WorldWideScience

Sample records for antiemetics

  1. Antiemetic research: future directions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olver, Ian; Molassiotis, Alexander; Aapro, Matti

    2011-01-01

    across studies and finding the minimum tolerated effective dose and schedule of an antiemetic. Also control of delayed emesis is not independent of the control of acute emesis. The full range of side effects and the impact on global quality of life scores should be part of the routine assessment...

  2. Enhanced Patient Expectant and Antiemetic Drug Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    Breast Cancer Nausea and Vomiting Expectancy Patient Information Antiemetic Side Effect 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 15 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY ...CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE Unclassified 19. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF ABSTRACT...5-HT3 receptor antagonist class of antiemetics (ondansetron, granisetron , tropisitron) have greatly reduced chemotherapy-related vomiting, this has

  3. Enhanced Patient Expectation and Antiemetic Drug Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    NUMBER OF PAGES 15 Breast Cancer Expectancy Antiemetic Nausea and Vomiting Patient Information Side Effect 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 18... SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS 19. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 20. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT OF REPORT PAGE OF ABSTRACT Unclassified Unclassified...by the introduction of the 5-HT 3 receptor antagonist class of antiemetics (ondansetron, granisetron , tropisitron) have greatly reduced chemotherapy

  4. Anti-emetic principles of Poria cocos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, T; Akita, Y; Kinoshita, K; Koyama, K; Takahashi, K; Watanabe, K

    1995-12-01

    The triterpenes isolated from P. cocos and their derivatives were examined for anti-emetic activity. Some of these triterpenes inhibited emetic action induced by oral administration of copper sulfate pentahydrate to leopard frog. The triterpenes having an exomethylene group at C-24 showed anti-emetic activity to frogs.

  5. Ondansetron. Therapeutic use as an antiemetic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milne, R.J.; Heel, R.C. (Adis Drug Information Services, Auckland (New Zealand))

    1991-04-01

    Ondansetron (GR 38032F) is a highly selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, one of a new class of compounds which may have several therapeutic applications. Animal and clinical studies show that ondansetron reduces the 24-hour incidence and severity of nausea and vomiting induced by cytotoxic drugs, including cisplatin, and by single exposure, high dose radiation. Ondansetron is more effective than high dose metoclopramide in the 24 hours following chemotherapy, and preliminary clinical evidence suggests that it is equally effective in the following 4 days. It is also more effective than the moderate doses of metoclopramide used to suppress emesis following radiotherapy. The antiemetic efficacy of ondansetron is enhanced by dexamethasone in cisplatin-treated patients. Importantly, extrapyramidal effects have not been reported with ondansetron. Further comparisons are required with standard combination antiemetic therapy to complement the data presently available. Thus, ondansetron is a promising new agent for prophylaxis against nausea and vomiting in chemotherapy and radiotherapy. It may be particularly useful in young and elderly patients who are more susceptible to extrapyramidal symptoms induced by high dose metoclopramide. With its improved tolerability and clinical response profiles, ondansetron represents an important advance in a difficult area of therapeutics. 101 refs.

  6. Ondansetron. Therapeutic use as an antiemetic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milne, R.J.; Heel, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    Ondansetron (GR 38032F) is a highly selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, one of a new class of compounds which may have several therapeutic applications. Animal and clinical studies show that ondansetron reduces the 24-hour incidence and severity of nausea and vomiting induced by cytotoxic drugs, including cisplatin, and by single exposure, high dose radiation. Ondansetron is more effective than high dose metoclopramide in the 24 hours following chemotherapy, and preliminary clinical evidence suggests that it is equally effective in the following 4 days. It is also more effective than the moderate doses of metoclopramide used to suppress emesis following radiotherapy. The antiemetic efficacy of ondansetron is enhanced by dexamethasone in cisplatin-treated patients. Importantly, extrapyramidal effects have not been reported with ondansetron. Further comparisons are required with standard combination antiemetic therapy to complement the data presently available. Thus, ondansetron is a promising new agent for prophylaxis against nausea and vomiting in chemotherapy and radiotherapy. It may be particularly useful in young and elderly patients who are more susceptible to extrapyramidal symptoms induced by high dose metoclopramide. With its improved tolerability and clinical response profiles, ondansetron represents an important advance in a difficult area of therapeutics. 101 refs

  7. Antiemetic prophylaxis with promethazine or ondansetron in major

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studio G5

    of PONV.2–8 Traditional antiemetic drugs (e.g. promethazine, metoclopramide ... a developing country's health care delivery system because of ..... Comparison of the bioavailability of oral, rectal and intramuscular promethazine. Biopharm ...

  8. [Research on antiemetics: an Italian model of success].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roila, F

    1998-01-01

    At the beginning of the 80's the Italian Group for Clinical Research (G.O.I.R.C.) identified chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting as one of the most distressing adverse events, and decided to plan and execute clinical trials on antiemetics in order to reduce this negative impact on patients. Therefore, some consecutive double-blind randomized trials were conducted on cisplatin-treated patients. The first was a dose-finding study on four different high-doses of domperidone, followed by a study comparing two different high-doses of metoclopramide, and a study comparing the addition of a corticosteroid to high-dose metoclopramide with respect to metoclopramide alone. Finally, a study demonstrating that a combination of a higher dose of metoclopramide (3 mg/kg x 2) plus dexamethasone and diphenhydramine was significantly superior with respect to a lower dose of metoclopramide (1 mg/kg x 4) combined with methylprednisolone was carried out. With the introduction of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists the interest for antiemetic therapy increased and other Italian gynecological and medical oncology centres became involved in the antiemetic research. The Italian Group for Antiemetic Research was formed in 90's and its first study demonstrated the superiority of a combination of a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist plus dexamethasone with respect to the standard three drug combination of high doses of metoclopramide in the prevention of cisplatin-induced acute emesis. In the following years, the Group contributed to the identification of the best antiemetic prophylaxis for acute emesis induced by moderately emetogenic chemotherapy, and for delayed emesis induced by cisplatin. Also a drug utilization review on antiemetics in clinical practice has recently been carried out. Today, the interest of the Group is concentrated in studying the optimal antiemetic prophylaxis for delayed emesis induced by moderately emetogenic chemotherapy. The rules always followed by the Italian Group for

  9. Role of prophylactic antiemetics in oral and maxillofacial surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanif, S.; Warraich, R.A.; Khan, S.R.; Riaz, N.; Mehdi, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    To find out the occurrence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONY) in oral and maxillofacial surgery done under general anaesthesia and to evaluate the purpose of using prophylactic antiemetic drugs. Design: Observational study. Place and Duration of the Study: Oral and Maxillofacial Department, KEMU / Mayo Hospital Lahore, from September 20 II to June 2012. Method: The number of patients who were operated in oral and maxillofacial surgery ward irrespective of age and gender for this study were 240. Risk factors related with PONY including gender, anesthetic drug used, surgical procedure, approach' used, total time of surgery and postoperative use of opioids were investigated. A wait and watch scheme was followed in patients with complaint of PONY. Antiemetics to be given in those cases where more than 2 episodes of vomiting took place. Results: It was found out that only II patients experienced from nausea and vomiting in post operative period. A notable relation was seen between PONY and female population, total time of surgery, anesthetic drug, surgery of tumor and temporomandibular joint. The surgical approach and opioids in postoperative period for PONY were found to be insignificant. Conclusion: PONY is not a significant finding in oral and maxillofacial surgery. We find out that there is no logic for the use of prophylactic antiemetic drugs in maxillofacial surgery. (author)

  10. Bioavailability of the antiemetic metopimazine given as a microenema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrstedt, J.; Jørgensen, M.; Angelo, H.R.

    1996-01-01

    The absorption of the antiemetic metopimazine (MPZ) given as a single dose of (a) 40 mg microenema, (b) 40 mg orally and (c) 10 mg as a 60 min i.v. continuous infusion was investigated in six healthy volunteers. Blood samples were drawn and the serum concentrations of MPZ and its acid metabolite ...... were measured. The bioavailability of MPZ given orally and as enemas was 22.3 and 19.5% respectively. Partial avoidance of hepatic first pass metabolism was seen with the enemas, which in contrast to suppositories, seems to represent a reliable form of rectal administration....

  11. Optimizing antiemetic therapy in multiple-day and multiple cycles of chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellebaek, E.; Herrstedt, J.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Only a few studies have investigated the effect of antiemetic therapy in patients treated with multiple-day or multiple cycles of chemotherapy. The present review will assess the available data, highlight the current recommendations and draw attention towards the remaining...... of chemotherapy the addition of a NK1-receptor antagonist aprepitant to standard antiemetic therapy has increased the antiemetic effect, and multiple cycle extension studies have demonstrated that this increment in effect is sustained during multiple cycles of chemotherapy. A recent study indicated...... that the dopamine D2-receptor antagonist metopimazine has some additive effect on delayed symptoms induced by multiple-day chemotherapy. SUMMARY: The development of the NK1-receptor antagonist aprepitant has significantly improved the antiemetic control in patients treated with multiple cycles of chemotherapy. Far...

  12. Anti-emetic principles of Magnolia obovata bark and Zingiber officinale rhizome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, T; Kinoshita, K; Koyama, K; Takahashi, K

    1994-02-01

    Magnolol and honokiol, biphenyl compounds, were isolated as anti-emetic principles from the methanolic extract of Magnolia obovata bark. [6]-, [8]-, and [10]-shogaols and [6]-, [8]-, and [10]-gingerols were isolated from the methanolic extract of Zingiber officinale rhizome as anti-emetic principles. Some phenyl-propanoids with allyl side-chains were found to show the same activity. They inhibited the emetic action induced by the oral administration of copper sulfate pentahydrate to leopard and ranid frogs.

  13. Effectiveness of antiemetics in control of antineoplastic chemotherapy-induced emesis at home

    OpenAIRE

    Castro,Marielly Cunha; Araújo,Suely Amorim de; Mendes,Thaís Rezende; Vilarinho,Glauciane Silva; Mendonça,Maria Angélica Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Objective Evaluating if antiemetics are effective in the prevention or treatment at home, of chemotherapy-induced emesis. Methods In total, were included 42 women with breast cancer in moderately emetogenic chemotherapy, using dexamethasone/ondansetron before each cycle. The frequency of nausea and vomiting was obtained by applying the instrument in the pre-chemotherapy period, and 24h, 48h, 72h and 96h after chemotherapy. The use of antiemetics was considered in accordance with adherence...

  14. Anti-emetic principles of Inula linariaefolia flowers and Forsythia suspensa fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, K; Kawai, T; Imaizumi, T; Akita, Y; Koyama, K; Takahashi, K

    1996-05-01

    The anti-emetic effects of 40 extracts made from 12 traditional Chinese herbal drugs were examined. Ten extracts inhibited emesis induced by copper sulfate pentahydrate; all were administered orally, and one extract inhibited emesis induced by apomorphine hydrochloride given to leopard and ranid frogs. Taraxasteryl palmitate and acetate, bigelovin and dihydrobigelovin were isolated from the CHCl(3) extract of Inula linariaefolia flowers, and identified as the active antiemetic agents when emesis was induced by copper sulfate. In addition, chlorogenic acid was isolated from the MeOH extract as an anti-emetic principle for the emesis induced by apomorphine hydrochloride. Rengyol, phillyrin and rutin were isolated from the MeOH extract of Forsythia suspensa fruits and identified as the inhibitors of emesis induced by copper sulfate pentahydrate. Copyright © 1996 Gustav Fischer Verlag · Stuttgart · Jena · New York. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of Antiemetic Effects of Ondansetron, Granisetron and Tropisetron in Treatment of Acute Emesis Caused By Cisplatin/Paclitaxel Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taner Turan

    2016-06-01

    CONCLUSION: Although this study is not prospective, it is homogenous for treatment modalities and patient selection. Complete response was observed in 63% of courses; however this antiemetic affect is not found to be satisfactory. In order to develope better protocols there is need for prospective studies on homogenous group. Antiemetic efficiency has to associate for chemotherapy protocols.

  16. Antiemetic therapy for non-anthracycline and cyclophosphamide moderately emetogenic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Naoki

    2017-05-01

    Although antiemetic management in cancer therapy has improved, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting remain common and troubling adverse events. Chemotherapeutic agents are classified based on their emetogenic effects, and appropriate antiemetics are recommended according to this categorization. Chemotherapy categorized as moderately emetogenic is associated with a wide spectrum of emetic risks. Combined anthracycline and cyclophosphamide regimens have been recently reclassified as highly emetogenic chemotherapy regimen. This review focuses on antiemetic pharmacotherapy in patients receiving non-anthracycline and cyclophosphamide-based moderately emetogenic chemotherapy regimens. Combination therapy with a 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 receptor agonist, preferably palonosetron, and dexamethasone is the standard therapy in moderately emetogenic chemotherapy, although triple therapy with add-on neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist is used as an alternative treatment strategy. Among moderately emetogenic chemotherapy regimens, carboplatin-containing chemotherapy has considerable emetic potential, particularly during the delayed phase. However, the additional of a neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist to the standard antiemetic therapy prevents carboplatin-induced nausea and vomiting. For regimens including oxaliplatin, the benefit of adding neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist requires further clarification.

  17. Antiemetic therapy in Asia Pacific countries for patients receiving moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy--a descriptive analysis of practice patterns, antiemetic quality of care, and use of antiemetic guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shiying; Burke, Thomas A; Chan, Alexandre; Kim, Hoon-Kyo; Hsieh, Ruey Kuen; Hu, Xichun; Liang, Jin-Tung; Baños, Ana; Spiteri, Carmel; Keefe, Dorothy M K

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports prescribing patterns for prophylaxis of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) after highly or moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC or MEC) for cancer in six Asia Pacific countries. In a prospective noninterventional study, 31 sites in Australia, China, India, Singapore, South Korea, and Taiwan recorded details of CINV prophylaxis for the acute phase (first 24 h) and delayed phase (days 2-5) after single-day HEC or MEC for adult patients. Additional information on CINV prophylactic medications was collected from 6-day patient diaries. Primary antiemetic therapies were defined as corticosteroids, the 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 receptor antagonists (5HT3-RAs), and neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists (NK1-RAs). Evaluable patients in cycle 1 numbered 648 (318 [49%] HEC and 330 [51%] MEC) of mean (SD) age of 56 (12) years, including 58% women. For the acute phase after HEC, overall (and country range), 96% (91-100%) of patients received a 5HT3-RA, 87% (70-100%) a corticosteroid, and 43% (0-91%) an NK1-RA. CINV prophylaxis for the HEC delayed phase was more variable: including 22% (7-65%) 5HT3-RA, 52% (12-93%) corticosteroid, and 46% (0-88%) NK1-RA. For the MEC acute phase, 97% (87-100%) of patients received 5HT3-RA and 86% (73-97%) a corticosteroid. For the MEC delayed phase, 201 patients (61%) received a primary antiemetic, including 5HT3-RA (41%), corticosteroid (37%), and/or NK1-RA (4%). The 5HT3-RAs were prescribed consistently in all countries, while prescribing of other antiemetic therapies was variable, and corticosteroids were under-prescribed for CINV prophylaxis, particularly in the delayed phase.

  18. Anti-emetic effect of granisetron in patients undergoing cranial and craniospinal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Fumiyuki; Watanabe, Yosuke; Nosaka, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 30-59% of patients undergoing cranial or craniospinal radiotherapy experience nausea and/or vomiting. Here, we evaluated the effectiveness of granisetron for controlling emesis in patients treated with cranial or craniospinal radiotherapy. Between December 2011 and January 2013, 34 patients (19 males, 15 females; age range, 3-80 years) received cranial or craniospinal radiotherapy at our department. All but one male patient, who developed meningitis during the irradiation period were enrolled in this retrospective study. Patients who experienced irradiation-induced vomiting (grade 1) or nausea (grade 2) were treated with granisetron as a rescue anti-emetic. Episodes were graded as no vomiting, no nausea, no anti-emetic; no vomiting, nausea, no anti-emetic; no vomiting, nausea with anti-emetic; and vomiting. Of the 9 patients who underwent whole-brain or whole neural-axis irradiation, 5 (55.6%) experienced grade 2 nausea or vomiting. Two of 6 patients (33.3%) treated with whole ventricle irradiation experienced grade 2 nausea or vomiting. Three of 18 patients (16.7%) who underwent local-field irradiation experienced grade 2 nausea or vomiting. Patients who underwent wide-field irradiation experienced nausea, vomiting, and anorexia (p<0.05). Complete response (no vomiting, no additional rescue anti-emetic, and no nausea) was observed in 5 of 9 patients treated with granisetron. Four of 9 patients (44.4%) treated with granisetron experienced constipation (grade 1 or 2); its administration had no major adverse effects in our study population. Rescue therapy with granisetron is safe and effective to treat nausea and vomiting in patients subjected to cranial or craniospinal irradiation. (author)

  19. Initial high anti-emetic efficacy of granisetron with dexamethasone is not maintained over repeated cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, R.; van den Berg, H.; Burghouts, J.; Nortier, J.; Slee, P.; Rodenburg, C.; Keizer, J.; Fonteyn, M.; Verweij, J.; Wils, J.

    1998-01-01

    We have reported previously that the anti-emetic efficacy of single agent 5HT3 antagonists is not maintained when analysed with the measurement of cumulative probabilities. Presently, the most effective anti-emetic regimen is a combination of a 5HT3 antagonist plus dexamethasone. We, therefore, assessed the sustainment of efficacy of such a combination in 125 patients, scheduled to receive cisplatin > or = 70 mg m(-2) either alone or in combination with other cytotoxic drugs. Anti-emetic therapy was initiated with 10 mg of dexamethasone and 3 mg of granisetron intravenously, before cisplatin. On days 1-6, patients received 8 mg of dexamethasone and 1 mg of granisetron twice daily by oral administration. Protection was assessed during all cycles and calculated based on cumulative probability analyses using the method of Kaplan-Meier and a model for transitional probabilities. Irrespective of the type of analysis used, the anti-emetic efficacy of granisetron/dexamethasone decreased over cycles. The initial complete acute emesis protection rate of 66% decreased to 30% according to the method of Kaplan-Meier and to 39% using the model for transitional probabilities. For delayed emesis, the initial complete protection rate of 52% decreased to 21% (Kaplan-Meier) and to 43% (transitional probabilities). In addition, we observed that protection failure in the delayed emesis period adversely influenced the acute emesis protection in the next cycle. We conclude that the anti-emetic efficacy of a 5HT3 antagonist plus dexamethasone is not maintained over multiple cycles of highly emetogenic chemotherapy, and that the acute emesis protection is adversely influenced by protection failure in the delayed emesis phase. PMID:9652766

  20. Off-label prescribing patterns of antiemetics in children: a multicenter study in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanon, Davide; Gallelli, Luca; Rovere, Francesca; Paparazzo, Rossella; Maximova, Natalia; Lazzerini, Marzia; Reale, Antonio; Corsetti, Tiziana; Renna, Salvatore; Emanueli, Tullia; Mannelli, Francesco; Manteghetti, Francesco; Da Dalt, Liviana; Palleria, Caterina; Banchieri, Nicola; Urbino, Antonio; Miglietta, Mario; Cardoni, Giovanni; Pompilio, Adriana; Arrighini, Alberto; Lazzari, Clara; Messi, Gianni

    2013-03-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AG) represents both the main cause of acute vomiting in children under 3 years old and a major cause of access to the emergency department. Even if several drugs may be able to reduce the emesis, the pharmacological treatment of vomiting in children remains a controversial issue, and several drugs are prescribed outside their authorized drug label with respect dosage, age, indication, or route of administration and are named as off-label. The aim of present study was to assess the off-label use of antiemetic drugs in patients less than 18 years with vomiting related to AG. This study was carried out in eight pediatric emergency departments in Italy. The following data were obtained crossing the pharmacy distribution records with emergency departments' patient data: sex and age of the patients and detailed information for each drug used (indication, dose, frequency, and route of administration). We recorded that antiemetic drugs were prescribed in every year, particularly in children up to 2 years old, and compared with both literature data and data sheet; 30 % of the administered antiemetics were used off-label. In particular, domperidone was the only antiemetic used labeled for AG treatment in pediatric patients, while metoclopramide and ondansetron have been off-label for both age and indications (i.e., AG treatment). In conclusion, we documented an off-label use of antiemetics in children, and this could represents a problem of safety for the patient and a legal risk for the prescribing physician if patients have an unwanted or bad outcome from treatment.

  1. Survey of Implementation of Antiemetic Prescription Standards in Indian Oncology Practices and Its Adherence to the American Society of Clinical Oncology Antiemetic Clinical Guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Patil

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Adherence to international antiemetic prophylaxis guidelines like those of ASCO can result in better control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting; however, the extent of implementation of such guidelines in India is unknown. Therefore, this survey was planned. Methods: This study was an anonymized cross-sectional survey approved by the ethics committee. Survey items were generated from the clinical questions given in the ASCO guidelines. The survey was disseminated through personal contacts at an oncology conference and via e-mail to various community oncology centers across India. The B1, B2, and B3 domains included questions regarding the optimal antiemetic prophylaxis for high, moderate, and low-minimal emetogenic regimens. Results: Sixty-six (62.9% of 105 responded and 65 centers (98.5% were aware of the published guidelines. The partial, full, and no implementation scores were 92.5%, 4.5%, and 3.0%, respectively. Full implementation was better for the low-minimal emetogenic regimens (34.8% than the highly emetogenic regimens (6.1%. The three most frequent reasons for hampered implementation of ASCO guidelines in routine chemotherapy practice cited by centers were a lack of sensitization (26 centers; 39.4%, lack of national guidelines (12 centers; 18.2%, and lack of administrative support (10 centers; 15.2%. Conclusion: Awareness regarding ASCO antiemetic guidelines is satisfactory in Indian oncology practices; however, there is a need for sensitization of oncologists toward complete implementation of these guidelines in their clinical practice.

  2. Effects of antiemetics on the acquisition and recall of radiation- and lithium chloride-induced conditioned taste aversions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabin, B.M.; Hunt, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    A series of experiments were run to evaluate the effect of antiemetics on the acquisition and recall of a conditioned taste aversion induced by exposure to ionizing radiation or by injection of lithium chloride. Groups of male rats were exposed to 100 rad gamma radiation or 3 mEq/kg lithium chloride following consumption of a 10% sucrose solution. They were then injected with saline or with one of three antiemetics (prochlorperazine, trimethobenzamide, or cyclizine) at dose levels that have been reported to be effective in attenuating a previously acquired lithium chloride-induced taste aversion. The pretreatments with antiemetics had no effect on the acquisition or recall of either the lithium chloride- or radiation-induced taste aversion. The data suggest that antiemetics do not disrupt lithium chloride-induced taste aversions as previously reported, nor do they effect radiation-induced taste aversion learning

  3. Evaluation of antiemetic activities of alcoholic extract of grewia asiatica in experimental model dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaqeen, Z.; Shail, T.; Rahman, A.U.; Saleem, M.

    2008-01-01

    The fruits of Grewia asiatica were evaluated for the antiemetic activity in the experimental model dogs, whereas, acute oral toxicity test was carried out in mice and rats. Maximum oral dose of 200 mg/kg and 600 mg/kg of crude alcoholic extract was found non toxic in mice and rats. Oral dose of crude alcoholic extract (120 mg/kg body weight) caused antiemetic effect in dogs in 3 h and controlled emesis centrally induced by Apomorphine (0.044 mg/kg body weight). This activity of G asiatica was comparable with standard commercial anti-emctic drugs like Maxolon (Metoclopramide) and Largactil tablets 10 mg (Chlorpromazine) of M/s. Aventis Pharma., Pakistan. (author)

  4. Development and evaluation of a sublingual film of the antiemetic granisetron hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalia, Vani; Garg, Tarun; Rath, Gautam; Goyal, Amit Kumar

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an oral transmucosal formulation of an antiemetic drug that can not only serve in the active form but also provide a controlled release profile. In this study, sublingual films based on the biodegradable and water-soluble polymers, that is HPMCK-4M and PVPK-30, were developed by the solvent casting method, and were loaded with the antiemetic drug granisetron hydrochloride (granisetron HCl). The entrapment efficiency of the developed formulation was found to be 86%. The in vitro profile showed an instant release of the drug from the sublingual film, in a pattern following the first order kinetics array. The in vivo studies showed that granisetron HCl was delivered in its active state and showed effective results, as compared to its activity in the marketed formulation.

  5. Comparison of antiemetic effects of granisetron and palonosetron in patients receiving bendamustine-based chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, M; Nakamura, T; Makihara, Y; Suetsugu, K; Ikesue, H; Mori, Y; Kato, K; Shiratsuchi, M; Hosohata, K; Miyamoto, T; Akashi, K

    2018-05-01

    The antiemetic effects and safety of granisetron and palonosetron against chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) were retrospectively evaluated in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma receiving bendamustine-based chemotherapy. A total of 61 patients were eligible for this study. Before starting the bendamustine-based chemotherapy, granisetron or palonosetron were intravenously administered with or without aprepitant and/or dexamethasone. The proportions of patients with complete control (CC) during the overall (during the 6 days after the start of the chemotherapy), acute (up to 2 days), and delayed (3 to 6 days) phases were assessed. CC was defined as complete response with only grade 0-1 nausea, no vomiting, and no use of antiemetic rescue medication. Granisetron or palonosetron alone were administered to 9 and 19 patients, respectively. Aprepitant and/or dexamethasone were combined with granisetron and palonosetron in 28 and 5 patients, respectively. Acute CINV was completely controlled in all patients. Both granisetron monotherapy and palonosetron combination therapy could provide good control of delayed CINV, although the CC rates during the delayed and overall phases were not significantly different among mono- and combination therapy of the antiemetics. There was no significant difference in the frequencies of adverse drug events between the granisetron and palonosetron treatment groups. The present study showed that the antiemetic efficacy and safety of granisetron-based therapy were non-inferior to those of palonosetron-based therapy. Taken together with treatment costs, granisetron monotherapy would be adequate to prevent CINV in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma receiving bendamustine-based chemotherapy.

  6. Postoperative analgesia and antiemetic efficacy after intrathecal neostigmine in patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy during spinal anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauretti, G R; Mattos, A L; Gomes, J M; Pereira, N L

    1997-01-01

    Postoperative analgesia and antiemetic efficacy after intrathecal neostigmine were investigated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 100 patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy. The patients were assigned to one of five groups (n = 20), and received intravenous prior to the spinal block the antiemetic test drug (except propofol) and 0.05 mg/kg midazolam. The control group (group C), the neostigmine group (group N), and the propofol group (group P) received saline as the test drug. The droperidol group (group D) received 0.5 mg intravenous droperidol, and the metoclopramide group (group M) 10 mg intravenous metoclopramide. Group P was single-blinded and had an intravenous continuous propofol infusion (2-4 mg/kg/h) turned on 10 minutes after the spinal injection. The intrathecal drugs administered were 20 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine (0.5%) associated with either 100 microg neostigmine or saline (for group C). Nausea, emetic episodes, and the need for rescue medication were recorded for the first 24 hours postoperative and scored by the Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Time-to-first-rescue medication and rescue medications in 24 hours were similar among the groups (P = .2917 and P = .8780, respectively). Intrathecal 100 microg neostigmine was associated with a high incidence of nausea and vomiting perioperative, leading to a high consumption of antiemetics (P antiemetic test drugs were effective in preventing nausea and vomiting after 100 microg neostigmine. Intrathecal neostigmine (100 microg) was ineffective for postoperative analgesia after abdominal hysterectomy due to side effects of nausea and vomiting.

  7. Association of ABCB1 polymorphisms with the antiemetic efficacy of granisetron plus dexamethasone in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Daiki; Kim, Yong-Il; Nakamichi, Hidenori; Daimon, Takashi; Suwa, Kaori; Iwabe, Yutaro; Hayashi, Hideki; Inoue, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Masayuki; Itoh, Kunihiko

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to antiemetic treatment with 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonists is a problem, with 20-30% of patients showing unsatisfactory responses. Efflux transport by P-glycoprotein, encoded by the ATP-binding cassette ABCB1 gene in the blood-brain barrier, has been the suggested resistance mechanism. We evaluated the association between the antiemetic efficacy of granisetron plus dexamethasone and ABCB1 polymorphisms 3435C>T and 2677G>T/A. Sixty-four breast cancer patients treated with doxorubicin plus cyclophosphamide were evaluated for their responses to antiemetic therapy. Genotyping of patient DNA samples for ABCB1 single nucleotide polymorphisms was performed; the genotypes were then investigated for their association with the efficacy of prophylactic antiemetics. The acute phase complete response rate was 83% in GG subjects (n = 12), and 69% (n = 35) and 41% (n = 17) in heterozygous and homozygous carriers of the 2677T/A allele, respectively (p = 0.047). The ABCB1 2677 TT genotype group showed significantly lower rates of complete control of acute emesis than the group with GG genotypes (p = 0.045). No significant association with complete response was found for 3435C>T (p = 0.190). ABCB1 polymorphisms may influence the extent of acute emesis control in granisetron-treated patients, making the ABCB1 genotype a predictor of prophylactic antiemetic response.

  8. [Anti-emetic effect of granisetron in patients undergoing cranial and craniospinal radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Fumiyuki; Watanabe, Yosuke; Nosaka, Ryo; Kenjo, Masahiro; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Takayasu, Takeshi; Saito, Taiichi; Tominaga, Atsushi; Sugiyama, Kazuhiko; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 30-59% of patients undergoing cranial or craniospinal radiotherapy experience nausea and/or vomiting. Here, we evaluated the effectiveness of granisetron for controlling emesis in patients treated with cranial or craniospinal radiotherapy. Between December 2011 and January 2013, 34 patients(19 males, 15 females;age range, 3-80 years)received cranial or craniospinal radiotherapy at our department. All but one male patient, who developed meningitis during the irradiation period were enrolled in this retrospective study. Patients who experienced irradiation-induced vomiting(grade 1)or nausea(grade 2)were treated with granisetron as a rescue anti-emetic. Episodes were graded as(1)no vomiting, no nausea, no anti-emetic;(2)no vomiting, nausea, no anti-emetic;(3)no vomiting, nausea with anti-emetic;and(4)vomiting. Of the 9 patients who underwent whole-brain or whole neural-axis irradiation, 5(55.6%)experienced grade 2 nausea or vomiting. Two of 6 patients(33.3%)treated with whole ventricle irradiation experienced grade 2 nausea or vomiting. Three of 18 patients(16.7%)who underwent local-field irradiation experienced grade 2 nausea or vomiting. Patients who underwent wide-field irradiation experienced nausea, vomiting, and anorexia(pgranisetron. Four of 9 patients(44.4%)treated with granisetron experienced constipation(grade 1 or 2);its administration had no major adverse effects in our study population. Rescue therapy with granisetron is safe and effective to treat nausea and vomiting in patients subjected to cranial or craniospinal irradiation.

  9. Chronic nausea in advanced cancer patients: a retrospective assessment of a metoclopramide-based antiemetic regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruera, E; Seifert, L; Watanabe, S; Babul, N; Darke, A; Harsanyi, Z; Suarez-Almazor, M

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study is to assess the frequency and intensity of chronic nausea in patients admitted to the Palliative Care Unit and the results of a metoclopramide-based treatment regimen. We reviewed the medical records of 100 consecutive patients admitted to the Palliative Care Unit at the Edmonton General Hospital until death during 1992-1993. All patients had terminal cancer and normal cognitive function. All patients completed the Functional Analogue Scale for appetite, nausea, pain, activity, shortness of breath, and sensation of well-being at 1000 and 1600 hours every day. Patients who complained of nausea initially received metoclopramide 10 mg every 4 hr orally or subcutaneously (Step 1). If nausea persisted, dexamethasone 10 mg twice daily was added (Step 2). Step 3 consisted of a continuous subcutaneous infusion of metoclopramide of 60-120 mg/day plus dexamethasone. If no response was observed, other antiemetics were administered (Step 4). Upon admission to the unit, 32 patients (32%) presented with nausea. During the average admission of 25 +/- 13 days, 98 patients (98%) developed nausea. Twenty-five patients (25%) required other antiemetics because of bowel obstruction (18), extrapyramidal side effects (3), or other reasons (4). Most patients without bowel obstruction achieved excellent control of nausea using the metoclopramide-based regimen. During the first 5 days and last 5 days of admission, nausea had significantly lower intensity than the rest of the symptoms that were monitored. Our results suggest that, although nausea is very frequent, it can be well controlled in the majority of patients using safe and simple antiemetic regimens.

  10. Intravenous dextrose administration reduces postoperative antiemetic rescue treatment requirements and postanesthesia care unit length of stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabu-Bondoc, Susan; Vadivelu, Nalini; Shimono, Chantelle; English, Annette; Kosarussavadi, Boonsri; Dai, Feng; Shelley, Kirk; Feinleib, Jessica

    2013-09-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) remains the most common postoperative complication, and causes decreased patient satisfaction, prolonged postoperative hospital stays, and unanticipated admission. There are limited data that indicate that dextrose may reduce nausea and vomiting. In this trial, we attempted to determine whether the rate of PONV can be decreased by postoperative administration of IV dextrose bolus. To test the effect of postoperative dextrose administration on PONV rates, we conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. We enrolled 62 nondiabetic, ASA class I or II nonsmoking outpatients scheduled for gynecologic laparoscopic and hysteroscopic procedures. Patients were randomized into 2 groups: the treatment group received dextrose 5% in Ringer lactate solution, and the control (placebo) group received Ringer lactate solution given immediately after surgery. All patients underwent a standardized general anesthesia and received 1 dose of antiemetic a half hour before emergence from anesthesia. PONV scores, antiemetic rescue medications, narcotic consumption, and discharge time were recorded in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) in half-hour intervals. The 2 groups were similar with regard to age, weight, anxiety scores, prior PONV, non per os status, presurgical glucose, anesthetic duration, intraoperative narcotic use, and total weight-based fluid volume received. Postoperative nausea scores were not significantly different in the dextrose group compared with the control group (P > 0.05) after Bonferroni correction for repeated measurements over time. However, patients who received dextrose 5% in Ringer lactate solution consumed less rescue antiemetic medications (ratio mean difference, 0.56; 95% confidence interval, 0.39-0.82; P = 0.02), and had a shorter length of stay in the PACU (ratio mean difference, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.66-0.97; P = 0.03) compared with patients in the control group. In this trial

  11. Mechanisms of Broad-Spectrum Antiemetic Efficacy of Cannabinoids against Chemotherapy-Induced Acute and Delayed Vomiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nissar A. Darmani

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV is a complex pathophysiological condition and consists of two phases. The conventional CINV neurotransmitter hypothesis suggests that the immediate phase is mainly due to release of serotonin (5-HT from the enterochromaffin cells in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT, while the delayed phase is a consequence of release of substance P (SP in the brainstem. However, more recent findings argue against this simplistic neurotransmitter and anatomical view of CINV. Revision of the hypothesis advocates a more complex, differential and overlapping involvement of several emetic neurotransmitters/modulators (e.g. dopamine, serotonin, substance P, prostaglandins and related arachidonic acid derived metabolites in both phases of emesis occurring concomitantly in the brainstem and in the GIT enteric nervous system (ENS [1]. No single antiemetic is currently available to completely prevent both phases of CINV. The standard antiemetic regimens include a 5-HT3 antagonist plus dexamethasone for the prevention of acute emetic phase, combined with an NK1 receptor antagonist (e.g. aprepitant for the delayed phase. Although NK1 antagonists behave in animals as broad-spectrum antiemetics against different emetogens including cisplatin-induced acute and delayed vomiting, by themselves they are not very effective against CINV in cancer patients. Cannabinoids such as D9-THC also behave as broad-spectrum antiemetics against diverse emetic stimuli as well as being effective against both phases of CINV in animals and patients. Potential side effects may limit the clinical utility of direct-acting cannabinoid agonists which could be avoided by the use of corresponding indirect-acting agonists. Cannabinoids (both phyto-derived and synthetic behave as agonist antiemetics via the activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors in both the brainstem and the ENS emetic loci. An endocannabinoid antiemetic tone may exist since inverse CB1

  12. Palonosetron-A Single-Dose Antiemetic Adjunct for Hepatic Artery Radioembolization: A Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqi, Nasir H.; Khan, Atif J.; Devlin, Phillip M.

    2009-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting may occur in a significant minority of patients following hepatic artery embolization with yttrium-90 spheres (K. T. Sato et al. Radiology 247:507-515, 2008). This encumbers human and economic resources and undercuts the assertion that it is as a well-tolerated outpatient treatment. A single intravenous dose of palonosetron HCl was administered before hepatic artery embolization with yttrium-90 spheres to ameliorate posttreatment nausea and vomiting, in 23 consecutive patients. The patients were discharged the day of procedure on oral antiemetics, steroids, and blockers of gastric acid release. All patients had clinical and laboratory evaluation at 2 weeks after the procedure. The data were gathered and reviewed retrospectively. At 2-week follow-up, none reported significant nausea, vomiting, additional antiemetic use, need for parenteral therapy, hospital readmission, or palonosetron-related side effects. All patients recovered from postembolization symptoms within a week after treatment. In conclusion, this retrospective study suggests that single-dose palonosetron is feasible, safe, and effective for acute and delayed nausea and vomiting in this group of patients. The added cost may be offset by benefits.

  13. Dronabinol for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting unresponsive to antiemetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May MB

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Megan Brafford May,1 Ashley E Glode2 1Department of Pharmacy, Baptist Health Lexington, Lexington, KY, USA; 2Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV is one of the most common symptoms feared by patients, but may be prevented or lessened with appropriate medications. Several antiemetic options exist to manage CINV. Corticosteroids, serotonin receptor antagonists, and neurokinin receptor antagonists are the classes most commonly used in the prevention of CINV. There are many alternative drug classes utilized for the prevention and management of CINV such as antihistamines, benzodiazepines, anticonvulsants, cannabinoids, and dopamine receptor antagonists. Medications belonging to these classes generally have lower efficacy and are associated with more adverse effects. They are also not as well studied compared to the aforementioned agents. This review will focus on dronabinol, a member of the cannabinoid class, and its role in CINV. Cannabis sativa L. (also known as marijuana contains naturally occurring delta-9-tetrahydrocannibinol (delta-9-THC. The synthetic version of delta-9-THC is the active ingredient in dronabinol that makes dronabinol an orally active cannabinoid. Evidence for clinical efficacy of dronabinol will be analyzed in this review as monotherapy, in combination with ondansetron, and in combination with prochlorperazine. Keywords: dronabinol, cannabinoids, antiemetic, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

  14. Comparison of antiemetic efficacy of granisetron and ondansetron in Oriental patients: a randomized crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, R. T.; Chow, L. W.

    1998-01-01

    A double-blind randomized crossover trial was performed to compare the antiemetic efficacy of two 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, granisetron and ondansetron, in Chinese patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil) for breast cancer. Twenty patients were randomized to receive chemotherapy with either granisetron on day 1 and ondansetron on day 8 of the first cycle followed by the reverse order in the second cycle, or vice versa. The number of vomiting episodes and the severity of nausea in the first 24 h (acute vomiting/nausea) and the following 7 days (delayed vomiting/nausea) were studied. Acute vomiting was completely prevented in 29 (72.5%) cycles with granisetron and 27 (67.5%) cycles with ondansetron, and treatment failure (>5 vomiting episodes) occurred in two (5%) cycles with each agent (P = NS). Acute nausea was completely controlled in 15 (37.5%) cycles with granisetron and 14 (35%) cycles with ondansetron, whereas severe acute nausea occurred in four (10%) cycles with each agent (P = NS). However, complete response for delayed vomiting was observed in only 21 (52.5%) cycles with granisetron and 22 (55%) cycles with ondansetron (P = NS), and delayed nausea was completely controlled in only 11 (27.5%) and ten (25%) cycles respectively (P = NS). In conclusion, both granisetron and ondansetron are effective in controlling acute nausea and vomiting in Chinese patients, with equivalent antiemetic efficacy. Control of delayed nausea and vomiting is less satisfactory. PMID:9635849

  15. Evidence-based recommendations for the use of antiemetics in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maranzano, Ernesto; Feyer, Petra Ch.; Molassiotis, Alexander; Rossi, Romina; Clark-Snow, Rebecca A.; Olver, Ian; Warr, David; Schiavone, Concetta; Roila, Fausto

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To report recommendations given in the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) International Consensus Conference regarding the use of antiemetics in radiotherapy. Patients and methods: A steering committee under MASCC auspice chose panel participants for the guidelines development process on prevention of chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-induced emesis (RIE). Pertinent information from published literature as of March 2004 was reviewed for the guideline process. Both the MASCC level of scientific confidence and level of consensus, and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) type of evidence and grade for recommendation were adopted. Results: Total body irradiation is classified at high risk, upper abdomen at moderate, lower thorax, pelvis, cranium (radiosurgery) and craniospinal at low, head and neck, extremities, cranium and breast at minimal risk. The recommendations for the use of antiemetics in radiotherapy are as follows: prophylaxis with a 5-HT3 antagonist in patients at high and moderate risk levels of RIE (±dexamethasone in the former group), prophylaxis or rescue with a 5-HT3 antagonist in the low risk group, and rescue with dopamine or a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist in minimal risk level. Conclusions: These recommendations represent a valid tool for prophylaxis and treatment of RIE in clinical practice

  16. Antiemetic effects of lerisetron in radiation-induced emesis in the dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-de-Segura, I.A.; De Miguel, E.; Grande, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    The 5-HT 3 receptor antagonists are the most potent antiemetics known at present. Lerisetron is a new 5-HT 3 receptor antagonist chemically unrelated to other antagonists like Ondansetron. An emesis model in the dog induced by irradiation with 60 Co was used, and 8 Gy were administered over the total body surface. An irradiated control group was established and received no medication, and two irradiated groups received treatment with either Ondansetron or Lerisetron. The 'up-down' technique was employed to determine the effective dose (ED 50 ). A logarithmic scale was used to increase or decrease the doses in each case. The initial doses were 300 μg/kg for Ondansetron and 100 μg/kg for Lerisetron. All animals in the control group vomited. The ED 50 of Ondansetron was 178 ± 151 μg/kg body wt and that of Lerisetron was 63 ± 18 μg/kg. Lerisetron is more potent and presented less individual variability than Ondansetron, but its antiemetic effects were equally effective. (orig.)

  17. Hollow silicon microneedle array based trans-epidermal antiemetic patch for efficient management of chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharbikar, Bhushan N.; Kumar S., Harish; Kr., Sindhu; Srivastava, Rohit

    2015-12-01

    Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and Vomiting (CINV) is a serious health concern in the treatment of cancer patients. Conventional routes for administering anti-emetics (i.e. oral and parenteral) have several drawbacks such as painful injections, poor patient compliance, dependence on skilled personnel, non-affordability to majority of population (parenteral), lack of programmability and suboptimal bioavailability (oral). Hence, we have developed a trans-epidermal antiemetic drug delivery patch using out-of-plane hollow silicon microneedle array. Microneedles are pointed micron-scale structures that pierce the epidermal layer of skin to reach dermal blood vessels and can directly release the drug in their vicinity. They are painless by virtue of avoiding significant contact with dermal sensory nerve endings. This alternate approach gives same pharmacodynamic effects as par- enteral route at a sparse drug-dose requirement, hence negligible side-effects and improved patient compliance. Microneedle design attributes were derived by systematic study of human skin anatomy, natural micron-size structures like wasp-sting and cactus-spine and multi-physics simulations. We used deep reactive ion etching with Bosch process and optimized recipe of gases to fabricate high-aspect-ratio hollow silicon microneedle array. Finally, microneedle array and polydimethylsiloxane drug reservoir were assembled to make finished anti-emetic patch. We assessed microneedles mechanical stability, physico-chemical properties and performed in-vitro, ex- vivo and in-vivo studies. These studies established functional efficacy of the device in trans-epidermal delivery of anti-emetics, its programmability, ease of use and biosafety. Thus, out-of-plane hollow silicon microneedle array trans-epidermal antiemetic patch is a promising strategy for painless and effective management of CINV at low cost in mainstream healthcare.

  18. A Review of NEPA, a Novel Fixed Antiemetic Combination with the Potential for Enhancing Guideline Adherence and Improving Control of Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. Hesketh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Combination antiemetic regimens targeting multiple molecular pathways associated with emesis have become the standard of care for prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV related to highly and moderately emetogenic chemotherapies. Antiemetic consensus guidelines from several professional societies are widely available and updated regularly as new data emerges. Unfortunately, despite substantial research supporting the notion that guideline conformity improves CINV control, adherence to antiemetic guidelines is unsatisfactory. While studies are needed to identify specific barriers to guideline use and explore measures to enhance adherence, a novel approach has been taken to improve clinician adherence and patient compliance, with the development of a new combination antiemetic. NEPA is an oral fixed combination of a new highly selective NK1 receptor antagonist (RA, netupitant, and the pharmacologically and clinically distinct 5-HT3 RA, palonosetron. This convenient antiemetic combination offers guideline-consistent prophylaxis by targeting two critical pathways associated with CINV in a single oral dose administered only once per cycle. This paper will review and discuss the NEPA data in the context of how this first combination antiemetic may overcome some of the barriers interfering with adherence to antiemetic guidelines, enhance patient compliance, and offer a possible advance in the prevention of CINV for patients.

  19. Effect of olanzapine for breast cancer patients resistant to triplet antiemetic therapy with nausea due to anthracycline-containing adjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Junya; Kashiwaba, Masahiro; Komatsu, Hideaki; Ishida, Kazushige; Nihei, Satoru; Kudo, Kenzo

    2016-05-01

    Triplet antiemetic therapy with neurokinin 1 receptor blocker, 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor blocker and steroids is commonly used in patients who are highly emetic after chemotherapy. However, an alternative antiemetic therapy for patients who are resistant to triplet antiemetic therapy is not established. Olanzapine is recommended in the guidelines as an optional antiemetic drug. However, the effectiveness of adding olanzapine to triplet antiemetic therapy is unknown. In this study, the effectiveness and safety of adding olanzapine to triplet antiemetic therapy with aprepitant, palonosetron and dexamethasone as highly emetic anthracycline-containing adjuvant chemotherapy for primary breast cancer patients were prospectively investigated. Forty-five patients with breast cancer who experienced >Grade 1 nausea or any vomiting after the first cycle of chemotherapy using both epirubicin and cyclophosphamide were included. Low-dose olanzapine (2.5 mg/day) was administered orally from the first day of chemotherapy for 4 days, and the number of episodes of vomiting, scale of nausea, dietary intake and somnolence were compared with the symptoms after the first cycle. As the primary endpoint, the nausea grade was significantly improved by adding olanzapine (P effectiveness and tolerability of adding low-dose olanzapine for patients with insufficient nausea relief with triplet antiemetic therapy consisting of palonosetron, steroid and aprepitant. Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  20. A review of granisetron, 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptor antagonists, and other antiemetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Eric S

    2010-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are 2 of the most upsetting adverse reactions of chemotherapy. Current guidelines propose 5-hydroxytryptamine3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists as a pharmacologic intervention for acute and delayed nausea and vomiting [chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV)] associated with moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Meanwhile, both postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and postdischarge nausea and vomiting are challenging situations after surgeries and procedures. Prophylactic and therapeutic combinations of antiemetics are recommended in patients at high risk of suffering from PONV and postdischarge nausea and vomiting. Granisetron (Kytril) is a selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist that does not induce or inhibit the hepatic cytochrome P-450 system in vitro. There are also 4 other antagonists of 5-HT3 receptor (dolasetron, ondansetron, palonosetron, and tropisetron) being metabolized via the CYP2D6 and are subject to potential genetic polymorphism. The launch of a new class of antiemetics, the substance P/neurokinin1 receptor antagonists, was attributed to the scientific update on the central generator responsible for emesis and role of substance P. There has been mounting interest in exploring integrative medicine, either acupuncture or acustimulation of P6 (Nei-Kuwan), to complement the western medicine for prevention and management of nausea and vomiting. The potential application of cannabinoids, either alone or in combination with other agents of different mechanism, could contribute further to improve outcome in CINV. Implementation of future treatment guidelines for more effective management of CINV and PONV could certainly improve the efficacy and outcome of cancer and postoperative care.

  1. Reviewing current and emerging antiemetics for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, James J

    2015-01-01

    This review provides background information on chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) classification and pathophysiology and reviews various antiemetic agents for CINV prophylaxis, including corticosteroids, serotonin receptor antagonists (5-HT3 RAs), tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonists (NK1 RAs), and olanzapine. Other less commonly used agents are briefly discussed. Practical considerations are reviewed as well, including emetogenicity of chemotherapeutic regimens, patient-specific risk factors for CINV, principles of CINV management, health economics outcome research, and quality of life. Available data on the newly FDA-approved antiemetic combination netupitant/palonosetron (NEPA) is also reviewed. Prevention of CINV is an important goal in managing patients with cancer and is especially difficult with respect to nausea and delayed CINV. Corticosteroids are a mainstay of CINV prophylaxis and are usually given in combination with other therapies. The 5-HT3 RA palonosetron has shown increased efficacy over other agents in the same class for prevention of delayed emesis with moderately emetogenic chemotherapy and NK1 RAs improve emesis prevention in combination with 5-HT3 RAs and dexamethasone. Olanzapine has shown efficacy for CINV prophylaxis and the treatment of breakthrough CINV. The new combination therapy, NEPA, has been shown to be efficacious for the prevention of acute, delayed, and overall CINV. Risk factors that have been identified for CINV include gender, age, and alcohol intake. It is important to assess the emetogenicity of chemotherapy regimens as well as the potential impact of patient risk factors in order to provide adequate prophylaxis. Acute and delayed CINV are severe, burdensome side effects of chemotherapy; however, new data on prevention and the discovery of new agents can further improve CINV control.

  2. Diclofenac with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Sheena; Rabbie, Roy; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Migraine is a common, disabling condition and a burden for the individual, health services and society. Many sufferers choose not to, or are unable to, seek professional help and rely on over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics. Diclofenac is an established analgesic, and new formulations using the potassium or epolamine salts, which can be dissolved in water, have been developed for rapid absorption, which may be beneficial in acute migraine. Co-therapy with an antiemetic should help to reduce the nausea and vomiting commonly associated with migraine. Objectives To determine the efficacy and tolerability of diclofenac, alone or in combination with an antiemetic, compared to placebo and other active interventions in the treatment of acute migraine headaches in adults. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Oxford Pain Relief Database, ClinicalTrials.gov, and reference lists for studies through 27 September 2011. Selection criteria We included randomised, double-blind, placebo- and/or active-controlled studies using self administered diclofenac to treat a migraine headache episode, with at least 10 participants per treatment arm. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We used numbers of participants achieving each outcome to calculate relative risk (or ‘risk ratio’) and numbers needed to treat to benefit (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared to placebo or a different active treatment. Main results Five studies (1356 participants) compared oral diclofenac with placebo, and one also compared it with sumatriptan; none combined diclofenac with a self administered antiemetic. Four studies treated attacks with single doses of medication, and two allowed an optional second dose for inadequate response. Only two studies, with three active treatment arms, provided data for pooled analysis of primary outcomes. For single doses of diclofenac

  3. Paracetamol (acetaminophen) with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew

    2013-04-30

    This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 11, 2010 (Derry 2010). Migraine is a common, disabling condition and a burden for the individual, health services and society. Many sufferers choose not to, or are unable to, seek professional help and rely on over-the-counter analgesics. Co-therapy with an antiemetic should help to reduce nausea and vomiting, which are commonly associated with migraine. To determine the efficacy and tolerability of paracetamol (acetaminophen), alone or in combination with an antiemetic, compared with placebo and other active interventions in the treatment of acute migraine in adults. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies through 4 October 2010 for the original review, and to 13 February 2013 for the update. Two clinical trials registers (ClinicalTrials.gov and gsk-clinicalstudyregister.com) were also searched on both occasions. We included randomised, double-blind, placebo- or active-controlled studies using self-administered paracetamol to treat a migraine headache episode, with at least 10 participants per treatment arm. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Numbers of participants achieving each outcome were used to calculate relative risk and numbers needed to treat (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared with placebo or other active treatment. Searches for the update identified one additional study for inclusion. Eleven studies (2942 participants, 5109 attacks) compared paracetamol 1000 mg, alone or in combination with an antiemetic, with placebo or other active comparators, mainly sumatriptan 100 mg. For all efficacy outcomes paracetamol was superior to placebo, with NNTs of 12 (19% response with paracetamol, 10% with placebo), 5.0 (56% response with paracetamol, 36% with placebo) and 5.2 (39% response with paracetamol, 20% with placebo) for 2-hour pain-free and 2- and 1

  4. Interaction of the antiemetics ondansetron and granisetron with the cytotoxicity induced by irradiation, epirubicin, bleomycin, estramustine, and cisplatin in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnam Motlagh, P. [Dept. of Oncology, Umeaa Univ. Hospital (Sweden); Henriksson, R. [Dept. of Oncology, Umeaa Univ. Hospital (Sweden); Grankvist, K. [Dept. of Clinical Chemistry, Umeaa Univ. Hospital (Sweden)

    1995-12-31

    At cancer treatment, the use of antiemetics are often needed due to induction of nausea and vomiting. Some antiemetics have been shown to interact with the direct cytotoxic effects. The newly developed antiemetics have, so far as we know, not been studied in this respect. In the present study, the effects of the 5-HT{sub 3} receptor antagonists ondansetron and granisetron were evaluated on the cytotoxicity, induced by irradiation, bleomycin, epirubicin, estramustine, and cisplatin using fibroblasts (V79) and lung cancer cells (P31) in vitro. Ondansetron or granisetron (10{sup -5} mol/l) had no effect on the survival of irradiated cells. Granisetron (10{sup -5} mol/l) significantly potentiated cytoxocity of 2.5 mg/l epirubicin on fibroblasts whereas the effect of granisetron (10{sup -7} mol/l) on the cytotoxic effect of 25 mg/l bleomycin, and estramustine (80 mg/l) seemed additive to lung cancer cells. Ondansetron was non-interactive with the cytotoxicity induced by any of the anti-cancer drugs. Although the encountered observation with an enhancing effect of granisetron on the epirubicin-induced cytotoxicity is seen in a specific experimental situation in vitro, the fact that 5-HT{sub 3} receptor antagonists are routinely used during cancer treatment indicate that attention should be given to a possible interaction with the antineoplastic action of cancer treatment. (orig.).

  5. Interaction of the antiemetics ondansetron and granisetron with the cytotoxicity induced by irradiation, epirubicin, bleomycin, estramustine, and cisplatin in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behnam Motlagh, P.; Henriksson, R.; Grankvist, K.

    1995-01-01

    At cancer treatment, the use of antiemetics are often needed due to induction of nausea and vomiting. Some antiemetics have been shown to interact with the direct cytotoxic effects. The newly developed antiemetics have, so far as we know, not been studied in this respect. In the present study, the effects of the 5-HT 3 receptor antagonists ondansetron and granisetron were evaluated on the cytotoxicity, induced by irradiation, bleomycin, epirubicin, estramustine, and cisplatin using fibroblasts (V79) and lung cancer cells (P31) in vitro. Ondansetron or granisetron (10 -5 mol/l) had no effect on the survival of irradiated cells. Granisetron (10 -5 mol/l) significantly potentiated cytoxocity of 2.5 mg/l epirubicin on fibroblasts whereas the effect of granisetron (10 -7 mol/l) on the cytotoxic effect of 25 mg/l bleomycin, and estramustine (80 mg/l) seemed additive to lung cancer cells. Ondansetron was non-interactive with the cytotoxicity induced by any of the anti-cancer drugs. Although the encountered observation with an enhancing effect of granisetron on the epirubicin-induced cytotoxicity is seen in a specific experimental situation in vitro, the fact that 5-HT 3 receptor antagonists are routinely used during cancer treatment indicate that attention should be given to a possible interaction with the antineoplastic action of cancer treatment. (orig.)

  6. Prophylactic antiemetic effects of midazolam, dexamethasone, and its combination after middle ear surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhdoom, Naeem K; Farid, Magdy F

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the efficacy of the combination of midazolam and dexamethasone, with midazolam and dexamethasone alone, for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) in female patients undergoing middle ear surgery. A prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in 80 female patients (mean age 32.6 years), undergoing middle ear surgery with general anesthesia at Ohud Hospital, Madina, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from May 2007 to May 2008. Patients were classified into 4 groups. They received intravenous normal saline (S group), midazolam 0.075 mg/kg (M group), or dexamethasone 10 mg (D group), or a combination of midazolam and dexamethasone (MD group), before the induction of anesthesia. Postoperatively for 24 hours observation and assessment of nausea, vomiting, rescue anti-emetics, and side effects of the study drugs such as headache and drowsiness were carried out. There was a significant difference between the 4 groups. The MD group was the least to develop PONV compared to other groups (p<0.01). Regarding nausea, there was a non-significant difference between the 4 groups, although the MD group developed the least symptoms among the 4 groups, there were no significant differences in pain intensity and side effects such as, headache, dizziness, and drowsiness between the 4 groups. The combination of midazolam 0.075 mg/kg and dexamethasone 10 mg intravenously is better than either drug alone in reducing the incidence of PONV in female patients after middle ear surgery. (author)

  7. Formulation Design and Development of a Unani Transdermal Patch for Antiemetic Therapy and Its Pharmaceutical Evaluation

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    Mohd Nauman Saleem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Transdermal Drug Delivery System (TDDS is one of the novel routes for systemic delivery of drugs through intact skin. A transdermal patch (TP is a medicated patch that is placed on skin for delivery of medication through skin into the blood stream. The aim of present study was to formulate and evaluate a Unani transdermal patch that could be used for antiemetic therapy. The incorporation of Unani ingredients, namely, Khardal (Brassica nigra, Zanjabeel (Zingiber officinale, Podina (Mentha arvensis, and Sirka (Vinegar were envisaged. The TP was prepared by solvent evaporation technique and was evaluated for organoleptic characteristics and other physicochemical properties, such as thickness, weight uniformity, folding endurance, moisture content, drug content, and tolerability and acceptability of patch. The in vitro permeation study of the patch was carried out through Franz diffusion cell using egg shell membrane as barrier membrane. Phosphate buffer pH 7.4 was used as dissolution medium and the temperature was maintained at 37 ± 1°C. The in vitro permeation study of the prepared TP indicated a time dependent increase in drug release throughout the study. The percentage of cumulative drug release was found to be 77.38% in 24 hours. The study shows a new approach to work in Unani pharmaceutics.

  8. Dronabinol for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting unresponsive to antiemetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, Megan Brafford; Glode, Ashley E

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is one of the most common symptoms feared by patients, but may be prevented or lessened with appropriate medications. Several antiemetic options exist to manage CINV. Corticosteroids, serotonin receptor antagonists, and neurokinin receptor antagonists are the classes most commonly used in the prevention of CINV. There are many alternative drug classes utilized for the prevention and management of CINV such as antihistamines, benzodiazepines, anticonvulsants, cannabinoids, and dopamine receptor antagonists. Medications belonging to these classes generally have lower efficacy and are associated with more adverse effects. They are also not as well studied compared to the aforementioned agents. This review will focus on dronabinol, a member of the cannabinoid class, and its role in CINV. Cannabis sativa L. (also known as marijuana) contains naturally occurring delta-9-tetrahydrocannibinol (delta-9-THC). The synthetic version of delta-9-THC is the active ingredient in dronabinol that makes dronabinol an orally active cannabinoid. Evidence for clinical efficacy of dronabinol will be analyzed in this review as monotherapy, in combination with ondansetron, and in combination with prochlorperazine

  9. Palonosetron as an anti-emetic and anti-nausea agent in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aapro, Matti S

    2007-12-01

    Palonosetron (Aloxi(®), Onicit(®), Paloxi(®)) is a second-generation 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist (RA) with an extended half-life of ~40 hours and high binding affinity for the 5-HT₃ receptor that is markedly different from other 5-HT(3) RAs. Phase III trials demonstrate that a single dose of palonosetron compared with traditional 5-HT₃ RAs is more effective in preventing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) during the first 24 hours following chemotherapy (acute CINV), and also exhibits prolonged efficacy to provide significantly better protection from CINV in the delayed and overall phases. This superior and extended protection from CINV conferred by palonosetron following a single intravenous dose before chemotherapy simplifies dosing schedules. Recent research has focused on optimization of palonosetron-based antiemetic regimens, particularly in combination with steroids and neurokinin-1 RAs. The available clinical data indicate high control rates for palonosetron, suggesting a synergistic potential for protection in patients scheduled to receive emetogenic drug regimens.

  10. A comparison of three antiemetic combinations for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Ledesma, M J; López-Olaondo, L; Pueyo, F J; Carrascosa, F; Ortega, A

    2002-12-01

    In this study we compared the efficacy and safety of three antiemetic combinations in the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). Ninety ASA status I-II women, aged 18-65 yr, undergoing general anesthesia for major gynecological surgery, were included in a prospective, randomized, double-blinded study. A standardized anesthetic technique and postoperative analgesia (intrathecal morphine plus IV patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with morphine) were used in all patients. Patients were randomly assigned to receive ondansetron 4 mg plus droperidol 1.25 mg after the induction of anesthesia and droperidol 1.25 mg 12 h later (Group 1, n = 30), dexamethasone 8 mg plus droperidol 1.25 mg after the induction of anesthesia and droperidol 1.25 mg 12 h later (Group 2, n = 30), or ondansetron 4 mg plus dexamethasone 8 mg after the induction of anesthesia and placebo 12 h later (Group 3, n = 30). A complete response, defined as no PONV in 48 h, occurred in 80% of patients in Group 1, 70% in Group 3, and 40% in Group 2 (P = 0.004 versus Groups 1 and 3). The incidences of side effects and other variables that could modify the incidence of PONV were similar among groups. In conclusion, ondansetron, in combination with droperidol or dexamethasone, is more effective than dexamethasone in combination with droperidol in women undergoing general anesthesia for major gynecological surgery with intrathecal morphine plus IV PCA with morphine for postoperative analgesia. The combination of ondansetron plus dexamethasone or droperidol was significantly better than the combination of dexamethasone plus droperidol in the prophylaxis of postoperative nausea and vomiting in women undergoing general anesthesia for major gynecological surgery, with intrathecal and IV morphine (patient-controlled analgesia) for management of postoperative pain.

  11. Anti-emetic mechanisms of Zingiber officinale against cisplatin induced emesis in the pigeon; behavioral and neurochemical correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Ihsan; Subhan, Fazal; Ayaz, Muhammad; Shah, Rehmat; Ali, Gowhar; Haq, Ikram Ul; Ullah, Sami

    2015-02-26

    Zingiber officinale (ZO, family Zingiberaceae) has been reported for its antiemetic activity against cancer chemotherapy induced emesis in animal models and in clinics. Current study was designed to investigate ZO for potential usefulness against cisplatin induced vomiting in pigeon and its effects on central and peripheral neurotransmitters involved in the act of vomiting. Zingiber officinale acetone fraction (ZO-ActFr) was investigated for attenuation of emesis induced by cisplatin in healthy pigeons. Neurotransmitters DA, 5HT and their metabolites DOPAC, HVA and 5HIAA were analyzed using High Performance Liquid Chromatography system coupled with electrochemical detector in area postrema, brain stem and intestine. Antiemetic effect of ZO-ActFr was correlated with central and intestinal neurotransmitters levels in pigeon. Cisplatin (7 mg/kg i.v.) induced emesis without lethality upto the observation period. ZO-ActFr (25, 50 & 100 mg/kg) attenuated cisplatin induced emesis ~ 44.18%, 58.13% (P < 0.05) and 27.9%, respectively; the reference drug, metoclopramide (MCP; 30 mg/kg), produced ~ 48.83% reduction (P < 0.05). ZO-ActFr reduced (P < 0.05 - 0.001) 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT) concentration in the area postrema, brain stem and intestine at 3(rd) hour of cisplatin administration, while at the 18(th) hour ZO treatments attenuated the dopamine upsurge (P < 0.001) caused by cisplatin in the area postrema and 5HT concentration (P < 0.01 - 0.001) in the brain stem and intestine. ZO treatments alone did not altered the basal neurotransmitters and their metabolites in the brain areas and intestine. The behavioral study verify the antiemetic profile of ZO against cisplatin induced emesis in the pigeon, where central and peripheral neural evidences advocate the involvement of serotonergic mechanism at initial time point (3(rd) hr), while the later time point (18(th) hr) is associated with serotonergic and dopaminergic component in the mediation

  12. Study of inclusion complex formation between chlorpromazine hydrochloride, as an antiemetic drug, and β-cyclodextrin, using conductometric technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafati, Amir Abbas; Hamnabard, Nazanin; Ghasemian, Ensieh; Nojini, Zabiolah Bolboli

    2009-01-01

    The behavior of micellization of chlorpromazine hydrochloride (CPH) as an antiemetic drug and its inclusion complex formation with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) was studied using conductometric technique. The binding or association constant of the complexation equilibrium is evaluated from conductometric measurements by using a nonlinear regression method. The resulting K values for micellization as well as complexation are analyzed. The experiments were carried out at different temperatures. It has been found that CPH form only the 1:1 complex. The association constant values are used for evaluation of thermodynamic parameters of complexation, such as ΔG complex o , ΔH complex o and ΔS complex o .

  13. Evaluating the antiemetic administration consistency to prevent chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting with the standard guidelines: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazin, Afsaneh; Eslami, Davood; Sahebi, Ebrahim

    2017-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting (NV) are the most prevalent adverse effects of chemotherapy (CT). This study was conducted to evaluate adherence of the health care team to standard guidelines for antiemetics usage to prevent acute chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in a large CT center. A prospective study was performed during an 11-month period on patients receiving CT. A form was designed to collect patients' demographic information and their chemotherapeutic and antiemetic regimen data. The Likert scale was used to measure the effectiveness of the antiemetics in patients. In this study, the effect of patient-related risk factors on the incidence rate of CINV was examined. Based on the results, CINV events were reported by 74.4% of patients. The antiemetic regimen of 71.2% of the patients complied with the guidelines. The complete response, complete protection, and complete control end points did not differ significantly between patients undergoing guidelines-consistent prophylaxis or guidelines-inconsistent prophylaxis. The females clearly showed a higher incidence rate of CINV ( P =0.001) during the first course of CT ( P =0.006). A history of motion sickness did not affect the incidence of NV. The maximum compliance error occurred for the use of aprepitant, as 16.16% of the patients who were receiving aprepitant did not comply with its instructions. The results of this study highlight how CINV was controlled in this center, which was significantly lower than that of the global standard. Perhaps, factors such as noncompliance to antiemetic regimens with standard guidelines and the failure to adhere to the administration instructions of the antiemetics were involved in the incomplete control of CINV.

  14. The cost of antiemetic therapy for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients receiving platinum-containing regimens in daily practice in Japan: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Shota; Hinotsu, Shiro; Hori, Katsuhito; Furuse, Hiroshi; Oikawa, Takehiro; Kawakami, Junichi; Ozono, Seiichiro; Akaza, Hideyuki; Kawakami, Koji

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the cost of antiemetic therapy for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in daily practice in Japan. This was a retrospective observational study using medical records. Eligible patients were those with bladder or testicular cancer receiving platinum-containing highly emetogenic chemotherapy. The incidence of CINV on days 1-5 in single-day chemotherapy and on days 1-9 in multiple-day chemotherapy, and the costs of antiemetic therapy directly associated with the administration of antiemetics were estimated. The analysis of costs was performed from a hospital perspective. A total of 54 patients or 169 chemotherapy courses were included. In all chemotherapy courses 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists were used on the day(s) that platinum-containing agents were administered and frequently used on subsequent days. In contrast, the use of corticosteroids was infrequent. Acute CINV in single-day chemotherapy was well controlled, but the incidences of delayed CINV in single-day chemotherapy and CINV in multiple-day chemotherapy were relatively high. The costs for antiemetic therapy were $484.65 in courses with CINV and $318.56 in courses without CINV, and the difference was approximately $170 per chemotherapy course, which was considered to be mainly imputable to the prevalence of CINV. The cost of antiemetic therapy for CINV is substantial in Japan as well as in other countries, and it is suggested that the onset of CINV is a possible cost driver. The improvements in antiemetic therapy may contribute not only to improved patient well-being but also to a reduction of economic burden.

  15. Comparison of Antiemetic Effects of Ondansetron Granisetron and Tropisetron For Acute Emesis In Ovarian Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy With Paclitaxel and Carboplatin

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    Taner Turan

    2007-08-01

    CONCLUSION: Even though this study was retrospective, the treatment and patient groups were homogeneous. Both the discovery of an antiemetic that is much more effective and a protocol that is improved are essential. An emerging need for prospective studies achieved with homogeneous patient groups does exist.

  16. Aromatherapy Versus Oral Ondansetron for Antiemetic Therapy Among Adult Emergency Department Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    April, Michael D; Oliver, Joshua J; Davis, William T; Ong, David; Simon, Erica M; Ng, Patrick C; Hunter, Curtis J

    2018-02-17

    We compare aromatherapy with inhaled isopropyl alcohol versus oral ondansetron for treating nausea among emergency department (ED) patients not requiring immediate intravenous access. In a randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled trial, we enrolled a convenience sample of adults presenting to an urban tertiary care ED with chief complaints including nausea or vomiting. We randomized subjects to 1 of 3 arms: inhaled isopropyl alcohol and 4 mg oral ondansetron, inhaled isopropyl alcohol and oral placebo, and inhaled saline solution placebo and 4 mg oral ondansetron. The primary outcome was mean nausea reduction measured by a 0- to 100-mm visual analog scale from enrollment to 30 minutes postintervention. Secondary outcomes included receipt of rescue antiemetic medications and adverse events. We enrolled 122 subjects, of whom 120 (98.3%) completed the study. Of randomized subjects, 40 received inhaled isopropyl alcohol and oral ondansetron, 41 received inhaled isopropyl alcohol and oral placebo, and 41 received inhaled saline solution placebo and oral ondansetron. The mean decrease in nausea visual analog scale score in each arm was 30 mm (95% confidence interval [CI] 22 to 37 mm), 32 mm (95% CI 25 to 39 mm), and 9 mm (95% CI 5 to 14 mm), respectively. The proportions of subjects who received rescue antiemetic therapy in each arm were 27.5% (95% CI 14.6% to 43.9%), 25.0% (95% CI 12.7% to 41.2%), and 45.0% (95% CI 29.3% to 61.5%), respectively. There were no adverse events. Among ED patients with acute nausea and not requiring immediate intravenous access, aromatherapy with or without oral ondansetron provides greater nausea relief than oral ondansetron alone. Copyright © 2018 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. COMPARISON OF ANTIEMETIC EFFICACY OF ONDANSETRON, GRANISETRON AND PALONOSETRON IN HIGH-RISK PATIENTS UNDERGOING ABDOMINAL HYSTERECTOMY UNDER GENERAL ANAESTHESIA

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    Rakesh Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Postoperative nausea and vomiting is (PONV a very distressing complication and preventive measures are justified when the risk of PONV is very high. Ondansetron is the first 5-HT3 antagonist used alone or in combination for prophylaxis of PONV due to its lower cost. Granisetron and palonosetron are recently introduced 5-HT3 antagonists with greater affinity for 5-HT3 receptor and having longer half-life. Aim of the present study is to compare the antiemetic efficacy of ondansetron, granisetron and palonosetron in high-risk patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy under general anaesthesia. METHODS After obtaining Institutional Ethical Committee approval and written informed consent from all the participants, 150 patients of ASA grade I & II, aged between 20-50 years and weight between 30-60 kg undergoing abdominal hysterectomy under general anaesthesia were assigned randomly in to three groups of 50 patients each using random number table receiving either ondansetron 4 mg (Group O or granisetron 2 mg (Group G or palonosetron 0.75 mg (Group P intravenously just before the induction of anaesthesia. Incidence and severity of nausea and frequency of retching and vomiting were recorded in each group at the end of 2-hour and then at 24-hour and 48-hour intervals. RESULTS The incidence of nausea during first two hours postoperatively was found to be 14(28% in Group O, which was found to be significantly higher than 6(12% in group G and 4(8% in group P (p value = 0.016. The incidence of vomiting was found to be 6(12% in group O, which was found to be significantly higher than 2(4% in both group G and group P (p value = 0.018. Number of complete responders was significantly higher in Group P and group G as compared to group O. Number of patients requiring rescue antiemetic treatment was significantly high in group O{10(20%} as compared to 3(6% in both the group G and group P. CONCLUSIONS Newly introduced 5-HT3 antagonists, granisetron and

  18. Cost-effectiveness analysis of granisetron-based versus standard antiemetic regimens in low-emetogenic chemotherapy: a hospital-based perspective from Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keat, Chan Huan; Ghani, Norazila Abdul

    2013-01-01

    In a prospective cohort study of antiemetic therapy conducted in Malaysia, a total of 94 patients received low emetogenic chemotherapy (LEC) with or without granisetron injections as the primary prophylaxis for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). This study is a retrospective cost analysis of two antiemetic regimens from the payer perspective. This cost evaluation refers to 2011, the year in which the observation was conducted. Direct costs incurred by hospitals including the drug acquisition, materials and time spent for clinical activities from prescribing to dispensing of home medications were evaluated (MYR 1=$0.32 USD). As reported to be significantly different between two regimens (96.1% vs 81.0%; p=0.017), the complete response rate of acute emesis which was defined as a patient successfully treated without any emesis episode within 24 hours after LEC was used as the main indicator for effectiveness. Antiemetic drug acquisition cost per patient was 40.7 times higher for the granisetron-based regimen than for the standard regimen (MYR 64.3 vs 1.58). When both the costs for materials and clinical activities were included, the total cost per patient was 8.68 times higher for the granisetron-based regimen (MYR 73.5 vs 8.47). Considering the complete response rates, the mean cost per successfully treated patient in granisetron group was 7.31 times higher (MYR 76.5 vs 10.5). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) with granisetron-based regimen, relative to the standard regimen, was MYR 430.7. It was found to be most sensitive to the change of antiemetic effects of granisetron-based regimen. While providing a better efficacy in acute emesis control, the low incidence of acute emesis and high ICER makes use of granisetron as primary prophylaxis in LEC controversial.

  19. A randomized controlled non-inferiority study comparing the antiemetic effect between intravenous granisetron and oral azasetron based on estimated 5-HT3 receptor occupancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Junki; Iihara, Hirotoshi; Yamada, Maya; Yanase, Koumei; Kamiya, Fumihiko; Ito, Fumitaka; Funaguchi, Norihiko; Ohno, Yasushi; Minatoguchi, Shinya; Itoh, Yoshinori

    2012-09-01

    The acute antiemetic effect was compared between oral azasetron and intravenous granisetron based on the 5-hydroxytryptamine(3) (5-HT(3)) receptor occupancy theory. Receptor occupancy was estimated from reported data on plasma concentrations and affinity constants to 5-HT(3) receptor. A randomized non-inferiority study comparing acute antiemetic effects between oral azasetron and intravenous granisetron was performed in 105 patients receiving the first course of carboplatin-based chemotherapy for lung cancer. Azasetron exhibited the highest 5-HT(3) receptor occupancy among various first-generation 5-HT(3) antagonists. The complete response to oral azasetron was shown to be non-inferior to that of intravenous granisetron, in which the risk difference was 0.0004 (95% confidence interval: -0.0519-0.0527). The lower limit of the confidence intervals did not exceed the negative non-inferiority margin (-0.1). The complete response during the overall period was not different (68% versus 67%). Oral azasetron was found to be non-inferior to intravenous granisetron in the acute antiemetic effect against moderately emetogenic chemotherapy.

  20. Outbreak of Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteremia in a chemotherapy day care unit due to intrinsic contamination of an antiemetic drug

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    T Singhal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the end of 2009, a large number of patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy at the day care unit of a private hospital in Mumbai, India developed Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC blood stream infection (BSI. Objective: The objectives were to identify the source of the outbreak and terminate the outbreak as rapidly as possible. Materials and Methods: All infection control protocols and processes were reviewed. Intensive training was started for all nursing staff involved in patient care. Cultures were sent from the environment (surfaces, water, air, intravenous fluids, disinfectants and antiseptics and opened/unopened medication. Results: A total of 13 patients with cancer with tunneled catheters were affected with BCC BSI. The isolates were of similar antimicrobial sensitivity. No significant breach of infection control protocols could be identified. Cultures from the prepared intravenous medication bags grew BCC. Subsequently, culture from unused vials of the antiemetic granisetron grew BCC, whereas those from the unopened IV fluid bag and chemotherapy medication were negative. On review, it was discovered that the outbreak started when a new brand of granisetron was introduced. The result was communicated to the manufacturer and the brand was withdrawn. There were no further cases. Conclusions: This outbreak was thus linked to intrinsic contamination of medication vials. We acknowledge a delay in identifying the source as we were concentrating more on human errors in medication preparation and less on intrinsic contamination. We recommend that in an event of an outbreak, unopened vials be cultured at the outset.

  1. A phase I trial of a new antiemetic drug--clebopride malate--in cisplatin-treated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiberg, H; Piccart, M; Lips, S; Panzer, J M; N'Koua Mbon, J B

    1992-02-01

    Clebopride, a new benzamide derivative, has, in common with the other members of this group, antidopaminergic activity. In animals, its therapeutic ratio is superior to that of metoclopramide at doses free of side effects associated with hyperprolactinemia and extrapyramidal symptoms. The present study was designed to define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) in patients with advanced histologically-proven cancer, treated with cisplatin at a dose of greater than 50 mg/m2. Most of them were pretreated and refractory to standard antiemetics. Clebopride was started at a dosage of 0.10 mg/kg in a group of 6 patients and escalated by 0.2 mg at each dose level. A total of 30 patients were included. Side effects include somnolence, diarrhea and extrapyramidal-like symptoms. The latter occurred at almost all dose levels in 14% of the cycles and limited continuation of the study. Activity in this group of patients was encouraging but, considering the rate of extrapyramidal symptoms, further dose escalation is not indicated and activity at lower, nontoxic levels should be investigated.

  2. Impact of 5-HT(3) RA selection within triple antiemetic regimens on uncontrolled highly emetogenic chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzberg, Lee; Jackson, James; Jain, Gagan; Balu, Sanjeev; Buchner, Deborah

    2011-08-01

    It is recommended that patients initiate triple antiemetic therapy with one of the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonists (5-HT(3) RAs), aprepitant (or its intravenous prodrug fosaprepitant) and dexamethasone prior to the start of highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC). However, the impact of 5-HT(3) RA selection within triple antiemetic regimens on the risk of uncontrolled chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) with HEC has not been well studied. To assess the likelihood of an uncontrolled CINV event following antiemetic prophylaxis with the 5-HT(3) RA palonosetron + aprepitant/fosaprepitant + dexamethasone (palonosetron cohort) versus any of the other 5-HT(3) RAs + aprepitant/fosaprepitant + dexamethasone (other 5-HT(3) RA cohort) among single-day HEC cycles. Single-day HEC cycles (a gap of at least 5 days between two administrations) among patients with a cancer diagnosis and receiving antiemetic prophylaxis with the aforementioned regimens between 1/1/2006 and 6/30/2010 were identified from the IMS LifeLink claims database. Uncontrolled CINV events were identified through ICD-9-CM codes (nausea and vomiting), Current Procedural Terminology codes (hydration), rescue medications and/or use of antiemetic therapy from days 2-5 following HEC administration. Risks for an uncontrolled CINV event among all patients, and within breast cancer and multiple cancer subpopulations, were analyzed at cycle level using logistic multivariate regression models. A total of 8018 cycles for the palonosetron cohort and 1926 cycles for the other 5-HT(3) RA cohort (3574 and 978 patients, respectively) were analyzed. Single-day HEC cycles received by the palonosetron cohort had a significantly lower unadjusted risk of an uncontrolled CINV event (17.5 vs 20.7% for the other 5-HT(3) RA cohort; p = 0.0010), with a 17% lower adjusted risk for palonosetron-administered cycles (odds ratio: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.73-0.94; p = 0.0042). Results in the breast cancer and multiple cancer

  3. Lipids bearing extruded-spheronized pellets for extended release of poorly soluble antiemetic agent-Meclizine HCl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qazi, Faaiza; Shoaib, Muhammad Harris; Yousuf, Rabia Ismail; Nasiri, Muhammad Iqbal; Ahmed, Kamran; Ahmad, Mansoor

    2017-04-12

    Antiemetic agent Meclizine HCl, widely prescribed in vertigo, is available only in immediate release dosage forms. The approved therapeutic dose and shorter elimination half-life make Meclizine HCl a potential candidate to be formulated in extended release dosage form. This study was aimed to develop extended release Meclizine HCl pellets by extrusion spheronization using natural and synthetic lipids. Influence of lipid type, drug/lipid ratio and combinations of different lipids on drug release and sphericity of pellets were evaluated. Thirty two formulations were prepared with four different lipids, Glyceryl monostearate (Geleol ® ), Glyceryl palmitostearate (Precirol ® ), Glyceryl behenate (Compritol ® ) and Carnauba wax, utilized either alone or in combinations of drug/lipid ratio of 1:0.5-1:3. Dissolution studies were performed at variable pH and release kinetics were analyzed. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was conducted and no drug lipid interaction was found. Sphericity indicated by shape factor (e R ) varied with type and concentration of lipids: Geleol ® (e R  = 0.891-0.997), Precirol ® (e R  = 0.611-0.743), Compritol ® (e R  = 0.665-0.729) and Carnauba wax (e R  = 0.499-0.551). Highly spherical pellets were obtained with Geleol ® (Aspect ratio = 1.005-1.052) whereas irregularly shaped pellets were formed using Carnauba wax (Aspect ratio = 1.153-1.309). Drug release was effectively controlled by three different combinations of lipids: (i) Geleol ® and Compritol ® , (ii) Geleol ® and Carnauba wax and (iii) Geleol ® , Compritol ® and Carnauba wax. Scanning electron microscopy of Compritol ® pellets showed smooth surface with pores, whereas, irregular rough surface with hollow depressions was observed in Carnauba wax pellets. Energy dispersive spectroscopy indicated elemental composition of lipid matrix pellets. Kinetics of (i) Geleol ® and Compritol ® pellets, explained by Korsmeyer-Peppas (R 2  = 0.978-0.993) indicated

  4. Comparison between Antiemetic Effects of Palonosetron and Granisetron on Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Japanese Patients Treated with R-CHOP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Mayako; Mori, Yasuo; Nakamura, Tsutomu; Kato, Koji; Kamezaki, Kenjiro; Takenaka, Katsuto; Shiratsuchi, Motoaki; Kadoyama, Kaori; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Akashi, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, the antiemetic effect of palonosetron, not combined with dexamethasone and aprepitant, on chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting was evaluated in patients with malignant lymphoma receiving first-line rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) therapy, and was compared to that of granisetron. A total of 74 patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma were included in this study (April 2007 to December 2015). Palonosetron (0.75 mg) or granisetron (3 mg) was intravenously administered before R-CHOP therapy. The proportions of patients with complete response (CR) during the overall (0-120 h after the start of R-CHOP therapy), acute (0-24 h) and delayed (24-120 h) phases were evaluated. CR was defined as no vomiting and no use of antiemetic rescue medication. A total of 32 and 42 patients were treated with palonosetron and granisetron, respectively. The CR rate in the palonosetron group was significantly higher than that in the granisetron group during the delayed phase (90.6 and 61.9%, respectively; p=0.007). Logistic regression analysis showed that use of palonosetron improved the CR rate during the delayed phase, compared to use of granisetron. Female sex, age less than 60 years, no habitual alcohol intake, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG-PS) score of 1 were significant risk factors associated with non-CR. The findings of this study suggested the superiority of palonosetron to granisetron, without accompanying dexamethasone and aprepitant, for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients with malignant lymphoma.

  5. Comparison of palanosetron, granisetron and ondansetron as anti-emetics for prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting in patients undergoing middle ear surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Anjana; Saha, Debdas; Hembrom, Bani P; Roy, Amit; Naaz, Anjum

    2011-05-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the efficacy of palanosetron (0.25 mg), granisetron (3.0 mg) and ondansetron (8.0 mg) used as anti-emetics for the prevention of postoperative nausea/vomiting in patients undergoing middle ear surgery. The study was done among 75 adult patients (age group 30-45 years) of which 50 were males and rest (25) females, all of ASA I and ASA II. The patients were randomly allocated into 3 equal groups: Group I (n = 25) received injection palanosetron (0.25 mg) IV, group II (n = 25) received injection granisetron (3 mg) IV and group III (n = 25) received injection ondansetron (8.0 mg) IV at the end of the surgical procedure. A standard general anaesthesia technique was employed. Emetic episodes and safety assessments were performed during two periods of 0-6 hours in the postanaesthesia care unit and 6-24 hours in the ward after anaesthesia. The incidence of emesis-free patients during the 0-6 hours period was 100% for group I; 72% for group II and 56% for group III. During the 6-24 hours period incidence of emesis-free patients were 96% for group I; 56% for group II and 32% for group III. So to conclude, a single dose of palanosetron (0.25 mg) is a superior anti-emetic to granisetron (3.0 mg) or ondansetron (8.0 mg) in complete prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting after middle ear surgery during the first 24 hours period.

  6. Effects of a self-management program on antiemetic-induced constipation during chemotherapy among breast cancer patients: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanai, Akiko; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Sozu, Takashi; Tsuda, Moe; Arai, Hidenori; Mitani, Akira; Tsuboyama, Tadao

    2016-01-01

    Research on patient-reported outcomes indicates that constipation is a common adverse effect of chemotherapy, and the use of 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin; 5HT3) receptor antagonists aggravates this condition. As cancer patients take multiple drugs as a part of their clinical management, a non-pharmacological self-management (SM) of constipation would be recommended. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a SM program on antiemetic-induced constipation in cancer patients. Thirty patients with breast cancer, receiving 5HT3 receptor antagonists to prevent emesis during chemotherapy were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. The SM program consisted of abdominal massage, abdominal muscle stretching, and education on proper defecation position. The intervention group started the program before the first chemotherapy cycle, whereas patients in the wait-list control group received the program on the day before their second chemotherapy cycle. The primary outcome was constipation severity, assessed by the constipation assessment scale (CAS, sum of eight components). The secondary outcome included each CAS component (0-2 points) and mood states. A self-reported assessment of satisfaction with the program was performed. The program produced a statistically and clinically significant alleviation of constipation severity (mean difference in CAS, -3.00; P = 0.02), decrease in the likelihood of a small volume of stool (P = 0.03), and decrease in depression and dejection (P = 0.02). With regards to program satisfaction, 43.6 and 26.4 % patients rated the program as excellent and good, respectively. Our SM program is effective for mitigating the symptoms of antiemetic-induced constipation during chemotherapy.

  7. Eliminating Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting in Outpatient Surgery with Multimodal Strategies including Low Doses of Nonsedating, Off-Patent Antiemetics: Is “Zero Tolerance“ Achievable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan J. Skledar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available For ondansetron, dexamethasone, and droperidol (when used for prophylaxis, each is estimated to reduce risk of postoperative nausea and/or vomiting (PONV by approximately 25%. Current consensus guidelines denote that patients with 0–1 risk factors still have a 10–20% risk of encountering PONV, but do not yet advocate routine prophylaxis for all patients with 10–20% risk. In ambulatory surgery, however, multimodal prophylaxis has gained favor, and our previously published experience with routine prophylaxis has yielded PONV rates below 10%. We now propose a “zero-tolerance” antiemetic algorithm for outpatients that involves routine prophylaxis by first avoiding volatile agents and opioids to the extent possible, using locoregional anesthesia, multimodal analgesia, and low doses of three nonsedating off-patent antiemetics. Routine oral administration (immediately on arrival to the ambulatory surgery suite of perphenazine 8 mg (antidopaminergic or cyclizine 50 mg (antihistamine, is followed by dexamethasone 4 mg i.v. after anesthesia induction (dexamethasone is avoided in diabetic patients. At the end of surgery, ondansetron (4 mg i.v., now off-patent is added. Rescue therapy consists of avoiding unnecessary repeat doses of drugs acting by the same mechanism: haloperidol 2 mg i.v. (antidopaminergic is prescribed for patients pretreated with cyclizine or promethazine 6.25 mg i.v. (antihistamine for patients having been pretreated with perphenazine. If available, a consultation for therapeutic acupuncture procedure is ordered. Our approach toward “zero tolerance” of PONV emphasizes liberal identification of and prophylaxis against common risks.

  8. Profile of Antiemetic Activity of Netupitant Alone or in Combination with Palonosetron and Dexamethasone in Ferrets and Suncus murinus (house musk shrew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Rudd

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Chemotherapy-induced acute and delayed emesis involves the activation of multiple pathways, with 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin playing a major role in the initial response. Substance P tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonists can reduce emesis induced by disparate emetic challenges and therefore have a clinical utility as broad inhibitory anti-emetic drugs. In the present studies, we investigate the broad inhibitory anti-emetic profile of a relatively new NK1 receptor antagonist, netupitant, alone or in combination with the long acting 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, palonosetron, for a potential to reduce emesis in ferrets and shrews.Materials and Methods: Ferrets were pretreated with netupitant and/or palonosetron, or their combination, and then administered apomorphine (0.125 mg/kg, s.c., morphine (0.5 mg/kg, s.c., ipecacuanha (1.2 mg/kg, p.o., copper sulphate (100 mg/kg, intragastric, or cisplatin (5-10 mg/kg, i.p.; in other studies netupitant was administered to Suncus murinus before motion (4 cm horizontal displacement, 2 Hz for 10 min.Results: Netupitant (3 mg/kg, p.o. abolished apomorphine-, morphine-, ipecacuanha- and copper sulphate-induced emesis. Lower doses of netupitant (0.03-0.3 mg/kg, p.o. dose-dependently reduced cisplatin (10 mg/kg, i.p.-induced emesis in an acute (8 h model, and motion-induced emesis in Suncus murinus. In a ferret cisplatin (5 mg/kg, i.p.-induced acute and delayed emesis model, netupitant administered once at 3 mg/kg, p.o., abolished the first 24 h response and reduced the 24-72 h response by 94.6 %; the reduction was markedly superior to the effect of a three times per day administration of ondansetron (1 mg/kg, i.p.. A single administration of netupitant (1 mg/kg, p.o. plus palonosetron (0.1 mg/kg, p.o. combined with dexamethasone (1 mg/kg, i.p., once per day, also significantly antagonized cisplatin-induced acute and delayed emesis and was comparable with a once-daily regimen of

  9. A prospective cohort study of patient-reported vomiting, retching, nausea and antiemetic use during neoadjuvant long-course radiation therapy and concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy for rectal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristopher Dennis

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Antiemetic guidelines suggest daily prophylaxis with a serotonin3 receptor antagonist (5-HT3RA as an option for patients receiving long-course neoadjuvant radiation therapy and concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy for rectal cancer, despite the risks that 5-HT3RA-induced constipation may pose. We explored the incidence of patient-reported vomiting, retching, nausea and antiemetic intake among patients in this setting to determine if these risks are justified. Materials and methods: We carried out a single-centre non-randomised prospective cohort study of adult patients receiving long-course neoadjuvant radiation therapy and concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy for rectal adenocarcinoma. Patients recorded symptoms and medication intake daily until 7 days following treatment completion. Results: From 33 evaluable patients, we collected 1407 days of patient-reported data. Vomiting was reported by 7 patients (21%, retching by 5(15% and nausea by 21(64%. No patients were administered prophylactic antiemetics. The median number of days with vomiting was 2, and the cumulative number of days for all affected patients was 22 (1.6% of 1407 evaluable days. There were no differences in PTV or small bowel loop V15Gy, V45Gy and V50Gy volumes between patients that did and did not vomit. Conclusions: The cumulative incidence of days with vomiting was only 1.6%. 5-HT3RA prophylaxis during long-course neoadjuvant treatment seems unnecessary. Keywords: Antiemetic, Nausea, Patient-reported outcome, Radiation therapy, Rectal cancer, Vomiting

  10. Usefulness of antiemetic therapy with aprepitant, palonosetron, and dexamethasone for lung cancer patients on cisplatin-based or carboplatin-based chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazaki, Takeshi; Fukuda, Yuichi; Fukahori, Susumu; Oyanagi, Kazuhiko; Soda, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yoichi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the usefulness of the triplet regimen comprising aprepitant, palonosetron, and dexamethasone in patients treated with highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC) and moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC). Patients with lung cancer (aged 65.8 ± 8.4 years) who received carboplatin-based MEC and those treated with cisplatin-based HEC were enrolled. The antiemetic regimen for both types of chemotherapy consisted of aprepitant, palonosetron, and dexamethasone based on the May 2010 guidelines prepared by the Japan Society of Clinical Oncology. The incidence of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) and the use of salvage treatment were assessed. The primary endpoints were the percentage of patients with a complete response (CR: no nausea and no salvage treatment) during the entire study period (5 days) after chemotherapy, during the acute phase (day 1), and during the delayed phase (days 2-5). CR rates for the entire period were 86 and 71% in patients receiving carboplatin-based and cisplatin-based chemotherapy, respectively. CR rates were respectively 98 and 100% in the acute phase versus 87 and 71% in the delayed phase. Most of the patients could ingest food throughout the entire period after chemotherapy. Assessment of various risk factors for acute and delayed CINV (gender, age, prior vomiting due to antineoplastic therapy, prior experience of motion sickness, and history of drinking) revealed no significant influence of these factors on the CR rate for the entire period in patients receiving either carboplatin-based or cisplatin-based chemotherapy. The present triple therapy can be recommended for supporting both carboplatin-based and cisplatin-based chemotherapy regimens.

  11. Study on the interactions of antiemetic drugs and 12-tungstophosphoric acid by absorption and resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra and their analytical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaqiong; Liu, Shaopu; Liu, Zhongfang; Yang, Jidong; Hu, Xiaoli

    2013-03-01

    In 0.1 mol L-1 HCl medium, antiemetic drugs (ATM), such as granisetron hydrochloride (GS) and tropisetron hydrochloride (TS), reacted with H3PW12O40·nH2O and formed 3:1 ion-association complex of [(ATM)3PW12O40], then self-aggregated into nanoparticles-[(ATM)3PW12O40]n with an average size of 100 nm. The reaction resulted in the enhancement of resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) and the absorption spectra. The increments of scattering intensity (ΔIRRS) and the change of absorbance (ΔA) were both directly proportional to the concentrations of ATM in certain ranges. Accordingly, two new RRS and spectrophotometric methods were proposed for ATM detection. The detection limits (3σ) of GS and TS were 3.2 ng mL-1 and 4.0 ng mL-1(RRS method), 112.5 ng mL-1 and 100.0 ng mL-1(spectrophotometric method). These two methods were applied to determine GS in orally disintegrating tablets and the results were in good agreement with the official method. The ground-state geometries and electronic structures of GS and TS were optimized by the hybrid density functional theory (DFT) method and the shape of [(ATM)3PW12O40]n was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Take the RRS method with higher sensitivity as an example, the reaction mechanism and the reasons for enhancement of scattering were discussed.

  12. Nausea still the poor relation in antiemetic therapy? The impact on cancer patients' quality of life and psychological adjustment of nausea, vomiting and appetite loss, individually and concurrently as part of a symptom cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirri, Carlo; Bayliss, Evan; Trotter, James; Olver, Ian N; Katris, Paul; Drummond, Peter; Bennett, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Despite significant antiemetic advances, almost 50% of treated cancer patients still experience nausea and vomiting (N&V). The goal of antiemetic therapy--complete prevention of treatment-induced nausea and/or vomiting (TIN+/-V)--remains elusive for several reasons. Potentially, N&V may be part of a symptom cluster where co-occurring symptoms negatively affect antiemetic management. Consequently, we examined TIN+/-V incidence and the impact of nausea, vomiting and symptom cluster(s) containing them, respectively, on patients' quality of life (QoL) and psychological adjustment across treatment. A longitudinal secondary analysis was performed on data from a prospective, observational QoL study involving 200 newly diagnosed cancer patients who underwent combined modality treatment. QoL, psychological adjustment and patient/clinical characteristics were examined at pretreatment, on-treatment (8 weeks) and post-treatment. Overall, 62% of patients experienced TIN+/-V, with TIN (60%) doubling TIV incidence (27 %). Exploratory factor analyses of QoL scores at each treatment time point identified a recurrent gastrointestinal symptom cluster comprising nausea, vomiting and appetite loss. Approximately two thirds of patients reported co-occurrence of all three symptoms, which exerted synergistic effects of multiplicative proportions on overall QoL. Patients who reported co-occurrence of these symptoms during treatment experienced significantly greater QoL impairment (physical, role and social functioning, fatigue, N&V, appetite loss, overall physical health, overall QOL) and psychological distress (cancer distress, premorbid neuroticism) than those unaffected (0.001 > p ≤ 0.05). Moreover, nausea was more pervasive than vomiting or appetite loss across treatment and had a greater impact on overall QoL. While antiemetic therapy was effective for vomiting and helped prevent/relieve associated appetite loss, the benefits for appetite loss were seemingly constrained by its

  13. A cost-utility analysis of risk model-guided versus physician's choice antiemetic prophylaxis in patients receiving chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer: a net benefit regression approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavorn, Kednapa; Coyle, Doug; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Vandermeer, Lisa; Mazzarello, Sasha; Wang, Zhou; Dranitsaris, George; Fergusson, Dean; Clemons, Mark

    2017-08-01

    We assessed the cost-effectiveness of a risk model-guided (RMG) antiemetic prophylaxis strategy compared with the physician's choice (PC) strategy in patients receiving chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer. We conducted a cost-utility analysis based on a published randomized controlled trial of 324 patients with early-stage breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy at two Canadian cancer centers. Patients were randomized to receive their antiemetic treatments according to either predefined risk scores or the treating physician's preference. Effectiveness was measured as quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained. Cost and utility data were obtained from the Canadian published literature. We used generalized estimating equations to estimate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) over a range of willingness-to-pay values. The lower and upper bounds of the 95% CIs were used to characterize the statistical uncertainty for the cost-effectiveness estimates and construct cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. From the health care system's perspective, the RMG strategy was associated with greater QALYs gained (0.0016, 95% CI 0.0009, 0.0022) and higher cost ($49.19, 95% CI $24.87, $73.08) than the PC strategy, resulting in an ICER of $30,864.28 (95% CI $14,718.98, $62,789.04). At the commonly used threshold of $50,000/QALY, the probability that RMG prophylaxis is cost-effective was >94%; this probability increased with greater willingness-to-pay values. The risk-guided antiemetic prophylaxis is an economically attractive option for patients receiving chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer. This information supports the implementation of risk prediction models to guide chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting prophylaxis in clinical practices.

  14. Class side effects: decreased pressure in the lower oesophageal and the pyloric sphincters after the administration of dopamine antagonists, neuroleptics, anti-emetics, L-NAME, pentadecapeptide BPC 157 and L-arginine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belosic Halle, Zeljka; Vlainic, Josipa; Drmic, Domagoj; Strinic, Dean; Luetic, Kresimir; Sucic, Mario; Medvidovic-Grubisic, Maria; Pavelic Turudic, Tatjana; Petrovic, Igor; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2017-05-17

    The ulcerogenic potential of dopamine antagonists and L-NAME in rats provides unresolved issues of anti-emetic neuroleptic application in both patients and experimental studies. Therefore, in a 1-week study, we examined the pressures within the lower oesophageal and the pyloric sphincters in rats [assessed manometrically (cm H 2 O)] after dopamine neuroleptics/prokinetics, L-NAME, L-arginine and stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 were administered alone and/or in combination. Medication (/kg) was given once daily intraperitoneally throughout the 7 days, with the last dose at 24 h before pressure assessment. Given as individual agents to healthy rats, all dopamine antagonists (central [haloperidol (6.25 mg, 16 mg, 25 mg), fluphenazine (5 mg), levomepromazine (50 mg), chlorpromazine (10 mg), quetiapine (10 mg), olanzapine (5 mg), clozapine (100 mg), sulpiride (160 mg), metoclopramide (25 mg)) and peripheral(domperidone (10 mg)], L-NAME (5 mg) and L-arginine (100 mg) decreased the pressure within both sphincters. As a common effect, this decreased pressure was rescued, dose-dependently, by BPC 157 (10 µg, 10 ng) (also note that L-arginine and L-NAME given together antagonized each other's responses). With haloperidol, L-NAME worsened both the lower oesophageal and the pyloric sphincter pressure, while L-arginine ameliorated lower oesophageal sphincter but not pyloric sphincter pressure, and antagonized L-NAME effect. With domperidone, L-arginine originally had no effect, while L-NAME worsened pyloric sphincter pressure. This effect was opposed by L-arginine. All these effects were further reversed towards a stronger beneficial effect, close to normal pressure values, by the addition of BPC 157. In addition, NO level was determined in plasma, sphincters and brain tissue. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were also assessed. Haloperidol increased NO levels (in both sphincters, the plasma and brain), consistently producing increased

  15. Efficacy of triplet regimen antiemetic therapy for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in bone and soft tissue sarcoma patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy, and an efficacy comparison of single-shot palonosetron and consecutive-day granisetron for CINV in a randomized, single-blinded crossover study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Norio; Shirai, Toshiharu; Nishida, Hideji; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Tanzawa, Yoshikazu; Takeuchi, Akihiko; Igarashi, Kentaro; Inatani, Hiroyuki; Shimozaki, Shingo; Kato, Takashi; Aoki, Yu; Higuchi, Takashi; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    The first aim of this study was to evaluate combination antiemetic therapy consisting of 5-HT 3 receptor antagonists, neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists (NK-1RAs), and dexamethasone for multiple high emetogenic risk (HER) anticancer agents in bone and soft tissue sarcoma. The second aim was to compare the effectiveness of single-shot palonosetron and consecutive-day granisetron in a randomized, single-blinded crossover study. A single randomization method was used to assign eligible patients to the palonosetron or granisetron arm. Patients in the palonosetron arm received a palonosetron regimen during the first and third chemotherapy courses and a granisetron regimen during the second and fourth courses. All patients received NK-1RA and dexamethasone. Patients receiving the palonosetron regimen were administered 0.75 mg palonosetron on day 1, and patients receiving the granisetron regimen were administered 3 mg granisetron twice daily on days 1 through 5. All 24 patients in this study received at least 4 chemotherapy courses. A total of 96 courses of antiemetic therapy were evaluated. Overall, the complete response CR rate (no emetic episodes and no rescue medication use) was 34%, while the total control rate (a CR plus no nausea) was 7%. No significant differences were observed between single-shot palonosetron and consecutive-day granisetron. Antiemetic therapy with a 3-drug combination was not sufficient to control chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) during chemotherapy with multiple HER agents for bone and soft tissue sarcoma. This study also demonstrated that consecutive-day granisetron was not inferior to single-shot palonosetron for treating CINV

  16. Efficacy of triplet regimen antiemetic therapy for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in bone and soft tissue sarcoma patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy, and an efficacy comparison of single-shot palonosetron and consecutive-day granisetron for CINV in a randomized, single-blinded crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Norio; Shirai, Toshiharu; Nishida, Hideji; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Tanzawa, Yoshikazu; Takeuchi, Akihiko; Igarashi, Kentaro; Inatani, Hiroyuki; Shimozaki, Shingo; Kato, Takashi; Aoki, Yu; Higuchi, Takashi; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    The first aim of this study was to evaluate combination antiemetic therapy consisting of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists (NK-1RAs), and dexamethasone for multiple high emetogenic risk (HER) anticancer agents in bone and soft tissue sarcoma. The second aim was to compare the effectiveness of single-shot palonosetron and consecutive-day granisetron in a randomized, single-blinded crossover study. A single randomization method was used to assign eligible patients to the palonosetron or granisetron arm. Patients in the palonosetron arm received a palonosetron regimen during the first and third chemotherapy courses and a granisetron regimen during the second and fourth courses. All patients received NK-1RA and dexamethasone. Patients receiving the palonosetron regimen were administered 0.75 mg palonosetron on day 1, and patients receiving the granisetron regimen were administered 3 mg granisetron twice daily on days 1 through 5. All 24 patients in this study received at least 4 chemotherapy courses. A total of 96 courses of antiemetic therapy were evaluated. Overall, the complete response CR rate (no emetic episodes and no rescue medication use) was 34%, while the total control rate (a CR plus no nausea) was 7%. No significant differences were observed between single-shot palonosetron and consecutive-day granisetron. Antiemetic therapy with a 3-drug combination was not sufficient to control chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) during chemotherapy with multiple HER agents for bone and soft tissue sarcoma. This study also demonstrated that consecutive-day granisetron was not inferior to single-shot palonosetron for treating CINV. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Enhanced Patient Expectant and Antiemetic Drug Efficacy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roscoe, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    ...; and writing abstracts, papers, and book chapters. The training also includes the design, implementation and analyses of a randomized controlled experiment examining the relationship between cancer patient expectations for experiencing chemotherapy...

  18. tic antiemetic in patients receiving intrathec

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-02

    Jun 2, 2014 ... Lagos State School of Anaesthesia, Badagry, Nigeria. 3. Obafemi Awolowo University I le-Ife, Nigeria. 4. ... a large proportion of surgical procedures are amenable to regional anesthesia, thus increasing its ..... women undergoing ambulatory laparoscopic surgery. Br J Anaesth 2000;84: 459 – 462. 14.

  19. 21 CFR 336.50 - Labeling of antiemetic drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... years of age. “Do not take this product, unless directed by a doctor, if you have a breathing problem... Section 336.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... under 12 years of age. “Do not give this product to children who have a breathing problem such as...

  20. Dexamethasone enhances the anti-emetic effect of metoclopramide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ninety patients, ASA I or II, aged 21-64years were randomly selected to either the dexamethasone-metoclopramide group, metoclopramide group or dexamethasone group using computer-generated random numbers . Spinal anaesthesia was induced in the sitting position under strict aseptic technique with hyperbaric ...

  1. Antiemetic Medicines: OTC Relief for Nausea and Vomiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CorrectlyPain Relievers: Understanding Your OTC OptionsAntacids and Acid Reducers: OTC Relief for Heartburn and Acid RefluxOTC Cough ... Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics ...

  2. Antiemetic prophylaxis with promethazine or ondansetron in major ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia ... Abstract. Background: Postoperative nausea and vomiting remain a significant cause of morbidity among patients undergoing general anaesthesia. ... Drowsiness was a significant side-effect with promethazine, and this will be a disadvantage in ambulatory surgery.

  3. Profilaxia antiemética em cirurgia de abdome agudo: estudo comparativo entre droperidol, metoclopramida, tropisetron, granisetron e dexametasona Profilaxis antiemética en cirugía de abdomen agudo: estudio comparativo entre droperidol, metoclopramida, tropisetrón, granisetrón y dexametasona Prophylactic antiemetic therapy for acute abdominal surgery: a comparative study of droperidol, metoclopramide, tropisetron, granisetron and dexamethasone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Contreras-Domínguez

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A incidência de náuseas e vômitos pós-operatórios (NVPO gira em torno de 30%. A profilaxia de NVPO foi objeto de múltiplos estudos, tanto para tentar diminuir esse problema como para comparar o índice custo-benefício do tratamento utilizado. Esse estudo comparou a eficácia de cinco fármacos antieméticos em apendicectomia. MÉTODO: Estudo clínico prospectivo controlado, duplamente encoberto de 150 pacientes ASA I e II com IMC JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS: La incidencia de náuseas y vómitos peri operatorios (NVPO se estima en un 30%. La profilaxis de NVPO ha sido objetivo de múltiples estudios, tanto para intentar disminuir este problema como a su vez comparar índice costo-beneficio de la terapia utilizada. Este estudio evalúa la utilización de 5 fármacos antieméticos en relación a grupo control para apendicectomía de urgencia. MÉTODO: Estudio clínico prospectivo controlado, doble ciego de 150 pacientes ASA I y II con IMC BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: It is calculated that the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV is approximately 30%. The prophylaxis of PONV has been the subject of several studies, both to decrease this problem and to compare the cost-benefit ration of the treatment used. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of 5 antiemetic drugs with a control group in emergency appendectomy. METHODS: A controlled, double-blind, prospective study with 150 patients, ASA I and II, BMI < 30, undergoing appendectomy, was undertaken. Patients were divided in six groups: Group 1 (n = 25: 5 mL of normal saline; Group 2 (n = 25: 0.625 mg of droperidol; Group 3 (n = 25: 20 mg of metoclopramide; Group 4 (n = 25: 5 mg of tropisetron; Group 5 (n = 25: 1 mg of granisetron; Group 6 (n = 25: 4 mg of dexamethasone. Monitoring included ECG, non-invasive blood pressure, O2 saturation, P ET CO2, anesthetic gas analyzer and peripheral nerve stimulator. The presence of PONV, complications

  4. Antiemetic and Myeloprotective Effects of Rhus verniciflua Stoke in a Cisplatin-Induced Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo-Seon Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhus verniciflua Stoke has been commonly used in traditional medicine to treat gastrointestinal (GI dysfunction diseases. In order to investigate pharmacological properties of Rhus verniciflua Stoke water extract (RVX on cisplatin-induced amnesia, RVX (0, 25, 50, or 100 mg/kg was orally administrated for five consecutive days after a single intraperitoneal injection of cisplatin (6 mg/kg to SD rat. Cisplatin injection significantly increased the kaolin intake (emesis but reduced the normal diet intake (anorexia whereas the RVX treatment significantly improved these abnormal diet behaviors at both the acute and delayed phase. The serotonin concentration and the related gene expressions (5-HT3 receptors and SERT in small intestine tissue were abnormally altered by cisplatin injection, which were significantly attenuated by the RVX treatment. Histological findings of gastrointestinal tracts, as well as the proteins level of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β, revealed the beneficial effect of RVX on cisplatin-induced gastrointestinal inflammation. In addition, RVX significantly improved cisplatin-induced myelosuppression, as evidenced by the observation of leukopenia and by histological examinations in bone marrow. Our findings collectively indicated Rhus verniciflua Stoke improved the resistance of rats to chemotherapy-related adverse effects in the gastrointestinal track and bone marrow.

  5. Determination of metal ion contents of two antiemetic clays use in Geophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon E. Owumi

    2015-01-01

    Specifically, our result indicates unacceptably high levels of aluminum in Eko and Omumu (>10-fold greater than the highest desirable levels set by the USEPA. The aluminum concentrations were influenced by the pH condition in which the samples were digested. Dietary exposure to aluminum at such high levels may be deleterious to maternal health and fetal development. Therefore consumption of Eko and Omumu as an antidote to reduce nausea during pregnancy should be discouraged. Future studies are planned to investigate specific impacts on fetal and maternal health and likely teratogenicity in rodent models.

  6. Antiemetic effects of granisetron versus dexamethasone in clonidine premedicated children undergoing strabismus surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indu Sen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In a prospective, double blind, randomized trial, 120 children, aged 3-8 years,ASAI-II, undergoing strabismus repair were randomly divided into three groups (n = 40 each. Oral clonidine premedication (4gg.kg-1 was administered to all the patients two hours prior to surgery. Soon after induction of anaesthesia, Group G patients were administered intravenous granisetron (40gg.kg-1 , Group D intravenous dexamethasone (150gg.kg-1 and group S received 4ml normal saline. Postoperatively, children were continuously monitored and assessed half-hourly till discharge and then after 24 hours for vomiting and pain. The overall incidence of postoperative emesis was lower (15.4% in the Group G compared with the Group D (21.6% in the first 24 hours (P>0.05. The Group S had a highest incidence of postoperative vomiting ((37% P value < 0.0324 compared to group G. The frequency of early vomiting was highest in the S group. Both G and D groups showed better control of delayed emetic episodes. We observed that in children who were premedicated with clonidine, both IV granisetron or dexamethasone were efficacious in reducing the incidence and severity of POV in day-care strabismus surgery.

  7. Anti-emetic activity of Grewia lasiodiscus root extract and fractions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-03

    Sep 3, 2008 ... peptic ulcer, drug toxicity, myocardial infarction, renal failure, and ... Anhydrous copper sulphate and metoclopramide were obtained from Sigma ... saline/kg. Groups 2, 3, and 4 ... Extract produced significant (P<0.05) dose dependent shortening ... GABA, have been implicated in sleep mechanisms. (Osuide ...

  8. Aprepitant: a promising antiemetic for prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aseeri, Mohamad A.

    2006-01-01

    Most patients who undergo chemotherapy have noted that nausea and vomiting are the most feared and distressing side-effects of cancer treatment (1). Nausea and vomiting from chemotherapy can be classified as acute, delayed, or anticipatory. Acute emesis generally occurs within 24 hours of chemotherapy administration; while delayed nausea and vomiting begin 24 hours after chemotherapy and may continue for up to one week. Anticipatory emesis occurs prior to chemotherapy in patients who anticipate another episode by sight, odors or memory of the place where acute nausea and vomiting occurred (2, 3). Different neurotransmitters found in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and central nervous system (CNS) mediate the pathophysiology of chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). These include dopamine, histamine, acetycholine, serotonin, and substance P; which act directly and indirectly on the vomiting center located in the lateral reticular formation of the medulla (1, 4). Substance P is a member of the tachykinins family of neuropeptides. The biological activity of this substance is to induce vomiting mediated by neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptors located primarily in the GIT and the CNS (5). Both Nk1 receptors and substance P play a significant role in the pathogenesis of acute and delayed CINV. (author)

  9. Tetrahydrocannabinol vs. Prochlorperazine: the effects of two antiemetics on patients undergoing radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungerleider, J.T.; Andrysiak, T.A.; Fiarbanks, L.A.; Tesler, A.S.; Parker, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    The authors tested the effectiveness of orally administred delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) as compared to prochlorperazine for the alleviation of symptoms, such as vomiting and nausea, experienced by patients receiving radiotherapy. The test subjects rated the severity of their illness, as well as the extent of their subsequent moods, their level of concentration, their amount of physical activity, and their desire for social interaction. They chose the drug they preferred and recorded its side effects. The use of THC was slightly more beneficial than the use of prochlorperazine

  10. Dgroup: DG01671 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3 ... Trimethobenzamide hydrochloride (USP) ... Gastrointestinal agent ... DG01762 ... Antiemetic ... DG01783 ... Benzamide type antiemetic ... Antiemetics, benzamides DRD2 [HSA:1813] [KO:K04145] ...

  11. Estudo comparativo de antieméticos e suas associações, na prevenção de náuseas e vômitos pós-operatórios, em pacientes submetidas a procedimentos cirúrgicos ginecológicos Estudio comparativo de antieméticos y sus asociaciones, en la prevención de náusea y vómito postoperatorios, en pacientes sometidas a procedimientos quirúrgicos ginecológicos Comparative study of anti-emetics and their association, in the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting in patients undergoing gynecologic surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Brandão Schnaider

    2008-12-01

    . MÉTODO: Setenta pacientes, ASA I y II, fueron sometidas a procedimientos quirúrgicos ginecológicos, bajo bloqueo epidural asociado a la anestesia general. En el Grupo Metoclopramida (GM, se administró 20 mg; en el Grupo Dexametasona (GDe, se inyectó 8 mg; en el Grupo Droperidol (GDr se administró 1,25 mg; en el Grupo Ondansetron (GO se inyectó 8mg; en el Grupo Dexametasona-Ondansetron (GDeO se administró respectivamente 8 mg y 4mg; en el Grupo Droperidol-Ondansetron (GDrO se inyectó 1,25 mg y 4 mg; en el Grupo Dexametasona-Droperidol-Ondansetron (GDeDrO se administró 8mg, 0,625 mg y 4mg. La presencia de náuseas y vómitos fue observada en los momentos de 6, 12, 24 y 36 horas después del término de la operación. RESULTADOS: La incidencia total de episodios de náuseas fue de 4 en el GDeDrO, 6 en el GO, 6 en el GDrO, 11 en el GDe, 11 en el GDeO, 18 en el GM y 22 en el GDr. Al aplicar el test del Chi-cuadrado o el test de Fisher, se comprobó la diferencia estadística significativa entre el GDr y los grupos GDe, GDO, GDrO, GDeO, GDeDrO; entre el GM y los grupos GO, GDrO y GDeDrO; entre el GDeO y el grupo GDeDrO. La incidencia total de episodios de vómitos fue de 3 en el GO, 3 en el GDeDrO, 6 en el GDrO, 7 en el GDe, 7 en el GDeO, 10 en el GDr y 13 en el G. Se comprobó así mismo, la diferencia estadística significativa entre el GDr y los grupos GO y GDeDrO; entre el GM y los grupos GO y GDeDrO. CONCLUSIONES: La asociación dexametasona-droperidol-ondansetron y el ondansetron fueron más eficaces en la profilaxis de náuseas y vómitos.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Prophylaxis of postoperative nausea and vomiting has been the subject of several studies. The objective of the present study was to compare anti-emetics, and their association, in the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting. METHODS: Seventy patients, ASA I and II, underwent epidural block associated with general anesthesia for gynecologic surgeries. Patients in the Metochlopramide Group

  12. Cathodic adsorptive stripping voltammetry of an anti-emetic agent Granisetron in pharmaceutical formulation and biological matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Jain

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Granisetron showed one well-defined reduction peak at Hanging Mercury Drop Electrode (HMDE in the potential range from −1.3 to −1.5 V due to reduction of C=N bond. Solid-phase extraction technique was employed for extraction of Granisetron from spiked human plasma. Granisetron showed peak current enhancement of 4.45% at square-wave voltammetry and 5.33% at cyclic voltammetry as compared with the non stripping techniques. The proposed voltammetric method allowed quantification of Granisetron in pharmaceutical formulation over the target concentration range of 50–200 ng/mL with detection limit 13.63 ng/mL, whereas in human plasma 50–225 ng/mL with detection limit 11.75 ng/mL. Keywords: Granisetron, Human plasma, Solid-phase extraction, Pharmaceutical formulation, Voltammetry, Hanging mercury drop electrode

  13. Current position of 5HT3 antagonists and the additional value of NK1 antagonists; a new class of antiemetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. de Wit (Ronald)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe advent of the 5HT3 receptor antagonists (5HT3 antagonists) in the 1990s and the combination with dexamethasone has resulted in acute emesis protection in 70% of patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Despite complete protection in the acute phase, however, 40% of patients

  14. A comparison of dexamethasone, ondansetron, and dexamethasone plus ondansetron as prophylactic antiemetic and antipruritic therapy in patients receiving intrathecal morphine for major orthopedic surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Szarvas, Szilvia

    2012-02-03

    In a prospective, double-blinded, randomized trial, we evaluated the efficacy of IV (a) dexamethasone 8 mg, (b) ondansetron 8 mg, and (c) dexamethasone 8 mg plus ondansetron 4 mg for the prevention of postoperative nausea, vomiting (PONV), and pruritus in 130 (ASA physical status I to III) patients undergoing elective major orthopedic surgery after spinal anesthesia with hyperbaric 0.5% bupivacaine and intrathecal morphine. After spinal anesthesia, patients were randomized to one of three groups. Failure of PONV prophylaxis in the 24-h postoperative period occurred more frequently in patients who received dexamethasone alone (29 of 40; 73%) compared with those who received either ondansetron alone (23 of 47; 49%) (P = 0.02) or dexamethasone plus ondansetron together (19 of 43; 44%)(P = 0.01). There was no difference in the incidence of failure of prophylaxis of pruritus (70%, 72%, and 70% in dexamethasone 8 mg, ondansetron 8 mg, and dexamethasone 8 mg plus ondansetron 4 mg, respectively) (P > 0.1) in the 24-h postoperative period. We conclude that the administration of dexamethasone 8 mg with ondansetron 4 mg has no added benefit compared with ondansetron 8 mg alone in the prophylaxis of PONV and pruritus. IMPLICATIONS: Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and pruritus are common side effects after spinal opioid administration. In this study, dexamethasone 8 mg plus ondansetron 4 mg was as effective as ondansetron 8 mg. The administration of dexamethasone alone was associated with a frequent incidence of PONV, demonstrating a lack of efficacy. This has important cost implications.

  15. Double-blind comparative study of droperidol, granisetron and granisetron plus dexamethasone as prophylactic anti-emetic therapy in patients undergoing abdominal, gynaecological, breast or otolaryngological surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janknegt, R; Pinckaers, JWM; Rohof, MHC; Ausems, MEM; Arbouw, MEL; van der Velden, RW; Brouwers, JRBJ

    In this double-blind study the clinical efficacy of a single pre-operative intravenous dose of droperidol 1.25 mg (137 patients), granisetron 1 mg (130 patients) and granisetron 1 mg plus dexamethasone 5 mg (130 patients) was investigated for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting after

  16. Comparative clinical effectiveness of various 5-HT3 RA antiemetic regimens on chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting associated with hospital and emergency department visits in real world practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatoum, Hind T; Lin, Swu-Jane; Buchner, Deborah; Cox, David

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the risk of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) events for various 5-HT(3) RAs in patients who received moderately (MEC) or highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC) by evaluating hospital or emergency department (ED) admissions. PharMetrics claims database was used to identify patients diagnosed with breast cancer (BC) who were initiated on cyclophosphamide-based adjuvant chemotherapy or with lung cancer (LC) initiated on carboplatin-based or cisplatin-based chemotherapy between 2005 and 2008. Patients were stratified in two groups: those initiated and maintained on palonosetron versus those treated with any other 5-HT(3) RA regimens in the 6-month post first chemotherapy. Risk for CINV events, identified by ICD-9-CM for nausea, vomiting, and/or dehydration, were estimated using logistic regressions, controlling for age, gender, comorbidity, and total chemotherapy doses or days. Of the 4,868 cyclophosphamide-treated BC, 5,414 carboplatin-treated LC, and 1,692 cisplatin-treated LC identified, there were 1,864 BC (38.5%), 1,806 carboplatin-treated LC (33.4%), and 390 cisplatin-treated LC (23.0%) in the palonosetron-only group. Palonosetron-only group had significantly lower probability of CINV events associated with ED/hospital admissions in all three cohorts (3.5% vs. 6.3% in BC, 9.5% vs. 13.8% in carboplatin-treated LC, and 16.4% vs. 22.6% in cisplatin-treated LC, all at p HEC had significantly lower risk of CINV events associated with hospital/ED admissions if initiated and maintained on palonosetron relative to patients receiving 5-HT(3) RA regimens.

  17. 2016 Updated MASCC/ESMO Consensus Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olver, Ian; Ruhlmann, Christina H.; Jahn, Franziska

    2017-01-01

    the MASCC antiemetic guidelines. A subgroup performed a systematic literature review on antiemetics for low emetogenic chemotherapy (LEC) and chemotherapy of minimal emetic potential and the chair presented the update recommendation to the whole group for discussion. They then voted with an aim of achieving...

  18. Osteonecrosis in patients with testicular tumours treated with chemotherapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkmortel, F.W.P.J. van den; Wit, R. de; Rooy, J.W.J. de; Mulder, P.H.M. de

    2004-01-01

    The role of antiemetics is invaluable in allowing cancer patients to complete, otherwise possibly intolerable, chemotherapy. In the Perugia Consensus Conference it was decided that the recommended antiemetic regimen in the prevention of acute emesis induced by a single high, low and repeated doses

  19. Fosaprepitant for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhlmann, Christina H. B.; Herrstedt, Jørn

    2012-01-01

    For patients receiving cancer chemotherapy, the ongoing development of antiemetic treatment is of significant importance. Patients consider nausea and vomiting among the most distressing symptoms of chemotherapy, and as new antiemetics have been very successful in prevention of vomiting, agents...... intravenous dose of 150 mg can replace the aprepitant 3-day oral regimen. This article focuses on the development and clinical application of fosaprepitant....

  20. 2016 updated MASCC/ESMO consensus recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhlmann, Christina H.; Jahn, Franziska; Jordan, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV) are distressing symptoms. Evidence-based guidelines should facilitate the prescription of the best possible antiemetic prophylaxis. As part of the MASCC/ESMO Antiemetic Guidelines Update 2016, a thorough review of the literature concerning ...

  1. Palonosetron and prednisolone for the prevention of nausea and emesis during fractionated radiotherapy and 5 cycles of concomitant weekly cisplatin-a phase II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhlmann, Christina H; Belli, Charlotte; Dahl, Tina

    2013-01-01

    Recommendations for antiemetic prophylaxis supportive to radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy are not evidence-based. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the antiemetic regimen concurrent to fractionated radiotherapy and concomitant weekly cisplatin in two Danish depart...

  2. Reducing radiation induced emesis in abdominal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, K.

    1994-01-01

    In patients with seminoma testes, a comparison was made between radiation induced emesis suffered by patients receiving 'dogleg' radiotherapy with those suffered by patients who received para-aortic radiotherapy. The same comparisons were made between the effects suffered by those patients who received the anti-emetic, Ondansetron, and those suffered by patients who received conventional anti-emetics. (UK)

  3. New treatments on the horizon for chemoradiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhlmann, Christina H; Herrstedt, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    the proper timing, duration, and combination of antiemetic drugs for the prevention of chemoradiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (C-RINV). AREAS COVERED: The article summarises the available antiemetic studies, the evidence for antiemetic prophylaxis of C-RINV, and the future perspectives for antiemetic...... research in chemoradiotherapy. EXPERT OPINION: Antiemetic prophylaxis for patients receiving concomitant chemoradiotherapy has, for many years, been an orphan research area. The distinction between acute and delayed nausea and vomiting does not apply to fractionated radiotherapy, and prophylaxis should...... be considered to cover the entire course of treatment and not only the acute and delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. The best prophylaxis in women receiving fractionated radiotherapy and concomitant weekly cisplatin is a combination of the neurokinin receptor antagonist fosaprepitant...

  4. Effect of postoperative experiences on willingness to pay to avoid postoperative pain, nausea, and vomiting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bosch, Jolanda E.; Bonsel, Gouke J.; Moons, Karel G.; Kalkman, Cor J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The authors assessed the willingness to pay (WTP) for "perfect" prophylactic antiemetics and analgesics in patients who were scheduled to undergo surgery during general anesthesia. Furthermore, they determined whether postoperative experiences of pain and nausea and vomiting (PONV)

  5. A Controlled Study Using Acupuncture as an Adjuvant to Treat Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lao, Lixing

    2001-01-01

    ...) on nausea and vomiting induced by chemotherapy in cancer patients. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of EA as an adjuvant on N/V in chemotherapy patients who do not respond to conventional antiemetics...

  6. Rolapitant Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... class of medications called antiemetics. It works by blocking the action of neurokinin and substance P, natural ... swallowing; shortness of breath; swelling of the eyes, face, mouth, tongue, or throat; chest pain; stomach pain ...

  7. Drug: D06574 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ntestinal agent ... DG01762 ... Antiemetic ATC code: A04AD13 Chemical group: DG02244 ... Treatment of unipolar depression, anxiety, and insom...nia disorders, Prevention and treatment of nausea and vomiting, Treatment of functi

  8. Pattern of prophylaxis administration for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: an analysis of city-based health insurance data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Fumiaki; Higashi, Takahiro

    2013-12-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) substantially affects patient quality of life. Although several guidelines have recommended the use of 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 (5HT3) receptor antagonists with glucocorticoids to alleviate acute CINV, studies in other countries have reported that these recommendations were often not followed. We aimed to assess antiemetic use in community practices just before the Japanese Guidelines for the Appropriate Use of Antiemetics were published. Using the insurance claims submitted to a public insurance program that covers residents up to 75 years old operated by a city with a population of 250,000, we examined the concurrent use of 5HT3 receptor antagonists and glucocorticoids with high or moderate emetic risk chemotherapy. Overall, 448 patients received high or moderate emetic risk chemotherapy 1,342 times during the study period. The recommended antiemetic therapy was provided in 61.9 % (95 % confidence interval 55.5-68.3 %) of the treated patients, but the moderate emetic risk chemotherapy group received the recommended antiemetic therapy less frequently than the high emetic risk chemotherapy group (55.5 vs. 82.1 %, P chemotherapy were associated with the recommended antiemetic therapy. Breast and lung cancer patients receiving high emetic risk chemotherapy received the recommended antiemetics in 100 % of cases, while only 67 % of patients with other cancer types received the recommended antiemetics. Despite several limitations associated with analysis of insurance claims, our study indicates that substantial room for improvement exists in the practice of preventing CINV.

  9. Control of Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Receiving Anthracycline/Cyclophosphamide Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawa-Nishigaki, Minako; Kobayashi, Ryo; Suzuki, Akio; Hirose, Chiemi; Matsuoka, Rie; Mori, Ryutaro; Futamura, Manabu; Sugiyama, Tadashi; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Yoshinori

    2018-02-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is one of most distressing adverse events during cancer chemotherapy. In breast cancer patients receiving anthracycline and cyclophosphamide (AC) chemotherapy, CINV is poorly controlled. The prevalence of guideline-consistent antiemetic medication and control of CINV were investigated retrospectively in breast cancer patients receiving the first cycle of AC chemotherapy. Risks for CINV were analyzed by the multivariate logistic regression analysis. The effect of olanzapine added to the standard antiemetic medication on the incidence of CINV was subsequently evaluated in separate patients who received the first cycle of AC chemotherapy. Although the guideline-consistent antiemetic medication was performed in all subjects, the control rate of nausea (32%), but not vomiting (78%) was low. Risk analysis indicated that age younger than 55-year-old was a significant factor that reduces the control of both nausea and vomiting. Olanzapine (5 mg/day for 5 days), when added to the standard three-drug antiemetic medication, significantly improved the control of nausea and complete response. CINV was poorly controlled in breast cancer patients receiving AC chemotherapy, in which age younger than 55-year-old was a significant risk for both nausea and vomiting. Olanzapine was effective for improvement of the control of CINV associated with AC chemotherapy. Therefore, care should be taken to prevent CINV in young patients receiving AC chemotherapy by adding olanzapine to the standard three-drug antiemetic medication. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of an every-other-day palonosetron schedule to control emesis in multiple-day high-dose chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabile, Aurora; Celio, Luigi; Magni, Michele; Bonizzoni, Erminio; Gianni, Alessandro Massimo; Di Nicola, Massimo

    2014-12-01

    Efficacy of intermittent palonosetron dosing in patients undergoing multiple-day, high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) was investigated. Fifty-eight patients received palonosetron (0.25 mg intravenous [iv.]) every other day plus daily dexamethasone (8 mg iv. twice daily) dosing. The primary end point was complete control (CC; no emesis, no rescue anti-emetics, and no more than mild nausea) in the overall acute-period (until 24 h after chemotherapy completion). Acute-period CC occurred in 81% and 50% of patients receiving palonosetron and ondansetron (historical control cohort), respectively. Palonosetron (odds ratio [OR]: 4.37; p = 0.001) and a longer duration of HDC regimen (OR: 3.47; p = 0.011) independently predicted a better anti-emetic outcome. Palonosetron every other day plus daily dexamethasone is an effective anti-emetic coverage in patients undergoing HDC.

  11. Amisulpride in the prevention of nausea and vomiting induced by cisplatin-based chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrstedt, Jørn; Summers, Yvonne; Daugaard, Gedske

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the antiemetic effect of the dopamine D2- and dopamine D3-receptor antagonist, amisulpride, in patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy. METHODS: This dose-finding, non-comparative study investigated the antiemetic effect and safety...... of increasing doses (2.5, 7.5 and 20 mg) of amisulpride against acute nausea and vomiting in the period 0-24 h after initiation of cisplatin-based chemotherapy. The 20 mg dose was also investigated in combination with the 5-HT3-receptor antagonist, ondansetron. The primary parameter was complete response (0...... interval: 65-94%) had a CR and 14/23 (61%) had no nausea at all. CONCLUSIONS: Amisulpride has antiemetic effect against cisplatin-induced acute nausea and vomiting. The effect against nausea is of particular interest. Randomised studies are warranted to further explore the effect and safety of amisulpride....

  12. Impact and management of chemotherapy/radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and the perceptual gap between oncologists/oncology nurses and patients: a cross-sectional multinational survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidall, Cheryl; Fernández-Ortega, Paz; Cortinovis, Diego; Jahn, Patrick; Amlani, Bharat; Scotté, Florian

    2015-11-01

    Chemotherapy/radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV/RINV) can affect half of oncology patients, significantly impacting daily life. Nausea without vomiting has only recently been thought of as a condition in its own right. As such, the incidence of nausea is often underestimated. This survey investigated the incidence and impact of CINV/RINV in patients compared with estimations of physicians/oncology nurses to determine if there is a perceptual gap between healthcare professionals and patients. An online research survey of physicians, oncology nurses and patients was conducted across five European countries. Participants had to have experience prescribing/recommending or have received anti-emetic medication for CINV/RINV treatment. Questionnaires assessed the incidence and impact of CINV/RINV, anti-emetic usage and compliance, and attribute importance of anti-emetic medication. A total of 947 (375 physicians, 186 oncology nurses and 386 patients) participated in this survey. The incidence of nausea was greater than vomiting: 60 % of patients reported nausea alone, whereas 18 % reported vomiting. Physicians and oncology nurses overestimated the incidence of CINV/RINV but underestimated its impact on patients' daily lives. Only 38 % of patients reported full compliance with physicians'/oncology nurses' guidelines when self-administering anti-emetic medication. Leading factors for poor compliance included reluctance to add to a pill burden and fear that swallowing itself would induce nausea/vomiting. There is a perceptual gap between healthcare professionals and patients in terms of the incidence and impact of CINV/RINV. This may lead to sub-optimal prescription of anti-emetics and therefore management of CINV/RINV. Minimising the pill burden and eliminating the requirement to swallow medication could improve poor patient compliance with anti-emetic regimens.

  13. Randomised clinical trial of Levonantradol and Chlorpromazine in the prevention of radiotherapy-induced vomiting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucraft, H H; Palmer, M K [Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Inst., Manchester (UK)

    1982-11-01

    Levonantradol is a cannabis derivative. Cannabinoid anti-emetics are being assessed in cancer chemotherapy but have been little used in radiotherapy to date. A pilot study and randomised trial compared the anti-emetic effect of a standard drug (Chlorpromazine 25 mg) with Levonantradol at two doses (0.5 and 0.75 mg) in patients receiving palliative single fraction radiotherapy to sites likely to cause nausea and vomiting. Most patients were out-patients. Both drugs were well tolerated. The frequency of vomiting was similar in all three groups in both the pilot study and randomised trial.

  14. Randomised clinical trial of Levonantradol and Chlorpromazine in the prevention of radiotherapy-induced vomiting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucraft, H.H.; Palmer, M.K.

    1982-01-01

    Levonantradol is a cannabis derivative. Cannabinoid anti-emetics are being assessed in cancer chemotherapy but have been little used in radiotherapy to date. A pilot study and randomised trial compared the anti-emetic effect of a standard drug (Chlorpromazine 25 mg) with Levonantradol at two doses (0.5 and 0.75 mg) in patients receiving palliative single fraction radiotherapy to sites likely to cause nausea and vomiting. Most patients were out-patients. Both drugs were well tolerated. The frequency of vomiting was similar in all three groups in both the pilot study and randomised trial. (author)

  15. The incidence of anticipatory nausea and vomiting after repeat cycle chemotherapy: the effect of granisetron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aapro, M. S.; Kirchner, V.; Terrey, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    Anticipatory nausea and vomiting (ANV) after repeated cycles of cytotoxic chemotherapy is thought to be a conditioned response to a conditioning stimulus. Good control of acute and delayed emesis may result in a lower incidence of ANV. We have analysed data from 574 chemotherapy patients who received granisetron as their antiemetic treatment during repeat cycle chemotherapy. Per treatment cycle, less than 10% of patients displayed symptoms of anticipatory nausea and 2% or less had symptoms of anticipatory vomiting. It is concluded that the use of granisetron as an antiemetic during the acute phase of chemotherapy may result in a lower incidence of ANV in patients undergoing repeat cycle chemotherapy. PMID:8180031

  16. 21 CFR 336.80 - Professional labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Professional labeling. 336.80 Section 336.80 Food... HUMAN USE ANTIEMETIC DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 336.80 Professional labeling. The labeling provided to health professionals (but not to the general public) may contain the...

  17. The nutritional management of a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The blood tests commonly show an elevated white blood cell ... history of alcohol abuse (he had stopped drinking four years earlier). Two of his ... a Serratia urinary tract infection. He also .... The patient was on antiemetic medication to relieve the nausea ..... the main site for L-glutamine synthesis and storage.17 Glutamine.

  18. 21 CFR 522.1962 - Promazine hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... for tetanus. (B) For use as a tranquilizer and preanesthetic. (iii) Limitations. Not for use in horses... (c)(1)(iii) of this section. (c) Conditions of use—(1) Horses—(i) Amount—(A) 0.2 to 0.5 milligrams... conjunction with local anesthesia, as adjunctive therapy for tetanus, and as an antiemetic prior to worming...

  19. Structural basis of ligand recognition in 5-HT(3) receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kesters, D.; Thompson, A.J.; Brams, M.; van Elk, R.; Spurny, R.; Geitmann, M.; Villalgordo, J.M.; Guskov, A.; Danielson, U.H.; Lummis, S.C.R.; Smit, A.B.; Ulens, C.

    2013-01-01

    The 5-HT 3 receptor is a pentameric serotonin-gated ion channel, which mediates rapid excitatory neurotransmission and is the target of a therapeutically important class of anti-emetic drugs, such as granisetron. We report crystal structures of a binding protein engineered to recognize the agonist

  20. 5-HT3-receptorantagonisten als vervangers van metoclopramide en domperidon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouch, Ikrame; Brouwers, J R B J; van 't Riet, E; Nieboer, Peter; Otten, Marten H; Jansman, Frank G A

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the anti-emetics metoclopramide and domperidone can be replaced by 5-HT3-antagonists, as side effects restrict use of these dopamine antagonists. DESIGN: Systematic review. METHOD: We searched the Embase and PubMed databases for articles published in the period

  1. Development and Validation of a New RP-HPLC Method for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents, such as cisplatin, via central actions. Animal and human positron emission tomography (PET) studies with APT have shown that it crosses the blood brain barrier and occupies brain NK 1 receptors [2]. Animal and human studies show that APT augments the antiemetic activity of the 5-HT3.

  2. Triage and Treatment of Combined Injury in Mass Casualty Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-11-01

    NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 21 19a. NAME OF...within 24-48 hours after CI. Antiemetic drugs, such as Ondansetron, Granisetron , Dimetcarb or Dixaphen, are useful for nausea and vomiting removal

  3. TRIAGE of Irradiated Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-09-25

    DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT APUBLIC RELEASE , 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT See Report 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...4510). Under draft STANAG 4511, multiple pro- phylactic antiemetic medications and regimens were evaluated prior to adoption of granisetron . Two drugs...exceeded the criteria (shown below), granisetron and ondansetron. The former was adopted due to a better technical profile and the operational

  4. Juvenile polyposis of the stomach--a novel cause of hypergastrinemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papay, Karen D; Falck, Vincent G; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    2010-01-01

    A 38-year-old female presented with a 3-year history of postprandial abdominal pain, refractory nausea, vomiting and hematemesis. She appeared malnourished and her symptoms were refractory to previous treatment with acid-suppressive drugs, prokinetics and antiemetics. Her medical history was sign...

  5. Acute gastroenteritis: from guidelines to real life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung M Chow

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Chung M Chow1, Alexander KC Leung2, Kam L Hon11Department of Paediatrics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, PR China; 2Department of Pediatrics, The University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: Acute gastroenteritis is a very common disease. It causes significant mortality in developing countries and significant economic burden to developed countries. Viruses are ­responsible for approximately 70% of episodes of acute gastroenteritis in children and rotavirus is one of the best studied of these viruses. Oral rehydration therapy is as effective as i­ntravenous therapy in treating mild to moderate dehydration in acute gastroenteritis and is strongly r­ecommended as the first line therapy. However, the oral rehydration solution is described as an underused simple solution. Vomiting is one of the main reasons to explain the underuse of oral rehydration therapy. Antiemetics are not routinely recommended in treating acute gastroenteritis, though they are still commonly prescribed. Ondansetron is one of the best studied antiemetics and its role in enhancing the compliance of oral rehydration therapy and decreasing the rate of hospitalization has been proved recently. The guidelines regarding the recommendation on antiemetics have been changed according to the evidence of these recent studies.Keywords: gastroenteritis, vomiting, antiemetic, ondansetron, rotavirus, oral rehydration therapy, intravenous therapy, guideline

  6. 2016 updated MASCC/ESMO consensus recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roila, Fausto; Warr, David; Hesketh, Paul J

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: An update of the recommendations for the prophylaxis of acute and delayed emesis induced by moderately emetogenic chemotherapy published after the last MASCC/ESMO antiemetic consensus conference in 2009 has been carried out. METHODS: A systematic literature search using PubMed from Janua...

  7. Addition of 3-day aprepitant to ondansetron and dexamethasone for prophylaxis of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting among patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma receiving 5-day cisplatin-based chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raafat Abdel-Malek

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: This triple anti-emetic regimen showed efficacy in controlling the multi-day cisplatin-induced nausea and vomiting. Further randomized controlled trials are needed to compare between 3-day and 7-day aprepitant for multi-day cisplatin regimens.

  8. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vol 7, No 17 (2008), Anti-emetic activity of Grewia lasiodiscus root extract and fractions, Abstract PDF. AY Tijani, SE Okhale, FE Oga, SZ Tags, OA Salawu, BA Chindo. Vol 13, No 27 (2014), Antifouling potential of seaweed, sponge and cashew nut oil extracts against biofilm bacteria and green mussel Perna viridis from ...

  9. Transdermal hyoscine induced unilateral mydriasis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, Breffni

    2012-03-20

    The authors present a case of unilateral mydriasis in a teenager prescribed transdermal hyoscine hydrobromide (scopolamine) for chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting. The authors discuss the ocular side-effects associated with this particular drug and delivery system and the potential use of transdermal hyoscine as an antiemetic agent in this group.

  10. Radiogenic hepatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rey, G; Woellgens, P; Haase, W [Katharinenhospital, Stuttgart (F.R. Germany). Strahlenklinik

    1976-08-01

    The article is about a patient who developed hepatitis after post-operative radiotherapy of a hypernephroma on the right side with /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. radiation. The scintigraph showed a normal-sized liver with parenchymal defects. Therapy consisted of anti-emetics and vitamin preparations.

  11. A Controlled Study Using Acupuncture as an Adjuvant to Treat Chemotherpay-Induced Nausea and Vomiting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lao, Lixing

    2000-01-01

    ...) on nausea and vomiting induced by chemotherapy in breast cancer patients. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of HA as an adjuvant on N/v in chemotherapy patients who do not respond to conventional antiemetics...

  12. Metabolism of clebopride in vitro. Mass spectrometry and identification of products of amide hydrolysis and N-debenzylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizing, G; Beckett, A H; Segura, J; Bakke, O M

    1980-03-01

    1. Electron impact and field desorption mass spectrometry is described and discussed for clebopride, a newly developed benzamide with anti-emetic and anti-dopaminergic properties, and for some related compounds. 2. When clebopride was incubated with liver homogenates of rabbits, 4-amino-5-chloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid and N-(4'-piperidyl)-4-amino-5-chloro-2-methoxybenzamide were identified as metabolites.

  13. Clinical and Financial Effects of Psychoeducational Care Provided by Staff Nurses to Adult Surgical Patients in the Post-DRG Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Elizabeth C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A three-hour, two-stage workshop for staff nurses on providing education and psychological support to 148 patients who had abdominal surgery. After the workshop the patients used fewer sedatives or antiemetics, fewer hypnotics, and were discharged from the hospital on the average half a day sooner. (Author/BJV)

  14. Chemotherapy-induced nausea, vomiting, and fatigue - the role of individual differences related to sensory perception and autonomic reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, Robert; Paulsen, Kim; Mehlsen, Mimi Yung

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In spite of antiemetics, postchemotherapy side effects continue to be common and may affect compliance to cancer treatment. Among the known factors associated with increased symptom severity are: younger age, treatment toxicity, expected severity, and distress, but little is still kno...

  15. POSTOPERATIVE NAUSEA AND VOMITING | Yusufu | Annals of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antiemetics, acupuncture and other drugs are used to prevent and treat postoperative nausea and vomiting. Those that manage patients in the postoperative period should endeavour to make postoperative nausea and vomiting as unacceptable as postoperative pain. Key words: Postoperative, Nausea, Vomiting, Narcotics, ...

  16. Important interaction between mirtazapine and ondansetron

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report an unexpected interaction between the antidepressant mirtazapine and the antiemetic ondansetron in a 72 year old patient, weighing 68 kg, with a height of 173 cm. The patient, who gave his informed consent for anonymous publication, underwent electro-convulsive therapy (ECT), using a Thymatron System II, ...

  17. Hyperemesis gravidarum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schouenborg, L O; Honnens de Lichtenberg, M; Djursing, H

    1992-01-01

    of the pregnancy usually runs a normal course. All of the forms of treatment are dominated by the tendency to spontaneous remission and great placebo effect. Antihistamines, antiemetics, ginger, change of environment, hypnotherapy and psychotherapy appear to be the best forms of treatment....

  18. Prevention of acute chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: the role of palonosetron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Bajetta

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Emilio Bajetta, Sara Pusceddu, Valentina Guadalupi, Monika Ducceschi, Luigi CelioMedical Oncology Unit 2, Fondazione IRCCS “Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori”, Milan, ItalyAbstract: Prevention of nausea and vomiting is the main goal of antiemetic treatment in cancer patients scheduled to receive chemotherapy. To prevent acute emesis, antiemetics should be administered just before chemotherapy and patients should be protected for up to 24 hours after chemotherapy initiation. The emetogenic potential of chemotherapeutic agents guides clinicians towards the most appropriate antiemetic prophylaxis. Current guidelines recommend the use of 5-HT3 receptor antagonist (RA either alone or in combination with dexamethasone and/or a neurokinin-1 RA both in the acute and delayed phases. The second-generation 5-HT3RA palonosetron exhibits a longer half-life and a higher binding affinity than older antagonists. Palonosetron has been approved by the FDA for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV in patients scheduled to receive either moderately (MEC or highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC and for the prevention of delayed CINV in patients receiving MEC. The present review will discuss the role of palonosetron in the prevention of acute CINV.Keywords: antiemetics, chemotherapy, nausea, vomiting, serotonin-receptor antagonists, palonosetron

  19. Effects of zacopride and BMY25801 (batanopride) on radiation-induced emesis and locomotor behavior in the ferret

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, G.L.; Landauer, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    The antiemetic and locomotor effects of two substituted benzamides, zacopride and batanopride (BMY25801), were compared in ferrets after bilateral 60Co irradiation at 2, 4 or 6 Gy. Both zacopride and BMY25801 were effective against emesis and related signs. Zacopride, tested at several doses (0.003, 0.03 and 0.3 mg/kg), appeared to be more potent because it abolished emesis at 100-fold lower doses than did BMY25801 (3 mg/kg). The ED50 value for the antiemetic effect of zacopride was 0.026 mg/kg (confidence levels = 0.0095, 0.072 mg/kg). However, analysis of emetic parameters recorded from vomiting animals (e.g., latency to first emesis) demonstrated that BMY25801 provided greater antiemetic protection in this population than zacopride without any apparent side effects. Locomotor activity was significantly depressed by both radiation (all doses) and zacopride alone (0.03 mg/kg and 0.3 mg/kg). BMY25801 alone did not affect locomotor activity, and protected against the radiation-induced locomotor decrement. Although zacopride potentiated the locomotor decrement to radiation, no clear dose-response relationship was evident. Bilateral abdominal vagotomy significantly increased the latency to the first emetic episode and significantly reduced the number of retches, but did not alter the duration of the prodromal response to 4-Gy irradiation. Unilateral vagotomies had no effect. Zacopride (at 0.03 mg/kg and 0.3 mg/kg) remained an effective antiemetic in animals that received a bilateral vagotomy, abolishing emesis in four of eight and two of eight ferrets, respectively. These data suggest that the antiemetic action of zacopride does not fully depend on intact vagal innervation and also acts via other pathways

  20. Cost-effectiveness of an aprepitant regimen for prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients with breast cancer in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humphreys S

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Samantha Humphreys,1 James Pellissier,2 Alison Jones3 1Market Access Department, Merck Sharp and Dohme Ltd, Hoddesdon, Hertfordshire, UK; 2Health Economic Statistics, Merck Research Laboratories, Upper Gwynedd, PA, USA; 3Department of Medical Oncology, University College Hospital, London, UK Purpose: Prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV remains an important goal for patients receiving chemotherapy. The objective of this study was to define, from the UK payer perspective, the cost-effectiveness of an antiemetic regimen using aprepitant, a selective neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist, for patients receiving chemotherapy for breast cancer. Methods: A decision-analytic model was developed to compare an aprepitant regimen (aprepitant, ondansetron, and dexamethasone with a standard UK antiemetic regimen (ondansetron, dexamethasone, and metoclopramide for expected costs and health outcomes after single-day adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. The model was populated with results from patients with breast cancer participating in a randomized trial of CINV preventative therapy for cycle 1 of single-day chemotherapy. Results: During 5 days after chemotherapy, 64% of patients receiving the aprepitant regimen and 47% of those receiving the UK comparator regimen had a complete response to antiemetic therapy (no emesis and no rescue antiemetic therapy. A mean of £37.11 (78% of the cost of aprepitant was offset by reduced health care resource utilization costs. The predicted gain in quality-adjusted lifeyears (QALYs with the aprepitant regimen was 0.0048. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER with aprepitant, relative to the UK comparator, was £10,847/QALY, which is well below the threshold commonly accepted in the UK of £20,000–£30,000/QALY. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that aprepitant is cost-effective for preventing CINV associated with chemotherapy for patients with breast cancer in the UK health

  1. Radiotherapy-induced emesis. An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feyer, P.; Buchali, A.; Hinkelbein, M.; Budach, V.; Zimmermann, J.S.; Titlbach, O.J.

    1998-01-01

    Background: A significant number of patients receiving radiotherapy experience the distressing side effects of emesis and nausea. These symptoms are some of the most distressing problems for the patients influencing their quality of life. Methods: International study results concerning radiotherapy-induced emesis are demonstrated. A German multicenter questionnaire examining the strategies to prevent or to treat radiotherapy-induced nausea and emesis is presented. An international analysis concerning incidence of emesis and nausea in fractionated radiotherapy patients is discussed. Finally the consensus of the consensus conference on antiemetic therapy from the Perugia International Cancer Conference V is introduced. Results: Untreated emesis can lead to complications like electrolyte disorders, dehydration, metabolic disturbances and nutrition problems with weight loss. Prophylactic antiemetics are often given to patients receiving single high-dose radiotherapy to the abdomen. A survey has revealed that antiemetic prophylaxis is not routinely offered to the patients receiving fractionated radiotherapy. However, there is a need for an effective treatment of emesis for use in this group of patients, too. In 20% of patients nausea and emesis can cause a treatment interruption because of an inadequate control of symptoms. Like in chemotherapy strategies there exist high, moderate, and low emetogenic treatment regimens in radiotherapy as well. The most emetogenic potential has the total body irradiation followed by radiotherapy to the abdomen. Radiotherapy induced emesis can be treated effectively with conventional antiemetics up to 50%. Conclusions: Studies with total body irradiation, fractionated treatment and high-dose single exposures have cleary demonstrated the value of 5-HT3-receptor antagonist antiemetics. There is a response between 60 and 97%. There is no difference in the efficacy of the different 5-HT3-antagonists. High-risk patients should be prophylactic

  2. Transdermal scopolamine: an alternative to ondansetron and droperidol for the prevention of postoperative and postdischarge emetic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Paul F; Tang, Jun; Song, Dajun; Coleman, Jayne E; Wender, Ronald H; Ogunnaike, Babatunde; Sloninsky, Alexander; Kapu, Rajani; Shah, Mary; Webb, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Given the controversy regarding the use of droperidol and the high cost of the 5-HT3 antagonists, a cost-effective alternative for routine use as a prophylactic antiemetic would be desirable. We designed two parallel, randomized, double-blind sham and placebo-controlled studies to compare the early and late antiemetic efficacy and adverse event profile of transdermal scopolamine (TDS) 1.5 mg, to ondansetron 4 mg IV, and droperidol 1.25 mg IV for antiemetic prophylaxis as part of a multimodal regimen in "at risk" surgical populations. A total of 150 patients undergoing major laparoscopic (n = 80) or plastic (n = 70) surgery procedures received either an active TDS patch (containing scopolamine 1.5 mg) or a similar appearing sham patch 60 min before entering the operating room. All patients received a standardized general anesthetic technique. A second study medication was administered in a 2-mL numbered syringe containing either saline (for the two active TDS groups), droperidol, 1.25 mg, or ondansetron, 4 mg (for the sham patch groups), and was administered IV near the end of the procedure. The occurrence of postoperative nausea and vomiting/retching, need for rescue antiemetics, and the complete response rates (i.e., absence of protracted nausea or repeated episodes of emesis requiring antiemetic rescue medication) was reported. In addition, complaints of visual disturbances, dry mouth, drowsiness, and restlessness were noted up to 72 h after surgery. There were no significant differences in any of the emetic outcomes or need for rescue antiemetics among the TDS, droperidol, and ondansetron groups in the first 72 h after surgery. The complete response rates varied from 41% to 51%, and did not significantly differ among the treatment groups. The overall incidence of dry mouth was significantly more frequent in the TDS groups than in the droperidol and ondansetron groups (21% vs 3%). Premedication with TDS was as effective as droperidol (1.25 mg) or ondansetron (4

  3. Additive effect of rikkunshito, an herbal medicine, on chemotherapy-induced nausea, vomiting, and anorexia in uterine cervical or corpus cancer patients treated with cisplatin and paclitaxel: results of a randomized phase II study (JORTC KMP-02).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Shunsuke; Watari, Hidemichi; Kanno, Maki; Ohba, Yoko; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Miyaji, Tempei; Oyamada, Shunsuke; Nomura, Eiji; Kato, Hidenori; Sugiyama, Toru; Asaka, Masahiro; Sakuragi, Noriaki; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Uezono, Yasuhito; Iwase, Satoru

    2017-09-01

    Rikkunshito, an herbal medicine, is widely prescribed in Japan for the treatment of anorexia and functional dyspepsia, and has been reported to recover reductions in food intake caused by cisplatin. We investigated whether rikkunshito could improve chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) and anorexia in patients treated with cisplatin. Patients with uterine cervical or corpus cancer who were to receive cisplatin (50 mg/m² day 1) and paclitaxel (135 mg/m² day 0) as first-line chemotherapy were randomly assigned to the rikkunshito group receiving oral administration on days 0-13 with standard antiemetics, or the control group receiving antiemetics only. The primary endpoint was the rate of complete control (CC: no emesis, no rescue medication, and no significant nausea) in the overall phase (0-120 hours). Two-tailed panorexia. Copyright © 2017. Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology, Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology

  4. Sleep Quality Effects Recovery After Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA)--A Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Long; Wang, ZhenHu; Fan, Dong

    2015-11-01

    This study examined the effects of sleep quality on early recovery after total knee arthroplasty. A total of 148 patients were randomized 1:1 to receive either zolpidem or placebo for 2 weeks. VAS pain scores (rest, ambulation and night), range of motion (ROM), total amount of opioid analgesics and antiemetics taken, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), sleep efficacy and satisfaction were recorded. It was found that patients taking zolpidem achieved greater improvement in quality of life and reported better satisfaction. Patients in the intervention group had lower pain score and took less antiemetics. Moreover, a significant correlation between sleep quality and ROM was detected. These results demonstrated that improved sleep quality is beneficial to patients' post-TKA recovery. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Chemotherapy in patients with hepatic failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roldán, G.; Sosa, A.

    2004-01-01

    The toxicity of chemotherapy in the liver may manifest as hepatocyte dysfunction with chemical hepatitis, veno-occlusive disease or chronic fibrosis. The hepatocyte dysfunction is caused by direct effect of the drug or its metabolites evidencing by increased bilirubin and liver enzymes (Sgot, SGPT). Prolonged effect leads to cholestasis and fatty infiltration. This dysfunction is concomitant enhanced by viral infection, liver metastases and other drugs as antiemetics. The vast majority of the indicated drugs in a cancer patient, cytostatics, antiemetics, analgésios, anticonvulsants, etc, are metabolized in the liver. The evidence of abnormal hepatocyte function in a patient in which involves chemotherapy raises the need for dose modification indicated and / or discontinuation. The aim of this paper is to review existing information on the use of cytostatics in cancer patients with hepatic impairment, classifying drugs according to their potential hepato toxicity and recommended dose modification in patients with hepatic dysfunction

  6. The effect of aromatherapy on postoperative nausea in women undergoing surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferruggiari, Luisa; Ragione, Barbara; Rich, Ellen R; Lock, Kathleen

    2012-08-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a common source of patient discomfort and decreased satisfaction. Aromatherapy has been identified as a complementary modality for the prevention and management of PONV. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of aromatherapy on the severity of postoperative nausea (PON) in women undergoing surgical procedures in the postanesthesia care unit. Women complaining of PON received traditional antiemetics, inhalation of peppermint oil, or saline vapor. A visual analog scale was used to rate nausea at the first complaint; at 5 minutes after intervention; and, if nausea persisted, at 10 minutes after intervention. At both 5 and 10 minutes, statistical analysis showed no significant differences between intervention and nausea rating. Obtaining eligible subjects was challenging. Although many women consented, most received intraoperative antiemetics and did not report nausea postoperatively. Copyright © 2012 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Safety evaluation of aprepitant for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhlmann, Christina H; Herrstedt, Jørn

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Aprepitant is the only neurokinin (NK(1)) receptor antagonist (RA) approved for prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). Aprepitant is co-administered with a 5-HT(3) RA and a corticosteroid. Although aprepitant is safe, in most clinical settings potential drug......A4, MK-0869, neurokinin(1) receptor antagonist, safety and tolerability. EXPERT OPINION: The recommended antiemetic regimen of aprepitant, a 5-HT(3) RA and a corticosteroid is safe. The combination of aprepitant, a 5-HT(3) RA and dexamethasone is now the gold standard of antiemetic treatment...... in prevention of CINV induced by HEC, or by the combination of an anthracycline and cyclophosphamide. The intravenous formulation of aprepitant used as a single dose is expected to be of benefit to cancer patients....

  8. Neurokinin NK1 and NK3 receptors as targets for drugs to treat gastrointestinal motility disorders and pain

    OpenAIRE

    Sanger, Gareth J

    2004-01-01

    NK1 and NK3 receptors do not appear to play significant roles in normal GI functions, but both may be involved in defensive or pathological processes. NK1 receptor antagonists are antiemetic, operating via vagal sensory and motor systems, so there is a need to study their effects on other gastro-vagal functions thought to play roles in functional bowel disorder's. Interactions between NK1 receptors and enteric nonadrenergic, noncholinergic motorneurones suggest a need to explore the role of t...

  9. Anti emetic effect of 5HT3 receptor antagonists in macaques exposed to a neutron-gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agay, D.; Martin, C.; Martin, S.; Roman, V.; Fatome, M.

    1994-01-01

    Ondansetron and granisetron were tested as antiemetics in cynomolgus macaques weighing 4 kg and submitted to a neutron-gamma irradiation with a high neutronic component. Compounds were delivered by oral way, each administration dose being 4 mg of ondansetron or 1 mg of granisetron. The effect was complete when were delivered before and after the irradiation. It was incomplete when there was a single administration be fore or after the exposure. No adverse side-effects were noted. (author)

  10. Aprepitant plus granisetron and dexamethasone for prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients with gastric cancer treated with S-1 plus cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Katsunobu; Fushida, Sachio; Kaji, Masahide; Takeda, Toshiya; Kinami, Shinichi; Hirono, Yasuo; Yoshimoto, Katsuhiro; Yabushita, Kazuhisa; Hirosawa, Hisashi; Takai, Yuki; Nakano, Tatsuo; Kimura, Hironobu; Yasui, Toshiaki; Tsuneda, Atsushi; Tsukada, Tomoya; Kinoshita, Jun; Fujimura, Takashi; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2013-11-01

    We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a new combination antiemetic therapy comprising aprepitant, granisetron, and dexamethasone in gastric cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy with cisplatin and S-1. Gastric cancer patients scheduled to receive their first course of chemotherapy with cisplatin (60 mg/m(2)) and S-1 (80 mg/m(2)) were treated with a new combination antiemetic therapy aprepitant, granisetron, and dexamethasone on day 1; aprepitant and dexamethasone on days 2 and 3; and dexamethasone on day 4. The patients reported vomiting, nausea, use of rescue therapy, and change in the amount of diet intake, and completed the Functional Living Index-Emesis (FLIE) questionnaire. The primary endpoint was complete response (CR; no emesis and use of no rescue antiemetics) during the overall study phase (0-120 h after cisplatin administration). The secondary endpoints included complete protection (CP; CR plus no significant nausea); change in the amount of diet intake; and the impact of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) on daily life during the overall, acute (0-24 h), and delayed (24-120 h) phases. Fifty-three patients were included. CR was achieved in 88.7, 98.1, and 88.7% of patients in the overall, acute, and delayed phases, respectively. The corresponding rates of CP were 67.9, 96.2, and 67.9%. Approximately half of the patients had some degree of anorexia. FLIE results indicated that 79.5% of patients reported "minimal or no impact of CINV on daily life". Addition of aprepitant to standard antiemetic therapy was effective in gastric cancer patients undergoing treatment with cisplatin and S-1.

  11. Double-blind comparison of granisetron, promethazine, or a combination of both for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting in females undergoing outpatient laparoscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Tong J; Candiotti, Keith A; Klein, Stephen M; Rodriguez, Yiliam; Nielsen, Karen C; White, William D; Habib, Ashraf S

    2009-11-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and postdischarge nausea and vomiting (PDNV) are common problems after surgery. Prophylactic combination antiemetic therapy is recommended for patients at high risk for developing PONV and PDNV. Granisetron, a serotonin antagonist, is an effective antiemetic that is devoid of sedative side effect. Although promethazine is effective, commonly used doses are associated with sedation. This study investigates the combination of low doses of granisetron and promethazine for the prevention of PONV. Women undergoing ambulatory gynecological laparoscopy were enrolled. A standard general anesthetic regimen was prescribed. Fifteen minutes before the expected end of surgery, the patients were randomly assigned to receive granisetron 0.1 mg iv, promethazine 6.25 mg iv, or a combination of the two drugs. Prophylaxis with oral promethazine 12.5 mg, granisetron 1 mg, or both was started in the respective groups 12 hr after the end of surgery and continued every 12 hr until postoperative day 3 (a total of five oral doses). The following outcomes were recorded: total response rate (defined as no vomiting, no more than mild nausea, and no use of rescue antiemetic); incidence of nausea, vomiting, and use of rescue antiemetics; severity of nausea; patient activity level; and patient satisfaction with PONV management. Patients in the combination group had a higher total response rate at 6, 24, 48, and 72 hr after surgery compared with those who received promethazine alone (at 24 hr, Combination 69.6%, Promethazine 36.2%, Granisetron 53.3%; P = 0.0079). The maximum nausea scores were also lower in the combination group at 6, 24, 48, and 72 hr (Combination 1.7 +/- 2.2, Promethazine 4.0 +/- 3.6, Granisetron 3.1 +/- 3.2 at 24 hr; P granisetron and promethazine combination was more effective in reducing PONV and PDNV than promethazine monotherapy. The combination also reduced the severity of nausea.

  12. The effect of granisetron dexamethasone combination on postoperative nausea and vomiting in gynecological operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziya Kaya

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV is one of the most frequent adverse effects of anesthesia. PONV postpones hospital stays and also delays recover and getting better, of the patients. The objective of the current study is to compare efficacy of prophylactic granisetron(40 μ/kg + dexamethasone (4 mg combination against PONV in different anesthesia models.Materials and Methods: 72 patients with an age range of 18-72 years and ASA 1 or 2 were enrolled in the present study. The patients were assigned as group 1 propofol-remifentanil (P-R, group 2 propofol- nitrous oxide (P-N2O, group 3 sevoflurane- nitrous oxide (S-N2O and group 4 sevoflurane-remifentanyl-air (S-R+H. Inductions of the patients in all groups were made with intravenous 2-3 mg/kg propofol, 1μ/kg remifentanil and 0.2 mg/kg cis-atracurium. 4 mg of dexamethasone by bolus and 40 μ/kg of granisetron by infusion were administered to the patients in all groups after induction. During the last 10 minutes of the operation, 1mg/kg tramadol was administered.Postoperative nausea and vomiting, VAS scores, and additional antiemetic needs were recorded during postoperative 48 hours.Results: Postoperative 48 hours follow up revealed that PONV was seen 27%, 16%, 38%, 48% frequencies in (P+R, (P+ N2O, (S+ N2O, (S+R+H groups, respectively.While antiemetic requirement was not observed in (P+ N2O and (S+ N2O groups, the patients in (P+R and (S+R+H groups needed additional antiemetic drugs with a frequency of 5.5% and 11% respectively.Conclusion: Granisetron, dexamethasone combination in different anesthetic models did not reveal significant difference in terms of postoperative nausea, vomiting, and additional antiemetic usage.

  13. Treatment of established postoperative nausea and vomiting: a quantitative systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tramèr Martin R

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relative efficacy of antiemetics for the treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV is poorly understood. Methods Systematic search (MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Library, bibliographies, any language, to 8.2000 for randomised comparisons of antiemetics with any comparator for the treatment of established PONV. Dichotomous data on prevention of further nausea and vomiting, and on side effects were combined using a fixed effect model. Results In seven trials (1,267 patients, 11 different antiemetics were tested without placebos; these data were not further analysed. Eighteen trials (3,809 had placebo controls. Dolasetron 12.5–100 mg, granisetron 0.1–3 mg, tropisetron 0.5–5 mg, and ondansetron 1–8 mg prevented further vomiting with little evidence of dose-responsiveness; with all regimens, absolute risk reductions compared with placebo were 20%–30%. The anti-nausea effect was less pronounced. Headache was dose-dependent. Results on propofol were contradictory. The NK1 antagonist GR205171, isopropyl alcohol vapor, metoclopramide, domperidone, and midazolam were tested in one trial each with a limited number of patients. Conclusions Of 100 vomiting surgical patients receiving a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, 20 to 30 will stop vomiting who would not have done so had they received a placebo; less will profit from the anti-nausea effect. There is a lack of evidence for a clinically relevant dose-response; minimal effective doses may be used. There is a discrepancy between the plethora of trials on prevention of PONV and the paucity of trials on treatment of established symptoms. Valid data on the therapeutic efficacy of classic antiemetics, which have been used for decades, are needed.

  14. Anti emetic effect of 5HT3 receptor antagonists in macaques exposed to a neutron-gamma radiation; Effet antiemetique d`antiserotoninergiques de type 3 chez le macaque soumis a une irradiation neutron-gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agay, D.; Martin, C.; Martin, S.; Roman, V.; Fatome, M.

    1994-12-31

    Ondansetron and granisetron were tested as antiemetics in cynomolgus macaques weighing 4 kg and submitted to a neutron-gamma irradiation with a high neutronic component. Compounds were delivered by oral way, each administration dose being 4 mg of ondansetron or 1 mg of granisetron. The effect was complete when were delivered before and after the irradiation. It was incomplete when there was a single administration be fore or after the exposure. No adverse side-effects were noted. (author). 4 refs.

  15. Medical Management of the Acute Radiation Syndrome: Recommendations of the Strategic National Stockpile Radiation Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-15

    STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY ...Assistance Medicine http://usuhs.mil U.S. Army www.nbc-med.org U.S. Department of Homeland Security Working Group on Radiological Dispersal Device...22. 97. Abbott B, Ippoliti C, Bruton J, Neumann J, Whaley R, Champlin R. Antiemetic efficacy of granisetron plus dexamethasone in bone marrow

  16. Medical Management of Radiological Casualties, Second Edition, Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-01

    psychogenic vomit- ing that often results from stress and realistic fear reac- tions. Use of oral prophylactic antiemetics, such as granisetron (Kytril...covered prior to decontamination. Contaminated clothing should be carefully removed, placed in marked plastic bags, and re- moved to a secure location...clean treatment area to the dirty decontamination area). Key Principles Wind direction Security of the decontamination site Area control of the

  17. Medical Managment of the Acute Radiation Syndrome: Recommendations of the Strategic National Stockpile Radiation Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-15

    AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY ...Humanitarian Assistance Medicine http://usuhs.mil U.S. Army www.nbc-med.org U.S. Department of Homeland Security Working Group on Radiological Dispersal...2002:11-22. 97. Abbott B, Ippoliti C, Bruton J, Neumann J, Whaley R, Champlin R. Antiemetic efficacy of granisetron plus dexamethasone in bone marrow

  18. Acute Radiation Sickness Amelioration Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Emetic Drugs 16. PRICE CODE Antagonists 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 19, SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 20. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT OF...102 UNCLASSIFIED mcuIw IA IIIcaIIin or Isis PAW CLASSFIED BY: N/A since Unclassified. DECLASSIFY ON: N/A since Unclassified. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...Approximately 2000 documents relevant to the development of the candidate anti-emetic drugs ondansetron (Zofran, Glaxo Pharmaceuticals) and granisetron

  19. Medical Management of Radiological Casualties Handbook. First Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-12-01

    fear reac- tions. Use of oral prophylactic antiemetics, such as granisetron (Kytril®) and ondansetron (Zofran®), may be indicated in situations where...clothing should be carefully removed, placed in marked plastic bags, and re-Imoved to a secure location within a contaminated area. Bare skin and hair...the treatment area (i.e., wind blows from the clean treatment area to the dirty decontamination area). Key Principles • Wind direction " Security of the

  20. Combination of gabapentin and ramosetron for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting after gynecologic laparoscopic surgery: a prospective randomized comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Mi; Huh, Jin; Lee, Soo Kyung; Park, Eun Young; Lee, Jung Min; Kim, Hyo Ju

    2017-05-19

    As a drug originally introduced for its anticonvulsant effects, gabapentin has been recently shown to be effective in the treatment of nausea and vomiting in various clinical settings. This study compared the antiemetic efficacy of oral gabapentin, intravenous ramosetron and gabapentin plus ramosetron in patients receiving fentanyl-based patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic gynecologic surgery. One hundred and thirty two patients undergoing laparoscopic gynecologic surgery under general anesthesia were allocated randomly into three groups: group G received 300 mg oral gabapentin 1 h before anesthesia, group R received 0.3 mg intravenous ramosetron at the end of surgery, and group GR received a combination of 300 mg oral gabapentin 1 h before anesthesia and 0.3 mg intravenous ramosetron at the end of surgery. Postoperative nausea, retching, vomiting, rescue antiemetic drug use, pain, rescue analgesic requirements and adverse effects were assessed at 0-2, 2-24 and 24-48 h after surgery. Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) was defined as the presence of nausea, retching or vomiting. The incidence of complete response (no PONV and no rescue antiemetics up to 48 h postoperatively) was significantly higher in group GR (26/40, 65%) than group G (16/40, 40%; P = 0.025) and group R (18/44, 41%; P = 0.027), whereas there was no significant difference between group G and group R (P = 0.932). There were no significant between-group differences in the incidence of emetic episodes, use of rescue antiemetics, severe emesis, use of rescue analgesics or any adverse effects. Postoperative pain scores were also similar among groups. The combination with gabapentin and ramosetron is superior to either drug alone for prevention of PONV after laparoscopic gynecologic surgery. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02617121 , registered November 25, 2015.

  1. Pengobatan infeksi parvovirus pada anjing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IKW Sardjana D Kusumawati

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Treatments of canine Parvovirus have already done to 22 dogs. There were 16 dogs, one month to one years of age and 6 dogs twoyears to seven years of age. The results of the theraphy, were ten dogs survived and twelve dogs died due to Parvovirus infection. Fluidtheraphy supported by antibiotic, antiemetic or antacids administrations were essential for Parvovirus infection in dogs. The recoveryrate of this dogs was 45%.

  2. Comparison of ramosetron with ondansetron for the prevention of post-operative nausea and vomiting in high-risk patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Agarkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV has an 80% incidence in high-risk patients. This is despite the availability of several antiemetic drugs. Selective 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT 3 receptor antagonists are considered first-line for prophylaxis, ondansetron being the most commonly used agent. Ramosetron, another selective 5-HT 3 receptor antagonist, is more potent and longer acting than ondansetron. This study was conducted to evaluate the antiemetic efficacy of ramosetron in comparison with ondansetron in patients at a high risk of PONV. Methods: This was a prospective randomised double-blind study carried out over a 6-month period in which 206 patients with at least two risk factors for PONV were randomised to receive ramosetron 0.3 mg or ondansetron 8 mg, 30 min before the end of surgery. The incidence of PONV, severity of nausea and need for rescue antiemetic were recorded over the next 24 h. Primary outcome was the incidence of PONV. Secondary outcomes included severity of nausea and need for rescue. The data were analysed using the Predictive Analytics Software (PASW, version 18: Chicago, IL, USA. Results: The incidence of PONV was found to be 35% in the ramosetron group as opposed to 43.7% in the ondansetron group (P = 0.199. Need for rescue antiemetic was 23.3% in the ramosetron group and 32% in the ondansetron group (P = 0.156 in the 24 h following surgery. Conclusion: Ramosetron 0.3 mg and ondansetron 8 mg were equally effective in reducing the incidence of PONV in high risk patients.

  3. Identification of drug combinations administered by continuous subcutaneous infusion that require analysis for compatibility and stability

    OpenAIRE

    Dickman, Andrew; Bickerstaff, Matthew; Jackson, Richard; Schneider, Jennifer; Mason, Stephen; Ellershaw, John

    2017-01-01

    Background A continuous subcutaneous infusion (CSCI) delivered via syringe pump is a method of drug administration used to maintain symptom control when a patient is no longer able to tolerate oral medication. Several classes of drugs, such as opioids, antiemetics, anticholinergics, antipsychotics and benzodiazepines are routinely administered by CSCI alone or in combinations. Previous studies attempting to identify the most-common CSCI combinations are now several years old and no longer ref...

  4. Acupressure at acupoint P6 for prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting: a randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majholm, Birgitte; Møller, Ann M

    2011-01-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting causes discomfort in many patients despite both antiemetic prophylactics and improved anaesthetic techniques. Stimulation of acupoint P6 is described as an alternative method for prophylaxis of postoperative nausea and vomiting.In a randomised, double-blinded stu......, we aimed to investigate the effect of P6 acupoint stimulation on the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting within 24 h postoperatively with an acupressure wristband: Vital-Band....

  5. A Phase II study of palonosetron, aprepitant, dexamethasone and olanzapine for the prevention of cisplatin-based chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients with thoracic malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Kazuhisa; Murakami, Haruyasu; Yokoyama, Kouichi; Omori, Shota; Wakuda, Kazushige; Ono, Akira; Kenmotsu, Hirotsugu; Naito, Tateaki; Nishiyama, Fumie; Kikugawa, Mami; Kaneko, Masayo; Iwamoto, Yumiko; Koizumi, Satomi; Mori, Keita; Isobe, Takeshi; Takahashi, Toshiaki

    2017-09-01

    The three-drug combination of a 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptor antagonist, a neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist and dexamethasone is recommended for patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy. However, standard antiemetic therapy is not completely effective in all patients. We conducted an open-label, single-center, single-arm Phase II study to evaluate the efficacy of olanzapine in combination with standard antiemetic therapy in preventing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients with thoracic malignancy receiving their first cycle of cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Patients received 5 mg oral olanzapine on Days 1-5 in combination with standard antiemetic therapy. The primary endpoint was complete response (no vomiting and no use of rescue therapy) during the overall Phase (0-120 h post-chemotherapy). Twenty-three men and seven women were enrolled between May and October 2015. The median age was 64 years (range: 36-75 years). The most common chemotherapy regimen was 75 mg/m2 cisplatin and 500 mg/m2 pemetrexed, which was administered to 14 patients. Complete response rates in acute (0-24 h post-chemotherapy), delayed (24-120 h post-chemotherapy) and overall phases were 100%, 83% and 83% (90% confidence interval: 70-92%; 95% confidence interval: 66-93%), respectively. There were no Grade 3 or Grade 4 adverse events. Although four patients (13%) experienced Grade 1 somnolence, no patients discontinued olanzapine. The addition of 5 mg oral olanzapine to standard antiemetic therapy demonstrates promising efficacy in preventing cisplatin-based chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and an acceptable safety profile in patients with thoracic malignancy. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. A Prospective Study of Postoperative Vomiting in Children Undergoing Different Surgical Procedures under General Anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Choudhary

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To identify the risk factors associated with postoperative vomiting (POV in paediatric population undergoing common surgeries. The risk factors studied for association with POV were age> 5 years, female gender, previous history of POV/motion sickness, type of surgery and duration of anaesthesia> 45 min. A total of 100 ASA grade I and II patients of either sex aged between 2-12 years undergoing elective surgical procedures were screened for the study. All patients underwent similar anaesthe-sia protocol and received two antiemetic agents (ondansetron 0.05mg.kg-1 and dexamethasone 0.15mg.kg-1 in premedication. The patients were observed for 24 hours postoperatively for the incidence of vomiting, number of times rescue antiemetic given and any adverse reaction to antiemetic.Overall 34% patients (34/100 developed POV of which 26 had only one episode and 8 patients had 2 episodes during first 24 h. Incidence of POV was 13% (13/100 in first 4 h whereas it was 29% (29/100 in late postoperative period. In early post operative period, POV was not associated significantly with any predicted risk factors. However, age>5years, duration of anaesthesia>45 minutes and history of motion sickness/POV were significantly associated in late postoperative period(4-24h. Female gender and type of surgery were not associated with increased POV. The combination antiemetic effectively prevented POV in early postoperative period (0-4h only but not in late postoperative period(0-24h.

  7. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    vomiting that can lead to dehydration, electrolyte and metabolic disturbances, and nutritional deficiencies.13-14 Hospitalization may be required...for correction of fluid and electrolyte imbalances as well as administra- tion of antiemetic medication and provision of nutritional counseling... Soccer (E007.5) 214 (2) Baseball (E007.3) 167 (2) aICD-9 activity code (E001–E030) was assigned to a total of 9,061 injury visits with an overexertion

  8. A prospective observational trial on emesis in radiotherapy: Analysis of 1020 patients recruited in 45 Italian radiation oncology centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maranzano, Ernesto; De Angelis, Verena; Pergolizzi, Stefano; Lupattelli, Marco; Frata, Paolo; Spagnesi, Stefano; Frisio, Maria Luisa; Mandoliti, Giovanni; Malinverni, Giuseppe; Trippa, Fabio; Fabbietti, Letizia; Parisi, Salvatore; Di Palma, Annamaria; De Vecchi, Pietro; De Renzis, Costantino; Giorgetti, Celestino; Bergami, Tiziano; Orecchia, Roberto; Portaluri, Maurizio; Signor, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective observational multicentre trial was carried out to assess the incidence, pattern, and prognostic factors of radiation-induced emesis (RIE), and to evaluate the use of antiemetic drugs in patients treated with radiotherapy or concomitant radio-chemotherapy. The application in clinical practice of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer guidelines was also studied. Materials and methods: Forty-five Italian radiation oncology centres took part in this trial. The accrual lasted for 3 consecutive weeks and only patients starting radiotherapy or concomitant radio-chemotherapy in this period were enrolled. Evaluation was based on diary card filled in daily by patients during treatment and one week after stopping it. Diary card recorded the intensity of nausea/vomiting and prophylactic/symptomatic antiemetic drug prescriptions. Results: A total of 1020 patients entered into the trial, and 1004 were evaluable. Vomiting and nausea occurred in 11.0% and 27.1% of patients, respectively, and 27.9% patients had both vomiting and nausea. In multifactorial analysis, the only statistically significant patient-related risk factors were concomitant chemotherapy and previous experience of vomiting induced by chemotherapy. Moreover, two radiotherapy-related factors were significant risk factors for RIE, the irradiated site (upper abdomen) and field size (>400 cm 2 ). An antiemetic drug was given only to a minority (17%) of patients receiving RT, and the prescriptions were prophylactic in 12.4% and symptomatic in 4.6%. Different compounds and a wide range of doses and schedules were used. Conclusions: These data were similar to those registered in our previous observational trial, and the radiation oncologists' attitude in underestimating RIE and under prescribing antiemetics was confirmed.

  9. Risk Factors of Prolonged Hospitalization in Patients with Hyperemesis Gravidarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Onur Topcu

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: Number of vomiting per day and maternal serum TSH levels could help physicians to estimate the risk of prolonged hospitalization; however further investigations are needed in large population studies. Identifying the high risk patients is important both for prevention of HEG and beginning appropriate antiemetic treatment to avoid complications to reduce the economic costs. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(1.000: 113-118

  10. The Effect of Transdermal Scopolamine for the Prevention of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Antor

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative nausea and vomiting is one of the most common and undesirable complaints recorded in as many as 70%-80% of high-risk surgical patients. The current prophylactic therapy recommendations for PONV management stated in the Society of Ambulatory Anesthesia guidelines should start with monotherapy and patients at moderate to high risk, a combination of antiemetic medication should be considered. Consequently, if rescue medication is required, the antiemetic drug chosen should be from a different therapeutic class and administration mode than the drug used for prophylaxis. The guidelines restrict the use of dexamethasone, transdermal scopolamine, aprepitant, and palonosetron as rescue medication 6 hours after surgery. In an effort to find a safer and reliable therapy for postoperative nausea and vomiting, new drugs with antiemetic properties and minimal side effects are needed, and scopolamine may be considered an effective alternative. Scopolamine is a belladonna alkaloid, α-(hydroxymethyl benzene acetic acid 9-methyl-3-oxa-9-azatricyclo non-7-yl ester, acting as a nonselective muscarinic antagonist and producing both peripheral antimuscarinic and central sedative, antiemetic, and amnestic effects. The empirical formula is C17H21NO4 and its structural formula is a tertiary amine L-(2-scopolamine (tropic acid ester with scopine; MW = 303.4. Scopolamine became the first drug commercially available as a transdermal therapeutic system used for extended continuous drug delivery during 72 hours. Clinical trials with transdermal scopolamine have consistently demonstrated its safety and efficacy in postoperative nausea and vomiting. Thus, scopolamine is a promising candidate for the management of postoperative nausea and vomiting in adults as a first line monotherapy or in combination with other drugs. In addition, transdermal scopolamine might be helpful in preventing postoperative discharge nausea and vomiting owing to its long

  11. Clinical roundtable monograph: New data in emerging treatment options for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Gary R; Navari, Rudolph M; Rugo, Hope S

    2014-03-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) has long been one of the most troublesome adverse effects of chemotherapy, leading to significant detriments in quality of life and functioning, increased economic costs, and, in some cases, the discontinuation of effective cancer therapy. The past 2 decades have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of effective antiemetic agents, with the introduction of the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT₃]) receptor antagonists (ondansetron, granisetron, and palonosetron), the neurokinin-1 (NK₁) receptor antagonists (aprepitant and fosaprepitant), and the identification of other agents that have demonstrated efficacy against CINV, including corticosteroids. These agents often provide excellent control of emesis. Nausea, however, has proven more intractable, particularly in the days after administration of chemotherapy. Newer antiemetic agents under study may provide additional CINV control, particularly against delayed nausea. New agents undergoing review by the US Food and Drug Administration for the prevention of CINV include the novel NK₁ receptor antagonist rolapitant and a fixed-dose combination consisting of the novel NK₁ receptor antagonist netupitant and palonosetron (NEPA). Adherence to clinical practice guidelines has been shown to significantly improve CINV control. As antiemetic therapy continues to evolve, it will be important for clinicians to stay informed of new developments and changes in guidelines.

  12. A Phase II/III Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Clinical Trial of Ginger (Zingiber officinale) for Nausea Caused by Chemotherapy for Cancer: A Currently Accruing URCC CCOP Cancer Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickok, Jane T; Roscoe, Joseph A; Morrow, Gary R; Ryan, Julie L

    2007-09-01

    Despite the widespread use of 5-HT3 receptor antagonist antiemetics such as ondansetron and granistron, up to 70% of patients with cancer receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy agents experience postchemotherapy nausea and vomiting. Delayed postchemotherapy nausea (nausea that occurs >/= 24 hours after chemotherapy administration) and anticipatory nausea (nausea that develops before chemotherapy administration, in anticipation of it) are poorly controlled by currently available antiemetic agents. Scientific studies suggest that ginger (Zingiber officinale) might have beneficial effects on nausea and vomiting associated with motion sickness, surgery, and pregnancy. In 2 small studies of patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy, addition of ginger to standard antiemetic medication further reduced the severity of postchemotherapy nausea. This article describes a phase II/III randomized, dose-finding, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial to assess the efficacy of ginger for nausea associated with chemotherapy for cancer. The study is currently being conducted by private practice oncology groups that are funded by the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program and affiliated with the University of Rochester Cancer Center Community Clinical Oncology Program Research Base.

  13. A prospective, randomized, double blind and placebo-control study comparing the additive effect of oral midazolam and clonidine for postoperative nausea and vomiting prophylaxis in granisetron premedicated patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystecomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanshyam Yadav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reduction of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV continues to be a major challenge in perioperative care in spite of introduction of newer antiemetics with better efficacy and safety profiles. Therefore, we evaluated the additive effect of oral midazolam and clonidine for PONV prophylaxis in granisetron premedicated patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Materials and Methods: In a prospective, randomized fashion, 120 selected cases were randomized into three groups: I, II or III to receive a tablet of midazolam (15 mg, n = 36, clonidine (150 mcg, n = 40, or glucose as placebo (5 g, n = 44 orally, 1 h before anesthesia. Occurrence of PONV along with need for rescue antiemetic during the first postoperative day was compared between groups as a primary outcome. Results: Episodes of PONV reduced significantly in Group II (15% as compared to group I and III (22.2%, 59% at various time points during the period of observation (P = 0.002. Need for rescue antiemetic was significantly lower in group I (13.88% and II (5% as compared to group III (52.27%, P < 0.001. Conclusion: Oral clonidine is better adjuvant for PONV prophylaxis, as compared to midazolam, in granisetron premedicated patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

  14. Observational Case Series Evaluation of the Granisetron Transdermal Patch System (Sancuso) for the Management of Nausea/Vomiting of Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tran N; Adler, Michael T; Ouillette, Holly; Berens, Pamela; Smith, Judith A

    2017-07-01

    Objective  The objective of this study was to observe the efficacy of antiemetic therapy (no emesis/retching episodes and no rescue medication use) when granisetron is administered via a transdermal patch system (TDS) in women who are 6 to 14 weeks pregnant when compared with oral ondansetron by evaluating the frequency of the use of rescue medications for control of nausea/vomiting of pregnancy (NVP). Methods  This was an observational case series study to observe the potential benefits of granisetron TDS compared with oral ondansetron for management of NVP in pregnant patients during the first trimester. Dates of data collection were September 1, 2014, through December 31, 2015. There was no direct contact with patient. The oral ondansetron and granisetron TDS patients were matched by age, 4:1. The proportion of patients who received rescue antiemetics was calculated from those patients who continued to experience NVP. Risk factors for NVP were identified and compared between groups. Descriptive statistics were used to describe study results. Results  Patients were prescribed rescue antiemetics in 0/3 patients in the granisetron TDS group compared with 2/12 patients in the oral ondansetron group. Conclusion  Prospective efficacy studies on the use of granisetron TDS for management of NVP are needed to confirm this clinical observation. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. Efficacy of aprepitant for prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting. Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berrío Valencia, Marta Inés

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of aprepitant compared with other antiemetics for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting in adults who underwent general anesthesia. Methods: Systematic review of randomized clinical trials with meta-analysis, that evaluated the efficacy of aprepitant in comparatison with other antiemetics for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting, antiemetic rescue and adverse effects. The search was done in The Cochrane Library, EBSCO, EMBASE, LILACS, OVID, PubMed, SciELO, ScienceDirect, Scopus and Google Scholar. Heterogeneity was defined with the Cochran Q and I2 statistic, the model fixed and random effects were used, the Mantel-Haenszel for relative risk of each outcome and its respective confidence interval 95% were used. Results: There was significant difference in favor of aprepitant for the prevention of vomiting at 24 (RR 0.52; 95% CI: 0.38-0.7 and at 48 hours (RR 0.51; 95% CI: 0.39 to 0.67 but not for nausea at 24 hours (RR 1.16; 95% CI: 0.85-1.6. Conclusions: Aprepitant prevents postoperative vomiting, but not nausea, at 24 and 48 hours.

  16. Prevention of acute chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: the role of palonosetron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajetta, Emilio; Pusceddu, Sara; Guadalupi, Valentina; Ducceschi, Monika; Celio, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    Prevention of nausea and vomiting is the main goal of antiemetic treatment in cancer patients scheduled to receive chemotherapy. To prevent acute emesis, antiemetics should be administered just before chemotherapy and patients should be protected for up to 24 hours after chemotherapy initiation. The emetogenic potential of chemotherapeutic agents guides clinicians towards the most appropriate antiemetic prophylaxis. Current guidelines recommend the use of 5-HT 3 receptor antagonist (RA) either alone or in combination with dexamethasone and/or a neurokinin-1 RA both in the acute and delayed phases. The second-generation 5-HT 3 RA palonosetron exhibits a longer half-life and a higher binding affinity than older antagonists. Palonosetron has been approved by the FDA for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in patients scheduled to receive either moderately (MEC) or highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC) and for the prevention of delayed CINV in patients receiving MEC. The present review will discuss the role of palonosetron in the prevention of acute CINV

  17. A comparison of the effects of droperidol and the combination of droperidol and ondansetron on postoperative nausea and vomiting for patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Awad, Imad T

    2012-02-03

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: To compare the prophylactic antiemetic efficacy of the combination of ondansetron and droperidol with that of droperidol alone in patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind controlled trial. University affiliated teaching hospital after induction of standardized general anesthesia. PATIENTS: 64 ASA physical status I or II patients aged 18 to 80 years, undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. INTERVENTION: Following induction of general anesthesia, patients received either droperidol 1.25 mg intravenously (IV; n = 30; Group D) or the combination of droperidol 1.25 mg IV and ondansetron 4 mg IV (n = 34; Group D+O). MEASUREMENTS: Number and severity of nausea episodes, number of emetic episodes, total analgesic consumption, and rescue antiemetic administration were assessed at 1, 3, and 24 hours after admission to the recovery room. Data were analyzed using Fisher\\'s Exact test and unpaired Student\\'s t-test; a p-value <0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: The proportions of patients who experienced nausea (70% and 53% for D and D+O groups, respectively) and vomiting (30% and 19% for D and D+O groups, respectively) were similar in the two groups. The frequency of moderate and severe nausea (requiring administration of antiemetic) was less in group D + O (7%) compared with group D (19%; p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Patients who received the combination of droperidol and ondansetron experienced less severe nausea compared with patients who received droperidol alone.

  18. [Comparative study on the tolerance and efficacy of high doses of metoclopramide and clebopride in vomiting induced by cisplatin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, M; Díaz-Rubio, E

    1989-06-10

    Forty-one patients treated with cisplatin (100-120 mg/m2), alone or associated with vindesine (3 mg/m2), were included in a randomized crossover pilot study which compared 3 different doses of intravenous clebopride with intravenous metoclopramide. The patients were randomly assigned to receive clebopride in the first chemotherapy course in one of the three dose levels used (0.5 mg/kg, 21 patients; 0.75 mg/kg, 11 patients; 1 mg/kg, 10 patients) or metoclopramide (10 mg/kg). In the second course of the same chemotherapy the patients received the alternative antiemetic, and thus each patient was his own control. The total dose of both antiemetic drugs was infused in 5 intravenous fractions given every 2 hours. The antiemetic activity of clebopride was moderately lower to that of metoclopramide with the first two tested doses (overall doses of 0.5 and 0.75 mg/kg) and similar with the last dose (1 mg/kg). Clebopride was reasonably well tolerated at the used dosages, inducing sedation in 20% of cases (versus 24% with metoclopramide) and diarrhea in 37% (versus 20% with metoclopramide). Extrapyramidal reactions developed in 17% of the courses which included metoclopramide and in none including clebopride. This difference was statistically significant.

  19. [The Effectiveness of Epidural Droperidol for Prophylaxis of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting: A Comparative Study of Droperidol and Adrenaline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyonaga, Shinya; Shinozuka, Norihiro; Dobashi, Tamae; Iiyori, Nao; Sudo, Tomoko

    2016-05-01

    Intravenous droperidol has strong evidence for antiemetic efficacy in high risk patients for prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). However it is not clear whether continuous epidural administration of doroperidol prevent PONV. It has been reported that epidural adrenaline decreases PONV; therefore we prospectively compared the effectiveness of epidural droperidol and adrenaline for prophylaxis of PONV. Eighty-six patients were scheduled for abdominal gynecological surgery under general-epidural anesthesia in the study. Patients were randomly assigned to droperidol group or adrenaline group. We investigated the incidences of PONV, the frequency of using the antiemetics. There was no statistical difference between the groups. The incidences of PONV were 27.9% (doropeidol group) and 58.1% (adrenaline group), respectively (P = 0.0046). The frequency of the anti-emetics use were 18.6% and 41.9%, respectively (P = 0.0189). There was one patient who needed cancellation of continuous epidural administration for vomiting in adrenaline group, but no patient in doropeidol group. The results suggest that epidural droperidol effectively decreases PONV in high risk patients. However epidural adrenaline might be ineffective.

  20. Efficacy of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists in radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: A quantitative systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tramer, M.R.; Reynolds, D.J.M.; Stoner, N.S.; Moore, R.A.; McQuay, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    5-HT 3 receptor antagonists are used to treat radiation-induced sickness. The purpose of this study was to define anti-emetic efficacy and potential for harm of these drugs in radiotherapy. A systematic search, critical appraisal and quantitative analysis of relevant data using the number-needed-to-treat or harm (NNT/H) were conducted. Acute (0 to 24 h) and delayed (beyond 24 h) anti-emetic efficacy were analysed separately. Data from 1,404 patients were found in 40 trials published in 36 reports. Data from 197 patients receiving ondansetron or granisetron in five randomised trials were regarded as valid according to preset criteria. One placebo-controlled trial had 10 patients per group and in this ondansetron was not significantly different from placebo. In a larger (n=105) placebo-controlled trial, ondansetron was significantly more efficacious than metoclopramide for complete control of acute vomiting (NNT 2.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-3.3) and acute nausea (NNT 3.6, 95% CI 2.2-10.2). Three trials reported delayed outcomes with ondansetron or granisetron: there was no evidence of any difference compared with placebo or other anti-emetics. Two trials reported no acute or delayed but a 'worst day' outcome; in these ondansetron's antivomiting effect was significantly better than placebo (NNT 4.4, 95% CI 2.5-23) or prochlorperazine (NNT 3.8, 95% CI 2.4-10.3), but not its antinausea effect. Constipation and headache were associated significantly with 5-HT 3 receptor antagonists compared with other anti-emetics or placebo (NNH 6.4 and 17.1, respectively). Only 14% of published data enabled valid estimation of the anti-emetic efficacy of 5-HT 3 receptor antagonists in radiotherapy. There was some evidence that these drugs prevent acute vomiting: 40% of treated patients will benefit (NNT approximately 2.5). The evidence for nausea was less clear. There was no evidence that these drugs are of any benefit beyond 24 h. There was evidence that they produce specific

  1. Recovery profile-e comparison of isoflurane and propofol anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, A.; Siddiqui, S.Z.; Aftab, S.; Sabbar, S.

    2008-01-01

    To compare the recovery profile in terms of time of extubation, eye opening, orientation and mobility and frequency of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting (PONV) between propofol and isoflurane based anesthesia in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy with prophylactic antiemetic. After informed consent, a total of 60 ASA I-II patients scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy were divided in two equal groups I and P. Anesthesia in all patients were induced by Nalbuphine 0.15 mg/kg, Midazolam 0.03 mg/kg, Propofol 1.5 mg/kg and Rocuronium 0.6 mg/kg. Anesthesia was maintained with Isoflurane in group I and propofol infusion in group P, while ventilation was maintained with 50% N/sub 2/O/sub 2/ mixture in both the groups. All patients were given antiemetic prophylaxis. Hemodynamics were recorded throughout anesthesia and recovery period. At the end of surgery, times of extubation, eye opening, orientation (by modified Aldrete score) and mobility (recovery profile) were assessed. PONV was observed and recorded immediately after extubation, during early postoperative period (0-4 hours) and late period (4-24 hours). Antiemetic requirements were also recorded for the same periods in both the groups. Propofol provided faster recovery (extubation and eye opening times) and orientation in immediate postoperative period with statistically significant differences between the groups (p<0.0001). Recovery characteristics were comparably lower in group I. More patients achieved full points (8) on modified Aldrete score at different time until 30 minutes in group P. Postoperative nausea and vomiting in early and late periods were significantly reduced in group P. Moreover, requirement of rescue antiemetic doses were significantly lower in group P in 24 hours (p<0.0001). In this series, recovery was much faster with earlier gain of orientation with propofol anesthesia compared to isoflurane in the early recovery periods. Propofol is likely to be a better choice of

  2. Efficacy of 5-HT{sub 3} receptor antagonists in radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: A quantitative systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tramer, M.R. [Pain Research and Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics, University of Oxford, Oxford Radcliffe Hospital, The Churchill, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom); Reynolds, D.J.M. [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, Radcliffe Hospital (United Kingdom); Stoner, N.S. [ICRF Department of Medical Oncology, Oxford Radcliffe Hospital (United Kingdom); Moore, R.A.; McQuay, H.J. [Pain Research and Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics, University of Oxford, Oxford Radcliffe Hospital, The Churchill, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1998-11-01

    5-HT{sub 3} receptor antagonists are used to treat radiation-induced sickness. The purpose of this study was to define anti-emetic efficacy and potential for harm of these drugs in radiotherapy. A systematic search, critical appraisal and quantitative analysis of relevant data using the number-needed-to-treat or harm (NNT/H) were conducted. Acute (0 to 24 h) and delayed (beyond 24 h) anti-emetic efficacy were analysed separately. Data from 1,404 patients were found in 40 trials published in 36 reports. Data from 197 patients receiving ondansetron or granisetron in five randomised trials were regarded as valid according to preset criteria. One placebo-controlled trial had 10 patients per group and in this ondansetron was not significantly different from placebo. In a larger (n=105) placebo-controlled trial, ondansetron was significantly more efficacious than metoclopramide for complete control of acute vomiting (NNT 2.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-3.3) and acute nausea (NNT 3.6, 95% CI 2.2-10.2). Three trials reported delayed outcomes with ondansetron or granisetron: there was no evidence of any difference compared with placebo or other anti-emetics. Two trials reported no acute or delayed but a 'worst day' outcome; in these ondansetron's antivomiting effect was significantly better than placebo (NNT 4.4, 95% CI 2.5-23) or prochlorperazine (NNT 3.8, 95% CI 2.4-10.3), but not its antinausea effect. Constipation and headache were associated significantly with 5-HT{sub 3} receptor antagonists compared with other anti-emetics or placebo (NNH 6.4 and 17.1, respectively). Only 14% of published data enabled valid estimation of the anti-emetic efficacy of 5-HT{sub 3} receptor antagonists in radiotherapy. There was some evidence that these drugs prevent acute vomiting: 40% of treated patients will benefit (NNT approximately 2.5). The evidence for nausea was less clear. There was no evidence that these drugs are of any benefit beyond 24 h. There was

  3. Radiation-induced emesis: a prospective observational multicenter Italian trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective observational multicenter trial was carried out to assess the incidence, pattern, and prognostic factors of radiation-induced emesis (RIE), and evaluate the use of antiemetic drugs in radiation oncology clinical practice. Methods and Materials: Fifty-one Italian radiation oncology centers took part in this trial. The accrual lasted 2 consecutive weeks, only patients starting radiotherapy in this period were enrolled. Exclusion criteria were age under 18 years, and concomitant chemotherapy. Evaluation was based on diary cards filled in daily by patients during radiotherapy and 1 week after stopping it. Diary cards recorded the intensity of nausea and any episode of vomiting and retching. Prophylactic and symptomatic antiemetic drug prescriptions were also registered. Results: Nine hundred thirty-four patients entered the trial, and 914 were evaluable. Irradiated sites were: breast in 211 patients, pelvis in 210 patients, head and neck in 136 patients, thorax in 129 patients, brain in 52 patients, upper abdomen in 42 patients, skin and/or extremities in 37 patients, and other sites in 97 patients. Vomiting and nausea occurred in 17.1% and 37.3% of patients, respectively, and 38.7% patients had both vomiting and nausea. At multifactorial analysis, the only patient-related risk factor that was statistically significant was represented by previous experience with cancer chemotherapy. Moreover, two radiotherapy (RT)-related factors were significant risk factors for RIE, the irradiated site and field size. In fact, a statistically significant higher percentage of RIE was registered in upper abdomen RT and RT fields > 400 cm 2 . Although nonstatistically significant, patients receiving RT to the thorax and head and neck presented a higher incidence of RIE. Only a minority (14%) of patients receiving RT were given an antiemetic drug, and the prescriptions were more often symptomatic than prophylactic (9% vs. 5%, respectively). Different compounds and

  4. Nevasic audio program for the prevention of chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting: A feasibility study using a randomized controlled trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradian, Saeed; Walshe, Catherine; Shahidsales, Soodabeh; Ghavam Nasiri, Mohammad Reza; Pilling, Mark; Molassiotis, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    Pharmacological therapy is only partially effective in preventing or treating chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). Therefore, exploring the complementary role of non-pharmacological approaches used in addition to pharmacological agents is important. Nevasic uses specially constructed audio signals hypothesized to generate an antiemetic reaction. The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of conducting a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate the effectiveness of Nevasic to control CINV. A mixed methods design incorporating an RCT and focus group interviews. For the RCT, female breast cancer patients were randomized to receive either Nevasic plus usual care, music plus usual care, or usual care only. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and linear mixed-effects models. Five focus group interviews were conducted to obtain participants' views regarding the acceptability of the interventions in the trial. 99 participants were recruited to the RCT and 15 participated in focus group interviews. Recruitment targets were achieved. Issues of Nevasic acceptability were highlighted as weaknesses of the program. This study did not detect any evidence for the effectiveness of Nevasic; however, the results showed statistically significant less use of anti-emetics (p = 0.003) and borderline non-significant improvement in quality of life (p = 0.06). Conducting a non-pharmacological intervention using such an audio program is feasible, although difficulties and limitations exist with its use. Further studies are required to investigate the effectiveness of Nevasic from perspectives such as anti-emetic use, as well as its overall effect on the levels of nausea and vomiting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Is perioperative administration of 5% dextrose effective in reducing the incidence of PONV in laparoscopic cholecystectomy?: A randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ankita; Pandey, Ravinder Kumar; Sharma, Ankur; Darlong, Vanlalnghaka; Punj, Jyotsna; Goswami, Devalina; Sinha, Renu; Rewari, Vimi; Chandralekha, Chandralekha; Bansal, Virinder Kumar

    2017-08-01

    To compare the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) during perioperative administration of 5% dextrose and normal saline in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Prospective, randomized, double-blind trial. Operating rooms in a tertiary care hospital of Northern India. One hundred patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists status I to II undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were enrolled in this study. Patients were randomized into two groups [normal saline (NS) group and 5% dextrose (D) group]. Both the groups received Ringer acetate (Sterofundin ISO) intravenously as a maintenance fluid during intraoperative period. Besides this, patients of group NS received 250ml of 0.9% normal saline and patients of group D received 5% dextrose @ 100ml/h started at the time when gall bladder was taken out. It was continued in the postoperative period with the same rate till it gets finished. Incidence of PONV, Apfel score, intraoperative opioids used and consumption of rescue antiemetics. Demographic data was statistically similar. Out of total 100 patients, 47 patients (47%) had PONV. In group D, 14 patients (28%) had PONV while in group NS, 33 patients (66%) had PONV within 24h of surgery (p value 0.001). The incidence of PONV was reduced by 38% in group D which is significantly lower when compared with that of group NS (p value 0.001). The consumption of single dose of rescue antiemetics in group D was also reduced by 26% when compared to that of group NS (p value 0.002). Perioperative administration of 5% dextrose in patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery can reduce PONV significantly and even if PONV occurs, the quantity of rescue antiemetics to combat PONV is also reduced significantly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ondansetron and Granisetron for prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting following laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauchan, Sabin; Thapa, Chitra; Shakya, Priyanka; Bhattarai, Ramesh; Shakya, Sajal

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgeries are known to be associated with a higher incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). Prophylaxis of PONV is usually achieved with a single-dose antiemetic drug administered during the surgical procedure. The aim of this study was to compare the antiemetic efficacy of two different 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5HT3) receptor antagonists, ondansetron and granisetron when given prophylactically to patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. It was a randomized, double blind study, conducted in 90 patients. Patients were divided into two groups: Group A and Group B with 45 patients in each group. Patients in groupA were given 100 microgram/kg ondansetron intravenously (IV), and patients in Group B were given 40 microgram/kg granisetron. Both the drugs were diluted in 10 ml of 0.9% NaCl and were given at the end of surgery. The standard general anesthetic technique was administered to all the patients. Episodes of nausea, retching and vomiting were assessed during the first 24 hours after anesthesia. There was no statistically significant difference for demographic data and duration of surgery among the two groups (P>0.05). Evaluated nausea and vomiting scores in the first 3 hours period revealed that each of the drugs had a similar antiemetic effect (P>0.05). Between 4-12 hours also the episodes of nausea, retching as well as vomiting were statistically insignificant in both the groups. In the last 12 hours, episodes of nausea, retching and vomiting were significantly higher in ondansetron group. Granisetron, when given prophylactically, resulted in a significantly lower incidence of PONV than ondansetron in the first 24 hours.

  7. Association of postoperative nausea/vomiting and pain with breastfeeding success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Abola

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful breastfeeding is a goal set forth by the World Health Organization to improve neonatal care. Increasingly, patients express the desire to breastfeed, and clinicians should facilitate successful breastfeeding. The primary aim of this study is to determine if postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV or postoperative pain are associated with decreased breastfeeding success after cesarean delivery. Methods This is a historical cohort study using the Stony Brook Elective Cesarean Delivery Database. Self-reported breastfeeding success at 4 weeks postoperative was analyzed for associations with postoperative antiemetic use and postoperative pain scores. Breastfeeding success was also analyzed for associations with patient factors and anesthetic medications. Results Overall, 86% of patients (n = 81 who intended on breastfeeding reported breastfeeding success. Breastfeeding success was not associated with postoperative nausea or vomiting as measured by post anesthesia care unit antiemetic use (15% use in successful vs. 18% use in unsuccessful, p = 0.67 or 48-h antiemetic use (28% use in successful group vs 36% use in unsuccessful group, p = 0.732. Pain visual analog scale scores at 6, 12 and 24 h postoperatively were not significantly different between patients with or without breastfeeding success. Breastfeeding success was associated with having had at least 1 previous child (86% vs 36%, p < 0.001. Patients with asthma were less likely to have breastfeeding success (45% vs 4%, p = 0.002. Conclusions Efforts to improve PONV and pain after cesarean delivery may not be effective in improving breastfeeding success. To possibly improve breastfeeding rates, resources should be directed toward patients with no previous children and patients with asthma.

  8. Fosaprepitant versus ondansetron for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting in patients who undergo gynecologic abdominal surgery with patient-controlled epidural analgesia: a prospective, randomized, double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Tomohiro; Kume, Katsuyoshi; Kakuta, Nami; Hamaguchi, Eisuke; Tsutsumi, Rie; Kawanishi, Ryosuke; Fukuta, Kohei; Tanaka, Katsuya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo M

    2015-10-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is the most common postoperative complication. The postoperative use of opioids is known to increase the incidence. We compared fosaprepitant, a neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor antagonist, and ondansetron for their preventive effects on PONV in patients who underwent gynecologic abdominal surgery with patient-controlled epidural analgesia. This prospective, double-blind, randomized study comprised 44 patients who underwent gynecologic abdominal surgery. They were randomly allocated to receive 150 mg intravenous fosaprepitant (n = 24; NKI group) or 4 mg ondansetron (n = 20; ONS group) before anesthesia, which was maintained with volatile anesthetics, remifentanil, fentanyl, and rocuronium. All patients received postoperative fentanyl by patient-controlled epidural anesthesia. The incidence of nausea and vomiting, complete response rate (i.e., no vomiting and no rescue antiemetic use), rescue antiemetic use, nausea score (0-3), and visual analog scale score (VAS 0-10) for pain were recorded at 2, 24, 48, and 72 h after surgery. No (0 %) patient in the NKI group experienced vomiting after surgery; however, 4-6 (20-30 %) of 20 patients in the ONS group experienced vomiting. This difference was significant at 0-24, 0-48, and 0-72 h. During the study period, no significant differences existed between the NK1 and ONS groups in the incidence of PONV, complete response rate, rescue antiemetic use, nausea score, and VAS score for pain. Compared to ondansetron, fosaprepitant more effectively decreased the incidence of vomiting in patients who underwent gynecologic abdominal surgery with patient-controlled epidural analgesia.

  9. The anti-asthmatic drug pranlukast suppresses the delayed-phase vomiting and reverses intracellular indices of emesis evoked by cisplatin in the least shrew (Cryptotis parva).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmani, Nissar A; Chebolu, Seetha; Zhong, Weixia; Kim, William D; Narlesky, Matthew; Adams, Joia; Dong, Fanglong

    2017-08-15

    The introduction of second generation serotonin 5-HT 3 receptor (5-HT 3 ) antagonist palonosetron combined with long-acting substance P neurokinin NK 1 receptor (NK 1 ) antagonists (e.g. netupitant) has substantially improved antiemetic therapy against early- and delayed-phases of emesis caused by highly emetogenic chemotherapeutics such as cisplatin. However, the improved efficacy comes at a cost that many patients cannot afford. We introduce a new class of antiemetic, the antiasthmatic leukotriene CysLT1 receptor antagonist pranlukast for the suppression of cisplatin-evoked vomiting. Pranlukast (10mg/kg) by itself significantly reduced the mean frequency of vomits (70%) and fully protected least shrews from vomiting (46%) during the delayed-phase of cisplatin (10mg/kg)-evoked vomiting. Although, pranlukast tended to substantially reduce both the mean frequency of vomits and the number of shrews vomiting during the early-phase, these reductions failed to attain significance. When combined with a first (tropisetron)- or a second (palonosetron)-generation 5-HT 3 receptor antagonist, pranlukast potentiated their antiemetic efficacy during both phases of vomiting. In addition, pranlukast by itself prevented several intracellular signal markers of cisplatin-evoked delayed-vomiting such as phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and PKA. When pranlukast was combined with either palonosetron or tropisetron, these combinations suppressed the evoked phosphorylation of: i) ERK1/2 during both acute- and delayed-phase, ii) PKCα/β at the peak acute-phase, and iii) PKA at the peak delayed-phase. The current and our published findings suggest that overall behavioral and intracellular signaling effects of pranlukast via blockade of CysLT1 receptors generally appear to be similar to the NK 1 receptor antagonist netupitant with some differences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of the Effect of Ondansetrone - Dexamethasone, Dexamethasone – Metoclopeamide and Ondansetron - Normal Saline in Decreasing Post Operative Nausa and Vomitting (PONV after Middle Ear Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haddadi Soudabeh

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of post-operative nausea and vomitting (PONV is increased after middle ear surgery and it may complicate and interact with reconstruction after surgery, so prevention and treatment of these complications are necessary.The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of anti-emetic combinations in decreasing the PONV after middle ear surgery.Materials and methods: This double blind clinical trial was carried out during 2007-2008 on 111 patients of 15-45 years old with ASA I-II who were candidates for elective middle ear surgery under general anesthesia. The patients were divided into three groups. Patients in the ON group received Ondansetrone 0.1mg/kg + Nacl 0.9% 2cc, OD group received Ondansetrone 0.1mg/kg + Dexamethasone 0.15mg/kg and MD group received Dexamethasone 0.15mg/kg+ Metoclopramide 0.15mg/kg intravenously just before the end of surgery. The patients were evaluated for nausea, vomiting, need of anti-emetic drugs and drug dosage in recovery, 1-6, 6-12 and 12-24 hours after operation and then all data were statistically analyzed by SPSS software, Chi-square, ANOVA and t- Test. P<0.05 was significant.Results: There were no significant differences among three groups in age and sex. The incidence of PONV among 3 groups was not significantly different during 24 hours after operation. (P=0.271 but the incidence of PONV in the first six hours was different among 3 groups (P=0.007 (ON: 8.1%, OD: 0%, MD: 21.6%. Also Metoclopramide consumption was significant between three groups. Conclusion: This study showed that the need to anti-emetic drugs in first 6 hours was the least in OD group, but the difference in the incidence of PONV was not significant otherwise.

  11. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF PROPHYLACTIC METOCLOPRAMIDE VERSUS ONDANSETRON FOR CONTROL OF POSTOPERATIVE NAUSEA AND VOMITING (PONV ASSOCIATED WITH IV TRAMADOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali P.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AIMS AND OBJECTIVE: This prospective double blind randomized study was conducted to compare: 1. The efficacy and safety of prophylactic administration of Metoclopramide versus Ondansetron in the control of postoperative nausea and vomiting in patients receiving intravenous Tr amadol as postoperative analgesic. 2. To study the incidence of post operative nausea and vomiting with IV bolus Tramadol. METHODS: 90 patients ASA grade I and II, age 18 - 60 years, posted for hernia, hydrocele and other peripheral lower limb surgeries under subarachnoid block were selected . Patients were randomly allocated into three groups of thirty each. All surgeries were performed under subarachnoid block and received IV Tramadol 100 m g 8 hourly for 24 hours as post - operative analgesic. Group N received no prophylactic antiemetic. Group M received 10 mg Metoclopramide 12 hourly. Group O received 4 mg Ondansetron 12 hourly. Vital signs, nausea, vomiting, pain, sedation, need for rescue a ntiemetic, rescue analgesic and adverse effects were recorded for 24 hours. RESULTS: Ondansetron group (Group O significantly reduced the incidence of PONV as compared to Metoclopramide (Group M and no antiemetic group (Group N .But Metoclopramide was fo und to be not significantly effective in controlling PONV in patients receiving Tramadol as analgesic. None of the patients in Group O required rescue antiemetic as compared to 13.3% patients in Group M and 26.7% patients in Group N. There was statisticall y no significant difference between the 3 groups with respect to requirement of rescue analgesic. No major adverse effects were observed which can be attributed to either Metoclopramide or Ondansetron. CONCLUSION: Ondansetron was more effective than Metoclopramide in controlling PONV, in patients receiving IV Tramadol as post-operative analgesia

  12. Olanzapine is effective for refractory chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting irrespective of chemotherapy emetogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vig, Sierra; Seibert, Laurel; Green, Myke R

    2014-01-01

    The role of olanzapine added to a dopamine antagonist and benzodiazepine for the treatment of refractory chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is incompletely characterized in all levels of chemotherapy emetogenicity. This retrospective study evaluated the efficacy of the addition of olanzapine in adults experiencing refractory CINV stratified by chemotherapy emetogenicity. Thirty-three adults who experienced CINV refractory to guideline-recommended prophylaxis and breakthrough antiemetics (dopamine antagonists and benzodiazepines) and received at least one dose of olanzapine 5-10 mg per os were evaluated. Failure was defined as >5 emesis events in 24 h or more than 10 cumulative doses of rescue antiemetics following first olanzapine dose per treatment cycle. Post hoc analyses investigated variables impacting olanzapine efficacy. The addition of olanzapine demonstrated an overall success rate of 70 %. This success rate did not differ between chemotherapy regimens of high versus low-to-moderate emetogenicity (p = 0.79), prophylaxis with serotonin antagonist plus corticosteroid and aprepitant versus serotonin antagonist alone (p = 0.77), or age over 50 versus ≤50 years (p > 0.99). A trend toward greater benefit was seen in women (p = 0.08). The addition of olanzapine to a dopamine antagonist and benzodiazepine demonstrated high efficacy rates for refractory CINV irrespective of chemotherapy emetogenicity. The high success rates among all groups suggests that incomplete resolution of CINV with prophylactic serotonin antagonists and breakthrough dopamine antagonists plus benzodiazepine may benefit from the addition of olanzapine regardless of gender, degree of chemotherapy emetogenicity, number of prophylactic antiemetics, or age. The trend toward greater control of emesis in women merits further investigation.

  13. Prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea: the role of neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bošnjak, Snežana M; Gralla, Richard J; Schwartzberg, Lee

    2017-05-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea (CIN) has a significant negative impact on the quality of life of cancer patients. The use of 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT 3 ) receptor antagonists (RAs) has reduced the risk of vomiting, but (except for palonosetron) their effect on nausea, especially delayed nausea, is limited. This article reviews the role of NK 1 RAs when combined with 5-HT 3 RA-dexamethasone in CIN prophylaxis. Aprepitant has not shown consistent superiority over a two-drug (ondansetron-dexamethasone) combination in nausea control after cisplatin- or anthracycline-cyclophosphamide (AC)-based highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC). Recently, dexamethasone and dexamethasone-metoclopramide were demonstrated to be non-inferior to aprepitant and aprepitant-dexamethasone, respectively, for the control of delayed nausea after HEC (AC/cisplatin), and are now recognized in the guidelines. The potential impact of the new NK 1 RAs rolapitant and netupitant (oral fixed combination with palonosetron, as NEPA) in CIN prophylaxis is discussed. While the clinical significance of the effect on nausea of the rolapitant-granisetron-dexamethasone combination after cisplatin is not conclusive, rolapitant addition showed no improvement in nausea prophylaxis after AC or moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC). NEPA was superior to palonosetron in the control of nausea after HEC (AC/cisplatin). Moreover, the efficacy of NEPA in nausea control was maintained over multiple cycles of HEC/MEC. Recently, NK 1 RAs have been challenged by olanzapine, with olanzapine showing superior efficacy in nausea prevention after HEC. Fixed antiemetic combinations (such as NEPA) or new antiemetics with a long half-life that may be given once per chemotherapy cycle (rolapitant or NEPA) may improve patient compliance with antiemetic treatment.

  14. Management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting by risk profile: role of netupitant/palonosetron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorusso V

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Vito Lorusso National Cancer Research Centre, Istituto Tumori Giovanni Paolo II, Bari, Italy Abstract: As recommended by most recent antiemetic guidelines, the optimal prophylaxis of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV requires the combination of 5-HT3 receptor antagonist (RA with an NK1-RA. Moreover, the major predictors of acute and delayed CINV include: young age, female sex, platinum- or anthracycline-based chemotherapy, nondrinker status, emesis in the earlier cycles of chemotherapy, and previous history of motion/morning sickness. Despite improved knowledge of the pathophysiology of CINV and advances in the availability of active antiemetics, an inconsistent compliance with their use has been reported, thereby resulting in suboptimal control of CINV in several cases. In this scenario, a new antiemetic drug is now available, which seems to be able to guarantee better prophylaxis of CINV and improvement of adherence to guidelines. In fact, netupitant/palonosetron (NEPA is a ready-to-use single oral capsule, combining an NK1-RA (netupitant and a 5-HT3-RA (palonosetron, which is to be taken 1 hour before the administration of chemotherapy, ensuring the coverage from CINV for 5 days. We reviewed the role of NEPA in patients at high risk of CINV receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy. In these patients, NEPA plus dexamethasone, as compared to standard treatments, achieved superior efficacy in all primary and secondary end points during the acute, delayed, and overall phases, including nausea assessment. Moreover, these results were also achieved in female patients receiving anthracycline plus cyclophosphamide-based chemotherapy. NEPA represents a real step forward in the prophylaxis of CINV. Keywords: NEPA, netupitant, NK1, CINV, vomiting, risk factors

  15. Suppression of Cisplatin-Induced Vomiting by Cannabis sativa in Pigeons: Neurochemical Evidences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihsan Ullah

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cannabis sativa (CS, family Cannabinaceae has been reported for its anti-emetic activity against cancer chemotherapy-induced emesis in animal models and in clinics. The current study was designed to investigate CS for potential effectiveness to attenuate cisplatin-induced vomiting in healthy pigeons and to study the impact on neurotransmitters involved centrally and peripherally in the act of vomiting. High-performance liquid chromatography system coupled with electrochemical detector was used for the quantification of neurotransmitters 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT, dopamine (DA and their metabolites; Di-hydroxy Phenyl Acetic acid (Dopac, Homovanillic acid (HVA, and 5-hydroxy indole acetic acid (5HIAA centrally in specific brain areas (area postrema and brain stem while, peripherally in small intestine. Cisplatin (7 mg/kg i.v. induce emesis without lethality across the 24 h observation period. CS hexane fraction (CS-HexFr; 10 mg/kg attenuated cisplatin-induced emesis ∼ 65.85% (P < 0.05; the reference anti-emetic drug, metoclopramide (MCP; 30 mg/kg, produced ∼43.90% reduction (P < 0.05. At acute time point (3rd h, CS-HexFr decreased (P < 0.001 the concentration of 5HT and 5HIAA in the area postrema, brain stem and intestine, while at 18th h (delayed time point CS-HexFr attenuated (P < 0.001 the upsurge of 5HT caused by cisplatin in the brain stem and intestine and dopamine in the area postrema. CS-HexFr treatment alone did not alter the basal neurotransmitters and their metabolites in the brain areas and intestine except 5HIAA and HVA, which were decreased significantly. In conclusion the anti-emetic effect of CS-HexFr is mediated by anti-serotonergic and anti-dopaminergic components in a blended manner at the two different time points, i.e., 3rd and 18th h in pigeons.

  16. Effect of Ginger and Chamomile on Nausea and Vomiting Caused by Chemotherapy in Iranian Women with Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaati, Fateme; Najafi, Safa; Kashaninia, Zahra; Sadeghi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) places a significant burden on the patient. Herbal agents are the most commonly complementary therapies used among the public. This study was done to determine the effect of ginger and chamomile capsules on nausea and vomiting in cases undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer (BC). In a randomized, double-blind and clinical trial study, 65 women with BC undergoing chemotherapy were referred to Breast Cancer Research Center, Tehran, Iran, between May 2013 to June 2014. Regimen for ginger group for 5 days before and 5 days after chemotherapy was: 2 times a day and 500 mg capsules of powdered ginger root in addition to a routine antiemetic regimen consisting of dexamethasone, metoclopramide and aprepitant (DMA) capsules. Chamomile group similarly was: 2 times a day and 500 mg capsules of Matricaria chamomilla extract in addition to a routine antiemetic regimen consisting of DMA capsules. Control group, routine antiemetic regimen consisting of DMA capsules. There were no significant differences between the ginger, chamomile and control groups regarding age. Drugs used for chemotherapy were identical and duration of disease was also matched (1-4 months). Ginger and chamomile were both significantly effective for reducing the frequency of vomiting, there being no significant difference between the ginger and chamomile groups. Moreover, unlike the chamomile, ginger significantly influenced the frequency of nausea. According to the findings of this study, it should be declared that taking ginger capsules (1 g/day) might relieve CINV safely. Nurses dealing directly with cancer patients should be responsible for providing educational programs for patients and their families about how to deal with their drug regimens and associated side effects.

  17. International Patterns of Practice in the Management of Radiation Therapy-induced Nausea and Vomiting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, Kristopher; Zhang Liying [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lutz, Stephen [Blanchard Valley Health Systems, Findlay, Ohio (United States); Baardwijk, Angela van [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Linden, Yvette van der [Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Holt, Tanya [Radiation Oncology Mater Centre, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Arnalot, Palmira Foro [Parc de Salut Mar. Universitat Pompeu Fabra Barcelona (Spain); Lagrange, Jean-Leon [AP-HP Hopital Henri-Mondor, Universite Paris Est Creteil, Creteil (France); Maranzano, Ernesto [' S. Maria' Hospital, Terni (Italy); Liu, Rico [Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong (China); Wong, Kam-Hung [Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Wong, Lea-Choung [National University Cancer Institute (Singapore); Vassiliou, Vassilios [Bank of Cyprus Oncology Centre, Nicosia (Cyprus); Corn, Benjamin W. [Tel Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); De Angelis, Carlo; Holden, Lori; Wong, C. Shun [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chow, Edward, E-mail: Edward.Chow@sunnybrook.ca [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate international patterns of practice in the management of radiation therapy-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV). Methods and Materials: Oncologists prescribing radiation therapy in the United States, Canada, The Netherlands, Australia, New Zealand, Spain, Italy, France, Hong Kong, Singapore, Cyprus, and Israel completed a Web-based survey that was based on 6 radiation therapy-only clinical cases modeled after the minimal-, low-, moderate-, and high-emetic risk levels defined in the antiemetic guidelines of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer. For each case, respondents estimated the risks of nausea and vomiting separately and committed to an initial management approach. Results: In total, 1022 responses were received. Risk estimates and management decisions for the minimal- and high-risk cases varied little and were in line with guideline standards, whereas those for the low- and moderate-risk cases varied greatly. The most common initial management strategies were as follows: rescue therapy for a minimal-risk case (63% of respondents), 2 low-risk cases (56% and 80%), and 1 moderate-risk case (66%); and prophylactic therapy for a second moderate-risk case (75%) and a high-risk case (95%). The serotonin (5-HT){sub 3} receptor antagonists were the most commonly recommended prophylactic agents. On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of a decision for prophylactic or rescue therapy were risk estimates of nausea and vomiting, awareness of the American Society of Clinical Oncology antiemetic guideline, and European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology membership. Conclusions: Risk estimates and management strategies for RINV varied, especially for low- and moderate-risk radiation therapy cases. Radiation therapy-induced nausea and vomiting are under-studied treatment sequelae. New observational and translational studies are needed to allow for individual patient risk

  18. Low doses of haloperidol combined with ondansetron are not effective for prophylaxis of postoperative nausea and vomiting in susceptible patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga-Gil, Leonor; López-Olaondo, Luis; Pueyo, Javier; Callejas, Raquel; Duque, Paula; Carrascosa, Francisco

    2015-02-01

    In this observational study we reviewed the efficacy and side effects of different antiemetic combinations used in our hospital for postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) prophylaxis in high-risk women undergoing highly emetogenic surgery. After reviewing retrospectively the medical records of patients undergoing highly emetogenic elective surgeries under general anaesthesia, we selected 368 women whose Apfel risk score was ≥ 3 and receiving a combination of 2 antiemetics for PONV prophylaxis. We analysed the incidence of PONV at 2, 6, 12 and 24h after surgery, antiemetic rescue requirements, pattern of occurrence of PONV, side effects and level of sedation were also assessed. The main goal was complete response defined as no PONV within 24h after surgery. Ondansetron 4mg i.v. plus dexamethasone 8mg i.v. (O&Dex), haloperidol 1mg i.v. (O&Hal1), haloperidol 2mg i.v. (O&Hal2) or droperidol 1.25mg i.v. (O&Dro) were the combinations most frequently used. The complete response was better in groups O&Dex: 68.5% (CI: 58-78), O&Hal2: 64.1% (CI: 53-74) and O&Dro 63% (CI: 52-73) than in group O&Hal1: 41.3% (CI: 31-52) (p<0,01). Peak incidence of PONV occurred within the 2-6h period. The incidence of side effects was higher in group O&Hal2. In high risk patients for PONV who underwent highly emetogenic surgeries, the efficacy of low-dose haloperidol (1mg) in combination is limited. Higher doses (2mg) are more effective but its use is associated with a high incidence of side effects. Copyright © 2013 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. International Patterns of Practice in the Management of Radiation Therapy-induced Nausea and Vomiting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, Kristopher; Zhang Liying; Lutz, Stephen; Baardwijk, Angela van; Linden, Yvette van der; Holt, Tanya; Arnalot, Palmira Foro; Lagrange, Jean-Léon; Maranzano, Ernesto; Liu, Rico; Wong, Kam-Hung; Wong, Lea-Choung; Vassiliou, Vassilios; Corn, Benjamin W.; De Angelis, Carlo; Holden, Lori; Wong, C. Shun; Chow, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate international patterns of practice in the management of radiation therapy-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV). Methods and Materials: Oncologists prescribing radiation therapy in the United States, Canada, The Netherlands, Australia, New Zealand, Spain, Italy, France, Hong Kong, Singapore, Cyprus, and Israel completed a Web-based survey that was based on 6 radiation therapy-only clinical cases modeled after the minimal-, low-, moderate-, and high-emetic risk levels defined in the antiemetic guidelines of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer. For each case, respondents estimated the risks of nausea and vomiting separately and committed to an initial management approach. Results: In total, 1022 responses were received. Risk estimates and management decisions for the minimal- and high-risk cases varied little and were in line with guideline standards, whereas those for the low- and moderate-risk cases varied greatly. The most common initial management strategies were as follows: rescue therapy for a minimal-risk case (63% of respondents), 2 low-risk cases (56% and 80%), and 1 moderate-risk case (66%); and prophylactic therapy for a second moderate-risk case (75%) and a high-risk case (95%). The serotonin (5-HT) 3 receptor antagonists were the most commonly recommended prophylactic agents. On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of a decision for prophylactic or rescue therapy were risk estimates of nausea and vomiting, awareness of the American Society of Clinical Oncology antiemetic guideline, and European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology membership. Conclusions: Risk estimates and management strategies for RINV varied, especially for low- and moderate-risk radiation therapy cases. Radiation therapy-induced nausea and vomiting are under-studied treatment sequelae. New observational and translational studies are needed to allow for individual patient risk

  20. On the mechanism of radiation-induced emesis: The role of serotonin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarantino, C.W.; Ornitz, R.D.; Hoffman, L.G.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the mechanism of action of radiation-induced emesis by determining the incidence of radiation-induced emesis following hemibody irradiation; the effects of specific antiemetics especially ondansetron, a 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist, and to determine the relationship between radiation-induced emesis and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) through its active metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). Forty-one patients received 53 hemibody treatments of 5-8 Gy following intravenous hydration. The patients were divided into three groups according to prehemibody irradiation treatment: Group A: no pretreatment antiemetics, 30 patients; Group B: nonondansetron antiemetics (metoclopramide, dexamethasone, prochlorperazine), ten patients; and Group C: ondansetron, 13 patient. The incidence of radiation-induced emesis was determined prehemibody irradiation or baseline and at 1 h posthemibody irradiation in 38 patients and the results expressed as the percent change in 5-HIAA (ng/ug creatinine). The incidence of radiation-induced emesis was 82% (14/17) following upper/mid hemibody irradiation and 15% (2/11) following lower hemibody irradiation in Group A; 50% (3/6) and 25% (1/4) following upper/mid and lower hemibody irradiation respectively, in Group B/; and 0% (p/13) after upper/mid hemibody irradiation in Group C. The incidence of emesis was significantly different (p<0.001) between the patients of Group A and C who received upper/mid hemibody irradiation. The percent change in 5-HIAA excretion following upper/mid hemibody irradiation were greatest in Group A and smallest in Group C (p<0.002). The degree of change following lower hemibody irradiation (15% incidence of emesis) in Group A was lower than upper/mid hemibody irradiation of the same group. 17 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Efficacy of tropisetron in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer receiving adjuvant chemotherapy with carboplatin and taxanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsavaris, N; Kosmas, C; Kopterides, P; Vadiaka, M; Kosmas, N; Skopelitis, H; Karadima, D; Kolliokosta, G; Tzima, E; Loukeris, D; Pagouni, E; Batziou, E; Xyla, V; Koufos, C

    2008-03-01

    Even though significant progress has been made, chemotherapy-induced emesis remains a challenging problem. Few studies focus on emesis in patients treated with carboplatin and the observation period is limited to the initial 24 h following chemotherapy. Thus, we investigated if tropisetron (T) monotherapy can adequately prevent acute and delayed emesis in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients receiving a moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC) (carboplatin-containing) regimen. Furthermore, we explored the merits of adding dexamethasone (D) or alprazolam (A) to T, especially in the setting of a pre-existing high level of stress. We studied 60 patients with advanced NSCLC receiving carboplatin and taxanes in three consecutive cycles. During the first cycle, patients received 5 mg of T intravenously before chemotherapy and the same dose per os on each of the following 3 days. In the second cycle, T was co-administered with 8 mg of D once a day, while, during the third cycle, T was combined with per os A 0.25 mg every 12 h and continued over the following 3 days. Finally, we evaluated the impact of stress on the anti-emetic response achieved with the previously described regimens. The combination of T + A was superior to T monotherapy and the combination of T + D, regarding the prevention of acute and delayed emesis. Both T + A and T + D combinations led to appetite improvement, while patients receiving T + A experienced sedation more frequently. Interestingly, subgroup analysis revealed that patients without underlying stress obtained no further benefit by the addition of A or D, while both T + A and T + D combinations led to a better anti-emetic response in patients with stress. In conclusion, T monotherapy provides a satisfactory result in controlling nausea and emesis caused by a MEC regimen in patients without stress. However, the addition of D and, mainly, A improves its anti-emetic effect in patients with obvious stress.

  2. Ambulatory anesthesia and postoperative nausea and vomiting: predicting the probability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hegarty AT

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aoife T Hegarty,1 Muiris A Buckley,1 Conan L McCaul1–3 1Department of Anaesthesia, The Rotunda Hospital, 2Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, 3School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland Abstract: Nausea and vomiting are distinctly unpleasant symptoms that may occur after surgery and anesthesia, and high priority is given to their prevention by patients. Research in this area is plentiful and has focused on event prediction and pharmacological prophylaxis but despite this, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV typically occurs in 20%–30% of patients in contemporary practice. Prediction of postoperative and postdischarge nausea and vomiting is particularly important in the ambulatory surgical population as these symptoms may occur following discharge from hospital and continue for up to one week when access to antiemetic therapies is limited. Many of the existing predictive scoring systems are based on data from inpatient populations and limited to the first 24 hours after surgery. Scoring systems based on data from ambulatory surgical populations to predict PONV are only moderately good. The best-performing systems in ambulatory patients are those of Sinclair and Sarin with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.78 and 0.74, respectively, but are limited by the short duration of follow-up and a greater emphasis on nausea than vomiting. Given that the ability to predict both PONV and postdischarge nausea and vomiting is clearly limited, emphasis has been placed on prophylactic strategies that incorporate antiemetic medication, intravenous hydration, and nonnarcotic analgesia. PONV has been reduced to <10% in institutions using multimodal approaches. Scoring systems may facilitate “risk tailoring” in which patient risk profile is used as a stratification method for pharmacointervention. Keywords: postoperative nausea and vomiting, prediction, antiemetics, anesthesia

  3. Multi-regional local anesthetic infiltration during laparoscopic cholecystectomy in patients receiving prophylactic multi-modal analgesia: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, T; Klarskov, B; Kristiansen, V B

    1999-01-01

    undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In addition, all patients received multi-modal prophylactic analgesic treatment. Fifty-eight patients were randomized to receive a total of 286 mg (66 mL) ropivacaine or 66 mL saline via periportal and intraperitoneal infiltration. During the first 3...... postoperative h, the use of morphine and antiemetics was registered, and pain and nausea were rated hourly. Daily pain intensity, pain localization, and supplemental analgesic consumption were registered the first postoperative week. Ropivacaine reduced overall pain the first two hours and incisional pain...... for the first three postoperative hours (P ropivacaine group (P

  4. The relationship of intravenous dextrose administration during emergence from anesthesia to postoperative nausea and vomiting: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Parul; Meineke, Minhthy N; Rasmussen, Thomas; Anderson, Donald L; Brown, Jennifer; Siddighi, Sam; Applegate, Richard L

    2013-07-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) may occur despite antiemetic prophylaxis and is associated with unanticipated hospital admission, financial impact, and patient dissatisfaction. Previous studies have shown variable impact of IV dextrose on PONV. We sought to determine the relationship of IV dextrose administered during emergence from anesthesia to PONV. This was a prospective, double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial. Adult female ASA physical status I and II nondiabetic patients scheduled for outpatient gynecologic, urologic, or breast surgery were randomly assigned to infusion of 250 mL lactated Ringer's solution (group P; n = 75) or dextrose 5% in lactated Ringer's solution (group D; n = 87) over 2 hours beginning with surgical closing. Blood glucose was determined using a point-of-care device before transfer to the operating room, in the operating room immediately before study fluid infusion, and in the recovery room after study fluid infusion. No antiemetics were given before arrival in the recovery room. PONV scores were recorded at 0, 30, 60, and 120 minutes and 24 hours after arrival in the recovery room. Medication administration was recorded. Data from 162 patients with normal baseline blood glucose were analyzed. There were no significant intergroup differences in demographics, history of PONV, or tobacco use. There was no significant intergroup difference in PONV during the first 2 hours after anesthesia (group D 52.9% vs group P 46.7%; difference, 6.2%; 95% confidence interval [CI], -9.2% to 21.6%; P = 0.43). Patients in groups D or P who developed PONV within 2 hours of anesthesia had similar number of severity scores ≥1 during recovery stay (1.5 vs 1.0; difference, 0; 95% CI, 0%-0%; P = 0.93); and similar proportions of: PONV onset within 30 minutes of recovery room arrival (65.2% vs 57.1%; difference, 8.1%; 95% CI, -13.1% to 28.8%; P = 0.46); more than 1 dose of antiemetic medication (56.5% vs 62.9%; difference, 6.3%; 95% CI, -26

  5. Solution behavior of metoclopramide in aqueous-alcoholic solutions at 30°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deosarkar, S. D.; Sawale, R. T.; Tawde, P. D.; Kalyankar, T. M.

    2016-07-01

    Densities (ρ) and refractive indices ( n D) of solutions of antiemetic drug metoclopramide (4-amino-5-chloro- N-(2-(diethylamino)ethyl)-2-methoxybenzamide hydrochloride hydrate) in methanolwater and ethanol-water mixtures of different compositions were measured at 30°C. Apparent molar volume (φv) of the drug was calculated from density data and partial molar volumes (φ v 0 ) were determined from Massons relation. Concentration dependence of nD has been studied to determine refractive indices of solution at infinite dilution ( n D 0 ). Results have been interpreted in terms of solute-solvent interactions.

  6. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol differentially suppresses cisplatin-induced emesis and indices of motor function via cannabinoid CB(1) receptors in the least shrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmani, N A

    2001-01-01

    We have recently shown that the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist, SR 141716A, produces emesis in the least shrew (Cryptotis parva) in a dose- and route-dependent manner. This effect was blocked by delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC). The present study investigates the cannabinoid receptor mechanisms by which Delta(9)-THC produces its antiemetic effects against cisplatin (20 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced emesis as well as its cannabimimetic activity profile (motor reduction) in the least shrew. Intraperitoneal administration of Delta(9)-THC (1, 2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg) dose-dependently reduced both the percentage of animals vomiting (ID(50)=1.8+/-1.6 mg/kg) and the frequency of vomits (ID(50)=0.36+/-1.18 mg/kg) in a potent manner. The lowest significantly effective antiemetic dose of Delta(9)-THC for the latter emesis parameters was 2.5 mg/kg. Although Delta(9)-THC reduced the frequency of vomits up to 98%, it failed to completely protect all tested shrews from vomiting (80% protection). The cannabinoid CB(1) antagonist (SR 141716A) and not the CB(2) antagonist (SR 144528), reversed the antiemetic effects of Delta(9)-THC in a dose-dependent fashion. Delta(9)-THC (1, 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg, ip) suppressed locomotor parameters (spontaneous locomotor activity, duration of movement and rearing frequency) in a biphasic manner and only the 20-mg/kg dose simultaneously suppressed the triad of locomotor parameters to a significant degree. Subcutaneous (1-10 mg/kg) and intraperitoneal (0.05-40 mg/kg) injection of some doses of SR 141716A caused significant reductions in one or more components of the triad of locomotor parameters but these reductions were not dose dependent. Subcutaneous injection of SR 141716A (0.2, 1, 5 and 10 mg/kg) reversed the motor suppressant effects of a 20-mg/kg dose of Delta(9)-THC (ip) in a dose-dependent manner. Relative to its motor suppressant effects, Delta(9)-THC is a more potent antiemetic agent. Both effects are probably mediated via CB(1

  7. Haloperidol, a Novel Treatment for Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witsil, Joanne C; Mycyk, Mark B

    Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (CHS) is typically unresponsive to conventional pharmacologic antiemetics, and patients often require excessive laboratory and radiographic testing and hospital admission. We report 4 cases of CHS that failed standard emergency department therapy but improved significantly after treatment with haloperidol. Although the exact mechanism for CHS remains unclear, dysregulation at cannabinoid type 1 seems to play a role. Recent animal data demonstrate complex interactions between dopamine and cannabinoid type 1 signaling, a potential mechanism for haloperidol success in patients with CHS. Our success with haloperidol in these 4 patients warrants further investigation of haloperidol as an emergency department treatment for CHS.

  8. MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE RENAL FAILURE WITH DELAYED HYPERCALCEMIA SECONDARY TO SARCOCYSTIS NEURONA-INDUCED MYOSITIS AND RHABDOMYOLYSIS IN A CALIFORNIA SEA LION (ZALOPHUS CALIFORNIANUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Amy B; Hanley, Christopher S; Duncan, Mary C; Ulmer, Kyle; Padilla, Luis R

    2015-09-01

    A 3-yr-old captive-born California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) developed Sarcocystis neurona-induced myositis and rhabdomyolysis that led to acute renal failure. The sea lion was successfully managed with fluid therapy, antiprotozoals, antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, antiemetics, gastroprotectants, and diuretics, but developed severe delayed hypercalcemia, a syndrome identified in humans after traumatic or exertion-induced rhabdomyolysis. Treatment with calcitonin was added to the management, and the individual recovered fully. The case emphasizes that animals with rhabdomyolysis-induced renal failure risk developing delayed hypercalcemia, which may be life threatening, and calcium levels should be closely monitored past the resolution of renal failure.

  9. Casopitant: a novel NK(1)-receptor antagonist in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhlmann, Christina; Herrstedt, Jørn

    2009-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) are among the most feared and distressing symptoms experienced by patients with cancer. The knowledge of the pathogenesis and neuropharmacology of CINV has expanded enormously over the last decades, the most significant discoveries being the role of 5......-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)(3)- and neurokinin (NK)(1) receptors in the emetic reflex arch. This has led to the development of two new classes of antiemetics acting as highly selective antagonists at one of these receptors. These drugs have had a huge impact in the protection from chemotherapy-induced vomiting...

  10. Treatment of heartburn and acid reflux associated with nausea and vomiting during pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Ruth; Maltepe, Caroline; Bozzo, Pina; Einarson, Adrienne

    2010-01-01

    QUESTION In addition to suffering from nausea and vomiting of pregnancy, which is being treated with antiemetics, some of my pregnant patients complain of heartburn and acid reflux. Should these symptoms also be treated and, if so, which acid-reducing medications are safe for use during pregnancy? ANSWER Increased severity of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy is associated with the presence of heartburn and acid reflux. Antacids, histamine-2 receptor antagonists, and proton pump inhibitors can be used safely during pregnancy, as large studies have been published with no evidence of adverse fetal effects. PMID:20154244

  11. Generation Z: Adolescent Xenobiotic Abuse in the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleston, William; Stork, Christine

    2015-12-01

    NMDA receptor antagonists include the prescription medication ketamine, the illicit xenobiotics PCP, MXE, and other novel PCP analogs, and the OTC medication DXM. The NMDA receptor antagonist most commonly abused by adolescents in the United States is DXM. These xenobiotics cause dissociative effects by non-competitively inhibiting the action of glutamate at the NMDA receptor. Additionally, these agents modulate the actions of monoamine neurotransmitters, agonize opioid receptors, and inhibit nitric oxide synthase. Patients typically present with sympathomimetic and neuropsychiatric clinical manifestations after abuse of NMDA receptor antagonists. Treatment is generally symptomatic and supportive. Interventions include benzodiazepines, propofol, fluids, antiemetics, aggressive cooling, and respiratory support.

  12. Nickel-Catalyzed Phosphine Free Direct N-Alkylation of Amides with Alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Jagadish; Banerjee, Debasis

    2018-03-16

    Herein, we developed an operational simple, practical, and selective Ni-catalyzed synthesis of secondary amides. Application of renewable alcohols, earth-abundant and nonprecious nickel catalyst facilitates the transformations, releasing water as byproduct. The catalytic system is tolerant to a variety of functional groups including nitrile, allylic ether, and alkene and could be extended to the synthesis of bis-amide, antiemetic drug Tigan, and dopamine D2 receptor antagonist Itopride. Preliminary mechanistic studies revealed the participation of a benzylic C-H bond in the rate-determining step.

  13. Reduction of adverse effects from intravenous acetylcysteine treatment for paracetamol poisoning: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, D Nicholas; Dear, James W; Thanacoody, H K Ruben; Thomas, Simon H L; Eddleston, Michael; Sandilands, Euan A; Coyle, Judy; Cooper, Jamie G; Rodriguez, Aryelly; Butcher, Isabella; Lewis, Steff C; Vliegenthart, A D Bastiaan; Veiraiah, Aravindan; Webb, David J; Gray, Alasdair

    2014-02-22

    Paracetamol poisoning is common worldwide. It is treated with intravenous acetylcysteine, but the standard regimen is complex and associated with frequent adverse effects related to concentration, which can cause treatment interruption. We aimed to ascertain whether adverse effects could be reduced with either a shorter modified acetylcysteine schedule, antiemetic pretreatment, or both. We undertook a double-blind, randomised factorial study at three UK hospitals, between Sept 6, 2010, and Dec 31, 2012. We randomly allocated patients with acute paracetamol overdose to either the standard intravenous acetylcysteine regimen (duration 20·25 h) or a shorter (12 h) modified protocol, with or without intravenous ondansetron pretreatment (4 mg). Masking was achieved by infusion of 5% dextrose (during acetylcysteine delivery) or saline (for antiemetic pretreatment). Randomisation was done via the internet and included a minimisation procedure by prognostic factors. The primary outcome was absence of vomiting, retching, or need for rescue antiemetic treatment at 2 h. Prespecified secondary outcomes included a greater than 50% increase in alanine aminotransferase activity over the admission value. Analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (identifier NCT01050270). Of 222 patients who underwent randomisation, 217 were assessable 2 h after the start of acetylcysteine treatment. Vomiting, retching, or need for rescue antiemetic treatment at 2 h was reported in 39 of 108 patients assigned to the shorter modified protocol compared with 71 of 109 allocated to the standard acetylcysteine regimen (adjusted odds ratio 0·26, 97·5% CI 0·13-0·52; ppoisoning, a 12 h modified acetylcysteine regimen resulted in less vomiting, fewer anaphylactoid reactions, and reduced need for treatment interruption. This study was not powered to detect non-inferiority of the shorter protocol versus the standard approach; therefore, further research is needed

  14. Efficacy of ondansetron in the management of radiotherapy induced emesis: a review. Efficacite de l'ondansetron dans les nausees et vomissements radio-induits: revue de la litterature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, E. (Hopital Henri-Mondor, 94 - Creteil (France)); Paillarse, J.M.; Votan, B. (Laboratoires Glaxo, 75 - Paris (France))

    1994-01-01

    Radiotherapy-induced emesis depends on the site of irradiation, the field size and the dose per fraction and is generally less intense than chemotherapy-induced emesis. Established anti-emetic drugs offer only limited symptom control (50%). Ondansetron, a 5HT[sub 3] receptors antagonist, had proven a complete or a major control efficacy (0-2 emetic episodes) of 68 to 95% in three pilot studies (fractionated, single-dose and total body irradiations). In controlled studies, ondansetron efficacy was significantly higher than placebo, metoclopramide and prochlorperazine. The treatment was well tolerated in the different studies. (authors). 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. [Clebopride in premedication in ambulatory interventions in general anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliavacca, S; Speranza, R; Cipolla, M; Laveneziana, D

    1992-03-01

    The authors examine the antiemetic effects of 1 mg clebopride administered iv after surgery, vs a placebo, by making a double blind randomized study on two groups of 40 women comparable by age and weight. The 2 groups of outpatients, admitted for short gynecological surgery, underwent diagnostic uterine curettage. They were anaesthetized with a cocktail of 2.5 mcg/kg fentanyl and 0.25 mg/kg ketamine, on spontaneous respiration. Nausea, vomiting and the other side effects were evaluated 3-6 hours after surgery. Statistically, clebopride proved more effective than placebo against nausea and vomiting (P ranging between 0.05-0.01), with no relevant side effects.

  16. Grewia asiatica L., a Food Plant with Multiple Uses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo De Feo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Grewia asiatica L., is a species native to south Asia from Pakistan, east to Cambodia, cultivated primarily for its edible fruit and well-reputed for its diverse medicinal uses. Fruits are a rich source of nutrients such as proteins, amino acids, vitamins, and minerals and contain various bioactive compounds, like anthocyanins, tannins, phenolics and flavonoids. Different parts of this plant possess different pharmacological properties. Leaves have antimicrobial, anticancer, antiplatelet and antiemetic activities; fruit possess anticancer, antioxidant, radioprotective and antihyperglycemic properties; while stem bark possesses analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. This review focuses on the botanical description, phytochemistry, nutritional studies and pharmacological properties of this plant.

  17. Prophylaxis of Radiation-Induced Nausea and Vomiting Using 5-Hydroxytryptamine-3 Serotonin Receptor Antagonists: A Systematic Review of Randomized Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvo, Nadia; Doble, Brett [Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Khan, Luluel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Amirthevasar, Gayathri [Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Dennis, Kristopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Pasetka, Mark; DeAngelis, Carlo [Department of Oncology Pharmacy, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Tsao, May [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chow, Edward, E-mail: Edward.Chow@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To systematically review the effectiveness and safety of 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 receptor antagonists (5-HT3 RAs) compared with other antiemetic medication or placebo for prophylaxis of radiation-induced nausea and vomiting. Methods and Materials: We searched the following electronic databases: MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials, and Web of Science. We also hand-searched reference lists of included studies. Randomized, controlled trials that compared a 5-HT3 RA with another antiemetic medication or placebo for preventing radiation-induced nausea and vomiting were included. We excluded studies recruiting patients receiving concomitant chemotherapy. When appropriate, meta-analysis was conducted using Review Manager (v5) software. Relative risks were calculated using inverse variance as the statistical method under a random-effects model. We assessed the quality of evidence by outcome using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. Results: Eligibility screening of 47 articles resulted in 9 included in the review. The overall methodologic quality was moderate. Meta-analysis of 5-HT3 RAs vs. placebo showed significant benefit for 5-HT3 RAs (relative risk [RR] 0.70; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.57-0.86 for emesis; RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.73-0.96 for nausea). Meta-analysis comparing 5-HT3 RAs vs. metoclopramide showed a significant benefit of the 5-HT3 RAs for emetic control (RR 0.27, 95% CI 0.15-0.47). Conclusion: 5-Hydroxytryptamine-3 RAs are superior to placebo and other antiemetics for prevention of emesis, but little benefit was identified for nausea prevention. 5-Hydroxytryptamine-3 RAs are suggested for prevention of emesis. Limited evidence was found regarding delayed emesis, adverse events, quality of life, or need for rescue medication. Future randomized, controlled trials should evaluate different 5-HT3 antiemetics and new agents with novel mechanisms of action such at the NK

  18. Prophylaxis of Radiation-Induced Nausea and Vomiting Using 5-Hydroxytryptamine-3 Serotonin Receptor Antagonists: A Systematic Review of Randomized Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvo, Nadia; Doble, Brett; Khan, Luluel; Amirthevasar, Gayathri; Dennis, Kristopher; Pasetka, Mark; DeAngelis, Carlo; Tsao, May; Chow, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To systematically review the effectiveness and safety of 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 receptor antagonists (5-HT3 RAs) compared with other antiemetic medication or placebo for prophylaxis of radiation-induced nausea and vomiting. Methods and Materials: We searched the following electronic databases: MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials, and Web of Science. We also hand-searched reference lists of included studies. Randomized, controlled trials that compared a 5-HT3 RA with another antiemetic medication or placebo for preventing radiation-induced nausea and vomiting were included. We excluded studies recruiting patients receiving concomitant chemotherapy. When appropriate, meta-analysis was conducted using Review Manager (v5) software. Relative risks were calculated using inverse variance as the statistical method under a random-effects model. We assessed the quality of evidence by outcome using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. Results: Eligibility screening of 47 articles resulted in 9 included in the review. The overall methodologic quality was moderate. Meta-analysis of 5-HT3 RAs vs. placebo showed significant benefit for 5-HT3 RAs (relative risk [RR] 0.70; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.57–0.86 for emesis; RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.73–0.96 for nausea). Meta-analysis comparing 5-HT3 RAs vs. metoclopramide showed a significant benefit of the 5-HT3 RAs for emetic control (RR 0.27, 95% CI 0.15–0.47). Conclusion: 5-Hydroxytryptamine-3 RAs are superior to placebo and other antiemetics for prevention of emesis, but little benefit was identified for nausea prevention. 5-Hydroxytryptamine-3 RAs are suggested for prevention of emesis. Limited evidence was found regarding delayed emesis, adverse events, quality of life, or need for rescue medication. Future randomized, controlled trials should evaluate different 5-HT3 antiemetics and new agents with novel mechanisms of action such at

  19. Efficacy of ondansetron in the management of radiotherapy induced emesis: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, E.; Paillarse, J.M.; Votan, B.

    1994-01-01

    Radiotherapy-induced emesis depends on the site of irradiation, the field size and the dose per fraction and is generally less intense than chemotherapy-induced emesis. Established anti-emetic drugs offer only limited symptom control (50%). Ondansetron, a 5HT 3 receptors antagonist, had proven a complete or a major control efficacy (0-2 emetic episodes) of 68 to 95% in three pilot studies (fractionated, single-dose and total body irradiations). In controlled studies, ondansetron efficacy was significantly higher than placebo, metoclopramide and prochlorperazine. The treatment was well tolerated in the different studies. (authors). 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  20. Ergometrine given during caesarean section and incidence of delayed postpartum haemorrhage due to uterine atony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourens, R; Paterson-Brown, S

    2007-11-01

    Delayed postpartum haemorrhage due to uterine atony after caesarean section was occurring in women in our recovery area despite many of them already having an oxytocin infusion running to prevent such a problem. We therefore decided to compare the incidence of such problems for a 2-month period before and after altering our uterotonic policy: in addition to the routine bolus dose of 5 units of oxytocin after delivery of the baby, we added 500 microg of intramuscular ergometrine during abdominal closure. We noticed a reduced number of massive postpartum haemorrhages due to an atonic uterus in the recovery room but an increased incidence of nausea and vomiting. No prophylactic anti-emetic was given during this pilot study. This small study suggests that 50 women would need to be given ergometrine at caesarean section to prevent one delayed massive haemorrhage from uterine atony and four extra women would suffer with vomiting. We feel this is reasonable and now use a prophylactic anti-emetic as well as delaying the ergometrine until closure of the rectus sheath which reduces the incidence of nausea and vomiting.

  1. Acute central nervous system (CNS) toxicity of total body irradiation (TBI) measured using neuropsychological testing of attention functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenz, Frederik; Steinvorth, Sarah; Lohr, Frank; Hacke, Werner; Wannenmacher, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate acute normal tissue damage of low irradiation doses to the healthy, adult central nervous system (CNS) using neuropsychological testing of attention functions. Methods and Materials: Neuropsychological testing (IQ, attention [modified Trail-Making Test A, Digit Symbol Test, D2 Test, Wiener Determination Machine]) was used to examine 40 patients (43 ± 10 years) before and immediately after the first fraction (1.2 Gy) of hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI) at the University of Heidelberg. The patients received antiemetic premedication. Test results are given as mean percentiles ± standard deviation, with 50 ± 34 being normal. Thirty-eight control patients (53 ± 15 years) were studied to quantify the influence of hospitalization, stress, and repeated testing. Results: The patients showed normal baseline test results (IQ = 101 ± 14, attention = 54 ± 28) and no decrease in test results after 1.2 Gy TBI. Attention functions improved (66 ± 25) corresponding to a practice effect of repeated testing that was seen in the control group, although alternate versions of the tests were used (IQ = 104 ± 10, attention before = 42 ± 29, attention after = 52 ± 31). Conclusion: Our data show no deterioration of neuropsychologic test results acutely after 1.2 Gy whole body exposure in adult patients without CNS disease receiving antiemetic medication

  2. Effects of ginger and expectations on symptoms of nausea in a balanced placebo design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Weimer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Ginger effects on (experimental nausea have been described, but also strong placebo effects and sex differences when nausea is involved. The "balanced placebo design" has been proposed to allow better separation of drug and placebo effects. METHODS: Sixty-four healthy participants (32 women were randomly assigned to receive an antiemetic ginger preparation or placebo, and half of each group was told to have received drug or placebo. They were exposed to 5×2 min body rotations to induce nausea. Subjective symptoms and behavioral (rotation tolerance, head movements and physiological measures (electrogastrogram, cortisol were recorded. Groups were balanced for sex of participants and experimenters. RESULTS: Ginger and the information given did not affect any outcome measure, and previous sex differences could not be confirmed. Adding the experimenters revealed a significant four-factorial interaction on behavioral but not on subjective or physiological measures Men who received placebo responded to placebo information when provided by the male experimenter, and to ginger information when provided by the female experimenter. This effect was not significant in women. CONCLUSION: The effects of an antiemetic drug and provided information interact with psychosocial variables of participants and experimenters in reports of nausea.

  3. Risk of severe and refractory postoperative nausea and vomiting in patients undergoing diep flap breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manahan, Michele A; Basdag, Basak; Kalmar, Christopher L; Shridharani, Sachin M; Magarakis, Michael; Jacobs, Lisa K; Thomsen, Robert W; Rosson, Gedge D

    2014-02-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) are commonly feared after general anesthesia and can impact results. The primary aim of our study was to examine incidence and severity of PONV by investigating complete response, or absence of PONV, to prophylaxis used in patients undergoing DIEP flaps. Our secondary aims were definition of the magnitude of risk, state of the art of interventions, clinical sequelae of PONV, and interaction between these variables, specifically for DIEP patients. A retrospective chart review occurred for 29 patients undergoing DIEP flap breast reconstruction from September 2007 to February 2008. We assessed known patient and procedure-specific risks for PONV after DIEPs, prophylactic antiemetic regimens, incidence, and severity of PONV, postoperative antiemetic rescues, and effects of risks and treatments on symptoms. Three or more established risks existed in all patients, with up to seven risks per patient. Although 90% of patients received diverse prophylaxis, 76% of patients experienced PONV, and 66% experienced its severe form, emesis. Early PONV (73%) was frequent; symptoms were long lasting (average 20 hours for nausea and emesis); and multiple rescue medications were frequently required (55% for nausea, 58% for emesis). Length of surgery and nonsmoking statistically significantly impacted PONV. We identify previously undocumented high risks for PONV in DIEP patients. High frequency, severity, and refractoriness of PONV occur despite standard prophylaxis. Plastic surgeons and anesthesiologists should further investigate methods to optimize PONV prophylaxis and treatment in DIEP flap patients. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) in outpatient repair of inguinal hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Piergaspare; Usai, Sofia; Amatucci, Chiara; Pulli, Valentina Taurisano; Illuminati, Giulio; Vietri, Francesco; Tellan, Guglielmo

    2018-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are among the most frequent complications following anesthesia and surgery. Due to anesthesia seems to be primarily responsible for post operative nausea and vomiting (PONV) in Day Surgery facilities, the aim of the study is to evaluate how different methods of anesthesia could modify the onset of postoperative nausea and vomiting in a population of patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair. Ninehundredten patients, aged between 18 and 87 years, underwent open inguinal hernia repair. The PONV risk has been assessed according to Apfel Score. Local anesthetic infiltration, performed by the surgeon in any cases, has been supported by and analgo-sedation with Remifentanil in 740 patients; Fentanyl was used in 96 cases and the last 74 underwent deep sedation with Propofol . Among the 910 patients who underwent inguinal hernia repair, PONV occurred in 68 patients (7.5%). Among patients presenting PONV, 29 received Remifentanil, whereas 39 received Fentanyl. In the group of patients receiving Propofol, no one presented PONV. This difference is statistically significant (p < .01). Moreover, only 50 patients of the total sample received antiemetic prophylaxis, and amongst these, PONV occurred in 3 subjects. Compared to Remifentanil, Fentanyl has a major influence in causing PONV. Nonetheless, an appropriate antiemetic prophylaxis can significantly reduce this undesirable complication. Key words: Day Surgery, Fentanyl, Inguinal, Hernia repair, Nausea, Vomiting.

  5. High-dose metoclopramide + lorazepam versus low-dose metoclopramide + lorazepam + dehydrobenzperidol in the treatment of cisplatin-induced nausea and vomiting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrstedt, Jørn; Hannibal, J; Hallas, Jesper

    1991-01-01

    In a randomized double-blind, cross-over trial of 34 patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy (20-100 mg/m2), the antiemetic effect of high-dose metoclopramide (HDM) (10 mg/kg iv. loading dose + 7 hours continuous infusion) + lorazepam (L) (2.5 mg x 4 po) was compared with low......-dose metoclopramide (LDM) (70 mg) + L (2.5 mg x 2 po) + dehydrobenzperidol (5 mg x 2 im). Among the 29 patients who completed the cross-over, HDM significantly reduced the number of vomiting episodes (p = 0.002) and the degree of nausea (p = 0.004). Seventeen patients preferred the HDM and 4 the LDM regimen (p = 0.......01). Sedation was seen in all but 1 patient, and was graded as severe in 6 patients receiving the HDM and in 2 patients receiving the LDM regimen. No extrapyramidal adverse reactions were seen. We conclude that high-dose metoclopramide + lorazepam is a safe antiemetic regimen and significantly superior to low...

  6. Integrating cannabis into clinical cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, D I

    2016-03-01

    Cannabis species have been used as medicine for thousands of years; only since the 1940s has the plant not been widely available for medical use. However, an increasing number of jurisdictions are making it possible for patients to obtain the botanical for medicinal use. For the cancer patient, cannabis has a number of potential benefits, especially in the management of symptoms. Cannabis is useful in combatting anorexia, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, pain, insomnia, and depression. Cannabis might be less potent than other available antiemetics, but for some patients, it is the only agent that works, and it is the only antiemetic that also increases appetite. Inhaled cannabis is more effective than placebo in ameliorating peripheral neuropathy in a number of conditions, and it could prove useful in chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. A pharmacokinetic interaction study of vaporized cannabis in patients with chronic pain on stable doses of sustained-release opioids demonstrated no clinically significant change in plasma opiates, while suggesting the possibility of synergistic analgesia. Aside from symptom management, an increasing body of in vitro and animal-model studies supports a possible direct anticancer effect of cannabinoids by way of a number of different mechanisms involving apoptosis, angiogenesis, and inhibition of metastasis. Despite an absence of clinical trials, abundant anecdotal reports that describe patients having remarkable responses to cannabis as an anticancer agent, especially when taken as a high-potency orally ingested concentrate, are circulating. Human studies should be conducted to address critical questions related to the foregoing effects.

  7. Pharmacotherapy of stomach diseases in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trailović Saša M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Stomach diseases have an important place in the clinical pathology of dogs. Etiological factors can be nutritive, chemical, or infective, but treatment implies certain common general principles and a certain number of therapy protocols which are most often used. On the other hand, a part of the medicines used in the pharmacotherapy of stomach diseases in dogs are taken from the palette of medicines intended for human use, so that a regular dosage and regime of implementation are the main precondition for the success of the applied therapy. Drugs used in the treatment of stomach diseases include antiemetics, prokinetics, antacids, mucoprotectives, anticholinergics, H2-antagonists, proton pump inhibitors, semisynthetic derivatives of prostaglandin E1, and others. The therapy of stomach diseases implies the simultaneous application of several drugs from different pharmacodynamic groups (for instance, an antiemetic, a prokinetic, an antacid, and an Hg antagonist or a proton pump inhibitor when it is necessary to establish a correct regime of implementation because of possible interaction, which will also be discussed in this work.

  8. Effects and Mechanisms of Transcutaneous Electroacupuncture on Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nausea and vomiting are one of the major complications of chemotherapy for cancers. The aim of this study is to investigate the emetic effects and mechanisms involving serotonin and dopamine of needleless transcutaneous electroacupuncture (TEA at Neiguan (PC6 and Jianshi (PC5 on chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients with cancers. Seventy-two patients with chemotherapy were randomly divided into sham-TEA group (sham-TEA, n=34 and TEA group (n=38. TEA was performed at PC 6 and PC 5 (1 h, bid in combination with granisetron. Sham-TEA was delivered at nonacupoints using the same parameters. We found the following. (1 In the acute phase, the conventional antiemetic therapy using Ondansetron effectively reduced nausea and vomiting; the addition of TEA did not show any additive effects. In the delayed phase, however, TEA significantly increased the rate of complete control (P<0.01 and reduced the nausea score (P<0.05, compared with sham-TEA. (2 TEA significantly reduced serum levels of 5-HT and dopamine in comparison with sham-TEA. Those results demonstrate that needleless transcutaneous electroacupuncture at PC6 using a watch-size digital stimulator improves emesis and reduces nausea in the delayed phase of chemotherapy in patients with cancers. This antiemetic effect is possibly mediated via mechanisms involving serotonin and dopamine.

  9. The anti emetic effect of oral administration of ondansetron or granisetron in macacus cynomolgus exposed to mixed neutron-gamma irradiation; Effet antiemetique de l`ondansetron ou du granisetron administres oralement chez le macaque soumis a une irradiation mixte neutron-gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, C.; Roman, V.; Martin, S.; Janodet, D.; Fatome, M. [Centre de Recherches du Service de Sante des Armees, 38 - La Tronche (France)

    1995-10-01

    Nausea and vomiting are the most often observed symptoms in the course of the early radiation syndrome. Their prevention has long been difficult because of the low effectiveness and side-effects of most antiemetics. There is a clear evidence that 5HT{sub 3} receptor antagonists such as ondansetron and granisetron are highly effective to prevent radiation-induced emesis without any side-effect. We studied the prophylactic effectiveness of their oral administration to macacus cynomolgus, for mixed neutron-gamma whole-body exposure, tat high dose rates. Doses of 4 mg of ondansetron or 1 mg of granisetron were administered before, or after, or both before and after irradiation. The treatment was effective when administered both before and after radiation exposure. It was significant but incomplete if administered once. Post-irradiation administration is interesting, particularly in case of accident. Both antiemetic drugs were well tolerated. Their effectiveness and tolerance are apparently comparable. The 5HT{sub 3} receptor antagonists represent a much improved treatment for radiation-induced nausea and vomiting by completely inhibiting emesis, if administered before and after irradiation. Unwanted sedation and extra-pyramidal side-effects, usually associated with the clinical use of D{sub 2} receptor antagonists, were not observed. (authors). 40 refs., 5 tabs.

  10. Efficacy of granisetron and aprepitant in a patient who failed ondansetron in the prophylaxis of radiation induced nausea and vomiting: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowbottom, Leigha; Pasetka, Mark; McDonald, Rachel; Hunyh, Lise; Raman, Srinivas; DeAngelis, Carlo; Chow, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV) is a toxicity that can occur in 40-80% of individuals who receive radiation treatment. Current guidelines recommend 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptor antagonists (5-HT3 RAs) for prophylaxis of RINV for moderate and highly emetogenic radiotherapy; however, certain patients may suffer from RINV despite prophylaxis. This report details the case of a 47-year-old female with extensive bony involvement to the spine from breast cancer presenting with lower back pain. To palliate her symptoms, the patient underwent a course of irradiation to the lumbar spine and was prescribed ondansetron as an antiemetic. However, the patient experienced severe nausea and emesis and was subsequently switched to granisetron and aprepitant. The patient completed the remainder of the radiation treatment with no further emesis and minimal nausea, representing the first documented success of granisetron and aprepitant for RINV after failure on ondansetron. In chemotherapy, switching 5-HT3 RAs after failure on the first is successful in preventing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV), yet this has not been previously reported in radiation. In this patient, granisetron and aprepitant were successful in substantially reducing nausea and preventing further emesis, and may represent an alternative antiemetic regimen for RINV prophylaxis and salvage.

  11. Comparison of granisetron alone and granisetron plus dexamethasone in the prophylaxis of cytotoxic-induced emesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, J.; Bessell, E. M.; Harris, A. L.; Hutcheon, A. W.; Dawes, P. J.; Daniels, S.; Bessel, E. M.

    1994-01-01

    Two hundred and seventy-eight adult chemonaive patients, receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy were randomly allocated to receive either intravenous (i.v.) granisetron 3 mg plus i.v. dexamethasone 8 mg or i.v. granisetron 3 mg plus i.v. placebo dexamethasone prior to chemotherapy. Eight-two per cent of all patients recruited were female, and 91% of all patients consumed less than 10 units of alcohol per week, suggesting a study population with an increased risk of nausea and vomiting. In the first 24 h 85% of patients who received granisetron plus dexamethasone were complete responders compared with 75.9% of the patients receiving granisetron alone (P = 0.053). There were statistically significant improvements in complete response over 7 days (P = 0.029) and in the numbers of patients receiving rescue antiemetic (P = 0.0004). Toxicity was minimal with no significant differences between treatment groups. These results confirm the antiemetic activity of granisetron and show that it has an additive effect in combination with dexamethasone. PMID:7981069

  12. Comparison of palonosetron, granisetron, and ramosetron for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting after laparoscopic gynecologic surgery: a prospective randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won-Suk; Lee, Kwang-Beom; Lim, Soyi; Chang, Young Gin

    2015-09-03

    Selective 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists are reported to have potent antiemetic effects for postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the efficacy of palonosetron, granisetron, and ramosetron for the prevention of PONV in patients undergoing laparoscopic gynecologic surgery. In this prospective, randomized observational study, 105 healthy female patients who were undergoing laparocopic hystectomy under general anaesthesia were enrolled (clinical trial number: NCT01752374, www.clinicaltrials.gov ). Patients were divided into three groups: the palonostron (0.075 mg i.v.; n = 35), the granisetron group (3 mg i.v.; n = 35), and the ramosetron group (0.3 mg i.v.; n = 35). The treatments were given before the end of surgery. The incidence of PONV, severity of nausea/vomiting, and the use of rescue antiemetic requirements during the first 48 h after surgery were evaluated. The overall incidence of PONV was 33.3 % for this series. The number of complete responders at 48 h after the surgery was 21 (60.0 %) for palonosetron, 24 (68.6 %) for granisetron, and 26 (71.4 %) for ramosetron, representing no statistical difference (P = 0.086). There were no significant differences in the overall incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting and complete responders for palonosetron, granisetron and ramosetron group. NCT01752374 , www.clinicaltrials.gov .

  13. Prophylaxis and management of antineoplastic drug induced nausea and vomiting in children with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidharth Totadri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Antineoplastic drug induced nausea and vomiting (AINV is a major adverse event which deeply impacts the quality of life of children with cancer. It additionally causes distress to parents and negatively impacts compliance to therapy. A robust AINV prophylaxis regimen is essential to achieve complete control; and prevent anticipatory, breakthrough and refractory AINV. With a wide array of available anti-emetics, standard guidelines for their use are crucial to ensure uniform and optimum prophylaxis. Chemotherapeutic agents are classified as having high, moderate, low or minimal emetic risk based on their potential to cause emesis in the absence of prophylaxis. Three drug regimen with aprepitant, ondansetron/granisetron and dexamethasone is recommended for protocols with high emetic risk. Although approved in children ≥12 years, there is mounting evidence for the use of aprepitant in younger children too. In protocols with moderate and low emetic risk, combination of ondansetron/granisetron and dexamethasone; and single agent ondansetron/granisetron are recommended, respectively. Metoclopramide is an alternative when steroids are contraindicated. Olanzapine and lorazepam are useful drugs for breakthrough AINV and anticipatory AINV. Knowledge of pediatric dosage, salient adverse events, drug interactions as well as cost of drugs is essential to prescribe anti-emetics accurately and safely in resource constrained settings. Non pharmacological interventions such as hypnosis, acupressure and psychological interventions can benefit a sub-group of patients without significant risk of adverse events.

  14. The anti emetic effect of oral administration of ondansetron or granisetron in macacus cynomolgus exposed to mixed neutron-gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C.; Roman, V.; Martin, S.; Janodet, D.; Fatome, M.

    1995-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are the most often observed symptoms in the course of the early radiation syndrome. Their prevention has long been difficult because of the low effectiveness and side-effects of most antiemetics. There is a clear evidence that 5HT 3 receptor antagonists such as ondansetron and granisetron are highly effective to prevent radiation-induced emesis without any side-effect. We studied the prophylactic effectiveness of their oral administration to macacus cynomolgus, for mixed neutron-gamma whole-body exposure, tat high dose rates. Doses of 4 mg of ondansetron or 1 mg of granisetron were administered before, or after, or both before and after irradiation. The treatment was effective when administered both before and after radiation exposure. It was significant but incomplete if administered once. Post-irradiation administration is interesting, particularly in case of accident. Both antiemetic drugs were well tolerated. Their effectiveness and tolerance are apparently comparable. The 5HT 3 receptor antagonists represent a much improved treatment for radiation-induced nausea and vomiting by completely inhibiting emesis, if administered before and after irradiation. Unwanted sedation and extra-pyramidal side-effects, usually associated with the clinical use of D 2 receptor antagonists, were not observed. (authors). 40 refs., 5 tabs

  15. Fosaprepitant-induced phlebitis: a focus on patients receiving doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, A D; Kadakia, K C; Looker, S; Hilger, C; Sorgatz, K; Anderson, K; Jacobson, A; Grendahl, D; Seisler, D; Hobday, T; Loprinzi, Charles L

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of fosaprepitant-associated infusion site adverse events (ISAEs) among a cohort of breast cancer patients receiving doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide (AC) chemotherapy. A retrospective review of electronic medical record (EMR) data was performed for all patients who were initiated on AC from January 2011 to April 2012. Data collected included baseline demographics, antiemetic regimen, documentation of ISAEs, and type of intravenous (IV) access. Descriptive statistics (mean and standard deviation or percentages) were summarized overall, by type of IV access and initial antiemetic given. Among the 148 patients included in this analysis, 98 initially received fosaprepitant and 44 received aprepitant. The incidence of ISAEs associated with fosaprepitant administration was 34.7 % (n=34), while the incidence of aprepitant-associated ISAEs was 2.3 % (n=1). All ISAEs were associated with peripheral IV access. The most commonly reported ISAEs were infusion site pain (n=26), erythema (n=22), swelling (n=12), superficial thrombosis (n=8), infusion site hives (n=5), and phlebitis/thrombophlebitis (n=5). Twenty-six patients experienced more than one type of ISAE. The incidence and severity of ISAEs associated with fosaprepitant administration among a group of patients receiving AC chemotherapy are significant and appreciably higher than what has been previously reported.

  16. Comparison of the effects of sugammadex and neostigmine on postoperative nausea and vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yağan, Özgür; Taş, Nilay; Mutlu, Tuğçe; Hancı, Volkan

    The aim of our study is to compare the effects of sugammadex and neostigmine, used for neuromuscular blockage antagonism, on postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). Our study was completed with 98 ASA I-II risk patients undergoing endotracheal intubation under general anesthesia. At the end of the surgery patients were randomly divided into two groups given 2mgkg -1 sugammadex (Group S) or 50μgkg -1 neostigmine plus 0.2mgkg -1 atropine (Group N). Monitoring and recording times were set as 1 hour postoperative and from 1-6, 6-12, and 12-24hours. The anti-emetic amounts administered were recorded. In the first hour postoperative 13 patients in Group N (27%) and 4 in Group S (8%) were observed to have nausea and/or vomiting and the difference was statistically significant (p=0.0016). During the 24 hours of monitoring there was no significant difference in the incidence and severity of PONV (p>0.05), however the number of patients given ondansetron for PONV treatment in Group N was statistically significantly higher than the number in Group S (16 in Group N, 6 in Group S, psugammadex for neuromuscular blockage antagonism, we found use of sugammadex had lower incidence of PONV in the postoperative 1st hour and less anti-emetic use in 24 hours of monitoring. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of the effects of sugammadex and neostigmine on postoperative nausea and vomiting

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    Özgür Yağan

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: The aim of our study is to compare the effects of sugammadex and neostigmine, used for neuromuscular blockage antagonism, on postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV. Methods: Our study was completed with 98 ASA I-II risk patients undergoing endotracheal intubation under general anesthesia. At the end of the surgery patients were randomly divided into two groups given 2 mg kg-1 sugammadex (Group S or 50 µg kg-1 neostigmine plus 0.2 mg kg-1 atropine (Group N. Monitoring and recording times were set as 1 hour postoperative and from 1-6, 6-12, and 12-24 hours. The anti-emetic amounts administered were recorded. Results: In the first hour postoperative 13 patients in Group N (27% and 4 in Group S (8% were observed to have nausea and/or vomiting and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.0016. During the 24 hours of monitoring there was no significant difference in the incidence and severity of PONV (p > 0.05, however the number of patients given ondansetron for PONV treatment in Group N was statistically significantly higher than the number in Group S (16 in Group N, 6 in Group S, p < 0.011. Conclusions: At the end of our study comparing neostigmine with sugammadex for neuromuscular blockage antagonism, we found use of sugammadex had lower incidence of PONV in the postoperative 1st hour and less anti-emetic use in 24 hours of monitoring.

  18. Integrative Therapeutic Approaches for the Management and Control of Nausea in Children Undergoing Cancer Treatment: A Systematic Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momani, Tha'er G; Berry, Donna L

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) continues to be a common symptom experienced by children undergoing cancer treatment despite the use of contemporary antiemetics. Integrative therapeutic approaches in addition to standard pharmacologic antiemetic regimes offer potential to control CINV. The purpose of this review was to identify current evidence on integrative therapeutic approaches for the control of CINV in children with cancer. Online search engines (PubMed, CINAHL, PsychINFO) were queried using MESH terms. Titles, abstracts, and then full-text articles were reviewed for relevance to the review. The search resulted in 53 studies. Twenty-one studies met our review criteria. Integrative therapies identified included acupuncture/acupressure, aromatherapy, herbal supplements, hypnosis, and other cognitive behavioral interventions. Our review identified little information on the effectiveness and safety of most integrative therapeutic approaches for the control and management of CINV in children with cancer. However, evidence from adult cancer studies and some pediatric studies identify promising interventions for further testing.

  19. A physiological perspective for utility or futility of alcohol-based hand rub gel against nausea-vomiting: is it P-6 acupoint or transnasal aroma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Deepak; Mazumdar, Ashish; Stellini, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Nausea-vomiting is a common and unpleasant phenomenon with numerous underlying mechanisms and pathways that are not always well elucidated. In clinical practice, refractory nausea-vomiting is encountered in several settings. Antiemetic medications may reduce these symptoms but are not always effective in all patients. In the absence of a well-defined optimal strategy for management of nausea-vomiting, the search for better approaches to treat this distressing symptom continues. One of the alternative treatment approaches is a compounded formulation called ABHR gel that is comprised of multiple antiemetic medications and has been shown to be useful for symptomatic relief in some patients with refractory nausea-vomiting. It has been suggested that alternative mechanisms should be explored to explain the perceived efficacy of ABHR gel, because transdermal absorption leading to nil-to-minimal or subtherapeutic blood concentrations of active ingredients does not explain the role of ABHR gel in the treatment of nausea-vomiting. In the current paper, we discuss possible mechanisms that may explain ABHR transdermal gel's efficacy. Compounded ABHR transdermal gel formulation's efficacy in antagonizing nausea-vomiting that has been recently questioned may be explained by alternative mechanisms mediated through the P-6 acupoint stimulation and facial-nasal, cooling-related counterstimulation. © The Author(s) 2013.

  20. Aromatherapy for treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Sonia; Steels, Elizabeth; Chang, Anne; Gibbons, Kristen

    2018-03-10

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a common, unpleasant phenomenon and current therapies are not always effective for all patients. Aromatherapy has been suggested as an addition to the available treatment strategies. This review was originally published in 2012 and updated in 2017. The main objective was to establish the efficacy and safety of aromatherapy comparable to standard pharmacological treatments for PONV in adults and children. We searched CENTRAL; MEDLINE; Embase; CINAHL; CAM on PubMed; Informit; LILACS; and ISI Web of Science as well as grey literature sources and the reference lists of retrieved articles up to March 2017. The original search was performed in August 2011. We included all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) where aromatherapy was used to treat PONV. Interventions were all types of aromatherapy compared to placebo or with standard antiemetics. Primary outcomes were severity and duration of PONV. Secondary outcomes were adverse reactions, use of rescue antiemetics and patient satisfaction. Two review authors independently assessed risk of bias in the included studies and extracted data. For dichotomous outcome variables, we used a random-effects model and calculated risk ratio (RR) with associated 95% confidence interval (95% CI). For continuous outcome variables, we used a random-effects model and calculated standardized mean difference (SMD) with associated 95% CI. We used the GRADE software to compile 'Summary of findings' tables. We included seven new studies with 663 participants in the 2017 update; five RCTs and two CCTs. These were added to the nine previously included studies (six RCTs and three CCTs with a total of 373 participants) for a total of 16 included studies and 1036 participants in this updated review. The mean age and range data for all participants were not reported for all studies. We identified two registered trials that met the inclusion criteria for this review

  1. Alternative Therapies for the Prevention of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoicea, Nicoleta; Gan, Tong J; Joseph, Nicholas; Uribe, Alberto; Pandya, Jyoti; Dalal, Rohan; Bergese, Sergio D

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a complication affecting between 20 and 40% of all surgery patients, with high-risk patients experiencing rates of up to 80%. Recent studies and publications have shed light on the uses of alternative treatment for PONV through their modulation of endogenous opioid neuropeptides and neurokinin ligands. In addition to reducing PONV, hypnosis was reported to be useful in attenuating postoperative pain and anxiety, and contributing to hemodynamic stability. Music therapy has been utilized to deepen the sedation level and decrease patient anxiety, antiemetic and analgesic requirements, hospital length of stay, and fatigue. Isopropyl alcohol and peppermint oil aromatherapy have both been used to reduce postoperative nausea. With correct training in traditional Chinese healing techniques, acupuncture (APu) at the P6 acupoint has also been shown to be useful in preventing early PONV, postdischarge nausea and vomiting, and alleviating of pain. Electro-acupuncture (EAPu), as with APu, provided analgesic and antiemetic effects through release and modulation of opioid neuropeptides. These non-pharmacological modalities of treatment contribute to an overall patient wellbeing, assisting in physical and emotional healing.

  2. COMPARISON BETWEEN ACUPRESSURE AND PALONOSETRON IN PREVENTION OF POSTOPERATIVE NAUSEA AND VOMITING IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING LAPAROSCOPIC TUBAL STERILISATION. A RANDOMISED CONTROL TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES To compare the effectiveness of acupressure at P6 point and palonosetron in prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting in patients undergoing laparoscopic tubal sterilisation. METHODS AND MATERIALS After obtaining institutional ethical clearance and patient consent, this study was conducted during the period of July 2015 to November 2015. Patients undergoing laparoscopic tubal sterilisation belonging to ASA 1 and 2 were included, and patients with hypertension, diabetes neurological diseases, peripheral vascular diseases, local skin diseases, patients on antiemetics and unwilling patients were excluded from the study. Randomisation done by sealed envelope method into two groups of sample size 25 each; group A (acupressure, at P6 point and group B (palonosetron 0.075 mg IV. Acupressure band and Inj palonosetron were given just before the induction of anaesthesia. Episodes of PONV were recorded at 0-2 hours, 2-6 hours, 6- 12 hours and evaluated separately as none, mild, moderate and severe. Rescue antiemetic was given to those who had episode of vomiting. Data analysed using Student ‘t’ test and P value <0.05 considered to be significant. RESULTS Between two group comparisons no significant differences in terms of severity of PONV was observed and Group B showed no incidence of PONV. CONCLUSION Acupressure being non-invasive, non-pharmacological, inexpensive and better patient acceptability can be effectively used as an alternative for the prophylaxis of PONV. However, palonosetron was more effective than acupressure in preventing PONV.

  3. A case of Boerhaave's syndrome during concurrent chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Tatsuya; Iwae, Shigemichi; Hirayama, Yuji; Yonezawa, Koichiro; Morita, Naruhiko

    2014-01-01

    Boerhaave's syndrome is a rare disease involving rupture or perforation of the entire layer of the esophagus caused by rapid increase in pressure. When the proper treatment is delayed, the outcome can be fatal, so early diagnosis is important. We experienced a patient of Boerhaave's syndrome during concurrent chemoradiotherapy for hypopharyngeal cancer. We report a 61-year-old male who underwent concurrent chemoradiotherapy for T3N1M0 hypopharyngeal cancer. He had severe chest pain immediately after vomiting. We initially made a differential diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, which needed emergency treatment. However, his general condition deteriorated markedly, and he went into septic shock. We performed a CT after injection of a contrast medium, and confirmed leakage into the thoracic cavity. We diagnosed Boerhaave's syndrome. We started surgery at 19 hours from the onset and found the rupture site by laparotomy. The ruptured esophagus was repaired by simple suturing and covered by the greater omentum, but the patient was not cured of his leakage even after surgery. Recently antiemetics have improved, but we still experience patients who have difficulty due to vomiting when we use cisplatin (CDDP). Furthermore, gastrostomy and opioids as supportive care cause vomiting. Therefore, we must approach antiemetic therapy cautiously, and we should rule out Boerhaave's syndrome quickly when patients have chest pain. (author)

  4. The effect of single low-dose dexamethasone on vomiting during awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Kotoe; Morioka, Nobutada; Maruyama, Takashi; Komayama, Noriaki; Nitta, Masayuki; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Kawamata, Takakazu; Ozaki, Makoto

    2016-12-01

    Intraoperative vomiting leads to serious respiratory complications that could influence the surgical decision-making process for awake craniotomy. However, the use of antiemetics is still limited in Japan. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of prophylactically administered single low-dose dexamethasone on the incidence of vomiting during awake craniotomy. The frequency of hyperglycemia was also examined. We conducted a retrospective case review of awake craniotomy for glioma resection between 2012 and 2015. Of the 124 patients, 91 were included in the analysis. Dexamethasone was not used in 43 patients and the 48 remaining patients received an intravenous bolus of 4.95 mg dexamethasone at anesthetic induction. Because of stable operating conditions, no one required conscious sedation throughout functional mapping and tumor resection. Although dexamethasone pretreatment reduced the incidence of intraoperative vomiting (P = 0.027), the number of patients who complained of nausea was comparable (P = 0.969). No adverse events related to vomiting occurred intraoperatively. Baseline blood glucose concentration did not differ between each group (P = 0.143), but the samples withdrawn before emergence (P = 0.018), during the awake period (P awake craniotomy cases. However, as even a small dose of dexamethasone increases the risk for hyperglycemia, antiemetic prophylaxis with dexamethasone should be administered after careful consideration. Monitoring of perioperative blood glucose concentration is also necessary.

  5. [A Case of Psychogenic Tremor during Awake Craniotomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujirai, Kazumasa; Kamata, Kotoe; Uno, Toshihiro; Hamada, Keiko; Ozaki, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    A 31-year-old woman with a left frontal and parietal brain tumor underwent awake craniotomy. Propofol/remifentanil general anesthesia was induced. Following craniotomy, anesthetic administrations ceased. The level of consciousness was sufficient and she was not agitated. However, the patient complained of nausea 70 minutes into the awake phase. Considering the adverse effects of antiemetics and the upcoming surgical strategy, we did not give any medications. Nausea disappeared spontaneously while the operation was suspended. When surgical intervention extended to the left caudate nucleus, involuntary movement, classified as a tremor, with 5-6 Hz frequency, abruptly occurred on her left forearm. The patient showed emotional distress. Tremor appeared on her right forearm and subsequently spread to her lower extremities. Intravenous midazolam and fentanyl could not reduce her psychological stress. Since the tremor disturbed microscopic observation, general anesthesia was induced. Consequently, the tremor disappeared and did not recur. Based on the anatomical ground and the medication status, her involuntary movement was diagnosed as psychogenic tremor. Various factors can induce involuntary movements. In fact, intraoperative management of nausea and vomiting takes priority during awake craniotomy, but we should be reminded that some antiemetics potentially induce involuntary movement that could be caused by surgery around basal ganglia.

  6. Casopitant: a novel NK1-receptor antagonist in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Ruhlmann

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Christina Ruhlmann, Jørn HerrstedtOdense University Hospital, Department of Oncology, Odense, DenmarkAbstract: Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV are among the most feared and distressing symptoms experienced by patients with cancer. The knowledge of the pathogenesis and neuropharmacology of CINV has expanded enormously over the last decades, the most significant discoveries being the role of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT3- and neurokinin (NK1 receptors in the emetic reflex arch. This has led to the development of two new classes of antiemetics acting as highly selective antagonists at one of these receptors. These drugs have had a huge impact in the protection from chemotherapy-induced vomiting, whereas the effect on nausea seems to be limited. The first NK1 receptor antagonist, aprepitant, became clinically available in 2003, and casopitant, the second in this class of antiemetics, has now completed phase III trials. This review delineates the properties and clinical use of casopitant in the prevention of CINV.Keywords: casopitant, GW679769, NK1 receptor antagonist, chemotherapy, emesis

  7. Action of Bacopa monnieri to antagonize cisplatin-induced emesis in Suncus murinus (house musk shrew

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    Ihsan Ullah

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacopa monnieri (BM, family Scrophulariaceae is used in several traditional systems of medicine for the management of epilepsy, depression, neuropathic pain, sleep disorders and memory deficits. The present study investigated the potential of BM methanol (BM-MetFr and BM n-butanol fractions (BM-ButFr to reduce chemotherapy-induced emesis in Suncus murinus (house musk shrew. Cisplatin (30 mg/kg, i.p. reliably induced retching and/or vomiting over a 2 day period. BM-MetFr (10–40 mg/kg, s.c. and BM-ButFr (5–20 mg/kg, s.c. antagonized the retching and/or vomiting response by ∼59.4% (p  0.05. In conclusion, the n-butanol fractions of BM have anti-emetic activity comparable with palonosetron and MPG. BM may be useful alone or in combination with other anti-emetic drugs for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced emesis in man.

  8. Formulation and evaluation of bilayer tablets of metoclopramide hydrochloride and diclofenac sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattani, Surendra G; Khabiya, Sohan S; Amrutkar, Jitendra R; Kushare, Sachin S

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of the present research work was to develop a bilayer tablet of metoclopramide hydrochloride (MTH) and diclofenac sodium (DS) in separate layers to avoid incompatibility and thus to maximize the efficacy of both drugs in combination for the effective treatment of migraine headaches. MTH and DS were formulated as immediate and sustained release layers respectively. In vitro dissolution kinetic studies of an optimized (D10) batch of DS in both sustained release layer and bilayer tablet forms show good linearity of regression coefficient 0.9773 (first order equation). The results reveal that an optimized immediate release layer (M5) of MTH and a sustained release layer (D10) of DS might be suitable for the treatment of migraine by sequential release of the two drugs in a bilayer tablet. Migraine is a type of recurring headache of moderate to severe intensity associated with gastrointestinal, neurological, and autonomic symptoms. In migraine, a combination of pretreatment with antiemetics is required for symptomatic treatment, when nausea and vomiting are severe. In our present research, we have selected the metoclopramide hydrochloride (MTH) active ingredient for study because it has an antiemetic effect and is a prokinetic agent. MTH is more effective to counteract gastric stasis associated with migraine, and it enhances the rate of absorption of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). In the present investigation we combine MTH and a second active ingredient, diclofenac sodium, as a formulated bilayer tablet to prevent degradation of MTH.

  9. Patients' perception of chemotherapy side effects: Expectations, doctor-patient communication and impact on quality of life - An Italian survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorusso, Domenica; Bria, Emilio; Costantini, Anna; Di Maio, Massimo; Rosti, Giovanni; Mancuso, Annamaria

    2017-03-01

    Chemotherapy side effects (CSE) have a strong impact on patients' quality of life (QOL). To assess patient perceptions of CSE, their impact on QOL and doctor-patient communication regarding these aspects, a survey was conducted among Italian cancer patients. Patients at least 18 years of age, who received chemotherapy, were administered a dedicated questionnaire to assess their point of view on five domains: expectations about CSE and impact on QOL; doctor-patient communication about CSE; treatments to reduce the impact of CSE; sexual life; family relationships/activities and employment. A total of 761 patients participated. CSE had a considerable impact on patient QOL. Nausea/vomiting was the most feared adverse effect before initiating chemotherapy and the one most commonly experienced during treatment. Patients generally reported good doctor-patient communication regarding information about CSE. In almost all cases, the oncologists prescribed an antiemetic treatment, but the incidence of nausea/vomiting was high. Cancer and CSE severely affected sexual life, daily activities and employment. CSE had a strong negative impact on QOL. Good doctor-patient communication is essential. Improving antiemetic strategies may improve QOL. Doctors' ability to inform patients about delicate issues, such as the impact of CSE on sexual life, needs to be improved. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Nausea and vomiting in fractionated radiotherapy: a prospective on-demand trial of tropisetron rescue for non-responders to metoclopramide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miralbell, R.; Behrouz, F.; Coucke, P.

    1995-01-01

    A prospective trial was performed to better assess the risk of nausea and vomiting and the rescue value of tropisetron (TRO), a 5-HT 3 receptor antagonist, in 88 patients undergoing fractionated radiotherapy to the abdomen or to large supradiaphragmatic fields and failing a first anti-emetic trial with metoclopramide (MET). Nausea was graded 0 (absent), 1 (mild), 2 (moderate) and 3 (severe). Nausea requiring anti-emetics (≥ grade 2) was present in 64% of the patients. MET was able to control nausea (≤ grade 1) in 26 of 58 patients (45%) who developed ≥ grade 2 nausea during radiation treatment (2 patients vomiting without nausea included). 34 patients required TRO, and 31 experienced immediate relief. However, nausea (≥ grade 2) recurred in 7 patients from 1 to 3 weeks after starting TRO. Sex, age, field type and field size (cm 2 ) did not influence the incidence and severity of nausea and vomiting. Only 24/88 patients vomited after starting radiotherapy. MET helped to eliminate emesis in one third of these patients. TRO helped to control vomiting in 73% of the salvaged patients. Constipation was observed in 8 patients on TRO and was a reason to stop the medication in 4 cases. (author)

  11. Efficacy and safety of electroacupuncture with different acupoints for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Hu, Shu-xiang; Liu, Bao-hu; Zhao, Tian-yi; Li, Bo; Liu, Yan; Li, Ming-yue; Pan, Xing-fang; Guo, Yong-ming; Chen, Ze-lin; Guo, Yi

    2015-05-12

    Many patients experience nausea and vomiting during chemotherapy treatment. Evidence demonstrates that electroacupuncture is beneficial for controlling chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). However, the acupoint or matching acupoint with the best efficacy for controlling CINV still remains unidentified. This study consists of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) with four parallel arms: a control group and three electroacupuncture groups (one with Neiguan (PC6), one with Zhongwan (CV12), and one with both PC6 and CV12). The control group received standard antiemetic only, while the other three groups received electroacupuncture stimulation with different acupoints besides the standard antiemetic. The intervention is done once daily from the first day (day 1) to the fourth day (day 4) during chemotherapy treatment. The primary outcome measures include frequency of nausea, vomiting and retching. The secondary outcome measures are the grade of constipation and diarrhea, electrogastrogram, assessment of quality of life, assessment of anxiety and depression, and other adverse effects during the chemotherapy. Assessments are scheduled from one day pre-chemotherapy (day 0) to the fifth day of chemotherapy (day 5). Follow-ups are done from day 6 to day 21. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of electro-acupuncture with different acupoints in the management of CINV. The register number of randomized controlled trial is NCT02195908 . The date of registration was 21 July 2014.

  12. Alternative Therapies for the Prevention of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta eStoicea

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV is a complication affecting between 20% and 40% of all surgery patients, with high-risk patients experiencing rates of up to 80%. Recent studies and publications have shed light on the uses of alternative treatment for PONV, through their modulation of endogenous opioid neuropeptides and neurokinin ligands. In addition to reducing PONV, hypnosis was reported to be useful in attenuating postoperative pain, anxiety, and contributing to hemodynamic stability. Music therapy has been utilized to deepen the sedation level and decrease patient anxiety, antiemetic and analgesic requirements, hospital length of stay, and fatigue. Isopropyl alcohol and peppermint oil aromatherapy have both been used to reduce postoperative nausea. With correct training in traditional Chinese healing techniques, acupuncture (APu at the P6 acupoint has also been shown to be useful in preventing early PONV, post-discharge nausea and vomiting, and alleviating of pain. Electro-acupuncture (EAPu, as with APu, provided analgesic and antiemetic effects through release of opioid neuropeptides and modulation. These non-pharmacological modalities of treatment contribute to an overall patient wellbeing, assisting in physical and emotional healing.

  13. PONV in Ambulatory surgery: A comparison between Ramosetron and Ondansetron: a prospective, double-blinded, and randomized controlled study

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    Debasis Banerjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV frequently hampers implementation of ambulatory surgery in spite of so many antiemetic drugs and regimens. Aims: the study was carried out to compare the efficacy of Ramosetron and Ondansetron in preventing PONV after ambulatory surgery. Setting and Design: it was a prospective, double blinded, and randomized controlled study. Methods: 124 adult patients of either sex, aged 25-55, of ASA physical status I and II, scheduled for day care surgery, were randomly allocated into Group A [(n=62 receiving (IV Ondansetron (4 mg] and Group B [(n=62 receiving IV Ramosetron (0.3 mg] prior to the induction of general anesthesia in a double-blind manner. Episodes of PONV were noted at 0.5, 1, 2, 4 h, 6 , 12, and 18 h postoperatively. Statistical Analysis and Results: statistically significant difference between Groups A and B (P <0.05 was found showing that Ramosetron was superior to Ondansetron as antiemetic both regarding frequency and severity. Conclusion: it was evident that preoperative prophylactic administration of single dose IV Ramosetron (0.3 mg has better efficacy than single dose IV Ondansetron (4 mg in reducing the episodes of PONV over 18 h postoperatively in patients undergoing day-care surgery under general anesthesia.

  14. Aromatherapy for treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Sonia; Steels, Elizabeth; Chang, Anne; Gibbons, Kristen

    2012-04-18

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting is a common and unpleasant phenomenon and current therapies are not always effective for all patients. Aromatherapy has been suggested as a possible addition to the available treatment strategies. This review sought to establish what effect the use of aromatherapy has on the severity and duration of established postoperative nausea and vomiting and whether aromatherapy can be used with safety and clinical effectiveness comparable to standard pharmacological treatments. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 3); MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL; CAM on PubMed; Meditext; LILACS; and ISI Web of Science as well as grey literature sources and the reference lists of retrieved articles. We conducted database searches up to August 2011. We included all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) where aromatherapy was used to treat postoperative nausea and vomiting. Interventions were all types of aromatherapy. Aromatherapy was defined as the inhalation of the vapours of any substance for the purposes of a therapeutic benefit. Primary outcomes were the severity and duration of postoperative nausea and vomiting. Secondary outcomes were adverse reactions, use of rescue anti-emetics and patient satisfaction with treatment. Two review authors assessed risk of bias in the included studies and extracted data. As all outcomes analysed were dichotomous, we used a fixed-effect model and calculated relative risk (RR) with associated 95% confidence interval (95% CI). The nine included studies comprised six RCTs and three CCTs with a total of 402 participants. The mean age and range data for all participants were not reported for all studies. The method of randomization in four of the six included RCTs was explicitly stated and was adequate. Incomplete reporting of data affected the completeness of the analysis. Compared with placebo, isopropyl alcohol vapour

  15. Radiotherapy-induced emesis. An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feyer, P.; Buchali, A.; Hinkelbein, M.; Budach, V. [Department Radiotherapy, Humboldt-University Berlin (Germany); Zimmermann, J.S. [Department Radiotherapy, Christian Albrechts-University Kiel (Germany); Titlbach, O.J. [Department of Medicine I, Hospital Friedrichshain, Berlin (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    Background: A significant number of patients receiving radiotherapy experience the distressing side effects of emesis and nausea. These symptoms are some of the most distressing problems for the patients influencing their quality of life. Methods: International study results concerning radiotherapy-induced emesis are demonstrated. A German multicenter questionnaire examining the strategies to prevent or to treat radiotherapy-induced nausea and emesis is presented. An international analysis concerning incidence of emesis and nausea in fractionated radiotherapy patients is discussed. Finally the consensus of the consensus conference on antiemetic therapy from the Perugia International Cancer Conference V is introduced. Results: Untreated emesis can lead to complications like electrolyte disorders, dehydration, metabolic disturbances and nutrition problems with weight loss. Prophylactic antiemetics are often given to patients receiving single high-dose radiotherapy to the abdomen. A survey has revealed that antiemetic prophylaxis is not routinely offered to the patients receiving fractionated radiotherapy. However, there is a need for an effective treatment of emesis for use in this group of patients, too. In 20% of patients nausea and emesis can cause a treatment interruption because of an inadequate control of symptoms. Like in chemotherapy strategies there exist high, moderate, and low emetogenic treatment regimens in radiotherapy as well. The most emetogenic potential has the total body irradiation followed by radiotherapy to the abdomen. Radiotherapy induced emesis can be treated effectively with conventional antiemetics up to 50%. Conclusions: Studies with total body irradiation, fractionated treatment and high-dose single exposures have cleary demonstrated the value of 5-HT3-receptor antagonist antiemetics. There is a response between 60 and 97%. There is no difference in the efficacy of the different 5-HT3-antagonists. High-risk patients should be prophylactic

  16. Palonosetron versus other 5-HT₃ receptor antagonists for prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients with hematologic malignancies treated with emetogenic chemotherapy in a hospital outpatient setting in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, Chris; Gayle, Julie; Balu, Sanjeev; Buchner, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the rate of uncontrolled chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) after initiating antiemetic prophylaxis with palonosetron versus other 5-HT₃ receptor antagonists (RAs) in patients diagnosed with hematologic malignancies (lymphoma and leukemia) and receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC) or moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC) in a hospital outpatient setting. Patients aged ≥ 18 years and diagnosed with hematologic malignancies initiating HEC or MEC and antiemetic prophylaxis with palonosetron (Group 1) and other 5-HT₃ RAs (Group 2) for the first time in a hospital outpatient setting between 4/1/2007 and 3/31/2009 were identified from the Premier Perspective Database. Within each cycle, CINV events were identified (in the hospital outpatient, inpatient, and emergency room settings) through ICD-9 codes for nausea, vomiting, and/or volume depletion (from each CT administration day 1 until the end of the CT cycle), or use of rescue medications (day 2 until the end of the CT cycle). Negative binomial distribution generalized linear multivariate regression model estimating the CINV event rate on CT, specific CT cycles, and cancer diagnosis (leukemia/lymphoma)-matched groups in the follow-up period (first of 8 cycles or 6 months) was developed. Of 971 identified patients, 211 initiated palonosetron (Group 1). Group 1 patients comprised of more females [50.2 vs. 41.4%; p = 0.0226], Whites [74.4 vs. 70.4%, and Hispanics [7.6 vs. 6.3%; all races p = 0.0105], received more HEC treatments [89.6 vs. 84.2%; all CT types p = 0.0129], and had more lymphoma diagnosed patients [89.6 vs. 76.3%; all cancer types p = 0.0033] at baseline. After controlling for differences in several demographic and clinical variables, the regression model predicted a 20.4% decrease in CINV event rate per CT cycle for Group 1 versus Group 2 patients. Study limitations include potential lack of generalizability, absence of data on certain

  17. Granisetron in the treatment of radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Seong Eon; Kang, Ji No

    1999-01-01

    Granisetron is a potent, the most selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist and is reported to be effective in treatment of radiation-induced emesis. The antiemetic efficacy and safety of oral granisteron was evaluated in patients with receiving highly emetogenic treatment by conventional fractionated irradiation. Patients with various cancers who were being treated with irradiation were accrued into the present study. The intensity of nausea was evaluated on first 24 hours and on day-7 by patients according to the degree of interference with normal daily life as followings; a) none; b) present but no interference with normal daily life (mild); c) interference with normal daily life (moderate); and d) bedridden because of nausea (severe). Non or mild state was considered to indicate successful treatment. The efficacy of antiemetic treatment was graded as follows; a) complete response; no vomiting, no worse than mild nausea and receive no rescue antiementic therapy over the 24h period, b) major response; either one episode of vomiting or moderate/severe nausea or had received rescue medication over 24h period, or any combination of these, c) minor response; two to four episodes of vomiting over the 24h period, regardless of nausea and rescue medication, d) failure; more than four medication. The score of the most symptom m was recorded and the total score over 24 hours was summarized. The complete or major response was considered to indicate successful treatment. A total of 10 patients were enrolled into this study, and all were assessable for efficacy analysis. Total nausea control was achieved in 90% (9/10:none=60% plus mild=30%) of total patients after 7 days. The control of vomiting by granisteron was noted in seven patients (70%) of complete response and three (30%) of major response with a hundred-percent successful treatment over 7 days. The minor response or treatment failure were not observed. No significant adverse events or toxicities from granisetron were

  18. Granisetron in the treatment of radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seong Eon; Kang, Ji No [College of Medicine, Kyunghee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-06-01

    Granisetron is a potent, the most selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist and is reported to be effective in treatment of radiation-induced emesis. The antiemetic efficacy and safety of oral granisteron was evaluated in patients with receiving highly emetogenic treatment by conventional fractionated irradiation. Patients with various cancers who were being treated with irradiation were accrued into the present study. The intensity of nausea was evaluated on first 24 hours and on day-7 by patients according to the degree of interference with normal daily life as followings; a) none; b) present but no interference with normal daily life (mild); c) interference with normal daily life (moderate); and d) bedridden because of nausea (severe). Non or mild state was considered to indicate successful treatment. The efficacy of antiemetic treatment was graded as follows; a) complete response; no vomiting, no worse than mild nausea and receive no rescue antiementic therapy over the 24h period, b) major response; either one episode of vomiting or moderate/severe nausea or had received rescue medication over 24h period, or any combination of these, c) minor response; two to four episodes of vomiting over the 24h period, regardless of nausea and rescue medication, d) failure; more than four medication. The score of the most symptom m was recorded and the total score over 24 hours was summarized. The complete or major response was considered to indicate successful treatment. A total of 10 patients were enrolled into this study, and all were assessable for efficacy analysis. Total nausea control was achieved in 90% (9/10:none=60% plus mild=30%) of total patients after 7 days. The control of vomiting by granisteron was noted in seven patients (70%) of complete response and three (30%) of major response with a hundred-percent successful treatment over 7 days. The minor response or treatment failure were not observed. No significant adverse events or toxicities from granisetron were

  19. Treatment of Hepatic Epithelioid Hemangioendothelioma: Finding Uses for Thalidomide in a New Era of Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Soape

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (HEH is extremely rare, occurring in 1 to 2 per 100,000, with chemotherapy options not well defined. Our case involved a 49-year-old female who had hepatic masses and metastasis to the lungs with a liver biopsy revealing HEH. After developing a rash from sorafenib, thalidomide was started with the progression of disease stabilized. Resection is only an option in 10% of the cases; therefore, chemotherapy is the only line of treatment. Newer chemotherapy alternatives are targeting angiogenesis via the vascular endothelial growth factor. Thalidomide was first used as an antiemetic, but, sadly, soon linked to phocomelia birth defects. Given the mechanism of action against angiogenesis, thalidomide has a valid role in vascular tumors. In conclusion, the use of thalidomide as chemotherapy is novel and promising, especially in the setting of a rare vascular liver tumor such as HEH.

  20. Postoperative recovery profile after elective abdominal hysterectomy: a prospective, observational study of a multimodal anaesthetic regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth; Kehlet, Henrik; Lund, Claus M

    2009-01-01

    insufficiency and time of discharge readiness. RESULTS: The structured regime consisting of total intravenous anaesthesia (propofol-remifentanil), well defined fluid administration, prophylactic antiemetics (dexamethasone, ondansetron, droperidol), weak analgesics (celecoxib, paracetamol) and intraoperative......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the applicability, effectiveness, immediate postoperative complaints and requirements for a postanaesthesia care unit stay after elective abdominal hysterectomy under a well defined, multimodal anaesthetic regime. METHODS: Observational study of 145 consecutive......, was seen in 52%. CONCLUSION: We conclude that a structured multimodal anaesthetic regime is feasible in daily clinical practice and advantageous, and that postoperative pain and oxygen requirements (to sustain an SpO2 >92%) are the major determinants for length of stay in the postanaesthesia care unit...

  1. Medical use of cannabis: Italian and European legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaami, S; Di Luca, A; Di Luca, N M; Montanari Vergallo, G

    2018-02-01

    This review illustrates some brief considerations of the medical use of cannabis recently issued in Italy. History and uses of cannabis throughout centuries and different countries are illustrated together with a description of botany and active phytocannabinoids. Then, medical use of cannabis anti-pain treatment for patients resistant to conventional therapies is described in case of chronic neuropathic pain, spasticity, for anticinetosic and antiemetic effect in nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy, for appetite stimulating effect in cachexia, anorexia, loss of appetite in cancer patients or patients with AIDS and in anorexia nervosa, hypotensive effect in glaucoma resistant to conventional therapies and for reduction of involuntary body and facial movements in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. Italian most recent legislation on medical cannabis is detailed with some law proposals, also showing the inconsistent legislation within European Union. Some final considerations of future studies are also reported.

  2. Pyrimetin therapy of early symptoms of radiation sickness in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehky, F.; Dobsinska, E.

    1975-01-01

    The antiemetic effect of Pyrimetin in dogs whole-body irradiated with gamma rays at a dose of 500 R, administered per os, intramuscularly, and subcutaneously, immediately before the exposure and after it in the course of the initial symptoms of radiation sickness was studied. A decreased emesis occurred after per os administration of Pyrimetin immediately before whole-body irradiation of the dogs. After the intramuscular application before whole-body irradiation two dogs vomitted, and in the case of the intramuscular administration after whole-body irradiation one dog vomitted. The subcutaneous application of Pyrimetin to dogs before whole-body irradiation and also after it produced only a 30% therapeutic effect. (author)

  3. Management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients receiving multiple-day highly or moderately emetogenic chemotherapy: role of transdermal granisetron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluzzi, Flaminia; Mattia, Consalvo

    2016-08-01

    Granisetron transdermal delivery system (GTDS) is the first 5-HT3 drug to be transdermally delivered and represents a convenient alternative to oral and intravenous antiemetics for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. GTDS is effective and well tolerated in patients receiving multiple-day moderate-to-highly emetogenic chemotherapy. In this setting noninferiority studies showed similar efficacy when GTDS was compared with intravenous and oral granisetron and intravenous palonosetron. GTDS has shown good cardiovascular safety; however, special caution is needed in patients at risk for developing excessive QTc interval prolongation and arrhythmias. So far, GTDS has been investigated for intravenous prevention in comparison with granisetron and palonosetron; however, further prospects open the route to future clinical investigations.

  4. Granisetron: a review of pharmacokinetics and clinical experience in chemotherapy induced - nausea and vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spartinou, Anastasia; Nyktari, Vasileia; Papaioannou, Alexandra

    2017-12-01

    Chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) are major side effects of chemotherapy and a great burden to patients' quality of life. Serotonin and substance P are the major neurotransmitters involved in the pathophysiology of CINV, but in spite of new antiemetics no completely effective regime exists for its prevention or treatment. Areas covered: In this review the authors provide a detailed description of granisetron's chemistry pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, toxicity and a brief review of clinical trials involving granisetron and the management of CINV. We searched reviews, meta-analysis and randomized controlled trials (Medline, Embase and article reference lists). Expert opinion: According to current literature, granisetron 2 mg orally or 0,01mg/kg (1 mg) intravenously per day, co-administered with dexamethasone and NK-1 antagonists is the recommended regime for highly emetogenic chemotherapy. In the future the role of transdermal and subcutaneous formulations against delayed CINV will be clarified and probably enhance patients' convenience.

  5. Drug Interactions in Childhood Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidar, Cyrine; Jeha, Sima

    2016-01-01

    Children with cancer are increasingly benefiting from novel therapeutic strategies and advances in supportive care, as reflected in improvements in both their survival and quality of life. However, the continuous emergence of new oncology drugs and supportive care agents has also increased the possibility of deleterious drug interactions and healthcare providers need to practice extreme caution when combining medications. In this review, we discuss the most common interactions of chemotherapeutic agents with supportive care drugs such as anticonvulsants, antiemetics, uric acid–lowering agents, acid suppressants, antimicrobials, and pain management medications in pediatric oncology patients. As chemotherapy agents interact not only with medications but also with foods and herbal supplements that patients receive during the course of their treatment, we also briefly review such interactions and provide recommendations to avoid unwanted and potentially fatal interactions in children with cancer. PMID:20869315

  6. 2016 updated MASCC/ESMO consensus recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einhorn, Lawrence H; Rapoport, Bernardo; Navari, Rudolph M

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: This review summarizes the recommendations for the prophylaxis of acute and delayed nausea and vomiting induced by multiple-day chemotherapy, high-dose chemotherapy, and breakthrough nausea and vomiting as agreed at the MASCC/ESMO Antiemetic Guidelines update meeting in Copenhagen in June...... receiving high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant, a combination of a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist with dexamethasone and aprepitant (125 mg orally on day 1 and 80 mg orally on days 2 to 4) is recommended before chemotherapy. For patients undergoing multiple-day chemotherapy-induced nausea...... and vomiting, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, dexamethasone, and aprepitant, are recommended before chemotherapy for the prophylaxis of acute emesis and delayed emesis. For patients experiencing breakthrough nausea and vomiting, the available evidence suggests the use of 10 mg oral olanzapine, daily for 3 days...

  7. Prophylaxis of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting in Adolescent Patients: A Review with Emphasis on Combination of Fixed-Dose Ondansetron and Transdermal Scopolamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph V. Pergolizzi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV is a relatively common occurrence (20–30% that delays discharge and, if persistent, can lead to serious complications. The incidence of PONV is a function of patient characteristics, the type and duration of surgery, the type of anesthesia, and the choice of pre-, intra-, and postoperative pharmacotherapy. There are no completely effective antiemetic agents for this condition, but recommendations for treatment strategies are separately available for pediatric and adult patients. Left unclear is whether adolescents should be guided by the pediatric or the adult recommendations. We review the developmental physiology of the relevant physiological factors (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination. We also review the clinical evidence regarding the safety and efficacy of a fixed-dose combination of ondansetron (4 mg, i.v. and transdermal scopolamine (1.5 mg.

  8. Caffeine for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Steinbrook

    2013-01-01

    Statistical analysis: Statistical comparisons were tested using bivariable linear and logistic regression for each outcome and then adjusted for high/low risk. Results: Nausea in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU was more common in the caffeine (16 of 62 patients than the placebo group (seven of 69; P = 0.02. There were no significant differences in the use of rescue antiemetics in the PACU, in the incidence of nausea or vomiting over 24 h postoperatively, nor in other outcomes (headache, fatigue, or overall satisfaction either in the PACU or at 24 h; time-to-discharge was similar for both groups. Conclusion: Caffeine was not effective in the prevention of PONV or headache, and did not improve time-to-discharge or patient satisfaction.

  9. [Diphenhydramine addiction and detoxification. A systematic review and case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbe, Sebastian; Bschor, Tom

    2013-07-01

    In many countries diphenhydramine (DPH) is commonly available over the counter, frequently used, and generally regarded as a harmless drug. It is used as a sedative, antiallergic or antiemetic substance. We present a systematic review of literature search in Pubmed from 1972 to 2012 describing DPH addiction. The literature search in reveals that the addictive potential of DPH can be regarded as proved, based on cases series, eight case reports, a pharmacological overview, one uncontrolled, and one randomized, placebo controlled study. In addition we report a case of an abstinent alcoholic patient treated in our department for DPH-dependency. Especially when treating patients with a history of addiction, physicians should consider and check the possibility of a DPH dependency. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Treatment of tension-type headache: from old myths to modern concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbanti, P; Egeo, G; Aurilia, C; Fofi, L

    2014-05-01

    Tension-type headache (TTH) is the second most common human disease, accounting for intense disability, high costs and numerous workdays lost. Tension-type headache is less simple and easy-to-treat than commonly thought. Antidepressants, despite their poor tolerability, are still the first-choice drugs for preventing TTH. The most widely studied non-pharmacological approach to TTH, cognitive-behavioral techniques, effectively relieve pain only in selected patients. The most frequently used and recommended treatments for acute TTH, NSAIDs and paracetamol have scarce efficacy as documented by their low therapeutic gain over placebo in the 2-h pain-free response. Their effectiveness may be increased by a more proper use and by the adjunction of caffeine, antiemetics, myorelaxants or tranquillizers but the risk of medication-overuse headache must be considered. Hence, the need for more effective and tailored treatments in TTH remains.

  11. Estimation of body surface area in the musk shrew ( Suncus murinus): a small animal for testing chemotherapy-induced emesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiseman, Julie L; Sciullo, Michael; Wang, Hong; Beumer, Jan H; Horn, Charles C

    2017-10-01

    Several cancer chemotherapies cause nausea and vomiting, which can be dose-limiting. Musk shrews are used as preclinical models for chemotherapy-induced emesis and for antiemetic effectiveness. Unlike rats and mice, shrews possess a vomiting reflex and demonstrate an emetic profile similar to humans, including acute and delayed phases. As with most animals, dosing of shrews is based on body weight, while translation of such doses to clinically equivalent exposure requires doses based on body surface area. In the current study body surface area in musk shrews was directly assessed to determine the Meeh constant (K m ) conversion factor (female = 9.97, male = 9.10), allowing estimation of body surface area based on body weight. These parameters can be used to determine dosing strategies for shrew studies that model human drug exposures, particularly for investigating the emetic liability of cancer chemotherapeutic agents.

  12. The prevention of postoperative vomiting following strabismus surgery in children with using Promethazine and Droperidol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaigh al Islam V

    1996-07-01

    Full Text Available Children undergoing general anesthesia for strabismus surgery have a higher incidence of postoperative vomiting than those receiving the same anaesthesia for other types of ambulatory surgical procedures. Droperidol (0/0 75 mg/kg IV and promethazine (0.05-1.0 mg/kg were used in 100 children between 2-15 years old. Promethazine which has sedative property, anticholinergic antihistaminic, antiemetic and anti-motion sickness effects is recommended for children 0.05 mg-1.0 mg/kg of body weight IV. After induction of anesthesia and before operation and manipulation of the eye and combined with 0.5 mg/kg IM promethazine after operation. The incidence of vomiting following strabismus surgery might be reduced more than with intravenous droperidol

  13. Dietary poisoning with Veratrum album--a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagler, Bernhard; Zelger, Anton; Salvatore, Carmen; Pechlaner, Christoph; De Giorgi, Franco; Wiedermann, Christian J

    2005-02-01

    Veratrum album is a poisonous plant that can easily be mistaken for the yellow gentian, Gentiana lutea, used in beverages. Two adult men were brought to the emergency department six hours after drinking gentian spirit. Each presented with nausea and vomiting, preceded by headache, developed within one hour after ingestion, and followed by diarrhea in one of the patients. Vital signs were normal except for heart rates of 42 and 45 beats per minute in the two patients, respectively. Laboratory findings were unremarkable. Electrocardiograms revealed sinus bradycardia. Activated charcoal and antiemetics were given and the patients were admitted for observation of signs of toxicity. The further clinical course was uneventful. Heart rates returned to normal within eight hours after admission. Retrospective investigation of the gentian beverage confirmed that V. album was mistaken for G. lutea. Patients with clinical toxicity following unintentional ingestion of V. album should be kept under observation and generally recover with supportive care.

  14. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome: A Paradoxical Cannabis Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivonne Marie Figueroa-Rivera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite well-established antiemetic properties of marijuana, there has been increasing evidence of a paradoxical effect in the gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system, given rise to a new and underrecognized clinical entity called the Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Reported cases in the medical literature have established a series of patients exhibiting a classical triad of symptoms: cyclic vomiting, chronic marijuana use, and compulsive bathing. We present a case of a 29-year-old man whose clinical presentation strongly correlates with cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome. Despite a diagnosis of exclusion, this syndrome should be considered plausible in the setting of a patient with recurrent intractable vomiting and a strong history of cannabis use as presented in this case.

  15. Recent advances in pharmacotherapy of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasan R Bhandari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nausea and vomiting remain among the most feared side effects of chemotherapy for cancer patients. Significant progress has been made in the last 15 years in developing more effective and better-tolerated measures to minimize chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV. During the 1990s, the selective 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonists were first introduced for the treatment of CINV, and resulted in more effective and better tolerated treatment of CINV. Despite recent progress, however, a significant number of patients still develop CINV, particularly during the 2-5-day period (delayed emesis following chemotherapy. There is evidence that this may be an underappreciated problem on the part of some caregivers. Recently, two new antiemetics, aprepitant, the first member of the neurokinin-1 antagonists, and palonosetron, a second-generation 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist, received regulatory approval in the U.S. Both represent useful additions to the therapeutic armamentarium for the management of CINV.

  16. A Phase II single-arm trial of palonosetron for the prevention of acute and delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in malignant glioma patients receiving multidose irinotecan in combination with bevacizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Affronti ML

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mary Lou Affronti,1–3 Sarah Woodring,1,2 Katherine B Peters,1,4 James E Herndon II,5 Frances McSherry,5 Patrick N Healy,5 Annick Desjardins,1,4 James J Vredenburgh,6 Henry S Friedman1,2 1The Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke, South Hospital, Duke University Medical Center, 2Department of Neurosurgery, Duke University Health System, 3Duke University School of Nursing, 4Department of Neurology, 5Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Health System, Durham, NC, 6Saint Francis Cancer Center, Hartford, CT, USA Purpose: Given that the prognosis of recurrent malignant glioma (MG remains poor, improving quality of life (QoL through symptom management is important. Meta-analyses establishing antiemetic guidelines have demonstrated the superiority of palonosetron (PAL over older 5-hydroxytryptamine 3-receptor antagonists in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV prevention, but excluded patients with gliomas. Irinotecan plus bevacizumab is a treatment frequently used in MG, but is associated with low (55% CINV complete response (CR; no emesis or use of rescue antiemetic with commonly prescribed ondansetron. A single-arm Phase II trial was conducted in MG patients to determine the efficacy of intravenous PAL (0.25 mg and dexamethasone (DEX; 10 mg received in conjunction with biweekly irinotecan–bevacizumab treatment. The primary end point was the proportion of subjects achieving acute CINV CR (no emesis or antiemetic ≤24 hours postchemotherapy. Secondary end points included delayed CINV CR (days 2–5, overall CINV CR (days 1–5, and QoL, fatigue, and toxicity.Materials and methods: A two-stage design of 160 patients was planned to differentiate between CINV CR of 55% and 65% after each dose of PAL–DEX. Validated surveys assessed fatigue and QoL.Results: A total of 63 patients were enrolled, after which enrollment was terminated due to slow accrual; 52 patients were evaluable for the primary outcome

  17. Recent advances in pharmacotherapy of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasan R Bhandari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nausea and vomiting remain among the most feared side effects of chemotherapy for cancer patients. Significant progress has been made in the last 15 years in developing more effective and better-tolerated measures to minimize chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV. During the 1990s, the selective 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonists were first introduced for the treatment of CINV, and resulted in more effective and better tolerated treatment of CINV. Despite recent progress, however, a significant number of patients still develop CINV, particularly during the 2-5-day period (delayed emesis following chemotherapy. There is evidence that this may be an underappreciated problem on the part of some caregivers. Recently, two new antiemetics, aprepitant, the first member of the neurokinin-1 antagonists, and palonosetron, a second-generation 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist, received regulatory approval in the U.S. Both represent useful additions to the therapeutic armamentarium for the management of CINV.

  18. Degree and therapy of acute radiation syndromes. Introduction of a suggestion on acute radiation sickness therapy made by strategic national stockpile radiation working group of USA. part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Rui; Pan Zhen; Li Yu

    2005-01-01

    Recommendations based on radiation dose and physiologic response are made for treatment of the hematopoietic syndrome. Therapy includes treatment with hematopoietic cytokines, blood transfusion, and stem-cell transplantation in selected cases. Additional medical management based on the evolution of clinical signs and symptoms includes the use of antimicrobial agents (quinolones, antiviral therapy, and antifungal agents), antiemetic agents, and analgesic agents. Because of the strong psychological impact of a possible radiation exposure, psychosocial support will be required for those exposed, regardless of the dose, as well as for family and friends. Treatment of pregnant women must account for risk to the fetus. For terrorist or accidental events involving exposure to radioiodines, prophylaxis against malignant disease of the thyroid is also recommended, particularly for children and adolescents. (authors)

  19. Early oral feeding after elective abdominal surgery--what are the issues?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Thue; Kehlet, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    This review analyzes the literature and the historical concerns (restrictions, traditions, nasogastric tube) and pathophysiologic factors (postoperative ileus, risk of anastomotic dehiscence, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite) invoked for not instituting early oral feeding after major abdomin...... surgical programs in abdominal surgery provide a rational basis for future studies to investigate and facilitate enforced oral feeding after major abdominal procedures.......This review analyzes the literature and the historical concerns (restrictions, traditions, nasogastric tube) and pathophysiologic factors (postoperative ileus, risk of anastomotic dehiscence, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite) invoked for not instituting early oral feeding after major abdominal...... procedures. It appears that several factors may promote postoperative oral feeding such as thoracic epidural analgesia, multimodal anti-emetic treatment, opioid-sparing analgesia, selective peripheral opioid antagonists, and enforced oral nutrition. Recent data from multimodal fast-track rehabilitation...

  20. Cancer Chemoprevention Effects of Ginger and its Active Constituents: Potential for New Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong-Zhi; Qi, Lian-Wen; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2015-01-01

    Ginger is a commonly used spice and herbal medicine worldwide. Besides its extensive use as a condiment, ginger has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for the management of various medical conditions. In recent years, ginger has received wide attention due to its observed antiemetic and anticancer activities. This paper reviews the potential role of ginger and its active constituents in cancer chemoprevention. The phytochemistry, bioactivity, and molecular targets of ginger constituents, especially 6-shogaol, are discussed. The content of 6-shogaol is very low in fresh ginger, but significantly higher after steaming. With reported anti-cancer activities, 6-shogaol can be served as a lead compound for new drug discovery. The lead compound derivative synthesis, bioactivity evaluation, and computational docking provide a promising opportunity to identify novel anticancer compounds originating from ginger.

  1. Postoperative shoulder pain after laparoscopic hysterectomy with deep neuromuscular blockade and low-pressure pneumoperitoneum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Matias Vested; Istre, Olav; Staehr-Rye, Anne K

    2016-01-01

    indicate that the use of deep neuromuscular blockade (NMB) improves surgical conditions during a low-pressure pneumoperitoneum (8 mmHg). OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate whether low-pressure pneumoperitoneum (8 mmHg) and deep NMB (posttetanic count 0 to 1) compared with standard......: Ninety-nine patients. INTERVENTIONS: Randomisation to either deep NMB and 8 mmHg pneumoperitoneum (Group 8-Deep) or moderate NMB and 12 mmHg pneumoperitoneum (Group 12-Mod). Pain was assessed on a visual analogue scale (VAS) for 14 postoperative days. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary endpoint...... was the incidence of shoulder pain during 14 postoperative days. Secondary endpoints included area under curve VAS scores for shoulder, abdominal, incisional and overall pain during 4 and 14 postoperative days; opioid consumption; incidence of nausea and vomiting; antiemetic consumption; time to recovery...

  2. Intestinal mucus accumulation in a child with acutemyeloblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namık Özbek

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal mucus accumulation is a very rare situation observed in some solid tumors, intestinal inflammation, mucosal hyperplasia, elevated intestinal pressure, and various other diseases. However, it has never been described in acute myeloblastic leukemia. The pathogenesis of intestinal mucus accumulation is still not clear. Here, we report a 14-year-old girl with acute myeloblastic leukemia and febrile neutropenia in addition to typhlitis. She was also immobilized due to joint contractures of the lower extremities and had intestinal mucus accumulation, which was, at first, misdiagnosed as intestinal parasitosis. We speculate that typhlitis, immobilization and decreased intestinal motility due to usage of antiemetic drugs might have been the potential etiologic factors in this case. However, its impact on prognosis of the primary disease is unknown.

  3. Chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in an English bulldog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvir, E; Leisewitz, A L; Van der Lugt, J J

    2001-05-01

    A case of chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in an English bulldog is described. The dog was presented with chronic weight loss and vomiting. An intestinal obstruction was suspected based on clinical and radiological findings. A diagnosis of chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction was made on the basis of full thickness intestinal biopsies. The dog was refractory to any antiemetic therapy. Necropsy revealed marked atrophy and fibrosis of the tunica muscularis, together with a mononuclear cell infiltrate extending from the duodenum to the colon. This case was presented with clinical findings consistent with visceral myopathy in humans--namely, atony and dilatation of the whole gut--but the histological findings resembled sclerosis limited to the gastrointestinal tract.

  4. Evidence that 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptors mediate cytotoxic drug and radiation-evoked emesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miner, W.D.; Sanger, G.J.; Turner, D.H.

    1987-01-01

    The involvement of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) 5-HT 3 receptors in the mechanisms of severe emesis evoked by cytotoxic drugs or by total body irradiation have been studied in ferrets. Anti-emetic compounds tested were domperidone (a dopamine antagonist), metoclopramide (a gastric motility stimulant and dopamine antagonist at conventional doses, a 5-HT 3 receptor antagonist at higher doses) and BRL 24924 (a potent gastric motility stimulant and a 5-HT 3 receptor antagonist). Domperidone or metoclopramide prevented apomorphine-evoked emesis, whereas BRL 24924 did not. Similar doses of domperidone did not prevent emesis evoked by cis-platin or by total body irradiation, whereas metoclopramide or BRL 24924 greatly reduced or prevented these types of emesis. Metoclopramide and BRL 24924 also prevented emesis evoked by a combination of doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide. These results are discussed in terms of a fundamental role for 5-HT 3 receptors in the mechanisms mediating severely emetogenic cancer treatment therapies. (author)

  5. Action of (R)-sila-venlafaxine and reboxetine to antagonize cisplatin-induced acute and delayed emesis in the ferret

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warneck, Julie B.; Cheng, Frankie H.M.; Barnes, Matthew J.; Mills, John S.; Montana, John G.; Naylor, Robert J.; Ngan, Man-P.; Wai, Man-K.; Daiss, Juergen O.; Tacke, Reinhold; Rudd, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin is associated with severe gastrointestinal toxicity that can last for several days. A recent strategy to treat the nausea and emesis includes the combination of a 5-HT 3 receptor antagonist, a glucocorticoid, and an NK 1 receptor antagonist. The present studies explore the use of the selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, (R)-sila-venlafaxine, (R,R)-reboxetine and (S,S)-reboxetine to prevent cisplatin (5 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced acute (0-24 h) and delayed (24-72 h) emesis in ferrets. The positive control regimen of ondansetron and dexamethasone, both at 1 mg/kg/8 h, reduced acute and delayed emesis by 100 (P 0.05). In conclusion, the studies provide the first evidence for an anti-emetic potential of noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors to reduce chemotherapy-induced acute and delayed emesis

  6. The effect of ondansetron on radiation-induced emesis and diarrhoea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksson, R.; Lomberg, H.; Israelsson, G.; Zackrisson, B.; Franzen, L.

    1992-01-01

    Ondansetron is a new 5-HT 3 -antagonist with antiemetic properties. In this consecutive study, 33 patients receiving fractionated upper abdominal irradiation (≥ 100 cm 2 , 1,8-4 Gy daily dose for a mean of 13 days) were treated with ondansetron (8 mg t.d.s. p.o.). Emesis was completely controlled in 26/33 (79%) patients throughout their radiation course, which embraced 628 (94%) treatment days. Ondansetron was well tolerated. Eleven patients developed mild constipation. No patients experienced diarrhoea (a common distressing side-effect of abdominal irradiation). It is suggested that ondansetron can be of value in preventing emesis in patients receiving fractionated radiotherapy. The possible beneficial effect in preventing diarrhoea must be further evaluated. (orig./MG)

  7. Emerging role of thalidomide in the treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Michael; O'Flynn, Lauren; Ventre, Rachel; Disney, Benjamin R

    2018-04-01

    Thalidomide was initially synthesised in 1954 and marketed as a sedative and antiemetic for morning sickness. It was withdrawn in 1961 due to the realisation that it was teratogenic with over 10 000 children born with congenital abnormalities. Since then it has been used for treatment of dermatological and oncological conditions, including myeloma. In 1994, it was found to have a potent antiangiogenic effect via downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). This has led to its use in gastrointestinal bleeding, as vascular abnormalities such as angiodysplasia have been found to have elevated VEGF levels. This article will review the current evidence of the use of thalidomide in bleeding associated with gastrointestinal vascular malformations, including angiodysplasia, gastric cancer and radiation-induced proctitis.

  8. Acute gastroenteritis: evidence-based management of pediatric patients [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, KeriAnne; Pade, Kathryn H

    2018-02-01

    Although most cases of acute gastroenteritis require minimal medical intervention, severe dehydration and hypoglycemia may develop in cases of prolonged vomiting and diarrhea. The mainstay of treatment for mild-to-moderately dehydrated patients with acute gastroenteritis should be oral rehydration solution. Antiemetics allow for improved tolerance of oral rehydration solution, and, when used appropriately, can decrease the need for intravenous fluids and hospitalization. This issue reviews the common etiologies of acute gastroenteritis, discusses more-severe conditions that should be considered in the differential diagnosis, and provides evidence-based recommendations for management of acute gastroenteritis in patients with mild-to-moderate dehydration, severe dehydration, and hypoglycemia. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice].

  9. Experiment on metoclopramide (reglan) application in the radiodiagnosis of diseases of the stomach and duodenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolyuk, I.P.; Petrushkin, V.I.

    1980-01-01

    It is suggested to use metoclopramide (reglan) which is introduced in a dose of 10 ml 10 min before the study intramuscularly at radio X-ray examination of the stomach and duodenum. Peroral application of the drug is not effective. The authors' experience is based on the drug application in 19 healthy persons and 89 patients with the diseases of stomach and duodenum. In patients with gastric ulcer reglan helped in the detection of the niche symptom. The use of the drug facilitated visualization of the pylorus in the case of its organic stenosis. In patients with ulcer of the duodenal bulb after introduction of reglan a better contrasting of the intestine was observed which promoted to the niche detection. An antiemetic property of reglan which can be used in patients, who do not tolerate barium suspension is also pointed out

  10. Perioperative solutions for rapid recovery joint arthroplasty: get ahead and stay ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sculco, Peter K; Pagnano, Mark W

    2015-04-01

    Rapid recovery after total joint arthroplasty requires patients to get ahead and stay ahead or the four impediments to early rehabilitation and discharge: volume depletion, blood loss, pain, and nausea. Adequate volume resuscitation starts before entering the operating room and focuses on intravenous fluids rather than red blood cell transfusion. Tranexamic acid limits blood loss and reduces the need for most other blood management systems. Rapid recovery pain management focuses on minimizing parenteral opioids. A short-acting spinal with a peri-articular local anesthetic injection is reliable, reproducible, and safe. Patients at risk for post-operative nausea are treated with anti-emetic medications and perioperative dexamethasone. These interventions reflect a transition from the sick-patient model to the well-patient model and make rapid recovery joint arthroplasty a reality in 2015. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE GASTROENTERITIS IN CHILDREN: WHAT IS NEW?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Zakharova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High prevalence of acute enteric infections in children, the majority of which affects infants, determines the necessity of development of modern recommendation on diagnostics and treatment of such conditions. The authors show data on etiology of enteric infections and results of various Russian and international research on efficacy of treatment of acute gastroenteritis, including information about sorbents, probiotics, antiemetic agents and antibacterial drugs usage. Recommendations on treatment of acute gastroenteritis are based on the modern protocol of the European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterologists, Hepatologists and Nutritionists (ESPGHAN, which was published in 2008. According to these recommendations, oral rehydration is one of the main components of treatment, decreasing children’s mortality rates. However due to the absence of the effect of this measure on the intestinal peristalsis, duration of the diarrhea and concomitant symptoms (abdominal pain and distension, additional therapy is necessary. In Russia combinations of enterosorbents and probiotics are used in order to relieve such conditions.

  12. Preoperative dexamethasone improves surgical outcome after laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Thue; Klarskov, Birthe; Kehlet, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    drug. Dexamethasone significantly reduced postoperative levels of CRP (P = 0.01), fatigue (P = 0.01), overall pain, and incisional pain during the first 24 postoperative hours (P ... and pain. Preoperatively and at several times during the first 24 postoperative hours, we measured C-reactive protein (CRP) and pulmonary function, pain scores, nausea, and number of vomiting episodes were registered. Analgesic and antiemetic requirements were recorded. Also, on a daily basis, patients...... reported scores of fatigue and pain before and during the first postoperative week and the dates for resumption of work and recreational activities. RESULTS: Eight patients were excluded from the study, leaving 40 patients in each study group for analysis. There were no apparent side effects of the study...

  13. The lesser of two adverse reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborti, Chayan; Egan, John

    2010-01-01

    Fundamental to complex systems are interconnected processes involved in providing high-quality patient care. A case study and a root cause analysis (RCA) illustrate a patient safety effort with unintended consequences. A 38-year-old woman presented to the hospital for odynophagia and vomiting. The patient developed Mobitz type 2, second-degree heart block temporally associated with the administration of intravenous ondansetron. RESPONSE TO THE EVENT: An Ishikawa, or fishbone, diagram conducted to enumerate potential contributing factors indicated that a key factor appeared to be an institutional restriction against using intravenous (i.v.) promethazine, which resulted in ondansetron being the only readily available i.v. anti-emetic on formulary. The anesthesia department requested that i.v. promethazine be removed from all operating and recovery room automated medication dispensing machines. The pharmacy department, given the realization that individual departments were taking independent action regarding promethazine, discussed the matter with the medical director, who issued a memo banning the use of i.v. promethazine. An institutional ban on i.v. anti-emetics such as promethazine may have resulted in an increase in the use of ondansetron and contributed to this adverse reaction. The reason to restrict promethazine is not well reported in the literature. In limiting the use of promethazine for patient safety concerns, the inadvertent increase in adverse reactions of the alternative medication, ondansetron, may have been overlooked. The resultant RCA underscores the need for careful cataloguing of adverse medication effects. Stakeholders should anticipate as many "downstream effects" of quality and patient safety improvements as possible. Comprehensive reporting of adverse medication effects will augment the emerging science of patient safety.

  14. Safety and Efficacy of a Pharmacist-Managed Patient-Controlled Analgesia Service in Postsurgical Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonigal, Katrina H; Giuliano, Christopher A; Hurren, Jeff

    2017-09-01

    To compare the safety and efficacy of a pharmacist-managed patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) service with physician/midlevel provider-managed (standard) PCA services in postsurgical patients. This was a multicenter, retrospective cohort study performed at 3 major hospitals in the Detroit, Michigan, metropolitan area. Postsurgical patients from October 2012 to December 2013 were included. The primary outcome compared the pain area under the curve adjusted for time on PCA (AUC/T) of patients receiving pharmacist-managed PCA services vs. standard care, up to 72 hours after initiation of PCA. Secondary outcomes included initial opioid selection, programmed PCA settings, duration of PCA use, frequency of adjunct analgesia utilization, and frequency of breakthrough analgesia utilization. Safety outcomes were assessed as a composite safety endpoint and individually. Total pain AUC/T scores did not differ between the pharmacist-managed and standard-managed groups (3.25 vs. 3.25, respectively; P = 0.98). Adjunct pain medications were given with similar frequency in the 2 groups; however, significantly fewer patients required breakthrough pain medication in the pharmacist-managed group (11% vs. 36%, respectively; P patients requiring antiemetic use (46% vs. 32%; P = 0.04). A pharmacist-managed PCA service provided no difference in pain control compared to standard management. The requirement for breakthrough analgesia was decreased in the pharmacist group, while the need for antiemetic use was increased. Further research should be conducted to evaluate different PCA management strategies. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  15. Domperidone prolongs oral to duodenal transit time in video capsule endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcfarlane, Michael; Liu, B; Nwokolo, C

    2018-04-01

    Domperidone is thought to accelerate gastric emptying via D2 receptor antagonism at the gastro-oesophageal and gastro-duodenal junctions. Listed in the BNF as a prokinetic anti-emetic, it has been used in video capsule endoscopy (VCE) to accelerate capsule delivery to the small intestine. We audited VCEs performed at UHCW from 2011, when as standard practice, domperidone was given pre-VCE, to 2012, after its discontinuation due to doubts about its effectiveness. Thirty-one patients received oral domperidone 20 mg pre-VCE. Thirty-three patients underwent VCE without domperidone pre-treatment. After 2 h, if the capsule remained intra-gastric, gastroscopy-assisted duodenal delivery was performed. Data was analysed using Mann-Whitney testing. Median oro-duodenal transit was 13 and 30 min in the untreated and domperidone groups, respectively (p = 0.01). Median oro-caecal transit was 242 and 267 min in the untreated and domperidone groups, respectively (p = 0.02). No difference in duodenal-caecal transit was seen (p = 0.60). Six percent of untreated and 13% of domperidone VCEs required gastroscopy-assisted duodenal capsule delivery (p = 0.65). Unexpectedly domperidone delayed VCE gastric transit. Most studies on domperidone prokinetic effects have been in diabetic gastroparesis, demonstrating that domperidone can achieve good symptomatic relief, but with mixed results for gastric emptying. Our study suggests that any antiemetic effects of domperidone are not mediated through accelerated gastric transit.

  16. Dextrose saline compared with normal saline rehydration of hyperemesis gravidarum: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Peng Chiong; Norazilah, Mat Jin; Omar, Siti Zawiah

    2013-02-01

    To compare 5% dextrose-0.9% saline against 0.9% saline solution in the intravenous rehydration of hyperemesis gravidarum. Women at their first hospitalization for hyperemesis gravidarum were enrolled on admission to the ward and randomly assigned to receive either 5% dextrose-0.9% saline or 0.9% saline by intravenous infusion at a rate 125 mL/h over 24 hours in a double-blind trial. All participants also received thiamine and an antiemetic intravenously. Oral intake was allowed as tolerated. Primary outcomes were resolution of ketonuria and well-being (by 10-point visual numerical rating scale) at 24 hours. Nausea visual numerical rating scale scores were obtained every 8 hours for 24 hours. Persistent ketonuria rates after the 24-hour study period were 10 of 101 (9.9%) compared with 11 of 101 (10.9%) (P>.99; relative risk 0.9, 95% confidence interval 0.4-2.2) and median (interquartile range) well-being scores at 24 hours were 9 (8-10) compared with 9 (8-9.5) (P=.73) in the 5% dextrose-0.9% saline and 0.9% saline arms, respectively. Repeated measures analysis of variance of the nausea visual numerical rating scale score as assessed every 8 hours during the 24-hour study period showed a significant difference in favor of the 5% dextrose-0.9% saline arm (P=.046) with the superiority apparent at 8 and 16 hours, but the advantage had dissipated by 24 hours. Secondary outcomes of vomiting, resolution of hyponatremia, hypochloremia and hypokalemia, length of hospitalization, duration of intravenous antiemetic, and rehydration were not different. Intravenous rehydration with 5% dextrose-0.9% saline or 0.9% saline solution in women hospitalized for hyperemesis gravidarum produced similar outcomes. ISRCTN Register, www.controlled-trials.com/isrctn, ISRCTN65014409. I.

  17. Co-administration of dexamethasone increases severity and accelerates onset day of neutropenia in bladder cancer patients on methotrexate, vinblastine, adriamycin and cisplatin chemotherapy: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itai, Shingo; Suga, Yukio; Hara, Yusuke; Izumi, Kouji; Maeda, Yuji; Kitagawa, Yasuhide; Ishizaki, Junko; Shimada, Tsutomu; Mizokami, Atsushi; Sai, Yoshimichi

    2017-01-01

    Bladder cancer patients receiving methotrexate, vinblastine, adriamycin and cisplatin (MVAC) chemotherapy are co-administered with dexamethasone as an anti-emetic. We examined whether or not dexamethasone affects the severity and onset day of MVAC-induced severe neutropenia. This was a retrospective study of bladder cancer patients treated with MVAC chemotherapy with or without dexamethasone as an antiemetic at Kanazawa University Hospital during January 2005 - December 2009. Patients were categorized into three groups; no dexamethasone use (Dex (-)), dexamethasone on day 2 (Dex 1 day), and dexamethasone on days 2, 3 and 4 (Dex multiday). We evaluated the incidence of grade 3/4 neutropenia and the day of onset of first severe neutropenic episode during the first course of MVAC chemotherapy. Logistic regression was used to investigate whether co-administration of dexamethasone was a risk factor for severe neutropenia. Episodes of grade 3/4 neutropenia occurred in 3 out of 6 (50.0%), 11 out of 12 (91.7%) and 6 out of 6 (100%) patients in the Dex (-), Dex 1 day, and Dex multiday groups, respectively. The appearance day of first severe neutropenia in the Dex multiday group (13.2 ± 1.0) was significantly accelerated compared to the Dex (-) group (17.7 ± 2.1). Univariate logistic regression analysis revealed that dexamethasone is a risk factor for severe neutropenia (OR 17.0; 95%CI: 1.3-223.1). Co-administration of dexamethasone for anti-emesis brings forward the first appearance of neutropenia, and increases the severity of neutropenia, in bladder cancer patients receiving MVAC chemotherapy.

  18. Cannabinoids for nausea and vomiting in adults with cancer receiving chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lesley A; Azariah, Fredric; Lavender, Verna T C; Stoner, Nicola S; Bettiol, Silvana

    2015-11-12

    Cannabis has a long history of medicinal use. Cannabis-based medications (cannabinoids) are based on its active element, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and have been approved for medical purposes. Cannabinoids may be a useful therapeutic option for people with chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting that respond poorly to commonly used anti-emetic agents (anti-sickness drugs). However, unpleasant adverse effects may limit their widespread use. To evaluate the effectiveness and tolerability of cannabis-based medications for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in adults with cancer. We identified studies by searching the following electronic databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and LILACS from inception to January 2015. We also searched reference lists of reviews and included studies. We did not restrict the search by language of publication. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared a cannabis-based medication with either placebo or with a conventional anti-emetic in adults receiving chemotherapy. At least two review authors independently conducted eligibility and risk of bias assessment, and extracted data. We grouped studies based on control groups for meta-analyses conducted using random effects. We expressed efficacy and tolerability outcomes as risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We included 23 RCTs. Most were of cross-over design, on adults undergoing a variety of chemotherapeutic regimens ranging from moderate to high emetic potential for a variety of cancers. The majority of the studies were at risk of bias due to either lack of allocation concealment or attrition. Trials were conducted between 1975 and 1991. No trials involved comparison with newer anti-emetic drugs such as ondansetron. Comparison with placebo People had more chance of reporting complete absence of vomiting (3 trials; 168 participants; RR 5.7; 95% CI 2.6 to 12.6; low quality evidence

  19. Palonosetron versus granisetron in combination with aprepitant for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients with gynecologic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Satoe; Terai, Yoshito; Tsunetoh, Satoshi; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Kanemura, Masanori; Ohmichi, Masahide

    2015-10-01

    There is no research regarding the appropriate antiemetic agents for female patients, especially those receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC). We evaluated the antiemetic efficacy of a combination of 5-HT₃ receptor with/without aprepitant in patients with gynecological cancer treated with the TC (paclitaxel and carboplatin) regimen of MEC. We enrolled 38 patients diagnosed with gynecologic cancer and scheduled to receive the TC regimen. The patients were randomly assigned to receive a 5-HT₃ receptor antagonist, either palonosetron in the first cycle followed by granisetron in the second cycle or vice versa. In the third cycle, all patients received a combination of the 5-HT₃ receptor and dexamethasone with/without aprepitant. When three drugs were administered, palonosetron consistently produced an equivalent complete response (CR) rate to granisetron in the acute phase (89.5% vs. 86.8%, p=0.87) and delayed phase (60.5% vs. 65.8%, p=0.79). With regard to the change in dietary intake, palonosetron exhibited similar efficacy to granisetron in the acute phase (92.1% vs. 89.4%, p=0.19) and delayed phase (65.7% vs. 68.4%, p=0.14). However, in the delayed phase, the addition of aprepitant therapy with a 5-HT₃ receptor antagonist and dexamethasone produced a higher CR rate than a 5-HT₃ receptor antagonist with dexamethasone (93.3% vs. 47.8%, p<0.001) and allowed the patients to maintain a higher level of dietary intake (93.3% vs. 56.5%, p<0.001). The addition of aprepitant therapy was more effective than the control therapy of a 5-HT₃ receptor antagonist, and dexamethasone in gynecological cancer patients treated with the TC regimen.

  20. Ondansetron versus granisetron in the prevention of chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, R; Hafiz, M G; Rokeya, B; Jamal, C Y; Islam, A

    2011-10-01

    Effect of ondansetron and granisetron were evaluated in sixty (60) children (age 4-11 years) irrespective of sex, diagnosed case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who received high dose methotrexate and did not receive any antiemetic 24 hours prior to HDMTX. This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind, single center study. Of 60 children, 30 received oral ondansetron (4mg) and rest 30 granisetron (1mg) half an hour before therapy. Drugs were randomly allocated with appropriate code. The patients were followed up from day 1 to day 5 of therapy. Episodes of nausea and vomiting were recorded and scorings was done every 24 hours following chemotherapy. No significant difference was found between two groups according to acute emesis (Day-1) (p=0.053). In day two and day three it was significant (pgranisetron and 70% in children who received ondansetron. Delayed (Day 2-4) CINV were controlled in 80% of children who received granisetron and 43.4% who received ondansetron (pGranisetron group required additional doses only 3.3% cases and ondanseton group 30% cases on the second day (pgranisetron group due to adverse effects of antiemetic drug itself (p=0.001). Maximum episodes of vomiting were found on the second day in ondansetron group 33.3% and in granisetron group 3.3% (p=0.003). Though adverse effects like headache, constipation, abdominal pain and loose motion were common in both group of children but their number was much less in children who received granisetron. On second day of therapy score of nausea and vomiting was maximum in ondansetron and minimum in granisetron treated on day 4 and the result was significant. So, to prevent acute and delayed CINV in children with ALL, oral graniseteron can be considered as more effective and well tolerated with minimum adverse effects compared with ondansetrons.

  1. Analysis of Dietary Intake during Consecutive-Day Chemotherapy for Bone and Soft-Tissue Sarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta Hori

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundBone and soft tissue sarcomas are commonly treated with consecutive-day chemotherapy regimens consisting of multiple anticancer agents. Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV is a serious adverse effect of these regimens and may result in decreased energy intake during chemotherapy. Decreased energy intake may lead to undernutrition and may cause adverse effects on patient quality of life and survival.MethodsPatients with bone and soft tissue sarcomas who received consecutive-day chemotherapy were retrospectively evaluated. CINV and dietary energy intake were assessed, as well as the occurrences of hiccups and constipation during chemotherapy.ResultsA total of 13 patients, 10 males and 3 females, with a total 16 chemotherapy courses were included in the study. All patients received antiemetic prophylaxis. The CINV control rate, defined as no emesis and no rescue therapy, gradually decreased from chemotherapy day 1 (94% to day 5 (75%. Four patients experienced emesis, two of whom had been treated with a cisplatin-containing regimen. Decreased dietary energy intake was possibly associated with CINV during chemotherapy. Anorexia was grade 2 except for one case of grade 3. The incidences of hiccups and constipation were high on days 3–5.ConclusionAntiemetic prophylaxis treatment did not prevent emesis due to consecutive-day chemotherapy, especially with cisplatin-containing regimens, in patients with bone and soft-tissue tumors. Dietary energy intake decreased during chemotherapy, and this appeared to be associated with CINV. In addition, the incidence of hiccups and constipation increased during the course of consecutive-day chemotherapy regimens. Although these results are based on a small number of patients, it may be important to observe nutritional status during chemotherapy, as this may reflect a patient’s general condition. Nutritional counseling might be useful in supporting nutritional status in patients undergoing

  2. Dexamethasone Does Not Inhibit Sugammadex Reversal After Rocuronium-Induced Neuromuscular Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonanno, Pasquale; Laiola, Anna; Palumbo, Chiara; Spinelli, Gianmario; Servillo, Giuseppe; Di Minno, Raffaele Maria; Cafiero, Tullio; Di Iorio, Carlo

    2016-06-01

    Sugammadex is a relatively new molecule that reverses neuromuscular block induced by rocuronium. The particular structure of sugammadex traps the cyclopentanoperhydrophenanthrene ring of rocuronium in its hydrophobic cavity. Dexamethasone shares the same steroidal structure with rocuronium. Studies in vitro have demonstrated that dexamethasone interacts with sugammadex, reducing its efficacy. In this study, we investigated the clinical relevance of this interaction and its influence on neuromuscular reversal. In this retrospective case-control study, we analyzed data from 45 patients divided into 3 groups: dexamethasone after induction group (15 patients) treated with 8 mg dexamethasone as an antiemetic drug shortly after induction of anesthesia; dexamethasone before reversal group (15 patients) treated with dexamethasone just before sugammadex injection; and control group (15 patients) treated with 8 mg ondansetron. All groups received 0.6 mg/kg rocuronium at induction, 0.15 mg/kg rocuronium at train-of-four ratio (TOF) 2 for neuromuscular relaxation, and 2 mg/kg sugammadex for reversal at the end of the procedure at TOF2. Neuromuscular relaxation was monitored with a TOF-Watch® system. The control group had a recovery time of 154 ± 54 seconds (mean ± SD), the dexamethasone after induction group 134 ± 55 seconds, and the dexamethasone before reversal group 131 ± 68 seconds. The differences among groups were not statistically significant (P = 0.5141). Our results show that the use of dexamethasone as an antiemetic drug for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting does not interfere with reversal of neuromuscular blockade with sugammadex in patients undergoing elective surgery with general anesthesia in contrast to in vitro studies that support this hypothesis.

  3. Aromatherapy as treatment for postoperative nausea: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Ronald; Dienemann, Jacqueline; Norton, H James; Hartley, Wendy; Hudgens, Amanda; Stern, Thomas; Divine, George

    2013-09-01

    Postoperative nausea (PON) is a common complication of anesthesia and surgery. Antiemetic medication for higher-risk patients may reduce but does not reliably prevent PON. We examined aromatherapy as a treatment for patients experiencing PON after ambulatory surgery. Our primary hypothesis was that in comparison with inhaling a placebo, PON will be reduced significantly by aromatherapy with (1) essential oil of ginger, (2) a blend of essential oils of ginger, spearmint, peppermint, and cardamom, or (3) isopropyl alcohol. Our secondary hypothesis was that the effectiveness of aromatherapy will depend upon the agent used. A randomized trial of aromatherapy with patients who reported nausea in the postanesthesia care unit was conducted at one ambulatory surgical center. Eligibility criteria were adult, able to give consent, and no history of coagulation problems or allergy to the aromatherapy agents. Before surgery, demographic and risk factors were collected. Patients with a nausea level of 1 to 3 on a verbal descriptive scale (0-3) received a gauze pad saturated with a randomly chosen aromatherapy agent and were told to inhale deeply 3 times; nausea (0-3) was then measured again in 5 minutes. Prophylactic and postnausea antiemetics were given as ordered by physicians or as requested by the patient. A total of 1151 subjects were screened for inclusion; 303 subjects reporting nausea were enrolled (26.3%), and 301 meeting protocol were analyzed (26.2%). The change in nausea level was significant for the blend (P aromatherapy was also significantly reduced with ginger or blend aromatherapy versus saline (P = 0.002 and P aromatherapy would be effective as a treatment for PON was supported. On the basis of our results, future research further evaluating aromatherapy is warranted. Aromatherapy is promising as an inexpensive, noninvasive treatment for PON that can be administered and controlled by patients as needed.

  4. The impact of 5-hydroxytryptamine-receptor antagonists on chemotherapy treatment adherence, treatment delay, and nausea and vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palli, Swetha Rao; Grabner, Michael; Quimbo, Ralph A; Rugo, Hope S

    2015-01-01

    To determine the incidence of chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting (CINV) and chemotherapy treatment delay and adherence among patients receiving palonosetron versus other 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist (5-HT3 RA) antiemetics. This retrospective claims analysis included adults with primary malignancies who initiated treatment consisting of single-day intravenous highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC) or moderately EC (MEC) regimens. Treatment delay was defined as a gap in treatment at least twice the National Comprehensive Cancer Network-specified cycle length, specific to each chemotherapy regimen. Treatment adherence was determined by the percentage of patients who received the regimen-specific recommended number of chemotherapy cycles within the recommended time frame. We identified 1,832 palonosetron and 2,387 other 5-HT3 RA ("other") patients who initiated HEC therapy, and 1,350 palonosetron users and 1,379 patients on other antiemetics who initiated MEC therapy. Fewer patients receiving palonosetron experienced CINV versus other (HEC, 27.5% versus 32.2%, P=0.0011; MEC, 36.1% versus 41.7%, P=0.0026), and fewer treatment delays occurred among patients receiving palonosetron versus other (HEC, 3.2% versus 6.0%, PHEC, 74.7% versus 69.7%, P=0.0004; MEC, 43.1% versus 37.3%, P=0.0019) and dosage (HEC, 27.3% versus 25.8%, P=0.0004; MEC, 15.0% versus 12.6%, P=0.0019). Palonosetron more effectively reduced occurrence of CINV in patients receiving HEC or MEC compared with other agents in this real-world setting. Additionally, patients receiving palonosetron had better adherence and fewer treatment delays than patients receiving other 5-HT3 RAs.

  5. Hypermesis gravidarum in a tertiary care centre in eastern nepal: a prospective obeservational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chhetry, M.; Thakur, A.; Uprety, D.K.; Basnet, P.; Joshi, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) is the most severe form of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy which can have potentially dangerous complications if untreated. Its treatment is basically supportive as the condition itself is self-limiting. The aim of our study was to evaluate maternal characteristics in patients with HG including risk factors and treatment outcome with respect to improvement in Pregnancy Unique Quantification of Emesis (PUQE) scores, number of doses of antiemetics used, weight gain during treatment and duration of intravenous fluid therapy Methods: A cross-sectional study where all women admitted to B.P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences with a diagnosis of HG during a period of one year were studied for different maternal characteristics. The severity of disease was quantified using Modified PUQE score and the various treatment outcomes considered. Results: The admission for hyperemesis gravidarum (n=81, including 13 re-admissions) was 10.64 percentage of total early pregnancy admissions (n=735). The condition was more common in nulliparous patients (56 percentage) at a mean period of gestation of 8.93±2.33wks. Most patients suffered from moderate to severe disease at presentation, mean PUQE scores being 12.29±1.59. The median number of doses of intravenous antiemetics used was three (IQR 3-6), median weight gain was one kg (IQR 0-1kg), median duration of intravenous fluid therapy was 24hrs (IQR 24-48hrs) and mean length of hospital stay was 3.2±1.48 days. Conclusions: Hyperemesis is one of the common causes of hospitalization in early pregnancy. Treatment has favourable outcome with early recovery. (author)

  6. Rikkunshito for Preventing Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Lung Cancer Patients: Results from 2 Prospective, Randomized Phase 2 Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Harada

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The herbal medicine rikkunshito has the potential to improve chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV by stimulating ghrelin secretion. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of rikkunshito in preventing CINV for patients with lung cancer. Two separate prospective, randomized, phase II parallel design studies were conducted in patients with lung cancer. Fifty-eight and sixty-two patients scheduled to receive highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC and moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC, respectively, were randomized 1:1 to receive either standard antiemetic therapy in accordance with international guidelines (S group or standard antiemetic therapy plus oral rikkunshito (R group. The primary endpoint was overall complete response (CR—that is, no emesis and rescue medication in the first 120 h post-chemotherapy. Secondary endpoints included CR in the acute (0–24 h and delayed (>24–120 h phases and safety. Fifty-seven patients (S group, 28; R group, 29 receiving HEC and sixty-two patients (S group, 30; R group, 32 receiving MEC with comparable characteristics were evaluated. The CR rates were similar across the S and R groups for the HEC study in the overall (67.9% vs. 62.1%, acute (96.4% vs. 89.6%, and delayed (67.9% vs. 62.1% phases, respectively, and for the MEC study in the overall (83.3% vs. 84.4%, acute (100% vs. 100%, and delayed (83.3% vs. 84.4% phases, respectively. No severe adverse events were observed. Although rikkunshito was well tolerated, it did not demonstrate an additional preventative effect against CINV in lung cancer patients receiving HEC or MEC.Clinical Trial Registry Information: This study is registered with the University Hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN Clinical Trial Registry1, identification numbers UMIN 000014239 and UMIN 000014240.

  7. Impact of Nausea and Vomiting on Quality of Life in Cancer Patients During Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roila Fausto

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It is commonly claimed that the nausea and vomiting accompanying cytotoxic chemotherapy have a negative impact on health-related quality of life. While this may seem self-evident, until a few years ago there was little empirical data demonstrating that the failure to control postchemotherapy emesis affects aspects of quality of life. In spite of their limitations, several observational studies showed that nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy induced a decrease in health-related quality of life with respect to patients without nausea and vomiting. This has also been demonstrated after the adjustment for health-related quality of life before chemotherapy that is an important prognostic factor of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Furthermore, one study suggests that the optimal time of assessment of quality of life to evaluate the impact of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting is day 4 if a 3-day recall period is used or day 8 when the recall period is 7 days. In double-blind studies the efficacy, tolerability and impact on quality of life of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists was superior with respect to metoclopramide, alizapride and prochlorperazine. Similar results have been achieved with the combination of ondansetron with dexamethasone, the standard treatment for the prevention of acute emesis induced by moderately emetogenic chemotherapy, with respect to the metoclopramide plus dexamethasone combination. Instead, in another double-blind study, in patients submitted to moderately emetogenic chemotherapy, a 5-HT3 antagonist did not seem to significantly increase complete protection from delayed emesis and the patients' quality of life with respect to dexamethasone alone. In conclusion, the evaluation of quality of life in randomized trials comparing different antiemetic drugs for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting can add important information useful for the choice of the optimal antiemetic

  8. Prophylactic gabapentin for prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey Chandra

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gabapentin is an antiepileptic drug. Its antiemetic effect is demonstrated in chemotherapy-induced acute and delayed onset of nausea and vomiting in breast cancer patients. Aim: To evaluate the antiemetic effect of gabapentin on incidence and severity of postoperative nausea and vomiting in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Settings and Design: Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and fifty patients of ASA physical status I and II, scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly assigned into two equal groups to receive 600 mg gabapentin or matching placebo two hours before surgery. Standard anaesthesia technique was used. Fentanyl was used as rescue postoperative analgesic. Ondansetron 4 mg was used intravenously as rescue medication for emesis. The total number of patients who had nausea or vomiting, and its severity and total fentanyl consumption in the first 24 hours were recorded. Statistical Analysis: "Z test" was used to test the significance of severity of post-operative nausea and vomiting between groups. Fentanyl consumed in each group (Mean±SD within 24 hrs was compared using student t test. P value< 0.05 was considered significant. Results: There were no demographic difference between the two groups. Incidence of post-operative nausea and vomiting within 24 hrs after laparoscopic cholecystectomy was significantly lower in gabapentin group (46/125 than in the placebo group (75/125 (37.8% vs 60%; P =0.04. There was a significantly decreased fentanyl consumption in gabapentin group (221.2±92.4 µg as compared to placebo group (505.9±82.0 µg; P =0.01. Conclusion: Gabapentin effectively suppresses nausea and vomiting in laparoscopic cholecystectomy and post-operative rescue analgesic requirement.

  9. The effect of crystalloid versus Low molecular weight colloid solution on post-operative nausea and vomiting after ambulatory gynecological surgery - a prospective randomized trial

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hayes, Ivan

    2012-07-31

    AbstractBackgroundIntravenous fluid is recommended in international guidelines to improve patient post-operative symptoms, particularly nausea and vomiting. The optimum fluid regimen has not been established. This prospective, randomized, blinded study was designed to determine if administration of equivolumes of a colloid (hydroxyethyl starch 130\\/0.4) reduced post operative nausea and vomiting in healthy volunteers undergoing ambulatory gynecologic laparoscopy surgery compared to a crystalloid solution (Hartmann’s Solution).Methods120 patients were randomized to receive intravenous colloid (N = 60) or crystalloid (N = 60) intra-operatively. The volume of fluid administered was calculated at 1.5 ml.kg-1 per hour of fasting. Patients were interviewed to assess nausea, vomiting, anti-emetic use, dizziness, sore throat, headache and subjective general well being at 30 minutes and 2, 24 and 48 hours post operatively. Pulmonary function testing was performed on a subgroup.ResultsAt 2 hours the proportion of patients experiencing nausea (38.2 % vs 17.9%, P = 0.03) and the mean nausea score were increased in the colloid compared to crystalloid group respectively (1.49 ± 0.3 vs 0.68 ± 0.2, P = 0.028). The incidence of vomiting and anti-emetic usage was low and did not differ between the groups. Sore throat, dizziness, headache and general well being were not different between the groups. A comparable reduction on post-operative FVC and FEV-1 and PEFR was observed in both groups.ConclusionsIntra-operative administration of colloid increased the incidence of early postoperative nausea and has no advantage over crystalloid for symptom control after gynaecological laparoscopic surgery.

  10. Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in Asian women with breast cancer receiving anthracycline-based adjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdeanu, Laura; Frankel, Paul; Yu, Wai; Hendrix, Gregory; Pal, Sumanta; Badr, Lina; Somlo, George; Luu, Thehang

    2012-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) remain among the most frequently reported distressing side effects associated with anthracycline-based chemotherapy despite significant advances in antiemetic management. The main risk factor for severity of CINV is the emetogenic potential of the chemotherapeutic agents. However, patient-related risk factors have been identified, including genetic makeup. Although studies have noted that ethnicity influences nausea and vomiting in other contexts, there is a paucity of research regarding the impact of ethnicity on CINV. This study was undertaken to evaluate whether Asian women receiving anthracycline-based chemotherapy experience more CINV than non-Asians. A retrospective, comparative, correlational chart review was performed to abstract the relevant variables. Data from a convenience sample of 358 women with breast cancer who received chemotherapy with doxorubicin between 2004 and 2008 at City of Hope in Duarte, California, were evaluated. The sample consisted of Caucasians (45%), Hispanics (27.7%), Asians (19.8%), and African Americans (7.5%). The results indicate that Asian women with breast cancer undergoing anthracycline-based chemotherapy experienced statistically significantly more clinically important CINV than their non-Asian counterparts. The data were collected retrospectively, with a certain population distribution at a specific time. This study provides interesting preliminary evidence that Asian ethnicity plays a role in the development of severe CINV. When managing chemotherapy toxicities in women with breast cancer, health-care providers should tailor therapy to individual risk profiles. Specifically, consideration of antiemetic therapy should accommodate patient characteristics, such as Asian descent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The management of children with gastroenteritis and dehydration in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colletti, James E; Brown, Kathleen M; Sharieff, Ghazala Q; Barata, Isabel A; Ishimine, Paul

    2010-06-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is characterized by diarrhea, which may be accompanied by nausea, vomiting, fever, and abdominal pain. To review the evidence on the assessment of dehydration, methods of rehydration, and the utility of antiemetics in the child presenting with acute gastroenteritis. The evidence suggests that the three most useful predictors of 5% or more dehydration are abnormal capillary refill, abnormal skin turgor, and abnormal respiratory pattern. Studies are conflicting on whether blood urea nitrogen (BUN) or BUN/creatinine ratio correlates with dehydration, but several studies found that low serum bicarbonate combined with certain clinical parameters predicts dehydration. In most studies, oral or nasogastric rehydration with an oral rehydration solution was equally efficacious as intravenous (i.v.) rehydration. Many experts discourage the routine use of antiemetics in young children. However, children receiving ondensetron are less likely to vomit, have greater oral intake, and are less likely to be treated by intravenous rehydration. Mean length of Emergency Department (ED) stay is also less, and very few serious side effects have been reported. In the ED, dehydration is evaluated by synthesizing the historical and physical examination, and obtaining laboratory data points in select patients. No single laboratory value has been found to be accurate in predicting the degree of dehydration and this is not routinely recommended. The evidence suggests that the majority of children with mild to moderate dehydration can be treated successfully with oral rehydration therapy. Ondansetron (orally or intravenously) may be effective in decreasing the rate of vomiting, improving the success rate of oral hydration, preventing the need for i.v. hydration, and preventing the need for hospital admission in those receiving i.v. hydration. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Thalidomide for control delayed vomiting in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Z.; Sun, X.; Du, X.

    2016-01-01

    To explore the efficacy and safety of thalidomide for the treatment of delayed vomiting, induced by chemotherapy in cancer patients. Study Design: Randomized, double-blind controlled study. Place and Duration of Study: The Oncology Department of Affiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical University, Jiangsu Xuzhou, China, from January 2012 to January 2014. Methodology: A total of 78 cancer patients, who had delayed vomiting observed from 24 hours to 1 week after chemotherapy, were included in the study. Patients were divided in a treatment group (40 patients, 51.28%) and a control group (38 patients, 48.71%). The treatment group received thalidomide at an oral dose of 100 mg per night; 50 mg was added daily up to a dose of 200 mg per night, if the curative effect was suboptimal and the medicine was tolerated. Both the treatment and the control groups received a drip of 10 mg azasetron 30 minutes before chemotherapy. The control group only proportions of antiemetic effects and adverse reactions were compared using the ?2 test. Antiemetic effects and adverse reactions were assessed from Odds Ratios (OR) with 95% Confidence Intervals(95% CI). Results: The effective control rate of delayed vomiting in the treatment group was significantly higher than that in the control group (?2=5.174, p=0.023). No significant difference was found between the two groups in other adverse effects of chemotherapy. Karnofsky scores or the overall self-evaluation of the patients (p>0.05). Conclusion: Thalidomide can effectively control the delayed vomiting of cancer patients receiving chemotherapy and the adverse reactions of the agent can be tolerated.

  13. Distonia aguda relacionada ao uso de bromoprida em pacientes pediátricos Acute dystonia after use of bromopride in pediatric patients

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    Eliane Roseli Barreira

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever dois casos de distonia aguda após uso de bromoprida em crianças e realizar revisão da literatura em relação aos mecanismos fisiopatológicos de indução de liberação extrapiramidal, sua sintomatologia e tratamento. DESCRIÇÃO DO CASO: Caso 1: adolescente de 13 anos com quadro de dor e hipertonia cervical associados a febre, náuseas e vômitos, com hipótese inicial de meningite. A investigação subsequente revelou que o quadro iniciou-se após ingestão de uma única dose de bromoprida. O paciente apresentou boa resposta ao tratamento com difenidramina, sem necessidade de coleta de líquor. Caso 2: Lactente de seis meses que desenvolveu sintomas graves de liberação extrapiramidal relacionados à superdosagem de bromoprida, com reversão rápida dos sintomas após administração de biperideno. COMETÁRIOS: Este é o primeiro relato de distonia aguda após uso de bromoprida em crianças. Embora muito utilizada no Brasil como agente pró-cinético e antiemético, nenhum estudo clínico até o momento demonstrou melhor perfil de segurança da bromoprida em relação aos demais antieméticos antagonistas da dopamina. Até que tais estudos sejam realizados, sugere-se cautela na prescrição de bromoprida. Medidas não-farmacológicas devem ser recomendadas no tratamento de vômitos e da doença do refluxo gastresofágico. Quando o tratamento farmacológico for indispensável, deve-se dar preferência a drogas com perfil de segurança mais bem estabelecido.OBJECTIVE: To report the case of two patients with acute dystonia induced by bromopride in children, followed by a review of the mechanisms of induction of movement disorders by antidopaminergic anti-emetic drugs, its clinical symptoms and treatment. CASE DESCRIPTION: Case 1: a 13 years old teenager who developed acute hypertonia and neck pain associated to fever and vomiting, suggestive of meningitis. Further investigation revealed that symptoms were associated with

  14. Uso da mirtazapina no tratamento da náusea e vômito refratários a terapia habitual após derivação gástrica em Y de Roux Intractable nausea and vomiting following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass controlled with mirtazapine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Coutinho Teixeira de Freitas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: A cirurgia bariátrica é procedimento com significativa morbidade. A náusea a vômito geralmente ocorrem devido à presença de complicações mecânicas como as estenoses das anastomoses. Alguns casos apresentam sintomas importantes na ausência dessas complicações. OBJETIVO: Relato do uso da mirtazapina no pós-operatório de cirurgia bariátrica em um paciente com náuseas de vômitos refratários ao tratamento clínico habitual, na ausência de complicações mecânicas. RELATO DO CASO: Paciente portador de obesidade mórbida foi submetido à derivação gástrica em Y de Roux laparoscópica. Evoluiu com náusea persistente associada a episódios de vômitos refratários a ondansetron, metoclopramida e bromoprida. Não foram identificadas causas mecânicas para o quadro. Foi iniciado mirtazapina (Remeron® via oral na dose de 30mg por dia durante 60 dias. Após dois dias do início da medicação foi observado melhora total do quadro. A mirtazapina é um antidepressivo que apresenta efeito antiemético através do bloqueio de receptores para a serotonina (5-HT3 no centro do vômito no tronco cerebral. CONCLUSÃO: A mirtazapina pode ser útil nos casos de náusea e vômito refratários à terapia antiemética habitual no pós-operatório de derivação gástrica em Y de Roux, quando causas mecânicas são excluídas.BACKGROUND: Bariatric surgery is related to significant morbidity. Mechanical complications such as stricture of the anastomotic sites are the most common causes of persistent nausea and vomiting. Some patients present such symptoms in the absence of these complications. AIM: To report the use of mirtazapine in a patient submitted to bariatric surgery, presenting persistent nausea and vomiting in the absence of mechanical complications, and unresponsive to conventional antiemetic drugs. CASE REPORT: A morbidly obese patient submitted to laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass presented persistent nausea and vomiting

  15. A prospective randomized comparative clinical trial comparing the efficacy between ondansetron and metoclopramide for prevention of nausea and vomiting in patients undergoing fractionated radiotherapy to the abdominal region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Chul; Suh, Chang Ok; Seong, Jin Sil; Cho, Jae Ho; Lim, John Jihoon; Park, Won; Song, Jae Seok; Kim, Gwi Eon [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-01

    This study is a prospective randomized clinical trial comparing the efficacy and complication of anti-emetic drugs for prevention of nausea and vomiting after radiotherapy which has moderate emetogenic potential. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the anti-emetic efficacy at ondansetron(Zofran) 8 mg bid dose (Group O) is better than the efficacy of metoclopramide 5 mg tid dose (Group M) in patients undergoing fractionated radiotherapy to the abdominal region. Study entry was restricted to those patients who met the following eligibility criteria: histologically confirmed malignant disease; no distant metastasis; performance status of not more than ECOG grade 2; no previous chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Between March 1997 and February 1998, 60 patients enrolled in this study. All patients signed a written statement of informed consent prior to enrollment. Blinding was maintained by dosing identical number of tables including one dose of matching placebo for Group O. The extent of nausea, appetite loss, and the number of emetic episodes were recorded everyday using diary card. The mean score of nausea, appetite loss and the mean number of emetic episodes were obtained in a weekly interval. Prescription error occurred in one patient. And diary cards have not returned in 3 patients due to premature refusal of treatment. Card from one patient was excluded from the analysis because she had a history of treatment for neurosis. As a result, the analysis consisted of 55 patients. Patient characteristics and radiotherapy characteristics were similar except mean age was 52.9{+-} 11.2 in group M, 46.5{+-}9.6 in group O. The difference of age was statistically significant. The mean score of nausea, appetite loss and emetic episodes in a weekly interval was higher in group M than O. In group M, the symptoms were most significant at 5th week. In a panel data analysis using mixed procedure, treatment group was only significant factor detecting the difference of

  16. A prospective randomized comparative clinical trial comparing the efficacy between ondansetron and metoclopramide for prevention of nausea and vomiting in patients undergoing fractionated radiotherapy to the abdominal region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hee Chul; Suh, Chang Ok; Seong, Jin Sil; Cho, Jae Ho; Lim, John Jihoon; Park, Won; Song, Jae Seok; Kim, Gwi Eon

    2001-01-01

    This study is a prospective randomized clinical trial comparing the efficacy and complication of anti-emetic drugs for prevention of nausea and vomiting after radiotherapy which has moderate emetogenic potential. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the anti-emetic efficacy at ondansetron(Zofran) 8 mg bid dose (Group O) is better than the efficacy of metoclopramide 5 mg tid dose (Group M) in patients undergoing fractionated radiotherapy to the abdominal region. Study entry was restricted to those patients who met the following eligibility criteria: histologically confirmed malignant disease; no distant metastasis; performance status of not more than ECOG grade 2; no previous chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Between March 1997 and February 1998, 60 patients enrolled in this study. All patients signed a written statement of informed consent prior to enrollment. Blinding was maintained by dosing identical number of tables including one dose of matching placebo for Group O. The extent of nausea, appetite loss, and the number of emetic episodes were recorded everyday using diary card. The mean score of nausea, appetite loss and the mean number of emetic episodes were obtained in a weekly interval. Prescription error occurred in one patient. And diary cards have not returned in 3 patients due to premature refusal of treatment. Card from one patient was excluded from the analysis because she had a history of treatment for neurosis. As a result, the analysis consisted of 55 patients. Patient characteristics and radiotherapy characteristics were similar except mean age was 52.9± 11.2 in group M, 46.5±9.6 in group O. The difference of age was statistically significant. The mean score of nausea, appetite loss and emetic episodes in a weekly interval was higher in group M than O. In group M, the symptoms were most significant at 5th week. In a panel data analysis using mixed procedure, treatment group was only significant factor detecting the difference of weekly

  17. Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome: potential mechanisms for the benefit of capsaicin and hot water hydrotherapy in treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, John R; Lapoint, Jeff M; Burillo-Putze, Guillermo

    2018-01-01

    Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome is a clinical disorder that has become more prevalent with increasing use of cannabis and synthetic cannabinoids, and which is difficult to treat. Standard antiemetics commonly fail to alleviate the severe nausea and vomiting characteristic of the syndrome. Curiously, cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome patients often report dramatic relief of symptoms with hot showers and baths, and topical capsaicin. In this review, we detail the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of capsaicin and explore possible mechanisms for its beneficial effect, including activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 and neurohumoral regulation. Putative mechanisms responsible for the benefit of hot water hydrotherapy are also investigated. An extensive search of PubMed, OpenGrey, and Google Scholar from inception to April 2017 was performed to identify known and theoretical thermoregulatory mechanisms associated with the endocannabinoid system. The searches resulted in 2417 articles. These articles were screened for relevant mechanisms behind capsaicin and heat activation having potential antiemetic effects. References from the selected articles were also hand-searched. A total of 137 articles were considered relevant and included. Capsaicin: Topical capsaicin is primarily used for treatment of neuropathic pain, but it has also been used successfully in some 20 cases of cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of capsaicin as a transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 agonist may explain this effect. Topical capsaicin has a longer half-life than oral administration, thus its potential duration of benefit is longer. Capsaicin and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1: Topical capsaicin binds and activates the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor, triggering influx of calcium and sodium, as well as release of inflammatory neuropeptides leading to transient burning, stinging, and itching. This elicits

  18. Ondansetron can enhance cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity via inhibition of multiple toxin and extrusion proteins (MATEs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Qing; Guo, Dong; Dong, Zhongqi; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Shiew-Mei; Polli, James E.; Shu, Yan

    2013-01-01

    The nephrotoxicity limits the clinical application of cisplatin. Human organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) and multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (MATEs) work in concert in the elimination of cationic drugs such as cisplatin from the kidney. We hypothesized that co-administration of ondansetron would have an effect on cisplatin nephrotoxicity by altering the function of cisplatin transporters. The inhibitory potencies of ondansetron on metformin accumulation mediated by OCT2 and MATEs were determined in the stable HEK-293 cells expressing these transporters. The effects of ondansetron on drug disposition in vivo were examined by conducting the pharmacokinetics of metformin, a classical substrate for OCTs and MATEs, in wild-type and Mate1−/− mice. The nephrotoxicity was assessed in the wild-type and Mate1−/− mice received cisplatin with and without ondansetron. Both MATEs, including human MATE1, human MATE2-K, and mouse Mate1, and OCT2 (human and mouse) were subject to ondansetron inhibition, with much greater potencies by ondansetron on MATEs. Ondansetron significantly increased tissue accumulation and pharmacokinetic exposure of metformin in wild-type but not in Mate1−/− mice. Moreover, ondansetron treatment significantly enhanced renal accumulation of cisplatin and cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity which were indicated by increased levels of biochemical and molecular biomarkers and more severe pathohistological changes in mice. Similar increases in nephrotoxicity were caused by genetic deficiency of MATE function in mice. Therefore, the potent inhibition of MATEs by ondansetron enhances the nephrotoxicity associated with cisplatin treatment in mice. Potential nephrotoxic effects of combining the chemotherapeutic cisplatin and the antiemetic 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT 3 ) receptor antagonists, such as ondansetron, should be investigated in patients. - Highlights: • Nephrotoxicity significantly limits clinical use of the chemotherapeutic cisplatin

  19. The impact of 5-hydroxytryptamine-receptor antagonists on chemotherapy treatment adherence, treatment delay, and nausea and vomiting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palli, Swetha Rao; Grabner, Michael; Quimbo, Ralph A; Rugo, Hope S

    2015-01-01

    To determine the incidence of chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting (CINV) and chemotherapy treatment delay and adherence among patients receiving palonosetron versus other 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist (5-HT 3 RA) antiemetics. This retrospective claims analysis included adults with primary malignancies who initiated treatment consisting of single-day intravenous highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC) or moderately EC (MEC) regimens. Treatment delay was defined as a gap in treatment at least twice the National Comprehensive Cancer Network-specified cycle length, specific to each chemotherapy regimen. Treatment adherence was determined by the percentage of patients who received the regimen-specific recommended number of chemotherapy cycles within the recommended time frame. We identified 1,832 palonosetron and 2,387 other 5-HT 3 RA (“other”) patients who initiated HEC therapy, and 1,350 palonosetron users and 1,379 patients on other antiemetics who initiated MEC therapy. Fewer patients receiving palonosetron experienced CINV versus other (HEC, 27.5% versus 32.2%, P=0.0011; MEC, 36.1% versus 41.7%, P=0.0026), and fewer treatment delays occurred among patients receiving palonosetron versus other (HEC, 3.2% versus 6.0%, P<0.0001; MEC, 17.0% versus 26.8%, P<0.0001). Compared with the other cohort, patients receiving palonosetron were significantly more adherent to the index chemotherapy regimen with respect to the recommended time frame (HEC, 74.7% versus 69.7%, P=0.0004; MEC, 43.1% versus 37.3%, P=0.0019) and dosage (HEC, 27.3% versus 25.8%, P=0.0004; MEC, 15.0% versus 12.6%, P=0.0019). Palonosetron more effectively reduced occurrence of CINV in patients receiving HEC or MEC compared with other agents in this real-world setting. Additionally, patients receiving palonosetron had better adherence and fewer treatment delays than patients receiving other 5-HT 3 RAs

  20. Addition of the Neurokinin-1-Receptor Antagonist (RA) Aprepitant to a 5-Hydroxytryptamine-RA and Dexamethasone in the Prophylaxis of Nausea and Vomiting Due to Radiation Therapy With Concomitant Cisplatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahn, Franziska, E-mail: franziska.jahn@uk-halle.de [Department of Hematology/Oncology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Riesner, Anica [Department of Gastroenterology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Jahn, Patrick [Nursing Research Unit, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Sieker, Frank; Vordermark, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Jordan, Karin [Department of Hematology/Oncology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To assess, in a prospective, observational study, the safety and efficacy of the addition of the neurokinin-1-receptor antagonist (NK1-RA) aprepitant to concomitant radiochemotherapy, for the prophylaxis of radiation therapy–induced nausea and vomiting. Patients and Methods: This prospective observational study compared the antiemetic efficacy of an NK1-RA (aprepitant), a 5-hydroxytryptamine-RA, and dexamethasone (aprepitant regimen) versus a 5-hydroxytryptamine-RA and dexamethasone (control regimen) in patients receiving concomitant radiochemotherapy with cisplatin at the Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Halle (Saale), Germany. The primary endpoint was complete response in the overall phase, defined as no vomiting and no use of rescue therapy in this period. Results: Fifty-nine patients treated with concomitant radiochemotherapy with cisplatin were included in this study. Thirty-one patients received the aprepitant regimen and 29 the control regimen. The overall complete response rates for cycles 1 and 2 were 75.9% and 64.5% for the aprepitant group and 60.7% and 54.2% for the control group, respectively. Although a 15.2% absolute difference was reached in cycle 1, a statistical significance was not detected (P=.22). Furthermore maximum nausea was 1.58 ± 1.91 in the control group and 0.73 ± 1.79 in the aprepitant group (P=.084); for the head-and-neck subset, 2.23 ± 2.13 in the control group and 0.64 ± 1.77 in the aprepitant group, respectively (P=.03). Conclusion: This is the first study of an NK1-RA–containing antiemetic prophylaxis regimen in patients receiving concomitant radiochemotherapy. Although the primary endpoint was not obtained, the absolute difference of 10% in efficacy was reached, which is defined as clinically meaningful for patients by international guidelines groups. Randomized phase 3 studies are necessary to further define the potential role of an NK1-RA in this setting.

  1. Postoperative pain and patient-controlled epidural analgesia-related adverse effects in young and elderly patients: a retrospective analysis of 2,435 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh JC

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Jae Chul Koh, Young Song, So Yeon Kim, Sooyeun Park, Seo Hee Ko, Dong Woo Han Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Anesthesia and Pain Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea Abstract: In this retrospective study, data of 2,435 patients who received fentanyl and ropivacaine-based patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA for pain relief after elective surgery under general or spinal anesthesia were reviewed. Differences in postoperative pain, incidence of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA-related adverse effects, and risk factors for the need for rescue analgesics for 48 hours postsurgery in young (age 20–39 years and elderly (age ≥70 years patients were evaluated. Although there were no significant differences in postoperative pain intensity between the two groups until 6 hours postsurgery, younger patients experienced greater postoperative pain intensity compared with older patients 6–48 hours postsurgery. While younger patients exhibited greater incidence of numbness, motor weakness, and discontinuation of PCA postsurgery, elderly patients exhibited greater incidence of hypotension, nausea/vomiting, rescue analgesia, and antiemetic administration. Upon multivariate analysis, low fentanyl dosage and history of smoking were found to be associated with an increased need for rescue analgesia among younger patients, while physical status classification III/IV and thoracic surgery were associated with a decreased need for rescue analgesia among the elderly. Discontinuation of PCA was more frequent among younger patients than the elderly (18.5% vs 13.5%, P=0.001. Reasons for discontinuation of PCA among young and elderly patients, respectively, were nausea and vomiting (6.8% vs 26.6%, numbness or motor weakness (67.8% vs 11.5%, urinary retention (7.4% vs 8.7%, dizziness (2.2% vs 5.2%, and hypotension (3.1% vs 20.3%. In conclusion, PCEA was more frequently associated with numbness, motor

  2. Racial disparities in cancer care in the Veterans Affairs health care system and the role of site of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Cleo A; Landrum, Mary Beth; McNeil, Barbara J; Bozeman, Samuel R; Williams, Christina D; Keating, Nancy L

    2014-09-01

    We assessed cancer care disparities within the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system and whether between-hospital differences explained disparities. We linked VA cancer registry data with VA and Medicare administrative data and examined 20 cancer-related quality measures among Black and White veterans diagnosed with colorectal (n = 12,897), lung (n = 25,608), or prostate (n = 38,202) cancer from 2001 to 2004. We used logistic regression to assess racial disparities for each measure and hospital fixed-effects models to determine whether disparities were attributable to between- or within-hospital differences. Compared with Whites, Blacks had lower rates of early-stage colon cancer diagnosis (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.80; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.72, 0.90), curative surgery for stage I, II, or III rectal cancer (AOR = 0.57; 95% CI = 0.41, 0.78), 3-year survival for colon cancer (AOR = 0.75; 95% CI = 0.62, 0.89) and rectal cancer (AOR = 0.61; 95% CI = 0.42, 0.87), curative surgery for early-stage lung cancer (AOR = 0.50; 95% CI = 0.41, 0.60), 3-dimensional conformal or intensity-modulated radiation (3-D CRT/IMRT; AOR = 0.53; 95% CI = 0.47, 0.59), and potent antiemetics for highly emetogenic chemotherapy (AOR = 0.87; 95% CI = 0.78, 0.98). Adjustment for hospital fixed-effects minimally influenced racial gaps except for 3-D CRT/IMRT (AOR = 0.75; 95% CI = 0.65, 0.87) and potent antiemetics (AOR = 0.95; 95% CI = 0.82, 1.10). Disparities in VA cancer care were observed for 7 of 20 measures and were primarily attributable to within-hospital differences.

  3. The impact of 5-hydroxytryptamine-receptor antagonists on chemotherapy treatment adherence, treatment delay, and nausea and vomiting

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    Palli SR

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Swetha Rao Palli,1 Michael Grabner,1 Ralph A Quimbo,1 Hope S Rugo2 1HealthCore, Wilmington, DE, 2University of California San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA, USA Purpose: To determine the incidence of chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting (CINV and chemotherapy treatment delay and adherence among patients receiving palonosetron versus other 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist (5-HT3 RA antiemetics. Materials and methods: This retrospective claims analysis included adults with primary malignancies who initiated treatment consisting of single-day intravenous highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC or moderately EC (MEC regimens. Treatment delay was defined as a gap in treatment at least twice the National Comprehensive Cancer Network-specified cycle length, specific to each chemotherapy regimen. Treatment adherence was determined by the percentage of patients who received the regimen-specific recommended number of chemotherapy cycles within the recommended time frame. Results: We identified 1,832 palonosetron and 2,387 other 5-HT3 RA (“other” patients who initiated HEC therapy, and 1,350 palonosetron users and 1,379 patients on other antiemetics who initiated MEC therapy. Fewer patients receiving palonosetron experienced CINV versus other (HEC, 27.5% versus 32.2%, P=0.0011; MEC, 36.1% versus 41.7%, P=0.0026, and fewer treatment delays occurred among patients receiving palonosetron versus other (HEC, 3.2% versus 6.0%, P<0.0001; MEC, 17.0% versus 26.8%, P<0.0001. Compared with the other cohort, patients receiving palonosetron were significantly more adherent to the index chemotherapy regimen with respect to the recommended time frame (HEC, 74.7% versus 69.7%, P=0.0004; MEC, 43.1% versus 37.3%, P=0.0019 and dosage (HEC, 27.3% versus 25.8%, P=0.0004; MEC, 15.0% versus 12.6%, P=0.0019. Conclusion: Palonosetron more effectively reduced occurrence of CINV in patients receiving HEC or MEC compared with

  4. Can treatment with Cocculine improve the control of chemotherapy-induced emesis in early breast cancer patients? A randomized, multi-centered, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase III trial

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    Pérol David

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV remains a major problem that seriously impairs the quality of life (QoL in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy regimens. Complementary medicines, including homeopathy, are used by many patients with cancer, usually alongside with conventional treatment. A randomized, placebo-controlled Phase III study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a complex homeopathic medicine, Cocculine, in the control of CINV in non-metastatic breast cancer patients treated by standard chemotherapy regimens. Methods Chemotherapy-naïve patients with non-metastatic breast cancer scheduled to receive 6 cycles of chemotherapy including at least three initial cycles of FAC 50, FEC 100 or TAC were randomized to receive standard anti-emetic treatment plus either a complex homeopathic remedy (Cocculine, registered in France for treatment of nausea and travel sickness or the matching placebo (NCT00409071 clinicaltrials.gov. The primary endpoint was nausea score measured after the 1st chemotherapy course using the FLIE questionnaire (Functional Living Index for Emesis with 5-day recall. Secondary endpoints were: vomiting measured by the FLIE score, nausea and vomiting measured by patient self-evaluation (EVA and investigator recording (NCI-CTC AE V3.0 and treatment compliance. Results From September 2005 to January 2008, 431 patients were randomized: 214 to Cocculine (C and 217 to placebo (P. Patient characteristics were well-balanced between the 2 arms. Overall, compliance to study treatments was excellent and similar between the 2 arms. A total of 205 patients (50.9%; 103 patients in the placebo and 102 in the homeopathy arms had nausea FLIE scores > 6 indicative of no impact of nausea on quality of life during the 1st chemotherapy course. There was no difference between the 2 arms when primary endpoint analysis was performed by chemotherapy stratum; or in the subgroup of patients with susceptibility

  5. Randomized controlled trial of postoperative belladonna and opium rectal suppositories in vaginal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Kristina; Yi, John; Wasson, Megan; Klauschie, Jennifer; Ryan, Debra; Hentz, Joseph; Cornella, Jeffrey; Magtibay, Paul; Kho, Roseanne

    2017-05-01

    After vaginal surgery, oral and parenteral narcotics are used commonly for pain relief, and their use may exacerbate the incidence of sedation, nausea, and vomiting, which ultimately delays convalescence. Previous studies have demonstrated that rectal analgesia after surgery results in lower pain scores and less intravenous morphine consumption. Belladonna and opium rectal suppositories may be used to relieve pain and minimize side effects; however, their efficacy has not been confirmed. We aimed to evaluate the use of belladonna and opium suppositories for pain reduction in vaginal surgery. A prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial that used belladonna and opium suppositories after inpatient or outpatient vaginal surgery was conducted. Vaginal surgery was defined as (1) vaginal hysterectomy with uterosacral ligament suspension or (2) posthysterectomy prolapse repair that included uterosacral ligament suspension and/or colporrhaphy. Belladonna and opium 16A (16.2/60 mg) or placebo suppositories were administered rectally immediately after surgery and every 8 hours for a total of 3 doses. Patient-reported pain data were collected with the use of a visual analog scale (at 2, 4, 12, and 20 hours postoperatively. Opiate use was measured and converted into parenteral morphine equivalents. The primary outcome was pain, and secondary outcomes included pain medication, antiemetic medication, and a quality of recovery questionnaire. Adverse effects were surveyed at 24 hours and 7 days. Concomitant procedures for urinary incontinence or pelvic organ prolapse did not preclude enrollment. Ninety women were randomly assigned consecutively at a single institution under the care of a fellowship-trained surgeon group. Demographics did not differ among the groups with mean age of 55 years, procedure time of 97 minutes, and prolapse at 51%. Postoperative pain scores were equivalent among both groups at each time interval. The belladonna and opium group used a

  6. Ondansetron can enhance cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity via inhibition of multiple toxin and extrusion proteins (MATEs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qing [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland at Baltimore, MD (United States); Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Hunan 410078 (China); Guo, Dong [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Hunan 410078 (China); Dong, Zhongqi [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland at Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhang, Wei [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland at Baltimore, MD (United States); Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Hunan 410078 (China); Zhang, Lei; Huang, Shiew-Mei [Office of Clinical Pharmacology, Office of Translational Sciences, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Polli, James E. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland at Baltimore, MD (United States); Shu, Yan, E-mail: yshu@rx.umaryland.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland at Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2013-11-15

    The nephrotoxicity limits the clinical application of cisplatin. Human organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) and multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (MATEs) work in concert in the elimination of cationic drugs such as cisplatin from the kidney. We hypothesized that co-administration of ondansetron would have an effect on cisplatin nephrotoxicity by altering the function of cisplatin transporters. The inhibitory potencies of ondansetron on metformin accumulation mediated by OCT2 and MATEs were determined in the stable HEK-293 cells expressing these transporters. The effects of ondansetron on drug disposition in vivo were examined by conducting the pharmacokinetics of metformin, a classical substrate for OCTs and MATEs, in wild-type and Mate1−/− mice. The nephrotoxicity was assessed in the wild-type and Mate1−/− mice received cisplatin with and without ondansetron. Both MATEs, including human MATE1, human MATE2-K, and mouse Mate1, and OCT2 (human and mouse) were subject to ondansetron inhibition, with much greater potencies by ondansetron on MATEs. Ondansetron significantly increased tissue accumulation and pharmacokinetic exposure of metformin in wild-type but not in Mate1−/− mice. Moreover, ondansetron treatment significantly enhanced renal accumulation of cisplatin and cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity which were indicated by increased levels of biochemical and molecular biomarkers and more severe pathohistological changes in mice. Similar increases in nephrotoxicity were caused by genetic deficiency of MATE function in mice. Therefore, the potent inhibition of MATEs by ondansetron enhances the nephrotoxicity associated with cisplatin treatment in mice. Potential nephrotoxic effects of combining the chemotherapeutic cisplatin and the antiemetic 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT{sub 3}) receptor antagonists, such as ondansetron, should be investigated in patients. - Highlights: • Nephrotoxicity significantly limits clinical use of the chemotherapeutic

  7. Brain Activation by H1 Antihistamines Challenges Conventional View of Their Mechanism of Action in Motion Sickness: A Behavioral, c-Fos and Physiological Study in Suncus murinus (House Musk Shrew

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    Longlong Tu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Motion sickness occurs under a variety of circumstances and is common in the general population. It is usually associated with changes in gastric motility, and hypothermia, which are argued to be surrogate markers for nausea; there are also reports that respiratory function is affected. As laboratory rodents are incapable of vomiting, Suncus murinus was used to model motion sickness and to investigate changes in gastric myoelectric activity (GMA and temperature homeostasis using radiotelemetry, whilst also simultaneously investigating changes in respiratory function using whole body plethysmography. The anti-emetic potential of the highly selective histamine H1 receptor antagonists, mepyramine (brain penetrant, and cetirizine (non-brain penetrant, along with the muscarinic receptor antagonist, scopolamine, were investigated in the present study. On isolated ileal segments from Suncus murinus, both mepyramine and cetirizine non-competitively antagonized the contractile action of histamine with pKb values of 7.5 and 8.4, respectively; scopolamine competitively antagonized the contractile action of acetylcholine with pA2 of 9.5. In responding animals, motion (1 Hz, 4 cm horizontal displacement, 10 min increased the percentage of the power of bradygastria, and decreased the percentage power of normogastria whilst also causing hypothermia. Animals also exhibited an increase in respiratory rate and a reduction in tidal volume. Mepyramine (50 mg/kg, i.p. and scopolamine (10 mg/kg, i.p., but not cetirizine (10 mg/kg, i.p., significantly antagonized motion-induced emesis but did not reverse the motion-induced disruptions of GMA, or hypothermia, or effects on respiration. Burst analysis of plethysmographic-derived waveforms showed mepyramine also had increased the inter-retch+vomit frequency, and emetic episode duration. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that motion alone did not induce c-fos expression in the brain. Paradoxically, mepyramine increased c

  8. Anesthesiologists' practice patterns for treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting in the ambulatory Post Anesthesia Care Unit

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    Claybon Louis

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When patients are asked what they find most anxiety provoking about having surgery, the top concerns almost always include postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV. Only until recently have there been any published recommendations, mostly derived from expert opinion, as to which regimens to use once a patient develops PONV. The goal of this study was to assess the responses to a written survey to address the following questions: 1 If no prophylaxis is administered to an ambulatory patient, what agent do anesthesiologists use for treatment of PONV in the ambulatory Post-Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU?; 2 Do anesthesiologists use non-pharmacologic interventions for PONV treatment?; and 3 If a PONV prophylaxis agent is administered during the anesthetic, do anesthesiologists choose an antiemetic in a different class for treatment? Methods A questionnaire with five short hypothetical clinical vignettes was mailed to 300 randomly selected USA anesthesiologists. The types of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions for PONV treatment were analyzed. Results The questionnaire was completed by 106 anesthesiologists (38% response rate, who reported that on average 52% of their practice was ambulatory. If a patient develops PONV and received no prophylaxis, 67% (95% CI, 62% – 79% of anesthesiologists reported they would administer a 5-HT3-antagonist as first choice for treatment, with metoclopramide and dexamethasone being the next two most common choices. 65% (95% CI, 55% – 74% of anesthesiologists reported they would also use non-pharmacologic interventions to treat PONV in the PACU, with an IV fluid bolus or nasal cannula oxygen being the most common. When PONV prophylaxis was given during the anesthetic, the preferred PONV treatment choice changed. Whereas 3%–7% of anesthesiologists would repeat dose metoclopramide, dexamethasone, or droperidol, 26% (95% confidence intervals, 18% – 36% of practitioners would re

  9. Hindbrain GLP-1 receptor mediation of cisplatin-induced anorexia and nausea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jonghe, Bart C; Holland, Ruby A; Olivos, Diana R; Rupprecht, Laura E; Kanoski, Scott E; Hayes, Matthew R

    2016-01-01

    While chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting are clinically controlled in the acute (anorexia, nausea, fatigue, and other illness-type behaviors during the delayed phase (>24 h) of chemotherapy are largely uncontrolled. As the hindbrain glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) system contributes to energy balance and mediates aversive and stressful stimuli, here we examine the hypothesis that hindbrain GLP-1 signaling mediates aspects of chemotherapy-induced nausea and reductions in feeding behavior in rats. Specifically, hindbrain GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) blockade, via 4th intracerebroventricular (ICV) exendin-(9-39) injections, attenuates the anorexia, body weight reduction, and pica (nausea-induced ingestion of kaolin clay) elicited by cisplatin chemotherapy during the delayed phase (48 h) of chemotherapy-induced nausea. Additionally, the present data provide evidence that the central GLP-1-producing preproglucagon neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) of the caudal brainstem are activated by cisplatin during the delayed phase of chemotherapy-induced nausea, as cisplatin led to a significant increase in c-Fos immunoreactivity in NTS GLP-1-immunoreactive neurons. These data support a growing body of literature suggesting that the central GLP-1 system may be a potential pharmaceutical target for adjunct anti-emetics used to treat the delayed-phase of nausea and emesis, anorexia, and body weight loss that accompany chemotherapy treatments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Olanzapine and Betamethasone Are Effective for the Treatment of Nausea and Vomiting due to Metastatic Brain Tumors of Rectal Cancer

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    M. Suzuki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain lesions originating from metastasis of colorectal cancer represent 3-5% of all brain metastases and are relatively rare. Of all distant metastases of colorectal cancer, those to the liver are detected in 22-29% of cases, while those to the lungs are detected in 8-18% of cases. In contrast, brain metastasis is quite rare, with a reported incidence ranging from 0.4 to 1.8%. Treatments for metastatic brain tumors include surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and supportive care with steroids, etc. Untreated patients exhibit a median survival of only approximately 1 month. The choice of treatment for brain metastasis depends on the number of lesions, the patient's general condition, nerve findings and presence of other metastatic lesions. We herein report the case of a 78-year-old male who presented with brain metastases originating from rectal carcinoma. He suffered from nausea, vomiting, anorexia and vertigo during body movement. He received antiemetics, glycerol and whole brain radiation therapy; however, these treatments proved ineffective. Olanzapine therapy was started at a dose of 1.25 mg every night. The persistent nausea disappeared the next day, and the frequency of vomiting subsequently decreased. The patient was able to consume solid food. Olanzapine is an antipsychotic that has recently been used as palliative therapy for refractory nausea and vomiting in patients receiving chemotherapy. We consider that olanzapine was helpful as a means of supportive care for the treatment of nausea and vomiting due to brain metastasis.

  11. EFFERVESCENT TABLETS FORMULATION OF GINGER RHIZOME (Zingiber officinale Rosc. WITH VARIATION OF CITRIC ACID AND TARTARIC ACID LEVEL

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    Mufrod Mufrod

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc. has efficacy as an anti-emetic. Ginger rhizome is usually consumed as instant beverages, so that need to be made into a dosage form that more effective, efficient and attractive. This research aims to formulate ginger into effervescent tablets by using variation of the levels of citric acid and tartaric acid. Dried extract of ginger was made with percolation method using ethanol 70% and evaporated using spray dryer. Extract was made for 5 formulas with variation of acid source using smelting method. Granules were tested its physical properties include flow time, tap index, angle of repose, water absorption, compactibility, mass density, water content, and total phenolic level. Granules were compressed become tablets and tested for physical properties include weight uniformity, friability, hardness, dissolve time, flavor response test and total phenolic level. Data were analyzed with Anova One Way using 95% confidence level. The result shown that formula III was the best formula because it meets the physical requirements of granules and tablets. While the formula V (100% tartaric acid was a formula that provides the greatest stability phenolic levels.

  12. The Rise, Fall and Subsequent Triumph of Thalidomide: Lessons Learned in Drug Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Waqas; Arfons, Lisa M.; Lazarus, Hillard M.

    2011-01-01

    Perhaps no other drug in modern medicine rivals the dramatic revitalization of thalidomide. Originally marketed as a sedative, thalidomide gained immense popularity worldwide among pregnant women because of its effective anti-emetic properties in morning sickness. Mounting evidence of human teratogenicity marked a dramatic fall from grace and led to widespread social, legal and economic ramifications. Despite its tragic past thalidomide emerged several decades later as a novel and highly effective agent in the treatment of various inflammatory and malignant diseases. In 2006 thalidomide completed its remarkable renaissance becoming the first new agent in over a decade to gain approval for the treatment of plasma cell myeloma. The catastrophic collapse yet subsequent revival of thalidomide provides important lessons in drug development. Never entirely abandoned by the medical community, thalidomide resurfaced as an important drug once the mechanisms of action were further studied and better understood. Ongoing research and development of related drugs such as lenalidomide now represent a class of irreplaceable drugs in hematological malignancies. Further, the tragedies associated with this agent stimulated the legislation which revamped the FDA regulatory process, expanded patient informed consent procedures and mandated more transparency from drug manufacturers. Finally, we review recent clinical trials summarizing selected medical indications for thalidomide with an emphasis on hematologic malignancies. Herein, we provide a historic perspective regarding the up-and-down development of thalidomide. Using PubMed databases we conducted searches using thalidomide and associated keywords highlighting pharmacology, mechanisms of action, and clinical uses. PMID:23556097

  13. Patients' and parents' views regarding supportive care in childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenniglo, L J A; Loeffen, E A H; Kremer, L C M; Font-Gonzalez, A; Mulder, R L; Postma, A; Naafs-Wilstra, M C; Grootenhuis, M A; van de Wetering, M D; Tissing, W J E

    2017-10-01

    Intensive therapies in pediatric malignancies increased survival rates but also occurrence of treatment-related morbidities. Therefore, supportive care fulfills an increasingly important role. In planning development of guidelines with incorporation of shared decision making, we noticed that little is known about the needs and preferences of patients and their parents. Our goals were therefore to investigate (1) which supportive care topics patients and parents regard as most important and (2) the preferred role they wish to fulfill in decision making. This qualitative study consisted of three focus groups (two traditional, one online) with patients and parents of two Dutch pediatric oncology centers. Data were transcribed as simple verbatim and analyzed using thematic analysis. Eleven adolescent patients and 18 parents shared detailed views on various aspects of supportive care. Themes of major importance were communication between patient and physician (commitment, accessibility, proactive attitude of physicians), well-timed provision of information, and the suitability and accessibility of psychosocial care. In contrast to prioritized supportive care topics by medical professionals, somatic issues (e.g., febrile neutropenia) were infrequently addressed. Patients and parents preferred to be actively involved in decision making in selected topics, such as choice of analgesics and anti-emetics, but not in, e.g., choice of antibiotics. Children with cancer and parents were provided a valuable insight into their views regarding supportive care and shared decision making. These results have important implications towards improving supportive care, both in selecting topics for guideline development and incorporating preferences of patients and parents herein.

  14. Holoptelea integrifolia (Roxb. Planch: A Review of Its Ethnobotany, Pharmacology, and Phytochemistry

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    Showkat Ahmad Ganie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Holoptelea integrifolia (Ulmaceae is a versatile medicinal plant used in various indigenous systems of medicine for curing routine healthcare maladies. It is traditionally used in the treatment and prevention of several ailments like leprosy, inflammation, rickets, leucoderma, scabies, rheumatism, ringworm, eczema, malaria, intestinal cancer, and chronic wounds. In vitro and in vivo pharmacological investigations on crude extracts and isolated compounds showed antibacterial, antifungal, analgesic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anthelmintic, antidiabetic, antidiarrhoeal, adaptogenic, anticancer, wound healing, hepatoprotective, larvicidal, antiemetic, CNS depressant, and hypolipidemic activities. Phytochemical analysis showed the presence of terpenoids, sterols, saponins, tannins, proteins, carbohydrates, alkaloids, phenols, flavonoids, glycosides, and quinines. Numerous compounds including Holoptelin-A, Holoptelin-B, friedlin, epifriedlin, β-amyrin, stigmasterol, β-sitosterol, 1, 4-napthalenedione, betulin, betulinic acid, hexacosanol, and octacosanol have been identified and isolated from the plant species. The results of several studies indicated that H. integrifolia may be used as an effective therapeutic remedy in the prevention and treatment of various ailments. However, further studies on chemical constituents and their mechanisms in exhibiting certain biological activities are needed. In addition, study on the toxicity of the crude extracts and the compounds isolated from this plant should be assessed to ensure their eligibility to be used as source of modern medicines.

  15. Nanoethosomes for transdermal delivery of tropisetron HCl: multi-factorial predictive modeling, characterization, and ex vivo skin permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Messih, Hanaa A; Ishak, Rania A H; Geneidi, Ahmed S; Mansour, Samar

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the present work is to exclusively optimize and model the effect of phospholipid type either egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) or soybean phosphatidylcholine (SPC), together with other formulation variables, on the development of nano-ethosomal systems for transdermal delivery of a water-soluble antiemetic drug. Tropisetron HCl (TRO) is available as hard gelatin capsules and IV injections. The transdermal delivery of TRO is considered as a novel alternative route supposing to improve BAV as well as patient convenience. TRO-loaded ethanolic vesicular systems were prepared by hot technique. The effect of formulation variables were optimized through a response surface methodology using 3 × 2 2 -level full factorial design. The concentrations of both PC (A) and ethanol (B) and PC type (C) were the factors, while entrapment efficiency (Y 1 ), vesicle size (Y 2 ), polydispersity index (Y 3 ), and zeta potential (Y 4 ) were the responses. The drug permeation across rat skin from selected formulae was studied. Particle morphology, drug-excipient interactions, and vesicle stability were also investigated. The results proved the critical role of all formulation variables on ethosomal characteristics. The suggested models for all responses showed good predictability. Only the concentration of phospholipid, irrespective to PC type, had a significant effect on the transdermal flux (p transdermal TRO delivery.

  16. Cardiovascular Events in Cancer Patients Treated with Highly or Moderately Emetogenic Chemotherapy: Results from a Population-Based Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo, T. T.; Nelson, J. J.

    2012-01-01

    Studies on cardiovascular safety in cancer patients treated with highly or moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC or MEC), who may have taken the antiemetic, aprepitant, have been limited to clinical trials and postmarketing spontaneous reports. Our study explored background rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events among HEC- or MEC-treated cancer patients in a population-based setting to contextualize events seen in a new drug development program and to determine at a high level whether rates differed by aprepitant usage. Medical and pharmacy claims data from the 2005-2007 IMPACT National Benchmark Database were classified into emetogenic chemotherapy categories and CVD outcomes. Among 5827 HEC/MEC-treated patients, frequencies were highest for hypertension (16-21%) and composites of venous (7-12%) and arterial thromboembolic events (4-7%). Aprepitant users generally did not experience higher frequencies of events compared to nonusers. Our study serves as a useful benchmark of background CVD event rates in a population-based setting of cancer patients.

  17. Neurokinin NK1 and NK3 receptors as targets for drugs to treat gastrointestinal motility disorders and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanger, Gareth J

    2004-04-01

    NK1 and NK3 receptors do not appear to play significant roles in normal GI functions, but both may be involved in defensive or pathological processes. NK1 receptor antagonists are antiemetic, operating via vagal sensory and motor systems, so there is a need to study their effects on other gastro-vagal functions thought to play roles in functional bowel disorders. Interactions between NK1 receptors and enteric nonadrenergic, noncholinergic motorneurones suggest a need to explore the role of this receptor in disrupted colonic motility. NK1 receptor antagonism does not exert consistent analgesic activity in humans, but similar studies have not been carried out against pain of GI origin, where NK1 receptors may have additional influences on mucosal inflammatory or "irritant" processes. NK3 receptors mediate certain disruptions of intestinal motility. The activity may be driven by tachykinins released from intrinsic primary afferent neurones (IPANs), which induce slow EPSP activity in connecting IPANs and hence, a degree of hypersensitivity within the enteric nervous system. The same process is also proposed to increase C-fibre sensitivity, either indirectly or directly. Thus, NK3 receptor antagonists inhibit intestinal nociception via a "peripheral" mechanism that may be intestine-specific. Studies with talnetant and other selective NK3 receptor antagonists are, therefore, revealing an exciting and novel pathway by which pathological changes in intestinal motility and nociception can be induced, suggesting a role for NK3 receptor antagonism in irritable bowel syndrome.

  18. Management of intestinal obstruction in advanced malignancy

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    Henry John Murray Ferguson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with incurable, advanced abdominal or pelvic malignancy often present to acute surgical departments with symptoms and signs of intestinal obstruction. It is rare for bowel strangulation to occur in these presentations, and spontaneous resolution often occurs, so the luxury of time should be afforded while decisions are made regarding surgery. Cross-sectional imaging is valuable in determining the underlying mechanism and pathology. The majority of these patients will not be suitable for an operation, and will be best managed in conjunction with a palliative medicine team. Surgeons require a good working knowledge of the mechanisms of action of anti-emetics, anti-secretories and analgesics to tailor early management to individual patients, while decisions regarding potential surgery are made. Deciding if and when to perform operative intervention in this group is complex, and fraught with both technical and emotional challenges. Surgery in this group is highly morbid, with no current evidence available concerning quality of life following surgery. The limited evidence concerning operative strategy suggests that resection and primary anastomosis results in improved survival, over bypass or stoma formation. Realistic prognostication and involvement of the patient, care-givers and the multidisciplinary team in treatment decisions is mandatory if optimum outcomes are to be achieved.

  19. Nuclear and radiological terrorism: continuing education article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Peter D; Bokor, Gyula

    2013-06-01

    Terrorism involving radioactive materials includes improvised nuclear devices, radiation exposure devices, contamination of food sources, radiation dispersal devices, or an attack on a nuclear power plant or a facility/vehicle that houses radioactive materials. Ionizing radiation removes electrons from atoms and changes the valence of the electrons enabling chemical reactions with elements that normally do not occur. Ionizing radiation includes alpha rays, beta rays, gamma rays, and neutron radiation. The effects of radiation consist of stochastic and deterministic effects. Cancer is the typical example of a stochastic effect of radiation. Deterministic effects include acute radiation syndrome (ARS). The hallmarks of ARS are damage to the skin, gastrointestinal tract, hematopoietic tissue, and in severe cases the neurovascular structures. Radiation produces psychological effects in addition to physiological effects. Radioisotopes relevant to terrorism include titrium, americium 241, cesium 137, cobalt 60, iodine 131, plutonium 238, califormium 252, iridium 192, uranium 235, and strontium 90. Medications used for treating a radiation exposure include antiemetics, colony-stimulating factors, antibiotics, electrolytes, potassium iodine, and chelating agents.

  20. Indigenous knowledge of medicinal plants of Chagharzai valley, district Buner, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, N.; Shinwari, Z.K.; Ilyas, M.; Ullah, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Indigenous knowledge of medicinal plants was recorded during summer 2004, in 22 villages of Chagharzai valley, District Buner. The study revealed 141 plant species belonging to 120 genera and 26 families are being used as medicine. The local people know the prospect and nature of the plant utilization, through personal experiences and ancestral prescriptions. The study also revealed that old aged people particularly women posses strong folk love of medicinal plants in comparison to young people. It was concluded that some plants are used singly while many other are used in combination. Similarly few plant species are used for the treatment of a specific disease, while several other have multiple uses. The plants were mainly used as stomachic, anti-allergic, antineuralgia, vermifuge, narcotic, laxative, anti jaundice, emollient, hypnotic, diuretic, digestive, demulcent, carminative, astringent, aphrodisiac, anti-spasmodic, anti-emetic, anti-diabetic, anthelmentic, anodyne and alterative. The present investigation will help in the preservation of indigenous knowledge of the local people, which is depleting day by day. (author)

  1. Availability, Pharmaceutics, Security, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacological Activities of Patchouli Alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guanying; Peng, Cheng; Xie, Xiaofang; Zhang, Sanyin; Cao, Xiaoyu

    2017-01-01

    Patchouli alcohol (PA), a tricyclic sesquiterpene, is one of the critical bioactive ingredients and is mainly isolated from aerial part of Pogostemon cablin (known as guanghuoxiang in China) belonging to Labiatae. So far, PA has been widely applied in perfume industries. This review was written with the use of reliable information published between 1974 and 2016 from libraries and electronic researches including NCKI, PubMed, Reaxys, ACS, ScienceDirect, Springer, and Wiley-Blackwell, aiming at presenting comprehensive outline of security, pharmacokinetics, and bioactivities of PA and at further providing a potential guide in exploring the PA and its use in various medical fields. We found that PA maybe was a low toxic drug that was acquired numerously through vegetable oil isolation and chemical synthesis and its stability and low water dissolution were improved in pharmaceutics. It also possessed specific pharmacokinetic characteristics, such as two-compartment open model, first-order kinetic elimination, and certain biometabolism and biotransformation process, and was shown to have multiple biological activities, that is, immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, antitumor, antimicrobial, insecticidal, antiatherogenic, antiemetic, whitening, and sedative activity. However, the systematic evaluations of preparation, pharmaceutics, toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and bioactivities underlying molecular mechanisms of action also required further investigation prior to practices of PA in clinic.

  2. Attenuation of oxidative and nitrosative stress in cortical area associates with antidepressant-like effects of tropisetron in male mice following social isolation stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Amiri, Shayan; Amini-Khoei, Hossein; Rahimi-Balaei, Maryam; Kordjazy, Nastaran; Olson, Carl O; Rastegar, Mojgan; Naserzadeh, Parvaneh; Marzban, Hassan; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Hosseini, Mir-Jamal; Samiei, Elika; Mehr, Shahram Ejtemaei

    2016-06-01

    Tropisetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist widely used as an antiemetic, has been reported to have positive effects on mood disorders. Adolescence is a critical period during the development of brain, where exposure to chronic stress during this time is highly associated with the development of depression. In this study, we showed that 4 weeks of juvenile social isolation stress (SIS) provoked depressive-like behaviors in male mice, which was associated with disruption of mitochondrial function and nitric oxide overproduction in the cortical areas. In this study, tropisetron (5mg/kg) reversed the negative behavioral effects of SIS in male mice. We found that the effects of tropisetron were mediated through mitigating the negative activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) on mitochondrial activity. Administration of aminoguanidine (specific iNOS inhibitor, 20mg/kg) augmented the protective effects of tropisetron (1mg/kg) on SIS. Furthermore, l-arginine (nitric oxide precursor, 100mg/kg) abolished the positive effects of tropisetron. These results have increased our knowledge on the pivotal role of mitochondrial function in the pathophysiology of depression, and highlighted the role of 5-HT3 receptors in psychosocial stress response during adolescence. Finally, we observed that tropisetron alleviated the mitochondrial dysfunction through decreased nitrergic system activity in the cerebral cortex. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Application of medical cannabis in patients with the neurodegeneration disorders

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    Lidia Kotuła

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Medical cannabis is the dried flowers of the female Cannabis sativa L. plant. Cannabis contains a number of active elements, including dronabinol (THC and cannabidiol (CBD. Dronabinol is usually the main ingredient. The body’s own cannabinoid system has been identified. The discovery of this system, which comprises endocannabinoids and receptors, confirmed that cannabis has a positive effect on certain illnesses and conditions. Two types of cannabinoid receptors have been identified: CB1 and CB2 receptors. The first type CB1 is mostly found in the central nervous system, modulate pain. It also has an anti-emetic effect, and has influence on the memory and the motor system. The second type of receptors CB2 is peripheral, and it is primarily found in immune system cells and it is responsible for the immunomodulatory effects of cannabinoids. Medical cannabis can help in cases of the neurodegeneration disorders, for example Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s Disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. Patients generally tolerate medical cannabis well.

  4. Gastroparesis: a review of current and emerging treatment options

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    Enweluzo C

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Chijioke Enweluzo, Fahad AzizHospital Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC, USAAbstract: Gastroparesis is a motility disorder of the stomach causing delay in food emptying from the stomach without any evidence of mechanical obstruction. The majority of cases are idiopathic. Patients need to be diagnosed properly by formal testing, and the evaluation of the severity of the gastroparesis may assist in guiding therapy. Initially, dietary modifications are encouraged, which include frequent and small semisolid-based meals. Promotility medications, like erythromycin, and antiemetics, like prochlorperazine, are offered for symptom relief. In patients who are refractory to pharmacologic treatment, more invasive options, such as intrapyloric botulinum toxin injections, placement of a jejunostomy tube, or implantation of a gastric stimulator, can be considered. Hemin therapy and gastric electric stimulation are emerging treatment options that are still at different stages of research. Regenerative medicine and stem cell-based therapies also hold promise for gastroparesis in the near future.Keywords: Gastroparesis, gastric emptying, gastric electrical stimulation, hemin

  5. Granistron and dexamethasone provide more improved prevention of postoperative emesis than granisetron alone in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Y; Tanaka, H; Toyooka, H

    1996-12-01

    Dexamethasone decreases chemotherapy-induced emesis when added to antiemetic regimens. This study was designed to compare the effectiveness of granisetron and dexamethasone with granisetron alone in the prevention of post-operative vomiting after strabismus repair, tonsillectomy with or without adenoidectomy in children. In a randomized, double-blind study, 60 healthy children, 4-10 yr of age, received either granisetron 40 micrograms.kg-1 and saline (Group S) or granisetron 40 micrograms.kg-1 and dexamethasone 4 mg (Group D) iv immediately after the induction of anaesthesia. All subjects received anaesthetics consisting of sevoflurane and nitrous oxide in oxygen Postoperative pain was treated with acetaminophen pr or pentazocine iv. Postoperatively, during the first 24 hr after anaesthesia, the frequencies of retching and vomiting, and the incidence of adverse events were recorded by nursing staff. There were no differences between the treatment groups with regard to demographics, surgical procedure, anaesthetic administered or analgesics used for postoperative pain. The frequency of the symptoms was 27% and 7% in Groups S and D, respectively (P < 0.05). The incidence of adverse events was comparable in the two groups. The prophylactic administration of granisetron and dexamethasone was more effective than granisetron alone in the prevention of postoperative vomiting in paediatric subjects undergoing strabismus repair, tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy.

  6. [Comparison of antiemesis effects of granisetron, aprepitant and dexamethasone to palonosetron, aprepitant and dexamethasone in treatment of high-emetic risk chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting - a retrospective study for efficacy and safety in a single institute].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, Hiroshi; Goto, Hiroaki; Myojo, Tomohiro

    2013-05-01

    Nausea and vomiting are among the most problematic symptoms experienced by patients with cancer who are receiving chemotherapy. 5-hydroxytryptamine 3(5-HT3)-receptor antagonists, NK1 receptor antagonists(aprepitant)and dexamethasone are now the standard therapies for preventing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting(CINV)that follow highly emetogenic chemotherapy, such as cisplatin and anthracycline. However, since it is not cleared which 5-HT3-recepter antagonist is a proper treatment for combined use with aprepitant and dexamethasone, we conducted a questionnaire survey, which used the numerical rating scale(NRS), for comparing palonosetron with granisetron in the same patient. Palonosetron showed a significant improvement of nausea for both acute(within 24 hours)and delayed phase(24-120 hours later), regardless of the type of chemotherapy(cisplatin or anthracycline-based regimen). Furthermore, palonosetron had a tolerable safety profile. Our study suggests that palonosetron-based antiemetic treatment will be a preferred choice for preventing CINV following highly emetogenic chemotherapy.

  7. Granisetron Extended-Release Injection: A Review in Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeks, Emma D

    2016-12-01

    An extended-release (ER) subcutaneously injectable formulation of the first-generation 5-HT 3 receptor antagonist granisetron is now available in the USA (Sustol ® ), where it is indicated for the prevention of acute and delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) following moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC) or anthracycline and cyclophosphamide combination chemotherapy regimens in adults. Granisetron ER is administered as a single subcutaneous injection and uses an erosion-controlled drug-delivery system to allow prolonged granisetron release. Primary endpoint data from phase III studies after an initial cycle of chemotherapy indicate that, when used as part of an antiemetic regimen, granisetron ER injection is more effective than intravenous ondansetron in preventing delayed CINV following highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC); is noninferior to intravenous palonosetron in preventing both acute CINV following MEC or HEC and delayed CINV following MEC; and is similar, but not superior, to palonosetron in preventing delayed CINV following HEC. The benefits of granisetron ER were seen in various patient subgroups, including those receiving anthracycline plus cyclophosphamide-based HEC, and (in an extension of one of the studies) over multiple MEC or HEC cycles. Granisetron ER injection is generally well tolerated, with an adverse event profile similar to that of ondansetron or palonosetron. Thus, granisetron ER injection expands the options for preventing both acute and delayed CINV in adults with cancer receiving MEC or anthracycline plus cyclophosphamide-based HEC.

  8. Granisetron versus Granisetron-Dexamethasone for Prevention of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting in Pediatric Strabismus Surgery: A Randomized Double-Blind Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Sinha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Efficacy of granisetron and combination of granisetron and dexamethasone was evaluated for prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV in children undergoing elective strabismus surgery. Methods. A total of 136 children (1–15 years were included. Children received either granisetron (40 mcg/kg [group G] or combination of granisetron (40 mcg/kg and dexamethasone (150 mcg/kg [group GD]. Intraoperative fentanyl requirement and incidence and severity of oculocardiac reflex were assessed. PONV severity was assessed for first 24 hours and if score was >2, it was treated with metoclopramide. Postoperative analgesia was administered with intravenous fentanyl and ibuprofen. Results. The demographic profile, muscles operated, and fentanyl requirement were comparable. Complete response to PONV in first 24 hours was observed in 75% (51/68 of children in group G and 76.9% (50/65 of children in group GD, which was comparable statistically (p=0.96, Fisher exact test; OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.50, 2.46. Incidence of PONV between 0 and 24 hours was comparable. One child in group G required rescue antiemetic in first 24 hours and none of the children had severe PONV in group GD. There was no significant difference in incidence or severity of oculocardiac reflex. Conclusion. Dexamethasone did not increase efficacy of granisetron for prevention of PONV in elective pediatric strabismus surgery. Registration number of clinical trial was CTRI/2009/091/001000.

  9. Ondansetron, granisetron, and dexamethasone compared for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy : A randomized placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhan, Yamac; Erhan, Elvan; Aydede, Hasan; Yumus, Okan; Yentur, Alp

    2008-06-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomies are associated with an appreciably high rate of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). This study was designed to compare the effectiveness of ondansetron, granisetron, and dexamethasone for the prevention of PONV in patients after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. A total of 80 American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical class I-II patients scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy were included in this randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled study. All patients received a similar standardized anesthesia and operative treatment. Patients were randomly divided into four groups (n = 20 each). Group 1, consisting of control patients, received 0.9% NaCl; group 2 patients received ondansetron 4 mg i.v.; group 3 patients received granisetron 3 mg i.v.; and group 4 patients received dexamethasone 8 mg i.v., all before the induction of anesthesia. Both nausea and vomiting were assessed during the first 24 h after the procedure. The total incidence of PONV was 75% with placebo, 35% with ondansetron, 30% with granisetron, and 25% with dexamethasone. The incidence of PONV was significantly less frequent in groups receiving antiemetics (p granisetron, and ondansetron were not significant. Prophylactic dexamethasone 8 mg i.v. significantly reduced the incidence of PONV in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Dexamethasone 8 mg was as effective as ondansetron 4 mg and granisetron 3 mg, and it was more effective than placebo.

  10. A novel lipid nanoemulsion system for improved permeation of granisetron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doh, Hea-Jeong; Jung, Yunjin; Balakrishnan, Prabagar; Cho, Hyun-Jong; Kim, Dae-Duk

    2013-01-01

    A new lipid nanoemulsion (LNE) system containing granisetron (GRN) was developed and its in vitro permeation-enhancing effect was evaluated using Caco-2 cell monolayers. Particle size, polydispersity index (PI) and stability of the prepared GRN-loaded LNE systems were also characterized. The mean diameters of prepared LNEs were around 50 nm with PI<0.2. Developed LNEs were stable at 4°C in the dark place over a period of 12 weeks. In vitro drug dissolution and cytotoxicity studies of GRN-loaded LNEs were performed. GRN-loaded LNEs exhibited significantly higher drug dissolution than GRN suspension at pH 6.8 for 2h (P<0.05). In vitro permeation study in Caco-2 cell monolayers showed that the LNEs significantly enhanced the drug permeation compared to GRN powder. The in vivo toxicity study in the rat jejunum revealed that the prepared GRN-loaded LNE was as safe as the commercial formulation (Kytril). These results suggest that LNE could be used as a potential oral liquid formulation of GRN for anti-emetic treatment on the post-operative and chemotherapeutic patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of the efficacy of ondansetron and granisetron to prevent postoperative nausea and vomiting after laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Si-Jia; Xiong, Xian-Ze; Lin, Yi-Xin; Cheng, Nan-Sheng

    2013-02-01

    Our purpose was to assess the prophylactic antiemetic effects of ondansetron versus granisetron for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. We searched Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, Embase, Science Citation Index Expanded, Foreign Medical Journal Full-Text Service, China National Knowledge Infrastructure Whole Article Database, Chinese Biomedical Database, and the Google Scholar. We calculated the risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for dichotomous data. The χ(2) test and I(2) value were used to assess heterogeneity. The merged early incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) in ondansetron group (42.9%) was higher than granisetron group (34.3%) (RR = 1.25, 95% CI, 0.82-1.92, P=0.31, I(2) = 48%). The merged total incidence of PONV in ondansetron group (38.7%) was higher than granisetron group (34.2%) (RR = 1.13, 95% CI, 0.82-1.56, P = 0.46, I(2) = 39%), although these differences were not statistically significant. Ondansetron is equivalent to granisetron for preventing early and total incidence of PONV after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

  12. Can granisetron injection used as primary prophylaxis improve the control of nausea and vomiting with low- emetogenic chemotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keat, Chan Huan; Phua, Gillian; Abdul Kassim, Mohd Shainol; Poh, Wong Kar; Sriraman, Malathi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the risk of uncontrolled chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) among patients receiving low emetogenic chemotherapy (LEC) with and without granisetron injection as the primary prophylaxis in addition to dexamethasone and metochlopramide. This was a single-centre, prospective cohort study. A total of 96 patients receiving LEC (52 with and 42 without granisetron) were randomly selected from the full patient list generated using the e-Hospital Information System (e-His). The rates of complete control (no CINV from days 1 to 5) and complete response (no nausea or vomiting in both acute and delayed phases) were identified through patient diaries which were adapted from the MASCC Antiemesis Tool (MAT). Selected covariates including gender, age, active alcohol consumption, morning sickness and previous chemotherapy history were controlled using the multiple logistic regression analyses. Both groups showed significant difference with LEC regimens (pgranisetron group indicated a higher complete response rate in acute emesis (adjusted OR: 0.1; 95%CI 0.02-0.85; p=0.034) than did the non-granisetron group. Both groups showed similar complete control and complete response rates for acute nausea, delayed nausea and delayed emesis. Granisetron injection used as the primary prophylaxis in LEC demonstrated limited roles in CINV control. Optimization of the guideline-recommended antiemetic regimens may serve as a less costly alternative to protect patients from uncontrolled acute emesis.

  13. In vitro percutaneous absorption enhancement of granisetron by chemical penetration enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nanxi; Cun, Dongmei; Li, Wei; Ma, Xu; Sun, Lin; Xi, Honglei; Li, Li; Fang, Liang

    2013-04-01

    Granisetron (GRN), a potent antiemetic agent, is frequently used to prevent nausea and vomiting induced by cancer cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiation therapy. As part of our efforts to further modify the physicochemical properties of this market drug, with the ultimate goal to formulate a better dosage form for GRN, this work was carried out to improve its permeability in vitro. The permeation behavior of GRN in isopropyl myristate (IPM) was investigated across excised rabbit abdominal skin and the enhancing activities of three novel O-acylmenthol derivatives synthesized in our laboratory as well as five well-known chemical enhancers were evaluated. It was found that the steady-state flux of granisetron free base (GRN-B) was about 26-fold higher than that of granisetron hydrochloride (GRN-H). The novel enhancer, 2-isopropyl-5-methylcyclohexyl heptanoate (M-HEP), was observed to provide the most significant enhancement for the absorption of GRN-B. When incorporated in the donor solution with the optimal enhancer M-HEP, the steady-state flux of GRN-B increased from (196.44 ± 12.03) μg·cm⁻²·h⁻¹ to (1044.95 ± 71.99) μg·cm⁻²·h⁻¹ (P < 0.01). These findings indicated that the application of chemical enhancers was an effective approach to increase the percutaneous absorption of GRN in vitro.

  14. Simultaneous Determination of Dexamethasone, Ondansetron, Granisetron, Tropisetron, and Azasetron in Infusion Samples by HPLC with DAD Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-chao Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and rapid high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector (HPLC-DAD method has been developed and validated for simultaneous quantification of five antiemetic agents in infusion samples: dexamethasone, ondansetron, granisetron, tropisetron, and azasetron. The chromatographic separation was achieved on a Phenomenex C18 column (4.6 mm × 150 mm, 5 μm using acetonitrile-50 mM KH2PO4 buffer-triethylamine (25 : 74 : 1; v/v; pH 4.0. Flow rate was 1.0 mL/min with a column temperature of 30°C. Validation of the method was made in terms of specificity, linearity, accuracy, and intra- and interday precision, as well as quantification and detection limits. The developed method can be used in the laboratory to routinely quantify dexamethasone, ondansetron, granisetron, tropisetron, and azasetron simultaneously and to evaluate the physicochemical stability of referred drugs in mixtures for endovenous use.

  15. Geranisetron versus gabapentin in preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting after middle ear surgery in adults: A double-blinded randomized clinical trial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Heidari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV after middle ear surgery is high. In this study we want to compare the effects of intravenous granisetron and oral gabapentin as a premedication before surgery on the incidence and severity of PONV after middle ear surgery in adult patents. Materials and Methods: We enrolled 90 patients that were randomly divided into the three groups of 30 in each. Group I received granisetron 3 mg iv 2 minutes before induction of anesthesia; Group II received oral gabapentin 300 mg 1 hour before anesthesia and Group III received placebo. The incidence and severity of PONV were recorded each 15 minutes in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU and each 8 hours until 24 hours after discharge from the PACU. Result: The incidence and severity of nausea and vomiting at different time intervals in Groups I and Group II was significantly lower compared with Group III (P < 0.05. There was no significant difference in the incidence of side effects of study drug administration including respiratory depression, apnea, extra pyramidal disorders, drowsiness, dizziness, vertigo and headache in three groups. Conclusion: The study was shown that using gabapentin and granisetron have equal anti-emetic effects, but significant differences were seen between these two groups compared to the control group. These submit the efficiency of these drugs in preventing PONV.

  16. [Preventive efficacy of ondansetron and granisetron for postoperative nausea and vomiting in high risk patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Xiang; Zhu, Bo; Ye, Tie-hu

    2011-08-01

    To compare the efficacy of ondansetron and granisetron in the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) in high-risk patients. Totally 200 patients with three key risk factors for PONV (female, non-smoking and postoperative opioid use) were equally randomized into ondansetron group and granisetron group. Ondansetron (4 mg) or granisetron (3 mg) was intravenously administered upon the completion of surgery. The episodes of nausea and vomiting were observed for 24 hours after surgery. A significantly greater proportion of patients in granisetron group achieved a complete response (i.e., no PONV or rescue medication) during the first 24 hours postoperatively versus those in ondansetron group (62.6% vs. 46.9%, respectively; P=0.048). There were no significant differences in terms of postoperative nausea incidences (42.9% vs. 34.3%, respectively), postoperative vomiting incidences (25.5% vs. 20.2%, respectively) and postoperative rescue anti-emetics incidences (19.4% vs. 15.2%, respectively) (P>0.05). Granisetron is more effective than ondansetron in preventing PONV in high-risk patients during the first 24 hours postoperatively.

  17. A pilot study to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of ondansetron and granisetron in fractionated total body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, S.J.; Cassoni, A.M. [Middlesex Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1996-11-01

    The duration of the antiemetic effect of granisetron was examined in a pilot study of patients (n = 26) undergoing a standard emetogenic stimulus in the form of total body irradiation fractionated over 3-4 days, in a randomized comparison with twice-daily ondansetron. A single intravenous dose of granisetron at the onset of therapy was effective over the entire follow-up period in 50% (6/12) of patients, compared with 77% (10/13) prescribed twice-daily oral ondansetron for 3 or 4 days. The response rate within the first 24 hours from the start of irradiation was 67% (8/12) for granisetron and 77% (10/13) for ondansetron. Granisetron and ondansetron was therefore of similar efficacy within the first 24-hour period, but granisetron was less efficaceous more than 24 hours after the onset of therapy. Patients who required a second dose of granisetron did so at intervals of 12, 42, 47 and 48 hours following the first fraction of radiotherapy. The cost per patient in this study was 48 for granisetron and {sub 1}54 for ondanestron, but the dose scheduling we used cannot be recommended in view of the lower effectiveness of granisetron. (author).

  18. A pilot study to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of ondansetron and granisetron in fractionated total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, S.J.; Cassoni, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The duration of the antiemetic effect of granisetron was examined in a pilot study of patients (n = 26) undergoing a standard emetogenic stimulus in the form of total body irradiation fractionated over 3-4 days, in a randomized comparison with twice-daily ondansetron. A single intravenous dose of granisetron at the onset of therapy was effective over the entire follow-up period in 50% (6/12) of patients, compared with 77% (10/13) prescribed twice-daily oral ondansetron for 3 or 4 days. The response rate within the first 24 hours from the start of irradiation was 67% (8/12) for granisetron and 77% (10/13) for ondansetron. Granisetron and ondansetron was therefore of similar efficacy within the first 24-hour period, but granisetron was less efficaceous more than 24 hours after the onset of therapy. Patients who required a second dose of granisetron did so at intervals of 12, 42, 47 and 48 hours following the first fraction of radiotherapy. The cost per patient in this study was 48 for granisetron and 1 54 for ondanestron, but the dose scheduling we used cannot be recommended in view of the lower effectiveness of granisetron. (author)

  19. Comparative trial of two intravenous doses of granisetron (1 versus 3 mg) in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced acute emesis: a double-blind, randomized, non-inferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Daiki; Kim, Yong-Il; Taku, Keisei; Nakagaki, Shigeru; Ikematsu, Yoshito; Tsubota, Hiromi; Maeda, Masato; Hashimoto, Naoya; Kimura, Masayuki; Daimon, Takashi

    2012-05-01

    A single 3 mg or 40 μg/kg intravenous dose of granisetron combined with dexamethasone is routinely used in several countries, although the antiemetic guidelines have recommended granisetron at the dose of 1 mg or 10 μg/kg. A randomized, multicenter trial was conducted to determine the optimal intravenous granisetron dose, 1 or 3 mg, in cancer patients receiving emetogenic chemotherapy. We enrolled 365 patients and randomly assigned them to receive intravenous granisetron 3 mg (3-mg group) or 1 mg (1-mg group), combined with dexamethasone at an adequate dose fixed as per the emetic risk category. The primary end point was the proportion of patients with a complete response during the first 24 h after chemotherapy. The study demonstrated that 1 mg of granisetron was not inferior in effect to 3 mg. For the primary end point, 359 patients were evaluable according to the modified intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis. Complete protection was achieved in the modified ITT population, 90.6% and 88.8% for the 3- and 1-mg groups, respectively (p granisetron is not inferior to 3 mg when both doses are combined with dexamethasone. Therefore, 1-mg dose of intravenous granisetron should be the recommended prophylactic regimen for the prevention of acute emesis.

  20. The prevention and treatment of radiotherapy induced nausea and vomiting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Zyl, A.J.

    1992-11-01

    Nausea and vomiting are side-effects that are associated with chemo- and radiotherapy. A single-blind study to compare the efficacy and safety of intravenous granisetron (G) with metoclopramide (M) plus dexamethasone (D) in the prophylaxis and control of nausea and emesis in patients undergoing hemi-body irradiation (HBI) was performed. G (3 mg) or M (20 mg) plus D (12 mg) were given intravenously, thirty minutes prior to the start of radiotherapy. Patients were monitored for nausea, vomiting and side-effects. Thirty-five patients were treated, 28 men and 7 women. A total of 21 (60%) patients did not vomit during the first 24 hours after the start of radiotherapy. Both G and M plus D offer safe and effective anti-emetic regimes for the prophylaxis and control of radiotherapy induced nausea and vomiting. However, granisetron was found to be more effective than metoclopramide plus dexamethasone in preventing nausea and vomiting. 101 refs., 40 tabs., 8 figs

  1. A randomized, double-blinded comparison of ondansetron, granisetron, and placebo for prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting after supratentorial craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Virendra; Mitra, Jayanta K; Rath, Girija P; Prabhakar, Hemanshu; Bithal, Parmod K; Dash, Hari H

    2009-07-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) are frequent and distressing complications after neurosurgical procedures. We evaluated the efficacy of ondansetron and granisetron to prevent PONV after supratentorial craniotomy. In a randomized double-blind, placebo controlled trial, 90 adult American Society of Anesthesiologists I, II patients were included in the study. A standard anesthesia technique was followed. Patients were divided into 3 groups to receive either placebo (saline), ondansetron 4 mg, or granisetron 1 mg intravenously at the time of dural closure. After extubation, episodes of nausea and vomiting were noted for 24 hours postoperatively. Statistical analysis was performed using chi2 test and 1-way analysis of variance. Demographic data, duration of surgery, intraoperative fluids and analgesic requirement, and postoperative pain (visual analog scale) scores were comparable in all 3 groups. It was observed that the incidence of vomiting in 24 hours, severe emetic episodes, and requirement of rescue antiemetics were less in ondansetron and granisetron groups as compared with placebo (Pgranisetron 1 mg are comparably effective at preventing emesis after supratentorial craniotomy. However, neither drugs prevented nausea effectively.

  2. Treatment of nausea and vomiting in terminally ill cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glare, Paul A; Dunwoodie, David; Clark, Katherine; Ward, Alicia; Yates, Patsy; Ryan, Sharon; Hardy, Janet R

    2008-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting is a common and distressing symptom complex in patients with far-advanced cancer, affecting up to 60% of individuals at some stage of their illness. The current approach to the palliative care of patients with nausea and vomiting is based on identifying the cause, understanding its pathophysiology and knowing the pharmacology of the drugs available for its amelioration. The following six main syndromes are identified: gastric stasis, biochemical, raised intracranial pressure, vestibular, mechanical bowel obstruction and ileus. A careful history, focused physical examination and appropriate investigations are needed to elucidate the syndrome and its cause, so that therapy is rational. Drugs are the mainstay of treatment in terminal cancer, and the main classes of antiemetic agents are prokinetics, dopamine antagonists, antihistamines, anticholinergics and serotonin antagonists. Dexamethasone and octreotide are also used, especially in bowel obstruction. Non-drug measures are important in relieving the associated distress. Patients should be able to die comfortably, without tubes. Despite decades of practice affirming this approach, the evidence base is weak and well designed studies are urgently needed.

  3. Interactions and incompatibilities of pharmaceutical excipients with active pharmaceutical ingredients: a comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonali S. Bharate

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies of active drug/excipient compatibility represent an important phase in the preformulation stage of the development of all dosage forms. The potential physical and chemical interactions between drugs and excipients can affect the chemical nature, the stability and bioavailability of drugs and, consequently, their therapeutic efficacy and safety. The present review covers the literature reports of interaction and incompatibilities of commonly used pharmaceutical excipients with different active pharmaceutical ingredients in solid dosage forms. Examples of active drug/excipient interactions, such as transacylation, the Maillard browning reaction, acid base reactions and physical changes are discussed for different active pharmaceutical ingredients belonging to different therapeutic categories viz antiviral, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, antihypertensive, anti-convulsant, antibiotic, bronchodialator, antimalarial, antiemetic, antiamoebic, antipsychotic, antidepressant, anticancer, anticoagulant and sedative/hypnotic drugs and vitamins. Once the solid-state reactions of a pharmaceutical system are understood, the necessary steps can be taken to avoid reactivity and improve the stability of drug substances and products.

  4. A randomised trial of the analgesic efficacy of ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block after caesarean delivery under general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Terry T; Teoh, Wendy H L; Woo, David C M; Ocampo, Cecilia E; Shah, Mukesh K; Sia, Alex T H

    2012-02-01

    Previous studies examining the efficacy of transversus abdominis plane block after caesarean section have mostly been in parturients under spinal anaesthesia. We postulated that the advantage of performing transversus abdominis plane block after caesarean section might be even more obvious after general anaesthesia, resulting in reduced 24-h consumption of morphine. DESIGN, SETTING, PATIENTS AND INTERVENTIONS: In this single centre, randomised double-blind controlled trial, 40 women who underwent caesarean delivery under general anaesthesia were allocated randomly to receive a transversus abdominis plane block or no block. In those who received the block, 20 ml of levobupivacaine 2.5 mg ml was deposited bilaterally into the transversus abdominis plane under ultrasound guidance using a Sonosite Titan (SonoSite, Bothell, Washington, USA) 7-13 MHz linear transducer at the end of surgery when the patient was still anaesthetised. We recorded patient-controlled intravenous morphine use for 24 h, pain scores at rest and activity, sedation, nausea and vomiting, use of antiemetic medication and overall maternal satisfaction. The primary outcome was 24-h morphine consumption. Patients who received the transversus abdominis plane block used significantly less morphine in 24 h than those in the control group [12.3 (2.6) vs. 31.4 mg (3.1), Pplane block reduced morphine consumption following caesarean section under general anaesthesia, with increased maternal satisfaction.

  5. Efficiency of bupivacaine and association with dexmedetomidine in transversus abdominis plane block ultrasound guided in postoperative pain of abdominal surgery

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    Recep Aksu

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives We aimed to evaluate the effect of bupivacaine and dexmedetomidine added to bupivacaine used in tranversus abdominis plane (TAP block on postoperative pain and patient satisfaction in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Methods Patients submitted to lower abdominal surgery were enrolled in the study. After anesthesia induction, ultrasound guided TAP block was performed. TAP block was obtained with 21 mL 0.9% saline in Group C (n = 31, 20 mL 0.5% bupivacaine + 1 mL saline in Group B (n = 31, and 20 mL 0.5% bupivacaine + 1 mL dexmedetomidine (100 µg in Group BD (n = 31. Results Visual analog scale scores were lower in Group BD compared to Group C, at all time points (p 0.05. Conclusions The addition of dexmedetomidine to bupivacaine on TAP block decreased postoperative pain scores and morphine consumption; it also increased patient satisfaction in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Dexmedetomidine did not have any effect on nausea and vomiting score and antiemetic requirement.

  6. [Efficiency of bupivacaine and association with dexmedetomidine in transversus abdominis plane block ultrasound guided in postoperative pain of abdominal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Recep; Patmano, Gülçin; Biçer, Cihangir; Emek, Ertan; Çoruh, Aliye Esmaoğlu

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of bupivacaine and dexmedetomidine added to bupivacaine used in tranversus abdominis plane (TAP) block on postoperative pain and patient satisfaction in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Patients submitted to lower abdominal surgery were enrolled in the study. After anesthesia induction, ultrasound guided TAP block was performed. TAP block was obtained with 21mL 0.9% saline in Group C (n=31), 20mL 0.5% bupivacaine+1mL saline in Group B (n=31), and 20mL 0.5% bupivacaine+1mL dexmedetomidine (100μg) in Group BD (n=31). Visual analog scale scores were lower in Group BD compared to Group C, at all time points (pconsumption was lower in Group BD compared to other groups and lower in group B than in the controls (p0.05). The addition of dexmedetomidine to bupivacaine on TAP block decreased postoperative pain scores and morphine consumption; it also increased patient satisfaction in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Dexmedetomidine did not have any effect on nausea and vomiting score and antiemetic requirement. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. The response of red ginger (Zinggiber officinalle var rubra) with various processing in broilers were infected by Eimeria tenella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasution, E. Z. J.; Tafsin, M.; Hanafi, N. D.

    2018-02-01

    Red ginger contains high antioxidants and have anti -inflamatory properties. Ginger also has the ability to treat kimiatif, antiemetic, antinausea, and antiparasitik. The aim of this experiment was identified the response of red ginger in broilers were infected by Eimeria tenella. This research used Completely Randomized Design (CRD) with 5 treatments and 4 replications. Eimeria tenella were infected by 10.000 oocysts / head and red ginger solution were aplicated with 1% concentration. The treatments consist of KP (positive control), KO (coccidiostat), K1 (red ginger powder), K2 (extracted red ginger by ethanol) and K3 (extracted red ginger by water) . The results showed that the treatment of red ginger was significant effect (PEimeria tenella. The comparison between extracted red ginger by ethanol is better than by water or in powder form to decreased. The utilization of red ginger showed the percentage of heterophile and eosinophile close to normal when compared with positive control. Assesment of caecum lesion score was not significant (P>0.05) different effect between all the treatments. It is concluded that the treatment by red ginger better than coccidiostat and positive control.

  8. [Methods of preventing phlebitis induced by infusion of fosaprepitant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Emiko; Kanematsu, Sayaka; Okazaki, Satoshi; Ogata, Makoto; Kanemitsu, Meiko; Yamashita, Hiromi; Syuntou, Kaori; Sekita, Masako; Nishioka, Ryoko; Yoshida, Hideyuki

    2015-03-01

    At our hospital, we use aprepitant for nausea and vomiting when administering highly emetic anticancer agents, according to "Guidelines for the Appropriate Use of Antiemetic Agents" given by the Japan Society of Clinical Oncology. We initiated the intravenous administration of fosaprepitant for better compliance compared with aprepitant; however, we observed phlebitis after the infusion of fosaprepitant. Therefore, we investigated measures to reduce phlebitis associated with the infusion of fosaprepitant. For the first premedication, fosaprepitant (150 mg) was dissolved in 100 mL of saline and administered for 30 minutes; 1 of 2 patients showed grade 4 phlebitis. For the modified premedication, fosaprepitant, dexamethasone, and 5- HT(3) antagonist were dissolved in 100 mL of saline and administered for 30 minutes. The modified premedication was administered to a total of 27 patients; 5 patients developed mild phlebitis (grade 1), but infusion could be continued by treating their phlebitis with a hot pack. We used a combination of dexamethasone and 5-HT(3) antagonist with fosaprepitant as a modified premedication in order to avoid drug-induced vascular damage, which resulted in the pH decreasing to 6.20-7.55 (close to neutral) and a shorter infusion time.

  9. Pediatric Patients Receiving Specialized Palliative Home Care According to German Law: A Prospective Multicenter Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Nolte-Buchholtz

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In Germany, every child with a life-limiting condition suffering from symptoms that cannot sufficiently be controlled is eligible by law for specialized pediatric palliative home care (SPPHC. It is the aim of this study to describe the demographic and clinical characteristics of children referred to SPPHC and to compare patients with cancer and non-cancer conditions. The prospective multicenter study includes data on 75 children (median age 7.7 years, 50.7% male. The majority had non-cancer conditions (72%. The most common symptoms were cognitive impairment, somatic pain, impairment in communication or swallowing difficulties. Swallowing difficulties, seizures, and spasticity occurred significantly more often in non-cancer patients (p < 0.01. Cancer patients received antiemetics significantly more often (permanent and on demand than non-cancer patients (p < 0.01. Significantly more non-cancer patients had some type of feeding tube (57.3% or received oxygen (33.3% (p < 0.01. Central venous catheters had been fitted in 20% of the patients, mostly in cancer patients (p < 0.001. Tracheostomy tubes (9.3% or ventilation (14.7% were only used in non-cancer patients. In conclusion, patients referred to SPPHC are a diverse cohort with complex conditions including a large range of neurologically originating symptoms. The care of pediatric palliative care patients with cancer is different to the care of non-cancer patients.

  10. Biopharmaceutical potentials of Prosopis spp. (Mimosaceae, Leguminosa

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    Santhaseelan Henciya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Prosopis is a commercially important plant genus, which has been used since ancient times, particularly for medicinal purposes. Traditionally, Paste, gum, and smoke from leaves and pods are applied for anticancer, antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial purposes. Components of Prosopis such as flavonoids, tannins, alkaloids, quinones, or phenolic compounds demonstrate potentials in various biofunctions, such as analgesic, anthelmintic, antibiotic, antiemetic, microbial antioxidant, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, antipustule, and antiulcer activities; enhancement of H+, K+, ATPases; oral disinfection; and probiotic and nutritional effects; as well as in other biopharmaceutical applications, such as binding abilities for tablet production. The compound juliflorine provides a cure in Alzheimer disease by inhibiting acetylcholine esterase at cholinergic brain synapses. Some indirect medicinal applications of Prosopis spp. are indicated, including antimosquito larvicidal activity, chemical synthesis by associated fungal or bacterial symbionts, cyanobacterial degradation products, “mesquite” honey and pollens with high antioxidant activity, etc. This review will reveal the origins, distribution, folk uses, chemical components, biological functions, and applications of different representatives of Prosopis.

  11. Comparison of sugammadex and conventional reversal on postoperative nausea and vomiting: a randomized, blinded trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuncu, Onur; Turhanoglu, Selim; Ozbakis Akkurt, Cagla; Karcıoglu, Murat; Ozkan, Mustafa; Ozer, Cahit; Sessler, Daniel I; Turan, Alparslan

    2015-02-01

    To determine whether the new selective binding agent sugammadex causes less postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) than the cholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine. Prospective, randomized, double-blinded study. University-affiliated hospital. One hundred American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 1 and 2 patients scheduled for extremity surgery. Patients were randomly assigned to neostigmine (70 μg/kg) and atropine (0.4 mg per mg neostigmine) or sugammadex 2 mg/kg for neuromuscular antagonism at the end of anesthesia, when 4 twitches in response to train-of-four stimulation were visible with fade. We recorded PONV, recovery parameters, antiemetic consumption, and side effects. Nausea and vomiting scores were lower in the sugammadex patients upon arrival in the postanesthesia care unit (med: 0 [min-max, 0-3] vs med: 0 [min-max, 0-3]; P sugammadex. Postoperative heart rates were significantly lower in all measured times patients given neostigmine. Nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking antagonism with sugammadex speeds recovery of neuromuscular strength but only slightly and transiently reduces PONV compared with neostigmine and atropine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Carbamazepine for prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaiana Aragão Santana

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Nausea and vomiting are major inconveniences for patients undergoing chemotherapy. Despite standard preventive treatment, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV still occurs in approximately 50% of these patients. In an attempt to optimize this treatment, we evaluated the possible effects of carbamazepine for prevention of CINV.DESIGN AND LOCATION: Prospective nonrandomized open-label phase II study carried out at a Brazilian public oncology service. METHODS: Patients allocated for their first cycle of highly emetogenic chemotherapy were continuously recruited. In addition to standard antiemetic protocol that was made available, they received carbamazepine orally, with staggered doses, from the third day before until the fifth day after chemotherapy. Considering the sparseness of evidence about the efficacy of anticonvulsants for CINV prevention, we used Simon's two-stage design, in which 43 patients should be included unless overall complete prevention was not achieved in 9 out of the first 15 entries. The Functional Living Index-Emesis questionnaire was used to measure the impact on quality of life.RESULTS:None of the ten patients (0% presented overall complete prevention. In three cases, carbamazepine therapy was withdrawn because of somnolence and vomiting before chemotherapy. Seven were able to take the medication for the entire period and none were responsive, so the study was closed. There was no impact on the patients' quality of life.CONCLUSION: Carbamazepine was not effective for prevention of CINV and also had a deleterious side-effect profile in this population.

  13. A brief review of current scientific evidence involving aromatherapy use for nausea and vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lua, Pei Lin; Zakaria, Noor Salihah

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compile existing scientific evidence regarding the effects of essential oils (EOs) administered via inhalation for the alleviation of nausea and vomiting. CINAHL, PubMed, and EBSCO Host and Science Direct databases were searched for articles related to the use of EOs and/or aromatherapy for nausea and vomiting. Only articles using English as a language of publication were included. Eligible articles included all forms of evidence (nonexperimental, experimental, case report). Interventions were limited to the use of EOs by inhalation of their vapors to treat symptoms of nausea and vomiting in various conditions regardless of age group. Studies where the intervention did not utilize EOs or were concerned with only alcohol inhalation and trials that combined the use of aromatherapy with other treatments (massage, relaxations, or acupressure) were excluded. Five (5) articles met the inclusion criteria encompassing trials with 328 respondents. Their results suggest that the inhaled vapor of peppermint or ginger essential oils not only reduced the incidence and severity of nausea and vomiting but also decreased antiemetic requirements and consequently improved patient satisfaction. However, a definitive conclusion could not be drawn due to methodological flaws in the existing research articles and an acute lack of additional research in this area. The existing evidence is encouraging but yet not compelling. Hence, further well-designed large trials are needed before confirmation of EOs effectiveness in treating nausea and vomiting can be strongly substantiated.

  14. Controlled breathing with or without peppermint aromatherapy for postoperative nausea and/or vomiting symptom relief: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sites, Debra S; Johnson, Nancy T; Miller, Jacqueline A; Torbush, Pauline H; Hardin, Janis S; Knowles, Susan S; Nance, Jennifer; Fox, Tara H; Tart, Rebecca Creech

    2014-02-01

    With little scientific evidence to support use of aromatherapy for postoperative nausea and/or vomiting (PONV) symptoms, this study evaluated controlled breathing with peppermint aromatherapy (AR) and controlled breathing alone (CB) for PONV relief. A single blind randomized control trial design was used. On initial PONV complaint, symptomatic subjects received either CB (n = 16) or AR (n = 26) intervention based on randomization at enrollment. A second treatment was repeated at 5 minutes if indicated. Final assessment occurred 10 minutes post initial treatment. Rescue medication was offered for persistent symptoms. Among eligible subjects, PONV incidence was 21.4% (42/196). Gender was the only risk factor contributing to PONV symptoms (P = .0024). Though not statistically significant, CB was more efficacious than AR, 62.5% versus 57.7%, respectively. CB can be initiated without delay as an alternative to prescribed antiemetics. Data also support use of peppermint AR in conjunction with CB for PONV relief. Copyright © 2014 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Comprehensive Review on the Phytochemical Constituents and Pharmacological Activities of Pogostemon cablin Benth.: An Aromatic Medicinal Plant of Industrial Importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamy, Mallappa Kumara; Sinniah, Uma Rani

    2015-05-12

    Pogostemon cablin Benth. (patchouli) is an important herb which possesses many therapeutic properties and is widely used in the fragrance industries. In traditional medicinal practices, it is used to treat colds, headaches, fever, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, insect and snake bites. In aromatherapy, patchouli oil is used to relieve depression, stress, calm nerves, control appetite and to improve sexual interest. Till now more than 140 compounds, including terpenoids, phytosterols, flavonoids, organic acids, lignins, alkaloids, glycosides, alcohols, aldehydes have been isolated and identified from patchouli. The main phytochemical compounds are patchouli alcohol, α-patchoulene, β-patchoulene, α-bulnesene, seychellene, norpatchoulenol, pogostone, eugenol and pogostol. Modern studies have revealed several biological activities such as antioxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antiplatelet, antithrombotic, aphrodisiac, antidepressant, antimutagenic, antiemetic, fibrinolytic and cytotoxic activities. However, some of the traditional uses need to be verified and may require standardizing and authenticating the bioactivity of purified compounds through scientific methods. The aim of the present review is to provide comprehensive knowledge on the phytochemistry and pharmacological activities of essential oil and different plant extracts of patchouli based on the available scientific literature. This information will provide a potential guide in exploring the use of main active compounds of patchouli in various medical fields.

  16. Evaluation of mortality rate and predictors of outcome in dogs receiving outpatient treatment for parvoviral enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarpong, Kathryn J; Lukowski, Jennifer M; Knapp, Cassandra G

    2017-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine mortality rates and prognostic factors for dogs with parvoviral enteritis receiving outpatient treatment. DESIGN Retrospective case series and case-control study. ANIMALS 130 client-owned dogs with a diagnosis of parvoviral enteritis between August 1, 2012, and January 31, 2015, that were treated with outpatient care. PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed and data extracted regarding dog age, body weight, breed, and vaccination history; treatments administered; and short-term (≥ 3 day) outcome (determined via telephone call with owner). Treatments were administered according to clinician preference. Mortality rates were calculated overall and for various signalment and treatment groupings and compared. RESULTS 97 (75%) dogs survived and 33 (25%) dogs failed to survive for ≥ 3 days after initial diagnosis of parvoviral enteritis. Compared with distributions in the general hospital population, Chihuahuas, German Shepherd Dogs, pit bull-type dogs, and males were overrepresented. No significant difference was identified between survivors and nonsurvivors regarding age, body weight, or sex. Dogs prescribed a caloric supplement fed every 2 to 4 hours had a mortality rate of 19% (16/85). Most of these dogs had also received fluids administered SC, an antiemetic, and antimicrobials. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Clinicians should note the 25% mortality rate of the dogs with parvoviral enteritis that received outpatient care in this study setting when discussing treatment options with owners of affected dogs who are financially unable to pursue hospitalization.

  17. [Vertigo and dizziness in the emergency room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwergal, A; Möhwald, K; Dieterich, M

    2017-06-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are among the most common chief complaints in the emergency department. Etiologies can be categorized into three subgroups: neurootological (vestibular), medical (especially cardiovascular, metabolic), and psychiatric disorders. The diagnostic approach in the emergency department is based on a systematic analysis of case history (type, time course of symptoms, modulating factors, associated symptoms), clinical examination of the vestibular, ocular motor, and cerebellar systems (head impulse test, nystagmus, skew deviation, positioning maneuver, test of gait and stance), as well as a basal monitoring (vital signs, 12-lead ECG, blood tests). For differentiation of peripheral and central etiologies in acute vestibular syndrome, the HINTS exam (head impulse test, nystagmus, test of skew) and examination of smooth pursuit and saccades should be applied. Nonselective use of neuroimaging is not indicated due to a low diagnostic yield. Cranial imaging should be done in the following constellations: (1) detection of focal neurological or central ocular motor and vestibular signs on clinical exam, (2) acute abasia with only minor ocular motor signs, (3) presence of various cardiovascular risk factors, (4) headache of unknown quality as an accompanying symptom. Besides the symptomatic therapy of vertigo and dizziness with antiemetics or analgesics, further diagnostic differentiation is urgent to guide proper treatment. Examples are the acute therapy in cerebral ischemia, the execution of positioning maneuvers in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, the use of corticosteroids in acute unilateral vestibulopathy, as well as the readjustment of metabolic homeostasis in medical disorders.

  18. Drug cocktail optimization in chemotherapy of cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Preissner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In general, drug metabolism has to be considered to avoid adverse effects and ineffective therapy. In particular, chemotherapeutic drug cocktails strain drug metabolizing enzymes especially the cytochrome P450 family (CYP. Furthermore, a number of important chemotherapeutic drugs such as cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, tamoxifen or procarbazine are administered as prodrugs and have to be activated by CYP. Therefore, the genetic variability of these enzymes should be taken into account to design appropriate therapeutic regimens to avoid inadequate drug administration, toxicity and inefficiency. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work was to find drug interactions and to avoid side effects or ineffective therapy in chemotherapy. DATA SOURCES AND METHODS: Information on drug administration in the therapy of leukemia and their drug metabolism was collected from scientific literature and various web resources. We carried out an automated textmining approach. Abstracts of PubMed were filtered for relevant articles using specific keywords. Abstracts were automatically screened for antineoplastic drugs and their synonyms in combination with a set of human CYPs in title or abstract. RESULTS: We present a comprehensive analysis of over 100 common cancer treatment regimens regarding drug-drug interactions and present alternatives avoiding CYP overload. Typical concomitant medication, e.g. antiemetics or antibiotics is a preferred subject to improvement. A webtool, which allows drug cocktail optimization was developed and is publicly available on http://bioinformatics.charite.de/chemotherapy.

  19. The use of stereotactic radiosurgical boost in the treatment of medulloblastomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Charles; Stea, Baldassarre; Lulu, Bruce; Hamilton, Allan; Cassady, J. Robert

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Starting in 1992, we began using a stereotactic radiosurgical (SRS) boost for the treatment of medulloblastomas. Four patients ranging in age from 7 to 42 years old have since been treated and are the subject of this retrospective study. Methods and Materials: All patients were initially treated with a maximally debulking surgery and external beam radiotherapy, which were then followed by a stereotactic radiosurgical boost using a modified 6 MeV linear accelerator. Radiosurgical boost doses ranged from 4.50 to 10.0 Gy. Target volumes ranged from 1.1 to 8.1 cc. The procedure was well tolerated with minimal acute toxicities. Results: All four patients are alive without evidence of recurrence (at 8 to 35 months). Acute nausea and vomiting was elicited during the radiosurgical procedure in the first patient treated. We have since begun premedicating patients with antiemetics or treating under general anesthesia. Late complications consisted of panhypopituitarism in one patient, which was thought to be attributable to the previous course of whole-brain radiotherapy. We have not observed any incidence of radionecrosis in this small cohort of patients. Conclusions: Our preliminary results with the use of radiosurgery for medulloblastomas are optimistic, and we would like to suggest the inclusion of a radiosurgery boost in future clinical trials for treatment of this disease

  20. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic effects of the intravenous CB1 receptor agonist Org 26828 in healthy male volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuurman, Lineke; Passier, Paul C C M; de Kam, Marieke L; Kleijn, Huub J; Cohen, Adam F; van Gerven, Joop M A

    2010-11-01

    An ideal drug for outpatient treatments under conscious sedation would have both sedative and analgesic properties. CB1/CB2 agonists are expected to have sedative, amnestic, analgesic and anti-emetic properties. The main objective of this first study in humans was to assess the sedative properties of intravenous Org 26828. In addition, pharmacokinetics, amnestic properties, postural stability, and behavioural and cardiovascular effects were studied. Midazolam intravenous 0.1 mg/kg and placebo were used as controls. The pharmacokinetic parameters (Cmax and AUC0-inf) of the main metabolite Org 26761 were proportional to dose. No effects were observed after doses up to 0.3 μg/kg of Org 26828. Dose-related effects were observed at higher doses. Although subjects reported subjective sedation after administration of Org 26828 at 3 and 6 μg/kg, the observed sedation was considerably less than after midazolam. Doses higher than the maximum tolerated dose of 1 μg/kg of Org 26828 caused unpleasant central nervous system effects (anxiety, paranoia, hallucinations). Therefore, Org 26828 is not suitable for providing sedation for outpatient surgical procedures.

  1. Effects of a histamine H4 receptor antagonist on cisplatin-induced anorexia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kouichi; Okui, Rikuya; Yamatodani, Atsushi

    2018-04-12

    Cancer chemotherapy often induces gastrointestinal symptoms such as anorexia, nausea, and vomiting. Antiemetic agents are effective in inhibiting nausea and vomiting, but patients still experience anorexia. We previously reported that chemotherapeutic agent-induced anorexia is associated with an increase of inflammatory cytokines. Other studies also reported that antagonism of the histamine H 4 receptor is anti-inflammatory. In this study, we investigated the involvement of the H 4 receptor in the development of chemotherapy-induced anorexia in mice. Cisplatin-induced anorexia occurred within 24 h of its administration and continued for 3 days. The early phase (day 1), but not the delayed phase (days 2 and 3), of anorexia was inhibited by the daily injection of a 5-HT 3 receptor antagonist (granisetron). However, a corticosteroid (dexamethasone) or selective H 4 receptor antagonist (JNJ7777120) abolished the delayed phases of anorexia. Cisplatin significantly increased TNF-α mRNA expression in the hypothalamus and spleen, and the period of expression increase paralleled the onset period of anorexia. In addition, pretreatment with JNJ7777120 completely inhibited the increased expression. These results suggest that TNF-α mRNA expression via H 4 receptors may contribute to the development of cisplatin-induced anorexia, and that H 4 receptor antagonists are potentially useful treatments. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Pharmacological treatment of bowel obstruction in cancer patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Brenda

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Malignant bowel obstruction (MBO) is a common complication of advanced cancer, occurring most frequently in gynaecological and colorectal cancer. Its management remains complex and variable. This is in part due to the lack of evidence-based guidelines for the clinicians involved. Although surgery should be considered the primary treatment, this may not be feasible in patients with a poor performance status or advanced disease. Advances have been made in the medical management of MBO which can lead to a considerable improvement in symptom management and overall quality of life. AREAS COVERED: This review emphasizes the importance of a prompt diagnosis of MBO with early introduction of pharmacological agents to optimize symptom control. The authors summarize the treatment options available for bowel obstruction in those patients for whom surgical intervention is not a feasible option. The authors also explore the complexities involved in the introduction of parenteral hydration and total parenteral nutrition in this group of patients. EXPERT OPINION: It is not always easy to distinguish reversible from irreversible bowel obstruction. Early and aggressive management with the introduction of pharmacological agents including corticosteroids, octreotide and anti-cholinergic agents have the potential to maintain bowel patency, and allow for more rapid recovery of bowel transit. A combination of analgesics, anti-emetics and anti-cholinergics with or without anti-secretory agents can successfully improve symptom control in patients with irreversible bowel obstruction.

  3. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Intravenous Haloperidol vs. Intravenous Metoclopramide for Acute Migraine Therapy in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffigan, Matthew E; Bruner, David I; Wason, Courtney; Pritchard, Amy; Frumkin, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    Emergency Department (ED) headache patients are commonly treated with neuroleptic antiemetics like metoclopramide. Haloperidol has been shown to be effective for migraine treatment. Our study compared the use of metoclopramide vs. haloperidol to treat ED migraine patients. A prospective, double-blinded, randomized control trial of 64 adults aged 18-50 years with migraine headache and no recognized risks for QT-prolongation. Haloperidol 5 mg or metoclopramide 10 mg was given intravenously after 25 mg diphenhydramine. Pain, nausea, restlessness (akathisia), and sedation were assessed with 100-mm visual analog scales (VAS) at baseline and every 20 min, to a maximum of 80 min. The need for rescue medications, side effects, and subject satisfaction were recorded. QTc intervals were measured prior to and after treatment. Follow-up calls after 48 h assessed satisfaction and recurrent or persistent symptoms. Thirty-one subjects received haloperidol, 33 metoclopramide. The groups were similar on all VAS measurements, side effects, and in their satisfaction with therapy. Pain relief averaged 53 mm VAS over both groups, with equal times to maximum improvement. Subjects receiving haloperidol required rescue medication significantly less often (3% vs. 24%, p haloperidol-treated subjects experiencing more restlessness (43% vs. 10%). Intravenous haloperidol is as safe and effective as metoclopramide for the ED treatment of migraine headaches, with less frequent need for rescue medications. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. [Diarrheal disease in the region of Marrakech, Morocco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourrous, M; Elmjati, H; Amine, M; El Omari, J; Bouskraoui, M

    2010-04-01

    Diarrhea is the second cause of child morbidity and mortality in Morocco after acute respiratory infection. Each child suffers from 4 to 8 episodes of diarrhea per year. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knowledge as well as diagnostic and therapeutic practices of general practitioners regarding children presenting with diarrhea. Study was based on an epidemiologic survey using a written questionnaire completed by general practitioners in state-run hospitals in the Marrakesh (Tensift El Haouz) region. The anonymous questionnaire containing items on the epidemiological, clinical, laboratory, and therapeutic aspects was distributed in all 5 medical districts in the region. Analysis of reponses concerning therapeutic practices showed heavy reliance on oral rehydration that was prescribed by 98.2% of general practitioners. Dietary analysis was performed by only 24% of practitioners and blood/stool testing was not systematically ordered. Only 3% of practitioners recommended early resumption of feeding. However, data showed excessive use of additional laboratory tests (57.8%) and prescription drugs (48.8%). Overprescription mainly involved antiemetics and anti-diarrheals (77.7%). This study demonstrates an urgent need to develop a strategy to improve the quality of dietary management of diarrhea by general practitioners and rationalize prescription drug use. A continuing medical education program would be useful to increase the awareness of general practitioners and reduce child/infant morbidity and mortality relating to this disease.

  5. [10]-gingerol induces apoptosis and inhibits metastatic dissemination of triple negative breast cancer in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ana Carolina B M; Fuzer, Angelina M; Becceneri, Amanda B; da Silva, James Almada; Tomasin, Rebeka; Denoyer, Delphine; Kim, Soo-Hyun; McIntyre, Katherine A; Pearson, Helen B; Yeo, Belinda; Nagpal, Aadya; Ling, Xiawei; Selistre-de-Araújo, Heloisa S; Vieira, Paulo Cézar; Cominetti, Marcia R; Pouliot, Normand

    2017-09-22

    There is increasing interest in the use of non-toxic natural products for the treatment of various pathologies, including cancer. In particular, biologically active constituents of the ginger oleoresin ( Zingiber officinale Roscoe) have been shown to mediate anti-tumour activity and to contribute to the anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antiemetic properties of ginger. Here we report on the inhibitory properties of [10]-gingerol against metastatic triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) in vitro and in vivo . We show that [10]-gingerol concentration-dependently induces apoptotic death in mouse and human TNBC cell lines in vitro . In addition, [10]-gingerol is well tolerated in vivo , induces a marked increase in caspase-3 activation and inhibits orthotopic tumour growth in a syngeneic mouse model of spontaneous breast cancer metastasis. Importantly, using both spontaneous and experimental metastasis assays, we show for the first time that [10]-gingerol significantly inhibits metastasis to multiple organs including lung, bone and brain. Remarkably, inhibition of brain metastasis was observed even when treatment was initiated after surgical removal of the primary tumour. Taken together, these results indicate that [10]-gingerol may be a safe and useful complementary therapy for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer and warrant further investigation of its efficacy, either alone or in combination with standard systemic therapies, in pre-clinical models of metastatic breast cancer and in patients.

  6. Interactions of Desmethoxyyangonin, a Secondary Metabolite from Renealmia alpinia, with Human Monoamine Oxidase-A and Oxidase-B

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    Narayan D. Chaurasiya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Renealmia alpinia (Zingiberaceae, a medicinal plant of tropical rainforests, is used to treat snakebites and other injuries and also as a febrifuge, analgesic, antiemetic, antiulcer, and anticonvulsant. The dichloromethane extract of R. alpinia leaves showed potent inhibition of human monoamine oxidases- (MAOs- A and B. Phytochemical studies yielded six known compounds, including pinostrobin 1, 4′-methyl ether sakuranetin 2, sakuranetin 3, pinostrobin chalcone 4, yashabushidiol A 5, and desmethoxyyangonin 6. Compound 6 displayed about 30-fold higher affinity for MAO-B than MAO-A, with Ki values of 31 and 922 nM, respectively. Kinetic analysis of inhibition and equilibrium-dialysis dissociation assay of the enzyme-inhibitor complex showed reversible binding of desmethoxyyangonin 6 with MAO-A and MAO-B. The binding interactions of compound 6 in the active site of the MAO-A and MAO-B isoenzymes, investigated through molecular modeling algorithms, confirmed preferential binding of desmethoxyyangonin 6 with MAO-B compared to MAO-A. Selective reversible inhibitors of MAO-B, like desmethoxyyangonin 6, may have important therapeutic significance for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease.

  7. Bosutinib in the management of chronic myelogenous leukemia

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    Keller-von Amsberg G

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Gunhild Keller-von Amsberg, Philippe SchafhausenDepartment of Hematology and Oncology and, Stem Cell Transplantation and Pulmonology Division, Oncological Center, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, GermanyAbstract: Bosutinib (SKI-606 is an orally available, once-daily dual Src and Abl kinase inhibitor, approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of adults with chronic, accelerated, or blast-phase Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia who are intolerant of or resistant to first- or second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Bosutinib effectively overcomes the majority of imatinib-resistance-conferring BCR-ABL mutations except V299L and T315I. In the Bosutinib Efficacy and Safety in chronic myeloid LeukemiA (BELA trial, bosutinib attained a faster and deeper molecular response than imatinib in newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia patients. Treatment-emergent adverse events are usually very manageable. Low grade, mostly self-limiting diarrhea represents the most frequently observed toxicity of bosutinib. Anti-diarrheal drugs, antiemetic agents, and/or fluid replacement should be used to treat these patients. The improved hematological toxicity of bosutinib compared with other tyrosine kinase inhibitors has been ascribed to its minimal activity against platelet-derived growth factor receptor and KIT. In this review, we give an overview on the profile of bosutinib, the clinical potential and treatment-emergent adverse events.Keywords: CML, BCR-ABL, SRC/ABL kinase inhibitor, resistance-conferring mutation

  8. Epigastric Distress Caused by Esophageal Candidiasis in 2 Patients Who Received Sorafenib Plus Radiotherapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuo-Hsin; Weng, Meng-Tzu; Chou, Yueh-Hung; Lu, Yueh-Feng; Hsieh, Chen-Hsi

    2016-03-01

    Sorafenib followed by fractionated radiotherapy (RT) has been shown to decrease the phagocytic and candidacidal activities of antifungal agents due to radiosensitization. Moreover, sorafenib has been shown to suppress the immune system, thereby increasing the risk for candida colonization and infection. In this study, we present the 2 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients suffered from epigastric distress caused by esophageal candidiasis who received sorafenib plus RT. Two patients who had received sorafenib and RT for HCC with bone metastasis presented with hiccups, gastric ulcer, epigastric distress, anorexia, heart burn, and fatigue. Empiric antiemetic agents, antacids, and pain killers were ineffective at relieving symptoms. Panendoscopy revealed diffuse white lesions in the esophagus. Candida esophagitis was suspected. Results of periodic acid-Schiff staining were diagnostic of candidiasis. Oral fluconazole (150 mg) twice daily and proton-pump inhibitors were prescribed. At 2-weak follow-up, esophagitis had resolved and both patients were free of gastrointestinal symptoms. Physicians should be aware that sorafenib combined with RT may induce an immunosuppressive state in patients with HCC, thereby increasing their risk of developing esophagitis due to candida species.

  9. The Analgesic Potential of Cannabinoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elikottil, Jaseena; Gupta, Pankaj; Gupta, Kalpna

    2013-01-01

    Historically and anecdotally cannabinoids have been used as analgesic agents. In recent years, there has been an escalating interest in developing cannabis-derived medications to treat severe pain. This review provides an overview of the history of cannabis use in medicine, cannabinoid signaling pathways, and current data from preclinical as well as clinical studies on using cannabinoids as potential analgesic agents. Clinical and experimental studies show that cannabis-derived compounds act as anti-emetic, appetite modulating and analgesic agents. However, the efficacy of individual products is variable and dependent upon the route of administration. Since opioids are the only therapy for severe pain, analgesic ability of cannabinoids may provide a much-needed alternative to opioids. Moreover, cannabinoids act synergistically with opioids and act as opioid sparing agents, allowing lower doses and fewer side effects from chronic opioid therapy. Thus, rational use of cannabis based medications deserves serious consideration to alleviate the suffering of patients due to severe pain. PMID:20073408

  10. Gastroprokinetic effect of a new benzamide derivative itopride and its action mechanisms in conscious dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Y; Miyashita, N; Saito, T; Morikawa, K; Itoh, Z

    1996-06-01

    The novel benzamide derivative itopride was assayed for its effect on gastrointestinal motility in conscious dogs when it was administered intraduodenally (i.d.). Gastrointestinal motility was measured by means of chronically implanted force transducers, and itopride at a dose of 10 mg/kg, i.d. or more increased the gastric contractile force during the digestive state. Intraduodenal cisapride, domperidone and metoclopramide also stimulated gastric motility, and their threshold doses were 1, 3 and 1 mg/kg, respectively. Dopamine infusion (1 mg/kg/hr, i.v.) caused the postprandial gastric motility to disappear, but it was immediately restored by itopride at a dose of 3 mg/kg, i.d. With itopride at 1 and 3 mg/kg, i.d., acetylcholine (0.05 mg/kg/min)-induced contractions were greatly enhanced. In addition to its gastric stimulation, itopride at doses of 10-100 mg/kg, p.o. inhibited apomorphine (0.1 mg/kg, s.c.)-induced vomiting in dogs. In conclusion, intraduodenal itopride stimulates gastric motility through both anti-dopaminergic and anti-acetylcholinesterase actions. Its gastroprokinetic threshold dose was as large as 3-10 times those of cisapride, domperidone and metoclopramide. These findings suggest that itopride is an orally active gastroprokinetic with a moderate anti-emetic action.

  11. Efficacy of promethazine suppositories dispensed to outpatient surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, C. D.; Jilka, J.; Gentry, W. B.

    1998-01-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting frequently complicate outpatient anesthesia and surgery. The duration of treatment for this complication must occasionally extend beyond discharge from the hospital. In this study, we evaluated the commonly used anti-emetic promethazine for its efficacy in the post-discharge period. Adult outpatient surgical patients who had excessive postoperative nausea and vomiting in the recovery room, or who were at risk for postoperative nausea and vomiting following discharge were given two promethazine suppositories (25 mg) for home use. All patients were contacted by our recovery room nurses on the first business day after their surgery and questioned as to their use of the suppositories and, if used, their efficacy. We found that 55 percent of patients given promethazine suppositories for home use had nausea and vomiting in the post-discharge period. Of the patients given promethazine, 89 percent used the suppositories. All of these patients reported improvement in their symptoms following use of the suppositories. None reported adverse effects from the promethazine suppositories. In conclusion, we found promethazine suppositories to be an inexpensive and efficacious treatment for nausea and vomiting in adult outpatient surgical patients following discharge from the hospital. Side-effects were minimal, and our patients voiced no complaints about this mode of therapy. We recommend this therapy for treatment of nausea and vomiting after hospital discharge following adult outpatient surgery. PMID:10527366

  12. Single-dose palonosetron for prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy containing steroids: results of a phase II study from the Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio dei Linfomi (GISL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Renzo, Nicola; Montanini, Antonella; Mannina, Donato; Dondi, Alessandra; Muci, Stefania; Mancuso, Salvatrice; De Paolis, M Rosaria; Plati, Caterina; Stelitano, Caterina; Patti, Catia; Olivieri, Attilio; Liardo, Eliana; Buda, Gabriele; Cantaffa, Renato; Federico, Massimo

    2011-10-01

    The control of nausea and vomiting induced by chemotherapy is paramount for overall treatment success in cancer patients. Antiemetic therapy during chemotherapy in lymphoma patients generally consists of anti-serotoninergic drugs and dexamethasone. The aim of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy of a single dose of palonosetron, a second-generation serotonin type 3 (5-HT(3)) receptor antagonist, in patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC) containing steroids. Patients received a single intravenous bolus of palonosetron (0.25 mg) before administration of chemotherapy. Complete response (CR) defined as no vomiting and no rescue therapy during overall phase (0-120 h) was the primary endpoint. Complete control (CC) defined as CR and only mild nausea was a secondary endpoint. Eighty-six evaluable patients entered in the study. A CR was observed in 74 patients (86.0%) during the overall phase; the CR during the acute (0-24 h) and delayed (24-120 h) phases was 90.7% and 88.4%, respectively. CC was 89.5% during the acute and 84.9% during the delayed phase; the overall CC was 82.6%. This was the first trial, which demonstrated the efficacy of a single dose of palonosetron in control CINV in patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma receiving MEC regimen containing steroids.

  13. Rolapitant: A Review in Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Young-A; Deeks, Emma D

    2017-10-01

    Oral rolapitant (Varubi™; Varuby ® ), a long-acting neurokinin-1 (NK 1 ) receptor antagonist (RA), is indicated in the USA and EU as part of an antiemetic regimen to prevent delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in adults receiving highly or moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC or MEC). In randomized, phase III trials, a single oral dose of rolapitant 180 mg was effective in preventing delayed CINV compared with placebo, when each was used in combination with a 5-HT 3 RA plus dexamethasone, in adults receiving their first course of HEC or MEC. The benefits of rolapitant were maintained over multiple cycles of chemotherapy. The tolerability profile of rolapitant is similar to that of placebo and consistent with that of other NK 1 RAs. However, rolapitant differs from other existing NK 1 RAs in that it does not interact with CYP3A4, thereby negating the need for dexamethasone dose adjustments and potentially making rolapitant a more suitable option for patients receiving CYP3A4 substrates. Thus, oral rolapitant is an effective and well tolerated NK 1 RA that expands the treatment options for preventing delayed CINV in adults receiving HEC or MEC.

  14. Availability, Pharmaceutics, Security, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacological Activities of Patchouli Alcohol

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    Guanying Hu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patchouli alcohol (PA, a tricyclic sesquiterpene, is one of the critical bioactive ingredients and is mainly isolated from aerial part of Pogostemon cablin (known as guanghuoxiang in China belonging to Labiatae. So far, PA has been widely applied in perfume industries. This review was written with the use of reliable information published between 1974 and 2016 from libraries and electronic researches including NCKI, PubMed, Reaxys, ACS, ScienceDirect, Springer, and Wiley-Blackwell, aiming at presenting comprehensive outline of security, pharmacokinetics, and bioactivities of PA and at further providing a potential guide in exploring the PA and its use in various medical fields. We found that PA maybe was a low toxic drug that was acquired numerously through vegetable oil isolation and chemical synthesis and its stability and low water dissolution were improved in pharmaceutics. It also possessed specific pharmacokinetic characteristics, such as two-compartment open model, first-order kinetic elimination, and certain biometabolism and biotransformation process, and was shown to have multiple biological activities, that is, immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, antitumor, antimicrobial, insecticidal, antiatherogenic, antiemetic, whitening, and sedative activity. However, the systematic evaluations of preparation, pharmaceutics, toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and bioactivities underlying molecular mechanisms of action also required further investigation prior to practices of PA in clinic.

  15. Behavioral methods of alleviating motion sickness: effectiveness of controlled breathing and a music audiotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen Pik Sang, Fleur D; Billar, Jessica P; Golding, John F; Gresty, Michael A

    2003-01-01

    Behavioral countermeasures for motion sickness would be advantageous because of the side effects of antiemetic drugs, but few alternative treatments are available. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of controlling breathing and listening to a music audiotape designed to reduce motion sickness symptoms, on increasing tolerance to motion-induced nausea. Twenty-four healthy subjects were exposed to nauseogenic Coriolis stimulation on a rotating turntable under three conditions: whilst focusing on controlling breathing; listening to a music audiotape; or without intervention (control). The three conditions were performed by each subject according to a replicated factorial design at 1-week intervals at the same time of day. Ratings of motion sickness were obtained every 30 seconds. Once a level of mild nausea was reached subjects commenced controlling breathing or listened to the music audiotape. Motion was stopped after the onset of moderate nausea. Mean (+/- SD) motion exposure time in minutes tolerated before the onset of moderate nausea was significantly longer (p music (10.4 +/- 5.6 min) compared with control (9.2 +/- 5.9 min). Both controlling breathing and the music audiotape provided significant protection against motion sickness and with similar effectiveness. These nonpharmacologic countermeasures are only half as effective as standard doses of anti-motion sickness drugs, such as oral scopolamine; however, they are easy to implement and free of side effects.

  16. Ramosetron for the prevention of nausea and vomiting during 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy for pancreatico-biliary cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyubo; Chie, Eui-Kyu; Jang, Jin-Young; Kim, Sun-Whe; Oh, Do-Youn; Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Tae-You; Bang, Yung-Jue; Ha, Sung-W.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of ramosetron for the prevention of chemoradiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CRINV) in patients receiving upper abdominal irradiation with concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. Between November 2006 and April 2007, 25 patients with pancreatico-biliary cancer underwent adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. A total dose of 40 Gy was delivered using 2 Gy/fraction, 5 days a week, with 2 weeks of planned rest after 20 Gy. Concomitant 5-fluorouracil (500 mg/m 2 /day i.v. bolus) was administered for the first 3 days of each split course. During the first course of chemoradiotherapy, all patients had prophylactic metoclopramide before treatment and those refractory to metoclopramide received rescue medication with ondansetron. During the second course of chemoradiotherapy, prophylactic ramosetron was given to patients who were refractory to ondansetron. Response to antiemetics was scored in four tiers: none, no CRINV; mild, did not interfere with normal daily life; moderate, interfered with normal daily life and severe, patient bedridden because of CRINV. Fifty-six percent of the patients (14 of 25) had moderate CRINV despite metoclopramide, and received ondansetron. Ten patients who experienced moderate CRINV despite the ondansetron had prophylactic ramosetron, and 60% of the patients (6 of 10) had the symptom improved. Ramosetron proved to be an effective alternative for the control of CRINV during upper abdominal irradiation with concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. (author)

  17. Cachexia Syndrome, anorexia patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roldán, G.; Musé, I.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Two thirds of patients (ptes) cancer present slimming recognized a negative prognostic factor. Anorexia cachexia syndrome (SCA) results from the interaction of multiple factors and causes death of 22% of these patients. Nutritional support produces a moderate recovery weight without affecting the underlying metabolic disorders. Objectives: Conduct a review of current knowledge of the underlying pathophysiology and management the cachexia-anorexia syndrome in cancer patients. Designing indications possible policy interventions in the management of these patients. Method: Performed an a literature review on SCA. Conclusions: We identify patients at risk for early implementation of non-pharmacological measures preventive. The control side effects to treatment oncospecific with particular attention to the need for antiemetics, laxatives / antidiarrheal control dental and proper pain management is fundamental. Keep track enteral is a priority. In those with swallowing disorders or dysphagia, nasogastric feeding tube should be considered early. Indications for gastrostomy / jejunostomy and total parenteral nutrition (TPN) are very limited. The NPT is a complementary treatment maneuver a temporary and reversible complication, in order to prevent deterioration

  18. Cachexia Syndrome, anorexia patient; Síndrome de Caquexia, anorexia del paciente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roldán, G.; Musé, I. [Facultad de Medicina , Hospital de Clínicas , Servicio de Oncología Clínica, Montevideo(Uruguay)

    2004-12-15

    Introduction: Two thirds of patients (ptes) cancer present slimming recognized a negative prognostic factor. Anorexia cachexia syndrome (SCA) results from the interaction of multiple factors and causes death of 22% of these patients. Nutritional support produces a moderate recovery weight without affecting the underlying metabolic disorders. Objectives: Conduct a review of current knowledge of the underlying pathophysiology and management the cachexia-anorexia syndrome in cancer patients. Designing indications possible policy interventions in the management of these patients. Method: Performed an a literature review on SCA. Conclusions: We identify patients at risk for early implementation of non-pharmacological measures preventive. The control side effects to treatment oncospecific with particular attention to the need for antiemetics, laxatives / antidiarrheal control dental and proper pain management is fundamental. Keep track enteral is a priority. In those with swallowing disorders or dysphagia, nasogastric feeding tube should be considered early. Indications for gastrostomy / jejunostomy and total parenteral nutrition (TPN) are very limited. The NPT is a complementary treatment maneuver a temporary and reversible complication, in order to prevent deterioration.

  19. Evidence that 5-hydroxytryptamine/sub 3/ receptors mediate cytotoxic drug and radiation-evoked emesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miner, W.D.; Sanger, G.J.; Turner, D.H.

    1987-08-01

    The involvement of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) 5-HT/sub 3/ receptors in the mechanisms of severe emesis evoked by cytotoxic drugs or by total body irradiation have been studied in ferrets. Anti-emetic compounds tested were domperidone (a dopamine antagonist), metoclopramide (a gastric motility stimulant and dopamine antagonist at conventional doses, a 5-HT/sub 3/ receptor antagonist at higher doses) and BRL 24924 (a potent gastric motility stimulant and a 5-HT/sub 3/ receptor antagonist). Domperidone or metoclopramide prevented apomorphine-evoked emesis, whereas BRL 24924 did not. Similar doses of domperidone did not prevent emesis evoked by cis-platin or by total body irradiation, whereas metoclopramide or BRL 24924 greatly reduced or prevented these types of emesis. Metoclopramide and BRL 24924 also prevented emesis evoked by a combination of doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide. These results are discussed in terms of a fundamental role for 5-HT/sub 3/ receptors in the mechanisms mediating severely emetogenic cancer treatment therapies.

  20. Thalidomide for prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting following highly emetogenic chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Song

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Antiemetic guidelines recommend co-administration of agents to maximize the prevention of chemotherapyinduced nausea and vomiting (CINV, however, the control of delayed CINV is still not satisfactory. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of thalidomide in the prevention of CINV. Methods Of 89 patients enrolled, 83 chemotherapy-naïve patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy (cisplatin 70mg/m2 were randomized into two groups: standard therapy group (ondansetron on day 1, metoclopramide and dexamethasone on days one to five and thalidomide group (in addition to standard emesis prevention, patients received oral 100mg thalidomide on days one to five. Patients recorded nausea and vomiting episodes in a diary. The primary end point was the efficacy of thalidomide in controlling vomiting and nausea on days one to five post cisplatin, and the secondary end point was the safety of the thalidomide. Results No significant differences of complete response rates (no emesis, no use of rescue therapy and no nausea were observed between the two groups, while the percentages of patients with complete response of delayed vomiting on day four and day five were higher in the thalidomide group, furthermore, the complete response rate of delayed nausea for thalidomide group and standard therapy group showed significant differences. Thalidomide group showed a similar safety profile as standard emesis prevention group. Conclusion Addition of thalidomide was generally well tolerated and improved prevention of CINV in patients receiving cisplatinbased chemotherapy to some degree, especially for delayed nausea.

  1. Differential pharmacology and clinical utility of rolapitant in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

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    Rapoport BL

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Bernardo Leon Rapoport The Medical Oncology Centre of Rosebank, Johannesburg, South Africa Abstract: Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV is a debilitating side effect of many cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens. CINV typically manifests during two well-defined time periods (acute and delayed phases. The acute phase is the first 24 hours after chemotherapy and is largely managed with 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonists. The delayed phase, a 5-day at-risk period during which patients are not often in direct contact with their health care provider, remains a significant unmet medical need. Neurokinin-1 (NK-1 receptor antagonists have demonstrated protection against acute and delayed CINV in patients treated with highly emetogenic chemotherapy and moderately emetogenic chemotherapy when used in combination with a 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonist and dexamethasone. Furthermore, recent data indicate that this protection is maintained over multiple treatment cycles. Rolapitant, a selective and long-acting NK-1 receptor antagonist, is approved as oral formulation for the prevention of delayed CINV in adults. This review discusses the differential pharmacology and clinical utility of rolapitant in preventing CINV compared with other NK-1 receptor antagonists. Keywords: antiemetics, highly emetogenic chemotherapy, moderately emetogenic chemotherapy, delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, emesis, neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists

  2. Comparison of nutritional status and inflammatory stress levels after gastric cancer patients with chemotherapy received palonosetron hydrochloride injection and tropisetron

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    Wei Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the nutritional status and inflammatory stress levels after gastric cancer patients with chemotherapy received palonosetron and tropisetron. Methods: 94 patients with advanced gastric cancer undergoing FOLFOX4 intravenous chemotherapy in our hospital between May 2014 and March 2016 were selected and randomly divided into observation group (n=47 and control group (n=47 who received palonosetron and tropisetron for chemotherapy anti-emesis respectively. After four cycles of chemotherapy, serum samples were collected from two groups of patients to determine nutritional status, inflammatory reaction and stress reaction indexes. Results: After four cycles of chemotherapy, serum albumin (ALB, prealbumin (PAB, transferrin (TFN, immunoglobulin A (IgA, IgG and IgM content of observation group were significantly higher than those of control group (P<0.05. After four cycles of chemotherapy, serum Keap1 content of observation group was significantly higher than that of control group (P<0.05, while Nrf2, ARE, NQO1, HO-1, interferon-γ (IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, interleukin-4 (IL-4 and IL-10 content were significantly lower than those of control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Palonosetron has better antiemetic effect than tropisetron for gastric cancer patients with chemotherapy, and after chemotherapy, the nutritional status is better and the inflammatory stress level is lighter.

  3. Phytochemistry and Pharmacology of Berberis Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhber-Dezfuli, Najmeh; Saeidnia, Soodabeh; Gohari, Ahmad Reza; Kurepaz-Mahmoodabadi, Mahdieh

    2014-01-01

    The genus Berberis (Berberidaceae) includes about 500 species worldwide, some of which are widely cultivated in the north-eastern regions of Iran. This genus consists of spiny deciduous evergreen shrubs, characterized by yellow wood and flowers. The cultivation of seedless barberry in South Khorasan goes back to two hundred years ago. Medicinal properties for all parts of these plants have been reported, including: Antimicrobial, antiemetic, antipyretic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-arrhythmic, sedative, anti-cholinergic, cholagogic, anti-leishmaniasis, and anti-malaria. The main compounds found in various species of Berberis, are berberine and berbamine. Phytochemical analysis of various species of this genus revealed the presence of alkaloids, tannins, phenolic compounds, sterols and triterpenes. Although there are some review articles on Berberis vulgaris (as the most applied species), there is no review on the phytochemical and pharmacological activities of other well-known species of the genus Berberis. For this reason, the present review mainly focused on the diverse secondary metabolites of various species of this genus and the considerable pharmacological and biological activities together with a concise story of the botany and cultivation. PMID:24600191

  4. Effect of intramuscular clebopride on postoperative nausea and vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, D F; Linhares, S; Gesser, N; Pederneiras, S G

    1985-01-01

    The antiemetic effect of clebopride, a new derivative of the orthopramide group, was compared with that of placebo in 298 women undergoing elective surgery. A group of 150 patients received premedication of 1 mg/kg of meperidine, administered intramuscularly (IM), and a group of 148 patients received premedication of 10 mg of diazepam IM. All patients received 0.5 mg of atropine IM. Anesthesia was induced with thiopental and maintained with halogenated N2O/O2. In a double-blind procedure, clebopride (2 mg) or placebo was injected IM at the end of anesthesia and whenever a patient had a second episode of vomiting. Clebopride appeared to be better than placebo in the prevention of nausea (P less than or equal to 0.05) and vomiting (P less than or equal to 0.001) during the 12-hour observation period. The frequency of side effects was virtually the same in patients given clebopride and patients given placebo.

  5. Efficacy of intravenous ondansetron to prevent vomiting episodes in acute gastroenteritis: a randomized, double blind, and controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanguansak Rerksuppaphol

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute gastroenteritis is one of the most common infectious diseases of childhood. Its symptoms are vomiting, diarrhea, and dehydration. In the emergency ward, intravenous rather than oral rehydration is usually preferred because of the high likelihood of emesis. Treatments to reduce emesis are of value in improving the rehydration procedure. Our study is a double-blind randomized trial and proposes the use of ondansetron as an anti-emetic drug to treat children with acute gastroenteritis. Seventy-four in-patients, aged 3 months to 15 years, were enrolled and randomly assigned to an ondansetron or placebo group. Inclusion criteria were the diagnosis of acute gastroenteritis and the absence of other diseases or allergies to drugs. A single bolus (0.15 mg/kg of ondansetron was injected intravenously; normal 0.9% saline solution was used as a placebo. This treatment induced vomiting cessation in the ondansetron group significantly in comparison to the placebo group. The length of the hospital stay and the oral rehydration fluid volume were similar in the two groups and no adverse effects were noticed. Thus, safety, low cost, and overall bene­fit of ondansetron treatment suggests that this drug can be administered successfully to children with acute gastroenteritis.

  6. Acute diarrhea in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radlović Nedeljko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute diarrhea (AD is the most frequent gastroenterological disorder, and the main cause of dehydration in childhood. It is manifested by a sudden occurrence of three or more watery or loose stools per day lasting for seven to 10 days, 14 days at most. It mainly occurs in children until five years of age and particularly in neonates in the second half-year and children until the age of three years. Its primary causes are gastrointestinal infections, viral and bacterial, and more rarely alimentary intoxications and other factors. As dehydration and negative nutritive balance are the main complications of AD, it is clear that the compensation of lost body fluids and adequate diet form the basis of the child’s treatment. Other therapeutic measures, except antipyretics in high febrility, antiparasitic drugs for intestinal lambliasis, anti-amebiasis and probiotics are rarely necessary. This primarily regards uncritical use of antibiotics and intestinal antiseptics in the therapy of bacterial diarrhea. The use of antiemetics, antidiarrhetics and spasmolytics is unnecessary and potentially risky, so that it is not recommended for children with AD.

  7. Acute Copper Sulfate Poisoning: Case Report and Review of Literature

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    Mahesh Chand Meena

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Copper sulfate ingestion is a relatively popular method for committing suicide in Indian subcontinent. It causes a high mortality rate, and so a growing concern has been raised to identify the severe alarming signs suggestive of poor prognosis and to improve treatment approaches. Case report: A 22-year-old unmarried man working as a painter was found unconscious at his friend residence. The patient developed hypotension, hemorrhagic gastroenteritis with hematemesis and melena, renal and hepatic failure, severe metabolic acidosis and intravascular hemolysis during admission at hospital. His signs were refractory to treatment with fluid replacement therapy, vasoactive drugs, antiemetic drugs, ranitidine, furosemide, methylene blue and 2,3 dimercaptopropane-1-sulphonate. He died six hours post-admission. In post-mortem examinations, there were multiple sub-pleural and sub-epicardial hemorrhages and the gastrointestinal mucosa was congested, hemorrhagic, and greenish blue in color. The liver, on histological examination, showed sub-massive hepatic necrosis. On toxicological analyses, copper sulfate was detected in preserved viscera and results for other heavy metals were negative. Conclusion: Hypotension, cyanosis, uremia and jaundice can be considered as signs of poor prognosis in copper sulfate poisoning. Copper sulfate ingestion is life-threatening due to its deleterious effects on the upper GI, kidneys, liver and blood. Having no time to waste, aggressive treatments should be immediately instituted and signs of poor prognosis should be kept in mind.

  8. Safety and side effects of cannabidiol, a Cannabis sativa constituent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamaschi, Mateus Machado; Queiroz, Regina Helena Costa; Zuardi, Antonio Waldo; Crippa, José Alexandre S

    2011-09-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD), a major nonpsychotropic constituent of Cannabis, has multiple pharmacological actions, including anxiolytic, antipsychotic, antiemetic and anti-inflammatory properties. However, little is known about its safety and side effect profile in animals and humans. This review describes in vivo and in vitro reports of CBD administration across a wide range of concentrations, based on reports retrieved from Web of Science, Scielo and Medline. The keywords searched were "cannabinoids", "cannabidiol" and "side effects". Several studies suggest that CBD is non-toxic in non-transformed cells and does not induce changes on food intake, does not induce catalepsy, does not affect physiological parameters (heart rate, blood pressure and body temperature), does not affect gastrointestinal transit and does not alter psychomotor or psychological functions. Also, chronic use and high doses up to 1,500 mg/day of CBD are reportedly well tolerated in humans. Conversely, some studies reported that this cannabinoid can induce some side effects, including inhibition of hepatic drug metabolism, alterations of in vitro cell viability, decreased fertilization capacity, and decreased activities of p-glycoprotein and other drug transporters. Based on recent advances in cannabinoid administration in humans, controlled CBD may be safe in humans and animals. However, further studies are needed to clarify these reported in vitro and in vivo side effects.

  9. A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial of Oral Ramosetron for Prevention of Post Operative Nausea and Vomiting after Intrathecal Morphine in Patients Undergoing Gynecological Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangnamthip, Suratsawadee; Chinachoti, Thitima; Amornyotin, Somchai; Wongtangman, Karuna; Sukantarat, Numphung; Noitasaeng, Papiroon

    2016-05-01

    The incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) after intrathecal morphine is high. Ramosetron is a 5-HT₃ antagonist that has been shown to reduce PONV in general anesthesia. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Ramosetron in preventing PONV MATERIAL AND METHOD: 165 patients undergoing elective gynecological surgery under spinal anesthesia were randomly allocated to two groups: the Ramosetron group (0.1 mg orally, n = 82), and the placebo group (oral corn starch, n = 83). The incidence of PONV severity of nausea and use of rescue antiemetic during the first 24 hour after surgery were evaluated. The incidence of PONV was significantly lower in the Ramosetron group compared with the placebo group (24.4% vs. 44.6%, number needed to treat (NNT) = 5.0). The severity of nausea was significantly lower in the Ramosetron group compared with the placebo group (20.7% vs. 39.8%, NNT = 6.0) in the 24 hour period. Oral Ramosetron 0.1 mg was more effective than placebo in PONV prevention and reduced the incidence of moderate to severe nausea after intrathecal morphine in the first 24 hour after gynecological surgery.

  10. Antitumor action of temozolomide, ritonavir and aprepitant against human glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Richard E; Ramiro, Susana; Lladó, Sandra; Toro, Salvador; Coveñas, Rafael; Muñoz, Miguel

    2016-02-01

    In the effort to find better treatments for glioblastoma we tested several currently marketed non-chemotherapy drugs for their ability to enhance the standard cytotoxic drug currently used to treat glioblastoma- temozolomide. We tested four antiviral drugs- acyclovir, cidofovir, maraviroc, ritonavir, and an anti-emetic, aprepitant. We found no cytotoxicity of cidofovir and discussed possible reasons for discrepancy from previous findings of others. We also found no cytotoxicity from acyclovir or maraviroc also in contradistinction to predictions. Cytotoxicity to glioma cell line GAMG for temozolomide alone was 14%, aprepitant alone 7%, ritonavir alone 14%, while temozolomide + aprepitant was 19%, temozolomide + ritonavir 34%, ritonavir + aprepitant 64 %, and all three, temozolomide + ritonavir + aprepitant 78%. We conclude that a remarkable synergy exists between aprepitant and ritonavir. Given the long clinical experience with these two well-tolerated drugs in treating non-cancer conditions, and the current median survival of glioblastoma of 2 years, a trial is warranted of adding these two simple drugs to current standard treatment with temozolomide.

  11. A Comprehensive Review on the Phytochemical Constituents and Pharmacological Activities of Pogostemon cablin Benth.: An Aromatic Medicinal Plant of Industrial Importance

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    Mallappa Kumara Swamy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pogostemon cablin Benth. (patchouli is an important herb which possesses many therapeutic properties and is widely used in the fragrance industries. In traditional medicinal practices, it is used to treat colds, headaches, fever, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, insect and snake bites. In aromatherapy, patchouli oil is used to relieve depression, stress, calm nerves, control appetite and to improve sexual interest. Till now more than 140 compounds, including terpenoids, phytosterols, flavonoids, organic acids, lignins, alkaloids, glycosides, alcohols, aldehydes have been isolated and identified from patchouli. The main phytochemical compounds are patchouli alcohol, α-patchoulene, β-patchoulene, α-bulnesene, seychellene, norpatchoulenol, pogostone, eugenol and pogostol. Modern studies have revealed several biological activities such as antioxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antiplatelet, antithrombotic, aphrodisiac, antidepressant, antimutagenic, antiemetic, fibrinolytic and cytotoxic activities. However, some of the traditional uses need to be verified and may require standardizing and authenticating the bioactivity of purified compounds through scientific methods. The aim of the present review is to provide comprehensive knowledge on the phytochemistry and pharmacological activities of essential oil and different plant extracts of patchouli based on the available scientific literature. This information will provide a potential guide in exploring the use of main active compounds of patchouli in various medical fields.

  12. A case of probable esomeprazole-induced transient liver injury in a pregnant woman with hyperemesis

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    Thomas B

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Binny Thomas,1-3 Mahmoud Mohamed,1,3,4 Moza Al Hail,1-3 Fatma Alzahra Y Awwad,1 Ramy M Wahba,1 Sabir B Hassan,1 Khalid Omar,1 Wessam El Kassem,1 Palivalappila Abdul Rouf1 1Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar; 2Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, Scotland, UK; 3Qatar University, Doha, 4Weill Cornell Medical College, Ar-Rayyan, Qatar Abstract: We report a case of 22-year-old primigravida presented to Women’s Hospital – Hamad Medical Corporation emergency with severe epigastric pain, nausea, and vomiting. On admission, she was dehydrated with remarkably worsening symptoms. Laboratory findings revealed significantly elevated liver enzymes with unknown etiology. Her past medical history showed an admission for nausea and vomiting 3 weeks previously and she was discharged on antiemetics, and esomeprazole for the first time. Due to the predominantly elevated liver enzymes, the clinical pharmacist discussed the possibility of esomeprazole-induced adverse effects and suggested to suspend esomeprazole based on the evidence from literature review. The liver enzymes showed a substantial improvement within days after the discontinuation of the drug; however, a rechallenge was not done since it could have adversely affected the mother or the fetus. Using the Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability scales, the adverse reaction due to esomeprazole was classified as “probably”. Keywords: hyperemesis, drug-induced liver injury, esomeprazole, adverse drug reaction, ADR, proton pump inhibitor

  13. Ginger-Mechanism of action in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Wolfgang; Ried, Karin; McCarthy, Alexandra L; Vitetta, Luis; Sali, Avni; McKavanagh, Daniel; Isenring, Liz

    2017-01-02

    Despite advances in antiemetic therapy, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) still poses a significant burden to patients undergoing chemotherapy. Nausea, in particular, is still highly prevalent in this population. Ginger has been traditionally used as a folk remedy for gastrointestinal complaints and has been suggested as a viable adjuvant treatment for nausea and vomiting in the cancer context. Substantial research has revealed ginger to possess properties that could exert multiple beneficial effects on chemotherapy patients who experience nausea and vomiting. Bioactive compounds within the rhizome of ginger, particularly the gingerol and shogaol class of compounds, interact with several pathways that are directly implicated in CINV in addition to pathways that could play secondary roles by exacerbating symptoms. These properties include 5-HT 3 , substance P, and acetylcholine receptor antagonism; antiinflammatory properties; and modulation of cellular redox signaling, vasopressin release, gastrointestinal motility, and gastric emptying rate. This review outlines these proposed mechanisms by discussing the results of clinical, in vitro, and animal studies both within the chemotherapy context and in other relevant fields. The evidence presented in this review indicates that ginger possesses multiple properties that could be beneficial in reducing CINV.

  14. The Effect of a Standardized Ginger Extract on Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea-Related Quality of Life in Patients Undergoing Moderately or Highly Emetogenic Chemotherapy: A Double Blind, Randomized, Placebo Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Wolfgang; McCarthy, Alexandra L; Ried, Karin; McKavanagh, Dan; Vitetta, Luis; Sali, Avni; Lohning, Anna; Isenring, Elisabeth

    2017-08-12

    Ginger supplementation could be an effective adjuvant treatment for chemotherapy-induced nausea (CIN). The aim of this clinical trial was to address significant methodological limitations in previous trials. Patients (N = 51) were randomly allocated to receive either 1.2 g of standardised ginger extract or placebo per day, in addition to standard anti-emetic therapy, during the first three cycles of chemotherapy. The primary outcome was CIN-related quality of life (QoL) measured with the Functional Living Index- Emesis (FLIE) questionnaire. Secondary outcomes included acute and delayed nausea, vomiting, and retching as well as cancer-related fatigue, nutritional status, and CIN and vomiting-specific prognostic factors. Over three consecutive chemotherapy cycles, nausea was more prevalent than vomiting (47% vs. 12%). In chemotherapy Cycle 1, intervention participants reported significantly better QoL related to CIN ( p = 0.029), chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV)-related QoL ( p = 0.043), global QoL ( p = 0.015) and less fatigue ( p = 0.006) than placebo participants. There were no significant results in Cycle 2. In Cycle 3, global QoL ( p = 0.040) and fatigue ( p = 0.013) were significantly better in the intervention group compared to placebo. This trial suggests adjuvant ginger supplementation is associated with better chemotherapy-induced nausea-related quality of life and less cancer-related fatigue, with no difference in adverse effects compared to placebo.

  15. Clinical observation of ondansetron administration at different time in preventing nausea and vomiting after pediatric strabismus surgery

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    Huai-Gang Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the efficacy of ondansetron by intravenous injection at different time in preventing nausea and vomiting after pediatric strabismus surgery. METHODS: Totally 90 children aged 3-11y were randomly selected for pediatric strabismus surgery from June 2013 to August 2013 in our hospital. The ASA grade of all children were Ⅰ-Ⅱ. Children were randomly divided into three groups with 30 cases each. Group A received intravenous drip of ondansetron 0.1mg/kg before surgery. Group B received intravenous drip of ondansetron 0.1mg/kg after surgery. Group C as control group was not given ondansetron. The number and severity of nausea and vomiting were observed within 24h after surgery. RESULTS: There were no statistical significance in patients' gender, weight, age, duration of anesthesia, ketamine dosage and vital signs intraoperative between the three groups(P>0.05. The incidence rate of postoperative nausea and vomiting(PONVof group A and B were significantly lower than group C(PP>0.05. CONCLUSION: Using ondansetron is effective and safe in preventing PONV before and at the end of the pediatric strabismus surgery, which can also improve safety and be lower cost. It is a worthy promoting antiemetic approach for eye surgery.

  16. Acute Organoaxial gastric volvulus: A massive problem with a twist-case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Daoud, Fadi; Daswani, Gul Sachwani; Perinjelil, Vinu; Nigam, Tina

    2017-01-01

    Gastric volvulus (GV) is a rare and life threatening condition if not treated promptly or wrongly diagnosed. The main complication of gastric volvulus is foregut obstruction. The extreme rotation can cut off blood supply to the stomach and even distal organs, which can lead to ischemia and necrosis of the affected area. We report a case of a 41yo female that complained of severe abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting for approximately 3days after eating a large meal. The patient didn't have any flatus or bowel movements in the last 24h. CT of the abdomen and pelvis showed a dilatation of the stomach and esophageal hernia. Laparotomy confirmed an organoaxial volvulus at the level of the antrum and body of the stomach. Gastropexy was implemented and the stomach fixed to the posterior abdominal wall to prevent recurrence. GV may have a significant related morbidity and mortality rate. It can be missed easily on diagnosis. The presence of vomiting not responding to initial antiemetic treatment, as well as, the presence of a hiatal hernia on the imaging studies should trigger our thinking of gastric volvulus, regardless of the stable appearance of the patient. Chronic GV can manifests as atypical chest, abdomen and gastro intestinal symptoms. We recommend that everyone with these atypical symptoms seek medical attention to rule out GV. Early diagnosis and treatment will reduce the risk of developing chronic gastric volvulus to acute gastric volvulus. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Gastrinoma and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome in canids: a literature review and a case in a Mexican gray wolf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struthers, Jason D; Robl, Nick; Wong, Valerie M; Kiupel, Matti

    2018-06-01

    Gastrinoma, an infrequent diagnosis in middle-aged dogs, occurs with nonspecific gastrointestinal morbidity. Laboratory tests can yield a presumptive diagnosis, but definitive diagnosis depends on histopathology and immunohistochemistry. We describe a malignant pancreatic gastrinoma with lymph node metastases and corresponding Zollinger-Ellison syndrome in a Mexican gray wolf ( Canis lupus baileyi) and review this endocrine neoplasm in domestic dogs. A 12-y-old, captive, male Mexican gray wolf developed inappetence and weight loss. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a thickened duodenum and peritoneal effusion. Two duodenal perforations were noted on exploratory celiotomy and were repaired. Persisting clinical signs led to a second celiotomy that revealed a mesenteric mass, which was diagnosed histologically as a neuroendocrine carcinoma. During the following 16 mo, the wolf received a combination of H 2 -receptor antagonists, proton-pump inhibitors, gastroprotectants, and anti-emetics, but had recurrent episodes of anorexia, nausea, acid reflux, and remained underweight. Worsening clinical signs and weakness prompted euthanasia. The antemortem serum gastrin concentration of 414 ng/L (reference interval: 10-40 ng/L) corroborated hypergastrinemia. Autopsy revealed a mass expanding the right pancreatic limb; 3 parapancreatic mesenteric masses; duodenal ulcers; focal duodenal perforation with septic fibrinosuppurative peritonitis; chronic-active ulcerative esophagitis; and poor body condition. The pancreatic mass was diagnosed histologically as a neuroendocrine carcinoma and the parapancreatic masses as lymph node metastases. Immunohistochemistry of the pancreatic mass was positive for gastrin and negative for glucagon, insulin, pancreatic polypeptide, serotonin, somatostatin, and vasoactive intestinal peptide.

  18. [Quebec Pregnancy Cohort: prevalence of medication use during gestation and pregnancy outcomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérard, Anick; Sheehy, Odile

    2014-01-01

    Many women are exposed to medications during pregnancy. The Quebec Pregnancy Cohort (QPC) is a prospective population-based cohort which includes all data on pregnancies and children between January 1997 and December 2008. We linked four administrative databases in Quebec, Canada: RAMQ (medical and pharmaceutical), MED-ECHO (hospitalizations), ISQ (births/deaths), and MELS (Ministry of Education). Pregnancies included were covered by the Quebec prescription drug insurance plan (36% of women aged 15-45 years) from 12 months prior until the end of pregnancy. We analyzed 97,680 pregnancies. Prevalence of medication use was 74% pre-pregnancy, 56% during pregnancy, and 80% post-pregnancy. Most frequently used medications during pregnancy were antibiotics (47%), antiemetic drugs (23%), and non-steroïdal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) [17%]. Medication users were more likely to have spontaneous abortions, preterm births, children with congenital malformations and postpartum depression than non-users (ppregnancy. The QPC is a powerful tool for perinatal pharmacoepidemiological research. © 2014 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  19. Adding metoclopramide to paroxetine induced extrapyramidal symptoms and hyperprolactinemia in a depressed woman: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igata R

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ryohei Igata, Hikaru Hori, Kiyokazu Atake, Asuka Katsuki, Jun Nakamura Department of Psychiatry, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan Abstract: A 54-year-old Japanese woman was diagnosed with major depressive disorder and prescribed paroxetine 20 mg/day. In around May 2013, the patient experienced gastric discomfort, so metoclopramide was prescribed. Beginning on June 4, 2013, the patient was given metoclopramide, 10 mg intravenously, twice per week. On the seventh day after beginning metoclopramide, facial hot flushes, increased sweating, muscle rigidity, and galactorrhea were noted. Extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS rapidly subsided in response to an intramuscular injection of biperiden. Blood biochemical tests revealed an elevated serum prolactin level of 44 ng/mL. After stopping metoclopramide, EPS disappeared. Serum prolactin level decreased to 15 ng/mL after 4 weeks. In our case, although no adverse reactions had previously occurred following the administration of metoclopramide, the patient developed EPS and hyperprolactinemia following the administration of this antiemetic in combination with paroxetine. Paroxetine and metoclopramide are mainly metabolized by CYP2D6, and they are inhibitors for CYP2D6. We report a case with EPS and hyperprolactinemia whose plasma paroxetine and metoclopramide level rapidly increased after the addition of metoclopramide. Our experience warrants the issuing of a precaution that adverse reactions may arise following the coadministration of metoclopramide and paroxetine even at their respective standard dose levels. Keywords: metoclopramide, paroxetine, extrapyramidal symptoms, SSRI, hyperprolactinemia, depression

  20. Novel method of determination of D9-tetrahydrocannabinol(THC) in human serum by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubun, Hideya; Uezono, Yasuhito; Matoba, Motohiro

    2014-04-01

    In Europe and the United States, D9-tetrahydrocannabinol(THC, dronabinol), one of the psychoactive constituents of cannabis, has been used for both its anti-emetic and orexigenic effects in cancer patient receiving chemotherapy.However, dronabinol has not yet been launched in the market in Japan.In the future, it is necessary to ascertain the pharmacokinetics of dronabinol in cancer paitient.Therefore, we developed an HPLC procedure using electrochemical detection(ECD)for quan- titation of the concentrations of dronabinol in blood.An eluent of 50mM KH2PO4/CH3CN(9:16)was used as the mobile phase.The column was used the XTerra®RP18, and the voltage of the electrochemical detector in dronabinol was set at 400 mV.As a result, the calibration curve was linear in the range of 10 ng/mL to 100 ng/mL(y=964.85x -3,419, r=0.997).The lower limit of quantification was 0.5 ng/mL(S/N=3).The relative within-runs and between-runs standard deviations for the assay dronabinol were less than 4.7%. The method reported here is superior to previously reported methods in cancer patient.

  1. Physiological bases and treatment to the radiation-induced emetic reflex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulen Napoles, Barbara M.; Torres Babie, Priscilla; Ropero Toirac, Ramon de J.

    2002-01-01

    In the course of the specific oncologic treatment, there are frequent complications such as nausea and vomiting. The radiation-induced emetic reflex depends on various factors: primary site of radiation, administered dose, fractioning, irradiated volume, the sensory and psychic characteristics of the patient as well as the chemotherapy association. It is known that the afferent path to the so-called center of vomiting is determined by chemical mediators, protuberance receptors of the intracranial pressure and the unleashing chemoreceptor zone. In radiation-induced emesis, the exact mechanism is yet to be determined but it is known that radiation stimulates the production of chemical mediators and serotonin released by enterochromaffin cells that act upon the center of vomiting and vagal nucleus. Most of patients who are exposed to irradiation of their upper and middle hemibody as well as all the patients exposed to whole-body irradiation present with nausea and vomiting. The therapeutical anti-emetic recommendations are based on the neurochemical control of vomiting and the emetogenic effect of radiotherapy. 5HT3 receptor-antagonists are evaluated as effective agents in the control of radiation-induced emesis

  2. P6 Electroacupuncture Improved QTc Interval Prolongation by Upregulation of Connexin43 in Droperidol Treated Rats

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    Feng Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. This study investigated the effect of P6 EA on droperidol-induced QTc interval prolongation and Cx43 expression in ventricular muscle of rats. Methods. Twenty-four rats were randomly divided into control group (C, droperidol group (D, or EA group (E. C group rats were injected with normal saline. D group rats were injected with droperidol 0.13 mg/kg. E group rats were pretreated with EA at left P6 acupoint for 30 min and then injected with droperidol (0.13 mg/kg. QTc intervals were recorded at lead II in ECG within 120 min. Cx43 expression was measured by RT-PCR and western blotting. Result. Droperidol significantly prolonged QTc intervals compared with controls at 5 min, 10 min, 15 min, and 30 min (P0.05. Conclusion. P6 EA could improve QTc interval prolongation induced by droperidol, which may relate to upregulation of Cx43 mRNA and protein. Antiemetic dose of droperidol had minor effects on Cx43 mRNA and protein expression at 120 min.

  3. Acute Dystonia in a Child Receiving Metoclopramide: Case Report

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    Alaaddin Yorulmaz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Metoclopramide is a benzamide that is a dopamine receptor, often preferred as a prokinetic agent to accelerate gastrointestinal passage in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease; itis also used as an antiemetic agent in many diseases that progress with nausea-vomiting. It is effective on the digestive system both centrally and peripherally. It easily overcomes the blood-brain barrier and may create side effects pertaining to the extrapyramidal system. Acute dystonic reaction is rare among these side effects; it is, however, a condition that needs to be treated urgently. This paper presents a 5-month-old infant patient who developed acute dystonic reaction secondary to the use of Metpamid at a high dose. The diagnosis in this case was made based onpatient history. The patient%u2019s symptoms rapidly disappeared thanks to treatment with diphenhydramine. It should be remembered that metoclopramide may cause side effects in patients presenting to the emergency service with acute dystonia, soa complete history of drugs should definitely be taken for such patients.

  4. New approaches to chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: from neuropharmacology to clinical investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Edward B; Slusher, Barbara S; Rojas, Camilo; Navari, Rudolph M

    2006-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are considered to be among the most distressing consequences of cytotoxic chemotherapies. Currently, there are several novel 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV), including ondansetron, granisetron, and dolasetron. These agents provide significant improvement in the management of acute emesis but are ineffective at preventing delayed emesis. In 2003, a new 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist, palonosetron HCL (Aloxi), was introduced to the U.S. market. Palonosetron was found to be effective in preventing delayed CINV. Indeed, palonosetron was the first and only 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist approved by the FDA for the prevention of both acute and delayed CINV. More recently, studies on the role of substance P in the emetic process led to the development of aprepitant (Emend) for the prevention of delayed emesis in combination with 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists. Despite these major advances, CINV remains uncontrolled in some patients. Current efforts are focused on treating refractory emesis and include both the clinical evaluation of compounds marketed for other indications and the preclinical evaluation of novel molecules targeting other transmitters in the emetic pathway. Ongoing work in pharmacogenomics has postulated several candidate genes that could be involved in emetic sensitivity and responsiveness to antiemetic therapy. Investigations into the pharmacogenomics of CINV may someday be able to aid in the identification of high risk patients and patients unlikely to respond to conventional therapies.

  5. Dexamethasone: a potent blocker for radiation-induced taste aversion in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cairnie, A.B.; Leach, K.E.

    1982-01-01

    Rats, trained to drink water during a single 30-min period each day, were then given 0.1% saccharin twice a week and water on other days for 30 min. If 20 rad of radiation (0.2 Gy) were given each time 30 to 40 min after the saccharin the rats developed a profound aversion to saccharin during the course of three weeks, whereas control groups failed to do so. This paradigm was then used to test the ability of drugs, given twice weekly immediately after the saccharin, to prevent the development during three weeks of an aversion when 20 rad was given, 30 to 40 min later. Insulin, domperidone, haloperidol, acetylsalicylic acid, naloxone, chlorpheniramine, cimetidine, and dimethyl sulphoxide were tested without notable success. However dexamethasone, at doses ranging from 0.013 mg/kg to 1.3 mg/kg, significantly attenuated the conditioned taste aversion by up to 60 percent. The results are discussed in terms of a search for an antinauseant and antiemetic drug effective against radiation in man

  6. Holoptelea integrifolia (Roxb.) Planch: a review of its ethnobotany, pharmacology, and phytochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganie, Showkat Ahmad; Yadav, Surender Singh

    2014-01-01

    Holoptelea integrifolia (Ulmaceae) is a versatile medicinal plant used in various indigenous systems of medicine for curing routine healthcare maladies. It is traditionally used in the treatment and prevention of several ailments like leprosy, inflammation, rickets, leucoderma, scabies, rheumatism, ringworm, eczema, malaria, intestinal cancer, and chronic wounds. In vitro and in vivo pharmacological investigations on crude extracts and isolated compounds showed antibacterial, antifungal, analgesic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anthelmintic, antidiabetic, antidiarrhoeal, adaptogenic, anticancer, wound healing, hepatoprotective, larvicidal, antiemetic, CNS depressant, and hypolipidemic activities. Phytochemical analysis showed the presence of terpenoids, sterols, saponins, tannins, proteins, carbohydrates, alkaloids, phenols, flavonoids, glycosides, and quinines. Numerous compounds including Holoptelin-A, Holoptelin-B, friedlin, epifriedlin, β -amyrin, stigmasterol, β -sitosterol, 1, 4-napthalenedione, betulin, betulinic acid, hexacosanol, and octacosanol have been identified and isolated from the plant species. The results of several studies indicated that H. integrifolia may be used as an effective therapeutic remedy in the prevention and treatment of various ailments. However, further studies on chemical constituents and their mechanisms in exhibiting certain biological activities are needed. In addition, study on the toxicity of the crude extracts and the compounds isolated from this plant should be assessed to ensure their eligibility to be used as source of modern medicines.

  7. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity and immunostimulatory effect of extracts from Byrsonima crassa Nied. (Malpighiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilegas Wagner

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several in vitro studies have looked at the effect of medicinal plant extracts against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori. Regardless of the popular use of Byrsonima crassa (B. crassa as antiemetic, diuretic, febrifuge, to treat diarrhea, gastritis and ulcers, there is no data on its effects against H. pylori. In this study, we evaluated the anti-H. pylori of B. crassa leaves extracts and its effects on reactive oxygen/nitrogen intermediates induction by murine peritoneal macrophages. Methods The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC was determined by broth microdilution method and the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO by the horseradish peroxidase-dependent oxidation of phenol red and Griess reaction, respectively. Results The methanolic (MeOH and chloroformic (CHCl3 extracts inhibit, in vitro, the growth of H. pylori with MIC value of 1024 μg/ml. The MeOH extract induced the production H2O2 and NO, but CHCl3 extract only NO. Conclusion Based in our results, B. crassa can be considered a source of compounds with anti-H. pylori activity, but its use should be done with caution in treatment of the gastritis and peptic ulcers, since the reactive oxygen/nitrogen intermediates are involved in the pathogenesis of gastric mucosal injury induced by ulcerogenic agents and H. pylori infections.

  8. Pain Management in Ambulatory Surgery—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan G. Jakobsson

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Day surgery, coming to and leaving the hospital on the same day as surgery as well as ambulatory surgery, leaving hospital within twenty-three hours is increasingly being adopted. There are several potential benefits associated with the avoidance of in-hospital care. Early discharge demands a rapid recovery and low incidence and intensity of surgery and anaesthesia related side-effects; such as pain, nausea and fatigue. Patients must be fit enough and symptom intensity so low that self-care is feasible in order to secure quality of care. Preventive multi-modal analgesia has become the gold standard. Administering paracetamol, NSIADs prior to start of surgery and decreasing the noxious influx by the use of local anaesthetics by peripheral block or infiltration in surgical field prior to incision and at wound closure in combination with intra-operative fast acting opioid analgesics, e.g., remifentanil, have become standard of care. Single preoperative 0.1 mg/kg dose dexamethasone has a combined action, anti-emetic and provides enhanced analgesia. Additional α-2-agonists and/or gabapentin or pregabalin may be used in addition to facilitate the pain management if patients are at risk for more pronounced pain. Paracetamol, NSAIDs and rescue oral opioid is the basic concept for self-care during the first 3–5 days after common day/ambulatory surgical procedures.

  9. Anti-tuberculosis medication-induced oculogyric crisis and the importance of proper history taking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong LH

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Lin Ho Wong,1 Endean Tan2 1University College Cork, Cork, Ireland; 2Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore Abstract: Oculogyric crisis (OGC, frequently caused by medications such as antiemetics, antidepressants, and anti-epileptics, is an acute dystonic reaction of the ocular muscles. It consists of wide-staring gaze (lasting variably from seconds to minutes, seizures, and a widely-opened mouth. To date, there have been no reports of anti-tuberculosis medications such as rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide or ethambutol inducing OGC. It is of utmost importance to recognize this adverse reaction, which could be incorrectly diagnosed as an anaphylactic-like reaction. In this paper, we highlight a case of a 66-year-old Indian man who presented with OGC induced by anti-tuberculosis medications which was initially suspected to be an anaphylactic reaction and was subsequently halted with the administration of diphenhydramine. Keywords: oculogyric crisis, tuberculosis, rifampicin, isoniazid, ethambutol, adverse drug reaction 

  10. Rotavirus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Sue E.; Ramani, Sasirekha; Tate, Jacqueline E.; Parashar, Umesh D.; Svensson, Lennart; Hagbom, Marie; Franco, Manuel A.; Greenberg, Harry B.; O’Ryan, Miguel; Kang, Gagandeep; Desselberger, Ulrich; Estes, Mary K.

    2017-01-01

    Rotavirus infections are a leading cause of severe, dehydrating gastroenteritis in children rotavirus over a decade ago, rotavirus infections still result in >200,000 deaths annually, mostly in low-income countries. Rotavirus primarily infects enterocytes and induces diarrhoea through the destruction of absorptive enterocytes (leading to malabsorption), intestinal secretion stimulated by rotavirus non-structural protein 4 and activation of the enteric nervous system. In addition, rotavirus infections can lead to antigenaemia (which is associated with more severe manifestations of acute gastroenteritis) and viraemia, and rotavirus can replicate in systemic sites, although this is limited. Reinfections with rotavirus are common throughout life, although the disease severity is reduced with repeat infections. The immune correlates of protection against rotavirus reinfection and recovery from infection are poorly understood, although rotavirus-specific immunoglobulin A has a role in both aspects. The management of rotavirus infection focuses on the prevention and treatment of dehydration, although the use of antiviral and anti-emetic drugs can be indicated in some cases. PMID:29119972

  11. Pavlovian conditioning of nausea and vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockhorst, Ursula; Steingrueber, Hans-Joachim; Enck, Paul; Klosterhalfen, Sibylle

    2006-10-30

    Cancer patients undergoing cytotoxic drug treatment often experience side-effects, the most distressing being nausea and vomiting. Despite antiemetic drugs, 25-30% of the chemotherapy patients report these side-effects when being re-exposed to the stimuli that usually signal the chemotherapy session and its drug infusion. These symptoms are called anticipatory nausea and anticipatory vomiting. The present paper summarizes the evidence that anticipatory vomiting is acquired by Pavlovian conditioning, and, consequently, may be alleviated by conditioning techniques. To explore the mechanisms that induce and alleviate conditioned nausea and vomiting further, a conditioned nausea model was established in healthy humans using body rotation as the nausea-inducing treatment. The validity of this motion sickness model to examine conditioning mechanisms in the acquisition and alleviation of conditioned nausea was demonstrated. Cortisol and tumor-necrosis factor-alpha were elevated as endocrine and immunological correlates of nausea. Data in the rotation-induced motion sickness model indicated that gender is an important moderator variable to be considered in further studies. The paper concludes with a review of applications of the demonstrated conditioning principles as interventions to ameliorate distressing anticipatory nausea or anticipatory vomiting in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  12. Treatment of ibuprofen intoxication in a dog via therapeutic plasma exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Stuart; Ryan, Kirk A; Davis, Jennifer L; Acierno, Mark

    2017-07-01

    To describe the treatment of ibuprofen intoxication with therapeutic plasma exchange in a dog (TPE). A 13-year-old male neutered mixed breed dog presented after ingesting approximately 200 mg/kg of ibuprofen. Treatment consisted of supportive medical therapy with IV fluids, gastrointestinal protectants, antiemetics and prostaglandin analogs, and TPE. A cycle of TPE was performed over 180 minutes, achieving 1.5 plasma volume exchanges. During therapy, heparinized blood and effluent samples were collected. Ibuprofen concentrations were determined in the samples by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Post TPE, the dog was continued on supportive medical therapy and was discharged 96 hours after the overdose. This report describes the use of TPE as an adjunct for ibuprofen intoxication. An 85% reduction in plasma ibuprofen concentration occurred and recovery from a potentially lethal ingestion of ibuprofen was achieved with TPE and supportive care. TPE should be considered when presented with acute ibuprofen intoxication due to the rapid and efficacious nature of therapy. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2017.

  13. [Systematic review of safeness and therapeutic efficacy of cannabis in patients with multiple sclerosis, neuropathic pain, and in oncological patients treated with chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Laura; Minozzi, Silvia; Mitrova, Zuzana; Parmelli, Elena; Saulle, Rosella; Cruciani, Fabio; Vecchi, Simona; Davoli, Marina

    2017-01-01

    low risk of bias. The large majority (80%) of the comparisons were with placebo; only 8 studies included patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy comparing cannabis with other antiemetic drugs. Concerning the efficacy of cannabis (compared with placebo) in patients with multiple sclerosis, confidence in the estimate was high in favour of cannabis for spasticity (numerical rating scale and visual analogue scale, but not the Ashworth scale) and pain. For chronic and neuropathic pain (compared with placebo), there was evidence of a small effect; however, confidence in the estimate is low and these results could not be considered conclusive. There is uncertainty whether cannabis, including extracts and tinctures, compared with placebo or other antiemetic drugs reduces nausea and vomiting in patients with cancer requiring chemotherapy, although the confidence in the estimate of the effect was low or very low. In the included studies, many adverse events were reported and none of the studies assessed the development of abuse or dependence. there is incomplete evidence of the efficacy and safety of medical use of cannabis in the clinical contexts considered in this review. Furthermore, for many of the outcomes considered, the confidence in the estimate of the effect was again low or very low. To give conclusive answers to the efficacy and safety of cannabis used for medical purposes in the clinical contexts considered, further studies are needed, with higher quality, larger sample sizes, and possibly using the same diagnostic tools for evaluating outcomes of interest.

  14. Total body irradiation prior to bone marrow transplantation: efficacy and safety of granisetron in the prophylaxis and control of radiation-induced emesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkacemi, Yazid; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Pene, Francoise; Rio, Bernard; Sutton, Laurent; Laporte, Jean-Philippe; Touboul, Emmanuel; Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Laugier, Alain

    1996-01-01

    moderate nausea; S3 = severe nausea and/or single episode of vomiting; and S4 multiple episodes of vomiting. Results: During TBI, 18 (50%) patients were scored as complete responders (S1), 1 (3%) as a major responder (S2), 9 (25%) as minor responders (S3), and 8 (22%) as nonresponders (S4). During the following 12 h, 28 (78%) patients were free of severe nausea and vomiting (S1 or S2), whereas 8 (22%) vomited (S3 or S4). In univariate analyses, the 12-h probability of emesis was significantly higher in patients undergoing hyper diuresis (63% vs. 30%; p = 0.05), and in patients older than 45 years (65% for age >45 vs. 33% for age ≤45; p = 0.05). The probability of S3 or S4 emesis was 50% with Treatment A and 47% with Treatment B (p = 0.86). Sex, body weight, and type of conditioning chemotherapy did not influence the 12-h probability of emesis. Multivariate analysis revealed that hyper diuresis (p 0.02) and Treatment A (p = 0.04) were independently associated with radiation-induced emesis, whereas sex (p = 0.85), body weight (p = 0.13), age (p = 0.12), and type of conditioning chemotherapy (p = 0.92) were not. No early toxicity related to granisetron was observed. Conclusion: Granisetron is a well-tolerated and effective antiemetic agent that can be used as monotherapy during single-dose TBI. Good control of nausea and vomiting is obtained with this antiemetic drug, and its effect is increased when hyper diuresis is suspended during TBI

  15. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE EFFICACY OF GRANISETRON AND ONDANSETRON IN THE PREVENTION OF POST OPERATIVE NAUSEA AND VOMITING IN LSCS PATIENTS UNDER SPINAL ANAESTHESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadeesh Babu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The most common and distressing symptoms that follow anaesthesia and surgery are pain and vomiting problems. Pain causes greater amount of suffering, but in some instances nausea and vomiting may be more distressing, particularly after minor surgery. Spinal anaesthesia has been shown to be easy, rapid and safe techniqu e for caesarean section. Nevertheless, it has some minor side effects, including nausea and vomiting in more than 66% of the cases. (Ref (Chestnut D H 1987. The abrupt diaphragmatic contractions, and protrusion of the abdominal viscera causes surgery mor e difficult, aspiration is a hazard. Hence we intended to compare the preventive and therapeutic effects of Granisetron and Ondansetron on the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV in patients undergoing elective Lower segment caesarian sec tion under spinal anaesthesia. OBJECTIVES: Post - operative nausea and vomiting (PONV are commonly reported adverse events after surgery and can contribute to the development of aspiration, wound dehiscence, and increased bleeding. Prophylaxis with antiemet ic has been shown to reduce the incidence of PONV as well as improve patient satisfaction. The main aim of this study is to compare the efficacy and safety of Granisetron with that of Ondansetron and placebo in the prevention of post - operative nausea and v omiting in patients undergoing lower segment caesarian section under spinal anaesthesia. This study is also intended to know the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting in this group of patients. Incidence of adverse effects of ondansetron and grani setron were also noted in this study. METHODS : With prior approval from the Institutional ethical committee and written informed consent, 75 patients of ASA grade I, aged between 20 – 30 years, body weight ranging from 45kg to 65 kg were studied. All the patients were subjected to elective caesarian section. RESULTS : We have studied 75 patients of ASA

  16. Vigilância de eventos adversos a medicamentos em hospitais: aplicação e desempenho de rastreadores Surveillance of adverse drug events in hospitals: implementation and performance of triggers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabíola Giordani

    2012-09-01

    application and performance of these triggers in a teaching hospital. The information on the triggers and ADE were collected through a retrospective chart review of patients discharged from January to June 2008. Four hundred and ninety-seven triggers were identified in 177 charts, and each chart had 2.33 (SD = 2.7 triggers on average. The most frequent triggers were: "antiemetic" (72.1/100 charts, "abrupt cessation of medication" (70.0/100 charts and "over-sedation, drowsiness, numbness, lethargy, hypotension and fall" (34.6/100 charts. The most effective triggers for capturing ADE were "benzodiazepine antagonist", "antidiarrheal" and "rash", which, when identified in charts, were related to an event. The ADE most commonly found were related to the triggers, "abrupt cessation of medication" (8.3/100 charts, "antiemetic" (4.6/100 charts, "rash" and "anti-allergy" (2.1/100 charts. These results may help to decide which triggers are more useful in each situation.

  17. Ketamine versus propofol for strabismus surgery in children

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    Ayse Mizrak

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Ayse Mizrak1, Ibrahim Erbagci2, Tulin Arici1, Ibrahim Ozcan1, Gurkan Tatar2, Unsal Oner11Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Gaziantep University School of Medicine, Gaziantep, Turkey; 2The Department of Ophthalmology, Gaziantep University School of Medicine, Gaziantep, TurkeyPurpose: To compare the effects of intravenous infusion of ketamine and propofol anesthesia in children undergoing strabismus surgery. Methods: Sixty pediatric patients aged 4–11 years were enrolled for the study. Patients in Group K were infused ketamine 1–3 mg/kg/hr (n = 30 and patients in Group P were infused with propofol6–9 mg/kg/hr (n = 30. After giving fentanyl 1 µg/kg and rocuronium bromide 0.5 mg/kg, patients were intubated.Results: The consumption of anesthetics (P = 0.0001 and antiemetics (P = 0.004, the incidence of ­oculocardiac reflex (P = 0.02 in Group K were significantly lower than in Group P. The recovery time (P = 0.008, postoperative agitation score (P = 0.005, Face Pain Scale (P = 0.001, Ramsay Sedation Score (P = 0.01 during awakening and at postoperative 30th min (P = 0.02 in Group K were significantly lower than in Group P. The postoperative agitation score ­during awakening was significantly lower than the preoperative values in Group K (P = 0.0001.Conclusions: The infusion of ketamine is more advantageous than the infusion of propofol in children for use in strabismus surgery.Keywords: ketamine, propofol, pediatrics, strabismus, surgery

  18. A Paramedic-staffed Helicopter Emergency Medical Service's Response to Winch Missions in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadley, Ben; Heschl, Stefan; Andrew, Emily; de Wit, Anthony; Bernard, Stephen A; Smith, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Winching emergency medical care providers from a helicopter to the scene enables treatment of patients in otherwise inaccessible locations, but is not without risks. The objective of this study was to define characteristics of winch missions undertaken by Intensive Care Flight Paramedics (ICFP) in Victoria, Australia with a focus on extraction methods and clinical care delivered at the scene. A retrospective data analysis was performed to identify all winch missions between November 2010 and March 2014. Demographic data, winch characteristics, physiological parameters, and interventions undertaken on scene by the ICFP were extracted. Out of 5,003 missions in the study period, 125 were identified as winch operations. Winter missions were significantly less frequent than those of any other season. Patients were predominantly male (78.4%) and had a mean age of 38 years (±17.6). A total of 109 (87.2%) patients were identified as experiencing trauma with a mean Revised Trauma Score of 7.5288, and isolated limb fractures were the most frequently encountered injury. Falls and vehicle-related trauma were the most common mechanisms of injury. The total median scene duration was 49 minutes (IQR 23-91). Sixty-three patients (50.4%) were extracted using a stretcher, 45 (36.0%) using a hypothermic strop, and 6 (4.8%) via normal rescue strop. Eleven patients (8.8%) were not winched to the helicopter. Vascular access (38.4%), analgesia (44.0%), and anti-emetic administration (28.8%) were the most frequent clinical interventions. Forty-nine patients (39.2%) did not receive any clinical intervention prior to winch extraction. Winch operations in Victoria, Australia consisted predominantly of patients with minor to moderate traumatic injuries. A significant proportion of patients did not require any clinical treatment prior to winching, and among those who did, analgesia was the most frequent intervention. Advanced medical procedures were rarely required prior to winch extraction.

  19. Management strategies in the treatment of neonatal and pediatric gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciccarelli S

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Simona Ciccarelli,1 Ilaria Stolfi,1 Giuseppe Caramia2 1Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 2Division of Neonatology and Pediatrics, Maternal and Child Hospital "G. Salesi", Ancona, Italy Abstract: Acute gastroenteritis, characterized by the onset of diarrhea with or without vomiting, continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children in mostly resource-constrained nations. Although generally a mild and self-limiting disease, gastroenteritis is one of the most common causes of hospitalization and is associated with a substantial disease burden. Worldwide, up to 40% of children aged less than 5 years with diarrhea are hospitalized with rotavirus. Also, some microorganisms have been found predominantly in resource-constrained nations, including Shigella spp, Vibrio cholerae, and the protozoan infections. Prevention remains essential, and the rotavirus vaccines have demonstrated good safety and efficacy profiles in large clinical trials. Because dehydration is the major complication associated with gastroenteritis, appropriate fluid management (oral or intravenous is an effective and safe strategy for rehydration. Continuation of breastfeeding is strongly recommended. New treatments such as antiemetics (ondansetron, some antidiarrheal agents (racecadotril, and chemotherapeutic agents are often proposed, but not yet universally recommended. Probiotics, also known as “food supplement,” seem to improve intestinal microbial balance, reducing the duration and the severity of acute infectious diarrhea. The European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and the European Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases guidelines make a stronger recommendation for the use of probiotics for the management of acute gastroenteritis, particularly those with documented efficacy such as Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus reuteri, and Saccharomyces boulardii. To date, the

  20. Nitric oxide mediates the anticonvulsant effects of thalidomide on pentylenetetrazole-induced clonic seizures in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payandemehr, Borna; Rahimian, Reza; Gooshe, Maziar; Bahremand, Arash; Gholizadeh, Ramtin; Berijani, Sina; Ahmadi-Dastgerdi, Mohammad; Aminizade, Mehdi; Sarreshte-Dari, Ali; Dianati, Vahid; Amanlou, Massoud; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2014-05-01

    Thalidomide is an old glutamic acid derivative which was initially used as a sedative medication but withdrawn from the market due to the high incidence of teratogenicity. Recently, it has reemerged because of its potential for counteracting number of diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. Other than the antiemetic and hypnotic aspects, thalidomide exerts some anticonvulsant properties in experimental settings. However, the underlying mechanisms of thalidomide actions are not fully realized yet. Some investigations revealed that thalidomide could elicit immunomodulatory or neuromodulatory properties by affecting different targets, including cytokines (such as TNF α), neurotransmitters, and nitric oxide (NO). In this regard, we used a model of clonic seizure induced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) in male NMRI mice to investigate whether the anticonvulsant effect of thalidomide is affected through modulation of the l-arginine-nitric oxide pathway or not. Injection of a single effective dose of thalidomide (10 mg/kg, i.p. or higher) significantly increased the seizure threshold (P<0.05). On the one hand, pretreatment with low and per se noneffective dose of l-arginine [NO precursor] (10, 30 and 60 mg/kg) prevented the anticonvulsant effect of thalidomide. On the other hand, NOS inhibitors [l-NAME and 7-NI] augmented the anticonvulsant effect of a subeffective dose of thalidomide (1 and 5 mg/kg, i.p.) at relatively low doses. Meanwhile, several doses of aminoguanidine [an inducible NOS inhibitor] (20, 50 and 100 mg/kg) failed to alter the anticonvulsant effect of thalidomide significantly. In summary, our findings demonstrated that the l-arginine-nitric oxide pathway can be involved in the anticonvulsant properties of thalidomide, and the role of constitutive nNOS is prominent in the reported neuroprotective feature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Efficacy and toxicity of postoperative temozolomide radiochemotherapy in malignant glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocher, M.; Kunze, S.; Eich, H.T.; Semrau, R.; Mueller, R.P. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Cologne (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the feasibility, safety and efficacy of daily temozolomide concurrent with postoperative radiotherapy in malignant glioma. Patients and methods: from 11/1999 to 03/2003, n = 81 patients aged 15-72 years (median 52 years, karnofsky score 80-100% in 83%) suffering from primary glioblastoma (n = 47), anaplastic astrocytoma (n = 6), anaplastic oligodendroglioma (n = 16), and recurrent glioma (n = 12) were treated. Patients with primary gliomas received a combination of postoperative radiotherapy (60 Gy/1.8- to 2.0-Gy fractions) and daily oral temozolomide (75 mg/m{sup 2}) at all irradiation days (30-33 doses), while recurrent tumors were treated with 45-60 Gy and temozolomide. Initially, 6/81 patients had daily temozolomide doses of 50 mg/m{sup 2}. Results: in total, 70/81 patients (86%) completed both radio- and chemotherapy. Grade 1 nausea/vomiting was seen in 28%, grade 2 in 11%, grade 3 in 1%. Antiemetics were applied in 41%. Hematologic toxicities were observed as follows: leukopenia grade 3/4 1%, lymphopenia grade 3/4 46%, thrombopenia grade 3/4 1%. Two patients under dexamethasone suffered herpes encephalitis after one and 16 doses of temozolomide (75 mg/m{sup 2}). Median survival was 15 months for glioblastoma. In oligodendroglioma patients, a 4-year survival rate of 78% was observed. Conclusion: postoperative radiochemotherapy with 30-33 daily doses of temozolomide (75 mg/m{sup 2}) is safe in patients with malignant glioma. The combined schedule is effective in oligodendroglioma patients and may prolong survival in glioblastoma. Effort should be taken to minimize corticosteroid doses, since both steroids and temozolomide lead to immunosuppression. (orig.)

  2. Protective role of plants against harmful radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautam, Shreesh Kumar; Kumar, Pawan; Singh, Abhishek; Kumar, Vikas; Bharti, Navaldey [Department of Applied Plant Science-Horticulture, Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar University, Lucknow (India)

    2012-07-01

    The rapid technological advancement has increased human exposure to ionizing radiations enormously. Ionizing radiations produces deleterious effects in the living organisms. Widespread use of radiation in diagnosis therapy, industry, energy sector and inadvertent exposure during air and space travel, nuclear accidents and nuclear terror attacks requires safeguard against human exposures. Lead shielding and other physical measures can be used in such situations but with difficulty to manage; thus pharmacological intervention could be the most prudent strategy to protect humans against the harmful effect of ionizing radiations. These pharmacological agents are radioprotectives; The development of radioprotective agents has been the subject of intense research in view of their potential for use within a radiation environment. However, no ideal, safe synthetic radio protectors are available to date, so the search for alternative sources including plants has been ongoing. In Ayurveda, the traditional Indian system of medicine, several plants have been used to treat free radical-mediated ailments and, therefore, it is logical to expect that such plants may also render some protection against radiation damage. This all is due to antioxidant enzymes, nitroxides, and melatonin, antiemetic, anti-inflammatory. haemopoitic and immunostimulant compounds. Some of the plants which are found to be radioprotective are Centella asiatica, Ginkgo biloba, Hippophae rhamnoides, Ocimum sanctum, Podophyllurn hexandrum, Tinospora cordifolia, Emblica officinalis, Phyllanthus amarus, etc. So there is an urgent need to identify and characterize the many of the plants in relation to the radioprotection. Besides these medicinal plants there are also some fruits and vegetables which are having good response against harmful radiations such as Kiwifruit Actinidia deliciosa (Actinidaceae), Cape Gooseberry Physalis peruviana (Solanaceae). They protect against the radiation-induced damage by

  3. Bilateral Breast Reduction Without Opioid Analgesics: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa, Fereydoun Don; Cheng, Justin; Stephan, Brad; Castel, Nikki; Kim, Leslie; Murariu, Daniel; Parsa, Alan A

    2017-09-01

    Breast reduction has traditionally been performed under general anesthesia with adjunct opioid use. However, opioids are associated with a wide variety of adverse effects, including nausea, vomiting, constipation, postoperative sedation, dizziness, and addiction. This study compares bilateral breast reduction using a multimodal opioid-free pain management regimen vs traditional general anesthesia with adjunct opioids. A total of 83 female patients were enrolled in this study. Group 1 includes a retrospective series of 39 patients that underwent breast reduction via general anesthesia with adjunct opioid use. This series was compared to 2 prospective groups of patients who did not receive opioids either preoperatively or intraoperatively. In group 2, twenty-six patients underwent surgery under intravenous sedation and local anesthesia. In group 3, eighteen patients underwent surgery with general anesthesia. All patients in groups 2 and 3 received preoperative gabapentin and celecoxib along with infiltration of local anesthetics during the operation and prior to discharge to the Post-Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU). Primary outcome measures included the duration of surgery, time from end of operation to discharge home, postoperative opioid and antiemetic use, and unplanned postoperative hospitalizations. When compared to group 1, groups 2 and 3 experienced a shorter time from end of operation to discharge home (P opioid use (P opioid-free bilateral breast reduction either under local or general anesthesia as an outpatient. This method resulted in significantly less morbidity, use of opioids postoperatively, as well as unplanned hospital admissions compared to "traditional" breast reduction under general anesthesia with the use of opioids. 3. © 2017 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  4. Countermeasures against methotrexate intolerance in juvenile idiopathic arthritis instituted by parents show no effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuern, Andrea; Tyrrell, Pascal N; Haas, Johannes-Peter; Hügle, Boris

    2017-06-01

    A high proportion of children with JIA will develop intolerance to MTX with anticipatory and associative gastrointestinal adverse effects. Parents and physicians frequently try to alleviate these symptoms with a variety of countermeasures. The objective of this study was to investigate the course of MTX intolerance within a 6 month period, and the effects of countermeasures on MTX intolerance severity. We performed a prospective study of 196 consecutive JIA patients treated with MTX. Intolerance was determined using the Methotrexate Intolerance Severity Score (MISS) questionnaire. MISS and countermeasures instituted by parents or physicians were determined at four time points, each 2 months apart. Countermeasures, classified into four types (antiemetic drugs, covert dosing, taste masking and complementary medicine), were analysed using non-parametric statistics and mixed linear modelling, adjusted by propensity scoring for use of countermeasures. Ninety patients (46%) showed MTX intolerance, with 58 (64%) using countermeasures at time of inclusion. Median MISS at inclusion was 11 (interquartile range = 8.0-14.25), and did not change significantly over time. No significant difference in MISS score was observed between patients receiving countermeasures and those who did not. For specific countermeasures, MISS did not change significantly after introduction. Sensitivity analysis adjusting for propensity score indicated no significant association of MISS severity on parents' decision to implement any countermeasures. MTX intolerance was present in many children with JIA and symptoms decreased little in the short term. Various modalities used as countermeasures against nausea by parents showed no discernible effect. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  5. Evidence for the use of Levomepromazine for symptom control in the palliative care setting: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Levomepromazine is an antipsychotic drug that is used clinically for a variety of distressing symptoms in palliative and end-of-life care. We undertook a systematic review based on the question “What is the published evidence for the use of levomepromazine in palliative symptom control?”. Methods To determine the level of evidence for the use of levomepromazine in palliative symptom control, and to discover gaps in evidence, relevant studies were identified using a detailed, multi-step search strategy. Emerging data was then scrutinized using appropriate assessment tools, and the strength of evidence systematically graded in accordance with the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine’s ‘levels of evidence’ tool. The electronic databases Medline, Embase, Cochrane, PsychInfo and Ovid Nursing, together with hand-searching and cross-referencing provided the full research platform on which the review is based. Results 33 articles including 9 systematic reviews met the inclusion criteria: 15 on palliative sedation, 8 regarding nausea and three on delirium and restlessness, one on pain and six with other foci. The studies varied greatly in both design and sample size. Levels of evidence ranged from level 2b to level 5, with the majority being level 3 (non-randomized, non-consecutive or cohort studies n = 22), with the quality of reporting for the included studies being only low to medium. Conclusion Levomepromazine is widely used in palliative care as antipsychotic, anxiolytic, antiemetic and sedative drug. However, the supporting evidence is limited to open series and case reports. Thus prospective randomized trials are needed to support evidence-based guidelines. PMID:23331515

  6. Efficacy and Safety of Subcutaneous Amifostine in Minimizing Radiation-Induced Toxicities in Patients Receiving Combined-Modality Treatment for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, Amy; Kennedy, Thomas; Pellitteri, Phillip; Wood, Craig; Christie, Douglas; Yumen, Omar

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report long-term data from a prospective trial of subcutaneous (s.c.) amifostine in patients who received chemoradiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Methods and Materials: Patients ≥18 years of age with previously untreated Stage III/IV SCCHN received fractionated radiotherapy, 1.8-2.0 Gy/day, 5 days per week, to a total dose of 70-72 Gy, plus weekly paclitaxel (40 mg/m 2 ) and carboplatin (100 mg/m 2 ) administered intravenously (i.v.) for 6 weeks. All patients received 500 mg s.c. amifostine 30-60 min before radiotherapy with antihistamine and antiemetic prophylaxis. Results: Twenty patients were evaluable (median age, 55 years). The incidence of Grade 2 xerostomia was 42% and 29% at 12 and 18 months, respectively; there were no reports of Grade ≥3 xerostomia. Grade ≥3 mucositis occurred in 30% of patients, with median time to resolution of 12.5 weeks (range, 5-17 weeks). Survival estimates at 1 and 2 years were 95% and 71%, respectively. All patients experienced Grade 2 weight loss; 7 patients (35%) experienced Grade ≤2 nausea/vomiting. There were no reports of Grade ≥3 amifostine-related adverse events. Conclusions: Subcutaneous amifostine was well tolerated by patients receiving chemoradiotherapy for SCCHN, with lower rates of nausea/vomiting than reported in trials with i.v. amifostine. Xerostomia and mucositis rates were similar to those reported in trials with i.v. amifostine

  7. Supportive care utilization and treatment toxicity in children with Down syndrome and acute lymphoid leukaemia at free-standing paediatric hospitals in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Elizabeth G; Li, Yimei; Fisher, Brian T; Rheingold, Susan R; Fitzgerald, Julie; Seif, Alix E; Huang, Yuan-Shung; Bagatell, Rochelle; Aplenc, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Although inferior outcomes of children with Down syndrome (DS) and acute lymphoid leukaemia (ALL) are established, national supportive care patterns for these patients are unknown. A validated retrospective cohort of paediatric patients diagnosed with ALL from 1999 to 2011 was assembled from the US Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS) database to examine organ toxicity, sepsis, and resource utilization in children with and without DS. Among 10699 ALL patients, 298 had DS-ALL (2·8%). In a multivariate model, DS was associated with increased risk of cardiovascular (odds ratio [OR] 2·0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1·6-2·7), respiratory (OR 2·1, 95% CI: 1·6-2·9), neurologic (OR 3·4, 95% CI 1·9-6·2), and hepatic (OR 1·4, 95% CI 1·0-1·9) dysfunction and sepsis (OR 1·8, 95% CI: 1·4-2·4). Children with DS-ALL used significantly more respiratory support, insulin, and anti-infectives, including broad-spectrum Gram-positive agents, quinolones, and azoles. They used significantly fewer analgesics and antiemetics compared to non-DS-ALL children. Ultimately, this study confirms the increased risk of infectious and end-organ toxicity in children with DS-ALL and quantifies important differences in resource utilization between children with DS and non-DS ALL. These findings highlight the importance of investigating the impact of these care variations and developing specific supportive care guidelines for this population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Auditing Safety of Compounding and Reconstituting of Intravenous Medicines on Hospital Wards in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvikas-Peltonen, Eeva; Palmgren, Joni; Häggman, Verner; Celikkayalar, Ercan; Manninen, Raija; Airaksinen, Marja

    2017-01-01

    On the hospital wards in Finland, nurses generally reconstitute intravenous medicines, such as antibiotics, analgesics, and antiemetics prescribed by doctors. Medicine reconstitution is prone to many errors. Therefore, it is important to identify incorrect practices in the reconstitution of medicine to improve patient safety in hospitals. The aim of this study was to audit the compounding and reconstituting of intravenous medicines on hospital wards in a secondary-care hospital in Finland by using an assessment tool and microbiological testing for identifying issues posing patient safety risks. A hospital pharmacist conducted an external audit by using a validated 65-item assessment tool for safe-medicine compounding practices on 20 wards of the selected hospital. Also, three different microbiological samples were collected to assure the aseptics. Practices were evaluated using a four-point rating scale of "never performed," "rarely performed," "often performed," and "always performed," and were based on observation and interviews with nurses or ward pharmacists. In addition, glove-, settle plate-, and media fill-tests were collected. Associations between microbial sample results and audit-tool results were discussed. Altogether, only six out of the 65 items were fully implemented in all wards; these were related to logistic practices and quality assurance. More than half of the wards used incorrect practices ("rarely performed" or "never performed") for five items. Most of these obviated practices related to aseptic practices. All media-fill tests were clean but the number of colony forming units in glove samples and settle- plate samples varied from 0 to >100. More contamination was found in wards where environmental conditions were inadequate or the use of gloves was incorrect. Compounding practices were [mostly] quite well adapted, but the aseptic practices needed improvement. Attention should have been directed particularly to good aseptic techniques and

  9. Esophageal leiomyoma in a dog causing esophageal distension and treated by transcardial placement of a self-expanding, covered, nitinol esophageal stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Elisabeth M; Pey, Pascaline B; de Fornel-Thibaud, Pauline; Moissonnier, Pierre H M; Freiche, Valérie

    2018-02-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 10-year-old spayed female Rottweiler was referred for evaluation because of a 2-month history of regurgitation and weight loss, despite no apparent change in appetite. The dog had received antiemetic and antacid treatment, without improvement. CLINICAL FINDINGS Physical examination revealed a low body condition score (2/5), but other findings were unremarkable. Diffuse, global esophageal dilatation was noted on plain thoracic radiographs, and normal motility was confirmed through videofluoroscopic evaluation of swallowing. Transhepatic ultrasonographic and CT examination revealed a circumferential, intraparietal lesion in the distal portion of the esophagus causing distal esophageal or cardial subobstruction and no metastases. Incisional biopsy of the lesion was performed, and findings of histologic examination supported a diagnosis of esophageal leiomyoma. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME In view of numerous possible complications associated with esophageal surgery, the decision was made to palliatively treat the dog by transcardial placement of a self-expanding, covered, nitinol esophageal stent under endoscopic guidance. Two weeks after stent placement, radiography revealed complete migration of the stent into the gastric lumen. Gastrotomy was performed, and the stent was replaced and fixed in place. Twenty-four months after initial stent placement, the dog had a healthy body condition and remained free of previous clinical signs. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Diffuse benign muscular neoplasia should be considered as a differential diagnosis for acquired esophageal dilatation in adult and elderly dogs. In the dog of this report, transcardial stent placement resulted in resolution of the clinical signs, with no apparent adverse effect on digestive function. The described procedure could be beneficial for nonsurgical treatment of benign esophageal tumors in dogs.

  10. Intraoperative Nerve Blocks Fail to Improve Quality of Recovery after Tissue Expander Breast Reconstruction: A Prospective, Double-Blinded, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanier, Steven T; Lewis, Kevin C; Kendall, Mark C; Vieira, Brittany L; De Oliveira, Gildasio; Nader, Anthony; Kim, John Y S; Alghoul, Mohammed

    2018-03-01

    The authors' study represents the first level I evidence to assess whether intraoperative nerve blocks improve the quality of recovery from immediate tissue expander/implant breast reconstruction. A prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted in which patients undergoing immediate tissue expander/implant breast reconstruction were randomized to either (1) intraoperative intercostal and pectoral nerve blocks with 0.25% bupivacaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine and 4 mg of dexamethasone or (2) sham nerve blocks with normal saline. The 40-item Quality of Recovery score, pain score, and opioid use in the postoperative period were compared statistically between groups. Power analysis ensured 80 percent power to detect a 10-point (clinically significant) difference in the 40-item Quality of Recovery score. Forty-seven patients were enrolled. Age, body mass index, laterality, mastectomy type, and lymph node dissection were similar between groups. There were no statistical differences in quality of recovery, pain burden as measured by visual analogue scale, opioid consumption, antiemetic use, or length of hospital stay between groups at 24 hours after surgery. Mean global 40-item Quality of Recovery scores were 169 (range, 155 to 182) for the treatment arm and 165 (range, 143 to 179) for the placebo arm (p = 0.36), indicating a high quality of recovery in both groups. Although intraoperative nerve blocks can be a safe adjunct to a comprehensive postsurgical recovery regimen, the authors' results indicate no effect on overall quality of recovery from tissue expander/implant breast reconstruction. Therapeutic, I.

  11. Effect of intravenous fluid therapy on postoperative vomiting in children undergoing tonsillectomy.

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    Elgueta, M F; Echevarría, G C; De la Fuente, N; Cabrera, F; Valderrama, A; Cabezón, R; Muñoz, H R; Cortinez, L I

    2013-04-01

    Postoperative vomiting (POV) is one of the most frequent complications of tonsillectomy in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiemetic effect of super-hydration with lactated Ringer's solution in children undergoing elective otorhinolaryngological surgery. One hundred ASA I-II children, aged 1-12 yr, undergoing elective tonsillectomy, with or without adenoidectomy, under general anaesthesia were studied. Induction and maintenance of anaesthesia were standardized with fentanyl, mivacurium, and sevoflurane in N(2)O/O(2). Subjects were assigned to one of the two groups: 10 ml kg(-1) h(-1) lactated Ringer's solution or 30 ml kg(-1) h(-1) lactated Ringer's solution. A multivariable logistic regression was used for assessing the effects of super-hydration on POV (defined as the presence of retching, vomiting, or both). A value of P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. During the first 24 h postoperative, the incidence of POV decreased from 82% to 62% (relative reduction of 24%, P=0.026). In the adjusted logistic regression model, subjects in the 10 ml kg(-1) h(-1) group had an odds ratio of POV that was 2.92 (95% confidence interval: 1.14, 7.51) for POV compared with subjects in the 30 ml kg(-1) h(-1) group. Intraoperative administration of 30 ml kg(-1) h(-1) lactated Ringer's solution significantly reduced the incidence of POV during the first 24 h postoperative. Our results support the use of super-hydration during tonsillectomy, as an alternative way to decrease the risk of POV in children.

  12. Methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus producing Panton-Valentine leukocidin toxin in Trinidad & Tobago: a case report

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    Rao AV

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Certain Staphylococcus aureus strains produce Panton-Valentine leukocidin, a toxin that lyses white blood cells causing extensive tissue necrosis and chronic, recurrent or severe infection. This report documents a confirmed case of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus strain harboring Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes from Trinidad and Tobago. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that such a case has been identified and reported from this country. Case presentation A 13-year-old Trinidadian boy of African descent presented with upper respiratory symptoms and gastroenteritis-like syptoms. About two weeks later he was re-admitted to our hospital complaining of pain and weakness affecting his left leg, where he had received an intramuscular injection of an anti-emetic drug. He deteriorated and developed septic arthritis, necrotizing fasciitis and septic shock with acute respiratory distress syndrome, leading to death within 48 hours of admission despite intensive care treatment. The infection was caused by S. aureus. Bacterial isolates from specimens recovered from our patient before and after his death were analyzed using microarray DNA analysis and spa typing, and the results revealed that the S. aureus isolates belonged to clonal complex 8, were methicillin-susceptible and positive for Panton-Valentine leukocidin. An autopsy revealed multi-organ failure and histological tissue stains of several organs were also performed and showed involvement of his lungs, liver, kidneys and thymus, which showed Hassal's corpuscles. Conclusion Rapid identification of Panton-Valentine leukocidin in methicillin-sensitive S. aureus isolates causing severe infections is necessary so as not to miss their potentially devastating consequences. Early feedback from the clinical laboratories is crucial.

  13. Assessment of the use of xerogenic medications for chronic medical and dental conditions among adult day health participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Annie; Kiyak, Asuman; Gossett, Allison M; McCormick, Lawrence

    2009-10-01

    To describe the health conditions, dental problems, and use of xerogenic medications among dental patients in adult day health (ADH) centers. Cross-sectional descriptive study. ADH centers in King County, Washington. ADH clients who were patients of a mobile dental service. Pharmacist-conducted chart reviews and in-person medication reviews with patients. Demographic description, mean numbers of medical and dental problems, medications, xerogenic medications used per subject, and identification of xerogenic medications by therapeutic class. At five sites, 97 patients were interviewed (average age 73.8 +/- 11.8 years, 61% female); ethnicities included: Asian-American (37.1%), Caucasian (30.9%), Russian (29%), and African-American (3%). Mean numbers of chronic health problems, medications, and xerogenic medications per patient were 5.2 +/- 2.7, 10.9 +/- 4.4, and 3.3 +/- 1.8, respectively. Antidepressants were the most commonly used xerogenic medication, followed by antipsychotics, antiemetics, analgesics, and antihistamines. Among 74 patients who received dental treatment, 33 (44.6%) wore dentures. Among 58 patients with teeth, a mean number of 2.8 dental problems per patient was identified. Dental caries (51.7%) was the most prevalent problem, followed by periodontitis (29.3%), soft tissue lesions (10.3%), gingivitis (5.2%), and candidiasis (3.4%). Multiple systemic diseases, use of multiple xerogenic medications, and poor oral health were prevalent among the ADH clients in this study. However, self-reports of dry mouth were unrelated to number of xerogenic medications or oral conditions. Further research is needed to determine the association between self-reported dry mouth, chronic health conditions, use of xerogenic medications, tooth loss, and/or denture use.

  14. Comparative Evaluation of Serotonin Toxicity among Veterans Affairs Patients Receiving Linezolid and Vancomycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, N.; Rivera, A.; Tristani, L.; Lazariu, V.; Vandewall, H.; McNutt, L. A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the theoretical risk of serotonin toxicity (ST) with linezolid, “real-world” clinical evaluations of the risk of ST in patients receiving linezolid have been limited to case reports and noncomparator studies. An observational, matched-cohort study was conducted to evaluate the risk of ST among hospitalized patients who received linezolid or vancomycin at the Upstate New York Veterans Affairs Healthcare Network (Veterans Integrated Service Network 2 [VISN-2]). Matching criteria included VISN-2 hospital, hospital ward, prior hospital length of stay, age, and baseline platelet counts. The patients' electronic medical records were evaluated for symptoms consistent with ST and the Hunter serotonin toxicity criteria (HSTC) using an intensive, natural word search algorithm. The study included 251 matched pairs. Demographics and comorbidities were similar between groups. Over half of the study population received at least one concurrent medication with serotonergic activity. Receipt of agents with serotonergic activity was more pronounced in the vancomycin group, and the higher frequency was due to concomitant antihistamine and antiemetic use. Antidepressant use, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), was similar between groups. No patients in either group were found to meet the criteria using the word search algorithm for ST. Fewer linezolid patients than vancomycin patients met the HSTC overall (3.2% versus 8.8%) and when stratified by receipt of a concurrent serotonergic agent (4.3% versus 12.4%). Of the patients meeting the HSTC, most had past or present comorbidities that may have contributed to or overlapped the HSTC. This study of hospitalized patients revealed comparably low frequencies of adverse events potentially related to ST among patients who received linezolid or vancomycin. PMID:24041888

  15. Neurodevelopmental delay in children exposed in utero to hyperemesis gravidarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejzo, Marlena S; Magtira, Aromalyn; Schoenberg, Frederic Paik; Macgibbon, Kimber; Mullin, Patrick M

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the frequency of emotional, behavioral, and learning disorders in children exposed in utero to hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) and to identify prognostic factors for these disorders. Neurodevelopmental outcomes of 312 children from 203 mothers with HG were compared to neurodevelopmental outcomes from 169 children from 89 unaffected mothers. Then the clinical profiles of patients with HG and a normal child outcome were compared to the clinical profiles of patients with HG and a child with neurodevelopmental delay to identify prognostic factors. Binary responses were analyzed using either a Chi-square or Fisher Exact test and continuous responses were analyzed using a t-test. Children exposed in utero to HG have a 3.28-fold increase in odds of a neurodevelopmental diagnosis including attention disorders, learning delay, sensory disorders, and speech and language delay (Pneurodevelopmental delay. We found no evidence for increased risk of 13 emotional, behavioral, and learning disorders, including autism, intellectual impairment, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. However, the study was not sufficiently powered to detect rare conditions. Medications, treatments, and preterm birth were not associated with an increased risk for neurodevelopmental delay. Women with HG are at a significantly increased risk of having a child with neurodevelopmental delay. Common antiemetic treatments were not linked to neurodevelopmental delay, but early symptoms may play a role. There is an urgent need to address whether aggressive treatment that includes vitamin and nutrient supplementation in women with early symptoms of severe nausea of pregnancy decreases the risk of neurodevelopmental delay. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Difficulties in controlling mobilization pain using a standardized patient-controlled analgesia protocol in burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Andreas; Kalman, Sigga; Sonesson, Lena Karin; Arvidsson, Anders; Sjöberg, Folke

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate pain relief for patients with burns during rest and mobilization with morphine according to a standard protocol for patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). Eighteen patients with a mean (SD) burned TBSA% of 26 (20) were studied for 10 days. Using a numeric rating scale (NRS, 0 = no pain and 10 = unbearable pain), patients were asked to estimate their acceptable and worst experienced pain by specifying a number on a scale and at what point they would like additional analgesics. Patients were allowed free access to morphine with a PCA pump device. Bolus doses were set according to age, (100 - age)/24 = bolus dose (mg), and 6 minutes lockout time. Degrees of pain, morphine requirements, doses delivered and demanded, oral intake of food, and antiemetics given were used as endpoints. Acceptable pain (mean [SD]) was estimated to be 3.8 (1.3) on the NRS, and additional treatment was considered necessary at scores of 4.3 (1.6) or more. NRS at rest was 2.7 (2.2) and during mobilization 4.7 (2.6). Required mean morphine per day was 81 (15) mg, and the number of doses requested increased during the first 6 days after the burn. The authors found no correlation between dose of morphine required and any other variables. Background pain can be controlled adequately with a standard PCA protocol. During mobilization, the pain experienced was too intense, despite having the already high doses of morphine increased. The present protocol must be refined further to provide analgesia adequate to cover mobilization as well.

  17. Identification of Glycyrrhiza as the rikkunshito constituent with the highest antagonistic potential on heterologously expressed 5HT3A receptors due to the action of flavonoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin eHerbrechter

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The traditional Japanese phytomedicine rikkunshito is traditionally used for the treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders, cachexia and nausea. These effects indicate 5-HT3 receptor antagonism, due to the involvement of these receptors in such pathophysiological processes. E.g. setrons, specific 5-HT3 receptor antagonists are the strongest antiemetics, developed so far. Therefore, the antagonistic effects of the eight rikkunshito constituents at heterologously expressed 5-HT3A receptors were analyzed using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. The results indicate that tinctures from Aurantii, Ginseng, Zingiberis, Atractylodis and Glycyrrhiza inhibited the 5-HT3A receptor response, whereas the tinctures of Poria cocos, Jujubae and Pinellia exhibited no effect. Surprisingly, the strongest antagonism was found for Glycyrrhiza, whereas the Zingiberis tincture, which is considered to be primarily responsible for the effect of rikkunshito, exhibited the weakest antagonist of 5-HT3A receptors. Rikkunshito contains various vanilloids, ginsenosides and flavonoids, a portion of which show an antagonistic effect on 5-HT3 receptors. A screening of the established ingredients of the active rikkunshito constituents and related substances lead to the identification of new antagonists within the class of flavonoids. The flavonoids (--liquiritigenin, glabridin and licochalcone A from Glycyrrhiza species were found to be the most effective inhibitors of the 5-HT-induced currents in the screening. The flavonoids (--liquiritigenin and hesperetin from Aurantii inhibited the receptor response in a non-competitive manner, whereas glabridin and licochalcone A exhibited a potential competitive antagonism. Furthermore, licochalcone A acts as a partial antagonist of 5-HT3A receptors. Thus, this study reveals new 5-HT3A receptor antagonists with the aid of increasing the comprehension of the complex effects of rikkunshito.

  18. Cannabidiol in Humans—The Quest for Therapeutic Targets

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    Stéphane Potvin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Cannabidiol (CBD, a major phytocannabinoid constituent of cannabis, is attracting growing attention in medicine for its anxiolytic, antipsychotic, antiemetic and anti-inflammatory properties. However, up to this point, a comprehensive literature review of the effects of CBD in humans is lacking. The aim of the present systematic review is to examine the randomized and crossover studies that administered CBD to healthy controls and to clinical patients. A systematic search was performed in the electronic databases PubMed and EMBASE using the key word “cannabidiol”. Both monotherapy and combination studies (e.g., CBD + ∆9-THC were included. A total of 34 studies were identified: 16 of these were experimental studies, conducted in healthy subjects, and 18 were conducted in clinical populations, including multiple sclerosis (six studies, schizophrenia and bipolar mania (four studies, social anxiety disorder (two studies, neuropathic and cancer pain (two studies, cancer anorexia (one study, Huntington’s disease (one study, insomnia (one study, and epilepsy (one study. Experimental studies indicate that a high-dose of inhaled/intravenous CBD is required to inhibit the effects of a lower dose of ∆9-THC. Moreover, some experimental and clinical studies suggest that oral/oromucosal CBD may prolong and/or intensify ∆9-THC-induced effects, whereas others suggest that it may inhibit ∆9-THC-induced effects. Finally, preliminary clinical trials suggest that high-dose oral CBD (150–600 mg/d may exert a therapeutic effect for social anxiety disorder, insomnia and epilepsy, but also that it may cause mental sedation. Potential pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic explanations for these results are discussed.

  19. Efficacy of palonosetron and 1-day dexamethasone in moderately emetogenic chemotherapy compared with fosaprepitant, granisetron, and dexamethasone: a prospective randomized crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitayama, Hiromitsu; Tsuji, Yasushi; Sugiyama, Junko; Doi, Ayako; Kondo, Tomohiro; Hirayama, Michiaki

    2015-12-01

    Although palonosetron (PALO) and NK1 receptor antagonist both reduce chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, no comparison trial in moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC) had been reported. The purpose of this study was to find out which drug combinations are preferable for patients receiving MEC. Chemotherapy-naive patients receiving MEC were randomized to two groups; group A first received PALO therapy [PALO plus 1-day dexamethasone (DEX)], and group B first received fosaprepitant (FAPR) therapy [FAPR, granisetron (GRAN), and DEX]. Patients were re-allocated to the other therapy, respectively, for the second cycle of chemotherapy. We administered intravenous PALO (0.75 mg) and DEX (9.9 mg) to the PALO therapy group, and FAPR (150 mg), DEX (4.95 mg), and GRAN (3 mg) to the FAPR therapy group, on Day 1. Complete response (CR) was the primary endpoint; complete control (CC), total control (CT), and the therapy chosen by the patients for their third and following cycles of antiemetic therapy were the secondary endpoints. We evaluated CR, CC, and TC in the acute phase, in the delayed phase, and over the whole period. A total of 35 patients and 70 cycles of therapy was evaluable for analysis. No significant difference was found at all evaluation points. Overall CR rates for PALO and FAPR therapy were 74 vs 69 % (P = 0.567), CC rates 66 vs 69 % (P = 0.521), and TC rates 46 vs 60 % (P = 0.235), respectively. Patients also showed no clear preference for their third and following cycles of chemotherapy, choosing both regimens almost equally often (PALO 10 vs FAPR 13). PALO and 1-day DEX is almost equivalent to FAPR, GRAN, and DEX for MEC.

  20. [Comparison of 1 mg/body and 3 mg/body of intravenous granisetron for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and adverse events in hematological malignancy patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motohashi, Shinya; Hori, Katsuhito; Ono, Takaaki; Ohnishi, Kazunori; Kawakami, Junichi

    2012-01-01

    Granisetron is a selective 5-hydroxy tryptamine3 receptor antagonist and widely used for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). Recommended dose of intravenous granisetron in the USA and Europe has been set at 0.01 mg/kg (1 mg/body) in the antiemetic treatment guidelines established by the American Society of Clinical Oncology and National Comprehension Cancer Network. In contrast, the approved dose in Japan is 0.04 mg/kg (3 mg/body). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) which compared 1 mg/body with 3 mg/body of intravenous granisetron for CINV had been reported in Japan. In these RCTs, however, hematological malignancy patients were excluded. We performed observational retrospective study to compare 1 mg/body with 3 mg/body of intravenous granisetron for the prevention of CINV and adverse events in hematological malignancy patients. Number of the patients and chemotherapy courses were 15 and 30 in the 1 mg/body group, and 15 and 27 in the 3 mg/body group, respectively. No nausea rates in the 1 and 3 mg/body group were 83% and 89% of courses, respectively. No vomiting rates in the 1 and 3 mg/body group were 97% and 100% of courses, respectively. The incidences of constipation in the 1 and 3 mg/body group were 34% and 45% of courses, respectively. Anaphylaxis and headache did not occur in both groups. Our findings suggested that 1 mg/body of intravenous granisetron can prevent from CINV in hematological malignancy patients, as well as 3 mg/body.

  1. Contribution to the treatment of nausea and emesis induced by chemotherapy in children and adolescents with osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Augusto Vercillo Luisi

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Chemotherapy-induced emesis is a limiting factor in treating children with malignancies. Intensive chemotherapy regimens along with emetogenic drug administration have increased the frequency and severity of emesis and nausea. Our study was designed to consider the importance of this problem and the need for improvement in emesis treatment for patients receiving chemotherapy. Our objective was to compare the efficacy and safety of the antiemetic drug granisetron and a regimen of metoclopramide plus dimenhydrinate. DESIGN AND SETTING: Open, prospective and randomized study at Instituto de Oncologia Pediátrica, Department of Pediatrics, Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: From February to August 1994, 26 patients (mean age: 14 years with osteosarcoma received 80 chemotherapy cycles of iphosphamide (2,500 mg/m² plus epirubicin (75 mg/m² or carboplatin (600 mg/m², or epirubicin (75 mg/m² plus carboplatin (600 mg/m². Eighty chemotherapy treatments were analyzed regarding nausea and vomiting control. Patients were randomized to receive either a single dose of granisetron (50 µg/kg or metoclopramide (2 mg/kg plus dimenhydrinate (5 mg/kg infused over eight hours. Emesis and nausea were monitored for 24 hours by means of the modified Morrow Assessment of Nausea and Emesis. Statistical analysis utilized the chi-squared, Student t and Mann-Whitney tests, plus data exploration techniques. RESULTS: 62.5% of the patients undergoing chemotherapy responded completely to granisetron, whereas 10% responded to metoclopramide plus dimenhydrinate (p < 0.0001. No severe adverse reactions were found in either of the treatments given. CONCLUSION: In children and adolescents with osteosarcoma, granisetron was safe and more efficient than metoclopramide plus dimenhydrinate for controlling chemotherapy-induced emesis and nausea.

  2. Use of transdermal and intravenous granisetron and the ability of the Hesketh score to assess nausea and vomiting induced by multiday chemotherapy

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    Boccia RV

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ralph V Boccia,1 Gemma Clark,2 Julian D Howell21Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2ProStrakan Pharmaceuticals, Galashiels, UKPurpose: Hesketh scores define emetogenicity of single-agent and multiagent single-day chemotherapy. This analysis determined the emetogenicity of multiagent, multiday chemotherapy and the Granisetron Transdermal System (GTDS; Sancuso®.Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, phase III noninferiority trial of GTDS versus oral granisetron in patients receiving 3 days of multiagent moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy, regardless of granisetron formulation. Emesis was defined as vomiting/retching or the use of rescue medication. Logistic regression and classification trees were used to determine the optimal combination of Hesketh scores over the multiagent, multiday regimens for the prediction of emesis.Results: Of 393 patients, 272 (69.2% were chemotherapy naïve. The most common types of cancer were lung (30.5% and gynecologic (21.9%. The most common chemotherapeutic regimen (in 14.2% of patients was cisplatin plus etoposide on days 1–3. The best binary emesis predictor was day 1 Hesketh score. Patients with a day 1 Hesketh score of 5 had the highest rate of emesis (62.5% versus patients with a score < 5 (31.7%. For patients with day 1 Hesketh score < 5, only 14.3% of those receiving only one drug on day 1 experienced emesis.Conclusion: Hesketh emetogenicity scores of individual agents are applicable to multiday, multiagent chemotherapeutic regimens in patients receiving antiemetics.Keywords: chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, emetogenicity, granisetron, clinical trial, retrospective analysis

  3. Pharmacokinetics and repolarization effects of intravenous and transdermal granisetron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Jay W; Selness, Daniel S; Moon, Thomas E; O'Mahony, Bridget; Donachie, Peter; Howell, Julian

    2012-05-15

    The need for greater clarity about the effects of 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists on cardiac repolarization is apparent in the changing product labeling across this therapeutic class. This study assessed the repolarization effects of granisetron, a 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist antiemetic, administered intravenously and by a granisetron transdermal system (GTDS). In a parallel four-arm study, healthy subjects were randomized to receive intravenous granisetron, GTDS, placebo, or oral moxifloxacin (active control). The primary endpoint was difference in change from baseline in mean Fridericia-corrected QT interval (QTcF) between GTDS and placebo (ddQTcF) on days 3 and 5. A total of 240 subjects were enrolled, 60 in each group. Adequate sensitivity for detection of QTc change was shown by a 5.75 ms lower bound of the 90% confidence interval (CI) for moxifloxacin versus placebo at 2 hours postdose on day 3. Day 3 ddQTcF values varied between 0.2 and 1.9 ms for GTDS (maximum upper bound of 90% CI, 6.88 ms), between -1.2 and 1.6 ms for i.v. granisetron (maximum upper bound of 90% CI, 5.86 ms), and between -3.4 and 4.7 ms for moxifloxacin (maximum upper bound of 90% CI, 13.45 ms). Day 5 findings were similar. Pharmacokinetic-ddQTcF modeling showed a minimally positive slope of 0.157 ms/(ng/mL), but a very low correlation (r = 0.090). GTDS was not associated with statistically or clinically significant effects on QTcF or other electrocardiographic variables. This study provides useful clarification on the effect of granisetron delivered by GTDS on cardiac repolarization. ©2012 AACR.

  4. Polymorphisms in CYP1A1 and CYP3A5 Genes Contribute to the Variability in Granisetron Clearance and Exposure in Pregnant Women with Nausea and Vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos, Martha L; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Huijun; Caritis, Steve N; Venkataramanan, Raman

    2016-12-01

    Nausea and vomiting affect up to 90% of pregnant women. Granisetron is a potent and highly selective serotonin receptor antagonist and is an effective antiemetic. Findings from a prior study in pregnant women demonstrated a large interindividual variability in granisetron exposure. Granisetron is primarily metabolized by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes CYP1A1 and CYP3A and is likely a substrate of the ABCB1 transporter. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CYP3A, CYP1A1, and ABCB1 can alter drug metabolism. This study evaluated the influence of polymorphisms in CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP1A1, and ABCB1 on the pharmacokinetic properties of granisetron in pregnant women. The study enrolled 16 pregnant women (gestational age of 12-19 wks). All patients had nausea and vomiting and were treated with granisetron 1 mg. Granisetron plasma concentrations were determined using liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry. The patients' genotype was determined using TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assays. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was assessed by comparing observed and expected genotype frequencies, using the exact test. Intravenous granisetron clearance was used as the dependent variable for analysis of associations. Of 16 patients, 25% were homozygous for the allele variant CYP3A5*3 and had a significantly lower granisetron clearance and increased area under the plasma concentration-versus-time curve (AUC) compared with nonhomozygous patients. Approximately one-third of patients (n=5) were carriers for the allele variant CYP1A1*2A and had a significantly higher granisetron clearance and decreased AUC. We did not find significant differences in the AUC or clearance for any SNPs in CYP3A4 and ABCB1 genes. Polymorphisms in CYP3A5 and CYP1A1 account for some of the variability in systemic clearance and exposure of granisetron in pregnant women. © 2016 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  5. Electrocardiographic Changes After Granisetron Administration for Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and Vomiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alidoosti Asadolah

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer patient receive various cytotoxic drugs in association with antiemetic drugs such as 5HT3 receptor antagonists as their chemotherapy regimen. 5HT3 receptor antagonists have been reported to produce changes in ECG parameter. There are only a few studies about cardiovascular events of these drugs in patient receiving potentially cardiotoxic chemotherapies. The subject of this study is to evaluate ECG changes after administration of chemotherapeutic agents and granisetron (the most commonly used 5HT3 antagonist in Iran in adults with cancer. For this clinical trial study, all cancer patients referred to department of radiation oncology of Imam Hossein Hospital since August 2005 to March 2006 were evaluated if they had inclusion criteria. Granisetron (3 mg was infused intravenously over 30 seconds just a few minutes before chemotherapeutic agent administration. The 12-lead ECG recording was obtained before and 90 minutes after infusion of granisetron. One cardiologist determined PR, QRS, QTc intervals and heart rate of all ECGs. During the study period 54 patients fulfilled our criteria. With paired t-test, the PR and QTc intervals, but not QRS interval showed statistically significant prolongation after drug infusion (P < 0.0001, and heart rate showed statistically significant decrease (P < 0.0001. The ECG findings of chemotherapeutic agents and granisetron administration were prolongation of PR and QTc intervals and decrease of heart rate (P < 0.0001. Although these changes did not cause clinical signs, with keeping in mind that there may be possible drug-drug interactions and preexisting cardiac comorbidities in cancer patient, it seems reasonable and necessary to consider physical condition specifically cardiac condition and drug usage of each patient, while designing chemotherapy regimen and supportive drugs.

  6. Ramosetron compared with granisetron for the prevention of vomiting following strabismus surgery in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Ito, M.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Postoperative vomiting occurs frequently after strabismus surgery in children. Granisetron, a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptor antagonist, is effective for the prevention of vomiting following paediatric strabismus surgery. Ramosetron, another new antagonist of 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptor, has more potent and longer acting properties than granisetron against cisplatin induced emesis. This study was undertaken to compare the efficacy and safety of granisetron and ramosetron for the prevention of vomiting following strabismus surgery in children.
METHODS—In a randomised, double blinded manner 80 children, aged 4-10 years, received intravenously granisetron 40 µg/kg or ramosetron 6 µg/kg (n=40 each) at the end of surgery. A standard general anaesthetic technique and postoperative analgesia were used. Emetic episodes and safety assessment were performed during the first 24 hours and the next 24 hours after anaesthesia.
RESULTS—The percentage of patients who were emesis free during 0-24 hours after anaesthesia was 85% with granisetron and 90% with ramosetron, respectively (p = 0.369); the corresponding rate during 24-48 hours after anaesthesia was 70% and 95% (p = 0.003). No clinically serious adverse events caused by the study drug were observed in any of the groups.
CONCLUSION—Prophylactic antiemetic therapy with ramosetron is comparable with granisetron for the prevention of vomiting during 0-24 hours after anaesthesia in children undergoing strabismus surgery. During 24-48 hours after anaesthesia, ramosetron is more effective than granisetron for prophylaxis against postoperative vomiting.

 PMID:11371485

  7. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of APF530 (extended-release granisetron) in patients receiving moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy: results of two Phase II trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabrail, Nashat; Yanagihara, Ronald; Spaczyński, Marek; Cooper, William; O’Boyle, Erin; Smith, Carrie; Boccia, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances with new therapies, a significant proportion of patients (>30%) suffer delayed-onset chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) despite use of antiemetics. APF530 is a sustained-release subcutaneous (SC) formulation of granisetron for preventing CINV. APF530 pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy were studied in two open-label, single-dose Phase II trials (C2005-01 and C2007-01, respectively) in patients receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy or highly emetogenic chemotherapy. In C2005-01, 45 patients received APF530 250, 500, or 750 mg SC (granisetron 5, 10, or 15 mg, respectively). In C2007-01, 35 patients were randomized to APF530 250 or 500 mg SC. Injections were given 30 to 60 minutes before single-day moderately emetogenic chemotherapy or highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Plasma granisetron was measured from predose to 168 hours after study drug administration. Safety and efficacy were also evaluated. APF530 pharmacokinetics were dose proportional, with slow absorption and elimination of granisetron after a single SC dose. Median time to maximum plasma concentration and half-life were similar for APF530 250 and 500 mg in both trials, with no differences between the groups receiving moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Exposure to granisetron was maintained at a therapeutic level over the delayed-onset phase, at least 168 hours. Adverse events in both trials were as expected for granisetron; injection site reactions (eg, erythema and induration) were predominantly mild and seen in ≤20% of patients. Complete responses (no emesis, with no rescue medication) were obtained in the acute, delayed, and overall phases in ≥80% and ≥75% of patients in both trials with the 250 and 500 mg doses, respectively. After a single injection of APF530, there were dose-proportional pharmacokinetics and sustained concentrations of granisetron over 168 hours. The 250 and 500 mg doses were well tolerated and maintained therapeutic granisetron

  8. Synthesis and Pharmacological Evaluation of [11C]Granisetron and [18F]Fluoropalonosetron as PET Probes for 5-HT3 Receptor Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Linjing; Müller Herde, Adrienne; Rüefli, Pascal M; Sladojevich, Filippo; Milicevic Sephton, Selena; Krämer, Stefanie D; Thompson, Andrew J; Schibli, Roger; Ametamey, Simon M; Lochner, Martin

    2016-11-16

    Serotonin-gated ionotropic 5-HT 3 receptors are the major pharmacological targets for antiemetic compounds. Furthermore, they have become a focus for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and there is some evidence that pharmacological modulation of 5-HT 3 receptors might alleviate symptoms of other neurological disorders. Highly selective, high-affinity antagonists, such as granisetron (Kytril) and palonosetron (Aloxi), belong to a family of drugs (the "setrons") that are well established for clinical use. To enable us to better understand the actions of these drugs in vivo, we report the synthesis of 8-fluoropalonosetron (15) that has a binding affinity (K i = 0.26 ± 0.05 nM) similar to the parent drug (K i = 0.21 ± 0.03 nM). We radiolabeled 15 by nucleophilic 18 F-fluorination of an unsymmetrical diaryliodonium palonosetron precursor and achieved the radiosynthesis of 1-(methyl- 11 C)-N-granisetron ([ 11 C]2) through N-alkylation with [ 11 C]CH 3 I, respectively. Both compounds [ 18 F]15 (chemical and radiochemical purity >95%, specific activity 41 GBq/μmol) and [ 11 C]2 (chemical and radiochemical purity ≥99%, specific activity 170 GBq/μmol) were evaluated for their utility as positron emission tomography (PET) probes. Using mouse and rat brain slices, in vitro autoradiography with both [ 18 F]15 and [ 11 C]2 revealed a heterogeneous and displaceable binding in cortical and hippocampal regions that are known to express 5-HT 3 receptors at significant levels. Subsequent PET experiments suggested that [ 18 F]15 and [ 11 C]2 are of limited utility for the PET imaging of brain 5-HT 3 receptors in vivo.

  9. Randomized, double-blind, crossover study of palonosetron compared with granisetron for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Weihua; Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Juntian; Zhang, Shucai; Wang, Jinghui; Chen, Qiang; Huang, Cheng; Pan, Liangxi; Zhang, Lili; Huang, Jianjin; Shen, Hong; Lin, Tongyu

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy and tolerability of palonosetron and granisetron in a Chinese population receiving highly emetogenic cisplatin-based chemotherapy or moderately emetogenic chemotherapy. Patients were stratified by chemotherapy with cisplatin (yes/no) and then randomly assigned to receive either palonosetron (0.25 mg i.v.) in the first cycle followed by granisetron (3 mg i.v.) in the second cycle or vice versa. The primary efficacy endpoint was the proportion of patients with complete response 0-24 h post-chemotherapy administration. The proportions of patients with complete response 24-120 and 0-120 h following chemotherapy were also compared. Of the 144 patients randomized, 36 (25%) received 60-80 mg/m(2) cisplatin; 66 of 72 patients in the palonosetron to granisetron group and 56 of 72 patients in the granisetron to palonosetron group completed treatment with both antiemetics. The efficacy and safety analyses included 128 palonosetron treatments and 138 granisetron treatments. Palonosetron consistently produced numerically higher complete response rates than granisetron in the acute phase (0-24 h, 71.09 vs. 65.22%), the delayed phase (24-120 h, 60.16 vs. 55.80%), and overall (0-120 h, 53.13 vs. 50.00%) though the differences were not significant. Both palonosetron and granisetron were well tolerated. Palonosetron was well tolerated and effective in preventing acute and delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in a Chinese population. When used as monotherapy, 0.25-mg palonosetron was not inferior to 3-mg granisetron for preventing vomiting following highly or moderately emetogenic chemotherapy.

  10. Granisetron transdermal system improves refractory nausea and vomiting in gastroparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Kellie; Parkman, Henry P

    2014-06-01

    Symptoms of gastroparesis include nausea and vomiting, which can markedly diminish quality of life. Nausea and vomiting can also make treatment with oral antiemetics problematic. Our aim was to determine whether treatment-resistant nausea and vomiting in patients with gastroparesis improve after granisetron transdermal patch (GTP) therapy. In an open-label pilot study, patients with gastroparesis and symptoms of nausea and vomiting refractory to conventional treatment were treated with GTP. After 2 weeks, patients were asked to assess their therapeutic response using the Clinical Patient Grading Assessment Scale (CPGAS; +7 = completely better; 0 = no change; -7 = very considerably worse). Responders were defined as CPGAS score >0, non-responders as ≤0. Patients (n = 36) were treated with GTP. Of these 36 patients, one patient discontinued treatment due to the GTP not adhering to the skin. Of the remaining 35 patients, 18 improved, 15 remained the same, and two worsened. The average CPGAS score was +1.8 ± 0.4 (SEM) (P < 0.05 vs 0). Of the 18 patients with improvement, the average CPGAS score was +3.7 ± 0.3 (SEM), corresponding to "somewhat" to "moderately better" improvement in nausea/vomiting. Side effects occurred in nine patients: four developed constipation, three patients had skin rash, and two reported headaches. GTP was moderately effective in reducing refractory symptoms of nausea and/or vomiting from gastroparesis in 50% of patients. Mild side effects were reported by 25% of patients. GTP may be an effective treatment for nausea and vomiting in gastroparesis, and further study is warranted.

  11. Enhanced tolerability of the 5-hydroxytryptophane challenge test combined with granisetron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, G E; Kamerling, I M C; de Kam, M L; Derijk, R H; van Pelt, J; Zitman, F G; van Gerven, J M A

    2010-01-01

    A recently developed oral serotonergic challenge test consisting of 5-Hydroxytryptophane (5-HTP, 200 mg) combined with carbidopa (CBD, 100 mg + 50 mg) exhibited dose-related neuroendocrine responsiveness and predictable pharmacokinetics. However, its applicability is limited by nausea and vomiting. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, four-way crossover trial was performed in 12 healthy male volunteers. The 5-HTP/CBD-challenge was combined with two oral anti-emetics (granisetron, 2 mg or domperidone, 10 mg) to investigate its reliability when side-effects are suppressed. The neuroendocrine response (serum cortisol and prolactin), the side-effect profile [Visual Analogue Scale Nausea (VAS)] and vomiting subjects per treatment were the main outcome measures. Compared to 5-HTP/CBD/placebo, 5-HTP/CBD/ granisetron had no impact on cortisol [% change with 95% confidence interval: -7.1% (18.9; 6.5)] or prolactin levels [-9.6% (-25.1; 9.1)]; 5-HTP/CBD/domperidone increased cortisol [+13.0% (-4.2; 33.4)], and increased prolactin extensively [+336.8% (245.7; 451.9)]. Compared to placebo, VAS Nausea increased non-significantly with granisetron [+7.6 mm (-1.3; 16.5)], as opposed to domperidone [+16.2 mm (7.2; 25.2)] and 5-HTP/CBD/placebo [+14.7 mm (5.5; 23.8)]. No subjects vomited with granisetron, compared to two subjects treated with 5-HTP/CBD/placebo and five subjects with domperidone. Compared with 5-HTP/CBD/placebo, granisetron addition decreased C(max) of 5-HTP statistically significantly different (from 1483 to 1272 ng/ml) without influencing AUC(0- infinity). Addition of granisetron to the combined 5-HTP/CBD challenge suppresses nausea and vomiting without influencing the neuroendocrine response or pharmacokinetics, enhancing its clinical applicability in future psychiatric research and drug development.

  12. A Randomized Cross‐over Study of High‐dose Metoclopramide plus Dexamethasone versus Granisetron plus Dexamethasone in Patients Receiving Chemotherapy with High‐dose Cisplatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Kenji; Shinkai, Tetsu; Tamura, Tomohide; Ohe, Yuichiro; Nisio, Masato; Kunikane, Hiroshi; Arioka, Hitoshi; Karato, Atsuya; Nakashima, Hajime; Sasaki, Yasutsuna; Tajima, Kinuko; Tada, Noriko; Saijo, Nagahiro

    1994-01-01

    We carried out a randomized, single‐blind, cross‐over trial to compare the antiemetic effect, for both acute and delayed emesis, of granisetron plus dexamethasone (GRN+Dx) with that of high‐dose metoclopramide plus dexamethasone (HDMP + Dx). Fifty‐four patients with primary or metastatic lung cancer, given single‐dose cisplatin (> 80 mg/m2) chemotherapy more than twice, were enrolled in this study. They were treated with both HDMP+Dx and GRN+Dx in two consecutive chemotherapy courses. On day 1, patients experienced a mean of 2.5 (SD=4.3) and 0,1 (SD = 0.4) episodes of vomiting in the HDMP+Dx and the GRN + Dx groups, respectively (P=0.0008). Complete response rate on day 1 was 45 and 90% in the HDMP+Dx and the GRN+Dx groups, respectively (P= 0.0001). Patients treated with GRN+Dx had a tendency to suffer more episodes of vomiting than the HDMP+Dx group on days 2–5, but it was not statistically significant. Twenty‐four patients (57%) preferred the GRN+Dx treatment and 14 patients (33%), HDMP + Dx. In the HDMP + Dx group, nine patients (21%) had an extrapyramidal reaction, and 5 patients (12%) had constipation that lasted for at least two days. In contrast, no patients had extrapyramidal reactions, and IS patients (43%) had constipation in the GRN+Dx group (P < 0.01). GRN+Dx was more effective than HDMP+Dx only in preventing the acute emesis induced by cisplatin. An effective treatment for delayed emesis is still needed. PMID:7829401

  13. Involvement of nitric oxide in granisetron improving effect on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi-Paydar, Mehrak; Zakeri, Marjan; Norouzi, Abbas; Rastegar, Hossein; Mirazi, Naser; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2012-01-06

    Granisetron, a serotonin 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist, widely used as an antiemetic drug following chemotherapy, has been found to improve learning and memory. In this study, effects of granisetron on spatial recognition memory and fear memory and the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) have been determined in a Y-maze and passive avoidance test. Granisetron (3, 10mg/kg, intraperitoneally) was administered to scopolamine-induced memory-impaired mice prior to acquisition, consolidation and retrieval phases, either in the presence or in the absence of a non-specific NO synthase inhibitor, l-NAME (3, 10mg/kg, intraperitoneally); a specific inducible NO synthase (iNOS) inhibitor, aminoguanidine (100mg/kg); and a NO precursor, l-arginine (750 mg/kg). It is demonstrated that granisetron improved memory acquisition in a dose-dependent manner, but it was ineffective on consolidation and retrieval phases of memory. The beneficial effect of granisetron (10mg/kg) on memory acquisition was significantly reversed by l-NAME (10mg/kg) and aminoguanidine (100mg/kg); however, l-arginine (750 mg/kg) did not potentiate the effect of sub-effective dose of granisetron (3mg/kg) in memory acquisition phase. It is concluded that nitric oxide is probably involved in improvement of memory acquisition by granisetron in both spatial recognition memory and fear memory. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled The Cognitive Neuroscience. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Management of a child with vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Sunit C; Shah, Ravi; Bansal, Arun; Jayashree, M

    2013-04-01

    Vomiting is a protective reflex that results in forceful ejection of stomach contents up to and out of the mouth. It is a common complaint and may be the presenting symptom of several life-threatening conditions. It can be caused by a variety of organic and nonorganic disorders; gastrointestinal (GI) or outside of GI. Acute gastritis and gastroenteritis (AGE) are the leading cause of acute vomiting in children. Important life threatening causes in infancy include congenital intestinal obstruction, atresia, malrotation with volvulus, necrotizing enterocolitis, pyloric stenosis, intussusception, shaken baby syndrome, hydrocephalus, inborn errors of metabolism, congenital adrenal hypoplasia, obstructive uropathy, sepsis, meningitis and encephalitis, and severe gastroenteritis, and in older children appendicitis, intracranial mass lesion, diabetic ketoacidosis, Reye's syndrome, toxic ingestions, uremia, and meningitis. Initial evaluation is directed at assessment of airway, breathing and circulation, assessment of hydration status and red flag signs (bilious or bloody vomiting, altered sensorium, toxic/septic/apprehensive look, inconsolable cry or excessive irritability, severe dehydration, concern for symptomatic hypoglycemia, severe wasting, Bent-over posture). The history and physical examination guides the approach in an individual patient. The diverse nature of causes of vomiting makes a "routine" laboratory or radiologic screen impossible. Investigations (Serum electrolytes and blood gases,renal and liver functions and radiological studies) are required in any child with dehydration or red flag signs, to diagnose surgical causes. Management priorities include treatment of dehydration, stoppage of oral fluids/feeds and decompression of the stomach with nasogastric tube in patients with bilious vomiting. Antiemetic ondansetron(0.2 mg/kg oral; parenteral 0.15 mg/kg; maximum 4 mg) is indicated in children unable to take orally due to persistent vomiting, post

  15. Predicting morphine related side effects in the ED: An international cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bounes, Vincent; Charriton-Dadone, Béatrice; Levraut, Jacques; Delangue, Cyril; Carpentier, Françoise; Mary-Chalon, Stéphanie; Houze-Cerfon, Vanessa; Sommet, Agnès; Houze-Cerfon, Charles-Henri; Ganetsky, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Morphine is the reference treatment for severe acute pain in an emergency department. The purpose of this study was to describe and analyse opioid-related ADRs (adverse drug reactions) in a large cohort of emergency department patients, and to identify predictive factors for those ADRs. In this prospective, observational, pharmaco-epidemiological international cohort study, all patients aged 18years or older who were treated with morphine were enrolled. The study was done in 23 emergency departments in the US and France. Baseline numerical rating scale score and initial and total doses of morphine titration were recorded. Logistic regression analysis was used to study the effects of demographic, clinical and medical history covariates on the occurrence of opioid-induced ADRs within 6h after treatment. A total of 1128 patients were included over 10months. Median baseline initial pain scores were 8/10 (7-10) versus 3/10 (1-4) after morphine administration. Median titration duration was 10min (IQR, 1-30). The occurrence of opioid-induced ADRs was 25% and 2% were serious. Patients experienced mainly nausea and drowsiness. Medical history of travel sickness (odds ratio [OR], 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-2.86) and history of nausea or vomiting post morphine (OR, 3.86; 95% CI, 2.29-6.51) were independent predictors of morphine related ADRs. Serious morphine related ADRs are rare and unpredictable. Prophylactic antiemetic therapy could be proposed to patients with history of travel sickness and history of nausea or vomiting in a postoperative setting or after morphine administration. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Impact of group psychotherapy in chemotherapy induced vomiting for treatment of advanced breast and lungs cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pervez, T.; Mein, F.D.; Alharbi, T.M.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the effect of group psychotherapy in the management of the side effects of chemotherapy treatment in advanced breast and lung cancer. One hundred patients treated with chemotherapy for advanced stage (IIIB and IV) breast and lung cancer were selected with ECOG performance status of 0 or 1. All patients received anti-emetic medications half an hour before chemotherapy. All those patients in this category who completed fist line chemotherapy with 6 cycles were included. Fifty were subjected to group discussions with other patients, family members and medical staff. This was labeled group A. The other 50 were not included in group discussion and were labeled group B. Both the group received similar standard chemotherapy and pre-medication for vomiting as per their disease and chemotherapy schedule. Breast and lung cancer patients were 29 and 21 in each arm respectively. At the end of the discharge, grade 2 and above of vomiting, according to common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAE) was counted for all patients in both the arms A and B, over full length of treatment for 6 cycles, and then were compared statistically. Mean with standard deviation for adverse event (vomiting) in group A and B was 6.2 + 2.6 and 13.4 + 3.8 respectively per cycle of treatment. It was observed that group psychotherapy had statistically significant effect (p-value <0.05) on the management of vomiting. Group psychotherapy can be used to reduce the incidence of vomiting in advanced breast and lung cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. (author)

  17. Ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block for postoperative analgesia in living liver donors: A prospective, randomized, double-blinded clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kıtlık, Arzu; Erdogan, Mehmet Ali; Ozgul, Ulku; Aydogan, Mustafa Said; Ucar, Muharrem; Toprak, Huseyin Ilksen; Colak, Cemil; Durmus, Mahmut

    2017-02-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a peripheral nerve block that reduces postoperative pain, nausea, vomiting and the need for postoperative opioids following various types of abdominal surgery. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of TAP block on postoperative analgesia and opioid consumption in living liver donors in whom a right "J" abdominal incision was used. This prospective, double-blinded, randomized controlled study was conducted with 50 living liver donors, aged 18-65years, who were scheduled to undergo right hepatectomy. Patients who received ultrasonography-guided subcostal TAP block were allocated into Group 1, and patients who did not receive TAP block were allocated into Group 2. The TAP blocks were performed bilaterally at the conclusion of surgery using 1.5mg∗kg -1 bupivacaine diluted with saline to reach a total volume of 40mL. For each patient, morphine consumption, pain scores at rest and movement, sedation scores, nausea, vomiting and the need for antiemetic medication were assessed at 0, 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24h postoperatively by researchers who were blinded to the study groups. Morphine consumption was significantly lower in Group 1 than in Group 2 at the 2nd, 6th and 24th hours (Pconsumption values after 24h were 40mg and 65mg in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. The TAP block significantly reduced postoperative visual analog scale pain scores both at rest and during movement at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 24h postoperatively (Pconsumption and contributed to analgesia in living liver donors who underwent upper abdominal wall incisions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of anticonvulsant and nootropic effect of ondansetron in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, S; Agarwal, N B; Mediratta, P K; Sharma, K K

    2012-09-01

    The role of serotonin receptors have been implicated in various types of experimentally induced seizures. Ondansetron is a highly selective 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 (5-HT(3)) receptor antagonist used as antiemetic agent for chemotherapy-, and radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. The present study was carried out to examine the effect of ondansetron on electroshock, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures and cognitive functions in mice. Ondansetron was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) at doses of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg (single dose) to observe its effect on the increasing current electroshock seizure (ICES) test and PTZ-induced seizure test. In addition, a chronic study (21 days) was also performed to assess the effects of ondansetron on electroshock-induced convulsions and cognitive functions. The effect on cognition was assessed by elevated plus maze and passive avoidance paradigms. Phenytoin (25 mg/kg, i.p.) was used as a standard anticonvulsant drug and piracetam (200 mg/kg) was administered as a standard nootropic drug. The results were compared with an acute study, wherein it was found that the administration of ondansetron (1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg) significantly raised the seizure-threshold current as compared to control group in the ICES test. Similar results were observed after chronic administration of ondansetron. In PTZ test, ondansetron in all the three tested doses failed to show protective effect against PTZ-induced seizure test. Administration of ondansetron for 21 days significantly decreased the transfer latency (TL) and prolonged the step-down latency (SDL). The results of present study suggest the anticonvulsant and memory-enhancing effect of ondansetron in mice.

  19. Transcriptome Sequencing of Chemically Induced Aquilaria sinensis to Identify Genes Related to Agarwood Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Wei; Wu, Hongqing; He, Xin; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Weimin; Li, Haohua; Fan, Yunfei; Tan, Guohui; Liu, Taomei; Gao, Xiaoxia

    2016-01-01

    Agarwood is a traditional Chinese medicine used as a clinical sedative, carminative, and antiemetic drug. Agarwood is formed in Aquilaria sinensis when A. sinensis trees are threatened by external physical, chemical injury or endophytic fungal irritation. However, the mechanism of agarwood formation via chemical induction remains unclear. In this study, we characterized the transcriptome of different parts of a chemically induced A. sinensis trunk sample with agarwood. The Illumina sequencing platform was used to identify the genes involved in agarwood formation. A five-year-old Aquilaria sinensis treated by formic acid was selected. The white wood part (B1 sample), the transition part between agarwood and white wood (W2 sample), the agarwood part (J3 sample), and the rotten wood part (F5 sample) were collected for transcriptome sequencing. Accordingly, 54,685,634 clean reads, which were assembled into 83,467 unigenes, were obtained with a Q20 value of 97.5%. A total of 50,565 unigenes were annotated using the Nr, Nt, SWISS-PROT, KEGG, COG, and GO databases. In particular, 171,331,352 unigenes were annotated by various pathways, including the sesquiterpenoid (ko00909) and plant-pathogen interaction (ko03040) pathways. These pathways were related to sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis and defensive responses to chemical stimulation. The transcriptome data of the different parts of the chemically induced A. sinensis trunk provide a rich source of materials for discovering and identifying the genes involved in sesquiterpenoid production and in defensive responses to chemical stimulation. This study is the first to use de novo sequencing and transcriptome assembly for different parts of chemically induced A. sinensis. Results demonstrate that the sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis pathway and WRKY transcription factor play important roles in agarwood formation via chemical induction. The comparative analysis of the transcriptome data of agarwood and A. sinensis lays the foundation

  20. Drug-induced Inhibition and Trafficking Disruption of ion Channels: Pathogenesis of QT Abnormalities and Drug-induced Fatal Arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubeddu, Luigi X.

    2016-01-01

    Risk of severe and fatal ventricular arrhythmias, presenting as Torsade de Pointes (TdP), is increased in congenital and acquired forms of long QT syndromes (LQTS). Drug-induced inhibition of K+ currents, IKs, IKr, IK1, and/or Ito, delay repolarization, prolong QT, and increase the risk of TdP. Drug-induced interference with IKr is the most common cause of acquired LQTS/TdP. Multiple drugs bind to KNCH2-hERG-K+ channels affecting IKr, including antiarrythmics, antibiotics, antivirals, azole-antifungals, antimalarials, anticancer, antiemetics, prokinetics, antipsychotics, and antidepressants. Azithromycin has been recently added to this list. In addition to direct channel inhibition, some drugs interfere with the traffic of channels from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell membrane, decreasing mature channel membrane density; e.g., pentamidine, geldalamicin, arsenic trioxide, digoxin, and probucol. Other drugs, such as ketoconazole, fluoxetine, norfluoxetine, citalopram, escitalopram, donepezil, tamoxifen, endoxifen, atazanavir, and roxitromycin, induce both direct channel inhibition and impaired channel trafficking. Although many drugs prolong the QT interval, TdP is a rare event. The following conditions increase the risk of drug-induced TdP: a) Disease states/electrolyte levels (heart failure, structural cardiac disease, bradycardia, hypokalemia); b) Pharmacogenomic variables (presence of congenital LQTS, subclinical ion-channel mutations, history of or having a relative with history of drug-induced long QT/TdP); c) Pharmacodynamic and kinetic factors (high doses, women, elderly, metabolism inhibitors, combining two or more QT prolonging drugs, drugs that prolong the QT and increase QT dispersion, and drugs with multiple actions on ion channels). Because most of these conditions are preventable, careful evaluation of risk factors and increased knowledge of drug use associated with repolarization abnormalities are strongly recommended. PMID:26926294

  1. Documentation and quantitative analysis of local ethnozoological knowledge among traditional healers of Theni district, Tamil Nadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellappandian, M; Pandikumar, P; Mutheeswaran, S; Gabriel Paulraj, M; Prabakaran, S; Duraipandiyan, V; Ignacimuthu, S; Al-Dhabi, N A

    2014-05-28

    This study investigated the use of animals among the traditional healers in Theni district of Tamil Nadu, India. The data regarding the medicinal animals/animal products were documented and their usages were analyzed quantitatively. Based on free list interviews with the traditional healers, we documented the medicinal usage of animals/animal products and calculated the indices such as informant consensus factor (Fic) to determine the consensus over the species for an illness category, as well as the Index Agreement on Remedies (IAR) to determine the extent of potential utilization of each species. In this study, 69 medicinal animals/animal products were documented with the help of standardized questionnaires among the local healers. The results were tabulated and Fic value for each illness category was calculated. Three illness categories viz., jaundice (milk of Capra aegagrus hircus), orthopedics (egg white and meat of Gallus gallus domesticus) and pediatrics (milk of Equus africanus asinus) had got high Fic values. Fifteen illness categories had moderate Fic values. Highly cited animals in these illness categories were: Rusa unicolor (antiemetic), Reticulitermes spp. (diabetes), flesh of Varanus benghalensis (oral ailments), milk (eye ailments, fever) and urine (antidote) of Homo sepians, meat of Trachypithecus johnii (respiratory ailments), various parts of C. aegagrus hircus (blood ailments, coolants, diarrhea, pulmonary and urinary ailments), flesh of Chamaeleon zeyalnica (neural ailments), meat of Passer domesticus (aphrodisiac), curd and dung of Bos primigenius taurus (dermatological ailments), meat of G. domesticus (musculo-skeletal disorders, analgesic), meat of Lissemys punctata (hemorrhoids), and Pherthima posthuma (psychological ailments). Six illness categories had low Fic values. This study indicated that the animals are still being used by the local healers of Theni district, to treat various illnesses. Cross-disciplinary approaches to explore the

  2. Anticipatory Nausea, Risk Factors, and Its Impact on Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting: Results From the Pan European Emesis Registry Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molassiotis, Alexander; Lee, Paul H; Burke, Thomas A; Dicato, Mario; Gascon, Pere; Roila, Fausto; Aapro, Matti

    2016-06-01

    Anticipatory (prechemotherapy) nausea (AN) is a classic conditioned s