, until now, none of previous studies revealed the effect of this technique on pharmacokinetics, coagulation, and fibrinolysis. Materials and Methods. An experimental study was conducted, during 2011-2012, in 30 patients undergoing unilateral TKR. Patients received IA-TXA application and then were allocated into six groups regarding clamping drain duration (2-, 4-, 6-, 8-, 10-, and 12-hours. Blood and drainage fluid were collected to measure tranexamic acid (TXA level and related coagulation and fibrinolytic markers. Postoperative complication was followed for one year. Results. There was no significant difference of serum TXA level at 2 hour and 24 hour among groups (p<0.05. Serum TXA level at time of clamp release was significantly different among groups with the highest level at 2 hour (p<0.0001. There was no significant difference of TXA level in drainage fluid, postoperative blood loss, blood transfusion, and postoperative complications (p<0.05.  Conclusions. Low-dose IA-TXA application in TKR with prolonged clamping drain method is a safe and effective blood conservative technique with only minimal systemic absorption and without significant increase in systemic absorption over time.

  18. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or ... humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or ...

  19. Combined effect of therapeutic strategies for bleeding injury on early survival, transfusion needs and correction of coagulopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balvers, K.; van Dieren, S.; Baksaas-Aasen, K.; Gaarder, C.; Brohi, K.; Eaglestone, S.; Stanworth, S.; Johansson, P. I.; Ostrowski, S. R.; Stensballe, J.; Maegele, M.; Goslings, J. C.; Juffermans, N. P.; Bergman, R.; Naess, P. A.; Kolstadbråten, K. M.; Rourke, C.; Gall, L.; Curry, N.; Stürmer, E. K.; Schäfer, N.; Driessen, A.; Orr, A.; Schubert, A.; Görlinger, K.; Harrison, M.; Buchanan, J.; Char, A.; Neble, S.; Sayel, H.

    2017-01-01

    The combined effects of balanced transfusion ratios and use of procoagulant and antifibrinolytic therapies on trauma-induced exsanguination are not known. The aim of this study was to investigate the combined effect of transfusion ratios, tranexamic acid and products containing fibrinogen on the

  20. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... of clinical trials contribute to medical knowledge and practice. Why Clinical Trials Are Important Clinical trials are ... earlier than they would be in general medical practice. This is because late-phase trials have large ...

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    Full Text Available ... and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, ... kol). This plan explains how the trial will work. The trial is led by a principal investigator ( ...

  7. Clinical Trials

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  8. Process Improvement Project Using Tranexamic Acid Is Cost-Effective in Reducing Blood Loss and Transfusions After Total Hip and Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demos, Harry A; Lin, Zilan X; Barfield, William R; Wilson, Sylvia H; Robertson, Dawn C; Pellegrini, Vincent D

    2017-08-01

    Tranexamic acid (TXA) has been associated with decreased blood loss and transfusion after total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to examine both transfusion utilization and the economic impact of a Process Improvement Project implementing TXA for THA and TKA. After standardization of TXA administration in THA and TKA patients, retrospective data were compared from 12 consecutive months before (group A, n = 336 procedures) and after (group B, n = 436 procedures) project initiation. TXA administration increased with project implementation (group A = 3.57%, group B = 86.01%) and was associated with reductions in perioperative hemoglobin decrement (20.2%), patients transfused (45%), and number of units transfused per patient (61.9%). Cost savings were notable per patient ($128) and annually program wide ($55,884) with the primary THA subgroup contributing the most to the savings. No increase in adverse effects was observed. Standardized administration of TXA is an effective and economically favorable blood-reduction strategy for patients undergoing elective THA or TKA. Although reduction in transfusions with TXA may be greater after TKA, the economic and clinical impact of transfusion reduction is more substantial in THA patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Intra-articular injection of tranexamic acid via a drain plus drain-clamping to reduce blood loss in cementless total knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutsuzaki Hirotaka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients undergoing cementless total knee arthroplasty (TKA sometimes suffer large blood loss. In a retrospective study, we explored whether postoperative intra-articular retrograde injection of tranexamic acid (TA and leaving a drain clamp in place for 1 h reduced blood loss. Patients and methods Patients (n = 140 treated with unilateral primary cementless TKA (posterior cruciate ligament retained were divided into two groups: those who had an intra-articular injection of TA (1000 mg and drain clamping for 1 h postoperatively (study group, n = 70 and those who were not given TA and did not undergo clamping of their drains (control group, n = 70. Postoperative total blood loss, volume of drainage, hemoglobin level, transfusion amounts and rates, D-dimer level at postoperative day (POD 7, and complications were recorded. Results Total blood loss, total drainage, mean transfusion volume, and transfusion rates were lower in the study group than in controls (P P P  Conclusions Immediately postoperative intra-articular retrograde injection of TA and 1 h of drain-clamping effectively reduced blood loss and blood transfusion after cementless TKA. We believe that this method is simple, easy, and suitable for these patients.

  10. Tranexamic acid reduces blood loss and need of blood transfusion in total knee arthroplasty: A prospective, randomized, double-blind study in Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Shinde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: For quite a few years, tranexamic acid (TEA has been used during total knee arthroplasty (TKA to reduce blood loss. However, no consensus exits regarding its timing and doses. Materials and Methods: We conducted a prospective, randomized double-blinded study of 56 patients in the Indian population undergoing TKA from 2011 to 2012. A dose of 10 mg/kg body weight of TEA (three doses was given in one group and normal saline was administered in the other. Results: The mean blood loss in the TEA unilateral group was 295 mL ± 218 mL and in the placebo group was 482 mL ± 186 mL (P < 0.005. In the bilateral TEA group, the mean blood loss was 596 mL ± 235 mL and in the placebo group was 1349 mL ± 41 mL (P < 0.005. Conclusion: The number of patients requiring blood transfusion reduced substantially. There was no increase in the risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary embolism. TEA reduces intraoperative and postoperative blood loss and thus reduces the need of allogenic blood transfusion.

  11. Predicting Factors for Allogeneic Blood Transfusion and Excessive Postoperative Blood Loss after Single Low-Dosage Intra-Articular Tranexamic Acid Application in Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paphon Sa-ngasoongsong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recently, intra-articular tranexamic acid (IA-TXA application has become a popular method for perioperative blood loss (PBL reduction in total knee replacement (TKR. Nevertheless, through our knowledge, no previous studies had shown the correlation perioperative factors and the risk of excessive PBL or need of blood transfusion (BT after IA-TXA. Materials and Methods. A retrospective study was conducted in patients underwent 299 primary TKRs, using IA-TXA, during 2-year period (2013-2014. Patient’s characteristic and perioperative data were reviewed and collected. PBL was measured as total hemoglobin loss (THL, estimated total blood loss (ETBL, and drainage volume per kg (DV/kg. Excessive PBL was defined as PBL that exceeded 90th percentile. Results. From multivariate analysis, low preoperative hemoglobin (Hb level and body mass index (BMI were the significant predictors of postoperative BT (p<0.0001 and 0.003, resp.. Excessive THL significant associated with preoperative Hb (p<0.0001. Excessive ETBL significantly associated with preoperative Hb, height, preoperative range-of-motion, and creatinine clearance (p<0.05 all. Low BMI and large prosthesis size were the significant predictors of excessive DV/kg (p=0.0001 and 0.002, resp.. Conclusions. Low preoperative Hb and BMI were the significant risks of postoperative transfusion after TKR with IA-TXA. Moreover, multiple perioperative factors could result in higher PBL.

  12. Acido tranexâmico e hemostasia em cirurgia de revascularização do miocárdio com circulação extracorpórea Tranexamic acid and hemostasis in myocardial revascularization with extracorporeal circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme F Vargas

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available O antífibrinolítico sintético ácido tranexâmico (Transamin ® foi avaliado em seus efeitos hemostáticos e poupadores de transfusões homólogas, em pacientes submetidos a revascularização do miocárdio com circulação extracorpórea (CEC. Quarenta pacientes receberam placebo e 55 pacientes foram operados sob o efeito do ácido tranexâmico na dose de 10 g endovenosa no trans-operatório (2 g administrados na indução anestésica e os restantes 8 g nas 4 horas seguintes de cirurgia, de modo contínuo. O ácido tranexâmico, na dosagem utilizada, demonstrou possuir efeito hemostático impressionante, promovendo uma redução no débito pelos drenos torácicos da ordem de 47% nas 12 horas de P.O., 42,5% nas 24 horas de P. O. e 40,5% até a retirada dos drenos, em relação ao grupo-controle (pThe synthetic antif ibrinolytic drug tranexamic acid was evaluated in its hemostatic and blood saving effects, in patients submitted to myocardial revascularization with extracorporeal circulation. To 40 patients were administered placebo and to 55 tranexamic acid I.V. in a dosage of 10 g in the operative period (2 g in the anesthetic induction and the remaining 8 g in a continuous way during the operative procedure. Tranexamic acid, in this dosage, has proved to have a very impressive hemostatic effect, leadir g to a reduction in post operative bleeding of 47% in 12 h, 42,5% in 24 h and 40,5% when drains were taken off, related to the control group (p < 0.05. Tranexamic acid have led to less utilization for homologous paked red cells per patient, but statistical significance was found only in the 24 h of post operative period, with 1,025 units/patient in control group and 0,333 units/ patient in treated group. Concerning post operative complications, there have been more neurological alterations without sequelae (2.5% against 12.7% and creatinin alterations (5% against 10.9% in the tranexamic acid group. Such alterations were attributed to the high

  13. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... under way. For example, some trials are stopped early if benefits from a strategy or treatment are ... stop a trial, or part of a trial, early if the strategy or treatment is having harmful ...

  6. Combined intravenous, topical and oral tranexamic acid administration in total knee replacement: Evaluation of safety in patients with previous thromboembolism and effect on hemoglobin level and transfusion rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Joris A; Lameijer, Joost R C; Snoeker, Barbara A M

    2017-10-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the safety of combined intravenous, oral and topical tranexamic acid (TXA) in primary total knee replacement. We assessed dose-related efficacy on hemoglobin level, transfusion, length of stay and thromboembolic complications. In addition, TXA safety in patients with previous history of thromboembolism >12months ago was monitored specifically. From January 2013 until January 2016, 922 patients were included who received TXA after primary total knee replacement. Patients without TXA administration or with thromboembolic events 10-25mg/kg and >25-50mg/kg. Between the three TXA groups no significant difference was found in thromboembolic complications (deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE)), wound leakage and transfusion rate. For patients with DVT or PE in their history >12months ago specifically, no more complications were noted in higher-TXA-dosage groups compared to the low-dosage group. Length of stay was shorter in the highest-TXA-dosage group compared with lower-dosage groups (median two vs three days). With high TXA dose a smaller difference between pre- and postoperative Hb was found: the >25-50mg/kg TXA group had a 0.419mmol/l smaller decrease in postoperative hemoglobin compared to the lowest-dosage group (Ptopical TXA is effective in knee replacement and can safely be given to patients with a thromboembolic history >12months ago. High dosage (>25-50mg/kg) TXA resulted in the smallest decrease in postoperative hemoglobin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficacy of functional microarray of microneedles combined with topical tranexamic acid for melasma: A randomized, self-controlled, split-face study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Ma, Renyan; Juliandri, Juliandri; Wang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Bai; Wang, Daguang; Lu, Yan; Zhou, Bingrong; Luo, Dan

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a functional microarray of microneedles (MNs) plus topical tranexamic acid (TA) for melasma in middle-aged women in China.Thirty female subjects with melasma were enrolled in this study. The left or right side of the face was chosen randomly to be pretreated with a functional microarray of MNs, followed by topical 0.5% TA solution once per week for 12 weeks. The other half-face was the control, treated with a sham device plus topical 0.5% TA solution. At baseline and at weeks 4, 8, and 12 of treatment, clinical (photographic) evaluations and parameters determined by Visia were recorded. At baseline and week 12, patient satisfaction scores and the biophysical parameters measured by Mexameter were also recorded. Side effects were evaluated at baseline and at the end of the 12 weeks.In total, 28 women (93.3%) completed the study. The brown spots' scores measured by Visia were significantly lower on the combined therapy side than on the control side at 12 weeks after starting treatment; there was no significant difference between sides at 4 or 8 weeks. After 12 weeks, melanin index (MI) decreased significantly in both 2 groups, and the MI was significantly less on the combined side at week 12. Transepidermal water loss, roughness, skin hydration, skin elasticity, and erythema index showed no significant differences between 2 sides at baseline, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after treatment. Physicians' evaluations of photographs showed better results at week 12 with combined therapy: >25% improvement was observed in the MNs plus TA side in 25 patients, and in the TA side in only 10 patients. Subjective satisfaction scores on both sides increased significantly. The participants were more satisfied with the results of the combined therapy side than the control side. No obvious adverse reactions were observed throughout the study.Combined therapy with a functional microarray of MNs and topical TA solution is a promising treatment for melasma.

  8. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... need to travel or stay in hospitals to take part in clinical trials. For example, the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in ... Maryland, runs clinical trials. Many other clinical trials take place in medical centers and ... trial can have many benefits. For example, you may gain access to new treatments before ...

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    Full Text Available ... of clinical trials contribute to medical knowledge and practice. Why Clinical Trials Are Important Clinical trials are a key ... Enterprise NHLBI has a strong tradition of supporting clinical trials that have not only shaped medical practice around the world, but have improved the health ...

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    Full Text Available ... clinical trials. If you're thinking about taking part in a clinical trial, find out ahead of time about costs and coverage. You should learn about the risks and benefits of any clinical trial before you agree to take part in the trial. Talk with your doctor about ...

  11. Effect of Topical Intranasal Therapy on Epistaxis Frequency in Patients With Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Kevin J; Sautter, Nathan B; McWilliams, Justin P; Chakinala, Murali M; Merlo, Christian A; Johnson, Maribeth H; James, Melissa; Everett, Eric M; Clancy, Marianne S; Faughnan, Marie E; Oh, S Paul; Olitsky, Scott E; Pyeritz, Reed E; Gossage, James R

    2016-09-06

    Epistaxis is a major factor negatively affecting quality of life in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT; also known as Osler-Weber-Rendu disease). Optimal treatment for HHT-related epistaxis is uncertain. To determine whether topical therapy with any of 3 drugs with differing mechanisms of action is effective in reducing HHT-related epistaxis. The North American Study of Epistaxis in HHT was a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial performed at 6 HHT centers of excellence. From August 2011 through March 2014, there were 121 adult patients who met the clinical criteria for HHT and had experienced HHT-related epistaxis with an Epistaxis Severity Score of at least 3.0. Follow-up was completed in September 2014. Patients received twice-daily nose sprays for 12 weeks with either bevacizumab 1% (4 mg/d), estriol 0.1% (0.4 mg/d), tranexamic acid 10% (40 mg/d), or placebo (0.9% saline). The primary outcome was median weekly epistaxis frequency during weeks 5 through 12. Secondary outcomes included median duration of epistaxis during weeks 5 through 12, Epistaxis Severity Score, level of hemoglobin, level of ferritin, need for transfusion, emergency department visits, and treatment failure. Among the 121 patients who were randomized (mean age, 52.8 years [SD, 12.9 years]; 44% women with a median of 7.0 weekly episodes of epistaxis [interquartile range {IQR}, 3.0-14.0]), 106 patients completed the study duration for the primary outcome measure (43 were women [41%]). Drug therapy did not significantly reduce epistaxis frequency (P = .97). After 12 weeks of treatment, the median weekly number of bleeding episodes was 7.0 (IQR, 4.5-10.5) for patients in the bevacizumab group, 8.0 (IQR, 4.0-12.0) for the estriol group, 7.5 (IQR, 3.0-11.0) for the tranexamic acid group, and 8.0 (IQR, 3.0-14.0) for the placebo group. No drug treatment was significantly different from placebo for epistaxis duration. All groups had a significant

  12. Clot lysis time in platelet-rich plasma: method assessment, comparison with assays in platelet-free and platelet-poor plasmas, and response to tranexamic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panes, Olga; Padilla, Oslando; Matus, Valeria; Sáez, Claudia G; Berkovits, Alejandro; Pereira, Jaime; Mezzano, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Fibrinolysis dysfunctions cause bleeding or predisposition to thrombosis. Platelets contain several factors of the fibrinolytic system, which could up or down regulate this process. However, the temporal relationship and relative contributions of plasma and platelet components in clot lysis are mostly unknown. We developed a clot lysis time (CLT) assay in platelet-rich plasma (PRP-CLT, with and without stimulation) and compared it to a similar one in platelet-free plasma (PFP) and to another previously reported test in platelet-poor plasma (PPP). We also studied the differential effects of a single dose of tranexamic acid (TXA) on these tests in healthy subjects. PFP- and PPP-CLT were significantly shorter than PRP-CLT, and the three assays were highly correlated (p plasma PAI-1, von Willebrand factor, fibrinogen, LDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides (p platelet aggregation/secretion, platelet counts, and pro-coagulant tests to explore factor X activation by platelets, PRP clotting time, and thrombin generation in PRP. Among all the studied variables, PFP-CLT was independently associated with plasma PAI-1, LDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides and, additionally, stimulated PRP-CLT was also independently associated with plasma fibrinogen. A single 1 g dose of TXA strikingly prolonged all three CLTs, but in contrast to the results without the drug, the lysis times were substantially shorter in non-stimulated or stimulated PRP than in PFP and PPP. This standardized PRP-CLT may become a useful tool to study the role of platelets in clot resistance and lysis. Our results suggest that initially, the platelets enmeshed in the clot slow down the fibrinolysis process. However, the increased clot resistance to lysis induced by TXA is overcome earlier in platelet-rich clots than in PFP or PPP clots. This is likely explained by the display of platelet pro-fibrinolytic effects. Focused research is needed to disclose the mechanisms for the relationship between CLT and plasma

  13. Topical fibrin sealant versus intravenous tranexamic acid for reducing blood loss following total knee arthroplasty: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fuqiang; Ma, Jinhui; Sun, Wei; Guo, Wanshou; Li, Zirong; Wang, Weiguo

    2016-08-01

    Efficacy and safety of topical application of a fibrin sealant (FS) compared with intravenous administration of tranexamic acid (TXA) for reducing blood loss after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is controversial. We undertook a meta-analysis to compare the effects of topical application of FS or intravenous administration of TXA on blood loss after TKA. PubMed, Medline, Embase, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library were searched to identify studies comparing FS with TXA for TKA patients. The mean difference (MD) of blood loss, hemoglobin value, and odds ratios (ORs) of transfusion requirements and adverse events in FS and TXA groups were pooled throughout the study. Relevant data were analyzed using RevMan v5.3. Five studies involving 359 patients were included (181 FS vs. 178 TXA). TXA use had a significantly lower prevalence of blood transfusion (OR = 3.14; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.67 to 5.90, P = 0.0004) and higher hemoglobin level (MD = -1.23; 95% CI, -2.19 to -0.27, P = 0.01) than FS in the early postoperative period. No significant difference was seen in total blood loss between the two groups (MD = 198.06; 95% CI, -267.45 to 663.57; P = 0.40). There were no significant differences in adverse events, superficial infections, or deep-vein thrombosis among study groups. Our meta-analysis suggests that intravenous administration of TXA for patients undergoing TKA may reduce blood-transfusion requirements and maintain higher hemoglobin levels compared with topical application of FS in the early postoperative period. There were no significant differences in total calculated blood loss and prevalence of complications between the two groups. However, owing to the variation of included studies, no firm conclusions can be drawn. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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    Full Text Available ... Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs; private companies; universities; and nonprofit organizations. NIH Institutes and Centers (including ... our campus or trials NIH has sponsored at universities, medical centers, and hospitals. ClinicalTrials.gov View a ...

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    Full Text Available ... decisionmaking. The purpose of clinical trials is research, so the studies follow strict scientific standards. These standards ... otherwise. The purpose of clinical trials is research, so the studies follow strict scientific standards. These standards ...

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    Full Text Available ... identified earlier than they would be in general medical practice. This is because late-phase trials have large ... supporting clinical trials that have not only shaped medical practice around the world, but have improved the health ...

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    Full Text Available ... Working at the NHLBI Contact and FAQs Accessible Search Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to ... to learn more about clinical research and to search for clinical trials: NHLBI Clinical Trials Browse a ...

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    Full Text Available ... people who fit the patient traits for that study (the eligibility criteria). Eligibility criteria differ from trial to trial. They include factors such as a patient's age and gender, the type and stage of disease, and whether ...

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    Full Text Available ... risks that outweigh any possible benefits. Clinical Trial Phases Clinical trials of new medicines or medical devices are done in phases. These phases have different purposes and help researchers ...

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    Full Text Available ... clinical trials. An IRB is an independent committee created by the institution that sponsors a clinical trial. ... have not only shaped medical practice around the world, but have improved the health of millions of ...

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    Full Text Available ... or strategies work best for certain illnesses or groups of people. Some clinical trials show a positive result. For example, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) sponsored a trial of two different ...

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    Full Text Available ... and Centers sponsor clinical trials. Many other groups, companies, and organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include ... U.S. Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs; private companies; universities; and nonprofit organizations. NIH Institutes and Centers ( ...

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    Full Text Available ... for trials with cutting-edge approaches, such as gene therapy or new biological treatments. Health insurance and ... trials that involve high-risk procedures (such as gene therapy) or vulnerable patients (such as children). A ...

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    Full Text Available ... comparison groups by chance, rather than choice. This method helps ensure that any differences observed during a ... to learn more about clinical research and to search for clinical trials: NHLBI Clinical Trials Browse a ...

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    Full Text Available ... healthy people to test new approaches to prevention, diagnosis, or screening. In the past, clinical trial participants ... DSMBs for large trials comparing alternative strategies for diagnosis or treatment. In addition, the NIH requires DSMBs ...

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    Full Text Available ... at the smallest dose and for the shortest time possible. Clinical trials, like the two described above, ... in a clinical trial, find out ahead of time about costs and coverage. You should learn about ...

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    Full Text Available ... Clinical trials produce the best data available for health care decisionmaking. The purpose of clinical trials is research, ... and advance medical care. They also can help health care decisionmakers direct resources to the strategies and treatments ...

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    Full Text Available ... whether a new approach causes any harm. In later phases of clinical trials, researchers learn more about ... other National Institutes of Health (NIH) Institutes and Centers sponsor clinical trials. Many other groups, companies, and ...

  3. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or device is safe and effective for ... a Clinical Trial If you're interested in learning more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, ...

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    Full Text Available ... treatment, or device is safe and effective for humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials are research ... are required to have an IRB. Office for Human Research Protections The U.S. Department of Health and ...

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    Full Text Available ... these results are important because they advance medical knowledge and help improve patient care. Sponsorship and Funding ... All types of clinical trials contribute to medical knowledge and practice. Why Clinical Trials Are Important Clinical ...

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    Full Text Available ... well they work. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees these clinical trials. The NIH may partner with these companies or groups to help sponsor some trials. All ...

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    Full Text Available ... best data available for health care decisionmaking. The purpose of clinical trials is research, so the studies ... Thus, research in humans is needed. For safety purposes, clinical trials start with small groups of patients ...

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    Full Text Available ... trials produce the best data available for health care decisionmaking. The purpose of clinical trials is research, ... they advance medical knowledge and help improve patient care. Sponsorship and Funding The National Heart, Lung, and ...

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    Full Text Available ... Events About NHLBI About NHLBI Home Mission and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory ... a Clinical Trial If you're interested in learning more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, ...

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    Full Text Available ... and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, ... Customer Service/Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs and Careers Site Index About NHLBI National Institute ...

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    Full Text Available ... Some companies and groups sponsor clinical trials that test the safety of products, such as medicines, and how well they work. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees these clinical trials. ...

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    Full Text Available ... What to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, social workers, and other health care providers might ... enroll in a clinical trial, a doctor or nurse will give you an informed consent form that ...

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    Full Text Available ... and doctors' offices around the country. Benefits and Risks Possible Benefits Taking part in a clinical trial ... volunteer because they want to help others. Possible Risks Clinical trials do have risks and some downsides, ...

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    Full Text Available ... sponsored a trial of two different combinations of asthma treatments. The trial found that one of the ... much better than the other for moderate persistent asthma. The results provided important treatment information for doctors ...

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    Full Text Available ... Sponsors also may stop a trial, or part of a trial, early if the strategy or treatment is having harmful effects. Food and Drug Administration In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provides oversight ...

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    Full Text Available ... providers don't always cover all patient care costs for clinical trials. If you're thinking about ... clinical trial, find out ahead of time about costs and coverage. You should learn about the risks ...

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    Full Text Available ... including the NHLBI) usually sponsor trials that test principles or strategies. For example, one NHLBI study explored ... risks. Other examples of clinical trials that test principles or strategies include studies that explore whether surgery ...

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    Full Text Available ... and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, ... Learn More Connect With Us Contact Us Directly Policies Privacy Policy Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Accessibility ...

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    Full Text Available ... and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, ... your doctor about all of your treatment options. Together, you can make the best choice for you. ...

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    Full Text Available ... medical knowledge and practice. Why Clinical Trials Are Important Clinical trials are a key research tool for ... and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Customer Service/Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs ...

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    Full Text Available ... resources to the strategies and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, you may get tests or treatments in a hospital, clinic, or doctor's office. In some ways, taking part in a clinical trial is different ...

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    Full Text Available ... Health Topics / About Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, ... tool for advancing medical knowledge and patient care. Clinical research is done only if doctors don't know ...

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    Full Text Available ... about your health or fill out forms about how you feel. Some people will need to travel or stay in hospitals to take part in clinical trials. For example, the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, runs clinical trials. Many other clinical trials take place ...

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    Full Text Available ... more screening tests to see which test produces the best results. Some companies and groups sponsor clinical trials that test the ... and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees these clinical trials. The NIH may partner with these companies or groups to help sponsor some trials. All ...

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    Full Text Available ... child to enroll. Also, children aged 7 and older often must agree (assent) to take part in clinical trials. Clinical trials for children have the same scientific safeguards as clinical trials for adults. For more information, go to "How Do Clinical ...

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    Full Text Available ... give permission for their child to enroll. Also, children aged 7 and older often must agree (assent) to take part in clinical trials. Find a Clinical Trial If you're interested in learning more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, ...

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    Full Text Available ... part in a clinical trial is your decision. Talk with your doctor about all of your treatment options. Together, you can make the ... more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, talk with your doctor. He or she may know about ... clinical trials. NIH Clinical Research Studies ...

  9. Gadolinium Complex of 1,4,7,10-Tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-1,4,7-trisacetic Acid (DO3A) Conjugate of Tranexamates: A Quest for a Liver-specific Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Kisoo; Jeong, Hyunjeong; Kim, Heekyung; Choi, Garam; Chang, Yongmin; Kim, Taejeong; Suh, Kyungjin

    2014-01-01

    The work is directed toward the synthesis of a series of DO3A conjugates of tranexamates (1c-e) and their Gd complexes (2c-e) for use as a liver-specific MRI CA. All these complexes show thermodynamic and kinetic stabilities comparable to those of structurally related clinical agents such as Dotarem. Their R 1 relaxivities also compare well with those of commercial agent, ranging 3.68-4.84 mM -1 s -1 . In vivo MR images of mice with 2a-e reveal that only 2a exhibits liver-specificity. Although 2b and 2c show strong enhancement in liver, yet no bile-excretion is observed to be termed as a liver-specific agent. The rest behaves much like ordinary ECF CAs like Dotarem. The new series possess no toxicity to be employed in vivo

  10. A randomized prospective analysis of alteration of hemostatic function in patients receiving tranexamic acid and hydroxyethyl starch (130/0.4 undergoing off pump coronary artery bypass surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali Chakravarthy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative hemorrhagic complications is still one of the major problems in cardiac surgeries. It may be caused by surgical issues, coagulopathy caused by the side effects of the intravenous fluids administered to produce plasma volume expansion such as hydroxyl ethyl starch (HES. In order to thwart this hemorrhagic issue, few agents are available. Fibrinolytic inhibitors like tranexamic acid (TA may be effective modes to promote blood conservation; but the possible complications of thrombosis of coronary artery graft, precludes their generous use in coronary artery bypass graft surgery. The issue is a balance between agents that promote coagulation and those which oppose it. Therefore, in this study we have assessed the effects of concomitant use of HES and TA. Thromboelastogram (TEG was used to assess the effect of the combination of HES and TA. With ethical committee approval and patient′s consent, 100 consecutive patients were recruited for the study. Surgical and anesthetic techniques were standardized. Patients fulfilling our inclusion criteria were randomly allocated into 4 groups of 25 each. The patients in group A received 20 ml/kg of HES (130/0.4, 10 mg/kg of T.A over 30 minutes followed by infusion of 1 mg/kg/hr over the next 12 hrs. The patients in group B received Ringer′s lactate + TA at same dose. The patients in the Group C received 20 ml/kg of HES. Group D patients received RL. Fluid therapy was goal directed. Total blood loss was assessed. Reaction time (r, α angle, maximum amplitude (MA values of TEG were assessed at baseline, 12, 36 hrs. The possible perioperative myocardial infraction (MI was assessed by electrocardiogram (ECG and troponin T values at the baseline, postoperative day 1. Duration on ventilator, length of stay (LOS in the intensive care unit (ICU were also assessed. The demographical profile was similar among the groups. Use of HES increased blood loss significantly (P < 0.05. Concomitant use of TA

  11. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... part. Randomization Most clinical trials that have comparison groups use randomization. This involves assigning patients to different comparison groups by chance, rather than choice. This ...

  12. [Medical hemostasis. II. Systemic hemostatics, a critical evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bogaard, A E

    1989-02-01

    The control of spontaneous and traumatic haemorrhage is a matter of constant concern to veterinary practitioners. In some instances, the control of bleeding may be relatively simple using some topical therapeutic procedure, but when haemostatic defects are present, treatment with topical agents alone might not be sufficient, and more radical and life-saving procedures are indicated: replacement therapy with blood or blood products. As this is not easy to perform in most veterinary clinical situations, any therapeutic agent, which facilitates control of haemorrhage is a welcome addition to the therapeutic armament. Besides vitamin K, blood products and agents for topical use, there are only a few agents having a well-defined action on the mechanism of haemostasis. On the other hand several drugs are propagated in the Netherlands as systemic haemostatics in the treatment of bleeding disorders and prevention of haemorrhage during operation. None of these is of proven clinical value in veterinary practice. The only agent, which possibly showed some clinical effect: ethamsylate, has recently been withdrawn from the Dutch market by the manufacturers. Double-blind prospective trials with quantitation of loss of blood showed that antifibrinolytic agents such as tranexamic acid are clinically effective in certain conditions in humans. Because of their mode of action, it might reasonably be expected that these drugs might have positive results in veterinary medicine. Therefore, clinical trials with antifibrinolytic agents are urgently indicated to evaluate the effectiveness and side-effects of these drugs in animals showing severe bleeding or in the prevention of peroperative haemorrhage.

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    Full Text Available ... trial found that one of the combinations worked much better than the other for moderate persistent asthma. The results provided important treatment information for doctors and patients. The results from other clinical trials show what doesn't work or may cause harm. For example, the NHLBI ...

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    Full Text Available ... the clinical trial you take part in, the information gathered can help others and add to scientific knowledge. People who take part in clinical trials are vital to the process of improving medical care. Many people volunteer because ...

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    Full Text Available ... from other clinical trials show what doesn't work or may cause harm. For example, the NHLBI Women's Health Initiative ... safe a treatment is or how well it works. Children (aged 18 and younger) get ... legal consent for their child to take part in a clinical trial. When ...

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    Full Text Available ... other expenses (for example, travel and child care)? Who will be in charge of my care? What will happen after the trial? Taking part in a clinical trial is your decision. Talk with your doctor about all of your treatment ...

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    Full Text Available ... for trials with cutting-edge approaches, such as gene therapy or new biological treatments. Health insurance and health ... trials that involve high-risk procedures (such as gene therapy) or vulnerable patients (such as children). A DSMB's ...

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    Full Text Available ... to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, social workers, and other health care providers might be part of your treatment ... clinical trials are vital to the process of improving medical care. Many people ... participants, it may not work for you. A new treatment may have side ...

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    Full Text Available ... Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, social workers, and other health care providers might be part of your treatment ... phase II clinical trials. The risk of side effects might be even greater for ... treatments. Health insurance and health care providers don't always ...

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    Full Text Available ... a Clinical Trial If you're interested in learning more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, talk with your doctor. He or she may know about studies going on in your area. You can visit the following website to learn more about ...

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    Full Text Available ... benefits of lowering high blood pressure in the elderly outweighed the risks. Other examples of clinical trials ... child to enroll. Also, children aged 7 and older often must agree (assent) to ... as clinical trials for adults. For more information, go to "How Do Clinical ...

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    Full Text Available ... products, such as medicines, and how well they work. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees these clinical trials. ... cancer also increased. As a result, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration now recommends never using HT ... Clinical Trials Work If you take ...

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    Full Text Available ... include factors such as a patient's age and gender, the type and stage of disease, and whether ... How long will the trial last? Who will pay for the tests and treatments I receive? Will ...

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    Full Text Available ... medicines, and how well they work. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees these ... trials are a key research tool for advancing medical knowledge and patient care. ...

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    Full Text Available ... patients to find out whether a new approach causes any harm. In later phases of clinical trials, ... device improves patient outcomes; offers no benefit; or causes unexpected harm All of these results are important ...

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    Full Text Available ... and compare new treatments with other available treatments. Steps To Avoid Bias The researchers doing clinical trials take steps to avoid bias. "Bias" means that human choices ...

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    Full Text Available ... gathered can help others and add to scientific knowledge. People who take part in clinical trials are vital to the process of improving medical care. Many people volunteer because they want to help others. ...

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    Full Text Available ... materials, and offer advice on research-related issues. Data Safety Monitoring Board Every National Institutes of Health ( ... III clinical trial is required to have a Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB). This board consists ...

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    ... of Personal Stories Peers Celebrating Art Peers Celebrating Music Be Vocal Support Locator DBSA In-Person Support ... by participating in a clinical trial is to science first and to the patient second. More About ...

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    Full Text Available ... to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, social workers, and other health care providers might be ... the new approach. You also will have the support of a team of health care providers, who ...

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    Full Text Available ... final stages of a long and careful research process. The process often begins in a laboratory (lab), where scientists ... part in clinical trials are vital to the process of improving medical care. Many people volunteer because ...

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    Full Text Available ... as gene therapy) or vulnerable patients (such as children). A DSMB's role is to review data from a clinical trial for safety problems or differences in results among different groups. The DSMB also reviews research results ...

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    Full Text Available ... medical centers and doctors' offices around the country. Benefits and Risks Possible Benefits Taking part in a clinical trial can have many benefits. For example, you may gain access to new ...

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    Full Text Available ... Usually, a computer program makes the group assignments. Masking The term "masking" refers to not telling the clinical trial participants which treatment they're getting. Masking, or "blinding," helps avoid bias. For this reason, ...

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    Full Text Available ... you to explore NIH Clinical Center for patient recruitment and clinical trial information. For more information, please email the NIH Clinical Center Office of Patient Recruitment at cc-prpl@cc.nih.gov or call ...

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    Full Text Available ... organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include Government Agencies, such as the U.S. Departments of Defense and ... how you feel. Some people will need to travel or stay in hospitals to take part in ...

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    Full Text Available ... clinical trials are required to have an IRB. Office for Human Research Protections The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS’) Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) oversees all research ...

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    Full Text Available ... successfully developed and evaluated to fill an important gap in information and education for parents, clinicians, researchers, ... gathered can help others and add to scientific knowledge. People who take part in clinical trials are ...

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    Full Text Available ... Masking, or "blinding," helps avoid bias. For this reason, researchers also may not be told which treatments ... from a study at any time, for any reason. Also, during the trial, you have the right ...

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    Full Text Available ... studies. View funding information for clinical trials optimization . Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ... and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ...

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    Full Text Available Skip to main content U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Health Topics Health Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and ...

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    Full Text Available ... get special protection as research subjects. Almost always, parents must give legal consent for their child to ... trial's potential risks are greater than minimal, both parents must give permission for their child to enroll. ...

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    Full Text Available ... risk of heart disease in the first few years, and HT also increased the risk of stroke ... a safety measure. They ensure a trial excludes any people for whom the protocol has known risks ...

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    Full Text Available ... Initiative tested whether hormone therapy (HT) reduced the risk of heart disease in postmenopausal women. (When the trial began, HT was already in common use for the treatment of menopausal symptoms. It also ...

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    Full Text Available ... results. Clinical trials are one of the final stages of a long and careful research process. The ... a patient's age and gender, the type and stage of disease, and whether the patient has had ...

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    Full Text Available ... risk of heart disease in the first few years, and HT also increased the risk of stroke ... master plan called a protocol (PRO-to-kol). This plan explains how the trial will work. The ...

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    Full Text Available ... Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood ... of estrogen and progestin, the risk of breast cancer also increased. As a result, the U.S. Food ...

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    Full Text Available ... issues arise. Participation and Eligibility Each clinical trial defines who is eligible to take part in the ... the strategy or treatment is having harmful effects. Food and Drug Administration In the United States, the ...

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    Full Text Available Skip to main content U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Health Topics Health Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ...

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    Full Text Available ... treatment is having harmful effects. Food and Drug Administration In the United States, the Food and Drug ... life? Will I have to be in the hospital? How long will the trial last? Who will ...

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    Full Text Available ... the same scientific safeguards as clinical trials for adults. For more information, go to "How Do Clinical ... based on what is known to work in adults. To improve clinical care of children, more studies ...

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    Full Text Available ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ... to fill an important gap in information and education for parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general ...

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    Full Text Available ... clinical care of children, more studies are needed focusing on children's health with the goal to develop ... study? How might this trial affect my daily life? Will I have to be in the hospital? ...

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    Full Text Available ... procedures painful? What are the possible risks, side effects, and benefits of taking part in the study? How might this trial affect my daily life? Will I have to be in the hospital? ...

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    Full Text Available ... work best for certain illnesses or groups of people. Clinical trials produce the best data available for ... or animals doesn't always work well in people. Thus, research in humans is needed. For safety ...

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    Full Text Available ... sponsor clinical trials. Examples include Government Agencies, such as the U.S. Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs; ... age and frequency for doing screening tests, such as mammography; and compare two or more screening tests ...

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    Full Text Available ... harm. In later phases of clinical trials, researchers learn more about the new approach's risks and benefits. ... explore whether surgery or other medical treatments produce better results for certain illnesses or groups of people; ...

  1. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... offer a variety of funding mechanisms tailored to planning and conducting clinical trials at all phases, including ... Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs and Careers Site Index About NHLBI National Institute of Health ...

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    Full Text Available ... Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, ... whether hormone therapy (HT) reduced the risk of heart disease in postmenopausal women. (When the trial began, HT ...

  3. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... patients. Usually, a computer program makes the group assignments. Masking The term "masking" refers to not telling ... questions to ask your doctor and the research staff, go to "How Do Clinical Trials Protect Participants?" ...

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    Full Text Available ... study explored whether the benefits of lowering high blood pressure in the elderly outweighed the risks. Other examples of clinical trials that test principles or strategies include studies that explore whether ...

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    Full Text Available ... are ethical and that the participants' rights are protected. The IRB reviews the trial's protocol before the ... may know about studies going on in your area. You can visit the following website to learn ...

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    Full Text Available ... treatment is having harmful effects. Food and Drug Administration In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provides oversight for clinical trials that are ...

  7. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... a laboratory (lab), where scientists first develop and test new ideas. If an approach seems promising, the ... Centers (including the NHLBI) usually sponsor trials that test principles or strategies. For example, one NHLBI study ...

  8. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Children and Clinical Studies Program has been successfully developed and evaluated to fill an important gap in ... Possible Benefits Taking part in a clinical trial can have many benefits. For example, you may gain ...

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    Full Text Available ... questions to ask your doctor and the research staff, go to "How Do Clinical Trials Protect Participants?" ... in Bethesda, Maryland. The physicians, nurses, scientists and staff of the NHLBI encourage you to explore NIH ...

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    Full Text Available ... Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision ... women and that are ethnically diverse. Children also need clinical trials that focus on them, as medical ...

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    Full Text Available ... and evaluated to fill an important gap in information and education for parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general public. What to Expect During a clinical trial, ...

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    Full Text Available ... small groups of people for safety and side effects. Phase II clinical trials look at how well ... confirm how well treatments work, further examine side effects, and compare new treatments with other available treatments. ...

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    Full Text Available ... whether hormone therapy (HT) reduced the risk of heart disease in postmenopausal women. (When the trial began, HT ... also was increasingly being used for prevention of heart disease.) The study found that HT increased the risk ...

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    Full Text Available ... trials optimization . Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn more about getting to NIH Get ... and Funding Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn more about getting to NIH Connect ...

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    Full Text Available ... Events About NHLBI About NHLBI Home Mission and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory ... offer a variety of funding mechanisms tailored to planning and conducting clinical trials at all phases, including ...

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    Full Text Available ... NHLBI About NHLBI Home Mission and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget ... always, parents must give legal consent for their child to take part in a clinical trial. When ...

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    Full Text Available ... and organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include Government Agencies, such as the U.S. Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs; private companies; universities; and nonprofit organizations. NIH Institutes and ...

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    Full Text Available ... records can quickly show this information if safety issues arise. Participation and Eligibility Each clinical trial defines ... and materials, and offer advice on research-related issues. Data Safety Monitoring Board Every National Institutes of ...

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    Full Text Available ... that the participants' rights are protected. The IRB reviews the trial's protocol before the study begins. An IRB will only approve research that deals with medically important questions ...

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    Full Text Available ... women and that are ethnically diverse. Children also need clinical trials that focus on them, as medical ... often differ for children. For example, children may need lower doses of certain medicines or smaller medical ...

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    Full Text Available ... you may get tests or treatments in a hospital, clinic, or doctor's office. In some ways, taking ... people will need to travel or stay in hospitals to take part in clinical trials. For example, ...

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    Full Text Available ... care providers might be part of your treatment team. They will monitor your health closely. You may ... taking part in a clinical trial. Your treatment team also may ask you to do other tasks. ...

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    Full Text Available ... new treatments in small groups of people for safety and side effects. Phase II clinical trials look at how well treatments work and further review these treatments for safety. Phase ...

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    Full Text Available ... Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood ... these results are important because they advance medical knowledge and help improve patient care. Sponsorship and Funding ...

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    Full Text Available ... and organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include Government Agencies, such as the U.S. Departments of Defense ... FOIA) Accessibility Copyright and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, ...

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    Full Text Available ... to preexisting differences between the patients. Usually, a computer program makes the group assignments. Masking The term " ... under way. For example, some trials are stopped early if benefits from a strategy or treatment are ...

  7. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... as the U.S. Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs; private companies; universities; and nonprofit organizations. NIH Institutes ... for parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general public. What to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, ...

  8. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatment of menopausal symptoms. It also was increasingly being used for prevention of heart disease.) The study ... a trial are due to the different strategies being used, not to preexisting differences between the patients. ...

  9. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... combination of estrogen and progestin, the risk of breast cancer also increased. As a result, the U.S. Food ... to test new approaches to prevention, diagnosis, or screening. In the past, clinical trial participants often were ...

  10. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... from other clinical trials show what doesn't work or may cause harm. For example, the NHLBI Women's Health Initiative tested whether hormone therapy (HT) reduced the risk of heart disease in postmenopausal women. ( ...

  11. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A- ... assumed that trial results were valid for other populations as well. Researchers now realize that women and ...

  12. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... always, parents must give legal consent for their child to take part in a clinical trial. When ... minimal, both parents must give permission for their child to enroll. Also, children aged 7 and older ...

  13. The research agenda for trauma critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asehnoune, Karim; Balogh, Zsolt; Citerio, Giuseppe; Cap, Andre; Billiar, Timothy; Stocchetti, Nino; Cohen, Mitchell J; Pelosi, Paolo; Curry, Nicola; Gaarder, Christine; Gruen, Russell; Holcomb, John; Hunt, Beverley J; Juffermans, Nicole P; Maegele, Mark; Midwinter, Mark; Moore, Frederick A; O'Dwyer, Michael; Pittet, Jean-François; Schöchl, Herbert; Schreiber, Martin; Spinella, Philip C; Stanworth, Simon; Winfield, Robert; Brohi, Karim

    2017-09-01

    In this research agenda on the acute and critical care management of trauma patients, we concentrate on the major factors leading to death, namely haemorrhage and traumatic brain injury (TBI). In haemostasis biology, the results of randomised controlled trials have led to the therapeutic focus moving away from the augmentation of coagulation factors (such as recombinant factor VIIa) and towards fibrinogen supplementation and administration of antifibrinolytics such as tranexamic acid. Novel diagnostic techniques need to be evaluated to determine whether an individualised precision approach is superior to current empirical practice. The timing and efficacy of platelet transfusions remain in question, while new blood products need to be developed and evaluated, including whole blood variants, lyophilised products and novel red cell storage modalities. The current cornerstones of TBI management are intracranial pressure control, maintenance of cerebral perfusion pressure and avoidance of secondary insults (such as hypotension, hypoxaemia, hyperglycaemia and pyrexia). Therapeutic hypothermia and decompressive craniectomy are controversial therapies. Further research into these strategies should focus on identifying which subgroups of patients may benefit from these interventions. Prediction of the long-term outcome early after TBI remains challenging. Early magnetic resonance imaging has recently been evaluated for predicting the long-term outcome in mild and severe TBI. Novel biomarkers may also help in outcome prediction and may predict chronic neurological symptoms. For trauma in general, rehabilitation is complex and multidimensional, and the optimal timing for commencement of rehabilitation needs investigation. We propose priority areas for clinical trials in the next 10 years.

  14. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an important gap in information and education for parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general public. What to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, social workers, and other health care providers might be part of your treatment team. ...

  15. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... taking the same treatment the same way. These patients are closely watched by Data and Safety Monitoring Boards. Even if you don't directly ... risk procedures (such as gene therapy) or vulnerable patients (such as ... trial for safety problems or differences in results among different groups. ...

  16. The Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Jen

    2004-01-01

    Growing up in Flemington, New Jersey, put Jen Bryant in the heart of the lore behind the Lindbergh baby kidnapping. Family stories of the events of the day and extensive research led to "The Trial," a novel in verse. The first several parts of this novel are included here.

  17. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Skip to main content U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Health Topics Health Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep ...

  18. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... treatments produce better results for certain illnesses or groups of people; look at the best age and frequency for doing screening tests, such as mammography; and compare two or more screening tests to see which test ... Some companies and groups sponsor clinical trials that test the safety of ...

  19. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient has had certain treatments or has other health problems. Eligibility criteria ensure that new approaches are tested ... public. What to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, social workers, and other health care providers might be part of your treatment ...

  20. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... This shows how the approach affects a living body and whether it's harmful. However, an approach that works well in the lab or animals doesn't always work well in people. Thus, research in humans is needed. For safety purposes, clinical trials start ...

  1. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... edge approaches, such as gene therapy or new biological treatments. Health insurance and health care providers don't ... of a trial, early if the strategy or treatment is having harmful effects. Food and Drug Administration In the United States, the Food and ...

  2. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... U.S. Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs; private companies; universities; and nonprofit organizations. NIH Institutes and Centers (including the NHLBI) usually sponsor trials that test principles or strategies. For example, one NHLBI study explored whether the ...

  3. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... to main content U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Health Topics Health Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and ...

  4. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... protect patients and help produce reliable study results. Clinical trials are one of the final stages of a long and careful research process. The process often begins in a laboratory (lab), where scientists first develop and test new ...

  5. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... benefits of lowering high blood pressure in the elderly outweighed the risks. Other examples of clinical trials ... child to enroll. Also, children aged 7 and older often must agree (assent) to take part ... about how you feel. Some people will need to travel or stay in hospitals ...

  6. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep ... Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants ... in the Press Research Features All Events Past Events Upcoming ...

  7. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... safe a treatment is or how well it works. Children (aged 18 and younger) get special protection as research subjects. Almost always, parents must give legal consent for their child to take part in a clinical trial. When ...

  8. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... As a result, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration now recommends never using HT to prevent heart disease. When HT is used for menopausal symptoms, it should be taken only at the smallest dose and for the shortest time possible. Clinical trials, like the two described above, ...

  9. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies ... include factors such as a patient's age and gender, the type and stage of disease, ... helps ensure that any differences observed during a trial are due to the ...

  10. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... an important gap in information and education for parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general public. What to Expect During ... trial's potential risks are greater than minimal, both parents must give permission for their child to enroll. Also, children aged 7 and older ...

  11. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Wide Range of Audiences The Children and Clinical Studies Program has been successfully developed and evaluated to fill an important gap in information and education for parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general public. What to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, ...

  12. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... approach that works well in the lab or animals doesn't always work well in people. Thus, research in humans is needed. For safety purposes, clinical trials start with small groups of patients to find out whether a ...

  13. Textbook of clinical trials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Day, Simon; Machin, David; Green, Sylvan B

    2006-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 The Development of Clinical Trials Simon...

  14. 高效液相色谱法测定牙膏中的氨甲环酸%Determination of Tranexamic Acid in Toothpaste by High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨培; 谭建华; 李慧勇; 王继才; 夏泽敏; 熊小婷; 刘家(晋); 李燕飞

    2017-01-01

    建立了丹磺酰氯柱前衍生/高效液相色谱测定牙膏中氨甲环酸(TA)的方法.牙膏经甲醇提取、氮吹至干,再用丹磺酰氯进行衍生.衍生物通过X-Bridge C18色谱柱(250 mm×4.6 mm×5μm)分离,以乙腈和0.1%甲酸水溶液为流动相梯度洗脱,在紫外波长250 nm条件下进行定量测定.系统考察了缓冲溶液pH值、衍生温度和衍生时间对氨甲环酸衍生效率的影响.结果表明,在优化实验条件下,氨甲环酸衍生物与基体杂质达到有效分离,在1~425 mg/L范围内线性关系良好,相关系数为0.999 5;在20,200,1 600 mg/kg 3个加标浓度下的回收率为98.7% ~ 102%,相对标准偏差为0.85% ~2.5%,方法检出限为2.0 mg/kg.该方法准确、可靠、灵敏度高,适用于各类牙膏中氨甲环酸的测定.%A high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method was developed for the determination of tranexamic acid (TA) in toothpaste.Sample was extracted with methanol,and the extract was evaporated to dryness under nitrogen before it was derived with dansyl chloride.Chromatographic separation was performed on an X-Bridge C1s(250 mm ×4.6 mm ×5 μm) column using 0.1% formic acid-acetonitrile mixture aqueous solution as mobile phase.The ultraviolet detection wavelength was set at 250 nm.Effects of pH value of buffer solution,reaction temperature and time were investigated.Under the optimized experimental conditions,the TA derivative was successfully separated from the other impurities,and showed a good linearity in the range of 1-425 mg/L with a correlation coefficient(r) of 0.999 5.At three spiked concentrations of 20,200,1 600 mg/kg,the recoveries ranged from 98.7% to 102% with relative standard deviations(RSDs) of 0.85%-2.5%.The limit of detection for this method was 2.0 mg/kg.With the advantages of accuracy,reliability and high sensitivity,this method was suitable for the determination of tranexamic acid in different kinds of toothpaste.

  15. Types of Cancer Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the several types of cancer clinical trials, including treatment trials, prevention trials, screening trials, supportive and palliative care trials. Each type of trial is designed to answer different research questions.

  16. Alternatives to allogeneic platelet transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desborough, Michael J R; Smethurst, Peter A; Estcourt, Lise J; Stanworth, Simon J

    2016-11-01

    Allogeneic platelet transfusions are widely used for the prevention and treatment of bleeding in thrombocytopenia. Recent evidence suggests platelet transfusions have limited efficacy and are associated with uncertain immunomodulatory risks and concerns about viral or bacterial transmission. Alternatives to transfusion are a well-recognised tenet of Patient Blood Management, but there has been less focus on different strategies to reduce bleeding risk by comparison to platelet transfusion. Direct alternatives to platelet transfusion include agents to stimulate endogenous platelet production (thrombopoietin mimetics), optimising platelet adhesion to endothelium by treating anaemia or increasing von Willebrand factor levels (desmopressin), increasing formation of cross-linked fibrinogen (activated recombinant factor VII, fibrinogen concentrate or recombinant factor XIII), decreasing fibrinolysis (tranexamic acid or epsilon aminocaproic acid) or using artificial or modified platelets (cryopreserved platelets, lyophilised platelets, haemostatic particles, liposomes, engineered nanoparticles or infusible platelet membranes). The evidence base to support the use of these alternatives is variable, but an area of active research. Much of the current randomised controlled trial focus is on evaluation of the use of thrombopoietin mimetics and anti-fibrinolytics. It is also recognised that one alternative strategy to platelet transfusion is choosing not to transfuse at all. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Diagnosis and Treatment of Hyperfibrinolysis in Trauma (A European Perspective).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Lewis S; Brohi, Karim; Davenport, Ross A

    2017-03-01

    Fibrinolysis activation occurs almost universally after severe trauma. Systemic hyperfibrinolysis is a key component of acute traumatic coagulopathy and associated with poor clinical outcomes, although controversy exists over optimal treatment strategies. The mechanistic drivers and dynamics of fibrinolytic activation in response to injury and trauma resuscitation are currently unclear. Furthermore, therapeutic triggers are compounded by the lack of a sensitive and rapid diagnostic tool, with discrepancy between hyperfibrinolysis diagnosed by viscoelastic hemostatic assays versus biomarkers for fibrinolysis. Rotational thromboelastometry and thromboelastography appear capable of detecting the severest forms of hyperfibrinolysis but are relatively insensitive to moderate, yet clinically significant fibrinolytic activation. Rapid evaluation of the current status of the fibrinolytic system remains a challenge and therefore the decision whether to administer an antifibrinolytic agent should be based on available evidence from clinical trials. In line with current European guidelines, we recommend that all bleeding trauma patients, and in particular, severely injured patients with evidence of hemorrhagic shock, should receive early empiric tranexamic acid. This review explains our current knowledge of the pathophysiological pathways which induce hyperfibrinolysis in trauma hemorrhage, evaluates the available diagnostic modalities, and describes current treatment strategies. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. Understanding Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watch these videos to learn about some basic aspects of cancer clinical trials such as the different phases of clinical trials, methods used to protect patient safety, and how the costs of clinical trials are covered.

  19. Using social media for community consultation and public disclosure in exception from informed consent trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Shannon W; Williams, Carolyn; Gray, Randal; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Wang, Henry E; Bosarge, Patrick L

    2016-06-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration and the Department of Health and Human Services outline regulations allowing an exception from informed consent (EFIC) for research conducted in an emergency setting. Acute care clinical trials using EFIC must include community consultation and public disclosure (CC/PD) activities. We describe our experience using social media to facilitate the CC/PD process in two trauma resuscitation clinical trials. We conducted local CC/PD activities for two multicenter trauma clinical trials, Pragmatic, Randomized Optimal Platelet and Plasma Ratios (PROPPR) and Prehospital Tranexamic Acid Use for Traumatic Brain Injury (ROC-TXA). As part of the CC/PD process, we developed research study advertisements using the social media Web site Facebook. The Facebook advertisements directed users to a regional study Web site that contained trial information. We targeted the advertisements to specific demographic users, in specific geographic areas. We analyzed the data using descriptive statistics. During the study periods, the PROPPR Facebook advertisement was displayed 5,001,520 times (12 displays per target population) with 374 individuals selecting the advertisement. The ROC-TXA Facebook advertisement was displayed 3,806,448 times (8 per target population) with 790 individuals selecting the advertisement. Respondents to both Facebook advertisements were mostly male (52.6%), with the highest proportion between the ages 15 years and 24 years (28.2%). Collectively, 26.9% of individuals that clicked on the Facebook advertisement spent more than 3 minutes on the study Web site (3-49 minutes). Commonly accessed Web pages were "contact us" (PROPPR, 5.5%; ROC-TXA, 7.7%), "study-specific FAQs" (PROPPR, 2.4%; ROC-TXA, 6.7%), and "opt out of research" (PROPPR, 2.5%; ROC-TXA, 3.8%). Of 51 total individuals viewing the opt out of research information (PROPPR, 19; ROC-TXA, 32), time spent on that specific page was modest (PROPPR, 62 seconds; ROC-TXA, 55 seconds

  20. Utilizing Social Media for Community Consultation and Public Disclosure in Exception from Informed Consent Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Shannon W.; Williams, Carolyn; Gray, Randal; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Wang, Henry E.; Bosarge, Patrick L.

    2016-01-01

    Background The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Department of Health and Human Services outline regulations allowing an Exception From Informed Consent (EFIC) for research conducted in an emergency settings. Acute care clinical trials utilizing EFIC must include community consultation and public disclosure (CC/PD) activities. We describe our experience using social media to facilitate the CC/PD process in two trauma resuscitation clinical trials. Methods We conducted local CC/PD activities for two multicenter trauma clinical trials, Pragmatic, Randomized Optimal Platelet and Plasma Ratios (PROPPR) and Prehospital Tranexamic Acid Use for Traumatic Brain Injury (ROC TXA). As part of the CC/PD process, we developed research study advertisements using the social media website Facebook. The Facebook advertisements directed users to a regional study website that contained trial information. We targeted the advertisements to specific demographic users, in specific geographic areas. We analyzed the data using descriptive statistics. Results During the study periods, the PROPPR Facebook advertisement was displayed 5,001,520 times, (12 displays per target population) with 374 individuals selected the advertisement. The ROC-TXA Facebook advertisement was displayed 3,806,448 times (8 per target population) with 790 individuals selecting the advertisement. Respondents to both Facebook advertisements were mostly male (52.6%), with the highest proportion between the ages 15-24 (28.2%). Collectively, 26.9% of individuals that clicked on the Facebook advertisement, spent > 3 minutes on the study website [3min – 49 min]. Commonly accessed webpages were “Contact Us” (PROPPR 5.5%, TXA 7.7%), “Study-specific FAQs” (PROPPR 2.4%), ROC-TXA 6.7%) and “Opt-Out of Research” (PROPPR 2.5%, ROC-TXA 3.8%). Of 51 total individuals viewing the opt-out of research information (PROPPR 19, ROC-TXA 32), Time spent on that specific page was modest (PROPPR 62 seconds, ROC-TXA 55

  1. Clinical trials of homoeopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleijnen, J; Knipschild, P; ter Riet, G

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To establish whether there is evidence of the efficacy of homoeopathy from controlled trials in humans. DESIGN--Criteria based meta-analysis. Assessment of the methodological quality of 107 controlled trials in 96 published reports found after an extensive search. Trials were scored using a list of predefined criteria of good methodology, and the outcome of the trials was interpreted in relation to their quality. SETTING--Controlled trials published world wide. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Results of the trials with the best methodological quality. Trials of classical homoeopathy and several modern varieties were considered separately. RESULTS--In 14 trials some form of classical homoeopathy was tested and in 58 trials the same single homoeopathic treatment was given to patients with comparable conventional diagnosis. Combinations of several homoeopathic treatments were tested in 26 trials; isopathy was tested in nine trials. Most trials seemed to be of very low quality, but there were many exceptions. The results showed a positive trend regardless of the quality of the trial or the variety of homeopathy used. Overall, of the 105 trials with interpretable results, 81 trials indicated positive results whereas in 24 trials no positive effects of homoeopathy were found. The results of the review may be complicated by publication bias, especially in such a controversial subject as homoeopathy. CONCLUSIONS--At the moment the evidence of clinical trials is positive but not sufficient to draw definitive conclusions because most trials are of low methodological quality and because of the unknown role of publication bias. This indicates that there is a legitimate case for further evaluation of homoeopathy, but only by means of well performed trials. PMID:1825800

  2. Managing clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenyon Sara

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Managing clinical trials, of whatever size and complexity, requires efficient trial management. Trials fail because tried and tested systems handed down through apprenticeships have not been documented, evaluated or published to guide new trialists starting out in this important field. For the past three decades, trialists have invented and reinvented the trial management wheel. We suggest that to improve the successful, timely delivery of important clinical trials for patient benefit, it is time to produce standard trial management guidelines and develop robust methods of evaluation.

  3. Remune trial will stop; new trials planned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, J S

    1999-05-21

    A clinical trial using remune, the anti-HIV vaccine developed by the late Dr. Jonas Salk, has been ended. The study is a clinical-endpoint trial which looks for statistically significant differences in AIDS sickness or death between patients who add remune to their treatment regimens versus those who use a placebo. Agouron Pharmaceuticals and the Immune Response Corporation who were conducting the trial announced their decision to stop it after an analysis by the Data Safety Monitoring Board. No differences in clinical endpoints were found and it was projected that continuing the trial would likely not find any. The companies are now planning two new Phase III trials using viral load testing rather than clinical endpoints as study criteria.

  4. Research Areas - Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about NCI programs and initiatives that sponsor, conduct, develop, or support clinical trials, including NCI’s Clinical Trial Network (NCTN) and NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) initiatives.

  5. Clinical trial methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peace, Karl E; Chen, Ding-Geng

    2011-01-01

    "Now viewed as its own scientific discipline, clinical trial methodology encompasses the methods required for the protection of participants in a clinical trial and the methods necessary to provide...

  6. Hepatitis C: Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Public Home » Hepatitis C » Treatment Decisions Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... can I find out about participating in a hepatitis C clinical trial? Many trials are being conducted ...

  7. Understanding noninferiority trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seokyung Hahn

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Noninferiority trials test whether a new experimental treatment is not unacceptably less efficacious than an active control treatment already in use. With continuous improvements in health technologies, standard care, and clinical outcomes, the incremental benefits of newly developed treatments may be only marginal over existing treatments. Sometimes assigning patients to a placebo is unethical. In such circumstances, there has been increasing emphasis on the use of noninferiority trial designs. Noninferiority trials are more complex to design, conduct, and interpret than typical superiority trials. This paper reviews the concept of noninferiority trials and discusses some important issues related to them.

  8. DNA, histones and neutrophil extracellular traps exert anti-fibrinolytic effects in a plasma environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varjú, Imre; Longstaff, Colin; Szabó, László; Farkas, Ádám Zoltán; Varga-Szabó, Veronika Judit; Tanka-Salamon, Anna; Machovich, Raymund; Kolev, Krasimir

    2015-06-01

    In response to various inflammatory stimuli, neutrophils secrete neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), web-like meshworks of DNA, histones and granular components forming supplementary scaffolds in venous and arterial thrombi. Isolated DNA and histones are known to promote thrombus formation and render fibrin clots more resistant to mechanical forces and tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA)-induced enzymatic digestion. The present study extends our earlier observations to a physiologically more relevant environment including plasma clots and NET-forming neutrophils. A range of techniques was employed including imaging (scanning electron microscopy (SEM), confocal laser microscopy, and photoscanning of macroscopic lysis fronts), clot permeability measurements, turbidimetric lysis and enzyme inactivation assays. Addition of DNA and histones increased the median fibre diameter of plasma clots formed with 16 nM thrombin from 108 to 121 and 119 nm, respectively, and decreased their permeability constant from 6.4 to 3.1 and 3.7×10(-9) cm(2). Histones effectively protected thrombin from antithrombin-induced inactivation, while DNA inhibited plasminogen activation on the surface of plasma clots and their plasmin-induced resolution by 20 and 40 %, respectively. DNA and histones, as well as NETs secreted by phorbol-myristate-acetate-activated neutrophils, slowed down the tPA-driven lysis of plasma clots and the latter effect could be reversed by the addition of DNase (streptodornase). SEM images taken after complete digestion of fibrin in NET-containing plasma clots evidenced retained NET scaffold that was absent in DNase-treated clots. Our results show that DNA and histones alter the fibrin architecture in plasma clots, while NETs contribute to a decreased lytic susceptibility that can be overcome by DNase.

  9. 1029: Tranexamic Acid for Pediatric Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    parts. Of total 74 cases of rib fracture , the number of fracture between bone scan and CT are identical in only 9 cases (12%), and different in 65...OF BONE SCANNING IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF HIDDEN FRACTURE IN MAJOR TRAUMA PATIENTS Hang Joo Cho1, Sung Jeep Kim1, Jin Seok Baek2; 1The Catholic University...the hidden fracture . We investi- gated the usefulness of bone scan in the diagnosis of hidden fracture of major trauma patients. Methods: This study

  10. Treatment for preventing bleeding in people with haemophilia or other congenital bleeding disorders undergoing surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Antonio; Windyga, Jerzy; Tufano, Antonella; Yeung, Cindy; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario

    2015-02-09

    In people with haemophilia or other congenital bleeding disorders undergoing surgical interventions, haemostatic treatment is needed in order to correct the underlying coagulation abnormalities and minimise the bleeding risk. This treatment varies according to the specific haemostatic defect, its severity and the type of surgical procedure. The aim of treatment is to ensure adequate haemostatic coverage for as long as the bleeding risk persists and until wound healing is complete. To assess the effectiveness and safety of different haemostatic regimens (type, dose and duration, modality of administration and target haemostatic levels) administered in people with haemophilia or other congenital bleeding disorders for preventing bleeding complications during and after surgical procedures. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Coagulopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Date of the last search: 20 November 2014. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing any hemostatic treatment regimen to no treatment or to another active regimen in children and adults with haemophilia or other congenital bleeding disorders undergoing any surgical intervention. Two authors independently assessed trials (eligibility and risks of bias) and extracted data. Meta-analyses were performed on available and relevant data. Of the 16 identified trials, four (112 participants) were eligible for inclusion.Two trials evaluated 59 people with haemophilia A and B undergoing 63 dental extractions. Trials compared the use of a different type (tranexamic acid or epsilon-aminocaproic acid) and regimen of antifibrinolytic agents as haemostatic support to the initial replacement treatment. Neither trial specifically addressed mortality (one of this review's primary outcomes); however, in the frame

  11. The effectiveness of a de-implementation strategy to reduce low-value blood management techniques in primary hip and knee arthroplasty: a pragmatic cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorn, Veronique M A; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J; van der Hout, Anja; Hofstede, Stefanie N; So-Osman, Cynthia; van den Akker-van Marle, M Elske; Kaptein, Ad A; Stijnen, Theo; Koopman-van Gemert, Ankie W M M; Dahan, Albert; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M M; Nelissen, Rob G H H; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti

    2017-05-30

    Perioperative autologous blood salvage and preoperative erythropoietin are not (cost) effective to reduce allogeneic transfusion in primary hip and knee arthroplasty, but are still used. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a theoretically informed multifaceted strategy to de-implement these low-value blood management techniques. Twenty-one Dutch hospitals participated in this pragmatic cluster-randomized trial. At baseline, data were gathered for 924 patients from 10 intervention and 1040 patients from 11 control hospitals undergoing hip or knee arthroplasty. The intervention included a multifaceted de-implementation strategy which consisted of interactive education, feedback on blood management performance, and a comparison with benchmark hospitals, aimed at orthopedic surgeons and anesthesiologists. After the intervention, data were gathered for 997 patients from the intervention and 1096 patients from the control hospitals. The randomization outcome was revealed after the baseline measurement. Primary outcomes were use of blood salvage and erythropoietin. Secondary outcomes included postoperative hemoglobin, length of stay, allogeneic transfusions, and use of local infiltration analgesia (LIA) and tranexamic acid (TXA). The use of blood salvage (OR 0.08, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.30) and erythropoietin (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.97) reduced significantly over time, but did not differ between intervention and control hospitals (blood salvage OR 1.74 95% CI 0.27 to 11.39, erythropoietin OR 1.33, 95% CI 0.26 to 6.84). Postoperative hemoglobin levels were significantly higher (β 0.21, 95% CI 0.08 to 0.34) and length of stay shorter (β -0.36, 95% CI -0.64 to -0.09) in hospitals receiving the multifaceted strategy, compared with control hospitals and after adjustment for baseline. Transfusions did not differ between the intervention and control hospitals (OR 1.06, 95% CI 0.63 to 1.78). Both LIA (OR 0.0, 95% CI 0.0 to 0.0) and TXA (OR 0.3, 95% CI 0.2 to 0

  12. Clinical trial methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peace, Karl E; Chen, Ding-Geng

    2011-01-01

    ... in the pharmaceutical industry, Clinical trial methodology emphasizes the importance of statistical thinking in clinical research and presents the methodology as a key component of clinical research...

  13. Comparability of prostate trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suciu, S; Sylvester, R; Iversen, P

    1993-01-01

    The present overview of advanced prostate cancer required the identification of randomized clinical trials studying the question of maximal androgen blockade versus the classic castration therapy. The heterogeneity of the trials concerned the type of castration (surgical or chemical) and the type...

  14. Conducting clinical trials in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, K T

    1999-04-01

    All clinical trials in Singapore will now have to conform to the Medicines (Clinical Trials) Amended Regulations 1998 and the Singapore Good Clinical Practice (GCP) Guidelines 1998. The Medical Clinical Research Committee (MCRC) has been established to oversee the conduct of clinical drug trials in Singapore and together with the legislations in place, these will ensure that clinical trials conducted in Singapore are properly controlled and the well-being of trial subjects are safe guarded. All clinical drug trials require a Clinical Trial Certificate from the MCRC before the trial can proceed. The hospital ethics committee (EC) vets the application for a trial certificate before it is sent to MCRC. The drug company sponsoring the trial has to indemnify the trial investigators and the hospital for negligence arising from the trial. The MCRC, apart from ensuring the safety of trial subjects, has to provide continuing review of the clinical trial and monitors adverse events in the course of the trial. The EC will conduct continuing review of clinical trials. When a non-drug clinical trial is carried out, the EC will ensure that the proposed protocol addresses ethical concerns and meets regulatory requirements for such trials. There is great potential for pharmaceutical Research & Development (R&D) in Singapore. We must develop our skills and infrastructure in clinical trials to enable Singapore to be a regional hub for R&D of drugs in Asia.

  15. Fundamentals of clinical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Lawrence M; DeMets, David L; Reboussin, David M; Granger, Christopher B

    2015-01-01

    This is the fifth edition of a very successful textbook on clinical trials methodology, written by recognized leaders who have long and extensive experience in all areas of clinical trials. The three authors of the first four editions have been joined by two others who add great expertise.  Most chapters have been revised considerably from the fourth edition.  A chapter on regulatory issues has been included and the chapter on data monitoring has been split into two and expanded.  Many contemporary clinical trial examples have been added.  There is much new material on adverse events, adherence, issues in analysis, electronic data, data sharing, and international trials.  This book is intended for the clinical researcher who is interested in designing a clinical trial and developing a protocol. It is also of value to researchers and practitioners who must critically evaluate the literature of published clinical trials and assess the merits of each trial and the implications for the care and treatment of ...

  16. Update on TROG trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, D.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Validation of treatment methodologies can only be achieved in the context of unambiguous, efficiently managed, randomised and controlled clinical trials. Since 1991, the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) has coordinated over 29 protocols in radiation oncology, including several key randomised controlled trials. The impetus behind TROG is the establishment of an evidence base for particular approaches to radiotherapy and its adjunct use with alternative and complementary treatment methods. As the level of technology incorporated into radiotherapy continues to increase, as the need for improved accuracy in dose assessment increases and as the requirements of realistic quality assurance (QA) for clinical trials becomes more demanding it is imperative that all professionals involved in radiotherapy, including physicists, become actively involved in the QA of trials. This is particularly important for large scale multi-centre trials which intend to prove the benefits of particular treatment approaches on a national or international stage rather then in the context of a single clinic. This talk will: 1. Examine the outcomes of TROG trials to date in terms of the information obtained. 2. Briefly consider current and impending TROG trials and their requirements in terms of clinical and physics input. 3. Examine the results of international clinical trials in terms of the influence they have had on radiotherapy practice and health outcomes, and the advantages they have obtained by consistent co-operation between clinical and technological staff. 4. Consider the benefits of multi-centre clinical trials and the QA controls that are necessary to ensure accuracy of resulting recommendations. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  17. ClinicalTrials.gov

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Provides patients, family members, health care professionals, and members of the public easy access to information on clinical trials for a wide range of diseases...

  18. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katz, J N; Losina, E; Lohmander, L S

    2015-01-01

    To highlight methodological challenges in the design and conduct of randomized trials of surgical interventions and to propose strategies for addressing these challenges. This paper focuses on three broad areas: enrollment; intervention; and assessment including implications for analysis. For eac...

  19. Cancer clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheurlen, A.; Kay, R.; Baum, M.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on Cancer clinical trials: A critical appraisal. Topics covered include: Scientific fundamentals; Heterogeneous treatment effects; On combining information: Historical controls, overviews, and comprehensive cohort studies; and assessment of quality of life

  20. Comparability of prostate trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suciu, S; Sylvester, R; Iversen, P

    1993-01-01

    The present overview of advanced prostate cancer required the identification of randomized clinical trials studying the question of maximal androgen blockade versus the classic castration therapy. The heterogeneity of the trials concerned the type of castration (surgical or chemical) and the type...... of antiandrogen (flutamide, Anandron, or cyproterone acetate) added to castration. This paper reviews the different types of heterogeneity that might exist among trials that are involved in the overview: study design, randomization procedure, treatment evaluation, statistical evaluation, and data maturity....... In order to overcome these various types of heterogeneity and to compare like with like, the treatment comparison should be stratified a posteriori by question (i.e., type of castration or type of anti-androgen studied) and by study. In this way, one may draw valid conclusions. Of course, those trials...

  1. Falsificationism and clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senn, S J

    1991-11-01

    The relevance of the philosophy of Sir Karl Popper to the planning, conduct and analysis of clinical trials is examined. It is shown that blinding and randomization can only be regarded as valuable for the purpose of refuting universal hypotheses. The purpose of inclusion criteria is also examined. It is concluded that a misplaced belief in induction is responsible for many false notions regarding clinical trials.

  2. The OA Trial Bank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Middelkoop, Marienke; Arden, N K; Atchia, I.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of intra-articular (IA) glucocorticoids for knee or hip osteoarthritis (OA) in specific subgroups of patients with severe pain and inflammatory signs using individual patient data (IPD) from existing trials. Design: Randomized trials evaluating one or more IA...... glucocorticoid preparation in patients with knee or hip OA, published from 1995 up to June 2012 were selected from the literature. IPD obtained from original trials included patient and disease characteristics and outcomes measured. The primary outcome was pain severity at short-term follow-up (up to 4 weeks...... Interval 1.50-26.31) when receiving IA glucocorticoid injection compared to placebo. No statistical significant interaction effects were found between inflammatory signs and IA glucocorticoid injections compared to placebo and to tidal irrigation at all follow-up points. Conclusions: This IPD meta...

  3. The CYTONOX trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Christina; Mikus, Gerd; Christensen, Hanne Rolighed

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In Denmark, it is estimated that 3-5% of children are obese. Obesity is associated with pathophysiological alterations that may lead to alterations in the pharmacokinetics of drugs. In adults, obesity was found to influence important drug-metabolising enzyme pathways. The impact...... of obesity-related alterations on drug metabolism and its consequences for drug dosing remains largely unknown in both children and adults. An altered drug metabolism may contribute significantly to therapeutic failure or toxicity. The aim of this trial is to investigate the in vivo activity of CYP3A4, CYP2E......1 and CYP1A2 substrates in obese versus non-obese children. METHODS: The CYTONOX trial is an open-label explorative pharmacokinetic trial. We intend to include 50 obese and 50 non-obese children. The primary end points are: in vivo clearance of CYP3A4, CYP2E1 and CYP1A2 substrates, which...

  4. The FOCUS trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glenthøj, Louise B; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Randers, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cognitive deficits are a distinct feature among people at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis and pose a barrier to functional recovery. Insufficient evidence exists on how to ameliorate these cognitive deficits in patients at UHR for psychosis and hence improve daily living and quality...... of life. The aim of the trial is to investigate whether cognitive remediation can improve cognitive and psychosocial function in patients at UHR for psychosis. METHODS: The FOCUS trial (Function and Overall Cognition in Ultra-high risk States) is a randomised, parallel group, observer-blinded clinical...... trial enrolling 126 patients meeting the standardised criteria of being at UHR for psychosis. Patients are recruited from psychiatric in- and outpatient facilities in the Copenhagen catchment area. Patients are randomised to one of the two treatment arms: cognitive remediation plus standard treatment...

  5. Efficiency of Cardiotropic Therapy in Neonatal Infants with Posthypoxic Myocardial Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. N. Belova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to define the optimal tranexamic acid dosage regimen to reduce perioperative blood loss during total endo-prosthetic hip joint replacement (TEHJR. Subjects and methods. A randomized controlled trial enrolled 90 patients admitted for elective primary cementless TEHJR. Prior to surgery, all the patients were given an intravenous bolus injection of tranexamic acid in a dose of 1 g. A day before surgery, the patients were divided into 3 groups of 30 subjects each. In Group 1, tranexamic acid was administered only before incision of the skin. In Group 2, a second bolus of tranexamic acid 1 g was injected 3 hours after start of surgery. In Group 3, 1 g of tranexamic acid was readminis-tered 6 hours following surgery if drainage blood loss volume exceeded 200 ml. Results. No statistically significant differences were found between the study patient groups in terms of the amount of blood loss, the blood levels of hemoglobin, needs for hemotransfusion therapy, and the frequency of postoperative complications. Conclusion. A second bolus of tranexamic acid 1 g does not reduce the amount of blood loss as compared to a single preoperative bolus dose of tranexamic acid 1 g during elective primary cementless TEHJP. Key words: tranexamic acid, endoprosthetic hip joint replacement, blood loss.

  6. Randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimer, C; Lødrup, A; Smith, G

    2016-01-01

    of an alginate (Gaviscon Advance, Reckitt Benckiser, Slough, UK) on reflux symptoms in patients with persistent symptoms despite once daily PPI. MethodsThis was a multicentre, randomised, placebo-controlled, 7-day double-blind trial preceded by a 7-day run-in period. Reflux symptoms were assessed using...

  7. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, V B; Blanco, F J; Englund, M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to describe requirements for inclusion of soluble biomarkers in osteoarthritis (OA) clinical trials and progress toward OA-related biomarker qualification. The Guidelines for Biomarkers Working Group, representing experts in the field of OA biomarker research from...

  8. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAlindon, T. E.; Driban, J. B.; Henrotin, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this document is to update the original OARSI recommendations specifically for the design, conduct, and reporting of clinical trials that target symptom or structure modification among individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). To develop recommendations for the design, conduct...

  9. [Clinical trials in nursing journals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giulio, Paola; Campagna, Sara; Dimonte, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials are pivotal for the development of nursing knowledge. To describe the clinical trials published in nursing journals in the last two years and propose some general reflections on nursing research. A search with the key-word trial was done on PubMed (2009-2013) on Cancer Nursing, European Journal of Oncology Nursing, International Journal of Nursing Studies, Journal of Advanced Nursing, Journal of Clinical Nursing and Nursing Research. Of 228 trials identified, 104 (45.8%) were published in the last 2 years. Nurses from Asian countries published the larger number of trials. Educational and supportive interventions were the most studied (61/104 trials), followed by clinical interventions (33/104). Samples were limited and most trials are monocentric. A growing number of trials is published, on issues relevant for the nursing profession, however larger samples and multicentric studies would be necessary.

  10. The COLOFOL trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansdotter Andersson, Pernilla; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet

    2016-01-01

    population. To be eligible, patients had to be 75 years or younger and curatively resected for stage II or III colorectal cancer. Exclusion criteria were hereditary colorectal cancer, no signed consent, other malignancy, and life expectancy less than 2 years due to concomitant disease. In four of the 24......INTRODUCTION: The COLOFOL trial, a prospective randomized multicenter trial comparing two follow-up regimes after curative surgical treatment for colorectal cancer, focuses on detection of asymptomatic recurrences. This paper aims to describe the design and recruitment procedure in the COLOFOL...... participating centers, we scrutinized hospital inpatient data to identify all colorectal cancer patients who underwent surgery, in order to ascertain all eligible patients who were not included in the study and to compare them with enrolled patients. RESULTS: Of a total of 4,445 eligible patients, 2...

  11. Ethics of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palter, S F

    1996-05-01

    The modern clinical trial is a form of human experimentation. There is a long history of disregard for individual rights of the patient in this context, and special attention must be paid to ethical guidelines for these studies. Clinical trials differ in basic ways from clinical practice. Foremost is the introduction of outside interests, beyond those of the patient's health, into the doctor-patient therapeutic alliance. Steps must be taken to protect the interests of the patient when such outside influence exists. Kantian moral theory and the Hippocratic oath dictate that the physician must respect the individual patient's rights and hold such interests paramount. These principles are the basis for informed consent. Randomization of patients is justified when a condition of equipoise exists. The changing nature of health care delivery in the United States introduces new outside interests into the doctor-patient relationship.

  12. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Intergrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 249553, 2-Methoxyestradiol; Abatacept, Adalimumab, Adefovir dipivoxil, Agalsidase beta, Albinterferon alfa-2b, Aliskiren fumarate, Alovudine, Amdoxovir, Amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium, Amrubicin hydrochloride, Anakinra, AQ-13, Aripiprazole, AS-1404, Asoprisnil, Atacicept, Atrasentan; Belimumab, Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Botulinum toxin type B, Brivaracetam; Catumaxomab, Cediranib, Cetuximab, cG250, Ciclesonide, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Curcumin, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, Denosumab, Dihydrexidine; Eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, Entecavir, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Etoricoxib, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Febuxostat, Fenspiride hydrochloride, Fondaparinux sodium; Gefitinib, Ghrelin (human), GSK-1562902A; HSV-tk/GCV; Iclaprim, Imatinib mesylate, Imexon, Indacaterol, Insulinotropin, ISIS-112989; L-Alanosine, Lapatinib ditosylate, Laropiprant; Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin-beta, Mipomersen sodium, Motexafin gadolinium; Natalizumab, Nimotuzumab; OSC, Ozarelix; PACAP-38, Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein-(1-36), Pasireotide, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Pertuzumab, Picoplatin, Pimecrolimus, Pitavastatin calcium, Plitidepsin; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Ranolazine, Recombinant human relaxin H2, Regadenoson, RFB4(dsFv)-PE38, RO-3300074, Rosuvastatin calcium; SIR-Spheres, Solifenacin succinate, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Talabostat, Taribavirin hydrochloride, Taxus, Temsirolimus, Teriparatide, Tiotropium bromide, Tipifarnib, Tirapazamine, Tocilizumab; UCN-01, Ularitide

  13. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-04-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity. prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABX-IL-8, Acclaim, adalimumab, AGI-1067, alagebrium chloride, alemtuzumab, Alequel, Androgel, anti-IL-12 MAb, AOD-9604, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Biphasic insulin aspart, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, bovine lactoferrin, brivudine; Cantuzumab mertansine, CB-1954, CDB-4124, CEA-TRICOM, choriogonadotropin alfa, cilansetron, CpG-10101, CpG-7909, CTL-102, CTL-102/CB-1954; DAC:GRF, darbepoetin alfa, davanat-1, decitabine, del-1 Genemedicine, dexanabinol, dextofisopam, dnaJP1, dronedarone hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, eletriptan, emtricitabine, EPI-hNE-4, eplerenone, eplivanserin fumarate, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, etoricoxib, ezetimibe; Falecalcitriol, fingolimod hydrochloride; Gepirone hydrochloride; HBV-ISS, HSV-2 theracine, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, Indiplon, insulin glargine, ISAtx-247; L612 HuMAb, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, lidocaine/prilocaine, LL-2113AD, lucinactant, LY-156735; Meclinertant, metelimumab, morphine hydrochloride, morphine-6-glucuronide; Natalizumab, nimotuzumab, NX-1207, NYVAC-HIV C; Omalizumab, onercept, osanetant; PABA, palosuran sulfate, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PBI-1402, PCK-3145, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, pimecrolimus, PINC, pregabalin; Ramelteon, rasagiline mesilate, rasburicase, rimonabant hydrochloride, RO-0098557, rofecoxib, rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride; Safinamide mesilate, SHL-749, sitaxsentan sodium, sparfosic acid, SprayGel, squalamine, St. John's Wort

  14. Clinical trials in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Rituparna; M, Raghavendra

    2007-07-01

    The concept of outsourcing for the development and global studies on new drugs has become widely accepted in the pharmaceutical industry due to its cost and uncertainty. India is going to be the most preferred location for contract pharma research and development due to its huge treatment naïve population, human resources, technical skills, adoption/amendment/implementation of rules/laws by regulatory authorities, and changing economic environment. But still 'miles to go' to fulfill the pre-requisites to ensure India's success. In spite of all the pitfalls, the country is ambitious and optimist to attract multinational pharmaceutical companies to conduct their clinical trials in India.

  15. Clinical trials in dentistry in India: Analysis from trial registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowri, S; Kannan, Sridharan

    2017-01-01

    Evidence-based practice requires clinical trials to be performed. In India, if any clinical trial has to be performed, it has to be registered with clinical trial registry of India. Studies have shown that the report of clinical trials is poor in dentistry. Hence, the present study has been conducted to assess the type and trends of clinical trials being undertaken in dentistry in India over a span of 6 years. All the clinical trials which were registered with the Central Trial Registry of India (CTRI) (www.ctri.nic.in) from January 1, 2007 to March 3, 2014 were evaluated using the keyword "dental." Following information were collected for each of the clinical trials obtained from the search; number of centres (single center/multicentric), type of the institution undertaking the research (government/private/combined), study (observational/interventional), study design (randomized/single blinded/double-blinded), type of health condition, type of participants (healthy/patients), sponsors (academia/commercial), phase of clinical trial (Phase 1/2/3/4), publication details (published/not published), whether it was a postgraduate thesis or not and prospective or retrospective registration of clinical trials, methodological quality (method of randomization, allocation concealment). Descriptive statistics was used for analysis of various categories. Trend analysis was done to assess the changes over a period of time. The search yielded a total of 84 trials of which majority of them were single centered. Considering the study design more than half of the registered clinical trials were double-blinded (47/84 [56%]). With regard to the place of conducting a trial, most of the trials were planned to be performed in private hospitals (56/84 [66.7%]). Most (79/84, 94.1%) of the clinical trials were interventional while only 5/84 (5.9%) were observational. Majority (65/84, 77.4%) of the registered clinical trials were recruiting patients while the rest were being done in healthy

  16. Japan nuclear ship sea trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Kitamura, Toshikatus; Mizushima, Toshihiko

    1992-01-01

    The sea trial of the first Japan nuclear Ship 'MUTSU' was conducted from the end of October to December in 1990. The purpose of the sea trial was to verify the nuclear propulsive performances and maneuverabilities. The present report describes the results of the sea trial. These results are classified into four items: 1. Speed test and engineering performance tests 2. Maneuvering performance tests 3. Vibration tests 4. Other tests. Acceptable performances were demonstrated, as expected in the original design. The experience of the use of the Global Positioning System (GPS), which were newly adopted for the sea trial, is also reported. (author)

  17. [Maraviroc: clinical trials results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidiac, C; Katlama, C; Yeni, P

    2008-03-01

    Just over a decade after identification of chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 as coreceptors for HIV, maraviroc (Celsentri), the first CCR5 antagonist, has recently obtained its Marketing Authorization in the United States and Europe, for treatment of treatment-experienced adult patients infected with only CCR5-tropic HIV-1 detectable. CCR5 antagonists, after fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide available since 2003, also belong to entry inhibitors. These molecules, unlike previous antiretrovirals, do not target the virus but its target cell by blocking viral penetration. Maraviroc has shown its clinical efficacy in patients failing other antiretroviral classes. Its safety profile was similar to placebo in two large phase III trials. However, careful assessment of both hepatic and immunologic safety of this new therapeutic class is needed. Viral tropism testing has to be investigated before using maraviroc in the clinic, because CCR5 antagonists are not active against CXCR4 viruses. For the moment indicated for the treatment-experienced patient population, maraviroc could in the future benefit to other types of patients, depending on ongoing trials results.

  18. Combined effect of therapeutic strategies for bleeding injury on early survival, transfusion needs and correction of coagulopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balvers, K.; van Dieren, S.; Baksaas-Aasen, K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The combined effects of balanced transfusion ratios and use of procoagulant and antifibrinolytic therapies on trauma-induced exsanguination are not known. The aim of this study was to investigate the combined effect of transfusion ratios, tranexamic acid and products containing......) or high (1 or more : 1) ratio of plasma or platelets to RBCs, and in receipt or not of tranexamic acid or fibrinogen products (fibrinogen concentrates or cryoprecipitate). Logistic regression models were used to assess the effect of transfusion strategies on the outcomes ‘alive and free from massive...... number of patients alive and without massive transfusion were a high platelet to RBC ratio (odds ratio (OR) 2·67, 95 per cent c.i. 1·24 to 5·77; P = 0·012), a high plasma to RBC ratio (OR 2·07, 1·03 to 4·13; P = 0·040) and treatment with tranexamic acid (OR 2·71, 1·29 to 5·71; P = 0·009). No strategies...

  19. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issues focuses on the following selection of drugs: (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate, (-)-gossypol, 2-deoxyglucose, 3,4-DAP, 7-monohydroxyethylrutoside; Ad5CMV-p53, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, ADH-1, alemtuzumab, aliskiren fumarate, alvocidib hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, amrubicin hydrochloride, AN-152, anakinra, anecortave acetate, antiasthma herbal medicine intervention, AP-12009, AP-23573, apaziquone, aprinocarsen sodium, AR-C126532, AR-H065522, aripiprazole, armodafinil, arzoxifene hydrochloride, atazanavir sulfate, atilmotin, atomoxetine hydrochloride, atorvastatin, avanafil, azimilide hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, biphasic insulin aspart, BMS-214662, BN-83495, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B; Caspofungin acetate, cetuximab, chrysin, ciclesonide, clevudine, clofarabine, clopidogrel, CNF-1010, CNTO-328, CP-751871, CX-717, Cypher; Dapoxetine hydrochloride, darifenacin hydrobromide, dasatinib, deferasirox, dextofisopam, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, diclofenac, dronedarone hydrochloride, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Edaravone, efaproxiral sodium, emtricitabine, entecavir, eplerenone, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, etoricoxib, ezetimibe, ezetimibe/simvastatin; Finrozole, fipamezole hydrochloride, fondaparinux sodium, fulvestrant; Gabapentin enacarbil, gaboxadol, gefitinib, gestodene, ghrelin (human); Human insulin, human papillomavirus vaccine; Imatinib mesylate, immunoglobulin intravenous (human), indiplon, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, intranasal insulin, istradefylline, i.v. gamma

  20. Market trials of irradiated chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, John A.; Olson, Dennis G.

    1998-01-01

    The potential market for irradiated chicken breasts was investigated using a mail survey and a retail trial. Results from the mail survey suggested a significantly higher level of acceptability of irradiated chicken than did the retail trial. A subsequent market experiment involving actual purchases showed levels of acceptability similar to that of the mail survey when similar information about food irradiation was provided